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Sample records for kahnawake schools diabetes

  1. Using a Participatory Approach to the Development of a School-Based Physical Activity Policy in an Indigenous Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Lindsay; Bengoechea, Enrique García; Salsberg, Jon; Jacobs, Judi; King, Morrison; Macaulay, Ann C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: This study is part of a larger community-based participatory research (CBPR) project to develop, implement, and evaluate the physical activity component of a school-based wellness policy. The policy intervention is being carried out by community stakeholders and academic researchers within the Kahnawake Schools Diabetes Prevention…

  2. Can we improve diabetes care in schools?

    OpenAIRE

    Tatman, M A; Lessing, D N

    1993-01-01

    Results of a questionnaire study showed that parents were dissatisfied with school care of their children's diabetes and with teachers' knowledge of diabetes. Parents were more satisfied with support in school if a paediatric diabetes liaison service was provided rather than an adult one.

  3. Diabetes Management in the School Setting. Position Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Sarah; Fekaris, Nina; Pontius, Deborah; Zacharski, Susan

    2012-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses that the registered professional school nurse (hereinafter referred to as school nurse) is the only school staff member who has the skills, knowledge base, and statutory authority to fully meet the healthcare needs of students with diabetes in the school setting. Diabetes management…

  4. Improving School Experiences for Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kise, Saori S.; Hopkins, Amanda; Burke, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus (diabetes) is one of the most common metabolic diseases in children worldwide and the incidence of type 1 diabetes (T1D) is growing. T1D is complicated to manage and adolescents with diabetes face unique, age-specific challenges. The purpose of this article is to discuss ways in which schools can create a positive…

  5. Diabetes and youth resources for school nurses: an update from the National Diabetes Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallivan, Joanne; Greenberg, R D Rachel H

    2014-07-01

    In response to the challenge of diabetes in youth, the National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) has developed free, evidence-based education materials and online resources for school nurses, parents, and children living with or at risk for diabetes. This article highlights some of NDEP's resources and identifies ways for school nurses to use them with students and their families.

  6. Multimedia technology for diabetes education of school nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) require school nurses (SN) with specific diabetes training. Multimedia learning can facilitate cost-effective, convenient education of SN by diabetes educators (DE). We conducted formative research to gather qualitative and quantitative data to inform the interven...

  7. Managing Type 1 Diabetes at School: An Integrative Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolbert, Rebecca

    2009-01-01

    This integrative literature review examines research studies that describe the care of the student with type 1 diabetes at school and interventions to improve care. Participants of the studies include school nurses, counselors, staff, administrators, parents, and students with diabetes. The studies reviewed use a descriptive approach in examining…

  8. Assessment of the knowledge of diabetes mellitus among school teachers within the scope of the managing diabetes at school program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aycan, Zehra; Önder, Aşan; Çetinkaya, Semra; Bilgili, Hatice; Yıldırım, Nurdan; Baş, Veysel Nijat; Peltek Kendirci, Havva Nur; Ağladıoğlu, Sebahat Yılmaz

    2012-12-01

    Training teachers and education professionals on diabetes is crucial for full-time monitoring of diabetic children in schools. The objective of this study was to assess the knowledge on diabetes in a group of school teachers in Turkey. Between November 2010 and November 2011, 1054 teachers from three regions of Ankara were given a questionnaire to assess their knowledge on diabetes. The mean age of the group (27% males, 73% females) was 38.8±8 years. 61.7% of the participants were class teachers, 23.3% were school counselors, and the rest were physical education teachers and administrators. A fair percentage (47.6%) of the participants had a moderate knowledge level on diabetes and 32.4% expressed a lower level of knowledge. A large proportion (94%) gave an accurate definition of diabetes. Of the total group of 1054 teachers, 625 were aware that blood glucose level might decrease in diabetic children during follow-up. Also, 75% believed that diabetic children were eligible for physical education classes. 52.8% of these teachers had no diabetic child in their classes and teachers with a diabetic patient in their family had better knowledge of diabetes compared to their counterparts. Our study results indicate that school teachers have limited knowledge on diabetes. We believe that their knowledge levels can be improved by widespread training programs.

  9. Assessment of the Knowledge of Diabetes Mellitus Among School Teachers within the Scope of the Managing Diabetes at School Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aycan, Zehra; Önder, Aşan; Çetinkaya, Semra; Bilgili, Hatice; Yıldırım, Nurdan; Baş, Veysel Nijat; Peltek Kendirci, Havva Nur; Yılmaz Ağladıoğlu, Sebahat

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Training teachers and education professionals on diabetes is crucial for full-time monitoring of diabetic children in schools. The objective of this study was to assess the knowledge on diabetes in a group of school teachers in Turkey. Methods: Between November 2010 and November 2011, 1054 teachers from three regions of Ankara were given a questionnaire to assess their knowledge on diabetes. The mean age of the group (27% males, 73% females) was 38.8±8 years. 61.7% of the participants were class teachers, 23.3% were school counselors, and the rest were physical education teachers and administrators. Results: A fair percentage (47.6%) of the participants had a moderate knowledge level on diabetes and 32.4% expressed a lower level of knowledge. A large proportion (94%) gave an accurate definition of diabetes. Of the total group of 1054 teachers, 625 were aware that blood glucose level might decrease in diabetic children during follow-up. Also, 75% believed that diabetic children were eligible for physical education classes. 52.8% of these teachers had no diabetic child in their classes and teachers with a diabetic patient in their family had better knowledge of diabetes compared to their counterparts. Conclusions: Our study results indicate that school teachers have limited knowledge on diabetes. We believe that their knowledge levels can be improved by widespread training programs. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:23032146

  10. Diabetes Management at School: Application of the Healthy Learner Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobo, Nichole; Kaup, Tara; McCarty, Patricia; Carlson, Jessie Parker

    2011-01-01

    Every child with diabetes deserves a school nurse with the capacity to effectively manage the disease at school. The school nurse needs knowledge and skills to confidently provide care and communicate with health care providers and families. The Healthy Learner Model for Chronic Condition Management provided a framework to eliminate the disjointed…

  11. Diabetes Management at School: Application of the Healthy Learner Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobo, Nichole; Kaup, Tara; McCarty, Patricia; Carlson, Jessie Parker

    2011-01-01

    Every child with diabetes deserves a school nurse with the capacity to effectively manage the disease at school. The school nurse needs knowledge and skills to confidently provide care and communicate with health care providers and families. The Healthy Learner Model for Chronic Condition Management provided a framework to eliminate the disjointed…

  12. Implementing a New Diabetes Resource for Wisconsin Schools and Families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Nimsgern, MPH

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Diabetes is one of the most common diseases in the nation. Students with diabetes face the daily task of balancing food, physical activity, and medication to survive. Teachers and school personnel often lack the knowledge needed to assist them. Context An estimated 2647 schoolchildren in Wisconsin have diabetes. The Wisconsin Diabetes Prevention and Control Program frequently receives anecdotal reports from parents and diabetes educators on the care of children with diabetes in the schools; the program also manages requests for information on new diabetes-related equipment from school personnel. Methods A statewide workgroup convened to develop Children with Diabetes: A Resource Guide for Wisconsin Schools and Families, aimed at improving the school staff's knowledge of diabetes and its management and their awareness of the benefits of maintaining glucose control. Training sessions for school professionals were developed and conducted around the state. All attendees were asked to complete an evaluation of the training. In addition, the workgroup included an evaluation form with each guide distributed and conducted a follow-up survey on the impact of the guide and changes to school policies. Consequences Of the 762 people who attended training sessions, 631 (83% completed the evaluation form. On questions about the training session’s content, quality, organization, and appropriateness, responses averaged 4.42 points on a scale of 1 (poor to 5 (excellent. More than 9713 resource guides were distributed to more than 1359 individuals; 58 recipients responded to the evaluation form included with the resource guide, with 57 (98% of these indicating that they would recommend the guide to others. Preliminary results of the follow-up impact survey show that many positive changes have been implemented to improve the school environment for children with diabetes since the resource guide was implemented. Interpretation This model of working

  13. A Collaborative Approach to Diabetes Management: The Choice Made for Colorado Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobo, Nichole; Wyckoff, Leah; Patrick, Kathleen; White, Cathy; Glass, Sue; Carlson, Jessie Parker; Perreault, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Students with diabetes deserve a school nurse who can effectively manage the disease. Tensions between the school and families sometimes emerge when a child with diabetes goes to school. To resolve these tensions in Colorado, stakeholders collaborated to implement a statewide program to meet the needs of students with diabetes. Colorado school…

  14. Experiences of Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes as They Transition from Middle School to High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischman, Katie; Smothers, Melissa K.; Christianson, Heidi F.; Carter, Laura; Hains, Anthony A.; Davies, W. Hobart

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (T1DM) as they transitioned into high school in order to understand the contextual factors that impact diabetic health-related behaviors and self-identity. A qualitative interviewing methodology called consensual qualitative research (CQR) was…

  15. The management of type 1 diabetes in primary school: review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Anne; Wilson, Valerie; Crisp, Jackie

    2013-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is one of the most common chronic health conditions in childhood. The introduction of intensive insulin therapy and the rising prevalence of diabetes in younger children has increased the need for involvement of diabetes educators and school personnel in school diabetes care. School encompasses a significant proportion of a child's day, therefore diabetes treatment at school needs to be optimal or the child will have poor metabolic control. The aim of this literature review is to examine diabetes management in the early primary school setting. The main areas of diabetes management explored are: type, provision, and location of treatment, the impact on the child, and the role of the credentialed diabetes educator. The review identifies that the majority of children are not receiving intensive diabetes treatment at school. Younger children require more assistance with care and may be disadvantaged due to lack of appropriate school staff support. Most schools do not have nurses to assist with diabetes care, therefore teaching and administration staff are utilized. The use of insulin pump therapy may increase access to insulin at school, as children and teaching staff appear more confident with this method of delivery than injections. Treatment is frequently performed away from the classroom and can impact on class attendance, metabolic control, and emergencies. Diabetes educators need to work in collaboration with children, parents, and school personnel to ensure diabetes care is fully integrated into the school day.

  16. Jordanian School Counselors' Knowledge about and Attitudes toward Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannous, Adel G.; Khateeb, Jamal M.; Khamra, Hatem A.; Hadidi, Muna S.; Natour, Mayada M.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the knowledge and attitudes of Jordanian school counselors toward diabetes mellitus. A sample of 295 counselors completed a questionnaire consisting of two parts concerning knowledge and attitudes. The face validity of the questionnaire was assessed using an informed panel of judges, and its reliability was established…

  17. Jordanian School Counselors' Knowledge about and Attitudes toward Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannous, Adel G.; Khateeb, Jamal M.; Khamra, Hatem A.; Hadidi, Muna S.; Natour, Mayada M.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the knowledge and attitudes of Jordanian school counselors toward diabetes mellitus. A sample of 295 counselors completed a questionnaire consisting of two parts concerning knowledge and attitudes. The face validity of the questionnaire was assessed using an informed panel of judges, and its reliability was established…

  18. Oxfordshire Childrens Diabetes - The Primary Schools Intervention Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Rani; Edge, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Poorly controlled diabetes adversely affects a child's education, with concentration difficulties, alterations in mood, behaviour and fatigue associated with high or low blood glucose levels. Between years 2004-6 we started all toddlers and children on intensive insulin regimens (multiple dose injection or pump) making it imperative that they received support during the school day. This required close monitoring of blood glucose levels and counting carbohydrate intake to adjust rapid-acting insulin dose or pump bolus at every meal. We report our experience of formulating a sustainable structure of support in primary schools based on trained volunteers who partake in the daily 'Individualised Care Plan (ICP)'. After overcoming multiple barriers, an acceptable system was negotiated with our Primary Care Trust (PCT) and Local Education Authority (LEA). In 2009, the PCT confirmed 3 years funding for a Paediatric Diabetes specialist nurse (PDSN) for schools. In 2010, the first full school year with agreed protocols was in place. By July 2012, our nurses had trained a total of 342 volunteers who provide care for 132 children. The Oxfordshire Schools Intervention Programme ensures that legal obligations are met. A risk assessment allows the LEA to provide indemnity to their school staff to give injections and do blood tests, after training and competency sign-off by a PDSN. Parents, volunteers and PDSN jointly agree a comprehensive 'ICP' and utilise a hand-held communication record book. Diabetes control improved (age 4-11 years cohort from 2004 onwards: Mean (SD) HbA1c in 2001-4 = 8.38 (1.09)%; in 2005-8 = 7.74 (0.81)%; in 2009-12 = 7.58 (0.69)%; ANOVA ptime to train/retrain/problem-solve annually (approximately 5-10days per month). The cost-benefits are discussed. We advocate that our programme supports each child's ICP, use of intensive insulin regimes in school-day and reassures parents that schools can deliver this safely.

  19. Protecting the Rights of School Children with Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, James M.

    2013-01-01

    School children with diabetes are facing increasing difficulties in receiving care during the school day. Despite theexistence of federal statutes ensuring their rights to a free, appropriate public education, many school districts throughout the country do little, if anything, to ensure that their condition is treated throughout the school day. The chronic shortage of school nurses has resulted in hardships on families, relatives, and friends to ensure that care, including insulin, is timely and appropriately provided. While many states have taken measures to provide care by unlicensed trained volunteers, efforts to accomplish this in California have resulted in prolonged litigation. A variety of nursing organizations oppose all efforts to train unlicensed volunteers, arguing that such is not permitted by California law. The issue is unresolved and currently pending in the California Supreme Court. PMID:23566990

  20. Protecting the rights of school children with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, James M

    2013-03-01

    School children with diabetes are facing increasing difficulties in receiving care during the school day. Despite theexistence of federal statutes ensuring their rights to a free, appropriate public education, many school districts throughout the country do little, if anything, to ensure that their condition is treated throughout the school day. The chronic shortage of school nurses has resulted in hardships on families, relatives, and friends to ensure that care, including insulin, is timely and appropriately provided. While many states have taken measures to provide care by unlicensed trained volunteers, efforts to accomplish this in California have resulted in prolonged litigation. A variety of nursing organizations oppose all efforts to train unlicensed volunteers, arguing that such is not permitted by California law. The issue is unresolved and currently pending in the California Supreme Court.

  1. A collaborative approach to diabetes management: the choice made for Colorado schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobo, Nichole; Wyckoff, Leah; Patrick, Kathleen; White, Cathy; Glass, Sue; Carlson, Jessie Parker; Perreault, Christine

    2011-08-01

    Students with diabetes deserve a school nurse who can effectively manage the disease. Tensions between the school and families sometimes emerge when a child with diabetes goes to school. To resolve these tensions in Colorado, stakeholders collaborated to implement a statewide program to meet the needs of students with diabetes. Colorado school nursing leadership partnered with the National Association of School Nurses to adapt components of the Managing and Preventing Diabetes and Weight Gain Program (MAP), funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The Healthy Learner Model for Chronic Condition Management, integral to MAP, provided guidance for the Colorado Collaborative to design the Diabetes Resource Nurse Program. The program supports the practicing school nurse, and facilitates collaboration between the family, school, and health care provider. This article describes how stakeholders in Colorado chose to collaborate when faced with rising tensions over how to best manage students with diabetes.

  2. Supporting Participation in Physical Education at School in Youth with Type 1 Diabetes: Perceptions of Teachers, Youth with Type 1 Diabetes, Parents and Diabetes Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacMillan, Freya; Kirk, Alison; Mutrie, Nanette; Moola, Fiona; Robertson, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    It is not clear how best to support youth with type 1 diabetes to participate in physical education (PE) at school. The aim of this study was to explore perceptions of facilitators and barriers to PE in youth with type 1 diabetes and to determine how schools can help these individuals to be physically active. Interviews and focus groups were…

  3. Supporting Participation in Physical Education at School in Youth with Type 1 Diabetes: Perceptions of Teachers, Youth with Type 1 Diabetes, Parents and Diabetes Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacMillan, Freya; Kirk, Alison; Mutrie, Nanette; Moola, Fiona; Robertson, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    It is not clear how best to support youth with type 1 diabetes to participate in physical education (PE) at school. The aim of this study was to explore perceptions of facilitators and barriers to PE in youth with type 1 diabetes and to determine how schools can help these individuals to be physically active. Interviews and focus groups were…

  4. Diabetes Management in the School Setting: The Role of the School Psychologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delamater, Alan M.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    The epidemiology and characteristics of diabetes mellitus in children are discussed. Empirical studies focusing on personality and family variables, stress, behavior management, problems related to newly diagnosed cases, and cognitive functioning are reviewed. The role of school psychologists is highlighted, and guidelines are offered for…

  5. Problems in diabetes managment in school setting in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes in Serbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesić, Maja D; Milenković, Tatjana; Mitrović, Katarina; Todorović, Sladjana; Zdravković, Vera; Jesić, Milos M; Bosnjović-Tucaković, Tatjana; Marković, Slavica; Vorguin, Ivana; Stanković, Sandra; Sajić, Silvija

    2016-03-01

    The obtained results show that not all children test blood glucose levels at school (50% of children in the 6-10-year-old age group and 67.3% in the age group over 11 years) and that not all children receive insulin at school (81.1% vs. 18.9%, and 57.7% vs. 42.3%, respectively). The frequency of severe hypoglycemia was 2.7% in children and 3.3% in adolescents. A high proportion of teachers did not have diabetes training. This brief report about problems in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes at school in Serbia indicates what happens in the school setting and suggests how to improve control of this disease and facilitate the complete integration of children with diabetes at school. Children with type 1 diabetes typically spend one-third of the day in school and they should achieve the same level of diabetes management there as they do outside the school environment. The aim of this study was to identify problems in diabetes management in children with type 1 diabetes at school according to the perceptions reported by children and parents. This cross-sectional survey was carried out at nine public hospitals in Serbia with a cohort of 6-18-year old children/adolescents. The parents were personally informed about the objectives of the survey and the necessity to involve their children. The self-reporting questionnaire included demographic information as well as some questions that helped to evaluate the general situation of children with type 1 diabetes at school.

  6. School performance in children with type 1 diabetes: a contemporary population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Matthew N; McNamara, Kaitrin A R; de Klerk, Nicholas H; Davis, Elizabeth A; Jones, Timothy W

    2016-03-01

    Our aim was to examine the school performance of children with type 1 diabetes in comparison to their peers, exploring changes over time, and the impact of clinical factors on school performance. The study included data on 666 children with type 1 diabetes from the Western Australia Children's Diabetes Database. (WACDD), a population-based registry, and 3260 school and school year matched non-diabetic children. Records from the National Assessment Program - Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN) (2008-2011), which examines four educational outcome domains and is administered annually to all years 3, 5, 7, and 9 children in Australia, were sourced for both groups. Clinical data were obtained for the children with diabetes from the WACDD. No significant difference was observed between those with type 1 diabetes and their peers, across any of the tested domains and school years analysed. No decline over time was observed, and no decline following diagnosis was observed. Type 1 diabetes was associated with decreased school attendance, 3% fewer days attended per year. Poorer glycaemic control [higher haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c)] was associated with a lower test score [0.2-0.3 SD per 1% (10.9 mmol/mol) increase in HbA1c], and with poorer attendance [1.8% decrease per 1% (10.9 mmol/mol) increase in HbA1c]. No association was observed with history of severe hypoglycaemia, diabetic ketoacidosis or age of onset and school test scores. These results suggest that type 1 diabetes is not associated with a significant decrement in school performance, as assessed by NAPLAN. The association of poorer glycaemic control with poorer school performance serves as further evidence for clinicians to focus on improving glycaemic control. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Psychological, Behavioral, and Educational Considerations for Children with Classified Disabilities and Diabetes within the School Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyckoff, Leah; Hanchon, Timothy; Gregg, S. Renee

    2015-01-01

    School nurses are answering a call to action to provide day-to-day care for an increasing number of students diagnosed with chronic illnesses. Diabetes mellitus is one of the most prevalent chronic health conditions identified among school-age children and presents a host of complex challenges for the school nurse, educators, and other support…

  8. Psychological, Behavioral, and Educational Considerations for Children with Classified Disabilities and Diabetes within the School Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyckoff, Leah; Hanchon, Timothy; Gregg, S. Renee

    2015-01-01

    School nurses are answering a call to action to provide day-to-day care for an increasing number of students diagnosed with chronic illnesses. Diabetes mellitus is one of the most prevalent chronic health conditions identified among school-age children and presents a host of complex challenges for the school nurse, educators, and other support…

  9. Managing type 1 diabetes in school: Recommendations for policy and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Sarah E; Cummings, Elizabeth A; Pacaud, Danièle; Lynk, Andrew; Metzger, Daniel L

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes requiring insulin is increasingly common and likely to impact students in most, if not all, schools. Diabetes and its complications have major personal, social and economic impact, and improved diabetes control reduces the risk of both short- and long-term complications. Evidence shows that more intensive management of diabetes - through frequent blood glucose monitoring, insulin administration with injections and/or insulin pumps, and careful attention to diet and exercise - leads to better control. Since children spend 30 to 35 hours per week at school, effectively managing their diabetes while there is integral to their short- and long-term health. The Canadian Paediatric Society and the Canadian Pediatric Endocrine Group recommend that minimum standards for supervision and care be established across Canada to support children and youth with type 1 diabetes in schools. These recommendations are derived from evidence-based clinical practice guidelines, with input from diabetes care providers from across Canada, and are consistent with the Canadian Diabetes Association's Guidelines for the Care of Students Living with Diabetes at School.

  10. Diabetes Cooking Schools Improve Knowledge and Skills in Making Healthful Food Choices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archuleta, Martha; VanLeeuwen, Dawn; Halderson, Karen; Wells, Linda; Bock, Margaret Ann

    2012-01-01

    Rates of type 2 diabetes are increasing nationally and in New Mexico, particularly in ethnic minorities. A key self-care area with challenging barriers is healthy eating. The New Mexico Cooperative Extension Service conducts diabetes cooking schools statewide together with community health providers. The study reported here determined if this…

  11. Diabetes Cooking Schools Improve Knowledge and Skills in Making Healthful Food Choices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archuleta, Martha; VanLeeuwen, Dawn; Halderson, Karen; Wells, Linda; Bock, Margaret Ann

    2012-01-01

    Rates of type 2 diabetes are increasing nationally and in New Mexico, particularly in ethnic minorities. A key self-care area with challenging barriers is healthy eating. The New Mexico Cooperative Extension Service conducts diabetes cooking schools statewide together with community health providers. The study reported here determined if this…

  12. Relations between Resiliency, Diabetes-Related Quality of Life, and Disease Markers to School-Related Outcomes in Adolescents with Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfect, Michelle M.; Jaramillo, Evelyn

    2012-01-01

    The current study examined the role that resiliency and diabetes quality of life play in school functioning and glucose control among adolescents with diabetes. Participants included 45 adolescents with diabetes who participated in a larger study evaluating the feasibility of a model of mental health screening, assessment, and referral/service…

  13. Relations between Resiliency, Diabetes-Related Quality of Life, and Disease Markers to School-Related Outcomes in Adolescents with Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfect, Michelle M.; Jaramillo, Evelyn

    2012-01-01

    The current study examined the role that resiliency and diabetes quality of life play in school functioning and glucose control among adolescents with diabetes. Participants included 45 adolescents with diabetes who participated in a larger study evaluating the feasibility of a model of mental health screening, assessment, and referral/service…

  14. Evaluation of the Impact of a Diabetes Education Curriculum for School Personnel on Disease Knowledge and Confidence in Caring for Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Cory T.; Chen, Aleda M. H.; Plake, Kimberly S.; Nash, Christiane L.

    2012-01-01

    Background: School personnel may lack knowledge of diabetes and be unprepared to address the needs of students with type 1 diabetes. This project evaluated the effectiveness of a type 1 diabetes education program for school personnel on increasing knowledge of diabetes and confidence in caring for students with diabetes. Methods: Two types of…

  15. Evaluation of the Impact of a Diabetes Education Curriculum for School Personnel on Disease Knowledge and Confidence in Caring for Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Cory T.; Chen, Aleda M. H.; Plake, Kimberly S.; Nash, Christiane L.

    2012-01-01

    Background: School personnel may lack knowledge of diabetes and be unprepared to address the needs of students with type 1 diabetes. This project evaluated the effectiveness of a type 1 diabetes education program for school personnel on increasing knowledge of diabetes and confidence in caring for students with diabetes. Methods: Two types of…

  16. School-based diabetes interventions and their outcomes: a systematic literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bénédicte Pansier

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes is one of the most common chronic childhood diseases, while type 2 diabetes in children is increasing at alarming rates globally. Against this backdrop, the school is a critical environment for children with diabetes. They continue to face barriers to education that may lead to depression, poor academic performance, and poor quality of life. To address these challenges, diabetes interventions have been implemented in school and the goal was to systematically review these interventions and their outcomes between 2000 and 2013. Fifteen studies were included in the narrative synthesis. Education of school personnel was the main focus before 2006. Studies reported gains in knowledge and perceived confidence of school staff. Since 2006, more comprehensive interventions have been developed to promote better care coordination and create a safe school environment. These studies reported improved diabetes management and quality of life of students. Assessment tools varied and study design included randomized controlled trials, quantitative and qualitative methods. Although many of the studies reported a significant difference in the parameters measured, it was not possible to determine optimal ways to improve the health, quality of life and academic performance of children with diabetes, given the disparity in scope, assessment tools and measured outcomes. Experimental designs, longer follow-up studies, larger sample sizes, and a higher number of participating schools are critical issues to consider in future studies. Most of the research was conducted in North America and further research is needed in other parts of the world.

  17. Evaluation of a school-based diabetes education intervention, an extension of Program ENERGY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, Matthew David

    Background: The prevalence of both obesity and type 2 diabetes in the United States has increased over the past two decades and rates remain high. The latest data from the National Center for Health Statistics estimates that 36% of adults and 17% of children and adolescents in the US are obese (CDC Adult Obesity, CDC Childhood Obesity). Being overweight or obese greatly increases one's risk of developing several chronic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes. Approximately 8% of adults in the US have diabetes, type 2 diabetes accounts for 90-95% of these cases. Type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents is still rare, however clinical reports suggest an increase in the frequency of diagnosis (CDC Diabetes Fact Sheet, 2011). Results from the Diabetes Prevention Program show that the incidence of type 2 diabetes can be reduced through the adoption of a healthier lifestyle among high-risk individuals (DPP, 2002). Objectives: This classroom-based intervention included scientific coverage of energy balance, diabetes, diabetes prevention strategies, and diabetes management. Coverage of diabetes management topics were included in lesson content to further the students' understanding of the disease. Measurable short-term goals of the intervention included increases in: general diabetes knowledge, diabetes management knowledge, and awareness of type 2 diabetes prevention strategies. Methods: A total of 66 sixth grade students at Tavelli Elementary School in Fort Collins, CO completed the intervention. The program consisted of nine classroom-based lessons; students participated in one lesson every two weeks. The lessons were delivered from November of 2005 to May of 2006. Each bi-weekly lesson included a presentation and interactive group activities. Participants completed two diabetes knowledge questionnaires at baseline and post intervention. A diabetes survey developed by Program ENERGY measured general diabetes knowledge and awareness of type 2 diabetes prevention strategies

  18. Diabetes Awareness of Low-Income Middle School Students Participating in the Help a Friend, Help Yourself Youth Diabetes Awareness Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wroten, Kathryn; Reames, Elizabeth S.; Tuuri, Georgianna

    2012-01-01

    The study reported here investigated the effectiveness of the LSU AgCenter Help a Friend, Help Yourself youth diabetes education curriculum to increase knowledge and awareness of diabetes and its symptoms in low-income middle school students participating in the Boys and Girls Club after-school program. The curriculum includes four lessons with…

  19. Diabetes Awareness of Low-Income Middle School Students Participating in the Help a Friend, Help Yourself Youth Diabetes Awareness Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wroten, Kathryn; Reames, Elizabeth S.; Tuuri, Georgianna

    2012-01-01

    The study reported here investigated the effectiveness of the LSU AgCenter Help a Friend, Help Yourself youth diabetes education curriculum to increase knowledge and awareness of diabetes and its symptoms in low-income middle school students participating in the Boys and Girls Club after-school program. The curriculum includes four lessons with…

  20. Initial findings: primary diabetes care responsibility among emerging adults with type 1 diabetes post high school and move out of parental home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, K M; Weaver, M T; Stump, T E; Dimeglio, L A; Miller, A R; Crowder, S; Fortenberry, J D

    2013-01-01

    Emerging adults with diabetes are assuming diabetes care responsibility, graduating from high school and leaving their parental homes. We examined: (1) how diabetes care responsibility changed in relation to time (high school to post high school) and living situation (living independently or not of parents) and (2) the association of diabetes self-efficacy, worry about hypoglycaemia, gender and glycaemic control with these changes in responsibility among emerging adults with type 1 diabetes.   During the last 6 months in high school (T1), 113 participants completed diabetes care responsibility (total, daily and non-daily), diabetes self-efficacy and worry about hypoglycaemia scales. Participants again completed the responsibility scales post high school graduation (T2). We used a linear mixed-effects model with diabetes self-efficacy, worry about hypoglycaemia, time since graduation, living situation, gender and glycaemic control as independent variables; and diabetes care responsibility (total, daily and non-daily) as dependent variables. Moderation involving diabetes self-efficacy, worry about hypoglycaemia, gender and glycaemic control was also tested.   Diabetes care responsibility increased over time for total (P responsibility were moderated by living situation. Self-efficacy was negatively related to total (P= 0.006), daily (P= 0.010) and non-daily (P= 0.030) responsibility for those not living independently while positively related only to total responsibility (P= 0.028) for those living independently. Being female was positively related to total (P= 0.007) and non-daily (P= 0.001) responsibility for those living independently.   Diabetes care responsibility increased from high school to post high school among these emerging adults with diabetes. There is a complex relationship between self-efficacy, gender and responsibility related to living independently of parents for these youth. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Parent and Teacher Perceptions of the Impact of School Nurse Interventions on Children's Self-Management of Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peery, Annette I.; Engelke, Martha Keehner; Swanson, Melvin S.

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes is a common chronic illness among school-age children. The school nurse collaborates with the student, parents, and teachers to help the child manage their diabetes effectively. Very little is known about the relationship between school nurse interventions and parent/teacher perceptions of the child's self-management. We examined this…

  2. Management of Type 1 Diabetes in Schools: Whose Responsibility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandali, Swarna L.; Gordon, Theresa A.

    2009-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2008) reports that approximately 0.2% of all persons under the age of 20 have been diagnosed with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes. This represents 186,300 children and young adults. Type 1 diabetes has traditionally been a disease of children and adolescents. Although type 2 diabetes has in the past…

  3. Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Case Decisions: Health-Related Service Considerations for School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Ara J.; Wodrich, David L.; Lazar, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is a chronic illness that can impact learning and often requires medical management in the school setting. School psychologists must therefore be knowledgeable of special service eligibility criteria associated with T1DM, the health-related services often required of such students, and what health-related services…

  4. Prevention of Type 2 Diabetes among Youth: A Systematic Review, Implications for the School Nurse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brackney, Dana E.; Cutshall, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Childhood obesity and the early development of type 2 diabetes (T2 DM) place students at risk for chronic health problems. The school nurse is uniquely situated to promote school health initiatives that influence health behavior. The purpose of this review was to determine effective nonpharmacological interventions for prevention of T2 DM in…

  5. Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Case Decisions: Health-Related Service Considerations for School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Ara J.; Wodrich, David L.; Lazar, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is a chronic illness that can impact learning and often requires medical management in the school setting. School psychologists must therefore be knowledgeable of special service eligibility criteria associated with T1DM, the health-related services often required of such students, and what health-related services…

  6. Prevention of Type 2 Diabetes among Youth: A Systematic Review, Implications for the School Nurse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brackney, Dana E.; Cutshall, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Childhood obesity and the early development of type 2 diabetes (T2 DM) place students at risk for chronic health problems. The school nurse is uniquely situated to promote school health initiatives that influence health behavior. The purpose of this review was to determine effective nonpharmacological interventions for prevention of T2 DM in…

  7. Nutritional Status And Its Association With Diabetes Mellitus In School Children, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muninarayana C

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Poor health and nutrition may impair both the growth and intellectual development of school children. Incidence of malnutrition related childhood diabetes mellitus has increased and continues to be on the rise.Objectives: To assess the nutritional status by anthropometry and to screen for diabetes by capillary blood examination of school children. Design: Longitudinal study Setting: The study was carried out at Sri R.L.Jalappa Central School, Kolar from August 2008 to December 2009. Methods: All the school children were interviewed with pre-designed and pre-tested proforma. Height, Weight was measured by standard procedures. The nutritional status was analysed by Body Mass Index (BMI for age. The school children were also screened for diabetes mellitus by Finger stick capillary random plasma glucose testing. The children were followed up for any major medical problems during the study period.Participants: All the students studying in the school during study period.Results: Mean height and weight of children were found comparable to the ICMR pooled data. However, compared to NCHS standards and affluent Indian children the mean height and weight were found to be much inferior at all ages. According to BMI for age as per NCHS most of the children were undernourished (79.2% and 3 children (0.6% were overweight. Out of 495 children screened for diabetes 14 children had hyperglycaemia (>160mg/dl. These 14 children were further tested by oral glucose tolerance test and found to have normal blood sugars levels. During the follow up two undernourished children developed diabetes mellitus. Conclusion: The magnitude of malnutrition among school going children was found to be 79%. During the follow up two undernourished children developed diabetes mellitus, hence under nutrition was associated with diabetes mellitus.

  8. THE RISK FACTORS OF DIABETES MELLITUS IN ADOLESCENT SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL IN MALANG CITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyah Widodo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetes mellitus is a disease caused by a hormonal disorder that affects insulin. 5.7% of the total population of Indonesia, including teenagers is a big challenge for the health sector to do the step in anticipation of the complexity of health problems caused by diabetes mellitus in Indonesia. This study aims to analyze the risk factors of diabetes mellitus in adolescent senior high school in the city of Malang. Method: This research was correlational research design, sampled in this study was partly teenagers is high school class in Malang city area drawn at random sampling with a large sample of 375 respondents. Research conducted at government senior high school 6 and 9 (SMU Negeri 6 and SMU Negeri 9 in the city of Malang, in May–August, 2011. Data collection techniques using questionnaires; measurements: weight, height, abdominal circumference/waist, blood pressure and food consumption survey (Recording of Present Food Intake of the diet for three days. Data was analyzed by descriptive and analytic Spearman Rho correlation with alpha 0.05. Result:  The results showed that a BMI (body mass index and waist circumference (central obesity related to the risk of diabetes mellitus in teens senior high school in Malang with 0.000 p-values < α 0.05. However, there is no relationship between blood pressure, physical activity, frequency of fruit and vegetable consumption, family history of diabetes mellitus and the risk of diabetes mellitus in teens senior high school in Malang. Discussion: Recommended for teens to pay attention to healthy eating and balanced, in order to awake the ideal body weight and abdominal circumference are normal, so that avoid the risk of diabetes mellitus.

  9. School factors as barriers to and facilitators of a preventive intervention for pediatric type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, William J; Schneider, Margaret; Thompson, Deborah; Volpe, Stella L; Steckler, Allan; Hall, John M; Fisher, M Randall

    2014-06-01

    School-based interventions are essential to prevent pediatric obesity and type 2 diabetes. School environmental factors influence implementation of these interventions. This article examines how school factors acted as barriers to and facilitators of the HEALTHY intervention. The HEALTHY study was a cluster-randomized trial of a multicomponent intervention implemented in 21 schools. Interview data were analyzed to identify barriers and facilitators. Barriers included teacher frustration that intervention activities detracted from tested subjects, student resistance and misbehavior, classroom management problems, communication equipment problems, lack of teacher/staff engagement, high cost and limited availability of nutritious products, inadequate facility space, and large class sizes. Facilitators included teacher/staff engagement, effective classroom management, student engagement, schools with direct control over food service, support from school leaders, and adequate facilities and equipment. Contextual barriers and facilitators must be taken into account in the design and implementation of school-based health interventions.

  10. Cooking Schools Improve Nutrient Intake Patterns of People with Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archuleta, Martha; VanLeeuwen, Dawn; Halderson, Karen; Jackson, K'Dawn; Bock, Margaret Ann; Eastman, Wanda; Powell, Jennifer; Titone, Michelle; Marr, Carol; Wells, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether cooking classes offered by the Cooperative Extension Service improved nutrient intake patterns in people with type 2 diabetes. Design: Quasi-experimental using pretest, posttest comparisons. Setting: Community locations including schools, churches, and senior centers. Participants: One hundred seventeen people with…

  11. Effectiveness of Acceptance & Commitment Therapy on School Phobia in Children with Type 1 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Najaf abadi Maryam

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT is one of the third wave behavioral therapies in the field of in the treatment of anxiety disorders. The purpose of present study was to investigate the effectiveness of acceptance and commitment therapy on school phobia in children with type 1 diabetes. Methods: This was a semi-experimental study, including pretest-posttest and follow up with the control group. The participants of the study were all girls aged 8-12 years old with type 1 diabetes referred to Najafabad town in 2014-2015. Instruments used in this study was “screen for child anxiety related disorders”(SCARED. Childeren filled measure of anxiety, and among them, 24 childern whom were suffering with school phobia were selected and then assigned randomly into two experimental and control groups (n1=n2=12. For subjects in the experimental group, 8 sessions of acceptance and commitment therapy, each lasting 120 minutes, were offered and control subjects received no therapy in this while. Six month later follow up was executed. Results: Data were analyzed using analysis of covariance method (ANCOVA. Results indicated that acceptance and commitment therapy reduced school phobia in the students with  type 1 diabetes and it showed a persistent recovery on symptoms after six months of follow up. Conclusion: After all, the results of the current study showed that acceptance and commitment therapy can be used for reducing school phobia.

  12. Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Derbyshire general practitioner Stuart Bootle has had diabetes for 20 years. He speaks to Paul Smith, who has type 1 diabetes himself, about the trials and tribulations of being on the receiving end of NHS care

  13. Relations among school/daycare functioning, fear of hypoglycaemia and quality of life in parents of young children with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Linda J; Clary, Lauren; Owen, Victoria; Monaghan, Maureen; Alvarez, Vanessa; Streisand, Randi

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the type 1 diabetes-related school/daycare experiences of parents of young children and to examine the relationship among child school/daycare functioning, parent fear of hypoglycaemia and parent type 1 diabetes-related quality of life. Parents of young children who attend school/daycare must rely on others for daily type 1 diabetes management. Worry about school/daycare type 1 diabetes management may cause parental distress and contribute to diminished parent quality of life. Parental concerns about type 1 diabetes management in young children in the school/daycare setting have not been well described in the literature. Descriptive correlational and cross-sectional parent report of questionnaires design. As part of a randomised controlled trial for parents of young children with type 1 diabetes, 134 parents completed self-report measures at baseline. Data included demographic, school/daycare, and medical information, parent reports of child school/daycare functioning, parent fear of hypoglycaemia and parent type 1 diabetes-related quality of life. Parents of younger children, children on a more intensive medical regimen and children who had experienced type 1 diabetes-related unconsciousness or seizures had more school/daycare concerns. Parents who perceived their children had higher school/daycare functioning had less fear about hypoglycaemia and reported better type 1 diabetes-related quality of life. School/daycare functioning and fear of hypoglycaemia were significantly associated with parent type 1 diabetes-related quality of life. Parents' concerns about school/daycare functioning and fear of hypoglycaemia play an important role in parents' type 1 diabetes-related quality of life. Members of the healthcare team should be aware of concerns related to children attending school/daycare and provide additional support as warranted. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. The impact of managing school-aged children's diabetes: the role of child behavior problems and parental discipline strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Anna C; DeCourcey, Wendy M; Freeman, Kurt A

    2009-09-01

    Models of diabetes management in children emphasize family relationships, particularly parent-child interactions. In adolescents, parental involvement in disease-specific management relates to better health and adherence. However, information about parental involvement in disease management for young children is limited and mixed. This study investigated behavior problems of school-aged children with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (T1DM) in association with parent discipline strategies and parents' perceptions of (1) time spent managing diabetes and (2) the impact their child's diabetes has on their discipline strategies. Parents of children ages 5-12 with T1DM completed standardized measures of child misbehavior, parent discipline strategies, and responded to questions regarding perceived time spent managing diabetes, and perceived impact of diabetes on ability to discipline. Results showed child mealtime misbehavior was common and associated with overreactive parental discipline. Further, overreactive discipline was also associated with reports of less time spent managing child's illness. Child misbehavior was positively associated with parents' perceived amount of time spent managing diabetes and with the impact of child diabetes on discipline. Findings suggest the importance of considering parent discipline strategies and child misbehavior when working with young children with diabetes.

