WorldWideScience

Sample records for k-12 educational outreach

  1. Engaging Scientists in NASA Education and Public Outreach: K - 12 Formal Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolone, Lindsay; Smith, D. A.; Eisenhamer, B.; Lawton, B. L.; Universe Professional Development Collaborative, Multiwavelength; NASA Data Collaborative, Use of; SEPOF K-12 Formal Education Working Group; E/PO Community, SMD

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Science Education and Public Outreach Forums support the NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) and its education and public outreach (E/PO) community through a coordinated effort to enhance the coherence and efficiency of SMD-funded E/PO programs. The Forums foster collaboration between scientists with content expertise and educators with pedagogy expertise. We present opportunities for the astronomy community to participate in collaborations supporting the NASA SMD efforts in the K - 12 Formal Education community. Members of the K - 12 Formal Education community include classroom educators, homeschool educators, students, and curriculum developers. The Forums’ efforts for the K - 12 Formal Education community include a literature review, appraisal of educators’ needs, coordination of audience-based NASA resources and opportunities, professional development, and support with the Next Generation Science Standards. Learn how to join in our collaborative efforts to support the K - 12 Formal Education community based upon mutual needs and interests.

  2. Creating Effective K-12 Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, J.

    2011-12-01

    Grant opportunities require investigators to provide 'broader impacts' for their scientific research. For most researchers this involves some kind of educational outreach for the K-12 community. I have been able to participate in many different types of grant funded science teacher professional development programs. The most valuable have been outreach where the research seamlessly integrated with my classroom curriculum and was sustainable with my future classes. To accomplish these types of programs, the investigators needed to research the K-12 community and identify several key aspects of the K-12 environment where their expertise would benefit me and my students. There are a lot of different K-12 learning environments, so researchers need to be sure to match up with the right grade level and administrative environment. You might want to consider non-main stream school settings, such as magnet programs, STEM academies, and distance learning. The goal is to try to make your outreach seem natural and productive. This presentation will illustrate how researchers can create an educational outreach project that will be a win-win situation for everyone involved.

  3. K-12 Neuroscience Education Outreach Program: Interactive Activities for Educating Students about Neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deal, Alex L; Erickson, Kristen J; Bilsky, Edward J; Hillman, Susan J; Burman, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    The University of New England's Center for Excellence in the Neurosciences has developed a successful and growing K-12 outreach program that incorporates undergraduate and graduate/professional students. The program has several goals, including raising awareness about fundamental issues in neuroscience, supplementing science education in area schools and enhancing undergraduate and graduate/professional students' academic knowledge and skill set. The outreach curriculum is centered on core neuroscience themes including: Brain Safety, Neuroanatomy, Drugs of Abuse and Addiction, Neurological and Psychiatric Disorders, and Cognition and Brain Function. For each theme, lesson plans were developed based upon interactive, small-group activities. Additionally, we've organized our themes in a "Grow-up, Grow-out" approach. Grow-up refers to returning to a common theme, increasing in complexity as we revisit students from early elementary through high school. Grow-out refers to integrating other scientific fields into our lessons, such as the chemistry of addiction, the physics of brain injury and neuronal imaging. One of the more successful components of our program is our innovative team-based model of curriculum design. By creating a team of undergraduate, graduate/professional students and faculty, we create a unique multi-level mentoring opportunity that appears to be successful in enhancing undergraduate students' skills and knowledge. Preliminary assessments suggest that undergraduates believe they are enhancing their content knowledge and professional skills through our program. Additionally, we're having a significant, short-term impact on K-12 interest in science. Overall, our program appears to be enhancing the academic experience of our undergraduates and exciting K-12 students about the brain and science in general.

  4. K-12 Students Flock To ToxTown In San Diego: Results of an SOT K-12 Education Outreach Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Just prior to the start of the 2015 Annual Meeting in San Diego, hundreds of K-12 students, teachers, and science enthusiasts visited the ToxTown booth at the annual San Diego Festival of Science and Engineering grand finale event, EXPO Day. Over 20,000 attendees participated in ...

  5. VISL: A Virtual Ice Sheet Laboratory For Outreach and K-12 Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, D. L. C.; Halkides, D. J.; Larour, E. Y.; Moore, J.; Dunn, S.; Perez, G.

    2015-12-01

    We present an update on our developing Virtual Ice Sheet Laboratory (VISL). Geared to K-12 classrooms and the general public, VISL's main goal is to improve climate literacy, especially in regards to the crucial role of the polar ice sheets in Earth's climate and sea level. VISL will allow users to perform guided experiments using the Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM), a state-of-the-art ice flow model developed at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and UC Irvine that simulates the near-term evolution of the ice sheets on Greenland and Antarctica. VISL users will access ISSM via a graphical interface that can be launched from a web browser on a computer, tablet or smart phone. Users select climate conditions and run time by moving graphic sliders then watch how a given region evolves in time under those conditions. Lesson plans will include conceptual background, instructions for table top experiments related to the concepts addressed in a given lesson, and a guide for performing model experiments and interpreting their results. Activities with different degrees of complexity will aim for consistency with NGSS Physical Science criteria for different grade bands (K-2, 3-5, 6-8, and 9-12), although they will not be labeled as such to encourage a broad user base. Activities will emphasize the development of physical intuition and critical thinking skills, understanding conceptual and computational models, as well as observation recording, concept articulation, hypothesis formulation and testing, and mathematical analysis. At our present phase of development, we seek input from the greater science education and outreach communities regarding VISL's planned content, as well as additional features and topic areas that educators and students would find useful.

  6. A Win-Win Model for Outreach and Graduate Education: Research Findings on Professional Development Outcomes for STEM Graduate Students Participating in K-12 Classroom Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laursen, S.; Thiry, H.; Liston, C.

    2006-12-01

    National attention has recently focused on the failures of STEM graduate education in preparing Ph.D. graduates to think broadly, communicate effectively, work in interdisciplinary settings, and succeed in a variety of careers beyond tenure-track academic positions at research universities. We will report findings on a study of a school outreach program that also enhances the graduate education and career preparation of a group of STEM graduate students interested in science education. The Science Squad at the University of Colorado at Boulder is a group of university STEM graduate students who develop and present hands-on, inquiry-based science sessions in local K-12 schools. Squad members hold the position as an alternative to a standard teaching assistantship, typically spending two days a week in the schools. Our ethnographic interview study examines the benefits and costs to the K-12 students, teachers, and graduate students who participate. The program provides significant benefits to the K-12 students and teachers that it serves, but even more importantly offers significant professional development in teaching and learning to a group of STEM graduate students who seek to develop their science careers as communicators and educators. Findings elucidate how the design of the program enables the graduate Squad members to develop teaching, communication, and organizational skills; deepen their understanding of K-12 education and diversity issues; grow in professional confidence; and apply these gains to their career development. In addition, over 80% of the Squad members interviewed reported that participation in the Squad influenced their careers in one of two ways. Members who were pursuing academic positions emphasizing teachers found the Squad experience to confirm their interest in this career and enhance their ability to earn a suitable academic position. Members who were reconsidering their career options and rejecting their initial plans to pursue

  7. Strategies for Engaging NASA Earth Scientists in K-12 Education and Public Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeson, Blanche W.; Gabrys, Robert E.

    2001-01-01

    Engagement of the Earth Science research community in formal education at the kindergarten through high school level and in various aspects of informal education and in professional development of practitioners in related fields has been and continues to be a challenge. A range of approaches is being used and new ones are constantly being tried. Fundamental to our strategies is an understanding of the priorities, skills, academic experiences, motivation, rewards and work experiences of most scientists. It is within this context that efforts to engage a scientist in education efforts are attempted. A key strategy is to limit our requests to activities where the scientist's contribution of time and expertise can have the most impact. Don't waste the scientist's time! Time is one of their most prized resources, it is extremely valuable to you, and to them, we treat their time like a treasured resource. The clearer a scientist's role, their unique contribution and the finite nature of their effort, the more likely they are to participate. It is critical that commitments made to scientists are kept. If they want and can do more, great! Don't expect or assume more will be forthcoming. Another approach that we use is to create periodic venues that, among other things, serve to identify individuals who have an interest or inclination to con , tribute to education efforts. Once identified we strive to determine their interests so that we can make the best match between their interests and the needs of the education program or efforts. In this way, we try to make the best use of their time while engaging them in efforts which will be personally rewarding, and will further the overall education objectives. In addition, we try to make it easier for scientists to participate by providing focused training, such as development of their interviewing skills, and exposure to key concepts, knowledge and skills which are well known among educators but are not common knowledge among

  8. Strategies for Engaging NASA Earth Scientists in K-12 Education and Public Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeson, B. W.; Gabrys, R. E.

    2001-05-01

    Engagement of the Earth Science research community in formal education at the kindergarten through high school level and in various aspects of informal education and in professional development of practitioners in related fields has been and continues to be a challenge. A range of approaches is being used and new ones are constantly being tried. Fundamental to our strategies is an understanding of the priorities, skills, academic experiences, motivation, rewards and work experiences of most scientists. It is within this context that efforts to engage a scientist in education efforts are attempted. A key strategy is to limit our requests to activities where the scientist's contribution of time and expertise can have the most impact. Don't waste the scientist's time! Time is one of their most prized resources, it is extremely valuable to you, and to them - we treat their time like a treasured resource. The clearer a scientist's role, their unique contribution and the finite nature of their effort, the more likely they are to participate. It is critical that commitments made to scientists are kept. If they want and can do more -great! Don't expect or assume more will be forthcoming. Another approach that we use is to create periodic venues that, among other things, serve to identify individuals who have an interest or inclination to contribute to education efforts. Once identified we strive to determine their interests so that we can make the best match between their interests and the needs of the education program or efforts. In this way, we try to make the best use of their time while engaging them in efforts which will be personally rewarding, and will further the overall education objectives. In addition, we try to make it easier for scientists to participate by providing focused training, such as development of their interviewing skills, and exposure to key concepts, knowledge and skills which are well known among educators but are not common knowledge among

  9. Optics education for K-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilbro, James W.; Gaines Walker, Janice M.

    2000-06-01

    The SPIE Education Committee has developed an outreach program aimed at enhancing the dissemination of information about optics to children in kindergarten through the 12th grade (K-12). The main impetus behind the program was that more practicing optical scientists and engineers would be willing to give lectures and demonstrations aimed at inspiring the next generation about optics if material could be made easily available. Consequently, three instructional `outreach kits' were assembled to use in teaching optics to kids in exciting and fun ways. These kits were beta-tested over the last two years at six different U.S. regional sites. Each `outreach kit' contained: (1) a workbook on Optical Demonstrations on the Overhead Projector; (2) a Science and Math Experience Manual: Light, Color and Their Uses; (3) The Optics Discovery Classroom Kit; (4) a slide show; and (5) a video on careers in optics. The best tests were aimed at evaluating the practical ways of utilizing the kits, developing easy-to-follow instructions for guiding others in their use and providing suggestions on modifications, additions, and deletions to the kits. This paper discuses this outreach program and provides details relative to the kit's composition and future plans.

  10. Permafrost monitoring K12 outreach program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, K.; Saito, T.; Romanovsky, V.

    2007-12-01

    experience and educational participation at levels ranging from elementary school to high school. 2). To provide high-resolution spatial distribution of the thermal state of permafrost, especially in Alaska. 3). To assist in improving the general knowledge of the Earth's climatic pattern and opportunity to take part in understanding the climatic systems for younger generations. The obtained data and Internet Q&A systems help understand the relationship between permafrost condition and the arctic climate system. As well as being a strong outreach program to support village science education, the date sets form this project will establish a baseline for future permafrost monitoring investigations.

  11. Preparing University Students to Lead K-12 Engineering Outreach Programmes: A Design Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Anika B.; Greene, Howard; Post, Paul E.; Parkhurst, Andrew; Zhan, Xi

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes an engineering outreach programme designed to increase the interest of under-represented youth in engineering and to disseminate pre-engineering design challenge materials to K-12 educators and volunteers. Given university students' critical role as facilitators of the outreach programme, researchers conducted a two-year…

  12. Connecting with Teachers and Students through K-12 Outreach Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Susan; Lindbo, David; Robinson, Clay

    2014-05-01

    The Soil Science Society of America has invested heavily in a significant outreach effort to reach teachers and students in the primary/secondary grades (K-12 grades in US/Canada) to raise awareness of soil as a critical resource. The SSSA K-12 committee has been charged with increasing interest and awareness of soil science as a scientific pursuit and career choice, and providing resources that integrate more information on soil science into biology, chemistry, physics, and earth science areas taught at multiple grade levels. Activities center around five main areas: assessment and standards, learning modules/lesson plans, website development, and books and materials, and partnership activities. Members (professionals and students) of SSSA are involved through committee participation, local events, materials review, and project development.

  13. Scientists Involved in K-12 Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robigou, V.

    2004-12-01

    The publication of countless reports documenting the dismal state of science education in the 1980s, and the Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMMS) report (1996) called for a wider involvement of the scientific community in K-12 education and outreach. Improving science education will not happen without the collaboration of educators and scientists working in a coordinated manner and it requires a long-term, continuous effort. To contribute effectively to K-12 education all scientists should refer to the National Science Education Standards, a set of policies that guide the development of curriculum and assessment. Ocean scientists can also specifically refer to the COSEE recommendations (www.cosee.org) that led to the creation of seven regional Centers for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence. Scientists can get involved in K-12 education in a multitude of ways. They should select projects that will accommodate time away from their research and teaching obligations, their talent, and their interest but also contribute to the education reform. A few examples of effective involvement are: 1) collaborating with colleagues in a school of education that can lead to better education of all students and future teachers, 2) acting as a resource for a national program or a local science fair, 3) serving on the advisory board of a program that develops educational material, 4) speaking out at professional meetings about the value of scientists' involvement in education, 5) speaking enthusiastically about the teaching profession. Improving science education in addition to research can seem a large, overwhelming task for scientists. As a result, focusing on projects that will fit the scientist's needs as well as benefit the science reform is of prime importance. It takes an enormous amount of work and financial and personnel resources to start a new program with measurable impact on students. So, finding the right opportunity is a priority, and stepping

  14. Soil Science Society of America - K-12 Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindbo, David L.; Loynachan, Tom; Mblia, Monday; Robinson, Clay; Chapman, Susan

    2013-04-01

    The Soil Science Society of America created its K12 Committee in 2006 in part to compliment the Dig It! The Secrets of Soil exhibit that opened in July 2008 at the Smithsonian's Institution's Nation Museum of Natural History (of which SSS was a founding sponsor). The committee's work began quickly with a website designed to provide resources for K12 teachers. The first accomplishments included reviewing and posting links to web based information already available to teachers. These links were sorted by subject and grade level to make it easier for teachers to navigate the web and find what they needed quickly. Several presentations and lessons designed for K12 teachers were also posted at this time. Concurrent with this effort a subcommittee review and organized the national teaching standards to show where soils could fit into the overall K12 curriculum. As the website was being developed another subcommittee developed a soils book (Soil! Get the Inside Scoop, 2008) to further compliment the Dig It! exhibit. This was a new endeavor for SSSA having never worked with the non-academic audience in developing a book. Peer-reviews of this book included not only scientist but also students in order to make sure the book was attractive to them. Once the book was published and the website developed it became clear more outreach was needed. SSSA K12 Committee has attended both the National Science Teachers Association (since 2008) the USA Science and Engineering Festival (since 2010) with exhibits and workshops. It has cooperated and contributed to the American Geologic Institutes' Earth Science Week materials with brochures and lesson plans and with National Association of Conservation Districts by providing peer-review and distribution of materials. The most recent developments from the committee include a web redesign that is more student and teacher friendly, the development of a peer-review system to publish K12 Lesson Plans, and finally the publication of a new soils

  15. Standards for K-12 Engineering Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Academies Press, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the value and feasibility of developing and implementing content standards for engineering education at the K-12 level. Content standards have been developed for three disciplines in STEM education--science, technology, and mathematic--but not for engineering. To date, a small but growing number of K-12

  16. K-12 Educational Outcomes of Immigrant Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosnoe, Robert; Turley, Ruth N. Lopez

    2011-01-01

    The children from immigrant families in the United States make up a historically diverse population, and they are demonstrating just as much diversity in their experiences in the K-12 educational system. Robert Crosnoe and Ruth Lopez Turley summarize these K-12 patterns, paying special attention to differences in academic functioning across…

  17. Integrating Robot Design Competitions into the Curriculum and K-12 Outreach Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avanzato, Robert

    The Penn State Abington campus has integrated several mobile robot design competitions into project-based design activities to provide enhancement for undergraduate engineering and information sciences and technology courses and also to provide outreach to K-12 institutions. The robot competitions, which encourage interdisciplinary design, teamwork, and rapid prototyping, support a wide range of educational outcomes in a variety of courses. A survey of undergraduate students was also implemented to identify the key lessons learned and overall educational quality of the robot competition activities. Overall, the responses on the quality of the robot competition experience were very positive. The strategic selection and implementation of robot design competitions, such as described in this paper, provide a cost-effective approach to enhancing the curriculum, promoting retention, and encouraging interest in science and technology (STEM) careers in K-12 students.

  18. Engineering Education in K-12 Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Anne

    2013-03-01

    Engineers rely on physicists as well as other scientists and mathematicians to explain the world in which we live. Engineers take this knowledge of the world and use it to create the world that never was. The teaching of physics and other sciences as well as mathematics is critical to maintaining our national workforce. Science and mathematics education are inherently different, however, from engineering education. Engineering educators seek to enable students to develop the habits of mind critical for innovation. Through understanding of the engineering design process and how it differs from the scientific method, students can apply problem and project based learning to solve the challenges facing society today. In this talk, I will discuss the elements critical to a solid K-12 engineering education that integrates science and mathematics to solve challenges throughout the world.

  19. The Chem-E-Car as a Vehicle for Service Learning through K-12 Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirdon, William

    2017-01-01

    This article presents the results of combining the American Institute of Chemical Engineers' (AIChE) Chem-E-Car competition activities with engineering outreach to K-12 students in a service-learning course. Survey results are presented to show how the program develops technical skills as well as leadership, teamwork, and communication skills in…

  20. Science Museum Resources and Partnerships for Public and K-12 Outreach and Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Larry

    2011-03-01

    Science museums engage in a wide range of activities not apparent to exhibit hall visitors. Many of them can support research outreach to public and K-12 teachers and students. In addition to exhibits in science centers, and demonstrations on topics like electricity or cryogenics, science museums offer courses for children and adults, out-of-school programs for students, teacher professional development; some do K-12 curriculum development and some run science magnet schools. In recent years science museums have increased their capacity to communicate with the public about current research. The Museum of Science, for instance, created a Current Science and Technology Center in 2001 dedicated to science in the news and current research developments. Through this Center, the Museum partnered with Harvard University to provide a wide range of public engagement activities as part of Harvard's Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center focused on the Science of Nanoscale Systems and their Device Applications. In the past five years a number of new collaborations among science museums have developed, many in partnership with researchers and research centers. Perhaps the largest or these, the Nanoscale Informal Science Education Network (NISE Net) was launched in 2005 with funding from the National Science Foundation. The NISE Net links informal science education organizations together and to university research centers to raise the capacity of all the participant organizations to increase public awareness, understanding, and engagement with nanoscale science, engineering, and technology. Nearly 300 informal educational organizations in every state nationwide make use of NISE Net's educational materials, professional development, national and regional meetings, and online resources. NISE Net is an open source network with all of its materials freely available to everyone.

  1. AIAA Educator Academy: Enriching STEM Education for K-12 Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slagle, E.; Bering, E. A.; Longmier, B. W.; Henriquez, E.; Milnes, T.; Wiedorn, P.; Bacon, L.

    2012-12-01

    Educator Academy is a K-12 STEM curriculum developed by the STEM K-12 Outreach Committee of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA). Consisting of three independent curriculum modules, K-12 students participate in inquiry-based engineering challenges to improve critical thinking skills and enhance problem solving skills. The Mars Rover Celebration Curriculum Module is designed for students in grades 3-8. Throughout this module, students learn about Mars and the solar system. Working with given design criteria, students work in teams to do basic research about Mars that will determine the operational objectives and structural features of their rover. Then, students participate in the design and construction of a model of a mock-up Mars Rover to carry out a specific science mission on the surface of Mars. At the end of this project, students have the opportunity to participate in a regional capstone event where students share their rover designs and what they have learned. The Electric Cargo Plan Curriculum Module is designed for students in grades 6-12. Throughout this module, students learn about aerodynamics and the four forces of flight. Working individually or in teams, students design and construct an electrically-powered model aircraft to fly a tethered flight of at least one lap without cargo, followed by a second tethered flight of one lap carrying as much cargo as possible. At the end of this project, students have the opportunity to participate in a regional capstone event where students share what they have learned and compete with their different cargo plane designs. The Space Weather Balloon Curriculum Module is designed for students in grades 9-12. Throughout this module, students learn and refine physics concepts as well as experimental research skills. Students participate in project-based learning that is experimental in nature. Students are engaged with the world around them as they collaborate to launch a high altitude

  2. Scientific and Engineering Practices in K-12 Classrooms: Understanding "A Framework for K-12 Science Education"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bybee, Rodger W.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author presents the science and engineering practices from the recently released "A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas" (NRC 2011). The author recognizes the changes implied by the new framework, and eventually a new generation of science education standards will present new…

  3. Revolutionizing Arts Education in K-12 Classrooms through Technological Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemon, Narelle, Ed.

    2015-01-01

    Educational technologies are becoming more commonplace across the K-12 curriculum. In particular, the use of innovative digital technology is expanding the potential of arts education, presenting new opportunities--and challenges--to both curricular design and pedagogical practice. "Revolutionizing Arts Education in K-12 Classrooms through…

  4. Influences of Globalization on K-12 Language Teacher Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Navin Kumar

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of globalization on K-12 language teacher education at Northern Arizona University (NAU) in terms of multilingual practices in the US, with reference to an English-only-state, Arizona. This study explored influences of globalization on K-12 language education practices in the US through teacher…

  5. Merging University Students into K-12 Science Education Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    consider the effects of outreach programs on university science students. Improved communication in science , increased enrollment in science courses as a...education side. Improved communication in science , increased enrollment in science courses as a result of adding an outreach component to traditional

  6. Extending Engineering Education to K-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, Gwen; Kunz, Gina; Rilett, Larry; Jones, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    The United States is facing a crisis in terms of meeting demands for a highly skilled technical workforce. Workforce preparation must begin in primary and secondary educational settings. Teachers are perfectly positioned to increase student awareness of and interest in careers in engineering and technology; unfortunately, they are often not well…

  7. Conceptual framework for energy education, K-12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-05-01

    After a brief statement of the goals of energy education, the concept of energy literacy is loosely defined and two ways are identified by which energy education can be introduced into school curricula. A number of related generalizations are identified that might form the basis for the development of energy curricula, followed in each case by a brief list of selected reference materials. These generalizations include lessons that may be taught on: conversion and measurement of energy, energy flow in the biosphere, human use of energy, energy history of the United States, energy from fossil fuels, nuclear reactions, and solar technologies, electricity as an energy carrier, economic and financial aspects of energy use, ethical issues in energy use, conservation of energy, shelter-related energy conservation, and transportation conservation. Some sample objectives are given that might be considered for use at various grade levels in a typical sequence, with widely used texts accompanying each example. 607 references. (LEW)

  8. Satellite Applications for K-12 Geoscience Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, M.; Ackerman, S.; Lettvin, E.; Emerson, N.; Whittaker, T. M.

    2007-12-01

    This presentation will highlight interactive on-line curriculum developed at the Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies (CIMSS) at the University of Wisconsin in Madison. CIMSS has been on the forefront of educational software design for over two decades, routinely integrating on-line activities into courses on satellite remote sensing. In 2006, CIMSS began collaborating with education experts and researchers from the University of Washington to create an NSF-funded distance learning course for science teachers called Satellite Applications for Geoscience Education. This course includes numerous web-based learning activities, including a distance education tool called VISITview which allows instructors to connect with multiple students simultaneously to conduct a lesson. Developed at CIMSS to facilitate training of National Weather Service forecasters economically and remotely, VISITview is especially effective for groups of people discussing and analyzing maps or images interactively from many locations. Along with an on-line chat function, VISITview participants can use a speaker phone or a networked voice-enabled application to create a learning environment similar to a traditional classroom. VISITview will be used in two capacities: first, instructors will convey topics of current relevance in geoscience disciplines via VISITview. Second, the content experts will participate in "virtual visits" to the classrooms of the educators who take the course for full credit. This will enable scientists to interact with both teachers and students to answer questions and discuss exciting or inspiring examples that link satellite data to their areas of research. As long as a school has Internet access, an LCD projector and a speakerphone, VISITview sessions can be shared with an entire classroom. The geoscientists who developed material for the course and conducting VISITview lectures include a geologist from the University of Wisconsin-Richland, an

  9. Education Nation: Obama, Romney Outline Different K-12, Postsecondary Priorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dervarics, Charles

    2012-01-01

    With negative ads already rampant on radio and TV, it's clear that President Obama and Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney differ on most issues. That statement carries over to education as well, as both offer starkly different views on K-12 and higher education policy for the fall campaign. Obama is touting a large increase in Pell Grants…

  10. 2008 Public Opinion Survey on K-12 Education in Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plucker, Jonathan A.; Spradlin, Terry E.; Burroughs, Nathan A.; Hiller, Stephen C.

    2008-01-01

    During the course of each calendar year since 2003, staff of the Center for Evaluation & Education Policy (CEEP) at Indiana University evaluates the benefits of continuing the Annual Public Opinion Survey on K-12 Education in Indiana. In 2008, the Indiana legislature determined that school corporations would no longer use property tax revenues…

  11. Merging University Students into K?12 Science Education Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    limited to the K–12 classrooms but were related to the broader issue of creating university- school partnerships as a strategy for science education reform...of interest to federal policymakers who are concerned with science education reform and the development of partnerships between universities and K–12...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Merging University Students into K?12 Science Education Reform Unclassified 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM

  12. K-12 Engineering Education Standards: Opportunities and Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bybee, Rodger W.

    2011-01-01

    Does the nation need K-12 engineering education standards? The answer to this question is paradoxically both simple and complex, and requires an examination of a rationale for such standards as well as the opportunities and barriers to developing and implementing the standards. In two decades since 1989, the idea of national standards for…

  13. The Green Pages: Environmental Education Activities K-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clearing, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Presented are 38 environmental education activities for grades K-12. Topics include seed dispersal, food chains, plant identification, sizes and shapes, trees, common names, air pollution, recycling, temperature, litter, water conservation, photography, insects, urban areas, diversity, natural cycles, rain, erosion, phosphates, human population,…

  14. A Framework for Educational Computer Usage. K-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Julia; And Others

    A framework for educational computer usage in grades K-12 is outlined. For each grade level, objectives are shown for the following knowledge areas: computer-related terminology and use; history and development of computers; the use of the computer as a tool; communicating instructions to the computer; social implications; and robotics. Suggested…

  15. Florida's Opinion on K-12 Public Education Spending

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, Greg

    2006-01-01

    This scientifically representative poll of 1,200 Floridians finds that public opinion about K-12 public education spending is seriously misinformed. Floridians think public schools need more money, but the main reason is that they are badly mistaken about how much money the public schools actually get. Key findings of the study include: (1) Half…

  16. The Green Pages: Environmental Education Activities K-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clearing, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Presented are 38 environmental education activities for grades K-12. Topics include seed dispersal, food chains, plant identification, sizes and shapes, trees, common names, air pollution, recycling, temperature, litter, water conservation, photography, insects, urban areas, diversity, natural cycles, rain, erosion, phosphates, human population,…

  17. Inspiring the Next Generation: Astronomy Catalyzes K12 STEM Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borders, Kareen; Thaller, Michelle; Winglee, Robert; Borders, Kyla

    2017-06-01

    K-12 educators need effective and relevant astronomy professional development. NASA's Mission Science provides innovative and accessible opportunities for K-12 teachers. Science questions involve scale and distance, including Moon/Earth scale, solar system scale, and distance of objects in the universe. Teachers can gain an understanding of basic telescopes, the history of telescopes, ground and satellite based telescopes, and models of JWST Telescope. An in-depth explanation of JWST and Spitzer telescopes gave participants background knowledge for infrared astronomy observations. During teacher training, we taught the electromagnetic spectrum through interactive stations. The stations included an overview via lecture and power point, the use of ultraviolet beads to determine ultraviolet exposure, the study of lenticulars and diagramming of infrared data, looking at visible light through diffraction glasses and diagramming the data, protocols for using astronomy based research in the classroom, and infrared thermometers to compare environmental conditions around the observatory. An overview of LIDAR physics was followed up by a simulated LIDAR mapping of the topography of Mars.We will outline specific steps for K-12 infrared astronomy professional development, provide data demonstrating the impact of the above professional development on educator understanding and classroom use, and detail future plans for additional K-12 professional development.Funding was provided by Washington STEM, NASA, and the Washington Space Grant Consortium.

  18. K-12 Math and Science Education: A Physicist Meets Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenstein, Robert

    2009-05-01

    Can professional engineers, mathematicians, and scientists have a positive impact on K-12 math and science education? The experience of the Santa Fe Alliance for Science, and several other like-minded organizations, indicates that they can indeed. But success is by no means assured. Good scientists are not automatically good educators, but they can learn enough about pedagogy, classroom, and community to do well. For example, their experiences working on research topics of great societal interest (e.g. the energy supply or global warming) can be a great attraction to young people. This discussion will be oriented around three major points: lessons learned, prospects for the future, and how our effort fits into state-wide plans for re-inventing K-12 math and science education in New Mexico.

  19. NASA's Astrophysics Education and Public Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Hashima

    2011-05-01

    NASA conducts a balanced Astrophysics Education and Public Outreach program over K-12, higher education, informal education and public outreach, with the goal of taking excitement of NASA's scientific discoveries to the public, and generating interest in students in the area of Science, Technology, Education and Mathematics (STEM). Examples of classroom material, innovative research programs for teachers and students, collaborative programs with libraries, museums and planetaria, and programs for special needs individuals are presented. Information is provided on the competitive opportunities provided by NASA for participation in Astrophysics educational programs.

  20. Undergraduate interest in K--12 teaching and the perceived 'climate' for the K--12 education profession in the natural sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerdeman, Robert Dean

    Previous research suggests that the natural science setting in universities does not offer a supportive environment for undergraduates interested in K--12 education careers, an important problem given the need for K--12 science teachers. A mixed-method approach was used to examine student perspectives toward K--12 education careers, and the influence of the college experience on perspectives, at a public research university. Quantitative data come from a cross-sectional survey sample (N = 444) of upper-division natural science majors in the university. The survey focused on student background characteristics, undergraduate experiences, perceptions of the college environment, career interests, and satisfaction. Pursuit of K--12 education as a top current career choice was rare among the respondents (3.6%). However, about one-fourth of them indicated some interest in this career and overall interest increased slightly during the college experience. Based on student perceptions, K--12 education was substantially less emphasized within the natural sciences than other career fields. Regression analyses revealed that the most important predictors (aside from initial career interests) of interest in and attitude toward K--12 teaching were self-concept and personality measures. Several college experience measures were also predictors, including perceptions about faculty and peers in the natural sciences. The effect of college experiences differed for students initially more inclined toward K--12 teaching, who reported a net decrease in interest, versus those more disinclined, who reported a net gain in interest. Satisfaction with the college experience was similar for the two groups. Qualitative data come from follow-up interviews conducted with eight survey respondents who recalled a top choice of K--12 teaching upon entering college but had decided to pursue another career. These students perceived other career fields to offer better professional opportunities for

  1. Supporting Geoscientists in Partnerships for K-12 Education at NSF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinen, M.

    2001-12-01

    NSF Directorate for Geosciences (GEO) education activities have evolved over the last decade based on advice from a broad segment of the geosciences community. These activities gained momentum when a Geosciences Education Working Group (GEWG, 1996) recognized the shift from traditional priorities that emphasized only research, to those that support education in geosciences as well. The GEWG report embraced this increased emphasis on education as a component of NSF's role in assuring the long-term health of the geosciences and endorsed the principle that research and education should be well integrated. While many geosciences education activities are funded by the Education and Human Resources Directorate (EHR) of NSF, the GEWG report highlighted the need to have more active participation by research geoscientists in K-12 education activities, and the need to train them to be able to do so. While some roles in education are clearly best left to educational professionals (e.g. large-scale systemic reform projects, pedagogical development at the K-12 level, and many teacher enhancement projects), activities such as undergraduate research, technology advancement, curriculum content development and informal science are ones in which GEO should actively seek to collaborate with programs in EHR. The GEO education program has expanded over the last decade. Our first education activity, Awards to Facilitate Geoscience Education (AFGE), was very successful in attracting some of the leading researchers in geosciences. This program evolved to become the Geoscience Education Program. An important program funded by GEO that developed from community activity is the Digital Library for Earth System Education (DLESE). This program grew out of a joint EHR/GEO award and a series of community workshops. The program will establish an Internet portal for geoscience curricular materials and other teacher resources that will enable further collaboration between the research and education

  2. Role of Public Outreach in the University Science Mission: Publishing K-12 Curriculum, Organizing Tours, and Other Methods of Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittrich, T. M.

    2015-12-01

    Much attention has been devoted in recent years to the importance of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) education in K-12 curriculum for developing a capable workforce. Equally important is the role of the voting public in understanding STEM-related issues that impact public policy debates such as the potential impacts of climate change, hydraulic fracturing in oil and gas exploration, mining impacts on water quality, and science funding. Since voted officials have a major impact on the future of these policies, it is imperative that the general public have an understanding of the basic science behind these issues. By engaging with the public in a more fundamental way, university students can play an important role in educating the public while at the same time enhancing their communication skills and gaining valuable teaching experience. I will talk about my own experiences in (1) evaluating and publishing water chemistry and hazardous waste cleanup curriculum on the K-12 engineering platform TeachEngineering.org, (2) organizing public tours of water and energy sites (e.g., abandoned mine sites, coal power plants, wastewater treatment plants, hazardous waste treatment facilities), and (3) other outreach and communication activities including public education of environmental issues through consultations with customers of a landscaping/lawn mowing company. The main focus of this presentation will be the role that graduate students can play in engaging and educating their local community and lessons learned from community projects (Dittrich, 2014; 2012; 2011). References: Dittrich, T.M. 2014. Adventures in STEM: Lessons in water chemistry from elementary school to graduate school. Abstract ED13E-07 presented at 2014 Fall Meeting, AGU, San Francisco, Calif., 15-19 Dec. Dittrich, T.M. 2012. Collaboration between environmental water chemistry students and hazardous waste treatment specialists on the University of Colorado-Boulder campus. Abstract ED53C

  3. Physical Education Teacher Educator's Perceptions toward and Understanding of K-12 Online Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daum, David N.; Woods, Amelia M.

    2015-01-01

    K-12 online physical education (OLPE) is as an educational opportunity in at least 30 states in the US (NASPE, 2006; 2010; 2012). The purpose of this study was to examine physical education teacher educators' perceptions toward and understanding of K-12 OLPE. Bandura's Social Cognitive Theory (1986) served as the theoretical framework for this…

  4. What good is a scientist in the classroom? Participant outcomes and program design features for a short-duration science outreach intervention in K-12 classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laursen, Sandra; Liston, Carrie; Thiry, Heather; Graf, Julie

    2007-01-01

    Many short-duration science outreach interventions have important societal goals of raising science literacy and increasing the size and diversity of the science workforce. Yet, these long-term outcomes are inherently challenging to evaluate. We present findings from a qualitative research study of an inquiry-based, life science outreach program to K-12 classrooms that is typical in design and excellent in execution. By considering this program as a best case of a common outreach model, the "scientist in the classroom," the study examines what benefits may be realized for each participant group and how they are achieved. We find that K-12 students are engaged in authentic, hands-on activities that generate interest in science and new views of science and scientists. Teachers learn new science content and new ways to teach it, and value collegial support of their professional work. Graduate student scientists, who are the program presenters, gain teaching and other skills, greater understanding of education and diversity issues, confidence and intrinsic satisfaction, and career benefits. A few negative outcomes also are described. Program elements that lead to these benefits are identified both from the research findings and from insights of the program developer on program design and implementation choices.

  5. Infrared Astronomy Professional Development for K-12 Educators: WISE Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borders, Kareen; Mendez, B. M.

    2010-01-01

    K-12 educators need effective and relevant astronomy professional development. WISE Telescope (Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer) and Spitzer Space Telescope Education programs provided an immersive teacher professional development workshop at Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico during the summer of 2009. As many common misconceptions involve scale and distance, teachers worked with Moon/Earth scale, solar system scale, and distance of objects in the universe. Teachers built and used basic telescopes, learned about the history of telescopes, explored ground and satellite based telescopes, and explored and worked on models of WISE Telescope. An in-depth explanation of WISE and Spitzer telescopes gave participants background knowledge for infrared astronomy observations. We taught the electromagnetic spectrum through interactive stations. The stations included an overview via lecture and power point, the use of ultraviolet beads to determine ultraviolet exposure, the study of WISE lenticulars and diagramming of infrared data, listening to light by using speakers hooked up to photoreceptor cells, looking at visible light through diffraction glasses and diagramming the data, protocols for using astronomy based research in the classroom, and infrared thermometers to compare environmental conditions around the observatory. An overview of LIDAR physics was followed up by a simulated LIDAR mapping of the topography of Mars. We will outline specific steps for K-12 infrared astronomy professional development, provide data demonstrating the impact of the above professional development on educator understanding and classroom use, and detail future plans for additional K-12 professional development. Funding was provided by WISE Telescope, Spitzer Space Telescope, Starbucks, Arecibo Observatory, the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, and the Washington Space Grant Consortium.

  6. Professional Society Resources and Partnerships for Public and K-12 Outreach and Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Philip W.

    2011-03-01

    Outreach and public engagement lower the barriers that inhibit broader public appreciation of and participation in physics, and are important for inspiring the next generation of scientists and science-literate citizens. The APS and many other professional societies have made significant and sustained investments in public engagement because of the importance of these activities - APS, for example, has an entire department dedicated to outreach. In addition, professional societies have responded to members who desire resources for enabling and enhancing their own outreach efforts. A key question is always, ``What works?'' Professional societies can help provide the answers. In this talk, I will explore the critical interface played by professional societies as a bridge to the public, as a resource to members, and as a broker of partnerships. I will also feature numerous examples of creative and compelling ways to engage the public, including physicscentral.org, LaserFest, NISE Net, Comic Con, SOCKs, citizen science, and many more. A more important question is, ``Is it fun?'' I will show that the answer is an unqualified, ``Yes!'' The author gratefully acknowledges Rebecca Thompson, Head of APS Public Outreach, for her contributions to this work.

  7. K-12 science education: A teacher`s view

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, P.

    1994-12-31

    Science education has experienced significant changes over the past two decades. Science is now vital to good citizenship, performance in the workplace, and everyday life.It is time to re-tool and re-design the entire K-12 science education system, employing the same principles and methods used in the practice of science itself. We can no longer ignore the special needs of science instruction. All students need a course that develops their scientific literacy and critical thinking skills every year. Each science program needs meaningful, useful content and skill standards to drive and continuously update the curriculum content and enabel usefull assessment. Science teachers must articulate their needs and develop opportunities for professional development and the strengthening of their profession. We need a national plan that gets the many different participants working coherently towards a common goal.

