WorldWideScience

Sample records for k-8 teacher engagement

  1. Preparing K-8 Teachers to Conduct Inquiry Oriented Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, N. A.; Garik, P.; Nolan, M. D.; Winrich, C.; Derosa, D.; Duffy, A.; Jariwala, M.; Konjoian, B.

    2010-12-01

    The need for STEM professional development for K-8 teachers is well documented. Such professional development promises broad impact, but it must have a positive effect on teachers’ knowledge and skills: 1) a focus on content knowledge, 2) opportunities for active learning, and 3) coherence with other activities. However, sustained impact is only achieved through intensive professional development. In response to the need for science education courses for K-8 teachers, for the past three years, the School of Education and the Department of Physics have collaborated to offer K-8 teachers science content courses of extended duration (75 contact hours) that emphasize inquiry based learning and investigation. The School of Education graduate courses have consisted of five three-hour meetings during the months of May and June, and a two week intensive period in July when the participants come for six hours per day. The alignment of these courses with inquiry teaching was confirmed using the Reformed Teaching Observation Protocol (RTOP). Courses offered in this format have been: --Immersion in Green Energy (IGE) -alternative sources of energy and how electricity is generated (75 teachers over the last 3 years), --Immersion in Global Energy Distribution (IGED) -understanding global climate as an outcome of insolation, convection, and radiation (27 teachers over the last 2 years) The Immersion courses cover a spectrum for inquiry learning that begins with introduction to equipment and experiments through guided discovery and culminates with students taking responsibility for defining and completing their own investigative projects. As a specific example, we consider here the IGED course. For IGED, the first five sessions are devoted to content and learning to use experimental equipment such as digital data collection probes to measure temperature, CO2 and salinity. Content addressed during these sessions include the differentiation between conduction, convection, and

  2. Evidence that Teacher Interactions with Pedagogical Contexts Facilitate Chemistry-Content Learning in K-8 Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Duzor, Andrea Gay

    2012-08-01

    In many innovative science content professional development (PD) courses for teachers, science concepts are situated within pedagogical contexts, or in other words, science content is incorporated within contexts relevant to teaching and student learning. Pedagogical contexts are often used because they are believed to be engaging for teachers and to support content transfer to the classroom. However, few studies have investigated how pedagogical contexts serve to impact teacher engagement and science content learning. This qualitative case study examined K-8 in-service teachers' interactions with pedagogical contexts in a chemistry PD course. Findings indicate that teachers': (1) contribution of teaching experiences helped create a collegial learning environment, (2) sharing of concerns from classroom teaching directed content discussion and learning objectives, and (3) reflection on teacher and learner roles in the PD classroom led to persistence in chemistry-content learning. Implications for PD instructor use of pedagogical contexts in science content based PD are discussed.

  3. Preservice Teachers' Perspectives on 'Appropriate' K-8 Climate Change and Environmental Science Topics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, D. J.

    2013-12-01

    With the release of the Next Generation Science Standards (NRC, 2013), climate change and related environmental sciences will now receive greater emphasis within science curricula at all grade levels. In grades K-8, preparation in foundational content (e.g., weather and climate, natural resources, and human impacts on the environment) and the nature of scientific inquiry will set the groundwork for later learning of climate change in upper middle and high school. These rigorous standards increase pressure on elementary and middle school teachers to possess strong science content knowledge, as well as experience supporting children to develop scientific ideas through the practices of science. It also requires a set of beliefs - about children and the science that is appropriate for them - that is compatible with the goals set out in the standards. Elementary teachers in particular, who often have minimal preparation in the earth sciences (NSF, 2007), and entrenched beliefs about how particular topics ought to be taught (Holt- Reynolds, 1992; Pajares, 1992), including climate change (Bryce & Day, 2013; Lambert & Bleicher, 2013), may face unique challenges in adjusting to the new standards. If teachers hold beliefs about climate change as controversial, for example, they may not consider it an appropriate topic for children, despite its inclusion in the standards. On the other hand, those who see a role for children in efforts to mitigate human impacts on the environment may be more enthusiastic about the new standards. We report on a survey of preservice K-8 teachers' beliefs about the earth and environmental science topics that they consider to be appropriate and inappropriate for children in grades K-3, 4-5, and 6-8. Participants were surveyed on a variety of standards-based topics using terminology that signals publicly and scientifically neutral (e.g. weather, ecosystems) to overtly controversial (evolution, global warming) science. Results from pilot data

  4. Inquiry-Based Course in Physics and Chemistry for Preservice K-8 Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loverude, Michael E.; Gonzalez, Barbara L.; Nanes, Roger

    2011-01-01

    We describe an inquiry-based course in physics and chemistry for preservice K-8 teachers developed at California State University Fullerton. The course is one of three developed primarily to enhance the science content understanding of prospective teachers. The course incorporates a number of innovative instructional strategies and is somewhat…

  5. Ice, Ice, Baby: A Program for Sustained, Classroom-Based K-8 Teacher Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, C.

    2009-12-01

    Ice, Ice, Baby is a K-8 science program created by the education team at the Center for the Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets (CReSIS), an NSF-funded science and technology center headquartered at the University of Kansas. The twenty-four hands-on activities, which constitute the Ice, Ice, Baby curriculum, were developed to help students understand the role of polar ice sheets in sea level rise. These activities, presented in classrooms by CReSIS' Educational Outreach Coordinator, demonstrate many of the scientific properties of ice, including displacement and density. Student journals are utilized with each lesson as a strategy for improving students' science process skills. Journals also help the instructor identify misconceptions, assess comprehension, and provide students with a year-long science reference log. Pre- and post- assessments are given to both teachers and students before and after the program, providing data for evaluation and improvement of the Ice, Ice, Baby program. While students are actively engaged in hands-on learning about the unusual topics of ice sheets, glaciers, icebergs and sea ice, the CReSIS' Educational Coordinator is able to model best practices in science education, such as questioning and inquiry-based methods of instruction. In this way, the Ice, Ice, Baby program also serves as ongoing, in-class, professional development for teachers. Teachers are also provided supplemental activities to do with their classes between CReSIS' visits to encourage additional science lessons, reinforce concepts taught in the Ice, Ice, Baby program, and to foster teachers' progression toward more reform-based science instruction.

  6. BIOINFORMATICS IN THE K-8 CLASSROOM: DESIGNING INNOVATIVE ACTIVITIES FOR TEACHER IMPLEMENTATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuster, Michele; Claussen, Kira; Locke, Melly; Glazewski, Krista

    At the intersection of biology and computer science is the growing field of bioinformatics-the analysis of complex datasets of biological relevance. Despite the increasing importance of bioinformatics and associated practical applications, these are not standard topics in elementary and middle school classrooms. We report on a pilot project and its evolution to support implementation of bioinformatics-based activities in elementary and middle school classrooms. Specifically, we ultimately designed a multi-day summer teacher professional development workshop, in which teachers design innovative classroom activities. By focusing on teachers, our design leverages enhanced teacher knowledge and confidence to integrate innovative instructional materials into K-8 classrooms and contributes to capacity building in STEM instruction.

  7. The National Teacher Enhancement Program (K-8) coordinated by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richmond, C.R.

    1991-01-01

    Teachers need help, not harassment. So do the establishments in which teachers practice their profession. Community resources must be marshalled to provide help to local schools and teachers. In 1990 the National Science Foundation (NSF) established a unique educational activity named the National Teacher Enhancement Program (NTEP). NSF took advantage of the Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored educational programs and resources at several large DOE contractor labs that had had prior experience with DOE supported teacher enhancement programs. While DOE concentrated on teacher enhancement activities for secondary teachers, the NSF concentrated on teachers from grades K-8. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is the lead organization for both administering and coordinating the grant. Other participating laboratories are Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FERMI), Battelle-Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLNL) with some support functions provided by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and the Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU). The program calls for a three week duration workshop to be conducted at each lab followed by in-service training and other activities during the year. The NSF/NTEP protocol calls for networking among the participating organizations and some of the teachers. An assessment effort is also an integral part of the program. 2 refs.

  8. LSU Virtual Museum: Technology-Enhanced Geoscience Teacher Workshops for Louisiana K-8 Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warny, S.; Egea-Kuehne, D.; Tedford, R.; Lopez, A.

    2007-12-01

    The Virtual Museum, a Louisiana Board of Regents sponsored SELECT program, is a collaborative project between the Museum of Natural Science and the French Education Project at Louisiana State University. It offers Louisiana science teachers, in-training teachers, and immersion teachers a professional development program via six videoconferences. These videoconferences are broadcast from LSU to six distance-learning sites across the entire state of Louisiana. This unique teacher population was selected because in Louisiana, there are two types of K-8 science teachers: teachers in traditional classroom settings and teachers in immersion programs. In the Foreign language Immersion programs, the target language (French or Spanish) is the language of instruction and communication in the classroom. For each videoconference, teachers are provided content material that is prepared by geology faculty and graduate students, example of ongoing field research by LSU faculty members, classroom-ready activities, information on available loan material and on-line resources, training on the unique Scope-On-A-Rope microscope, pre-made PowerPoint presentations and virtual museum photos, all, in French and in English. Three of the videoconferences emphasize regional and statewide earth science topics including Louisiana fossils, rocks and minerals, and field techniques used to interpret Louisiana's geologic history. The activities provided for teachers are hands-on, inquiry based classroom exercises that focus on the availability of local materials. These activities can also be scaled for use in a variety of grade-levels and teachers are encouraged to use these activities in their classrooms. The program has proven to foster new collaboration between science teachers in regular programs and immersion schools while boosting the interest statewide for natural science topics.

  9. Inquiry-based course in physics and chemistry for preservice K-8 teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E. Loverude

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available We describe an inquiry-based course in physics and chemistry for preservice K-8 teachers developed at California State University Fullerton. The course is one of three developed primarily to enhance the science content understanding of prospective teachers. The course incorporates a number of innovative instructional strategies and is somewhat unusual for its interdisciplinary focus. We describe the course structure in detail, providing examples of course materials and assessment strategies. Finally, we provide research data illustrating both the need for the course and the effectiveness of the course in developing student understanding of selected topics. Student responses to various questions reflect a lack of understanding of many relatively simple physical science concepts, and a level of performance that is usually lower than that in comparable courses serving a general education audience. Additional data suggest that course activities improve student understanding of selected topics, often dramatically.

  10. Teaching strategies and conceptual change in a professional development program for science teachers of K--8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ji

    This case study investigates two consecutive science courses for teachers of K-8 in a professional development program at Washington University. It aims (1) to trace the processes of the teachers' conceptual change; (2) to analyze the teaching strategies by course instructors; and (3) to try to establish possible links between the two. To achieve this goal, I build a modeling theory to account for the observations. The main body of the study consists of four sub-cases. The first two cases instantiate the elements of the modeling theory. The opening case of balance shows that learning tools and task structures shape the learning outcome, and discusses cycles of modeling. The case also delineates the strategy that the instructors employed---moving from concrete experience to abstract explanation. The second case of buoyancy demonstrates that the modeling theory is able to explain the origins and forming mechanism of the alternative conceptions held by the teachers. It also shows that the teaching strategies of using alternative conceptions, applying analogies and following a logical sequence helped the teachers build new models. The last two cases demonstrate the ways of improving the competence of modelers. The third case of physical models emphasizes the metacognition of the learner who builds models. It illustrates that teachers' level of self-awareness in learning is increased when the models are physical. It shows that the creativity of modeling is rooted in agency, curiosity, communicability, and confidence, and that a chain of transformation among models is the key of systematizing and forming knowledge. The last case of frames of reference tries to answer the question "what is the justification of models if there are alternatives?" The teachers employed different forms of justification which relied heavily on common sense, authority, relativism, and pragmatism, all of which are not rational. While discussing both the positive and negative traits of these

  11. Science teachers in deaf education: A national survey of K-8 teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Cynthia

    A survey was conducted with 67 science teachers who taught deaf children at the elementary school level. Teacher background variables, information about teacher preparation and certification, preferred teaching methods, communication methodologies, curriculum, and the use of technology were gathered. A purposeful, convenience sampling technique was employed. Utilizing a non-experimental, basic research design and survey methodology, the researcher reviewed both quantitative and qualitative data. The majority of science teachers in this survey at the elementary school level are female and hearing. More than half have deaf education masters degrees. Few have science degrees. The majority of teachers had less than 10 years teaching experience with deaf students. Sixty percent were highly qualified in science; only forty percent were certified in science. They were equally employed at either a state residential school or a public day school. Two-way chi-square analyses were carried out. Hearing teachers preferred to observe other teachers teaching science compared to deaf teachers chi2 (1, N = 67) = 5.39, p based science materials (chi2 (1, N = 67) = 4.65, p based learning chi 2 (1, N = 67) = 4.14, p technology infrequently and did not have access to in-service science workshops. Recommendations are made to provide higher quality science preparation at the pre-service and in-service levels. More research was also suggested to investigate the use of bilingual strategies in the teaching of science as many of the deaf teachers reported they used these strategies often.

  12. GeoGebra in Professional Development: The Experience of Rural Inservice Elementary School (K-8 Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingguo Bu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available GeoGebra is an emergent open-source Dynamic and Interactive Mathematics Learning Environment (DIMLE (Martinovic & Karadag, 2012 that invites a modeling perspective in mathematics teaching and learning. In springs of 2010 and 2012, GeoGebra was integrated respectively into two online professional development courses on mathematical problem solving in a rural region of a Midwest state in the USA. Using GeoGebra as a primary tool for modeling and communication, fifty-three K-8 inservice elementary school teachers with no or little previous exposure to DIMLEs participated in the graduate level course, where they experimented with various resources of GeoGebra for mathematical modeling in the broad context of problem solving. The instructional team incorporated a variety of pedagogical components to support teachers’ exploration of the new technologies and the mathematical content, including video-based demonstration, affective intervention, learning with children, and social and cognitive scaffoldings. After intensive online instruction, a 25-item questionnaire was administered to collect data on participants’ attitudes, curricular awareness, mathematical content, and pedagogical reflection regarding the integration of GeoGebra. Based on results of the questionnaire (N = 45, this article provides a preliminary description of inservice elementary school teachers’ learning experience in a GeoGebraintegrated DIMLE setting, including an exploratory dimension analysis of the survey data. Overall, the use of GeoGebra challenged teachers’ view about the nature of mathematics and student-teacher interactions and further enriched their mathematical knowledge and pedagogical choices. The course design, context, and implications for future efforts are discussed.

  13. Environmental Education & Ecology in a Life Science Course for Preservice K-8 Teachers Using Project Wildlife in Learning Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Allan

    2010-01-01

    During laboratory sessions devoted to ecology, 182 preservice K-8 teachers participated in a Project Wildlife in Learning Design (WILD) workshop. Participants rated the workshop highly, indicated they would use more inquiry-based activities, and were more interested in teaching ecology following the workshop. Post-test scores indicated an…

  14. Environmental Education & Ecology in a Life Science Course for Preservice K-8 Teachers Using Project Wildlife in Learning Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Allan

    2010-01-01

    During laboratory sessions devoted to ecology, 182 preservice K-8 teachers participated in a Project Wildlife in Learning Design (WILD) workshop. Participants rated the workshop highly, indicated they would use more inquiry-based activities, and were more interested in teaching ecology following the workshop. Post-test scores indicated an…

  15. Making Earth Science Relevant in the K-8 Classroom. The Development of an Instructional Soils Module for Pre-Service Elementary Teachers Using the Next Generation Science Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, K. A.; Hauge, R.; Dechaine, J. M.; Varrella, G.; Egger, A. E.

    2013-12-01

    's STEP Center in the geosciences. The module goals are: 1) Pre-service teachers will apply classification methods, testing procedures and interdisciplinary systems thinking to analyze and evaluate a relevant societal issue in the context of soils, 2) Pre-service teachers will design, develop, and facilitate a standards-based K-8 soils unit, incorporating a relevant broader societal issue that applies authentic geoscientific data, and incorporates geoscientific habits of mind. In addition, pre-service teachers will look toward the NGSS and align activities with content standards, systems thinking, and science and engineering practices. This poster will provide an overview of module development to date as well as a summary of pre-semester survey results indicating pre-service elementary teachers' ideas (beliefs, attitudes, preconceptions, and content knowledge) about teaching soils, and making science relevant in a K-8 classroom.

  16. A Comparison of Burnout among Honors, Regular Education, and Special Education K-8 Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    This study employed a quantitative, ex-post facto non-experimental design to examine the effect of whether teaching honors, regular, or special education classes in either an elementary or middle school setting influenced the experience of teacher burnout. Participants included 69 teachers from two counties in a Southern state. The study survey…

  17. Measuring Teacher Engagement: Development of the Engaged Teachers Scale (ETS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klassen, Robert M.; Yerdelen, Sündüs; Durksen, Tracy L.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study was to create and validate a brief multidimensional scale of teacher engagement--the Engaged Teachers Scale (ETS)--that reflects the particular characteristics of teachers' work in classrooms and schools. We collected data from three separate samples of teachers (total N = 810), and followed five steps in developing and…

  18. The Bully Free Classroom: Over 100 Tips and Strategies for Teachers K-8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beane, Allan L.

    Bullying is a common experience among American elementary and middle school students. This book presents strategies and tips for teachers in grades kindergarten through 8 to help students learn to resolve conflicts appropriately and safely and help schools become "bully free" zones where students can learn with confidence and without…

  19. Professional Development Workshops for K-8 Teachers at the Planetary Science Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebofsky, L. A.; Bleamaster, L. F.; Caniso, T. L.; Croft, S. K.; Crown, D. A.; Pierazzo, E.

    2009-12-01

    Using NASA data sets, results of currently funded NASA research investigations, and a team of Earth and space scientists and educators, the Planetary Science Institute (PSI), in partnership with the Tucson Regional Science Center (RSC), is offering a series of professional development workshops targeting elementary and middle school teachers within the Tucson, Arizona region. Capitalizing on the curiosity, enthusiasm, and inspiration created by NASA missions, images, and data, we are encouraging interest in planetary science and space exploration to enhance Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) learning and teaching. Workshop participants are given the opportunity to improve their content knowledge and conceptual understanding of fundamental concepts in astronomy, geology, and planetary science, which in turn leads to their greater scientific confidence and more positive attitudes towards science. Teacher interaction with scientists during and after our workshops helps them to better model science practices and to identify potential career paths for their students. The current program includes offering three workshops: The Moon-Earth System, Exploring the Terrestrial Planets, and Impact Cratering with a plan to develop additional workshops (e.g., Volcanoes of the Solar System) and to increase distribution to locations other than southern Arizona.

  20. A Toolkit for Teacher Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grantmakers for Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Teachers are critical to the success of education grantmaking strategies, yet in talking with them we discovered that the world of philanthropy is often a mystery. GFE's Toolkit for Teacher Engagement aims to assist funders in authentically and effectively involving teachers in the education reform and innovation process. Built directly from the…

  1. Computer Visualizations for K-8 Science Teachers: One Component of Professional Development Workshops at the Planetary Science Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortenkamp, S.; Baldridge, A. M.; Bleamaster, L. F.; Buxner, S.; Canizo, T.; Crown, D. A.; Lebofsky, L. A.

    2012-12-01

    The Planetary Science Institute (PSI), in partnership with the Tucson Regional Science Center, offers a series of professional development workshops targeting K-8 science teachers in southern Arizona. Using NASA data sets, research results, and a team of PSI scientists and educators, our workshops provide teachers with in-depth content knowledge of fundamental concepts in astronomy, geology, and planetary science. Current workshops are: The Earth-Moon System, Exploring the Terrestrial Planets, Impact Cratering, The Asteroid-Meteorite Connection, Volcanoes of the Solar System, Deserts of the Solar System, and Astrobiology and the Search for Extrasolar Planets. Several workshops incorporate customized computer visualizations developed at PSI. These visualizations are designed to help teachers overcome the common misconceptions students have in fundamental areas of space science. For example, the simple geometric relationship between the sun, the moon, and Earth is a concept that is rife with misconceptions. How can the arrangement of these objects account for the constantly changing phases of the moon as well as the occasional eclipses of the sun and moon? Students at all levels often struggle to understand the explanation for phases and eclipses even after repeated instruction over many years. Traditional classroom techniques have proven to be insufficient at rooting out entrenched misconceptions. One problem stems from the difficulty of developing an accurate mental picture of the Earth-Moon system in space when a student's perspective has always been firmly planted on the ground. To address this problem our visualizations take the viewers on a journey beyond Earth, giving them a so-called "god's eye" view of how the Earth-Moon system would look from a distance. To make this journey as realistic as possible we use ray-tracing software, incorporate NASA mission images, and accurately portray rotational and orbital motion. During a workshop our visualizations are

  2. Assessing the Life Science Knowledge of Students and Teachers Represented by the K-8 National Science Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadler, Philip M.; Coyle, Harold; Cook Smith, Nancy; Miller, Jaimie; Mintzes, Joel; Tanner, Kimberly; Murray, John

    2013-01-01

    We report on the development of an item test bank and associated instruments based on the National Research Council (NRC) K-8 life sciences content standards. Utilizing hundreds of studies in the science education research literature on student misconceptions, we constructed 476 unique multiple-choice items that measure the degree to which test…

  3. There Is Another Way: The Faculty-Developed Idaho Comprehensive Literacy Assessment for K-8 Pre-Service Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squires, David; Canney, George F.; Trevisan, Michael S.

    2004-01-01

    In this era of external teacher testing with the intent of ensuring the competence of the teaching force, as well as holding students and institutions accountable for results, the Idaho Comprehensive Literacy Assessment (ICLA) stands in sharp contrast. It represents an alternative to external testing of preservice teachers, testing procured from…

  4. Integrating Science Content and Pedagogy in the Earth, Life, and Physical Sciences: A K-8 Pre-Service Teacher Preparation Continuum at the University of Delaware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, J.; Allen, D.; Donham, R.; Fifield, S.; Ford, D.; Shipman, H.; Dagher, Z.

    2007-12-01

    University of Delaware faculty in the geological sciences, biological sciences, and the physics and astronomy departments have partnered with faculty and researchers from the school of education to form a continuum for K- 8 pre-service teacher preparation in science. The goal of the continuum is to develop integrated understandings of content and pedagogy so that these future teachers can effectively use inquiry-based approaches in teaching science in their classrooms. Throughout the continuum where earth science content appears an earth system science approach, with emphasis on inquiry-based activities, is employed. The continuum for K-8 pre-service teachers includes a gateway content course in the earth, life, or physical sciences taken during the freshman year followed by integrated science content and methods courses taken during the sophomore year. These integrated courses, called the Science Semester, were designed and implemented with funding from the National Science Foundation. During the Science Semester, traditional content and pedagogy subject matter boundaries are crossed to stress shared themes that teachers must understand to teach standards-based science. Students work collaboratively on multidisciplinary problem-based learning (PBL) activities that place science concepts in authentic contexts and build learning skills. They also critically explore the theory and practice of elementary science teaching, drawing on their shared experiences of inquiry learning during the Science Semester. The PBL activities that are the hallmark of the Science Semester provide the backdrop through which fundamental earth system interactions can be studied. For example in a PBL investigation that focuses on kids, cancer, and the environment, the hydrologic cycle with emphasis on surface runoff and ground water contamination is studied. Those students seeking secondary certification in science will enroll, as a bridge toward their student teaching experience, in an

  5. Teaching future K-8 teachers the language of Newton: A case study of collaboration and change in university physics teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briscoe, Carol; Prayaga, Chandra S.

    2004-11-01

    This interpretive case study describes a collaborative project involving a physics professor and a science educator. We report what was learned about factors that influenced the professor's development of teaching strategies, alternative to lecture, that were intended to promote prospective teachers' meaningful learning and their use of canonical ways of communicating physics concepts. We describe how the professor's beliefs influenced the pedagogy that he used to communicate the language of physics and the nature of what was communicated. We also report how our collaboration fostered change as we developed a shared language that allowed us to discuss how students learn and to explicate the referent beliefs that supported the professor's practices. We found that focused reflection on referent beliefs led to a change in the manner in which the professor communicated with the prospective teachers. Traditional lecture pedagogy focused the professor's concern on how he was teaching evolved toward a pedagogy that focused on how students were learning. Classroom interactions were increased with a primary goal of orchestrating a discourse of physics initiated in the language already accessible to the prospective teachers. This change in the manner that classroom interactions occurred provided opportunities for the prospective teachers' language to evolve toward eventually communicating their ideas in canonical physics language.

  6. Primary School English Teachers' Research Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xuesong; Chow, Alice Wai Kwan

    2012-01-01

    Research engagement is an important means for teachers to develop their professional competence. This paper reports on an enquiry into the research engagement of a group of primary school English language teachers in Guangdong province on the Chinese mainland. Drawing on questionnaire data and teachers' interview narratives, the paper examines how…

  7. Burnout and Work Engagement among Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakanen, Jari J.; Bakker, Arnold B.; Schaufeli, Wilmar B.

    2006-01-01

    The Job Demands-Resources Model was used as the basis of the proposal that there are two parallel processes involved in work-related well-being among teachers, namely an energetical process (i.e., job demands --> burnout --> ill health) and a motivational process (i.e., job resources --> engagement --> organizational…

  8. Burnout and Work Engagement among Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakanen, Jari J.; Bakker, Arnold B.; Schaufeli, Wilmar B.

    2006-01-01

    The Job Demands-Resources Model was used as the basis of the proposal that there are two parallel processes involved in work-related well-being among teachers, namely an energetical process (i.e., job demands --> burnout --> ill health) and a motivational process (i.e., job resources --> engagement --> organizational commitment). In…

  9. What Drives Teacher Engagement: A Study of Different Age Cohorts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guglielmi, Dina; Bruni, Ilaria; Simbula, Silvia; Fraccaroli, Franco; Depolo, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Despite the growing body of research on work engagement, little is known about what drives work engagement among different age cohorts. This study aims to investigate whether engagement varies across age cohorts and examines the job resources that foster teacher engagement. A questionnaire was distributed to 537 teachers who were employed in…

  10. Students' anticipated situational engagement: the roles of teacher behavior, personal engagement, and gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thijs, Jochem; Verkuyten, Maykel

    2009-09-01

    Among 9th-grade students (248 girls, 255 boys) from a large multiethnic school, the authors examined 2 aspects of anticipated situational engagement in relation to 3 types of hypothetical teacher behavior: authoritarian, authoritative, permissive. Furthermore, the authors investigated the moderating roles of students' personal (trait-like) engagement and gender. Multilevel analyses showed differential effects of teacher behavior type. Anticipated situational engagement was generally highest with the authoritative teacher and lowest with the authoritarian teacher. However, students' personal engagement and gender qualified these effects. The effects of the authoritative and authoritarian teachers versus the permissive teachers on anticipated situational engagement were more positive (or less negative) for students with high versus low personal engagement. Also, the positive effects of the authoritative and permissive teachers versus the authoritarian teacher were stronger for female students than for male students. Results show that anticipated situational engagement should be understood by examining the combined influences of contextual and individual characteristics.

  11. Science Fairs and Projects K-8. A Collection of Articles Reprinted from "Science and Children,""Science Scope," and "The Science Teacher."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Shirley, Ed.; And Others

    The National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) has assembled this collection of reprints to assist teachers in organizing a science fair, working with students and establishing equitable judging procedures. The NSTA position statement on science fairs is included. The 24 reprints in this volume are geared toward elementary and middle school…

  12. Teacher Misbehavior and Its Effects on Student Interest and Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broeckelman-Post, Melissa Ann; Tacconelli, Angelica; Guzmán, Jaime; Rios, Maritza; Calero, Beverly; Latif, Farah

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to investigate whether there was any relationship between teacher misbehaviors and student interest and engagement. Consistent with Emotional Response Theory and models for how teacher behavior impacts student interest and engagement, teacher misbehaviors were strongly correlated with student interest and weakly correlated with…

  13. Using Teacher Greetings to Increase Speed to Task Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allday, R. Allan; Bush, Miranda; Ticknor, Nicole; Walker, Lindsay

    2011-01-01

    We used a multiple baseline design across participants to determine if teacher greetings would reduce the latency to task engagement. Three participants were identified by their respective teachers as having difficulty initiating task-appropriate engagement at the beginning of class. Latency was measured from teacher greeting until the participant…

  14. I Think I Can Engage My Students. Teachers' Perceptions of Student Engagement and Their Beliefs about Being a Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Uden, Jolien M.; Ritzen, Henk; Pieters, Jules M.

    2013-01-01

    Student engagement is an important condition for positive outcomes at school. This study examined whether teachers' motives for being a teacher, their ratings of the relative importance of different teacher competences, their self-efficacy for teaching, and ratings of their own interpersonal teacher behavior could predict teacher perceptions of…

  15. Engaging students: The role of teacher beliefs and interpersonal teacher behavior in fostering student engagement in vocational education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uden, van Jolien M.; Ritzen, Henk; Pieters, Jules M.

    2014-01-01

    Student engagement is an important precursor for learning. In this study we used teacher (N = 200) and student (N = 2288) questionnaires to investigate whether perceived interpersonal teacher behavior and teacher beliefs concerning motives for being a teacher, attitudes toward teacher knowledge doma

  16. I think I can engage my students. Teachers' perceptions of student engagement and their beliefs about being a teacher

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uden, van J.M.; Ritzen, H.; Pieters, J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Student engagement is an important condition for positive outcomes at school. This study examined whether teachers' motives for being a teacher, their ratings of the relative importance of different teacher competences, their self-efficacy for teaching, and ratings of their own interpersonal teacher

  17. Weekly work engagement and performance: A study among starting teachers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.B. Bakker (Arnold); P.M. Bal (Matthijs)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThis study among 54 Dutch teachers tested a model of weekly work engagement. On the basis of theories about the motivational potential of job resources, we predicted that teachers' weekly job resources are positively related to their week-levels of work engagement, and that week-level wo

  18. Challenging Teacher Beliefs about Student Engagement in Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobis, Janette; Way, Jennifer; Anderson, Judy; Martin, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the beliefs about student engagement in mathematics of three Year 5 and 6 teachers, focusing on the shifts that occurred during a 10-week intervention. Data obtained from teacher surveys, interviews, video-recorded workshop observations and artefacts from teachers' classrooms reveal variations in their reactions to the…

  19. Influences of Teacher Delivery, Student Engagement, and Observation Focus on Preservice Teachers' Perceptions of Teaching Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napoles, Jessica; MacLeod, Rebecca B.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how teacher delivery, student engagement, and observation focus influenced preservice teachers' ratings of teaching effectiveness. Participants (N = 84 preservice teachers) viewed short teaching excerpts of orchestral and choral rehearsals wherein the teacher displayed either high or low teacher delivery,…

  20. Primary School English Teachers'Research Engagement%Primary School English Teachers'Research Engagement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuesong Gao; Alice Wai Kwan Chow

    2012-01-01

    Research engagement is an important means for teachers to develop their professional competence. This paper reports on an enquiry into the research engagement of a group of primary school English language teachers in Guangdong province on the Chinese mainland. Drawing on questionnaire data and teachers' interview narratives, the paper examines how these Chinese primary school teachers experienced research and what their conceptions of good quality research were. While the enquiry revealed that the participants had a variety of research experiences, it also revealed that their

  1. Teacher self-efficacy and perceived autonomy: relations with teacher engagement, job satisfaction, and emotional exhaustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaalvik, Einar M; Skaalvik, Sidsel

    2014-02-01

    When studied separately, research shows that both teacher self-efficacy and teacher autonomy are associated with adaptive motivational and emotional outcomes. This study tested whether teacher self-efficacy and teacher autonomy are independently associated with engagement, job satisfaction, and emotional exhaustion. 2,569 Norwegian teachers in elementary school and middle school (719 men, 1,850 women; M age = 45.0 yr., SD = 11.5) were administered the Norwegian Teacher Self-Efficacy Scale, the Teacher Autonomy Scale, the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale, the Teacher Job Satisfaction Scale, and the Maslach Burnout Inventory. The analysis revealed that both teacher autonomy and self-efficacy were independent predictors of engagement, job satisfaction, and emotional exhaustion. This study suggests that autonomy or decision latitude works positively but through different processes for teachers with high and low mastery expectations.

  2. Training Beginning Teachers How to Engage Families: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackett-Villalobos, Karen

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study focuses on how beginning teachers attain skills to engage families in the educational process. Historical rationale, theoretical frameworks, and key research findings for family engagement training during the last three decades were reviewed, studied, and analyzed for themes. A review of scholarly literature is incorporated…

  3. English-Language Teachers' Engagement with Research: Findings from Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwaruddin, Sardar M.; Pervin, Nasrin

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we report on a small-scale study in which we investigated English-language teachers' engagement with educational research. We conceptualized engagement with research as reading and systematically using research for professional development. Using questionnaires and in-depth interviews, we gathered empirical materials from 40…

  4. Training Beginning Teachers How to Engage Families: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackett-Villalobos, Karen

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study focuses on how beginning teachers attain skills to engage families in the educational process. Historical rationale, theoretical frameworks, and key research findings for family engagement training during the last three decades were reviewed, studied, and analyzed for themes. A review of scholarly literature is incorporated…

  5. English-Language Teachers' Engagement with Research: Findings from Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwaruddin, Sardar M.; Pervin, Nasrin

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we report on a small-scale study in which we investigated English-language teachers' engagement with educational research. We conceptualized engagement with research as reading and systematically using research for professional development. Using questionnaires and in-depth interviews, we gathered empirical materials from 40…

  6. Teacher Support, School Goal Structures, and Teenage Mothers' School Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalil, Ariel; Ziol-Guest, Kathleen M.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates how perceptions of teacher support and achievement goal structures in the school environment correlate with school engagement, and whether depressive symptoms mediate or moderate this association, among 64 low-income teenage mothers. Controlling for prior grades, perceptions of teacher support correlate with higher levels…

  7. University Teacher Educators' Research Engagement: Perspectives from Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Simon; Alshumaimeri, Yousif

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines university teacher educators' engagement with and in educational research. Survey results collected from eighty-two teacher educators at a leading university in Saudi Arabia pointed to modest levels of research activity and also suggested that these individuals held largely technical views of what research is. Their assessments…

  8. Writing Instruction in Elementary Classrooms: Why Teachers Engage or Do Not Engage Students in Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harward, Stan; Peterson, Nancy; Korth, Byran; Wimmer, Jennifer; Wilcox, Brad; Morrison, Timothy G.; Black, Sharon; Simmerman, Sue; Pierce, Linda

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative study explored reasons K-6 teachers did or did not engage students regularly in writing. Interviews with 14 teachers, classified as high, transitional, and low implementers of writing instruction, revealed three themes: hindrances and helps, beliefs concerning practice, and preparation and professional development. Both high and…

  9. Reframing Teacher Education for Democratic Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strahley, Lisa; D'Arpino, Tracy

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes a partnership between teacher education students at SUNY Broome and students at a local elementary school that led to all participants gaining a stronger sense of themselves as civic change agents in their communities.

  10. How to Weave... the Web Into K-8 Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzel, David R.

    2005-01-01

    Like a search engine for science teachers, How to... "Weave the Web into K-8 Science" is a custom-made guide to bringing the best of the Internet into the classroom. Author David Wetzel has done the work of locating online materials. The book offers resources for Web-based science teaching and learning plus online technical help for both…

  11. Fostering Creativity in Children, K-8: Theory and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Mervin D., Ed.; Harris, Carole Ruth, Ed.

    This book identifies strategies for use by classroom teachers in grades K-8 to nurture the development of creativity. Section 1 offers general strategies to stimulate productive thinking. Section 2 examines personality, creative thinking, and appropriate teaching strategies. Section 3 is dedicated to teaching special groups. Section 4 focuses on…

  12. Spanish Teacher Education Programs and Community Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanovi, Ana; Filipovi, Jelena

    2013-01-01

    Theories of situated knowledge support that knowledge involves experience of practices rather than just accumulated information. While an important segment of foreign language teacher education programs focuses on the theoretical component of second/foreign language acquisition theories and relevant methodological concerns, it is mainly through…

  13. Teachers' Engagement at Work: An International Validation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klassen, Robert M.; Aldhafri, Said; Mansfield, Caroline F.; Purwanto, Edy; Siu, Angela F. Y.; Wong, Marina W.; Woods-McConney, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the validity of the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale in a sample of 853 practicing teachers from Australia, Canada, China (Hong Kong), Indonesia, and Oman. The authors used multigroup confirmatory factor analysis to test the factor structure and measurement invariance across settings, after which they examined the relationships…

  14. Classroom Justice and Psychological Engagement: Students' and Teachers' Representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berti, Chiara; Molinari, Luisa; Speltini, Giuseppina

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the results of a study carried out with the aim to: (1) analyze secondary school students' and their teachers' ideal representations of classroom justice, (2) deepen the topic of students' sense of injustice, and (3) explore the links between students' perceived injustice and their psychological engagement in school, measured…

  15. The Relationship between Teacher Cultural Competency and Student Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Erin Nicole

    2012-01-01

    This exploratory study investigated teachers' cultural competency and their students' engagement within international high schools located in Hong Kong. Cultural competency is defined as a combination of knowledge about cultural groups as well as attitudes towards and skills for dealing with cultural diversity (Betancourt, 2003). The literature…

  16. Students’ anticipated situational engagement : the roles of teacher behaviour, personal engagement, and gender

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijs, J.T.; Verkuyten, M.J.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Among 9th-grade students (248 girls, 255 boys) from a large multiethnic school, the authors examined 2 aspects of anticipated situational engagement in relation to 3 types of hypothetical teacher behavior: authoritarian, authoritative, permissive. Furthermore, the authors investigated the moderating

  17. What secondary teachers think and do about student engagement in mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skilling, Karen; Bobis, Janette; Martin, Andrew J.; Anderson, Judy; Way, Jennifer

    2016-12-01

    What teachers' think about student engagement influences the teaching practices they adopt, their responses to students and the efforts they make in the classroom. Interviews were conducted with 31 mathematics teachers from ten high schools to investigate their perceptions and beliefs about student engagement in mathematics. Teachers also reported the practices they used to engage their students during mathematics lessons. Teacher perceptions of student engagement were categorised according to recognised `types' (behavioural, emotional and cognitive) and `levels' (ranging from disengaged to engaged). The teachers' reports emphasised immediate attention being paid to students' behaviours and overt emotions towards mathematics with fewer and less extensive reports made about students' cognitive engagement. Teachers' abilities to implement practices considered supportive of student engagement were linked to a number of elements, including their self-efficacy. Perceptions of being powerless to engage their students resulted in many teachers limiting their efforts to attempt some form of intervention.

  18. The Relationship between Teacher Behaviors and Student Academic Engagement in an Inner-City Preschool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Camilo

    This study examined whether teacher behaviors (such as teacher enthusiasm, level of lesson difficulty, teacher voice volume and inflection, teacher use of inquiries, and teacher use of positive feedback) were related to student academic engagement in an inner city day care center. Data were collected by videotaping 13 teachers and 94 ethnic…

  19. Engaging teachers & students in geosciences by exploring local geoheritage sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gochis, E. E.; Gierke, J. S.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding geoscience concepts and the interactions of Earth system processes in one's own community has the potential to foster sound decision making for environmental, economic and social wellbeing. School-age children are an appropriate target audience for improving Earth Science literacy and attitudes towards scientific practices. However, many teachers charged with geoscience instruction lack awareness of local geological significant examples or the pedagogical ability to integrate place-based examples into their classroom practice. This situation is further complicated because many teachers of Earth science lack a firm background in geoscience course work. Strategies for effective K-12 teacher professional development programs that promote Earth Science literacy by integrating inquiry-based investigations of local and regional geoheritage sites into standards based curriculum were developed and tested with teachers at a rural school on the Hannahville Indian Reservation located in Michigan's Upper Peninsula. The workshops initiated long-term partnerships between classroom teachers and geoscience experts. We hypothesize that this model of professional development, where teachers of school-age children are prepared to teach local examples of earth system science, will lead to increased engagement in Earth Science content and increased awareness of local geoscience examples by K-12 students and the public.