  15. Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomberk, Gwen

    2009-01-01

    Pancreatologists have often divided research of the pancreas based upon the origin of the function or disease, namely the endocrine or exocrine pancreas. In fact, as a result, many of our meetings and conferences have followed separate paths. Interestingly, among patients with chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, both disorders of the exocrine pancreas, diabetes is common. However, the clinical features of the diabetes associated with these two differ. Peripheral insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia are the predominant diabetic traits in pancreatic cancer, while reduced islet cell mass and impaired insulin secretion are observed more often in chronic pancreatitis. The causal relationship between diabetes and pancreatic cancer remains an intriguing but unanswered question. Since diabetes often precedes pancreatic cancer, it is regarded as a potential risk factor for malignancy. On the other hand, there remains the possibility that pancreatic cancer secretes diabetogenic factors. Regardless of how the science ultimately illuminates this issue, there is increasing interest in utilizing screening for diabetes to aid early detection of pancreatic tumor lesions. Therefore, in this issue of Pancreatology and the Web, we explore the topic of diabetes to keep us alert to this very important association, even if we study diseases of the exocrine pancreas.

  16. Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damm, Peter; Mathiesen, Elisabeth R

    2015-01-01

    For >30 years, insulin has been the drug of choice for the medical treatment of gestational diabetes mellitus. However, the use of oral hypoglycaemic agents has increased during the past 1–2 decades, so a recent comparison of treatment with glibenclamide, metformin or insulin in women with gestat......For >30 years, insulin has been the drug of choice for the medical treatment of gestational diabetes mellitus. However, the use of oral hypoglycaemic agents has increased during the past 1–2 decades, so a recent comparison of treatment with glibenclamide, metformin or insulin in women...... with gestational diabetes mellitus is highly relevant....

  17. Diabetes

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — These datasets provide de-identified insurance data for diabetes. The data is provided by three managed care organizations in Allegheny County (Gateway Health Plan,...

  18. Impact of the Bienestar School-Based Diabetes Mellitus Prevention Program on Fasting Capillary Glucose Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treviño, Roberto P.; Yin, Zenong; Hernandez, Arthur; Hale, Daniel E.; Garcia, Oralia A.; Mobley, Connie

    2005-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the impact of a school-based diabetes mellitus prevention program on low-income fourth-grade Mexican American children. Design A randomized controlled trial with 13 intervention and 14 control schools. Setting Elementary schools in inner-city neighborhoods in San Antonio, Tex. Participants Eighty percent of participants were Mexican American and 94% were from economically disadvantaged households. Baseline and follow-up measures were collected from 1419 (713 intervention and 706 control) and 1221 (619 intervention and 602 control) fourth-grade children, respectively. Intervention The Bienestar Health Program consists of a health class and physical education curriculum, a family program, a school cafeteria program, and an after-school health club. The objectives are to decrease dietary saturated fat intake, increase dietary fiber intake, and increase physical activity. Main Outcome Measures The primary end point was fasting capillary glucose level, and the secondary end points were percentage of body fat, physical fitness level, dietary fiber intake, and dietary saturated fat intake. Fasting capillary glucose level, bioelectric impedance, modified Harvard step test, three 24-hour dietary recalls, weight, and height were collected at baseline and 8 months later. Results Children in the intervention arm attended an average of 32 Bienestar sessions. Mean fasting capillary glucose levels decreased in intervention schools and increased in control schools after adjusting for covariates (−2.24 mg/dL [0.12 mmol/L]; 95% confidence interval, −6.53 to 2.05 [−0.36 to 0.11 mmol/L]; P = .03). Fitness scores (P = .04) and dietary fiber intake (P = .009) significantly increased in intervention children and decreased in control children. Percentage of body fat (P = .56) and dietary saturated fat intake (P = .52) did not differ significantly between intervention and control children. Conclusion This intervention showed some positive results, but additional

  19. Diabetes risk factors in children: a partnership between nurse practitioner and high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipman, Terri H; Schucker, Mary McGrath; Ratcliffe, Sarah J; Holmberg, Tyler; Baier, Scott; Deatrick, Janet A

    2011-01-01

    This project was a 4-year university/community collaboration to (1) screen for diabetes risk factors in children from in an inner-city community; (2) assess children's knowledge of nutrition and measure their physical endurance; and (3) survey parents about barriers to healthy living. Descriptive cross-sectional study utilizing a community participatory-based research approach. For a 4-week period each year, nurse practitioner students and high school students partnered in an evaluation of elementary school children that included assessment of (1) height, weight, waist circumference, BMI, and acanthosis nigricans; (2) scores on a nutrition knowledge test; and (3) recovery heart rate after a dance activity. Parents of the children were surveyed regarding barriers to healthy eating and activity. A total of 240 African American children were evaluated: 25% were obese, 24% had a waist circumference >95th percentile, and 14% had acanthosis nigricans. The mean score of a nutrition knowledge test was 65%, and recovery heart rates were significantly higher than preexercise heart rates. Of 48 parents surveyed, the most common barrier to eating healthy reported was the children's picky eating (62%), and most common barrier to activity was lack of access to safe places to play (54%). Nurses working with children from inner-city communities should be especially aware of the children's many risk factors for diabetes. Clinicians who hope to make a difference in altering these risks should collaborate with the community to target high-risk populations for diabetes screening, promote good nutrition and exercise, and address barriers to healthy living. When developing plans of care for children, regardless of setting, it is critical to understand the community and incorporate the families as partners in developing culturally relevant interventions.

  20. The Relations of Sleep and Quality of Life to School Performance in Youth with Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfect, Michelle M.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined parent and youth self-reports to test the hypothesis that perceived insufficient sleep duration, inconsistent sleep habits, reduced quality of life, less frequent blood glucose monitoring, and higher hemoglobin A1c would predict poorer school functioning among 50 youth with type 1 diabetes. The data suggested that a delay in…

  1. The Relations of Sleep and Quality of Life to School Performance in Youth with Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfect, Michelle M.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined parent and youth self-reports to test the hypothesis that perceived insufficient sleep duration, inconsistent sleep habits, reduced quality of life, less frequent blood glucose monitoring, and higher hemoglobin A1c would predict poorer school functioning among 50 youth with type 1 diabetes. The data suggested that a delay in…

  2. Effect of Nutrition Changes on Foods Selected by Students in a Middle School-Based Diabetes Prevention Intervention Program: The HEALTHY Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley, Connie C.; Stadler, Diane D.; Staten, Myrlene A.; El Ghormli, Laure; Gillis, Bonnie; Hartstein, Jill; Siega-Riz, Anna Maria; Virus, Amy

    2012-01-01

    Background: The HEALTHY primary prevention trial developed an integrated multicomponent intervention program to moderate risk factors for type 2 diabetes in middle schools. The nutrition component aimed to improve the quality of foods and beverages served to students. Changes in the School Breakfast Program (SBP), National School Lunch Program…

  3. Effect of Nutrition Changes on Foods Selected by Students in a Middle School-Based Diabetes Prevention Intervention Program: The HEALTHY Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley, Connie C.; Stadler, Diane D.; Staten, Myrlene A.; El Ghormli, Laure; Gillis, Bonnie; Hartstein, Jill; Siega-Riz, Anna Maria; Virus, Amy

    2012-01-01

    Background: The HEALTHY primary prevention trial developed an integrated multicomponent intervention program to moderate risk factors for type 2 diabetes in middle schools. The nutrition component aimed to improve the quality of foods and beverages served to students. Changes in the School Breakfast Program (SBP), National School Lunch Program…

  4. Academic Achievement in Primary School in Offspring Born to Mothers With Type 1 Diabetes (the EPICOM Study): A Register-Based Prospective Cohort Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knorr, Sine; Clausen, Tine D; Vlachová, Zuzana

    2015-01-01

    compared with control offspring. The opposite applied to offspring born to mothers with inadequate glycemic control, who obtained significantly lower average school grades compared with control offspring. CONCLUSIONS: Offspring of mothers with pregestational type 1 diabetes obtained similar average grades...

  5. Diabetes Preparedness in Schools: What Do Foodservice Personnel Need to Know to Respond?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenci, Alexandra

    2009-01-01

    Diabetes is increasing in youth, presenting a serious public health threat. Although type 1 diabetes has historically been more common in children, type 2 diabetes is on the rise, linked to increases in overweight and obesity among American youth, particularly those of high risk racial and ethnic groups. Foodservice personnel, along with other…

  6. Diabetes Preparedness in Schools: What Do Foodservice Personnel Need to Know to Respond?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenci, Alexandra

    2009-01-01

    Diabetes is increasing in youth, presenting a serious public health threat. Although type 1 diabetes has historically been more common in children, type 2 diabetes is on the rise, linked to increases in overweight and obesity among American youth, particularly those of high risk racial and ethnic groups. Foodservice personnel, along with other…

  7. Screening for Diabetes in a Dental School Clinic to Assess Interprofessional Communication Between Physicians and Dental Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biethman, Rick Ken; Pandarakalam, Cyril; Garcia, M Nathalia; Whitener, Sara; Hildebolt, Charles F

    2017-09-01

    If a dental student diagnoses a patient in a dental school clinic as being at high risk of prediabetes or diabetes, the patient should be referred to his or her physician for further diagnostic evaluation, and the physician should send back the evaluation results so that the dental team can optimize treatment and health care choices if the diagnosis is confirmed. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate physicians' responses to written and oral requests for information regarding follow-up diabetes testing. A secondary aim was to evaluate patients' compliance with recommendations to seek medical care after being determined to be at high risk of prediabetes or diabetes in the dental clinic. Based on at least one positive risk factor for diabetes, 74 patients in one U.S. dental school's clinic were screened by third- and fourth-year dental students for prediabetes or diabetes and underwent point of care HbA1C (glycalated hemoglobin) blood tests between June 2014 and June 2015. Patients with an HbA1C value of 5.7% or above were referred to their physicians for follow-up testing. The physician was mailed the patient's HIPAA release and a request for updates to the student regarding the patient's diabetes status. If the physician did not provide the requested information, a dental student telephoned him or her to obtain the patient's diabetes status. Of the 74 patients, 34 (46%) tested positive with HbA1C tests and were referred to their physicians. Of those 34 referred patients, 20 (59%) saw their physicians for additional evaluations within six months of referral. None of the 20 physicians responded to the written requests for information on additional diabetes testing. After one or two telephone requests, all 20 physicians provided the test results. This study found that most of the patients (59%) followed their dental practitioner's advice to seek follow-up care with their physician, supporting the value of conducting these tests in a dental clinic. However, the

  8. HEALTHY study rationale, design and methods: moderating risk of type 2 diabetes in multi-ethnic middle school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirst, Kathryn; Baranowski, Tom; DeBar, Lynn; Foster, Gary D; Kaufman, Francine; Kennel, Phyllis; Linder, Barbara; Schneider, Margaret; Venditti, Elizabeth M; Yin, Zenong

    2009-08-01

    The HEALTHY primary prevention trial was designed and implemented in response to the growing numbers of children and adolescents being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. The objective was to moderate risk factors for type 2 diabetes. Modifiable risk factors measured were indicators of adiposity and glycemic dysregulation: body mass index > or =85th percentile, fasting glucose > or =5.55 mmol l(-1) (100 mg per 100 ml) and fasting insulin > or =180 pmol l(-1) (30 microU ml(-1)). A series of pilot studies established the feasibility of performing data collection procedures and tested the development of an intervention consisting of four integrated components: (1) changes in the quantity and nutritional quality of food and beverage offerings throughout the total school food environment; (2) physical education class lesson plans and accompanying equipment to increase both participation and number of minutes spent in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity; (3) brief classroom activities and family outreach vehicles to increase knowledge, enhance decision-making skills and support and reinforce youth in accomplishing goals; and (4) communications and social marketing strategies to enhance and promote changes through messages, images, events and activities. Expert study staff provided training, assistance, materials and guidance for school faculty and staff to implement the intervention components. A cohort of students were enrolled in sixth grade and followed to end of eighth grade. They attended a health screening data collection at baseline and end of study that involved measurement of height, weight, blood pressure, waist circumference and a fasting blood draw. Height and weight were also collected at the end of the seventh grade. The study was conducted in 42 middle schools, six at each of seven locations across the country, with 21 schools randomized to receive the intervention and 21 to act as controls (data collection activities only). Middle school was the unit of

  9. Establishing a model to assess the effects of school support and self-care behaviors on life satisfaction in adolescents with type 1 diabetes in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shan-Mei; Chen, Shu-Wen; Wang, Ruey-Hsia

    2013-12-01

    Life satisfaction is associated with positive development in adolescents. Understanding a path model of life satisfaction can help healthcare providers design interventions to improve positive development in adolescents with type 1 diabetes. The aim of this study was to construct a model that assesses the effects of school support and self-care behaviors on life satisfaction in adolescents with type 1 diabetes in Taiwan. This study used a cross-sectional design. One hundred and thirty-nine adolescents aged 10-18 years and diagnosed with type 1 diabetes were recruited. Participants completed questionnaires that assessed perceived school support, self-care behaviors, and life satisfaction. The hypothesized model was tested using structural equation modeling. School support significantly and directly affected self-care behaviors (β = .46, p = .022) and life satisfaction (β = .39, p = .034), self-care behaviors directly affected life satisfaction (β = .56, p = .048), and school support indirectly affected life satisfaction (β = .26, p = .015) through the mediation of self-care behaviors. The fix indices were as follows: χ2 = 8.141, df = 11, p = .701, goodness of fit index = .984, normed fit index = .949, and root mean square residual = .001. The model explained 66.1% of total life satisfaction variance. School support and self-care behaviors positively influence the life satisfaction of adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Improvements in school support and self-care behaviors are necessary to improve life satisfaction in this vulnerable group.

  10. Targeting blood glucose management in school improves glycemic control in children with poorly controlled type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thanh M; Mason, Kimberly J; Sanders, Cynthia G; Yazdani, Parvin; Heptulla, Rubina A

    2008-10-01

    We hypothesized that school nurse supervision of glucose and insulin-dose adjustment significantly improves the hemoglobinA(1c) (HbA(1c)) level in pediatric patients with poorly controlled type 1 diabetes mellitus (HbA(1c) > or = 9%). A total of 36 subjects were enrolled and 18 subjects were randomized to receive the 3-month intervention. Their average HbA(1c) was lowered by 1.6%, suggesting that this intervention helps this difficult group of patients.

  11. Impact of the Bienestar school-based diabetes mellitus prevention program on fasting capillary glucose levels: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treviño, Roberto P; Yin, Zenong; Hernandez, Arthur; Hale, Daniel E; Garcia, Oralia A; Mobley, Connie

    2004-09-01

    To evaluate the impact of a school-based diabetes mellitus prevention program on low-income fourth-grade Mexican American children. A randomized controlled trial with 13 intervention and 14 control schools. Elementary schools in inner-city neighborhoods in San Antonio, Tex. Eighty percent of participants were Mexican American and 94% were from economically disadvantaged households. Baseline and follow-up measures were collected from 1419 (713 intervention and 706 control) and 1221 (619 intervention and 602 control) fourth-grade children, respectively. The Bienestar Health Program consists of a health class and physical education curriculum, a family program, a school cafeteria program, and an after-school health club. The objectives are to decrease dietary saturated fat intake, increase dietary fiber intake, and increase physical activity. The primary end point was fasting capillary glucose level, and the secondary end points were percentage of body fat, physical fitness level, dietary fiber intake, and dietary saturated fat intake. Fasting capillary glucose level, bioelectric impedance, modified Harvard step test, three 24-hour dietary recalls, weight, and height were collected at baseline and 8 months later. Children in the intervention arm attended an average of 32 Bienestar sessions. Mean fasting capillary glucose levels decreased in intervention schools and increased in control schools after adjusting for covariates (-2.24 mg/dL [0.12 mmol/L]; 95% confidence interval, -6.53 to 2.05 [-0.36 to 0.11 mmol/L]; P =.03). Fitness scores (P =.04) and dietary fiber intake (P =.009) significantly increased in intervention children and decreased in control children. Percentage of body fat (P =.56) and dietary saturated fat intake (P =.52) did not differ significantly between intervention and control children. This intervention showed some positive results, but additional research is needed to examine long-term benefits, translation, and cost-effectiveness.

  12. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family Life First Aid & Safety Doctors & Hospitals Q&A ... Media Use Affects Your Child Natural Disasters: How Families Can Help Diabetes Movie KidsHealth > For Parents > Diabetes ...

  13. A cross-sectional study to determine the prevalence of obesity and other risk factors for type 2 diabetes among school children in Trinidad, West Indies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batson, Yvonne Ann; Teelucksingh, Surujpal; Maharaj, Rohan G; Cockburn, Brian N

    2014-08-01

    Our previous work has shown that type 2 diabetes mellitus is a problem in the school-aged population of Trinidad, West Indies. The current study evaluated the prevalence in this population of selected risk factors for diabetes, viz: obesity, family history of diabetes and acanthosis nigricans. To assess the prevalence of the following risk factors for type 2 diabetes (T2DM) in school children in Trinidad: obesity, family history of diabetes in first- or second-degree relatives and the presence of acanthosis nigricans (AN). A cross-sectional survey was performed among school children aged 7-18 years from September 2009 to June 2010. A convenience sample was selected from a random sample of 32 schools drawn from all educational districts. A self-administered questionnaire was employed to record family history, gender and ethnicity. AN was assessed and scored clinically at the neck and obesity was measured by anthropometry and bio-impedance. There were 2130 participants in the study. Fifteen per cent were obese and 17% were overweight. Primary school children had a higher prevalence of obesity (22·9% vs 11·0%) and overweight (20·0% vs 15·6%) than secondary school children (Pobesity as measured by BMI for age (35·8 vs 29·4%, Pchildren have a degree of AN greater than grade 2, which clinically is readily recognisable. Females displayed this physical sign more commonly than males (Pchildren in Trinidad. More than 40% had at least one risk factor. Strategies aimed at reducing risk factors for T2DM, especially obesity, among Trinidadian school children are urgently warranted.

  14. [Aide aux jeunes diabétiques, a diabetes school for children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahané, Michel; Vias, Marthe

    2011-01-01

    The general aim of the association Aide aux jeunes diabétiques (AID) (Help for young diabetics) is to help children and their families live as well as possible with the disease. This requires specific education which forms part of the overall therapy and which combines training, information and patient compliance. The AJD works on all three of these levels during the holidays it organises for young diabetics.

  15. Evaluation of Jump into Action: A Program to Reduce the Risk of Non-Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus in School Children on the Texas-Mexico Border.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcomb, J. David; Lira, Juanita; Kingery, Paul M.; Smith, D. W.; Lane, Dorothy; Goodway, Jackie

    1998-01-01

    Evaluated Jump into Action, a non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM)-prevention program that encouraged students to eat well and exercise regularly to reduce NIDDM risks. Surveys of predominantly Hispanic fifth graders and their teachers at Texas-Mexico border schools indicated that the program increased NIDDM-prevention knowledge and…

  16. Effect of Nutrition Changes on Foods Selected by Students in a Middle School-based Diabetes Prevention Intervention Program; the HEALTHY Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley, Connie C.; Stadler, Diane D.; Staten, Myrlene A; ghormli, Laure El; Gillis, Bonnie; Hartstein, Jill; Siega-Riz, Anna Maria; Virus, Amy

    2011-01-01

    BACKGOUND The HEALTHY primary prevention trial developed an integrated multi-component intervention program to moderate risk factors for type 2 diabetes in middle schools. The nutrition component aimed to improve the quality of foods and beverages served to students. Changes in the School Breakfast Program (SBP), National School Lunch Program (NSLP), and a la carte venues are compared to the experience of control schools. METHODS The intervention was implemented in 21 middle schools from winter 2007 through spring 2009 (following a cohort of students from sixth through eighth grades); 21 schools acted as observed controls. The nutrition component targeted school food service environmental change. Data identifying foods and nutrients served (selected by students for consumption) were collected over a 20-day period at baseline and end of study. Analysis compared end of study values for intervention versus control schools. RESULTS Intervention schools more successfully limited dessert and snack food portion size in NSLP and a la carte and lowered fat content of foods served. Servings of high fiber grain-based foods and/or legumes were improved in SBP but not NSLP. Intervention and control schools eliminated >1% fat milk and sugar added beverages in SBP, but intervention schools were more successful in NSLP and a la carte. CONCLUSION The HEALTHY program demonstrated significant changes in the nutritional quality of foods and beverages served in the SBP, NSLP, and a la carte venues, as part of an effort to decrease childhood obesity and support beneficial effects in some secondary HEALTHY study outcomes. PMID:22239133

  17. Prevalence of depressive symptoms in school aged children with type 1 diabetes – a questionnaire study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Sendela

    2015-10-01

    Depressive symptoms were observed in 1 out of 12 T1D children in a primary school and in 1 out of 5 teenagers. Depressive symptoms may affect metabolic control and quality of life. Therefore, early detection and treatment of depressive symptoms in T1D school children is needed.

  18. Providing a Safe Environment for Students with Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, Janet H.; Jackson, Crystal C.; Bobo, Nichole; Kaufman, Francine R.; Butler, Sarah; Marschilok, Katie

    2009-01-01

    Current diabetes regimens require more effort than ever before. The level of diabetes control students are able to maintain is affected greatly by their ability to care for their diabetes during the school day. This article reviews use of School Health Plans and Diabetes Medical Management Plans in schools. Students with diabetes, their families,…

  19. Student public commitment in a school-based diabetes prevention project: impact on physical health and health behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solomon Sara

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As concern about youth obesity continues to mount, there is increasing consideration of widespread policy changes to support improved nutritional and enhanced physical activity offerings in schools. A critical element in the success of such programs may be to involve students as spokespeople for the program. Making such a public commitment to healthy lifestyle program targets (improved nutrition and enhanced physical activity may potentiate healthy behavior changes among such students and provide a model for their peers. This paper examines whether student's "public commitment"--voluntary participation as a peer communicator or in student-generated media opportunities--in a school-based intervention to prevent diabetes and reduce obesity predicted improved study outcomes including reduced obesity and improved health behaviors. Methods Secondary analysis of data from a 3-year randomized controlled trial conducted in 42 middle schools examining the impact of a multi-component school-based program on body mass index (BMI and student health behaviors. A total of 4603 students were assessed at the beginning of sixth grade and the end of eighth grade. Process evaluation data were collected throughout the course of the intervention. All analyses were adjusted for students' baseline values. For this paper, the students in the schools randomized to receive the intervention were further divided into two groups: those who participated in public commitment activities and those who did not. Students from comparable schools randomized to the assessment condition constituted the control group. Results We found a lower percentage of obesity (greater than or equal to the 95th percentile for BMI at the end of the study among the group participating in public commitment activities compared to the control group (21.5% vs. 26.6%, p = 0.02. The difference in obesity rates at the end of the study was even greater among the subgroup of students who

  20. Using a participatory research approach in a school-based physical activity intervention to prevent diabetes in the Hualapai Indian community, Arizona, 2002-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teufel-Shone, Nicolette I; Gamber, Michelle; Watahomigie, Helen; Siyuja, T J; Crozier, Laurie; Irwin, Sandra L

    2014-09-25

    In the United States, type 2 diabetes has reached epidemic proportions among indigenous people. Community-based participatory research offers American Indian communities and university partners an opportunity to integrate skills in community action and systematic inquiry to develop locally acceptable primary prevention interventions to combat diabetes risk factors. The Hualapai Tribe and the University of Arizona designed, implemented, and assessed a school-based physical activity intervention to reduce diabetes risk factors among youth. During a 2-year period, trained community members led in-school physical activity classes 2 times per week among students in grades 3 through 8. Body mass index (BMI), fitness measures, and fasting blood glucose level were measured on 6 occasions. Descriptive statistics and t tests were used to assess change in outcome measures. Of the more than 100 youth who took part in the physical activity classes for 2 years, 71 youth (38 male, 33 female) participated in 3 or more data collection sessions. Over time, the percentage of youth with a high fasting blood glucose level of more than 125 mg/dL decreased concurrently with significant improvements in fitness measures. However, BMI increased in both male and female participants. The high number of youth who missed more than 3 data collection sessions was attributed to poor school attendance and tardiness. Classes led by lay physical activity leaders can affect diabetes risk factors in youth. Incongruous health and fitness outcomes suggest that one indicator does not adequately define the risk profile; BMI alone may not be sufficient as a measure of diabetes risk in youth.

  1. Diabetes mellitus: Identifying the knowledge gaps and risk factors among adolescents attending a public school in Lagos State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lovelyn Otammi Ubangha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM, a noncommunicable disease (NCD in adolescents, is on the rise worldwide; therefore, knowledge which facilitates prevention and early detection is important. The objective of this study was to determine the knowledge of DM and self-reported risk factors among adolescents in a senior secondary school, in Surulere, Lagos State. Methodology: This was a cross-sectional descriptive study of 144 male and 106 female senior secondary students with a mean age of 15.2 ΁ 1.3 years. Respondents were selected through multistage sampling technique. A structured pretested questionnaire was used to collect data. Epi Info 7.1.5 was used for data analysis and the level of statistical significance was set at 5%. Results obtained were presented with the use of frequency tables. Results: Two out of three respondents had heard of DM. Among those who were aware of the condition, 64.9% knew it referred to abnormally high blood glucose. Only (10.9% knew it was a lifelong condition and less than a third (26.7% knew the measurement of blood glucose with a device for the screening test. Less than 30% considered obesity, family history, diet, and physical inactivity as risk factors. Their main source of information was the mass media. Overall, 46% of respondents had good knowledge of DM. As regards the presence of lifestyle behavior/risk factor for DM/NCDs in the respondents, 8.4% of the respondents had a family history of DM, had consumed alcohol (28.8%, smoked tobacco (4.8%, and were overweight/obese (5.2%. Conclusion: Two-thirds were aware of DM, of which over half had inadequate knowledge of DM despite the existence of some risk factors. There should, therefore, be an inclusion of NCD education in the curriculum of secondary school students.

  2. Interactive learning activities for the middle school classroom to promote healthy energy balance and decrease diabetes risk in the HEALTHY primary prevention trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venditti, Elizabeth M; Giles, Catherine; Firrell, L Suzanne; Zeveloff, Abigail D; Hirst, Kathryn; Marcus, Marsha D

    2014-01-01

    The HEALTHY trial evaluated the effectiveness of a multicomponent intervention program to reduce risk for type 2 diabetes in middle school students. The comprehensive intervention addressed nutrition, physical activity, and behavior in the context of a social marketing-based communications campaign to promote healthy energy balance. One element was a classroom-based program called FLASH (Fun Learning Activities for Student Health). Five FLASH modules were delivered, one per semester. Process evaluation data were collected from teachers at 21 schools and study staff at seven national sites via survey, interview, and in-class observation. Data from the first four modules were evaluated and showed that FLASH was delivered with high fidelity. Sessions that required peer interaction were rated as the most effective in engaging students and promoting knowledge. Study-provided material resources and on-site support were identified as key facilitators. Student misbehavior was viewed as the greatest barrier. Although the high level of support provided by the study is not likely to be replicated in school systems, those developing wellness policies, health curricula, and teacher training programs may benefit from using the evidence-supported, publicly available HEALTHY materials in their efforts to reduce diabetes risk factors in middle school youth.

  3. Community capacity as an "inside job": evolution of perceived ownership within a university-aboriginal community partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cargo, Margaret D; Delormier, Treena; Lévesque, Lucie; McComber, Alex M; Macaulay, Ann C

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE. To assess the evolution of perceived ownership of a university-Aboriginal community partnership across three project stages. DESIGN. Survey administration to project partners during project formalization (1996-T1), mobilization (1999-T2), and maintenance (2004-T3). SETTING. Aboriginal community of Kahnawake, outside Montreal, Quebec, Canada. PARTICIPANTS. Partners involved in influencing decision making in the Kahnawake Schools Diabetes Prevention Project (KSDPP). MEASURE AND ANALYSIS . A measure of perceived primary ownership subjected to linear trend analysis. RESULTS. KSDPP staff were perceived as primary owner at T1 and shared ownership with Community Advisory Board (CAB) members at T2 and T3. Trend tests indicated greater perceived ownership between T1 and T3 for CAB (χ(2)(1)  =  12.3, p community driven from the beginning. It was not dependent on an external academic change agent to activate the community and develop the community's capacity to plan and implement a solution. It still took several years for the grassroots CAB to take responsibility from KSDPP staff, thus indicating the need for sustained funding to build grassroots community capacity.

  4. Diabetes - resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resources - diabetes ... The following sites provide further information on diabetes: American Diabetes Association -- www.diabetes.org Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation International -- www.jdrf.org National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion -- ...

  5. Diabetic Retinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease > Facts About Diabetic Eye Disease Facts About Diabetic Eye Disease Points to Remember Diabetic eye disease ... existing therapies for different patient groups. What is diabetic eye disease? Diabetic eye disease can affect many ...

  6. Do discrimination, residential school attendance and cultural disruption add to individual-level diabetes risk among Aboriginal people in Canada?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dyck, Roland F; Karunanayake, Chandima; Janzen, Bonnie; Lawson, Josh; Ramsden, Vivian R; Rennie, Donna C; Gardipy, P Jenny; McCallum, Laura; Abonyi, Sylvia; Dosman, James A; Episkenew, Jo-Ann; Pahwa, Punam

    2015-01-01

    Aboriginal peoples in Canada (First Nations, Metis and Inuit) are experiencing an epidemic of diabetes and its complications but little is known about the influence of factors attributed to colonization...

  7. School-Based Health Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... School Balancing Schoolwork and Hospital Stays Homework Help Cancer: Readjusting to Home and School Is It OK to Talk to a Teacher About Personal Problems? School Counselors School and Asthma School and Concussions School and Diabetes Sports Physicals Starting High School Contact Us Print Resources ...

  8. HEALTHY study rationale, design and methods: moderating risk of type 2 diabetes in multi-ethnic middle school students

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    The HEALTHY primary prevention trial was designed and implemented in response to the growing numbers of children and adolescents being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. The objective was to moderate risk factors for type 2 diabetes. Modifiable risk factors measured were indicators of adiposity and glycemic dysregulation: body mass index ≥85th percentile, fasting glucose ≥5.55 mmol l-1 (100 mg per 100 ml) and fasting insulin ≥180 pmol l-1 (30 μU ml-1). A series of pilot studies established the f...

  9. Supporting At-Risk Youth and Their Families to Manage and Prevent Diabetes: Developing a National Partnership of Medical Residency Programs and High Schools.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liana Gefter

    Full Text Available The Stanford Youth Diabetes Coaches Program (SYDCP is a school based health program in which Family Medicine residents train healthy at-risk adolescents to become diabetes self-management coaches for family members with diabetes. This study evaluates the impact of the SYDCP when disseminated to remote sites. Additionally, this study aims to assess perceived benefit of enhanced curriculum.From 2012-2015, 10 high schools and one summer camp in the US and Canada and five residency programs were selected to participate. Physicians and other health providers implemented the SYDCP with racial/ethnic-minority students from low-income communities. Student coaches completed pre- and posttest surveys which included knowledge, health behavior, and psychosocial asset questions (i.e., worth and resilience, as well as open-ended feedback questions. T-test pre-post comparisons were used to determine differences in knowledge and psychosocial assets, and open and axial coding methods were used to analyze qualitative data.A total of 216 participating high school students completed both pre-and posttests, and 96 nonparticipating students also completed pre- and posttests. Student coaches improved from pre- to posttest significantly on knowledge (p<0.005 in 2012-13, 2014 camp, and 2014-15; worth (p<0.1 in 2014-15; problem solving (p<0.005 in 2014 camp and p<0.1 in 2014-15; and self-efficacy (p<0.05 in 2014 camp. Eighty-two percent of student coaches reported that they considered making a behavior change to improve their own health as a result of program participation. Qualitative feedback themes included acknowledgment of usefulness and relevance of the program, appreciation for physician instructors, knowledge gain, pride in helping family members, improved relationships and connectedness with family members, and lifestyle improvements.Overall, when disseminated, this program can increase health knowledge and some psychosocial assets of at-risk youth and holds

  10. The Educational Implications of Type I Diabetes Mellitus: A Review of Research and Recommendations for School Psychological Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucera, Miranda; Sullivan, Amanda L.

    2011-01-01

    Type I diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is one of the most common chronic illnesses in children and youth, with many affected students requiring individualized services and supports within educational settings. This article systematically reviews the research regarding the implications of this illness for students' cognitive and academic functioning to…

  11. The Educational Implications of Type I Diabetes Mellitus: A Review of Research and Recommendations for School Psychological Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucera, Miranda; Sullivan, Amanda L.

    2011-01-01

    Type I diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is one of the most common chronic illnesses in children and youth, with many affected students requiring individualized services and supports within educational settings. This article systematically reviews the research regarding the implications of this illness for students' cognitive and academic functioning to…

  12. Eagle Adventure: School-Based Type 2 Diabetes Prevention Program Results in Improved Outcomes Related to Food and Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stovall-Amos, Angelina; Parker, Stephany; Mata, Sara; Fox, Jill; Jackson, Teresa; Miracle, Sarah; Hermann, Janice

    2014-01-01

    The Eagle Adventure program was designed as a semester-long, SNAP-Ed program to address food and physical activity choices important for prevention of type 2 diabetes, obesity, and other chronic diseases. The program was developed for implementation in Grades 1-3. This article presents findings from two participating grade centers inclusive of…

  13. Eagle Adventure: School-Based Type 2 Diabetes Prevention Program Results in Improved Outcomes Related to Food and Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stovall-Amos, Angelina; Parker, Stephany; Mata, Sara; Fox, Jill; Jackson, Teresa; Miracle, Sarah; Hermann, Janice

    2014-01-01

    The Eagle Adventure program was designed as a semester-long, SNAP-Ed program to address food and physical activity choices important for prevention of type 2 diabetes, obesity, and other chronic diseases. The program was developed for implementation in Grades 1-3. This article presents findings from two participating grade centers inclusive of…

  14. Women and Diabetes -- Diabetes Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Audience For Women Women's Health Topics Women and Diabetes - Diabetes Medicines Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... 1-800-332-1088 to request a form. Diabetes Medicines The different kinds of diabetes medicines are ...

  15. Management of diabetes mellitus in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawal, Muili

    Diabetes is a global health problem, with a challenging epidemiology. It is one of the major health problems affecting countries around the world, particularly the UK (World Health Organization [WHO], 2006; Department of Health [DH], 2006b). It is also a growing public health threat in the US (Mokdad et al, 2001). As a result, diabetes has become an important public health issue, prompting the WHO and International Diabetes Federation (IDF) to adopt the theme 'Diabetes for Everyone' for World Diabetes Day 2006. In 2007, on World Diabetes Day, the United Nations also launched its 'Living with Diabetes at School' campaign, in response to the growing diabetes 'epidemics' (Diabetes UK, 2007). This article provides an overview of diabetes mellitus and its acute- and long-term management, including definition, aetiology, pathophysiology, classification, signs, symptoms and complications. The role of the nurse in providing patient-centred care for people with diabetes is emphasized.

  16. Enabling the nation's schools to help prevent heart disease, stroke, cancer, COPD, diabetes, and other serious health problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolbe, Lloyd; Kann, Laura; Patterson, Beth; Wechsler, Howell; Osorio, Jenny; Collins, Janet

    2004-01-01

    In the United States, more than 53 million young people attend nearly 120,000 schools, usually for 13 of their most formative years. Modern school health programs--if appropriately designed and implemented--could become one of the most efficient means the nation might employ to reduce the establishment of four main chronic disease risks: tobacco use, unhealthy eating patterns, inadequate physical activity, and obesity. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and its partners have developed four integrated strategies to help the nation's schools reduce these risks. Participating national, state, and local agencies (1) monitor critical health risks among students, and monitor school policies and programs to reduce those risks; (2) synthesize and apply research to identify, and to provide information about, effective school policies and programs; (3) enable state, large city, and national education and health agencies to jointly help local schools implement effective policies and programs; and (4) evaluate implemented policies and programs to iteratively assess and improve their effectiveness.

  17. Markers of Diabetic Nephropathy in Diabetic Patients in Gusau ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    4School of Education, Yusuf Bala Usman College of Legal and General Studies, Daura. ... microalbuminuria could be the markers of nephropathy in type I diabetics while serum glucose level, systolic pressure ... MATERIALS AND METHODS.

  18. Diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Nessim Dayan, Edgard; Fundación Valle de Lili

    1996-01-01

    ¿Qué es la diabetes?/¿Cuantos tipos o formas de diabetes existen?/¿Cuáles son los síntomas de la diabetes?/¿cuál es la causa de la diabetes?/¿Quién tiene mayor riesgo de desarrollar diabetes?/¿Cómo se diagnostica la diabetes?/¿Cuál es el tratamiento de la diabetes?/¿Cuándo y cómo se controlan los niveles de glicemia?/¿Cuáles son las complicaciones de la diabetes?/Recomendaciones actuales y futuro de la diabetes.

  19. Diabetic Nephropathy without Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia López-Revuelta

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic nephropathy without diabetes (DNND, previously known as idiopathic nodular glomerulosclerosis, is an uncommon entity and thus rarely suspected; diagnosis is histological once diabetes is discarded. In this study we describe two new cases of DNND and review the literature. We analyzed all the individualized data of previous publications except one series of attached data. DNND appears to be favored by recognized cardiovascular risk factors. However, in contrast with diabetes, apparently no factor alone has been demonstrated to be sufficient to develop DNND. Other factors not considered as genetic and environmental factors could play a role or interact. The most plausible hypothesis for the occurrence of DNND would be a special form of atherosclerotic or metabolic glomerulopathy than can occur with or without diabetes. The clinical spectrum of cardiovascular risk factors and histological findings support this theory, with hypertension as one of the characteristic clinical features.

  20. Diabetes Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. If you can't control your diabetes with wise food choices and physical activity, you may need diabetes medicines. The kind of medicine you take depends ...

  1. The Results of Open-Label, Multicenter, Non-Randomized Study on the Efficacy and Safety of Insulins: Insuman Basal®, Insuman Comb 25®, Insuman Rapid® in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 Who Underwent Basic Training in Diabetes Schools (SPIRIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S. Larin

    2015-06-01

    Conclusions. Treatment with Insuman® insulins of patients with DM-2, who were not compensated while taking OADs, was associated with improved glycemic control without an increase in the incidence of severe hypoglycemia. There was no statistically significant increase in the effectiveness of therapy in patients, who have successfully completed a training program at diabetes school, compared with evaluation of overall efficiency. The state of young studied population of patients with inadequate control at baseline, and those who had developed cardiovascular complications associated with DM, improved in most cases in terms of glycemic control, and, at that, episodes of severe hypoglycemia were not detected. This may be due to the positive influence of training in diabetes school.

  2. diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehraban Falahati

    2016-09-01

    candiduria and female gender, high FBS and urine glucose, uncontrolled diabetes (HbA1c ≥8, and acidic urine pH (P<0.05. Conclusion: Considering the high incidence rate of candiduria in diabetic patients, control of diabetes, predisposing factors, and causal relationships between diabetes and candiduria should be highlighted.

  3. [Diabetic neuropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechleitner, Monika; Abrahamian, Heidemarie; Francesconi, Claudia; Kofler, Markus

    2016-04-01

    These are the guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of diabetic neuropathy. This diabetic late complication comprises a number of mono- and polyneuropathies, plexopathies, radiculopathies and autonomic neuropathy. The position statement summarizes characteristic clinical symptoms and techniques for diagnostic assessment of diabetic neuropathy. Recommendations for the therapeutic management of diabetic neuropathy, especially for the control of pain in sensorimotor neuropathy, are provided.