  8. K-12 Education Nonprofit Employees' Perceptions of Strategies for Recruiting and Retaining Employees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Tara Marie

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the key reasons individuals who work in K-12 education nonprofit organizations enter the field of K-12 nonprofit education and their motivations for doing so. The purpose of this study was to find new strategies for recruiting and retaining K-12 education nonprofit employees by examining the obstacles that exist to…

  9. "Flipping" educational technology professional development for K-12 educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Daniel

    As the demand for more effective professional development increases in K-12 schools, trainers must adjust their training methods to meet the needs of their teacher learners. Just as lecture-heavy, teacher-centered instruction only meet the learning needs of a small minority of students, "sit and get" professional development rarely results in the teachers gaining the skills and confidence necessary to use technology effectively in their instruction. To resolve the frustrations of teachers related to ineffective professional development, a "Flipped PD" training model was developed based on the learning needs of adult learners, the integration of technological, pedagogical, and content knowledge (TPACK), learning activities, and the Flipped Classroom concept. Under this model, training shifts from a passive, trainer-centered format, to an active, learner-centered format where teachers learn to use technology in their classrooms by first focusing on pedagogical issues, then choosing the options that work best for addressing those issues in their unique situation, and completing "learn-by-doing" projects. Those who participate in "Flipped PD" style trainings tend to have more confidence upon completion that they can use the tools they were trained on in their teaching, as well as believe that the PD was engaging and a good use of their time.

  10. ARES Education and Public Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jaclyn; Galindo, Charles; Graff, Paige; Willis, Kim

    2014-01-01

    The ARES Directorate education team is charged with translating the work of ARES scientists into content that can be used in formal and informal K-12 education settings and assisting with public outreach. This is accomplished through local efforts and national partnerships. Local efforts include partnerships with universities, school districts, museums, and the Lunar and Planetary Institute (LPI) to share the content and excitement of space science research. Sharing astromaterials and exploration science with the public is an essential part of the Directorate's work. As a small enclave of physical scientists at a NASA Center that otherwise emphasizes human space operations and engineering, the ARES staff is frequently called upon by the JSC Public Affairs and Education offices to provide presentations and interviews. Scientists and staff actively volunteer with the JSC Speaker's Bureau, Digital Learning Network, and National Engineers Week programs as well as at Space Center Houston activities and events. The education team also participates in many JSC educator and student workshops, including the Pre-Service Teacher Institute and the Texas Aerospace Scholars program, with workshop presentations, speakers, and printed materials.

  11. National Laboratory Resources and Partnerships for Public and K-12 Outreach and Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risbud, Aditi

    2011-03-01

    Nanoscale science and engineering draws upon aspects of chemistry, physics, biology and engineering to address scientific problems in energy, healthcare, security and technology. Scientists in this field often work in a multidisciplinary setting, which suggests a need for educational content unlike that currently offered in single-discipline high school and college science courses. Instructors are faced with the daunting task of accurately describing nanoscience in the context of their discipline, while inspiring students to explore careers in nanoscale science and engineering. The Molecular Foundry, a Department of Energy nanoscience user facility located at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, offers opportunities for high school and college students, along with science and engineering educators interested in learning basic concepts and research developments in nanoscience. Successful partnering with the Nanoscale Informal Science Education Network also provides opportunities for scientists to interact informally with the general public. These interactions convey the role of national laboratories in helping lay audiences understand the breakthroughs, potential issues and societal impact of nanoscience.

  12. Transforming K-12 Rural Education through Blended Learning: Teacher Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellerer, Paula; Kellerer, Eric; Werth, Eric; Werth, Lori; Montgomery, Danielle; Clyde, Rozella; Cozart, Joe; Creach, Laura; Hibbard, Laura; LaFrance, Jason; Rupp, Nadine; Walker, Niki; Carter, Theresa; Kennedy, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    A qualitative study exploring rural teacher perspectives on the impact of blended learning on students and teachers was conducted in Idaho during the Fall of 2013. Researchers from Northwest Nazarene University's DOCEO Center in partnership with Idaho Digital Learning Academy (IDLA) and the International Association for K-12 Online Learning…

  13. Enriching K-12 Science and Mathematics Education Using LEGOs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Keeshan; Igel, Irina; Poveda, Ronald; Kapila, Vikram; Iskander, Magued

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a series of illustrative LEGO Mindstorms-based science and math activities, developed under an NSF GK-12 Fellows project, for elementary, middle, and high school grades. The activities, developed by engineering and science graduate Fellows in partnership with K-12 teachers, are grade appropriate, address pertinent learning…

  14. ASA education outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Uwe J.; Everbach, E. Carr

    2003-04-01

    A number of very successful Hands-on demo sessions for high school students have been a part of regular ASA meetings for some time. In addition, the Education Committee has organized a series of teacher workshops. These workshops are designed to give high school teachers relatively sophisticated tools to enhance their laboratory content. Workshops for teachers in the elementary grades prepare teachers to use music as a vehicle to introduce additional science concepts. Content and methods associated with both workshops will be discussed. Cyberspace outreach by the ASA was accelerated by the establishment of a Home Page Committee, and more recently by the On-Line Education committee, which is creating an educational website. The website provides a fun way for users to access information including acoustics information, history, demos, and links to the Technical Committee's webpages. The ASA has joined other AIP member societies in developing additional mechanisms, including road shows and nightly news spots.

  15. Value Added Models and the Implementation of the National Standards of K-12 Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, Clancy M.; Garrison, Mark J.

    2017-01-01

    The implementation of value-added models of teacher evaluation continue to expand in public education, but the effects of using student test scores to evaluate K-12 physical educators necessitates further discussion. Using the five National Standards for K-12 Physical Education from the Society of Health and Physical Educators America (SHAPE),…

  16. Core Curriculum for Social Studies Education K-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utah State Office of Education, Salt Lake City. Office of Curriculum and Instruction.

    The Utah social studies curriculum for grades K-12 is divided into three levels: K-6, 7-8, and 9-12. For K-6, mastery of core concepts is required; for grades 7-8, 1.5 units of United States History and Utah studies are required; and for grades 9-12, three units of world cultural geography, ancient world civilizations, European history, United…

  17. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Engaging K-12 Educators, Students, and the General Public in Space Science Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The session "Engaging K-12 Educators, Students, and the General Public in Space Science Exploration" included the following reports:Training Informal Educators Provides Leverage for Space Science Education and Public Outreach; Teacher Leaders in Research Based Science Education: K-12 Teacher Retention, Renewal, and Involvement in Professional Science; Telling the Tale of Two Deserts: Teacher Training and Utilization of a New Standards-based, Bilingual E/PO Product; Lindstrom M. M. Tobola K. W. Stocco K. Henry M. Allen J. S. McReynolds J. Porter T. T. Veile J. Space Rocks Tell Their Secrets: Space Science Applications of Physics and Chemistry for High School and College Classes -- Update; Utilizing Mars Data in Education: Delivering Standards-based Content by Exposing Educators and Students to Authentic Scientific Opportunities and Curriculum; K. E. Little Elementary School and the Young Astronaut Robotics Program; Integrated Solar System Exploration Education and Public Outreach: Theme, Products and Activities; and Online Access to the NEAR Image Collection: A Resource for Educators and Scientists.

  18. K-12 Teachers Encounter Digital Games: A Qualitative Investigation of Teachers' Perceptions of the Potential of Digital Games for K-12 Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, Michele D.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate teachers' perceptions of the integration of digital games for K-12 education. Specifically, this qualitative investigation focuses on reflective dialogued gathered from a group of K-12 educators about their experiences and perceptions of learning about and playing digital games for teaching and learning.…

  19. K-12 Teachers Encounter Digital Games: A Qualitative Investigation of Teachers' Perceptions of the Potential of Digital Games for K-12 Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, Michele D.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate teachers' perceptions of the integration of digital games for K-12 education. Specifically, this qualitative investigation focuses on reflective dialogued gathered from a group of K-12 educators about their experiences and perceptions of learning about and playing digital games for teaching and learning.…

  20. Development and Evaluation of Food Safety Modules for K-12 Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapin, Travis K.; Pfuntner, Rachel C.; Stasiewicz, Matthew J.; Wiedmann, Martin; Orta-Ramirez, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    Career and educational opportunities in food science and food safety are underrecognized by K-12 students and educators. Additionally, misperceptions regarding nature of science understanding persist in K-12 students despite being emphasized as an important component of science education for over 100 y. In an effort to increase awareness…

  1. State P-20 Councils and Collaboration between K-12 and Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rippner, Jennifer A.

    2017-01-01

    For decades, numerous observers have agreed on the value of collaboration between K-12 and higher education--especially as these sectors work toward increasing college readiness and success. While most states maintain separate agencies for K-12 and higher education, many states have worked to foster collaboration through state P-20 councils.…

  2. The Efficiency and Effectiveness of the K-12 Energy Technology Education Promotion Centers in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lung-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    In order to promote energy literacy for graders K-12, the Ministry of Education (MOE) in Taiwan initiated a K-12 Energy Technology Education Project in September 2010. This 40-month project has one project office affiliated to a university, and 18 promotion centers affiliated to 18 schools--including 5 regional centers for upper-secondary schools…

  3. State P-20 Councils and Collaboration between K-12 and Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rippner, Jennifer A.

    2017-01-01

    For decades, numerous observers have agreed on the value of collaboration between K-12 and higher education--especially as these sectors work toward increasing college readiness and success. While most states maintain separate agencies for K-12 and higher education, many states have worked to foster collaboration through state P-20 councils.…

  4. A Critique of the Brave New World of K-12 Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmani Nodoushan, Mohammad Ali

    2008-01-01

    Over the past few decades life style has changed so rapidly that remote areas of the Earth are now inhabited by human beings. Technology has also developed and people can stay at home and have access to virtual schools. This has stimulated the need for K-12 Education. K-12 education has emerged from the no-child-left-behind concerns of governments…

  5. Agriculture's Role in K-12 Education: Proceedings of a Forum on the National Science Education Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Board on Agriculture.

    The Board on Agriculture organized a Forum on Agriculture's Role in K-12 Education to provide an opportunity for agricultural professional societies to explore ways in which examples from agriculture, food, and environment systems can be used to enhance inquiry-based science education. Participants discussed how professional societies could…

  6. NASA's Astrophysics Education and Public Outreach: Selected Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, H.; Smith, D.; Sharma, M.

    2013-04-01

    NASA's rich portfolio of Astrophysics Education and Public Outreach (EPO) programs spans formal and informal education from K-12, addresses diverse audiences, and takes the latest NASA scientific discoveries to the public through science museums, planetaria, exhibitions, and other outlets. Public outreach activities use NASA Astrophysics scientific discoveries and technology to inspire students to undertake scientific careers and enhance public understanding of science and technology. Examples of noteworthy activities in the past year include Hubble, Chandra, JWST exhibits at the Intrepid Museum, New York, community collaborations such as the Multiwavelength Universe online course, and a variety of Citizen Science projects associated with robotic telescopes and with flight missions such as HST and Kepler. Special EPO programs have been developed to reach out to girls and underrepresented minorities. NASA's Astrophysics Science Education and Public Outreach Forum (SEPOF) has developed resources to assist the scientific community in participating in education and public outreach.

  7. A Framework for Quality K-12 Engineering Education: Research and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Tamara J.; Glancy, Aran W.; Tank, Kristina M.; Kersten, Jennifer A.; Smith, Karl A.; Stohlmann, Micah S.

    2014-01-01

    Recent U.S. national documents have laid the foundation for highlighting the connection between science, technology, engineering and mathematics at the K-12 level. However, there is not a clear definition or a well-established tradition of what constitutes a quality engineering education at the K-12 level. The purpose of the current work has been…

  8. Lessons for Louisiana from Florida's K-12 Education Revolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladner, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Louisiana has emerged as one of the most fascinating states in the nation for education reform. The state's creative response to rebuilding the New Orleans education system in the wake of Hurricane Katrina is now considered a potential model for reformers across the nation. Governor Bobby Jindal has carried the reforms further in pushing for…

  9. A Dozen Economic Facts about K-12 Education. Policy Memo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenstone, Michael; Harris, Max; Li, Karen; Looney, Adam; Patashnik, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    The Hamilton Project's mission is advancing opportunity, prosperity, and growth. On both the individual and society-wide levels, a strong public education system enables Americans to achieve those objectives. Indeed, education has historically been the great equalizer and offered students of all backgrounds not the promise of equal outcomes but…

  10. Centennial of Flight Educational Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Marianne (Technical Monitor); Miller, Susan (Technical Monitor); Vanderpool, Celia

    2003-01-01

    The Centennial of Flight Education Outreach project worked with community partners to disseminate NASA Education materials and the Centennial of Flight CD-ROM as a vehicle to increase national awareness of NASA's Aerospace Education products, services and programs. The Azimuth Education Foundation and the Ninety Nines, an International Women Pilots Association, Inc. were chartered to conduct education outreach to the formal and informal educational community. The Dryden Education Office supported the development of a training and information distribution program that established a national group of prepared Centennial of Flight Ambassadors, with a mission of community education outreach. These Ambassadors are members of the Ninety Nines and through the Azimuth Foundation, they assisted the AECC on the national level to promote and disseminate Centennial of Flight and other educational products. Our objectives were to explore partnership outreach growth opportunities with consortium efforts between organizations. This project directly responded to the highlights of NASA s Implementation Plan for Education. It was structured to network, involve the community, and provide a solid link to active educators and current students with NASA education information. Licensed female pilots who live and work in local communities across the nation carried the link. This partnership has been extremely gratifying to all of those Ninety-Nines involved, and they eagerly look forward to further work opportunities.

  11. 10 Years of Media Literacy Education in K-12 Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daunic, Rhys

    2011-01-01

    When the author started working with teachers and students on classroom multimedia productions a little over 10 years ago, he had not yet encountered the term "media literacy", nor did he realize he had joined a long standing international movement of media literacy educators. Serendipitous exposure to "old-media" texts by Neil Postman and Noam…

  12. Improving K-12 STEM Education Outcomes through Technological Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Michael J., Ed.; Falvo, David A., Ed.

    2016-01-01

    The application of technology in classroom settings has equipped educators with innovative tools and techniques for effective teaching practice. Integrating digital technologies at the elementary and secondary levels helps to enrich the students' learning experience and maximize competency in the areas of science, technology, engineering, and…

  13. Fitness Promotion Strategies for K-12 Physical Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Grant; Turner, Bud

    2004-01-01

    In recent years efforts have been made to emphasize the need for physical education by showing how physical activity helps students reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease; strengthen bones and muscles; supply energy, reduce stress, and help maintain a healthy body weight. This article describes a variety of proactive fitness strategies…

  14. Empowering Educators through Teacher Research: Promoting Qualitative Inquiry among K-12 Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, E. Jason

    2012-01-01

    The desire to find pedagogically effective uses of technology in K-12 education has exposed the need for reliable professional development programs that empower teachers to identify the problems and needs they have in their classrooms, apply a process of systematic inquiry in order to discover solutions to those problems, and to share those…

  15. Celebrating 30 Years of K-12 Educational Programming at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardeen, M.; Cooke, M.P.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    In 1980 Leon Lederman started Saturday Morning Physics with a handful of volunteer physicists, around 300 students and all the physics teachers who tagged along. Today Fermilab offers over 30 programs annually with help from 250 staff volunteers and 50 educators, and serves around 40,000 students and 2,500 teachers. Find out why we bother. Over the years we have learned to take advantage of opportunities and confront challenges to offer effective programs for teachers and students alike. We offer research experiences for secondary school teachers and high school students. We collaborate with educators to design and run programs that meet their needs and interests. Popular school programs include classroom presentations, experience-based field trips, and high school tours. Through our work in QuarkNet and I2U2, we make real particle physics data available to high school students in datadriven activities as well as masterclasses and e-Labs. Our professional development activities include a Teacher Resource Center and workshops where teachers participate in authentic learning experiences as their students would. We offer informal classes for kids and host events where children and adults enjoy the world of science. Our website hosts a wealth of online resources. Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, the National Science Foundation and Fermilab Friends for Science Education, our programs reach out across Illinois, throughout the United States and even around the world. We will review the program portfolio and share comments from the volunteers and participants.

  16. Celebrating 30 Years of K-12 Educational Programing at Fermilab

    CERN Document Server

    Bardeen, M

    2011-01-01

    In 1980 Leon Lederman started Saturday Morning Physics with a handful of volunteer physicists, around 300 students and all the physics teachers who tagged along. Today Fermilab offers over 30 programs annually with help from 250 staff volunteers and 50 educators, and serves around 40,000 students and 2,500 teachers. Find out why we bother. Over the years we have learned to take advantage of opportunities and confront challenges to offer effective programs for teachers and students alike. We offer research experiences for secondary school teachers and high school students. We collaborate with educators to design and run programs that meet their needs and interests. Popular school programs include classroom presentations, experience-based field trips, and high school tours. Through our work in QuarkNet and I2U2, we make real particle physics data available to high school students in datadriven activities as well as masterclasses and e-Labs. Our professional development activities include a Teacher Resource Cent...

  17. Undergraduates' Perceived Gains and Ideas about Teaching and Learning Science from Participating in Science Education Outreach Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Stacey L.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined what undergraduate students gain and the ideas about science teaching and learning they develop from participating in K-12 science education outreach programs. Eleven undergraduates from seven outreach programs were interviewed individually about their experiences with outreach and what they learned about science teaching and…

  18. The K-12 Educational Technology Value Chain: Apps for Kids, Tools for Teachers and Levers for Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Glenn L.; Cleary, Paul F.

    2016-01-01

    Historically implementing, maintaining and managing educational technology has been difficult for K-12 educational systems. Consequently, opportunities for significant advances in K-12 education have often gone unrealized. With the maturation of Internet delivered services along with K-12 institutional trends, educational technologies are poised…

  19. The K-12 Educational Technology Value Chain: Apps for Kids, Tools for Teachers and Levers for Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Glenn L.; Cleary, Paul F.

    2016-01-01

    Historically implementing, maintaining and managing educational technology has been difficult for K-12 educational systems. Consequently, opportunities for significant advances in K-12 education have often gone unrealized. With the maturation of Internet delivered services along with K-12 institutional trends, educational technologies are poised…

  20. Integrating local environmental research into K-12 science classrooms and the value of graduate student-educator partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, N. D.; Petrik-Finley, R.

    2015-12-01

    Collaboration between researchers and K-12 educators enables an invaluable exchange of teaching philosophies and educational tools. Programs that partner graduate students with K-12 educators serve the dual purpose of training future educators and providing K-12 students with unique opportunities and perspectives. The benefits of this type of partnership include providing students with enhanced educational experiences and positive student-mentor relationships, training STEM graduate students in effective teaching strategies, and providing teachers with a firsthand resource for scientific information and novel educational materials. Many high school students have had little exposure to science beyond the classroom. Frequent interactions with "real-life" scientists can help make science more approachable and is an effective strategy for promoting science as a career. Here I describe my experiences and several lessons designed as a NSK GK-12 fellow. For example, a month-long unit on biogeochemical principles was framed as a crime scene investigation of a fish kill event in Hood Canal, Washington, in which students were given additional pieces of evidence to solve the mystery as they satisfied checkpoints in their understanding of key concepts. The evidence pieces included scientific plots, maps, datasets, and laboratory exercises. A clear benefit of this investigation-style unit is that students were able to learn the material at their individual pace. This structure allowed for a streamlined integration of differentiated materials such as simplified background readings or visual learning aids for struggling students or more detailed news articles and primary literature for more advanced students. Although the NSF GK-12 program has been archived, educators and researchers should pursue new partnerships, leveraging local and state-level STEM outreach programs with the goal of increasing national exposure of the societal benefits of such synergistic activities.

  1. Improving indicators of the quality of science and mathematics education in grades K-12

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Murnane, Richard J; Raizen, Senta A

    ... and Mathematics Education in in Grades K- -12 12 Richard J. Murnane and Senta A. Raizen, Editors Committee on Indicators of Precollege Science and Mathematics Education Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education National Research Council NATIONAL ACADEMY PRESS Washington, D.C. 1988 Copyrightthe cannot be not from book, paper however, version for...

  2. When Professions Shape Politics: The Case of Accountability in K-12 and Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Jal

    2014-01-01

    Professionalization is an important but overlooked dimension in education politics, particularly the politics of accountability. To isolate the importance of professionalization, this article compares accountability movements in K-12 education with similar movements in higher education. I draw on three pairs of reports that have sought to impose…

  3. Netflixing Human Capital Development: Personalized Learning Technology and the Corporatization of K-12 Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts-Mahoney, Heather; Means, Alexander J.; Garrison, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    Advanced by powerful venture philanthropies, educational technology companies, and the US Department of Education, a growing movement to apply "big data" through "learning analytics" to create "personalized learning" is currently underway in K-12 education in the United States. While scholars have offered various…

  4. A Case for the Nationwide Inclusion of Engineering in the K-12 Curriculum via Technology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Haynie, W. James, III

    2010-01-01

    This paper resulted from discussions between a technology teacher educator and a colleague who has served in various education outreach roles with NASA. The basis of the paper was developed by the NASA director and two engineers, one serving with NASA and the other with the National Institute of Aerospace. The technology teacher educator read the…

  5. K-12 Math and Science Education: Tales from the Santa Fe Alliance for Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenstein, Robert

    2008-10-01

    Can professional engineers, mathematicians, and scientists have a positive impact on K-12 math and science education? The experience of the Santa Fe Alliance for Science, and several other like-minded organizations, indicates that they can indeed. But success is by no means assured. Good scientists are not automatically good educators, but they can learn enough about pedagogy, classroom, and community to do well. This discussion will be oriented around three major points: lessons learned, prospects for the future, and how our effort fits into state-wide plans for re-inventing K-12 math and science education in New Mexico.

  6. A Library approach to establish an Educational Data Curation Framework (EDCF) that supports K-12 data science sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branch, B. D.; Wegner, K.; Smith, S.; Schulze, D. G.; Merwade, V.; Jung, J.; Bessenbacher, A.

    2013-12-01

    It has been the tradition of the libraries to support literacy. Now in the realm of Executive Order, Making Open and Machine Readable the New Default for Government Information, May 9, 2013, the library has the responsibility to support geospatial data, big data, earth science data or cyber infrastructure data that may support STEM for educational pipeline stimulation. (Such information can be found at http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2013/05/09/executive-order-making-open-and-machine-readable-new-default-government-.) Provided is an Educational Data Curation Framework (EDCF) that has been initiated in Purdue research, geospatial data service engagement and outreach endeavors for future consideration and application to augment such data science and climate literacy needs of future global citizens. In addition, this endorsement of this framework by the GLOBE program may facilitate further EDCF implementations, discussion points and prototypes for libraries. In addition, the ECDF will support teacher-led, placed-based and large scale climate or earth science learning systems where such knowledge transfer of climate or earth science data is effectively transferred from higher education research of cyberinfrastructure use such as, NOAA or NASA, to K-12 teachers and school systems. The purpose of this effort is to establish best practices for sustainable K-12 data science delivery system or GLOBE-provided system (http://vis.globe.gov/GLOBE/) where libraries manage the data curation and data appropriateness as data reference experts for such digital data. Here, the Purdue University Libraries' GIS department works to support soils, LIDAR and water science data experiences to support teacher training for an EDCF development effort. Lastly, it should be noted that the interdisciplinary collaboration and demonstration of library supported outreach partners and national organizations such the GLOBE program may best foster EDCF development. This trend in data

  7. Leading Effective Educational Technology in K-12 School Districts: A Grounded Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Lara Gillian C.

    2011-01-01

    A systematic grounded theory qualitative study was conducted investigating the process of effectively leading educational technology in New Jersey public K-12 school districts. Data were collected from educational technology district leaders (whether formal or non-formal administrators) and central administrators through a semi-structured online…

  8. Mobile Apps for Reflection in Learning: A Design Research in K-12 Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinonen, Teemu; Keune, Anna; Veermans, Marjaana; Toikkanen, Tarmo

    2016-01-01

    This study takes a design-based research approach to explore how applications designed for mobile devices could support reflection in learning in K-12 education. Use of mobile devices is increasing in schools. Most of the educational apps support single-person use of interactive learning materials, simulations and learning games. Apps designed to…

  9. How Vocational Psychologists Can Make a Difference in K-12 Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Justin C.; Shannon, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    In general, vocational psychologists have not been engaged in applied research that demonstrates how career interventions can improve educational problems that matter to relevant decision-makers and stakeholders. This article describes how vocational psychology can make a difference in K-12 education by embracing an interdisciplinary…

  10. Mobile Apps for Reflection in Learning: A Design Research in K-12 Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinonen, Teemu; Keune, Anna; Veermans, Marjaana; Toikkanen, Tarmo

    2016-01-01

    This study takes a design-based research approach to explore how applications designed for mobile devices could support reflection in learning in K-12 education. Use of mobile devices is increasing in schools. Most of the educational apps support single-person use of interactive learning materials, simulations and learning games. Apps designed to…

  11. Mobile Technology in 2020: Predictions and Implications for K-12 Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Cathleen A.; Soloway, Elliot

    2015-01-01

    While "mobile learning" has gained recognition in K-12 as a category in educational technology, the authors argue that, between 2010 and 2015, at least, its impact hasn't matched the hype. But between 2015 and 2020, hardware, software, and network technologies will mature sufficiently such that educational technology's Holy…

  12. Use of Second Life in K-12 and Higher Education: A Review of Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inman, Chris; Wright, Vivian H.; Hartman, Julia A.

    2010-01-01

    This study reviewed empirical research conducted in Second Life by educators since Second Life's launch in 2003. The study's purpose was to identify how Second Life is being used in both K-12 and higher education. The methodology, findings, and recommendations of 27 research studies were analyzed. Researchers identified potential problems when…

  13. Status of K-12 Education in California at a Time of Fiscal Crisis: Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitmitto, Sami; Parrish, Thomas; Shambaugh, Larisa

    2010-01-01

    The worldwide economic decline in 2008 hit many states hard, and had an especially strong impact on California and its public education system. The purpose of this report is to develop and present baseline information regarding K-12 public education in California prior to this fiscal crisis. This report presents alternative ways of comparing the…

  14. The Effectiveness of Educational Technology Applications for Enhancing Mathematics Achievement in K-12 Classrooms: A Meta-Analysis. Educator's Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Research and Reform in Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This review summarizes research on the effects of technology use on mathematics achievement in K-12 classrooms. The main research questions included: (1) Do education technology applications improve mathematics achievement in K-12 classrooms as compared to traditional teaching methods without education technology?; and (2) What study and research…

  15. Monitoring Progress toward Successful K-12 STEM Education: A Nation Advancing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Academies Press, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Following a 2011 report by the National Research Council (NRC) on successful K-12 education in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM), Congress asked the National Science Foundation to identify methods for tracking progress toward the report's recommendations. In response, the NRC convened the Committee on an Evaluation Framework…

  16. Under Construction: Building on ESSA's K-12 Foundation. Quality Counts. Education Week. Volume 36, Issue 16

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzo, Kathleen Kennedy, Ed.

    2017-01-01

    With just months to go until the nation's overhauled K-12 law goes into effect, state policymakers are still scrambling to firm up the infrastructure for their education systems, under the new blueprint laid out in the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA). They're doing it at a time of political change and policy uncertainty at the national level,…

  17. Six Qualities of Socially Engaged Design: Emerging Possibilities for K-12 Art Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donoghue, Dónal; Berard, Marie-France

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we consider socially engaged design practice, and examine its potential for informing design curriculum and pedagogy in K-12 art education programs. Our hope is to prompt discussion and debate about socially engaged design's potentiality for preparing students to participate in a world in which "nothing is truly, or can…

  18. Perceptions of Professional and Educational Skills Learning Opportunities Made Available through K-12 Robotics Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakke, Christine K.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine whether participation in robotics provides opportunities for educational and professional skill development, significant enough to merit the recommendation of robotics courses as a part of mainstream curriculum offerings in K-12 schools. This non-experimental, mixed methods study examined current junior high…

  19. Factors that Affect the Adoption and Use of Electronic Mail by K-12 Foreign Language Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelley, Janine Onffroy

    1998-01-01

    Reports the results of electronic mail instruction given to K-12 foreign-language teachers during workshops. Factors found to influence workshop participants' adoption of email included training, the need to keep up with educational technology trends, availability of an easy-to-use system, hands-on experience, school support, and individual…

  20. Perspectives and Visions of Computer Science Education in Primary and Secondary (K-12) Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubwieser, Peter; Armoni, Michal; Giannakos, Michail N.; Mittermeir, Roland T.

    2014-01-01

    In view of the recent developments in many countries, for example, in the USA and in the UK, it appears that computer science education (CSE) in primary or secondary schools (K-12) has reached a significant turning point, shifting its focus from ICT-oriented to rigorous computer science concepts. The goal of this special issue is to offer a…

  1. Immigration and Education: What Should K-12 Teachers, School Administrators, and Staff Know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein-Avila, Eliane

    2017-01-01

    We are currently living in an era of mass global migration. Therefore, it is a pertinent time to reflect on the challenges and the possibilities inherent in educating immigrant and refugee children. Because of the importance immigration has played in the history of the United States, it may be assumed that American K-12 teachers and school…

  2. How to Implement Rigorous Computer Science Education in K-12 Schools? Some Answers and Many Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubwieser, Peter; Armoni, Michal; Giannakos, Michail N.

    2015-01-01

    Aiming to collect various concepts, approaches, and strategies for improving computer science education in K-12 schools, we edited this second special issue of the "ACM TOCE" journal. Our intention was to collect a set of case studies from different countries that would describe all relevant aspects of specific implementations of…

  3. Tech-Savvy Science Education? Understanding Teacher Pedagogical Practices for Integrating Technology in K-12 Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hechter, Richard; Vermette, Laurie Anne

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the technology integration practices of Manitoban K-12 inservice science educators based on the Technological, Pedagogical, and Content knowledge (TPACK) framework. Science teachers (n = 433) completed a 10-item online survey regarding pedagogical beliefs about technology integration, types of technology used, and how often…

  4. Tech-Savvy Science Education? Understanding Teacher Pedagogical Practices for Integrating Technology in K-12 Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hechter, Richard; Vermette, Laurie Anne

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the technology integration practices of Manitoban K-12 inservice science educators based on the Technological, Pedagogical, and Content knowledge (TPACK) framework. Science teachers (n = 433) completed a 10-item online survey regarding pedagogical beliefs about technology integration, types of technology used, and how often…

  5. K-12 Single-Sex Education: What Does the Research Say? ERIC Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haag, Pamela

    Although research on the effects of K-12 single-sex education is inconclusive in general, some common themes emerge in the research literature. This Digest reviews that research with particular attention to effects on girls' attitudes and achievement. The Digest first discusses attitudinal variables (i.e., self-esteem and attitudes toward academic…

  6. How Being a Teaching Artist Can Influence K-12 Art Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Mark A.; Zwirn, Susan Goetz

    2010-01-01

    Many K-12 art teachers have rich artistic backgrounds and continue to be active as artists in spite of the challenges of time, energy, and stereotypes that insist a real artist would not teach. This article describes a research project that examined the educational dynamic engendered by teachers who are also artists. We interviewed and observed…

  7. A Correlational Analysis of Strategic Information Systems Planning in K-12 Public Educational Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    Three decades of research has indicated that strategic information systems planning is a vital component to business success. The purpose of this study was to identify the relationship strategic information systems planning and financial commitment has within the K-12 public education sector. Data for this study was obtained from top management of…

  8. How to Implement Rigorous Computer Science Education in K-12 Schools? Some Answers and Many Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubwieser, Peter; Armoni, Michal; Giannakos, Michail N.

    2015-01-01

    Aiming to collect various concepts, approaches, and strategies for improving computer science education in K-12 schools, we edited this second special issue of the "ACM TOCE" journal. Our intention was to collect a set of case studies from different countries that would describe all relevant aspects of specific implementations of…

  9. A Correlational Analysis of Strategic Information Systems Planning in K-12 Public Educational Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    Three decades of research has indicated that strategic information systems planning is a vital component to business success. The purpose of this study was to identify the relationship strategic information systems planning and financial commitment has within the K-12 public education sector. Data for this study was obtained from top management of…

  10. Perceptions of Professional and Educational Skills Learning Opportunities Made Available through K-12 Robotics Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakke, Christine K.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine whether participation in robotics provides opportunities for educational and professional skill development, significant enough to merit the recommendation of robotics courses as a part of mainstream curriculum offerings in K-12 schools. This non-experimental, mixed methods study examined current junior high…

  11. Accountability and Assessment: Is Public Interest in K-12 Education Being Served? CRESST Report 728

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Joan L.

    2007-01-01

    The reauthorization of No Child Left Behind (NCLB) makes this a good time to consider whether and how current accountability serves the public interest and whether and how it can better do so. This report explores these issues in the context of the current literature on the effects of accountability in K-12 education. It considers the meaning…

  12. Are K-12 Learners Motivated in Physical Education? A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Senlin; Chen, Ang; Zhu, Xihe

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies devoted to K-12 learner motivation in physical education share a general assumption that students may lack motivation. This meta-analytic study examined published original studies (n = 79) to determine students' motivation level and the association between motivation and outcomes. Original means of motivation measures were…

  13. Forum on Technology in K-12 Education: Envisioning a New Future Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakow, Steven J.

    This paper examines the impacts of instructional technologies on K-12 science instruction. The first section addresses the question, "What is technology?" The dimensions of technology identified by the International Technology Education Association are summarized, and definitions of technology from the American Association for the…

  14. Immigration and Education: What Should K-12 Teachers, School Administrators, and Staff Know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein-Avila, Eliane

    2017-01-01

    We are currently living in an era of mass global migration. Therefore, it is a pertinent time to reflect on the challenges and the possibilities inherent in educating immigrant and refugee children. Because of the importance immigration has played in the history of the United States, it may be assumed that American K-12 teachers and school…

  15. Perspectives and Visions of Computer Science Education in Primary and Secondary (K-12) Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubwieser, Peter; Armoni, Michal; Giannakos, Michail N.; Mittermeir, Roland T.

    2014-01-01

    In view of the recent developments in many countries, for example, in the USA and in the UK, it appears that computer science education (CSE) in primary or secondary schools (K-12) has reached a significant turning point, shifting its focus from ICT-oriented to rigorous computer science concepts. The goal of this special issue is to offer a…

  16. The SERC K12 Educators Portal to Teaching Activities and Pedagogic Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, K.; Kirk, K. B.; Manduca, C. A.; Ledley, T. S.; Schmitt, L.

    2013-12-01

    The Science Education Resource Center (SERC) has created a portal to information for K12 educators to provide high-quality grade level appropriate materials from a wide variety of projects and topics. These materials were compiled across the SERC site, showcasing materials that were created for, or easily adaptable to, K12 classrooms. This resource will help support implementation of Next Generation Science Standards by assisting educators in finding innovative resources to address areas of instruction that are conceptually different than previous national and state science standards. Specifically, the K12 portal assists educators in learning about approaches that address the cross-cutting nature of science concepts, increasing students quantitative reasoning and numeracy skills, incorporating technology such as GIS in the classroom, and by assisting educators of all levels of K12 instruction in using relevant and meaningful ways to teach science concepts. The K12 portal supports educators by providing access to hundreds of teaching activities covering a wide array of science topics and grade levels many of which have been rigorously reviewed for pedagogic quality and scientific accuracy. The portal also provides access to web pages that enhance teaching practices that help increase student's system thinking skills, make lectures interactive, assist instructors in conducting safe and effective indoor and outdoor labs, providing support for teaching energy and climate literacy principles, assisting educators in addressing controversial content, provide guidance in engaging students affective domain, and provides a collection of tools for making teaching relevant in 21st century classrooms including using GIS, Google Earth, videos, visualizations and simulations to model and describe scientific concepts. The portal also provides access to material for specific content and audiences by (1) Supporting AGIs 'Map your World' week to specifically highlight teaching

  17. San Diego Science Alliance Education Outreach Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, Anne P.

    1996-11-01

    The General Atomics Science Education Outreach Activities as well as those of several other San Diego area institutions led to the formation in 1994 of the San Diego Science Alliance. The Science Alliance is a consortium of science-related industries, institutions of research and higher education, museums, medical health networks, and science competitions in support of K-12 science education. Some Alliance accomplishments include printing over 4000 resource catalogs for teachers, workshops presented by over 20 of their business members at the San Diego Science Education Conference, and hosting of 3 eight-week courses for teachers. The Alliance provides an important forum for interaction between schools and teachers and local industries and institutions. The Science Alliance maintains a World Wide Web Home Page at elvbf http://www.cerf.net/sd_science/. General Atomics' role in the San Diego Science Alliance will be presented.(Presented by Patricia S. Winter for the General Atomics Science Education Groups and San Diego Science Alliance.)

  18. Information behaviors of Chinese K-12physical education teachers:A survey study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Geoffrey; Z.LIU; Yan; HUO

    2012-01-01

    Purpose:Given the unique characteristics of physical education(PE) teaching in K-12education,PE teachers’ information behaviors deserve special attention.This article reports a survey study of PE teachers’ information behaviors,covering information literacy skills and behaviors of information seeking and information use.Design/methodology/approach:A questionnaire survey was conducted of K-12 PE teachers in the Tianjin municipal region of China,with a response rate of 61.9%.Findings:PE teachers lack skills with information retrieval systems in general.The Internet continues to be their primary information source,and they rely more on personal collection and colleagues than the school library for teaching materials.They rarely develop a searching strategy,employ querying tactics,or use advanced search functions,and they tend to be content with finding a few relevant articles.Research limitations:The survey is limited to the Tianjin municipal region in scope.Though attempting to reach 210 participants from 40 schools,it yielded only 130 valid responses.A larger survey covering more regions and with greater responses may be useful.Practical implications:Insights from this study inform the educational and on-job training of K-12 PE teachers to improve their information literacy skills.Originality/value:Little research exists on PE teachers’ behaviors of information seeking.This study bridges the gap and enriches our understanding of K-12 teachers’ information behaviors.

  19. Trends of Technology Education in American K-12 Education%美国K-12阶段技术教育的发展趋势

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵长兰

    2016-01-01

    The United States is a developed country in technology and technology education. In the 21st century, in response to the new social and economic problems, there are some new trends in technology education:establishing the technology literacy and STEM literacy as the technology educational goal, so as to build a technologically and STEM literate society;integrating the engineering and engineering design into K-12 curriculum framework, forming a variety of integrated technology engineering education courses, such as “pre-Engineering”curriculum and“project-based”curriculum;and adopting“issue-based”teaching strategies.%美国是技术和技术教育发达国家。进入21世纪,为应对新的社会、经济问题,技术教育出现了新的发展趋势:把技术教育培养目标转向培养学生的技术素养再到STEM素养,建构具有技术素养乃至STEM素养的社会;把工程学及工程设计内容整合进K-12技术教育课程框架,形成多种整合的技术工程教育课程,如“准工程”课程模式和“以项目为基础”的课程模式;“以问题为基础”的教学策略和方法的采用等。

  20. Mobile apps for reflection in learning: A design research in K-12 education

    OpenAIRE

    Leinonen, Teemu; Keune, Anna; Veermans, Marjaana; Toikkanen, Tarmo

    2014-01-01

    This study takes a design-based research approach to explore how applications designed for mobile devices could support reflection in learning in K-12 education. Use of mobile devices is increasing in schools. Most of the educational apps support single-person use of interactive learning materials, simulations and learning games. Apps designed to correspond to collaborative learning paradigms, such as collaborative progressive inquiry or project-based learning, are scarce. In these pedagogica...

  1. Paired Peer Learning through Engineering Education Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogg-Rogers, Laura; Lewis, Fay; Edmonds, Juliet

    2017-01-01

    Undergraduate education incorporating active learning and vicarious experience through education outreach presents a critical opportunity to influence future engineering teaching and practice capabilities. Engineering education outreach activities have been shown to have multiple benefits; increasing interest and engagement with science and…

  2. Paired Peer Learning through Engineering Education Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogg-Rogers, Laura; Lewis, Fay; Edmonds, Juliet

    2017-01-01

    Undergraduate education incorporating active learning and vicarious experience through education outreach presents a critical opportunity to influence future engineering teaching and practice capabilities. Engineering education outreach activities have been shown to have multiple benefits; increasing interest and engagement with science and…

  3. Global TIE: Developing a Virtual Network of Robotic Observatories for K-12 Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, L. A.; Clark, G.