  20. Making physics fun key concepts, classroom activities, and everyday examples, grades K-8

    CERN Document Server

    Prigo, Robert

    2007-01-01

    In easy-to-understand language, this resource presents engaging, ready-to-use learning experiences that address the "big ideas" in K-8 science education and help students make larger, real-world connections.

  1. The Relationship between Work Engagement and Organizational Trust: A Study of Elementary School Teachers in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gülbahar, Bahadir

    2017-01-01

    The relationships based on trust which are established by a teacher with a school's internal stakeholders can provide greater engagement in work. Teachers who are engaged in their jobs can be decisive in turning their schools into successful and effective schools. It is important to research the relationship between work engagement and…

  2. Indicators of Student Engagement: What Teachers Notice during Introductory Algebra Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyman, Rimma

    2015-01-01

    This article presents results from an empirical study of how student engagement is visible during introductory algebra. Previously, the notion of engagement in mathematics has been studied from students' and researchers' perspectives. This study is instead focused on teachers' perspectives on student engagement. Eight teachers in grade 6-7 have…

  3. Why Do Secondary School Chemistry Teachers Engage in Long-Term Outreach Partnership with a University?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, S. R.; Harrison, T. G.; Shallcross, D. E.

    2016-01-01

    While the effects of outreach with secondary school pupils has been researched the reasons teachers engage or the impacts on the teachers engaging in long-term relationships with a university department have not. Detailed interviews with chemistry teachers associated with outreach at Bristol ChemLabS have revealed many reasons for prolonged…

  4. Teachers' Beliefs, Instructional Behaviors, and Students' Engagement in Learning from Texts with Instructional Pictures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Sascha; Richter, Tobias; McElvany, Nele; Hachfeld, Axinja; Baumert, Jurgen; Schnotz, Wolfgang; Horz, Holger; Ullrich, Mark

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the relations between teachers' pedagogical beliefs and students' self-reported engagement in learning from texts with instructional pictures. Participants were the biology, geography, and German teachers of 46 classes (Grades 5-8) and their students. Teachers' instructional behaviors and students' engagement in learning…

  5. The Effect of Tertiary Teachers' Goal Orientations for Teaching on Their Commitment: The Mediating Role of Teacher Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jiying; Yin, Hongbiao; Wang, Wenlan

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the effect of tertiary teachers' goal orientations for teaching on their commitment, with a particular focus on the mediating role of teacher engagement. The results of a survey of 597 Chinese tertiary teachers indicated that teacher commitment was positively predicted by ability approach, mastery and relational goals, but was…

  6. Investigation of urban science teachers' pedagogical engagements: Are urban science teachers culturally responsive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udokwu, Chukwudi John

    This study utilized mixed methodology of quantitative and qualitative research approach to explore the current pedagogical engagements of twenty middle school urban science teachers in the Midwest region of the United States. It qualitatively examined twelve of these teachers' knowledge of culturally responsive pedagogy. The study investigated the following questions: What are the current pedagogical practices of urban middle school science teachers? To what extent are middle school science teachers' pedagogical practices in urban schools culturally responsive? What are urban students' perspectives of their teachers' current pedagogical engagements? The design of the study was qualitative and quantitative methods in order to investigate these teachers' pedagogical practices. Data collections were drawn from multiple sources such as lesson plans, students' sample works, district curriculum, surveys, observational and interview notes. Analysis of collected data was a mixed methodology that involved qualitative and quantitative methods using descriptive, interpretative, pattern codes, and statistical procedures respectively. Purposeful sampling was selected for this study. Thus, demographically there were twenty participants who quantitatively took part in this study. Among them were seven (35%) males and thirteen (65%) females, three (15%) African Americans and seventeen (85%) Caucasians. In determining to what extent urban science teachers' pedagogical practices were culturally responsive, eight questions were analyzed based on four cluster themes: (a) teachers' social disposition, (b) culturally responsive curriculum, (c) classroom interactions, and (d) power pedagogy. Study result revealed that only five (25%) of the participants were engaged in culturally responsive pedagogy while fifteen (75%) were engaged in what Haberman (1991) called the pedagogy of poverty. The goal was to investigate urban science teachers' pedagogical engagements and to examine urban

  7. Engaging Preservice Teachers in Critical Dialogues on Race

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna E. Durham-Barnes

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Rarely do White, middle-class Americans, the population from which most teachers are drawn, have the opportunity to consider themselves as racialized beings. Although personal experience is usually the best teacher, our increasingly homogeneous teaching population oftentimes lacks experience with diversity, and schools of education often struggle to find appropriate and meaningful diverse field experiences for their teacher candidates. This study uses a documentary in an attempt to provoke thoughtful conversations about race and racism in the United States among the mostly White teacher candidates. The study identifies racial themes that emerge from the conversations, explores the ways the groups’ racial diversity alters conversations on race, and explores how the race of the group’s facilitator may affect the conversations. The study suggested that racially diverse groups are more likely to explore greater numbers of racial themes and engage each other more deeply through polite disagreement. Although racial diversity of any kind seemed to promote deeper conversations, participants reported greater satisfaction from the conversations when the students themselves were racially diverse rather than with the facilitator alone.

  8. Exploring Elements That Support Teachers Engagement in Online Professional Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Prestridge

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study sought to identify the most effective elements required in online professional development to enable teachers to improve their use of Information and Communications Technologies (ICT in their classrooms. Four schools in Queensland were involved, with twelve classroom teachers participating in a year-long online professional development program over the school year supported by an online mentor. The online professional development program did not provide course based or sequential learning activities. Rather it was design to enable individual learning pathways and draw on the many professional learning opportunities available through web 2.0 tools and Internet resources. The focus was to explore the process of online ICT professional development to contribute to the conceptualization of how teachers learn in the 21st Century. Findings indicate that teachers need to engage in three elements: investigation, reflection, and constructive dialogue; build a sense of group and individual online presence; and be supported by mentorship that responds to the various cognitive and affective demands of autonomous learners.

  9. Perceived Challenge, Teacher Support, and Teacher Obstruction as Predictors of Student Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strati, Anna D.; Schmidt, Jennifer A.; Maier, Kimberly S.

    2017-01-01

    This study explored associations between students' perceptions of challenge, teacher-provided support and obstruction, and students' momentary academic engagement in high school science classrooms. Instrumental and emotional dimensions of support and obstruction were examined separately, and analyses tested whether the relationship between…

  10. Contributions of Work-Related Stress and Emotional Intelligence to Teacher Engagement: Additive and Interactive Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mérida-López, Sergio; Extremera, Natalio; Rey, Lourdes

    2017-09-29

    This study examined the additive and interactive effects of role stress and emotional intelligence for predicting engagement among 288 teachers. Emotional intelligence and engagement were positively associated. Role ambiguity and role conflict showed negative associations with vigor and dedication scores. The interaction of role ambiguity and emotional intelligence was significant in explaining engagement dimensions. Similar results were found considering overall teacher engagement. Emotional intelligence boosted engagement when the levels of role ambiguity were higher. Our findings suggest the need for future research examining the impact of job hindrances on the links between emotional intelligence and teachers' occupational well-being indicators. Finally, the implications for emotional intelligence training in education are discussed.

  11. Using EarthScope Data to Engage Teachers in Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, E.; McGuire, J. J.; Rubio, E.; Newton, M. H.; Hardwig, M. D.; Kraft, R. L.

    2012-12-01

    An overarching goal of the Master of Education in Earth Sciences program at Penn State University is to expose excellent and enthusiastic teachers to primary scientific research in Earth and space science so they can master educational objectives and translate their own discoveries directly back to their classrooms. Since 2010, teachers in the program have collaborated with research scientists at Penn State and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in research efforts focused on EarthScope data. We have investigated the connection between seismic strain transients and earthquake swarms in the western United States using a combination of Plate Boundary Observatory Global Positioning System data and earthquake catalog data. The Next Generation Science Standards emphasize a learning process that is much more closely aligned with the way scientists actually conduct research, but secondary teachers are often not given the opportunity for the professional development necessary to implement this style of teaching. We observe that one of the best ways to achieve this goal is for teachers to do research. The teachers who participated in this project have asserted that their experience not only enhanced their content knowledge but also gave them a true appreciation about "the way science really works." Previous studies confirm our anecdotal observation that teacher participation in fundamental research translates to student success, although few longitudinal studies exist. We are in the process of creating an Open Educational Resources database that features downloadable lesson plans sorted by subject, grade level, and learning standard based on the EarthScope-data-driven current research our project has produced. It is a testament to the skills and depth of content mastery of these teachers that they have engaged in cutting edge research and have also distilled it, and repurposed it so that it can be taught to and shared with their own middle and high school students

  12. Enhancing Students' Engagement: Report of a 3-Year Intervention with Middle School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Julianne C.; Christensen, Andrea; Kackar-Cam, Hayal Z.; Trucano, Meg; Fulmer, Sara M.

    2014-01-01

    All teachers (N = 32) at one middle school participated in a university-led intervention to improve student engagement. Teachers discussed four principles of motivation and related instructional strategies. Teachers enacted instructional strategies in their classrooms. We observed six randomly selected teachers and their students over 3 years.…

  13. Teacher and observer views on student-teacher relationships: convergence across kindergarten and relations with student engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doumen, Sarah; Koomen, Helma M Y; Buyse, Evelien; Wouters, Sofie; Verschueren, Karine

    2012-02-01

    Most studies regarding the role of teacher-child relationships for children's early school adjustment use only teacher ratings of relationship quality. The current study examines (a) the agreement between teacher and observer ratings, (b) whether similar patterns of relations with behavioral engagement are obtained across informants, and (c) which informant matters the most in the prediction of engagement. Teacher and observer ratings of teacher-child closeness, conflict, and dependency were gathered for a sample of 148 kindergartners and their teachers at three measurement occasions. Teacher and observer reports converged to a moderate degree but only when considering multiple occasions and ruling out occasion-specific variance. Although some relations with behavioral engagement were similar, only teacher ratings had unique, added value in this prediction.

  14. The gender gap in student engagement: The role of teachers' autonomy support, structure, and involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lietaert, Sofie; Roorda, Debora; Laevers, Ferre; Verschueren, Karine; De Fraine, Bieke

    2015-12-01

    The gender gap in education in favour of girls is a widely known phenomenon. Boys generally have higher dropout rates, obtain lower grades, and show lower engagement. Insight into factors related to these academic outcomes could help to address the gender gap. This study investigated, for Dutch language classes, (1) how boys and girls differ in behavioural engagement, (2) which teacher support dimensions (autonomy support, structure, involvement) may explain gender differences in engagement (mediation hypothesis), and (3) whether and which of these teacher support dimensions matter more for boys' as opposed to girls' engagement (moderation or differential effects hypothesis). A total of 385 Grade 7 students and their 15 language teachers participated in this study. Teacher support was assessed through student reports. Student engagement was measured using student, teacher, and observer reports. By means of structural equation modelling, the mediating role of the teacher support dimensions for gender differences in behavioural engagement was tested. The potential differential role of the teacher support dimensions for boys' and girls' engagement was investigated through multigroup analysis. Boys were less engaged than girls and reported lower support from their teacher. Autonomy support and involvement partially mediated the relationship between gender and behavioural engagement. Autonomy support was demonstrated to be a protective factor for boys' engagement but not for girls'. Structure and involvement contributed equally to engagement for both sexes. Although involvement and autonomy support partly explained the gender gap in engagement (mediation hypothesis), more support was found for differential effects of autonomy support on boys' versus girls' engagement (differential effects hypothesis). © 2015 The British Psychological Society.

  15. Reconceptualizing Self and Other through Critical Media Engagement. Experiences and Reflections of English Learners and Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shin-ying

    2015-01-01

    This research explores how critical media literacy transforms ways of engaging with media texts and expands the understanding and practice of literacy. In this qualitative teacher inquiry, even though the teacher researcher had envisioned for the students an identity as academic-language learners who engage with competing ideologies of masculinity…

  16. Reconceptualizing Self and Other through Critical Media Engagement. Experiences and Reflections of English Learners and Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shin-ying

    2015-01-01

    This research explores how critical media literacy transforms ways of engaging with media texts and expands the understanding and practice of literacy. In this qualitative teacher inquiry, even though the teacher researcher had envisioned for the students an identity as academic-language learners who engage with competing ideologies of masculinity…

  17. Teachers' Conceptions of Student Engagement in Learning: The Case of Three Urban Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkaoui, Khaled; Barrett, Sarah Elizabeth; Samaroo, Julia; Dahya, Negin; Alidina, Shahnaaz; James, Carl

    2015-01-01

    Although student engagement plays a central role in the education process, defining it is challenging. This study examines teachers' conceptions of the social and cultural dimensions of student engagement in learning at three low-achieving schools located in a low socioeconomic status (SES) urban area. Sixteen teachers and administrators from the…

  18. Teacher and Observer Views on Student-Teacher Relationships: Convergence across Kindergarten and Relations with Student Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doumen, Sarah; Koomen, Helma M. Y.; Buyse, Evelien; Wouters, Sofie; Verschueren, Karine

    2012-01-01

    Most studies regarding the role of teacher-child relationships for children's early school adjustment use only teacher ratings of relationship quality. The current study examines (a) the agreement between teacher and observer ratings, (b) whether similar patterns of relations with behavioral engagement are obtained across informants, and (c) which…

  19. Professional Dialogue, Reflective Practice and Teacher Research: Engaging Early Childhood Pre-Service Teachers in Collegial Dialogue about Curriculum Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoncini, Kym M.; Lasen, Michelle; Rocco, Sharn

    2014-01-01

    While embedded in teacher professional standards and assumed aspects of teacher professionalism, willingness and ability to engage in professional dialogue about practice and curriculum initiatives are rarely examined or explicitly taught in teacher education programs. With this in mind, the authors designed an assessment task for pre-service…

  20. Engaging with Research through Practitioner Enquiry: The Perceptions of Beginning Teachers on a Postgraduate Initial Teacher Education Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulse, Bethan; Hulme, Rob

    2012-01-01

    This study focuses on the perceptions of student-teachers towards their engagement in small-scale research projects undertaken whilst on a one-year postgraduate initial teacher education programme. We present an institutional response to national and international policy agendas regarding the place of research within initial teacher education at…

  1. Where Student, Teacher, and Content Meet: Student Engagement in the Secondary School Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corso, Michael J.; Bundick, Matthew J.; Quaglia, Russell J.; Haywood, Dawn E.

    2013-01-01

    The degree to which students think, feel, and act engaged in school plays a vital role in their chances for academic and life success, yet levels of student engagement remain low. In this article, we focus specifically on how engagement works in the classroom, namely as a function of the interactions between students, teachers, and the class…

  2. Teaching English Language Learners: 43 Strategies for Successful K-8 Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Michaela

    2011-01-01

    Ideal as a supplementary text for a variety of courses and as a guide for in-service teachers and for professional development settings, "Teaching English Language Learners: 43 Strategies for Successful K-8 Classrooms" provides teachers of all content areas with a broad, practical approach to teaching English language learners in the regular…

  3. Differentiated Instruction for K-8 Math and Science: Activities and Lesson Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Mary; Adams, Dennis

    2008-01-01

    This book offers practical recommendations to reach every student in a K-8 classroom. Research-based and written in a teacher-friendly style, it will help teachers with classroom organization and lesson planning in math and science. Included are math and science games, activities, ideas, and lesson plans based on the math and science standards.…

  4. Teaching English Language Learners: 43 Strategies for Successful K-8 Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Michaela

    2011-01-01

    Ideal as a supplementary text for a variety of courses and as a guide for in-service teachers and for professional development settings, "Teaching English Language Learners: 43 Strategies for Successful K-8 Classrooms" provides teachers of all content areas with a broad, practical approach to teaching English language learners in the regular…

  5. Belonging and Work Control in Two Suburban Public High Schools and Their Effects on Teacher Engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyree, Alexander K., Jr.

    This paper shows how, in two suburban high schools, Cherry Glen and Pinehill, teachers' work control interacted with normative and social integration in their effect upon teachers' engagement with their work. In each school, a two-person team initially observed, and later interviewed, eight teachers in English, math, foreign language, social…

  6. Promoting Student Engagement through Evidence-Based Action Research with Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strambler, Michael J.; McKown, Clark

    2013-01-01

    We present findings from a group-randomized teacher action research intervention to promote academic engagement and achievement among elementary school students. Eighteen teachers from 3 elementary schools were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups. Intervention teachers studied evidence-based instructional practices that cultivate academic…

  7. Engaging and Working in Solidarity with Local Communities in Preparing the Teachers of Their Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeichner, Ken; Bowman, Michael; Guillen, Lorena; Napolitan, Kate

    2016-01-01

    This article analyzes a programmatic effort in teacher education, "The Community Teaching Strand" (CTS), to engage local community members as mentors of teacher candidates (TCs) in two postgraduate teacher preparation programs in a large research university. Three different conceptions of the nature and purpose of…

  8. Facilitating the Teaching-Learning Process through the Reflective Engagement of Pre-Service Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodman, Gloria Jean

    2010-01-01

    The repeated use of reflection throughout their teacher preparation experience can be useful in encouraging growth and improving pedagogical knowledge, teaching performance and professional development among pre-service teachers. This study looks at how the reflective engagement of these teachers in a structured classroom activity reinforces the…

  9. Evidence of the Need to Prepare Prospective Teachers to Engage in Mathematics Consultations

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ingen, Sarah; Eskelson, Samuel L.; Allsopp, David

    2016-01-01

    The mathematics consultation represents a powerful opportunity for mathematics teachers to leverage the knowledge base of special education professionals to advance equity for students with special education needs. Yet, most teacher preparation programs do not specifically prepare prospective teachers to engage in mathematics-specific…

  10. Robotics Technologies for K-8 Educators:A Semiotic Approach for Instructional Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoinette P. Bruciati

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Play in the K-8 curriculum? What robotic technologies are currently available for educators having no prior computer programming experience? and How should instruction in robotics technologies for K-8 educators be designed? Robotics engineering courses have provided undergraduate computer science students with opportunities for designing and programming simulations of robotic tasks. In contrast, many teacher education programs have lacked courses in this area. Educators who have not gained a conceptual understanding of computer programming could lack the skills that would have enabled them to successfully integrate robotics technologies into their K-8 curriculum.

  11. The Student Engagement in Schools Questionnaire (SESQ) and the Teacher Engagement Report Form-New (TERF-N): Examining the Preliminary Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Shelley R.; Stewart, Kaitlyn; Jimerson, Shane R.

    2011-01-01

    Student engagement in school is an important construct that has been associated with student success. For the current study, researchers examined the psychometrics of the Student Engagement in Schools Questionnaire (SESQ) and the Teacher Engagement Report Form (TERF-N) of student engagement. The results revealed that both the SESQ and the TERF-N…

  12. Teacher performance goal practices and elementary students' behavioral engagement: a developmental perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Jan N; Wu, Wei; West, Stephen G

    2011-02-01

    We investigated growth trajectories for classroom performance goal practices and for student behavioral engagement across grades 2 to 5 for 497 academically at-risk elementary students. This study is the first longitudinal investigation of performance goal practices in the early elementary years. On average, teacher use of performance goal practices increased and students' behavioral engagement declined across the four years. Using autoregressive latent trajectory (ALT) models, we examined the synchronous relations between teacher-reported performance goal practices and teacher-reported student behavioral engagement. As expected, as students move into classrooms with a new teacher with less emphasis on performance goal practices, they become more behaviorally engaged in school. Gender did not moderate these results. Implications for teacher professional development are discussed.

  13. Motivation and engagement in mathematics: a qualitative framework for teacher-student interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durksen, Tracy L.; Way, Jennifer; Bobis, Janette; Anderson, Judy; Skilling, Karen; Martin, Andrew J.

    2017-02-01

    We started with a classic research question (How do teachers motivate and engage middle year students in mathematics?) that is solidly underpinned and guided by an integration of two theoretical and multidimensional models. In particular, the current study illustrates how theory is important for guiding qualitative analytical approaches to motivation and engagement in mathematics. With little research on how teachers of mathematics are able to maintain high levels of student motivation and engagement, we focused on developing a qualitative framework that highlights the influence of teacher-student interactions. Participants were six teachers (upper primary and secondary) that taught students with higher-than-average levels of motivation and engagement in mathematics. Data sources included one video-recorded lesson and associated transcripts from pre- and post-lesson interviews with each teacher. Overall, effective classroom organisation stood out as a priority when promoting motivation and engagement in mathematics. Results on classroom organisation revealed four key indicators within teacher-student interactions deemed important for motivation and engagement in mathematics—confidence, climate, contact, and connection. Since much of the effect of teachers on student learning relies on interactions, and given the universal trend of declining mathematical performance during the middle years of schooling, future research and intervention studies might be assisted by our qualitative framework.

  14. A Model of Student Engagement and Academic Achievement: The Role of Teacher-Student Relationships and Teacher Expectations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temple, Aja

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine patterns of academic achievement among minority students and investigate teacher-student relationships, teachers' classroom and future educational expectations for students, and students' levels of classroom engagement in order to better understand their patterns of academic achievement. Participants (n =…

  15. Towards a Model of Teacher Well-Being: Personal and Job Resources Involved in Teacher Burnout and Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermejo-Toro, Laura; Prieto-Ursúa, María; Hernández, Vicente

    2016-01-01

    Although much research has focused on the role of job demands and job resources in teacher well-being, few studies have targeted the function of personal variables. The aim of this study is to develop a comprehensive model of teacher well-being, using burnout and engagement in order to reflect, not only job demands and professional resources, but…

  16. Teacher and Principal Perceptions of Authentic Leadership: Implications for Trust, Engagement, and Intention to Return

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, James J.; Wang, Chuang; Watson, Jim; Murray, Louise

    2012-01-01

    The focus of this study was to explore the relationships between the authentic leadership of building principals and the trust, engagement, and intention to return of their teaching staffs. School principals (n = 28) and their teaching staffs (n = 633) were surveyed. Teacher trust and engagement were found to be significantly related to principal…

  17. Autobiography, Disclosure, and Engaged Pedagogy: Toward a Practical Discussion on Teaching Foundations in Teacher Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milam, Jennifer L.; Jupp, James C.; Hoyt, Mei Wu; Kaufman, Mitzi; Grumbein, Matthew; O'Malley, Michael P.; Carpenter, B. Stephen, II; Slattery, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    In this research reflection, we develop a portrait of our engaged pedagogy for teaching educational foundations classes in teacher education. Our engaged pedagogy--based on autobiography and self-disclosure traditions-- emphasizes instructors and students' self-disclosure of lived experiences as being central to practical curriculum in teaching…

  18. The Role of Student-Teacher Ratio in Parents' Perceptions of Schools' Engagement Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Raymond J.; Elbaum, Batya

    2014-01-01

    Research suggests a positive relationship between schools' efforts to engage parents and parents' involvement in their child's education. The authors investigated school socioeconomic status, school size, grade level, and student-teacher ratio as predictors of schools' efforts to engage parents of students receiving special education services. The…

  19. Autobiography, Disclosure, and Engaged Pedagogy: Toward a Practical Discussion on Teaching Foundations in Teacher Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milam, Jennifer L.; Jupp, James C.; Hoyt, Mei Wu; Kaufman, Mitzi; Grumbein, Matthew; O'Malley, Michael P.; Carpenter, B. Stephen, II; Slattery, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    In this research reflection, we develop a portrait of our engaged pedagogy for teaching educational foundations classes in teacher education. Our engaged pedagogy--based on autobiography and self-disclosure traditions-- emphasizes instructors and students' self-disclosure of lived experiences as being central to practical curriculum in teaching…

  20. Offering Community Engagement Activities to Increase Chemistry Knowledge and Confidence for Teachers and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewry, Joyce D.; Glover, Sarah R.; Harrison, Timothy G.; Shallcross, Dudley E.; Ngcoza, Kenneth M.

    2014-01-01

    Given the emphasis on community engagement in higher education, academic departments need to become more involved in the community. This paper discusses a number of outreach activities undertaken by the chemistry department at Rhodes University, South Africa. The activities range from service learning to community engagement with teachers and…

  1. Teaching Every Child to Read: Innovative and Practical Strategies for K-8 Educators and Caretakers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Rita; Blake, Brett Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    This book provides educators, parents and caretakers with a variety of instructional strategies for engaging K-8 students. These approaches are designed to enable all students to read easily and enjoyably by utilizing different styles and approaches. The techniques are not generally found in conventional classrooms, but are specifically targeted…

  2. Engaging Youth and Pre-Service Teachers in Immigration Deliberations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Shannon M.

    2015-01-01

    In this report of innovative teacher practice, the author describes an arts-based event which brought together adolescent refugee and immigrant students and pre-service teachers to deliberate about immigration policies and attitudes in the United States.

  3. Advanced Level Biology Teachers' Attitudes towards Assessment and Their Engagement in Assessment for Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramwell-Lalor, Sharon; Rainford, Marcia

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on a Mixed Methods study involving an investigation into the attitudes of advanced level biology teachers towards assessment and describes the teachers' experiences while being engaged in Assessment for Learning (AfL) practices such as sharing of learning objectives and peer- and self-assessment. Quantitative data were collected…

  4. Motivation to become a teacher and engagement to the profession. : Evidence from different contexts.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokkens-Bruinsma, Marjon; Canrinus, Esther

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the assumption that motivation is relevant for preservice teachers’ engagement to the profession is investigated using the Factors Influencing Teaching (FIT) Choice theory. This assumption is tested in two Dutch teacher training contexts. Survey data from preservice teachers training

  5. ASPIRE: Formation of Pre-Service Teachers through Leadership, Community Engagement and Retreat Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackett, Chris; Lavery, Shane

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the experiences of pre-service teachers who are involved in a program promoting leadership, community engagement and retreat training. It initially presents a review of the literature on the significant links between teacher commitment and quality teaching. It then describes how four significant dispositions: care,…

  6. "Pretty Much Fear!!" Rationalizing Teacher (Dis)Engagement in Social Justice Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baily, Supriya; Katradis, Maria

    2016-01-01

    This article analyzes how teachers in U.S. classrooms navigate, dialogue, debate, and absorb the ideas of privilege, power, and the presence of various forms of injustices. Through their understanding of these topics, we explore how K-12 teachers engage, disengage, and rationalize issues of social justice in education, society, and their own…

  7. Teacher and Peer Support for Young Adolescents' Motivation, Engagement, and School Belonging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Sarah M.; Alley, Kathleen M.; Ellerbrock, Cheryl R.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this sequential explanatory mixed methods study was to investigate teacher and peer support for young adolescents' academic motivation, classroom engagement, and school belonging within one large, urban, ethnically diverse middle school. In the initial quantitative phase, associations among aspects of teacher support (autonomy,…

  8. Rural High School Teachers' Self-Efficacy in Student Engagement, Instructional Strategies, and Classroom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoulders, Tori L.; Krei, Melinda Scott

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the differences in rural high school teachers' (n = 256) self-efficacy in student engagement, instructional practices, and classroom management using selected teacher characteristics. Analysis of variance showed significant mean differences between different levels of education in self-efficacy for…

  9. The Relationship between Teacher Value Orientations and Engagement in Professional Learning Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Hoi Kwan; Lee, Daphnee; Lee, Wing On

    2016-01-01

    The development of teacher professional learning communities (PLC) has attracted growing attention among practitioners, policy-makers and researchers. The aims of this study were to identify typologies of professional learning teams based on measures of professional learning engagement, and assess their linkages with teachers' value orientations.…

  10. Teacher Morale, Student Engagement, and Student Achievement Growth in Reading: A Correlational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabin, Jenny T.

    2015-01-01

    This research study explored the current state of teacher morale in fourth and fifth grade classrooms in three low socio-economic schools in North Carolina. Additional research questions address correlational relationships among the variables of teacher morale, student engagement, and student achievement growth as measured by the NC Teacher…

  11. Talking Points: Data Displays Are an Effective Way to Engage Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Alyson; Ross, Dorene; Burns, Jamey; Gibbs, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    This article describes an instructional coaching program that includes high-quality data displays to engage teachers in conversation about instruction. A descriptive, nonjudgmental data display that captures a teacher's practice around an identified focus provides the foundation for a productive collaborative coaching conversation. The data…

  12. Teacher Support and Engagement in Math and Science: Evidence from the High School Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Sean; Zhang, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Supportive teacher-student relationships are associated with increased levels of engagement and higher levels of achievement. Yet, studies also show that higher achieving students typically receive the most encouragement. Moreover, many studies of teacher-student relationships pertain to elementary and middle school students; by the time students…

  13. Motivation to become a teacher and engagement to the profession. : Evidence from different contexts.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokkens-Bruinsma, Marjon; Canrinus, Esther

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the assumption that motivation is relevant for preservice teachers’ engagement to the profession is investigated using the Factors Influencing Teaching (FIT) Choice theory. This assumption is tested in two Dutch teacher training contexts. Survey data from preservice teachers training

  14. Using a Conference Workshop Setting to Engage Mathematics Teachers in Culturally Relevant Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmons-Brown, Stephanie; Warner, Catharine

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the authors explore using a conference workshop setting to engage mathematics teachers, who serve largely underserved student populations, in culturally relevant pedagogy (CRP). The conference workshop encouraged the exchange of information among teachers of similar grade levels and classroom contexts. The authors' analysis of the…

  15. Rural High School Teachers' Self-Efficacy in Student Engagement, Instructional Strategies, and Classroom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoulders, Tori L.; Krei, Melinda Scott

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the differences in rural high school teachers' (n = 256) self-efficacy in student engagement, instructional practices, and classroom management using selected teacher characteristics. Analysis of variance showed significant mean differences between different levels of education in self-efficacy for…

  16. To What Extent Do Teacher-Student Interaction Quality and Student Gender Contribute to Fifth Graders' Engagement in Mathematics Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimm-Kaufman, Sara E.; Baroody, Alison E.; Larsen, Ross A. A.; Curby, Timothy W.; Abry, Tashia

    2015-01-01

    This study examines concurrent teacher-student interaction quality and 5th graders' (n = 387) engagement in mathematics classrooms (n = 63) and considers how teacher-student interaction quality relates to engagement differently for boys and girls. Three approaches were used to measure student engagement in mathematics: Research assistants observed…

  17. We Are All Teachers: Modeling Democratic Engagement in Faculty Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studer, Morgan; Rogers, Christian; Benton, Melissa; Quirke, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    As service-learning and community engagement (SLCE) have become increasingly legitimized in higher education as scholarly pedagogical practice, resources to support faculty in learning about and undertaking this engaged work have grown. As Zlotkowski (2015) points out in his framing essay for the SLCE Future Directions Project (FDP), the movement…

  18. Student Engagement in Very Large Classes: The Teachers' Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exeter, Daniel J.; Ameratunga, Shanthi; Ratima, Matiu; Morton, Susan; Dickson, Martin; Hsu, Dennis; Jackson, Rod

    2010-01-01

    The rapid growth in the student population observed in higher education over the past 10-15 years in some countries has coincided with an increased recognition of student engagement and its value in developing knowledge. Active learning approaches have the potential to promote student engagement with lectures, but this becomes more challenging as…

  19. Behavioral Engagement, Peer Status, and Teacher-Student Relationships in Adolescence: A Longitudinal Study on Reciprocal Influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engels, Maaike C; Colpin, Hilde; Van Leeuwen, Karla; Bijttebier, Patricia; Van Den Noortgate, Wim; Claes, Stephan; Goossens, Luc; Verschueren, Karine

    2016-06-01

    Although teachers and peers play an important role in shaping students' engagement, no previous study has directly investigated transactional associations of these classroom-based relationships in adolescence. This study investigated the transactional associations between adolescents' behavioral engagement, peer status (likeability and popularity), and (positive and negative) teacher-student relationships during secondary education. A large sample of adolescents was followed from Grade 7 to 11 (N = 1116; 49 % female; M age = 13.79 years). Multivariate autoregressive cross-lagged modeling revealed only unidirectional effects from teacher-student relationships and peer status on students' behavioral engagement. Positive teacher-student relationships were associated with more behavioral engagement over time, whereas negative teacher-student relationships, higher likeability and higher popularity were related to less behavioral engagement over time. We conclude that teachers and peers constitute different sources of influence, and play independent roles in adolescents' behavioral engagement.

  20. Focusing on Form: Student Engagement with Teacher Feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyland, Fiona

    2003-01-01

    Explores the relationship between teacher feedback and student revision in two academic writing classes. Adopts a case study approach and looks at all the feedback given to six students over a complete course. Examines the extent to which teachers focused on formal language concerns when they gave feedback and the use that students made of this…

  1. Translanguaging, Identity, and Learning: Science Teachers as Engaged Language Planners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langman, Juliet

    2014-01-01

    With shifts in demographics leading to increasingly diverse student populations, and pressures from state educational accountability offices to streamline budgets and improve test scores, teachers at the secondary level are increasingly challenged to support English learners new to US schools. Teachers, often with minimal understanding of second…

  2. Engaging Elementary Preservice Teachers with Active Learning Teaching Methodologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olgun, Ozlem Sila

    2009-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of active learning on preservice teachers' dignity, energy, self-management, community, and awareness (DESCA) abilities, attitudes toward teaching, and attitudes toward science. Third year preservice teachers (n = 77) from two different classes were involved in the study. One intact…

  3. Teachers' use of educative curriculum materials to engage students in science practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Anna Maria; Davis, Elizabeth A.; Marino, John-Carlos; Kademian, Sylvie M.; Sullivan Palincsar, Annemarie

    2016-06-01

    New reform documents underscore the importance of integrating science practices into the learning of science. This integration requires sophisticated teaching that does not often happen. Educative curriculum materials - materials explicitly designed to support teacher and student learning - have been posited as a way to support teachers to achieve these ambitious goals, yet little is known about how elementary teachers actually use educative curriculum materials to support student engagement in science practices. To address this gap, this study investigated how five upper elementary teachers supported students to engage in science practices during an enactment of two curriculum units. Three of the teachers had units enhanced with educative features, informed by current research and reforms, while two of the teachers had units without these features. The teachers varied in how they supported students in the science practices of justifying predictions, constructing evidence-based claims, recording observations, and planning investigations. For example, some of the teachers with the educative features supported students in constructing evidence-based claims and justifying predictions in ways called for by the educative features. Implications for curriculum developers and teacher educators are discussed based on the patterns found in the teachers' use of the educative curriculum materials.

  4. Towards an understanding of the factors that influence teacher engagement in continuimng professional development

    OpenAIRE

    O'Connell, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the research reported in this thesis is to examine the factors that Irish post-primary teachers report as influencing their decision making regarding engagement in continuing professional development (CPD) and to present a conceptualisation of what I call engagement. The study examines the current research and theorising about CPD and from this develops an analysis and argument about how there is a need, within the context of CPD, to examine the relationship between the agency of t...

  5. Students' Engagement with Engagement: The Case of Teacher Education Students in Higher Education in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Ruksana; Petersen, Nadine

    2010-01-01

    Public engagement is one of the three legs which support and underpin a restructured and transformed post-apartheid higher education system in South Africa (along with teaching and research). This third sector role of higher education is widely implemented in South Africa and is described differently by different institutions and entails a diverse…

  6. Engaging second language teachers in videoconference-integrated exchanges: towards a social constructivist perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Roura Planas, Sergi

    2015-01-01

    The questions addressed in this study arose from an earlier project which attempted to provide videoconferencing opportunities for Second Language (SL) teachers to engaging in bilingual “virtual exchanges” for their students (hereafter referred to as “eTandem videoconferencing”). This investigation was initially motivated by the interest on discovering why these teachers and their students did not take the opportunity to participate in the synchronous part of the exchanges. ...

  7. Promoting Student Teachers' Adaptive Capabilities through Community Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlalele, Dipane; Tsotetsi, Cias T.

    2016-01-01

    The gap between student teachers and their ability to adapt to the school situation remains a challenge. The literature further indicates that there is an under-utilisation of students' abilities in an ever-changing curriculum that should be responsive to the challenges with which communities are faced. This paper aims to report on the students'…

  8. Influential Factors for Knowledge Creation Practices of CTE Teachers: Mutual Impact of Perceived School Support, Transformational Leadership, and Work Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ji Hoon; Bae, Sang Hoon; Park, Sunyoung; Kim, Hye Kyoung

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the structural relationships among perceived school support, transformational leadership, teachers' work engagement, and teachers' knowledge creation practices. It also investigated the mediating effects of transformational leadership and work engagement in explaining the association between perceived school support…

  9. Influential Factors for Knowledge Creation Practices of CTE Teachers: Mutual Impact of Perceived School Support, Transformational Leadership, and Work Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ji Hoon; Bae, Sang Hoon; Park, Sunyoung; Kim, Hye Kyoung

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the structural relationships among perceived school support, transformational leadership, teachers' work engagement, and teachers' knowledge creation practices. It also investigated the mediating effects of transformational leadership and work engagement in explaining the association between perceived school support…

  10. Motives for Becoming a Teacher and Their Relations to Academic Engagement and Dropout among Student Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungert, Tomas; Alm, Fredrik; Thornberg, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Difficulties in attracting student teachers have resulted in research focusing on student teachers' motives for studying to join the profession. Because previous findings are mixed, the first aim of this study was to explore motives for students to become teachers. A second aim was to explore the relationship between teachers' motives and their…

  11. Teachers' work engagement: Considering interaction with pupils and human resources practices as job resources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Runhaar, P.R.; Sanders, K.; Konermann, J.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of these 2 studies was to investigate whether teachers' work engagement is related to the extent to which they experience their interactions with pupils and human resource (HR) practices within their schools as motivating. Study 1 was a qualitative study, including document analysis and int

  12. Relationships for Learning: Using Pupil Voice to Define Teacher-Pupil Relationships that Enhance Pupil Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Helena

    2012-01-01

    This paper is a summary of a pupil voice research project conducted to investigate the influence that teacher-pupil relationships have on pupils' feelings of engagement with their school. The study involved two year groups (12-13 and 14-15 year olds) in a rural secondary school in Cambridgeshire. Data sources were collected through a questionnaire…

  13. Say Cheese! A Snapshot of Elementary Teachers' Engagement and Motivation for Classroom Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Glenda L.

    2014-01-01

    Assessment is a complex function requiring an understanding of student learning, assessment principles, practices, and purposes of data to implement effective classroom assessment. The purpose of this study was to add to the growing base of knowledge about teachers' engagement with assessment data and their motivation for classroom assessment.…

  14. Say Cheese! A Snapshot of Elementary Teachers' Engagement and Motivation for Classroom Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Glenda L.

    2014-01-01

    Assessment is a complex function requiring an understanding of student learning, assessment principles, practices, and purposes of data to implement effective classroom assessment. The purpose of this study was to add to the growing base of knowledge about teachers' engagement with assessment data and their motivation for classroom assessment.…

  15. Encouraging Prospective Teachers to Engage Friends and Family in Exploring Physical Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowl, Michele; Devitt, Adam; Jansen, Henri; van Zee, Emily H.; Winograd, Kenneth J.