  4. Streptococcus pneumoniae oropharyngeal colonization in school-age children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus: Impact of the heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Principi, Nicola; Iughetti, Lorenzo; Cappa, Marco; Maffeis, Claudio; Chiarelli, Franco; Bona, Gianni; Gambino, Monia; Ruggiero, Luca; Patianna, Viviana; Matteoli, Maria Cristina; Marigliano, Marco; Cipriano, Paola; Parlamento, Silvia; Esposito, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated Streptococcus pneumoniae colonization in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1) to investigate the theoretical risk of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in these patients and the potential protective efficacy of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs). An oropharyngeal swab was obtained from 299 patients aged 6-17 y with DM1 who were enrolled during routine clinical visits. DNA from swabs was analyzed for S. pneumoniae using real-time polymerase chain reaction. S. pneumoniae was identified in the swabs of 148 subjects (49.8%). Colonization was strictly age-related and declined significantly in the group aged ≥15 years (odds ratio [OR] 0.28; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.14-0.57). Carriage was also significantly influenced by sex (lower in females: OR 0.56; 95% CI, 0.35-0.91), ethnicity (less common among non-Caucasians: OR 0.34; 95% CI, 0.13-0.89), parental smoking habit (more frequent among children with at least one smoker between parents: OR 1.76; 95% CI, 0.90-2.07), and the administration of antibiotic therapy in the previous 3 months (less frequent among patients who received antibiotics: OR 0.21; 95% CI, 0.07-0.62). Multivariate analyses of the entire study population showed no association between carriage and PCV7 vaccination status. Serotypes 19F, 9V, and 4 were the most frequently identified serotypes. In conclusion, school-age children and adolescents with DM1 are frequently colonized by S. pneumoniae, and protection against pneumococcal carriage following infant and toddler vaccination was not effective after several years. Together with the need to increase vaccine uptake in all the children aged <2 years, these results suggest that PCV booster doses are needed in DM1 patients to maintain the protection offered by these vaccinations.

  5. [Diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahdi, M; Gerdes, V E A; Hoekstra, J B L; Meesters, E W

    2012-02-01

    Currently there are over 740,000 patients with diabetes mellitus in the Netherlands, and this number will increase further in the coming years. Approximately 90% of patients has type 2 diabetes, a metabolic disorder that is often associated with obesity, hypertension and increased cholesterol levels. Treatment of diabetes mellitus is essential to reduce the risk of severe complications with irreversible organ damage in the long-term. Gingivitis and periodontitis are more common in patients with diabetes mellitus and are now also considered as complications of diabetes. Collaboration among healthcare professionals is important for effective diabetes care.

  6. Periodontitis and risk of diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurav, Abhijit; Jadhav, Varsha

    2011-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a complex disease with varying degrees of systemic and oral complications. The periodontium is also a target for diabetic damage. Diabetes is a pandemic in both developed and developing countries. In recent years, a link between periodontitis and diabetes mellitus has been postulated. The oral cavity serves as a continuous source of infectious agents that could further worsen the diabetic status of the patient and serve as an important risk factor deterioration of diabetes mellitus. The present review highlights the relationship between diabetes mellitus and periodontitis. The potential mechanisms involved in the deterioration of diabetic status and periodontal disease are also discussed. © 2011 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  7. Diabetic Eye Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Other Dental Problems Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems Diabetic Eye Disease What is diabetic eye disease? Diabetic eye disease is a group of ... loss can occur. How does diabetes affect my eyes? Diabetes affects your eyes when your blood glucose, ...

  8. Diabetes Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    If you have diabetes, your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. Over time, this can cause problems with other body ... as your kidneys, nerves, feet, and eyes. Having diabetes can also put you at a higher risk ...

  9. Diabetes Insipidus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) causes frequent urination. You become extremely thirsty, so you drink. Then you urinate. This ... is almost all water. DI is different from diabetes mellitus (DM), which involves insulin problems and high ...

  10. Diabetic Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Emergencies A-Z Share this! Home » Emergency 101 Diabetic Emergencies It is estimated that more than 20 ... they have it. The best way to prevent diabetic emergencies is to effectively manage the disease through ...

  11. Diabetic ketoacidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000320.htm Diabetic ketoacidosis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Diabetic ketoacidosis is a life-threatening problem that affects ...

  12. Diabetes Myths

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease (Nephropathy) Gastroparesis Mental Health Step On Up Treatment & Care Blood Glucose Testing Medication Doctors, Nurses & More ... us get closer to curing diabetes and better treatments for those living with diabetes. Other Ways to ...

  13. Monogenic Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... form of monogenic diabetes? • What type of monogenic diabetes does my child (or do I) have? • What are the treatment options? • What are the advantages and disadvantages of each treatment option? • Should I see a diabetes educator? • Should I see an endocrinologist? Resources • Find- ...

  14. Diabetes insipidus - nephrogenic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus; Acquired nephrogenic diabetes insipidus; Congenital diabetes insipidus; NDI ... of very dilute urine. NDI is rare. Congenital diabetes insipidus is present at birth. It is a ...

  15. Diabetic Neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izenberg, Aaron; Perkins, Bruce A; Bril, Vera

    2015-08-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a common condition and diabetics are prone to develop a spectrum of neuropathic complications ranging from symmetric and diffuse to asymmetric and focal neuropathies that may be associated with significant morbidity. Diabetic sensorimotor polyneuropathy is the most common of these complications, occurring in patients with type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus, as well as in those with prediabetes and glucose intolerance. In this review, the authors discuss the wide variety of neuropathies that can present in the context of diabetes, including the clinical manifestations, diagnostic features, and approach to management. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  16. Overview of Diabetes in Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... height >85th percentile; or weight >120 percent of ideal for height PLUS Any two of the following ... to-day management of diabetes. Extended family members, teachers, school nurses, counselors, coaches, day care providers, and ...

  17. Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarry-Horn, Jill L.; Evans, Barbara J.; Kerrigan, James R.

    2003-01-01

    In the United States, the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) in children and adolescents has been increasing at an alarming rate. Early recognition and intervention can delay the onset of type 2 DM and prevent the long-term complications. School nurses have an essential role in implementing the American Diabetes Association (ADA)…

  18. [Diabetic neuropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudzik, Wiesław; Kaczorowska, Beata; Przybyła, Monika; Chudzik, Bartosz; Gałka, Małgorzata

    2007-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is most common chronic complication of diabetes mellitus. It is responsible for substantial morbidity, increased mortality and impaired quality of life. Patogenesis of diabetic neuropathy is complex. Chronic hyperglycemia is a major factor induces nerve fibers injury. High level of glucose stimulate the polyol pathway causing osmotic stress and enhance reactive oxygen species generation, as well as it play an important role in diabetic angiopathy development. Distal symmetric polineuropathy is most common type of diabetic neuropathy. Many patient may develop combinations of neuropathies concerning somatic and autonomic system. Early diagnosis and administered suitable treatment are necessary to reduce severe complication of diabetic neuropathy as well as strict glycemic control and risk factor increased.

  19. Increasing incidence of diabetes after gestational diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauenborg, Jeannet; Hansen, Torben; Jensen, Dorte Møller;

    2004-01-01

    To study the incidence of diabetes among women with previous diet-treated gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in the light of the general increasing incidence of overweight and diabetes and to identify risk factors for the development of diabetes....

  20. Diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    930047 Relationship between diabetic cardiacautonomic disturbances and Q-Tc interval pro-longation and its clinical significance.XIANGMingzhu(向明珠),et al.Dept Med,1st PeopleHosp,Shashi,Hubei Prov,Shashi,434000.Chin J Endocrinol & Metabol 1992;8(3):149-151.Autonomic cardiovascular function tests andelectrocardiograms were performed in 61 pa-tients with diabetes mellitus.The result showedthat Q-Tc interval in diabetic patients with ab-

  1. Diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    2005179 The association of LMNA1908C/T polymorphism with insulin resistance and dyslipidemia in diabetic patients. SU Ben-li (苏本利), et al. Dept Endocrinol, 2nd Affili Hosp, Dalian Med Univ, Dalian 116027. Chin J Diabetes, 2005;13(1) :27-30. Objective: To study the association of LMhlA 1908 C/T polymorphism with insulin resistance and dyslipidemia in type 2 diabetic patients. Methods:

  2. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Your Child What Kids Say About: Handling Stress Anxiety, Fears, and Phobias Community Service: A Family's Guide ... Diabetes: Lindsey's Story (Video) Diabetes Center Movie: Endocrine System Diabetes Center Diabetes: DJ's Story (Video) Diabetes: Marco's ...

  3. Genetics of Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A A A Listen En Español Genetics of Diabetes You've probably wondered how you developed diabetes. ... to develop diabetes than others. What Leads to Diabetes? Type 1 and type 2 diabetes have different ...

  4. Types of Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Dental Problems Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems What is Diabetes? Diabetes is a disease that occurs when your ... is serious. What are the different types of diabetes? The most common types of diabetes are type ...

  5. Diabetes eye exams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetic retinopathy - eye exams; Diabetes - eye exams; Glaucoma - diabetic eye exam; Macular edema - diabetic eye exam ... if the doctor who takes care of your diabetes checks your eyes, you need an eye exam ...

  6. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... How to Report Problems with Glucose Meters Diabetes Treatments Some people with diabetes need to take diabetes ... with your health care provider about your diabetes treatment. Diabetes Medicines - easy-to-read booklet for women ...

  7. Diabetes and Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease of diabetes, or diabetic nephropathy. How does diabetes cause kidney disease? High blood glucose , also called ... I keep my kidneys healthy if I have diabetes? The best way to slow or prevent diabetes- ...

  8. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... How to Report Problems with Glucose Meters Diabetes Treatments Some people with diabetes need to take diabetes ... with your health care provider about your diabetes treatment. Diabetes Medicines - easy-to-read booklet for women ...

  9. Diabetic Ketoacidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... adrenaline or cortisol. Unfortunately, these hormones counter the effect of insulin — sometimes triggering an episode of diabetic ketoacidosis. Pneumonia and urinary tract infections are common culprits. A ...

  10. Increasing incidence of diabetes after gestational diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauenborg, Jeannet; Hansen, Torben; Jensen, Dorte Møller

    2004-01-01

    To study the incidence of diabetes among women with previous diet-treated gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in the light of the general increasing incidence of overweight and diabetes and to identify risk factors for the development of diabetes.......To study the incidence of diabetes among women with previous diet-treated gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in the light of the general increasing incidence of overweight and diabetes and to identify risk factors for the development of diabetes....

  11. Increasing incidence of diabetes after gestational diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauenborg, Jeannet; Hansen, Torben; Jensen, Dorte Møller

    2004-01-01

    To study the incidence of diabetes among women with previous diet-treated gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in the light of the general increasing incidence of overweight and diabetes and to identify risk factors for the development of diabetes.......To study the incidence of diabetes among women with previous diet-treated gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in the light of the general increasing incidence of overweight and diabetes and to identify risk factors for the development of diabetes....

  12. Adolescents’ knowledge and awareness of diabetes mellitus in Kuwait

    OpenAIRE

    Maryam Al-Hussaini; Seham Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Background and aim: Diabetes mellitus is a major public health problem in Kuwait. This study aimed to evaluate the awareness and the knowledge of diabetes in adolescent about the disease which, will be of a great help to reduce the risk of developing diabetes and its complications. Methodology: A cross-sectional survey was done to evaluate the general knowledge of diabetes. The survey was introduced randomly to the students of 30 secondary public and private schools in Kuwait. The question...

  13. Diabetes and Pregnancy: Gestational Diabetes

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-11-14

    Gestational diabetes happens in a woman who develops diabetes during pregnancy. This podcast discusses its potential effects and action steps to avoid complications.  Created: 11/14/2007 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), Division of Diabetes Translation (DDT) and National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities (NCBDDD), Prevention Research Branch.   Date Released: 11/27/2007.

  14. Impact of intensive nutritional education with carbohydrate counting on diabetes control in type 2 diabetic patients

    OpenAIRE

    Christopher Zipp; Jessica Terrone Roehr; Lucia Beck Weiss; et al.

    2010-01-01

    Christopher Zipp, Jessica Terrone Roehr, Lucia Beck Weiss, Frank FilipettoDepartment of Family Medicine, School of Osteopathic Medicine, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Stratford, NJ, USAAbstract: This pilot study assessed the impact of an intensive carbohydrate counting educational intervention on diabetes control in type 2 diabetic patients. An experimental, prospective study design was used to assess the effect of nutritional education on diabetes control. The impact an...

  15. Social disparities in diabetes care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heltberg, Andreas; Andersen, John Sahl; Kragstrup, Jakob

    2017-01-01

    Objective: We investigated the association between socioeconomic factors and the attainment of treatment goals and pharmacotherapy in patients with type 2 diabetes in Denmark. Design: A cross-sectional population study. Setting: The municipality of Naestved, Denmark. Subjects: We studied 907...... patients with type 2 diabetes identified from a random sample of 21,205 Danish citizens. Main outcome measures: The proportion of patients who were not achieving goals for diabetes care based on their HbA1c, LDL-cholesterol, blood pressure, and lifestyle, and the proportion of patients who were treated...... modification of cardiovascular disease and kidney disease. Results: Middle age (40–65 years), low education level (i.e. basic schooling), and low household income (i.e. less than 21,400 € per year) were associated with nonattainment of goals for diabetes care. The association of socioeconomic factors...

  16. Diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008395 Evaluating the feature of hypoglycemia detected by continuous glucose monitoring system during temporary continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion in type 2 diabetes patients. LI Ming(李鸣), et al.Shanghai Diabet Clin Center, Dept Endocrinol & Metab, Shanghai Jiaotong Univ, Shanghai 200233. Natl Med J China 2008;88(24):1679-1682.

  17. Olympic diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallen, Ian W; Redgrave, Ann; Redgrave, Steven

    2003-01-01

    Winning an Olympic gold medal represents the pinnacle of achievement in any sporting event, to do so with diabetes is almost miraculous. This report outlines the history and management of Steven Redgrave's diabetes, and describes the physiology associated with the extremes of human endurance and the difficulties that this presents.

  18. Attitudes to Exercise and Diabetes in Young People with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: A Qualitative Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsty Ryninks

    Full Text Available To investigate young people's attitudes to, and understanding of, physical activity on glycaemic control in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.Four focus groups with 11-14 and 15-16 year olds were conducted with twelve young people with Type 1 Diabetes, from within a larger study investigating physical activity and fitness. Qualitative analysis of the focus group data was performed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis.Four superordinate themes were identified: Benefits of Exercise, Knowledge and Understanding, Information and Training and "You can do anything". Young people felt that exercising helped them to manage their diabetes and had a beneficial psychological and physical impact on their bodies. They reported a lack of knowledge and understanding about diabetes among school staff and other young people. The overwhelming sense from young people was that although diabetes impacts upon their lives, with preparation, physical activity can take place as normal.Whilst young people had an awareness of the physical and psychological benefits of exercise in managing their diabetes, they experienced difficulties at school. Professional support and discussions with young people, giving tailored strategies for managing Type 1 Diabetes during exercise are needed. Healthcare teams should ensure that the support and educational needs of school staff are met. Providing more opportunities to empower young people to take on the responsibility for their Type 1 Diabetes care is merited. Young people felt diabetes did not stop them from participating in activities; it is simply a part of them that needs managing throughout life.

  19. Recognizing diabetes in children: what does it look like?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Catherine

    2015-05-01

    Both type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes are on the rise in children. School nurses should be familiar with these conditions and have an understanding of who is more likely to be affected, what the presenting symptoms are, and how to support the student, family, and school personnel when a diagnosis is made. This article serves as a reference for school nurses and highlights key resources freely available for their use.

  20. Diabetic nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zelmanovitz Themis

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Diabetic nephropathy is the leading cause of chronic renal disease and a major cause of cardiovascular mortality. Diabetic nephropathy has been categorized into stages: microalbuminuria and macroalbuminuria. The cut-off values of micro- and macroalbuminuria are arbitrary and their values have been questioned. Subjects in the upper-normal range of albuminuria seem to be at high risk of progression to micro- or macroalbuminuria and they also had a higher blood pressure than normoalbuminuric subjects in the lower normoalbuminuria range. Diabetic nephropathy screening is made by measuring albumin in spot urine. If abnormal, it should be confirmed in two out three samples collected in a three to six-months interval. Additionally, it is recommended that glomerular filtration rate be routinely estimated for appropriate screening of nephropathy, because some patients present a decreased glomerular filtration rate when urine albumin values are in the normal range. The two main risk factors for diabetic nephropathy are hyperglycemia and arterial hypertension, but the genetic susceptibility in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes is of great importance. Other risk factors are smoking, dyslipidemia, proteinuria, glomerular hyperfiltration and dietary factors. Nephropathy is pathologically characterized in individuals with type 1 diabetes by thickening of glomerular and tubular basal membranes, with progressive mesangial expansion (diffuse or nodular leading to progressive reduction of glomerular filtration surface. Concurrent interstitial morphological alterations and hyalinization of afferent and efferent glomerular arterioles also occur. Podocytes abnormalities also appear to be involved in the glomerulosclerosis process. In patients with type 2 diabetes, renal lesions are heterogeneous and more complex than in individuals with type 1 diabetes. Treatment of diabetic nephropathy is based on a multiple risk factor approach, and the goal is retarding the

  1. Treatment of diabetic vasculopathy: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman S

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Sayeeda Rahman1, Md Anwarul Azim Majumder1, Abdul Rashid Abdul Rahman21Department of Clinical Sciences, School of Medical Sciences, University of Bradford, Bradford, UK; 2Cyberjaya University College of Medical Sciences, Cyberjaya, MalaysiaAbstract: Type 2 diabetes is a chronic, degenerative, and noncommunicable disease, and is associated with a high prevalence of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The complications of diabetic vasculopathy are commonly grouped into microvascular and macrovascular complications. In diabetes, macrovascular complications are the commonest cause of morbidity and mortality and are responsible for a high incidence of vascular diseases. The aim of this review to provide an overview of current treatment modalities for diabetic vasculopathy and highlight the importance of effective control of blood glucose, blood lipids, and blood pressure, as well as reduction of blood hypercoagulability, in lowering the macrovascular complications of diabetic vasculopathy. A literature review was conducted to retrieve the relevant information using the PubMed, Science Direct, and Google Scholar databases, reports, and books. People with type 2 diabetes are at markedly increased risk for cardiovascular disease and mortality. The initiators of vasculopathy that ultimately develop into long-term diabetic complications can be avoided by a healthy lifestyle and pharmacological intervention. Clinical trials have shown that effective control of blood glucose, blood lipids, blood pressure, and blood hypercoagulability can reduce macrovascular complications in patients with type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is responsible for premature mortality, predominantly through atherosclerotic vascular disease. Lifestyle modification and pharmacotherapy should be used to prevent or delay development of type 2 diabetes, including adverse cardiovascular outcomes. A multidisciplinary approach involving patients, health professionals, and diabetic

  2. Travelling diabetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chełmińska, Katarzyna; Jaremin, Bogdan

    2002-01-01

    During the past several decades, the number of both business and tourist travels has greatly increased. Among them are persons suffering from chronic diseases, including diabetics for whom travels pose the additional health-hazard. Irrespective of better education, self-control and constantly improving quality of specialistic equipment available, diabetics still are the group of patients requiring particular attention. In the case of travelling diabetics, problems may occur concerning the transport and storage of insulin, as well as control of glycaemia, all caused by irregularity of meals, variable diet, physical activity, stress, kinetosis (sea voyages), and the change of time zones. The travel may as well evoke ailments caused by the change of climate and concomitant diseases such as traveller's diarrhoea, malaria, etc. Apart from avoiding glycaemia fluctuations, important for retaining health of diabetics is the prevention of other diseases and carrying the necessary drugs.

  3. Diabetes Insipidus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Information Kidney Disease Diabetes Inspidus Related Topics Section Navigation Kidney Disease Acquired Cystic Kidney Disease Amyloidosis & ... for a Child with Kidney Disease Ectopic Kidney Medullary Sponge Kidney Kidney Dysplasia Kidney Failure Choosing a ...

  4. [Diabetes insipidus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krysiak, Robert; Handzlik-Orlik, Gabriela; Okopień, Bogusław

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes insipidus is an uncommon disorder of water-electrolyte balance characterized by the excretion of abnormally large volumes of diluted urine (polyuria) and increased fluid intake (polydipsia). The disease may result from the insufficient production of vasopressin, its increased degradation, an impaired response of kidneys to vasopressin, or may be secondary to excessive water intake. Patients with severe and uncompensated symptoms may develop marked dehydration, neurologic symptoms and encephalopathy, and therefore diabetes insipidus can be a life-threatening condition if not properly diagnosed and managed. Patients with diabetes insipidus require treatment with desmopressin or drugs increasing sensitivity of the distal nephron to vasopressin, but this treatment may be confusing because of the disorder's variable pathophysiology and side-effects of pharmacotherapy. This review summarizes the current knowledge on different aspects of the pathophysiology, classification, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management of diabetes insipidus. The reader is also provided with some practical recommendations on dealing with patients suffering from this disease.

  5. Gestational diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... first few days of life. Mothers with gestational diabetes have an increased risk for high blood pressure during pregnancy . After delivery: Your high blood sugar (glucose) level often goes back to normal. You should be ...

  6. Diabetes Insipidus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Download PDFs English Espanol Editors Anne Klibanski, MD Janet Schlechte, MD Nicholas Tritos, MD What is diabetes ... Desmopressin (nasal spray or pill) What is the long-term outlook for people with DI? Long-term ...

  7. Diabetic Coma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sometimes, people with diabetes who also have an eating disorder choose not to use their insulin as directed ... 22, 2015 Original article: ... of Nondiscrimination Advertising Mayo Clinic is a not-for-profit organization ...

  8. Gestational diabetes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    metabolism. In normal pregnancy fasting glucose declines to ... changes in lifestyle. The cause .... disease phenotype and requires interaction of environmental factors for ... lifestyle.'8. Gestational diabetes is a clinical event with conseque~ces.

  9. Diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008025 Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-γ agonists improves arterial stiffness in type 2 diabetic patients with coronary artery disease. YU Jie(于婕), et al. Dept Cardiovasc Med, Peking Univ 3rd Hosp, Beijing 100083. Chin Cir J 2007;22(6):418-422. Objective Arterial stiffness is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular events in diabetic patients, and it may be assessed by measurement of pulse wave velocity(PWV).

  10. Diabetes gestacional

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigues, Marília da Costa Soares

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Gestational diabetes mellitus is defined as any degree of glucose intolerance with onset or first recognition during pregnancy. This condition is associated with an increase of important outcomes in the fetus and newborn. Objectives: Review of gestational diabetes mellitus physiopathology and the metabolic/hormonal changes that happen in the fetal environment. Review of the impact in the mother, intrauterine environment, fetus and newborn. Results: The maternal metabolic d...

  11. Diabetes gestacional

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigues, Marília da Costa Soares

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Gestational diabetes mellitus is defined as any degree of glucose intolerance with onset or first recognition during pregnancy. This condition is associated with an increase of important outcomes in the fetus and newborn. Objectives: Review of gestational diabetes mellitus physiopathology and the metabolic/hormonal changes that happen in the fetal environment. Review of the impact in the mother, intrauterine environment, fetus and newborn. Results: The maternal metabolic d...

  12. Diabetic retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Tien Y; Cheung, Chui Ming Gemmy; Larsen, Michael

    2016-01-01

    , and diabetic macular oedema, in which there is exudation and oedema in the central part of the retina. DR is strongly associated with a prolonged duration of diabetes, hyperglycaemia and hypertension. It is traditionally regarded as a microvascular disease, but retinal neurodegeneration is also involved....... Complex interrelated pathophysiological mechanisms triggered by hyperglycaemia underlie the development of DR. These mechanisms include genetic and epigenetic factors, increased production of free radicals, advanced glycosylation end products, inflammatory factors and vascular endothelial growth factor...

  13. Diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008256 Role of heparanase in the pathogenesis of proteinuria in diabetic nephropathy rats.TANG Lin(唐琳),et al.Dept Nephrol,1st Affili Hosp,Zhengzhou Univ,Zhengzhou 450052.Chin J Nephrol 2008;24(4):277-281.Objective To observe the expression of heparanase (HPA)in kidney of diabetic nephropathy(DN)rats and to investigate the role of HPA in the pathogenesis of proteinuria in DN rats.Methods DM rat models induced

  14. Diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    2010297 Effect of 4-phenylbutyric acid on diabetic nephropathy rats.LUO Zhifeng(罗志锋),et al.Dept Nephrol,Xinqiao Hosp,3rd Milit Med Univ,Chongqing 400037.Chin J Nephrol 2010;26(5):358-363. Objective To investigate the effect of 4-phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA) on the renal pathogenesis of rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes and its mechanism.Methods

  15. Diabetes Mellitus: fatores de risco em uma instituição de ensino na área da saúde Los factores de riesgo para los Diabetes Mellitus tipo 2 de institución de enseñanza Type-2 Diabetes Mellitus: risk factors in a school in the health field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Carolina Alves Ortiz

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo é identificar os fatores de risco para o diabetes mellitus tipo 2. Os resultados indicam a necessidade de programa educativo junto às instituições, visando despertar nos sujeitos a busca de estilos de vida saudáveis a fim de prevenir os fatores de risco para o diabetes tipo 2.El objetivo del estudio es identificar los factores de riesgo para la diabetes mellitus de tipo 2. Los resultados muestran la necesidad de un programa educativo junto con las instituciones, buscando despertar en los sujetos la necesidad de buscar un estilo de vida saludable con el fin de prevenir los factores de riesgo para la diabetes tipo 2.This work aims at identifying the risks factors of type-2 diabetes mellitus. The results show the need of an education program in institutions aiming at making the subjects aware of the necessity to look for healthy life styles in order to prevent the risks factors of type-2 diabetes.

  16. Urban and rural prevalence of diabetes and pre-diabetes and risk factors associated with diabetes in Tanzania and Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faraja S. Chiwanga

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The increase in prevalence of diabetes and pre-diabetes in sub-Saharan Africa underlines the importance of understanding its magnitude and causes in different population groups. We analyzed data from the Africa/Harvard Partnership for Cohort Research and Training (PaCT studies to determine the prevalence of diabetes and pre-diabetes and risk factors associated with diabetes. Methodology: Participants were randomly selected from peri-urban (n=297 and rural (n=200 communities in Uganda, and teachers were recruited from schools (n=229 in urban Tanzania. We used a standardized questionnaire to collect socio-demographic and self-reported disease status including diabetes status. Blood glucose was also measured after participants fasted for 8 h. We used standard protocols for anthropometric and blood pressure measurement. Results: The overall prevalence of diabetes was 10.1% and was highest in rural Ugandan residents (16.1% compared to teachers in Tanzania (8.3% and peri-urban Ugandan residents (7.6%. The prevalence of pre-diabetes was 13.8%. The prevalence of self-reported diabetes was low across all sites, where 68% of participants with diabetes were not captured by self-report. In multivariable logistic regression analysis, family history (OR 2.5, 95% CI: 1.1, 5.6 and hypertension (OR 2.3, 95% CI: 1.1, 5.2 were significantly associated with diabetes. Conclusions: The prevalence of diabetes and pre-diabetes in Uganda and Tanzania is high, differs markedly between population groups, and remains undiagnosed in an alarmingly high proportion of individuals. These findings highlight the need for large-scale, prospective studies to accurately quantify the burden and identify effective intervention and treatment strategies across diverse African populations.

  17. Diabetes and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes is a disease in which your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. When ... pregnant women in the United States get gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes is diabetes that happens for the ...

  18. Women and Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Audience For Women Women's Health Topics Women and Diabetes Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... Diabetes How to Report Problems with Glucose Meters Diabetes Treatments Some people with diabetes need to take ...

  19. Diabetes and nerve damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetic neuropathy; Diabetes - neuropathy; Diabetes - peripheral neuropathy ... In people with diabetes, the body's nerves can be damaged by decreased blood flow and a high blood sugar level. This condition is ...

  20. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Audience For Women Women's Health Topics Women and Diabetes Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... Diabetes How to Report Problems with Glucose Meters Diabetes Treatments Some people with diabetes need to take ...

  1. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Diabetes: Lindsey's Story (Video) Diabetes Center Movie: Endocrine System Diabetes Center Diabetes: DJ's Story ... About KidsHealth Nemours.org Reading BrightStart! Contact Us ...

  2. Diabetes: Dental Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diabetes and Oral Health > Diabetes: Dental Tips Diabetes: Dental Tips Main Content Diabetes can cause serious problems ... FOIA Web Policies Privacy Policy National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research National Institutes of Health Bethesda, ...

  3. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Beware of Illegally Sold Diabetes Treatments Diabetes and Pregnancy Some women develop diabetes for the first time ... care provider about how to manage diabetes during pregnancy. Medicine and Pregnancy Fact Sheet Pregnancy Registries - Sign- ...

  4. National Diabetes Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Living Tips About WIN NIDDK Information Clearinghouses National Diabetes Education Program Together with more than 200 partners ... type 2 diabetes. Learn more about NDEP . National Diabetes Month You are the center of your diabetes ...

  5. Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Cardiovascular Disease & Diabetes Updated:Apr 14,2017 The following statistics speak ... disease. This content was last reviewed August 2015. Diabetes • Home • About Diabetes • Why Diabetes Matters Introduction Cardiovascular ...

  6. Diabetes and kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetic nephropathy; Nephropathy - diabetic; Diabetic glomerulosclerosis; Kimmelstiel-Wilson disease ... 26696680 . Tong LL, Adler S. Prevention and treatment of diabetic nephropathy. In: Johnson RJ, Feehally J, Floege J, eds. ...

  7. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Audience For Women Women's Health Topics Women and Diabetes Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... Diabetes How to Report Problems with Glucose Meters Diabetes Treatments Some people with diabetes need to take ...

  8. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Parents > Diabetes Movie Print A A A Kids who have diabetes have trouble taking energy from food and delivering ... to learn more about diabetes. For Teens For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Diabetes Center Diabetes: Marco's Story (Video) Diabetes: Grace's Story ( ...

  9. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... For Parents > Diabetes Movie Print A A A Kids who have diabetes have trouble taking energy from food and delivering ... to learn more about diabetes. For Teens For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Diabetes Center Diabetes: Marco's Story (Video) Diabetes: Grace's Story ( ...

  10. Diabetic dyslipidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Liya; Parhofer, Klaus G

    2014-12-01

    Diabetic dyslipidemia is characterized by elevated fasting and postprandial triglycerides, low HDL-cholesterol, elevated LDL-cholesterol and the predominance of small dense LDL particles. These lipid changes represent the major link between diabetes and the increased cardiovascular risk of diabetic patients. The underlying pathophysiology is only partially understood. Alterations of insulin sensitive pathways, increased concentrations of free fatty acids and low grade inflammation all play a role and result in an overproduction and decreased catabolism of triglyceride rich lipoproteins of intestinal and hepatic origin. The observed changes in HDL and LDL are mostly sequence to this. Lifestyle modification and glucose control may improve the lipid profile but statin therapy mediates the biggest benefit with respect to cardiovascular risk reduction. Therefore most diabetic patients should receive statin therapy. The role of other lipid lowering drugs, such as ezetimibe, fibrates, omega-3 fatty acids, niacin and bile acid sequestrants is less well defined as they are characterized by largely negative outcome trials. This review examines the pathophysiology of diabetic dyslipidemia and its relationship to cardiovascular diseases. Management approaches will also be discussed.

  11. Subclinical Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LUÍS M.T.R. LIMA

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is increasing in prevalence worldwide, and those non-diagnosed or misdiagnosed comprise a significant group compared to those diagnosed. Accumulated scientific evidence indicate that the current diagnostic markers (fasting glycemia, 2h glycemia after an oral glucose load and HbA1c are indeed late diagnostic criteria when considering the incidence of diabetes-related complications and comorbidities, which are also at high risk in some groups among normoglycemic individuals. Additionally, the earlier identification of future risk of diabetes is desirable since it would allow better adherence to preventive actions such as lifestyle intervention, ultimately avoiding complications and minimizing the economic impact/burden on health care expenses. Insulin resistance and hyperhormonemia (insulin, amylin, glucagon are non-disputable hallmarks of T2DM, which already takes place among these normoglycemic, otherwise health subjects, characterizing a state of subclinical diabetes. Insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia can be computed from fasting plasma insulin as an independent variable in normoglycemia. An overview of the current diagnostic criteria, disease onset, complications, comorbidities and perspectives on lifestyle interventions are presented. A proposal for early detection of subclinical diabetes from routine evaluation of fasting plasma insulin, which is affordable and robust and thus applicable for the general population, is further suggested.

  12. Endoplasmic reticulum stress and diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Oshitari

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Toshiyuki Oshitari1,2, Natsuyo Hata1, Shuichi Yamamoto11Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba City, Chiba, Japan; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Kimitsu Central Hospital, Kisarazu City, Chiba, JapanAbstract: Endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress is involved in the pathogenesis of several diseases including Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease. Many recent studies have shown that ER stress is related to the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus, and with the death of pancreatic β-cells, insulin resistance, and the death of the vascular cells in the retina. Diabetic retinopathy is a major complication of diabetes and results in death of both neural and vascular cells. Because the death of the neurons directly affects visual function, the precise mechanism causing the death of neurons in early diabetic retinopathy must be determined. The ideal therapy for preventing the onset and the progression of diabetic retinopathy would be to treat the factors involved with both the vascular and neuronal abnormalities in diabetic retinopathy. In this review, we present evidence that ER stress is involved in the death of both retinal neurons and vascular cells in diabetic eyes, and thus reducing or blocking ER stress may be a potential therapy for preventing the onset and the progression of diabetic retinopathy.Keywords: endoplasmic reticulum stress, diabetic retinopathy, vascular cell death, neuronal cell death

  13. Diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Moreno

    Full Text Available This paper describes the importance of diabetic retinopathy in the loss of visual function. We exposed the most important risk factors, such as diabetes duration, poor metabolic control, pregnancy, puberty, hypertension, poor control of blood lipids, renal disease, and sleep apnea syndrome. We describe the pathogenesis of the disease, small retinal vessel microangiopathies which produce extravasation, edema and ischemia phenomena. We put special emphasis on the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and its pathogenic importance. They are also described the main clinical symptoms as microaneurysms, intraretinal hemorrhages, hard and soft exudates, intraretinal microvascular abnormalities (IRMA, venous disorders, formation of new vessels and diabetic macular edema (the latter being the most common cause of vision loss. Finally we describe the latest diagnostic techniques and eye treatment, with special emphasis on obesity surgery importance as more important preventive factor to eliminate the predisposing and precipitating disease symptoms.

  14. Monogenic Forms of Diabetes: Neonatal Diabetes Mellitus and Maturity-Onset Diabetes of the Young

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diabetes Monogenic Forms of Diabetes Monogenic Forms of Diabetes The most common forms of diabetes, type 1 ... is inherited from each parent. Monogenic Forms of Diabetes Some rare forms of diabetes result from mutations ...

  15. 76 FR 63805 - National School Lunch Week, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-13

    ... year 2000 will develop Type 2 diabetes during their lifetime. Schools are central to improving child... calories at school. The Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 has brought historic reform to school meal... Healthy Kids competition and the Chefs Move to Schools initiative. Good nutrition at school is an...

  16. School-Based Tertiary and Targeted Interventions for Students with Chronic Medical Conditions: Examples from Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus and Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wodrich, David L.; Cunningham, Melissa M.

    2007-01-01

    Approximately 15% of children experience a significant illness prior to age 18 years. For many of them, school absenteeism, substandard academic performance, and social problems ensue. When disorders affect the central nervous system, some suffer global developmental delays or selective neuropsychological deficits. As health service providers,…

  17. School-Based Tertiary and Targeted Interventions for Students with Chronic Medical Conditions: Examples from Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus and Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wodrich, David L.; Cunningham, Melissa M.

    2007-01-01

    Approximately 15% of children experience a significant illness prior to age 18 years. For many of them, school absenteeism, substandard academic performance, and social problems ensue. When disorders affect the central nervous system, some suffer global developmental delays or selective neuropsychological deficits. As health service providers,…

  18. Multidisciplinary management of type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E Bowen

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Michael E Bowen1,2, Russell L Rothman2,31Veterans Affairs Quality Scholars Fellowship Program, Tennessee Valley Healthcare System, Tennessee Valley Geriatric Research Education Clinical Center, Nashville, TN, USA; 2Division of General Internal Medicine and Public Health, Department of Medicine, 3Vanderbilt Eskind Diabetes Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, USAAbstract: Although once considered a disease of adults, the prevalence of type 2 diabetes in youth is increasing at a significant rate. Similar to adults, youth with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk for developing hypertension, lipid abnormalities, renal disease, and other diabetes-related complications. However, children and adolescents with type 2 diabetes also face many unique management challenges that are different from adults with type 2 diabetes or children with type 1 diabetes. To deliver safe, effective, high-quality, cost-effective health care to adolescents with type 2 diabetes, reorganization and redesign of health care systems are needed. Multidisciplinary health care teams, which allow individuals with specialized training to maximally utilize their skills within an organized diabetes treatment team, may increase efficiency and effectiveness and may improve outcomes in children with type 2 diabetes. This review article provides a brief review of type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents, provides an overview of multidisciplinary health care teams, and discusses the role of multidisciplinary health care management in youth with type 2 diabetes.Keywords: adolescent, type 2 diabetes, multidisciplinary

  19. Diabetes empowerment, medication adherence and self-care behaviors in adults with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Tejada, Melba A; Campbell, Jennifer A; Walker, Rebekah J; Smalls, Brittany L; Davis, Kimberly S; Egede, Leonard E

    2012-07-01

    Evidence suggests that empowerment is an important factor to address everyday aspects of dealing with a chronic disease. This study evaluated the effect of diabetes empowerment on medication adherence and self-care behaviors in adults with type 2 diabetes. Data on 378 subjects with type 2 diabetes recruited from two primary care clinics in the southeastern United States were examined. Previously validated scales were used to measure diabetes empowerment, medication adherence, diabetes knowledge, and diabetes self-care behaviors (including diet, physical activity, blood sugar testing, and foot care). Multiple linear regression was used to assess the independent effect of diabetes empowerment on medication adherence and self-care behaviors controlling for relevant covariates. Eighty-three percent were non-Hispanic blacks, 69% were women, 22% were 65 years or older, 68% were not married, 26% had less than high school education, 60% were unemployed, 39% were uninsured, and 47% had a yearly income Empowerment had significant correlations with medication adherence (r=0.17, Pempowerment was significantly associated with medication adherence (β=-0.04, P=0.001), diabetes knowledge (β=0.09, P=0.012), diet (β=0.09, Pempowerment was related to better diabetes knowledge, medication adherence and improved self-care behaviors. Emphasis on empowerment and self-efficacy is relevant to improve outcomes in the management of diabetes.

  20. Type 1 diabetes guidelines: Are they enough?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Abdul Zargar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of insulin by Banting and Best in 1922 changed the landscape of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM. Guidelines on T1DM should be evidence based and should emphasize comprehensive risk management. Guidelines would improve awareness amongst governments, state health care providers and the general public about the serious long-term implications of poorly managed diabetes and of the essential resources needed for optimal care. T1DM requires lifelong daily medication, regular control as well as access to facilities to manage acute and chronic complications. American Diabetes Association 2014 guidelines recommends annual nephropathy screening for albumin levels; random spot urine sample for albumin-to-creatinine ratio at start of puberty or age ≥10 years, whichever is earlier, once the child has had diabetes for 5 years. Hypertension should be screened for in T1DM patients by measuring blood pressure at each routine visit. Dyslipidemia in T1DM patients is important and patients should be screened if there is a family history of hypercholesterolemia or a cardiovascular event before the age of 55 years exists or if family history is unknown. Retinopathy is another important complication of diabetes and patients should be subjected to an initial dilated and comprehensive eye examination. Basic diabetes training should be provided for school staff, and they should be assigned with responsibilities for the care of diabetic children. Self-management should be allowed at all school settings for students.

  1. Diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    970258 Relationship between non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus and lipoprotein(a)in aged patients.CHI Jiamin(迟家敏), et al. Dept Endocrinol, BeijingHosp, Beijing, 100730. Chin J Geriatr 1997; 16(1): 39-42.

  2. Fats for diabetics. (Letter).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Katan, M.B.

    1994-01-01

    Opinion. Comments on the treatment of type 2 diabetes from the interaction between nature and nurture. Effective form of treatment for type 2 diabetes; Composition of the diet for diabetics; Identification of unsaturated fats in the diabetic diet; Risks faced by diabetic patients.

  3. 78 FR 62335 - National School Lunch Week, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-18

    ... Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act, we expanded access to school meals while taking action to combat childhood... health problems including diabetes and heart disease. We updated nutritional standards for school meals...