    2001-11-01

    Astronomy in grades K-12 is traditionally taught (if at all) using textbooks and a few simple hands-on activities. In addition, most students, by High School graduation, will never have even looked through the eyepiece of a telescope. The possibility now exists to establish a network of research grade telescopes, no longer useful to the professional astronomical community, that can be made accessible to schools all across the country through existing IT technologies and applications. These telescopes could provide unparalleled research and educational opportunities for a broad spectrum of K-12 and college students and turns underutilized observatory facilities into valuable, state-of-the-art teaching centers. The NASA-sponsored Telescopes In Education (TIE, http://tie.jpl.nasa.gov) project has been wildly successful in engaging the K-12 education community in real-time, hands-on, interactive astronomy activities. Hundreds of schools in the US, Australia, Canada, England, and Japan have participated in the TIE program, remotely controlling the 24-inch telescope at the Mount Wilson Observatory from their classrooms. In recent years, several (approximately 20 to date) other telescopes have been, or are in the process of being, outfitted for remote use as TIE affiliates. Global TIE integrates these telescopes seamlessly into one virtual observatory and provides the services required to operate this facility, including a scheduling service, tools for data manipulation, an online proposal review environment, an online "Virtual TIE Student Ap J" for publication of results, and access to related educational materials provided by the TIE community. Global TIE provides unparalleled research and educational opportunities for a broad spectrum of K-12 and college students and turns essentially unused observatory facilities into valuable, state-of-the-art teaching centers. This presentation describes the Global TIE Observatory data and organizational systems and details the

  4. Educational Outreach for Astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadooka, M.; Meech, K.

    2009-12-01

    Astrobiology, the search for life in the universe, has fascinating research areas that can excite students and teachers about science. Its integrative nature, relating to astronomy, geology, oceanography, physics, and chemistry, can be used to encourage students to pursue physical sciences careers. Since 2004, the University of Hawaii NASA Astrobiology Institute (NAI) team scientists have shared their research with secondary teachers at our ALI’I national teacher program to promote the inclusion of astrobiology topics into science courses. Since 2007, our NAI team has co-sponsored the HI STAR program for Hawaii’s middle and high school students to work on authentic astronomy research projects and to be mentored by astronomers. The students get images of asteroids, comets, stars, and extrasolar planets from the Faulkes Telescope North located at Haleakala Observatories on the island of Maui and owned by Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope network. They also do real time observing with DeKalb Observatory telescope personally owned by Donn Starkey who willing allows any student access to his telescope. Student project results include awards at the Hawaii State Science Fair and the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair. We believe that research experience stimulates these students to select STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) majors upon entering college so a longitudinal study is being done. Plans are underway with California and Hawaii ALI’I teachers cooperating on a joint astronomy classroom project. International collaborations with Brazil, Portugal, and Italy astronomers have begun. We envision joint project between hemispheres and crossing time zones. The establishment of networking teachers, astronomers, students and educator liaisons will be discussed.

  5. EarthScope Education and Outreach: Accomplishments and Emerging Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, S.; Ellins, K. K.; Semken, S. C.; Arrowsmith, R.

    2014-12-01

    EarthScope's Education and Outreach (E&O) program aims to increase public awareness of Earth science and enhance geoscience education at the K-12 and college level. The program is distinctive among major geoscience programs in two ways. First, planning for education and public engagement occurred in tandem with planning for the science mission. Second, the NSF EarthScope program includes funding support for education and outreach. In this presentation, we highlight key examples of the program's accomplishments and identify emerging E&O opportunities. E&O efforts have been collaboratively led by the EarthScope National Office (ESNO), IRIS, UNAVCO, the EarthScope Education and Outreach Subcommittee (EEOSC) and PI-driven EarthScope projects. Efforts by the EEOSC, guided by an EarthScope Education and Outreach Implementation Plan that is periodically updated, focus EarthScope E&O. EarthScope demonstrated early success in engaging undergraduate students (and teachers) in its mission through their involvement in siting USArray across the contiguous U.S. Funded E&O programs such as TOTLE, Illinois EarthScope, CEETEP (for K-12), InTeGrate and GETSI (for undergraduates) foster use of freely available EarthScope data and research findings. The Next Generation Science Standards, which stress science and engineering practices, offer an opportunity for alignment with existing EarthScope K-12 educational resources, and the EEOSC recommends focusing efforts on this task. The EEOSC recognizes the rapidly growing use of mobile smart devices by the public and in formal classrooms, which bring new opportunities to connect with the public and students. This will capitalize on EarthScope's already prominent social media presence, an effort that developed to accomplish one of the primary goals of the EarthScope E&O Implementation Plan to "Create a high-profile public identity for EarthScope" and to "Promote science literacy and understanding of EarthScope among all audiences through

  6. A Tale of Two Countries: Successes and Challenges in K-12 Computer Science Education in Israel and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal-Ezer, Judith; Stephenson, Chris

    2014-01-01

    This article tells a story of K-12 computer science in two different countries. These two countries differ profoundly in culture, language, government and state structure, and in their education systems. Despite these differences, however, they share the pursuit of excellence and high standards in K-12 education. In Israel, curriculum is…

  7. A Tale of Two Countries: Successes and Challenges in K-12 Computer Science Education in Israel and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal-Ezer, Judith; Stephenson, Chris

    2014-01-01

    This article tells a story of K-12 computer science in two different countries. These two countries differ profoundly in culture, language, government and state structure, and in their education systems. Despite these differences, however, they share the pursuit of excellence and high standards in K-12 education. In Israel, curriculum is…

  8. K--12 science educator perception of instructing students with learning disabilities in the regular classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holliday-Cashwell, Janet Rose

    2000-10-01

    Selected K--12 public school science educators in 14 eastern North Carolina counties were surveyed to examine their perceptions of their undergraduate preparation programs with regard to instructing students with learning disabilities in the regular classroom. A quantitative study, this research examined science educator preparedness in instructing students with learning disabilities by evaluating educator perception in regard to mainstrearned and inclusive educational settings. Specifically, two null hypotheses were tested. Null hypothesis I stated a significant difference does not exist between selected North Carolina K--12 science educators' perceptions of their undergraduate teacher education preparation programs and their perceptions of their abilities to instruct students needing accommodations on behalf of their learning disabilities in mainstrearned or inclusive settings. Participants' responses to perception as well as value statements regarding opinions, adaptations, and undergraduate training with respect to mainstreaming and inclusion were evaluated through t-test analyses of 22 Likert-scale items. Null hypothesis 1 was not accepted because a statistically significant difference did exist between the educators' perceptions of their undergraduate training and their perceived abilities to instruct students with learning disabilities in mainstreamed or inclusive settings. Null hypothesis 2 stated a significant difference does not exist between selected North Carolina K--12 science educators' attained educational level; grade level currently taught, supervised or chaired; and years of experience in teaching science, supervising science education, and/or chairing science departments in selected North Carolina public schools and their opinions of their undergraduate teacher education program with regard to instructing students with learning disabilities in mainstreamed or inclusive educational settings. Null hypothesis 2 was evaluated through an analysis of

  9. Implications of the Next Generation Science Standards for K-12, EPO, and Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, G.; Barber, J.; Pomeroy, R.; Reagan, G.

    2014-07-01

    The newly-released Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) have been under development for a few years with broad community input and explicit involvement of many states likely to adopt these as their own science standards. Several key features of the NGSS make these a substantial advance from the existing National Science Education Standards (NRC 1996), including focus on three dimensions previously outlined in A Framework for K-12 Science Education (NRC 2011): Science and Engineering Practices; Cross-cutting Concepts; and Disciplinary Core Ideas. What are the implications of all this now for K-12 educators, in the immediate term and in the long-term? What do the NGSS imply for EPO professionals, especially those involved in science curriculum development and teacher professional development? What should higher education faculty know about the NGSS, especially as it relates to the preparation of incoming college students, as well as the education of future elementary and secondary science teachers in college (including in Astro 101-type courses)?

  10. Using Scientific Visualizations to Enhance Scientific Thinking In K-12 Geoscience Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robeck, E.

    2016-12-01

    The same scientific visualizations, animations, and images that are powerful tools for geoscientists can serve an important role in K-12 geoscience education by encouraging students to communicate in ways that help them develop habits of thought that are similar to those used by scientists. Resources such as those created by NASA's Scientific Visualization Studio (SVS), which are intended to inform researchers and the public about NASA missions, can be used in classrooms to promote thoughtful, engaged learning. Instructional materials that make use of those visualizations have been developed and are being used in K-12 classrooms in ways that demonstrate the vitality of the geosciences. For example, the Center for Geoscience and Society at the American Geosciences Institute (AGI) helped to develop a publication that outlines an inquiry-based approach to introducing students to the interpretation of scientific visualizations, even when they have had little to no prior experience with such media. To facilitate these uses, the SVS team worked with Center staff and others to adapt the visualizations, primarily by removing most of the labels and annotations. Engaging with these visually compelling resources serves as an invitation for students to ask questions, interpret data, draw conclusions, and make use of other processes that are key components of scientific thought. This presentation will share specific resources for K-12 teaching (all of which are available online, from NASA, and/or from AGI), as well as the instructional principles that they incorporate.

  11. A qualitative assessment of preservice elementary teachers' formative perceptions regarding engineering and K-12 engineering education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culver, Dennis Eugene

    Current teacher education programs provide limited instruction for preservice elementary teachers regarding the incorporation or teaching of engineering concepts and skills in their classrooms. Few studies have been conducted that focus specifically on preservice elementary teachers' formative perceptions and receptivity towards engineering education. That is, not enough is known about what preservice teachers know and think about engineering. The purpose of this qualitative research study was to investigate how forty-four preservice elementary teachers' from a large Midwestern university approached engineering design, the perceptions of engineering and K-12 engineering education that they possessed, and their level of receptiveness with regards to K-12 engineering education. Data were collected using a demographic survey, journal entries, observations, and focus group discussions. The written, verbal, and visual data collected in this study were analyzed using conventional qualitative content analysis, which consisted of inductively developing categories and codes after repeatedly examining the data. The results of the study indicate that the preservice elementary teachers did not utilize any deliberate design process when engaged in a design task. Engineering was perceived as being synonymous with construction and that engineering design consists of trial and error. Participants envisioned their students succeeding in engineering due to their students' prior knowledge, not necessarily the actions of themselves as the teacher. With regards to receptivity, participants expressed apprehension and optimism along with fear and pessimism. Tangential factors also impacted the receptivity of participants.

  12. Enhancing the Impact of NASA Astrophysics Education and Public Outreach: Community Collaborations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Denise A.; Lawton, B. L.; Bartolone, L.; Schultz, G. R.; Blair, W. P.; Astrophysics E/PO Community, NASA; NASA Astrophysics Forum Team

    2013-01-01

    The NASA Astrophysics Science Education and Public Outreach Forum is one of four scientist-educator teams that support NASA's Science Mission Directorate and its nationwide education and public outreach community in increasing the coherence, efficiency, and effectiveness of their education and public outreach efforts. NASA Astrophysics education and outreach teams collaborate with each other through the Astrophysics Forum to place individual programs in context, connect with broader education and public outreach activities, learn and share successful strategies and techniques, and develop new partnerships. This poster highlights examples of collaborative efforts designed to engage youth and adults across the full spectrum of learning environments, from public outreach venues, to centers of informal learning, to K-12 and higher education classrooms. These include coordinated efforts to support major outreach events such as the USA Science and Engineering Festival; pilot "Astro4Girls" activities in public libraries to engage girls and their families in science during Women’s History Month; and a pilot "NASA's Multiwavelength Universe" online professional development course for middle and high school educators. Resources to assist scientists and Astro101 instructors in incorporating NASA Astrophysics discoveries into their education and public outreach efforts are also discussed.

  13. Models for Information Assurance Education and Outreach: A Report on Year 1 Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianjun

    2013-01-01

    On September 22, 2012, NSF announced its decision to fund a three-year project, "Models for Information Assurance Education and Outreach" (MIAEO). In the first year of grant operation, MIAEO has invited 18 high school students, two K-12 teachers, and two CSUB student assistants to conduct research explorations in the fields of…

  14. Catalyzing Effective Science Education: Contributions from the NASA Science Education and Public Outreach Forums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Denise A.; Bartolone, L.; Eisenhamer, B.; Lawton, B. L.; Schultz, G. R.; Peticolas, L.; Schwerin, T.; Shipp, S.; Astrophysics E/PO Community, NASA; NASA Astrophysics Forum Team

    2013-06-01

    Advancing scientific literacy and strengthening the Nation’s future workforce through stimulating, informative, and effective learning experiences are core principles of the NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) education and public outreach (E/PO) program. To support and coordinate its E/PO community in offering a coherent suite of activities and experiences that effectively meet the needs of the education community, NASA SMD has created four Science Education and Public Outreach Forums (Astrophysics, Planetary Science, Heliophysics, Earth Science). Forum activities include: professional development to raise awareness of the existing body of best practices and educational research; analysis and cataloging of SMD-funded education materials with respect to AAAS Benchmarks for Science Literacy; Working Groups that assemble needs assessment and best practices data relevant to Higher Education, K-12 Formal Education, and Informal Science Education audiences; and community collaborations that enable SMD E/PO community members to develop new partnerships and to learn and share successful strategies and techniques. This presentation will highlight examples of Forum and community-based activities related to astronomy education and teacher professional development, within the context of the principles articulated within the NRC Framework for K-12 Science Education and the Next Generation Science Standards. Among these are an emerging community of practice for K-12 educators and online teacher professional development and resources that incorporate misconception research and authentic experiences with NASA Astrophysics data.

  15. Community Outreach and Education on Soil Fumigants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information on how outreach programs can help address the risk of bystander exposure by educating community members about fumigants, buffer zones, how to recognize warning signs, and how to respond appropriately in case of an incident.

  16. I-LLINI Partnerships to improve K-12 Earth Science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomkin, J. H.; Wong, K.; Charlevoix, D. J.

    2009-12-01

    I-LLINI Partnerships is a three-year State of Illinois funded program to initiate enhanced communication between the faculty at University of Illinois and K-12 teachers in the surrounding communities. The program focuses on math and science with a particular emphasis on the use of technology to teaching math and science to middle-school aged children. The Partnership provides participating teachers with a suite of technology including a computer, digital camera, and software, as well as a small stipend. University partners include representatives from the Departments of Mathematics as well as the Department of Atmospheric Sciences and the Department of Geology. The Atmospheric Sciences and Geology faculty have partnered to provide content using an Earth Systems Science approach to improving Earth Science education for in- and pre-service teachers through new undergraduate and graduate classes that focus on fundamental earth science content, State K-12 standards, and transferable lesson plans and materials that enable course participants to easily transfer university practice to the classroom.

  17. Education and Outreach: Advice to Young Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, R. M. C.

    2005-08-01

    Carl Sagan set an example to all scientists when he encouraged us to reach out to the public and share the excitement of discovery and exploration. The prejudice that ensued did not deter Sagan and, with the passing of years, more and more scientists have followed his example. Although at present scientists at all ranks are encouraged by their institutions to do outreach, the balancing of a successful scientific career with teaching and outreach is often not an easy one. Young scientists, in particular, may worry about how their outreach efforts are viewed in the community and how they will find the time and energy for these efforts. This talk will offer suggestions on how to balance an active science research program with outreach activities, the many different ways to engage in education and public outreach, and how the rewards are truly priceless.

  18. Building Partnerships Between Research Institutions, University Academic Departments, Local School Districts, and Private Enterprise to Advance K-12 Science Education in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellins, K. K.; Ganey-Curry, P.; Fennell, T.

    2003-12-01

    The University of Texas at Austin Institute for Geophysics (UTIG) is engaged in six K-12 education and outreach programs, including two NSF-sponsored projects--GK-12: Linking Graduate Fellows with K-12 Students and Teachers and Cataclysms and Catastrophes--Texas Teachers in the Field, Adopt-a-School, Geoscience in the Classroom, and UT's Science and Engineering Apprenticeship Program. The GK-12 Program is central to UTIG's effort and links the six education projects together. While the specific objectives of each project differ, the broad goals of UTIG's education and outreach are to provide high-quality professional development for teachers, develop curriculum resources aligned with state and national education standards, and promote interaction between teachers, scientists, graduate students, and science educators. To achieve these goals, UTIG has forged funded partnerships with scientific colleagues at UT's Bureau of Economic Geology, Marine Science Institute and Department of Geological Sciences; science educators at UT's Charles A. Dana Center and in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction in the College of Education; teachers in six Texas independent school districts; and 4empowerment.com, a private education company that established the "Cyberways and Waterways" Web site to integrate technology and education through an environmentally-based curriculum. These partnerships have allowed UTIG to achieve far more than would have been possible through individual projects alone. Examples include the development of more than 30 inquiry-based activities, hosting workshops and a summer institute, and participation in local science fairs. UTIG has expanded the impact of its education and outreach and achieved broader dissemination of learning activities through 4empowerment's web-based programs, which reach ethnically diverse students in schools across Texas. These partnerships have also helped UTIG and 4empowerment to secure additional funding for other education

  19. Young Researchers Engaged in Educational Outreach to Increase Polar Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, M.; Baeseman, J.; Xavier, J.; Kaiser, B.; Vendrell-Simon, B.

    2008-12-01

    The Association of Polar Early Career Scientists (APECS) grew out of the 4th International Polar Year (IPY-4) 2007-08 and is an international and interdisciplinary organization of over 1200 undergraduate and graduate students, postdoctoral researchers, early faculty members, educators and others with interests in Polar Regions and the wider cryosphere from more than 40 countries. Our aims are to stimulate interdisciplinary and international research collaborations, and develop effective future leaders in polar research, education and outreach. As potentially one of the major legacies of IPY-4, APECS members have been at the forefront of increasing scientific knowledge and public interest in the polar regions, centered around global climate change, and enhancing scientific understanding, media attention, primary and secondary school (K-12) educational programs, undergraduate institutions, and public literacy campaigns. Research and Educational Outreach activities by APECS members during IPY-4 have improved both our understanding and the communication of all aspects of the Polar Regions and the importance of their broader global connections. APECS National Committees have run Polar Contests where young researchers partnered with teachers and students to develop curriculum and activities to share their research, have participated in many field based communication exchanges and are mentoring youth to pursue careers in science, and enhancing the public perception of scientists through photo, video and museum exhibits. In cooperation with the IPY Teachers Network and the IPY IPO, APECS is developing a polar education resource book that will feature education and outreach activities by young researchers, as well as provide examples of classroom activities for teachers to incorporate polar literacy into their curriculum and a How-To guide for researchers interested in conducting education and outreach. As young researchers interactively share their excitement and

  20. K-12 science education reform will take a decade, and community partnerships hold best hope for success

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keever, J.R.

    1994-12-31

    Fundamental change in K-12 science education in the United States, essential for full citizenship in an increasingly technological world, will take a decade or more to accomplish, and only the sustained, cooperative efforts of people in their own communities -- scientists, teachers, and concerned citizens -- will likely ensure success. These were among the themes at Sigma Xi`s national K-12 science education forum.

  1. The NASA SMD Science Education and Public Outreach Forums: Engaging Scientists in NASA Education and Public Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Denise A.; Peticolas, L.; Schwerin, T.; Shipp, S.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) program provides a direct return on the public’s investment in NASA’s science missions and research programs through a comprehensive suite of educational resources and opportunities for students, educators, and the public. Four Science Education and Public Outreach Forums work with SMD-funded missions, research programs, and grantees to organize individual E/PO activities into a coordinated, effective, and efficient nationwide effort, with easy entry points for scientists, educators, and the public. We outline the Forums’ role in 1) facilitating communication and collaboration among SMD E/PO programs, scientists, and educators; 2) supporting utilization of best practices and educational research; 3) creating clear paths of involvement for scientists interested in SMD E/PO; and, 4) enabling efficient and effective use of NASA content and education products. Our work includes a cross-Forum collaboration to inventory existing SMD education materials; identify and analyze gaps; and interconnect and organize materials in an accessible manner for multiple audiences. The result is NASAWavelength.org, a one-stop-shop for all NASA SMD education products, including tools to help users identify resources based upon their needs and national education standards. The Forums have also collaborated with the SMD E/PO community to provide a central point of access to metrics, evaluation findings, and impacts for SMD-funded E/PO programs (http://smdepo.org/page/5324). We also present opportunities for the astronomy community to participate in collaborations supporting NASA SMD efforts in the K - 12 Formal Education, Informal Education and Outreach, Higher Education and Research Scientist communities. See Bartolone et al., Lawton et al., Meinke et al., and Buxner et al. (this conference), respectively, to learn about Forum resources and opportunities specific to each of these communities.

  2. Turning K-12 Science Education Inside Out, Knocking Down Walls and Empowering the Disenchanted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, A. Y. M.

    2016-12-01

    For a 'user' there are several genres of citizen science activities one can enlist themselves in, from microtasked analytics to data collection. Often times design conversation for these efforts are focused around the goal of collecting high quality data for an urgent scientific question. However, there is much to be discussed around the opportunity to expand upon the interaction experience of the 'user'. This is particularly relevant in the integration of citizen science in the classroom. Here we explore the role of citizen science in formal K-12 science education through the lens of "Project Based Learning", examining design challenges in classroom adoption (including standards alignment) as well as interaction design focused around long term user/student motivation and engagement in the science exploration.

  3. Heliophysics Concept Maps for Education and Public Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols-Yehling, M.; Ali, N. A.; Paglierani, R.; Mendez, B. J.

    2014-07-01

    The NASA Science Mission Directorate Heliophysics Science Education and Public Outreach Forum team has created a set of Heliophysics Concept Maps. The concepts are based on content related to the three major questions in the NASA Heliophysics Science Roadmap: What causes the Sun to vary? How do the Earth and the heliosphere respond? What are the impacts on humanity? These maps tie into the AAAS Project 2061 Benchmarks for Scientific Literacy, a set of K-12 learning goals that are widely used by education professionals for curriculum development and program planning. The purpose of this effort was to identify key concepts related to heliophysics and map their progression to show how students' understanding of heliophysics might develop from kindergarten through higher education. This effort creates more comprehensive maps specific to heliophysics that provide content at a deeper level than what is in the existing Benchmarks. It also extends the concept maps to higher education, an audience not included in the Benchmarks.

  4. Evaluation Framework for NASA's Educational Outreach Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Rick; Booker, Angela; Linde, Charlotte; Preston, Connie

    1999-01-01

    The objective of the proposed work is to develop an evaluation framework for NASA's educational outreach efforts. We focus on public (rather than technical or scientific) dissemination efforts, specifically on Internet-based outreach sites for children.The outcome of this work is to propose both methods and criteria for evaluation, which would enable NASA to do a more analytic evaluation of its outreach efforts. The proposed framework is based on IRL's ethnographic and video-based observational methods, which allow us to analyze how these sites are actually used.

  5. The ATLAS Education and Outreach Group

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Barnett

    With the unprecedented scale and duration of ATLAS and the unique possibilities to make groundbreaking discoveries in physics, ATLAS has special opportunities to communicate the importance and role of our accomplishments. We want to participate in educating the next generation of scientific and other leaders in our society by involving students of many levels in our research. The Education and Outreach Group has focused on producing informational material of various sorts - like brochures, posters, a film, animations and a public website - to assist the members of the collaboration in their contacts with students, teachers and the general public. Another aim is to facilitate the teaching of particle physics and particularly the role of the ATLAS Experiment by providing ideas and educational material. The Education and Outreach Group meets every ATLAS week, with an attendance of between 25 and 40 people. The meetings have become an interesting forum for education and outreach projects and new ideas. The comi...

  6. Infusing Multicultural Education into the Curriculum: Preparing Pre-Service Teachers to Address Homophobia in K-12 Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Joseph R.

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the role multicultural education can play in addressing homophobia in K-12 schools. The author explores the lack of multiculturalism courses in undergraduate teacher education programs. To address the lack of multiculturalism courses, three instructional activities are offered that faculty in teacher education programs can…

  7. Integrating Data Mining in Program Evaluation of K-12 Online Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Jui-Long; Hsu, Yu-Chang; Rice, Kerry

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated an innovative approach of program evaluation through analyses of student learning logs, demographic data, and end-of-course evaluation surveys in an online K-12 supplemental program. The results support the development of a program evaluation model for decision making on teaching and learning at the K-12 level. A case study…

  8. Science Communication versus Science Education: The Graduate Student Scientist as a K-12 Classroom Resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Jeff; Shope, Richard E., III; Terebey, Susan

    2005-01-01

    Science literacy is a major goal of science educational reform (NRC, 1996; AAAS, 1998; NCLB Act, 2001). Some believe that teaching science only requires pedagogical content knowledge (PCK). Others believe doing science requires knowledge of the methodologies of scientific inquiry (NRC, 1996). With these two mindsets, the challenge for science educators is to create models that bring the two together. The common ground between those who teach science and those who do science is science communication, an interactive process that galvanizes dialogue among scientists, teachers, and learners in a rich ambience of mutual respect and a common, inclusive language of discourse . The dialogue between science and non-science is reflected in the polarization that separates those who do science and those who teach science, especially as it plays out everyday in the science classroom. You may be thinking, why is this important? It is vital because, although not all science learners become scientists, all K-12 students are expected to acquire science literacy, especially with the implementation of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB). Students are expected to acquire the ability to follow the discourse of science as well as connect the world of science to the context of their everyday life if they plan on moving to the next grade level, and in some states, to graduate from high school. This paper posits that science communication is highly effective in providing the missing link for K-12 students cognition in science and their attainment of science literacy. This paper will focus on the "Science For Our Schools" (SFOS) model implemented at California State Univetsity, Los Angeles (CSULA) as a project of the National Science Foundation s GK-12 program, (NSF 2001) which has been a huge success in bridging the gap between those who "know" science and those who "teach" science. The SFOS model makes clear the distinctions that identify science, science communication, science

  9. Science Communication versus Science Education: The Graduate Student Scientist as a K-12 Classroom Resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Jeff; Shope, Richard E., III; Terebey, Susan

    2005-01-01

    Science literacy is a major goal of science educational reform (NRC, 1996; AAAS, 1998; NCLB Act, 2001). Some believe that teaching science only requires pedagogical content knowledge (PCK). Others believe doing science requires knowledge of the methodologies of scientific inquiry (NRC, 1996). With these two mindsets, the challenge for science educators is to create models that bring the two together. The common ground between those who teach science and those who do science is science communication, an interactive process that galvanizes dialogue among scientists, teachers, and learners in a rich ambience of mutual respect and a common, inclusive language of discourse . The dialogue between science and non-science is reflected in the polarization that separates those who do science and those who teach science, especially as it plays out everyday in the science classroom. You may be thinking, why is this important? It is vital because, although not all science learners become scientists, all K-12 students are expected to acquire science literacy, especially with the implementation of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB). Students are expected to acquire the ability to follow the discourse of science as well as connect the world of science to the context of their everyday life if they plan on moving to the next grade level, and in some states, to graduate from high school. This paper posits that science communication is highly effective in providing the missing link for K-12 students cognition in science and their attainment of science literacy. This paper will focus on the "Science For Our Schools" (SFOS) model implemented at California State Univetsity, Los Angeles (CSULA) as a project of the National Science Foundation s GK-12 program, (NSF 2001) which has been a huge success in bridging the gap between those who "know" science and those who "teach" science. The SFOS model makes clear the distinctions that identify science, science communication, science

  10. Technology Adoption in K-12 Education: A Qualitative Study Using TAM3 to Explore Why Technology Is Underutilized

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosley, Victoria V. W.

    2012-01-01

    Educators, researchers, and the government speculate that technology can reform education and contribute to increased student learning. Despite extensive efforts to equip the K-12 schools with technology, the challenge is more than just getting technology into classrooms; it is getting teachers to use the technologies. The goal of this…

  11. Use of Web 2.0 Technologies in K-12 and Higher Education: The Search for Evidence-Based Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hew, Khe Foon; Cheung, Wing Sum

    2013-01-01

    Evidence-based practice in education entails making pedagogical decisions that are informed by relevant empirical research evidence. The main purpose of this paper is to discuss evidence-based pedagogical approaches related to the use of Web 2.0 technologies in both K-12 and higher education settings. The use of such evidence-based practice would…

  12. The Elephant in the (Class)Room: Parental Perceptions of LGBTQ-Inclusivity in K-12 Educational Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullman, Jacqueline; Ferfolja, Tania

    2016-01-01

    While little is known about parental beliefs and desires regarding LGBTQ-inclusive education, assumptions about these appear to justify teachers', curriculum writers' and policy makers' silences regarding sexuality and gender diversity in the K-12 classroom. Thus, in order to better inform educators' practices, this paper presents an analysis of…

  13. Cataclysms and Catastrophes: A Case Study of Improving K-12 Science Education Through a University Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennell, T.; Ellins, K. K.; Morris, M.; Christeson, G.

    2003-12-01

    The K-12 science teacher is always seeking ways of improving and updating their curriculum by integrating the latest research into their most effective classroom activities. However, the daily demands of delivering instruction to large numbers of students coupled with the rapid advances in some fields of science can often overwhelm this effort. The NSF-sponsored Cataclysms and Catastrophes curriculum, developed by scientists from the The University of Texas at Austin Institute for Geophysics (UTIG) and Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG), middle and high school teachers, and UT graduate students (NSF GK-12 fellows) working together through the GK-12 program, is a textbook example of how universities can facilitate this quest, benefiting education at both K-12 and university levels. In 1992, "The Great K-T Extinction Debate" was developed as an activity in the Planet Earth class at the Liberal Arts and Science Academy of Austin as an interdisciplinary approach to science. Taking advantage of the media attention generated by the impact scenario for the K-T extinction, the activity consists of students participating in a simulated senate hearing on the potential causes of the K-T extinction and their implications for society today. This activity not only exposes students to the wide range of science involved in understanding mass extinctions, but also to the social, political and economic implications when this science is brought into the public arena and the corresponding use of data in decision making and disaster preparedness. While "The Great K-T Extinction Debate" was always a popular and effective activity with students, it was in desperate need of updating to keep pace with the evolving scientific debate over the cause of the K-T extinction and the growing body of impact evidence discovered over the past decade. By adding two inquiry-based learning activities that use real geophysical data collected by scientists studying the buried Chicxulub feature as a

  14. Whose Accountability Is It? Conceptual Metaphor and Affinity for Learning Outcomes Based Accountability: Comparisons between California PreK-12 and Higher Education Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blizzard, Devin Dag

    2010-01-01

    The strength of leaders' identification with education accountability language framed by Conceptual Metaphor (Lakoff & Johnson, 2002) was evaluated across California PreK-12 and Higher Education groups. Survey and short-answer data from 549 California college deans, college presidents, PreK-12 superintendents, and PreK-12 school principals…

  15. Frigid air and frozen oceans: Educational outreach opportunities in Arctic ocean-ice-atmosphere research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perovich, D. K.; Codispoti, L. A.; Hawkey, J.

    2003-12-01

    Arctic research provides a marvelous venue for educational outreach activities. The polar regions, with snow and ice, months-long winter nights and summer days, and marine mammals such as seals, whales, and polar bears, has an intrinsic sense of adventure and interest. This interest provides an entry point for educational outreach activities, but does not guarantee success. Arctic researchers studying ocean-ice-atmosphere interactions have used a myriad of techniques for education outreach activities: web sites, classroom visits, lectures, news articles, and e-mail correspondence from the field. One such web site, http://arcss-oaii.hpl.umces.edu/outreach.htm, has been developed as a clearinghouse for researchers to share ideas, strategies, and techniques. For K-12 outreach, developing an ongoing effort with several classroom visits over the school year, is particularly effective. Classroom visits with brief lectures, replete with pictures, followed by an experiment or activity make it relatively straightforward to convey the enthusiasm and excitement of polar research. A more difficult task, however, is to integrate outreach activities into the curriculum. Collaborating with teachers is essential to achieve this integration. In public lectures, it is productive to first capture the audience's attention by describing what it is like to work in the polar regions, then discuss the science. It is important to distill the science to one or two key concepts and present them clearly and concisely. A recurring theme was that not only were outreach activities fun and satisfying, but they also enhanced the researchers understanding of the material.

  16. Current Challenges for K-12 Dance Education and Development: Perspectives from Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risner, Doug

    2007-01-01

    From an administrative perspective, this article investigates equity issues in dance education, and current challenges and opportunities for leadership in postsecondary dance programs involved in teacher education and certification. Although dance education is varied in content and environment, much is shared in terms of common goals for gender…

  17. OUTREACH

    CERN Multimedia

    Dave Barney

    Planning for a new CMS exhibition centre, next to the CMS Centre (Meyrin), is progressing well. The two rooms that form the exhibition will be divided into an "outreach" room and an "education" room, with the main target audience for both rooms being high school students (about 80% of all visitors to CERN). A global scenario for the exhibition has been developed by the CMS Outreach team in close collaboration with Juliette Davenne (who produced the ATLAS exhibition centre). The aim is to start civil engineering work in the summer and to have the centre operational in early 2010. Preliminary plans for a second exhibition site, at point 5, are also evolving, though on a longer timescale. Recently it has become clear that there are many models of the CMS detector in various institutes around Europe and the world. If you know of such a model please let the outreach team know by dropping us a line at cms.outreach@cern.ch Indeed any ideas for exhibits and hands-on interactive de...

  18. Opportunities for IPY Higher Education and Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrow, E. B.

    2007-12-01

    A very rich network for higher education and outreach during the fourth International Polar Year (IPY) exists through the University of the Arctic (UArctic, www.uarctic.org), a collaborative consortium of more than ninety institutions e.g. universities, colleges, and other organizations committed to higher education and research in the North, as well as eighteen other projects submitted as Expression of Intents to the IPY Joint Committee formed into an IPY cluster. The coordination office for this UArctic IPY education outreach efforts is located at the University of Alaska Fairbanks (www.uaf.edu and www.alaska.edu/ipy). The education outreach programs reflect a continuum of learning as a lifelong process that targets different audiences and approaches: 1) primary and secondary students through teacher professional development workshops on science teaching and research; 2) undergraduate students via education and research experience; 3) graduate students through integrated education and research; 4) early career scientists/university faculty via professional development; and 5) communities/ general public via continuing education/adult education either through formal or informal ways. Additionally there are organizations such as the Association of Polar Early Career Scientists (APECS) and the Youth Steering Committee (YSC) including a newly formed group on tertiary education to nurture the next generation of polar and non-polar scientists and foster the leadership of the next IPY.

  19. Education and Outreach in Particle Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Barnett, R Michael

    2011-01-01

    There are many varied programs of education and outreach in particle physics. This report for the Division of Particles and Fields of the American Physical Society 2001 meeting reviews the impact of these programs in general, and also gives several examples of ongoing programs with a primary focus on those in the US.

  20. Outreach to Future Hispanic Educational Leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafin, Ana Gil

    This paper discusses issues related to the recruitment of Hispanic-American educational leaders, focusing on the El Centro de Recursos Educativos outreach center at Northeastern Illinois University in Chicago, which began operation in Fall 1997. It examines the characteristics of successful programs for Hispanic recruitment and retention and the…

  1. Educating K-12 Students about Glacier Dynamics in a Changing Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stearns, L. A.; Hamilton, G. S.

    2005-12-01

    Public awareness of climate change is growing in the United States. Popular movies, books and magazines are frequently addressing the issue of global warming - some with careful scientific research, but many with unrealistic statements. Early education about the basic principles and processes of climate change is necessary for the general public to distinguish fact from fiction. The U.S. National Science Foundation's GK-12 program (GK-12; grades K to 12) currently in its sixth year, provides an opportunity for scientific enrichment for students and their teachers at the K-12 level through collaborative pairings with science and engineering graduate students (the Fellows). The NSF GK-12 program at the University of Maine has three goals: to enrich the scientific education of the students by providing role models, expertise, and equipment that may not be accessible otherwise; to provide professional development for the teachers through curriculum enrichment and participation at science conferences; and to improve the teaching and communication skills of the Fellows. The University of Maine is one of over 100 U. S. universities participating in this program. During the 2004-05 academic year, 11 graduate and one undergraduate student Fellows, advised by University faculty members, taught at schools across the state of Maine. Fellows from, biology, earth science, ecology, engineering, food science, forestry, and marine science, and taught in their area of expertise. We created a hands-on activity for middle and high school students that describes glacier mass balance in a changing climate. The students make a glacier using glue, water and detergent ('flubber') and construct a glacier valley using plastic sheeting. Flubber behaves in mechanically similar ways to glacier ice, undergoing plastic deformation at low stresses and exhibiting brittle failure at high stresses. Students are encouraged to run several tests with different values for valley slope, glacier mass

  2. Science achievement as an indicator of educational opportunity available in rural K--12 districts in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capehart, Cheryl Louise

    Purpose of the study. This study examined Rural K--12 Texas districts to investigate whether science achievement could serve as a gauge to measure the availability and quality of rigorous educational opportunities in Rural Texas districts. Procedure. A Case II criterion-group design was used; 2 groups of districts were selected based on their 3-year performances on the 8th grade Science Texas Assessment of Academic Skills (TAAS)---the statewide criterion-referenced test. The High Performing Group (HPG) was composed of 30 top performing districts; the Low Performing Group (LPG) was composed of 30 lowest performing districts. Data collection was limited to archived quantitative data from Texas Education Agency's open records. Achievement variables were percent passing (1) Science TASS, (2) Biology End-of-Course (EoC) test and (3) the composite passing all Reading, Writing, and Mathematics TAAS. Academic variables were percent participating in (1) advanced courses, (2) rigorous graduation programs, and (3) college entrance examinations. District quality indicators also included 3 budget variables: (1) average teacher salary, (2) per pupil instructional expenditure, (3) percent allocated for instructional leadership; and 4 staff variables: (1) percent teachers fully certified, (2) percent teachers with advanced degrees, (3) average years teacher experience, (4) average percent non-turnover of teachers. One score per variable was obtained for each district. The HPG and LPG were compared on each variable using the group means, standard deviations, standard errors of the mean, Levene's test for equality of variance, and a t test for equality of means with a 95% confidence level. The Pearson correlation with two-tailed significance calculated the relationship of each independent variable (budget and staff factors) to each dependent variable (performance measures). Science TASS and a Combined Science score (grand mean of Science TASS & Biology EoC passing rates) were

  3. A Review of Research on Content-Based Foreign/Second Language Education in US K-12 Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedick, Diane J.; Wesely, Pamela M.

    2015-01-01

    This review of the extant research literature focuses on research about content-based language instruction (CBI) programmes in K-12 foreign/second language education in the USA. The review emphasises studies on one-way language immersion (OWI) and two-way language immersion (TWI) programmes, which are school-based and subject matter-driven. OWI…

  4. Use of Audio Podcast in K-12 and Higher Education: A Review of Research Topics and Methodologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hew, Khe Foon

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews past empirical studies on the use of audio podcast (hereby referred to as podcast) in K-12 and higher education settings. Using the constant comparative method, this review is organized into three major research areas or topics: (a) participants' podcast usage profile, (b) effects of podcast on learners' outcomes, and (b)…

  5. Evaluation of Online Teacher and Student Materials for the Framework for K-12 Science Education Science and Engineering Crosscutting Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    The National Research Council developed and published the "Framework for K-12 Science Education," a new set of concepts that many states were planning on adopting. Part of this new endeavor included a set of science and engineering crosscutting concepts to be incorporated into science materials and activities, a first in science…

  6. The Effectiveness of Educational Technology Applications for Enhancing Mathematics Achievement in K-12 Classrooms: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Alan C. K.; Slavin, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    The present review examines research on the effects of educational technology applications on mathematics achievement in K-12 classrooms. Unlike previous reviews, this review applies consistent inclusion standards to focus on studies that met high methodological standards. In addition, methodological and substantive features of the studies are…

  7. Use of Audio Podcast in K-12 and Higher Education: A Review of Research Topics and Methodologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hew, Khe Foon

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews past empirical studies on the use of audio podcast (hereby referred to as podcast) in K-12 and higher education settings. Using the constant comparative method, this review is organized into three major research areas or topics: (a) participants' podcast usage profile, (b) effects of podcast on learners' outcomes, and (b)…

  8. Incremental Improvement of a K-12 Career Education Program. Final Report, July 1, 1977-June 30, 1978.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monterey Peninsula Unified School District, Monterey, CA.