    2013-01-01

    Involving people outside of a science course can foster learning for students enrolled in the course. Assignments involving friends and family provided such opportunities in an undergraduate physics course for prospective teachers. These assignments included reflecting upon prior experiences, interviewing friends and family members, engaging them…

  16. Striving for Authentic Community Engagement: A Process Model from Urban Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, Jana

    2011-01-01

    This article presents an urban teacher education center as a process model of how a university can cultivate authentic community engagement. Tree essential steps of the process model are identified: (1) being physically located at the school or community site in order to build trust and become integrated into the life of the school or community,…

  17. Tertiary Teachers' Perspectives on Their Role in Student Engagement: A Snapshot from Aotearoa New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Linda; Zepke, Nick; Butler, Philippa

    2014-01-01

    This article is based on data from a large mixed method research project funded by the Teaching and Learning Research Initiative (TLRI) in Aotearoa New Zealand. The article addresses the question: how do tertiary teachers in Aotearoa New Zealand perceive their role in student engagement? Quantitative data revealed both similarities and differences…

  18. Teacher recommended academic and student engagement strategies for learning disabled students: A qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwachukwu, Bethel C.

    There has been a push towards the education of students with Learning Disabilities in inclusive educational settings with their non-disabled peers. Zigmond (2003) stated that it is not the placement of students with disabilities in general education setting alone that would guarantee their successes; instead, the strategies teachers use to ensure that these children are being engaged and learning will enable them become successful. Despite the fact that there are several bodies of research on effective teaching of students with learning disabilities, special education teachers continue to have difficulties concerning the appropriate strategies for promoting student engagement and improving learning for students with learning disabilities placed in inclusive educational settings (Zigmond, 2003). This qualitative study interviewed and collected data from fifteen high performing special education teachers who were employed in a Southern state elementary school district to uncover the strategies they have found useful in their attempts to promote student engagement and attempts to improve student achievement for students with learning disabilities placed in inclusive educational settings. The study uncovered strategies for promoting engagement and improving learning outcomes for students with learning disabilities placed in inclusive classrooms. The findings showed that in order to actually reach the students with learning disabilities, special education teachers must go the extra miles by building rapport with the school communities, possess good classroom management skills, and become student advocates.

  19. (De)constructing Student Engagement for Pre-Service Teacher Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beasley, Jennifer G.; Gist, Conra D.; Imbeau, Marcia B.

    2014-01-01

    Learning to teach is a complex intellectual and adaptive performance act. Student engagement is the cornerstone of effective instruction. Current education reform policies, such as Common Core State Standards (National Governors Association Center for Best Practices & Council of Chief State School Officers, 2010) and Teacher Effectiveness…

  20. The Impact of a Teacher Professional Development Program on Student Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Kristin; Shin, Seon-Hi; Hagans, Kristi S.; Cordova, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Student engagement is associated with many positive outcomes, including academic achievement, school persistence, and social-emotional well-being. The present study examined whether the Freedom Writers Institute, a professional development program designed to improve teachers' skills in creating personalized learning environments, can increase…

  1. Teachers' work engagement: Considering interaction with pupils and human resources practices as job resources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Runhaar, P.R.; Sanders, K.; Konermann, J.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of these 2 studies was to investigate whether teachers' work engagement is related to the extent to which they experience their interactions with pupils and human resource (HR) practices within their schools as motivating. Study 1 was a qualitative study, including document analysis and

  2. Obscuring Power Structures in the Physics Classroom: Linking Teacher Positioning, Student Engagement, and Physics Identity Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazari, Zahra; Cass, Cheryl; Beattie, Carrie

    2015-01-01

    In the process of reforming physics education over the last several decades, a tension has developed between engaging students with the content in more conceptually challenging ways and helping them identify with physics so they are personally motivated in their learning. Through comparative case studies of four high school physics teachers, we…

  3. Engaging Students, Teachers, and the Public with NASA Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science (ARES) Assets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, P. V.; Foxworth, S.; Kascak, A.; Luckey, M. K.; Mcinturff, B.; Runco, S.; Willis, K. J.

    2016-01-01

    Engaging students, teachers, and the public with NASA Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science (ARES) assets, including Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) experts and NASA curation astromaterial samples, provides an extraordinary opportunity to connect citizens with authentic aspects unique to our nation's space program. Effective engagement can occur through both virtual connections such as webcasts and in-person connections at educator workshops and public outreach events. Access to NASA ARES assets combined with adaptable resources and techniques that engage and promote scientific thinking helps translate the science and research being facilitated through NASA exploration, elicits a curiosity that aims to carry over even after a given engagement, and prepares our next generation of scientific explorers.

  4. Engaging Early Childhood Teachers in the Thinking and Practice of Inquiry: Collaborative Research Mentorship as a Tool for Shifting Teacher Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmo, John W.; Park, Soyeon

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of participation in a research mentorship team (RMT) on early childhood teachers' professional identities. The participants were seven early childhood teachers engaged in preservice teacher supervision at a university-affiliated child care center who volunteered to be members of the RMT…

  5. Young Engineers & Scientists (YES) - Engaging Teachers in Space Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boice, D. C.; Reiff, P. H.

    2011-12-01

    The Young Engineers and Scientists (YES) Program is a community partnership between Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) and local high schools in San Antonio. It provides talented high school juniors and seniors a bridge between classroom instruction and real world, research experiences in physical sciences, information sciences, and engineering. YES consists of two parts: 1) An intensive three-week summer workshop held at SwRI where students experience the research environment first-hand; develop skills and acquire tools for solving scientific problems, attend mini-courses and seminars on electronics, C++ programming, the Internet, careers, science ethics, social impact of technology, and other topics; and select their individual research project with their mentor (SwRI staff member) to be completed during the academic year; and 2) A collegial mentorship where students complete individual research projects under the guidance of their mentors and teachers during the academic year and earn honors credit. At the end of the school year, students publicly present and display their work, acknowledging their accomplishments and spreading career awareness to other students and teachers. YES has been highly successful during the past nineteen (19) years. A total of 258 students have completed or are currently enrolled in YES. Of these students, 38% are females and 57% are ethnic minorities, reflecting the local diversity of the San Antonio area. All YES graduates have entered college, several work or have worked for SwRI, two businesses have formed, and three scientific publications have resulted. Sixteen (16) teacher participants have attended the YES workshop and have developed classroom materials based on their experiences in research at SwRI in the past three (3) years. In recognition of its excellence, YES received the Celebrate Success in 1996 and the Outstanding Campus Partner-of-the-Year Award in 2005, both from Northside Independent School District (San Antonio

  6. Committed to Differentiation and Engagement: A Case Study of Two American Secondary Social Studies Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek Anderson

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This case study examines two 10th-grade US History teachers who collaborated to create and implement an integrated, thematic eight-week unit on war with an emphasis differentiated instruction. Drawing on the National Council for the Social Studies (2010 framework for powerful and purposeful social studies instruction, the case study uses multiple sources of data, including 38 lesson observations, analyses of the teachers’ lesson plans and student work, and interviews of teachers. Initially, the teachers were successful at engaging students in simulations, small-group discussions, and higher-order thinking. As the unit progressed, however, the teachers reverted to transmission-style teaching with an emphasis on breadth over depth. Changing teaching practice requires overcoming barriers associated with prior experiences and deeply-held beliefs about teaching and learning.

  7. Kinder Lernen Deutsch Materials Evaluation Project: Grades K-8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association of Teachers of German.

    The Kinder Lernen Deutsch (Children Learn German) project, begun in 1987, is designed to promote German as a second language in grades K-8. The project is premised on the idea that the German program will contribute to the total development of the child and the child's personality. Included in this guide are a selection of recommended core…

  8. Helping Future Physics Teachers Learn How to Engage Students in Meaningful Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etkina, Eugenia

    2012-02-01

    Learning to solve problems is an important part of learning physics. Preparing future physics teachers to engage their students in meaningful problem solving is a part of a larger set of knowledge and skills called pedagogical content knowledge. One of the most common issues that students have when approaching physics problems is looking for the ``right formula'' instead of thinking about the concepts involved. What can we do to help students break this habit and learn to engage in expert-like problems solving? Answers to this question applied to specific areas of physics are a part of physics PCK. Workshop participants will learn how to approach problems solving with their pre-service physics teachers to help them develop problem-solving aspect of their PCK.

  9. Space Weather Around the World: Using Educational Technology to Engage Teachers and Students in Science Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, E.; Cline, T.; Thieman, J.

    2007-12-01

    The Space Weather Around the World Program uses NASA satellite data and education technology to provide a framework for students and teachers to study the effects of solar storms on the Earth and then report their results at their own school and to others around the world. Teachers and students are trained to create Space Weather Action Centers by building their own equipment to take data or using real satellite and/or ground-based data available through the internet to study and track the effects of solar storms. They can then predict "space weather" for our planet and what the effects might be on aurora, Earth-orbiting satellites, humans in space, etc. The results are presented via proven education technology techniques including weather broadcasts using green screen technology, podcasts, webcasts and distance learning events. Any one of these techniques can capture the attention of the audience, engage them in the science and spark an interest that will encourage continued participation. Space Weather Around the World uses all of these techniques to engage millions. We will share the techniques that can be applied to any subject area and will increase participation and interest in that content. The Space Weather program provides students and teachers with unique and compelling teaching and learning experiences that will help to improve science literacy, spark an interest in careers in Science, Technology, Engineeering, and Mathematics (STEM), and engage children and adults in shaping and sharing the experience of discovery and exploration.

  10. Navigating Layers of Teacher Uncertainty among Preservice Science and Mathematics Teachers Engaged in Action Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capobianco, Brenda M.; Ní Ríordáin, Máire

    2015-01-01

    Action research provides valuable opportunities for preservice teachers to improve their practice, their understanding of their practice, and the situation in which their practice takes place. Moreover, action research empowers preservice teachers to critically examine an experience that demonstrates their potential to be influential researchers…

  11. Assessing Dimensions of Inquiry Practice by Middle School Science Teachers Engaged in a Professional Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakin, Joni M.; Wallace, Carolyn S.

    2015-03-01

    Inquiry-based teaching promotes students' engagement in problem-solving and investigation as they learn science concepts. Current practice in science teacher education promotes the use of inquiry in the teaching of science. However, the literature suggests that many science teachers hold incomplete or incorrect conceptions of inquiry. Teachers, therefore, may believe they are providing more inquiry experiences than they are, reducing the positive impact of inquiry on science interest and skills. Given the prominence of inquiry in professional development experiences, educational evaluators need strong tools to detect intended use in the classroom. The current study focuses on the validity of assessments developed for evaluating teachers' use of inquiry strategies and classroom orientations. We explored the relationships between self-reported inquiry strategy use, preferences for inquiry, knowledge of inquiry practices, and related pedagogical content knowledge. Finally, we contrasted students' and teachers' reports of the levels of inquiry-based teaching in the classroom. Self-reports of inquiry use, especially one specific to the 5E instructional model, were useful, but should be interpreted with caution. Teachers tended to self-report higher levels of inquiry strategy use than their students perceived. Further, there were no significant correlations between either knowledge of inquiry practices or PCK and self-reported inquiry strategy use.

  12. Advancing Climate Change Education: Student Engagement and Teacher Talk in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holthuis, N.; Saltzman, J.; Lotan, R.; Mastrandrea, M. D.; Diffenbaugh, P.; Gray, S.; Kloser, M.

    2011-12-01

    Stanford's Global Climate Change: Professional Development for K-12 Teachers is a unique collaboration between the Stanford School of Education and School of Earth Sciences to provide teacher professional development on the science of global climate change, pedagogical strategies, and curriculum materials. Scientists and education specialists developed a curriculum for middle and high school science classrooms. It addresses the fundamental issues of climate science, the impacts of climate change on society and on global resources, mitigation and adaptation strategies. This project documents in detail the full circle of curriculum development, teacher professional development, classroom implementation, analysis of student achievement data, and curriculum revision. Ongoing evaluation has provided understanding of the unique conditions and requirements of climate change education. In a sample of 750 secondary students in 25 Bay Area classrooms, we found statistically significant differences between post- (x=11.56, sd=4.75) and pre- (x=8.64, sd=4.58) test scores on standardized items and short open-ended essay questions. Through systematic classroom observations (300 observations in 25 classrooms), we documented student engagement and interactions, and the nature of teachers' talk in the classroom. We found that on average, 73.4% of the students were engaged, 14.4% were interacting with peers, and about 12.1% were disengaged. We also documented teacher talk (165 observations) and found that on the average, teachers delivered factual content and talked about classroom processes and spent less time on scientific argumentation, reasoning and/ or analysis. We documented significant differences in the quality of implementation among the teachers. Our study suggests that in addition to strengthening content knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge, professional development for teachers needs to include classroom management strategies, explicit modeling of collaborative

  13. Exploring Pre-Service Student-Teachers' Commitment to Community Engagement in the Second Year of Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human-Vogel, Salome; Dippenaar, Hanlie

    2013-01-01

    This preliminary study examines the utility of the Community Engagement Commitment Scale and reports on factors that predict student-teachers' commitment to community engagement in their second year of study at a South African university. Independent variables included Dalbert's personal belief in a just world, an adaptation of Rusbult et al.'s…

  14. Teaching Multiple Literacies and Critical Literacy to Pre-Service Teachers through Children's-Literature-Based Engagements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheu-jey

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a pragmatic way of introducing pre-service teachers to multiple literacies and critical literacy through children's-literature-based engagements. The concepts of multiple literacies and critical literacy are reviewed, and their interrelationship is explained. Two instructional engagements, which connect theory to practice…

  15. Languages and Children: Making the Match. Foreign Language Instruction for an Early Start, Grades K-8. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtain, Helena; Pesola, Carol Ann Bjornstad

    This book is designed as both a methods text and practical guide for school districts and teachers involved in foreign language instruction at the elementary and middle school levels (grades K-8). Its primary concern is with majority-language speakers and with beginning-level classes. Brief introductory sections outline key concepts for success.…

  16. Tibetans and Tibetan Americans: Helping K-8 School Librarians and Educators Understand Their History, Culture, and Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Frank Alan; Beilke, Patricia F.

    2001-01-01

    Provides a review and listing of literature for K-8 school librarians and teachers that focuses on the geography, history, and culture of Tibet and the diverse experiences and folklore of Tibetans. Includes references, other recommended works, and an annotated bibliography divided into folklore, biography, culture and history, fiction, videos, and…

  17. Anniversary Article: The Practices of Encouraging TESOL Teachers to Engage in Reflective Practice--An Appraisal of Recent Research Contributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Thomas S. C.

    2016-01-01

    Within the field of education, reflective practice has become a very popular concept within teacher education and development programs. The general consensus is that teachers who are encouraged to engage in reflective practice can gain new insight of their practice. There have been similar developments in the field of teaching English to speakers…

  18. More than Social Media: Using Twitter with Preservice Teachers as a Means of Reflection and Engagement in Communities of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benko, Susanna L.; Guise, Megan; Earl, Casey E.; Gill, Witny

    2016-01-01

    English teacher education programs often look for ways to help preservice teachers engage in critical reflection, participate in communities of practice, and write for authentic audiences in order to be able to teach in the 21st century. In this article, the authors describe how they used Twitter to provide opportunities for reflection and…

  19. Preservice Teachers' Personality Traits and Engagement in Creative Activities as Predictors of Their Support for Children's Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Il Rang; Kemple, Kristen

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine relationships among preservice teachers' personality traits, their own engagement in creative activities, and their beliefs about the teaching practices that have been shown to support children's creativity. A total of 302 early childhood and elementary preservice teachers participated in this study. The…

  20. Teachers' Organizational Citizenship Behaviour: Considering the Roles of Their Work Engagement, Autonomy and Leader-Member Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runhaar, Piety; Konermann, Judith; Sanders, Karin

    2013-01-01

    The increasing demands that schools are confronted with recently, require teachers' commitment and contribution to school goals, regardless of formal job requirements. This study examines the influence of teachers' work context, in terms of autonomy and leader-membership exchange (LMX), on the relationship between their work engagement and…

  1. Peer Assessments of Normative and Individual Teacher-Student Support Predict Social Acceptance and Engagement among Low-Achieving Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Jan N.; Zhang, Duan; Hill, Crystal R.

    2006-01-01

    This study used hierarchical linear modeling to predict first grade students' peer acceptance, classroom engagement, and sense of school belonging from measures of normative classroom teacher-student support and individual teacher-student support. Participants were 509 (54.4% male) ethnically diverse, first grade children attending one of three…

  2. Motivating teacher and student engagement with the environment through renewable energy education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Nirav Sanat

    Environmental and energy education is focused on fostering environmental behavior. This study investigates empirically if education leads to changes in environmental attitudes and subsequent environmentally significant behavior (ESB). The study contextualizes teachers' and students' motivation to engage in ESB within an environmental educational training framework. The results of structured questionnaires administered in Northeast, Mid-Atlantic, and Midwestern K-12 schools (n=214 for teachers and n=1498 for students) reveal that environmental attitudes are not a good predictor of teaching behavior but they do predict students' intent towards ESB. Teachers' energy attitudes are a better predictor in motivating them to teach while students are most responsive to their affective attitudes. The study finds that education does not play a significant role in changing environmental or energy attitudes of teachers and students. The study also advances a methodological tool for data collection that can expand the reach of evaluation instruments and measure learning across formal and informal audiences. It highlights how interactional technology can be readily utilized for future research and outreach in classrooms, nature learning centers, professional training programs, and museums. Overall, the work advances social-psychological understanding of how adults and youth respond to educational programming. It highlights the need to go beyond the cognitive shifts in affecting behavior. Curriculum based on environment might be necessary but is often not sufficient for changing environmental values. Finally, information and knowledge acquired must motivate the teachers' and students' desire and ability to conscientiously act, wherever necessary.

  3. Teacher engagement with teaching games for understanding - game sense in physical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHANE PILL

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has suggested that the implementation of innovation that reinvigorates the teaching ofgames and sports in Australian schools has faced considerable barriers (Alexander, 2008; Light & Georgakis,2005; Pill, 2009. One example of an innovation to enhance sport teaching and learning is Teaching Games forUnderstanding-Game Sense (den Dun, 1996, 1997a. This paper presents the findings from a survey of physicaleducation teachers’ in one Australian state and the degree of engagement with TGfU-GS curriculum design andenactment. Sixty Four teachers participated in a web survey investigating the penetration of TGfU-GScurriculum. The data was treated as qualitative and the surveys were analysed by comparative systematicinterpretation to reveal recurring themes. The analysis indicated that TGfU- GS was thought to be mostapplicable for senior years (Years 11-12 physical education. Teachers recognised the use of small-sidedmodified games and ‘questioning as pedagogy’ as common practice and not distinctive to a TGfU-GS approach.However, the use of questioning was generally not planned for in teacher lesson preparation and lesson planningdid not utilise TGfU-GS game categories to thematically develop game understanding systematically acrosssport specific units of work. While elements of TGfU-GS pedagogy are evidenced in the design and enactmentof sport and sport related games teachers TGfU-GS was yet to be fully understood and implemented by themajority of teachers.

  4. Engaging novice teachers in semiotic inquiry: considering the environmental messages of school learning settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Bonnie

    2014-12-01

    Katherine Fogelberg's insightful study of the messages of zoo signs describes the complex, sometimes contradictory nature of the messages they communicate. The construction and content of signs are influenced by institutional power. Fogelberg argues that the creation of zoo signage designed to inform the public can, through its messages, silence a perspective of care and compassion for animals. The research presented in the following article extends discussion about the value of critical considerations of cultural and institutional messages created and read in another type of setting designed to educate and inform, the school learning setting. The article reports on a project that engaged novice teachers in explorations of the nature and types of environmental messages found in learning settings. During our inquiry work together, novice teachers suggested areas of particular concern to them, and began to construct ideas about aspects of their work in which they plan to take action or engage in future inquiry. The research also reveals some of the challenges involved when novice educators first begin the process of engaging in semiotic interpretive readings of learning settings.

  5. Eliciting and Developing Teachers' Conceptions of Random Processes in a Probability and Statistics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Toni M.; Hjalmarson, Margret A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine prospective mathematics specialists' engagement in an instructional sequence designed to elicit and develop their understandings of random processes. The study was conducted with two different sections of a probability and statistics course for K-8 teachers. Thirty-two teachers participated. Video analyses…

  6. Engaging Pre-Service Teachers in the Drama in Teacher Leadership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Jerome Cranston

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the findings of a qualitative research study that examined the effects of a transdisciplinary ethnotheatre workshop designed to support the professional development of school leaders as they navigate the complexities of teacher leadership. The site of inquiry was a pre-service teacher leadership workshop held in a graduate school class where participants analyzed, witnessed, and enacted ethnodramas, problematizing tensions in teacher leadership. Using a constant comparative approach, the participant journals were read and re-read, coded, and then categorized thematically with particular focus on negative case analysis. The authors present excerpts from the ethnodrama scripts used in the workshop alongside the research findings, which suggest that, while some participants perceived the injustice of a given situation presented in the ethnodrama, and could articulate how the process of ethnotheatre created avenues for learning about the lived reality of teacher leaders, others indicated either a lack of awareness or a tacit acceptance of the bullying and discriminatory behaviors embedded within the scripts.

  7. Small Bodies, Big Concepts: Engaging Teachers and Their Students in Visual Analysis of Comets and Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, W. H.; Buxner, S.; Lebofsky, L. A.; Ristvey, J.; Weeks, S.; Zolensky, M.

    2011-12-01

    Small Bodies, Big Concepts is a multi-disciplinary, professional development project that engages 5th - 8th grade teachers in high end planetary science using a research-based pedagogical framework, Designing Effective Science Instruction (DESI). In addition to developing sound background knowledge with a focus on visual analysis, teachers' awareness of the process of learning new content is heightened, and they use that experience to deepen their science teaching practice. Culling from NASA E/PO educational materials, activities are sequenced to enhance conceptual understanding of big ideas in space science: what do we know, how do we know it, why do we care? Helping teachers develop a picture of the history and evolution of our understanding of the solar system, and honing in on the place of comets and asteroids in helping us answer old questions and discover new ones, teachers see the power and excitement underlying planetary science as human endeavor. Research indicates that science inquiry is powerful in the classroom and mission scientists are real-life models of science inquiry in action. Using guest scientist facilitators from the Planetary Science Institute, NASA Johnson Space Center, Lockheed Martin, and NASA E/PO professionals from McREL and NASA AESP, teachers practice framing scientific questions, using current visual data, and adapting NASA E/PO activities related to current exploration of asteroids and comets in our Solar System. Cross-curricular elements included examining research-based strategies for enhancing English language learners' ability to engage in higher order questions and a professional astronomy artist's insight into how visual analysis requires not just our eyes engaged, but our brains: comparing, synthesizing, questioning, evaluating, and wondering. This summer we pilot tested the SBBC curriculum with thirteen 5th- 10th grade teachers modeling a variety of instructional approaches over eight days. Each teacher developed lesson plans

  8. Enhancing Teacher and Student Engagement and Understanding of Marine Science Through Classroom Citizen Science Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodale, T. A.

    2016-02-01

    Overview This paper presentation shares findings from a granted funded project that sought to expand teacher content knowledge and pedagogy within the fields of marine science and coastal resource management through the implementation of classroom citizen science projects. A secondary goal was to increase middle and high school student interest and participation in marine science and natural resources research. Background A local science & engineering fair has seen a rapid decline in secondary student participants in the past four years. Research has demonstrated that when students are a part of a system of knowledge production (citizen science) they become much more aware, involved and conscious of scientific concepts compared to traditional school laboratory and nature of science activities. This project's primary objectives were to: (a) enhance teacher content expertise in marine science, (b) enrich teacher professional learning, (c) support citizen science classroom projects and inspire student activism and marine science engagement. Methods Project goals were addressed through classroom and meaningful outdoor educational experiences that put content knowledge into field based practices. Teachers learned to apply thier expanded content knowlege through classroom citizen science projects that focus on marine resource conservation issues such as fisheries management, water quality, turtle nesting and biodiversity of coastal ecosystems. These projects would eventually become potential topics of citizen science research topics for their students to pursue. Upon completion of their professional development, participants were urged to establish student Marine Science clubs with the goal of mentoring student submissions into the local science fair. Supplemental awards were possible for the students of project participants. Findings Based on project measures participants significantly increased their knowledge and awareness of presented material marine science and

  9. Choice is good, but relevance is excellent: autonomy-enhancing and suppressing teacher behaviours predicting students' engagement in schoolwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assor, Avi; Kaplan, Haya; Roth, Guy

    2002-06-01

    This article examines two questions concerning teacher-behaviours that are characterised in Self-Determination Theory (Ryan & Deci, 2000) as autonomy-supportive or suppressive: (1) Can children differentiate among various types of autonomy-enhancing and suppressing teacher behaviours? (2) Which of those types of behaviour are particularly important in predicting feelings toward and engagement in schoolwork? It was hypothesised that teacher behaviours that help students to understand the relevance of schoolwork for their personal interests and goals are particularly important predictors of engagement in schoolwork. Israeli students in grades 3-5 (N = 498) and in grades 6-8 (N = 364) completed questionnaires assessing the variables of interest. Smallest Space Analyses indicated that both children and early adolescents can differentiate among three types of autonomy enhancing teacher behaviours - fostering relevance, allowing criticism, and providing choice - and three types of autonomy suppressing teacher behaviours - suppressing criticism, intruding, and forcing unmeaningful acts. Regression analyses supported the hypothesis concerning the importance of teacher behaviours that clarify the personal relevance of schoolwork. Among the autonomy-suppressing behaviours, 'Criticism-suppression' was the best predictor of feelings and engagement. The findings underscore the active and empathic nature of teachers' role in supporting students' autonomy, and suggest that autonomy-support is important not only for early adolescents but also for children. Discussion of potential determinants of the relative importance of various autonomy-affecting teacher actions suggests that provision of choice should not always be viewed as a major indicator of autonomy support.

  10. Engaging students and teachers in meteorology and atmospheric sciences: the LaMMA activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, Valentina; Bartolini, Giorgio; Benedetti, Riccardo; Betti, Giulio; Capecchi, Valerio; Gozzini, Bernardo; Magno, Ramona; Orlandi, Andrea; Rovai, Luca; Tei, Claudio; Torrigiani, Tommaso; Zabini, Federica

    2017-05-01

    Scientific institutes contribute to increase scientific awareness in local communities. They also provide students and teachers with learning opportunities outside the classroom. This is especially true when science centers create opportunities to visit laboratories or design activities based on learning by doing. LaMMA, a public consortium set up by Italian National Research Council and Tuscany Region (Italy), is the official weather service for Tuscany. In recent years LaMMA developed several educational modules on meteorology for different school grades. Activities are performed during a two-hour visit at the LaMMA laboratory. Since 2011 every year more than 1200 students come to visit LaMMA to follow one of the proposed modules on meteorology. Students are engaged in different activities and have the opportunity to visit the LaMMA weather operations room and meet the forecasters. In the last two years, an educational module on climate change based on a participatory approach was proposed to teachers of all school levels. More than 500 teachers and environmental educators from all over Tuscany participated and many of them developed a follow up project in the classroom.

  11. The Impact of Teacher Efficacy and Student Engagement on Eleventh-Grade South Carolina U.S History and Constitution End-of-Course State Exam Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persinski, Jacqueline L.

    2015-01-01

    This research study analyzed the impact of teacher self-efficacy and student engagement on eleventh-grade South Carolina U.S. History and Constitution end-of-course state exam scores. Research questions centered on analyzing the relationships between the variables of teacher efficacy, student engagement, and student achievement as measured by the…

  12. Job burnout and engagement among teachers - Worklife areas and personality traits as predictors of relationships with work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojsa-Kaja, Justyna; Golonka, Krystyna; Marek, Tadeusz

    2015-01-01

    The main goal of the present study was to analyze the burnout syndrome due to selected personality traits (based on the Cloninger's psychobiological personality model and positive and negative affectivity) and the degree of mismatch between teachers and their work environment (described in terms of the Model of Worklife Areas). The 2nd goal was to determine if the participants could be classified into different burnout profile groups (clusters) based on their burnout dimension (exhaustion, cynicism and efficacy) scores and whether those groups differed significantly with regard to their personality traits and levels of mismatch between them and the workplace. Individual and contextual factors responsible for burnout were analyzed in a group of 205 Polish teachers who completed a set of questionnaires: Maslach Burnout Inventory - General Scale, Areas of Worklife Scale, Temperament and Character Inventory, and Positive and Negative Affect Schedule. The hierarchical regression analysis revealed that teachers' efficacy is determined only by personality factors, while exhaustion and cynicism are determined by both individual and organizational variables. The cluster analysis revealed 3 groups (burnout, engaged, ineffective) that varied in the level of all burnout dimensions. Teachers experiencing burnout perceived a higher level of mismatch between themselves and the work environment, compared to the engaged teachers demonstrating better alignment. The engaged teachers were lower on negative affectivity and higher on self-directedness as compared to the burnout group. The study provided insight into the role of individual factors in the development of teacher burnout and engagement. Negative affectivity could be considered as a predisposing risk factor and self-directedness as a protective factor for burnout. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  13. General Education Teachers' Ratings of the Academic Engagement Level of Students Who Read Braille: A Comparison with Sighted Peers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardin, Julie A.; Lewis, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    English and language arts teachers of braille-reading students in general education classes rated these students' academic engagement and the academic achievement of low- and average-achieving sighted students in the same classrooms. The braille readers were found to be statistically similar to the low-achieving students with regard to effort,…

  14. How Preservice Teachers Engage in the Process of (De)Colonization: Findings from an International Field Experience in Honduras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Suniti; Rahatzad, Jubin; Phillion, JoAnn

    2013-01-01

    Critical multicultural education and its promise of cultural inclusion face a crisis induced by powerful neoliberal forces that view education as an economic enterprise rather than open dialogue and inclusive pedagogies. With this in mind, this article uses interpretive phenomenology to examine how US American preservice teachers engage in the…

  15. Mathematics Teachers' Perceptions of Their Students' Mathematical Competence: Relations to Mathematics Achievement, Affect, and Engagement in Singapore and Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Areepattamannil, Shaljan; Kaur, Berinderjeet

    2013-01-01

    This study, drawing on data from the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) 2011, examined whether mathematics teachers' perceptions of their students' mathematical competence were related to mathematics achievement, affect toward mathematics, and engagement in mathematics lessons among Grade 8 students in Singapore and…

  16. Engaging in Drama: Using Arts-Based Research to Explore a Social Justice Project in Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belliveau, George

    2006-01-01

    This arts-based research invites the reader to consider the complex learning that emerged when a group of pre-service teachers collectively developed a play about anti-bullying as part of a teaching practicum. To capture the learning that emerged during the collective writing and rehearsing, the author engages in an artistic process by writing the…

  17. Teacher Efficacy in Student Engagement, Instructional Management, Student Stressors, and Burnout: A Theoretical Model Using In-Class Variables to Predict Teachers' Intent-to-Leave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Nancy K.; Sass, Daniel A.; Schmitt, Thomas A.

    2012-01-01

    The models presented here posit a complex relationship between efficacy in student engagement and intent-to-leave that is mediated by in-class variables of instructional management, student behavior stressors, aspects of burnout, and job satisfaction. Using data collected from 631 teachers, analyses provided support for the two models that…

  18. Teacher-student relationships and adolescent behavioral engagement and rule-breaking behavior: The moderating role of dopaminergic genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Laet, Steven; Colpin, Hilde; Van Leeuwen, Karla; Van den Noortgate, Wim; Claes, Stephan; Janssens, Annelies; Goossens, Luc; Verschueren, Karine

    2016-06-01

    This study examined whether the dopamine transporter DAT1 and the dopamine receptor DRD4 genes moderate the effect of student-reported teacher-student relationship affiliation or dissatisfaction on parent-reported adolescent rule-breaking behavior and behavioral engagement. The sample included 1053 adolescents (51% boys, Mage=13.79) from grades 7 to 9. Regression analyses were conducted using Mplus while controlling for multiple testing and nested data. Adolescents who experienced stronger affiliation with their teachers were more engaged in school, whereas greater dissatisfaction predicted more rule-breaking behavior. In addition, a significant gene-environment interaction was found for both genes examined. The link between low teacher-student affiliation and low engagement was more pronounced for DAT1-10R homozygotes. The link between high teacher-student dissatisfaction and more rule-breaking was stronger for DRD4 non-long carriers. Implications for understanding the role of teacher-student relationships in adolescence and suggestions for future research are outlined.

  19. Classroom engagement mediates the effect of teacher-student support on elementary students' peer acceptance: A prospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Jan N; Kwok, Oi-Man

    2006-01-01

    Participants were 360 (52.2% male) ethnically diverse and academically at-risk first-grade children attending one of three school districts in southeast and central Texas. Using latent variable structural equation modeling, we tested a theoretical model positing that the quality of the teacher-student relationship in first grade predicts children's peer acceptance the following year, controlling for children's previous externalizing problems and peer acceptance. We also expected that children's classroom engagement would mediate the effect of teacher-student relationship quality on peer acceptance. The hypothesized model provided a good fit to the data. Engagement fully mediated the effect of teacher support on subsequent peer acceptance. Neither ethnicity nor gender moderated the mediation findings.

  20. Description of an expert teacher's constructivist-oriented teaching: engaging students' critical thinking in learning creative dance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, W

    2001-12-01

    The focus of this study was to investigate how an expert teacher implemented constructivist-oriented teaching strategies to engage students'critical thinking skills in learning creative dance. The data were collected through videotaping 16 creative dance lessons taught by an expert teacher to 2 kindergarten, 2 first-grade, and 4 third-grade classes and conducting two formal interviews and several informal interviews with the teacher. In addition, one group interview was conducted with 4 kindergarten students, 4 first-grade students, and 8 third-grade students. The three salient themes were: (a) relating students' knowledge and ideas to lessons to spark dispositions, (b) encouraging and facilitating students' inquiries and creative products, and (c) engaging students' metacognition in refining the quality of dance movement.

  1. Job burnout and engagement among teachers – Worklife areas and personality traits as predictors of relationships with work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Mojsa-Kaja

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The main goal of the present study was to analyze the burnout syndrome due to selected personality traits (based on the Cloninger’s psychobiological personality model and positive and negative affectivity and the degree of mismatch between teachers and their work environment (described in terms of the Model of Worklife Areas. The 2nd goal was to determine if the participants could be classified into different burnout profile groups (clusters based on their burnout dimension (exhaustion, cynicism and efficacy scores and whether those groups differed significantly with regard to their personality traits and levels of mismatch between them and the workplace. Material and methods Individual and contextual factors responsible for burnout were analyzed in a group of 205 Polish teachers who completed a set of questionnaires: Maslach Burnout Inventory – General Scale, Areas of Worklife Scale, Temperament and Character Inventory, and Positive and Negative Affect Schedule. Results The hierarchical regression analysis revealed that teachers’ efficacy is determined only by personality factors, while exhaustion and cynicism are determined by both individual and organizational variables. The cluster analysis revealed 3 groups (burnout, engaged, ineffective that varied in the level of all burnout dimensions. Teachers experiencing burnout perceived a higher level of mismatch between themselves and the work environment, compared to the engaged teachers demonstrating better alignment. The engaged teachers were lower on negative affectivity and higher on self-directedness as compared to the burnout group. Conclusions The study provided insight into the role of individual factors in the development of teacher burnout and engagement. Negative affectivity could be considered as a predisposing risk factor and self-directedness as a protective factor for burnout.

  2. A Quantitative Analysis of Distributed Leadership in Practice: Teachers' Perception of Their Engagement in Four Dimensions of Distributed Leadership in Bhutanese Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashi, Kelzang

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the teacher engagement in distributed leadership practices within the four dimensions of the distributed leadership in Bhutan. It seeks to investigate the differences in teachers' perception of distributed leadership based on teacher and school background including gender, experience and qualification,…

  3. A Comparison of Elementary/K-8 and Middle Schools' Suspension Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcia, Emily

    2007-01-01

    This study was undertaken to examine the suspension percentages among three sixth-grade transition groups: (a) students who attended elementary or K-8 schools in sixth grade and K-8 schools in seventh grade, (b) students who attended elementary or K-8 schools in sixth grade and middle schools in seventh grade, and (c) students who attended middle…

  4. Newly Qualified Teachers' Work Engagement and Teacher Efficacy Influences on Job Satisfaction, Burnout, and the Intention to Quit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoigaard, Rune; Giske, Rune; Sundsli, Kari

    2012-01-01

    Teacher policy is high on national agendas and countries are seeking to improve schools. Demands on schools and teachers are more complex and it is expected that a larger number of teachers will enter the profession. Studies indicate that the period when teachers are newly qualified is a peak time for leaving the profession. The purpose of this…

  5. Teacher Emotions in the Classroom: Associations with Students' Engagement, Classroom Discipline and the Interpersonal Teacher-Student Relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagenauer, Gerda; Hascher, Tina; Volet, Simone E.

    2015-01-01

    The present study explores teacher emotions, in particular how they are predicted by students' behaviour and the interpersonal aspect of the teacher-student relationship (TSR). One hundred thirty-two secondary teachers participated in a quantitative study relying on self-report questionnaire data. Based on the model of teacher emotions by Frenzel…

  6. Sequencing learning experiences to engage different level learners in the workplace: An interview study with excellent clinical teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H Carrie; O'Sullivan, Patricia; Teherani, Arianne; Fogh, Shannon; Kobashi, Brent; ten Cate, Olle

    2015-01-01

    Learning in the clinical workplace can appear to rely on opportunistic teaching. The cognitive apprenticeship model describes assigning tasks based on learner rather than just workplace needs. This study aimed to determine how excellent clinical teachers select clinical learning experiences to support the workplace participation and development of different level learners. Using a constructivist grounded theory approach, we conducted semi-structured interviews with medical school faculty identified as excellent clinical teachers teaching multiple levels of learners. We explored their approach to teach different level learners and their perceived role in promoting learner development. We performed thematic analysis of the interview transcripts using open and axial coding. We interviewed 19 clinical teachers and identified three themes related to their teaching approach: sequencing of learning experiences, selection of learning activities and teacher responsibilities. All teachers used sequencing as a teaching strategy by varying content, complexity and expectations by learner level. The teachers initially selected learning activities based on learner level and adjusted for individual competencies over time. They identified teacher responsibilities for learner education and patient safety, and used sequencing to promote both. Excellent clinical teachers described strategies for matching available learning opportunities to learners' developmental levels to safely engage learners and improve learning in the clinical workplace.

  7. The Effects of Enhancing Prospective EFL Teachers' Knowledge Management Strategies in Virtual Learning Environments on Their Ideational Flexibility and Engagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ammar Abdullah Mahmoud Ismail

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The last few years have witnessed an increased interest in moving away from traditional language instruction settings towards more hybrid and virtual learning environments. Face-to-face interaction, guided practice, and uniformity of knowledge sources and skills are all replaced by settings where multiplicity of views from different learning communities, interconnectedness, self-directedness, and self-management of knowledge and learning are increasingly emphasized. This shift from walled-classroom instruction with its limited scope and resources to hybrid and virtual learning environments with their limitless provisions requires that learners be equipped with requisite skills and strategies to manage knowledge and handle language learning in ways commensurate with the nature and limitless possibilities of these new environments. The current study aimed at enhancing knowledge management strategies of EFL teachers in virtual learning environments and examine the impact on their ideational flexibility and engagement in language learning settings. A knowledge management model was proposed and field-test on a cohort of prospective EFL teachers in the Emirati context. Participants were prospective EFL teachers enrolled in the Methods of Teaching Courses and doing their practicum in the Emirati EFL context. Participants' ideational flexibility was tapped via a bi-methodical approach including a contextualized task and a decontextualized one. Their engagement in virtual language learning settings was tapped via an engagement scale. Results of the study indicated that enhancing prospective EFL teachers' knowledge management strategies in virtual learning environments had a significant impact on their ideational flexibility and engagement in foreign language learning settings. Details of the instructional intervention, instruments for tapping students’ ideational flexibility and engagement, and results of the study are discussed. Implications for

  8. Do student self-efficacy and teacher-student interaction quality contribute to emotional and social engagement in fifth grade math?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Daniel P; Rimm-Kaufman, Sara E

    2015-10-01

    This study examined (a) the contribution of math self-efficacy to students' perception of their emotional and social engagement in fifth grade math classes, and (b) the extent to which high quality teacher-student interactions compensated for students' low math self-efficacy in contributing to engagement. Teachers (n = 73) were observed three times during the year during math to measure the quality of teacher-student interactions (emotional, organizational, and instructional support). Fifth graders (n = 387) reported on their math self-efficacy at the beginning of the school year and then were surveyed about their feelings of engagement in math class three times during the year immediately after the lessons during which teachers were observed. Results of multi-level models indicated that students initially lower in math self-efficacy reported lower emotional and social engagement during math class than students with higher self-efficacy. However, in classrooms with high levels of teacher emotional support, students reported similar levels of both emotional and social engagement, regardless of their self-efficacy. No comparable findings emerged for organizational and instructional support. The discussion considers the significance of students' own feelings about math in relation to their engagement, as well as the ways in which teacher and classroom supports can compensate for students lack of agency. The work has implications for school psychologists and teachers eager to boost students' engagement in math class.