  4. Using Behavioral Interventions to Assist Children with Type 1 Diabetes Manage Blood Glucose Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasecki, Kim; Olympia, Daniel; Clark, Elaine; Jenson, William; Heathfield, Lora Tuesday

    2008-01-01

    Treatment and management of chronic disease processes on children occurs across multiple settings, placing demands for consultation and expertise on school personnel, including school psychologists. One such chronic condition in children is type I diabetes. Children with type I insulin dependent diabetes mellitus exhibit high rates of…

  5. Bronze diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    L N, Akshatha; Shenoy, Mamatha T; Yadav, Charu; M S, Rukmini; Kamath, Nutan

    2015-04-01

    Thalassemia is a group of disorders characterized by deficient production of the β-globin sub unit of hemoglobin. The mandatory blood transfusions in patients with thalassemia to maintain adequate erythrocyte levels, leads to iron overload. The prevalence of diabetes in patients with thalassemia varies from 6 to 14%. We here by present a known case of thalassemia major in an 18 year old boy. He was diagnosed with thalassemia before the age of one year and is on regular blood transfusion every two weeks since then. The repeated blood transfusion is one of the common causes for haemochromatosis. Iron overload initially leads to glucose abnormalities such as insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia, which is followed by impaired secretion of insulin. Diagnosed as a case of bronze diabetes, this patient is on insulin therapy for the last two years. Currently the patient is on iron chelation therapy at Kasturba Medical College Hospital, Mangalore, Karnataka, India.

  6. diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1995-01-01

    950257 Report of a case of glucagonoma misdiag-nosed as“eczema”and“hepatic angioma”for three yearsand review of literature.DAI Weixin(戴为信),et al.PUMC Hosp,Beijing,100730.Chin J Intern Med 1995;34(3):190-192.Glucagonoma is a rare pancreatic tumor,necrolyticmigratory erythema is its distinctive feature and it isoften associated with diabetes mellitus,weight loss.anemia,hypoaminoacidemia,glossitis and stomatitis.

  7. Diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1992-01-01

    920537 The urinary activity of N-acetyl-D-glucosaminidase and diabetic nephropa-thy. XU Dashun (徐大顺), et al. Shanghai 1stPeople Hosp, 200085. Shanghai Med J 1992;15(8): 439-442. Urinary activity of N-acetyl-β-D-glucosa-minidase (NAG) and NAG: Creatinine(NAGI)in 24-hour urine and NAG-I in a single random

  8. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Diabetes: Lindsey's Story (Video) Diabetes Center Movie: Endocrine System Diabetes ... of Nondiscrimination Visit the Nemours Web site. Note: All information on KidsHealth® is for ...

  9. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Diabetes Movie KidsHealth > For Parents > Diabetes Movie Print A A A Kids who have diabetes have trouble taking energy from food and delivering ...

  10. American Diabetes Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 800-342-2383) Give by Mail Close Fight Diabetes Complications 40% of people with diabetes eventually develop ... Next » « Previous Our Mission: To prevent and cure diabetes and to improve the lives of all people ...

  11. Native Americans with Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Read the MMWR Science Clips Native Americans with Diabetes Better diabetes care can decrease kidney failure Language: ... between 1996 and 2013. Problem Kidney failure from diabetes was highest among Native Americans. Native Americans are ...

  12. Preventing Diabetes Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Other Dental Problems Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems Preventing Diabetes Problems View or Print All Sections Heart Disease & ... prevent or delay sexual and urologic problems. Depression & Diabetes Depression is common among people with a chronic, ...

  13. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Diabetes: Lindsey's Story (Video) Diabetes Center Movie: Endocrine System Diabetes ... Visit the Nemours Web site. Note: All information on KidsHealth® is for educational purposes only. For ...

  14. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... from Other Government Agencies and Offices National Diabetes Education Program Diabetes Information on MedlinePlus Diabetes and Depression ... Emergency Preparedness International Programs News & Events Training & Continuing Education Inspections & Compliance Federal, State & Local Officials Consumers Health ...

  15. Diabetic Nerve Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... at the wrong times. This damage is called diabetic neuropathy. Over half of people with diabetes get ... you change positions quickly Your doctor will diagnose diabetic neuropathy with a physical exam and nerve tests. ...

  16. "Stop Diabetes Now!"

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Diabetes "Stop Diabetes Now!" Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents ... Tips for Seniors at Risk for Type 2 Diabetes Lifestyle changes that lead to weight loss—such ...

  17. Gestational Diabetes and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Arrives Trouble Getting Pregnant Avoiding Pregnancy Articles Gestational Diabetes and Pregnancy Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) ... diabetes must also take insulin. Problems of Gestational Diabetes in Pregnancy Blood sugar that is not well ...

  18. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Teaching Kids to Be Smart About Social Media Diabetes Movie KidsHealth > For Parents > Diabetes Movie Print A A A Kids who have diabetes have trouble taking energy from food and delivering ...

  19. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... from Other Government Agencies and Offices National Diabetes Education Program Diabetes Information on MedlinePlus Diabetes and Depression ... Emergency Preparedness International Programs News & Events Training & Continuing Education Inspections & Compliance Federal, State & Local Officials Consumers Health ...

  20. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Diabetes: Lindsey's Story (Video) Diabetes Center Movie: Endocrine System Diabetes ... Visit the Nemours Web site. Note: All information on KidsHealth® is for educational purposes only. For ...

  1. Diabetes diet - gestational

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is usually the easiest type of exercise, but swimming or other low-impact exercises can work just ... 23969827 . American Diabetes Association. Management of diabetes in pregnancy. Diabetes Care . 2017;40(Suppl 1):S114-S119. ...

  2. Living With Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... statement, and the Director's Update newsletter Offices & Divisions Organizational structure and descriptions of offices and divisions Staff Directory ... Transformation Promoting Medication Adherence GAME PLAN for Preventing Type 2 Diabetes NDEP ... Partner Spotlight National Diabetes Month Diabetes Alert ...

  3. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... resources to help you talk with your health care provider about your diabetes treatment. Diabetes Medicines - easy-to- ... resources to help you talk to your health care provider about how to manage diabetes during pregnancy. Medicine ...

  4. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and the type of diabetes you have. Use these resources to help you talk with your health care provider about your diabetes treatment. Diabetes Medicines - easy-to-read booklet for women Insulin - easy- ...

  5. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you need depends on your health and the type of diabetes you have. Use these resources to help you ... Diabetes and Pregnancy Some women develop diabetes for the first time ...

  6. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Your Child Natural Disasters: How Families Can Help Diabetes Movie KidsHealth > For Parents > Diabetes Movie Print A A A Kids who have diabetes have trouble taking energy from food and delivering ...

  7. Treating Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blood glucose level to rise. Treatment goals for kids with diabetes are to control the condition in a way ... diabetes. The key is a balanced, healthy diet. Kids with diabetes benefit from the same kind of diet as ...

  8. Tuberculosis and Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    TUBERCULOSIS www.who.int/tb & DIABETES THE DUAL EPIDEMIC OF TB AND DIABETES DEADLY LINKAGES  People with ... higher risk of progressing from latent to active tuberculosis.  Diabetes triples a person’s risk of developing TB. ...

  9. Diabetes Resources for Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Financial Help for Diabetes Care Diabetes A-Z Diabetes Overview View or Print All Sections What is ... Disease Sexual and Bladder Problems Other Types of Diabetes Learn more about less-common types of diabetes. ...

  10. Peripheral Artery Disease and Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Peripheral Artery Disease & Diabetes Updated:Jan 26,2016 People with diabetes are ... life. This content was last reviewed January 2016. Diabetes • Home • About Diabetes • Why Diabetes Matters Introduction Cardiovascular ...

  11. Self-care management strategies among individuals living with type 2 diabetes mellitus: nursing interventions

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Caralise W HuntAuburn University School of Nursing, Auburn, AL, USAAbstract: Nurses provide care for individuals living with diabetes in a variety of areas. Nursing interventions assist individuals living with diabetes to manage diabetes and can positively affect outcomes. This article describes an integrated literature review conducted to evaluate and summarize nursing interventions and research in self-management of type 2 diabetes mellitus. PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and the Cochrane databa...

  12. INTRODUCTION OF PASTEURIZED/RAW COW'S MILK DURING THE SECOND SEMESTER OF LIFE AS A RISK FACTOR OF TYPE 1 DIABETES MELLITUS IN SCHOOL CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villagrán-García, Edna F; Hurtado-López, Erika F; Vasquez-Garibay, Edgar M; Troyo-Sanromán, Rogelio; Aguirre-Salas, Liuba M; Larrosa-Haro, Alfredo; León-Robles, Ruth V

    2015-08-01

    Objetivo: demostrar que la diabetes mellitus tipo 1 (DMT1) en escolares y adolescentes se asocia a una temprana introducción de leche entera pasteurizada/no pasteurizada en el segundo semestre de vida. Material y métodos: en este estudio no probabilístico de casos y controles se incluyeron 150 participantes (75 pacientes y 75 controles), divididos de acuerdo a la edad y el sexo de 6 a 16 años de edad. Se consideró DMT1 como una variable independiente. El análisis estadístico incluyó la prueba de Ji cuadrada y razón de momios con su intervalo de confianza del 95% Resultados: los participantes fueron 51% varones, con edades de 11 ± 3.2 años y el 80% alimentados al pecho materno, 18% en forma exclusiva, y el 13% recibieron leche entera pasteurizada/no pasteurizada. Los niños que recibieron leche entera pasteurizada/no pasteurizada tuvieron un riesgo mayor de DMT1 [OR, 3,9 (1,2-12,8)]. La presencia de DMT1 fue tres veces más elevada en quienes consumieron leche entera pasteurizada/no pasteurizada que en aquellos que recibieron fórmula de seguimiento [RM, 3,2 (1,03-10,07)]. Conclusión: la introducción de leche entera pasteurizada/ no pasteurizada en el segundo semestre de vida incrementó cuatro veces la probabilidad de desarrollo de DMT1 en escolares y adolescentes.

  13. Tips for Teens with Diabetes: About Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP), 2010

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes is a serious disease. It means that one's blood glucose, also called blood sugar, is too high. Having too much glucose in a person's blood is not healthy. This paper offers tips for managing diabetes.

  14. Socioeconomic profile of diabetic patients with and without foot problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz Nather

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To identify the differences in a socioeconomic profile between two cohorts of diabetic patients – one with diabetic foot problems and another without diabetic foot problems. Materials and methods: The cohort with diabetic foot problems (including cellulitis, abscess, osteomyelitis, septic arthritis, gangrene, ulcers, or Charcot joint disease consisted of 122 diabetic patients, while the other cohort without foot problems consisted of 112 diabetic patients. Both were seen at the National University Hospital from January to April 2007. A detailed protocol was designed and the factors studied included patient profile, average monthly household income, education, compliance to diabetic medication, attendance at clinics for diabetic treatment, exercise, smoking, alcohol consumption, gender, and glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1C level. These were studied for significant differences using univariate and stepwise multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results: With multivariate analysis, Malay ethnicity (p<0.001, education of up to secondary school only (p=0.021, low average monthly household income of less than SGD $2,000 (p=0.030, lack of exercise (at least once a week, p=0.04, and elevated HbA1C level (>7.0%; p=0.015 were found to be significantly higher in the cohort with diabetic foot problems than the cohort without. Conclusions: There are significant differences in the socioeconomic factors between diabetic patients with diabetic foot problems and those without.

  15. Precision diabetes: learning from monogenic diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattersley, Andrew T; Patel, Kashyap A

    2017-05-01

    The precision medicine approach of tailoring treatment to the individual characteristics of each patient or subgroup has been a great success in monogenic diabetes subtypes, MODY and neonatal diabetes. This review examines what has led to the success of a precision medicine approach in monogenic diabetes (precision diabetes) and outlines possible implications for type 2 diabetes. For monogenic diabetes, the molecular genetics can define discrete aetiological subtypes that have profound implications on diabetes treatment and can predict future development of associated clinical features, allowing early preventative or supportive treatment. In contrast, type 2 diabetes has overlapping polygenic susceptibility and underlying aetiologies, making it difficult to define discrete clinical subtypes with a dramatic implication for treatment. The implementation of precision medicine in neonatal diabetes was simple and rapid as it was based on single clinical criteria (diagnosed precision diabetes approach in type 2 diabetes will require simple, quick, easily accessible stratification that is based on a combination of routine clinical data, rather than relying on newer technologies. Analysing existing clinical data from routine clinical practice and trials may provide early success for precision medicine in type 2 diabetes.

  16. Meal Plans and Diabetes (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... TOPIC Diabetes Center Carbohydrates and Diabetes Weight and Diabetes Eating Out When Your Child Has Diabetes About Recipes for Kids With Diabetes Carbohydrates, Sugar, and Your Child Type 1 Diabetes: What Is It? Diabetes Control: ...

  17. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Diabetes Information on WebMD Order Free Women's Health Publications Women's Health Information on Twitter Information from Other ... YourDiabetesInfo.org American Diabetes Association Get Other FDA Publications for Women For Women Homepage FDA Diabetes Information ...

  18. Is diabetes-specific health literacy associated with diabetes-related outcomes in older adults?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Takashi; Kart, Cary S

    2011-06-01

     The present study examined the association between a measure of diabetes-specific health literacy and three different Type 2 diabetes outcome indicators in a national sample of older adults. Data were taken from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) 2003 Diabetes module and the HRS 2002 core wave. Analysis was performed on data from 1318 respondents aged 42-96 years [mean (±SD) 67.96 ± 8.65 years] who submitted responses on all relevant independent variable measures along with an HbA1c test kit. The index of diabetes-specific health literacy was constructed from responses to 10 diabetes self-care regimen items (α = 0.927). Using a multivariate regression strategy to analyze weighted data, the diabetes-specific health literacy index was significantly and positively associated with self-graded assessment of diabetes self-care (R2 = 0.231). However, diabetes-specific health literacy was not independently associated with the HbA1c level or the average number of days five recommended self-management behaviors were practiced each week.  No previous single study has focused on the relationship between diabetes-specific health literacy and multiple diabetes-related outcomes. The direct association of diabetes-specific health literacy with patients' assessment of their self-care practice acumen is useful information for the design of effective patient intervention and/or communication strategies. Health literacy is a broad, multidimensional construct that bridges basic literacy skills and various health and illness contexts. Because it is so important to adults engaged in the self-management of chronic illness, indicators of disease-specific knowledge and/or understanding should be included in efforts to measure health literacy. © 2011 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  19. Genomet og diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allin, Kristine Højgaard; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf Borbye

    2014-01-01

    In terms of their genetic architecture monogenic diabetes and type 2 diabetes represent two extremes. Whereas each subtype of monogenic diabetes is caused by one penetrant, rare mutation in a single gene, the genetic susceptibility to type 2 diabetes can be attributed to many low-penetrant variants...... across the genome. At present, only 10% of the genetic susceptibility to type 2 diabetes can be explained by the hitherto identified 90 genomic loci. Here we briefly review the genetics of monogenic diabetes and type 2 diabetes and outline future directions of research within this field....

  20. Intraoperative Management of Diabetes in Diabetic Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulhan Akbaba

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: According to TURDEP-II study, the prevalence of diabetes has reached 13.7% in Turkey. Diabetes mellitus is rapidly increasing, and diabetic patients are likely to undergo surgical procedures more than non-diabetic patients. Observational and prospective studies have demonstrated that hyperglycemia correlates with increased morbidity and mortality associated with surgery. Stress hormones such as epinephrine, norepinephrine, cortisol, glucagon, and growth hormone are mostly augmented, and insulin resistance develops during surgery. All diabetic patients undergoing surgery should have comprehensive preoperative evaluation due to the risk of both hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia during surgical procedures. In this article we aimed to review the diabetes treatment protocols for preoperative and postoperative assessment of adult diabetic patients undergoing surgery.

  1. Management of Diabetic Neuropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, Raymond Azman

    2003-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the commonest cause of neuropathy worldwide. Diabetic neuropathy (DN) develops in about 4–10% of diabetic patients after 5 years and in 15% after 20 years. Four main mechanisms have been postulated to underlie the pathogenesis of DN. Diabetic neuropathy can be divided into symmetrical and asymmetrical neuropathies. Diabetic Autonomic Neuropathy (DAN) parallels the severity of DSN, and affects primarily the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, genitourinary and integumentary ...

  2. Periodontitis and Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Straka, Michal; Straka-Trapezanlidis, Michaela

    2007-01-01

    There is general agreement that there is a significant relationship between diabetes and periodontitis. Many studies have shown a high prevalence of periodontitis in diabetic patients. In addition a higher prevalence and more aggressive periodontitis are found in patients with poorly controlled diabetes. The duration of having diabetes is an important factor that affects the progression and severity of periodontitis. Alterations in the host response in diabetics to existing periodontal pa...

  3. Monogenic diabetes and pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Rinki

    2015-01-01

    Monogenic diabetes is frequently mistakenly diagnosed as either type 1 or type 2 diabetes, yet accounts for approximately 1–2% of diabetes. Identifying monogenic forms of diabetes has practical implications for specific therapy, screening of family members and genetic counselling. The most common forms of monogenic diabetes are due to glucokinase (GCK), hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF)-1A and HNF-4A, HNF-1B, m.3243A>G gene defects. Practical aspects of their recognition, diagnosis and manageme...

  4. Gestational diabetes - self-care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pregnancy - gestational diabetes; Prenatal care - gestational diabetes ... Gestational diabetes is high blood sugar (glucose) that happens during pregnancy. There are no symptoms in most cases. But ...

  5. DIABETES MELITO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Breitsameter

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available RESUMO E apresentada revisão bibliográfica sobre diabetes melito animal. Esta enfermidade sistêmica envolve um grupo heterogênio de alterações metabólicas podendo ser incriminada na etiologia de várias enfermidades. O seu diagnóstico é incomum em medicina veterinária e apesar de ocorrer em várias espécies, tem sido descrita principalmente em cães e gatos. A presente revisão enfoca o diagnóstico (clínico e laboratorial e as alterações no tratamento, comentando a ação rápida, intermediária e lenta da insulina, bem como as complicações que a terapia insulínica pode determinar.

  6. DIABETES MELITO

    OpenAIRE

    Irene Breitsameter; Luiz Carlos Ribeiro Fan; Cláudio Baptista de Carvalho

    1994-01-01

    RESUMO E apresentada revisão bibliográfica sobre diabetes melito animal. Esta enfermidade sistêmica envolve um grupo heterogênio de alterações metabólicas podendo ser incriminada na etiologia de várias enfermidades. O seu diagnóstico é incomum em medicina veterinária e apesar de ocorrer em várias espécies, tem sido descrita principalmente em cães e gatos. A presente revisão enfoca o diagnóstico (clínico e laboratorial) e as alterações no tratamento, comentando a ação rápida, intermediária e l...

  7. Renal protection in diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parving, H H; Tarnow, L; Rossing, P

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The combination of diabetes and hypertension increases the chances of progressive renal disorder and, ultimately, renal failure. Roughly 40% of all diabetics, whether insulin-dependent or not, develop diabetic nephropathy. Diabetic nephropathy is the single most important cause of end......-stage renal disease in the Western world and accounts for more than a quarter of all end-stage renal diseases. Diabetic nephropathy is a major cause of increased morbidity and mortality in diabetic patients. Increased arterial blood pressure is an early and common phenomenon in incipient and overt diabetic...... nephropathy. The relationship between arterial blood pressure and diabetic nephropathy is a complex one, with diabetic nephropathy increasing blood pressure and blood pressure accelerating the course of nephropathy. OVERVIEW: Calcium antagonists antagonize preglomerular vasoconstriction. Additional putative...

  8. Impact of a District-Wide Diabetes Prevention Programme Involving Health Education for Children and the Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheeladevi, Sethu; Sagar, Jayanthi; Pujari, Siddharth; Rani, Padmaja Kumari

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To present results from a district-wide diabetes prevention programme involving health education for school children and the local community. Method: The model of health education that was utilized aimed to secure lifestyle changes and the identification of diabetes risk by school children (aged 9-12 years). The children acted as health…

  9. Impact of a District-Wide Diabetes Prevention Programme Involving Health Education for Children and the Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheeladevi, Sethu; Sagar, Jayanthi; Pujari, Siddharth; Rani, Padmaja Kumari

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To present results from a district-wide diabetes prevention programme involving health education for school children and the local community. Method: The model of health education that was utilized aimed to secure lifestyle changes and the identification of diabetes risk by school children (aged 9-12 years). The children acted as health…

  10. "Control Your Diabetes. For Life."

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Diabetes "Control Your Diabetes. For Life." Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents For information about "Control Your Diabetes. For Life" campaign, visit www.YourDiabetesInfo. ...

  11. How to Treat Gestational Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A Listen En Español How to Treat Gestational Diabetes Be sure to see the latest Diabetes Forecast ... and a healthy start for your baby. Gestational Diabetes – Looking Ahead Gestational diabetes usually goes away after ...

  12. Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease, & Other Dental Problems Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke Having diabetes means that ... help to stop. What is the link between diabetes, heart disease, and stroke? Over time, high blood ...

  13. National Diabetes Statistics Report, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... I ndirect costs $ 69 billion (disability, work loss, premature death). 8 General Information What is diabetes? Diabetes is ... as heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, blindness, and premature death. Types of diabetes Type 1 diabetes was previously ...

  14. Prevention of type 2 diabetes: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, A; Claussen, B; Ramachandran, A; Williams, R

    2007-06-01

    One of the major public health challenges of the 21st century is type 2 diabetes. WHO estimates that by 2025 as many as 200-300 million people worldwide will have developed the disease. A distressing increase in children is perhaps the most alarming sign of something going wrong. Roughly half of the risk of type 2 diabetes can be attributed to environmental exposure and the other half to genetics. Central themes for prevention are the risk factors overweight, sedentary lifestyle, certain dietary components and perinatal factors. Overweight is the most critical risk factor, and should be targeted for prevention of type 2 diabetes especially among children and youths. Ethnicity and perinatal factors are also worth considering. Today we know that prevention helps. In the US Diabetes Prevention Programme for high risk individuals, there was a 58% relative reduction in the progression to diabetes in the lifestyle group compared with the controls. Within the lifestyle group, 50% achieved the goal of more than 7% weight reduction, and 74% maintained at least 150 min of moderately intense activity each week. This review discusses different forms of prevention, and proposes first of all to target people with Impaired Glucose Tolerance with increasing activity and altering dietary factors. And secondly, population-based measures to encourage increased physical activity and decreased consumption of energy-dense foods are important, and may target school children and young people, certain ethnic groups and women with gestational diabetes.

  15. Diabetic autonomic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Roy

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the commonest cause of an autonomic neuropathy in the developed world. Diabetic autonomic neuropathy causes a constellation of symptoms and signs affecting cardiovascular, urogenital, gastrointestinal, pupillomotor, thermoregulatory, and sudomotor systems. Several discrete syndromes associated with diabetes cause autonomic dysfunction. The most prevalent of these are: generalized diabetic autonomic neuropathy, autonomic neuropathy associated with the prediabetic state, treatment-induced painful and autonomic neuropathy, and transient hypoglycemia-associated autonomic neuropathy. These autonomic manifestations of diabetes are responsible for the most troublesome and disabling features of diabetic peripheral neuropathy and result in a significant proportion of the mortality and morbidity associated with the disease.

  16. Impact of intensive nutritional education with carbohydrate counting on diabetes control in type 2 diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Zipp

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Christopher Zipp, Jessica Terrone Roehr, Lucia Beck Weiss, Frank FilipettoDepartment of Family Medicine, School of Osteopathic Medicine, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Stratford, NJ, USAAbstract: This pilot study assessed the impact of an intensive carbohydrate counting educational intervention on diabetes control in type 2 diabetic patients. An experimental, prospective study design was used to assess the effect of nutritional education on diabetes control. The impact and efficacy of the education were measured over a 1-year period through changes in diabetes clinical markers, including hemoglobin A1c, lipid profiles, glucose levels, patients’ energy levels, and sense of well-being. Six patients were initially enrolled in the pilot study, with only three patients completing the intervention phase and the 3-month follow-up. Two patients were followed-up at the 1-year mark for their diabetes, although neither continued participation in the study beyond the 3-month mark. Marginal improvements in clinical markers at 3 months were found. However, due to the small sample size, changes in the clinical profiles may have occurred because of variables unrelated to the nutritional intervention. Further research is indicated for the control of these variables.Keywords: type 2 diabetes, nutritional education, carbohydrate counting, diabetes control

  17. Type 2 Diabetes: What You Need to Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Us Home Health Information Diabetes English English Español Diabetes Diabetes is a disease that occurs when your ... Diabetes Preventing Diabetes after Pregnancy More Diabetes Topics Diabetes Basics What is Diabetes? Symptoms & Causes of Diabetes ...

  18. Depression in diabetic patients attending University of Gondar Hospital Diabetic Clinic, Northwest Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birhanu AM

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Anteneh Messele Birhanu,1 Fekadu Mazengia Alemu,2 Tesfaye Demeke Ashenafie,3 Shitaye Alemu Balcha,4 Berihun Assefa Dachew5 1School of Medicine, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Wollo University, Dessie, 2Department of Midwifery, 3Department of Nursing, 4Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, 5Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Institute of Public Health, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia Background: Diabetes mellitus, frequently associated with comorbid depression, contributes to the double burden of individual patients and community. Depression remains undiagnosed in as many as 50%–75% of diabetes cases. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and associated factors of depression among diabetic patients attending the University of Gondar Hospital Diabetic Clinic, Northwest Ethiopia. Methods: An institution-based cross-sectional study was conducted from March to May 2014 among 422 sampled diabetic patients attending the University of Gondar Hospital Diabetic Clinic. The participants were selected using systematic random sampling. Data were collected by face-to-face interview using a standardized and pretested questionnaire linked with patient record review. Depression was assessed using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9. Data were entered to EPI INFO version 7 and analyzed by SPSS version 20 software. Binary logistic regression analysis was performed to identify factors associated with depression. Results: A total of 415 diabetic patients participated in the study with a response rate of 98.3%. The prevalence of depression among diabetic patients was found to be 15.4% (95% confidence interval (CI: 11.7–19.2. Only religion (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] =2.65 and 95% CI: 1.1–6.0 and duration of diabetes (AOR =0.27 and 95% CI: 0.07–0.92 were the factors associated with depression among diabetic patients. Conclusion: The prevalence of depression was low as compared to other

  19. Can the democratic ideal of participatory research be achieved? An inside look at an academic-indigenous community partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cargo, Margaret; Delormier, Treena; Lévesque, Lucie; Horn-Miller, Kahente; McComber, Alex; Macaulay, Ann C

    2008-10-01

    Democratic or equal participation in decision making is an ideal that community and academic stakeholders engaged in participatory research strive to achieve. This ideal, however, may compete with indigenous peoples' right to self-determination. Study objectives were to assess the perceived influence of multiple community (indigenous) and academic stakeholders engaged in the Kahnawake Schools Diabetes Prevention Project (KSDPP) across six domains of project decision making and to test the hypothesis that KSDPP would be directed by community stakeholders. Self-report surveys were completed by 51 stakeholders comprising the KSDPP Community Advisory Board (CAB), KSDPP staff, academic researchers and supervisory board members. KSDPP staff were perceived to share similar levels of influence with (i) CAB on maintaining partnership ethics and CAB activities and (ii) academic researchers on research and dissemination activities. KSDPP staff were perceived to carry significantly more influence than other stakeholders on decisions related to annual activities, program operations and intervention activities. CAB and staff were the perceived owners of KSDPP. The strong community leadership aligns KSDPP with a model of community-directed research and suggests that equitable participation-distinct from democratic or equal participation-is reflected by indigenous community partners exerting greater influence than academic partners in decision making.

  20. A Better Diabetes Test?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have," said Zonszein, director of clinical diabetes at Albert Einstein College of Medicine's University Hospital in New York ... Diabetes Center, University Hospital, and professor, clinical medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York City; Oct. 5, ...

  1. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Information by Audience For Women Women's Health Topics Women and Diabetes Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... women during pregnancy. Diabetes and Pregnancy (CDC) Diverse Women in Clinical Trials Campaign Clinical trials can help ...

  2. Diabetes - tests and checkups

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Groot LJ, de Kretser DM, et al, eds. Endocrinology: Adult and Pediatric . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 51. Standards of medical care in diabetes - 2016. Diabetes Care. 2016;39:S4-S5. PMID: ...

  3. Cardiovascular diseases and diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, A.; Sortso, C.; Jensen, Peter Bjødstrup

    2016-01-01

    of diabetes has been rather constant at higher level in males (around 16-18%) than in females (around 12-14%) during 2000-2011 (incl.). In contrast, the incidence rate of CVD after having diabetes diagnosis has declined from about 4.5 to less than 3 during the same period, with higher declining level...... for males than for females. Efforts to detect diabetes at an earlier stage have not resulted in a reduced occurrence of CVD at the diagnosis of diabetes in Denmark. However, the risk of developing CVD after the diagnosis of diabetes has been declining, possibly reflecting benefits of intensified treatment......We present an investigation of the occurrence of cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes in Denmark 2000 through 2011. The Diabetes Impact Study 2013 is based on all registrants in the Danish National Diabetes Register as of July 3rd 2013 (n=497,232). Record linkage with the Danish...

  4. Bone disease in diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shanbhogue, Vikram V.; Hansen, Stinus; Frost, Morten

    2017-01-01

    Type 1 and type 2 diabetes are generally accepted to be associated with increased bone fracture risk. However, the pathophysiological mechanisms of diabetic bone disease are poorly understood, and whether the associated increased skeletal fragility is a comorbidity or a complication of diabetes...... remains under debate. Although there is some indication of a direct deleterious effect of microangiopathy on bone, the evidence is open to question, and whether diabetic osteopathy can be classified as a chronic, microvascular complication of diabetes remains uncertain. Here, we review the current...... knowledge of potential contributory factors to diabetic bone disease, particularly the association between diabetic microangiopathy and bone mineral density, bone structure, and bone turnover. Additionally, we discuss and propose a pathophysiological model of the effects of diabetic microvascular disease...

  5. Type 1 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or foot problems. Treat minor infections, such as athlete's foot, right away. Use moisturizing lotion on dry ... Read More Acute kidney failure Arterial insufficiency Bunions Carbohydrates Cataract - adult Diabetes and eye disease Diabetes and ...

  6. Diabetic hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000304.htm Diabetic hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Diabetic hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome (HHS) is a complication of ...

  7. Diabetic Eye Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... damage your eyes. The most common problem is diabetic retinopathy. It is a leading cause of blindness ... You need a healthy retina to see clearly. Diabetic retinopathy damages the tiny blood vessels inside your ...

  8. Diabetic Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be coronary heart disease (CHD), heart failure, and diabetic cardiomyopathy. Diabetes by itself puts you at risk for heart disease. Other risk factors include Family history of heart disease Carrying extra ...

  9. Diabetic Kidney Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... too high. Over time, this can damage your kidneys. Your kidneys clean your blood. If they are damaged, waste ... in your blood instead of leaving your body. Kidney damage from diabetes is called diabetic nephropathy. It ...

  10. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Registries - Sign-up for a study to help doctors learn more about how diabetes medicines affect women ... in Clinical Trials Campaign Clinical trials can help doctors learn more about treatments for diabetes. The FDA ...

  11. Women and Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information by Audience For Women Women's Health Topics Women and Diabetes Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... women during pregnancy. Diabetes and Pregnancy (CDC) Diverse Women in Clinical Trials Campaign Clinical trials can help ...

  12. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Information by Audience For Women Women's Health Topics Women and Diabetes Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... women during pregnancy. Diabetes and Pregnancy (CDC) Diverse Women in Clinical Trials Campaign Clinical trials can help ...

  13. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... healthy diet, exercising, and using FDA-approved medicines, insulin, and devices every day. FDA has lots of ... with diabetes need to take diabetes medicines or insulin to help keep their blood sugar at a ...

  14. Medicines for Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... their doctor's advice on eating and exercising . A kid's diabetes management plan will give specific instructions on these ... sugar levels from going too high . But sometimes kids with diabetes experience really low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia . That's ...

  15. Themenheft 24 "Diabetes mellitus"

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Bei etwa 5 % der Bevölkerung in Deutschland ist ein Diabetes mellitus, die sog. Zuckerkrankheit, diagnostiziert worden, rund 90 % davon haben einen Typ 2-Diabetes, der vorwiegend im höheren Lebensalter auftritt. 5 % der Diabeteskranken leiden am insulinpflichtigen Typ 1-Diabetes, der sich vorwiegend im Kindes- und Jugendalter manifestiert. Weitere Diabetesformen sind eher selten. Außerdem gibt es viele Menschen mit einem unentdeckten Diabetes.

  16. Alcoholism and Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Soo-Jeong Kim; Dai-Jin Kim

    2012-01-01

    Chronic use of alcohol is considered to be a potential risk factor for the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), which causes insulin resistance and pancreatic β-cell dysfunction that is a prerequisite for the development of diabetes. However, alcohol consumption in diabetes has been controversial and more detailed information on the diabetogenic impact of alcohol seems warranted. Diabetes, especially T2DM, causes dysregulation of various metabolic processes, which includes a defect i...

  17. Genetics of Diabetes Insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schernthaner-Reiter, Marie Helene; Stratakis, Constantine A; Luger, Anton

    2017-06-01

    Diabetes insipidus is a disease characterized by polyuria and polydipsia due to inadequate release of arginine vasopressin from the posterior pituitary gland (neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus) or due to arginine vasopressin insensitivity by the renal distal tubule, leading to a deficiency in tubular water reabsorption (nephrogenic diabetes insipidus). This article reviews the genetics of diabetes insipidus in the context of its diagnosis, clinical presentation, and therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Diabetes Type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. With type 1 diabetes, your pancreas does not make insulin. Insulin is ... kidneys, nerves, and gums and teeth. Type 1 diabetes happens most often in children and young adults ...

  19. Diabetes Type 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. With type 2 diabetes, the more common type, your body does not ... You have a higher risk of type 2 diabetes if you are older, obese, have a family ...

  20. Glukagonomsyndrom uden diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Carsten Sauer; Mikkelsen, Dorthe Bisgaard; Vestergaard, Vibeke

    2008-01-01

    without diabetes. Glucagonoma syndrome is characterized by glucagon overproduction, diabetes, depression, deep venous thrombosis and necrolytic migrating erythema. Glucagonoma is frequently diagnosed late which increases the risk of metastases. It is important not to rule out glucagonoma in patients...... with a relevant clinical picture but without diabetes. Udgivelsesdato: 2008-Nov-17...

  1. [Diabetes mellitus in teenagers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isla Pera, Pilar

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus during infancy childhood or adolescence does not differ from adult diabetes mellitus in terms of basic principles nor therapeutic treatment methods but the characteristics patients have during those ages signify that diabetes has a special repercussion and becomes harder to treat in patients during those ages.

  2. Herpes zoster and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Sanjay; Chawla, Aastha

    2016-08-01

    This review is a succinct description of the relationship between herpes zoster and diabetes. It makes a strong case for screening for diabetes in all patients of herpes zoster, and for using insulin to achieve optimal glycaemic control in persons with concomitant diabetes and herpes zoster. It highlights potential impact of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitor therapy and statin usage on herpes zoster incidence.

  3. Teen Diabetes Quiz Answers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... type 2 diabetes. Having a family member with diabetes means that certain family genes increase the risk for type 2 diabetes. Some ... have a greater chance of getting type 2 diabetes—American Indians, Alaska ... Pacific Islanders. Genes also appear to interact with things like viruses ...

  4. Diabetic neuropathy in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mah, Jean K; Pacaud, Danièle

    2014-01-01

    The worldwide burden of diabetes and its complications in children continues to increase due to the rise in type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Although overt diabetic neuropathy is rarely present in children and adolescents with diabetes, subclinical diabetic neuropathy has been estimated to occur in approximately half of all children with type 1 diabetes with a duration of 5 years or longer and up to 25% of pediatric patients with newly diagnosed diabetes have abnormal findings on nerve conduction studies. The present review on the state of pediatric diabetic neuropathy covers the definition, prevalence, pathogenesis, diagnosis, risk factors, and possible treatment approaches specific to children and adolescents with diabetes. It also highlights the many unknowns in this field. Nonetheless, new emerging interventions that can either prevent or delay the progression of diabetic microvascular and macrovascular complications may become available in the near future. Until specific interventions for diabetic neuropathy are available for use in children, it will be hard to justify screening for neuropathy other than through clinical assessment. Meanwhile, the search for quicker, easily administered, and quantifiable tests for diabetic neuropathy and efforts to establish valid pediatric norms for well-established measures used in adults will need to continue.

  5. Dealing with Diabetes Distress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... screening and treating people with diabetes for distress, depression and other mental health concerns. The new guidelines, published recently in the journal Diabetes Care , suggest that providers screen all of their diabetes patients with standardized tests for these conditions. A demanding ...

  6. Diabetes in HFE Hemochromatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James C. Barton

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes in whites of European descent with hemochromatosis was first attributed to pancreatic siderosis. Later observations revealed that the pathogenesis of diabetes in HFE hemochromatosis is multifactorial and its clinical manifestations are heterogeneous. Increased type 2 diabetes risk in HFE hemochromatosis is associated with one or more factors, including abnormal iron homeostasis and iron overload, decreased insulin secretion, cirrhosis, diabetes in first-degree relatives, increased body mass index, insulin resistance, and metabolic syndrome. In p.C282Y homozygotes, serum ferritin, usually elevated at hemochromatosis diagnosis, largely reflects body iron stores but not diabetes risk. In persons with diabetes type 2 without hemochromatosis diagnoses, serum ferritin levels are higher than those of persons without diabetes, but most values are within the reference range. Phlebotomy therapy to achieve iron depletion does not improve diabetes control in all persons with HFE hemochromatosis. The prevalence of type 2 diabetes diagnosed today in whites of European descent with and without HFE hemochromatosis is similar. Routine iron phenotyping or HFE genotyping of patients with type 2 diabetes is not recommended. Herein, we review diabetes in HFE hemochromatosis and the role of iron in diabetes pathogenesis in whites of European descent with and without HFE hemochromatosis.

  7. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... common links HHS U.S. Department of Health and Human Services U.S. Food and Drug Administration A to ... Glucose Meters Diabetes Treatments Some people with diabetes need to take diabetes medicines or insulin to help ...

  8. Diabetes insipidus: The other diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Kalra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes insipidus (DI is a hereditary or acquired condition which disrupts normal life of persons with the condition; disruption is due to increased thirst and passing of large volumes of urine, even at night. A systematic search of literature for DI was carried out using the PubMed database for the purpose of this review. Central DI due to impaired secretion of arginine vasopressin (AVP could result from traumatic brain injury, surgery, or tumors whereas nephrogenic DI due to failure of the kidney to respond to AVP is usually inherited. The earliest treatment was posterior pituitary extracts containing vasopressin and oxytocin. The synthetic analog of vasopressin, desmopressin has several benefi ts over vasopressin. Desmopressin was initially available as intranasal preparation, but now the oral tablet and melt formulations have gained significance, with benefits such as ease of administration and stability at room temperature. Other molecules used for treatment include chlorpropamide, carbamazepine, thiazide diuretics, indapamide, clofibrate, indomethacin, and amiloride. However, desmopressin remains the most widely used drug for the treatment of DI. This review covers the physiology of water balance, causes of DI and various treatment modalities available, with a special focus on desmopressin.

  9. Diabetes insipidus: The other diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Sanjay; Zargar, Abdul Hamid; Jain, Sunil M.; Sethi, Bipin; Chowdhury, Subhankar; Singh, Awadhesh Kumar; Thomas, Nihal; Unnikrishnan, A. G.; Thakkar, Piya Ballani; Malve, Harshad

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) is a hereditary or acquired condition which disrupts normal life of persons with the condition; disruption is due to increased thirst and passing of large volumes of urine, even at night. A systematic search of literature for DI was carried out using the PubMed database for the purpose of this review. Central DI due to impaired secretion of arginine vasopressin (AVP) could result from traumatic brain injury, surgery, or tumors whereas nephrogenic DI due to failure of the kidney to respond to AVP is usually inherited. The earliest treatment was posterior pituitary extracts containing vasopressin and oxytocin. The synthetic analog of vasopressin, desmopressin has several benefits over vasopressin. Desmopressin was initially available as intranasal preparation, but now the oral tablet and melt formulations have gained significance, with benefits such as ease of administration and stability at room temperature. Other molecules used for treatment include chlorpropamide, carbamazepine, thiazide diuretics, indapamide, clofibrate, indomethacin, and amiloride. However, desmopressin remains the most widely used drug for the treatment of DI. This review covers the physiology of water balance, causes of DI and various treatment modalities available, with a special focus on desmopressin. PMID:26904464

  10. Myths about type 1 diabetes: Awareness and education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok Kanungo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Not all healthcare professionals (HCPs are aware of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM and various myths still exist in the society and among HCPs. The medical challenge in treating T1DM is the confusion between T1DM and T2DM and its management, which is very common and is observed with both general practitioners and parents of children with diabetes. There are multiple medical and social myths associated with diabetes, especially T1DM, prevalent in society. Diabetes management requires support and collaboration from family, school and society, which is sometimes difficult, as they are more discouraging than positive. The launch of the Changing Diabetes in Children program in India has created a lot of awareness and is helping patients and their parents understand the disease.