    A project was designed to promote innovation in instructional procedures, curriculum development, collaborative community involvement, and staff development for incremental improvements in a comprehensive K-12 career education program. The fifteen project components focused on (1) applications of basic skills (reading, writing, and math) in…

  9. The Effects of Teacher Background, Teacher Preparation, and Support on Attitudes and Expectations of K-12 Urban Music Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of personal and professional background factors, teacher preparation, and support on urban music teacher disposition. Specifically, the study aimed to examine the status of K-12 urban music education; verify the psychometric appropriateness of the researcher-created survey instrument; analyze…

  10. A Conceptual Framework for Digital Libraries for K-12 Mathematics Education: Part 1, Information Organization, Information Literacy, and Integrated Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsin-liang; Doty, Philip

    2005-01-01

    This article is the first of two that present a six-part conceptual framework for the design and evaluation of digital libraries meant to support mathematics education in K-12 settings (see also pt. 2). This first article concentrates on (1) information organization, (2) information literacy, and (3) integrated learning with multimedia materials.…

  11. Living in a Materials World: Materials Science Engineering Professional Development for K-12 Educators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anne Seifert; Louis Nadelson

    2011-06-01

    Advances in materials science are fundamental to technological developments and have broad societal impacs. For example, a cellular phone is composed of a polymer case, liquid crystal displays, LEDs, silicon chips, Ni-Cd batteries, resistors, capacitors, speakers, microphones all of which have required advances in materials science to be compacted into a phone which is typically smaller than a deck of cards. Like many technological developments, cellular phones have become a ubiquitous part of society, and yet most people know little about the materials science associated with their manufacture. The probable condition of constrained knowledge of materials science was the motivation for developing and offering a 20 hour fourday course called 'Living in a Materials World.' In addition, materials science provides a connection between our every day experiences and the work of scientists and engineers. The course was offered as part of a larger K-12 teacher professional development project and was a component of a week-long summer institute designed specifically for upper elementary and middle school teachers which included 20 hour content strands, and 12 hours of plenary sessions, planning, and collaborative sharing. The focus of the institute was on enhancing teacher content knowledge in STEM, their capacity for teaching using inquiry, their comfort and positive attitudes toward teaching STEM, their knowledge of how people learn, and strategies for integrating STEM throughout the curriculum. In addition to the summer institute the participating teachers were provided with a kit of about $300 worth of materials and equipment to use to implement the content they learned in their classrooms. As part of this professional development project the participants were required to design and implement 5 lesson plans with their students this fall and report on the results, as part of the continuing education course associated with the project. 'Living in a

  12. Educational Outreach by the NSF Polymers Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovinger, Andrew J.

    2002-03-01

    Education and outreach have been NSF priority areas over the last few years. Reviewers of all proposals are explicitly asked to evaluate not only the "intellectual merit" of a research proposal but also its "broader impacts", including specifically "integration of research and education". The NSF Polymers Program has strongly emphasized these areas and has initiated and supported a wide variety of outreach activities designed to bring out the importance of polymeric materials to diverse communities and to encourage young students to develop interests in this area. Specific activities have included: Workshops and their broad dissemination through the media; press releases on important polymer-related developments; interviews to the scientific and popular press; outreach to Congress; establishment of widely publicized and broadly attended lecture series; funding and support of conferences, symposia, and workshops aimed at students and teachers from kindergarten to graduate school; support of web-based educational projects aimed at the general public and schoolchildren; participation in web-based "ask-the-experts" resources to answer science questions from children or the general public; and personal outreach to middle- and high-schools through talks and demonstrations on polymers and plastics, participation at science fairs, career days, etc.

  13. Connecting Three Pivotal Concepts in K-12 Science State Standards and Maps of Conceptual Growth to Research in Physics Education

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Chandralekha

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes three conceptual areas in physics that are particularly important targets for educational interventions in K-12 science. These conceptual areas are force and motion, conservation of energy, and geometrical optics, which were prominent in the US national and four US state standards that we examined. The four US state standards that were analyzed to explore the extent to which the K-12 science standards differ in different states were selected to include states in different geographic regions and of different sizes. The three conceptual areas that were common to all the four state standards are conceptual building blocks for other science concepts covered in the K-12 curriculum. Since these three areas have been found to be ripe with deep student misconceptions that are resilient to conventional physics instruction, the nature of difficulties in these areas is described in some depth, along with pointers towards approaches that have met with some success in each conceptual area.

  14. Exploring an Invisible Medium: Teacher Language Awareness among Preservice K12 Educators of English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Kristen Marie

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the construct of Teacher Language Awareness (TLA) in a group of preservice mainstream K-12 teachers who are developing skills to work with English Language Learners (ELLs) in United States (US) public school contexts. Specifically, the study seeks to explore how preservice teachers' participation in directed university…

  15. Makerspaces: The Next Iteration for Educational Technology in K-12 Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strycker, Jesse

    2015-01-01

    With the continually growing number of computers and mobile devices available in K-12 schools, the need is dwindling for dedicated computer labs and media centers. Some schools are starting to repurpose those facilities into different kinds of exploratory learning environments known as "makerspaces". This article discusses this next…

  16. Integrating the iPod Touch in K-12 Education: Visions and Vices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banister, Savilla

    2010-01-01

    Advocates of ubiquitous computing have long been documenting classroom benefits of one-to-one ratios of students to handheld or laptop computers. The recent sophisticated capabilities of the iPod Touch, iPhone, and iPad have encouraged further speculation on exactly how K-12 teaching and learning might be energized by such devices. This paper…

  17. Efficacy of Webinar Training for Continuing Professional Education: Applications for School Personnel in K-12 Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covington, Julie Anne

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the researcher was to evaluate the effectiveness of webinar training for K-12 school personnel in childhood obesity prevention tools and resources provided by the North Carolina Prevention Partners (NCPP). A mixed method sequential research design was used to evaluate the training across the first three levels of the Kirkpatrick…

  18. Cisco Networking Academy: Next-Generation Assessments and Their Implications for K-12 Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Meredith

    2014-01-01

    To illuminate the possibilities for next-generation assessments in K-12 schools, this case study profiles the Cisco Networking Academy, which creates comprehensive online training curriculum to teach networking skills. Since 1997, the Cisco Networking Academy has served more than five million high school and college students and now delivers…

  19. An analysis of United States K-12 stem education versus STEM workforce at the dawn of the digital revolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataldo, Franca

    The world is at the dawn of a third industrial revolution, the digital revolution, that brings great changes the world over. Today, computing devices, the Internet, and the World Wide Web are vital technology tools that affect every aspect of everyday life and success. While computing technologies offer enormous benefits, there are equally enormous safety and security risks that have been growing exponentially since they became widely available to the public in 1994. Cybercriminals are increasingly implementing sophisticated and serious hack attacks and breaches upon our nation's government, financial institutions, organizations, communities, and private citizens. There is a great need for computer scientists to carry America's innovation and economic growth forward and for cybersecurity professionals to keep our nation safe from criminal hacking. In this digital age, computer science and cybersecurity are essential foundational ingredients of technological innovation, economic growth, and cybersecurity that span all industries. Yet, America's K-12 education institutions are not teaching the computer science and cybersecurity skills required to produce a technologically-savvy 21st century workforce. Education is the key to preparing students to enter the workforce and, therefore, American K-12 STEM education must be reformed to accommodate the teachings required in the digital age. Keywords: Cybersecurity Education, Cybersecurity Education Initiatives, Computer Science Education, Computer Science Education Initiatives, 21 st Century K-12 STEM Education Reform, 21st Century Digital Literacies, High-Tech Innovative Problem-Solving Skills, 21st Century Digital Workforce, Standardized Testing, Foreign Language and Culture Studies, Utica College, Professor Chris Riddell.

  20. Outreach and Education with Europlanet 2020 RI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heward, Anita R.; Barrosa, Mariana; Europlanet 2020 RI

    2016-10-01

    Since 2005, Europlanet has provided a framework to bring together Europe's widespread planetary science community. The project has evolved through a number of phases, and currently comprises a Research Infrastructure (RI) funded through the European Commission's Horizon 2020 program, as well as a self-sustaining membership organization. Launched in September 2015, Europlanet 2020 RI provides support, services, access to facilities, new research tools and a virtual planetary observatory. Europlanet 2020 RI's outreach and education program aims to engage members of the public, schools, teachers, policy makers and industrial partners across Europe with planetary science and the opportunities that it provides for innovation, inspiration and job creation. Europlanet's outreach and education activities are led by Science Office Ltd, a Portuguese-based SME, and a network of partners spread across nine countries including University College London, the University of Leiden, University of Latvia, Vilnius University, the Institute of Accelerating Systems and Applications, the Observatoire de Paris, CAB-INTA and the Austrian Space Forum.Europlanet supports educators and outreach providers within the planetary science community by organizing meetings, best practice workshops and communication training sessions, offering a seed-funding scheme for outreach activities, and awarding an annual prize for public engagement. Europlanet is also developing its own education and outreach resources, including an animation on 'Jupiter and its Icy Moons' (the first in a series of video "shorts") and kits for hands-on comparative planetology activities. The Europlanet Media Centre uses traditional and social media channels to communicate newsworthy results and activities to diverse audiences in Europe and worldwide. Using tools like Google Hangouts, the project connects planetary researchers directly with the public and school groups. In addition, Europlanet engages with policy makers in the

  1. Wind Energy Stakeholder Outreach and Education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bob Lawrence; Craig Cox; Jodi Hamrick; DOE Contact - Keith Bennett

    2006-07-27

    Since August of 2001, Bob Lawrence and Associates, Inc. (BL&A) has applied its outreach and support services to lead a highly effective work effort on behalf of Wind Powering America (WPA). In recent years, the company has generated informative brochures and posters, researched and created case studies, and provided technical support to key wind program managers. BL&A has also analyzed Lamar, Colorado’s 162MW wind project and developed a highly regarded 'wind supply chain' report and outreach presentation. BL&A’s efforts were then replicated to characterize similar supply chain presentations in New Mexico and Illinois. Note that during the period of this contract, the recipient met with members of the DOE Wind Program a number of times to obtain specific guidance on tasks that needed to be pursued on behalf of this grant. Thus, as the project developed over the course of 5 years, the recipient varied the tasks and emphasis on tasks to comply with the on-going and continuously developing requirements of the Wind Powering America Program. This report provides only a brief summary of activities to illustrate the recipient's work for advancing wind energy education and outreach from 2001 through the end of the contract period in 2006. It provides examples of how the recipient and DOE leveraged the available funding to provide educational and outreach work to a wide range of stakeholder communities.

  2. Space Plasma Science as a Motivator for Education & Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusenbery, Paul

    1999-11-01

    Education and public outreach (EPO) continue to play an important role in how science is funded by the federal government. The plasma science community has a responsibility to share their exciting science with the American public. Bruce Alberts, president of the National Academy of Sciences, and Neal Lane, former head of NSF, are on record as strong advocates of scientists becoming more actively and effectively engaged in K-12 science education reform. In addition, research directorates of funding agencies like NASA and NSF are increasingly encouraging (and in some cases requiring) the integration of science and education and greater scientist involvement in EPO. How does plasma science and scientists fit into this broader political and social landscape? How well does the public understand our science and technology? Are there ways to effectively engage the public that provide good visibility for plasma science? These questions and more will be addressed in this talk. The Space Science Institute (SSI), a nonprofit organization in Colorado, provides national leadership in developing innovative ways to translate the activities and resources of space and earth science research into exciting and effective K-12 and museum education programs. SSI’s mission is to link its space science research enterprise with its education programs. SSI has active programs in curriculum and exhibit development and professional development for both scientists about education and for educators about science. I will share with you one exhibit project and one curriculum project whose goals are to raise public understanding of space plasmas and by extension all of plasma science.

  3. "It's worth our time": a model of culturally and linguistically supportive professional development for K-12 STEM educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charity Hudley, Anne H.; Mallinson, Christine

    2016-08-01

    Professional development on issues of language and culture is often separate from professional development on issues related to STEM education, resulting in linguistic and cultural gaps in K-12 STEM pedagogy and practice. To address this issue, we have designed a model of professional development in which we work with educators to build cultural and linguistic competence and to disseminate information about how educators view the relevance of language, communication, and culture to STEM teaching and learning. We describe the design and facilitation of our model of culturally and linguistically responsive professional development, grounded in theories of multicultural education and culturally supportive teaching, through professional development workshops to 60 K-12 STEM educators from schools in Maryland and Virginia that serve African American students. Participants noted that culturally and linguistically responsive approaches had yet to permeate their K-12 STEM settings, which they identified as a critical challenge to effectively teaching and engaging African-American students. Based on pre-surveys, workshops were tailored to participants' stated needs for information on literacy (e.g., disciplinary literacies and discipline-specific jargon), cultural conflict and mismatch (e.g., student-teacher miscommunication), and linguistic bias in student assessment (e.g., test design). Educators shared feedback via post-workshop surveys, and a subset of 28 participants completed in-depth interviews and a focus group. Results indicate the need for further implementation of professional development such as ours that address linguistic and cultural issues, tailored for K-12 STEM educators. Although participants in this study enumerated several challenges to meeting this need, they also identified opportunities for collaborative solutions that draw upon teacher expertise and are integrated with curricula across content areas.

  4. "It's worth our time": a model of culturally and linguistically supportive professional development for K-12 STEM educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charity Hudley, Anne H.; Mallinson, Christine

    2017-09-01

    Professional development on issues of language and culture is often separate from professional development on issues related to STEM education, resulting in linguistic and cultural gaps in K-12 STEM pedagogy and practice. To address this issue, we have designed a model of professional development in which we work with educators to build cultural and linguistic competence and to disseminate information about how educators view the relevance of language, communication, and culture to STEM teaching and learning. We describe the design and facilitation of our model of culturally and linguistically responsive professional development, grounded in theories of multicultural education and culturally supportive teaching, through professional development workshops to 60 K-12 STEM educators from schools in Maryland and Virginia that serve African American students. Participants noted that culturally and linguistically responsive approaches had yet to permeate their K-12 STEM settings, which they identified as a critical challenge to effectively teaching and engaging African-American students. Based on pre-surveys, workshops were tailored to participants' stated needs for information on literacy (e.g., disciplinary literacies and discipline-specific jargon), cultural conflict and mismatch (e.g., student-teacher miscommunication), and linguistic bias in student assessment (e.g., test design). Educators shared feedback via post-workshop surveys, and a subset of 28 participants completed in-depth interviews and a focus group. Results indicate the need for further implementation of professional development such as ours that address linguistic and cultural issues, tailored for K-12 STEM educators. Although participants in this study enumerated several challenges to meeting this need, they also identified opportunities for collaborative solutions that draw upon teacher expertise and are integrated with curricula across content areas.

  5. How Astronomers View Education and Public Outreach

    CERN Document Server

    Dang, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Over the past few years, there have been a few studies on the development of an interest in science and scientists' views on public outreach. Yet, to date, there has been no global study regarding astronomers' views on these matters. Through the completion of our survey by 155 professional astronomers online and in person during the 28th International Astronomical Union General Assembly in 2012, we explored their development of and an interest for astronomy and their views on time constraints and budget restriction regarding public outreach activities. We find that astronomers develop an interest in astronomy between the ages of 4-6 but that the decision to undertake a career in astronomy often comes during late adolescence. We also discuss the claim that education and public outreach is regarded an optional task rather than a scientist's duty. Our study revealed that many astronomers think there should be a larger percentage of their research that should be invested into outreach activities, calling for a ch...

  6. Particle Physics Outreach to Secondary Education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardeen, Marjorie G.; /Fermilab; Johansson, K.Erik; /Stockholm U.; Young, M.Jean

    2011-11-21

    This review summarizes exemplary secondary education and outreach programs of the particle physics community. We examine programs from the following areas: research experiences, high-energy physics data for students, informal learning for students, instructional resources, and professional development. We report findings about these programs' impact on students and teachers and provide suggestions for practices that create effective programs from those findings. We also include some methods for assessing programs.

  7. Wind Energy Education and Outreach Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loomis, David G. [Illinois State Univ., Normal, IL (United States)

    2013-01-09

    The purpose of Illinois State University's wind project was to further the education and outreach of the university concerning wind energy. This project had three major components: to initiate and coordinate a Wind Working Group for the State of Illinois, to launch a Renewable Energy undergraduate program, and to develop the Center for Renewable Energy that will sustain the Illinois Wind Working Group and the undergraduate program.

  8. Open Educational Resources from Performance Task using Video Analysis and Modeling - Tracker and K12 science education framework

    CERN Document Server

    Wee, Loo Kang

    2014-01-01

    This invited paper discusses why Physics performance task by grade 9 students in Singapore is worth participating in for two reasons; 1) the video analysis and modeling are open access, licensed creative commons attribution for advancing open educational resources in the world and 2) allows students to be like physicists, where the K12 science education framework is adopted. Personal reflections on how physics education can be made more meaningful in particular Practice 1: Ask Questions, Practice 2: Use Models and Practice 5: Mathematical and Computational Thinking using Video Modeling supported by evidence based data from video analysis. This paper hopes to spur fellow colleagues to look into open education initiatives such as our Singapore Tracker community open educational resources curate on http://weelookang.blogspot.sg/p/physics-applets-virtual-lab.html as well as digital libraries http://iwant2study.org/lookangejss/ directly accessible through Tracker 4.86, EJSS reader app on Android and iOS and EJS 5....

  9. Assessment lessons from K-12 education research: Knowledge representation, learning, and motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, Lorrie A.

    2012-02-01

    Research on teaching to the test in K-12 settings has documented the lack of generalized understanding of underlying principles in tested subjects. This is similar to the experience of physics students who can complete computational problems without conceptual understanding. The PER community is well aware of the importance of explicit representations of learning goals as well as the role of the formative assessment process, especially feedback and self assessment, in promoting or deterring students' engagement and willingness to take responsibility for their own learning. Key principles from socio-cultural learning theory and research on motivation are summarized and used to identify instructional and assessment practices that hold the most promise for engaging students in developing deep conceptual understanding.

  10. National Sexuality Education Standards: Core Content and Skills, K-12. A Special Publication of the Journal of School Health. Special Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    American School Health Association (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this paper, "National Sexuality Education Standards: Core Content and Skills, K-12," is to provide clear, consistent and straightforward guidance on the "essential minimum, core content" for sexuality education that is developmentally and age-appropriate for students in grades K-12. The development of these standards is a result of an…

  11. CSU's MWV Observatory: A Facility for Research, Education and Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, John; Carpenter, N. D.; McCarty, C. B.; Samford, J. H.; Johnson, M.; Puckett, A. W.; Williams, R. N.; Cruzen, S. T.

    2014-01-01

    The Mead Westvaco Observatory (MWVO), located in Columbus State University's Coca-Cola Space Science Center, is dedicated to education and research in astronomy through hands-on engagement and public participation. The MWVO has recently received funding to upgrade from a 16-inch Meade LX-200 telescope to a PlaneWave CDK 24-inch Corrected Dall-Kirkham Astrograph telescope. This and other technological upgrades will allow this observatory to stream live webcasts for astronomical events, allowing a worldwide public audience to become a part of the growing astronomical community. This poster will explain the upgrades that are currently in progress as well as the results from the current calibrations. The goal of these upgrades is to provide facilities capable of both research-class projects and widespread use in education and public outreach. We will present our initial calibration and tests of the observatory equipment, as well as its use in webcasts of astronomical events, in solar observing through the use of specialized piggy-backed telescopes, and in research into such topics as asteroids, planetary and nebula imaging. We will describe a pilot research project on asteroid orbit refinement and light curves, to be carried out by Columbus State University students. We will also outline many of the K-12 educational and public outreach activities we have designed for these facilities. Support and funding for the acquisition and installation of the new PlaneWave CDK 24 has been provided by the International Museum and Library Services via the Museums for America Award.

  12. Opportunities and Resources for Scientist Participation in Education and Public Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxner, Sanlyn; CoBabe-Ammann, E.; Shipp, S.; Hsu, B.

    2012-10-01

    Active engagement of scientists in Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) activities results in benefits for both the audience and scientists. Most scientists are trained in research but have little formal training in education. The Planetary Science Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) Forum helps the Science Mission Directorate support scientists currently involved in E/PO and to help scientists who are interested in becoming involved in E/PO efforts find ways to do so through a variety of avenues. We will present current and future opportunities and resources for scientists to become engaged in education and public outreach. These include upcoming NASA SMD E/PO funding opportunities, professional development resources for writing NASA SMD E/PO proposals (webinars and other online tools), toolkits for scientists interested in best practices in E/PO (online guides for K-12 education and public outreach), EarthSpace (a community web space where instructors can find and share about teaching space and earth sciences in the undergraduate classroom, including class materials news and funding opportunities, and the latest education research), thematic resources for teaching about the solar system (archived resources from Year of the Solar System), and an online database of scientists interested in connecting with education programs. Learn more about the Forum and find resources at http://smdepo.org/.

  13. Developing Partnerships between Higher Education Faculty, K-12 Science Teachers, and School Administrators via MSP initiatives: The RITES Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulkins, J. L.; Kortz, K. M.; Murray, D. P.

    2011-12-01

    The Rhode Island Technology Enhanced Science Project (RITES) is a NSF-funded Math and Science Partnership (MSP) project that seeks to improve science education. RITES is, at its core, a unique partnership that fosters relationships between middle and high school science teachers, district and school administrators, higher education (HE) faculty members, and science education researchers. Their common goal is to enhance scientific inquiry, increase classroom technology usage, and improve state level science test scores. In one of the more visible examples of this partnership, middle and high school science teachers work closely with HE science faculty partners to design and teach professional development (PD) workshops. The PD sessions focus on technology-enhanced scientific investigations (e.g. use of probes, online simulations, etc.), exemplify inquiry-based instruction, and relate expert content knowledge. Teachers from these sessions express substantial satisfaction in the program, report increased comfort levels in teaching the presented materials (both via post-workshop surveys), and show significant gains in content knowledge (via pre-post assessments). Other benefits to this kind of partnership, in which K-12 and HE teachers are considered equals, include: 1) K-12 teachers are empowered through interactions with HE faculty and other science teachers in the state; 2) HE instructors become more informed not only about good pedagogical practices, but also practical aspects of teaching science such as engaging students; and 3) the PD sessions tend to be much stronger than ones designed and presented solely by HE scientists, for while HE instructors provide content expertise, K-12 teachers provide expertise in K-12 classroom practice and implementation. Lastly, the partnership is mutually beneficial for the partners involved because both sides learn practical ways to teach science and inquiry at different levels. In addition to HE faculty and K-12 science teacher

  14. Alliance for Sequestration Training, Outreach, Research & Education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, Hilary

    2013-09-01

    The Sequestration Training, Outreach, Research and Education (STORE) Alliance at The University of Texas at Austin completed its activity under Department of Energy Funding (DE- FE0002254) on September 1, 2013. The program began as a partnership between the Institute for Geophysics, the Bureau of Economic Geology and the Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering Department at UT. The initial vision of the program was to promote better understanding of CO2 utilization and storage science and engineering technology through programs and opportunities centered on training, outreach, research and technology transfer, and education. With over 8,000 hrs of formal training and education (and almost 4,500 of those hours awarded as continuing education credits) to almost 1,100 people, STORE programs and activities have provided benefits to the Carbon Storage Program of the Department of Energy by helping to build a skilled workforce for the future CCS and larger energy industry, and fostering scientific public literacy needed to continue the U.S. leadership position in climate change mitigation and energy technologies and application. Now in sustaining mode, the program is housed at the Center for Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering, and benefits from partnerships with the Gulf Coast Carbon Center, TOPCORP and other programs at the university receiving industry funding.

  15. Education and Outreach at the USGS Albuquerque Seismological Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, L.; Bolton, H. F.; Hutt, C. R.

    2002-12-01

    The Education and Outreach effort at the USGS Albuquerque Seismological Laboratory (ASL) over the past decade has evolved into an exciting program that provides many new educational opportunities in seismology and related science, engineering, and mathematics. Our target audience includes K-12, post-secondary, undergraduate, graduate, continuing education and the general public. With an emphasis on reaching young people, our major goal is to provide to the local community an increased understanding, awareness and appreciation of the relevance of Earth science and technology in daily life. A broadened base of public support for science helps enable us to stimulate the intrinsic curiosity of youngsters who may find science and technology exciting and challenging. Our programs capitalize on the natural interests of young students in earthquakes, volcanoes, magnetism and other scientific fields. Our hands-on interactive presentations foster a students sense of inquiry and increase their knowledge of science. We see an increased amount of confidence displayed by young students as they begin to understand basic scientific principles. We attempt to increase scientific literacy within the community and help create a new generation of students with a greater understanding of the opportunities in Earth science. We outline recent Earth science and Career Day presentations we have made at numerous elementary schools. Many of these presentations are made both in English and Spanish. Also featured are other cooperative bilingual projects that have been coordinated with the New Mexico Museum of Natural History, the National Atomic Museum and the New Mexico State Fair.

  16. “互联网+”背景下美国K-12教育转型分析%The Transformation of U.S. K-12 Education in the Background of“Internet+”

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡永斌

    2016-01-01

    It is a great challenge for almost all the countries in the world to use traditional educational system and traditional classroom teaching to narrow the gap between the developed and developing area. This means it is urgent to implement“Internet+Education”strategy in this smart education age. This paper ifrstly analyzes the process and causes of transformation in k-12 education from digital education to blended and online education. And then, this paper selects an example to decompose its innovations in operation model, instructional model and institutional management. Finally, this paper proposes implications from U.S. K-12 blended and online education and suggestions to China.%当今世界,依靠传统办学体系和常规课堂教学模式来解决教育公平和教育均衡问题存在重大挑战,落实“互联网+教育”的发展战略是智慧教育时代的必然选择。该文首先分析了美国K-12教育从数字教育到混合与在线教育转型发展的历程及转型动因,选择案例剖析了美国混合与在线教育的运作模式、教学模式及制度创新,提出了美国K-12混合与在线教育的启示以及我国发展混合与在线教育的建议。

  17. Influencing the Future: Special Considerations for IPY Education and Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beitler, J.

    2004-12-01

    The International Geophysical Year (IGY) of 1957-1958 created a valuable legacy, by not only advancing the sciences involved, but by also stimulating interest in and support for science, and by inspiring many to enter science careers. Successful education and outreach efforts in conjunction with IGY transmitted this energy to the public and helped researchers to create this legacy. The International Polar Year (IPY) for 2007-2008 again holds promise to generate new scientific insights and leave a similar legacy -- if the sciences are once again successful in connecting with the public. Despite the fine example of the IGY of 1958 -1959, the way forward for meaningful education and outreach for IPY isn't entirely clear. Every element affecting science education and outreach today is considerably more complex, and the distinct challenges and opportunities of today may not always be addressed by simply extending what has been helpful in the past. Whether a large research group or an individual researcher, whether working with a dedicated outreach staff or conducting outreach more informally, whether already operating successful outreach programs or starting from scratch, any project intending an education and outreach effort will significantly increase its relevance and effectiveness by taking pause to formulate specific goals and objectives for IPY. Such thinking shouldn't be entirely delegated to non-researchers. The engagement of the scientists themselves in setting objectives for education and outreach will provide the strongest outcome. This discussion analyzes the communication setting for IPY as it affects outreach and education efforts, and proposes a model for discussing and formulating outreach and education objectives. It poses the key questions that should be asked and answered in order to ensure that researchers take full advantage of education and outreach opportunities with IPY, whatever the scope of their efforts. Education and outreach programs that

  18. Listening to the soloists in the choir: A study of the life experience of exemplary K--12 environmental educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Robert L.

    Following the environmental awakening of the last third of the twentieth century, anchored by the enactment of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, education, and its frontline providers---teachers---were expected to become the dominant engines for realizing the new ideal of an environmentally literate populace. In reality, no such change has yet occurred despite continuous efforts from a variety of governmental and nongovernmental entities. A review of the literature revealed that there was something missing in research on the preparation of teachers for environmental education. There did not appear to be any research into why teachers who embrace the idea of environmental education as a fundamental part of education do so in the first place. In this study, described as basic qualitative research, I used a multiple-session interview technique to explore, in depth, the life experiences of the phenomenon I refer to as "an exemplary K-12 environmental educator." The pool of potential participants was composed of environmental education award winners from several states in the upper Midwest. Ten teachers were recruited from the available pool. Among these 10 were represented both genders, teaching in grades ranging from grade 2 through grade 12. The results of this study provide a look into a complex set of interactions which were eventually manifested as the phenomenon of interest. Highlights of the findings indicate that (1) a strong connection to the environment was developed early in life, (2) this connection was the result of experiences shared in the outdoors with significant others, (3) a love of learning and self-directedness are both integral to who these individuals are, (4) the study participants, as K-12 educators, draw heavily from the support of relevant professional associations. Implications for the continuing professional education of teachers in environmental education are that more emphasis is needed on awareness and affect as components

  19. Preparing the Future Workforce: Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) Policy in K-12 Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickman, Anneliese; Schwabe, Amy; Schmidt, Jeff; Henken, Rob

    2009-01-01

    Last December, the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Education Coalition--a national organization of more than 600 groups representing knowledge workers, educators, scientists, engineers, and technicians--wrote to President-elect Obama urging him to "not lose sight of the critical role that STEM education plays in…

  20. Diffusing Innovations: Adoption of Serious Educational Games by K-12 Science Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallett, David; Annetta, Leonard; Lamb, Richard; Bowling, Brandy

    2014-01-01

    Innovation is a term that has become widely used in education; especially as it pertains to technology infusion. Applying the corporate theory of diffusing innovation to educational practice is an innovation in itself. This mixed-methods study examined 38 teachers in a science educational gaming professional development program that provided…

  1. Changes in K-12 Physical Education Programs from 2001 to 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Xiaofen D.; Lambdin, Dolly; Harrison, Louis, Jr.; Dauenhauer, Brian

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the changes in physical education programs from 2001 to 2006 based on an analysis of data reported in The Shape of the Nation Report: Status of Physical Education in the USA (National Association for Sport and Physical Education, 2006). Means and standard deviations for numeric variables in the reports were computed,…

  2. Toward a More Inclusive Multicultural Education: Methods for Including LGBT Themes in K-12 Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    Although multicultural education scholars and the National Association for Multicultural Education (NAME) have encouraged the implementation of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender themes in the classroom (NAME, 2005), many classroom educators look the other way because of fear, retaliation, or personal discomfort. The following article will…

  3. Implementing Competency Education in K-12 Systems: Insights from Local Leaders. CompetencyWorks Issue Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturgis, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Competency education, an educator-led reform, is taking root in schools and districts across the country. In some states, state leadership has cleared the path with policies to advance competency education. This paper seeks to map out the terrain of the district implementation strategies being used to convert traditional systems into personalized,…

  4. Offering a Geoscience Professional Development Program to Promote Science Education and Provide Hands-on Experiences for K-12 Science Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakayode, Sayo O.; Pollard, David A.; Snipes, Vincent T.; Atkinson, Alvin

    2014-01-01

    Development of an effective strategy for promoting science education and professional development of K-12 science educators is a national priority to strengthen the quality of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education. This article reports the outcomes of a Geoscience Professional Development Program (GPDP) workshop…

  5. Monitoring Progress: How the 2012 National Survey of Science and Mathematics Education Can Inform a National K-12 STEM Education Indicator System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulkerson, William O.; Banilower, Eric R.

    2014-01-01

    "Monitoring Progress Toward Successful K-12 STEM Education: A Nation Advancing?" (National Research Council, 2013) describes a set of 14 indicators for assessing and tracking the health of pre-college STEM education in the United States. This 2012 National Survey of Science and Mathematics Education (NSSME), is the fifth in a series of…

  6. Influences on and Obstacles to K-12 Administrators' Support for Environment-Based Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Julie

    2012-01-01

    The term environment-based education (EBE) describes a form of school-based environmental education that uses the environment as a context for integrating subjects and a source of real-world learning experiences. Because of the importance of administrator support in teachers' use of EBE (Ernst, 2009), survey research was conducted to explore…

  7. Examining Arizona's Policy Response Post "Flores v. Arizona" in Educating K-12 English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Silva, Margarita; Gomez, Laura; Cisneros, Jesus

    2014-01-01

    This article provides an analysis of Arizona's policy response in educating English language learners by conducting a narrative review. A critical Latina/o theory approach was used to analyze the data. This study reveals 5 salient policy responses: (a) severely limit bilingual education, (b) develop controversial funding solutions, (c) implement a…

  8. Enacting FAIR Education: Approaches to Integrating LGBT Content in the K-12 Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecellio, Shawn

    2012-01-01

    The FAIR Education Act (SB 48) was signed into law in California in July of 2011, amending the Education Code by requiring representation of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender persons in the social sciences. In this article, the author uses James Banks' model of the Four Levels of Integration of Multicultural Content to suggest ways in which…

  9. Enacting FAIR Education: Approaches to Integrating LGBT Content in the K-12 Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecellio, Shawn

    2012-01-01

    The FAIR Education Act (SB 48) was signed into law in California in July of 2011, amending the Education Code by requiring representation of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender persons in the social sciences. In this article, the author uses James Banks' model of the Four Levels of Integration of Multicultural Content to suggest ways in which…

  10. Opportunities and Challenges for Integrating Sustainability Education into K-12 Schools: Case Study Phoenix, AZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redman, Erin

    2013-01-01

    Teacher education for sustainability is a central part of integrating sustainability into classrooms and schools. However, educating for sustainability is not limited to increased content knowledge; rather it encompasses different forms of knowledge that embrace the normative, dynamic and action-oriented nature of sustainability. Curriculum for a…

  11. The Application of System Dynamics to the Integration of National Laboratory Research and K-12 Education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, James Ignatius; Zounar Harbour, Elda D

    2001-08-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is dedicated to finding solutions to problems related to the environment, energy, economic competitiveness, and national security. In an effort to attract and retain the expertise needed to accomplish these challenges, the INEEL is developing a program of broad educational opportunities that makes continuing education readily available to all laboratory employees, beginning in the K–12 environment and progressing through post-graduate education and beyond. One of the most innovative educational approaches being implemented at the laboratory is the application of STELLA© dynamic learning environments, which facilitate captivating K–12 introductions to the complex energy and environmental challenges faced by global societies. These simulations are integrated into lesson plans developed by teachers in collaboration with INEEL scientists and engineers. This approach results in an enjoyable and involved learning experience, and an especially positive introduction to the application of science to emerging problems of great social and environmental consequence.

  12. The Application of System Dynamics to the Integration of National Laboratory Research and K-12 Education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, James Ignatius; Zounar Harbour, Elda D

    2001-08-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is dedicated to finding solutions to problems related to the environment, energy, economic competitiveness, and national security. In an effort to attract and retain the expertise needed to accomplish these challenges, the INEEL is developing a program of broad educational opportunities that makes continuing education readily available to all laboratory employees, beginning in the K–12 environment and progressing through post-graduate education and beyond. One of the most innovative educational approaches being implemented at the laboratory is the application of STELLA© dynamic learning environments, which facilitate captivating K–12 introductions to the complex energy and environmental challenges faced by global societies. These simulations are integrated into lesson plans developed by teachers in collaboration with INEEL scientists and engineers. This approach results in an enjoyable and involved learning experience, and an especially positive introduction to the application of science to emerging problems of great social and environmental consequence.

  13. Bridging the Divide Between Climate and Global Change Science and Education of Public and K-12 Visitors at the National Center for Atmospheric Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, S. Q.; Johnson, R. M.; Carbone, L.; Munoz, R.; Eastburn, T.; Ammann, C.; Lu, G.; Richmond, A.; Committee, S.

    2004-12-01

    The study of climate and global change is an important on-going focus for scientists at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). Programs overseen by the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research Office of Education and Outreach (UCAR-EO) help to translate NCAR's scientific programs, methodologies, and technologies and their societal benefits to over 80,000 visitors to the NCAR Mesa Laboratory each year, including about 10,000 K-12 students. This is currently accomplished through the implementation of an increasingly integrated system of exhibits, guided tours, an audiotour, programs for school groups, and a teachers' guide to the exhibits, which is currently in development. The Climate Discovery Exhibit unveiled in July 2003 and expanded in 2004 offers visitors visually engaging and informative text panels, graphics, artifacts, and interactives describing Sun-Earth connections, dynamic processes that contribute to and mediate climate change, and the Earth's climate history. The exhibit seeks to help visitors to understand why scientists model the global climate system and how information about past and current climate is used to validate models and build scenarios for Earth's future climate. Exhibit-viewers are challenged to ask questions and reflect upon decision making challenges while considering the roles various natural and human-induced factors play in shaping these predictions. With support from NASA and NCAR, a K-12 Teacher's Guide has been developed corresponding the Climate Discovery exhibit's sections addressing the Sun-Earth connection and past climates (the Little Ice Age, in particular). This presentation will review efforts to identify the challenges of communicating with the public and school groups about climate change, while also describing several successful strategies for utilizing visitor questionnaires and interviews to learn how to develop and refine educational resources that will target their interests, bolster their

  14. Variable Star Astronomy Education & Public Outreach Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Donna L.

    2008-05-01

    The American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO) published a comprehensive variable star curriculum, "Hands-On Astrophysics, Variable Stars in Science, Math, and Computer Education" in 1997. The curriculum, funded by the National Science Foundation, was developed for a comprehensive audience -- amateur astronomers, classroom educators, science fair projects, astronomy clubs, family learning, and anyone interested in learning about variable stars. Some of the activities from the Hands-On Astrophysics curriculum have been incorporated into the educational materials for the Chandra X-Ray Observatory's Educational and Public Outreach (EPO) Office. On two occasions, in 2000 and 2001, triggered by alerts from amateur astronomers, Chandra observed the outburst of the dwarf nova SS Cygni. The cooperation of amateur variable star astronomers and Chandra X-Ray scientists provided proof that the collaboration of amateur and professional astronomers is a powerful tool to study cosmic phenomena. Once again, the Chandra and AAVSO have teamed up -- this time to promote variable star education. The Hands-On Astrophysics curriculum is being re-designed and updated from the original materials to a web-based format. The new version, re-named Variable Star Astronomy, will provide formal and informal educators, and especially amateur astronomers, educational materials to help promote interest in and knowledge of variable stars.

  15. Train Like an Astronaut Educational Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Yamil L.; Lloyd, Charles; Reeves, Katherine M.; Abadie, Laurie J.

    2012-01-01

    In an effort to reduce the incidence of childhood obesity, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), capitalizing on the theme of human spaceflight developed two educational outreach programs for children ages 8-12. To motivate young "fit explorers," the Train Like an Astronaut National (TLA) program and the Mission X: Train Like an Astronaut International Fitness Challenge (MX) were created. Based on the astronauts' physical training, these programs consist of activities developed by educators and experts in the areas of space life sciences and fitness. These Activities address components of physical fitness. The educational content hopes to promote students to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields. At the national level, in partnership with First Lady Michelle Obama's Let?s Move! Initiative, the TLA program consists of 10 physical and 2 educational activities. The program encourages families, schools, and communities to work collaboratively in order to reinforce in children and their families the importance of healthy lifestyle habits In contrast, the MX challenge is a cooperative outreach program involving numerous space agencies and other international partner institutions. During the six-week period, teams of students from around the world are challenged to improve their physical fitness and collectively accumulate points by completing 18 core activities. During the 2011 pilot year, a t otal of 137 teams and more than 4,000 students from 12 countries participated in the event. MX will be implemented within 24 countries during the 2012 challenge. It is projected that 7,000 children will "train like an astronaut".