  9. Extension of the Job Demands-Resources model in the prediction of burnout and engagement among teachers over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorente Prieto, Laura; Salanova Soria, Marisa; Martínez Martínez, Isabel; Schaufeli, Wilmar

    2008-08-01

    Our purpose was to extend the Job Demand-Resources Model (Schaufeli & Bakker, 2004) by including personal resources, job demands and job resources to predict burnout (exhaustion, cynicism, depersonalization) and work engagement (vigour and dedication). The sample comprised 274 teachers from 23 secondary schools of the Valencian Community (Spain). Hierarchical multiple regression analyses have revealed: (1) the predictor effect of quantitative overload on exhaustion and dedication at T2, (2) role conflict on cynicism and (3) role ambiguity on dedication. Lastly, the mediating role of burnout and engagement at T2. Practical implications and directions of future research are discussed.

  10. Guideposts and Roadblocks to the Career-Long Scholarly Engagement of Physical Education Teacher Education Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berei, Catherine P; Pratt, Erica; Parker, Melissa; Shephard, Kevin; Liang, Tanjian; Nampai, Udon; Neamphoka, Guntima

    2017-08-22

    Scholarship is essential for the growth and development of the physical education field. Over time, scholarship expectations have changed, forcing faculty members to alter time spent for research, teaching, and service. Social-cognitive career theory (SCCT) presents a model for understanding performance and persistence in an occupational environment. The interconnected aspects of SCCT have different emphasis related to self-efficacy, outcome expectations, or personal goals pursuit. This study explored physical education teacher education (PETE) faculty members' continuing engagement in scholarly activity through SCCT. Data collection included interviews with 9 senior PETE faculty members who met the criteria for "productive scholars over time." Curriculum vitae were collected to verify productivity. Data analysis revealed guidepost themes that included collaborating, finding balance, defining a research process, and maintaining a strong work ethic. Roadblocks encountered included other obligations and lack of support for research. Participants demonstrated strong self-efficacy; held high, positive expectations for success; and set very specific, clear, and deliberate goals. Participant behavior was moderated by their personal attributes (capacity to build relationships, set goals, and maintain interest and passion) and was tempered by the environments in which they worked. Fostering similar behaviors has the potential to guide future and current PETE faculty members in creating supportive and encouraging atmospheres for sustained productivity. The lack of literature relating to this topic warrants the need for more research exploring the influential factors and benefits gained from sustained scholarly productivity over time for PETE faculty members.

  11. Poetry as an engagement strategy: A novice teacher experience of its use within lectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Denise; Smyth, Siobhan

    2017-05-01

    It has been acknowledged the traditional lecture format is a familiar teaching methodology and that there is still much to be learnt from using this in class room based lectures. Whilst the first author was a postgraduate student undertaking a programme in Nurse Education at a University in the Republic of Ireland, poetry was used to challenge undergraduate nursing students' attitudes towards older persons in a large group format. The students were in Year 3 of a Bachelor of Nursing Science General and Intellectual Disability Programmes. Feedback was obtained from the students that comprised of three main themes; Aids Recall of Information; Enriched Learning Experiences, Challenges Attitudes to Person Centred Care. Thus, the paper aims to evaluate using poetry as an engaging teaching strategy within a lecture format for the first time as a novice teacher when drawing out nursing students' attitudes towards older persons with a focus on supporting them in embracing key care skills in the clinical setting. This paper should provide other student educationalists the opportunity to see the value of poetry as a teaching strategy and provide practical tips on its use within the classroom. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Combinations of Personal Responsibility: Differences on Pre-service and Practicing Teachers' Efficacy, Engagement, Classroom Goal Structures and Wellbeing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Lia M; Radil, Amanda I; Goegan, Lauren D

    2017-01-01

    Pre-service and practicing teachers feel responsible for a range of educational activities. Four domains of personal responsibility emerging in the literature are: student achievement, student motivation, relationships with students, and responsibility for ones own teaching. To date, most research has used variable-centered approaches to examining responsibilities even though the domains appear related. In two separate samples we used cluster analysis to explore how pre-service (n = 130) and practicing (n = 105) teachers combined personal responsibilities and their impact on three professional cognitions and their wellbeing. Both groups had low and high responsibility clusters but the third cluster differed: Pre-service teachers combined responsibilities for relationships and their own teaching in a cluster we refer to as teacher-based responsibility; whereas, practicing teachers combined achievement and motivation in a cluster we refer to as student-outcome focused responsibility. These combinations affected outcomes for pre-service but not practicing teachers. Pre-service teachers in the low responsibility cluster reported less engagement, less mastery approaches to instruction, and more performance goal structures than the other two clusters.

  13. Are We Preparing the Next Generation? K-12 Teacher Knowledge and Engagement in Teaching Core STEM Practices

    OpenAIRE

    Nadelson, Louis; Seifert, Anne; Hendricks, J. Kade

    2015-01-01

    Background: Several of the recent reform efforts in K-12 STEM education (e.g. Next Generation Science Standards [NGSS and Common Core State Standards-Mathematics [CCSS-M]) have included significant emphasis on the practices of STEM. We argue that K-12 teachers' ability to effectively engage their students in these core STEM practices is fundamental to the success of potential and current engineering students and their subsequent careers as engineers. Practices such as identifying problems, mo...

  14. Teacher and observer views on student-teacher relationships: convergence across kindergarten and relations with student engagement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. dr Doumen; H.M.Y. Koomen; E. Buyse; S. Wouters; K. Verschueren

    2012-01-01

    Most studies regarding the role of teacher-child relationships for children's early school adjustment use only teacher ratings of relationship quality. The current study examines (a) the agreement between teacher and observer ratings, (b) whether similar patterns of relations with behavioral engagem

  15. 提升高校教师敬业度对策分析%Analysis of the Teacher Engagement Strategies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢婷婷; 王宁

    2015-01-01

    The teacher engagement management is an important part of the development and management of human resources in universities. University teacher engagement plays a significant role in its work efficiency and quality, and then decides the quality of teaching and research of regional schools. Finally it will influence the whole construction of regional colleges and universities and the future development. Therefore to attach great importance to and to conduct scientific and rational evaluation of teacher engagement and management will be the key to the future of management of colleges and universities, and it is of important theoretical and realistic significance.%教师敬业度管理是高校人力资源管理与开发的重要环节.高校教师敬业度决定其工作效率及质量,进而决定区域学校的教学和科研质量,最后将决定区域高校的整体建设及未来发展.因此高度重视并进行科学合理的教师敬业度评价及管理,将是高校未来的管理工作重点,具有重要的理论和现实意义.

  16. Student Engagement in the Classroom: The Impact of Classroom, Teacher, and Student Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykstra Steinbrenner, Jessica R.; Watson, Linda R.

    2015-01-01

    Researchers have highlighted engagement as a critical component of effective interventions for students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), yet there is limited research related to engagement in school-age children with ASD. This descriptive study was designed to examine joint engagement and its relationship with classroom factors and student…

  17. Predicting adolescent problematic online game use from teacher autonomy support, basic psychological needs satisfaction, and school engagement: a 2-year longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chengfu; Li, Xian; Zhang, Wei

    2015-04-01

    Problematic online game use (POGU) has become a serious global public health concern among adolescents. However, its influencing factors and mediating mechanisms remain largely unknown. This study provides the first longitudinal design to test stage-environment fit theory empirically in POGU. A total of 356 Chinese students reported on teacher autonomy support, basic psychological needs satisfaction, school engagement, and POGU in the autumn of their 7th-9th grade years. Path analyses supported the proposed pathway: 7th grade teacher autonomy support increased 8th grade basic psychological needs satisfaction, which in turn increased 9th grade school engagement, which ultimately decreased 9th grade POGU. Furthermore, 7th grade teacher autonomy support directly increased 9th grade school engagement, which in turn decreased 9th grade POGU. These findings suggest that teacher autonomy support is an important protective predictor of adolescent POGU, and basic psychological needs satisfaction and school engagement are the primary mediators in this association.

  18. Barriers influencing implementation of the National Science Education Standards by middle school teachers engaged in collaborative professional development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Carla Cunnagin

    This study focused on implementation of the National Science Education Standards by middle school science teachers. Science teachers from two suburban middle schools who engaged in structured collaborative professional development over a period of two years were participants in the study. A review of the current literature in this field indicated a need for further research on sustained, collaborative professional development (Loucks-Horsley, Hewson, Love & Stiles, 1998; Supovitz & Turner, 2000). Previous findings indicated teachers implementing curricular reform encounter barriers and/or dilemmas when implementing the new instructional strategies into their teaching practices (Anderson, 1996). This study sought to find out what technical, political and cultural barriers teachers encounter when implementing standards-based instruction and how those barriers impacted implementation. There were twelve participants in this mixed methods study. A stratified random sample of a high, medium and low implementer of standards-based instruction, based upon their self-reported use in a teacher questionnaire, were selected at each of the two middle schools. Detailed classroom observations were conducted using the Local Systemic Change Classroom Observation Protocol (Horizon Research, 2002) identifying their level of use of standards-based instruction. All twelve teachers were interviewed regarding their instructional practices and possible barriers they encountered to implementation. Findings in this study indicated that as the number of technical, political or cultural barriers increased, implementation of standards-based instruction decreased. Cultural dimension categories such as existing teacher beliefs about instruction and how students learn science, as well as the belief that standards-based instruction is not aligned with state assessments were barriers for teachers in this study. In addition, if a teacher had a high barrier in a cultural category, they also were one

  19. The NASA Galileo Educator Network: Using Astronomy to Engage Teachers in Science Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, B.; Bass, K. M.; Schultz, G.

    2015-11-01

    With funding from a NASA EPOESS grant, the Astronomical Society of the Pacific developed the NASA Galileo Educator Network (GEN), a train-the-trainer teacher professional development program based in part on the Galileo Teacher Training Program. Formal evaluation of the program demonstrates that both teacher trainers and teacher participants grew in their ability to utilize astronomy investigations focusing on science practices as described in the Next Generation Science Standards.

  20. Engaging Professionals: Investigating in Service Teachers Use of Formative Classroom Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tariq, Muhammad Arshad

    2013-01-01

    This study examined in-service teachers use of formative classroom assessment (FCA) approach. The research aimed at to achieve following three major objectives: (a) to identify in-service teachers' comprehension of determining the purpose of formative classroom assessment, (b) to investigate teachers' use of process and techniques of assessment in…

  1. Thai Pre-Service Science Teachers Engaging Action Research during Their Fifth Year Internship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faikhamta, Chatree; Clarke, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    As a key element in teacher education programmes, action research is a learning process in which pre-service teachers inquire, reflect on and improve their teaching practices. This qualitative study sought to understand what enhanced or hindered Thai pre-service teachers' action research projects during their student teaching. This study drew upon…

  2. Emergent Identity and Dilemmatic Spaces: Pre-Service Teachers' Engagement with EAL Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    Integrationist policies that promote the mainstreaming of English language learners are well established in many English-speaking countries. This has led to the embedding of English as an additional language (EAL) methodology in teacher education, and also to the notion of collaboration between English language teachers and content area teachers.…

  3. Punish Them or Engage Them? Teachers' Views of Unproductive Student Behaviours in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Anna M.; Johnson, Bruce; Owens, Larry; Conway, Robert

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on a study that investigated the extent to which student behaviour is a concern for school teachers. A questionnaire was used to investigate teachers' views about student behaviour in their classes. The results suggest that low-level disruptive and disengaged student behaviours occur frequently and teachers find them difficult…

  4. Novice Mathematics Teachers' Use of Technology to Enhance Student Engagement, Questioning, Generalization, and Conceptual Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Virginia; Garofalo, Joe

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe how and why novice mathematics teachers incorporated technology-generated representations in their instruction. The participants in the study were graduates of a technology-rich mathematics teacher educator program. The teachers were interviewed at the beginning and end of the study concerning their…

  5. The Relationship between Beginning Teachers' Engagement with Induction Program Components and Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Janice Hooper

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine induction programs in North Carolina during the 2010-2011 school year to determine beginning teachers received the support as recommended by State Board of Education policy. Participants were second-year high school teachers participating in district level beginning teacher induction programs and were…

  6. Student Engagement in the Classroom: The Impact of Classroom, Teacher, and Student Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykstra Steinbrenner, Jessica R; Watson, Linda R

    2015-08-01

    Researchers have highlighted engagement as a critical component of effective interventions for students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), yet there is limited research related to engagement in school-age children with ASD. This descriptive study was designed to examine joint engagement and its relationship with classroom factors and student characteristics. The sample included 25 elementary and middle school students with ASD. Mixed level modeling was used to examine relationships between joint engagement and classroom factors and student characteristics. Joint engagement was significantly related to group size, use of student-directed practices, autism severity, and expressive communication skills. These findings have important implications for educational policies and practices and future research related to engagement and effective interventions for students with ASD.

  7. "I'm Not Afraid to Come into Your World": Case Studies of Teachers Facilitating Engagement in Urban High School English Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkins-Coleman, Theresa A.

    2010-01-01

    This article provides a vicarious experience in the classrooms of two teachers who successfully facilitated engagement in urban schools. With practices grounded in culturally responsive classroom management, the teachers created classroom environments in which students were motivated to participate, met high behavioral expectations, and remained…

  8. Children with Communication Impairments: Caregivers' and Teachers' Shared Book-Reading Quality and Children's Level of Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaderavek, Joan N.; Pentimonti, Jill M.; Justice, Laura M.

    2014-01-01

    This study addressed two aims: First, to examine the quality of adult shared book-reading behaviors for teachers and caregivers of children with communication impairments (CI) and, second, to compare the level of child literacy engagement during the teacher-led (group) and caregiver-led (one-on-one) shared book-reading sessions. Sixteen children…

  9. Engaging in Argument and Communicating Information: A Case Study of English Language Learners and Their Science Teacher in an Urban High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Lauren Honeycutt; Bianchini, Julie A.; Lee, Jin Sook

    2014-01-01

    This study documents how an urban high school science teacher engaged her English Language Learners (ELLs) in the discourse-intensive science and engineering practices of (1) arguing from evidence and (2) obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information. The teacher taught an introductory integrated science course to classes with a large…

  10. A Simulation Pedagogical Approach to Engaging Generalist Pre-Service Teachers in Physical Education Online: The GoPro Trial 1.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyndman, Brendon P.

    2017-01-01

    There has been a continuous increase in enrolments within teacher education programs in recent years delivered via online and external modes. Such levels of enrolment have raised discussion around the theory-practice nexus and whether pre-service teachers (PSTs) can optimally engage with practical learning components via online platforms. This…

  11. "These Rights Go beyond Borders and Pieces of Paper:" Urban High School Teachers and Newcomer Immigrant Youth Engaging in Human Rights Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Juliet

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the ways that two ninth and tenth grade teachers and their newcomer immigrant students engaged in HRE using elements of critical pedagogy at an urban pubic high school. Research data included eight months of classroom observations and interviews with two teachers and nineteen of their students across four of their…

  12. Teachers and students' divergent perceptions of engagement: recognition of school or work place goals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonasson, Charlotte

    2012-01-01

    In extant research, the concept of student engagement refers to individual behavioural patterns and traits. Recent research indicates that engagement should not only be related to the individual but also should be anchored in the social context. This ethnographic field study of students and teach......In extant research, the concept of student engagement refers to individual behavioural patterns and traits. Recent research indicates that engagement should not only be related to the individual but also should be anchored in the social context. This ethnographic field study of students...

  13. Human rotavirus K8 strain represents a new VP4 serotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, B; Larralde, G; Gorziglia, M

    1993-01-01

    The complete VP4 gene of the human rotavirus (HRV) K8 strain (G1 serotype) was cloned and inserted into the baculovirus transfer vector pVL941 under the control of the polyhedrin promoter. A K8VP4 recombinant baculovirus was obtained by cotransfection of Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells with transfer vector DNA containing the K8VP4 gene and wild-type baculovirus DNA. Infection of Sf9 cells with this VP4 recombinant baculovirus resulted in the production of a protein that is similar in size and antigenic activity to the authentic VP4 of the K8 strain. Guinea pigs immunized with the expressed VP4 developed antibodies that neutralized the infectivity of the K8 strain. This antiserum neutralized HRV strains belonging to VP4 serotypes 1A, 1B, and 2 with efficiency eightfold or lower than that of the homologous virus, indicating that the human rotavirus K8 strain represents a distinct VP4 serotype (P3). In addition, low levels of cross-immunoprecipitation of the K8VP4 and its VP5 and VP8 subunits with hyperimmune antisera to HRV strains representing different VP4 serotype specificities also suggested that the K8 strain possesses a unique VP4 with few epitopes in common with other P-serotype strains. Images PMID:8380098

  14. Engaging a Prosumer: Preservice Teachers Interrogate Popular Toys through Stop-Motion Animation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivashkevich, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Today's global digital culture not only engages young people in daily consumption of visual images, texts, and artifacts, but also provides them with the tools to actively participate in the production of imagery and narratives. Whether they post a picture on Facebook, create a blog, or make a YouTube video with their peers, they engage in what…

  15. Social Support and Behavioral and Affective School Engagement: The Effects of Peers, Parents, and Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estell, David B.; Perdue, Neil H.

    2013-01-01

    School engagement has long been seen as an important component of school completion, and research shows that social support in the home and school promotes engagement. However, many researchers have argued that it is not a unitary construct but rather a multifaceted phenomenon, and the role of peer social support has not been as well studied as…

  16. Student and Teacher Perceptions of Online Student Engagement in an Online Middle School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louwrens, Nathaniel; Hartnett, Maggie

    2015-01-01

    While our understanding of student engagement in the compulsory schooling sector is well developed in face-to-face contexts, the same cannot be said for online and distance learning environments. Indeed, most of what is currently known about online engagement has come from research with older students in tertiary education contexts. This study…

  17. Using Virtual and In-Person Engagement Opportunities to Connect K-12 Students, Teachers, and the Public With NASA Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science Assets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, P.; Foxworth, S.; Luckey, M. K.; McInturff, B.; Mosie, A.; Runco, S.; Todd, N.; Willis, K. J.; Zeigler, R.

    2017-01-01

    Engaging K-12 students, teachers, and the public with NASA Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science (ARES) assets provides an extraordinary opportunity to connect audiences with authentic aspects unique to our nation's space program. NASA ARES has effectively engaged audiences with 1) Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) experts, 2) NASA specialized facilities, and 3) NASA astromaterial samples through both virtual and in-person engagement opportunities. These engagement opportunities help connect local and national audiences with STEM role models, promote the exciting work being facilitated through NASA's Science Mission Directorate, and expose our next generation of scientific explorers to science they may be inspired to pursue as a future STEM career.

  18. The ABCs of Student Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Seth A.; Nuland, Leila Richey; Parsons, Allison Ward

    2014-01-01

    Student engagement is an important consideration for teachers and administrators because it is explicitly associated with achievement. What the authors call the ABC's of engagement they outline as: Affective engagement, Behavioral engagement, and Cognitive engagement. They also present "Three Things Every Teacher Needs to Know about…

  19. Reflective Engagement in Cultural History: A Lacanian Perspective on Pasifika Teachers in Aotearoa New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Tony; Devine, Nesta; Leslie, Elsie; Paiti, Margaret; Sila'ila'i, Emilie; Umaki, Sandra; Williams, Jay

    2007-01-01

    How do we understand our own cultural histories and how do these understandings impact on our senses of self? This paper addresses the case of Pacific islander migration into New Zealand. It is based on a study fuelled by a group of Pacific island teachers exploring their own experiences of becoming teachers in New Zealand schools. The paper…

  20. How Is My Child Doing?: Preparing Pre-Service Teachers to Engage Parents through Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehlig, Lisa M.; Shumow, Lee

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to help pre-service teachers develop basic knowledge and skill for partnering with families on assessment-related issues. An assessment class for teacher educators (experimental group) participated in role-playing activities designed to expand their understanding and skill in a way that would help them learn how to…

  1. Engaging Nature of Science to Preservice Teachers through Inquiry-Based Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuangchalerm, Prasart

    2013-01-01

    Inquiry-based classroom is widely distributed in the school science based on its useful and effective instruction. Science teachers are key elements allowing students to have scientific inquiry. If teachers understand and imply inquiry-based learning into science classroom, students will learn science as scientific inquiry and understand nature of…

  2. Teachers and Facebook: Using Online Groups to Improve Students' Communication and Engagement in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende da Cunha, Fernando, Jr.; van Kruistum, Claudia; van Oers, Bert

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on how teachers, from different cities in Brazil, used groups on Facebook and how communication between teachers and students was affected by using such groups. This study is framed under the Cultural Historical Activity Theory (CHAT) perspective, and is conceived from a methodological background that invites participants to…

  3. Engaging Second-Stage Teachers in Their Work: The Role of Professional Culture in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, Cheryl Lynne

    2009-01-01

    Educational researchers acknowledge that teachers make a difference in the educational outcomes of youth (Boyd, Lankford, Loeb, Rockoff, & Wyckoff, 2008; Darling-Hammond, 2000; Hanushek, 1992; Hanushek & Rivkin, 2007; Johnson, 2006; Sanders & Rivers, 1996; Sanders & Horn, 1998). However, staffing schools with qualified teachers has proven…

  4. Teachers and Facebook: Using Online Groups to Improve Students' Communication and Engagement in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende da Cunha, Fernando, Jr.; van Kruistum, Claudia; van Oers, Bert

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on how teachers, from different cities in Brazil, used groups on Facebook and how communication between teachers and students was affected by using such groups. This study is framed under the Cultural Historical Activity Theory (CHAT) perspective, and is conceived from a methodological background that invites participants to…

  5. Preservice Teachers Engaged in Professional Learning Community to Explore Critical Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casciola, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    As demographics change, our school populations are ever changing. Preservice teachers (PSTs) need to be aware of how to meet the needs of all of their future students. Teacher education programs have been charged with the duty of preparing these PSTs for the diverse school population they will encounter. This qualitative multiple case study…

  6. Engaging Preservice Teachers in Context-Based, Action-Oriented Curriculum Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, K. Andrew R.; Ressler, James D.

    2016-01-01

    Physical education teacher education programs have a responsibility to prepare students in the technical aspects of teaching physical education, while also helping them to develop an awareness of the micropolitical cultures of schools that have implications for the implementation of what has been learned. Without the latter, beginning teachers may…

  7. Professional Development of Mexican Secondary EFL Teachers: Views and Willingness to Engage in Classroom Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, Ruth; Valladares, Jorge Luis Mendoza

    2014-01-01

    The effective implementation of any educational reform is largely dependent on the preparation of teachers. In the case of the National English Program in Basic Education, (NEPBE) implemented in public schools in Mexico in 2009, teacher preparation options have been designed by both public and private higher education institutions in several…

  8. Home Economics Teachers' Intentions and Engagement in Teaching Sustainable Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haapala, Irja; Biggs, Simon; Cederberg, Riitta; Kosonen, Anna-Liisa

    2014-01-01

    Home Economics (HE) teachers can have a central role in teaching sustainable development (SD) to young adolescents through everyday household management and the promotion of personally and globally sustainable well-being. How well the teachers cope with this task is not well known. The objective of this study was to survey Finnish HE…

  9. Engaging Preservice Teachers in Context-Based, Action-Oriented Curriculum Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, K. Andrew R.; Ressler, James D.

    2016-01-01

    Physical education teacher education programs have a responsibility to prepare students in the technical aspects of teaching physical education, while also helping them to develop an awareness of the micropolitical cultures of schools that have implications for the implementation of what has been learned. Without the latter, beginning teachers may…

  10. Kindergartners' Temperament, Classroom Engagement, and Student-Teacher Relationship: Moderation by Effortful Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiente, Carlos; Swanson, Jodi; Lemery-Chalfant, Kathryn

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether kindergartners' (N = 291; M age = 5 years) effortful control (EC), impulsivity, anger, or shyness predict their classroom participation, school liking, and student-teacher relationship. Parents and teachers reported on children's temperament. Children's EC and impulsivity were also assessed with…

  11. Are You Being Served? The Relationship between School Climate for Service and Teachers' Engagement, Satisfaction, and Intention to Leave: A Moderated Mediation Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldor, Liat; Shoshani, Anat

    2017-05-19

    The notion of service has been receiving increasing attention in organizational psychology literature in recent years, due to the client-oriented managerial movement. Yet, little to no attention has been paid to the service notion in educational psychology despite its high relevance to educational settings, given the pressure to be more service-oriented and possess a client-focused state of mind. The present study explores the notion of service in school domains by examining the joint effects of climate for service and the internal service in schools on teachers' work attitudes: work engagement, job satisfaction, and intention to leave their work. The notion of climate for service emphasizes the school's attitude of teachers as service providers to its clients (students and their parents); internal climate emphasizes the school's attitude of providing service to its teaching staff. The study was conducted via a sample of 423 teachers from 30 different schools in Israel. We hypothesized that the indirect relationship between the climate for service and teachers' job satisfaction and intention to leave work would be mediated by teacher work engagement. Our findings supported this hypothesis. Moreover, this indirect relationship via teacher work engagement was demonstrated most strongly when the internal service quality received was high, providing teachers with the capability to deliver what the service climate motivates them to do. Therefore, service-oriented resources-both climate for service and internal service-may be crucial in affecting teachers work attitudes and should be specifically targeted by principals and other educational decision makers.

  12. The relationship among teacher classroom management behavior, student engagement, and student achievement of middle and high school science students of varying aptitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarity, John R., Jr.; Butts, David P.

    This study was designed to determine the relationship among teacher classroom management behavior, student engagement, and student achievement of middle and high school science students. These variables were investigated across varying levels of academic aptitude. Two week long units were taught by 30 experienced science teachers. During this period of time teacher classroom management behavior, student achievement (n = 570), student engagement (n = 269), and student academic aptitude (n = 649) were measured. Twelve selected management indicators from Georgia Teachers Performance Assessment Indicators (TPAI) were used to measure teacher classroom management behaviors. Regression analysis was used to determine the relationship between the variables, and appropriate post hoc procedures were used. Analyses showed that there was a significant relationship among all variables. Post hoc analysis showed that these results were consistent across levels of aptitude. Other relationships found were between student engagement and achievement, student aptitude and achievement, and student aptitude and engagement. Correlation coefficients were obtained for each individual management indicators. Those particular management behaviors which were correlated with achievement and engagement are: identifies students who do not understand directions and helps them individually, maintains learner involvement in lessons, reinforces and encourages the efforts of learners to maintain involvement, attends to routine tasks, uses instructional time efficiently, provides feedback to learners about their behavior, manages disruptive behavior among learners.

  13. Transactional Links Between Teacher-Student Relationships and Adolescent Rule-Breaking Behavior and Behavioral School Engagement: Moderating Role of a Dopaminergic Genetic Profile Score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Laet, Steven; Colpin, Hilde; Van Leeuwen, Karla; Van den Noortgate, Wim; Claes, Stephan; Janssens, Annelies; Goossens, Luc; Verschueren, Karine

    2016-06-01

    Throughout adolescence, there is an increase in rule-breaking behavior and a decrease in behavioral school engagement. The role of teacher-student relationship quality in the development of these adjustment problems remains understudied. This study examined how adolescent-reported teacher-student affiliation and dissatisfaction and parent-reported rule-breaking behavior and behavioral engagement impact one another throughout adolescence. In addition, we examined the moderating effect of genes by means of a Biologically Informed Multilocus genetic Profile Score (BIMPS), a composite score reflecting the cumulative effect of multiple dopaminergic genes, with a higher score indicating higher dopamine signaling in the adolescent brain. We used three-year longitudinal data from 1111 adolescents (51 % boys; M age = 13.79), and their parents. Cross-lagged analyses revealed a transactional process in which adolescents who display more rule-breaking behavior and less behavioral engagement experienced increased subsequent dissatisfaction with their teachers, which in turn further increased their adjustment problems. Also, adolescents with more adjustment problems experienced decreased subsequent affiliation with their teachers. The other way around, adolescents' behavioral engagement also benefitted from positive relationships with teachers. Multi-group analyses revealed genetic moderation for behavioral engagement, but not for rule-breaking. Specifically, adolescents who had a BIMPS score coding for moderate levels of dopamine signaling (instead of high or low signaling) were most affected in their behavioral engagement when they experienced dissatisfaction with their teachers. Our study findings may guide schools in implementing interventions to create a supportive class and school environment including positive, supportive teacher-student relationships and indicate that providing a such a supportive school environment is important for all adolescents.

  14. K-8 Teachers Using Mobile Technology as a Student Centered Instructional Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durbin, Annette L.

    2013-01-01

    Mobile technology is increasing its presence in the educational environment. The public school district in this study has made great strides improving technology usage in schools with updated hardware, extensive district-wide infrastructure, a technology plan, and professional development. While the district has been successful in some areas, like…

  15. Engaging Your Beginners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Teachers love to see the spark of engagement when students eagerly engage in learning. But when teachers work with English language learners in the earliest stages of language acquisition, they're often unsure how to foster challenge and engagement with students who know such sparse English. Hill shares six key do's and don'ts for classroom…

  16. Research on Teacher Engagement Based on 985 University in Jiangsu Province%基于江苏925高校的教师敬业度研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    舒瑞; 向林凯

    2014-01-01

    The rise of positive psychology has aroused poeple’s attention to employee engagement. Many scholars and consultants have given different definition of employee engagement and done a lot of researces about it .They found that employee engagement is closely related to organizational performance. University teachers shoulder the missions of talents cultivation, scientific research and social services .Their engagement is not only related to the development of universities, but to the quality of higher education in our country. So the study of university teacher engagement is of great significance. This paper reviews the research status quo of employee engagement at home and abroad, advances the three dimensions "work, organization, satisfaction" of university teacher engagement and designs the university teacher engagement questionnaire in combination of the subjective and objective aspects: the teachers and students of them . This paper has investgated the university teacher engagement in the 985 universities in Jiangsu province ,and obtained the conclusion that the university teacher engagement of Jiangsu’s 985 university is high.%积极心理学的兴起引发了人们对员工敬业的关注。许多学者和咨询机构对员工敬业度的定义及其构成维度做了大量研究,发现员工敬业度与组织绩效密切相关。高校教师肩负着人才培养,科学研究,社会服务等使命,其敬业程度不仅关系到高校的发展,而且直接影响到我国高等教育的质量,所以对高校教师敬业度的研究意义重大。本文回顾了国内外员工敬业度的研究现状,提出了高校敬业度“投入工作,组织关注,满意度”的三个维度,并设计出从师生两个角度主客观结合的高校教师敬业度调查问卷。对江苏985高校教师敬业度进行了调查与分析,得出了江苏985高校教师敬业度较高的结论。

  17. Engaging with issues of emotionality in mathematics teacher education for social justice

    OpenAIRE

    Boylan, M.

    2009-01-01

    This article focuses on the relationship between social justice, emotionality and mathematics teaching in the context of the education of prospective teachers of mathematics. A relational approach to social justice calls for giving attention to enacting socially-just relationships in mathematics classrooms. Emotionality and social justice in teaching mathematics variously intersect, interrelate or interweave. An intervention, usng creative action methods, with a cohort of prospective teachers...

  18. School physics teacher class management, laboratory practice, student engagement, critical thinking, cooperative learning and use of simulations effects on student performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz, Muhammad

    The purpose of this study was to examine how simulations in physics class, class management, laboratory practice, student engagement, critical thinking, cooperative learning, and use of simulations predicted the percentage of students achieving a grade point average of B or higher and their academic performance as reported by teachers in secondary school physics classes. The target population consisted of secondary school physics teachers who were members of Science Technology, Engineeering and,Mathematics Teachers of New York City (STEMteachersNYC) and American Modeling Teachers Association (AMTA). They used simulations in their physics classes in the 2013 and 2014 school years. Subjects for this study were volunteers. A survey was constructed based on a literature review. Eighty-two physics teachers completed the survey about instructional practice in physics. All respondents were anonymous. Classroom management was the only predictor of the percent of students achieving a grade point average of B or higher in high school physics class. Cooperative learning, use of simulations, and student engagement were predictors of teacher's views of student academic performance in high school physics class. All other variables -- class management, laboratory practice, critical thinking, and teacher self-efficacy -- were not predictors of teacher's views of student academic performance in high school physics class. The implications of these findings were discussed and recommendations for physics teachers to improve student learning were presented.

  19. The Gender Gap in Student Engagement: The Role of Teachers' Autonomy Support, Structure, and Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lietaert, Sofie; Roorda, Debora; Laevers, Ferre; Verschueren, Karine; De Fraine, Bieke

    2015-01-01

    Background: The gender gap in education in favour of girls is a widely known phenomenon. Boys generally have higher dropout rates, obtain lower grades, and show lower engagement. Insight into factors related to these academic outcomes could help to address the gender gap. Aims: This study investigated, for Dutch language classes, (1) how boys and…

  20. Using Critical Literacy to Engage Learners: What New Teachers Can Do

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanklin, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    Shanklin knows that as school populations become more culturally and linguistically diverse, perspectives such as critical literacy become of interest to students themselves and act as keys to their engagement. Critical literacy marks an exciting shift in thinking toward English/language arts, global education, English language learners, and ways…

  1. The Gender Gap in Student Engagement: The Role of Teachers' Autonomy Support, Structure, and Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lietaert, Sofie; Roorda, Debora; Laevers, Ferre; Verschueren, Karine; De Fraine, Bieke

    2015-01-01

    Background: The gender gap in education in favour of girls is a widely known phenomenon. Boys generally have higher dropout rates, obtain lower grades, and show lower engagement. Insight into factors related to these academic outcomes could help to address the gender gap. Aims: This study investigated, for Dutch language classes, (1) how boys and…

  2. Relational perceptions in high school physical education: teacher- and peer-related predictors of female students' motivation, behavioral engagement, and social anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gairns, Felicity; Whipp, Peter R; Jackson, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Although researchers have demonstrated the importance of interpersonal processes in school-based physical education (PE), there have been calls for further studies that account for multiple relational perspectives and provide a more holistic understanding of students' relational perceptions. Guided by principles outlined within self-determination theory and the tripartite efficacy model, our aim was to explore the ways in which students' perceptions about their teacher and classmates directly and/or indirectly predicted motivation, anxiety, and engagement in PE. A total of 374 female high-school students reported the extent to which their teachers and classmates independently (a) engaged in relatedness-supportive behaviors, (b) satisfied their need for relatedness, and (c) were confident in their ability in PE (i.e., relation-inferred self-efficacy). Students also rated their motivation and anxiety regarding PE, and teachers provided ratings of in-class behavioral engagement for each student. Analyses demonstrated support for the predictive properties of both teacher- and peer-focused perceptions. Students largely reported more positive motivational orientations when they held favorable perceptions regarding their teacher and peers, and autonomous motivation was in turn positively related to behavioral engagement ratings. These findings offer novel insight into the network of interpersonal appraisals that directly and indirectly underpins important in-class outcomes in PE.

  3. Relational perceptions in high school physical education: Teacher- and peer-related predictors of female students' motivation, behavioral engagement, and social anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicity eGairns

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Although researchers have demonstrated the importance of interpersonal processes in school-based physical education (PE, there have been calls for further studies that account for multiple relational perspectives and provide a more holistic understanding of students’ relational perceptions. Guided by principles outlined within self-determination theory and the tripartite efficacy model, our aim was to explore the ways in which students’ perceptions about their teacher and classmates directly and/or indirectly predicted motivation, anxiety, and engagement in PE. A total of 374 female high-school students reported the extent to which their teachers and classmates independently (a engaged in relatedness-supportive behaviors, (b satisfied their need for relatedness, and (c were confident in their ability in PE (i.e., relation-inferred self-efficacy. Students also rated their motivation and anxiety regarding PE, and teachers provided ratings of in-class behavioral engagement for each student. Analyses demonstrated support for the predictive properties of both teacher- and peer-focused perceptions. Students largely reported more positive motivational orientations when they held favorable perceptions regarding their teacher and peers, and autonomous motivation was in turn positively related to behavioral engagement ratings. These findings offer novel insight into the network of interpersonal appraisals that directly and indirectly underpins important in-class outcomes in PE.

  4. Using Action Research to Engage K-6 Teachers in Nature of Science Inquiry as Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Theresa A.; Akerson, Valarie L.; Hanson, Deborah L.

    2010-12-01

    Teachers are required to work with data on a daily basis to assess the effectiveness of their teaching strategies, but may not approach it as research. This paper presents a reflective discussion of how and when a professional development team used an action research project to help 12 K-6 teachers explore the effectiveness of reform based Nature of Science (NOS) teaching strategies in their classrooms. The team encouraged community development and provided “just in time” supports to scaffold the steps of the action research process for teachers. The discussion includes concerns they addressed and issues related to management and support of the professional development model. Evaluation results are shared to suggest how this approach can be improved in the future.

  5. Using Technology to Engage Preservice Elementary Teachers in Learning about Scientific Inquiry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James R. MacArthur

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Elementary teachers are often required to teach inquiry in their classrooms despite having had little exposure to inquiry learning themselves. In a capstone undergraduate science course preservice elementary teachers experience scientific inquiry through the completion of group projects, activities, readings and discussion, in order to develop a sense of how inquiry learning takes place. At the same time, they learn science content necessary for teacher licensure. The course exposes students to different pathways of scientific discovery and to the use of the computer both as a tool for conducting inquiry-based investigations and as a means of collecting and sharing student opinions. The students involved have many misconceptions about science and it is often difficult for them to distinguish science from pseudoscience. Computer simulations are used to help students understand that difference. In addition, a classroom response system using “clickers” is used to poll studentopinions on controversial issues and to stimulate discussion.

  6. The relationship between teacher responsiveness and the engagement of children with aggressive behavior in preschool : A systematic literature review from 2000-2016

    OpenAIRE

    Papadopoulou, Vasiliki

    2016-01-01

    The importance of aggressive behavior in preschool ages can be seen from the serious impact it has later in children's lives if a suitable change will not take place. the number of children with behavioral rpoblems in preschool are increasing with a great amount of teachers admitting that they are insufficiently prepared to manage it. The aim of this systematic literature review is to examine the evidence of teacher responsiveness affecting child engagement, with specific focus on children fr...

  7. Educating for diversity, social responsibility and action: preservice teachers engage in immersion experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Winston

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines how a short cultural immersion experience strongly impacted and had long lasting personal and educational effects on preservice teachers who were enrolled in a cultural diversity class. Reports from their reflections and oral responses indicated that this experience helped them to be more culturally aware and to seriously reflect on their prejudices, misconceptions and stereotypes about minority groups. Through personal convictions they realized that positive changes toward cultural diversity had to be made if they were going to be culturally responsive in their daily lives, and as teachers in the classrooms.