  11. CERN diabetes awareness days

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Do you have diabetes without knowing it? The Medical Service invites everyone working at CERN to participate in the above PREVENTION and DETECTION campaign on the: 8 and 9 November 2004 from 9 am to 4 pm at the infirmary, bldg. 57, ground floor Personal evaluation of diabetes risks, (blood pressure, cholesterol and sugar levels, Body Mass Index measurements and more...) will be offered as well as leaflets, information and advice, (diet, exercise). A dietician specialised in diabetes will be on hand from 2 pm until 4 pm. Diabetes is reaching epidemic proportions in many countries due to an increase in obesity, sedentary lifestyles and poor diet. Diabetes is a major cause of blindness, cardio-vascular and kidney disease. An estimated 30-50% of these cases of diabetes go undetected, despite de fact that easy and efficient prevention exists. Diabetes discovered and treated early is not a severe condition but untreated and ignored it can have dire consequences.

  12. Diabetes and exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Ruderman, N B; Schneider, S H

    1981-01-01

    This review describes (1) the metabolic and hormonal response to exercise in normal and diabetic man, and (2) the potential benefits of physical training in diabetes. Whereas in normal man plasma glucose varies little during exercise, the insulin-dependent diabetic subject may experience...... its site of injection. The response to exercise of noninsulin-dependent diabetic subjects and of diabetic subjects with autonomic neuropathy is also described. Physical training improves glucose tolerance in some noninsulin-dependent diabetic subjects and in insulin-dependent patients, it may diminish...... insulin requirements. It may also have a role in retarding the development of cardiovascular complications. Physical training is not totally innocuous, however, and in many patients with diabetes special precautions are required....

  13. Fenofibrate and Diabetic Retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knickelbein, Jared E; Abbott, Akshar B; Chew, Emily Y

    2016-10-01

    Diabetic retinopathy, a common and sight-threatening microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus, is a leading cause of blindness among working-aged adults. Medical therapies including intensive control of hyperglycemia and hypertension have been shown to reduce the incidence and progression of diabetic retinopathy. The association of dyslipidemia and treatment with statins with diabetic retinopathy is inconsistent in epidemiologic studies. However, two recent randomized clinical trials have demonstrated beneficial effects of systemic fenofibrate therapy in reducing the progression of diabetic retinopathy independently of serum lipid levels. These findings suggest that fenofibrate may be an effective strategy for reducing the progression of diabetic retinopathy, thus reducing the large and growing public health burden of treating the sight-threatening complications of diabetic retinopathy.

  14. School Health and Nutrition Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurcan Yabanci

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Schools play an effective role for adopt and maintain healthy eating and physical activity behaviors in children and adolescents. Schools are an important part of national efforts to prevent chronic diseases such as childhood obesity, coronary heart diseases, diabetes and cancer. Nutrition programs in schools can help children and adolescents participate in full educational potential; improve academic performance and health quality. To ensure a healthy future for our children, school-based nutrition education programs must become a national priority. Governments, community leaders, doctors, dieteticians, nurses, teachers, and parents must commit to implementing and sustaining nutrition education programs within the schools. School health and nutrition programs which part of public health and education are summarized in this review. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2011; 10(3.000: 361-368

  15. Diabetes mellitus, part 1: physiology and complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Muralitharan

    In part 1 of this 2-part article the author discusses the physiology and complications of diabetes mellitus (DM), a chronic and progressive disorder which affects all ages of the population. The number of people diagnosed with diabetes is approximately 1.8 million and an estimated further 1 million are undiagnosed (Department of Health, 2005). In the UK, 1-2% of the population have diabetes and among school children this is approximately 2 in 1000 (Watkins, 1996). There are two main types of diabetes--type 1 and type 2 (Porth, 2005). The aetiology of DM is unknown; however, genetic and environmental factors have been linked to its development. Type 1 results from the loss of insulin production in the beta cells of the pancreas, and type 2 from a lack of serum insulin or poor uptake of glucose into the cells. Diabetes causes disease in many organs in the body, which may be life-threatening if untreated. Complications such as heart disease, vascular disease, renal failure and blindness (Roberts, 2005) have all been reported. The increased prevalence may be caused by factors such as environmental aspects, diet, an ageing population and low levels of physical exercise.

  16. Anti-diabetic activity-guided screening of aqueous-ethanol Moringa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Pulau Pinang, Malaysia, 2Faculty of Pharmacy, ... increasing among Malaysians, reaching 23.8 % ... (Roche,. ACCU-CHEK. Performa no. 55404068967). Anti-diabetic studies.

  17. Cognitive Functioning and Academic Achievement in Children with Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus (IDDM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Clarissa S.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Consistent evidence relates insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) to lower intellectual functioning in children, although performance is still in the average range. Children with IDDM have received specialized classroom assistance at school. Boys with diabetes appear at greater risk for learning problems than girls. Evidence suggests both…

  18. Neuropathy and Diabetic Foot Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volmer-Thole, Maren; Lobmann, Ralf

    2016-06-10

    Diabetic foot ulceration is a serious complication of diabetes mellitus worldwide and the most common cause of hospitalization in diabetic patients. The etiology of diabetic foot ulcerations is complex due to their multifactorial nature; in the pathophysiology of diabetic foot ulceration polyneuropathy is important. Proper adherence to standard treatment strategies and interdisciplinary cooperation can reduce the still high rates of major amputations.

  19. Diabetes knowledge among older adults with diabetes in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jie; Gruber, Kenneth J; Liu, Huaping; Zhao, Hong; Garcia, Alexandra A

    2013-01-01

    To explore the relationships of demographic and clinical variables and attendance at diabetes educational programmes with diabetes knowledge among a community sample of older Chinese adults with type 2 diabetes residing in Beijing. Knowledge of diabetes is an important component of diabetes self-management. Level of education, duration of diabetes, visits to a dietician and diabetes self-management are associated with diabetes knowledge. A few studies have examined these relationships in older Chinese with diabetes. A descriptive correlational study. The study was conducted in face-to-face interviews with 108 older adults with type 2 diabetes and an average age of 68 (SD = 8·41) years residing in six residential apartment complexes in Beijing. Along with the assessment of diabetes knowledge and diabetes self-management, assessments of glucose, blood pressure, body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference were obtained. Age and systolic blood pressure were negatively associated with diabetes knowledge. Diabetes knowledge was not related to diabetes self-care activities or glucose level. A regression model with age, education and clinical variables significantly predicted diabetes knowledge, explaining 29% of the variance in knowledge. Participants who had a family history of diabetes, visited traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) doctors and ophthalmologists and attended diabetes educational programmes were more likely to have high scores on diabetes knowledge. Age, education, a family history of diabetes, visits to TCM providers and ophthalmologists and attending diabetes class are factors associated with increased levels of diabetes knowledge. Healthcare providers need to provide age-specific, low literacy and family-focused diabetes education programmes and consider integrating principles and holistic perspectives of TCM in diabetes educational programmes for older Chinese with diabetes. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. [Importance of the school nurse's role in the Canary Islands schools].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Pedro Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Today there are more and more children with chronic diseases or physical conditions that regularly attend schools. This study aims to identify the importance of school centers' directors attribute to the school nurse. It has been decided to make a cross-sectional study. So, it has been to sent by e-mail a questionnaire of 20 questions to 635 schools, receiving 209 completed. 65.6% of children in schools have required drugs administration. In 59.3% of schools, teachers have attended at one time any health problems (acute or chronic) of children. 98.1% of schools know the health problems of the students who is in charge. The most common health problem among children in schools were food allergies, followed by asthma, diabetes and epilepsy. 67% of school centers' directors know the guide attention to health emergencies in schools.

  1. Diabetes and Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Donghui

    2011-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is likely the third modifiable risk factor for pancreatic cancer after cigarette smoking and obesity. Epidemiological investigations have found that long-term type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with a 1.5- to 2.0-fold increase in the risk of pancreatic cancer. A causal relationship between diabetes and pancreatic cancer is also supported by findings from prediagnostic evaluations of glucose and insulin levels in prospective studies. Insulin resistance and associated hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and inflammation have been suggested to be the underlying mechanisms contributing to development of diabetes-associated pancreatic cancer. Signaling pathways that regulate the metabolic process also play important roles in cell proliferation and tumor growth. Use of the antidiabetic drug metformin has been associated with reduced risk of pancreatic cancer in diabetics and recognized as an antitumor agent with the potential to prevent and treat this cancer. On the other hand, new-onset diabetes may indicate subclinical pancreatic cancer, and patients with new-onset diabetes may constitute a population in whom pancreatic cancer can be detected early. Biomarkers that help define high-risk individuals for clinical screening for pancreatic cancer are urgently needed. Why pancreatic cancer causes diabetes and how diabetes affects the clinical outcome of pancreatic cancer have yet to be fully determined. Improved understanding of the pathological mechanisms shared by diabetes and pancreatic cancer would be the key to the development of novel preventive and therapeutic strategies for this cancer. PMID:22162232

  2. Diabetes and periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deshpande Kalyani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this review is to update the reader with practical knowledge concerning the relationship between diabetes mellitus and periodontal diseases. Exclusive data is available on the association between these two chronic diseases till date. Articles published on this relationship often provide the knowledge of definitions of diabetes mellitus and periodontal diseases, prevalence, extent, severity of periodontal disease, complications of diabetes along with the possible underlying mechanisms. The authors reviewed human epidemiological studies, cross-sectional observations and longitudinal cohort, case control that evaluated variables exclusively over the past 30 years and the predominant findings from the "certain" articles are summarized in this review. This review clarifies certain queries such as 1 Do periodontal diseases have an effect on the metabolic control of diabetes? 2 Does diabetes act as a risk factor of periodontitis? 3 What are the possible underlying mechanisms relating the connection between these two chronic diseases? 4 What is the effect of periodontal intervention on metabolic control of diabetes? After a thorough survey of literature, it was observed that diabetes acts as a risk factor in development of periodontitis as periodontitis is significantly aggravated in patients suffering from diabetes having long term hyperglycemia. Different mechanisms underlying the association between the accelerated periodontal disease and diabetes are emerging but still more work is required. Major efforts are required to elucidate the impact of periodontal diseases on diabetes. At the same time, patients are needed to be made aware of regular periodontal maintenance schedule and oral hygiene.

  3. Tips for Teens with Diabetes: What Is Diabetes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Teens: Lower Your Risk for Type 2 Diabetes When Your Child Is Diagnosed with Diabetes: Parents’ Questions for the ... the chances of both the mother and her child getting diabetes later on. Why should I take care of ...

  4. Diabetic ketoacidosis: a challenging diabetes phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cliona Small

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We describe three patients presenting with diabetic ketoacidosis secondary to ketosis prone type 2, rather than type 1 diabetes. All patients were treated according to a standard DKA protocol, but were subsequently able to come off insulin therapy while maintaining good glycaemic control. Ketosis-prone type 2 diabetes (KPD presenting with DKA has not been described previously in Irish patients. The absence of islet autoimmunity and evidence of endogenous beta cell function after resolution of DKA are well-established markers of KPD, but are not readily available in the acute setting. Although not emphasised in any current guidelines, we have found that a strong family history of type 2 diabetes and the presence of cutaneous markers of insulin resistance are strongly suggestive of KPD. These could be emphasised in future clinical practice guidelines.

  5. Insulin Administration in Catholic Schools: A New Look at Legal and Medical Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Anecdotal evidence indicates that more students with type 1 diabetes are enrolling in Catholic schools across the United States. Meeting the medical needs of these students appears to be a significant challenge--legally and logistically--for many Catholic schools. District officials, school leaders, and school staff need support to understand the…

  6. Gestational diabetes versus pregestational diabetes. Perinatal results.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristóbal Torres González

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Fundament: Diabetes Mellitus is one of the most affecting diseases in the development of pregnancy. This greatly depends on the metabolic control achieved, which has demanded several proyects of treatment, thus decreasing the risks that the gestational process carries out. Objective: to compare the perinatal results between the diabetic gestational women and pregestational ones admitted at Cienfuegos Hospital. Method: Comparative study developed at the Gynecological-Obstetric Universitary Hospital from Cienfuegos province, from January to december 2003, including 167 pregnant women with Diabetes mellitus during pregnancy. The variables under study were: type of Diabetes, Márquez Guillén classification about good or bad fetal-maternal prognosis , treatment used, type of delivery, gestational age at labor, newborn weight, prenatal and maternal complication. Results: There was a predominance of gestational diabetes (73, 6 % over the cases with pregestational diabetes (26,3 %. According to Marquez Guillén classification , the bad fetal-maternal prognosis (X=16.37, p

  7. Behavioral economics survey of patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emoto N

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Naoya Emoto,1 Fumitaka Okajima,1 Hitoshi Sugihara,2 Rei Goto3,4 1Division of Endocrinology, Department of Medicine, Nippon Medical School Chiba Hokusoh Hospital, Chiba, 2Department of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Graduate School of Medicine, Nippon Medical School, Tokyo, 3Hakubi Center of Advanced Research, Kyoto University, Kyoto, 4Graduate School of Economics, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan Background: Adherence to treatment and the metabolic control of diabetes are challenging in many patients with diabetes. The theory of neuroeconomics can provide important clues for understanding unreasonable human behavior concerning decisions between outcomes occurring at different time points.  Objective: We investigated patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes to determine whether patients who are at a risk of developing complications are less risk averse. We also examined whether patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes have different behavioral traits in decision making under risk.  Methods: We conducted a behavioral economics survey of 219 outpatients, 66 with type 1 diabetes and 153 with type 2 diabetes. All patients had been referred by general practitioners or other departments in the hospital. At the time of the survey, levels of hemoglobin A1c were not significantly different between patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes.  Results: Patients with type 2 diabetes showed a lower response rate to the survey compared with patients with type 1 diabetes (71.9% vs 87.9%, P<0.01. Logistic regression analysis indicated that diabetic retinopathy was negatively associated with risk averse in pricing of hypothetical lotteries, myopic time preference, willingness to pay for preventive medicine, and levels of satisfaction with life. Diabetic nephropathy was also negatively associated with risk averse in pricing of hypothetical lotteries. Detailed analysis revealed that a lower proportion of patients with type 2 diabetes (22.7% were categorized

  8. Update on diabetes classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Celeste C; Philipson, Louis H

    2015-01-01

    This article highlights the difficulties in creating a definitive classification of diabetes mellitus in the absence of a complete understanding of the pathogenesis of the major forms. This brief review shows the evolving nature of the classification of diabetes mellitus. No classification scheme is ideal, and all have some overlap and inconsistencies. The only diabetes in which it is possible to accurately diagnose by DNA sequencing, monogenic diabetes, remains undiagnosed in more than 90% of the individuals who have diabetes caused by one of the known gene mutations. The point of classification, or taxonomy, of disease, should be to give insight into both pathogenesis and treatment. It remains a source of frustration that all schemes of diabetes mellitus continue to fall short of this goal.

  9. Islamic Fasting and Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fereidoun Azizi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to review health-related aspects of Ramadan fasting in normal individuals and diabetics. During fasting days of Ramadan, glucose homeostasis is maintained by meal taken bepore dawn and by liver glycogen stores. Changes in serum lipids are variable and defend on the quality and quantity of food consumption and changes in weight. Compliant, well controlled type 2 diabetics may observe Ramadan fasting; but fasting is not recommended for type 1, non complaint, poorly controlled and pregnant diabetics. Although Ramadan fasting is safe for all healthy individuals and well controlled diabetics, those with uncontrolled diabetics and diabetics with complications should consult physicians and follow scientific recommendations.

  10. Diagnosis of Diabetes and Prediabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or obese and have at least two other risk factors for developing diabetes. 1 low birthweight a mother who had diabetes while pregnant with them any risk factor mentioned in Risk Factors for Type 2 Diabetes ...

  11. Carbohydrates and Diabetes (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Carbohydrates and Diabetes KidsHealth > For Parents > Carbohydrates and Diabetes ... many kids with diabetes take to stay healthy. Carbohydrates and Blood Sugar The two main forms of ...

  12. Natural history of diabetic complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deckert, T; Feldt-Rasmussen, B; Borch-Johnsen, K

    1991-01-01

    Until recently Type 1 diabetes has been characterized by a considerable degree of mortality, mainly associated with the development of diabetic nephropathy. Diabetic nephropathy is characterized by persistent proteinuria, decreasing glomerular filtration rate (GFR), increasing blood pressure, and...

  13. Snacking when you have diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy snacking - diabetes; Low blood sugar - snacking; Hypoglycemia - snacking ... When you have diabetes , you need to control your blood sugar. Insulin or diabetes medicines, as well as exercise in general, helps lower ...

  14. Family Health History and Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diabetes Diabetes Risk Test Family Health History Quiz Family Health History Quiz Family health history is an ... health problems. Four Questions You Should Ask Your Family About Diabetes & Family Health History Knowing your family ...

  15. Peripartum management of diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Pramila Kalra; Manjunath Anakal

    2013-01-01

    The peripartum control of diabetes is very important for the well-being of the newborn as higher incidence of neonatal hypoglycemia is seen if maternal hyperglycemia happens during this period. Type of diabetes (type 1, type 2 or gestational diabetes) also has an effect on the glucose concentration during intrapartum period. During the latent phase of labor, the metabolic demands are stable but during active labor there is increased metabolic demand and decreased insulin requirement. After de...

  16. History of Diabetes Insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenti, Giovanna; Tamma, Grazia

    2016-02-01

    Under physiological conditions, fluid and electrolyte homoeostasis is maintained by the kidney adjusting urine volume and composition according to body needs. Diabetes Insipidus is a complex and heterogeneous clinical syndrome affecting water balance and characterized by constant diuresis, resulting in large volumes of dilute urine. With respect to the similarly named Diabetes Mellitus, a disease already known in ancient Egypt, Greece and Asia, Diabetes Insipidus has been described several thousand years later. In 1670s Thomas Willis, noted the difference in taste of urine from polyuric subjects compared with healthy individuals and started the differentiation of Diabetes Mellitus from the more rare entity of Diabetes Insipidus. In 1794, Johann Peter Frank described polyuric patients excreting nonsaccharine urine and introduced the term of Diabetes Insipidus. An hystorical milestone was the in 1913, when Farini successfully used posterior pituitary extracts to treat Diabetes Insipidus. Until 1920s the available evidence indicated Diabetes Insipidus as a disorder of the pituitary gland. In the early 1928, De Lange first observed that some patients with Diabetes Insipidus did not respond to posterior pituitary extracts and subsequently Forssman and Waring in 1945 established that the kidney had a critical role for these forms of Diabetes Insipidus resistant to this treatment. In 1947 Williams and Henry introduced the term Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus for the congenital syndrome characterized by polyuria and renal concentrating defect resistant to vasopressin. In 1955, du Vigneaud received the 1955 Nobel Prize in chemistry for the first synthesis of the hormone vasopressin representing a milestone for the treatment of Central Diabetes Insipidus.

  17. Diabetes and pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Christine Hsu; Muhammad Wasif Saif

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Risk factors for pancreatic cancer are smoking, family history, chronic pancreatitis, and diabetes. There is controversy with regards to the causal relationship between diabetes and pancreatic cancer because many patients with pancreatic cancer have new onset diabetes. Abstracts presented at the 2011 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting highlighted and supported the positive association ...

  18. Diabetic microvascular complications: possible targets for improved macrovascular outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Weinrauch, Larry

    2010-01-01

    John A D’Elia1, George Bayliss1,2, Bijan Roshan1, Manish Maski1, Ray E Gleason1, Larry A Weinrauch11Renal Unit, Joslin Diabetes Center, Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; 2Department of Medicine, Rhode Island Hospital, Alpert School of Medicine, Brown University, Providence, RI, USAAbstract: The results of recent outcome trials challenge hypotheses that tight control of both glycohemoglobin and blood pressure dimini...

  19. Diabetes - preventing heart attack and stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes complications - heart; Coronary artery disease - diabetes; CAD - diabetes; Cerebrovascular disease - diabetes ... People with diabetes have a higher chance of having heart attacks and strokes. Smoking and having high blood pressure and high ...

  20. Take Steps to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... En español Take Steps to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes Browse Sections The Basics Overview Types of Diabetes ... 1 of 9 sections The Basics: Types of Diabetes What is diabetes? Diabetes is a disease. People ...

  1. Osteoporosis and diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Barbagallo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus and osteoporosis are chronic diseases with an elevated and growing incidence in the elderly. Recent epidemiological studies have demonstrated an elevated risk of hip, humerus and foot fractures in elder diabetic subjects. While type 1 diabetes is generally associated with a mild reduction in bone mineral density (BMD, type 2 diabetes, more prevalent in old subjects, is frequently linked to a normal or high BMD. Studies on experimental models of diabetes have suggested an altered bone structure that may help to explain the elevated risk of fractures observed in these animals and may as well help to explain the paradox of an incremented risk of fractures in type 2 diabetic elderly in the presence of normal or elevated BMD. In addition, diabetic elderly have an increased risk of falls, consequent at least in part to a poor vision, peripheral neuropathy, and weaken muscular performance. Diabetes may affect bone tissue by different mechanisms including obesity, hyperinsulinemia, deposit of advanced glycosilation end products in collagen fibre, reduced circulating levels of IGF-1, hypercalciuria, renal function impairment, microangiopathy and chronic inflammation. A better understanding of these mechanisms may help implement the prevention of fractures in the growing population of mature diabetics.

  2. Diabetes, Nutrition, and Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelhafiz, Ahmed H; Sinclair, Alan J

    2015-08-01

    Aging is associated with body composition changes that lead to glucose intolerance and increased risk of diabetes. The incidence of diabetes increases with aging, and the prevalence has increased because of the increased life expectancy of the population. Lifestyle modifications through nutrition and exercise in combination with medications are the main components of diabetes management. The potential benefits of nutrition and exercise intervention in older people with diabetes are enormous. Nutrition and exercise training are feasible even in frail older people living in care homes and should take into consideration individual circumstances, cultural factors, and ethnic preferences.

  3. Type 2 diabetes models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram, Dorte Xenia

    2012-01-01

    This chapter deals with type 2 diabetes in vivo models and techniques suitable for testing new anti-diabetic compounds. In particular, the testing of TRP antagonist for beneficial effects against type 2 diabetes is considered. There are many choices of both in vitro techniques and in vivo models......, impaired glucose tolerance, impaired insulin secretion, and insulin resistance in vivo and should, thus, be sufficient to demonstrate preclinical proof of concept of a TRP antagonist in type 2 diabetes in rodents. The experiments are suggestions and could be replaced or supplemented by others....

  4. Worldwide burden of diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaikrit Bhutani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is a pandemic of major public health importance cannot be disputed. While the IDF data does emphasis the importance of diabetes as a global public health problem, it does not place in perspective the ranking of diabetes as compared to other diseases and illnesses. The GBD data highlight this fact in multiple ways. The disease and its complications or comorbid conditions rank high in the list of risk factors, and causes of death. This communication describes the global burden of diabetes especially south-east Asia and the statistical sequelae of the disease.

  5. Healthy Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Wellness Policy Opportunities to create and support a healthy school environment. More Whole School, Whole Community, Whole Child A collaborative approach to learning and health Healthy Schools School Nutrition Environment Childhood Nutrition Facts Energy Drinks Obesity Prevention Youth ...

  6. [Type 2 diabetes and depression in Guadalajara , Mexico , 2005].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colunga-Rodríguez, Cecilia; García de Alba, Javier E; Salazar-Estrada, José G; Angel-González, Mario

    2008-01-01

    Determining the prevalence of depression and comparing sociodemographic, metabolic and clinical indicators in depressed and non-depressed people suffering from type 2 diabetes. A comparative cross-sectional study was carried out on a sample of 450 people aged over 30 suffering from type 2 diabetes; they had been diagnosed more than one year before and psychopathology had not been determined for them. A modified Zung's scale was applied and a sociodemographic survey carried out. Glucosylated haemoglobin, body mass index (BMI), blood pressure and glycemia in fasting were all evaluated. Diagnostic history and clinical state regarding diabetes were recorded. There was 63 % depression prevalence in a 3 to 1 ratio, this being greater in women than in men (2,08-4,82 95 %CI, p=0.00). Differences between depressed and non-depressed people were found in schooling, civil state and occupation (p0.05); however, diagnostic history and clinical state were associated with gender, the former being associated just with men and the latter with both sexes. The prevalence of depression was high in people suffering from diabetes and women were at greater risk. No association was revealed between age and people suffering from diabetes who were depressed, unlike schooling, civil state and occupation; depression was presented more amongst people having a longer diagnostic history of diabetes and greater BMI.

  7. Evaluation of Jamaican Knowledge of Diabetes and Health Beliefs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melody L. Hartzler

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: The International Diabetes Federation (IDF estimated that over 382 million people worldwide were affected by diabetes in 2013. The Caribbean region consistently is above the global average in regard to diabetes prevalence. Specifically, in Jamaica, researchers have found that the management of diabetes is not consistent with international guidelines, and in Caribbean culture, there are additional health beliefs that may need to be addressed. The purpose of this study is to (1 evaluate patient diabetes-related knowledge and health beliefs and (2 determine the association between diabetes-related knowledge and health beliefs in rural Jamaica. Methods: Rural Jamaican patients with diabetes (N=48, mean age = 55.16±15.08 were asked to complete questionnaires for cross-sectional examination of knowledge and health beliefs during a medical mission trip to the parish of St. Elizabeth in Jamaica. Participants were asked to verbally complete the Spoken Knowledge in Low Literacy in Diabetes Scale (SKILLD, 10 items and Health Belief Model-11 (HBM-11, 11 items, as well as a demographic instrument. Analyses were performed in SPSS v. 20.0. Descriptive statistics were performed for all items. Spearman or Pearson correlations, as appropriate, were utilized to assess associations. Differences in HBM subscales by demographic characteristics were assessed using paired t-tests. Results: Participants had poor knowledge of diabetes, particularly regarding signs and symptoms of hyper/hypoglycemia, importance of foot and eye exams, fasting blood glucose levels, and long-term diabetes complications. Knowledge deficits were associated with educational attainment, as many participants had only completed primary school. Most participants indicated they were ready to take action regarding their health, but they perceived there were significant barriers to doing so. Also, older adults were more likely to believe that they could control their diabetes

  8. Diabetic Retinopathy: Nature and Extent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, W. Ronald; Patz, Arnall

    1978-01-01

    The authors discuss the incidence and prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in juvenile and maturity onset diabetics, background and proliferative retinopathy, and current modalities of treatment. (Author)

  9. The Utrecht Healthy School Project: Connecting adolescent health behavior, academic achievement and Health Promoting Schools

    OpenAIRE

    Busch, V.

    2014-01-01

    Unhealthy behaviors contribute to the development of diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease and psychiatric disorders. Most often these behaviors develop in the teenage years. This thesis addresses the following topics: (1) How do health-related behaviors cluster and affect health in adolescents, (2) how do they affect their school performances and (3) are they improved by a Health Promoting School intervention that applies a Whole School Approach? Firstly, it was studied how healt...

  10. Predictors and prevention of diabetic cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chavali V

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Vishalakshi Chavali, Suresh C Tyagi, Paras K Mishra Department of Physiology and Biophysics, School of Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky, USA Abstract: Despite our cognizance that diabetes can enhance the chances of heart failure, causes multiorgan failure,and contributes to morbidity and mortality, it is rapidly increasing menace worldwide. Less attention has been paid to alert prediabetics through determining the comprehensive predictors of diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM and ameliorating DCM using novel approaches. DCM is recognized as asymptomatic progressing structural and functional remodeling in the heart of diabetics, in the absence of coronary atherosclerosis and hypertension. The three major stages of DCM are: (1 early stage, where cellular and metabolic changes occur without obvious systolic dysfunction; (2 middle stage, which is characterized by increased apoptosis, a slight increase in left ventricular size, and diastolic dysfunction and where ejection fraction (EF is <50%; and (3 late stage, which is characterized by alteration in microvasculature compliance, an increase in left ventricular size, and a decrease in cardiac performance leading to heart failure. Recent investigations have revealed that DCM is multifactorial in nature and cellular, molecular, and metabolic perturbations predisposed and contributed to DCM. Differential expression of microRNA (miRNA, signaling molecules involved in glucose metabolism, hyperlipidemia, advanced glycogen end products, cardiac extracellular matrix remodeling, and alteration in survival and differentiation of resident cardiac stem cells are manifested in DCM. A sedentary lifestyle and high fat diet causes obesity and this leads to type 2 diabetes and DCM. However, exercise training improves insulin sensitivity, contractility of cardiomyocytes, and cardiac performance in type 2 diabetes. These findings provide new clues to diagnose and mitigate DCM. This review embodies

  11. "Governare il diabete" ("to steer diabetes"): a new proposal for diabetic camps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvatoni, Alessandro; Pompili, Valeria; Biasoli, Roberta; Cardani, Roberta; Arioli, Gianluigi; Nespoli, Luigi

    2003-01-01

    "Governare il diabete" (the Italian translation of "to steer diabetes") is a project which gives young diabetics the opportunity of sailing with non-diabetic companions in a protected and educational environment. The education technique, based on the parallelism between sailing and diabetes, encourage correct self-management of both diabetes related and unrelated problems. The impact of the experience on self-esteem, quality of life and metabolic control is currently under investigation.

  12. [Diabetic nephropathy/diabetic kidney disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucek, P

    2013-03-01

    Diabetic kidney disease (DKD), which belongs to the triad of diabetic microvascular complications, is currently the main cause of end-stage renal disease in developed countries. DKD usually simultaneously leads to a deteriorated long-term control of glucose metabolism and blood pressure, and to the development of diabetic retinopathy, neuropathy and atherosclerotic complications, which are the main causes of patients' mortality. Screening of the initial stages of DKD is to be based on the detection of increased albumin leak into the urine, microalbuminuria, and the reduction of renal function by means of estimates of glomerular filtration rate based on the serum creatinine level. The main objective of the prophylactic and treatment measures is to prevent the onset of DKD, or at least to stop its transition into an irreversible, progressive stage characterised by a permanent, often nephrotic proteinuria. The basic procedures in the prevention and treatment of DKD are maintaining the optimal metabolic control of diabetes and intensive hypertension treatment based on the inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system. Reaching the stage of progressive renal insufficiency (serum creatinine level approximately > or = 200 micromol/l) is an indication for further follow-up in the nephrology department, which will then take the necessary preparatory measures for dialysis treatment. The optimal method of kidney function replacement for patients with DKD is kidney transplantation, or combined kidney-pancreas transplantation in patients with type 1 diabetes.

  13. Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Henrik U; Lanng, Susanne; Pressler, Tania

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Cystic fibrosis (CF)-related diabetes has been regarded as a mild form of diabetes with a low risk of severe diabetes complications. The prevalence of CF-related diabetes increases with age, resulting in a 50% prevalence of diabetes at age 30 years. We sought to investigate whether...... microvascular complications in CF-related diabetes appear with a relevant frequency. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Thirty-eight patients aged 30 (range 18-55) years with CF-related diabetes for 20 (0-31) years were screened for diabetes complications. Because of chronic pulmonary infections, the majority...... of diabetic retinopathy was found in patients with insulin-treated CF-related diabetes, stressing the need for a regular screening program as in type 1 diabetes. Severely impaired kidney function was common in lung transplant patients, probably secondary to cyclosporine treatment....

  14. Diabetic foot infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemechu, Fassil W; Seemant, Fnu; Curley, Catherine A

    2013-08-01

    Diabetic foot infection, defined as soft tissue or bone infection below the malleoli, is the most common complication of diabetes mellitus leading to hospitalization and the most frequent cause of nontraumatic lower extremity amputation. Diabetic foot infections are diagnosed clinically based on the presence of at least two classic findings of inflammation or purulence. Infections are classified as mild, moderate, or severe. Most diabetic foot infections are polymicrobial. The most common pathogens are aerobic gram-positive cocci, mainly Staphylococcus species. Osteomyelitis is a serious complication of diabetic foot infection that increases the likelihood of surgical intervention. Treatment is based on the extent and severity of the infection and comorbid conditions. Mild infections are treated with oral antibiotics, wound care, and pressure off-loading in the outpatient setting. Selected patients with moderate infections and all patients with severe infections should be hospitalized, given intravenous antibiotics, and evaluated for possible surgical intervention. Peripheral arterial disease is present in up to 40% of patients with diabetic foot infections, making evaluation of the vascular supply critical. All patients with diabetes should undergo a systematic foot examination at least once a year, and more frequently if risk factors for diabetic foot ulcers exist. Preventive measures include patient education on proper foot care, glycemic and blood pressure control, smoking cessation, use of prescription footwear, intensive care from a podiatrist, and evaluation for surgical interventions as indicated.

  15. Carbohydrates and Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Carbohydrates and Diabetes KidsHealth > For Teens > Carbohydrates and Diabetes A A A What's in this ... that you should keep track of how many carbohydrates (carbs) you eat. But what exactly are carbohydrates ...

  16. Preventing diabetic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, H P; Lund, S S; Rossing, P

    2001-01-01

    In type 1 diabetic patients with microalbuminuria not receiving antihypertensive treatment, an increase in urinary albumin excretion rate (AER) of 6% to 14%/year and a risk for the development of diabetic nephropathy of 3% to 30%/year have previously been reported. The aim of the present study wa...

  17. Genetics of diabetic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parving, H H; Tarnow, L; Rossing, P

    1996-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is a clinical syndrome characterized by persistent albuminuria, a relentless decline in GFR, raised arterial blood pressure, and increased relative mortality for cardiovascular diseases. Diabetic nephropathy is a leading cause of end-stage renal failure. The pathogenesis of d...

  18. Diabetes, Distress, and Depression

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-07-10

    This webinar is a discussion on incorporating the emotional side of diabetes into clinical care.  Created: 7/10/2014 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention’s Division of Diabetes Translation (NCCDP/DDT).   Date Released: 7/10/2014.

  19. Vitamin D and diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolden-Kirk, Heidi; Overbergh, Lut; Christesen, Henrik Thybo

    2011-01-01

    Experimental evidence indicates that vitamin D may play a role in the defense against type 1 diabetes (T1D) as well as type 2 diabetes (T2D). Epidemiological data have established a link between vitamin D deficiency and an increased incidence of both T1D and T2D, whereas early and long-term vitamin...

  20. Diabetes and cervical myelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houten, John K; Lenart, Christopher

    2016-05-01

    Diabetes may affect the typical physical findings associated with cervical spondylotic myelopathy, as coexisting diabetic neuropathy may dampen expected hyperreflexia and also produce non-dermatomal extremity numbness. Most large studies of surgically treated diabetic patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy have focused upon infection rates rather than exploring any differences in the presenting physical signs. We conducted a retrospective study of the pattern of presenting neurological signs and symptoms and of the clinical outcomes in 438 patients surgically treated for cervical spondylotic myelopathy, 79 of whom had diabetes. Compared with non-diabetic patients, those with diabetes were slightly older and had lower preoperative modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association (mJOA) scores. Those with diabetes also had a significantly higher incidence of hyporeflexia and a higher incidence of a positive Babinski sign, but there was no difference in the appearance of the Hoffman sign. The magnitude of mJOA improvement after surgery was comparable. We conclude that diabetes may alter the typical signs and symptoms of cervical spondylotic myelopathy and suggest that knowledge of the differences may aid in securing a prompt and accurate diagnosis.

  1. Diabetic Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... develop DHD. The higher a person's blood sugar level is, the higher his or her risk of DHD. Diabetes affects heart disease risk in three major ways. ... is that many lifestyle changes help control multiple risk factors. For example, ... treatment plan for diabetes and see your doctor for ongoing care. If ...

  2. Vulvovaginitis and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Bharti; Kalra, Sanjay

    2017-01-01

    Vulvovaginitis is a commonly encountered comorbid condition of diabetes, and is linked to poor glycaemic control. Proper, timely diagnosis and management is necessary to ensure optimal perineal/genital and metabolic health. Knowledge of current guidelines and recommendations helps in achieving this goal. This review describes the etiology, pathogenesis, clinical features, differential diagnosis, management and prevention of VV in diabetes.

  3. Therapies for diabetic dyslipidaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, D S H; Al Badarin, F; O'Keefe, J H

    2011-04-01

    Correction of diabetic dyslipidaemia in diabetic patients is the most important factor in reducing cardiac risk. Diabetic dyslipidaemia is characterized by elevated triglycerides, low total high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and small dense low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles. The most important therapeutic goal in diabetic dyslipidaemia is correction of the non-HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) level. Glycaemic control with particular attention to postprandial glucose control plays a role not only in improving dyslipidaemia but also in lowering cardiac events. Pioglitazone is particularly effective for improving the manifestations of diabetic dyslipidaemia, in addition to its favorable effects on systemic inflammation and hyperglycaemia. Use of statins in addition to lifestyle change is recommended in most if not all type 2 diabetic patients and the goal should be to lower the LDL to a level recommended for the patient with existing cardiovascular disease (CVD) (non-HDL-C level HDL and triglyceride levels should be deployed. Most patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) will require combining a lipid-lowering therapy with therapeutic lifestyle changes to achieve optimal lipid levels. Combinations usually include two or more of the following: a statin, nicotinic acid, omega-3 fats and bile acid sequestrants (BASs). Fibrates may also be of use in diabetic patients with persistently elevated triglycerides and depressed HDL-C levels, although their role in lowering adverse CV events is questionable. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Diabetes mellitus prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allende-Vigo, Myriam Zaydee

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review lifestyle modification interventions and pharmacological clinical studies designed to prevent diabetes and provide evidence-based recommendations for the prevention of Diabetes Mellitus. A review of relevant literature compiled via a literature search (PUBMED) of English-language publications between 1997 and 2010 was conducted. It is found that people at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus can halt the development of the disease. Lifestyle modification intervention with reduction of 5%-10% of excess body weight and increase in moderate physical activity by 150 min/wk has consistently proven to reduce the appearance of diabetes in different at-risk populations. Pharmacologic interventions have also demonstrated the prevention of the appearance of diabetes in persons at risk. Bariatric surgery has decreased the appearance of diabetes patients in a select group of individuals. The progression from prediabetes to diabetes mellitus can be prevented. Lifestyle modification intervention changes with weight loss and increased physical activity are currently recommended for the prevention of diabetes.

  5. Hyperglycemia and Diabetic Ketoacidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... These problems don't usually show up in kids or teens with diabetes who have had the disease for only a ... know when to call 911. In addition, all kids and teens with diabetes should wear some sort of medical identification (like ...

  6. Peripartum management of diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramila Kalra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The peripartum control of diabetes is very important for the well-being of the newborn as higher incidence of neonatal hypoglycemia is seen if maternal hyperglycemia happens during this period. Type of diabetes (type 1, type 2 or gestational diabetes also has an effect on the glucose concentration during intrapartum period. During the latent phase of labor, the metabolic demands are stable but during active labor there is increased metabolic demand and decreased insulin requirement. After delivery once the placenta is extracted, insulin resistance rapidly comes down and in patients with pre-gestational diabetes there will be a sudden drop in insulin requirement and the insulin may not be required in women with gestational diabetes, but they just need close monitoring. During breast-feeding blood glucose levels fall because of high metabolic demand and women need to take extra calories to maintain the levels and more vigilance especially in type 1 and type 2 diabetic mothers is required. The protocols used for the management of peripartum management of diabetes mostly rely on glucose and insulin infusion to maintain maternal blood sugars between 70 and 110 mg/dl. The data is mostly from retrospective studies and few randomized control trials done mainly in type 1 diabetes patients. The review summarizes guidelines, which are used for peripartum management of blood glucose.