  16. The Education and Outreach Program of ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    Barnett, M.

    2006-01-01

    The ATLAS Education and Outreach (E&O) program began in 1997, but the advent of LHC has placed a new urgency in our efforts. Even a year away, we can feel the approaching impact of starting an experiment that could make revolutionary discoveries. The public and teachers are beginning to turn their attention our way, and the newsmedia are showing growing interest in ATLAS. When datataking begins, the interest will peak, and the demands on us are likely to be substantial. The collaboration is responding to this challenge in a number of ways. ATLAS management has begun consultation with experts. The official budget for the E&O group has been growing as have the contributions of many ATLAS institutions. The number of collaboration members joining these efforts has grown, and their time and effort is increasing. We are in ongoing consultation with the CERN Public Affairs Office, as well as the other LHC experiments and the European Particle Physics Outreach Group. The E&O group has expanded the scope...

  17. HEP data in education and outreach efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellis, Matt

    2010-02-01

    The High Energy Physics (HEP) community has recognized that data preservation is an important part of our future and has organized an international working committee to address this. Beyond the continued data mining which can take place, there is a great opportunity to use these datasets as teaching tools, both for university students and an interested general public. The BABAR experiment at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory has a dedicated group working on the preservation effort; the education and outreach effort is a significant goal of this group. Retention of knowledge and conceptual understanding is enhanced by active participation in problem solving -- a challenge that can be addressed with more involved projects than currently available to the general public from the HEP outreach centers. We are developing a framework that will make subsets of the BABAR dataset available to others, along with computing tools and tutorials, so that interested parties can work through either parts or the whole of a variety of analyses. With the proper framework, this may be used by other HEP experiments as a way to make their physics available and teachable beyond our community. The scope of this project may be extended to teach the next generation of particle physicists, who may lack immediate data, by providing them with datasets with which to prepare themselves for upcoming experiments. )

  18. Generation Y Student-Teachers' Motivational Factors: Retention Implications for K-12 Educational Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bontempo, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Generation Y represents a growing number of student-teachers who will impact the future of educational practice, yet little research has been conducted for this demographic group. The purpose of this mixed-method study was to identify motivational factors of neophyte teachers and the retention implications these findings had on Kindergarten…

  19. Successful K-12 STEM Education: Identifying Effective Approaches in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Academies Press, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) are cultural achievements that reflect our humanity, power our economy, and constitute fundamental aspects of our lives as citizens, consumers, parents, and members of the workforce. Providing all students with access to quality education in the STEM disciplines is important to our nation's…

  20. Improving Access To, Quality, and the Effectiveness of Digital Tutoring in K-12 Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Patricia; Good, Annalee; Heinrich, Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    There is considerable variation in how providers of digital education describe what they do, their services, how students access services, and what is delivered, complicating efforts to accurately assess its impact. We examine program characteristics of digital tutoring providers using rich, longitudinal observational and interview data and then…

  1. Joint Ventures: An Experiment in Community/Professional Co-Framing in K-12 Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Public Agenda, 2014

    2014-01-01

    What happens when local school leaders sit down to talk with teachers, parents, and other members of the community about the ends and means of local education? Can people bringing different perspectives and experiences to the issue agree on top goals for their communities? Can they settle on needed changes and decide what signifies genuine…

  2. The Effects of State Public K-12 Education Expenditures On Income Distribution. NEA Research Working Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behr, Todd; Christofides, Constantinos; Neelakantan, Pattabiraman

    2004-01-01

    The effects of education on people's income are well documented in the economics literature, and the benefits of investing in human capital--in terms of both higher earnings and of other economic and social benefits--are popular research topics for economists and other social scientists. The present study explores the effects of public education…

  3. The Testing and Militarization of K-12 Education: Eugenic Assault on Urban School Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartlep, Nicholas Daniel

    2010-01-01

    This paper attempts to discuss eugenics in education and how this eugenic legacy continues to haunt American schooling and nonwhite students. Eugenic praxes and pedagogy continue to proliferate inside the American school systems' teachers may be unaware that they are teaching in such a way that maintains this ethos. This paper and seminar's…

  4. Improving Access To, Quality, and the Effectiveness of Digital Tutoring in K-12 Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Patricia; Good, Annalee; Heinrich, Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    There is considerable variation in how providers of digital education describe what they do, their services, how students access services, and what is delivered, complicating efforts to accurately assess its impact. We examine program characteristics of digital tutoring providers using rich, longitudinal observational and interview data and then…

  5. Nutrition Education and Body Mass Index in Grades K-12: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Cayla; Cohen, Deborah; Pribis, Peter; Cerami, Jean

    2017-01-01

    Background: Overweight and obese body mass index (BMI) status affects an increasing number of children in the United States. The school setting has been identified as a focus area to implement obesity prevention programs. Methods: A database search of PubMed, Education Search Complete, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature…

  6. Education/Public Outreach from McDonald Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemenway, M. K.; Preston, S.

    2001-05-01

    The University of Texas at Austin McDonald Observatory has a long history of providing public outreach programs and materials. Each week, StarDate, the daily 2-minute astronomy radio program reaches 3.7 million people and Universo, the Spanish-language version, reaches 1.5 million people. Additionally, a German-language version, Sternzeit, is produced and airs throughout Germany. StarDate and Universo also offer a classroom component that is used by 750 teachers nationally, reaching over 750,000 students. The StarDate magazine has a circulation of 11,000. Over 130,000 visitors come to our remote site in west Texas each year. A new visitor's center, The Texas Astronomy Education Center, is currently under construction and due to open in late 2001. It will allow us to host up to a quarter-million visitors a year. A goal for the Center is to become the hub for K-12 astronomy programs for teachers and students in Texas and to offer programs that align with national standards; these programs will serve a national audience through our websites (http://stardate.org and http://universo.utexas.edu/) and publications.

  7. IMPACT STATEMENTS ON THE K-12 SCIENCE PROGRAM IN THE ENHANCED BASIC EDUCATION CURRICULUM IN PROVINCIAL SCHOOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Grace S. Cabansag,

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The study described the knowledge, observations, benefits, expectations or potentials and sources of misinterpretations on the K-12 science program on its first implementation in selected provincial high schools in the Philippines. The impact statements of teachers, students and parent-respondents were analyzed using thematic content coding technique. Coding frames were constructed by adopting both “a priori” and “in-vivo” codes. The results showed the respondents viewed the K-12 science program as a means of preparing students toward better employment opportunities in the country or abroad. It also reports the program is viewed for holistic development of the 21st century learners equipped with necessary life skills who can contribute for economic and social development of the family and community. The impact statements suggest the need for close monitoring of the program implementation and provision of continuous professional trainings for teachers to clear areas of misinterpretations. Misconceptions on the nature of additional years of study further suggest the provision and wide dissemination of policy standards on employment and education opportunities in the ASEAN Economic Community integration.

  8. French language space science educational outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, I.; Masongsong, E. V.; Connors, M. G.

    2015-12-01

    Athabasca University's AUTUMNX ground-based magnetometer array to measure and report geomagnetic conditions in eastern Canada is located in the heart of French speaking Canada. Through the course of the project, we have had the privilege to partner with schools, universities, astronomy clubs and government agencies across Quebec, all of which operate primarily in French. To acknowledge and serve the needs of our research partners, we have endeavored to produce educational and outreach (EPO) material adapted for francophone audiences with the help of UCLA's department of Earth, Planetary and Space Sciences (EPSS). Not only will this provide greater understanding and appreciation of the geospace environment unique to Quebec and surrounding regions, it strengthens our ties with our francophone, first nations (native Americans) and Inuit partners, trailblazing new paths of research collaboration and inspiring future generations of researchers.

  9. Online Assessment, Measurement and Evaluation Case Studies from Higher Education, K-12 and Corporate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reviewed by Dr. Adnan BOYACI

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available With the revolution occurred in communication technologies at the beginning of 1990’s, network technologies have emerged as the challenging parameters accelerating improvements of instructional technologies. Online classrooms and management of them appeared as a new domain which necessitates a new paradigm different from the classical ones. User and instructor friendly learning context and management systems (LCMS have brought new approaches, techniques and tools for the assessment and measurement processes. These approaches, techniques and tools embedded in LCMS have redefined not only the way teachers teach but also students learn. WebCT, Blackboard and eCollege and many others as the online instructional environments have provided new opportunities to construct a coherent instructional system which has never been used as a unique environment any before. Assessment and measurement have been redefined within this framework. The successes of assessment and measurement methodologies or system inevitably depend on conceptualization and then implementation to different educational settings.

  10. Education and outreach using the falcon telescope network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gresham, Kimberlee C.; Palma, Christopher; Polsgrove, Daniel E.; Chun, Francis K.; Della-Rose, Devin J.; Tippets, Roger D.

    2016-12-01

    The Falcon Telescope Network (FTN) is a global network of small aperture telescopes developed by the Center for Space Situational Awareness Research in the Department of Physics at the United States Air Force Academy (USAFA). Consisting of commercially available equipment, the FTN is a collaborative effort between USAFA and other educational institutions ranging from two- and four-year colleges to major research universities. USAFA provides the equipment (e.g. telescope, mount, camera, filter wheel, dome, weather station, computers and storage devices) while the educational partners provide the building and infrastructure to support an observatory. The user base includes USAFA along with K-12 and higher education faculty and students. The diversity of the users implies a wide variety of observing interests, and thus the FTN collects images on diverse objects, including satellites, galactic and extragalactic objects, and objects popular for education and public outreach. The raw imagery, all in the public domain, will be accessible to FTN partners and will be archived at USAFA. Currently, there are five Falcon telescopes installed, two in Colorado and one each in Pennsylvania, Chile, and Australia. These five telescopes are in various stages of operational capability but all are remotely operable via a remote desktop application. The FTN team has conducted STEM First Light Projects for three of the U.S. observatories, soliciting proposals from middle and high school students and teachers that suggest and then become what is observed as official STEM first-light objects. Students and teachers learn how to write and submit a proposal as well as how telescopes operate and take data, while university-level students at the U.S. Air Force Academy and The Pennsylvania State University learn how to evaluate proposals and provide feedback to the middle and high school students and teachers. In this paper, we present the current status of the FTN, details of and lessons

  11. Education and public outreach of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, B.; /Natl. Tech. U., San Rafael; Snow, G.

    2005-08-01

    The Auger collaboration's broad mission in education, outreach and public relations is coordinated in a separate task. Its goals are to encourage and support a wide range of outreach efforts that link schools and the public with the Auger scientists and the science of cosmic rays, particle physics, and associated technologies. This report focuses on recent activities and future initiatives.

  12. Implementing Successful Geoscience Education and Outreach Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braile, L. W.

    2004-12-01

    Successful geoscience Education and Outreach (E&O) efforts associated with a research program benefit from effective planning and a commitment by scientists/researchers to become more knowledgeable about and involved in education. Several suggested strategies have evolved based on experience in Earth science E&O with K-16 educators and students during the past 10 years. E&O programs and materials should be developed at appropriate levels ("start from where they're at") and utilize information, skills and topics that are most relevant to students and teachers. Hands-on and inquiry-based activities that teach or reinforce fundamental science understanding and skills, while introducing new topics, results and discoveries, are particularly effective. It is useful to design materials that can provide for a range of time commitment, level of technical skills, and effort, so that introductory to in-depth curriculum units can be implemented. Use of the Internet and working with teachers can be effective methods for dissemination and taking advantage of a "multiplying factor". Obtaining feedback and evaluation of the programs and developed materials, and connecting the materials to national or state education standards are also highly recommended. Most importantly, scientists should become more involved in the science education community. Attending and presenting papers at appropriate science education sessions or workshops, or state or national science teacher meetings (the annual National Science Teachers Association convention is an excellent place to start) can be a significant educational experience for the scientist/researcher. Effective geoscience E&O programs have significant potential for enhancing K-16 education and scientific literacy, and can help attract students to the sciences. Perhaps surprisingly, these efforts have substantial positive impact on the scientist/researcher as well.

  13. 美国K-12年级学校体育课程内容体系解析及启示%An analysis of and inspirations from the American K-12 physical education curriculum content system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    殷荣宾; 季浏; 蔡赓

    2016-01-01

    分析美国 K-12年级学校体育课程内容体系,对其运动项目课程内容、运动技能课程内容和体育德育课程内容进行概述和解析,并归纳其主要特点为:依据体育素养构建课程内容;强调运动技能课程内容的递进与衔接;重视体育德育课程内容的渗透与融合;建立体育课程内容的更新机制和环境。我国可借鉴美国构建学校体育课程内容体系的经验,结合深化学校体育课程改革的现实需求,构建具有中国特色的基础教育体育课程内容体系。%The authors analyzed the American K-12 physical education curriculum content system, gave an over-view and analysis of its sports event curriculum contents, sports skill curriculum contents and sports moral educa-tion curriculum contents, and summarized its main characteristics as follows: emphasizing the progression and con-nection of sport skill curriculum contents based on sports makings building curriculum contents; valuing the per-meation and fusion of sports moral education curriculum contents; establishing a physical education curriculum content renewing mechanism and environment. China can build a physical education (in basic education) curricu-lum content system with Chinese features by referring to the United States’ beneficial experience in building a school physical education curriculum content system, coupled with the realistic need for deepening school physical education curriculum reform.

  14. The Arctic Climate Modeling Program: K-12 Geoscience Professional Development for Rural Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, K. B.

    2009-12-01

    Helping teachers and students connect with scientists is the heart of the Arctic Climate Modeling Program (ACMP), funded from 2005-09 by the National Science Foundation’s Innovative Technology Experience for Students and Teachers. ACMP offered progressive yearlong science, technology and math (STM) professional development that prepared teachers to train youth in workforce technologies used in Arctic research. ACMP was created for the Bering Strait School District, a geographically isolated area with low standardized test scores, high dropout rates, and poverty. Scientists from around the globe have converged in this region and other areas of the Arctic to observe and measure changes in climate that are significant, accelerating, and unlike any in recorded history. Climate literacy (the ability to understand Earth system science and to make scientifically informed decisions about climate changes) has become essential for this population. Program resources were designed in collaboration with scientists to mimic the processes used to study Arctic climate. Because the Bering Strait School District serves a 98 percent Alaska Native student population, ACMP focused on best practices shown to increase the success of minority students. Significant research indicates that Alaska Native students succeed academically at higher rates when instruction addresses topics of local interest, links education to the students’ physical and cultural environment, uses local knowledge and culture in the curriculum, and incorporates hands-on, inquiry-based lessons in the classroom. A seven-partner consortium of research institutes and Alaska Native corporations created ACMP to help teachers understand their role in nurturing STM talent and motivating students to explore geoscience careers. Research underscores the importance of increasing school emphasis in content areas, such as climate, that facilitate global awareness and civic responsibility, and that foster critical thinking and

  15. NASA Sounding Rocket Program educational outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberspeaker, P. J.

    2005-08-01

    Educational and public outreach is a major focus area for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The NASA Sounding Rocket Program (NSRP) shares in the belief that NASA plays a unique and vital role in inspiring future generations to pursue careers in science, mathematics, and technology. To fulfill this vision, the NASA Sounding Rocket Program engages in a host of student flight projects providing unique and exciting hands-on student space flight experiences. These projects include single stage Orion missions carrying "active" high school experiments and "passive" Explorer School modules, university level Orion and Terrier-Orion flights, and small hybrid rocket flights as part of the Small-scale Educational Rocketry Initiative (SERI) currently under development. Efforts also include educational programs conducted as part of major campaigns. The student flight projects are designed to reach students ranging from Kindergarteners to university undergraduates. The programs are also designed to accommodate student teams with varying levels of technical capabilities - from teams that can fabricate their own payloads to groups that are barely capable of drilling and tapping their own holes. The program also conducts a hands-on student flight project for blind students in collaboration with the National Federation of the Blind. The NASA Sounding Rocket Program is proud of its role in inspiring the "next generation of explorers" and is working to expand its reach to all regions of the United States and the international community as well.

  16. Education and Outreach for Volunteer Planetary Defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, J. D.

    2016-12-01

    When a large meteor exploded over Chelyabinsk in 2013, people saw the bright flash and rushed to windows. Then the blast wave hit and many were injured by flying glass fragments. Education about airbursts might have reduced the casualties. Education and Public Outreach (EPO) can also be important in broadening public involvement in preparations for dealing with cosmic hazards. Amateur astronomers have an important role in discovering potentially hazardous asteroids and comets, and also in making follow-up observations after discovery. This is especially important for Southern Hemisphere observing sites where professional observers are relatively few. The Planetary Society makes small Shoemaker grants to aid amateur astronomers in this work. Much more could be done if educators, students and the general public were aware of the opportunity and the need. Beyond this, public engagement is essential to raise and maintain support for active agencies, including the UN-sponsored International Asteroid Warning Network (IAWN) and Space Mission Planning Advisory Group (SMPAG). This paper will describe and advocate EPO efforts in support of these and other Volunteer Planetary Defense activities.

  17. Teaching K-12 teachers and students about nanoscale science through microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Nancy

    2014-09-01

    The National Nanotechnology Infrastructure Network (NNIN) is an integrated partnership of 14 universities across the US funded by NSF to support nanoscale researchers. NNIN's education and outreach programs are large and varied and includes outreach to the K-12 community in the form of professional development workshops and school programs. Two important components of nanoscale science education are understanding size and scale and the tools used in nanoscale science and engineering (NSE). As part of our K-12 endeavors, we educate K-12 students and teachers about the tools of nanoscience by providing experiences with the Hitachi TM 3000 tabletop Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). There are three of these across the network that are used in education and outreach. This paper will discuss approaches we use to engage the K-12 community at NNIN's site at Georgia Institute of Technology to understand size and scale and the applications of a variety of microscopes to demonstrate the imaging capabilities of these to see both the micro and nano scales. We not only use the tabletop SEM but also include USB digital microscopes, a Keyence VHX- 600 Digital Microscope, and even a small lens used with smart phones. The goal of this outreach is to educate students as well as teachers about the capabilities of the various instruments and their importance at different size scales.

  18. Renewable Microgrid STEM Education & Colonias Outreach Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2015-04-01

    To provide Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) outreach and education to secondary students to encourage them to select science and engineering as a career by providing an engineering-based problem-solving experience involving renewable energy systems such as photovoltaic (PV) panels or wind turbines. All public and private schools, community colleges, and vocational training programs would be eligible for participation. The Power Microgrids High School Engineering Experience used renewable energy systems (PV and wind) to provide a design capstone experience to secondary students. The objective for each student team was to design a microgrid for the student’s school using renewable energy sources under cost, schedule, performance, and risk constraints. The students then implemented their designs in a laboratory environment to evaluate the completeness of the proposed design, which is a unique experience even for undergraduate college students. This application-based program was marketed to secondary schools in the 28th Congressional District through the Texas Education Agency’s (TEA) Regional Service Centers. Upon application, TEES identified regionally available engineers to act as mentors and supervisors for the projects. Existing curriculum was modified to include microgrid and additional renewable technologies and was made available to the schools.

  19. Developing an Education and Public Outreach (EPO) program for Caltech's Tectonics Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalenko, L.; Jain, K.; Maloney, J.

    2012-12-01

    The Caltech Tectonics Observatory (TO) is an interdisciplinary center, focused on geological processes occurring at the boundaries of Earth's tectonic plates (http://www.tectonics.caltech.edu). Over the past four years, the TO has made a major effort to develop an Education and Public Outreach (EPO) program. Our goals are to (1) inspire students to learn Earth Sciences, particularly tectonic processes, (2) inform and educate the general public about science in the context of TO discoveries, and (3) provide opportunities for graduate students, postdocs, and faculty to do outreach in the local K-12 schools and community colleges. Our work toward these goals includes hosting local high school teachers and students each summer for six weeks of research experience (as part of Caltech's "Summer Research Connection"); organizing and hosting an NAGT conference aimed at Geoscience teachers at community colleges; participating in teacher training workshops (organized by the local school district); hosting tours for K-12 students from local schools as well as from China; and bringing hands-on activities into local elementary, middle, and high school classrooms. We also lead local school students and teachers on geology field trips through nearby canyons; develop education modules for undergraduate classes (as part of MARGINS program); write educational web articles on TO research (http://www.tectonics.caltech.edu/outreach/highlights/), and regularly give presentations to the general public. This year, we started providing content expertise for the development of video games to teach Earth Science, being created by GameDesk Institute. And we have just formed a scientist/educator partnership with a 6th grade teacher, to help in the school district's pilot program to incorporate new national science standards (NSTA's Next Generation Science Standards, current draft), as well as use Project-Based Learning. This presentation gives an overview of these activities.

  20. Science Educational Outreach Programs That Benefit Students and Scientists

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Clark, Greg; Russell, Josh; Enyeart, Peter; Gracia, Brant; Wessel, Aimee; Jarmoskaite, Inga; Polioudakis, Damon; Stuart, Yoel; Gonzalez, Tony; MacKrell, Al; Rodenbusch, Stacia; Stovall, Gwendolyn M; Beckham, Josh T; Montgomery, Michael; Tasneem, Tania; Jones, Jack; Simmons, Sarah; Roux, Stanley

    2016-01-01

    Both scientists and the public would benefit from improved communication of basic scientific research and from integrating scientists into education outreach, but opportunities to support these efforts are limited...

  1. Foundations in Student Services and Special Education Administration: A Pedagogical Process to Promote Leadership for Social Justice in K-12 Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frattura, Elise M.

    2006-01-01

    This article focuses from a critical perspective on the pedagogical foundations of a course on educational leadership of student services and special education administration. Additionally, it explores the ability of teaching the "practical application" of administering K-12 special education and student services using critical discourse…

  2. Teaching for Transformation: Engaging a Christian Worldview in Teacher Education Courses to Address K-12 Social Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crenshaw, Christina Y.

    2013-01-01

    How faculty at Christian universities encourage teacher candidates to draw on a Christian worldview ultimately influences the ways teacher candidates become effective agents of change in K-12 schools. This study examined the assumption that K-12 Christian teachers cannot remain religiously neutral since one's worldview shapes all aspects of life,…

  3. Technical Education Outreach in Materials Science and Technology Based on NASA's Materials Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, James A.

    2003-01-01

    The grant NAG-1 -2125, Technical Education Outreach in Materials Science and Technology, based on NASA s Materials Research, involves collaborative effort among the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s Langley Research Center (NASA-LaRC), Norfolk State University (NSU), national research centers, private industry, technical societies, colleges and universities. The collaboration aims to strengthen math, science and technology education by providing outreach related to materials science and technology (MST). The goal of the project is to transfer new developments from LaRC s Center for Excellence for Structures and Materials and other NASA materials research into technical education across the nation to provide educational outreach and strengthen technical education. To achieve this goal we are employing two main strategies: 1) development of the gateway website and 2) using the National Educators Workshop: Update in Engineering Materials, Science and Technology (NEW:Updates). We have also participated in a number of national projects, presented talks at technical meetings and published articles aimed at improving k-12 technical education. Through the three years of this project the NSU team developed the successful MST-Online site and continued to upgrade and update it as our limited resources permitted. Three annual NEW:Updates conducted from 2000 though 2002 overcame the challenges presented first by the September 11,2001 terrorist attacks and the slow U.S. economy and still managed to conduct very effective workshops and expand our outreach efforts. Plans began on NEW:Update 2003 to be hosted by NASA Langley as a part of the celebration of the Centennial of Controlled Flight.

  4. Education and Public Outreach at the American Astronomical Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fienberg, R. T.

    2011-09-01

    Recently the Council of the American Astronomical Society (AAS) adopted its first-ever mission-and-vision statement. Independently, the Astronomy Education Board (AEB), which has oversight of the Society's educational activities, adopted new goals for the AAS education program. Much of the responsibility for aligning the AAS mission-and-vision statement and AEB goals and implementing them is vested in a new position: AAS Press Officer and Education and Outreach Coordinator. Here I describe the AAS's priorities for education and public outreach and explain how they are being, or will be, achieved.

  5. Assessing the Impact of a Statewide STEM Investment on K-12, Higher Education, and Business/Community STEM Awareness over Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sondergeld, Toni A.; Johnson, Carla C.; Walten, Janet B.

    2016-01-01

    Despite monetary and educational investments in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) being at record high levels, little attention has been devoted to generating a common understanding of STEM. In addition, working with business, K-12 schools, and/or institutions of higher education to establish a grassroots effort to help…

  6. OUTREACH

    CERN Multimedia

    E. Gibney

    Feedback from users on the new CMS Outreach web site has been very encouraging, with a large majority of people finding the new navigation scheme and content clear and easy to use. Suggestions concerning content (in particular) are always welcome. Please send them to: outreach@cern.ch Compared with the LHC startup and mass media attention of the 10th September, the Official Inauguration of the LHC on the 21st October was a relatively subdued event. Even so, many VIPs visited the CMS experimental cavern and were left feeling awed and inspired. The ceremony itself, in the SM18 area at CERN (where all the dipoles were tested) was followed by a tour around a temporary exhibition area in the same building, where pieces of CMS were on display. These were accompanied by films of the lowering operations and preliminary versions of the "virtual reality" images from Peter McReady (soon to be available on the CMS Outreach web site), both of which were well received by the audience. Many thanks to th...

  7. 25 CFR 166.904 - What is agriculture education outreach?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... post-secondary mathematics and science courses; (2) Promote agriculture career awareness; (3) Involve... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What is agriculture education outreach? 166.904 Section... Agriculture Education, Education Assistance, Recruitment, and Training § 166.904 What is agriculture...

  8. Getting to Yes: Supporting Scientists in Education and Public Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhr, S. M.; Lynds, S. E.; Smith, L. K.

    2011-12-01

    Research scientists are busy people, with many demands on their time and few institutional rewards for engagement in education and public outreach (EPO). However, scientist involvement in education has been called for by funding agencies, education researchers and the scientific organizations. In support of this idea, educators consistently rate interaction with scientists as the most meaningful element of an outreach project. What factors help scientists become engaged in EPO, and why do scientists stay engaged? This presentation describes the research-based motivations and barriers for scientists to be engaged in EPO, presents strategies for overcoming barriers, and describes elements of EPO that encourage and support scientist engagement.

  9. NASA's SMD Cross-Forum Resources for Supporting Scientist Engagement in Education and Public Outreach Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxner, S.; Cobabe-Ammann, E. A.; Hsu, B. C.; Sharma, M.; Peticolas, L. M.; Schwerin, T. G.; Shipp, S. S.; Smith, D.

    2012-12-01

    Sharing the excitement of ongoing scientific discoveries is an important aspect of scientific activity for researchers. Directly engaging scientists in education and public outreach (E/PO) activities has the benefit of directly connecting the public to those who engage in scientific activities. A shortage of training in education methods, public speaking, and working with various public audiences increases barriers to engaging scientists in these types in E/PO activities. NASA's Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Education and Public forums (astrophysics, earth science, heliophysics, and planetary science) support scientists currently involved in E/PO and who are interested in becoming involved in E/PO through a variety of avenues. Over the past three years, the forums have developed a variety of resources to help engage scientists in education and public outreach. We will showcase the following resources developed through the SMD E/PO cross-forum efforts: Professional development resources for writing NASA SMD E/PO proposals (webinars and other online tools), ongoing professional development at scientific conferences to increase scientist engagement in E/PO activities, toolkits for scientists interested in best practices in E/PO (online guides for K-12 education and public outreach), toolkits to inform scientists of science education resources developed within each scientific thematic community, EarthSpace (a community web space where instructors can find and share about teaching space and earth sciences in the undergraduate classroom, including class materials news and funding opportunities, and the latest education research, http://www.lpi.usra.edu/earthspace/), thematic resources for teaching about SMD science topics, and an online database of scientists interested in connecting with education programs. Learn more about the Forum and find resources at http://smdepo.org/.

  10. Engaging the Geodetic and Geoscience Communities in EarthScope Education and Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlevoix, D. J.; Berg, M.; Morris, A. R.; Olds, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    UNAVCO is NSF's geodetic facility and operates as a university-governed consortium dedicated to facilitating geoscience research and education, including the support of EarthScope. The Education and Community Engagement program at UNAVCO provides support for broader impacts both externally to the broader University and EarthScope community as well as internally to the UNAVCO. During the first 10 years of EarthScope UNAVCO has engaged in outreach and education activities across the EarthScope footprint ranging from outreach to formal and informal educators and interpreters, to technical training for university faculty and researchers. UNAVCO works jointly with the EarthScope National Office and IRIS while simultaneously maintaining and developing an independent engagement and education program. UNAVCO provides training in the form of technical short courses to researchers including graduate students and early-career professionals, and conducts educational workshops for K-12 educators. A suite of educational materials focused on the integration of EarthScope data into curriculum materials is available from UNAVCO and will soon expand the undergraduate offerings to include a broader suite of geodesy applications activities for undergraduate students. UNAVCO provides outreach materials and in support of EarthScope including summaries of research project and campaign highlights, science snapshots featuring summaries of scientific advancements made possible by UNAVCO services and non-technical communications via social media. UNAVCO also provides undergraduate students exposure to EarthScope science research participation in a year-long research internship managed by UNAVCO (Research Experiences in Solid Earth Science for Students - RESESS).

  11. Investigating the criteria and processes used in the selection, implementation, and evaluation of STEM within K-12 education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delp, Matthew J.

    This study utilized survey research to investigate how school districts within K-12 education select, implement, and evaluate Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) programs. Thirty school districts within the Math and Science Collaborative located in Western Pennsylvania participated in this research. In addition to characterizing the STEM programs of the participating school districts, this study also analyzed the alignment of these programs to the components of comprehensive STEM programs and critical approaches to substantiate STEM program implementation as stated in the literature (Augustine, 2005; Bybee, 2010a, 2010b; Carnevale et al., 2011; DeJarnette, 2010; Epstein & Miller, 2011b; Gardner et al., 1983; Hossain & Robinson, 2011, 2012; Kuenzi, 2008). Findings suggest that the primary goal for school districts, as it relates to STEM program implementation, is to influence students' interest and pursuit of STEM-related careers and degrees. In order to achieve this goal, results of this study indicate the focus of STEM program implementation occurs with the greatest frequency at the middle school (grades seven and eight) level, are developed as an adaptation to the curriculum, and are very diverse from one school district to the next. In addition, findings suggest that although school districts maintain they aim to promote careers and degrees in STEM, districts rely on traditional methods of evaluating STEM program implementation (i.e. standardized test scores) and do not track the longitudinal impact their STEM programs as they related to degrees and careers in STEM. Furthermore, results indicate district STEM programs are not aligned to the characteristics of comprehensive STEM programs as defined by the literature. In order to address the misalignment of school district goals and evaluation processes involved in STEM program implementation and the absence of the characteristics commensurate with comprehensive STEM programs, this study has

  12. Teacher education professionals as partners in health science outreach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houtz, Lynne E; Kosoko-Lasaki, Omofolasade; Zardetto-Smith, Andrea M; Mu, Keli; Royeen, Charlotte B

    2004-01-01

    Medical school and other health science outreach programs to educate and recruit precollege students always have relied on successful collaborative efforts. Creighton University shares the value, significance, and strategies of involving teacher education professionals in several of its current outreach programs, including HPPI, Brains Rule! Neuroscience Expositions, and HHMI Build a Human Project. The education department partner serves as an essential team member in the development, implementation, assessment, and dissemination of these projects to promote science and mathematics achievement and interest in medical careers. Specific examples and mistakes to avoid are included.

  13. Education and public outreach on gravitational-wave astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, M.; Bradaschia, C.; Audley, H.; Barke, S.; Blair, D. G.; Christensen, N.; Danzmann, K.; Freise, A.; Gerberding, O.; Knispel, B.; Lieser, M.; Mandel, I.; Moore, T.; Stuver, A.; Whiting, B.

    2014-08-01

    In this paper we summarise the presentations given during the "Education and Public Outreach on Gravitational-Wave Astronomy" parallel session at the GR-20/Amaldi conference, held in Warsaw, July 2013. The talks presented demonstrate the wide range of education and public outreach activities being undertaken in the field of gravitational-wave astronomy—across science festivals, science education centers, junior schools and high schools, colleges and universities, via both face-to-face delivery and (increasingly) the internet and social media.

  14. Using sediment transport and river restoration to link research and education, and promote K-12 female involvement in STEM fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager, E. M.; Bradley-Eitel, K.

    2011-12-01

    raft trip. The girls also met with women working in various STEM careers as part of an evening program and afterwards indicated that the raft trip and career night were highlights of the program. A key reason for the success of this camp was working with an already established outdoor science school that focuses on teaching scientific inquiry to K-12 students. Finally, we are establishing a permanent field installation of bedload sediment traps, suspended sediment monitoring, and flow measurements in Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed, a USDA research site just outside of Boise, Idaho. This site will be used to better understand the mechanics of sediment transport in steep streams and will be linked to teaching through graduate class and general public field trips.

  15. Introducing Extension/Outreach Education in Tajikistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Julie A.; Prochaska-Cue, Kathleen; Rockwell, S. Kay; Pulatov, Pulat A.

    2010-01-01

    University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL) and Khujand branch of the Technological University of Tajikistan (KbTUT) collaborated on the development of an Extension/outreach program in Tajikistan. Fifteen KbTUT administrators, faculty, and students from textiles, food science, and management engaged in training sessions at UNL on entrepreneurship, adult…

  16. OUTREACH

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Barney

    The main emphasis for the coming months is clearly the Open Days of April 5th and 6th, in all likelihood the last opportunities that visitors will get to see the LHC underground installations. Tens of thousands of visitors are expected, especially on Sunday 6th - the Open Day for the General Public. As announced recently in a mail to the collaboration, CMS collaborators are encouraged to sign-up to be guides. If you are interested in doing this, please contact Catherine Brandt. In addition to guides, we require introductory talks to be given at point 5 and are looking for volunteers (many thanks to those of you who have already volunteered!). If you are interested, please send an email to outreach@cern.ch stating the languages you prefer and your availability on the 6th between 9am and 7pm. The CMS Outreach team has been significantly strengthened recently with the arrival of journalist Elizabeth "Lizzie" Gibney. One of her main tasks over the coming months will be to interview many of you...

  17. OUTREACH

    CERN Multimedia

    E. Gibney D. Barney

    The two core activities of the Outreach group are the continued production of the CMS Times and the evolution of the Outreach web site. Although the former began life as a publication for CMS members it is increasingly being viewed by the public, as evidenced by the external subscribers (nearly 400) and the fact that it is one of the most popular sections of the web-site, with tens of thousands of hits every month. Indeed a statistical analysis of our web-site is underway and already we know that it is host to around 11000 distinct visitors per month with more than half a million pages being viewed! Recent additions to the web-site include several new "virtual reality" movies of CMS underground - ideal for presentations to the public etc. A big effort is also being made to archive the thousands of superb images of CMS taken over the years and our team have recently been interacting with the CERN "CDS" team in order to achieve this in the most efficient way possible. The CDS...

  18. Education and public outreach at the SIRTF science center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daou, D.

    2002-01-01

    Communicating the world of infrared astronomy to the public is the main vocation of the Education and Public Outreach Office of the SIRTF Science Center; but certainly not its only goal. In the past few years we have created a wide variety of educational products that explains the infrared as well as the multi-wavelength universe.

  19. The Engagement of Engineers in Education and Public Outreach: Beginning the Conversation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grier, J.; Buxner, S.; Vezino, B.; Shipp, S. S.

    2014-12-01

    The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) are a new set of K-12 science standards that have been developed through a collaborative, state-led process. Based on the National Research Council (NRC) 'Framework for K-12 Education,' the NGSS are designed to provide all students with a coherent education possessing both robust content and rigorous practice. Within these standards is an enhanced emphasis on the intersection between science and engineering. The focus is not only on asking questions and finding answers (science) but also in identifying and designing solution to problems (engineering.) The NASA SMD (Science Mission Directorate) Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) Forums have been working with space scientists for many years to assist with their engagement in E/PO efforts, thus supporting the needs of previous science standards. In order to properly address the needs of NGSS, this conversation is being expanded to include engineers. Our initial efforts include a series of semi-structured interviews with a dozen engineers involved in different aspects of space science and mission development. We will present the responses from the survey and compare this information to our knowledge base about space scientists, their needs, attitudes, and understandings of E/PO. In addition to a new emphasis on engineering in the NGSS, we also consider engineering habits of mind such as systems thinking, creativity, optimism, collaboration, communication, and attention to ethical considerations as described by an NRC policy document for engineering education. Using the overall results, we will consider strategies, further ideas for investigation, and possible steps for going forward with this important aspect of including engineering in education and outreach programming.

  20. Impact of National Physical Activity and Health Guidelines and Documents on Research on Teaching K-12 Physical Education in U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weidong; Xiang, Ping; Gao, Zan; Shen, Bo; Yin, Zhihua; Kong, Qingtao

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the impact of published national physical activity (PA) and health guidelines, documents, and initiatives on the evolution of research on teaching K-12 physical education (PE) in U.S.A. from 1996 to October 2013. Methods: A total of 262 peer-reviewed, data-based journal articles meeting our inclusion and exclusion…

  1. Comparing Academic Library Spending with Public Libraries, Public K-12 Schools, Higher Education Public Institutions, and Public Hospitals between 1998-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regazzi, John J.

    2012-01-01

    This study compares the overall spending trends and patterns of growth of Academic Libraries with Public Libraries, K-12 schools, higher education institutions, and hospitals in the period of 1998 to 2008. Academic Libraries, while showing a growth of 13% over inflation for the period, far underperformed the growth of the other public institutions…

  2. K-12 Science Education Linked to Mars and the MER Mission: A New Curriculum Entitled Making Tracks on Mars Teacher Resource and Activity Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubele, J. C.; Stanley, J.; Grochowski, A.; Jones, K.; Aragon, J.

    2006-03-01

    Students' interest in Mars can be used as a "hook" to teach a wide range of topics. Mars-related science is used as the basis of a new K-12 integrated curriculum created by the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and classroom educators.

  3. Comparing Academic Library Spending with Public Libraries, Public K-12 Schools, Higher Education Public Institutions, and Public Hospitals between 1998-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regazzi, John J.

    2012-01-01

    This study compares the overall spending trends and patterns of growth of Academic Libraries with Public Libraries, K-12 schools, higher education institutions, and hospitals in the period of 1998 to 2008. Academic Libraries, while showing a growth of 13% over inflation for the period, far underperformed the growth of the other public institutions…

  4. Education and Professional Outreach as an Integrated Component of Science and Graduate Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staudigel, H.; Koppers, A. A.

    2007-12-01

    Education and Professional Outreach (EPO) is increasingly becoming a substantive and much needed activity for scientists. Significant efforts are expended to satisfy funding agency requirements, but such requirements may also develop into a mutually beneficial collaboration between scientists and K-16 educators with a minimal impact on science productivity. We focus here on two particularly high impact EPO opportunities, hosting of high school interns and the inclusion of an educational component to a graduate student's&pthesis work. We emphasize the importance of hands-on collaboration with teachers and teacher-educators, and the substantive benefits of highly leveraged customized internet-distribution. We will present two examples for how we integrated this K-12 EPO into our university-based science and education efforts, what types of products emerged from these activities, and how such products may be widely produced by any scientist and disseminated to the educational community. High school seniors offer a unique resource to university EPO because some of them can substantively contribute to the science, and they can be very effective peer-mentors for high and middle schools. Extended internships may be built easily into the schedule of many senior high school student programs, and we were able to involve such interns into a three-week seagoing expedition. The seniors were responsible for our EPO by maintaining a cruise website and video conferencing with their high school. They added substantially to the science outcome, through programming and participating in a range of shipboard science chores. Graduate theses may be augmented with an educational component that places the main theme of the thesis into an educational setting. We designed and supervised such a Master's graduate thesis with an educational component on the geochronology of hot spot volcanoes, including a high school lesson plan, enactment in the classroom and preparation of a wide range of web

  5. Sustaining educational and public outreach programs in astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Clarkson, William I; Swift, Carrie M; Rasmussen, Eric J; Matzke, David; Murrell, Steven R; LoPresto, Michael C; Campbell, Timothy; Clubb, Robert; Salliotte, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    We advocate meaningful support of sustained education-outreach partnerships between regional metropolitan undergraduate institutions and astronomical clubs and societies. We present our experience as an example, in which we have grown a partnership between the University of Michigan-Dearborn (hereafter UM-D, a 4-year primarily undergraduate institution or PUI), Henry Ford College (hereafter HFC, a 2-year undergraduate college), and maintained a strong collaboration with the Ford Amateur Astronomy Club (FAAC), which is highly active in the Detroit Metropolitan Area. By allowing each organization to play to its strengths, we have developed a continuum of education-outreach efforts at all levels, with connecting tissue between the previously disparate efforts. To-date, faculty and staff effort on these initiatives has been nearly entirely voluntary and somewhat ad-hoc. Here we suggest an initiative to sustain the continuum of education-outreach for the long-term. There are two levels to the suggested initiative....