  8. Utilizing Model Eliciting Activities (MEA's) to engage middle school teachers and students in storm water management practices to mitigate human impacts of land development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tazaz, A.; Wilson, R. M.; Schoen, R.; Blumsack, S.; King, L.; Dyehouse, M.

    2013-12-01

    'The Integrating STEM Project' engaged 6-8 grade teachers through activities incorporating mathematics, science and technology incorporating both Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) and Common Core State Standards-Mathematics (CCSS-Math). A group of researchers from Oceanography, Mathematics, and Education set out to provide middle school teachers with a 2 year intensive STEM integration professional development with a focus on environmental topics and to monitor the achievement outcomes in their students. Over the course of 2 years the researchers created challenging professional development sessions to expand teacher knowledge and teachers were tasked to transform the information gained during the professional development sessions for classroom use. One lesson resource kit presented to the teachers, which was directly applicable to the classroom, included Model Eliciting Activities (MEA's) to explore the positive and negative effects land development has on climate and the environment, and how land development impacts storm water management. MEA's were developed to encourage students to create models to solve complex problems and to allow teachers to investigate students thinking. MEA's are a great curriculum technique used in engineering fields to help engage students by providing hands on activities using real world data and problems. We wish to present the Storm Water Management Resource toolkit including the MEA and present the outcomes observed from student engagement in this activity.

  9. Beyond Rational Choice: How Teacher Engagement with Technology Is Mediated by Culture and Emotions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrotta, Carlo

    2017-01-01

    This paper focuses on the relationship between rational beliefs, culture and agency in formal school settings. This relationship is analysed in the context of the adoption of technological innovations. Interviews and focus groups with 39 secondary teachers from England and other European countries were carried out. The analysis highlights a number…

  10. Perceptions, Engagement, and Practices of Teachers Seeking Professional Development in Place-Based Integrated STEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadelson, Louis S.; Seifert, Anne

    2013-01-01

    As science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) continue to grow in economic and social importance, it is critical that citizenry are prepared to be STEM literate. Furthermore, the workforce demands on STEM necessitate students seeking STEM degrees and pursuing STEM careers. Primary and secondary (K-12) teachers play an important role…

  11. Use of Animation in Engaging Teachers and Students in Assessment in Hong Kong Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Cecilia K. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Animations have long been perceived as an effective tool in teaching and learning. While students' reception towards animations has often been studied, there is also literature covering how teachers perceive and incorporate animations into their classes. At a research intensive university in Hong Kong, animations on the topic of university…

  12. Engagement with Empires: Irish Catholic Female Religious Teachers in Colonial South Australia 1868-1901

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burley, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    This paper addresses the roles of Irish Catholic female religious institutes for teachers in the context of the recent debates about education and empire. Nineteenth century colonial South Australia provides an opportunity to examine such institutes, for example the Irish Dominicans from Cabra Dublin, the Irish Mercy Institute from Baggot Street,…

  13. Engaging Teachers in Language Analysis: A Functional Linguistics Approach to Reflective Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achugar, Mariana; Schleppegrell, Mary; Oteiza, Teresa

    2007-01-01

    Classrooms around the world are becoming more multilingual and teachers in all subject areas are faced with new challenges in enabling learners' academic language development without losing focus on content. These challenges require new ways of conceptualizing the relationship between language and content as well as new pedagogies that…

  14. Use of Animation in Engaging Teachers and Students in Assessment in Hong Kong Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Cecilia K. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Animations have long been perceived as an effective tool in teaching and learning. While students' reception towards animations has often been studied, there is also literature covering how teachers perceive and incorporate animations into their classes. At a research intensive university in Hong Kong, animations on the topic of university…

  15. Teachers' & Students' Literacy Performance in & Engagement with New Literacies Strategies in Underperforming Middle Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagood, Margaret C.; Provost, Mary C.; Skinner, Emily N.; Egelson, Paula E.

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports on Year 1 of a two-year study of implementing new literacies strategies into social studies and English/language arts content areas in two low-performing middle schools (grades 6-8). Situated within a New Literacies Studies framework, the study addressed three overarching questions: (1) What are teachers' and students'…

  16. Teacher-Directed and Learner-Engaged: Exploring a Confucian Conception of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Charlene

    2015-01-01

    Against a backdrop of an international trend to shift from a teacher-centred to a learner-centred education, this article explores a Confucian conception of education. Focusing on an ancient Chinese text "Xueji" (Record of Learning), the essay examines its educational ideals and practices based on the principles of "choice",…

  17. Literacy Teachers Engage in Service-Learning via Community Organization Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooley, Caitlin McMunn; Mays, Lydia Criss

    2014-01-01

    Service-learning provides community service as well as authentic, curriculum-driven learning experiences (Furco & Root, 2010) and has been an effective component of teacher education courses (García, Arias, Murri, & Surna, 2010; Mitton-Kukner, Nelson, & Descrochers, 2010; Spencer, Cox-Petersen, & Crawford, 2005). With these…

  18. Diverse Student Teachers Making Sense of Difference through Engaging in Boalian Theater Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhukhanwala, Foram; Allexsaht-Snider, Martha

    2012-01-01

    A diverse group of student teachers in an alternative certification program participated in seminars integrating Boal's "Theater of the Oppressed" (TO) activities. Participants created images and enacted scenes that recreated interactions with their students and also rehearsed ideas for taking action in the classroom. The research,…

  19. Engaging Mindfully with the Commons: A Case of Caribbean Teachers' Experience with ESD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Down, Lorna

    2015-01-01

    A study of teachers' responses to Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) in a graduate course in Literature and Education for Sustainable Development, at the School of Education, The University of the West Indies, Mona, revealed that ESD can change indifference to the "commons" to one of mindfulness about local and global…

  20. Resistance to Change among Veteran Teachers: Providing Voice for More Effective Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Richard R.

    2017-01-01

    Effective implementation of change remains a crucial concern for educational leaders in the 21st Century. One of the factors affecting effective implementation of reform is resistance to change. Veteran teachers in particular present unique challenges, and stereotypically the greatest resistance, for effective implementation of change. This study…

  1. Teachers Engaged in Authentic EarthScope Research: Challenges and Successes (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, E.

    2013-12-01

    Since 2010, eight teachers from five different states who are enrolled in the Master of Education in Earth Sciences program at Penn State University have collaborated with research scientists at Penn State and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in an NSF-funded research effort focused on EarthScope data. We have investigated the connection between seismic strain transients and earthquake swarms in the western United States using a combination of Plate Boundary Observatory global positioning system data and earthquake catalog data. The participating teachers have not only taken an active role in the research but have designed classroom-ready lessons and activities they have taught to their own students. Here I discuss the challenges and successes of this project, emphasizing those I believe to be applicable to any scientist hoping to develop a similar project. Foremost, university scientists are largely unfamiliar with mentoring teachers (or any adult learners who are not planning to become researchers) in the process of doing science. Therefore, project design requires careful planning, as the background knowledge and quantitative skills of the participating teachers can vary considerably. It is important to strike a balance between manageable scope and likelihood of achieving worthwhile scientific results. Furthermore, PSU's M.Ed. in Earth Sciences program is fully online--the teacher participants are all at a distance. We prevailed over this challenge largely because the project involved analysis of digital data, making it naturally suited for asynchronous electronic collaboration and communication. The other important basis of success of this project involved distribution of labor. We analyzed data from different geographic regions and over different time periods, so each teacher participant had ownership of and gained expertise about a specific portion of the project, and the parts naturally summed to the whole. The teachers who participated in this

  2. Engaging Our School Teachers: an Augmented Reality (AR Approach to Continuous Professional Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debbie Holley

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Currently, teachers in the UK learn about behaviour management strategies from theoretical perspectives when training, through discussions with mentors, and by trial and error at their schools. Existing literature mainly focuses on such issues from the ‘adult’ viewpoint, not the voice of the child. This paper reports on work-in-progress developing a range of Augmented Reality (AR resources for these issues, drawing upon co-design research workshops with children from a Year 6 class (aged 10 in a UK Primary School. Our research informs approaches to classroom management by encouraging reflection and analysis of ‘critical incidents’ identified by the pupils, and explored by teachers in workshops through the medium of AR, giving a reality previously uncaptured in more traditional approaches. Our final resources will be a set of Open Education Resources (OER, offered to the wider community for reuse/repurposing for educational settings through a Creative Commons (cc licence.

  3. Is There a Correlation between Teacher Efficacy and Effectiveness to Re-Engage At-Risk Students and Graduate on Time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillory, John Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Teachers are in the perfect position to be an influential source of help to students with life and academic circumstances that inhibit them from staying on the path to graduation, but they often underestimate their role in helping students develop the resilience to do so. Re-engaging students in the learning process who are severely off the…

  4. School Engagement as a Mediator of Academic Performance among Urban Youth: The Role of Career Preparation, Parental Career Support, and Teacher Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Justin C.; Liu, Xiongyi; Pabian, Yvona

    2010-01-01

    Drawing from the contributions of vocational psychology, this study examined school engagement as a mediator of academic performance through the effects of career preparation (career planning, career decision-making self-efficacy), parental career support, and teacher support among diverse urban youth in middle school and high school (N = 285).…

  5. Examining the Effect of Class Size on Classroom Engagement and Teacher-Pupil Interaction: Differences in Relation to Pupil Prior Attainment and Primary vs. Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatchford, Peter; Bassett, Paul; Brown, Penelope

    2011-01-01

    It is widely recognized that we need to know more about effects of class size on classroom interactions and pupil behavior. This paper extends research by comparing effects on pupil classroom engagement and teacher-pupil interaction, and examining if effects vary by pupil attainment level and between primary and secondary schools. Systematic…

  6. Examining the Effect of Class Size on Classroom Engagement and Teacher-Pupil Interaction: Differences in Relation to Pupil Prior Attainment and Primary vs. Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatchford, Peter; Bassett, Paul; Brown, Penelope

    2011-01-01

    It is widely recognized that we need to know more about effects of class size on classroom interactions and pupil behavior. This paper extends research by comparing effects on pupil classroom engagement and teacher-pupil interaction, and examining if effects vary by pupil attainment level and between primary and secondary schools. Systematic…

  7. A Review of Walden University's Online MSED Science (K-8) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iadevaia, David G.

    2010-01-01

    This review is based on the experience of an adjunct professor teaching in the Walden University online MSED Science (K-8) program. The program described by Walden University and the actual implementation of the science component of the program as experienced by the Professor will be presented. The program, while a noble attempt at a completely…

  8. The Educational Software Design and Evaluation for K-8: Oral and Dental Health Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabakci, Isil; Birinci, Gurkay; Izmirli, Serkan

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study is to inform about the development of the software "Oral and Dental Health" that will supplement the course of Science and Technology for K8 students in the primary school curriculum and to carry out an evaluation study of the software. This software has been prepared for educational purposes. In relation to the…

  9. Transforming Schools through Expanded Learning Time: Orchard Gardens K-8 Pilot School. Update 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Roy

    2013-01-01

    For years, Orchard Gardens K-8 Pilot School was plagued by low student achievement and high staff turnover. Then, in 2010, with an expanded school schedule made possible through federal funding, Orchard Gardens began a remarkable turnaround. Today, the school is demonstrating how increased learning time, combined with other key turnaround…

  10. Bibliography of Research Support for K-8th Grade Inclusive Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Center on Schoolwide Inclusive School Reform: The SWIFT Center, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Presented here are references to books, chapters, and peer-reviewed journal articles that provide evidence for improved student outcomes through inclusive education in elementary and middle schools (K-8th grades). Not included here are the broad evidence bases for each feature in the SWIFT framework.

  11. Reaching Out: A K-8 Resource for Connecting Families and Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, Diane W.; McIntyre, Ellen; Miller, Karen B.; Moore, Gayle H.

    Noting that developing a strong relationship between the elementary or middle school and the family can help prevent students feelings of alienation and problems in learning, this guidebook provides a resource to help K-8 educators involve the entire family in the educational experience. Chapter 1 of the book outlines the vision for parent…

  12. Impact of organizational climate and engagement on motivation level of university teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Salman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This research includes factors which affect motivation of employees. There are many factors which affect employee motivation but due to time constraint we take only 2 factors. Many researchers argue that employee motivation is very crucial for organizations; motivating employees can give financial success to organizations. Organizations have to invest on its employees to satisfy and motivate its employees. Took data through questionnaire and analyses data through SPSS. Research included two independent variables, organization climate and engagement and one dependent variable that is employee motivation. It was observed that the two independent variables had strong and positive effect on employee motivation; if one of the independent variable is increased the motivation will also be increased. So it is recommended that there should be no disturbance in working environment, strong relation among employees and conducting seminars and training workshops so that employees can do their work with their full potential and will be more motivated.

  13. Issues of Motivation and Identity Positioning: Two Teachers' Motivational Practices for Engaging Immigrant Children in Learning Heritage Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung-In

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates two Korean heritage language teachers' motivational practices in relation to their identity positioning as heritage language (HL) teachers. Constant-comparative analyses of teachers' interviews and classroom practices showed that the two teachers' identity positioning as HL teachers was partially shaped by their earlier…

  14. Teachers' work engagement. A deeper understanding of the role of job and personal resources in relationship to work engagement, its antecedents, and its outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konermann, J.

    2012-01-01

    Dutch schools for secondary education face many challenges: Teaching is considered one of the most stressful occupations and the burnout levels of teachers are relatively high. Also, the work satisfaction of teachers in secondary education is the lowest compared with the total educational sector. Th

  15. 中学教师工作投入问卷的编制%Development of the middle schools' teachers work engagement questionnaire

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尤玉钿; 蔡晓鹏; 汤海燕

    2015-01-01

    综合运用文献分析、访谈、开放式问卷调查等研究方法初步编制中学教师工作投入问卷。对424名中学教师的调查数据进行探索性因素分析和验证性因素分析。结果表明,中学教师工作投入问卷由工作奉献、工作活力和工作专注三个因素构成。中学教师工作投入三维模型与调查数据拟合度较高,所编制的问卷具有较高的信度、效度,达到心理测量学要求,可作为测量我国中学教师工作投入的工具。%The aim of this research is to develop the middle schools' teachers work engagement questionnaire. The structure and items were obtained on the basis of literature review,interview and open questionnaire investigation . According to the results of Explore Factor Analysis and Confirm Factory Analysis from the middle schools'teachers' survey data ( N = 424 ) ,the results of analysis show that:middle schools' teachers work engagement questionnaire consisted of three factors including work dedica-tion,work vigor and work absorption. Three-dimensional model of middle schools' teachers work engagement fit well with the survey data. The reliability and validity of the questionnaires meet the standards of psychological meterage and can be used as a tool for work engagement of teachers in China's middle schools.

  16. A Worldwide Community of Primary and Secondary Students and Their Teachers Engage in and Contribute to Geoscience Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrow, E. B.; Kopplin, M. R.; Yule, S.

    2009-12-01

    The GLOBE (Global learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment) program is among the most successful long-term citizen scientist programs engaging K-12 students, in-service and pre-service teachers, as well as community members in different areas of geoscience investigations: atmosphere/weather, land cover biology, soils, hydrology, and vegetation phenology. What sustains this multi-nation project is the interest and collaboration among scientists, educators, students and the GLOBE Partnerships that are mostly self-supporting and function in the United States and in a hundred other countries. The GLOBE Program Office in the United States continues to offer, an overall coordinating and leadership function, a website, an infrastructure, management and support for web data entry and access, as well as visualizations, and a much used help desk. In Alaska, GLOBE research and activities are maintained through professional development workshops for educators, continued year-long support for teachers and their students (classroom visits, email, mail and newsletters) including program assessments, funded through federal grants to the University of Alaska Fairbanks. The current earth system science Seasons and Biomes project uses GLOBE protocols as well as newly developed ones to fit the needs of the locale, such as ice freeze-up and break-up seasonality protocols for rivers and lakes in tundra, taiga and other northern biomes, and mosquito phenology protocols for tropical and sub-tropical moist broadleaf forests and other biomes in Asia and Africa, invasive plant species for Africa, and modified plant phenology protocols for temperate deciduous forests in Australia. Students contribute data and use archived data as needed when they conduct geoscience research individually, in small groups or as a class and/or collaboratively with others in schools in other parts of the country and the world.

  17. Crystal Structure and Spectroscopic Characterization of K8(VO)2O(SO4)6:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Søren Birk; Rasmussen, Rikke Christina; Fehrmann, Rasmus;

    2003-01-01

    Red and yellow dichroistic crystals of a vanadium(V) compound, potassium (mu-oxo, di-mu-suifato)bis(oxodisulfato-vanadate), K-8(VO)(2)O(SO4)(6), have been obtained from the ternary catalytic model melt system K2S2O7-K2SO4-V2O5. By slow cooling of the melt from 420 to 355 degreesC, crystal growth...

  18. 七彩虹推出K8 PCI—E主板

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    七彩虹近日推出基于VUA KBT890+VT8237R苍片组的“飞龙勇士C.K8T890 MAX”主板。该主板支持Socket 939的Athlon 64处理器。1GHz Hypernsport总线,双通道DDR400内存PCI-Express×16图形总线接口.

  19. From the Voices of Kindergarten Teachers: Factors That Impact Decisions about When to Engage the Natural Curiosities of Their Students in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Frances A.

    Students enter kindergarten as natural-born scientists, curious about the world around them. They enter middle school disliking science. Although implementing science in kindergarten has the potential to improve learning in other subjects in addition to science, it is not taught much in kindergarten. There are many reasons for this according to the literature. The purpose of the study is to gain insight into teachers' thinking as they decide when and how to engage their students in science, to better understand why student enjoyment of science fades in early grades; to contribute teachers' voices to the existing literature on teaching science in the early grades; and to investigate how teachers' science teaching methods align with current research regarding how students learn best. The key research question is "What are the factors that impact teachers' decisions about when to engage the natural curiosities of their students?" Broken down, the supporting research questions include: 1. What factors impact teacher decisions about when to teach science? 2. Under what conditions do teachers engage students' natural curiosities in science? 3. How do teachers describe engagement in their classrooms? This was a participatory action research study that used autoethnography, case studies, and grounded theory methods. Five co-researchers took part in the process. Purposeful sampling was used to select a range of kindergarten teachers in Tennessee and Alabama with different perspectives on teaching science--some from county systems and some from city systems; some using Alabama Math, Science, and Technology Initiative (AMSTI) kits and some not using kits. Co-researchers were selected during initial meetings, interviewed, collected journal entry data, and interviewed again at the culmination of the study. Interviews were transcribed and coded. Analysis included individual cases, each co-researcher, as well as across-case analysis. Results indicated that co-researchers did not

  20. Getting Close, Letting Go, Becoming Real: Civic Engagement with Preservice Art Teachers at the House of Hope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Wendy Sue

    2013-01-01

    This is a qualitative, mixed-methods study that focuses on the dispositions that preservice teachers bring into teacher education programs in regard to homelessness. Teacher education programs play an important role in providing preservice teachers experiences teaching that prepare them for working with diverse populations of students. Students…

  1. In the Eyes of Residents Good Supervisors Need to Be More than Engaged Physicians: The Relevance of Teacher Work Engagement in Residency Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheepers, Renée A.; Arah, Onyebuchi A.; Heineman, Maas Jan; Lombarts, Kiki M. J. M. H.

    2015-01-01

    During their development into competent medical specialists, residents benefit from their attending physicians' excellence in teaching and role modelling. Work engagement increases overall job performance, but it is unknown whether this also applies to attending physicians' teaching performance and role modelling. Attending physicians in clinical…

  2. Orchestrating classroom change to engage children in the process of scientific reasoning: Challenges for teachers and strategies for success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geist, Melissa J.

    Science curricula should reflect the nature of science as experienced by its practitioners (Hacking, 1992; Harding & Hare, 2000; Latour, 1987; Pickering, 1992). Contemporary literature depicts scientific research laboratories as social spaces, where intellectual debate plays a significant role in discovery. However, this is not the way science instruction is conducted in most science classrooms. Tharp and Gallimore (1988) argue that pedagogical methods have not changed in The United States in over one hundred years. Driver, Leach, Millar, and Scott (1996) suggest that in order for students to understand the scientific process, teachers must focus on the "actual work of scientists and illustrate the internal social relations within science" (p. 146). In light of the widespread appeals for change, why does the traditional classroom structure persist? The aim of the present study is to address the issue of classroom change to support students as they engage in the practice of posing questions and constructing scientific explanations complete with peer review. Although theoretical perspectives clearly support designing classroom environments in which the language of conjecture and evidence is the norm, translating these ideas into classroom practice has not been as successful. The original intent of the current study was to explore how students in one intact fifth grade class, positioned as specialists who each had access to one component of a problem with the responsibility of teaching that component to their peers, would differ from students in a second intact fifth grade class, who did not assume this role. The students were compared in terms of the predictions made and the types of evidence presented to support claims. The data indicated that the students did not engage in discussions as anticipated. In fact, the children from both classes approached the problem as a search for the correct answer. Very little evaluation of evidence or debate took place. Given that

  3. 出发!K8L——AMD新一代核心简析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Prometheus; 刘晋

    2006-01-01

    AMD自从发布了K8系列处理器之后,一直占据着CPU性能宝座的头把交椅。去年,AMD又早于Intel发布了超级强大的Athlon 64 X2 4800+双核产品,当时真可谓是风光无限。但是,今年上半年,Intel依靠神秘的Core 2 Duo处理器夺回了性能的桂冠。

  4. Place-Based Science Teaching and Learning: 40 Activities for K-8 Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxton, Cory A.; Provenzo, Eugene F., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    Grounded in theory and best-practices research, this practical text provides elementary and middle school teachers with 40 place-based activities that will help them to make science learning relevant to their students. This text provides teachers with both a rationale and a set of strategies and activities for teaching science in a local context…

  5. Literature-Based Teaching in the Content Areas: 40 Strategies for K-8 Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Carole

    2011-01-01

    Grounded in theory and best-practices research, this practical text provides teachers with 40 strategies for using fiction and non-fiction trade books to teach in five key content areas: language arts and reading, social studies, mathematics, science, and the arts. Each strategy provides everything a teacher needs to get started: a classroom…

  6. Teaching for Transformation: Engaging a Christian Worldview in Teacher Education Courses to Address K-12 Social Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crenshaw, Christina Y.

    2013-01-01

    How faculty at Christian universities encourage teacher candidates to draw on a Christian worldview ultimately influences the ways teacher candidates become effective agents of change in K-12 schools. This study examined the assumption that K-12 Christian teachers cannot remain religiously neutral since one's worldview shapes all aspects of life,…

  7. Engaging Preservice Primary and Preprimary School Teachers in Digital Storytelling for the Teaching and Learning of Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istenic Starcic, Andreja; Cotic, Mara; Solomonides, Ian; Volk, Marina

    2016-01-01

    A significant criticism made of preservice teacher education is that it fails to prepare teachers in such a way that they would feel confident in the use of information and communication technology (ICT) in teaching, despite the assumed digital literacy of student-teachers and the children they will eventually teach. New technologies have enabled…

  8. KEY COMPARISON: Report on key comparison EUROMET.EM-K8 (DC voltage ratio)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marullo Reedtz, G.; Cerri, R.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the regional comparison EUROMET.EM-K8 was to compare the scaling capabilities up to 1000 V DC of the European national metrology institutes, thus extending to Europe the evaluation of equivalence of voltage ratio measurements obtained by the comparison CCEM-K8. Twenty laboratories participated, with the Istituto Elettrotecnico Nazionale Galileo Ferraris (Torino, Italy) acting as pilot laboratory. The circulation of the travelling standard, a resistive voltage divider, started in July 1998 and ended in January 2002. The technical protocol requested the measurement of voltage ratios 1000 V/10 V and 100 V/10 V, the measurement of other ratios being optional. Nineteen laboratories reported measurements of the mandatory ratios. For these ratios, the measurement methods used are described and the process to evaluate the comparison reference value and the degrees of equivalence is reported in detail. The relative uncertainty of the comparison, given by the combination of the uncertainty of the reference value and the instability of the transfer standard, was about 0.26×10-6 for ratio 1000 V/10 V and about 0.16×10-6 for ratio 100 V/10 V, at 95% level of confidence. The results for the optional ratios are reported in an appendix. With some exceptions, the agreement between the results is satisfactory. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCEM, according to the provisions of the Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  9. Pre-Service Teachers' Modelling Processes through Engagement with Model Eliciting Activities with a Technological Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daher, Wajeeh M.; Shahbari, Juhaina Awawdeh

    2015-01-01

    Engaging mathematics students with modelling activities helps them learn mathematics meaningfully. This engagement, in the case of model eliciting activities, helps the students elicit mathematical models by interpreting real-world situation in mathematical ways. This is especially true when the students utilize technology to build the models.…

  10. Pre-Service Teachers' Modelling Processes through Engagement with Model Eliciting Activities with a Technological Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daher, Wajeeh M.; Shahbari, Juhaina Awawdeh

    2015-01-01

    Engaging mathematics students with modelling activities helps them learn mathematics meaningfully. This engagement, in the case of model eliciting activities, helps the students elicit mathematical models by interpreting real-world situation in mathematical ways. This is especially true when the students utilize technology to build the models.…

  11. Successfully Engaging Scientists in NASA Education and Public Outreach: Examples from a Teacher Professional Development Workshop Series and a Planetary Analog Festival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. P.; Hsu, B. C.; Bleacher, L.; Shaner, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Lunar Workshops for Educators are a series of weeklong workshops for grade 6-9 science teachers focused on lunar science and exploration, sponsored by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO). These workshops have been held across the country for the past five years, in places underserved with respect to NASA workshops and at LRO team member institutions. MarsFest is a planetary analog festival that has been held annually in Death Valley National Park since 2012, made possible with support from the Curiosity (primarily the Sample Analysis at Mars) Education and Public Outreach team, NASA's Ames Research Center, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, the SETI Institute, and Death Valley National Park. Both the Lunar Workshops for Educators and MarsFest rely strongly on scientist engagement for their success. In the Lunar Workshops, scientists and engineers give talks for workshop participants, support facility tours and field trips, and, where possible, have lunch with the teachers to interact with them in a less formal setting. Teachers have enthusiastically appreciated and benefited from all of these interactions, and the scientists and engineers also provide positive feedback about their involvement. In MarsFest, scientists and engineers give public presentations and take park visitors on field trips to planetary analog sites. The trips are led by scientists who do research at the field trip sites whenever possible. Surveys of festival participants indicate an appreciation for learning about scientific research being conducted in the park from the people involved in that research, and scientists and engineers report enjoying sharing their work with the public through this program. The key to effective scientist engagement in all of the workshops and festivals has been a close relationship and open communication between the scientists and engineers and the activity facilitators. I will provide more details about both of these programs, how scientists and engineers

  12. Racism and cultural identity: the reflections of two Black trainee teachers' engagement with the Stephen Lawrence Symposium

    OpenAIRE

    Edwards, Martyn

    2015-01-01

    The Stephen Lawrence Symposium held in London in 2013 provided an opportunity for academics and educators to reflect on changes in education and wider society resulting from the legacy of Stephen Lawrence over the 20 years since his racist murder. A Black African trainee teacher and a Black Caribbean trainee teacher in post-16 teacher training at a large university in the North of England participated in a series of lunchtime discussion groups as part of their university-based training. This ...

  13. Long-term Engagement in Authentic Research with NASA (LEARN): Lessons Learned from an Innovative Model for Teacher Research Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pippin, M. R.; Kollmeyer, R.; Joseph, J.; Yang, M. M.; Omar, A. H.; Harte, T.; Taylor, J.; Lewis, P. M.; Weisman, A.; Hyater-Adams, S.

    2013-12-01

    The NASA LEARN Project is an innovative program that provides long-term immersion in the practice of atmospheric science for middle and high school in-service teachers. Working alongside NASA scientists and using authentic NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Research and Analysis (R&A) related and mission-based research data, teachers develop individual research topics of interest during two weeks in the summer while on-site at NASA Langley. With continued, intensive mentoring and guidance of NASA scientists, the teachers further develop their research throughout the academic year through virtual group meetings and data team meetings mirroring scientific collaborations. At the end of the first year, the LEARN teachers present scientific posters. During summer 2013, Cohort 1 (7 teachers) presented posters at an open session and discussed their research topics with Cohort 2 (6 teachers) and science and educator personnel at Langley. The LEARN experience has had such an impact that 6 teachers from Cohort 1 have elected to continue a second year of research working alongside Cohort 2 and LEARN scientists. In addition, Cohort 1 teachers have brought their LEARN experiences back to their classrooms in a variety of ways. The LEARN project evaluation has provided insights into the outcomes of this research experience for teachers and particularly effective program elements. In particular, the LEARN evaluation has focused on how an extended research experience for teachers spanning a full year influences teacher views of science and classroom integration of scientific principles. Early findings indicate that teachers' perceptions of the scientific enterprise have changed, and that LEARN provided substantial resources to help them take real-world research to their students. Teachers also valued the teamwork and cohort approach. In addition, the LEARN evaluation focuses on the experiences of scientists involved in the LEARN program and how their experiences working with

  14. Teachers' organizational citizenship behaviour: Considering the roles of their work engagement, autonomy and leader–member exchange

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Runhaar, P.R.; Konermann, J.; Sanders, K.

    2013-01-01

    The increasing demands that schools are confronted with recently, require teachers' commitment and contribution to school goals, regardless of formal job requirements. This study examines the influence of teachers' work context, in terms of autonomy and leader–membership exchange (LMX), on the relat

  15. Teachers' organizational citizenship behaviour: Considering the roles of their work engagement, autonomy and leader–member exchange

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Runhaar, P.R.; Konermann, J.; Sanders, K.

    2013-01-01

    The increasing demands that schools are confronted with recently, require teachers' commitment and contribution to school goals, regardless of formal job requirements. This study examines the influence of teachers' work context, in terms of autonomy and leader-membership exchange (LMX), on the relat

  16. Teachers' organizational citizenship behaviour: Considering the roles of their work engagement, autonomy and leader–member exchange

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Runhaar, P.R.; Konermann, J.; Sanders, K.

    2013-01-01

    The increasing demands that schools are confronted with recently, require teachers' commitment and contribution to school goals, regardless of formal job requirements. This study examines the influence of teachers' work context, in terms of autonomy and leader–membership exchange (LMX), on the relat

  17. Going down the Rabbit-Hole: Teachers' Engagements with "Dialectical Images" in Canadian Children's Literature on Social Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong-Wilson, Teresa; Yoder, Amarou; Phipps, Heather

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the attraction of Canadian elementary teachers to children's stories that narrate trauma, particularly the trauma associated with First Nations peoples' experiences in Canadian residential schools as told by Indigenous authors. The teachers' responses to these texts are conceived of as occurring within a "contact…

  18. "I Don't Know Why I'm Learning This": Preservice English Teachers' Engagement in a Language Development Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanayake, Selena; Williams, Cheri

    2017-01-01

    Despite the increase of English learners in the U.S. and of standards for linguistically responsive teaching practices, teacher education programs often fall short of preparing preservice teachers to teach diverse learners. In this case study, specifically designed to improve a pedagogical course on English language development, the researchers…

  19. 生防茵K-8对南方根结线虫的防治及其鉴定%The Identification of Biocontrol Bacterium K-8 and Its Biological Control Against Meloidogyne incognita

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁建根; 郑经武; 郝中娜; 王连平; 陶荣祥; 张昕

    2011-01-01

    为了明确生防菌株K-8对南方根结线虫的防效及其分类地位,采用亚甲基蓝染色法测定了生防菌株K-8的发酵液对南方根结线虫2龄幼虫存活的影响,考察了其对南方根结线虫的防效,对其鉴定采用生理生化法、表型培养观察法、脂肪酸分析并结合16S rDNA序列分析法.结果表明,击倒试验发现,生防菌株K-8发酵液对南方根结线虫2龄幼虫有一定的杀伤作用,其矫正死亡率为70.8%,与化学药剂200 g/L克线丹的69.4%将近.菌株K-8对南方根结线虫温室盆栽防治效果为47.8%,明显高于对照200 g/L克线丹的防效41.3%.菌株K-8的形态与生理生化特性与巨大芽孢杆菌很接近,根据SI值和差值,脂肪分析把其鉴定为Bacillus megatenum,由16S rDNA序列分析的系统发育树发现,菌株K-8的序列与Bacillus megaterium构成1个分支,进化上的距离最近,由此可将其鉴定为巨大芽孢杆菌Bacillus megaterium.综合3种鉴定方法,最后把菌株鉴定为巨大芽孢杆菌Bacillus megaterium.%In order to evaluate classification status of biocontrol K-8 and its control efficacy to Meloidogyne incognita, using methylene blue staining method, death efficacy of biocontrol strain K-8 to Meloidogyne incogita was determined, its control efficacy to Meloidogyne incognita was studied by pot tests, and its identification was launched by means of phenotypic characteristics observation, physiological and biochemical indexes determination, FAME identity and the assay of 16S rDNA sequences. The results showed that the fermentation broth of strain K-8 showed a better killing effect on second stage juvennil Meloidogyne incognita and its correct death rate was 70.8%, which was close to that of 69.4% of 200 g/L cadusafos, pot trials of strain K-8 indicated that it had a better control efficacy to Meloidogyne incognita and was 47.8%, significantly better than that of 41.3% of 200 g/L cadusafos. According to the similarity index (SI

  20. Amino acid contents and transport of fixed N in nodules of Leucaena leucocephala variety K-8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DuBois, J.D.

    1987-04-01

    Seedlings of Leucaena leucocephala var. K-8 were grown with a N-free fertilizer or fertilizer containing /sup 15/N-depleted (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ (0.01 atom /sup 15/N; 10 ppm). The nodules of 5 month old trees grown on N-free media were used for /sup 15/N-enriched treatment and as controls. Nodules from plants grown on /sup 15/N-depleted media were also used. Nodules were extracted with 0.5% aqueous toluene and aliquots were analyzed with a Beckman 120B Amino Acid Analyzer. Samples were separated into free ammonium, Asp-N, Glu-N, Asn and Gln amide- and amino-N, and remaining amino acids. Fractions were then analyzed for /sup 15/N content. Asn (27.3 umol/gfw) represented 56% of the total free amino acid pool in the nodules. Asn (amide-N and amino-N) also represented approximately 77% of the total N fixed during the one hour /sup 15/N-enriched N/sub 2/ and the /sup 15/N-depleted treatments. Based on these findings and the fact that the ureide fraction is barely detectable in the nodules (0.25 ..mu..mol/gfw), the authors considers L. leucocephala an amide transporter of fixed N. Additional information will be presented on the amino acid contents of tissues, as well as a time course of amino acid content from seed through nodulation.

  1. Kaleidoscope: A Multicultural Booklist for Grades K-8. Third Edition. NCTE Bibliography Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Junko, Ed.

    The third edition of this annotated bibliography collection offers students, teachers, and librarians a helpful guide to the best multicultural literature (published between 1996 and 1998) for elementary and middle school readers. With approximately 600 annotations on topics and formats including picture story books, realistic fiction, history and…

  2. A Feasibility Study of Implementing Professional Learning Communities in a K-8 School District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillari, Michele R.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the specific needs of the New Horizons School District when implementing professional learning communities. The findings were: (1) teachers do not have a clear understanding of professional learning communities, (2) administrators have a clear understanding of professional learning communities, (3)…

  3. Seamless Assessment in Science: A Guide for Elementary & Middle School. Grades: K - 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Science Teachers Association (NJ3), 2006

    2006-01-01

    When a classroom is opened to inquiry-based learning, teachers can no longer rely solely on traditional end-of-unit tests. "Seamless Assessment" is a one-stop guide to strategies that mirror the investigatory spirit. Working with the popular 5E model as an instructional framework, the authors have designed methods for embedding formative and…

  4. Engaging a middle school teacher and students in formal-informal science education: Contexts of science standards-based curriculum and an urban science center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Shamarion Gladys

    This is a three-article five chapter doctoral dissertation. The overall purpose of this three-pronged study is to engage a middle school science teacher and students in formal-informal science education within the context of a science standards-based curriculum and Urban Science Center. The goals of the study were: (1) to characterize the conversations of formal and informal science educators as they attempted to implement a standards-based curriculum augmented with science center exhibits; (2) to study the classroom discourse between the teacher and students that foster the development of common knowledge in science and student understanding of the concept of energy before observing science center exhibits on energy; (3) to investigate whether or not a standards-driven, project-based Investigating and Questioning our World through Science and Technology (IQWST) curriculum unit on forms and transformation of energy augmented with science center exhibits had a significant effect on urban African-American seventh grade students' achievement and learning. Overall, the study consisted of a mixed-method approach. Article one consists of a case study featuring semi-structured interviews and field notes. Article two consists of documenting and interpreting teacher-students' classroom discourse. Article three consists of qualitative methods (classroom discussion, focus group interviews, student video creation) and quantitative methods (multiple choice and open-ended questions). Oral discourses in all three studies were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. In article one, the community of educators' conversations were critically analyzed to discern the challenges educators encountered when they attempted to connect school curriculum to energy exhibits at the Urban Science Center. The five challenges that characterize the emergence of a third space were as follows: (a) science terminology for lesson focus, (b) "dumb-down" of science exhibits, (c) exploration distracts

  5. Relationship quality and student engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culver, Jennifer

    The purpose of this study was to examine the qualities of support, relatedness, and negative interaction within parent-child and teacher-student relationships and their association with cognitive, psychological, and behavioral engagement. Additionally, this study explored the contributions of cognitive and psychological engagement on behavioral engagement. The role of gender, grade, and ethnicity on relationship quality and engagement was also considered. Participants (n=311) were students in grades three through five from a suburban school district in southeastern Michigan. Perceptions of teacher-student relationship quality varied by grade level. In general, younger students reported greater teacher support and relatedness in comparison to older students. Conversely, older students perceived greater conflict within the teacher-student relationship. Student engagement also varied by grade level, with younger students reporting greater engagement than older students. Ethnicity also contributed to variance in student engagement, with African American students reporting significantly more engagement than Caucasian or Multiracial students. Teacher-student relationship quality was a significant predictor of student engagement, even after controlling for student characteristics and parent-child relationship variables. Results of path analysis revealed that cognitive and psychological engagement contributed significantly to behavioral engagement.

  6. 七彩虹携手VIA推出国内首款K8 PCI-E平台

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    七彩虹近日推出了国内首款K8 PCI-E平台,基于VIA K8T890+VT8237R芯片组的“飞龙勇士C.K8T890 MAX”。此款主板支持Socket 939的Athlon64处理器、1GHz HyperTransport总线传输、双通道DDR400内存模式、x16 PCI—Express图形串行总线接口、4条x1 PCI Expreess串行接口、提供2个Serial ATA硬盘接口,

  7. An in-depth study of a teacher engaged in an innovative primary science trial professional development project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watters, James J.; Ginns, Ian S.

    1997-03-01

    The implementation of effective science programmes in primary schools is of continuing interest and concern for professional developers. As part of the Australian Academy of science's approach to creating an awareness of Primary Investigations, a project team trialed a series of satellite television broadcasts of lessons related to two units of the curriculum for Year 3 and 4 children in 48 participating schools. The professional development project entitled Simply Science, included a focused component for the respective classroom teachers, which was also conducted by satellite. This paper reports the involvement of a Year 4 teacher in the project and describes her professional growth. Already an experienced and confident teacher, no quantitative changes in science teaching self efficacy were detected. However, her pedagogical content knowledge and confidence to teach science in the concept areas of matter and energy were enhanced. Changes in the teacher's views about the co-operative learning strategies espoused by Primary Investigations were also evident. Implications for the design of professional development programmes for primary science teachers are discussed.