  7. Diabetes Technologies and Their Role in Diabetes Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollipara, Sobha; Silverstein, Janet H.; Marschilok, Katie

    2009-01-01

    The 1993 Diabetes Complications and Control Trial (DCCT) showed that controlling blood glucose prevents and delays the progression of long term complications of diabetes. New diabetes technologies can make control of diabetes possible and safer. This paper reviews these technologies used to monitor blood glucose, administer insulin and evaluate…

  8. Diabetes and Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvisaari, Jaana; Keinänen, Jaakko; Eskelinen, Saana; Mantere, Outi

    2016-02-01

    People with schizophrenia have 2- to 5-fold higher risk of type 2 diabetes than the general population. The traditional risk factors for type 2 diabetes, especially obesity, poor diet, and sedentary lifestyle, are common in people with schizophrenia already early in the course of illness. People with schizophrenia also often have low socioeconomic status and income, which affects their possibilities to make healthy lifestyle choices. Antipsychotic medications increase the risk of type 2 diabetes both directly by affecting insulin sensitivity and indirectly by causing weight gain. Lifestyle modification interventions for prevention of diabetes should be an integral part of treatment of patients with schizophrenia. In the treatment of type 2 diabetes in patients with schizophrenia, communication and collaboration between medical care and psychiatric treatment providers are essential.

  9. Pharmacogenomics in diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Kaixin; Pedersen, Helle Krogh; Dawed, Adem Y.

    2016-01-01

    Genomic studies have greatly advanced our understanding of the multifactorial aetiology of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) as well as the multiple subtypes of monogenic diabetes mellitus. In this Review, we discuss the existing pharmacogenetic evidence in both monogenic diabetes mellitus and T2DM....... We highlight mechanistic insights from the study of adverse effects and the efficacy of antidiabetic drugs. The identification of extreme sulfonylurea sensitivity in patients with diabetes mellitus owing to heterozygous mutations in HNF1A represents a clear example of how pharmacogenetics can direct...... future pharmacogenomic findings could provide insights into treatment response in diabetes mellitus that, in addition to other areas of human genetics, facilitates drug discovery and drug development for T2DM....

  10. Type 2 diabetes in Brazil: epidemiology and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almeida-Pititto B

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bianca de Almeida-Pititto,1 Monike Lourenço Dias,2 Ana Carolina Franco de Moraes,3 Sandra RG Ferreira,3 Denise Reis Franco,4 Freddy Goldberg Eliaschewitz4,5 1Department of Preventive Medicine, Federal University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; 2Department of Endocrinology, Federal University of Goiás, Goiânia, Goiás, Brazil; 3Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; 4CPClin Clinical Research Center, 5Albert Einstein Hospital, São Paulo, Brazil Abstract: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is one of the most important epidemic diseases in the world this century, and accounts for 90% of cases of diabetes globally. Brazil is one of the most important examples of the alarming picture of T2DM in emergent societies, being the country with the fourth largest number of people with diabetes. The aim of this paper is to review the literature on diabetes in Brazil, specifically looking at the epidemiology and management of T2DM. A literature search was conducted using PubMed and LILACS to identify articles containing information on diabetes in Brazil. Official documents from the Brazilian government, World Health Organization, and International Diabetes Federation were also reviewed. Keywords: type 2 diabetes, Brazil, epidemiology, management

  11. Primary care for diabetes mellitus: perspective from older patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong ELY

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Eliza Lai Yi Wong1, Jean Woo2, Elsie Hui3, Carrie Chan2, Wayne LS Chan2, Annie Wai Ling Cheung11School of Public Health and Primary Care, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, 2School of Public Health and Primary Care, Division of Geriatrics, Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, 3Medical and Geriatric Unit, Shatin Hospital, HK SAR, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of ChinaBackground: Care of diabetes mellitus in the elderly requires an additional perspective to take into account impaired cognitive function, physical function, low level of education, and difficulty making lifestyle changes. Existing services tend to be driven by the views of tertiary and secondary care staff, rather than those of primary care staff and elderly patients. This study aimed to explore the attitudes and preferences of elderly patients with diabetes mellitus towards primary care (clinical care and community program.Method: Elderly patients with diabetes mellitus aged 60 years or above were recruited from governmental diabetes mellitus clinics and diabetes mellitus specific community centers. Three focus group discussions of 14 diabetic elderly patients were conducted and their perspectives on the new service model were assessed. Participants were interviewed according to an open-ended discussion guide which includes the following items: comments on existing clinic follow up and community program, motivation for joining the community program, and suggestions on further clinical services and community service program development.Results: Incapability of the current health service to address their special needs was a common concern in three focus group discussions. The majority highlighted the benefits of the new service program, that is, self-care knowledge and skill, attitudes to living with diabetes mellitus, and supportive network. Key facilitators included experiential learning, a group discussion platform

  12. Smoking and progression of diabetic nephropathy in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovind, Peter; Rossing, Peter; Tarnow, Lise

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Cigarette smoking contributes to development of diabetic nephropathy. However, long-term studies on the effect of smoking on decline in kidney function in diabetic nephropathy are lacking. We assessed the impact of smoking on progression of diabetic nephropathy in type 1 diabetic...... patients enrolled in a prospective observational cohort study started in 1983. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We identified all albuminuric type 1 diabetic patients (n = 301) followed for at least 3 years, median (range) 7 years (3-14), who underwent at least yearly measurement of glomerular filtration rate...... was not associated with decline in kidney function in type 1 diabetic patients with diabetic nephropathy....

  13. Diabetes and thalassaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Barnard

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is a significant complication of b-thalassaemia major. The aetiology includes iron overload causing b-cell destruction, autoimmunity, insulin resistance secondary to liver disease and development of type 1 or 2 diabetes. There are specific issues for patients with diabetes and thalassaemia which will be discussed here. Impaired carbohydrate metabolism must be detected early, to allow intensification of iron chelation. As life expectancy in thalassaemia rises, diabetic complications are seen. Optimising blood glucose and cardiovascular risk factor control is essential. Insulin remains critical for severely symptomatic patients. With milder hyperglycaemia, oral antidiabetic drugs are increasingly used. At Whittington Hospital, we wanted to address these issues. In 2005, we developed a unique Joint Diabetes Thalassaemia Clinic, where patients are reviewed jointly by specialist teams, including Consultant Diabetologist and Haematologist. The Joint Clinic aims to optimise diabetes, endocrine and thalassaemia care, while supporting patient self-management. A retrospective audit of the Joint Clinic (2005-09, showed improvement in glycaemic control, (Fructosamine falling from 344 umol/l to 319 umol/l. We compared our cohort to the National Diabetes Audit for England (2007-08. Patients attending the Joint Clinic achieved better glycaemic control (target reached: 73% Joint Clinic vs. 63% Nationally, blood pressure control (target reached: 58% Joint Clinic vs. 30% Nationally and cholesterol control (target reached: 81% Joint Clinic vs. 78% Nationally. 22.7% of our patients had ≥1 microvascular complication. A significant proportion had endocrinopathies (86% hypogonadism, 23% hypoparathyroidism, 18% hypothyroidism. Managing diabetes is one of the greatest challenges a person with thalassaemia can face. Training people to self-manage their diabetes and providing support from specialist teams working together are critical. The unique partnership

  14. Diabetic bladder dysfunction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guiming Liu; Firouz Daneshgari

    2014-01-01

    Objective To review studies on diabetic bladder dysfunction (DBD),a common and bothersome complication of diabetes mellitus.Data sources We performed a search of the English literature through PubMed.The key words used were "diabetes" and "bladder dysfunction" or "cystopathy".Our own data and perspective are included in the discussion.Study selection Studies containing data relevant to DBD were selected.Because of the limited length of this article,we also referenced reviews that contain comprehensive amalgamations of relevant literature.Results The classic symptoms of DBD are decreased bladder sensation,increased bladder capacity,and impaired bladder emptying with resultant elevated post-void residual urine.However,recent clinical and experimental evidence indicate a strong presence of storage problems such as urge incontinence in diabetes.Recent studies of DBD in animal models of type 1 diabetes have revealed temporal effects of diabetes,causing an early phase of compensatory bladder function and a later phase of decompensated bladder function.The pathophysiology of DBD is multifactorial,including disturbances of the detrusor,urothelium,autonomic nerves,and urethra.Polyuria and hyperglycemia play important but distinctive roles in induction of bladder dysfunction in type 1 diabetes.Polyuria causes significant bladder hypertrophy in the early stage of diabetes,whereas oxidative stress in the bladder caused by chronic hyperglycemia may play an important role in the late stage failure of bladder function.Conclusions DBD includes time-dependent and mixed manifestations.The pathological alterations include muscle,nerve,and urothelium.Polyuria and hyperglycemia independently contribute to the pathogenesis of DBD.Treatments for DBD are limited.Future clinical studies on DBD in type 1 and type 2 diabetes should be investigated separately.Animal studies of DBD in type 2 diabetes are needed,from the natural history to mechanisms.Further understanding of the molecular

  15. Worldwide increase in diabetes: implications for tuberculosis control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fisher-Hoch SP

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Susan P Fisher-HochDivision of Epidemiology, Human Genetics and Environmental Science, University of Texas School of Public Health, Brownsville Campus, Brownsville, TX, USAAbstract: Diabetes presents a greater threat to global tuberculosis (TB control than previously appreciated, with risk of reversing the achievements of several decades. An estimated 382 million people worldwide currently have diabetes, half of whom are undiagnosed. Most live in low- and middle-income countries alongside many of the two billion individuals infected with TB. Though the frequency of TB in type 1 diabetes was known for centuries, only recently have we observed the tripling of TB in type 2 diabetes, most significantly in high-burden TB populations such as in Peru, Russia, and the People's Republic of China. In India diabetes is estimated to have increased TB cases by 46% between 1998 and 2008. Diabetes is a greater long-term threat to TB control than human immunodeficiency virus (HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS since ten-fold more people are affected by diabetes than HIV/AIDS in larger geographic areas. Diabetes in TB increases drug resistance, treatment failure, and mortality, and may increase the spread of drug-resistant strains. Delayed or missed diagnosis fuels transmission of TB and hinders control of diabetes. Tailored treatment for diabetes patients requires well-designed clinical trials. The World Health Organization (WHO framework for care and control of diabetes and TB needs improved screening strategies. Determination of how best to establish bi-directional screening is hampered by lack of affordable and reliable methods. Recommendations include education of health care providers, patients, and communities. Structured diabetes programs with registries and effective follow-up could be modeled on and communicate with existing TB programs. Vital research should address new diagnostic tools, lowering cost and evaluation of intervention

  16. A socioeconomic and behavioral survey of patients with difficult-to-control type 2 diabetes mellitus reveals an association between diabetic retinopathy and educational attainment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emoto N

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Naoya Emoto,1,2 Fumitaka Okajima,1,2 Hitoshi Sugihara,2 Rei Goto3 1Department of Endocrinology, Nippon Medical School Chiba-Hokusoh Hospital, Chiba, 2Department of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Graduate School of Medicine, Nippon Medical School, Tokyo, 3Graduate School of Business Administration, Keio University, Kanagawa, Japan Background: We have recently reported that the attitude of patients toward risk could be a factor in the progression of diabetic complications. In general, risk preference is closely related to socioeconomic status (SES, which includes factors such as age, sex, income, and educational attainment.Objective: We aimed to determine the effect of SES and behavioral propensity on the progress of diabetic complications in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM.Methods: We conducted a survey of 238 patients with difficult-to-control T2DM treated at a hospital in Japan using a modified behavioral economics questionnaire that included questions related to SES. The patients had been referred by general practitioners or other departments in the hospital because of poor metabolic control or unstable complications.Results: Educational attainment was significantly associated with progression of retinopathy in patients <65 years of age. Educational attainment of a high school diploma (12 years of education or lower was a significant risk factor, but there were no differences among levels of attainment beyond high school (13–16 years or more of education. Behavioral propensities were also weakly associated with complications, but not as much as educational attainment. Personal income level and economic status did not show an association with the retinopathy levels.Conclusion: Lower educational attainment is a strong risk factor for diabetic retinopathy, and it is independent of the economic status. The result suggests that cognitive function may play an important role in the progression of diabetic retinopathy in

  17. Undiagnosed Diabetes and Pre-Diabetes in Health Disparities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan P Fisher-Hoch

    Full Text Available Globally half of all diabetes mellitus is undiagnosed. We sought to determine the extent and characteristics of undiagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus and pre-diabetes in Mexican Americans residing in the United States. This disadvantaged population with 50% lifetime risk of diabetes is a microcosm of the current pandemic. We accessed baseline data between 2004 and 2014 from 2,838 adults recruited to our Cameron County Hispanic Cohort (CCHC; a two-stage randomly selected 'Framingham-like' cohort of Mexican Americans on the US Mexico border with severe health disparities. We examined prevalence, risk factors and metabolic health in diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes and pre-diabetes. Two thirds of this Mexican American population has diabetes or pre-diabetes. Diabetes prevalence was 28.0%, nearly half undiagnosed, and pre-diabetes 31.6%. Mean BMI among those with diabetes was 33.5 kg/m2 compared with 29.0 kg/m2 for those without diabetes. Significant risk factors were low income and educational levels. Most with diabetes had increased waist/hip ratio. Lack of insurance and access to health services played a decisive role in failure to have diabetes diagnosed. Participants with undiagnosed diabetes and pre-diabetes had similar measures of poor metabolic health similar but generally not as severe as those with diagnosed diabetes. More than 50% of a minority Mexican American population in South Texas has diabetes or pre-diabetes and is metabolically unhealthy. Only a third of diabetes cases were diagnosed. Sustained efforts are imperative to identify, diagnose and treat individuals in underserved communities.

  18. Periodontal health and diabetes awareness among Saudi diabetes patients

    OpenAIRE

    Bahammam MA

    2015-01-01

    Maha A BahammamDepartment of Periodontology, King Abdulaziz University Faculty of Dentistry, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi ArabiaPurpose: This study aimed to examine diabetic patients in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, regarding their general diabetic and oral health-related awareness and practices, their awareness of the association of diabetes with periodontal disease, and their sources of diabetes-related information.Methods: Diabetic patients (n=454) who were receiving care at...

  19. Diabetes, Biochemical Markers of Bone Turnover, Diabetes Control, and Bone

    OpenAIRE

    Starup-Linde, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is known to have late complications including micro vascular and macro vascular disease. This review focuses on another possible area of complication regarding diabetes; bone. Diabetes may affect bone via bone structure, bone density, and biochemical markers of bone turnover. The aim of the present review is to examine in vivo from humans on biochemical markers of bone turnover in diabetics compared to non-diabetics. Furthermore, the effect of glycemic control on bone marker...

  20. Mexican American Parents' Perceptions of Childhood Risk Factors for Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Barbara J.; Barr, Kathleen L.; Baker, Sharon K.

    2011-01-01

    A study was conducted to identify the norms, values, and perceptions of urban immigrant Mexican American (MA) parents of school children relative to physical activity, healthy eating, and child risk factors for type 2 diabetes. Investigators facilitated five focus groups in an urban elementary school setting and analyzed data using qualitative…

  1. Contraception and the Adolescent Diabetic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennoy, Ilene

    1989-01-01

    Data from a study of 11 teenage diabetics suggests that pregnancy among adolescent diabetics is more frequent than among the general population, at a time when diabetic control is poor because of psychosocial factors associated with adolescence. Current recommendations regarding contraception for diabetic women, focusing on barrier methods, are…

  2. [Diabetes-specific health literacy: what do Turkish immigrants with diabetes mellitus 2 know about their disease?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofahl, C; von dem Knesebeck, O; Hollmann, J; Mnich, E

    2013-12-01

    Only few findings are available for the large group of type 2 diabetics whose origin is not German. This article investigates 1) the degree of diabetes-knowledge among diabetics of Turkish origin, and 2) factors that influence this knowledge and the competencies with handling the disease. In cooperation with 15 medical practices 294 diabetics of Turkish origin were interviewed in person by Turkish-speaking interviewers. There is no established concept for this population to measure their health literacy, therefore we adopted some questions from other tests and added our own items. Besides diabetes knowledge tests with closed and open questions the interviewees had to undertake a reading test and a screening test on German language skills. Socio-demographics and the attendance at diabetes trainings were gathered as well, and analysed in principal component analyses and multiple regressions. On average, the respondents had lived in Germany for 32 years, but 40% of them do not speak German. 25% never went to school and 21% cannot read or write (Turkish). Even though 60% took part in a diabetes training course, it appears that knowledge about the disease is scarce: only 15% could sufficiently explain their diabetes disease with their own words. A dimensional analysis helps to differentiate "theoretical" and "behavioural relevant" knowledge about diabetes. Theoretical knowledge is strongly associated with education, German language skills and attending a training course, whereas competencies that are relevant to the behaviour only are associated with participation in diabetes training courses. The educational effects remain on a rather low level and cannot compensate the fact that theoretical knowledge about diabetes depends on education. Hence, the overall (too) low level of knowledge on health and diabetes is only marginally improved. Education, attending a diabetes training course and language skills are the main factors for explaining poor knowledge about diabetes

  3. Knowledge of complications of diabetes mellitus among patients visiting the diabetes clinic at Sampa Government Hospital, Ghana: a descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obirikorang, Yaa; Obirikorang, Christian; Anto, Enoch Odame; Acheampong, Emmanuel; Batu, Emmanuella Nsenbah; Stella, Agyemang Duah; Constance, Omerige; Brenya, Peter Kojo

    2016-07-26

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) appears to be a global epidemic and an increasingly major non-communicable disease threatening both affluent and non-affluent society. The study aimed to determine the knowledge of diabetic complications among diabetes mellitus clients visiting the Diabetic Clinical at Sampa Government Hospital, Ghana. This questionnaire-based descriptive study recruited a total 630 patients visiting the Diabetes Clinic at the Sampa Government Hospital. Structured questionnaire was used to obtain information such as socio-demographic and knowledge on complications of diabetes. Out of a total of 630 participants, 325 (51.5 %) knew diabetic foot as the most common complication followed by hypertension 223(35.4 %), neuropathy 184 (29.2 %), hypoactive sexual arousal 160(25.4 %), arousal disorder 135(21.5 %), eye diseases 112(17.7 %), heart disease 58(9.2 %), and renal disease 34(5.4 %). Comprehensive assessment of level of knowledge on the complications showed that majority 378(60.0 %) of T2D patients did not have knowledge on diabetes complications, 169(26.9 %) had inadequate knowledge on diabetics complication while 82(13.1 %) had adequate knowledge. The risk factors associated with the level of knowledge of diabetic complications were female gender adjusted odd ratio (AOR) =2.31 (1.56-3.41) married participants AOR = 3.37 (1.44-7.93), widowed AOR = 2.98 (1.10-8.08), basic level of education AOR =0.18 (0.082-0.50), Junior High School (JHS) and above of education level AOR = 0.035(0.017-0.75), 5-9 years of T2D duration AOR = 0.31(0.018-0.57), ≥10 years T2D duration AOR = 0.042 (0.02-0.10) and urban dwellers AOR = 0.36 (0.22-0.68) respectively. Participants knew the individual complication of diabetic mellitus but lack an in-depth knowledge on the complications. Further expansion of diabetic educative programs like using mass media and involving national curriculum of education can improve self-regulatory awareness of

  4. Genetic Counseling for Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Stephanie A.; Maloney, Kristin L.; Pollin, Toni I.

    2014-01-01

    Most diabetes is polygenic in etiology, with (type 1 diabetes, T1DM) or without (type 2 diabetes, T2DM) an autoimmune basis. Genetic counseling for diabetes generally focuses on providing empiric risk information based on family history and/or the effects of maternal hyperglycemia on pregnancy outcome. An estimated one to five percent of diabetes is monogenic in nature, e.g., maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY), with molecular testing and etiology-based treatment available. However, recent studies show that most monogenic diabetes is misdiagnosed as T1DM or T2DM. While efforts are underway to increase the rate of diagnosis in the diabetes clinic, genetic counselors and clinical geneticists are in a prime position to identify monogenic cases through targeted questions during a family history combined with working in conjunction with diabetes professionals to diagnose and assure proper treatment and familial risk assessment for individuals with monogenic diabetes. PMID:25045596

  5. Diabetic retinopathy (DR: everybody's business

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Yorston

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is on the increase worldwide, due mainly to the rise in the number of people with type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is becoming more common because:* People are living longer, and diabetes is more prevalent in older people.* As people increasingly migrate to urban areas, exercise less, eat more, and eat less healthy food, more people are becoming obese – a primary cause of type 2 diabetes.Diabetes increases the risk of a range of eye diseases, including cataract, but the main cause of blindness associated with diabetes is diabetic retinopathy (DR. DR usually develops between ten and twenty years after the onset of diabetes, and develops faster when diabetes is undiagnosed and untreated.People with DR whose sight is at risk can be treated, most commonly with laser, to prevent visual impairment and blindness. Sadly, there is no treatment that can restore vision that has already been lost.

  6. [Diabetes and pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer-Graf, U M; Vetter, K

    1999-10-01

    Preexisting type-I-diabetes (incidence 0.8%) and gestational diabetes (3-5%) are the two manifestations of disturbed carbohydrate metabolism in pregnancy. Maternal hyperglycemia and the resulting excessive glucose supply for the fetus leads to fetal hyperinsulinism which is responsible for the complications in the offspring. The most important clinical manifestations are the excessive growth of the fetus (macrosomia), the risk of intrauterine death and the neonatal morbidity caused by hypoglycemia and the delay of maturation of lungs and liver. Women with type-I-diabetes require preconception counseling and optimizing of glucose control to reduce the rate of abortion and of congenital anomalies of the offspring. Furthermore kidney function and retinopathia should be evaluated preconceptionally. The management of diabetic pregnancies requires a tight cooperation of obstetricians and diabetologists. Blood glucose levels have to be lower than outside pregnancy. Gestational diabetes is diagnosed by a screening test with 50 g glucose for all women followed by a regular 75 g oGTT when the glucose value is > or = 140 mg%. In most of the women euglycemia can be achieved by diet and exercise. Women after pregnancies with gestational diabetes should be retested postnatally and counseled about their increased risk to develop diabetes in later life.

  7. Diabetes mellitus and pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fathi I Abourawi

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is the most common medical complication of pregnancy and it carries a significant risk to the foetus and the mother. Congenital malformations and perinatal morbidity remain common compared with the offspring of non diabetic pregnancies. Diabetic mothers are at risk of progression of micro-vascular diabetic complications as well as early pregnancy loss, pre-eclampsia, polyhydramnios and premature labour. Glycaemic control before and during pregnancy is critical and the benefit may result in a viable, healthy offspring. Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM which manifests for the first time during pregnancy is common and on the increase, its proper management will reduce the risk of neonatal macrosomia and hypoglycaemia. Post-partum evaluation of glucose tolerance and appropriate counselling in women with GDM may help decrease the high risk of subsequent type 2 diabetes in the long-term. The article will briefly review the changes in the carbohydrate metabolism that characterise normal pregnancy and will focus on a practical approach to the care of patients with pre-existing diabetes as well as GDM.

  8. CERN diabetes awareness days

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Do you have diabetes without knowing it? The Medical Service invites everyone working at CERN to participate in the above PREVENTION and DETECTION campaign on the: 8 and 9 November 2004 from 9:00 to 16:00 at the infirmary, bldg. 57, ground floor Personal evaluation of diabetes risks, (blood pressure, cholesterol and sugar levels, Body Mass Index measurements and more...) will be offered as well as leaflets, information and advice, (diet, exercise). A dietician specialised in diabetes will be on hand from 14:00 until 16:00. Diabetes is reaching epidemic proportions in many countries due to an increase in obesity, sedentary lifestyles and poor diet. Diabetes is a major cause of blindness, cardio-vascular and kidney disease. An estimated 30-50% of these cases of diabetes go undetected, despite de fact that easy and efficient prevention exists. Diabetes discovered and treated early is not a severe condition but untreated and ignored it can have dire consequences.

  9. CERN diabetes awareness days

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Do you have diabetes without knowing it? The Medical Service invites everyone working at CERN to participate in the above PREVENTION and DETECTION campaign on the: 8 and 9 November 2004 from 9:00 to 16:00 at the infirmary, bldg. 57, ground floor Personal evaluation of diabetes risks, (blood pressure, cholesterol and sugar levels, Body Mass Index measurements and more...) will be offered as well as leaflets, information and advice, (diet, exercise). A dietician specialised in diabetes will be on hand from 14:00 until 16:00. Diabetes is reaching epidemic proportions in many countries due to an increase in obesity, sedentary lifestyles and poor diet. Diabetes is a major cause of blindness, cardio-vascular and kidney disease. An estimated 30-50% of these cases of diabetes go undetected, despite de fact that easy and efficient prevention exists. Diabetes discovered and treated early is not a severe condition but untreated and ignored it can have dire consequences.

  10. Alcoholism and diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo-Jeong; Kim, Dai-Jin

    2012-04-01

    Chronic use of alcohol is considered to be a potential risk factor for the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), which causes insulin resistance and pancreatic β-cell dysfunction that is a prerequisite for the development of diabetes. However, alcohol consumption in diabetes has been controversial and more detailed information on the diabetogenic impact of alcohol seems warranted. Diabetes, especially T2DM, causes dysregulation of various metabolic processes, which includes a defect in the insulin-mediated glucose function of adipocytes, and an impaired insulin action in the liver. In addition, neurobiological profiles of alcoholism are linked to the effects of a disruption of glucose homeostasis and of insulin resistance, which are affected by altered appetite that regulates the peptides and neurotrophic factors. Since conditions, which precede the onset of diabetes that are associated with alcoholism is one of the crucial public problems, researches in efforts to prevent and treat diabetes with alcohol dependence, receives special clinical interest. Therefore, the purpose of this mini-review is to provide the recent progress and current theories in the interplay between alcoholism and diabetes. Further, the purpose of this study also includes summarizing the pathophysiological mechanisms in the neurobiology of alcoholism.

  11. Alcoholism and Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo-Jeong Kim

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Chronic use of alcohol is considered to be a potential risk factor for the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, which causes insulin resistance and pancreatic β-cell dysfunction that is a prerequisite for the development of diabetes. However, alcohol consumption in diabetes has been controversial and more detailed information on the diabetogenic impact of alcohol seems warranted. Diabetes, especially T2DM, causes dysregulation of various metabolic processes, which includes a defect in the insulin-mediated glucose function of adipocytes, and an impaired insulin action in the liver. In addition, neurobiological profiles of alcoholism are linked to the effects of a disruption of glucose homeostasis and of insulin resistance, which are affected by altered appetite that regulates the peptides and neurotrophic factors. Since conditions, which precede the onset of diabetes that are associated with alcoholism is one of the crucial public problems, researches in efforts to prevent and treat diabetes with alcohol dependence, receives special clinical interest. Therefore, the purpose of this mini-review is to provide the recent progress and current theories in the interplay between alcoholism and diabetes. Further, the purpose of this study also includes summarizing the pathophysiological mechanisms in the neurobiology of alcoholism.

  12. [Type 2 diabetes complications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlienger, Jean-Louis

    2013-05-01

    People with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk of many complications, which are mainly due to complex and interconnected mechanisms such as hyperglycemia, insulino-resistance, low-grade inflammation and accelerated atherogenesis. Cardi-cerebrovascular disease are frequently associated to type 2 diabetes and may become life threatening, particularly coronaropathy, stroke and heart failure. Their clinical picture are sometimes atypical and silencious for a long time. Type 2 diabetes must be considered as an independent cardiovascular risk factor. Nephropathy is frequent in type 2 diabetes but has a mixed origin. Now it is the highest cause of end-stage renal disease. Better metabolic and blood pressure control and an improved management of microalbuminuria are able to slowdown the course of the disease. Retinopathy which is paradoxically slightly progressive must however be screened and treated in these rather old patients which are globally at high ophthalmologic risk. Diabetic foot is a severe complication secondary to microangiopathy, microangiopathy and neuropathy. It may be considered as a super-complication of several complications. Its screening must be done on a routine basis. Some cancer may be considered as an emerging complication of type 2 diabetes as well as cognitive decline, sleep apnea syndrome, mood disorders and bone metabolism impairments. Most of the type 2 diabetes complications may be prevented by a strategy combining a systematic screening and multi-interventional therapies.

  13. Osteoporosis and diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Montagnani

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetes mellitus (DM and osteoporotic fractures are major causes of mortality and morbidity in older subjects. Recent reports have revealed close association between fracture risk and DM types 1 and 2 (DM1 and DM2, respectively. Aim of this review is to highlight the importance of these diseases in the elderly and examine certain etiopathogenetic aspects of DM associated osteoporosis, which could be useful in management of diabetic patients. Materials and methods: We searched the Embase and PubMed databases using diabetes, osteoporosis, and bone mineral density (BMD as search terms and 1989-2009 as publication dates. Discussion: The risk of fractures seems to be increased in both types of DM although DM2 seems to be associated with normal-high BMDs compared with the normal population. This apparent paradox could reflect greater bone frailty in diabetic patients that are unrelated to adipose tissue, hyperinsulinemia, deposition of advanced glycosylation end products in collagen, reduced serum IGF-1 levels, hypercalciuria, renal failure, microangiopathy, and/or inflammation. Diabetic patients’ propensity to fall and multiple comorbidities might also explain their higher fracture rates. The effects of drugs that inhibit bone resorption in diabetic patients are probably similar to those obtained in nondiabetics although there is little information on this issue. In general, effective treatment of diabetes has positive effects on bone metabolism. Metformin acts directly on bone tissue, reducing AGE accumulation, and insulin has direct effects on osteoclast activity. In contrast, the thiazolidinediones seem to have negative effects since they orient mesenchymal progenitor cell differentiation toward adipose rather than bone tissue. Incretin therapy is a newer approach that appears to modify interactions between nutrition and bone turnover (e.g., postprandial suppression of bone resorption. Conclusions: Better understanding of how

  14. Diabetic angiopathy and angiogenic defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Ling

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Diabetes is one of the most serious health problems in the world. A major complication of diabetes is blood vessel disease, termed angiopathy, which is characterized by abnormal angiogenesis. In this review, we focus on angiogenesis abnormalities in diabetic complications and discuss its benefits and drawbacks as a therapeutic target for diabetic vascular complications. Additionally, we discuss glucose metabolism defects that are associated with abnormal angiogenesis in atypical diabetic complications such as cancer.

  15. [The foot in diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano del Hoyo, Ma Luisa; Armalé Casado, Ma José; Risco Otaolaurruchi, Concepción; Martes López, Carmen; Martín Sánchez, Juan Ignacio

    2005-10-01

    Nursing was qualified to carry out an in depth study on the effects diabetes has on feet by means of an educational intervention complemented by a pre- and post-intervention transversal study 268 primary care center nurses who deal with diabetics in 34 basic health areas participated in this study This project was sponsored by SALUD, the Aragon Health service, in 2000 and it lasted two years. This study was presented at the XI FEAED (Spanish Federation of Associations of Educators in Diabetes) Congress which took place in Valencia in 2004.

  16. Glukagonomsyndrom uden diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Carsten Sauer; Mikkelsen, Dorthe Bisgaard; Vestergaard, Vibeke

    2008-01-01

    without diabetes. Glucagonoma syndrome is characterized by glucagon overproduction, diabetes, depression, deep venous thrombosis and necrolytic migrating erythema. Glucagonoma is frequently diagnosed late which increases the risk of metastases. It is important not to rule out glucagonoma in patients......A patient developed depression, weight loss, ulcers and a migrating, denuded erythematous skin area. Punch biopsy revealed necrolytic migrating erythema. Computerised tomography and endoscopic ultrasound showed a solid tumour of the pancreas. A blood sample showed an increased level of glucagon...... with a relevant clinical picture but without diabetes. Udgivelsesdato: 2008-Nov-17...

  17. Bioreactors addressing diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minteer, Danielle M; Gerlach, Jorg C; Marra, Kacey G

    2014-11-01

    The concept of bioreactors in biochemical engineering is a well-established process; however, the idea of applying bioreactor technology to biomedical and tissue engineering issues is relatively novel and has been rapidly accepted as a culture model. Tissue engineers have developed and adapted various types of bioreactors in which to culture many different cell types and therapies addressing several diseases, including diabetes mellitus types 1 and 2. With a rising world of bioreactor development and an ever increasing diagnosis rate of diabetes, this review aims to highlight bioreactor history and emerging bioreactor technologies used for diabetes-related cell culture and therapies.

  18. Diabetes y Enfermedad Coronaria

    OpenAIRE

    Alfredo Jácome Roca

    1997-01-01

    La Diabetes Mellitus es un síndrome con etiología multifactorial y con variadas expresiones en la clínica y en las complicaciones. Las formas más comunes son la diabetes tipo 11 o diabetes no insulino dependiente (DMNID) y la tipo 1 (antigua juvenil) o insulino-dependiente (DMID). Las más notables diferencias entre la frecuencia e intensidad de sus manifestaciones clínicas y complicaciones así como de su etiología son muy conocidas pero las anotaremos a manera de repaso.

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  19. Diabetic radiculoplexus neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughlin, Ruple S; Dyck, P James B

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic radiculoplexus neuropathies (DRPN) are neuropathies clinically and pathologically distinct from the neuropathy typically associated with diabetes (DPN). DRPN are usually subacute in onset, painful, and often demonstrate a monophasic course with incomplete recovery. Pathologically, these neuropathies are due to ischemic injury from altered immunity and often have features suggestive or diagnostic of microvasculitis. Unlike DPN, immune therapy may be helpful in treatment of these conditions given their pathological substrate and therefore are important to identify early and distinguish from other neuropathies that occur in patient with diabetes.

  20. The Presence of Family History and the Development of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Risk Factors in Rural Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Marsha Howell; Barnett Lammon, Carol Ann

    2007-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is reaching epidemic proportions among children and adolescents. School health fairs offer an opportunity to identify children with risk factors for the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. This study identified selected risk factors (i.e., high-risk racial/ethnic group, obesity, elevated blood pressure, elevated…

  1. Quality of life and technology: impact on children and families with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Masakazu; Beverly, Elizabeth A; Weinger, Katie

    2012-12-01

    Ensuring quality of life (QOL) while maintaining glycemic control within targets is an important challenge in type 1 and type 2 diabetes treatment. For children with diabetes, QOL includes enjoying meals, feeling safe in school, and perceiving positive, supportive relationships with parents, siblings, and friends. Yet many treatment-related and psychosocial barriers can interfere with a child's QOL and their ability to manage diabetes effectively. Diabetes management also imposes considerable lifestyle demands that are difficult and often frustrating for children to negotiate at a young age. Recent advances in diabetes medications and technologies have improved glycemic control in children with diabetes. Two widely used technologies are the insulin pump and continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) system. These technologies provide patients with more flexibility in their daily life and information about glucose fluctuations. Several studies report improvements in glycemic control in children with type 1 diabetes using the insulin pump or sensor-augmented pump therapy. Importantly, these technologies may impact QOL for children and families with diabetes, although they are rarely used or studied in the treatment of children with type 2 diabetes. Further, emerging closed loop and web- and phone-based technologies have great potential for supporting diabetes self-management and perhaps QOL. A deeper understanding and appreciation of the impact of diabetes technology on children's and parents' QOL is critical for both the medical and psychological care of diabetes. Thus, the purpose of this review is to discuss the impact of new diabetes technologies on QOL in children, adolescents and families with type 1 diabetes.

  2. [Diabetes and social deprivation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffiol, Claude; Fontbonne, Annick; Vannereau, Denyse; Olive, Jean-Paul; Passeron, Serge

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes prevalence is frequently associated with low socioeconomic status (SES), but little is known about the relationship between SES and diabetes control, follow-up and quality of life. We evaluated SES by using the EPICES score, an individual index of deprivation (Evaluation de la Précarité et des Inégalités de Santé dans les Centres d'Examen de Santé; Evaluation of Precariousness and Inequalities in Health Examination Centers). A total of 1686 subjects aged from 25 to 85 years were selected at random in Montpellier and 154 in Narbonne, of whom 126 were managed by a care network including diabetologists, general practitioners and nurses. Capillary glycemia, the body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and blood pressure were measured in all the subjects. HbA1c was measured in subjects with above-normal glycemia. Five hundred sixty-four subjects from the study population (190 diabetic patients, 292 subjects with non diabetic hyperglycemia, and 86 euglycemic subjects) were clinically evaluated and asked to complete a questionnaire covering socioeconomic status and diet. The data were then compared between deprived and non deprived subjects. One hundred sixty-one diabetic patients had a clinical examination and completed a detailed questionnaire including their history, therapy, control and follow-up of diabetes, perception of diabetes, quality of life, socioeconomic status and diet. The data were then compared between deprived and non deprived patients. One hundred twenty-six diabetic subjects managed by the AUDIAB care network were compared with 163 diabetics recruited in Montpellier, based on the same investigations and the same questionnaires. The data were compared between the overall patients and between deprived and non deprived patients. In the overall population, deprived subjects were younger and more frequently smokers, and had higher BMI than non deprived subjects. The overall prevalence of type 2 diabetes was 8.1%. Among patients

  3. Prevalence of diabetes and pre-diabetes in Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablah, Elizabeth; Dong, Frank; Cupertino, Ana Paula; Konda, Kurt; Johnston, Judy A; Collins, Tracie

    2013-01-01

    The study objective was to determine the prevalence of diabetes and prediabetes among rural and urban populations in Kansas. This study utilized 2009 BRFSS data and included 18,912 respondents. Participants were identified through a stratified random sample of adult Kansans, living in a non-institutionalized setting, and with access to a land-based telephone line. Analyses were conducted using SAS to provide descriptive statistics for groups based on diabetes status. A logistic regression was conducted to explore significant variables associated with the likelihood of diabetes. Diabetes prevalence was lower among urban (11.8%) populations than rural (12.7%) areas of Kansas, but the inverse was true for pre-diabetes (3.7% urban, 3.1% in rural). Lower income and lower levels of educational attainment were associated with increased rates of diabetes and pre-diabetes, with the highest prevalence levels overall found among rural Latinos (19.3%) and urban African Americans (22.9%). Multivariate regression suggests that age, income, ethnicity, education, sex, rural vs urban status, and race all served as significant predicators of diabetes, net of other factors. Rural residents were more likely than urban residents to report having diabetes, whereas urban residents were more likely than rural residents to report having pre-diabetes. Although rural vs urban status played a significant role in the model's predicative ability for diabetes and pre-diabetes diagnosis, increased age was by far the most significant factor in diabetes and pre-diabetes diagnosis.

  4. Novel biomarkers for prediabetes, diabetes, and associated complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorcely B

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Brenda Dorcely,1 Karin Katz,1 Ram Jagannathan,2 Stephanie S Chiang,1 Babajide Oluwadare,1 Ira J Goldberg,1 Michael Bergman1 1New York University School of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, NY, 2Department of Global Health, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA Abstract: The number of individuals with prediabetes is expected to grow substantially and estimated to globally affect 482 million people by 2040. Therefore, effective methods for diagnosing prediabetes will be required to reduce the risk of progressing to diabetes and its complications. The current biomarkers, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c, fructosamine, and glycated albumin have limitations including moderate sensitivity and specificity and are inaccurate in certain clinical conditions. Therefore, identification of additional biomarkers is being explored recogni­zing that any single biomarker will also likely have inherent limitations. Therefore, combining several biomarkers may more precisely identify those at high risk for developing prediabetes and subsequent progression to diabetes. This review describes recently identified biomarkers and their potential utility for addressing the burgeoning epidemic of dysglycemic disorders. Keywords: prediabetes, biomarkers, inflammatory markers, diabetes, diabetes complications

  5. Diabetic microvascular complications: possible targets for improved macrovascular outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijan Roshan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available John A D’Elia1, George Bayliss1,2, Bijan Roshan1, Manish Maski1, Ray E Gleason1, Larry A Weinrauch11Renal Unit, Joslin Diabetes Center, Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; 2Department of Medicine, Rhode Island Hospital, Alpert School of Medicine, Brown University, Providence, RI, USAAbstract: The results of recent outcome trials challenge hypotheses that tight control of both glycohemoglobin and blood pressure diminishes macrovascular events and survival among type 2 diabetic patients. Relevant questions exist regarding the adequacy of glycohemoglobin alone as a measure of diabetes control. Are we ignoring mechanisms of vasculotoxicity (profibrosis, altered angiogenesis, hypertrophy, hyperplasia, and endothelial injury inherent in current antihyperglycemic medications? Is the polypharmacy for lowering cholesterol, triglyceride, glucose, and systolic blood pressure producing drug interactions that are too complex to be clinically identified? We review angiotensin–aldosterone mechanisms of tissue injury that magnify microvascular damage caused by hyperglycemia and hypertension. Many studies describe interruption of these mechanisms, without hemodynamic consequence, in the preservation of function in type 1 diabetes. Possible interactions between the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system and physiologic glycemic control (through pulsatile insulin release suggest opportunities for further clinical investigation.Keywords: angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, pulsatile insulin, diabetic nephropathy, cardiac autonomic neuropathy, podocytes, beta cells 

  6. [Predisposition and phenotypes of gestational diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinwechter, H; Demandt, N; Schäfer-Graf, U

    2014-05-01

    Gestational diabetes (GDM) is defined as glucose intolerance first diagnosed with a 75 gram oral glucose tolerance test based on IADPSG criteria which had been recently adopted by WHO. In industrial countries GDM is one of the most frequent pregnancy complications. In 2012, in Germany GDM had been diagnosed in 4,3 % of all births, overall 27,700 cases. GDM has to be considered as a preliminary stage of type 2 diabetes with insulin resistance and inadequate β-cell-compensation. Additionally, adverse metabolic profile, associations with inflammatory parameters, with D vitamin metabolism, and insufficient decline of renal threshold for glucose had been identified in women with GDM. Within 10 years after GDM roughly 50 % of the women convert to overt diabetes, mostly type 2. GDM and type 2 diabetes share potential candidate genes. In about 1 % of GDM in Caucasian women a mutation in glucokinase gene had been found (GCK-MODY). Predisposition to GDM is predominantly characterized by family history of diabetes, previous GDM in pregnancies, factors of metabolic syndrome, and unfavorable life style. The probability for GDM rises with increasing mother's age and preconceptional BMI. Via fetal programming GDM dispones to offspring obesity as early as school entry. Prevention of GDM focus on regular physical exercise, normalizing body weight before conception, reducing excess intake of animal protein and soft drinks, planning of pregnancy in younger ages, and avoiding pollutant exposition as well as smoking cessation. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Developmental changes in the roles of patients and families in type 1 diabetes management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowitz, Jessica T; Garvey, Katharine C; Laffel, Lori M B

    2015-01-01

    Developmentally-tailored diabetes self-care education and support are integral parts of contemporary multidisciplinary T1D care. The patient with T1D must have the support of the family and the diabetes team to maintain the rigors of diabetes management, but the specific roles of patients and families with regard to daily diabetes tasks change considerably throughout the developmental span of early childhood, middle childhood/school-age years, and adolescence. This review provides a framework of key normative developmental issues for each of these developmental stages. Within this context, ideal family diabetes management is reviewed within each developmental stage and anticipated challenges that can arise during these stages and that can adversely impact diabetes management are presented. This paper also summarizes empirical evidence for specific intervention and care strategies to support optimal diabetes management across these stages in order to maximize opportunities for a successful transfer of diabetes management tasks from parents to maturing youth. Finally, the review provides an emphasis on approaches to promote family teamwork and adolescent diabetes self-care adherence as well as opportunities to use novel technology platforms as a means to support optimal diabetes management.