  6. Effective Tools and Resources from the MAVEN Education and Public Outreach Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, T.

    2015-12-01

    Since 2010, NASA's Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) team has developed and implemented a robust and varied suite of projects, serving audiences of all ages and diverse backgrounds from across the country. With a program designed to reach formal K-12 educators and students, afterschool and summertime communities, museum docents, journalists, and online audiences, we have incorporated an equally varied approach to developing tools, resources, and evaluation methods to specifically reach each target population and to determine the effectiveness of our efforts. This poster will highlight some of the tools and resources we have developed to share the complex science and engineering of the MAVEN mission, as well as initial evaluation results and lessons-learned from each of our E/PO projects.

  7. US K-12 Blended and Online Education in a Global Context:The Present and the Future%全球视野下美国K-12混合与在线教育的现状与未来--与K-12在线教育国际联盟副主席艾雷森·鲍威尔博士的学术对话

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘晓琳; 胡永斌; 黄荣怀; 艾雷森·鲍威尔

    2015-01-01

    The wave of blended and online education is hitting K-12 education and triggering a revolution in K-12 education system in an unprecedented way. Keeping informed of present status and development trend of the global K-12 blended and online education is of vital practical significance to the current system revolution in China's K-12 education. The interview takes the present and the future of K-12 blended and online learning as a thread, and explores key issues in depth such as the development and openness model of e-resources, the market mechanism, the achievement-based funding model, the teacher training, and etc. In America, as well as many countries in the world, the role that market plays in K-12 education in satisfying learners' needs and providing quality service by promoting competition should be highly valued;achievement-based funding model is a beneficial practice that government could adopt in K-12 blended and online learning;most students prefer blended learning to full online learning, while full online learning is more likely to be adopted by the students who have special needs;the balance of educational resources, policy and funding support, teacher training as well as the leadership in ICT integrated into classroom are identified as the crucial issues that will affect the sustaining development of K-12 online and blended learning.%混合与在线教育的浪潮正以前所未有的方式引发K-12教育系统的变革,认识国际K-12混合与在线教育的推进现状并把握其未来发展趋势,对于我国基础教育教学改革具有重要现实意义。美国K-12在线教育国际联盟副主席艾雷森·鲍威尔博士围绕K-12混合与在线教育的现状和未来发展趋势,重点探讨了数字化教育资源的开发和共享模式、市场机制、资助模式、教师发展培训等普遍性和根本性问题。在美国及全球多个国家,K-12混合与在线教育在教育市场中利用竞争优势满足了受教育

  8. Increasing the Number of Underrepresented Minorities in Astronomy Through K-12 Education and Public Outreach (Paper II)

    CERN Document Server

    Norman, Dara; NSHP,; Agueros, Marcel; Anderson, Scott F; Baker, Andrew; Burgasser, Adam; Cruz, Kelle; Ernst, David J; Gawiser, Eric; Krishnamurthi, Anita; Lee, Hyun-chul; Mighell, Kenneth; McGruder, Charles; Sakimoto, Philip J; Sheth, Kartik; Soderblom, Dave; Strauss, Michael; Walter, Donald; West, Andrew; Agol, UW Pre-Map staff - Eric; Murphy, Jeremiah; Garner, Sarah; Bellovary, Jill; Schmidt, Sarah; Cowan, Nick; Gogarten, Stephanie; Stilp, Adrienne; Christensen, Charlotte; Hilton, Eric; Haggard, Daryl; Rosenfield, Sarah Loebman Phil; Munshi, Ferah

    2009-01-01

    In order to attract, recruit and retain underrepresented minority students to pursue Astronomy and related fields, we must ensure that there continues to be a well qualified pool of graduate and undergraduate students from which to recruit. This required pool of people are today's elementary, middle and high school students. The Astronomy community must be proactive in demonstrating the importance of pursing scientific study and careers to these students and their parents. Only by actively engaging these communities can U.S Astronomy hope to increase the numbers of minority PhDs and continue to be a leader in Astronomical discovery and knowledge.

  9. Workforce Education Models for K-12 STEM Education Programs: Reflections on, and Implications for, the NSF ITEST Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reider, David; Knestis, Kirk; Malyn-Smith, Joyce

    2016-12-01

    This article proposes a STEM workforce education logic model, tailored to the particular context of the National Science Foundation's Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST) program. This model aims to help program designers and researchers address challenges particular to designing, implementing, and studying education innovations in the ITEST program, considering ongoing needs and challenges in STEM workforce education in the USA. It is grounded in conceptual frameworks developed previously by teams of ITEST constituents, for their part intended to frame STEM career education, consider how people select and prepare for STEM careers, and reinforce the important distinction between STEM content and STEM career learnings. The authors take a first step in what they hope will be an ongoing discussion and research agenda by test-fitting assumptions of the model to exploratory case studies of recent NSF ITEST projects. Brief implications for future research and other considerations are provided.

  10. Workforce Education Models for K-12 STEM Education Programs: Reflections on, and Implications for, the NSF ITEST Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reider, David; Knestis, Kirk; Malyn-Smith, Joyce

    2016-07-01

    This article proposes a STEM workforce education logic model, tailored to the particular context of the National Science Foundation's Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST) program. This model aims to help program designers and researchers address challenges particular to designing, implementing, and studying education innovations in the ITEST program, considering ongoing needs and challenges in STEM workforce education in the USA. It is grounded in conceptual frameworks developed previously by teams of ITEST constituents, for their part intended to frame STEM career education, consider how people select and prepare for STEM careers, and reinforce the important distinction between STEM content and STEM career learnings. The authors take a first step in what they hope will be an ongoing discussion and research agenda by test-fitting assumptions of the model to exploratory case studies of recent NSF ITEST projects. Brief implications for future research and other considerations are provided.

  11. OUTREACH

    CERN Document Server

    David Barney

    The past three months have been very eventful for the CMS Outreach team. The majority of our efforts have concentrated on the update of the public web site at http://www.cern.ch/cmsinfo which was released to the public in time for the first LHC circulating beams. Congratulations in particular to Marzena Lapka and Lizzie Gibney for the excellent job that they have done. The layout of the new site roughly follows that of the main CERN public web site, a decision made long ago so that surfers do not feel lost when they jump from CERN to CMS. Both ALICE and LHCb also made this decision (after us!). The text of the new pages was made after interviewing many CMS collaborators, so has a very human feel to it. The site has been very well received by the community and the public/press alike. This is of course a first version so there will be more to come in the future, and comments are more than welcome. The 10th September is a date that few of us will forget. The world media (represented by nearly 300 journalists!...

  12. OUTREACH

    CERN Multimedia

    David Barney

    The highlight for CMS Outreach during the past few months was of course the CERN Open Days on 5th and 6th April. Of the 73000 people who came to CERN during that weekend more than 10000 visited CMS in the cavern, thanks to an incredible logistical effort from many members of CMS. The underground visit was only one of several activites at point 5. Others included a picture gallery (with huge thanks to Michael Hoch), an artwork corner for children, a working spark chamber and regular demonstrations of cryogenics (many thanks to Goran Perinic) and photogrammetry (thanks to Christian Lasseur et al). There were also well-attended public presentations on Particle Physics, CERN and CMS as well as a visit of "Fred" from the popular French television show "C'est pas Sorcier". A souvenir kiosk was also a popular attraction, selling CMS tee-shirts, polo-shirts, baseball caps and keyrings, amongst other items. These things are available to purchase from the CMS Secretariat in build...

  13. OUTREACH

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Barney

    The new underground visit itinerary to CMS was official¬ly launched during the summer. Many hundreds of people from far and near have already been into the caverns and all come away feeling excited and awed. The visitors gallery on the surface has also seen some improvements, including pieces of equipment from most CMS sub-detectors. At the beginning of this CMS week the gallery will receive a further addition - a cosmic ray detector. This detector was made by high school students associated to the US "Quarknet" program and it is these students, together with Dan Karmgard (US-CMS Outreach Coor¬dinator), who will install and commission it at point 5. The other main activity (apart from the CMS Times of course, which recently celebrated it's 1st anniversary!) is with the development of a new CMS public web site. This is needed for many reasons - not least because much of the content of the existing web site is outdated. The look and feel of the new site will be similar to tha...

  14. OUTREACH

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Barney

    The new underground visit itinerary to CMS was officially launched during the summer. Many hundreds of people from far and near have already been into the caverns and all come away feeling excited and awed. The visitors gallery on the surface has also seen some improvements, including pieces of equipment from most CMS sub-detectors. At the beginning of this CMS week the gallery will receive a further addition - a cosmic ray detector. This detector was made by high school students associated to the US "Quarknet" program and it is these students, together with Dan Karmgard (US-CMS Outreach Coordinator), who will install and commission it at point 5. The other main activity (apart from the CMS Times of course, which recently celebrated it's 1st anniversary!) is with the development of a new CMS public web site. This is needed for many reasons - not least because much of the content of the existing web site is outdated. The look and feel of the new site will be similar to that of the new CERN ...

  15. Google's Geo Education Outreach: Results and Discussion of Outreach Trip to Alaskan High Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, E. J.; Bailey, J.; Bishop, A.; Cain, J.; Goddard, M.; Hurowitz, K.; Kennedy, K.; Ornduff, T.; Sfraga, M.; Wernecke, J.

    2008-12-01

    The focus of Google's Geo Education outreach efforts (http://www.google.com/educators/geo.html) is on helping primary, secondary, and post-secondary educators incorporate Google Earth and Sky, Google Maps, and SketchUp into their classroom lessons. In partnership with the University of Alaska, our Geo Education team members visited several remote Alaskan high schools during a one-week period in September. At each school, we led several 40-minute hands-on learning sessions in which Google products were used by the students to investigate local geologic and environmental processes. For the teachers, we provided several resources including follow-on lesson plans, example KML-based lessons, useful URL's, and website resources that multiple users can contribute to. This talk will highlight results of the trip and discuss how educators can access and use Google's Geo Education resources.

  16. Educating for Social Justice: Perspectives from Library and Information Science and Collaboration with K-12 Social Studies Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidoo, Jamie Campbell; Sweeney, Miriam E.

    2015-01-01

    Library and Information Science (LIS) as a discipline is guided by core values that emphasize equal access to information, freedom of expression, democracy, and education. Importantly, diversity and social responsibility are specifically called out as foundations of the profession (American Library Association, 2004). Following from this, there…

  17. The Scaled Arrival of K-12 Online Education: Emerging Realities and Implications for the Future of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basham, James D.; Smith, Sean J.; Greer, Diana L.; Marino, Matthew T.

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the complex array of variables and implementation models that must be accounted for during the pivot from a purely brick-and-mortar educational system to one that makes use of both virtual and blended environments. The authors call for enhanced emphasis on instructional goals and design principles, rather than available…

  18. The Bellarmine Outreach Consortium: An Innovative Approach to Nursing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algren, Chris L.; Hockenberger, Susan

    The Bellarmine Outreach Consortium, which provides access to baccalaureate and masters education in nursing for registered nurses in Kentucky, West Virginia, and Tennessee, is described. The components of a marketing process for colleges are also considered, with attention to product, place, price, and promotion. The nursing department of…

  19. Education and Outreach for the Pierre Auger Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Snow, Gregory R

    2007-01-01

    The scale and scope of the physics studied at the Auger Observatory offer significant opportunities for original outreach work. Education, outreach, and public relations of the Auger collaboration are coordinated in a task of its own whose goals are to encourage and support a wide range of efforts that link schools and the public with the Auger scientists and the science of cosmic rays, particle physics, and associated technologies. This report focuses on the impact of the collaboration in Mendoza Province, Argentina, as: the Auger Visitor Center in Malargue that has hosted over 29,000 visitors since 2001, the Auger Celebration and a collaboration-sponsored science fair held on the Observatory campus in November 2005, the opening of the James Cronin School in Malargue in November 2006, public lectures, school visits, and courses for science teachers. As the collaboration prepares the proposal for the northern Auger site foreseen to be in southeast Colorado, plans for a comprehensive outreach program are being...

  20. The Impact of a University-Based School Science Outreach Program on Graduate Student Participants' Career Paths and Professional Socialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laursen, Sandra L.; Thiry, Heather; Liston, Carrie S.

    2012-01-01

    Drawing on professional socialization theory, this study examined how immersive experiences as science outreach educators in K-12 schools influenced the career paths and professional identities of science and engineering graduate students. Semi-structured interviews with 24 outreach program alumni revealed that school outreach experiences provided…

  1. STEMdex: CliffsNotes for Education and Public Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolone, L.; Nichols-Yehling, M.; Brinkworth, C.; Hurt, R. L.; Llamas, J.; Squires, G. K.; Wenger, M.; Martin, A.

    2014-07-01

    We present a new resource for the astronomy education community, with the goal of improving our community's knowledge and understanding of the educational research pertinent to our work. STEMdex will be a searchable database of summaries of peer-reviewed education papers, written by educators and researchers, and posted for the entire community to use. While we know we should base our EPO work on a solid research foundation, many people have limited time when it comes to staying on top of the literature. STEMdex aims to reduce that workload. Our database will summarize papers across the astronomy education spectrum, including formal and informal education, outreach, pedagogy, evaluation, and other topics.

  2. Development of a photonics outreach and education program through partnerships at Universidad Metropolitana for Puerto Rico and the IYL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, A.; Friedman, J. S.; Saltares, R.; Gordillo, R.; Trujillo, E.

    2016-09-01

    As the only photonics center in Puerto Rico and the Caribbean we have developed since 2014 and for the International Year of Light 2015 a comprehensive education and outreach program. We show how we have successfully reached an audience of more than 9,500 including K-12 students and teachers, general public, and specialized audiences, by partnering with other institutions and private companies to maximize resources. We present our experience, challenges, rewards and results or our activities and the types of partnerships we developed with institutions and private companies that were fundamental to achieve our goals.

  3. The Tragedy of the Unexamined Cat: Why K-12 and University Education Are Still in the Dark Ages and How Citizen Science Allows for a Renaissance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Robert R; Urban, Julie; Cavelier, Darlene; Cooper, Caren B

    2016-03-01

    At the end of the dark ages, anatomy was taught as though everything that could be known was known. Scholars learned about what had been discovered rather than how to make discoveries. This was true even though the body (and the rest of biology) was very poorly understood. The renaissance eventually brought a revolution in how scholars (and graduate students) were trained and worked. This revolution never occurred in K-12 or university education such that we now teach young students in much the way that scholars were taught in the dark ages, we teach them what is already known rather than the process of knowing. Citizen science offers a way to change K-12 and university education and, in doing so, complete the renaissance. Here we offer an example of such an approach and call for change in the way students are taught science, change that is more possible than it has ever been and is, nonetheless, five hundred years delayed.

  4. Education for a Green and Resilient Economy: An Educator Framework for Teaching Climate and Energy Literacy for K-12 Teachers Across the Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niepold, F., III; Ledley, T. S.; Lockwood, J.; Youngman, E.; Manning, C. L. B.; Sullivan, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    The U.S. is embarking on a major transition to a green and resilient economy, a monumental change requiring all sectors and segments of the population to pull together. Transforming our nation's economic, energy, and environmental systems to in this way will require a sustained level of expertise, innovation, and cooperative effort unseen since the 1940s to meet the challenges involved. Education can - and must - help people understand the true connections, the linkages and interdependencies, between the environment, our energy sources and the economy which underpin and form the very foundation of the concept of a green and resilient economy. To produce such a literate future workforce and citizenry, the United States will need to make major new investments in our educational systems. Teachers across the nation are helping to increase science-based understanding and awareness of current and future climate change, enhancing climate and energy literacy in K-12 classrooms, on college and university campuses. There has been tremendous progress to date, but there is still more work to be done. The new academic standards in mathematics and science (the Common Core State Standards in Mathematics and the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS)) represent a sea change from the nation's previous sets of standards. Addressing these standards in the currently over 40 percent of the nation's classrooms that have adopted or adapted the NGSS will demand that we prepare new and current teachers, who can effectively address the interdisciplinary nature of climate change and societal responses. To address this opportunity and need a collaboration between NOAA, TERC and CIRES has been established to develop an Educator Framework for Teaching Climate and Energy Literacy for K-12 teachers across the curriculum based on the NRC Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas. This collaboration is developing an effective way to frame the use of

  5. Report to the President on the Use of Technology to Strengthen K-12 Education in the United States: Findings Related to Research and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, David E.; Becker, Henry J.; Bransford, John D.; Davidson, Jan; Hawkins, Jan; Malcom, Shirley; Molina, Mario; Ride, Sally K.; Sharp, Phillip; Tinker, Robert F.; Vest, Charles; Young, John; Allen, Richard; Bakia, Marianne; Bryson, Rebecca; Chen, C. Samantha; Costello, Caroline M.; Deckel, Garrett M.; Dial, Marjorie R.; Kealey, Edith M.; Lehoczky, Sandor

    1998-06-01

    The Panel on Educational Technology was organized in April 1995 under the auspices of the President's Committee of Advisers on Science and Technology (PCAST) to provide advice to the President on matters related to the application of information technologies to K-12 education in the United States. Its findings and recommendations were set forth in March 1997 in the Report to the President on the Use of Technology to Strengthen K-12 Education in the United States. This report was based on a review of the research literature and on written submissions and oral briefings from a number of academic and industrial researchers, practicing educators, software developers, governmental agencies, and professional and industry organizations involved in various ways with the application of technology to education. Its most important finding is that a large-scale program of rigorous, systematic research on education in general and educational technology in particular will ultimately prove necessary to ensure both the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of technology use within our nation's K-12 schools. Finding that less than 0.1 percent of our nation's expenditures for elementary and secondary education are currently invested to determine which educational techniques actually work, and to find ways to improve them—an extremely low level relative to comparable ratios within the private sector—the Panel recommended that this figure be increased over a period of several years to at least 0.5 percent, and sustained at that level on an ongoing basis. Further, because no one state, municipality, or private firm could hope to capture more than a small fraction of the benefits associated with a significant advance in our understanding of how best to educate K-12 students, the Panel concluded that such funding will have to be provided largely at the federal level in order to avoid a systematic underinvestment (attributable to a classical form of economic externality) relative to the

  6. Impact of NASA's Astrophysics Education and Public Outreach Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Denise A.; Hasan, H.

    2014-01-01

    NASA has through the years developed a diverse portfolio of Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) programs that have taken the science of NASA's Astrophysics missions into classrooms, museums, planetaria and other public venues. From lesson plans, teacher workshops, public exhibitions, to social media and citizen science, these programs have reached vast audiences internationally. NASA's Science and Education Outreach Forums have developed valuable resources, such as NASA Wavelength, which is a user friendly website of a catalog of NASA's E/PO programs. A sample of programs and their metrics will be presented to demonstrate the impact of the NASA Science Mission Directorate E/PO program in providing a direct return on the public's investment in NASA science.

  7. Astronomy Education and Public Outreach in Virtual Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Adrienne J.

    2008-05-01

    Multi-user 3-dimensional virtual worlds, like Second Life or Active Worlds, are the latest trend for innovation in higher education. There are over 100 college/university projects currently in Second Life. These social environments are also being utilized as a public relation and outreach method by such organizations as NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration), JPL (Jet Propulsion Lab), NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration), NPL (National Physical Laboratory), Exploratorium, and The Tech Museum of Innovation. Immersive virtual environments can offer new methods for education and public outreach projects in astronomy and astrobiology. Whether you are a faculty member wanting to dabble in Second Life with your students or an EPO professional considering a virtual world presence you will learn about the challenges and opportunities for developing content for 3D worlds. A review of popular science areas in Second Life as well as a 'quick start' guide will be included.

  8. Resources for Education and Outreach Activities discussion session

    CERN Document Server

    Barney, David; The ATLAS collaboration; Bourdarios, Claire; Kobel, Michael; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Melo, Ivan; Rangel-Smith, Camila; Alexopoulos, Angelos

    2015-01-01

    Over the past few years a variety of resources have been developed, by individuals and groups, to support Education & Outreach activities in particle physics. Following short (five-minute) presentations by six speakers, a discussion session allowed the audience to go further in depth in activities they found particularly interesting. This paper presents brief overviews from each of the six speakers, followed by a summary of the ensuing discussion

  9. Developing Smartphone Apps for Education, Outreach, Science, and Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weatherwax, A. T.; Fitzsimmons, Z.; Czajkowski, J.; Breimer, E.; Hellman, S. B.; Hunter, S.; Dematteo, J.; Savery, T.; Melsert, K.; Sneeringer, J.

    2010-12-01

    The increased popularity of mobile phone apps provide scientists with a new avenue for sharing and distributing data and knowledge with colleagues, while also providing meaningful education and outreach products for consumption by the general public. Our initial development of iPhone and Android apps centered on the distribution of exciting auroral images taken at the South Pole for education and outreach purposes. These portable platforms, with limited resources when compared to computers, presented a unique set of design and implementation challenges that we will discuss in this presentation. For example, the design must account for limited memory; screen size; processing power; battery life; and potentially high data transport costs. Some of these unique requirements created an environment that enabled undergraduate and high-school students to participate in the creation of these apps. Additionally, during development it became apparent that these apps could also serve as data analysis and engineering tools. Our presentation will further discuss our plans to use apps not only for Education and Public Outreach, but for teaching, science and engineering.

  10. Outreach/education interface for Cryosphere models using the Virtual Ice Sheet Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larour, E. Y.; Halkides, D. J.; Romero, V.; Cheng, D. L.; Perez, G.

    2014-12-01

    In the past decade, great strides have been made in the development of models capable of projecting the future evolution of glaciers and the polar ice sheets in a changing climate. These models are now capable of replicating some of the trends apparent in satellite observations. However, because this field is just now maturing, very few efforts have been dedicated to adapting these capabilities to education. Technologies that have been used in outreach efforts in Atmospheric and Oceanic sciences still have not been extended to Cryospheric Science. We present a cutting-edge, technologically driven virtual laboratory, geared towards outreach and k-12 education, dedicated to the polar ice sheets on Antarctica and Greenland, and their role as major contributors to sea level rise in coming decades. VISL (Virtual Ice Sheet Laboratory) relies on state-of-the art Web GL rendering of polar ice sheets, Android/iPhone and web portability using Javascript, as well as C++ simulations (back-end) based on the Ice Sheet System Model, the NASA model for simulating the evolution of polar ice sheets. Using VISL, educators and students can have an immersive experience into the world of polar ice sheets, while at the same exercising the capabilities of a state-of-the-art climate model, all of it embedded into an education experience that follows the new STEM standards for education.This work was performed at the California Institute of Technology's Jet Propulsion Laboratory under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Cryosphere Science Program.

  11. Introducing ``The MOOSE,'' the Menu of Outreach Opportunities for Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraknoi, A.

    2015-11-01

    The Astronomical Society of the Pacific has been working with the American Astronomical Society to develop a new program of outreach training called “AAS Astronomy Ambassadors. ” We describe a key on-line resource from this project, which is now freely available for everyone doing astronomy education and outreach at http://aas.org/outreach/moose.

  12. Highlights and Challenges in Education, Outreach, and Undergraduate Mentoring from an NSF Hydrologic Sciences CAREER Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogue, T. S.

    2011-12-01

    A recent CAREER award (2009) has been used to facilitate environmentally-based outreach and education in local urban Los Angeles schools, primarily through an established NSF GK-12 program. Mini-weather stations, purchased through this CAREER award, were installed at two partner GK-12 schools, University High School (LAUSD) and Culver City Middle School (CCUSD). Each system contains an automated data logging system that record continuous observations of a range of variables (including precipitation, UV, temperature, humidity, wind speed, wind direction, dewpoint temperature and pressure). Observations are being downloaded and used by GK-12 Fellows and Teachers in curriculum development. In addition, the PI has worked with the GK-12 fellows in developing water-related inquiry lessons for both middle and high school science curriculum. Specific lessons facilitated during the initial stages of this CAREER award include urban ecosystems and satellite imagery, water quality, stream biota and ecosystem health, water treatment, urban climate and heat index, and soil chemistry testing. All lessons that have been implemented in the middle or high school classrooms are uploaded to the SEE-LA GK-12 website (http://measure.igpp.ucla.edu/GK12-SEE-LA/lessons.html). Examples of lesson development and integration in the classroom setting will be highlighted as well as tools required for sustainability of the projects. In addition to the K-12 outreach activities, the PI has engaged several undergraduates in independent research projects, working on various aspects of the primary research project. Highlights and lessons learned from outreach and mentoring activities will be presented.

  13. Earthscope National Office Education and Outreach Program: 2014 Update on Broader-Impacts Activities and Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semken, S. C.; Robinson, S.; Bohon, W.; Schwab, P.; Arrowsmith, R.; Garnero, E.; Pettis, L.; Baumback, D.; Dick, C.

    2014-12-01

    The EarthScope Program (www.earthscope.org), funded by the National Science Foundation, fosters interdisciplinary exploration of the geologic structure and evolution of the North American continent by means of geodesy, seismology, magnetotellurics, in-situ fault-zone sampling, geochronology, and high-resolution topographic measurements. EarthScope data, and the scientific findings they underpin, continue to revolutionize geoscientific research, enhance understanding and mitigation of geologic hazards, and bolster applications of geoscience in environmental management and sustainability. The EarthScope Program also produces and shares a wide range of resources and opportunities for education and outreach (E&O) in the Earth system sciences. The EarthScope National Office (ESNO) at Arizona State University serves all EarthScope stakeholders, including researchers, educators, students, and the general public. ESNO supports and promotes E&O through social media and the web, inSights newsletters and published articles, E&O workshops for informal educators (interpreters), an annual Speaker Series, assistance to grassroots K-12 STEM teacher professional development projects (typically led by EarthScope researchers), continuing education for researchers, collaborations with other Earth-science E&O providers, and biennial National Conferences. The EarthScope E&O program at ESNO, now in its final year at Arizona State University, leads and supports wide dissemination of the data, findings, and legacy of EarthScope. Significant activities in 2014 include an Interpretive Workshop in Alaska; the US Science and Engineering Festival; the Decade Symposium in Washington, DC; the Great ShakeOut; local and regional outreach; and a continued strong and exemplary E&O presence online. The EarthScope National Office is supported by the National Science Foundation under grants EAR-1101100 and EAR-1216301. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material

  14. The Nautilus Exploration Program: Utilizing Live Ocean Exploration as a Platform for STEM Education and Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fundis, A.; Cook, M.; Sutton, K.; Garson, S.; Poulton, S.; Munro, S.

    2016-02-01

    By sparking interest in scientific inquiry and engineering design at a young age through exposure to ocean exploration and innovative technologies, and building on that interest throughout students' educational careers, the Ocean Exploration Trust (OET) aims to motivate more students to be lifelong learners and pursue careers in STEM fields. Utilizing research conducted aboard Exploration Vessel Nautilus, the ship's associated technologies, and shore-based facilities at the University of Rhode Island — including the Graduate School of Oceanography and the Inner Space Center — we guide students to early career professionals through a series of educational programs focused on STEM disciplines and vocational skills. OET also raises public awareness of ocean exploration and research through a growing online presence, live streaming video, and interactions with the team aboard the ship 24 hours a day via the Nautilus Live website (www.nautiluslive.org). Annually, our outreach efforts bring research launched from Nautilus to tens of millions worldwide and allow the public, students, and scientists to participate in expeditions virtually from shore. We share the Nautilus Exploration Program's strategies, successes, and lessons learned for a variety of our education and outreach efforts including: 1) enabling global audiences access to live ocean exploration online and via social media; 2) engaging onshore audiences in live and interactive conversations with scientists and engineers on board; 3) engaging young K-12 learners in current oceanographic research via newly developed lessons and curricula; 4) onshore and offshore professional development opportunities for formal and informal educators; 5) programs and authentic research opportunities for high school, undergraduate, and graduate students onshore and aboard Nautilus; and 6) collaborative opportunities for early career and seasoned researchers to participate virtually in telepresence-enabled, interdisciplinary

  15. Science Educational Outreach Programs That Benefit Students and Scientists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Greg; Russell, Josh; Enyeart, Peter; Gracia, Brant; Wessel, Aimee; Jarmoskaite, Inga; Polioudakis, Damon; Stuart, Yoel; Gonzalez, Tony; MacKrell, Al; Rodenbusch, Stacia; Stovall, Gwendolyn M; Beckham, Josh T; Montgomery, Michael; Tasneem, Tania; Jones, Jack; Simmons, Sarah; Roux, Stanley

    2016-02-01

    Both scientists and the public would benefit from improved communication of basic scientific research and from integrating scientists into education outreach, but opportunities to support these efforts are limited. We have developed two low-cost programs--"Present Your PhD Thesis to a 12-Year-Old" and "Shadow a Scientist"--that combine training in science communication with outreach to area middle schools. We assessed the outcomes of these programs and found a 2-fold benefit: scientists improve their communication skills by explaining basic science research to a general audience, and students' enthusiasm for science and their scientific knowledge are increased. Here we present details about both programs, along with our assessment of them, and discuss the feasibility of exporting these programs to other universities.

  16. Science Educational Outreach Programs That Benefit Students and Scientists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg Clark

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Both scientists and the public would benefit from improved communication of basic scientific research and from integrating scientists into education outreach, but opportunities to support these efforts are limited. We have developed two low-cost programs--"Present Your PhD Thesis to a 12-Year-Old" and "Shadow a Scientist"--that combine training in science communication with outreach to area middle schools. We assessed the outcomes of these programs and found a 2-fold benefit: scientists improve their communication skills by explaining basic science research to a general audience, and students' enthusiasm for science and their scientific knowledge are increased. Here we present details about both programs, along with our assessment of them, and discuss the feasibility of exporting these programs to other universities.

  17. An International Perspective for Education, Outreach and Communication During IPY 2007- 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, R. A.; Carlson, D. J.; Hansen, C.

    2006-12-01

    The international education and outreach action plan will be presented including examples of how an integrated approach will strengthen all forms of communication, and involve access to real-time science direct from the poles. The IPY Education and Outreach Strategy considers education, outreach and communication (EOC) as a continuum of information and activities. There will be many individual EOC initiatives during IPY, including development of educational material, films, documentaries, web-blogs, and press releases to name a few. It is important that all participants in such events also see their part in the global picture of education and outreach, and IPY scientists realise their opportunities for getting involved.

  18. Conservation Education Outreach Program Accomplishment Report, 1998.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindlund, Rod, Comp.; Boshart, Tihisia, Comp.

    In 1992, Elaine McKinney and six college interns set into motion an experiment in human relations at the Forest Service's Northeast Area and Station Headquarters in Radnor, PA. The program provides basic conservation education to urban youth who may never have been exposed to the concepts of conservation, recycling, or forest management. This…

  19. Science for the Masses: A Public Lecture Series and Associated Course for K-12 Educators at the University of Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangin, K.; Wilch, M. H.; Thompson, R. M.; Ruiz, J.

    2008-12-01

    The College of Science at the University of Arizona in Tucson offers a series of free public lectures each year centered on a science theme of high general interest. Themes have been Evolution (2006), Global Climate Change (2007), and Edges of Life (2008). Speakers are UA faculty members. We have seen an overwhelming response from the public to each lecture series, with a typical audience size of 800-1200. Features that make the lecture series successful are careful choice of the themes, previews of lecture drafts by a panel, and the participation of a graphic design firm in the planning process, from the series title to the design of posters, bookmarks, and postcards used to advertise the series. This model could be successfully transferred to many universities. We offer a course for K-12 grade teachers in association with each lecture series. Teachers attend each public lecture, and participate in inquiry-based classroom activities and discussions of papers related to lecture topics. After each lecture, the speaker answers questions from the public, and then accompanies the teachers to a classroom to hold a private question and answer session lasting 45 minutes. The course and lecture series has been influential in changing attitudes about the nature of science research among teacher participants. In 2006, evolution was the lecture series topic, a science concept whose foundation in authentic science research has been difficult to communicate to the general public. Pre- and post- questionnaires on attitudes towards the science of evolution administered to the teacher participants showed a dramatic increase after the course in their view of the robustness of the theory of evolution, its testable nature, the amount of data supporting the theory, and its degree of consensus among scientists. A pre-course survey of the background of teachers in the course, mostly biology teachers, showed a need for more formal instruction in evolution: 76 percent had no formal course

  20. Math and Science Education with English Language Learners: Contributions of the DR K-12 Program. Targeted Study Group Working Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Alina; Rhodes, Hilary; Copson, Elizabeth; Tiano, Megan; DellaRocco, Nicole; Donoghue, Nathaniel; Marco, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    Although educational leaders, policy makers, and researchers have long emphasized the importance of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) for the country's continued prosperity, increasing participation in STEM has remained a challenge for both the education and scientific communities (Pearson & Fechter, 1994; National…

  1. Examining Arizona's Policy Response Post "Flores v. Arizona" in Educating K-12 English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Silva, Margarita; Gomez, Laura; Cisneros, Jesus

    2014-01-01

    This article provides an analysis of Arizona's policy response in educating English language learners by conducting a narrative review. A critical Latina/o theory approach was used to analyze the data. This study reveals 5 salient policy responses: (a) severely limit bilingual education, (b) develop controversial funding solutions, (c)…

  2. Closeted or out? Gay and Lesbian Educators Reveal Their Experiences about Their Sexual Identities in K-12 Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooker, Steven D.

    2010-01-01

    Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender school educators are practically invisible within the nature of heterosexist and homophobic education (Blount, 2005). "Openly gay and lesbian teachers were once thought of as immoral, and in some states coming out is still a risk to one's job" (McCarthy, 2003, p. 182). One's sexual orientation has nothing to…

  3. Look! Listen! Learn! Parent Narratives and Grounded Theory Models of Parent Voice, Presence, and Engagement in K-12 Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Maria K.; Millen, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    Educators' expectations and understandings of parental involvement in our nation's schools are often disconnected from the reality of students' home lives. This qualitative study purports that educators often lose opportunities to more fully understand and serve students, particularly when perceptions of parental involvement and…

  4. Challenging Transitions and Crossing Borders: Preparing Novice Mathematics Teacher Educators to Support Novice K-12 Mathematics Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yow, Jan A.; Eli, Jennifer A.; Beisiegel, Mary; McCloskey, Andrea; Welder, Rachael M.

    2016-01-01

    Sixty-nine recently graduated doctoral students in mathematics education completed a survey to determine their perceptions of transitioning from a doctoral program into an academic position at an institution of higher education. Research literature for novice mathematics school teachers was also reviewed to document their experiences transitioning…

  5. CMS Open Data for Education and Outreach

    CERN Document Server

    Villegas Garcia, Edith Natalia

    2017-01-01

    The CMS Collaboration recently published open access data sets for the data that was collected over the years 2010 and 2011. Using these sets of data different educational applications were developed for some data analysis tools, using particle physics exercises. Histograms of invariant mass were plotted and particles could be identified from them. The tools used include LibreOffice calc software, Microsoft Office Excel, the R programming language and pandas package for Python.

  6. Astronomy Education & Outreach in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Throop, Henry B.

    2015-11-01

    Although South Africa has evolved greatly in the 20 years since the end of apartheid, it remains a very divided country. The highest-performing students are comparable in ability to those in the US and Europe, but nearly all of these students are from priveleged Afrikaaner (European) backgrounds. The vast majority of students in the country are native African, and school standards remain very low across the country. It is common that students have no textbooks, teachers have only a high school education, and schools have no telephones and no toilets. By high school graduation, the majority of students have never used a web browser -- even students in the capital of Johannesburg. And while a few students are inspired by home-grown world-class projects such as the Square Kilometer Array (SKA) and Southern African Large Telescope (SALT), most remain unaware of their existence.Despite the poor state of education in the country, students work hard, are curious, and desire information from the outside world. Astronomy is one subject in which students in rural Africa often show exceptional interest. Perhaps astronomy serves as a 'gateway science,' linking the physically observable world with the exotic and unknown.Here I report on many visits I have made to both rural and urban schools in South Africa during the 2013-2015 period. I have interacted with thousands of grade 7-12 students at dozens of schools, as well as taught students who graduated from this system and enrolled in local universities. I will present an assessment of the state of science education in South Africa, as well as a few broader suggestions for how scientists and educators in developed countries can best make an impact in Southern Africa.

  7. Education and Public Outreach Programs at Columbus State University's Mead Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruzen, S.; Rutland, C.; Carr, D.; Seckinger, M.

    2003-12-01

    Columbus State University (CSU) has made a substantial commitment to community education in astronomy and space science. Through the programs of the Mead Observatory at CSU's Coca-Cola Space Science Center, students, staff and faculty have been providing public outreach programs in astronomy for more than seven years. Recently, a generous grant from a private foundation has facilitated an astounding growth in the observatory's astronomy outreach activities. The grant made possible the purchase of a van, a portable planetarium, and additional telescope and computer equipment. It also funded a two-year scholarship that has supported a pair of CSU's science education majors who have staffed the program and made it a success. NASA, through the Georgia Space Grant Consortium, has provided additional funding for scholarships for 2003-2004. Prior to receiving these funds, the observatory program consisted of monthly open houses, occasional public observing nights at remote locations and approximately 6 to 8 school visits per year. Annually, these programs served approximately 3500 people. Since beginning the new phase of this program in October of 2001, the number of people served has soared to more than 23,000 in only 24 months. Over 60 schools have been visited, increasing our previous annual rate by nearly five times. Additional groups served include boys and girls scouting groups, state parks and other community organizations. School presentations have been designed to assist K-12 teachers in meeting science education standards. More than 200 teachers were asked to assess the program, and their responses were quite positive. More information about the program is available at our website (http://www.ccssc.org).

  8. Increasing participation in the Earth sciences through engagement of K-12 educators in Earth system science analysis, inquiry and problem- based learning and teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrell, S.

    2012-12-01

    Given low course enrollment in geoscience courses, retention in undergraduate geoscience courses, and granting of BA and advanced degrees in the Earth sciences an effective strategy to increase participation in this field is necessary. In response, as K-12 education is a conduit to college education and the future workforce, Earth science education at the K-12 level was targeted with the development of teacher professional development around Earth system science, inquiry and problem-based learning. An NSF, NOAA and NASA funded effort through the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies led to the development of the Earth System Science Educational Alliance (ESSEA) and dissemination of interdisciplinary Earth science content modules accessible to the public and educators. These modules formed the basis for two teacher workshops, two graduate level courses for in-service teachers and two university course for undergraduate teacher candidates. Data from all three models will be presented with emphasis on the teacher workshop. Essential components of the workshop model include: teaching and modeling Earth system science analysis; teacher development of interdisciplinary, problem-based academic units for implementation in the classroom; teacher collaboration; daily workshop evaluations; classroom observations; follow-up collaborative meetings/think tanks; and the building of an on-line professional community for continued communication and exchange of best practices. Preliminary data indicate increased understanding of Earth system science, proficiency with Earth system science analysis, and renewed interest in innovative delivery of content amongst teachers. Teacher-participants reported increased student engagement in learning with the implementation of problem-based investigations in Earth science and Earth system science thinking in the classroom, however, increased enthusiasm of the teacher acted as a contributing factor. Teacher feedback on open

  9. Educational Outreach Efforts at the NNDC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holden, N.E., E-mail: holden@bnl.gov

    2014-06-15

    Isotopes and nuclides are important in our everyday life. The general public and most students are never exposed to the concepts of stable and radioactive isotopes/nuclides. The National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) is involved in an international project to develop a Periodic Table of the Isotopes for the educational community to illustrate the importance of isotopes and nuclides in understanding the world around us. This effort should aid teachers in introducing these concepts to students from the high school to the graduate school level.