  8. Problem Identification and Task Engagement Using the LIBRE Problem Solving Tool: A Case Study of Three Bilingual Teacher Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Norma; Castro-Villarreal, Felicia; Cheatham, Nicholas; Claeys, Lorena

    2014-01-01

    Bilingual Latino students engage multiple languages, cultures and environments as they pursue educational and professional goals. For this underrepresented group, pursuing a post-secondary degree is a "lucha" (fight) to negotiate the complex interplay of historical, educational, and cultural variables and achieve academic success.…

  9. Can a Dog Be Used as a Motivator to Develop Social Interaction and Engagement with Teachers for Students with Autism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Kathryn; Jarred, Scott; Hinchcliffe, Vivian; Roberts, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    Research into children with autism indicates that therapeutic sessions with dogs might provide a way of encouraging social interaction and reducing solitary or repetitive behaviours. With recent educational ASD interventions aimed at providing ways of encouraging intrinsic motivation to socially engage, it is possible that sessions with dogs could…

  10. Can a Dog Be Used as a Motivator to Develop Social Interaction and Engagement with Teachers for Students with Autism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Kathryn; Jarred, Scott; Hinchcliffe, Vivian; Roberts, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    Research into children with autism indicates that therapeutic sessions with dogs might provide a way of encouraging social interaction and reducing solitary or repetitive behaviours. With recent educational ASD interventions aimed at providing ways of encouraging intrinsic motivation to socially engage, it is possible that sessions with dogs could…

  11. Why Volunteer? The Complexities of International Pre-Service Teachers' Intercultural Adjustment Experiences through Community Service Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soong, Hannah

    2013-01-01

    Anecdotal evidence suggests that pre-service teachers who have volunteered in schools demonstrate greater awareness of the general operational aspects of a school and, thus, are better prepared for the teaching practicum. However, there is little documented evidence about the cross-cultural challenges of international pre-service teachers…

  12. Why Volunteer? The Complexities of International Pre-Service Teachers' Intercultural Adjustment Experiences through Community Service Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soong, Hannah

    2013-01-01

    Anecdotal evidence suggests that pre-service teachers who have volunteered in schools demonstrate greater awareness of the general operational aspects of a school and, thus, are better prepared for the teaching practicum. However, there is little documented evidence about the cross-cultural challenges of international pre-service teachers…

  13. Do Teachers Equate Male and Masculine with Lower Academic Engagement? How Students' Gender Enactment Triggers Gender Stereotypes at School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyder, Anke; Kessels, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    Girls presently outperform boys in overall academic success. Corresponding gender stereotypes portray male students as lazy and troublesome and female students as diligent and compliant. The present study investigated whether these stereotypes impact teachers' perceptions of students and whether students' visible enactment of their gender at…

  14. Sequencing learning experiences to engage different level learners in the workplace : An interview study with excellent clinical teachers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, H. Carrie; O'Sullivan, Patricia; Teherani, Arianne; Fogh, Shannon; Kobashi, Brent; Ten Cate, Olle

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Learning in the clinical workplace can appear to rely on opportunistic teaching. The cognitive apprenticeship model describes assigning tasks based on learner rather than just workplace needs. This study aimed to determine how excellent clinical teachers select clinical learning experiences

  15. "Why Are You Doing This?" Questions on Purpose, Structure, and Outcomes in Participatory Action Research Engaging Youth and Teacher Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galletta, Anne; Jones, Vanessa

    2010-01-01

    Our article is based on a study of our integration of social foundations coursework with filmmaking and participatory action research, bringing teacher candidates and middle and high school students together. The project was carried out in partnership between an urban university and two nearby public schools within a Midwestern city known for high…

  16. An Analysis of How and Why High School Geometry Teachers Implement Dynamic Geometry Software Tasks for Student Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirode, Wayne

    2012-01-01

    This study examined teachers' use of student tasks involving dynamic geometry software, in which a figure is constructed then altered while maintaining its constructed properties. Although researchers, professional organizations, and policy makers generally have been proponents of dynamic geometry for instruction, there is little research about…

  17. Taking Teachers' Continuous Professional Development (CPD) beyond Reflection: Adding Shared Sense-Making and Collaborative Engagement for Professional Renewal

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArdle, Karen; Coutts, Norman

    2010-01-01

    While reflection continues to be promoted as a central feature of teachers' continuous professional development (CPD) activities in Scotland and elsewhere, a wider debate across professions and national boundaries has opened as to how reflection might be re-conceptualised to restore its social and critical dimensions. This paper seeks to…

  18. Do Teachers Equate Male and Masculine with Lower Academic Engagement? How Students' Gender Enactment Triggers Gender Stereotypes at School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyder, Anke; Kessels, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    Girls presently outperform boys in overall academic success. Corresponding gender stereotypes portray male students as lazy and troublesome and female students as diligent and compliant. The present study investigated whether these stereotypes impact teachers' perceptions of students and whether students' visible enactment of their gender at…

  19. Children's Self-Concept: Parental School Engagement and Student-Teacher Relationships in Rural and Urban Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavidia-Payne, Susana; Denny, Bianca; Davis, Kate; Francis, Andrew; Jackson, Mervyn

    2015-01-01

    Self-concept is one important yet understudied construct, often associated with healthy children's well-being, and particularly crucial for those raised in rural disadvantaged communities. Also, commonly acknowledged is that adults, including parents and teachers, play an important role in fostering self-concept. The overall aim of the current…

  20. Raising Awareness to Transcend Disciplines: Developing Teachers' Critical Awareness across Disciplines to Increase Indigenous Learner Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Tasha

    2014-01-01

    The issue of low graduation rates among Indigenous learners transcends borders. Some argue that racism and discrimination in schools and in wider society impede the success of Indigenous learners. Although teachers may not intend to make discriminatory decisions based on a learner's ascribed characteristics, research has demonstrated that…

  1. Engaging Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students in the School Library: A Handbook for Teacher-Librarians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisner, Nadene

    2012-01-01

    Over seventy percent of students who are deaf or hard of hearing will attend a public school and enroll in a classroom with their hearing peers or in a self-contained classroom with other deaf and hard of hearing students. Teacher-librarians who work in these schools can improve their instruction by understanding not only what it means to be…

  2. Teacher as Learner in DV Poetry: Toward a Praxis of Engaging Literacies in Alternative Spaces for Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jocson, Korina M.

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author reflects on the uses of multimedia literacy and discusses a unique but replicable process of creating a video poem linking her artistic visions with some personal life experiences. Rethinking notions of teacher as learner, the author draws upon particular learning moments to reconceptualize current teaching practices…

  3. Genetic Evidence for O-Specific Antigen as Receptor of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Phage K8 and Its Genomic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuewei ePan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Phage therapy requires the comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms underlying the host-phage interactions. In this work, to identify the genes related to Pseudomonas aeruginosa phage K8 receptor synthesis, 16 phage-resistant mutants were selected from a Tn5G transposon mutant library of strain PAK. The disrupted genetic loci were identified and they were related to O-specific antigen (OSA synthesis, including gene wbpR, ssg, wbpV, wbpO, and Y880_RS05480, which encoded a putative O-antigen polymerase Wzy. The LPS profile of the Y880_RS05480 mutant was analyzed and shown to lack the O-antigen. Therefore, the data from characterization of Y880_RS05480 by TMHMM and SDS-PAGE silver staining analysis suggest that this locus might encode Wzy. The complete phage K8 genome was characterized as 93879 bp in length and contained identical 1188-bp terminal direct repeats. Comparative genomic analysis showed that phage K8 was highly homologous to members of the genus PaP1-like phages. On the basis of our genetic findings, OSA of P. aeruginosa PAK is proven to be the receptor of phage K8. The highly conserved structural proteins among the genetic closely related phages suggest that they may recognize the same receptor.

  4. Content Analysis of Selected Features of K-8 Environmental Education Research Studies in Turkey, 1997-2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan, Mehmet; Marcinkowski, Tom; Ok, Ahmet

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze environmental education research (EER) in Turkey conducted in Grades K-8 and published over the years 1997-2007. Due to the fact that there had been no systematic reviews of EER in Turkey prior to this time period, it was more appropriate to explore the implications of the results of this review for research policies…

  5. The role of the atypical kinases ABC1K7 and ABC1K8 in abscisic acid responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna eManara

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The ABC1K family of atypical kinases (activity of bc1 complex kinase is represented in bacteria, archaea and eukaryotes. In plants they regulate diverse physiological processes in the chloroplasts and mitochondria, but their precise functions are poorly defined. ABC1K7 and ABC1K8 are probably involved in oxidative stress responses, isoprenyl lipid synthesis and distribution of iron within chloroplasts. Because reactive oxygen species take part in abscisic acid (ABA-mediated processes, we investigated the functions of ABC1K7 and ABC1K8 during germination, stomatal movement and leaf senescence. Both genes were upregulated by ABA treatment and some ABA-responsive physiological processes were affected in abc1k7 and abc1k8 mutants. Germination was more severely affected by ABA, osmotic stress and salt stress in the single and double mutants; the stomatal aperture was smaller in the mutants under standard growth conditions and was not further reduced by exogenous ABA application; ABA-induced senescence symptoms were more severe in the leaves of the single and double mutants compared to wild type leaves. Taken together, our results suggest that ABC1K7 and ABC1K8 might be involved in the cross-talk between ABA and ROS signaling.

  6. Teachers' Understanding of Algebraic Generalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawthorne, Casey Wayne

    Generalization has been identified as a cornerstone of algebraic thinking (e.g., Lee, 1996; Sfard, 1995) and is at the center of a rich conceptualization of K-8 algebra (Kaput, 2008; Smith, 2003). Moreover, mathematics teachers are being encouraged to use figural-pattern generalizing tasks as a basis of student-centered instruction, whereby teachers respond to and build upon the ideas that arise from students' explorations of these activities. Although more and more teachers are engaging their students in such generalizing tasks, little is known about teachers' understanding of generalization and their understanding of students' mathematical thinking in this domain. In this work, I addressed this gap, exploring the understanding of algebraic generalization of 4 exemplary 8th-grade teachers from multiple perspectives. A significant feature of this investigation is an examination of teachers' understanding of the generalization process, including the use of algebraic symbols. The research consisted of two phases. Phase I was an examination of the teachers' understandings of the underlying quantities and quantitative relationships represented by algebraic notation. In Phase II, I observed the instruction of 2 of these teachers. Using the lens of professional noticing of students' mathematical thinking, I explored the teachers' enacted knowledge of algebraic generalization, characterizing how it supported them to effectively respond to the needs and queries of their students. Results indicated that teachers predominantly see these figural patterns as enrichment activities, disconnected from course content. Furthermore, in my analysis, I identified conceptual difficulties teachers experienced when solving generalization tasks, in particular, connecting multiple symbolic representations with the quantities in the figures. Moreover, while the teachers strived to overcome the challenges of connecting different representations, they invoked both productive and unproductive

  7. Mars Public Engagement Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christine

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the Mars public engagement goal to understand and protect our home planet, explore the Universe and search for life, and to inspire the next generation of explorers. Teacher workshops, robotics education, Mars student imaging and analysis programs, MARS Student Imaging Project (MSIP), Russian student participation, MARS museum visualization alliance, and commercialization concepts are all addressed in this project.

  8. Engaged to Learn Ways of Engaging ESL Learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Tomlinson

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I am going to argue that our most important role as language teachers is to provide potentially engaging materials for our learners and then to make use of them in optimally engaging ways. If we do not engage our learners most of the time no amount of exposure, teaching, practice or use of the language will help them to achieve sufficient language acquisition and development.

  9. Understanding Learning and Teaching in Papua New Guinea: Elementary Teacher Trainers Engaged in Cultural Authorship in the Context of National Educational Reforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownlee, Joanne M.; Farrell, Ann; Davis, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Over the last decade, Papua New Guinea (PNG) has pursued educational reform in elementary teacher education. Because elementary teachers and teacher education are central to the reform agenda, there is a need to gain empirical evidence about how PNG teacher trainers' understandings about learning and teaching impact on their practice. The study…

  10. Student Engagement with Others' Mathematical Ideas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Megan L.; Turrou, Angela C.; Webb, Noreen M.; Ing, Marsha; Wong, Jacqueline; Shin, Nami; Fernandez, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    Educators, researchers, and policy makers increasingly recognize that participation in classroom mathematics discussions, especially engaging with others' ideas, can promote students' mathematics understanding. How teachers can promote students' high-level engagement with others' ideas, and the challenges teachers face when trying to do so, have…

  11. MAP3K8 (TPL2/COT affects obesity-induced adipose tissue inflammation without systemic effects in humans and in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dov B Ballak

    Full Text Available Chronic low-grade inflammation in adipose tissue often accompanies obesity, leading to insulin resistance and increasing the risk for metabolic diseases. MAP3K8 (TPL2/COT is an important signal transductor and activator of pro-inflammatory pathways that has been linked to obesity-induced adipose tissue inflammation. We used human adipose tissue biopsies to study the relationship of MAP3K8 expression with markers of obesity and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8. Moreover, we evaluated obesity-induced adipose tissue inflammation and insulin resistance in mice lacking MAP3K8 and WT mice on a high-fat diet (HFD for 16 weeks. Individuals with a BMI >30 displayed a higher mRNA expression of MAP3K8 in adipose tissue compared to individuals with a normal BMI. Additionally, high mRNA expression levels of IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8, but not TNF -α, in human adipose tissue were associated with higher expression of MAP3K8. Moreover, high plasma SAA and CRP did not associate with increased MAP3K8 expression in adipose tissue. Similarly, no association was found for MAP3K8 expression with plasma insulin or glucose levels. Mice lacking MAP3K8 had similar bodyweight gain as WT mice, yet displayed lower mRNA expression levels of IL-1β, IL-6 and CXCL1 in adipose tissue in response to the HFD as compared to WT animals. However, MAP3K8 deficient mice were not protected against HFD-induced adipose tissue macrophage infiltration or the development of insulin resistance. Together, the data in both human and mouse show that MAP3K8 is involved in local adipose tissue inflammation, specifically for IL-1β and its responsive cytokines IL-6 and IL-8, but does not seem to have systemic effects on insulin resistance.

  12. Situating Engagement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korn, Matthias

    can participate in the world. We experience a new participatory culture on the go. These developments offer new possibilities for civic engagement in participatory land use planning: to engage people where they are. This dissertation coins the notion of situated engagement, which seeks to ’situate......’ civic engagement activities in those spatial contexts that are at stake in land use planning. This approach enables engagement activities to be better integrated with people’s everyday lived experiences through connecting to the places that are personally meaningful and relevant to them. A ’research...... through design’ approach is applied across four participatory design experiments to explore how to design for situated engagement in land use planning. A notion of a situated engagement infrastructure made up of mobile, stationary, ubiquitous, and remote systems frames the design experiments suggesting...

  13. Learn to Live: Simple and Practical Activities to Promote Health, Nutrition and Physical Fitness in the K-8 Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ann Y. Dirga

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Current health education and physical fitness programs have failed to prevent the youth obesity epidemic. The diminishing emphasis placed on such programs due to curricular and budgetary constraints results in few opportunities to promote students’ active participation in regular physical activity and health education programs. Findings indicate that a successful program to promote healthy nutrition, an active lifestyle, and regular physical exercise requires that the information is easily accessible, and presented in a clear and concise format. Readers are introduced to a comprehensive program, easily adjustable throughout the K-8 curriculum. It is designed to complement regular classroom activities by introducing a series of stand-alone lessons and activities to educate students on the benefits of regular exercise and healthy lifestyle. This program can be used in any community and can offer the youth population the information they need to create healthy habits that will last a lifetime.

  14. Elastic properties of type-I clathrate K8Zn4Sn42 determined by inelastic X-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leu, Bogdan M.; Sturza, Mihai; Hong, Jiawang; Alatas, Ahmet; Baran, Volodymyr; Fassler, Thomas F.

    2016-01-01

    We measured the phonon dispersion at ambient conditions in single-crystal type-I clathrate K8Zn4Sn42, a material with promising thermoelectric properties that has only recently been synthesized, using the high-energy resolution inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) technique. From the sound velocities along high-symmetry directions, we extracted the elastic constants (C 11, C 12, C 44 = 63.2, 19.1, 21.9 GPa, respectively). Experimental results agree with the predictions from first-principles calculations on the hypothetical, "guest-free", type-I clathrate Sn46. The size of the crystal investigated was several orders of magnitude smaller than what is required for neutron and ultrasonic measurements. Due to this essential property, together with the high-energy resolution, high-momentum-transfer resolution, and the access to the strongest Bragg reflections, IXS is the technique of choice for measuring the full elastic constant tensor for microcrystals.

  15. 师范大学生教师职业认同与学习投入关系的实证研究%Relationship between Teacher Professional Identity and Study Engagement of Normal College Students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭小宏; 刘勇

    2014-01-01

    In order to evaluate the relationship between teacher professional identity and study engagement, 631 normal college students were surveyed by scales. The result indicates:(1)their teacher professional identity is higher,and study engagement is at average level;(2)the relationship between teacher professional identity and study engagement is significantly positive;(3)the factors such as professional efficacy and professional volition show equable predictability on study engagement's three factors:dedication,vigor and absorption.%为了考察师范大学生教师职业认同与学习投入之间的关系,采用问卷调查法对631名师范大学生进行调查,数据统计分析的结果表明:①师范大学生教师职业认同处于较好水平,而学习投入则处于中等水平;②师范生教师职业认同及其各因子和学习投入及其各个因子之间均存在显著相关;③师范大学生教师职业认同的职业效能、职业意志等部分因子能够有效预测学习投入的动机、精力、专注三个因子。

  16. Teacher agency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Priestley, M.; Biesta, G.; Robinson, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    of the contexts within which teachers work – for example accountability mechanisms and other forms of output regulation of teachers’ work – leading to engagement with policy that is often instrumental and blighted by unintended consequences. In the chapter, we illustrate how a detailed understanding of teacher...

  17. Plakophilin3 loss leads to an increase in PRL3 levels promoting K8 dephosphorylation, which is required for transformation and metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nileema Khapare

    Full Text Available The desmosome anchors keratin filaments in epithelial cells leading to the formation of a tissue wide IF network. Loss of the desmosomal plaque protein plakophilin3 (PKP3 in HCT116 cells, leads to an increase in neoplastic progression and metastasis, which was accompanied by an increase in K8 levels. The increase in levels was due to an increase in the protein levels of the Phosphatase of Regenerating Liver 3 (PRL3, which results in a decrease in phosphorylation on K8. The increase in PRL3 and K8 protein levels could be reversed by introduction of an shRNA resistant PKP3 cDNA. Inhibition of K8 expression in the PKP3 knockdown clone S10, led to a decrease in cell migration and lamellipodia formation. Further, the K8 PKP3 double knockdown clones showed a decrease in colony formation in soft agar and decreased tumorigenesis and metastasis in nude mice. These results suggest that a stabilisation of K8 filaments leading to an increase in migration and transformation may be one mechanism by which PKP3 loss leads to tumor progression and metastasis.

  18. Hope in the Face of Climate Change: Associations with Environmental Engagement and Student Perceptions of Teachers' Emotion Communication Style and Future Orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojala, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Is hope concerning climate change related to environmental engagement, or is it rather associated with unrealistic optimism and inactivity? This study on Swedish high school students identified two kinds of hope: constructive hope and hope based on denial. Constructive hope was positively associated with engagement and a perception that teachers…

  19. A large-scale examination of the nature and efficacy of teachers' practices to engage parents: assessment, parental contact, and student-level impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitsinger, Anne M; Felner, Robert D; Brand, Stephen; Burns, Amy

    2008-08-01

    As schools move forward with comprehensive school reform, parents' roles have shifted and been redefined. Parent-teacher communication is critical to student success, yet how schools and teachers contact parents is the subject of few studies. Evaluations of school-change efforts require reliable and useful measures of teachers' practices in communicating with parents. The structure of teacher-parent-contact practices was examined using data from multiple, longitudinal cohorts of schools and teachers from a large-scale project and found to be a reliable and stable measure of parent contact across building levels and localities. Teacher/school practices in contacting parents were found to be significantly related to parent reports of school contact performance and student academic adjustment and achievement. Implications for school improvement efforts are discussed.

  20. Math in Motion: Origami in the Classroom. A Hands-On Creative Approach to Teaching Mathematics. K-8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearl, Barbara

    This perfect bound teacher's guide presents techniques and activities to teach mathematics using origami paper folding. Part 1 includes a history of origami, mathematics and origami, and careers using mathematics. Parts 2 and 3 introduce paper-folding concepts and teaching techniques and include suggestions for low-budget paper resources. Part 4…

  1. Measuring Student Engagement in the Online Course: The Online Student Engagement Scale (OSE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixson, Marcia D.

    2015-01-01

    Student engagement is critical to student learning, especially in the online environment, where students can often feel isolated and disconnected. Therefore, teachers and researchers need to be able to measure student engagement. This study provides validation of the Online Student Engagement scale (OSE) by correlating student self-reports of…

  2. Hoped for Possible Selves and Its Relationship with Job Engagement and Burnout of Secondary School Teachers%中学教师希望自我与其工作投入和工作倦怠

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐旭琳; 夏云颖; 甘怡群

    2013-01-01

    结合成就动机的期望价值模型,以感知效用和教师教学效能感为中介变量,探索中学教师希望自我与其工作投入和工作倦怠的关系,验证希望自我动机作用的中介模型.对7所中学的252位教师进行问卷调查,采用的量表是改编的适用于教师群体的希望自我量表、感知效用量表、教师教学效能感量表、教师工作倦怠量表和Utrecht工作投入量表.结果显示:中学教师希望自我通过教学效能感对工作投入和工作倦怠作用,即教学效能感是希望自我和工作投入、工作倦怠之间的完全中介变量;希望自我通过感知效用对工作倦怠作用,感知效用完全中介希望自我和工作倦怠之间的关系,但它不是希望自我和工作投入的中介.由研究结果得到如下结论:中学教师希望自我通过教学效能感提高工作投入,通过教学效能感和感知效用减少工作倦怠.%The authors discuss the relationship between hoped for possible selves and teaching behavior (including job engagement and teacher burnout) of secondary school teachers. Basing on the expectancy-value models of motivation, perceived instrumentality and teaching efficacy are chosen as the two variables' mediators. The questionnaire survey is used to 252 teachers in seven secondary schools and the data is collected by adapted scales for teachers of Hoped for Possible Selves Scale, Perceived Instrumentality Scale, Teaching Efficacy Scale, Job-Burnout Inventory for Middle School Teachers and UWES. The result indicates that perceived instrumentality is a fully mediator between hoped for possible selves and job burnout, but not one between hoped for possible selves and job engagement. Teaching efficacy fully mediates the relationship between hoped for possible selves and job engagement and teaching burnout.

  3. An Investigation of Teachers' Awareness and Willingness to Engage with a Self-Directed Professional Development Package on Gifted and Talented Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser-Seeto, Kylie T.; Howard, Steven J.; Woodcock, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Despite recognising the importance of educators in meeting the needs of gifted and talented students, research indicates that teachers often lack the essential knowledge, skills and confidence to identify and meet the needs of gifted and talented students. Evidence suggests this lack of preparation may be related to teachers' professional…

  4. Long-Term Engagement in Authentic Research with NASA (LEARN): Innovative Practices Suggested By a New Model for Teacher Research Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pippin, M. R.; Joseph, J. D.; Yang, M. M.; Omar, A. H.; Crecelius, S.; Harte, T.; Lewis, P. M., Jr.; Taylor, J.; Bujosa, R.; Moulton, C.; Haggard, C. S.; Hyater-Adams, S.; Kollmeyer, R.; Weisman, A.

    2014-12-01

    NASA's LEARN Project is an innovative program that provides long-term immersion in the practice of atmospheric science for middle and high school in-service teachers. Working alongside NASA scientists and using authentic NASA Science Mission Directorate research data, teachers develop individual research topics of interest during two weeks in the summer while on-site at NASA Langley. With continued, intensive mentoring by NASA scientists, the teachers further develop their research throughout the academic year through virtual group meetings and data team meetings mirroring scientific collaborations. At the end of the first year, LEARN teachers present scientific posters. The LEARN experience has had such an impact that multiple teachers from the first two cohorts have elected to continue their research. The LEARN project evaluation has provided insights into particularly effective elements of this new approach. Findings indicate that teachers' perceptions of the scientific enterprise have changed, and that LEARN provided substantial resources to help them take real-world research to their students. This presentation will focus on key factors from LEARN's implementation that inform best practices for the incorporation of authentic scientific research into teacher professional development experiences. We suggest that these factors should be considered in the development of other such experiences, including: (1) The involvement of a single scientist as both the project leader/manager and the project scientist, to ensure that the project can meet teachers' needs. (2) An emphasis on framing and approaching scientific research questions, so that teachers can learn to evaluate the feasibility of studies based on scope, scale, and availability of data. (3) Long term, ongoing relationships where teachers and scientists work as collaborators, beyond the workshop "mold." (4) A focus on meeting the needs of individual teachers, whether their needs relate to elements of

  5. Measuring the utility of the Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics (STEM) Academy Measurement Tool in assessing the development of K-8 STEM academies as professional learning communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irish, Teresa J.

    The aim of this study was to provide insights addressing national concerns in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) education by examining how a set of six perimeter urban K-12 schools were transformed into STEM-focused professional learning communities (PLC). The concept of a STEM Academy as a STEM-focused PLC emphasizes the development of a STEM culture where professional discourse and teaching are focused on STEM learning. The STEM Academies examined used the STEM Academy Measurement Tool and Rubric (Tool) as a catalyst for discussion and change. This Tool was developed with input from stakeholders and used for school-wide initiatives, teacher professional development and K-12 student engagement to improve STEM teaching and learning. Two primary goals of this study were to assess the levels of awareness and use of the tool by all stakeholders involved in the project and to determine how the Tool assisted in the development and advancement of these schools as STEM PLCs. Data from the STEM Academy Participant Survey was analyzed to determine stakeholders' perceptions of the Tool in terms of (i) how aware stakeholders were of the Tool, (ii) whether they participated in the use of the Tool, (iii) how the characteristics of PLCs were perceived in their schools, and finally (iv) how the awareness of the Tool influenced teachers' perceptions of the presence of PLC characteristics. Findings indicate that school faculty were aware of the Tool on a number of different levels and evidence exists that the use of the Tool assisted in the development of STEM Academies, however impact varied from school to school. Implications of this study suggest that the survey should be used for a longer period of time to gain more in-depth knowledge on teachers' perceptions of the Tool as a catalyst across time. Additional findings indicate that the process for using the Tool should be ongoing and involve the stakeholders to have the greatest impact on school culture

  6. Teacher Home Visits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronholz, June

    2016-01-01

    Volumes of research suggest that one key to a child's academic success is having "engaged" parents, but parents know that, to teachers, engagement means a fairly circumscribed round of activities--back-to-school nights, parent-teacher conferences, potlucks, and interactive homework. Making the connection between schools and families is…

  7. Camptothecin induces urokinase-type plasminogen activator gene-expression in human RC-K8 malignant lymphoma and H69 small cell lung cancer cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Shibakura M; Niiya K; Kiguchi T; Nakata Y; Tanimoto M

    2002-01-01

    We previously reported that anthracyclines, which could generate reactive oxygen species (ROS), could induce the urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) gene expression in human RC-K8 malignant lymphoma cells and in H69 small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cells. In screening other uPA-inducible anti-cancer agents, we found that camptothecin (CPT) and its derivative, SN38, could induce uPA in RC-K8 and H69 cells. CPT and SN38, which are also used for the treatment of lymphoma and SCLC, significan...

  8. Functions and Functional Preferences of Code Switching: A Case Study at a Private K-8 School in Turkish Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolin DEMIRCI

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to the changes in the approaches and methods in English language teaching throughout history, the use of mother tongue (L1 has been one of the most important topics discussed in the foreign language teaching field. Although most of the approaches used nowadays do not support the use of mother tongue, there is a change in the perception towards teachers’ code-switching in foreign language (L2 learning classrooms. There are various recent studies suggesting that using mother tongue facilitates foreign language learning. In this respect, the purpose of this study was to examine the teachers’ and students’ perceptions towards L1 use in L2 classrooms and under which circumstances they preferred using mother tongue. In addition, learners’ preferences of teachers’ code switching were also analyzed. Both teachers’ and students’ perceptions and beliefs on code switching were investigated using the questionnaires, classroom observations and interviews as data collection tools. There were 2 hour-observation periods (90 minutes in the classrooms of 2nd grade, 4th grade and 7th grade in which the circumstances of L1 use were analyzed to determine if there were any common characteristics of the L1 use. Findings of the revealed that there were some common circumstances where teachers code-switched to facilitate learning in the classroom and that students had some clear preferences for their teachers to switch to L1.

  9. Motivation, Engagement, and Student Voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toshalis, Eric; Nakkula, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Figuring out what motivates and engages individual students is essential. Indeed, it is the prerequisite for implementing student-centered approaches to learning. However, today's teachers--confronting large class sizes, fast-paced academic calendars, and standardized assessments--face particular pressures to lump all students together and "teach…

  10. Teacher agency:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robinson, Sarah; Priestley, Mark; Biesta, Gert

    2015-01-01

    The concept of teacher agency has emerged in recent literature as an alternative means of understanding how teachers might enact practice and engage with policy (e.g. Lasky, 2005; Leander & Osbourne, 2008; Ketelaar et al., 2012; Priestley, Biesta & Robinson, 2013). But what is agency? Agency...... remains an inexact and poorly conceptualised construct in much of the literature, where it is often not clear whether the term refers to an individual capacity of teachers to act agentically or to an emergent ‘ecological’ phenomenon dependent upon the quality of individuals’ engagement...... with their environments (Biesta & Tedder, 2007). In this chapter, we outline the latter conception of agency, developing a conceptual model for teacher agency that emphasizes the temporal and relational dimension of the achievement of agency. Why does this matter? Recent curriculum policy in many countries heralds a [re...

  11. Increasing Reading Engagement in African American Boys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husband, Terry

    2014-01-01

    Much has been written concerning the challenges many teachers face in engaging African American males in reading practices. While much of this extant scholarship focuses on African American males at the pre-adolescent stage of development and beyond, little has been written regarding increasing reading engagement in African American boys in P-5…

  12. MAP3K8 (TPL2/COT) Affects Obesity-Induced Adipose Tissue Inflammation without Systemic Effects in Humans and in Mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ballak, D.B.; Essen, van P.; Diepen, van J.A.; Jansen, H.; Hijmans, A.; Matsuguchi, T.; Sparrer, H.; Tack, C.J.; Netea, M.G.; Joosten, L.A.; Stienstra, R.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic low-grade inflammation in adipose tissue often accompanies obesity, leading to insulin resistance and increasing the risk for metabolic diseases. MAP3K8 (TPL2/COT) is an important signal transductor and activator of pro-inflammatory pathways that has been linked to obesity-induced adipose

  13. Annotated Bibliography of Children's Literature Resources on War, Terrorism, and Disaster since 1945: By Continents/Countries for Grades K-8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangi, Jane M.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents an annotated bibliography of children's literature resources on war, terrorism, and disaster since 1945. This annotated bibliography focuses on grades K-8 from different continents/countries, including (1) Africa; (2) Asia; (3) The Caribbean; (4) Central and South America; (5) Europe; and (6) The Middle East.

  14. Eighth-Grade School Form and Resilience in the Transition to High School: A Comparison of Middle Schools and K-8 Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Christopher C.; Baker-Smith, E. Christine

    2010-01-01

    We examine a set of academic and social outcomes in 9th grade, comparing middle school attendees with those who attended K-8 schools. Previous research with these data has shown that there are few differences in 8th-grade outcomes by school type. Here we extend these findings to determine whether school form influences student outcomes in the…

  15. Lattice Dynamics Study of Phonon Instability and Thermal Properties of Type-I Clathrate K8Si46 under High Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available For a further understanding of the phase transitions mechanism in type-I silicon clathrates K8Si46, ab initio self-consistent electronic calculations combined with linear-response method have been performed to investigate the vibrational properties of alkali metal K atoms encapsulated type-I silicon-clathrate under pressure within the framework of density functional perturbation theory. Our lattice dynamics simulation results showed that the pressure induced phase transition of K8Si46 was believed to be driven by the phonon instability of the calthrate lattice. Analysis of the evolution of the partial phonon density of state with pressure, a legible dynamic picture for both guest K atoms and host lattice, was given. In addition, based on phonon calculations and combined with quasi-harmonic approximation, the specific heat of K8Si46 was derived, which agreed very well with experimental results. Also, other important thermal properties including the thermal expansion coefficients and Grüneisen parameters of K8Si46 under different temperature and pressure were also predicted.

  16. MAP3K8 (TPL2/COT) Affects Obesity-Induced Adipose Tissue Inflammation without Systemic Effects in Humans and in Mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ballak, D.B.; Essen, P. van; Diepen, J.A. van; Jansen, H.J.; Hijmans, A.G.; Matsuguchi, T.; Sparrer, H.; Tack, C.J.J.; Netea, M.G.; Joosten, L.A.B.; Stienstra, R.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic low-grade inflammation in adipose tissue often accompanies obesity, leading to insulin resistance and increasing the risk for metabolic diseases. MAP3K8 (TPL2/COT) is an important signal transductor and activator of pro-inflammatory pathways that has been linked to obesity-induced adipose ti

  17. Adult Attachment,Work Engagement and Occupational Well-being among Kindergarten Teachers%幼儿教师的依恋类型、工作投入与职业幸福感

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王凤锦; 李同归

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the effects of adult attachment and work engagement on occupational well -being among Kinder-garten teachers.Methods Relationship Questionnaire(RQ) and Experiences of Close Relationship inventory (ECR) for measuring a-dult attachment ,Work Engagement Questionnaire and Occupational Well -being inventory were administrated to 214 kindergarten teach-ers in Tianjin city.Results ①There were significant differences among four attachment styles on work engagement indexes .Secure kin-dergarten teachers got highest score than insecure teachers on dedication (F(3,190)=3.261,P=0.023)and absorption(F(3,190)=3.761,P=0.012) dimensions.②The four attachment style teachers got no significant differences on all occupational well -being inde-xes except work motivation dimension .Secure teachers scored higher than insecure ones (F(3,190)=2.781,P=0.042).③There were significant correlations among attachment dimensions , work engagement and occupational well -being indexes .④ Some demographical variables,such as age,work time,educational level,and attachment dimensions,work engagement,as same as some organizational factors would influence kindergarten teachers'occupational well -being.Conclusion Different adult attachment and job engagement had differ-ent effects on occupational well -being in kindergarten teachers .%目的:探讨幼儿教师的依恋类型、工作投入与职业幸福感之间的关系。方法采用关系问卷( RQ)、亲密关系经历量表中文版( ECR)及工作投入问卷和职业幸福感问卷,从天津市抽取214名幼儿教师进行调查。结果①4种依恋类型的幼儿教师在工作投入水平上存在差异,除活力(F(3,190)=1.856,P=0.139)外,安全型的被试在奉献(F(3,190)=3.261,P=0.023)和专注(F(3,190)=3.761,P=0.012)指标中均显著高于非安全型的被试;②在职业幸福感的从业动机指标上(F(3,190)=2.781

  18. Engaging Employers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillier, Yvonne

    2008-01-01

    A key factor in the successful development of workplace learning is employer engagement (Leitch, 2006; DfES, 2007). However, despite numerous approaches by government in the United Kingdom to bring together employers, providers and learners so that economic success is generated by a skilled and flexible workforce, there continue to be challenges…

  19. Learning How to Improve Vocabulary Instruction through Teacher Study Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimino, Joseph; Taylor, Mary Jo

    2009-01-01

    Professional development with proven positive effects on vocabulary instruction and student achievement: that's what reading teachers are looking for, and that's what the Teacher Study Group (TSG) model delivers. With the nine complete TSG sessions in this book, K-8 teachers will form dynamic in-school learning groups with their fellow educators…

  20. Questions That Engage Students in Mathematical Thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilaria, Daniel R.

    Teacher questions are an important part of a student-inquiry classroom. This research examines two different student-centered settings to determine the teacher questions that engaged students in mathematical thinking. It reports on questions asked in both a research setting and a high school classroom. Discursive and retracing questions are…

  1. Re-Discovering the Arts: The Impact of Engagement in a Natural Environment upon Pre-Service Teacher Perceptions of Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Janice K.

    2013-01-01

    Australian national statements describing a quality 21st century education prioritize creativity and sustainability as essentials for global and economic survival and for individual wellbeing. However, data gathered from 114 pre-service teachers commencing undergraduate study indicates their limited experience and skills in the arts, and lack of…

  2. Engaging Primary Children and Pre-Service Teachers in a Whole School "Design and Make Day": The Evaluation of a Creative Science and Technology Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressick-Kilborn, Kimberley; Prescott, Anne

    2017-01-01

    A pedagogical innovation was collaboratively designed, implemented and evaluated in the context of a school-university partnership. The innovation had a dual purpose: 1) to provide an opportunity for primary pre-service teachers to develop their understanding and experience of teaching "design and produce" processes (working…

  3. Engaging Elementary School Pre-Service Teachers in Modeling a Socioscientific Issue as a Way to Help Them Appreciate the Social Aspects of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evagorou, Maria; Mauriz, Blanca Puig

    2017-01-01

    Socioscientific issues are ill-structured problems that involve moral, ethical, and financial aspects, and lack clear-cut solutions. Teaching socioscientific issues necessarily puts a demand on teachers to draw on knowledge stemming from other domains, and to also appreciate, and present to the students the societal aspects of science. For new…

  4. Engaging Pre-Service Middle-School Teacher-Education Students in Mathematical Problem Posing: Development of an Active Learning Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellerton, Nerida F.

    2013-01-01

    Although official curriculum documents make cursory mention of the need for problem posing in school mathematics, problem posing rarely becomes part of the implemented or assessed curriculum. This paper provides examples of how problem posing can be made an integral part of mathematics teacher education programs. It is argued that such programs…

  5. Re-Discovering the Arts: The Impact of Engagement in a Natural Environment upon Pre-Service Teacher Perceptions of Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Janice K.