  8. School Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... else except home. Schools can have a major effect on children's health. Schools can teach children about health, and promote healthy behaviors. Physical education classes give children a chance to get exercise. Schools work to Prevent risky behaviors such as ...

  9. Nerve Damage (Diabetic Neuropathies)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... normally. A woman may have difficulty with arousal, lubrication, or orgasm. Sweat Glands Autonomic neuropathy can affect ... performed in people with diabetes. Comprehensive foot care programs can reduce amputation rates by 45 to 85 ...

  10. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the trillions of cells that make up the body. Watch this movie to learn more about diabetes. ... doctor. © 1995- The Nemours Foundation. All rights reserved. Images provided by The Nemours Foundation, iStock, Getty Images, ...

  11. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the trillions of cells that make up the body. Watch this movie to learn more about diabetes. ... 1995- The Nemours Foundation. All rights reserved. Images provided by The Nemours Foundation, iStock, Getty Images, ...

  12. Diabetes Research Institute Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ketones I hate diabetes! April 2010 issue Team Parenting Reducing Conflict Kellie's Summer Tips DRIFinancial Focus: online ... Biology, Potency and Engraftment Cell Sources and Regeneration Career Opportunities cGMP/GTP Cell Processing Search: Search HOME ...

  13. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and learn helpful tips about managing your diabetes medicines. Veal el video en espanol . Get tips on ... a healthy diet, exercising, and using FDA-approved medicines, insulin, and devices every day. FDA has lots ...

  14. Diabetes and Dietary Supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... foods rich in polyphenols—antioxidants found in tea, coffee, wine, fruits, grains, and vegetables—might affect diabetes. ... is supporting research on the possible effects of: Components of grape skin on blood sugar control Chelation ...

  15. Find a Diabetes Educator

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Corporate Opportunities Annual Meeting Mailing Lists Favorably Reviewed Advertising DiMedex Media Resources Quote an Expert About Diabetes ... Media Policy | Contact AADE | Sitemap Copyright 2016 AADE FaceBook Twitter LinkedIn Pinterest Google Plus Instagram

  16. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Parents Help Kids Handle Teasing? Talking to Your Child About Puberty Helping Kids Deal With Bullies How Media Use Affects Your Child Natural Disasters: How Families Can Help Diabetes Movie ...

  17. Allegheny County Diabetes Hospitalization

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This data includes the number of people hospitalized with diabetes between 2013-2015, by age group, for Allegheny County Zip Codes.

  18. Diabetic Retinopathy Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sivakumar

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy is one of the common complications of diabetes. Unfortunately, in many cases the patient is not aware of any symptoms until it is too late for effective treatment. Through analysis of evoked potential response of the retina, the optical nerve, and the optical brain center, a way will be paved for early diagnosis of diabetic retinopathy and prognosis during the treatment process. In this paper, we present an artificial-neural-network-based method to classify diabetic retinopathy subjects according to changes in visual evoked potential spectral components and an anatomically realistic computer model of the human eye under normal and retinopathy conditions in a virtual environment using 3D Max Studio and Windows Movie Maker.

  19. Diabetes - foot ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagliero E. Diabetes and long-term complications. In: Jameson JL, De Groot LJ, de Kretser DM, et al, eds. Endocrinology: Adult and Pediatric . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 51. Kim PJ, Steinberg JS. Complications of ...

  20. Diabetes - eye care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagliero E. Diabetes and long-term complications. In: Jameson JL, De Groot LJ, de Kretser DM, et al, eds. Endocrinology: Adult and Pediatric . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 51. Lim JI, Rosenblatt BJ, Benson WE. ...

  1. Type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, Anders; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm

    2001-01-01

    Prediction of Type 1 diabetes at individual level is relevant for any possible intervention before clinical disease develops. Currently available markers of Type 1 diabetes include genetic specificities and immune markers, in addition to a positive family history. This chapter reviews the measures...... and methods of importance in predicting Type 1 diabetes. Based on numerical examples it is demonstrated that available markers have a low level of performance, even when combined. Even so, combined marker information may allow for the identification of the large majority of the general population who...... is at very low disease risk. The impact at population level of predicting Type 1 diabetes varies between societies because the performance of markers depends on levels of disease risk and distribution of markers within a population. The incorporation of the influence of non-genetic etiological factors may...

  2. Mechanisms of diabetic complications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Forbes, Josephine M; Cooper, Mark E

    2013-01-01

    .... These complications occur in the majority of individuals with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Among the most prevalent microvascular complications are kidney disease, blindness, and amputations, with current therapies only slowing disease progression...

  3. Diabetes and Wound Angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okonkwo, Uzoagu A.; DiPietro, Luisa A.

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus Type II (DM2) is a growing international health concern with no end in sight. Complications of DM2 involve a myriad of comorbidities including the serious complications of poor wound healing, chronic ulceration, and resultant limb amputation. In skin wound healing, which has definite, orderly phases, diabetes leads to improper function at all stages. While the etiology of chronic, non-healing diabetic wounds is multi-faceted, the progression to a non-healing phenotype is closely linked to poor vascular networks. This review focuses on diabetic wound healing, paying special attention to the aberrations that have been described in the proliferative, remodeling, and maturation phases of wound angiogenesis. Additionally, this review considers therapeutics that may offer promise to better wound healing outcomes. PMID:28671607

  4. Diabetes and Wound Angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uzoagu A. Okonkwo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes Mellitus Type II (DM2 is a growing international health concern with no end in sight. Complications of DM2 involve a myriad of comorbidities including the serious complications of poor wound healing, chronic ulceration, and resultant limb amputation. In skin wound healing, which has definite, orderly phases, diabetes leads to improper function at all stages. While the etiology of chronic, non-healing diabetic wounds is multi-faceted, the progression to a non-healing phenotype is closely linked to poor vascular networks. This review focuses on diabetic wound healing, paying special attention to the aberrations that have been described in the proliferative, remodeling, and maturation phases of wound angiogenesis. Additionally, this review considers therapeutics that may offer promise to better wound healing outcomes.

  5. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Administration A to Z Index Follow FDA En Español Search FDA Submit search Popular Content Home Food ... managing your diabetes medicines. Veal el video en espanol . Get tips on testing your blood sugar. Follow ...

  6. Diabetes + Hypertension (comorbidity)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This data set provides de-identified population data for diabetes and hypertension comorbidity prevalence in Allegheny County.

  7. Familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvistgaard, Helene

    2011-01-01

    Familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (FNDI) is characterized by severe low-solute polyuria and polydipisa. The disease is caused by a deficient neurosecretion of the antidiuretic hormone arginine vasopressin (AVP). The hormone is normally synthesized by the magnocellular neurons in the pa......Familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (FNDI) is characterized by severe low-solute polyuria and polydipisa. The disease is caused by a deficient neurosecretion of the antidiuretic hormone arginine vasopressin (AVP). The hormone is normally synthesized by the magnocellular neurons...... as one sporadic case of early-onset diabetes insipidus. Genetic testing of the sporadic case of diabetes insipidus revealed a highly unusual mosaicism for a variation in the gene encoding the AVP receptor (AVPR2). This mosaicism had resulted in a partial phenotype and initial diagnostic difficulties...

  8. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... during pregnancy. Diabetes and Pregnancy (CDC) Diverse Women in Clinical Trials Campaign Clinical trials can help doctors ... ages, races, ethnic backgrounds, and health conditions participating in clinical trials. Visit the Women in Clinical Trials ...

  9. Diabetes Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... diabetes by losing weight. Related information Fitness and nutrition Heart disease and stroke Obesity and weight loss fact sheet Physical activity fact sheet Pregnancy The javascript used in this widget is not ...

  10. "Diabetes has instant consequences…"

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2009 Table of Contents Photo: Christopher Klose Maddie Kuhn, 19 Washington, DC Type 1 Diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in the third grade, Madeleine "Maddie" Kuhn doesn't let the disease inhibit her. The ...

  11. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... en espanol . Get tips on testing your blood sugar. There is good news. Diabetes can be controlled ... medicines or insulin to help keep their blood sugar at a healthy level. What you need depends ...

  12. Teen Diabetes Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... physical activity by just: Watching TV and playing video games Going for a walk on the weekend Swimming ... friends All of the above Source: National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) Winter 2008 Issue: Volume 3 Number ...

  13. Hyperglycemia in Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... include: Cardiovascular disease Nerve damage (neuropathy) Kidney damage (diabetic nephropathy) or kidney failure Damage to the blood vessels ... supplement if you have high blood sugar. Emergency treatment for severe hyperglycemia If you have signs and ...

  14. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... make up the body. Watch this movie to learn more about diabetes. For Teens For Kids For ... doctor. © 1995- The Nemours Foundation. All rights reserved. Images provided by The Nemours Foundation, iStock, Getty Images, ...

  15. Purinergic signalling and diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burnstock, Geoffrey; Novak, Ivana

    2013-01-01

    The pancreas is an organ with a central role in nutrient breakdown, nutrient sensing and release of hormones regulating whole body nutrient homeostasis. In diabetes mellitus, the balance is broken-cells can be starving in the midst of plenty. There are indications that the incidence of diabetes...... type 1 and 2, and possibly pancreatogenic diabetes, is rising globally. Events leading to insulin secretion and action are complex, but there is emerging evidence that intracellular nucleotides and nucleotides are not only important as intracellular energy molecules but also as extracellular signalling...... molecules in purinergic signalling cascades. This signalling takes place at the level of the pancreas, where the close apposition of various cells-endocrine, exocrine, stromal and immune cells-contributes to the integrated function. Following an introduction to diabetes, the pancreas and purinergic...

  16. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & ... Kids who have diabetes have trouble taking energy from food and delivering it to the trillions of cells ...

  17. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... KidsHealth from Nemours for Parents for Kids for Teens Search Parents Home General Health Growth & Development Infections ... this movie to learn more about diabetes. For Teens For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC ...

  18. Asian Americans and Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... says that many Asian American patients think treating diabetes means following a specific regimen for a period of time to cure the disease. They believe that certain herbs or Chinese medicines can address the cause of the disease, while ...

  19. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... main page content Skip to search Skip to topics menu Skip to common links HHS U.S. Department ... Consumer Information by Audience For Women Women's Health Topics Women and Diabetes Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it ...

  20. Type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, Anders; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm

    2001-01-01

    Prediction of Type 1 diabetes at individual level is relevant for any possible intervention before clinical disease develops. Currently available markers of Type 1 diabetes include genetic specificities and immune markers, in addition to a positive family history. This chapter reviews the measures...... and methods of importance in predicting Type 1 diabetes. Based on numerical examples it is demonstrated that available markers have a low level of performance, even when combined. Even so, combined marker information may allow for the identification of the large majority of the general population who...... is at very low disease risk. The impact at population level of predicting Type 1 diabetes varies between societies because the performance of markers depends on levels of disease risk and distribution of markers within a population. The incorporation of the influence of non-genetic etiological factors may...

  1. Glycemic index and diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000941.htm Glycemic index and diabetes To use the sharing features on ... GI diet also may help with weight loss. Glycemic Index of Certain Foods Low GI foods (0 to ...

  2. Pig model for diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention relates to a transgenic pig comprising a mutated IAPP gene and displaying a phenotype associated with diabetes. The invention also relates to a transgenic blastocyst, embryo, fetus, donor cell and/or cell nucleusderived from said transgenic pig. The invention further relates...... to use of the transgenic pig as a model system for studying therapy, treatment and/or prevention of diabetes....

  3. Impotence in diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, A M; Ryder, R E

    1997-04-01

    Impotence is more common in diabetic patients than in the normal population. This is due to the complications of diabetes, which damage the neurovascular bundle required for normal penile function. Minimally invasive methods of treatment have improved the outcome; however, the methods are still suboptimal. Recent advances in our understanding of the underlying mechanisms may lead to more non-invasive, targeted forms of treatment. (Trends Endocrinol Metab 1997;8:98-101). (c) 1997, Elsevier Science Inc.

  4. Diabetic retinopathy in acromegaly

    OpenAIRE

    Said Azzoug; Farida Chentli

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Although growth hormone (GH) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy (DR), DR is deemed to be rare in patients with GH excess. Our aim was to study its prevalence in subjects with acromegaly suffering from diabetes mellitus (DM), to analyze its characteristics, and to look for predictive factors such as age at diagnosis, GH concentration and duration, DM duration, DM control, and family background. Materials and Methods: Forty patients with acromegaly and...

  5. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Lessons? Visit KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Your Child's Development (Birth to 3 Years) Feeding Your 1- to 3-Month-Old Feeding Your 4- to 7-Month-Old Feeding Your 8- to 12-Month-Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Diabetes Movie ... For Parents > Diabetes Movie Print A A A Kids who ...

  6. Diabetes insipidus in pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hague, William M

    2009-01-01

    Diabetes insipidus is an uncommon condition with various aetiologies. Recent research has uncovered new mechanisms underlying the syndrome. Careful attention to management is essential in pregnant women to avoid serious complications. Diabetes insipidus in pregnancy may be due to relative reduction in secretion of AVP from the posterior pituitary (cranial DI), increase in breakdown of AVP by placental cystine aminopeptidase with vasopressinase activity, or resistance of the rental tubules to AVP (nephrogenic DI). PMID:27579058

  7. Investigations of Diabetic Bone Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde, Jakob Starup

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with an increased risk of fracture with and current fracture predictors underestimate fracture risk in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Thus, further understanding of the underlying causes of diabetic bone disease may lead to better fracture predictors and preventive...... measures in patients with diabetes. This PhD thesis reports the results of two systematic reviews and a meta-analysis, a state-of-the-art intervention study, a clinical cross-sectional study and a registry-based study all examining the relationship between diabetes, glucose, and bone. Patients with type 2...... diabetes had lower bone turnover markers compared to patients with type 1 diabetes and bone mineral density and tissue stiffness were increased in patients with type 2 diabetes. The bone turnover markers were inversely associated with blood glucose in patients with diabetes and both an oral glucose...

  8. Certified Schools

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Certified schools must provide specific information regarding the school, the nature and requirements of the educational program, location and contact information,...

  9. Diabetes and Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Sarah E

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes and cancer are common conditions, affecting 384 million and 33 million people worldwide, respectively. Therefore, there is great potential for overlap, with people with diabetes also developing cancer and vice versa. However, people with diabetes may be at increased risk of developing cancer when compared with the general population. This is due to both shared risk factors associated with the two diseases and the metabolic derangements associated with diabetes, such as hyperglycaemia, insulin resistance, hyperinsulinaemia and oxidative stress. Glucose-lowering therapies may influence the risk of cancer in people with type 2 diabetes due to these therapies' effects on risk factors that are common to both conditions, including hyperglycaemia and obesity, as well as effects that are specific to the class of drug or drugs. Drugs that reduce circulating insulin levels, such as metformin, may reduce cancer risk, and drugs that increase circulating insulin levels, including exogenous insulin and insulin secretagogues, may increase cancer risk. The influence of glucose-lowering therapies on cancer risk may become an important consideration when selecting glucose-lowering therapies to treat people with type 2 diabetes and a high risk of cancer occurrence or recurrence.

  10. Cities Changing Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Astrid Ledgaard; Andersen, Gregers Stig; Jørgensen, Marit Eika

    The Rule of Halves (RoH), stating that half of those with diabetes are diagnosed, half of those diagnosed receive care, half of those receiving care achieve treatment targets, and finally that half of those achieving targets also achieve desired outcomes, has not previously been assessed for diab......The Rule of Halves (RoH), stating that half of those with diabetes are diagnosed, half of those diagnosed receive care, half of those receiving care achieve treatment targets, and finally that half of those achieving targets also achieve desired outcomes, has not previously been assessed...... for diabetes in Copenhagen. As part of the quantitative mapping phase of the Cities Changing Diabetes project in Copenhagen, a RoH analysis was conducted. The results of this analysis are summarized below. The figure shows that the ‘Halves’ rule does not generally apply for Copenhagen. On most of the levels......, Copenhagen is doing better than simple halves. For example, the results indicate that almost three quarters of the true diabetes population are diagnosed and that almost all of those diagnosed with diabetes receive some form of care. Although the analysis indicates that Copenhagen is doing better than...

  11. Education for diabetic foot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Batista

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this investigation was to stratify the risk in a consecutive group of diabetic patients presenting, for the first time, in a diabetic foot clinic. Additional aims were to investigate the preventive measures in the local health system and to evaluate the level of patient’s awareness about diabetic foot-associated morbidity. Methods: Fifty consecutive adult diabetic patients referred to a Diabetic Foot Clinic of a Municipal Public Hospital comprised the sample for this observational study. The enrollment visit was considered as the first health-system intervention for potential foot morbidity. The average time elapsed since a diagnosis of diabetes among patients was five years. Rresults: At the time of presentation, 94% of sample was not using appropriate footwear. Pedal pulses (dorsalis pedis and/or posterior tibial arteries were palpable in 76% of patients. Thirty subjects (60% had signs of peripheral neuropathy. Twenty-one subjects (42% had clinical deformity. There was a positive correlation between a history of foot ulcer, the presence of peripheral neuropathy, and the presence of foot deformity (p < 0.004 in each correlation. Cconclusions: Informing and educating the patients and those interested in this subject and these problems is essential for favorable outcomes in this scenario.

  12. Diabetes mellitus and alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Wiel, Albert

    2004-01-01

    Alcohol influences glucose metabolism in several ways in diabetic patients as well as in non-diabetic patients. Since alcohol inhibits both gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis, its acute intake without food may provoke hypoglycaemia, especially in cases of depleted glycogen stores and in combination with sulphonylurea. Consumed with a meal including carbohydrates, it is the preferred fuel, which may initially lead to somewhat higher blood glucose levels and hence an insulin response in type 2 diabetic patients. Depending on the nature of the carbohydrates in the meal, this may be followed by reactive hypoglycaemia. Moderate consumption of alcohol is associated with a reduced risk of atherosclerotic disorders. Diabetic patients benefit from this favourable effect as much as non-diabetic patients. Apart from effects on lipid metabolism, haemostatic balance and blood pressure, alcohol improves insulin sensitivity. This improvement of insulin sensitivity may also be responsible for the lower incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus reported to be associated with light-to-moderate drinking. In case of moderate and sensible use, risks of disturbances in glycaemic control, weight and blood pressure are limited. Excessive intake of alcohol, however, may not only cause loss of metabolic control, but also annihilate the favourable effects on the cardiovascular system.

  13. Potential Life-Threatening Events in Schools Involving Rescue Inhalers, Epinephrine Autoinjectors, and Glucagon Delivery Devices: Reports from School Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Katherine; Henselman, Kimbra; Laird, Brian; Quinones, Ana; Reutzel, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to use the reports of school nurses to facilitate the understanding of how schools experience and manage asthmatic, anaphylactic, and diabetic emergencies by quantitative and qualitative analysis of online surveys. E-mails with a link to SurveyMonkey[R] were sent to all U.S. members of the National Association of…

  14. Educational attainment moderates the associations of diabetes education with health outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Su Hyun

    2016-10-01

    Diabetes education is a critical element of care for people with diabetes. However, the associations between diabetes education and self-care or health outcomes have not been clearly demonstrated at a national level. The aims of this study were to examine the associations of attendance of diabetes education classes with health behaviours and glycaemic control, and to understand whether these associations were moderated by level of educational attainment. Data were analysed for 456 adults from the 2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey V, collected from January 2010 to December 2012. No significant differences were observed between patients who had attended diabetes education classes and those who had never attended for factors such as smoking, drinking, exercise, nutrition therapy or glycaemic control. There was a significant interaction effect between receiving diabetes education and level of educational attainment on obtaining optimal glycaemic control. Attending diabetes education was positively associated with optimal glycaemic control among patients with more than a high school education but was negatively associated with it among those with less than middle school education. Diabetes education programmes need to be tailored to the needs and cognitive capacities of the target population.

  15. Clinical presentation and precipitating factors of diabetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MoZarD

    Background: Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), one of the common emergencies in patient with diabetes mellitus is .... Materials and Methods .... diabetes mellitus patients and therefore might have already been exposed to diabetes education.

  16. Facing Diabetes: What You Need to Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Diabetes Facing Diabetes: What You Need to Know Past Issues / Fall ... your loved ones. Photos: AP The Faces of Diabetes Diabetes strikes millions of Americans, young and old, ...

  17. Diabetes - taking care of your feet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes - foot care - self-care; Diabetic foot ulcer - foot care; Diabetic neuropathy - foot care ... Diabetes can damage the nerves and blood vessels in your feet. This damage can cause numbness and ...

  18. Delaying or Preventing Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Problems Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems Preventing Type 2 Diabetes Perhaps you have learned that you have a ... I lower my chances of developing type 2 diabetes? Research such as the Diabetes Prevention Program shows ...

  19. Diabetic Diet: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spanish Diabetes and Diet (Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics) Diabetes and Nutrition (American Academy of Family Physicians) ... a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics) National Diabetes Education Program National Institute of Diabetes ...

  20. Diabetes and Sexual and Urologic Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Other Dental Problems Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems Troublesome bladder symptoms and changes in ... of these sexual and urologic problems. Diabetes and Sexual Problems Both men and women with diabetes can ...

  1. Diabetes and employment productivity: does diabetes management matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown I I I, H Shelton; Perez, Adriana; Yarnell, Lisa Marie; Pagan, Jose A; Hanis, Craig L; Fischer-Hoch, Susan P; McCormick, Joseph B

    2011-01-01

    To determine whether labor market effects were the result of diabetes per se or rather depended on the degree to which diabetes was controlled through management of blood sugar levels. This study utilized data from a recently completed survey of households in Brownsville, Texas, a largely Mexican American community with a high prevalence of diabetes that is located on the Texas-Mexico border. Diabetes management, or control, was measured by blood sugar levels, glycosylated hemoglobin (A1C) levels, and interaction terms. Methods used were probit and Heckman regression. Management of diabetes did not appear to have a discernible impact on labor market outcomes in the short run. However, diabetes was negatively associated with male productivity, particularly in males' propensity to work. The new American Diabetes Association (ADA) definition of diabetes is based on having an A1C level of diabetes was negatively associated with female productivity. Female productivity was also negatively associated with the new ADA definition of prediabetes (A1C levels between 5.7% and 6.4%). However, very few people with diabetes actually controlled their blood sugar or A1C levels. These results imply that in order to avoid productivity losses associated with diabetes, more scarce prevention resources should be spent on prevention of the onset of diabetes than on the management of A1C for those already diagnosed with diabetes. For women, the prevention of prediabetes is key.

  2. Diabetic Nephropathy in Women With Preexisting Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringholm, Lene; Damm, Julie Agner; Vestgaard, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    In women with preexisting diabetes and nephropathy or microalbuminuria, it is important to deliver careful preconception counselling to assess the risk for the mother and the foetus, for optimizing glycaemic status and to adjust medical treatment. If serum creatinine is normal in early pregnancy......, kidney function is often preserved during pregnancy, but complications such as severe preeclampsia and preterm delivery are still common. Perinatal mortality is now comparable with that in women with diabetes and normal kidney function. Besides strict glycaemic control before and during pregnancy, early...... and intensive antihypertensive treatment is important to optimize pregnancy outcomes. Methyldopa, labetalol, nifedipine and diltiazem are considered safe, whereas angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers should be stopped before or at confirmation of pregnancy...

  3. Diabetes mellitus and cognitive impairments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elham; Saedi[1; Mohammad; Reza; Gheini[2; Firoozeh; Faiz[3; Mohammad; Ali; Arami[4

    2016-01-01

    There is strong evidence that diabetes mellitus increases the risk of cognitive impairment and dementia. Insulin signaling dysregulation and small vessel disease in the base of diabetes may be important contributing factors in Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia pathogenesis, respectively. Optimal glycemic control in type 1 diabetes and identification of diabetic risk factors and prophylactic approach in type 2 diabetes are very important in the prevention of cognitive complications.In addition, hypoglycemic attacks in children and elderly should be avoided. Anti-diabetic medications especially Insulin may have a role in the management of cognitive dysfunction and dementia but further investigation is needed to validate these findings.

  4. Diabetes Mellitus amp Its Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KusumaNeela Bolla

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Diabetes Mellitus has been known for centuries as a disease related to sweetness. even though several million people all over the world are effected with diabetes not all are well informed about the nature of the disease. in diabetes there is excessive glucose in blood and urine due to inadequate production of insulin or insulin resistance. diabetics can lead a normal life provided they take prescribed durgs and make certain changes in their lifestyle particularly in their diet and physical activity. uncontrolled diabetes leads to some of the complication so some of the home remedies also play a major role to prevent the diabetes.

  5. Diabetes mellitus and cognitive impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saedi, Elham; Gheini, Mohammad Reza; Faiz, Firoozeh; Arami, Mohammad Ali

    2016-01-01

    There is strong evidence that diabetes mellitus increases the risk of cognitive impairment and dementia. Insulin signaling dysregulation and small vessel disease in the base of diabetes may be important contributing factors in Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia pathogenesis, respectively. Optimal glycemic control in type 1 diabetes and identification of diabetic risk factors and prophylactic approach in type 2 diabetes are very important in the prevention of cognitive complications. In addition, hypoglycemic attacks in children and elderly should be avoided. Anti-diabetic medications especially Insulin may have a role in the management of cognitive dysfunction and dementia but further investigation is needed to validate these findings. PMID:27660698

  6. Diabetic vitrectomy in a large type 1 diabetes patient population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostri, Christoffer; la Cour, Morten; Lund-Andersen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    1996 and 2010. Surgical history was obtained from The Danish National Patient Register. RESULTS: The population consisted of 3980 patients with type 1 diabetes. Median follow-up was 10.0 years. In total, 106 patients underwent diabetic vitrectomy in the observation period. Surgery indications were......Hg, diabetes duration, age, gender and nephropathy were not associated with an increased risk of reaching diabetic vitrectomy (p > 0.05 for all variables). CONCLUSIONS: Diabetic vitrectomy is rarely required in a type 1 diabetes population with varying degrees of retinopathy, but the risk increases markedly...... nonclearing vitreous haemorrhage (43%) or tractional retinal detachment (57%). The cumulative incidence rates of diabetic vitrectomy were 1.6% after 5 years and 2.9% after 10 years. When excluding patients with no or mild diabetic retinopathy, the corresponding rates were higher; 3.7% and 6.4%, respectively...

  7. Physical Activity, Public Health, and Elementary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Thomas L.; Kahan, David

    2008-01-01

    Physical inactivity is a serious public health problem that is associated with numerous preventable diseases. Public health concerns, particularly those related to the increased prevalence of overweight, obesity, and diabetes, call for schools to become proactive in the promotion of healthy, physically active lifestyles. This article begins by…

  8. Diabetic parturient - Anaesthetic implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nibedita Pani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy induces progressive changes in maternal carbohydrate metabolism. As pregnancy advances insulin resistance and diabetogenic stress due to placental hormones necessitate compensatory increase in insulin secretion. When this compensation is inadequate gestational diabetes develops. ′Gestational diabetes mellitus′ (GDM is defined as carbohydrate intolerance with onset or recognition during pregnancy. Women diagnosed to have GDM are at increased risk of future diabetes predominantly type 2 DM as are their children. Thus GDM offers an important opportunity for the development, testing and implementation of clinical strategies for diabetes prevention. Timely action taken now in screening all pregnant women for glucose intolerance, achieving euglycaemia in them and ensuring adequate nutrition may prevent in all probability, the vicious cycle of transmitting glucose intolerance from one generation to another. Given that diabetic mothers have proportionately larger babies it is likely that vaginal delivery will be more difficult than in the normal population, with a higher rate of instrumentally assisted delivery, episiotomy and conversion to urgent caesarean section. So an indwelling epidural catheter is a better choice for labour analgesia as well to use, should a caesarean delivery become necessary. Diabetes in pregnancy has potential serious adverse effects for both the mother and the neonate. Standardized multidisciplinary care including anaesthetists should be carried out obsessively throughout pregnancy. Diabetes is the most common endocrine disorder of pregnancy. In pregnancy, it has considerable cost and care demands and is associated with increased risks to the health of the mother and the outcome of the pregnancy. However, with careful and appropriate screening, multidisciplinary management and a motivated patient these risks can be minimized.

  9. Rheumatological manifestations in diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Rosso, Angela; Cerinic, Marco Matucci; De Giorgio, Francesca; Minari, Chiara; Rotella, Carlo Maria; Seghieri, Giuseppe

    2006-11-01

    Rheumatological manifestations of Diabetes Mellitus may be classified in: non articular, articular and bone conditions. Among non articular conditions, diabetic cheiroarthropathy, frequent in type I diabetes, the most important disorder related to limited joint mobility, results in stiff skin and joint contractures. Adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder, flexor tenosynovitis, and Duputryen's and Peyronie's diseases are also linked to limited joint mobility. Diffuse skeletal hyperostosis, due to calcification at entheses, is frequent and early, particularly in type 2 diabetes. Neuropathies cause some non articular conditions, mainly neuropathic arthritis, a destructive bone and joint condition more common in type I diabetes. Algodistrophy, shoulder-hand and entrapment syndromes are also frequent. Mononeuropathy causes diabetic amyotrophy, characterised by painless muscle weakness. Among muscle conditions, diabetic muscle infarction is a rare, sometimes severe, condition. Among articular conditions, osteoarthritis is frequent and early in diabetes, in which also chondrocalcinosis and gout occur. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and diabetes I have a common genetic background and the presence of diabetes gives to RA an unfavourable prognosis. Among bone conditions, osteopenia and osteoporosis may occur early in type 1 diabetes. Contrarily, in type 2 diabetes, bone mineral density is similar or, sometimes, higher than in non diabetic subjects, probably due to hyperinsulinemia.

  10. Determinants of diabetes knowledge in a cohort of Nigerian diabetics

    OpenAIRE

    Jasper, Unyime Sunday; Ogundunmade, Babatunde Gbolahan; Opara, Macmillian Chinonso; Akinrolie, Olayinka; Pyiki, Edna Bawa; Umar, Aishatu

    2014-01-01

    Background One of the consequences of the generational paradigm shift of lifestyle from the traditional African model to a more "western" standard is a replacement of communicable diseases by non-communicable or life style related diseases like diabetes. To address this trend, diabetes education along with continuous assessment of diabetes related knowledge has been advocated. Since most of the Nigerian studies assessing knowledge of diabetes were hospital-based, we decided to evaluate the di...

  11. Diabetes and Cancer: Is Diabetes Causally Related to Cancer?

    OpenAIRE

    Sunghwan Suh; Kwang-Won Kim

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a serious and growing health problem worldwide and is associated with severe acute and chronic complications. Moreover, epidemiologic evidence suggests that people with diabetes are at significantly higher risk for many forms of cancer. Several studies indicate an association between diabetes and the risk of liver, pancreas, endometrium, colon/rectum, breast, and bladder cancer. Mortality is also moderately increased in subjects with diabetes. Common risk factors such as ...

  12. Diabetes and Cancer: Is Diabetes Causally Related to Cancer?

    OpenAIRE

    Sunghwan Suh; Kwang-Won Kim

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a serious and growing health problem worldwide and is associated with severe acute and chronic complications. Moreover, epidemiologic evidence suggests that people with diabetes are at significantly higher risk for many forms of cancer. Several studies indicate an association between diabetes and the risk of liver, pancreas, endometrium, colon/rectum, breast, and bladder cancer. Mortality is also moderately increased in subjects with diabetes. Common risk factors such as ...

  13. Undiagnosed Diabetes and Pre-Diabetes in Health Disparities

    OpenAIRE

    Fisher-Hoch, Susan P; Vatcheva, Kristina P.; Rahbar, Mohammad H; McCormick, Joseph B.

    2015-01-01

    Globally half of all diabetes mellitus is undiagnosed. We sought to determine the extent and characteristics of undiagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus and pre-diabetes in Mexican Americans residing in the United States. This disadvantaged population with 50% lifetime risk of diabetes is a microcosm of the current pandemic. We accessed baseline data between 2004 and 2014 from 2,838 adults recruited to our Cameron County Hispanic Cohort (CCHC); a two-stage randomly selected 'Framingham-like' coho...

  14. Klinefelter's syndrome accompanied by diabetes mellitus and diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, K; Niwa, T; Ohkubo, M; Ohba, M; Shikano, M; Watanabe, Y

    1992-07-01

    The first case of Klinefelter's syndrome accompanied by diabetes insipidus and diabetes mellitus is reported. A 41-year-old man admitted for hyperosmolar diabetic coma with a past history of diabetes insipidus was diagnosed as having Klinefelter's syndrome by endocrinological examination and sex chromosome analysis. In this case, glucose tolerance test was normalized half a year later and blood glucose was well controlled with diet therapy alone.

  15. Nursery School

    CERN Multimedia

    Nursery School

    2016-01-01

    Enrolments 2016-2017 Enrolments for the school year 2016-2017 to the Nursery, the Nursery school and the school will take place on 7, 8 and 9 March 2016 from 8 to 10 am at the Nursery School. Registration forms will be available from Thursday 3rd March. More information on the website: http://nurseryschool.web.cern.ch/.

  16. The Diabetes Pearl : Diabetes biobanking in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van't Riet, Esther; Schram, Miranda T.; Abbink, Evertine J.; Admiraal, Wanda M.; Dijk-Schaap, Marja W.; Holleman, Frits; Nijpels, Giel; Ozcan, Behiye; Pijl, Hanno; Schaper, Nicolaas C.; Sijbrands, Eric J. G.; Silvius, Bianca; Tack, Cees J.; de Valk, Harold W.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.; Stehouwer, Coen D. A.; Dekker, Jacqueline M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Type 2 diabetes is associated with considerable comorbidity and severe complications, which reduce quality of life of the patients and require high levels of healthcare. The Diabetes Pearl is a large cohort of patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, covering different geographical areas

  17. The Diabetes Pearl: Diabetes biobanking in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van't Riet, E.; Schram, M.T.; Abbink, E.J.; Admiraal, W.M.; Dijk-Schaap, M.W.; Holleman, F.; Nijpels, G.; Ozcan, B.; Pijl, H.; Schaper, N.C.; Sijbrands, E.J.; Silvius, B.; Tack, C.J.J.; Valk, H.W. de; Wolffenbuttel, B.H.R.; Stehouwer, C.D.A.; Dekker, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Type 2 diabetes is associated with considerable comorbidity and severe complications, which reduce quality of life of the patients and require high levels of healthcare. The Diabetes Pearl is a large cohort of patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, covering different geograph

  18. Diabetic myonecrosis: An underreported complication of diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bipul Kumar Choudhury

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic myonecrosis is an underreported complication of long-standing, poorly controlled diabetes mellitus which is usually self-limiting and responds well to conservative management. Patients frequently have microvascular complications, and although short-term prognosis is good, the long-term prognosis is poor. We report four cases of diabetic myonecrosis admitted in a tertiary care hospital.

  19. The Diabetes Pearl: Diabetes biobanking in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. van 't Riet (Esther); M.T. Schram (Miranda); E.J. Abbink (Evertine); W.M. Admiraal (Wanda); M.W. Dijk-Schaap (Marja); F. Holleman (Frits); M.G.A.A.M. Nijpels (Giel); B. Özcan (Behiye); H. Pijl (Hanno); N. Schaper; E.J.G. Sijbrands (Eric); B. Silvius (Bianca); C.J. Tack (Cees); H.W. de Valk (Harold); B.H.R. Wolffenbuttel (Bruce); C.D. Stehouwer (Coen); J.M. Dekker (Jacqueline)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Type 2 diabetes is associated with considerable comorbidity and severe complications, which reduce quality of life of the patients and require high levels of healthcare. The Diabetes Pearl is a large cohort of patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, covering different geogra

  20. What is the diabetic foot?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-01-03

    Jan 3, 2011 ... can expect to see a massive increase in the complications related to diabetes as a result ... Neuropathy in diabetic patients affects the sensory, motor and ... commonly find that moving, standing or walking alleviates the pain.7.

  1. Diabetes MILES Youth-Australia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagger, Virginia; Trawley, Steven; Hendrieckx, Christel

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Type 1 diabetes is a complex and demanding condition, which places a substantial behavioural and psychological burden on young people and their families. Around one-third of adolescents with type 1 diabetes need mental health support. Parents of a child with type 1 diabetes are also...... at increased risk of psychological distress. A better understanding of the motivators, behaviours and psychological well-being of young people with diabetes and their parents will inform improvement of resources for supporting self-management and reducing the burden of diabetes. The Diabetes MILES (Management...... and Impact for Long-term Empowerment and Success) Youth-Australia Study is the first large-scale, national survey of the impact of diabetes on the psychosocial outcomes of Australian adolescents with type 1 diabetes and their parents. METHODS/DESIGN: The survey was web-based to enable a large-scale, national...

  2. Living with Diabetic Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Diabetic Heart Disease Diabetic heart disease (DHD) increases the likelihood of earlier and more ... also tend to have less success from certain heart disease treatments, such as coronary artery bypass grafting and ...

  3. Diabetes: Unique to Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stroke Urinary Incontinence Related Documents PDF Choosing Wisely: Diabetes Tests and Treatments Download Related Video Join our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Diabetes Unique to Older Adults This section provides information ...

  4. Retinopathy in a diabetic population

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shrestha, S; Malla, O K; Karki, D B; Byanju, R N

    2007-01-01

    The study was conducted with the aim to find out the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy among diabetics on treatment, to find out the presence of associated risk factors and to determine the knowledge...

  5. Living With Diabetes: Foot Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease (Nephropathy) Gastroparesis Mental Health Step On Up Treatment & Care Blood Glucose Testing Medication Doctors, Nurses & More ... us get closer to curing diabetes and better treatments for those living with diabetes. Other Ways to ...

  6. Recent Advances (in Diabetes Research)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease (Nephropathy) Gastroparesis Mental Health Step On Up Treatment & Care Blood Glucose Testing Medication Doctors, Nurses & More ... us get closer to curing diabetes and better treatments for those living with diabetes. Other Ways to ...