  10. Educational Outreach Efforts at the NNDC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holden, N. E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-06-01

    We found that isotopes and nuclides are important in our everyday life. The general public and most students are never exposed to the concepts of stable and radioactive isotopes/nuclides. The National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) is involved in an international project to develop a Periodic Table of the Isotopes for the educational community to illustrate the importance of isotopes and nuclides in understanding the world around us. Our effort should aid teachers in introducing these concepts to students from the high school to the graduate school level.

  11. Evaluation of an outreach education model over five years: Perception of dental students and their outreach clinical mentors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leisnert, L; Redmo Emanuelsson, I; Papia, E; Ericson, D

    2017-05-01

    The objective was to investigate changes in students' and clinical mentors' perceptions of a model for outreach education over a 5-year period, 2006-2010. Two cohorts of last-year students of a dental problem-based curriculum and their clinical mentors in the Public Dental Service (PDS) were invited to respond to a questionnaire. In 2006, 85% of 54 students and 72% of their 54 mentors responded; 98% of 40 students and 88% of 41 of the mentors did so in 2010. Participants scored their level of agreement with different statements on a numeric rating scale and gave comments. Dental students and their clinical mentors reported that they shared a consistent and favourable perception of this outreach education model over 5 years. The students reported increased professional confidence and self-reliance. Clinical mentors expressed a transfer of knowledge to their clinics. Differences in scoring were seen between students and mentors for two statements in 2006 and two statements in 2010 (P students perceived that they became self-reliant, which may facilitate their transition from being a student to becoming a professional. The current model supports exchange and professional development for students, faculty and outreach clinics. This leads us to look at outreach education as an opportunity to form a mutual learning community comprised of the outreach clinics and the dental school. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. An Urban Observatory for Research, Education and Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paglione, T. A. D.; Spergel, M.; Schlein, J.; Denecke, E.

    2002-12-01

    The primary mission of the York College Observatory and Outreach Program is to improve minority participation in space science and space science education. We aim to achieve this goal by developing an urban observatory in central Queens, the York College Observatory (YCO). We concentrate our efforts in three main areas: academics, outreach and research. Academically, we utilize astronomy's popular appeal to attract and retain students and to enhance existing science courses. We have also created a minor in Astronomy at York College, and are active members of the New York City Space Science Research Alliance, which has developed a City University major in Space Science. Our outreach efforts aim to increase the awareness of the general public through workshops for high school teachers, curriculum development for NYC middle and high schools, participation in summer programs for 4th to 9th graders, and public open nights at the YCO. Our research program utilizes the radio and optical capabilities of the YCO and our collaborations with other institutions.

  13. Education and Outreach for EarthScope's USArray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, G.; Taber, J.

    2005-12-01

    Maintaining public interest throughout the 10-year EarthScope project is a challenge and will require an ongoing community-based effort within a national support structure. The initial education and outreach effort of the USArray portion of the EarthScope project involves siting outreach that assists in finding potential sites and promoting the value of hosting a seismograph. This aspect of the program will continue as the Transportable Array (TA) moves across the US. As more of the TA is installed, the primary focus will shift to using the educational hook that there will be an EarthScope seismograph in almost every county of the US at some point in the next 10 years. The program will be closely linked to the efforts of EarthScope Education and Outreach, and other EarthScope partners such as UNAVCO. In the long term, the program will provide a way for local communities to stay engaged after the TA moves to the next region. IRIS, as a national consortium of universities, is well placed to engage groups via local connections in multiple regions. An example of university involvement is a small group of students from Oregon State University who spent the summer finding sites for USArray. Not only did they promote the project within the community, but by working with professional permitters and scientists, the students got a rare opportunity to get practical experience doing real science. At Arizona State University (ASU) two students are currently working on finding sites across Arizona. ASU also works closely with Native American communities to promote EarthScope siting and educational activities within an appropriate cultural context. Universities are helping to develop college and secondary school GIS-related exercises associated with the process of siting. Ongoing siting outreach activities have both a community and broad focus. When schools are engaged as a TA station host, students have access to "their" TA station data via the online IRIS Data Management System

  14. Educational Outreach to Opioid Prescribers: The Case for Academic Detailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotter Davis, Margot; Bateman, Brian; Avorn, Jerry

    2017-02-01

    Nonmedical use of opioid medications constitutes a serious health threat as the rates of addiction, overdoses, and deaths have risen in recent years. Increasingly, inappropriate and excessively liberal prescribing of opioids by physicians is understood to be a central part of the crisis. Public health officials, hospital systems, and legislators are developing programs and regulations to address the problem in sustained and systematic ways that both insures effective treatment of pain and appropriate limits on the availability of opioids. Three approaches have obtained prominence as means of avoiding excessive and inappropriate prescribing, including: providing financial incentives to physicians to change their clinical decision through pay-for-performance contracts, monitoring patient medications through Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs, and educational outreach to physicians. A promising approach to educational outreach to physicians is an intervention known as "academic detailing." It was developed in the 1980s to provide one-on-one educational outreach to physicians using similar methods as the pharmaceutical industry that sends "detailers" to market their products to physician practices. Core to academic detailing, however, is the idea that medical decisions should be based on evidence-based information, including managing conditions with updated assessment measures, behavioral, and nonpharmacological interventions. With the pharmaceutical industry spending billions of dollars to advertise their products, individual practitioners can have difficulty gathering unbiased information, especially as the number of approved medications grows each year. Academic detailing has successfully affected the management of health conditions, such as atrial fibrillation, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and recently, has targeted physicians who prescribe opioids. This article discusses the approach as a potentially effective preventative intervention to address the

  15. Impact Through Outreach and Education with Europlanet 2020 Research Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heward, A.; Barrosa, M.; Miller, S.

    2015-10-01

    Since 2005, Europlanet has provided a framework to bring together Europe's fragmented planetary science community. The project has evolved through a number of phases into a self-sustaining membership organization. Now, Europlanet is launching a new Research Infrastructure (RI) funded through the European Commission's Horizon 2020 programme that, for the next four years, will provide support, services, access to facilities, new research tools and a virtual planetary observatory. Europlanet 2020 RI's Impact Through Outreach and Education (IOE) activities aim to ensure that the work of Europlanet and the community it supports is known, understood and used by stakeholders, and that their inputs are taken into account by the project. We will engage citizens, policy makers and potential industrial partners across Europe with planetary science and the opportunities that it provides for innovation, inspiration and job creation. We will reach out to educators and students, both directly and through partner networks, to provide an interactive showcase of Europlanet's activities e.g through live link-ups with scientists participating in planetary analogue field trips, educational video "shorts" and through using real planetary data from the virtual observatory in comparative planetology educational activities. We will support outreach providers within the planetary science community (e.g. schools liaison officers, press officers, social media managers and scientists active in communicating their work) through meetings and best practice workshops, communication training sessions, an annual prize for public engagement and a seed-funding scheme for outreach activities. We will use traditional and social media channels to communicate newsworthy results and activities to diverse audiences not just in Europe but also around the globe.

  16. Asteroids Outreach Toolkit Development: Using Iterative Feedback In Informal Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Vivian; Berendsen, M.; Gurton, S.; Dusenbery, P. B.

    2011-01-01

    The Night Sky Network is a collaboration of close to 350 astronomy clubs across the US that actively engage in public outreach within their communities. Since 2004, the Astronomical Society of the Pacific has been creating outreach ToolKits filled with carefully crafted sets of physical materials designed to help these volunteer clubs explain the wonders of the night sky to the public. The effectiveness of the ToolKit activities and demonstrations is the direct result of a thorough testing and vetting process. Find out how this iterative assessment process can help other programs create useful tools for both formal and informal educators. The current Space Rocks Outreach ToolKit focuses on explaining asteroids, comets, and meteorites to the general public using quick, big-picture activities that get audiences involved. Eight previous ToolKits cover a wide range of topics from the Moon to black holes. In each case, amateur astronomers and the public helped direct the development the activities along the way through surveys, focus groups, and active field-testing. The resulting activities have been embraced by the larger informal learning community and are enthusiastically being delivered to millions of people across the US and around the world. Each ToolKit is delivered free of charge to active Night Sky Network astronomy clubs. All activity write-ups are available free to download at the website listed here. Amateur astronomers receive frequent questions from the public about Earth impacts, meteors, and comets so this set of activities will help them explain the dynamics of these phenomena to the public. The Space Rocks ToolKit resources complement the Great Balls of Fire museum exhibit produced by Space Science Institute's National Center for Interactive Learning and scheduled for release in 2011. NSF has funded this national traveling exhibition and outreach ToolKit under Grant DRL-0813528.

  17. Supporting Climate Literacy in the K12 Classroom by Identifying Educators' Perceived Barriers to and Gaps in Resources for Teaching Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayne, K.

    2015-12-01

    As K12 teachers seek ways to provide meaningful learning opportunities for students to understand climate change, they often face barriers to teaching about climate and/or lack relevant resources on the topic. In an effort to better understand how to support K12 teachers in this role, a survey about "teaching climate change" was created and distributed. The results of the 2015 survey are presented, based on more than 200 teacher responses. Respondents included National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) members, 2015 STEM Teacher and Researcher (STAR) Fellows and science teachers from several U.S. school districts. The survey identifies teachers' perceived barriers to teaching climate change, for example difficulty integrating climate change concepts into specific core courses (i.e., biology), as well as desired classroom resources, such as climate change project-based learning (PBL) units that connect to the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). Survey results also indicate possible pathways for federal agencies, non-profits, universities and other organizations to have a more significant impact on climate literacy in the classroom. In response to the survey results, a comprehensive guide is being created to teach climate change in K12 classrooms, addressing barriers and providing resources for teachers. For example, in the survey, some teachers indicated that they lacked confidence in their content knowledge and understanding of climate change, so this guide provides web-based resources to help further an educator's understanding of climate change, as well as opportunities for relevant online and in-person professional development. In this quest for desired resources to teach climate change, gaps in accessible and available online resources are being identified. Information about these "gaps" may help organizations that strive to support climate literacy in the classroom better serve teachers.

  18. Partnering with K-12 Education in Building Healthy, Sustainable, and Competitive Regions: A California Policy Symposium. Proceedings Summary & Next Steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Jeff; McKoy, Deborah; Alex, Ken; Mitchell, Connie; Moore, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    On December 6, 2012, UC Berkeley's Center for Cities & Schools, in collaboration with the California Department of Education, California Department of Public Health, Governor's Office of Planning and Research, Strategic Growth Council, and Health in All Policies Task Force, brought together leaders from across California to discuss the…

  19. Some Reflections on "Going beyond the Consensus View" of the Nature of Science in K-12 Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkovitz, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Hodson and Wong (2017, this issue) argue that, though the nature of science (NOS) is now an established focus of school science education and a key element in defining scientific literacy, "the consensus view" of NOS misrepresents contemporary scientific practice. They then propose a number of alternative approaches to science curriculum…

  20. The Emerging Fourth Tier in K-12 Education Finance in British Columbia, Canada: Increasing Privatisation and Implications for Social Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Wendy; Fallon, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines increasing privatisation of education in the province of British Columbia, Canada. Conceptually, the paper is informed by theories of privatisation and social justice; and methodologically, it uses policy analysis to examine documents and financial records obtained from government departments. The paper critically analyses…

  1. A K-12 Federal Policy Framework for Competency Education: Building Capacity for Systems Change. CompetencyWorks Issue Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthen, Maria; Pace, Lillian

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides federal policymakers and advocates with comprehensive, big-picture ideas for transforming federal policy to support the transition to competency-based learning. It is meant to start a dialogue on these issues, posing important questions to explore as policymakers contemplate a new vision for federal education policy through the…

  2. Microbes Should Be Central to Ecological Education and Outreach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Barberán

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Our planet is changing rapidly, and responding to the ensuing environmental challenges will require an informed citizenry that can understand the inherent complexity of ecological systems. However, microorganisms are usually neglected in the narratives that we use to understand nature. Here, we advocate for the inclusion of microbial ecology across education levels and delineate the often neglected benefits of incorporating microbes into ecology curricula. We provide examples across education levels, from secondary school (by considering one’s self as a microbial ecosystem, to higher education (by incorporating our knowledge of the global ecological role and medical application of microbes, to the general public (by engagement through citizen-science projects. The greater inclusion of microbes in ecological education and outreach will not only help us appreciate the natural world we are part of, but will ultimately aid in building a citizenry better prepared to make informed decisions on health and environmental policies.

  3. 3-D Printed Asteroids for Outreach Astronomy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, April

    2015-11-01

    3-D printed asteroids provide new opportunities for outreach astronomy education due to their low cost, interactive potential, and high interest value. Telescopes are expensive, bulky, fragile, and cannot be used effectively during the day. 3-D printing of asteroids combines exciting new technology with astronomy, appealing to a broader audience. The printed models are scientifically accurate, as their shapes have been modeled using light-curve inversion techniques using and occultation data to provide a jumping off point for discussions of these advanced and exciting topics.

  4. Hands-on, online, and workshop-based K-12 weather and climate education resources from the Center for Multi-scale Modeling of Atmospheric Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, S. Q.; Johnson, R. M.; Randall, D. A.; Denning, A.; Burt, M. A.; Gardiner, L.; Genyuk, J.; Hatheway, B.; Jones, B.; La Grave, M. L.; Russell, R. M.

    2009-12-01

    The need for improving the representation of cloud processes in climate models has been one of the most important limitations of the reliability of climate-change simulations. Now in its fourth year, the National Science Foundation-funded Center for Multi-scale Modeling of Atmospheric Processes (CMMAP) at Colorado State University (CSU) is addressing this problem through a revolutionary new approach to representing cloud processes on their native scales, including the cloud-scale interaction processes that are active in cloud systems. CMMAP has set ambitious education and human-resource goals to share basic information about the atmosphere, clouds, weather, climate, and modeling with diverse K-12 and public audiences. This is accomplished through collaborations in resource development and dissemination between CMMAP scientists, CSU’s Little Shop of Physics (LSOP) program, and the Windows to the Universe (W2U) program at University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR). Little Shop of Physics develops new hands on science activities demonstrating basic science concepts fundamental to understanding atmospheric characteristics, weather, and climate. Videos capture demonstrations of children completing these activities which are broadcast to school districts and public television programs. CMMAP and LSOP educators and scientists partner in teaching a summer professional development workshops for teachers at CSU with a semester's worth of college-level content on the basic physics of the atmosphere, weather, climate, climate modeling, and climate change, as well as dozens of LSOP inquiry-based activities suitable for use in classrooms. The W2U project complements these efforts by developing and broadly disseminating new CMMAP-related online content pages, animations, interactives, image galleries, scientists’ biographies, and LSOP videos to K-12 and public audiences. Reaching nearly 20 million users annually, W2U is highly valued as a curriculum enhancement

  5. How Can Catholic Higher Education Help K-12 Catholic Schools and School Systems Prepare for and Maximize Participation in Parental Choice Programs? "A Reflection on the 2013 Catholic Higher Education Collaborative Conference on Catholic School Financing"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    Susan Ferguson reflects on the Catholic Higher Education Collaborative Conference of 2013 and the breakout group talk titled "Helping the Church Prepare for and Implement Publicly Funded Programs." The main point of the talk asked: "How Can Catholic Higher Education Help K-12 Catholic Schools and School Systems Prepare for and…

  6. Changing perceptions one classroom at a time: Evaluation results from the Solar Dynamics Observatory formal Education and Public Outreach programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawro, Martha; Haden, Carol

    2014-06-01

    The Solar Dynamics Observatory’s (SDO) education and public outreach (EPO) team has developed and implemented a number of formal education programs for K-12 students and teachers. Programs include the Day At Goddard field trip for high school students, SDO Ambassador in the Classroom outreach to elementary classrooms, and teacher support materials for solar science education. These programs have been designed to foster student interest and engagement in science especially solar science, and increase their awareness and interest in NASA and STEM careers. Magnolia Consulting, who worked closely with the SDO EPO team to both design a substantive evaluation program, as well as improve the education programs offered, has extensively evaluated these programs. Evaluation findings indicate that teachers highly value the opportunities and resources provided by SDO EPO and that student impacts include increased interest and engagement in solar science topics and awareness of STEM careers. This presentation will be a summary of the results of the evaluation of these formal education programs including lessons learned that can be of value to the STEM EPO community.

  7. Ocean Literacy: Tools for Scientists and Educators to use in the Development of Education and Outreach Programs About the Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strang, C.; Lemus, J.; Schoedinger, S.

    2006-12-01

    Ocean sciences were idiosyncratically left out of the National Science Education Standards and most state standards, resulting in a decline in the public's attention to ocean issues. Concepts about the ocean are hardly taught in K-12 schools, and hardly appear in K-12 curriculum materials, textbooks, assessments or standards. NGS, COSEE, NMEA, NOAA, the US Commission on Ocean Policy, the Pew Ocean Commission have all urgently called for inclusion of the ocean in science standards as a means to increase ocean literacy nationwide. There has never been consensus, however, about what ocean literacy is or what concepts should be included in future standards. Scientists interested in education and outreach activities have not had a framework to guide them in prioritizing the content they present or in determining how that content fits into the context of what K-12 students and the public need to know about science in general. In 2004, an on-line workshop on Ocean Literacy Through Science Standards began the process of developing consensus about what that framework should include. Approximately 100 ocean scientists and educators participated in the workshop, followed by a series of meetings and extensive review by leading scientists, resulting in a series of draft documents and statements. The importance of community-wide involvement and consensus was reinforced through circulation of the draft documents for public comment April -May, 2005. The community agreed on an Ocean Literacy definition, tagline, seven ocean principles, 44 concepts and a matrix aligning the concepts to the National Science Education Standards (NSES). The elements are described in more detail in the final Ocean Literacy brochure. Broad ownership of the resulting documents is a tribute to the inclusiveness of the process used to develop them. The emerging consensus on Ocean Literacy has become an instrument for change, and has served as an important tool guiding the ocean sciences education efforts of

  8. Research, Education, and Outreach at the Oakley Observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditteon, Richard

    2013-05-01

    Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology is a four-year college specializing in undergraduate engineering, science and mathematics education. Rose students have a strong interest in anything space-related. In the early days of the space age, Rose established a campus observatory to collect data on man-made satellites. In 2000, a new observatory was completed and named the Oakley Observatory. The new observatory was designed primarily for education and outreach, but we have successfully used it for minor planet astrometry, and photometry of minor planets and variable stars. Rose-Hulman students have discovered 33 main belt asteroids. Faculty, Rose students, and local high school students have worked together to publish more than 350 minor planet lightcurves. To supplement the campus observatory, The Oakley Southern Sky Observatory was completed in 2007 near Siding Spring in New South Wales, Australia. OSSO makes it possible to observe the southern sky, and it has much less cloud cover, as well as, significantly darker skies than our campus. Rose-Hulman offers an area minor in astronomy and all of the astronomy courses are available to all majors as technical electives. Classes are normally filled to capacity. Finally, we also use the campus observatory for public outreach. We host scout troops, school classes and many other types of groups who want to look through a telescope. We also hold public open houses for special astronomical events such as the transit of Venus.

  9. An Introduction to the UK Polar Network: Education and Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, K.; Irvine, E.; Mugford, R.; Freeman, H.; Baker, N.; Thomas, L.; Rye, C.; Cheshire, J.

    2007-12-01

    The UK Polar Network is the UK branch of the IPY Youth Steering Committee, an endorsed IPY Project, and the Association of Polar Early Career Scientists (APECS). We have two aims in the UKPN: (1) to provide a network for early career polar researchers working in the UK and (2) to carry out education and outreach activities in UK schools, science festivals and through our website. The Education and Outreach working group is involved in organising programs for a range of age groups including engaging activities for primary and secondary school children, information packs on careers and gap year ideas to school leavers and undergraduate students. The intention is, as far as possible, to keep these events free through fundraising. In addition we aim to provide funding for UK polar researchers to attend national networking days and international IPY conferences to present their work, and are involved with organising workshops at these events. In addition, our website is being developed to provide discussion boards, careers information for polar researchers, as well as information for the public, photos and blogs from polar researchers in the field.

  10. 78 FR 9743 - NASA Advisory Council; Education and Public Outreach Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-11

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Education and Public Outreach Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of Meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the... Administration announces a meeting of the Education and Public Outreach Committee of the NASA Advisory...

  11. 75 FR 17438 - NASA Advisory Council; Education and Public Outreach Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-06

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Education and Public Outreach Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the... Administration announces a meeting of the Education and Public Outreach Committee of the NASA Advisory...

  12. 77 FR 66082 - NASA Advisory Council; Education and Public Outreach Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Education and Public Outreach Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the... Administration announces a meeting of the Education and Public Outreach Committee of the NASA Advisory...

  13. 76 FR 2150 - NASA Advisory Council; Education and Public Outreach Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-12

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Education and Public Outreach Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting SUMMARY: In accordance with the... Administration announces a meeting of the Education and Public Outreach Committee of the NASA Advisory...

  14. 76 FR 41825 - NASA Advisory Council; Education and Public Outreach Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-15

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Education and Public Outreach Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the... Administration announces a meeting of the Education and Public Outreach Committee of the NASA Advisory...

  15. ANDRILL Education and Public Outreach: A Legacy of the IPY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rack, F. R.; Huffman, L. T.; Reed, J.; Harwood, D. M.; Berg, M.; Diamond, J.; Fox, A.; Dahlman, L. E.; Levy, R. H.

    2009-12-01

    ANDRILL field projects during the IPY included the McMurdo Ice Shelf (MIS) and Southern McMurdo Sound (SMS) drilling projects, and the Mackay Sea Valley (MSV) and Offshore New Harbor (ONH) seismic surveys. ANDRILL's international network of scientists, engineers, students and educators work together to convey an understanding of geoscience research and the process of science to non-technical audiences. ANDRILL education and public outreach (EPO) program goals are to: (1) promote environmental and polar science literacy for all audiences; (2) develop and disseminate engaging resources for formal and informal education; (3) develop and nurture a network of polar science educators; (4) spark the curiosity of students and the general public; (5) encourage students to pursue careers in science; (6) challenge misconceptions about scientific research; (7) provide professional development opportunities for educators; and, (8) encourage inquiry teaching in science education. During the IPY, ANDRILL established partnerships with several IPY projects to enhance science literacy and promote the IPY in formal and informal education and outreach venues. ANDRILL-led initiatives include the ARISE (ANDRILL Research Immersion for Science Educators) Program, Project Iceberg, the FLEXHIBIT (FLEXible exHIBIT; in partnership with Antarctica’s Climate Secrets/IPY Engaging Antarctica), and the Project Circle. ANDRILL partnerships developed with several museums and school districts for teacher professional development workshops and a variety of public events. A polar learning community was created from the ARISE participants and their many contacts, the Project Circle participants, and interested educators who contacted ANDRILL. EPO activities are continuing in the post-IPY period with additional funding. The ARISE program has been successful in building a team of educators and a network of international collaborations across grade levels and cultures. The ANDRILL website has expanded to

  16. Teaching K-12 Students to Combat Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallhead, Tristan

    2007-01-01

    Physical education is one of the most viable intervention programs to reach overweight and obese children. Since physical activity habits developed early in life are more likely to persist into adulthood, it is important for K-12 physical educators to teach the skills, knowledge, and attitudes that will motivate students to become more active. Two…

  17. The NASA Astrobiology Institute: A Decade of Education and Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalice, Daniella

    The mission statement of the NASA Astrobiology Institute (NAI) charts a course to establishing astrobiology as a new and influential field of scientific inquiry. It integrates world class, interdisciplinary research with training for the next generation of astrobiologists. It enables collaboration between distributed research teams by prioritizing the use of modern information technologies, and empowers astrobiologists to provide leadership for space missions. But this unique vision would not have been complete without the inclusion of an Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) program. Over the past ten years, NAI's E/PO program has taken shape - from bootstrapping in the early days, to partnering with the likes of Disney and PBS - in pursuit of inspiring young people onto the scientific path. The E/PO program's highly collaborative group of education specialists has worked with museums, national parks, filmmakers, radio broadcasters, families, teachers, and students to ensure that the bright young faces of today find themselves in the labs of tomorrow's astrobiologists.

  18. Use of Podcasts as Lecture Supplement and Educational Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorey, C. V.

    2008-12-01

    Podcasts are digital media files that form a series of broadcasts distributed over the internet. End users subscribe to syndication feeds which automatically download files as they become available, or the files can be downloaded individually as desired. Such files, both audio and video, can be played on portable media devices or computers. An increasing proportion of freshmen-level college students are comfortable with this media as a means of information transfer, which opens a new dimension to content delivery for introductory geology and earth science educators. The public posting of such content can also lead to educating the general public in our field of science and creating outreach vehicles for our universities.

  19. The Hubble Space Telescope Education and Public Outreach Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teays, T. J.; Eisenhamer, B.; Eisenhamer, J.; Amazing Space Team

    2001-05-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope has conducted a long-standing and vigorous program in education and public outreach. This program uses a variety of methods to reach a broad spectrum of audiences. Education products are developed in a team environment that partners educators, curriculum experts, scientists, and production experts, such as graphic artists, Web designers, programmers, and education evaluators. A popular Web site is maintained, and has been substantially augmented in the past year. The Amazing Space program consists of a suite of online, interactive modules for use in the kindergarten through 12th grade classroom. The program is rooted in the national education standards and benefits from a robust evaluation process. The HST images and data are used to engage students in learning basic science and mathematics concepts. The activity/lessons include extensive, online assistance for educators, so that they can be readily used in the classroom. Hardcopy products such as posters, lithographs, teacher guides, and trading cards are generally tied to online products, to provide multiple entries to the material. We also provide training for teachers in the use of our products, as appropriate. Informal science education is supported by providing services to museums, planetariums, libraries and related institutions. The very popular ViewSpace, a computer-based video service is being used by many informal science facilities. In addition, HST has supported the creation of both permanent and traveling exhibits about HST. The Space Telescope Science Institute operates the Hubble Space Telescope for NASA.

  20. XMM-Newton Education and Public Outreach Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plait, P.; Silva, S.; Graves, T.; Simonnet, A.; Cominsky, L.

    2004-08-01

    XMM-Newton is a joint NASA-European Space Agency (ESA) orbiting observatory, designed to observe high energy X-rays emitted from exotic astronomical objects such as pulsars, black holes, and active galaxies. It was launched on December 10, 1999 from the ESA base at Kourou, French Guiana and continues to make observations today. In 2003, The NASA E/PO Group at Sonoma State University took the lead for the US portion of the XMM-Newton Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) program. This program is using the mission science to engage students in learning science and mathematics. Currently we are working on developing an educator's unit for grades 6-12 using supernovae to teach the origin of the chemical elements. With the Contemporary Laboratory Experiences in Astronomy (CLEA) group at Gettysburg College, we are developing an interactive laboratory exploring elemental abundances through the X-ray spectroscopy of a supernova remnant. The XMM-Newton E/PO program has also partnered with the GLAST Telescope Network (GTN) and the AAVSO to help coordinate observations of magnetic white dwarfs called polars. In addition, we are creating a Starlab Planetarium show which will compare and contrast the X-ray and visible light skies. The outreach program has created a website (mirrored at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center) designed to enhance the XMM-Newton mission's science education. More educational materials and information about the XMM-Newton E/PO program can be found at http://xmm.sonoma.edu.

  1. Web-based Tools for Educators: Outreach Activities of the Polar Radar for Ice Sheet Measurements (PRISM) Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braaten, D. A.; Holvoet, J. F.; Gogineni, S.

    2003-12-01

    The Radar Systems and Remote Sensing Laboratory at the University of Kansas (KU) has implemented extensive outreach activities focusing on Polar Regions as part of the Polar Radar for Ice Sheet Measurements (PRISM) project. The PRISM project is developing advanced intelligent remote sensing technology that involves radar systems, an autonomous rover, and communications systems to measure detailed ice sheet characteristics, and to determine bed conditions (frozen or wet) below active ice sheets in both Greenland and Antarctica. These measurements will provide a better understanding of the response of polar ice sheets to global climate change and the resulting impact the ice sheets will have on sea level rise. Many of the research and technological development aspects of the PRISM project, such as robotics, radar systems, climate change and exploration of harsh environments, can kindle an excitement and interest in students about science and technology. These topics form the core of our K-12 education and training outreach initiatives, which are designed to capture the imagination of young students, and prompt them to consider an educational path that will lead them to scientific or engineering careers. The K-12 PRISM outreach initiatives are being developed and implemented in a collaboration with the Advanced Learning Technology Program (ALTec) of the High Plains Regional Technology in Education Consortium (HPR*TEC). ALTec is associated with the KU School of Education, and is a well-established educational research center that develops and hosts web tools to enable teachers nationwide to network, collaborate, and share resources with other teachers. An example of an innovative and successful web interface developed by ALTec is called TrackStar. Teachers can use TrackStar over the Web to develop interactive, resource-based lessons (called tracks) on-line for their students. Once developed, tracks are added to the TrackStar database and can be accessed and modified

  2. Educational Outreach at the MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivenberg, Paul; Thomas, Paul

    2006-10-01

    At the MIT PSFC, student and staff volunteers work together to increase the public's knowledge of fusion science and plasma technology. Seeking to generate excitement in young people about science and engineering, the PSFC hosts a number of educational outreach activities throughout the year, including Middle and High School Outreach Days. The PSFC also has an in-school science demonstration program on the theme of magnetism. The Mr. Magnet Program, headed by Mr. Paul Thomas, has been bringing lively demonstrations on magnetism into local elementary and middle schools for 15 years. This year Mr. Magnet presented the program to nearly 30,000 students at over 67 schools and other events, reaching kindergartners through college freshmen. In addition to his program on magnetism, he is offering an interactive lecture about plasma to high schools. The "Traveling Plasma Lab" encourages students to learn more about plasma science while having fun investigating plasma properties using actual laboratory techniques and equipment. Beyond the classroom, Paul Thomas has provided technical training for Boston Museum of Science staff in preparation for the opening of a Star Wars exhibit. His hands-on demos have also been filmed by the History Channel for a one-hour program about Magnetism, which aired in June 2006.

  3. Advancing climate literacy in Idaho K-12 schools using STEM education approaches, open source electronics, and Maker culture as vehicles for teacher training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, A. N.; Gelb, L.; Watson, K. A.; Steimke, A.; Chang, C.; Busche, C.; Breidenbach, J.

    2016-12-01

    A climate literate citizenry is essential to the long-term success of climate change adaptation and to enhancing resilience of communities to climate change impacts. In support of a National Science Foundation CAREER award, we developed a teacher training workshop on a project that engages students in creating functioning, low-cost weather stations using open source electronics. The workshop aims to improve climate literacy among K-12 students while providing an authentic opportunity to acquire and hone STEM skills. Each station measures temperature, humidity, barometric pressure, light level, soil moisture, and precipitation occurrence. Our day-long workshop focuses on three elements: (1) providing context on the scientific importance of climate observation, (2) equipping teachers with technical skills needed to assemble and use a station from provided components, and (3) highlighting relevant educational standards met by the weather station activities. The workshop was attended by twelve 4th-9th grade teachers from southwest Idaho, all of whom teach at rural and/or Title I schools. Attendees reported having minimal or no previous experience with open source electronics, but all were able to effectively use their weather station with less than two hours of hands-on training. In written and oral post-workshop reflections teachers expressed a strong desire to integrate these activities into classrooms, but also revealed barriers associated with rigid curricular constraints and risk-averse administrators. Continued evolution of the workshop will focus on: (1) extending the duration and exploratory depth of the workshop, (2) refining pre- and post-assessments and performing longitudinal monitoring of teacher participants to measure short- and long-term efficacy of the workshop, and (3) partnering with colleagues to engage school district administrators in dialog on how to integrate authentic activities like this one into K-12 curriculum.

  4. INCREASING ACHIEVEMENT AND HIGHER-EDUCATION REPRESENTATION OF UNDER-REPRESENTED GROUPS IN SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING, AND MATHEMATICS FIELDS: A REVIEW OF CURRENT K-12 INTERVENTION PROGRAMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valla, Jeffrey M; Williams, Wendy M

    2012-01-01

    The under-representation of women and ethnic minorities in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) education and professions has resulted in a loss of human capital for the US scientific workforce and spurred the development of myriad STEM educational intervention programs. Increased allocation of resources to such programs begs for a critical, prescriptive, evidence-based review that will enable researchers to develop optimal interventions and administrators to maximize investments. We begin by providing a theoretical backdrop for K-12 STEM programs by reviewing current data on under-representation and developmental research describing individual-level social factors undergirding these data. Next, we review prototypical designs of these programs, highlighting specific programs in the literature as examples of program structures and components currently in use. We then evaluate these interventions in terms of overall effectiveness, as a function of how well they address age-, ethnicity-, or gender-specific factors, suggesting improvements in program design based on these critiques. Finally, program evaluation methods are briefly reviewed and discussed in terms of how their empirical soundness can either enable or limit our ability to delineate effective program components. "Now more than ever, the nation's changing demographics demand that we include all of our citizens in science and engineering education and careers. For the U.S. to benefit from the diverse talents of all its citizens, we must grow the pipeline of qualified, underrepresented minority engineers and scientists to fill positions in industry and academia."-Irving P. McPhail..

  5. the state of education and outreach activities in africa in relation to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Temechegn

    Versions of this paper were presented at 1) Twelfth Regional Meeting of .... of OPCE [2] education and outreach is a core component of national implementation of the .... Development partners that promote science education for sustainable ...

  6. Planning a New Education and Outreach Program Based on Past Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, W. H.; Eriksson, S. C.

    2004-12-01

    In 2004, UNAVCO, a geodetic research consortium, celebrated its 20th birthday and hired its first Education and Outreach Coordinator. UNAVCO has informally reached out to various constituents such as geodetic researchers, undergraduate and graduate students, and K-12 teachers through web-based mapping tools, short courses, and one-to-one training on research equipment. A strategically planned and implemented Education and Outreach Program will, by definition, depend on the organization's leadership and on the experience of the people leading such a program. Based on 39 years of combined experience, here are some lessons-learned that will inform UNAVCO's efforts. E & O should focus on what is special and unique to our organization. UNAVCO supports high precision, GPS, geodetic research as its primary mission. Define our audience. UNAVCO serves the research scientists at the member institutions. Do we have a broader goal of helping in the education of undergraduates? Is our work relevant in middle and secondary school? Include the audience in planning what we will do. A two-way dialogue to determine the most effective education and outreach products must balance what scientists think the audience needs and having the audience learn about a subject to help in making decisions. Involve the scientists and decision-makers in the process to develop ownership. Having people `buy in' from the beginning is important for participation, advocacy, and finding long term resources. Decide on quality and quantity. Is it important to serve large numbers of people? Would a small program that focuses on a few individuals over a long period of time serve the organization's goals better? What do we need from an E & O program? Being explicit about what an organization needs from E & O helps define what activities it will do. Does UNAVCO need visibility with members? Does the membership need help with `broader impacts'? Does UNAVCO see itself serving its members or being a `good citizen

  7. Enhancing the Impact of NASA Astrophysics Education and Public Outreach: Sharing Best Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolone, Lindsay; Smith, D. A.; Astrophysics Science Education, NASA; Public Outreach Forum Team

    2013-01-01

    The NASA Science Education and Public Outreach Forums support the NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) and its education and public outreach community in enhancing the coherence, efficiency, and effectiveness of SMD-funded education and public outreach programs. As part of this effort, the four Forums (Astrophysics, Earth Science, Heliophysics, and Planetary Science) work together to coordinate resources and opportunities that enable sharing of best practices relevant to SMD-funded education and public outreach. Efforts include collaborating with SMD-funded education and public outreach programs to identify community needs for professional development; raising awareness of the existing body of best practices and educational research; and, organizing distance learning and face-to-face professional development opportunities. Topics include best practices in navigating NASA SMD education and public outreach program requirements, social media, engaging girls in science, and student misconceptions / reasoning difficulties. Opportunities to share best practices and learn from experts are extended to the broader astronomy and astrophysics community through the annual Astronomical Society of the Pacific education and public outreach conference. Evaluation of community professional development resources and opportunities is in progress.

  8. K-12 Students, Teachers, Parents, Administrators and Higher Education Faculty: Partners Helping Rural Disadvantaged Students Stay on the Pathway to a Geoscience Career

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slattery, W.; Antonucci, C.; Myers, R. J.

    2013-12-01

    The National Science Foundation funded project K-12 Students, Teachers, Parents, Administrators and Higher Education Faculty: Partners Helping Rural Disadvantaged Students Stay on the Pathway to a Geoscience Career is a research-based proof of concept track 1 pilot project that tests the effectiveness of an innovative model for simultaneous K-12 teacher professional development, student learning and workforce development. The project builds a network of science experiences designed to keep eighth and ninth grade students from the Ripley, Union, Lewis, Huntington (RULH) Ohio school district on the path to a geoscience career. During each summer of the ongoing two-year project teams of RULH students, parents, teachers, administrators and college faculty traveled to the facilities of the New Jersey Sea Grant Consortium at Sandy Hook, New Jersey to study science from an Earth system perspective. Teachers had the opportunity to engage in professional development alongside their students. Parents participated in the science activities alongside their children. Administrators interacted with students, parents and their teachers and saw them all learning science in an engaging, collaborative setting. During the first academic year of the project professional development was provided to RULH teachers by a team of university scientists and geoscience educators from the Earth System Science Education Alliance (ESSEA), a National Science Foundation funded project. Teachers selected for professional development were from science disciplines, mathematics, language arts and civics. The teachers selected, taught and assessed ESSEA Earth system science modules to all eighth and ninth grade students, not just those that were selected to go on the summer trips to New Jersey. In addition, all ninth grade RULH students had the opportunity to take a course that includes Earth system science concepts that will earn them both high school and college science credits. Professional

  9. Education and Outreach in the Life Sciences: Qualitative Analysis Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burbank, Roberta L.; John, Lisa; Mahy, Heidi A.; Rose, Shyanika W.; Weller, Richard E.; Nelson-Wally, Anjanette

    2008-10-01

    The DOE's National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA) asked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to consider the role of individual scientists in upholding safety and security. The views of scientists were identified as being a critical component of this policy process. Therefore, scientists, managers, and representatives of Institutional Biosafety Committees (IBCs) at the national labs were invited to participate in a brief survey and a set of focus groups. In addition, three focus groups were conducted with scientists, managers, and IBC representatives to discuss some of the questions related to education, outreach, and codes of conduct in further detail and gather additional input on biosecurity and dual-use awareness at the laboratories. The overall purpose of this process was to identify concerns related to these topics and to gather suggestions for creating an environment where both the scientific enterprise and national security are enhanced.

  10. Education and Public Outreach for Nasa's Deep Impact Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFadden, L. A.; Rountree-Brown, M. K.; Warner, E. M.; Claughlin, S. A. M.; Behne, J. M.; Ristvey, J. D.; Baird-Wilkerson, S.; Duncan, D. K.; Gillam, S. D.; Walker, G. H.; Meech, K. J.

    2005-03-01

    The Deep Impact mission’s Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) program brings the principles of physics relating to the properties of matter, motions and forces and transfer of energy to school-aged and public audiences. Materials and information on the project web site convey the excitement of the mission, the principles of the process of scientific inquiry and science in a personal and social perspective. Members of the E/PO team and project scientists and engineers, share their experiences in public presentations and via interviews on the web. Programs and opportunities to observe the comet before, during and after impact contribute scientific data to the mission and engage audiences in the mission, which is truly an experiment.