    2013-01-01

    Australian national statements describing a quality 21st century education prioritize creativity and sustainability as essentials for global and economic survival and for individual wellbeing. However, data gathered from 114 pre-service teachers commencing undergraduate study indicates their limited experience and skills in the arts, and lack of…

  6. Engaging Faculty in Community Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Glynis A.

    2012-01-01

    Researchers endorse the integration of community engagement (CE) into higher education as a way to improve the relevance of education, address community needs, and forge university-community partnerships (Zlotkowski, 1996). CE can help create stronger ties between universities and their communities and provide students with experiential learning…

  7. 幼儿教师社会支持、工作投入和心理健康关系%Relationship among social support, work engagement and mental health in preschool teachers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李永占

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨幼儿教师社会支持、工作投入与心理健康三者间的关系。方法采用整群随机抽样法,选取348名河南省城乡幼儿教师为调查对象,采用《社会支持评定量表》、《Utrecht 工作投入量表》和《症状自评量表》( SCL-90)进行调查,分析社会支持、工作投入和心理健康的关系。结果幼儿教师社会支持总分及其客观支持、主观支持、支持利用度的维度得分分别为(40.90±10.48)、(8.93±2.87)、(23.79±5.85)、(8.17±1.94)分,工作投入总分及其活力、奉献和专注的维度得分分别为(71.69±20.18)、(24.91±9.06)、(21.44±6.93)、(25.34±7.58)分,SCL-90总分为(1.85±0.63)分。社会支持各维度得分分别与工作投入各维度得分呈正相关( P<0.01), SCL-90总分分别与社会支持、工作投入的各维度得分均呈负相关( P<0.01)。社会支持的客观支持、主观支持和支持利用度3个维度均对心理健康有直接效应(标准化路径系数分别为-0.21、-0.27和-0.23,P<0.01),上述3个维度通过工作投入对心理健康的间接效应分别为-0.13、-0.16和-0.12,分别占相应总效应(-0.34、-0.43和-0.35)的38.00%、37.00%和34.00%。结论社会支持和工作投入均是影响幼儿教师心理健康的重要因素;工作投入在社会支持与心理健康之间起着部分中介作用。%Objective To explore the relationship among social support , work engagement and mental health in preschool teachers.Methods By cluster random sampling method , 348 preschool teachers from cities and countryside in Henan Province were selected as study subjects .A questionnaire survey was conducted using the Social Support Rating Scale , the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale and the Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90) to analyze the relationship

  8. Practice and thoughts on engagement system of college teachers%教师职务聘任制的实践与思考

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹文军; 王凤云; 王玉慧

    2009-01-01

    Performing engagement system is the main component of reforming personnel system in higher education.By examining present condition in higher education,this paper proposes corresponding strategies,which are regarded as reference to deeper reform of engagement system and teaching staff construction.%教师职务聘任制是深化高校人事制度改革的一项重要内容.本文结合首都医科大学开展教师职务聘任制的具体实践过程,对如何继续推进并不断完善教师职务聘任制度,建设一支素质优良、结构合理、充满活力的高水平师资队伍,进行了初步的探讨.

  9. More Engagement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    At the end of 2008, the British Foreign and Commonwealth Office issued "The UK and China: A Framework for Engagement." It is the first such document Britain has issued on its China policy. It was designed to set out a way of thinking about China more widely. Peter Wilson, Political Counselor at the British Embassy in Beijing, recently talked with Beijing Review about the significance of the document for bilateral relations between China and Britain.

  10. Engaging complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gys M. Loubser

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, I discuss studies in complexity and its epistemological implications for systematic and practical theology. I argue that engagement with complexity does not necessarily assurea non-reductionist approach. However, if complexity is engaged transversally, it becomes possible to transcend reductionist approaches. Moreover, systematic and practical the ologians can draw on complexity in developing new ways of understanding and, therefore, new ways of describing the focus, epistemic scope and heuristic structures of systematic and practical theology. Firstly, Edgar Morin draws a distinction between restricted and general complexity based on the epistemology drawn upon in studies in complexity. Moving away from foundationalist approaches to epistemology, Morin argues for a paradigm of systems. Secondly,I discuss Kees van Kooten Niekerk�s distinction between epistemology, methodology andontology in studies in complexity and offer an example of a theological argument that drawson complexity. Thirdly, I argue for the importance of transversality in engaging complexity by drawing on the work of Wentzel van Huyssteen and Paul Cilliers. In conclusion, I argue that theologians have to be conscious of the epistemic foundations of each study in complexity, and these studies illuminate the heart of Reformed theology.Intradisciplinary and/or interdisciplinary implications: Therefore, this article has both intradisciplinary and interdisciplinary implications. When theologians engage studies incomplexity, the epistemological roots of these studies need to be considered seeing thatresearchers in complexity draw on different epistemologies. Drawing on transversality wouldenhance such considerations. Furthermore, Edgar Morin�s and Paul Cilliers� approach tocomplexity will inform practical and theoretical considerations in church polity and unity.

  11. New Postgraduate Student Experience and Engagement in Human Communication Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Godfrey A.

    2015-01-01

    New postgraduate students' feedback on their learning offers insights into engagement. Student feedback to students and teachers can contribute to teacher feedback to students. When this happens, students can feel engaged or connected to their learning experiences. Adopting a more inclusive notion of feedback on learning, this paper explores the…

  12. Engaging Students in Large Health Classes with Active Learning Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Steven; Combs, Sue; Huelskamp, Amelia; Hritz, Nancy

    2017-01-01

    Creative K-12 health teachers can engage students in large classes by utilizing active learning strategies. Active learning involves engaging students in higher-order tasks, such as analysis and synthesis, which is a crucial element of the movement toward what is commonly called "learner-centered" teaching. Health education teachers who…

  13. New Postgraduate Student Experience and Engagement in Human Communication Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Godfrey A.

    2015-01-01

    New postgraduate students' feedback on their learning offers insights into engagement. Student feedback to students and teachers can contribute to teacher feedback to students. When this happens, students can feel engaged or connected to their learning experiences. Adopting a more inclusive notion of feedback on learning, this paper explores the…

  14. Teacher Immediacy and its Impacts on Teacher-Student Relationship

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙亚兰

    2011-01-01

    Effective communication between teacher and students can help establish a closer relationship between the two sides and motivate the latter to engage in learning activities more efficiently. This paper aims to explore the impacts teacher immediacy has on teacher-student relationship and find some ways to improve teacher immediacy.

  15. Reflections on Strengthening the Construction of Teachers Engaged in the Teaching of the Red Resources%关于加强从事红色资源教育教学的教师队伍建设的几点思考

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王文礼

    2014-01-01

    当前从事红色资源教育教学的教师数量不断增长,对传播红色资源的丰富内涵,扩大红色资源的受众起着非常关键的作用。但是,在从事红色资源教育教学的教师队伍不断壮大的过程中,从事红色资源教育教学的教师队伍也暴露出一些问题。针对这些问题,文章提出了加强从事红色资源教育教学的教师队伍建设的几点建议。%The number of the teachers engaged in the teaching of red resources at present is increasing continuously,which plays a very crucial role in the spread of rich connotation of red resources,to expand the students of red resources. Howev-er,in the process of expansion of the teachers engaged in the teaching of the Red Resources,teachers engaged in the teach-ing of the Red Resources are also exposed with some problems. To solve these problems,this paper puts forward some sug-gestions to strengthen the construction of teachers engaged in the teaching of red resources.

  16. Involvement of MAP3K8 and miR-17-5p in poor virologic response to interferon-based combination therapy for chronic hepatitis C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihito Tsubota

    Full Text Available Despite advances in chronic hepatitis C treatment, a proportion of patients respond poorly to treatment. This study aimed to explore hepatic mRNA and microRNA signatures involved in hepatitis C treatment resistance. Global hepatic mRNA and microRNA expression profiles were compared using microarray data between treatment responses. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction validated the gene signatures from 130 patients who were infected with hepatitis C virus genotype 1b and treated with pegylated interferon-alpha and ribavirin combination therapy. The correlation between mRNA and microRNA was evaluated using in silico analysis and in vitro siRNA and microRNA inhibition/overexpression experiments. Multivariate regression analysis identified that the independent variables IL28B SNP rs8099917, hsa-miR-122-5p, hsa-miR-17-5p, and MAP3K8 were significantly associated with a poor virologic response. MAP3K8 and miR-17-5p expression were inversely correlated with treatment response. Furthermore, miR-17-5p repressed HCV production by targeting MAP3K8. Collectively, the data suggest that several molecules and the inverse correlation between mRNA and microRNA contributed to a host genetic refractory hepatitis C treatment response.

  17. Engaging Students in an Online Situated Language Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yu-Fen

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have emphasized the relationship between students' engagement and learning performance, and yet the context in which students and the teacher interact to engage each other has been ignored. In order to engage college students who are learning English as a foreign language (EFL) in the context of a big class, this study developed a…

  18. You Can't Always Get What You Want, But You Can Create What You Need: The Promise of DLESE for Pre-service Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, R.

    2003-12-01

    DLESE provides a practical and valuable alternative to conventional introductory Earth Science textbooks for college instructors teaching pre-service teachers. A review of commonly used introductory Earth science textbooks reveals a course of study that highlights topics not addressed in the K-8 National Science Education Standards, and misses others that are stressed in K-8 curriculum. Using DLESE objects, we created an on-line digital course supplement that replaces the traditional textbook and introduces a pre-service Earth science curriculum aligned to National and MN State Science Standards. There are some distinct advantages to a textbook-less approach: out-of-class study includes a variety of learning objects including scientific visualizations, diagrams, primary text sources, and video-clips, accommodating all learning styles. In addition, familiarity with the on-line environment facilitates the engagement of students in the application of real data to discover scientific concepts. One of the unexpected benefits of the DLESE-based curriculum is the increased motivation observed among members of the pre-service teacher cohort. The practical relevance of the curriculum is especially important to elementary teachers, many of whom are uncertain about their knowledge and ability to teach science. By the end of the course, the students know they have been exposed to every topic they are expected to teach. Importantly, they will also be skilled in the use of DLESE for their own lesson planning, curriculum development and ongoing personal professional development.

  19. Is the motivation to become a teacher related to pre-service teachers' intentions to remain in the profession?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruinsma, Marjon; Jansen, Ellen P. W. A.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated 198 pre-service teachers' intrinsic and extrinsic motivation for becoming teachers and focused on the distinction between adaptive motives, which promote lasting and effective engagement, and maladaptive motives, which promote superficial engagement. We examined the relations

  20. Is the motivation to become a teacher related to pre-service teachers' intentions to remain in the profession?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruinsma, Marjon; Jansen, Ellen P. W. A.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated 198 pre-service teachers' intrinsic and extrinsic motivation for becoming teachers and focused on the distinction between adaptive motives, which promote lasting and effective engagement, and maladaptive motives, which promote superficial engagement. We examined the

  1. ENGAGING ICT IN THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE CLASSROOM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LyndeTanLeeWee

    2004-01-01

    The Singapore Ministry of Education conducted a smallscale pilot study in Y2003 to find out how engaged learning was interpreted and translated into practice by teachers and the role of ICT in facilitating engaged learning. For this study, 6 teachers were involved, of which 2 were English language teachers. A case study methodology incorporating an intervention element was adopted. The analysis of the collected data, in the form of pre-lesson interview, lesson observations/videotaping and post-lesson interviews, surfaced teachers'understanding and implementation of engaged learning in the classroom context. This paper focuses on the 2 case studies in which one primary and secondary English language teachers were observed for the way they designed and implemented ICT-based English lessons to promote engaged learning. Although the insights generated by the 2 case studies are legitimate in their own instances, they may be used to sensitize those involved in professional development to five interdependent factors that influence the way ICT may be used to promote engaged learning in the EL classroom.

  2. Place Based STEM: Leveraging Local Resources to Engage K-12 Teachers in Teaching Integrated STEM and for Addressing the Local STEM Pipeline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Louis Nadelson; Anne Louise Seifert; Meagan McKinney

    2014-06-01

    Business, industry, parks, nature settings, government infrastructure, and people, can be invaluable resources for connecting STEM curriculum within context which results in conditions ideal for promoting purposeful learning of authentic STEM content. Thus, community-based STEM resources offer ideal context for teaching STEM content. A benefit of focusing teacher attention on these contextual, content aligned resources is that they are in every community; making place-based STEM education a possibility, regardless of the location of STEM teaching and learning. Further, associating STEM teaching and learning with local resources addresses workforce development and the STEM pipeline by exposing students to STEM careers and applications in their local communities. The desire to align STEM teaching and learning with local STEM related resources guided the design of our week-long integrated STEM K-12 teacher professional development (PD) program, i-STEM. We have completed four years of our i-STEM PD program and have made place-based STEM a major emphasis of our curriculum. This report focuses on the data collected in the fourth year of our program. Our week-long i-STEM PD served over 425 educators last summer (2013), providing them with in depth theme-based integrated STEM short courses which were limited to an average of 15 participants and whole group plenary sessions focused around placed based integrated STEM, inquiry, engineering design, standards and practices of Common Core and 21st Century skills. This state wide PD was distributed in five Idaho community colleges and took place over two weeks. The STEM short courses included topics on engineering for sustainability, using engineering to spark interest in STEM, municipal water systems, health, agriculture, food safety, mining, forestry, energy, and others. Integral to these short courses were field trips designed to connect the K-12 educators to the resources in their local communities that could be leveraged

  3. Tell Us More: Reading Comprehension, Engagement, and Conceptual Press Discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElhone, Dot

    2012-01-01

    This study examines interactions between teachers and students during reading comprehension instruction to determine how certain patterns of teacher-student talk support student comprehension achievement and reading engagement. The central focus of the study is "conceptual press discourse," a pattern of teacher response that includes requests for…

  4. Enhancing Student Engagement in Pre-Vocational and Vocational Education: A Learning History

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Uden, J. M.; Ritzen, H.; Pieters, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Interest in student engagement has increased over the past decade, which has resulted in increased knowledge about this concept and about the aspects that facilitate engagement. However, as yet, only a few studies have focused on engagement from the perspective of the teacher. In this study, we capture the experiences of teachers who were…

  5. Integrating long-term science projects into K-12 curriculum: Fostering teacher-student engagement in urban environmental research through an NSF UCLA GK-12 program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogue, T. S.; Moldwin, M.; Nonacs, P.; Daniel, J.; Shope, R.

    2009-12-01

    A National Science Foundation Graduate Teaching Fellows in K- 12 Education program at UCLA (SEE-LA; http://measure.igpp.ucla.edu/GK12-SEE-LA) has just completed its first year (of a five-year program) and has greatly expanded UCLA’s science and engineering partnerships with LA Unified and Culver City Unified School Districts. The SEE-LA program partners UCLA faculty, graduate students (fellows), middle and high school science teachers and their students into a program of science and engineering exploration that brings the environment of Los Angeles into the classroom. UCLA graduate fellows serve as scientists-in-residence at the four partner schools to integrate inquiry-based science and engineering lessons, facilitate advancements in science content teaching, and ultimately, to improve their own science communication skills. As part of their fellowship, graduate students are required to develop three inquiry-based lessons in their partner classroom, including a lesson focused on their dissertation research, a lesson focused on the environmental/watershed theme of the project, and a lesson that involves longer-term data collection and synthesis with the grade 6-12 teachers and students. The developed long-term projects ideally involve continued observations and analysis through the five-year project and beyond. During the first year of the project, the ten SEE-LA fellows developed a range of long-term research projects, from seasonal invertebrate observations in an urban stream system, to home energy consumption surveys, to a school bioblitz (quantification of campus animals and insects). Examples of lesson development and integration in the classroom setting will be highlighted as well as tools required for sustainability of the projects. University and local pre-college school partnerships provide an excellent opportunity to support the development of graduate student communication skills while also contributing significantly to the integration of sustainable

  6. Effects of Goal-Setting Instruction on Academic Engagement for Students at Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Dawn A.; Mazzotti, Valerie L.; Ingram, Angela; Lee, Seunghee

    2017-01-01

    Research indicates teachers feel teaching goal-setting is an effective way to enhance academic engagement. However, teachers ultimately feel unprepared to embed goal-setting instruction into academic content to support active student engagement. Given the importance teachers place on goal-setting skills, there is a need to identify strategies to…

  7. Effects of Goal-Setting Instruction on Academic Engagement for Students at Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Dawn A.; Mazzotti, Valerie L.; Ingram, Angela; Lee, Seunghee

    2017-01-01

    Research indicates teachers feel teaching goal-setting is an effective way to enhance academic engagement. However, teachers ultimately feel unprepared to embed goal-setting instruction into academic content to support active student engagement. Given the importance teachers place on goal-setting skills, there is a need to identify strategies to…

  8. 2010 NASA-AIHEC Summer Research Experience: Students and Teachers from TCUs Engage in GIS/Remote Sensing with Researchers and Scientists--Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, B. N.; Carlson, M.; Mell, V.; Maynard, N.

    2010-12-01

    Researchers and scientists from the University of New Hampshire (UNH) and the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde joined with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to develop and present a Summer Research Experience (SRE) that trained 21 students and 10 faculty members from 9 of the 36 Tribal Colleges and Universities (TCUs) which comprise the American Indian Higher Education Council (AIHEC). The 10-week SRE program was an inquiry-based introduction to remote sensing, geographic information systems (GIS) and field science research methods. Teams of students and TCU faculty members developed research projects that explored climate change, energy development, contamination of water and air, fire damage in forests, and lost cultural resources on tribal lands. The UNH-Grand Ronde team presented SRE participants with an initial three-week workshop in the use of research tools and development of research projects. During the following seven weeks, the team conferred weekly with SRE participants to monitor and support their progress. Rock provided specific guidance on numerous scientific questions. Carlson coached students on writing and organization and provided laboratory analysis of foliar samples. Mell provided support on GIS technology. Eight of the SRE college teams completed substantial research projects by the end of the SRE while one other team developed a method for future research. Seventeen students completed individual research papers, oral presentations and posters. Nineteen students and all teachers maintained regular and detailed communication with the UNH-Grand Ronde mentors throughout the ten-week program. The SRE produced several significant lessons learned regarding outreach educational programs in inquiry-based science and technology applications. These include: Leadership by an active research scientist (Rock) inspired and supported students and teachers in developing their own scientific inquiries. An intensive schedule of

  9. K8S0 METAR

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — METAR is a routine scheduled observation and is the primary observation code used in the United States to satisfy requirements for reporting surface meteorological...

  10. Camptothecin induces urokinase-type plasminogen activator gene-expression in human RC-K8 malignant lymphoma and H69 small cell lung cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shibakura M

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported that anthracyclines, which could generate reactive oxygen species (ROS, could induce the urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA gene expression in human RC-K8 malignant lymphoma cells and in H69 small cell lung cancer (SCLC cells. In screening other uPA-inducible anti-cancer agents, we found that camptothecin (CPT and its derivative, SN38, could induce uPA in RC-K8 and H69 cells. CPT and SN38, which are also used for the treatment of lymphoma and SCLC, significantly increased the uPA accumulation in the conditioned media of both cells in a dose-dependent manner. The maximum induction of uPA mRNA levels was observed 24 h after stimulation. Pretreatment with pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC, an anti-oxidant, inhibited the CPT-induced uPA mRNA expression. Thus, CPT induces uPA through gene expression, and, therefore, CPT may influence the tumor-cell biology by up-regulating the uPA/plasmin system.

  11. Camptothecin induces urokinase-type plasminogen activator gene-expression in human RC-K8 malignant lymphoma and H69 small cell lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibakura, Misako; Niiya, Kenji; Kiguchi, Toru; Nakata, Yasunari; Tanimoto, Mitsune

    2002-10-01

    We previously reported that anthracyclines, which could generate reactive oxygen species (ROS), could induce the urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) gene expression in human RC-K8 malignant lymphoma cells and in H69 small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cells. In screening other uPA-inducible anti-cancer agents, we found that camptothecin (CPT) and its derivative, SN38, could induce uPA in RC-K8 and H69 cells. CPT and SN38, which are also used for the treatment of lymphoma and SCLC, significantly increased the uPA accumulation in the conditioned media of both cells in a dose-dependent manner. The maximum induction of uPA mRNA levels was observed 24 h after stimulation. Pretreatment with pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), an anti-oxidant, inhibited the CPT-induced uPA mRNA expression. Thus, CPT induces uPA through gene expression, and, therefore, CPT may influence the tumor-cell biology by up-regulating the uPA/plasmin system.

  12. iUTAH Summer Research Institutes: Supporting the STEM Pipeline Through Engagement of High School, Undergraduate and Graduate Students, Secondary Teachers, and University Faculty in Authentic, Joint Research Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, L. A.; Malone, M.

    2015-12-01

    Multiple types of programs are needed to support the STEM workforce pipeline from pre-college through graduate school and beyond. Short-term, intensive programs provide opportunities to participate in authentic scientific research for students who may not be sure of their interest in science and for teachers who may be unable to devote an entire summer to a research experience. The iUTAH (innovative Urban Transitions and Aridregion Hydro-Systainability) Summer Research Institute utilizes an innovative approach for a 5-day program that engages high school and undergraduate students as well as middle and high school teachers in conducting research projects led by graduate students and faculty members. Each Institute involves 3-4 half to full-day research projects. Participants collect (usually in the field) and analyze data for use in on-going research or that is related to a current research project. The participants work in groups with the graduate students to create a poster about each research project. They present their posters on the last day of the Institute at the state-wide meeting of all researchers and involved in this EPSCoR-funded program. In addition to introducing participants to research, one of the Institute's goals is to provide opportunities for meaningful near-peer interactions with students along the STEM pipeline from high school to undergraduate to graduate school. On the end-of-Institute evaluations, almost all students have reported that their discussions with other participants and with graduate students and faculty were a "Highly effective" or "Effective" part of the Institute. In response to a question about how the Institute will impact their course choices or their plans to pursue a career in science, many high school and undergraduate students have noted that they plan to take more science courses. Each year several undergraduates who were previously unsure about a career in science have indicated that they now intend to pursue a

  13. The TRUST Project: A Formal-Informal Teacher Education Partnership for the Promotion of Earth Science Teacher Certification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, H.; Miele, E.; Powell, W.; MacDonald, M.

    2004-12-01

    The American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) in partnership with Lehman and Brooklyn Colleges of the City University of New York (CUNY) has initiated The Teacher Renewal for Urban Science Teaching (TRUST) project. TRUST combines informal and formal teacher education in a four-year initiative to enhance professional development and masters of science education programs, grades K-8 at Brooklyn College and 7-12 at Lehman College. This NSF-funded partnership brings together the resources of AMNH, CUNY, New York City school districts, New York City Department of Education-Museum Partnerships, and the expertise of scientists and teachers with research experiences. Following an initial planning year, TRUST will recruit and sustain 90 teachers over a period of 3 years as well as engage 30 school administrators in support of Earth science instruction. Program components include two new formal Earth systems science courses, intensive informal summer institutes, and a lecture and workshop series during which participants gain new Earth science content knowledge, develop action plans, and present their work on the local and national level. In addition, participants have access to ongoing resource and material support to enhance their learning and instruction. Continuous documentation and data collection by project investigators are being used to address questions regarding the impact various aspects of the TRUST participant experience on classroom instruction and learning, the acquisition of scientific knowledge in the new courses and institutes, and to examine the nature of the Museum experience in meeting certification goals. External formative and summative evaluation of the project is addressing issues surrounding the value of the program as a model for formal-informal partnership in urban Earth science teacher education and certification, analysis of policies that facilitate partnership arrangements, and how socialization of novices with experts affects retention and

  14. Pre-Service Teacher Self-Efficacy in Digital Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemon, Narelle; Garvis, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Self-efficacy is an important motivational construct for primary school teachers (teachers of children aged 5-12 years) within Australia. Teacher self-efficacy beliefs will determine the level of teacher confidence and competence to engage with a task. In this study, we explore engagement with digital technology and the associated learning and…

  15. Relationship between learning environment characteristics and academic engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opdenakker, Marie-Christine; Minnaert, Alexander

    2011-08-01

    The relationship between learning environment characteristics and academic engagement of 777 Grade 6 children located in 41 learning environments was explored. Questionnaires were used to tap learning environment perceptions of children, their academic engagement, and their ethnic-cultural background. The basis of the learning environment questionnaire was the International System for Teacher Observation and Feedback (ISTOF). Factor analysis indicated three factors: the teacher as a helpful and good instructor (having good instructional skills, clear instruction), the teacher as promoter of active learning and differentiation, and the teacher as manager and organizer of classroom activities. Multilevel analysis indicated that about 12% of the differences in engagement between children was related to the learning environment. All the mentioned learning environment characteristics mattered, but the teacher as a helpful, good instructor was most important followed by the teacher as promoter of active learning and differentiation.

  16. Kindergarten students' cognitive engagement in science learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Meng-Fang

    The study is based on a secondary analysis of data from the 3rd year of the Scientific Literacy Project (SLP), a federally funded research project that examines how kindergarten students learn science in inquiry settings (Mantzicopoulos, Patrick, & Samarapungavan, 2005). Videotapes of classroom lessons implemented as part of the Year 3 intervention were analyzed to identify kindergarten students' patterns of cognitive engagement during inquiry-based science learning, as well as to identify patterns of teacher discourse that promoted students' cognitive engagement. The data for the current study were drawn from videotapes and transcriptions of classroom discourse in 3 intervention classrooms that participated in the SLP. Three teachers and 55 kindergarten students participated in the study. Twelve categories of kindergarten students' cognitive engagement and eleven categories of teacher discourse were identified. The initial 12 student and 11 teacher discourse categories were further grouped into two superordinate categories (Higher Order and Basic) respectively. Chi Square analyses indicated that there was a statistically significant association between student and teacher superordinate discourse (alpha = .05). MANOVA analyses indicated that there was no significant difference on overall rates of kindergarten students' cognitive engagement by class (alpha = .05).

  17. Exploring Factors Related to Preschool Teachers' Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ying; Justice, Laura M.; Sawyer, Brook; Tompkins, Virginia

    2011-01-01

    This study examined how teacher (teaching experience, perceptions of teacher collaboration and teacher influence) and classroom (children's engagement) characteristics predicted teacher self-efficacy for 48 preschool teachers in the U.S. Results showed a significant interaction effect between teachers' perceptions of collaboration and children's…

  18. Environmental Studies Center Teacher Books. 3rd Grade - Grassflat Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin County Schools, Jensen Beach, FL. Environmental Studies Center.

    This teacher's guide, one of nine teacher packages developed for use in the sequential, hands-on, field-oriented, K-8 environmental education program of the Martin County Schools in Florida, was developed for use with elementary children in grade three prior to and after a visit to an environmental studies center located near an estuarine area.…

  19. Environmental Studies Center Teacher Books. 4th Grade - Mangrove Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin County Schools, Jensen Beach, FL. Environmental Studies Center.

    This teacher's guide, one of nine teacher packages developed for use in the sequential, hands-on, field-oriented, K-8 environmental education program of the Martin County Schools in Florida, was developed for use with elementary children in grade four prior to and after a visit to an environmental studies center located near an estuarine area. The…

  20. Developing Mathematical Knowledge for Teaching: Documenting Preservice Elementary Teachers' Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatkowski-Egizio, Erica

    2013-01-01

    The two research questions that guided this study were: (1) How do preservice teachers develop mathematical knowledge for teaching during a coordinated math methods course and field experience? and (2) What types of portfolio tasks lend themselves to documenting mathematical knowledge in teaching? Six, female, elementary (K-8) teacher candidates…

  1. What Do Teachers Need to Support English Learners?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Marjorie N.; Diarrassouba, Nagnon

    2014-01-01

    This study explored K-8 teachers' perceptions of their preparation and the challenges they encountered in delivering instruction to culturally and linguistically diverse learners. Using a mixed method research design, data were collected through a web-based survey from teachers in the state of Michigan. Researchers used chi-square tests to…

  2. Exploring student teachers' resistance to teacher education pedagogies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bronkhorst, L.H.; Koster, B.; Meijer, P.C.; Woldman, N.; Vermunt, J.D.

    2014-01-01

    Student teachers' resistance to teacher education is often understood as a lack of quality of the student teacher and/or the internship, and is expected to impede learning. In this study we suggest that resistance is interactive in nature, and can potentially have constructive outcomes. We engaged i

  3. Teacher-Led Reforms Have a Big Advantage--Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanulis, Randi N.; Cooper, Kristy S.; Dear, Benita; Johnston, Amanda M.; Richard-Todd, Rhonda R.

    2016-01-01

    Becoming a better teacher by learning and implementing new ways of teaching requires time, effort, persistence, and a belief that new strategies will enhance student learning. But when educational leaders try to improve teachers and teaching from the outside, by bringing in reformers to transform how teachers engage in the core business of…

  4. Novice Teachers Learning through Participation in a Teacher Study Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambson, Dawn

    2010-01-01

    Using Lave and Wenger's framework of legitimate peripheral participation in communities of practice, this case study explores the experiences of three novice teachers engaged with more experienced teachers in a teacher study group during their first year of teaching. The study illustrates how, over time, the novices moved from more peripheral to…

  5. Exploring student teachers' resistance to teacher education pedagogies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bronkhorst, L.H.; Koster, B.; Meijer, P.C.; Woldman, N.; Vermunt, J.D.

    2014-01-01

    Student teachers' resistance to teacher education is often understood as a lack of quality of the student teacher and/or the internship, and is expected to impede learning. In this study we suggest that resistance is interactive in nature, and can potentially have constructive outcomes. We engaged

  6. Why Teacher Voice Matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlenberg, Richard D.; Potter, Halley

    2014-01-01

    Kahlenberg and Potter report on research that shows when teachers are engaged in school decisions and collaborate with administrators and each other, school climate improves. The authors add, this promotes a better learning environment for students, which raises student achievement, and a better working environment for teachers, which reduces…

  7. Teacher Identity in a Multicultural Rural School: Lessons Learned at Vista Charter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, Kerri J.; Dinsmore, Jan; Villagomez, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a 30-month qualitative exploration of diverse teachers' identities in a high-poverty, bilingual, K-8 public charter school in rural eastern Oregon. First, we use the perspectives of saberes docentes and a situated view of teacher development to document the life histories of monolingual and bilingual teachers at Vista…

  8. Teacher Identity in a Multicultural Rural School: Lessons Learned at Vista Charter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, Kerri J.; Dinsmore, Jan; Villagomez, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a 30-month qualitative exploration of diverse teachers' identities in a high-poverty, bilingual, K-8 public charter school in rural eastern Oregon. First, we use the perspectives of saberes docentes and a situated view of teacher development to document the life histories of monolingual and bilingual teachers at Vista…

  9. Synthesis and Structural Characterization of the New Clathrates K8Cd4Ge42, Rb8Cd4Ge42, and Cs8Cd4Ge42

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion C. Schäfer

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results from our exploratory work in the systems K-Cd-Ge, Rb-Cd-Ge, and Cs-Cd-Ge, which yielded the novel type-I clathrates with refined compositions K8Cd3.77(7Ge42.23, Rb8Cd3.65(7Ge42.35, and Cs7.80(1Cd3.65(6Ge42.35. The three compounds represent rare examples of clathrates of germanium with the alkali metals, where a d10 element substitutes a group 14 element. The three structures, established by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, indicate that the framework-building Ge atoms are randomly substituted by Cd atoms on only one of the three possible crystallographic sites. This and several other details of the crystal chemistry are elaborated.

  10. SOCIAL MEDIA AND CLASSROOM ENGAGEMENT: STUDENTS’ PERCEPTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malissa Maria Mahmud

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Over the course of the last 15 years or so, social media have shown many facets—from connecting people on a global-scale, to penetrating aspects of lives which otherwise might have remained private or limited to a small audience. In the realm of education, social media have also begun to infiltrate the academic world by influencing and shaping students’ perceptions and influencing learning engagement. With millions of students and teachers simultaneously active on social networks, it is significant to observe how the media could influence student-teacher classroom interactions as well as their online communications. Some studies have documented that teachers who disclosed information about themselves on social media were perceived as more credible by students because they were regarded as more relatable. Moreover, students’ stereotyping beliefs and attitudes towards teachers also come into play when formulating perceptions about teachers on social media. For instance, their communications with teachers are often formal and impersonal on social media, as teachers are viewed as authoritative figures. Consequently, students’ perceptions towards teachers would have a significant repercussion on their interpersonal relationships, which in turn impacts students’ motivation and learning engagement. Thus, this research was conducted to establish preliminary findings whether social media shape students’ perceptions and whether these ramifications would result in positive or negative learning engagement. Consequently, the results indicate that students are more susceptible towards teachers who are active on social media because they are perceived as being more akin to a “real person” who can easily be reached for immediate classroom information and instructions. Such accessibilities via social media enable learning processes to be less contrived by just the physical classroom settings.

  11. Engaging All Students in Mathematical Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahr, Damon L.; Bahr, Kim

    2017-01-01

    Many teachers try to engage their students in meaningful mathematical discussions in which one or more students share their thinking about a problem while the other students are expected to listen and learn from the sharing. Indeed, such discussions can help students learn from one another and promote high levels of mathematical proficiency.…

  12. Toward a Pedagogy of Materially Engaged Listening

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaVecchia, Christina M.

    2017-01-01

    As writing teachers increasingly engage students with audio media, it has become crucial to coach listening explicitly in the classroom, activities that students may otherwise approach passively. In this article I suggest that a rhetorical approach applicable to (or derived from) print texts is not enough to help students listen actively, and…

  13. "Red Eyes": Engaging Emotions in Multicultural Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongyu

    2008-01-01

    Engaging emotions in multicultural education is an important but a relatively neglected issue in teacher education. This essay calls for pedagogical attention to the role of emotions and attempts to analyze how teaching autobiographies and films sheds light on the emotional dynamics of multicultural education. Two films, "The Color of Fear", and…

  14. Tutors' Forum: Engaging Distributed Communities of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, Rosemary; Stirling, Jeannette; Percy, Alisa

    2009-01-01

    The need to engage students studying at a distance in order to reduce isolation, foster a sense of belonging and enhance learning has received significant attention over the past few years. Conversely, very little research has focused on teachers working in this type of environment. In fact, we argue, they appear to be the forgotten dimension in…

  15. Engage and Excite Students with Educational Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petsche, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Using educational games to learn or reinforce lessons engages students and turns a potentially boring subject into something exciting and desirable to know! Games offer teachers and parents a new way to grab students' attention so that they will retain information. Games have become a teaching tool, an invaluable resource for reaching students in…

  16. Engaging Prekindergarten Dual Language Learners in Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Meredith K.; Shue, Pamela L.

    2013-01-01

    In a preschool class where the teachers speak only English and the majority of the children speak only Spanish, it is challenging to choose a topic that is interesting enough to engage all children in project work that supports language development. Luckily for the children, pizza is a delicious, familiar, and easily accessible topic to explore.…

  17. Teaching to Strengths: Engaging Young Boys in Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Cynthia; Gooliaff, Shauna

    2013-01-01

    Traditional teaching methods often fail to engage male students in learning. The purpose of this research was to increase student engagement in the story writing process and increase self-confidence in boys at risk. A qualitative approach included student surveys as well as teacher journaling and portfolios (including e-portfolios). The student…

  18. Reading Motivation and Engagement at a Rural Georgia High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winfree, Linda

    2013-01-01

    As college and workplace success becomes increasingly dependent on reading, parents and educators have become more interested in how to engage students in reading. Teachers at a rural Georgia high school have reported that students are reluctant to engage in academic reading. Guided by previous research on the factors that promote or discourage…

  19. Engaging Reluctant Readers in a French Immersion Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capina, Amanda Borton; Bryan, Gregory

    2017-01-01

    Reading engagement is like a puzzle consisting of many pieces to emplace for successful engagement to occur. The author, a French Immersion teacher/researcher, found that many of her grade one reluctant readers--those students who could read but chose not to--approached reading with some pieces of the puzzle. They had strategies and knowledge but…

  20. Engagement with Young Adult Literature: Outcomes and Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivey, Gay; Johnston, Peter H.

    2013-01-01

    This study examines students' perceptions of the outcomes and processes of engaged reading in classrooms prioritizing engagement through self-selected, self-paced reading of compelling young adult literature. The primary data were 71 end-of-year student interviews, supported by end-of-year teacher interviews, biweekly observational data,…

  1. Reading Motivation and Engagement at a Rural Georgia High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winfree, Linda

    2013-01-01

    As college and workplace success becomes increasingly dependent on reading, parents and educators have become more interested in how to engage students in reading. Teachers at a rural Georgia high school have reported that students are reluctant to engage in academic reading. Guided by previous research on the factors that promote or discourage…

  2. Impact of Smartphone Based Activities on EFL Students' Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarhandi, Pir Suhail Ahmed; Bajnaid, Ayman; Elyas, Tariq

    2017-01-01

    Teachers all over the world strive to keep their students engaged, and research has shown that task engagement can be elevated by utilising technology to complete classroom activities. Reasons suggested for this is that technology's alignment with students' interests, as well as the stimulatingly transformative effect that technology can have on…

  3. Student (dis)engagement and need-supportive teaching behavior: a multi-informant and multilevel approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Berghe, Lynn; Tallir, Isabel B; Cardon, Greet; Aelterman, Nathalie; Haerens, Leen

    2015-08-01

    Starting from self-determination theory, we explored whether student engagement/disengagement relates to teachers' need support and whether this relationship is moderated by teachers' causality orientations. A sample of 2004 students situated in 127 classes taught by 33 physical education teachers participated in the study. Both teachers and students reported on students' (dis)engagement, allowing investigation of the proposed relationships both at the student and teacher level. Most of the variance in need support was at the student level, but there was also between-teacher and between-class variance in need support. Engagement related to more need support, but only at the student level. In total, few moderation effects were found. Teachers with a relatively low controlled orientation were more need supportive when perceiving their students as emotionally and behaviorally engaged. By making teachers aware of these dynamics, automatic responses to student engagement can be better thought out. Recommendations for future research are discussed.

  4. Starchild Presents...StarChild: A Learning Center for Young Astronomers. Black Holes. An Information and Activity Booklet. Grades K-8, 1998-1999.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truelove, Elizabeth; Dejoie, Joyce

    The information provided in this booklet is meant to give the necessary background information so that the science of black holes can be taught confidently to elementary students. The featured activities can be used to engage and excite students about the topic of black holes in different disciplines and in a number of ways. Activities include:…

  5. Drawing AIDS : Tanzanian teachers picture the pandemic. Implications for re-curriculation of teacher education programmes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    De Lange, Naydene; Wood, Lesley; Mkumbo, Kitila

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we explain how we engaged teachers in creating their own representations of HIV and AIDS in Tanzania as a starting point for re-curriculation of the undergraduate teacher education programme...

  6. The Effect of NaCl on growth, N2 fixation (acetylene reduction), and percentage total nitrogen in Leucaena leucocephala (Leguminosae) var. K-8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthraper, Annie; Dubois, John D

    2003-05-01

    Leucaena leucocephala var. K-8 is a fast-growing, tropical leguminous tree that has multiple economic uses. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect(s) of varying NaCl concentrations on growth, N(2) fixation, and percentage of total tissue nitrogen in different organs in L. leucocephala. Seeds were germinated and grown for 10 wk with a nitrogen-free fertilizer applied every 2 wk. At 10 wk, plants were treated for either 0, 7, 14, 21, or 28 wk with either deionized water (control), 0.00625 mol/L, 0.0125 mol/L, 0.025 mol/L, 0.05 mol/L, or 0.1 mol/L NaCl in addition to the fertilizer every 2 wk. Growth was measured as plant height, nodule number and mass, and dry tissue mass. N(2) fixation was measured by the acetylene reduction assay. Percentage of tissue nitrogen was determined using Kjeldahl analysis. In younger plants (7-wk treatment), major fluctuations in NaCl tolerance were observed in the different plant organs. As plants matured (14- and 21-wk treatment) NaCl concentrations of 0.025 mol/L and higher caused the greatest reduction in growth and tissue nitrogen. We conclude that NaCl concentrations of 0.025 mol/L and greater caused a major decrease in growth, N(2) fixation, and percentage of tissue nitrogen in L. leucocephala plants that were less than 1 yr old.

  7. External Influences on an Internal Process: Supporting Preservice Teacher Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Ann; Klipfel, Lyndsay Halpin

    2016-01-01

    In an effort to better understand how participating in teacher research as a student teacher compares to conducting it as a practicing teacher, a teacher educator and her former teacher education student engaged in a collaborative dialogue. They focus their reflections in this article on the impact of external forces on the process of teacher…

  8. Iranian EFL teachers' perceptions of teacher self-disclosure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ali Rahimi; Rouhollah Askari Bigdeli

    2016-01-01

    Teacher self-disclosure (TSD) as a communication behavior can influence students' learning by increasing their engagement and class participation as well as helping them establish effective interpersonal relationships...