  7. Living with Diabetes: Foot Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease (Nephropathy) Gastroparesis Mental Health Step On Up Treatment & Care Blood Glucose Testing Medication Doctors, Nurses & More ... us get closer to curing diabetes and better treatments for those living with diabetes. Other Ways to ...

  8. Energy Therapies and Diabetes Mellitus

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Diana W. Guthrie; Maureen Gamble

    2001-01-01

    Energy Therapies and Diabetes Mellitus Diana W. Guthrie , PhD, FAAN, CDE and Maureen Gamble , BSN, MA, CHTP/I, CCAP, RM Abstract In Brief People with diabetes require multiple interventions to reach their glycemic goals...

  9. Diabetes and Hepatitis B Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes and Hepatitis B Vaccination Information for Diabetes Educators What is hepatitis B? Hepatitis B is a contagious liver disease that results from infection with the hepatitis B virus. When first infected, a person can develop ...

  10. Diabetic Complications and Amputation Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... enable Javascript in your browser. Diabetes Complications and Amputation Prevention People living with diabetes are prone to ... have lost any feeling or circulation. When Is Amputation Necessary? Even with preventive care and prompt treatment ...

  11. Weight and Diabetes (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... help all kids maintain a healthy weight. For kids with diabetes, diet and exercise are even more important because ... weight is good for the entire family! When kids with diabetes reach and maintain a healthy weight, they feel ...

  12. Diabetes Mellitus and Osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilek Durmuş

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis is a condition of bone fragility resulting from micro-architectural deterioration and decreased bone mass. Studies on the presence of a generalized osteoporosis related to diabetes mellitus (DM are few and controversial. Factors associated with osteoporosis diabetes in which may account for the patogenesis of diabetic bone loss have been studied. This article will review the relevant litarature relating to diabetes and osteoporosis including cellular and animal models. These studies include vascular and neuropathic mechanism, poor glisemic control, abnormalities of calcium and vitamin D metabolism and hypercalciuria with secondary increase in parathyroid hormone secretion, the role of insülin and insülin like growth factor I. It appears that there is a great deal of variability in the bone mineral density and fracture rates in both type I and type II DM. This may reflect multiple factors such as the population, age, duration of diabetes and insülin use. There is need for further longitudinal studies, including the incidence and risk factors for osteoporosis in DM.

  13. Metabolomics in diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ai-hua; Qiu, Shi; Xu, Hong-ying; Sun, Hui; Wang, Xi-jun

    2014-02-15

    Characterization of metabolic changes is key to early detection, treatment, and understanding molecular mechanisms of diabetes. Diabetes represents one of the most important global health problems. Approximately 90% of diabetics have type 2 diabetes. Identification of effective screening markers is critical for early treatment and intervention that can delay and/or prevent complications associated with this chronic disease. Fortunately, metabolomics has introduced new insights into the pathology of diabetes as well as to predict disease onset and revealed new biomarkers to improve diagnostics in a range of diseases. Small-molecule metabolites have an important role in biological systems and represent attractive candidates to understand T2D phenotypes. Characteristic patterns of metabolites can be revealed that broaden our understanding of T2D disorder. This technique-driven review aims to demystify the mechanisms of T2D, to provide updates on the applications of metabolomics in addressing T2D with a focus on metabolites based biomarker discovery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Osteomyelitis in the diabetic foot

    OpenAIRE

    Malhotra, Rishi; Chan, Claire Shu-Yi; Nather, Aziz

    2014-01-01

    Osteomyelitis (OM) is a common complication of diabetic foot ulcers and/or diabetic foot infections. This review article discusses the clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of OM in the diabetic foot. Clinical features that point to the possibility of OM include the presence of exposed bone in the depth of a diabetic foot ulcer. Medical imaging studies include plain radiographs, magnetic resonance imaging, and bone scintigraphy. A high index of suspicion is also required to make the...

  15. Diabetic Neuropathy: Mechanisms to Management

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Neuropathy is the most common and debilitating complication of diabetes and results in pain, decreased motility, and amputation. Diabetic neuropathy encompasses a variety of forms whose impact ranges from discomfort to death. Hyperglycemia induces oxidative stress in diabetic neurons and results in activation of multiple biochemical pathways. These activated pathways are a major source of damage and are potential therapeutic targets in diabetic neuropathy. Though therapies are available to al...

  16. Mouse Models of Diabetic Nephropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Brosius, Frank C.; Alpers, Charles E.; Bottinger, Erwin P.; Breyer, Matthew D.; Coffman, Thomas M.; Gurley, Susan B.; Harris, Raymond C.; Kakoki, Masao; Kretzler, Matthias; Leiter, Edward H.; Levi, Moshe; McIndoe, Richard A.; Sharma, Kumar; Smithies, Oliver; Susztak, Katalin

    2009-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the major cause of end-stage renal disease worldwide. Despite its prevalence, identification of specific factors that cause or predict diabetic nephropathy has been delayed in part by lack of reliable animal models that mimic the disease in humans. The Animal Models of Diabetic Complications Consortium (AMDCC) was created 8 years ago by the National Institutes of Health to develop and characterize models of diabetic nephropathy and other complications. This interim rep...

  17. Educational system for diabetic children

    OpenAIRE

    Tretyakova, Sofia

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces an educational system for diabetic children. It aims to create interest in self-monitoring among children diagnosed with diabetes, to enable them to learn and follow diabetes control guidelines from childhood. Abidance by such rules supports a normal lifestyle for diabetic children. Accordingly, this paper presents an online educational game that could be part of a social network, and as such be accessible everywhere to teach kids how to deal with their...

  18. Self-care management strategies among individuals living with type 2 diabetes mellitus: nursing interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hunt CW

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Caralise W HuntAuburn University School of Nursing, Auburn, AL, USAAbstract: Nurses provide care for individuals living with diabetes in a variety of areas. Nursing interventions assist individuals living with diabetes to manage diabetes and can positively affect outcomes. This article describes an integrated literature review conducted to evaluate and summarize nursing interventions and research in self-management of type 2 diabetes mellitus. PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and the Cochrane database were searched for the years 2002–2013 using the search terms “diabetes”, “type 2 diabetes”, “self-care”, “self-management”, “diabetes self-management”, “intervention”, and “nursing”. Results from the review indicate that nurses deliver care independently and in conjunction with other health care providers for individuals living with diabetes. A majority of the reviewed studies included a nursing education intervention for patients living with diabetes. Nursing interventions are linked to improvements in diabetes knowledge, self-management behaviors, and physiologic and psychologic outcomes.Keywords: type 2 diabetes mellitus, self-care management, nursing interventions

  19. Educational Needs and Technological Preferences of Fathers of Youth With Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albanese-O'Neill, Anastasia; Schatz, Desmond A; Bernhardt, Jay M; Elder, Jennifer H

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the educational needs and technological preferences of fathers of youth aged 6 to 17 years with type 1 diabetes (T1DM). Participants completed 2 surveys and 1 in-person semistructured interview. Survey data were collected via Qualtrics; interviews were recorded and transcribed. The quantitative data were analyzed with SPSS 22. Thirty fathers/stepfathers of youth 6 to 17 years old with T1DM participated in the study. Participants reported high levels of unmet diabetes-related educational needs, including needs in fundamental areas of diabetes management such as treatment of hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia, and calculating and adjusting insulin doses. A majority of participants identified educational needs in more nuanced aspects of diabetes management, indicating a need for more information about insulin pumps and continuous glucose monitors, managing diabetes at school, and finding help for diabetes challenges. All participants used smartphone technology, and most expressed interest in receiving diabetes education via mobile technology. The findings contribute to our understanding of the educational needs of fathers of children with T1DM and provide preliminary support for the acceptability of delivering diabetes education via mobile technology. The incorporation of patient and caregiver perspectives into the development of mHealth diabetes education applications may increase engagement and improve health outcomes. © 2016 The Author(s).

  20. Relationship of Food Security with Type 2 Diabetes and Its Risk Factors in Tehranian Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan-Ghomi, Majid; Ejtahed, Hanieh-Sadat; Mirmiran, Parvin; Hosseini-Esfahani, Firozeh; Sarbazi, Narges; Azizi, Fereidoun; Sadeghian, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    As food insecurity has negative effects on health, the aim of this study was to determine tahe relationship between household food security and type 2 diabetes mellitus and its related risk factors. In this case-control study, 200 individuals with and 200 individuals without type 2 diabetes mellitus, aged over 40 years, were randomly selected from among participants of the Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study. The questionnaire on household food security proposed by the United States Department of Agriculture was completed for them by trained personnel. Logistic regression was used to determine the variable that had the most significant relationship with food security status. The average of food security score was 2.38 ± 2.0 in non-diabetic and 2.25 ± 2.0 in diabetic individuals (P = 0.6). In both groups, the risk for food insecurity in women was more than in men. In the diabetic group, being single and having education levels below high school increased the risk of food insecurity. In the non-diabetic group, the risk of food insecurity in obese individuals was 3.3 times higher than normal individuals (odds ratio = 2.1, 95% confidence interval: 1.2-4.1). There were no significant differences in food security levels of diabetic and non-diabetic groups. However, some risk factors of type 2 diabetes including sex, marital status, educational level, and obesity were associated with food insecurity.

  1. Periodontal health and diabetes awareness among Saudi diabetes patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahammam, Maha A

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to examine diabetic patients in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, regarding their general diabetic and oral health-related awareness and practices, their awareness of the association of diabetes with periodontal disease, and their sources of diabetes-related information. Methods Diabetic patients (n=454) who were receiving care at the diabetes clinic in King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, from October 2013 to May 2014, completed a six-part questionnaire assessing their sociodemographic characteristics, general and oral health awareness and practices, and sources of diabetes-related information. Descriptive statistics were used to report the results. Results The responses indicated inadequate health-related practices in the surveyed group: 22.2% brushed their teeth twice daily, 73.6% never flossed their teeth, and while 80.2% visited a physician in the past year, only 12.6% visited a dentist during the same year. Of the respondents, 94.8% reported that they had never received advice on oral hygiene tasks in relation to diabetes from a health professional. Awareness about the diabetes and periodontal disease association was limited: 46.7% knew that diabetics have gum problems more often if their blood sugar stays very high, and only 21.8% knew that gum disease makes it harder to control blood sugar in diabetic patients. A significant association (Pdisease, regular exercise, and regular visits to the physician and awareness about diabetes mellitus. Additionally, a significant association (Pperiodontal disease and diabetes awareness. Family and friends were the main source of diabetes-related information, and the Internet was the least likely source. Conclusion Customized educational programs should be planned for diabetic patients according to community needs. PMID:25673974

  2. Necessidades especiais de escolares com diabetes mellitus tipo 1 identificadas por familiares Special needs of students with diabetes mellitus type 1 identified by relatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Moron Saes Braga

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available É um desafio atender aos alunos, em suas diversas necessidades especiais. Diferentemente das deficiências, há poucas pesquisas no Brasil sobre estudantes com doenças crônicas e suas especificidades, na escola. O objetivo do presente estudo foi identificar as necessidades especiais de escolares com diabetes mellitus tipo 1. Participaram 37 familiares de escolares em tratamento ambulatorial de uma faculdade paulista, por meio de entrevista semiestruturada, gravada em áudio e transcrita para análise. Os resultados mostraram que todos comunicaram a escola a respeito da doença do filho, mas, mesmo assim, 29,7% relatam dificuldade de inclusão ou acesso à escola, como desconhecimento do professor para o controle do diabetes, merenda escolar inadequada, preconceito dos colegas e da diretora ou vergonha por parte do aluno. As faltas ocorrem com 70,3% dos alunos, principalmente devido às consultas médicas. Necessidades especiais foram identificadas por 32,4%, incluindo a alimentação, o desempenho escolar e a necessidade de profissionais da escola mais bem informados sobre a doença. Além disso, 72,9% referem algum tipo de apoio para enfrentar o diabetes, principalmente de profissionais de saúde. Dos familiares, 51,3% apresentam sugestões para um melhor desenvolvimento do filho na escola, incluindo alimentação escolar adequada e melhor preparo da escola para lidar com o diabetes, como palestras e treinamento aos professores. Sugerimos a aproximação entre a escola e a área da saúde, porém, o primeiro passo para a integração intersetorial é identificar as necessidades desses alunos com doenças crônicas, como foi possível com este trabalho, ao enfocar o diabetes mellitus e suas repercussões escolares.Catering to students according to their various special needs is a challenge. As opposed to the field of disability, there is little research in Brazil on students with chronic diseases and their specific needs at school. The

  3. Type 2 diabetes mellitus and the cardiometabolic syndrome: impact of incretin-based therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Schwartz, Stanley

    2010-01-01

    Stanley Schwartz1, Benjamin A Kohl21Department of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA; 2Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USAAbstract: The rates of type 2 diabetes mellitus, obesity, and cardiovascular disease (CVD) continue to increase at epidemic proportions. It has become clear that these disease states are not independent but are freque...

  4. Caffeine, Diabetes, Cognition, and Dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biessels, Geert Jan

    2010-01-01

    People with diabetes mellitus are at increased risk of cognitive dysfunction. This review explores the relation between caffeine intake, diabetes, cognition and dementia, focusing on type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Epidemiological studies on caffeine/coffee intake and T2DM risk are reviewed. Next, the

  5. Monocyte functions in diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geisler, C; Almdal, T; Bennedsen, J

    1982-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the functions of monocytes obtained from 14 patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) compared with those of monocytes from healthy individuals. It was found that the total number of circulating monocytes in the 14 diabetic patients was lower than that from...... for the elucidation of concomitant infections in diabetic patients are discussed....

  6. Screening for gestational diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, M.

    2012-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus is associated with increased risk of complications for mother and child. Along with the growing epidemic of obesity and type 2 diabetes, the prevalence of gestational diabetes is expected to rise. With adequate and timely treatment, the risk of complications is reduced.

  7. Diabetes and diet: food choices.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niewind, A.C.

    1989-01-01

    This thesis reports on the food choices of diabetic patients. Two studies were undertaken considering the barriers these patients experience with the diabetic diet. Furthermore, the changes in food choices during the first years after the diagnosis of insulin-dependent diabetes as well as patients,

  8. Caffeine, Diabetes, Cognition, and Dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biessels, Geert Jan

    2010-01-01

    People with diabetes mellitus are at increased risk of cognitive dysfunction. This review explores the relation between caffeine intake, diabetes, cognition and dementia, focusing on type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Epidemiological studies on caffeine/coffee intake and T2DM risk are reviewed. Next, the impac

  9. Type 1 Diabetes and Sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farabi, Sarah S

    2016-02-01

    IN BRIEF In people with type 1 diabetes, sleep may be disrupted as a result of both behavioral and physiological aspects of diabetes and its management. This sleep disruption may negatively affect disease progression and development of complications. This review highlights key research findings regarding sleep in people with type 1 diabetes.

  10. Diabetes MILES Youth-Australia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagger, Virginia; Trawley, Steven; Hendrieckx, Christel;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Type 1 diabetes is a complex and demanding condition, which places a substantial behavioural and psychological burden on young people and their families. Around one-third of adolescents with type 1 diabetes need mental health support. Parents of a child with type 1 diabetes are also a...

  11. Cardiovascular consequences of diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.A. Baan (Caroline)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractDiabetes mellitus comprises a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders that have one common feature: abnormally high levels of glucose in the blood. The most common form is non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NlDDM); about 80-90% of all diabetic patients has NlDDM

  12. Diabetes and diet : food choices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niewind, A.C.

    1989-01-01

    This thesis reports on the food choices of diabetic patients. Two studies were undertaken considering the barriers these patients experience with the diabetic diet. Furthermore, the changes in food choices during the first years after the diagnosis of insulin-dependent diabetes as well as patients,

  13. Pathophysiology of peripheral arterial disease in diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shao-Ling; Zhu, Lv-Yun; Han, Rui; Sun, Lei-Lei; Li, Jun-Xia; Dou, Jing-Tao

    2017-02-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) increases the risk of lower extremity amputation. It is also an independent predictor of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular ischemic events, affecting both the quality and expectancy of life. Many studies have demonstrated that the prevalence of PAD in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) is higher than in non-diabetic patients. In diabetic patients, PAD occurs early with rapid progression, and is frequently asymptomatic. Multiple metabolic aberrations in DM, such as advanced glycation end-products, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and abnormal oxidative stress, have been shown to worsen PAD. However, the role of DM in PAD is not completely understood. The purpose of the present article is to review and discuss the pathophysiology of PAD in DM. © 2016 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  14. Diabetes and exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumb, Alistair

    2014-12-01

    Exercise has a beneficial effect on metabolic parameters affecting cardiovascular risk, such as lipids and blood glucose, and is a key component in both the prevention and the management of type 2 diabetes. Glycaemic control improves with both aerobic and resistance exercise in type 2 diabetes, but no glycaemic benefit is seen in type 1 diabetes. This probably results from glucose fluctuations commonly seen with exercise. Low and moderate intensity exercise are generally associated with a fall in blood glucose, and high intensity exercise can be associated with a rise in blood glucose. Trial evidence is suggestive of a reduction in cardiovascular risk with exercise, although evidence from prospective, randomised controlled trials is certainly not conclusive.

  15. [Coffee and diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempf, Kerstin; Martin, Stephan

    2010-12-01

    Lack of physical activity and high caloric diet are main causes for increasing diabetes prevalence. Thus, it is possible to influence blood glucose levels by lifestyle modifications. Coffee is an important lifestyle factor in Germany with a mean consumption of about 150 litres per inhabitant. It is important to know that coffee cannot be equated with caffeine. Scientific investigations have shown that caffeine can temporarily have a negative impact on cardiovascular risk factors but does not promote development of cardiovascular events. On the other hand, several international prospective studies demonstrate a protective effect of coffee on the development of type 2 diabetes as coffee consumption can reduce glucose uptake. Coffee components, e.g. chlorogenic acid, play a central role, as they can inhibit oxidative stress and inflammation in addition. In the context of lifestyle tasks coffee consumption therefore is an additional option for modifying diabetes risk.

  16. Knowing hypertension and diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whyte, Susan Reynolds

    2016-01-01

    In Uganda, hypertension and diabetes have only recently been included in the health policy agenda. As they become treatable disorders, they take on more distinct contours in people's minds. This article relates knowledge about these two conditions to health institutions and technology for diagnos......In Uganda, hypertension and diabetes have only recently been included in the health policy agenda. As they become treatable disorders, they take on more distinct contours in people's minds. This article relates knowledge about these two conditions to health institutions and technology...... for diagnosing and treating them. The response to the AIDS epidemic in Uganda provides an important context for, and contrast with, the emergence of hypertension and diabetes as social phenomena. Ethnographic fieldwork shows the interplay between experience of these conditions and the political economy...

  17. Diabetes in pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feig, Denice S; Corcoy, Rosa; Jensen, Dorte Møller

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rising rates of diabetes in pregnancy have led to an escalation in research in this area. As in any area of clinical research, outcome definitions vary from study to study, making it difficult to compare research findings and draw conclusions. Our aim was to compile and create...... a repository of definitions, which could then be used universally. METHODS: A systematic review of the literature was performed of published and ongoing randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in the area of diabetes in pregnancy between Jan 1, 2000 and June 1, 2012. Other sources included the World Health...... Organization and Academic Society Statements. The advice of experts was sought when appropriate definitions were lacking. RESULTS: Among the published RCTs on diabetes and pregnancy, 171 abstracts were retrieved, 64 full texts were reviewed, and 53 were included. Among the ongoing RCTs published in Clinical...

  18. Monogenic diabetes syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astuti, Dewi; Sabir, Ataf; Fulton, Piers

    2017-01-01

    We developed a variant database for diabetes syndrome genes, using the Leiden Open Variation Database platform, containing observed phenotypes matched to the genetic variations. We populated it with 628 published disease-associated variants (December 2016) for: WFS1 (n = 309), CISD2 (n = 3), ALMS1...... for the WFS1 gene. The presence of biallelic loss-of-function variants predicted Wolfram syndrome defined by insulin-dependent diabetes and optic atrophy, with a sensitivity of 79% (95% CI 75%-83%) and specificity of 92% (83%-97%). The presence of minor loss-of-function variants in WFS1 predicted isolated...... diabetes, isolated deafness, or isolated congenital cataracts without development of the full syndrome (sensitivity 100% [93%-100%]; specificity 78% [73%-82%]). The ability to provide a prognostic prediction based on genotype will lead to improvements in patient care and counseling. The development...

  19. Gestational diabetes versus pregestational diabetes. Perinatal results. Diabetes gestacional versus diabetes pregestacional. Resultados perinatales.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian Vázquez Martínez

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available

    Fundament: Diabetes Mellitus is one of the most affecting diseases in the development of pregnancy. This greatly depends on the metabolic control achieved, which has demanded several proyects of treatment, thus decreasing the risks that the gestational process carries out. Objective: to compare the perinatal results between the diabetic gestational women and pregestational ones admitted at Cienfuegos Hospital. Method: Comparative study developed at the Gynecological-Obstetric Universitary Hospital from Cienfuegos province, from January to december 2003, including 167 pregnant women with Diabetes mellitus during pregnancy. The variables under study were: type of Diabetes, Márquez Guillén classification about good or bad fetal-maternal prognosis , treatment used, type of delivery, gestational age at labor, newborn weight, prenatal and maternal complication. Results: There was a predominance of gestational diabetes (73, 6 % over the cases with pregestational diabetes (26,3 %. According to Marquez Guillén classification , the bad fetal-maternal prognosis (X=16.37, p < 0.05, the treatment with diet plus insulin(X=53.5, p < 0.05,abortio(X=32.2, p < 0.05,pre term delivery (X=11, p < 0.05,maternal morbidity (X=36.8, p < 0.05 and perinatal morbidity (X=39.6, p < 0.05 were the most frequent in pregestationaldiabetes than in gestational diabetes.

    Fundamento: La diabetes mellitus es una de las enfermedades que mayor repercusión tiene sobre el desarrollo y los resultados del embarazo, lo cual depende en gran medida del control metabólico alcanzado, para lo cual se han ideado numerosos protocolos de tratamiento, logrando por este medio minimizar el riesgo que el proceso gestacional lleva implícito. Objetivo: Comparar los resultados perinatales entre las diabéticas gestacionales y pregestacionales ingresadas en nuestro centro.

  20. Diabetic nephropathy and antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavafi, Majid

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress has crucial role in pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Despite satisfactory results from antioxidant therapy in rodent, antioxidant therapy showed conflicting results in combat with DN in diabetic patients. Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), Google Scholar,Pubmed (NLM), LISTA (EBSCO) and Web of Science have been searched. Treatment of DN in human are insufficient with rennin angiotensin system (RAS) blockers, so additional agent ought to combine with this management. Meanwhile based on DN pathogenesis and evidences in experimental and human researches, the antioxidants are the best candidate. New multi-property antioxidants may be improved human DN that show high power antioxidant capacity, long half-life time, high permeability to mitochondrion, improve body antioxidants enzymes activity and anti-inflammatory effects. Based on this review and our studies on diabetic rats, rosmarinic acid a multi-property antioxidant may be useful in DN patients, but of course, needs to be proven in clinical trials studies.

  1. Diabetes and periodontal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajkumar Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a systemic disease characterized by increased blood glucose levels and abnormalities of lipid metabolism due to absence or decreased level of insulin. It affects all the body organs and their functions either directly or indirectly. Every dentist should have a basic understanding of the etiopathogenesis, oral and systemic manifestations of this disease. The periodontal diseases are a consequence of extension of the gingival inflammation into the underlying supporting structures of the periodontium, initiated by the presence of plaque and its products on the surfaces of the teeth and the adjoining structures. The progression of periodontal disease is influenced by variety of factors like microorganisms, host response, systemic background, and genetic makeup of the host. Amongst them, diabetes mellitus tops the list. Diabetes and periodontitis influence the clinical outcome of each other and control of both influences the clinical improvement of each.

  2. Diabetes, insulin and exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Galbo, H

    1986-01-01

    The metabolic and hormonal adaptations to single exercise sessions and to exercise training in normal man and in patients with insulin-dependent as well as non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus are reviewed. In insulin-dependent (type I) diabetes good metabolic control is best obtained...... by a regular pattern of life which will lead to a fairly constant demand for insulin from day to day. Exercise is by nature a perturbation that makes treatment of diabetes difficult: Muscle contractions per se tend to decrease the plasma glucose concentration whereas the exercise-induced response of the so......-called counter-regulatory hormones tend to increase plasma glucose by increasing hepatic glucose production and adipose tissue lipolysis. If the pre-exercise plasma insulin level is high, hypoglycaemia may develop during exercise whereas hyperglycaemia and ketosis may develop if pre-exercise plasma insulin...

  3. [Diabetes in liver cirrhosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Compeán, Diego; Jáquez-Quintana, Joel O; González-González, José A; Lavalle-González, Fernando J; Villarreal-Pérez, Jesús Z; Maldonado-Garza, Hector J

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of overt diabetes mellitus (DM) in liver cirrhosis is about 30%. However, DM or impaired glucose tolerance can be observed in 90% after an oral glucose tolerance test in patients with normal fasting plasma glucose. Type 2 DM may produce cirrhosis, whereas DM may be a complication of cirrhosis. The latter is known as «hepatogenous diabetes». Overt and subclinical DM is associated with liver complications and death in cirrhotic patients. Treating diabetes is difficult in cirrhotic patients because of the metabolic impairments due to liver disease and because the most appropriate pharmacologic treatment has not been defined. It is also unknown if glycemic control with hypoglycemic agents has any impact on the course of the liver disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. y AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  4. Diabetes Epidemics in Korea: Reappraise Nationwide Survey of Diabetes "Diabetes in Korea 2007"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available There are many studies on the prevalence, clinical characteristics, and economic burden of diabetes across the past four decades in Korea. Nonetheless, there is a dearth of nationwide study regarding diabetes encompassing all age group. Eight years ago, the Committee on the Epidemiology of Diabetes Mellitus of Korean Diabetes Association collaborated with Health Insurance Review & Assessment Service to evaluate the status of diabetes care and characteristics in diabetic patients in Korea. In 2007, the collaborative task force team published a comprehensive survey titled "Diabetes in Korea 2007." In this review, we reappraise the diabetic epidemics from the joint report and suggest further studies that are needed to be investigated in the future.

  5. Quality of life for parents of children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulkner, M S; Clark, F S

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the issue of quality of life (QOL) of parents with children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Parental QOL was measured by the Parents Diabetes Quality of Life Questionnaire. Parental life satisfaction was most affected by the burden the child's diabetes placed on the family. The event having the most impact on parental QOL was the frequency of telling others about the child's diabetes. The greatest worry was that the child would develop complications from diabetes. Parents of school-aged children experienced significantly greater life satisfaction than parents of adolescents. Married parents had higher life satisfaction than those who were divorced. Metabolic control, reflected by HbA1c values, was associated with the life satisfaction of parents.

  6. [Diabetic gangrene and amputation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bríza, J; Krska, Z

    1996-01-01

    The authors describe group of 60 patients with diabetic gangrena of lower extremity. In 24 cases was performed primary amputation (14 acral and 10 in thigh for sepsis). In 14 patients was carried out balloon angioplasty, in 6 bypass and in 16 a lumbal sympathectomy. The big amputation was necessary after the revascularization in 9 cases. A treatment of the diabetic foot have to be complex. Before amputation is the angiography necessary. It is enabled also by the balloon angioplasty. Microangiopathy with the good arteriography finding in main limb arteries make acral amputation possible.

  7. Diabetes in population isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grarup, Niels; Moltke, Ida; Albrechtsen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is an increasing health problem worldwide with particularly high occurrence in specific subpopulations and ancestry groups. The high prevalence of T2D is caused both by changes in lifestyle and genetic predisposition. A large number of studies have sought to identify...... on glucose-stimulated plasma glucose, serum insulin levels, and T2D. The variant defines a specific subtype of non-autoimmune diabetes characterized by decreased post-prandial glucose uptake and muscular insulin resistance. These and other recent findings in population isolates illustrate the value...

  8. Hypertension og diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Per; Hansen, Klavs; Gæde, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The documentation for the beneficial effects of antihypertensive treatment in patients with diabetes is overwhelming. Most patients will require three or four antihypertensive drugs to achieve blood pressure (BP) goals. The regime should include an agent that blocks the renin angiotensin aldoster......The documentation for the beneficial effects of antihypertensive treatment in patients with diabetes is overwhelming. Most patients will require three or four antihypertensive drugs to achieve blood pressure (BP) goals. The regime should include an agent that blocks the renin angiotensin...

  9. Diabetic retinopathy in Swaziland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Burn

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available It is estimated that between 2010 and 2030 there will be a 98% increase in the number of adults in sub-Saharan Africa with diabetes.1 This is just one aspect of the epidemic of non-communicable diseases facing sub-Saharan Africa, driven by urbanisation, ageing, and changes to lifestyle and environment. The diabetes epidemic poses a significant challenge to health services, as non-communicable conditions should be managed by multi-disciplinary teams, with prevention as a primary aim.

  10. Diabetes knowledge among Greek Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulimeneas, Dimitrios; Grammatikopoulou, Maria G; Bougioukli, Vasiliki; Iosifidou, Parthena; Vasiloglou, Maria F; Gerama, Maria-Assimina; Mitsos, Dimitrios; Chrysanthakopoulou, Ioanna; Tsigga, Maria; Kazakos, Kyriakos

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes knowledge has been shown to improve glycemic control and associate with several demographic parameters. In Greece, a country with high obesity rates, disease knowledge has never been evaluated in diabetic patients. This cross sectional study aimed to assess diabetes knowledge and its associations between social and demographic parameters, among Greek type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients. One hundred fifty nine patients with T2DM were recruited from an urban and a rural clinic in Greece. Diabetes knowledge was assessed with the Brief Diabetes Knowledge Test (DKT). Basic anthropometry was performed. Data regarding glycemic control and sociodemographic characteristics were collected from the patients' medical files. Greek T2DM patients demonstrated poor disease knowledge (mean DKT score 8.3±2.2/14.0 and mean DKT as a percent of correct answers 59.6±15.8%). No differences were observed between sex, place of residence, or glycemic control, among subjects. Patients with higher education demonstrated greater diabetes knowledge. Simple obesity with concurrent central obesity or suboptimal glycemic control decreased diabetes knowledge among participants. Additionally, waist circumference was inversely correlated to diabetes knowledge. Based on the DKT, Greek patients exhibit poor diabetes knowledge. This study provides evidence for the need for better diabetes education in order to ameliorate disease outcome. Copyright © 2016 SEEN. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Diabetes foot disease: the Cinderella of Australian diabetes management?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzarini, Peter A; Gurr, Joel M; Rogers, Joseph R; Schox, Andrew; Bergin, Shan M

    2012-10-01

    Diabetes is one of the greatest public health challenges to face Australia. It is already Australia's leading cause of kidney failure, blindness (in those under 60 years) and lower limb amputation, and causes significant cardiovascular disease. Australia's diabetes amputation rate is one of the worst in the developed world, and appears to have significantly increased in the last decade, whereas some other diabetes complication rates appear to have decreased. This paper aims to compare the national burden of disease for the four major diabetes-related complications and the availability of government funding to combat these complications, in order to determine where diabetes foot disease ranks in Australia. Our review of relevant national literature indicates foot disease ranks second overall in burden of disease and last in evidenced-based government funding to combat these diabetes complications. This suggests public funding to address foot disease in Australia is disproportionately low when compared to funding dedicated to other diabetes complications. There is ample evidence that appropriate government funding of evidence-based care improves all diabetes complication outcomes and reduces overall costs. Numerous diverse Australian peak bodies have now recommended similar diabetes foot evidence-based strategies that have reduced diabetes amputation rates and associated costs in other developed nations. It would seem intuitive that "it's time" to fund these evidence-based strategies for diabetes foot disease in Australia as well.

  12. Diabetes foot disease: the Cinderella of Australian diabetes management?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazzarini Peter A

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Diabetes is one of the greatest public health challenges to face Australia. It is already Australia’s leading cause of kidney failure, blindness (in those under 60 years and lower limb amputation, and causes significant cardiovascular disease. Australia’s diabetes amputation rate is one of the worst in the developed world, and appears to have significantly increased in the last decade, whereas some other diabetes complication rates appear to have decreased. This paper aims to compare the national burden of disease for the four major diabetes-related complications and the availability of government funding to combat these complications, in order to determine where diabetes foot disease ranks in Australia. Our review of relevant national literature indicates foot disease ranks second overall in burden of disease and last in evidenced-based government funding to combat these diabetes complications. This suggests public funding to address foot disease in Australia is disproportionately low when compared to funding dedicated to other diabetes complications. There is ample evidence that appropriate government funding of evidence-based care improves all diabetes complication outcomes and reduces overall costs. Numerous diverse Australian peak bodies have now recommended similar diabetes foot evidence-based strategies that have reduced diabetes amputation rates and associated costs in other developed nations. It would seem intuitive that “it’s time” to fund these evidence-based strategies for diabetes foot disease in Australia as well.

  13. Postpartum healthcare after gestational diabetes and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenthal, Deborah B; Maiden, Kristin; Rogers, Stephanie; Ball, Amy

    2014-09-01

    Gestational diabetes and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy identify women with an elevated lifetime risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Prospective cohort of women recruited from the postpartum service of a large community-based academic obstetrical hospital after delivery of a pregnancy complicated by gestational diabetes (GDM) or a hypertensive disorder of pregnancy (HDP). Interviews were conducted, and validated surveys completed, before hospital discharge and again 3 months postpartum. The study sample included 249 women: 111 with GDM, 127 with HDP, and 11 with both. Most, 230 (92.4%) had a PCP prior to pregnancy and 97 (39.0%) reported an office visit with their PCP during the prenatal period. Of the 176 (70.7%) participants who attended the 3-month study visit, 169 (96.0%) women with either diagnosis reported they had attended their 6-week postpartum visit. By the 3-month study visit, 51 (57.9%) women with GDM had completed follow-up glucose testing; 93 (97.9%) with HDP had follow-up blood pressure testing; and 101 (57.4%) with either diagnosis recalled ever having completed lipid screening. Women least likely to complete screening tests were those who had no college education, less than a high school level of health literacy, and who were not privately insured. There are important opportunities to improve postpartum testing for diabetes and CVD risk factor assessment. Most women were connected to primary care suggesting a "hand-off" to a primary care physician after pregnancy is feasible. More robust strategies may be needed to improve follow-up care for women with less education, lower health literacy, and those without private health insurance.

  14. Progression of diabetic retinopathy: the Beijing Eye Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TU Ying; XU Liang; WEI Wen-bin; WANG Shuang; WANG Ya-xing; Jost B Jonas

    2011-01-01

    Background Diabetic retinopathy (DR) has emerged as a leading cause of visual impairment and blindness in the working-aged population worldwide.This study aimed to assess frequency and associated factors of progression of DR in subjects with known diabetes in a population-based setting.Methods The Beijing Eye Study is a population based study performed in Greater Beijing in 2001 and 2006.The present investigation included all subjects with known diabetes mellitus in 2001,who participated in the follow-up examination in 2006.Fundus photographs were assessed.Results The study included 170 subjects; 51 (30%) subjects showed signs of DR in 2001 and were re-examined in 2006,36 (21.2%) subjects (18 subjects with DR present at baseline,18 subjects with newly diagnosed DR in 2006)showed a progression of DR during follow-up.Progression of DR was associated with rural region (odds ratio (OR):5.43,P=0.001) and self-reported arterial hypertension (OR:3.85,P=0.023).In the non-progressive subgroup,presence of DR was associated with different levels of education (<middle school,middle school,college or higher,OR:0.30,P=0.023),treatment modes of diabetes mellitus (OR:10.24,P=0.003) and cataract surgery (OR:9.14,P=0.007).Conclusions In a population-based setting in Greater Beijing,progression of DR occurred in 35% of subjects with pre-existing DR and overall in 21% of subjects with known diabetes within a 5-year period.Progression of DR was significantly associated with rural region and self-reported arterial hypertension.In the stable subjects,presence of DR was significantly associated with poor educational level,insulin treatment of diabetes and cataract surgery.

  15. Experimental effect of retinoic acids on apoptosis during the development of diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nami Nishikiori

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Nami Nishikiori1,2, Makoto Osanai2, Hideki Chiba2, Takashi Kojima2, Shuichiro Inatomi1,2, Hiroshi Ohguro1, Norimasa Sawada2Departments of 1Ophthalmology and 2Pathology, Sapporo Medical University School of MedicinePurpose: This study was conducted to investigate whether retinoic acids (RAs had any effect on apoptosis during the development of diabetic retinopathy.Methods: To investigate whether RAs had any effect on apoptosis during the development of diabetic retinopathy, we housed 32 C57BL/6 male mice and induced diabetes in 24 by intra peritoneal injections of streptozotocin (STZ; Sigma, St Louis, MO and treated 16 of the diabetic mice with the RAs, all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA (seven mice and 4-[(5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-5,5,8,8-tetramethyl-2-naphthalenylcarboxamido] benzoic acid (Am580 (nine mice. The other eight mice were used as diabetic controls. We then measured apoptosis in the retina by TdT-dUTP terminal nick-end labeling assay.Results: RAs inhibited the apoptosis of retinal cells in diabetic retinopathy. Many apoptotic cells were observed in retinas of the eight diabetic control mice (mean value and SD: 37.8 ± 6.9, whereas when diabetic mice were treated with RAs, the number of apoptotic cells significantly decreased (mean value and SD: 9.9 ± 6.4 for the seven ATRA-treated diabetic mice and 9.8 ± 5.9 for the nine Am580-treated diabetic mice (p < 0.05.Conclusion: Treatment with RAs decreases apoptosis during the development of diabetic retinopathy.Keywords: retinoic acids, apoptosis, diabetic retinopathy, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor

  16. Clinical diagnosis of diabetic polyneuropathy with the diabetic neuropathy symptom and diabetic neuropathy examination scores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, J.W.; Lefrandt, J.D.; Links, T.P.; Smit, J.A.; Stewart, R.E.; van der Hoeven, J.H.; Hoogenberg, K.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE - To evaluate the discriminative power of the Diabetic Neuropathy Symptom (DNS) and Diabetic Neuropathy Examination (DNE) scores for diagnosing diabetic polyneuropathy (PNP), as well as their relation with cardiovascular autonomic function testing (cAFT) and electro-diagnostic studies (EDS

  17. My School

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李琳

    2016-01-01

    Hello,everyone.I’d like to talk about my school.I study at Luoyang Middle School.It’s a big and beautiful school.There are eighteen classrooms in our school.And my favorite place is the library.I like reading books there.I like the playground,too.I like playing football with my classmates.And of course,I like all the subjects.My favorite subject is Maths because it’s interesting.I live near the school.So I go to school

  18. Pathogenesis of Painful Diabetic Neuropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Amir Aslam; Jaipaul Singh; Satyan Rajbhandari

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes is rising globally and, as a result, its associated complications are also rising. Painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN) is a well-known complication of diabetes and the most common cause of all neuropathic pain. About one-third of all diabetes patients suffer from PDN. It has a huge effect on a person's daily life, both physically and mentally. Despite huge advances in diabetes and neurology, the exact mechanism of pain causation in PDN is still not clear. The origin o...

  19. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Kids for Teens Search Parents Home General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family Life First Aid & ...

  20. Cherokee Choices: a diabetes prevention program for American Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachar, Jeffrey J; Lefler, Lisa J; Reed, Lori; McCoy, Tara; Bailey, Robin; Bell, Ronny

    2006-07-01

    In 1999, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) provided Racial and Ethnic Approaches to Community Health 2010 (REACH 2010) funds to the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians to develop a community-based intervention to improve the health of this rural, mountainous community in North Carolina. During the first year of the Cherokee Choices program, team members conducted formative research, formed coalitions, and developed a culturally appropriate community action plan for the prevention of type 2 diabetes, particularly among children. The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians has higher rates of obesity and type 2 diabetes than the U.S. and North Carolina general populations. The Cherokee Choices program includes three main components: elementary school mentoring, worksite wellness for adults, and church-based health promotion. A social marketing strategy, including television advertisements and a television documentary series, supports the three components. School policy was altered to allow Cherokee Choices to have class time and after-school time devoted to health promotion activities. School staff have shown an interest in improving their health through attendance at fitness sessions. The credibility of the program has been validated through multiple invitations to participate in school events. Participants in the worksite wellness program have met dietary and physical activity goals, had reductions in body fat, and expressed enthusiasm for the program. A subcoalition has been formed to expand the worksite wellness component and link prevention efforts to health care cost reduction. Participants in the church program have walked more than 31,600 miles collectively.