  9. Investigating Teacher Efficacy: Comparing Preservice and Inservice Teachers with Different Levels of Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putman, S. Michael

    2012-01-01

    Teacher efficacy represents a powerful influence on the behaviors of teachers due to its impact on instructional choice, effort, and persistence. Yet few studies have been conducted examining differences in efficacy among groups of teachers with varying levels of experience, including those still engaged in teacher preparation programs. This study…

  10. Preparing Pre-Service Teachers as Emancipatory and Participatory Action Researchers in a Teacher Education Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esau, Omar

    2013-01-01

    In this paper I analyse the potential that participatory action research holds for educating pre-service teachers to become more critically reflective and socially conscious. I also describe the rationale for and process of engaging pre-service teachers in their teacher education programme. Involving these candidate teachers in participatory…

  11. International Engagement Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-14

    INTERNATIONAL ENGAGEMENT STRATEGY STATEMENT OF PURPOSE The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Science and Technology Directorate (S&T... International Engagement Strategy is intended to establish clear goals and objectives to guide S&T’s international cooperative research, development... International Engagement Strategy, the 2015 White House National Security Strategy, the 2014 Quadrennial Homeland Security Review, and the DHS Fiscal

  12. Engaging Scholarship with Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, Guillermina Gina

    2014-01-01

    A pedagogy of engagement links faculty and students to the needs of local communities while promoting academic success through higher retention and graduation rates in higher education. This work describes engaged scholarship and shares guidelines for documenting student engagement and critical reflection across the higher education curriculum.…

  13. Improving Student Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Jim; Taylor, Leah

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews research literature in the area of student engagement to discover curricular and pedagogical ideas educators might successfully use to better engage student learning. Student engagement has historically focused upon increasing achievement, positive behaviors, and a sense of belonging to help students remain in school. The…

  14. Designing for user engagement

    CERN Document Server

    Geisler, Cheryl

    2013-01-01

    Designing for User Engagement on the Web: 10 Basic Principles is concerned with making user experience engaging. The cascade of social web applications we are now familiar with - blogs, consumer reviews, wikis, and social networking - are all engaging experiences. But engagement is an increasingly common goal in business and productivity environments as well. This book provides a foundation for all those seeking to design engaging user experiences rich in communication and interaction. Combining a handbook on basic principles with case studies, it provides readers with a ric

  15. Enhancing student engagement in pre-vocational and vocational education: a learning history

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uden, van J.M.; Ritzen, H.; Pieters, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Interest in student engagement has increased over the past decade, which has resulted in increased knowledge about this concept and about the aspects that facilitate engagement. However, as yet, only a few studies have focused on engagement from the perspective of the teacher. In this study, we capt

  16. The processes of lipid peroxidation in the cells of Chlorobium limicola IMV K-8 under the influence of copper (II sulphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. B. Segin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of stressors, including heavy metal ions such as Cu2+, promotes activation of free radical processes in the cells of microorganisms, which causes changes in their physiological and biochemical properties and the structure of bacterial membranes. The aim of this work was to assess the influence of copper (II sulphate on intensity of lipid peroxidation (LPO of Chlorobium limicola IMV K-8 by measuring the content of primary (conjugated dienes and lipid hydroperoxides and secondary lipid peroxidation products (TBA-reactive products. Microorganisms were cultivated at a temperature of 28 °C in GSB cultivation medium with exposure to light of wavelength 700–800 nm and intensity 40 lux. A suspension of C. limicola ІМV К-8 cells in the phase of exponential growth was treated for one hour with metal salt solution in concentrations 0.05–0.50 mM for investigation of the influence of copper (II sulphate on its physiological and biochemical properties. The control samples did not contain any copper (II sulphate. Biomass was determined by turbidity of diluted cell suspension by application of photoelectric colorimeter KFK-3. A mixture of n-heptane and isopropyl alcohol was added into cell-free extract for conjugated dienes determination. The samples were incubated at room temperature and centrifuged. Water was added into the supernatant and the samples were stirred. Ethanol was added to the heptanes phase and adsorption was measured at 233 nm. The content of lipid hydroperoxides was determined by a method based on protein precipitation by trichloroacetic acid followed by addition of ammonium thiocyanate. The concentration of TBA-reactive products in the cell-free extracts was determined by color reaction with malondialdehyde and thiobarbituric acid exposed to high temperature and acidity of the medium, which causes formation of trimetinic adduct with maximal absorption at 532 nm. It was shown that when CuSO4 was added to the incubation

  17. Becoming Teacher Educators: An Innovative Approach to Teacher Educator Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosnik, Clare; Cleovoulou, Yiola; Fletcher, Tim; Harris, Tiffany; McGlynn-Stewart, Monica; Beck, Clive

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes an initiative, Becoming Teacher Educators (BTE), which is a group for doctoral students who want to become teacher educators. The group is composed of two professors and 12 doctoral students. The various activities in which the group has engaged over the past three years are described. This article brings to light a few key…

  18. Investigating engagement, thinking, and learning among culturally diverse, urban sixth graders experiencing an inquiry-based science curriculum, contextualized in the local environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Sybil Schantz

    This mixed-methods study combined pragmatism, sociocultural perspectives, and systems thinking concepts to investigate students' engagement, thinking, and learning in science in an urban, K-8 arts, science, and technology magnet school. A grant-funded school-university partnership supported the implementation of an inquiry-based science curriculum, contextualized in the local environment through field experiences. The researcher worked as co-teacher of 3 sixth-grade science classes and was deeply involved in the daily routines of the school. The purposes of the study were to build a deeper understanding of the complex interactions that take place in an urban science classroom, including challenges related to implementing culturally-relevant instruction; and to offer insight into the role educational systems play in supporting teaching and learning. The central hypothesis was that connecting learning to meaningful experiences in the local environment can provide culturally accessible points of engagement from which to build science learning. Descriptive measures provided an assessment of students' engagement in science activities, as well as their levels of thinking and learning throughout the school year. Combined with analyses of students' work files and focus group responses, these findings provided strong evidence of engagement attributable to the inquiry-based curriculum. In some instances, degree of engagement was found to be affected by student "reluctance" and "resistance," terms defined but needing further examination. A confounding result showed marked increases in thinking levels coupled with stasis or decrease in learning. Congruent with past studies, data indicated the presence of tension between the diverse cultures of students and the mainstream cultures of school and science. Findings were synthesized with existing literature to generate the study's principal product, a grounded theory model representing the complex, interacting factors involved in

  19. Preparing Preservice Teachers for Instruction on English-Language Development with Video Lesson Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ping

    2011-01-01

    This study explored the use of video lesson modules in a teaching methodology course to prepare preservice teachers for supporting the English-language development of pupils at K-8 schools. The basic material of a lesson module is a video lesson featuring instruction of an experienced classroom teacher in an English-language development setting of…

  20. Discrete Mathematics in Deaf Education: A Survey of Teachers' Knowledge and Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagliaro, C.; Kritzer, K. L.

    2005-01-01

    The study documents what deaf education teachers know about discrete mathematics topics and determines if these topics are present in the mathematics curriculum. Survey data were collected from 290 mathematics teachers at center and public school programs serving a minimum of 120 students with hearing loss, grades K-8 or K-12, in the United…

  1. It's All about the Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynt, E. Sutton; Brozo, William G.

    2009-01-01

    The most important element in the content literacy classroom is the teacher. Effective content literacy teachers engage their students through insistence, make connections across content areas, adapt instruction and are keenly aware of their students' out of class literacy interests. They are successful because they view themselves as learners too.

  2. Teacher Guidance of Knowledge Construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Baruch; Dreyfus, Tommy; Hadas, Nurit; Hershkowitz, Rina

    2004-01-01

    This paper focuses on how teachers guide construction of knowledge in classrooms. We suggest that guidance hinges on the kind of dialogue teachers choose to engage students in. We propose several classroom dialogue types relevant for the construction of knowledge and suggest that critical dialogue is particularly effective for knowledge…

  3. Mindfulness and the Beginning Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernay, Ross S.

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews a hermeneutic phenomenological study of five beginning teachers who were introduced to mindfulness during their initial teacher education programme. The participants kept fortnightly journals and engaged in three interviews with the researcher to assess the benefits of using mindfulness during the first year of teaching. The…

  4. Urban Legend in Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiley, Azure Dee

    2006-01-01

    Many European American pre-service special education teachers participate in activities and coursework to prepare them to engage with diverse students in urban settings. This qualitative study explores the experience of two teacher candidates taking part in one such program. Specifically, the interactions and perceptions of the participants' first…

  5. The Player Engagement Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoenau-Fog, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Engagement is an essential element of the player experience, and the concept is described in various ways in the literature. To gain a more detailed comprehension of this multifaceted concept, and in order to better understand what aspects can be used to evaluate engaging game play and to design...... engaging user experiences, this study investigates one dimension of player engagement by empirically identifying the components associated with the desire to continue playing. Based on a description of the characteristics of player engagement, a series of surveys were developed to discover the components......, categories and triggers involved in this process. By applying grounded theory to the analysis of the responses, a process-oriented player engagement framework was developed and four main components consisting of objectives, activities, accomplishments and affects as well as the corresponding categories...

  6. Constituting Public Engagement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Sarah Rachael

    2013-01-01

    understanding of science to those of public engagement with science and technology (PEST), and the histories, or genealogies, of such models. Data from two qualitative studies-a case study of one of the United Kingdom'ssix Beacons for Public Engagement and a study of contract research staff-are used...... backgrounds, suggesting that multiple and overlapping meanings around PEST are derived from particular histories that have been brought together, through the rubric of public engagement, in assemblages such as the Beacons....

  7. SOCIAL MEDIA AND CLASSROOM ENGAGEMENT: STUDENTS’ PERCEPTION

    OpenAIRE

    Malissa Maria Mahmud; Chandra Reka Ramachandiran; Othman Ismail

    2016-01-01

    Over the course of the last 15 years or so, social media have shown many facets—from connecting people on a global-scale, to penetrating aspects of lives which otherwise might have remained private or limited to a small audience. In the realm of education, social media have also begun to infiltrate the academic world by influencing and shaping students’ perceptions and influencing learning engagement. With millions of students and teachers simultaneously active on social networks, it is signi...

  8. The Classroom Teacher's Technology Survival Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Doug

    2012-01-01

    This is a must-have resource for all K-12 teachers and administrators who want to really make the best use of available technologies. Written by Doug Johnson, an expert in educational technology, "The Classroom Teacher's Technology Survival Guide" is replete with practical tips teachers can easily use to engage their students and make their…

  9. The Classroom Teacher's Technology Survival Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Doug

    2012-01-01

    This is a must-have resource for all K-12 teachers and administrators who want to really make the best use of available technologies. Written by Doug Johnson, an expert in educational technology, "The Classroom Teacher's Technology Survival Guide" is replete with practical tips teachers can easily use to engage their students and make their…

  10. Champion teachers : stories of exploratory action research

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Since 2013 the British Council / Ministry of Education Chile Champion Teachers programme has been helping secondary school teachers engage in exploratory action research projects. This book provides nine easily accessible examples of such projects and highlights the achievements gained in spite of teachers' difficult working conditions.

  11. Countering the Essentialized Discourse of Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stremmel, Andrew J.; Burns, James; Nganga, Christine; Bertolini, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the authors engage in a collaborative inquiry illustrative of a dialogical process of meaning making addressing the future of teacher education in times marked by uncertainty, intense public and political scrutiny, changing policy, and imposed learning standards. The authors urge teacher education programs and teacher educators to…

  12. An Interpersonal Approach to Classroom Management: Strategies for Improving Student Engagement. Classroom Insights from Educational Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Heather A.; Summers, Jessica J.; Miller, Lauren M.

    2012-01-01

    Like having a hidden camera in other teachers' classrooms, An Interpersonal Approach to Classroom Management engages you from the start by contrasting how two teachers respond differently to common situations. The authors expertly bridge the gap between educational psychology and peer and student-teacher management from the perspectives of student…

  13. Impact of Organizational Support on Organizational Justice and Job Engagement of Teachers in Higher Medical Universities, Heilongjiang%组织支持对黑龙江省高等医学院校教师组织公平感及工作投入的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段孝建; 樊立华; 邹路琦; 孙涛; 白诗萌; 葛思澳; 张薇; 关欣

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨组织支持对黑龙江省高等医学院校教师组织公平感及工作投入的影响及其作用机制。方法:采用问卷调查法收集数据,研究工具采用组织支持量表、组织公平量表及工作投入量表。结果:高等医学院校教师组织支持与组织公平感(β=0�653,P<0.01)和工作投入(β=0.268,P<0.01)呈积极的正向相关性,组织公平感在组织支持与工作投入关系间扮演完全中介作用(β=0.175,P<0.01)。结论:高等医学院校教师感知到的组织支持有助于提升其对组织公平的感知,进而正向激励其努力投入工作。%Objective:To explore impact and mechanism of organizational support on organizational justice and job engagement of teachers in higher medical university. Methods:Questionnaires were used to collect data,including organizational justice scale, organizational support scale and job engagement scale. Results:Organizational support and organizational justice (beta = 0. 653, P< 0. 01) was positive correlation with job engagement of teachers in higher medical university (beta = 0. 268, P< 0. 01), organizational justice play a full mediating role in the relation⁃ship between organizational support and job engagement (beta = 0. 175,P< 0. 01). Conclusion:Because of improving perception of organization justice of teachers in higher medical university through enhancing a sense of perceived organizational support, and to motivate them to work hard.

  14. Engaging Faculty across the Community Engagement Continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorski, Irena; Mehta, Khanjan

    2016-01-01

    There currently exists an incompatibility between the demands of university administrators for increased community engagement and the realities facing faculty who want to integrate it into their academic coursework, research, and professional service. This article provides insight on the complex challenges preventing faculty from becoming involved…

  15. Engagement Means Everyone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Carol

    2012-01-01

    Employee engagement is not just HR's responsibility. While HR is responsible for the process of measuring and driving engagement, improving it is actually everyone's responsibility. And that means reducing the barriers to productivity to drive business performance. Training departments can play a pivotal role. Their job is to enhance curriculum or…

  16. The Engagement Gap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tartari, Valentina; Salter, Ammon

    2013-01-01

    Recently, debate on women in academic science has been extended to academics' engagement with industry. We suggest that women tend to engage less in industry collaboration than their male colleagues of similar status. We argue that differences are mitigated by the presence of other women and by s...

  17. Community Engagement? Let's Dance!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Paul

    2008-01-01

    School districts across the nation are reaching out to their communities in hopes of creating support for their programs. Toward that end, this article provides a rationale for and an overview of the elements of effective community engagement. The author outlines the need and analyzes the shift toward new approaches in community engagement. Next,…

  18. Defining Student Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelson, Rick D.; Flick, Arend

    2011-01-01

    Few terms in the lexicon of higher education today are invoked more frequently, and in more varied ways, than "engagement". The phrase "student engagement" has come to refer to how "involved" or "interested" students appear to be in their learning and how "connected" they are to their classes, their institutions, and each other. As measured by…

  19. Civic Learning and Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanter, Martha; Schneider, Carol Geary

    2013-01-01

    For decades, the US education system has failed to adequately combat a decline of civic engagement and awareness, resulting in what many are now calling a "civics recession." The good news is that there is growing awareness, at all levels, that we need new and concerted efforts to make civic learning and engagement a core component of every…

  20. On making engagement tangible

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, van den Egon L.; Spink, A.J.; Grieco, F.; Krips, O.E.; Loijens, L.W.S.; Noldus, L.P.J.J.; Zimmerman, P.H.

    2012-01-01

    In this article the complexity of the construct engagement and three theories on this topic are discussed. Csikszentmihalyi's theory of flow is taken as starting point for the measurement of engagement. The measurement of each of its eight aspects is discussed, including its pros and cons. Regrettab

  1. Engagement Means Everyone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Carol

    2012-01-01

    Employee engagement is not just HR's responsibility. While HR is responsible for the process of measuring and driving engagement, improving it is actually everyone's responsibility. And that means reducing the barriers to productivity to drive business performance. Training departments can play a pivotal role. Their job is to enhance curriculum or…

  2. Drawing Identity: Beginning Pre-Service Teachers' Professional Identities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltman, Susan; Glass, Christine; Dinham, Judith; Chalk, Beryl; Nguyen, Bich

    2015-01-01

    Developing a professional teacher identity can be complex as pre-service teachers engage with a process informed by their previous experiences of teachers and teaching, by learning in their pre-service course, by field placements, and by societal expectations. Using drawing as the method for gathering data, pre-service teachers in an Australian…

  3. Teaching for Diversity in Teacher Education: Transformative Frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragoonaden, Karen O.; Sivia, Awneet; Baxan, Victorina

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the practice and professional development of teacher educators engaged in diversity pedagogy in Canadian teacher education programs. Using a reflective inquiry combined with a self-study of teacher and teacher education practices (S-STEP), three educators discuss the complexity of their research and teaching experiences through…

  4. What Millennial Preservice Teachers Want to Learn in Their Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Sarah K.; Byrnes, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    As teacher educators, we implore teacher candidates to understand the cultures and experiences of their students to engage them in learning. Yet, preservice teachers are seldom asked what they hope to learn in their training to become teachers of young children. In this study, we examined the interests, resources, and expectations of millennial…

  5. What Millennial Preservice Teachers Want to Learn in Their Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Sarah K.; Byrnes, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    As teacher educators, we implore teacher candidates to understand the cultures and experiences of their students to engage them in learning. Yet, preservice teachers are seldom asked what they hope to learn in their training to become teachers of young children. In this study, we examined the interests, resources, and expectations of millennial…

  6. Perceptions of Supervision Practices by Agricultural Education Student Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thobega, Moreetsi; Miller, Greg

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe student teachers' perceptions and preferences of the type of supervision they experienced while interacting with their university supervisors and cooperating teachers. Results revealed that student teachers perceived both their cooperating teachers and university supervisors to engage in contextual and…

  7. Closing the RN engagement gap: which drivers of engagement matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Reynaldo R; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J; Boyle, Suzanne M

    2011-06-01

    This study focused on the relationship between RNs' perceptions of drivers of engagement and their workplace engagement. In multiple studies, mostly not in healthcare, researchers found that employees engaged in their work are in the minority. This phenomenon is referred to as the engagement gap. Drivers of engagement and levels of nurse engagement were measured among 510 RNs from a large urban academic university center. The greatest difference between engaged and not-engaged nurses was in the manager action index; the smallest difference was in the salary and benefits index. The passion-for-nursing index was the only significant driver related to RN levels of engagement when controlling for all the other drivers. Nurse managers play a critical role in promoting employee engagement. The nurses' passion for nursing is an important dimension of engagement. Salary and benefits were not primary drivers in employee engagement. Copyright © 2011 Wolters Kluwer Health Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

  8. Digital Storytelling: The Arts and Preservice Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vito M. Dipinto

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In this presentation, the authors describe a journey of teachers in a graduate Fine Arts Methods course. The journey began with conversations about what art is and the nature of collections in exploring this question. Elements of visual literacy, storytelling and music were investigated. The final product was a Digital Story incorporating all of these elements into a teaching artifact that integrated the Arts into other content areas for K-8 students.

  9. Elementary Teacher's Conceptions of Inquiry Teaching: Messages for Teacher Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireland, Joseph E.; Watters, James J.; Brownlee, Jo; Lupton, Mandy

    2011-09-01

    This study explored practicing elementary school teacher's conceptions of teaching in ways that foster inquiry-based learning in the science curriculum (inquiry teaching). The advocacy for inquiry-based learning in contemporary curricula assumes the principle that students learn in their own way by drawing on direct experience fostered by the teacher. That students should be able to discover answers themselves through active engagement with new experiences was central to the thinking of eminent educators such as Pestalozzi, Dewey and Montessori. However, even after many years of research and practice, inquiry learning as a referent for teaching still struggles to find expression in the average teachers' pedagogy. This study drew on interview data from 20 elementary teachers. A phenomenographic analysis revealed three conceptions of teaching for inquiry learning in science in the elementary years of schooling: (a) The Experience-centered conception where teachers focused on providing interesting sensory experiences to students; (b) The Problem-centered conception where teachers focused on engaging students with challenging problems; and (c) The Question-centered conception where teachers focused on helping students to ask and answer their own questions. Understanding teachers' conceptions has implications for both the enactment of inquiry teaching in the classroom as well as the uptake of new teaching behaviors during professional development, with enhanced outcomes for engaging students in Science.

  10. Relationship among psychological contract,job engagement and job satisfaction in teachers from secondary vocational schools in Guangxi Province%广西中等职业教师心理契约、工作投入和工作满意度关系研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈露露; 杨新国; 徐明津; 黄霞妮; 钟裕洁

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the relationship among psychological contract,job engagement and job satisfaction of teachers from secondary vocational schools.Methods Three hundred and forty-two teachers were randomly selected from 55 secondary vocational schools in Guangxi Province.The questionnaire survey was carried out using the scales of psychological contract,job engagement and the job satisfaction.Results The scores of psychological contract,job engagement and job satisfaction of teachers were (3.69 ±0.48),(3.55 ±0.63)and (3.16 ±0.39)scores,respectively. The score of job satisfaction of the vocational school teachers with junior college level and below was higher than those of teachers with undergraduate college level and master degree level or above [(3.41 ±0.38)vs (3.14 ±0.38)scores, (3.41 ±0.38)vs (3.11 ±0.48)scores,P <0.01 ].The correlation analysis showed that psychological contract was positively correlated with job engagement and job satisfaction [correlation coefficient (r)was 0.514 and 0.509,P <0.01],job satisfaction was positively correlated with job engagement (r =0.591,P <0.01).Regression analysis showed job satisfaction was the intermediate (43.99% of the total effect)and regulated variable between psychological contract and job engagement.Conclusion Job satisfaction played an intermediate and regulated role in the psychological contract and job engagement of secondary vocational school teachers.Measurements should be taken to satisfy their psychological contract,so as to improve the levels of job satisfaction and job engagement.%目的:探讨中等职业教师(以下简称“中职教师”)心理契约、工作满意度与工作投入的关系。方法采用方便抽样的方法,抽取广西壮族自治区55所中等职业学校的342名教师,采用心理契约量表、工作投入量表和工作满意度量表进行问卷调查。结果广西中职教师心理契约、工作投入和工作满意度得分分别为(3.69±0.48

  11. Factors Influencing Student Engagement and the Role of Technology in Student Engagement in Higher Education: Campus-Class-Technology Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selim Günüç

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to determine both the factors influencing student engagement and the role and influence of technology on student engagement. The study is important as it aimed at determining the views of students about student engagement and examining in detail the research data to be collected with two different data collection techniques. The present study was designed as a grounded theory study. The research sample included a total of 45 student teachers. Of all the participants, 25 of them participated in face-to-face Interviews, and 20 of them were asked to take part in written compositions. In conclusion, it was seen that the components constituting and influencing student engagement were found to be campus engagement and class engagement. It was found out that for most of the participating students, use of technology in class was not an indispensable factor for student engagement. In addition, an effective technology integration would not only contribute much to student engagement but also constitute an important way of increasing student engagement. Finally, it was seen that use of technology in instructional activities constituted an important factor for student engagement, when the findings obtained via the interviews and the written compositions were taken into consideration together

  12. Examining Professional Learning and the Preparation of Professionally Competent Teachers in Initial Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Sylvia Y. F.; Wong, Angel K. Y.; Cheng, May M. H.

    2016-01-01

    The relative contributions of higher education and schools, and hence the conceptual and practical aspects of ITE, to student teachers' professional learning have been an issue of concern in teacher education. This article reports a mixed-methods study showing the relationship between student teachers' engagement with the practical and conceptual…

  13. From Isolation to Conversation: Supporting New Teachers' Development. SUNY Series, Teacher Preparation and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Dwight L.; Babinski, Leslie M.

    This book describes an inquiry-oriented form of professional development--the New Teacher Group--which provides teachers with opportunities to engage in discussions with their peers about problems experienced in their professional lives. Blending school psychology and teacher education, the book adapts a consultee-centered consultation model…

  14. The MetLife Survey of the American Teacher: Teachers, Parents and the Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    MetLife, Inc., 2012

    2012-01-01

    "The MetLife Survey of the American Teacher: Teachers, Parents and the Economy" (2011) examines the teaching profession and parent-school engagement at a time when there has been a prolonged economic downturn. The survey explores how teachers, parents and schools are working together to promote student learning and healthy development in the…

  15. Good Teacher-Student Relationships: Perspectives of Teachers in Urban High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Julia

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the behaviors that teachers in eight large urban high schools in a Northeastern state considered important for good teacher-student relationships. A factor analysis of teacher (N = 103) survey responses revealed three factors related to student behaviors: (a) demonstrating engagement and interest in schoolwork; (b) being…

  16. Measuring user engagement

    CERN Document Server

    Lalmas, Mounia; Yom-Tov, Elad

    2014-01-01

    User engagement refers to the quality of the user experience that emphasizes the positive aspects of interacting with an online application and, in particular, the desire to use that application longer and repeatedly. User engagement is a key concept in the design of online applications (whether for desktop, tablet or mobile), motivated by the observation that successful applications are not just used, but are engaged with. Users invest time, attention, and emotion in their use of technology, and seek to satisfy pragmatic and hedonic needs. Measurement is critical for evaluating whether online

  17. Engaging with learners’ errors when teaching mathematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Sapire

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Teachers come across errors not only in tests but also in their mathematics classrooms virtually every day. When they respond to learners’ errors in their classrooms, during or after teaching, teachers are actively carrying out formative assessment. In South Africa the Annual National Assessment, a written test under the auspices of the Department of Basic Education, requires that teachers use learner data diagnostically. This places a new and complex cognitive demand on teachers’ pedagogical content knowledge. We argue that teachers’ involvement in, and application of, error analysis is an integral aspect of teacher knowledge. The Data Informed Practice Improvement Project was one of the first attempts in South Africa to include teachers in a systematic process of interpretation of learners’ performance data. In this article we analyse video data of teachers’ engagement with errors during interactions with learners in their classrooms and in one-on-one interviews with learners (17 lessons and 13 interviews. The schema of teachers’ knowledge of error analysis and the complexity of its application are discussed in relation to Ball’s domains of knowledge and Hugo’s explanation of the relation between cognitive and pedagogical loads. The analysis suggests that diagnostic assessment requires teachers to focus their attention on the germane load of the task and this in turn requires awareness of error and the use of specific probing questions in relation to learners’ diagnostic reasoning. Quantitative and qualitative data findings show the difficulty of this activity. For the 62 teachers who took part in this project, the demands made by diagnostic assessment exceeded their capacity, resulting in many instances (mainly in the classroom where teachers ignored learners’ errors or dealt with them partially.

  18. Examining the Long-Term Impact of Collaborative Action Research on Teacher Identity and Practice: The Perceptions of K-12 Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodnough, Karen

    2011-01-01

    This study focused on teacher perceptions of the long-term impacts of engaging in collaborative action research on professional identity and practice. This qualitative, phenomenological study focused on understanding the lived experiences of 10 teachers before, during, and after engaging in action research. Each teacher was interviewed before…

  19. Model program for the recruitment and preparation of high ability elementary mathematics/science teachers: A collaborative project among scientists, teacher educators and classroom teachers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-01

    This teacher education program will provide a model for recruiting, educating and retaining high ability students to become mathematics and science lead teachers in elementary schools. The quality experiences and support provided these students will help them develop the knowledge and attitudes necessary to provide leadership for elementary mathematics and science programs. Students will have research experiences at the Ames Laboratory, high quality field experiences with nationally recognized mathematics and science teachers in local schools and opportunities to meaningfully connect these two experiences. This program, collaboratively designed and implemented by scientists, teacher educators and classroom teachers, should provide a replicatable model for other teacher education institutions. In addition, materials developed for the project should help other laboratories interface more effectively with K-8 schools and help other teacher education programs incorporate real science and mathematics experience into their curriculum.

  20. Model program for the recruitment and preparation of high ability elementary mathematics/science teachers: A collaborative project among scientists, teacher educators and classroom teachers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-01

    This teacher education program will provide a model for recruiting, educating and retaining high ability students to become mathematics and science lead teachers in elementary schools. The quality experiences and support provided these students will help them develop the knowledge and attitudes necessary to provide leadership for elementary mathematics and science programs. Students will have research experiences at the Ames Laboratory, high quality field experiences with nationally recognized mathematics and science teachers in local schools and opportunities to meaningfully connect these two experiences. This program, collaboratively designed and implemented by scientists, teacher educators and classroom teachers, should provide a replicatable model for other teacher education institutions. In addition, materials developed for the project should help other laboratories interface more effectively with K-8 schools and help other teacher education programs incorporate real science and mathematics experience into their curriculum.

  1. TEACHER LEARNING WITHIN THE SCHOOL CONTEXT: AN ECOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Van Canh

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Central to teacher professional development is teacher learning, which is situated in a classroom, a school, or an informal social setting. Using an ecological framework which incorporates a wide range of influences at multiple levels, including intrapersonal, interpersonal/ cultural, institutional, and physical environment, this research sets out to explore the influence of the school context on teachers’ engagement in informal learning activities. Data are collected through semi-structured open-ended interviews with six EFL teachers working in different upper secondary schools in Vietnam in an attempt to uncover what types of informal learning activities these teachers engage in and how the school context affects their engagement. Findings show multiple work-based factors that influence teacher learning in the school. The study provides evidence to teacher educators about the relationship between school context and teachers’ degree of engagement in informal learning. Keywords: ecological framework, professional development, informal learning, personal characteristics, teacher learning

  2. Reconceptualizing Teacher Preparation for Inclusive Classrooms: A Description of the Dual License Program at the University of New Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Elizabeth B.; Rossi, Pamela J.; de Valenzuela, J. S.; Howarth, Sam

    2000-01-01

    This article describes the Dual License Teacher Preparation Program at the University of New Mexico and the national and state context within which it was developed and continues to evolve. Graduates of the program are eligible for licensure in general education (K-8) and special education (K-12). Teacher collaboration is highlighted. (Contains…

  3. Achieving Provider Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfield, Geva; Pappas, Yannis; Car, Josip; Majeed, Azeem; Harris, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The literature on integrated care is limited with respect to practical learning and experience. Although some attention has been paid to organizational processes and structures, not enough is paid to people, relationships, and the importance of these in bringing about integration. Little is known, for example, about provider engagement in the organizational change process, how to obtain and maintain it, and how it is demonstrated in the delivery of integrated care. Based on qualitative data from the evaluation of a large-scale integrated care initiative in London, United Kingdom, we explored the role of provider engagement in effective integration of services. Using thematic analysis, we identified an evolving engagement narrative with three distinct phases: enthusiasm, antipathy, and ambivalence, and argue that health care managers need to be aware of the impact of professional engagement to succeed in advancing the integrated care agenda. PMID:25212855

  4. Identification of altered microRNAs and mRNAs in the cumulus cells of PCOS patients: miRNA-509-3p promotes oestradiol secretion by targeting MAP3K8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xin; Liu, Chang; Hao, Cuifang; Tang, Qianqing; Liu, Riming; Lin, Shaoxia; Zhang, Luping; Yan, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common endocrine and metabolic disorder in women and is characterised by polycystic ovaries, hyperandrogenism and chronic anovulation. Although the clinical and biochemical signs of PCOS are typically heterogeneous, abnormal folliculogenesis is considered a common characteristic of PCOS. Our aim is to identify the altered miRNA and mRNA expression profiles in the cumulus cells of PCOS patients to investigate their molecular function in the aetiology and pathophysiology of PCOS. In this study, the miRNA expression profiles of the cumulus cell samples isolated from five PCOS and five control patients were determined by an miRNA microarray. At the same time, the altered mRNA profiles of the same cumulus cell samples were also identified by a cDNA microarray. From the microarray data, 17 miRNAs and 1263 mRNAs showed significantly different expression in the PCOS cumulus cells. The differentially expressed miRNA-509-3p and its potential target gene (MAP3K8) were identified from the miRNA and mRNA microarrays respectively. The expression of miRNA-509-3p was up-regulated and MAP3K8 was down-regulated in the PCOS cumulus cells. The direct interaction between miRNA-509-3p and MAP3K8 was confirmed by a luciferase activity assay in KGN cells. In addition, miRNA-509-3p mimics or inhibitor transfection tests in KGN cells further confirmed that miRNA-509-3p improved oestradiol (E2) secretion by inhibiting the expression of MAP3K8 These results help to characterise the pathogenesis of anovulation in PCOS, especially the regulation of E2 production.

  5. Puppets and engagement in science: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda Keogh

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The PUPPETS Project set out to determine whether the use of hand-held puppets would help teachers change the nature of their whole class discourse to enhance children’s talk and engagement in primary science lessons. The research provided evidence of an increase in discourse focused on argument and reasoning, and a positive impact on children’s engagement and motivation. This case study focuses on one of the strategies (demonstration lessons used to help teachers implement key findings from the PUPPETS Project research. Data were gathered from groups of teachers who observed demonstration lessons. The purpose of the case study was to explore the value of demonstration lessons as a potential model for teacher professional development within the PUPPETS Project. Teachers responded positively to the demonstration lessons and engaged in significant professional dialogue about the use of puppets that mirrored findings from the original research. Their response suggests that demonstration lessons provide a useful complement to the strategies currently used for teacher professional development.

  6. Medarbejderinvolvering og engagement i arbejdspladsvurdering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasle, Peter; Thoft, Eva

    2000-01-01

    En vurdering af betingelserne for at udvikle medarbejder involvering og engagement i arbejdspladsvurdering.......En vurdering af betingelserne for at udvikle medarbejder involvering og engagement i arbejdspladsvurdering....

  7. Preservice elementary teachers' actual and designated identities as teachers of science and teachers of students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canipe, Martha Murray

    Preservice elementary teachers often have concerns about teaching science that may stem from a lack of confidence as teachers or their own negative experiences as learners of science. These concerns may lead preservice teachers to avoid teaching science or to teach it in a way that focuses on facts and vocabulary rather than engaging students in the doing of science. Research on teacher identity has suggested that being able to envision oneself as a teacher of science is an important part of becoming a teacher of science. Elementary teachers are generalists and as such rather than identifying themselves as teachers of particular content areas, they may identify more generally as teachers of students. This study examines three preservice teachers' identities as teachers of science and teachers of students and how these identities are enacted in their student teaching classrooms. Using a narrated identity framework, I explore stories told by preservice teachers, mentor teachers, student teaching supervisors, and science methods course instructors about who preservice teachers are as teachers of science and teachers of students. Identities are the stories that are told about who someone is or will become in relation to a particular context. Identities that are enacted are performances of the stories that are an identity. Stories were collected through interviews with each storyteller and in an unmoderated focus group with the three preservice teachers. In addition to sorting stories as being about teachers of science or students, the stories were categorized as being about preservice teachers in the present (actual identities) or in the future (designated identities). The preservice teachers were also observed teaching science lessons in their student teaching placements. These enactments of identities were analyzed in order to identify which aspects of the identity stories were reflected in the way preservice teachers taught their science lessons. I also analyzed the

  8. Increasing Induction-Level Teachers' Positive-to-Negative Communication Ratio and Use of Behavior-Specific Praise through E-Mailed Performance Feedback and Its Effect on Students' Task Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathel, Jeanna M.; Drasgow, Erik; Brown, William H.; Marshall, Kathleen J.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of e-mailed specific performance feedback that included progress monitoring graphs on induction-level teachers' ratios of positive-to-negative communication behaviors and their use of behavior-specific praise in classrooms for students with emotional and behavioral disorders, mild…

  9. Why Mentor? Linking Mentor Teachers' Motivations to Their Mentoring Conceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ginkel, Gisbert; Verloop, Nico; Denessen, Eddie

    2016-01-01

    Current mentoring models for teacher preparation and induction emphasize the need to engage novice teachers' learning through collaborative professional learning communities. Mentors in such communities are expected to engage in joint knowledge construction with novices, and to be "co-thinkers" who enact a developmental view of…

  10. Why mentor? Linking mentor teachers' motivations to their mentoring conceptions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginkel, G.V.M. van; Denessen, E.J.P.G.; Verloop, N.

    2016-01-01

    Current mentoring models for teacher preparation and induction emphasize the need to engage novice teachers' learning through collaborative professional learning communities. Mentors in such communities are expected to engage in joint knowledge construction with novices, and to be 'co-thinkers' who

  11. Perceptions of Pre-Service Teachers Value of Art Museums and Galleries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemon, Narelle; Garvis, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Art museums and galleries provide many educational opportunities for generalist classroom teachers to engage in learning experiences with students. Beliefs about engagement with art museums and galleries can begin in teacher education programs. This paper explores the beliefs of pre-service teachers in a Bachelor of Education (primary) program in…

  12. Doing Literary Criticism: Helping Students Engage with Challenging Texts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Tim

    2010-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges for English language arts teachers today is the call to engage students in more complex texts. Tim Gillespie, who has taught in public schools for almost four decades, has found the lenses of literary criticism a powerful tool for helping students tackle challenging literary texts. Tim breaks down the dense language…

  13. Student Engagement in the Classrooms of Restructuring Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Helen M.

    This paper presents findings of a study that investigated factors that contribute to the engagement of students. Based on the theoretical model of Newmann, Wehlage, and Lamborn (1992), the study examined the effect of instructional approaches of teachers, contextual features of classrooms, and attributes of student experience on students'…

  14. Talking about Texts: Middle School Students' Engagement in Metalinguistic Talk

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'warte, Jacqueline

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, discourse analytical methods are applied to data from two middle school classrooms, as a teacher, researcher, and students' engage in research based curricula (Martinez, Orellana, Pacheco, & Carbone, 2008; Orellana & Reynolds, 2008) designed to leverage students' language brokering skills and facilitate discussion about languages.…

  15. Using Game Elements to Increase Student Engagement in Course Assignments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armier, David Des, Jr.; Shepherd, Craig E.; Skrabut, Stan

    2016-01-01

    Gamification incorporates game-elements in non-gaming situations to enhance student engagement and desired behavior. This study examined participant's willingness to take part in gamified activities where reward systems were not directly tied to course grades. Participants enrolled in a technology integration course for preservice teachers, were…

  16. Research on Model of Student Engagement in Online Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Wang

    2017-01-01

    In this study, online learning refers students under the guidance of teachers through the online learning platform for organized learning. Based on the analysis of related research results, considering the existing problems, the main contents of this paper include the following aspects: (1) Analyze and study the current student engagement model.…

  17. "Cool" Engagements with YouTube: Part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trier, James

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses the participatory potential of YouTube, a social website that allows users to upload, view, and share video clips. The author provides examples of how YouTube was incorporated into a course as part of a "mosh-pit" pedagogy that involved both students and teachers in engaging with a variety of YouTube videos.

  18. Engaging Students in World History with a Bog Body Mystery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yell, Michael M.

    2012-01-01

    Getting students involved in the process of inquiry takes much more than pointing out a problem, offering sources, and setting them on their way. Fortunately, there are a number of teaching strategies that can be instrumental in engaging students in the process of inquiry. As a teacher of world history in the seventh grade, House of Avalon, at…

  19. Engaging Students in World History with a Bog Body Mystery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yell, Michael M.

    2012-01-01

    Getting students involved in the process of inquiry takes much more than pointing out a problem, offering sources, and setting them on their way. Fortunately, there are a number of teaching strategies that can be instrumental in engaging students in the process of inquiry. As a teacher of world history in the seventh grade, House of Avalon, at…

  20. Battling Boredom: 99 Strategies to Spark Student Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Bryan

    2011-01-01

    Drive boredom out of your classroom--and keep it out--with the student-engagement strategies in this book. You'll learn how to gain and sustain the attention of your students from the moment the bell rings. Perfect for teachers of all subjects and grade levels, these activities go head-to-head with student boredom and disengagement, resulting in…