  11. The Canadian Astronomy Education and Public Outreach Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percy, J. R.

    2002-05-01

    In Canada, astronomers do not have access to science and mathematics education funding such as NSF and NASA provide in the USA. Nevertheless, the Canadian astronomical community has always been very active in education and public outreach (EPO) at the local, provincial, and national level, thanks to the initiative of astronomers -- both professional and amateur -- and their institutions and associations. In 2001, the Canadian astronomical community embarked on a major EPO initiative, led by the Canadian Astronomical Society (CAS) in partnership with the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada (RASC) and other organizations. The initiative was motivated by a new long-range plan for astronomy in Canada, by the availability of modest funding for EPO, by the appearance of astronomy in the school science curriculum in several provinces, and by a heightened national interest in science education and literacy. As Chair of the CAS Education Committee, and coordinator of the EPO initiative, I shall describe its origin, funding, goals and strategies, organization, partnerships, programs, and projects. Supported by a PromoScience grant from NSERC Canada.

  12. Sustaining NASA’S Astrophysics Education And Public Outreach Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Hashima; Smith, Denise A.

    2014-06-01

    Sustaining NASA’s Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) projects has been a critical element of the Science Mission Directorate. Astrophysics E/PO programs have built robust partnerships and publicly accessible repositories of their products, which should enable them to form the bases of new initiatives. The recently released digital library, NASAWavelength, has a wealth of information which educators can use to design their own lessons, and students can use as a learning tool. Partnerships with libraries, science museums and amateur astronomers has led to targeted programs such as Astro4Girls and Night Sky Network. Teachers trained as Educator Ambassadors spread the knowledge gained through participating in NASA programs to other educators and students. These and other projects will be presented in this paper as examples of self -sustaining activities, which have a multiplier effect with high impact. While conveying the excitement of scientific discoveries from NASAs Astrophysics missions, these projects provide a powerful means of engaging students towards science and technology careers.

  13. Involving Scientists in Outreach: Incentives, Barriers, and Recommendations from Research Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melton, G.; Laursen, S.; Andrews, E.; Weaver, A.; Hanley, D.; Shamatha, J. H.

    2004-12-01

    Public agencies that fund scientific research are increasingly requiring that researchers invest some of their funding in education or outreach activities that have a "broader impact." Yet barriers exist that inhibit scientists' motivation to participate in K-12 outreach. We will share findings from a quantitative and qualitative study that examined the motivations, rewards, and obstacles for scientists who participate in outreach. We found that most researchers became interested in doing outreach out of a desire to contribute and an expectation of having fun and enjoying the experience. They typically gave outreach presentations away from work, acted as a resource for school teachers, or helped with teacher professional development. However, scientists viewed outreach as a form of volunteer work that was auxiliary to their other responsibilities. Thus, time constraints, a lack of information about outreach opportunities, and the lower value placed on outreach by departments constituted significant barriers to their participation. Scientists involved in outreach typically found their efforts to be rewarding, but occasionally factors left a negative impression, such as poor audience response, classroom management difficulties, organizational problems, or demonstrations not going as planned. Based upon our findings, we offer recommendations on how scientists' participation and experiences in K-12 outreach can be improved, including how to successfully recruit scientists, create a positive outreach experience, and increase institutional support for outreach work.

  14. K-12 Bolsters Ties to Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robelen, Erik W.

    2013-01-01

    When science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education is discussed in the K-12 sphere, it often seems like shorthand for mathematics and science, with perhaps a nod to technology and even less, if any, real attention to engineering. But recent developments signal that the "e" in STEM may be gaining a firmer foothold at…

  15. Public Interaction and Educational Outreach on the Yucca Mountain Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Benson; Y. Riding

    2002-11-14

    In July 2002, the U.S. Congress approved Yucca Mountain in Nevada as the nation's first long-term geologic repository site for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. This major milestone for the country's high-level radioactive waste disposal program comes after more than twenty years of scientific study and intense public interaction and outreach. This paper describes public interaction and outreach challenges faced by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Yucca Mountain Project in the past and what additional communication strategies may be instituted following the July 2002 approval by the U.S. Congress to develop the site as the nation's first long-term geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The DOE public involvement activities were driven by two federal regulations--the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) of 1982, as amended. The NEPA required that DOE hold public hearings at key points in the development of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and the NWPA required the agency to conduct public hearings in the vicinity of the site prior to making a recommendation regarding the site's suitability. The NWPA also provided a roadmap for how DOE would interact with affected units of government, which include the state of Nevada and the counties surrounding the site. Because the Department anticipated and later received much public interest in this high-profile project, the agency decided to go beyond regulatory-required public involvement activities and created a broad-based program that implemented far-reaching public interaction and outreach tactics. Over the last two decades, DOE informed, educated, and engaged a myriad of interested local, national, and international parties using various traditional and innovative approaches. The Yucca Mountain Project's intensive public affairs initiatives were instrumental in involving the public

  16. Avenues for Scientist Involvement in Planetary Science Education and Public Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipp, S. S.; Buxner, S.; Cobabe-Ammann, E. A.; Dalton, H.; Bleacher, L.; Scalice, D.

    2012-12-01

    The Planetary Science Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) Forum is charged by NASA's Science Mission Directorate (SMD) with engaging, extending, and supporting the community of E/PO professionals and scientists involved in planetary science education activities in order to help them more effectively and efficiently share NASA science with all learners. A number of resources and opportunities for involvement are available for planetary scientists involved in - or interested in being involved in - E/PO. The Forum provides opportunities for community members to stay informed, communicate, collaborate, leverage existing programs and partnerships, and become more skilled education practitioners. Interested planetary scientists can receive newsletters, participate in monthly calls, interact through an online community workspace, and attend annual E/PO community meetings and meetings of opportunity at science and education conferences. The Forum also provides professional development opportunities on a myriad of topics, from common pre-conceptions in planetary science to program evaluation, to delivering effective workshops. Thematic approaches, such as the Year of the Solar System (http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/yss), are coordinated by the Forum; through these efforts resources are presented topically, in a manner that can be easily ported into diverse learning environments. Information about the needs of audiences with which scientists interact - higher education, K-12 education, informal education, and public - currently is being researched by SMD's Audience-Based Working Groups. Their findings and recommendations will be made available to inform the activities and products of E/PO providers so they are able to better serve these audiences. Also in production is a "one-stop-shop" of SMD E/PO products and resources that can be used in conjunction with E/PO activities. Further supporting higher-education efforts, the Forum coordinates a network of planetary science

  17. Training Informal Educators Provides Leverage for Space Science Education and Public Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, J. S.; Tobola, K. W.; Betrue, R.

    2004-01-01

    How do we reach the public with the exciting story of Solar System Exploration? How do we encourage girls to think about careers in science, math, engineering and technology? Why should NASA scientists make an effort to reach the public and informal education settings to tell the Solar System Exploration story? These are questions that the Solar System Exploration Forum, a part of the NASA Office of Space Science Education (SSE) and Public Outreach network, has tackled over the past few years. The SSE Forum is a group of education teams and scientists who work to share the excitement of solar system exploration with colleagues, formal educators, and informal educators like museums and youth groups. One major area of the SSE Forum outreach supports the training of Girl Scouts of the USA (GS) leaders and trainers in a suite of activities that reflect NASA missions and science research. Youth groups like Girl Scouts structure their activities as informal education.

  18. Recovery Act - An Interdisciplinary Program for Education and Outreach in Transportation Electrification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Carl [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States); Bohmann, Leonard [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States); Naber, Jeffrey [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States); Beard, John [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States); Passerello, Chris [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States); Worm, Jeremy [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States); Chen, Bo [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States); Allen, Jeffrey [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States); Weaver, Wayne [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States); Hackney, Stephen [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States); Keith, Jason [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States); Meldrum, Jay [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States); Mork, Bruce [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States)

    2013-01-30

    industry, K-12 outreach, and public education. In 2012 the Mobile Lab participated in 22 outreach events, locally, throughout Michigan, and including events in Washington DC, Illinois, and Wisconsin. The Mobile Lab is a hit wherever it goes. In 2013 we will partner with the US Army TARDEC and be featured in their Green Warrior Convoy, a ten city tour starting in Detroit and finishing in Washington DC.

  19. Virtual Knowledge Production within a Physician Educational Outreach Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce Carleton

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describe the impacts and lessons learned of using conferencing technologies to support knowledge production activities within an academic detailing group. A three year case study was conducted in which 20 Canadian health professionals collaborated on developing educational outreach materials for family physicians. The groups communicated in face-to-face, teleconferencing, and web-conferencing environments. Data was collected over three years (2004-2007 and consisted of structured interviews, meeting transcripts, and observation notes. The analysis consisted of detailed reviews and comparisons of the data from the various sources. The results revealed several key findings on the on the impacts of conferencing technologies on knowledge production activities of academic detailers. The study found that: 1 The rigid communication structures of web-conferencing forced group members to introduce other tools for communication 2 Group discussions were perceived to be more conducive in face-to-face meetings and least conducive teleconferencing meetings; 3 Web-conferencing had an impact on information sharing; 4 Web-conferencing forces group interaction “within the text”. The study demonstrates the impacts and lessons learned of academic detailing groups collaborating at a distance to produce physician education materials. The results can be used as the bases for future research and as a practical guide for collaborative academic detailing groups working within a virtual collaborative and educational environment.

  20. Education and outreach bring NASA heliophysics to the public

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbier, Beth

    2011-11-01

    Educating and inspiring students, teachers, and the public by communicating advances in heliophysics science is the objective of the education and public outreach (E/PO) specialists at the Heliophysics Science Division (HSD) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in Greenbelt, Md. The specialists carry out NASA's E/PO goal to enhance the nation's formal education system and contribute to the broad public understanding of science, math, and technology. HSD E/PO projects exploit community best practices to meet or surpass NASA's requirements, which include attention to quality; leverage through internal and external partnerships; and a focus on customer needs, project sustainability, and audience diversity. One key to the group's success is the involvement of enthusiastic HSD research scientists who directly interface with E/PO specialists and various audiences, verify scientific content, and/or provide data access or other resources. Scientists also mentor interns from high school to graduate school through NASA and GSFC programs, and several have shared their science with the public via appearances on national media, including the National Geographic and History channels as well as local news.

  1. WestEd Eisenhower Regional Consortium: Helping to Build a Presence for Science With Online Professional Development Opportunities for K-12 Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rognier, E.

    2002-12-01

    The WestEd Eisenhower Regional Consortium (WERC) is in its third year of offering two Earth Systems Science On-line Graduate courses from IGES - one for High School teachers, and one for Middle School teachers. These high-quality courses support WERC's commitment to "supporting increased scientific and mathematical literacy among our nation's youth through services and other support aimed at enhancing the efforts of those who provide K-12 science and mathematics education." These courses also support our NSTA-sponsored "Building a Presence for Science" program in California, providing professional development opportunities to help achieve our vision of increased quantity and quality of science education statewide. Our students have included classroom teachers from upper elementary through high school, community college science teachers, and environmental science center staff who provide inservice for teachers. Educators from Hawaii to New Jersey have provided diverse personal experiences of Earth Systems Science events, and add richness to the online discussions. Students have consistently embraced the concept of a systems-based approach to science instruction, commenting on how these courses have forever changed their teaching practices and provided a successful means for engaging and involving their students in scientific inquiry. Through offering these online courses, we have learned valuable lessons about recruitment, retention, team-building, and facilitating discussions for classes with no "face to face" component. This format is both rich and challenging, with teammates from diverse geographic regions and timezones, with a variety of connectivity and accessibility issues. In this third year of offering the courses, we are pleased to have students taking their second course with us, wanting to continue learning content and stragtegies to improve their skills as science teachers.

  2. Exploring new possibilities of astronomy education and outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Kodai

    2015-08-01

    I investigate the influences of astronomy education and outreach activities on people in order to explore their potential benefits and contribution to society. This research is based on the astronomy education lessons I gave to 287 senior high school and junior high school students in Cambodia in November 2013. Before and after my lesson, I asked them to answer my questionnaires in Khmer, where they could also write free descriptions. Sentences in their free descriptions translated into Japanese are analyzed by means of a text mining method. By converting text data to various numbers using a text mining method, it is possible for us to do statistical analysis. I counted the number of question sentences and computed their rate with respect to the total number of sentences. The rate of question sentences in 9th and 12th grade students are 39% and 9%, respectively. This shows 9th grade students wonder why and how more frequently and appear to be more stimulated in their curiosity than 12th grade students. I counted the frequency of words in the free descriptions and examined high frequency words, to take a broad view of the characteristics of free description. The word ''world'' is the fourth highest frequency word among 369 words following the three words, ''the universe'', ''the earth'', and ''a star'', which frequently appear in the lesson in astronomy. The most sentences including the word “world” described amazement at the existence of so vast unknown world outside of what they had known until then. The frequency of sentences including the word ''world'' of 12th grade students is much higher (45%) than that (18%) of 9th grade students. A significant fraction of 12th grade students appears to have had a strong impact and changed their views of the world. It is found that my lesson and related activities inspired intellectual curiosity in many students, especially in 9th grade students. It is also found that a significant fraction of 12th grade students appear

  3. Dawn Mission Education and Public Outreach: Science as Human Endeavor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, W. H.; Wise, J.; Schmidt, B. E.; Ristvey, J.

    2012-12-01

    Dawn Education and Public Outreach strives to reach diverse learners using multi-disciplinary approaches. In-depth professional development workshops in collaboration with NASA's Discovery Program, MESSENGER and Stardust-NExT missions focusing on STEM initiatives that integrate the arts have met the needs of diverse audiences and received excellent evaluations. Another collaboration on NASA ROSES grant, Small Bodies, Big Concepts, has helped bridge the learning sequence between the upper elementary and middle school, and the middle and high school Dawn curriculum modules. Leveraging the Small Bodies, Big Concepts model, educators experience diverse and developmentally appropriate NASA activities that tell the Dawn story, with teachers' pedagogical skills enriched by strategies drawn from NSTA's Designing Effective Science Instruction. Dawn mission members enrich workshops by offering science presentations to highlight events and emerging data. Teachers' awareness of the process of learning new content is heightened, and they use that experience to deepen their science teaching practice. Activities are sequenced to enhance conceptual understanding of big ideas in space science and Vesta and Ceres and the Dawn Mission 's place within that body of knowledge Other media add depth to Dawn's resources for reaching students. Instrument and ion engine interactives developed with the respective science team leads help audiences engage with the mission payload and the data each instrument collects. The Dawn Dictionary, an offering in both audio as well as written formats, makes key vocabulary accessible to a broader range of students and the interested public. Further, as Dawn E/PO has invited the public to learn about mission objectives as the mission explored asteroid Vesta, new inroads into public presentations such as the Dawn MissionCast tell the story of this extraordinary mission. Asteroid Mapper is the latest, exciting citizen science endeavor designed to invite the

  4. CloudSat Education Network: Partnerships for Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    TeBockhorst, D.

    2014-12-01

    CloudSat Education Network (CEN): Partnerships to improve the understanding of clouds in formal and informal settings. Since The CloudSat satellite launched in 2006 the Formal and Informal education programs for the mission have been focused on bringing an understanding about the mission science and the importance of clouds, climate & weather science. This has been done by creating and strengthening partnership and collaboration within scientific and educational communities around the country and the world. Because CloudSat was formally recognized as a Earth System Science Pathfinder campaign with the GLOBE program, the CEN developed a set of field protocols for student observations that augmented the GLOBE atmosphere protocols when there was a satellite overpass. This shared process between GLOBE & CloudSat resulted in the training & creation of CEN schools that are both GLOBE schools and CloudSat schools, and also produced three GLOBE partnerships that specialize in cloud science education and outreach. In addition, the CEN has developed productive relationships with other NASA missions and EPO teams. Specifically, in collaboration with the NASA CERES mission projects S'Cool and MyNASAData, we have co-presented at NSTA conferences and with schools participating in a NASA EPOESS-funded formal education project. This collaborative work has been a very real benefit to a wide variety of audiences needing to strengthen their understanding of clouds and their roles in the earth system, and we hope will serve as a model to future missions looking to involve the public in mission science.

  5. Science Educational Outreach Programs That Benefit Students and Scientists: e1002368

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Greg Clark; Josh Russell; Peter Enyeart; Brant Gracia; Aimee Wessel; Inga Jarmoskaite; Damon Polioudakis; Yoel Stuart; Tony Gonzalez; Al MacKrell; Stacia Rodenbusch; Gwendolyn M Stovall; Josh T Beckham; Michael Montgomery; Tania Tasneem; Jack Jones; Sarah Simmons; Stanley Roux

    2016-01-01

      Both scientists and the public would benefit from improved communication of basic scientific research and from integrating scientists into education outreach, but opportunities to support these efforts are limited...

  6. Overview of nuclear education and outreach program among Malaysian school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahar, Haizum Ruzanna; Masngut, Nasaai; Yusof, Mohd Hafizal; Ngadiron, Norzehan; Adnan, Habibah

    2017-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of nuclear education and outreach program conducted by Agensi Nuklear Malaysia (Nuklear Malaysia) throughout its operation and establishment. Since its foundation in 1972, Nuklear Malaysia has been the pioneer and is competent in the application of nuclear science and technology. Today, Nuklear Malaysia has ventured and eventually contributed into the development of various socio-economic sectors which include but not limited to medical, industry, manufacturing, agriculture, health, radiation safety and environment. This paper accentuates on the history of education and outreach program by Nuklear Malaysia, which include its timeline and evolution; as well as a brief on education and outreach program management, involvement of knowledge management as part of its approach and later the future of Nuklear Malaysia education and outreach program.

  7. Educational outreach visits: effects on professional practice and health care outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson O'Brien, M A; Oxman, A D; Davis, D A; Haynes, R B; Freemantle, N; Harvey, E L

    2000-01-01

    Outreach visits have been identified as an intervention that may improve the practice of health care professionals, in particular prescribing. This type of 'face to face' visit has been referred to as university-based educational detailing, public interest detailing, and academic detailing. To assess the effects of outreach visits on improving health professional practice or patient outcomes. We searched MEDLINE up to March 1997, the Research and Development Resource Base in Continuing Medical Education, and reference lists of related systematic reviews and articles. Randomised trials of outreach visits (defined as a personal visit by a trained person to a health care provider in his or her own setting). The participants were health care professionals. Two reviewers independently extracted data and assessed study quality. Eighteen studies were included involving more than 1896 physicians. All of the outreach visit interventions consisted of several components, including written materials and conferences. Reminders or audit and feedback complemented some visits. In 13 studies, the targeted behaviours were prescribing practices. In three studies, the behaviours were preventive services, including counselling for smoking cessation. In two studies, the outreach visits were directed toward improving the general management of common problems encountered in general practice, including asthma, diabetes, otitis media, hypertension, anxiety, and acute bronchitis. All studies examined physician behaviour and in three studies other health professionals such as nurses, nursing home attendants or health care workers were targeted. Positive effects on practice were observed in all studies. Only one study measured a patient outcome. Few studies examined the cost effectiveness of outreach. Educational outreach visits, particularly when combined with social marketing, appear to be a promising approach to modifying health professional behaviour, especially prescribing. Further

  8. Sharing Planetary Exploration: The Education and Public Outreach Program for the NASA MESSENGER Mission to Orbit Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, S. C.; Stockman, S.; Chapman, C. R.; Leary, J. C.; McNutt, R. L.

    2003-12-01

    The Education and Public Outreach (EPO) Program of the MESSENGER mission to the planet Mercury, supported by the NASA Discovery Program, is a full partnership between the project's science and engineering teams and a team of professionals from the EPO community. The Challenger Center for Space Science Education (CCSSE) and the Carnegie Academy for Science Education (CASE) are developing sets of MESSENGER Education Modules targeting grade-specific education levels across K-12. These modules are being disseminated through a MESSENGER EPO Website developed at Montana State University, an Educator Fellowship Program managed by CCSSE to train Fellows to conduct educator workshops, additional workshops planned for NASA educators and members of the Minority University - SPace Interdisciplinary Network (MU-SPIN), and existing inner-city science education programs (e.g., the CASE Summer Science Institute in Washington, D.C.). All lessons are mapped to national standards and benchmarks by MESSENGER EPO team members trained by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Project 2061, all involve user input and feedback and quality control by the EPO team, and all are thoroughly screened by members of the project science and engineering teams. At the college level, internships in science and engineering are provided to students at minority institutions through a program managed by MU-SPIN, and additional opportunities for student participation across the country are planned as the mission proceeds. Outreach efforts include radio spots (AAAS), museum displays (National Air and Space Museum), posters and traveling exhibits (CASE), general language books (AAAS), programs targeting underserved communities (AAAS, CCSSE, and MU-SPIN), and a documentary highlighting the scientific and technical challenges involved in exploring Mercury and how the MESSENGER team has been meeting these challenges. As with the educational elements, science and engineering team members

  9. Project BioEYES: Accessible Student-Driven Science for K-12 Students and Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuda, Jamie R; Butler, Valerie G; Vary, Robert; Farber, Steven A

    2016-11-01

    BioEYES, a nonprofit outreach program using zebrafish to excite and educate K-12 students about science and how to think and act like scientists, has been integrated into hundreds of under-resourced schools since 2002. During the week-long experiments, students raise zebrafish embryos to learn principles of development and genetics. We have analyzed 19,463 participating students' pre- and post-tests within the program to examine their learning growth and attitude changes towards science. We found that at all grade levels, BioEYES effectively increased students' content knowledge and produced favorable shifts in students' attitudes about science. These outcomes were especially pronounced in younger students. Having served over 100,000 students, we find that our method for providing student-centered experiences and developing long-term partnerships with teachers is essential for the growth and sustainability of outreach and school collaborations.

  10. Revival of the "Sun Festival": An educational and outreach project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montabone, Luca

    2016-10-01

    In ancient times, past civilisations used to celebrate both the winter and summer solstices, which represented key moments in the periodical cycle of seasons and agricultural activities. In 1904, the French astronomer Camille Flammarion, the engineer Gustave Eiffel, the science writer Wilfrid de Fonvielle and the Spanish astronomer Josep Comas i Solà decided to celebrate the summer solstice with a festival of science, art and astronomical observations opened to the public at the Eiffel tower in Paris. For ten consecutive years (1904-1914) on the day of the summer solstice, the "Sun Festival" (Fête du Soleil in French) included scientific and technological lectures and demostrations, celestial observations, music, poetry, danse, cinema, etc. This celebration was interrupted by the First World War, just to resume in Barcelona, Spain, between 1915 and 1937, and in Marseille, France, in the 1930s. It was the founders' dream to extend this celebration to all cities in France and elsewhere.It is only during the International Year of Astronomy in 2009, to our knowledge, that the "Sun Festival" was given another chance in France, thanks to the joint effort of several scientific and cultural centers (Centres de Culture Scientifique, Technique et Industrielle, CCSTI) and the timely support of the European Space Agency (ESA). In this occasion again, the festival was characterized by the combination of science, art and technological innovation around a common denominator: our Sun!We have recently revived the idea of celebrating the summer solstice with a "Sun Festival" dedicated to scientific education and outreach about our star and related topics. This project started last year in Aix-les-Bains, France, with the "Sun and Light Festival" (2015 was the International Year of Light), attended by about 100 people. This year's second edition was in Le Bourget-du-Lac, France. Following the COP21 event, the specific theme was the "Sun and Climate Festival", and we had about 250

  11. Elements of the Next Generation Science Standards' (NGSS) New Framework for K-12 Science Education aligned with STEM designed projects created by Kindergarten, 1st and 2nd grade students in a Reggio Emilio project approach setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facchini, Nicole

    This paper examines how elements of the Next Generation Science Standards' (NGSS) New Framework for K-12 Science Education standards (National Research Council 2011)---specifically the cross-cutting concept "cause and effect" are aligned with early childhood students' creation of projects of their choice. The study took place in a Reggio Emilio-inspired, K-12 school, in a multi-aged kindergarten, first and second grade classroom with 14 students. Students worked on their projects independently with the assistance of their peers and teachers. The students' projects and the alignment with the Next Generation Science Standards' New Framework were analyzed by using pre and post assessments, student interviews, and discourse analysis. Results indicate that elements of the New Framework for K-12 Science Education emerged through students' project presentation, particularly regarding the notion of "cause and effect". More specifically, results show that initially students perceived the relationship between "cause and effect" to be negative.

  12. A Critique of the Brave New World of K-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmani-Nodoushan, Mohammad Ali

    2008-01-01

    Over the past few decades has changed so rapidly that remote areas of the Earth are now inhabited by human beings. Technology has also developed and people can stay at home and have access to virtual schools. This has stimulated the need for K-12 education. K-12 education has emerged from the no-child-left-behind concerns of governments for…

  13. Classifying K-12 Blended Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staker, Heather; Horn, Michael B.

    2012-01-01

    The growth of online learning in the K-12 sector is occurring both remotely through virtual schools and on campuses through blended learning. In emerging fields, definitions are important because they create a shared language that enables people to talk about the new phenomena. The blended-learning taxonomy and definitions presented in this paper…

  14. Fourteen Years of Education and Public Outreach for the Swift Gamma-ray Burst Explorer Mission

    CERN Document Server

    Cominsky, Lynn; Simonnet, Aurore

    2014-01-01

    The Sonoma State University (SSU) Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) group leads the Swift Education and Public Outreach program. For Swift, we have previously implemented broad efforts that have contributed to NASA's Science Mission Directorate E/PO portfolio across many outcome areas. Our current focus is on highly-leveraged and demonstrably successful activities, including the wide-reaching Astrophysics Educator Ambassador program, and our popular websites: Epo's Chronicles and the Gamma-ray Burst (GRB) Skymap. We also make major contributions working collaboratively through the Astrophysics Science Education and Public Outreach Forum (SEPOF) on activities such as the on-line educator professional development course NASA's Multiwavelength Universe. Past activities have included the development of many successful education units including the GEMS Invisible Universe guide, the Gamma-ray Burst Educator's guide, and the Newton's Laws Poster set; informal activities including support for the International Ye...

  15. Education and Professional Outreach for Scientists: Producing and Leveraging EPO Objects for Inquiry-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppers, A. A.; Staudigel, H.

    2007-12-01

    Most Education and Professional Outreach (EPO) by scientists reaches relatively small audiences. Most scientists also see their contributions to K-12 teaching rather limited due to their lack of experience in primary and secondary school education. These limitations remain a major barrier in bridging the gap between science and education, and in optimizing the effectiveness of EPO by scientists. As part of the Enduring Resources for Earth Science Education (ERESE) project, we have started to use web- templates in our EPO creation (http://earthref.org/ERESE). These templates are now being developed into web- based tools and services that will be served from the ERESE website and archived by the National Science Digital Library (NSDL). At EarthRef.org these EPO objects can be linked to teaching materials in the ERDA digital archive that can be displayed in a fashion allowing selection based on expert level and file type, in what we dubbed the "resource matrix" view. This is a powerful search mechanism for learners of all levels in which they can pre-screen materials to their own level, while allowing them to venture up to higher expert levels or to explore more simple cases at lower levels. This stimulates inquiry- based learning by permitting as much roaming freedom as possible in a "science-data- based" online environment. The current EarthRef.org and ERESE collections include websites for scientific projects, for classes taught and for expeditions, as well as a wide range of materials including press releases, video footage, science illustrations, interviews, data and diagrams, student reports and lesson plans. This collection is representative for EPO in any STEM discipline and provides much interesting materials that are useful for education. Our main goal is to provide scientists with tools so they can obtain an easy-to-use and highly leveraged outlet for their EPO efforts, where they can reach substantial numbers of learners and educators, and where their

  16. Overcoming Constraints of Building Successful Partnerships Incorporating STEM Research Into K-12 Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radencic, S.; McNeal, K. S.; Pierce, D.; Hare, D.

    2011-12-01

    The Initiating New Science Partnerships in Rural Education (INSPIRE) program at Mississippi State University (MSU), funded by the NSF Graduate STEM Fellows in K-12 Education (GK12) program, focuses on the advancement of Earth and Space science education in K-12 classrooms. INSPIRE is currently in its second year of partnering ten graduate students from the STEM fields of Geosciences, Engineering and Chemistry at MSU with five teachers from local, rural school districts. The five year project serves to increase inquiry and technology experiences in science and math while enhancing graduate student's communication skills as they create interactive lessons linking their STEM research focus to the state and national standards covered in the classrooms. Each graduate student is responsible for the development of two lessons each month of the school year that are then published on the INSPIRE project webpage, www.gk12.msstate.edu, where they are a free resource for any K-12 classroom teacher seeking innovative activities for their classrooms. Many of the participating teachers and graduate students share activities developed with non-participating teachers, expanding INSPIRE's outreach throughout the local community. Numerous challenges were met during the formation of the program as well as throughout the first year in which the project management team worked together to find solutions ensuring that INSPIRE maintained successful partnerships for all involved. Proposed solutions of the following key components were identified by INSPIRE through the development, implementation, and continuous evaluation (internal and external) of the first year of the program as areas that can pose challenges to the construction of strong relationships between STEM research and K-12 classrooms: initializing the partnerships with the K-12 classrooms and STEM graduate fields at the university; maintaining strong partnerships; providing appropriate training and support; developing sound

  17. The NuSTAR Education and Public Outreach Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cominsky, Lynn R.; McLin, K. M.; Boggs, S. E.; Christensen, F.; Hailey, C. J.; Harrison, F.; Stern, D.; Zhang, W.; NuSTAR Team

    2013-04-01

    NuSTAR is a NASA Small Explorer mission led by Caltech, managed by JPL, and implemented by an international team of scientists and engineers, under the direction of CalTech Professor Fiona Harrison, principal investigator. NuSTAR is a pathfinder mission that is opening the high-energy X-ray sky for sensitive study for the first time. By focusing X-rays at higher energies (up to 79 keV) NuSTAR will answer fundamental questions about the Universe: How are black holes distributed through the cosmos? How were the elements that compose our bodies and the Earth forged in the explosions of massive stars? What powers the most extreme active galaxies? Perhaps most exciting is the opportunity to fill a blank map with wonders we have not yet dreamed of: NuSTAR offers the opportunity to explore our Universe in an entirely new way. The purpose of the NuSTAR E/PO program is to increase understanding of the science of the high-energy Universe, by capitalizing on the synergy of existing high-energy astrophysics E/PO programs to support the mission’s objectives. Our goals are to: facilitate understanding of the nature of collapsed objects, develop awareness of the role of supernovae in creating the chemical elements and to facilitate understanding of the physical properties of the extreme Universe. We will do this through a program that includes educator workshops through NASA's Astrophysics Educator Ambassador program, a technology education unit for formal educators, articles for Physics Teacher and/or Science Scope magazines, and work with informal educators on a museum exhibit that includes a model of NuSTAR and describes the mission’s science objectives. Extensive outreach is also underway by members of the Science Team, who are working with high school students, undergraduates and graduate students. We are also developing printed materials that describe the mission and special workshops for girls at public libraries in order to improve the STEM pipeline.

  18. Providing sexually transmitted disease education and risk assessment to disengaged young men through community outreach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, David; Harrison, Patricia; Sidebottom, Abbey

    2010-12-01

    This study describes a community outreach project designed to increase access to reproductive health services to young African American men living in low-income urban neighborhoods. The project examined the effectiveness of providing community-based outreach and health education on increasing sexually transmitted disease (STD) screening. Outreach workers provided STD education and risk assessment in community settings, including street corners, parks, schools, and community centers. Data were recorded on outreach contacts, including client demographics, health education topics covered, and risk assessment results. Outreach workers conducted 9,701 contacts in a 176-week period. Most contacts (89%) were with African Americans, and most (84%) were with young men between 15 and 20 years old. Outreach workers discussed each health education item in their protocol at least 85% of the time and each risk assessment item at least 90% of the time. The majority of contacts (94%) reported being sexually active. Compared with the year prior to the project, actual STD testing of the target population doubled at the project clinics. This study suggests that going beyond traditional clinic-based testing to reach young, disenfranchised males constitutes a promising approach to reducing racial disparities in STD infections.

  19. Space Sciences Education and Outreach Project of Moscow State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasotkin, S.

    2006-11-01

    sergekras@mail.ru The space sciences education and outreach project was initiated at Moscow State University in order to incorporate modern space research into the curriculum popularize the basics of space physics, and enhance public interest in space exploration. On 20 January 2005 the first Russian University Satellite “Universitetskiy-Tatyana” was launched into circular polar orbit (inclination 83 deg., altitude 940-980 km). The onboard scientific complex “Tatyana“, as well as the mission control and information receiving centre, was designed and developed at Moscow State University. The scientific programme of the mission includes measurements of space radiation in different energy channels and Earth UV luminosity and lightning. The current education programme consists of basic multimedia lectures “Life of the Earth in the Solar Atmosphere” and computerized practice exercises “Space Practice” (based on the quasi-real-time data obtained from “Universitetskiy-Tatyana” satellite and other Internet resources). A multimedia lectures LIFE OF EARTH IN THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE containing the basic information and demonstrations of heliophysics (including Sun structure and solar activity, heliosphere and geophysics, solar-terrestrial connections and solar influence on the Earth’s life) was created for upper high-school and junior university students. For the upper-university students there a dozen special computerized hands-on exercises were created based on the experimental quasi-real-time data obtained from our satellites. Students specializing in space physics from a few Russian universities are involved in scientific work. Educational materials focus on upper high school, middle university and special level for space physics students. Moscow State University is now extending its space science education programme by creating multimedia lectures on remote sensing, space factors and materials study, satellite design and development, etc. The space

  20. The University of Delaware Carlson International Polar Year Events: Collaborative and Educational Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, F. E.; Bryant, T.; Wellington, P.; Dooley, J.; Bird, M.

    2008-12-01

    efforts on behalf of the University among public funding agencies, private foundations, and prominent Delaware corporations. The Carlson project includes public lectures and receptions, interdisciplinary seminars, films, art exhibitions, and other events to promote knowledge about the polar regions. The series is co-sponsored by the UD Center for International Studies, the UD Office of the Provost, all of UD's seven Colleges, and the American Geographical Society. The University's Office of Communications and Marketing is involved in all events through a wide variety of media. Educational outreach is achieved through the University's Academy of Lifelong Learning, the State of Delaware's Department of Education, and K-12 curricular efforts coordinated by a teacher with extensive field experience in Antarctica.

  1. Drilling Deep Into STEM Education with JOIDES Resolution Education and Outreach Officers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    During International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) expeditions, IODP scientists and Education/Outreach (E/O) Officers enter classrooms and informal science venues via live Internet video links between the JOIDES Resolution (JR) and land-based learning centers. Post-expedition, E/O Officers, serving as JR Ambassadors, deepen and broaden the learning experience by bringing STEM from the JR to the general public through targeted outreach events at those land-based sites. Youth and adult learners participate in scientific inquiry through interactive activities linked directly to the video broadcast experience. Outreach venues include museums, summer camps, and after-school programs; classroom visits from E/O Officers encompass kindergarten to undergraduate school groups and often include professional development for educators. Events are hands-on with simulations, expedition samples, core models, and equipment available for interaction. This program can serve as a model for linking virtual and real experiences; deepening the educational value of virtual field trip events; and bringing cutting edge science into both classrooms and informal science venues.

  2. Geological research for public outreach and education in Lithuania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skridlaite, Grazina; Guobyte, Rimante

    2013-04-01

    exposition at the Museum of Erratic Boulders in NW Lithuania is being rearranged for educational purposes, to show the major rock types and their origins more clearly. A new exhibition is supplemented with computer portals presenting geological processes, geological quizzes, animations etc. Magmatism, metamorphism, sedimentation and other geological processes are demonstrated using erratic boulders brought by glaciers from Scandinavia and northern Russia. A part of the exhibition is devoted to glaciation processes and arrival of ice sheets to Lithuania. Visitors are able to examine large erratic boulder groups in a surrounding park and to enjoy beautiful environment. The exhibition also demonstrates mineral resources of Lithuania, different fossils and stones from a human body. In all cases it was recognised that a lack of geological information limits the use of geology for public outreach. Ongoing scientific research is essential in many places as well as a mediator's job for interpreting the results of highly specialised research results and to adapt them for public consumption.

  3. The Evolution of the Penn State University Astronomy Outreach Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, C.; Charlton, J. C.

    2008-06-01

    The Penn State Dept. of Astronomy & Astrophysics has a long tradition of outreach. Faculty, students, and staff all participate as volunteers to create and deliver a variety of outreach programming to diverse audiences, including for example K-12 students, K-12 teachers, and senior citizens, in addition to open events that invite all members of the general public to attend. In the past four years, the University and the Department have provided institutional support for science outreach efforts. Many of our programs also receive financial support through NASA Education and Public outreach awards and through NSF awards to PSU Astronomy faculty. We actively collaborate with the NASA Pennsylvania Space Grant Consortium, the Penn State Center for Science and the Schools, four local school districts, and our colleagues from other science disciplines at the University. With this set of partners we are able to continue to innovate and offer new outreach programming annually. In this poster, we present an overview of the variety of outreach programs offered recently and those in the development stages. We describe how each program fits into the Department and University structure. In this way we provide a case study of a large, dynamic, university-based astronomy outreach venture.

  4. Evaluating the Authenticity of Egyptian Cartonnage Fragments: Educational Outreach in Search of the Truth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marty, Paul; Sheahan, Kim; Lacy, Ann

    This paper presents preliminary results from a five year longitudinal study on the efficacy of integrating museum resources into elementary and middle school curricula through educational outreach activities, over the Internet and in the classroom. From 1997 to 2003, museum educators at the University of Illinois' Spurlock Museum have explored how…

  5. The Metamorphosis by K. (12)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2012-01-01

    In the last issue of the Bulletin we reported on the first run of the new NA62 experiment. In this issue, we go behind the scenes to take a look at the production of the experiment's new kaon beam.   The start of the K12 beam line as seen during the installation of the shielding. 10-2, 10-3, 10-4, 10-5, 10-6 mbar… send in the protons! Since Thursday 1 November, the P42 beam line of the SPS has once again been sending protons to the beryllium target to produce the K12 kaon beam line eagerly awaited by the NA62 collaboration. This was no trivial matter! The first step was to clear the decks by dismantling the entire H10 beam line and NA60 experiment, as well as most of the NA48 experiment - representing some 1000 tonnes of equipment in total! Next came the complete renovation of the infrastructure, which dated back to 1979. The operation called on the expertise of virtually all branches of the EN and GS departments, as well as the Radiation Protection group: from ...

  6. The organizations for space education and outreach programs in the Republic of Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeongwon; Jo, Hyun-Jung; Choi, Jae Dong

    2011-09-01

    Korea has a short history in space development compared to neighboring countries like Japan, China, India and Russia. During the past 20 years, Korea has focused on developing satellite and rocket space technology under the national space development plan. KOMPSAT-1 and 2, and KSLV-1 are the results of the selection and concentration policy of the Korean government. Due to the arduous mission of developing hardware oriented space technology, the topic of space education and outreach for the general public has not received much in the national space program. But recently, the Korean government has begun planning a space science outreach program in the detailed action plan of the mid-long term national space development plan. This paper introduces and analyzes the organizations performing space education and outreach programs for primary and secondary schools in the Republic of Korea. "Young Astronaut Korea (YAK)" is one such program. This is a non-profit organization established to provide space education for students in 1989 when Korea just started its space development program. "YAK" is a unique group in Korea for space education and outreach activities because it is organized by branches at each school in the nation and it is much like the Boy Scout and Girl Scout programs. Space Science Museum and National Youth Space Center (NYSC), which are located near NARO space center in the southernmost part of the Korean peninsula are other examples of space education and outreach programs. NARO space center, which is the only launch site in Korea became the center of public interest by showing the KSLV-1 launch in 2009 and will be expected to play a key role for the space education of students in the Republic of Korea. The NYSC will perform many mission oriented space education programs for students as Space Camp in the USA does. This paper introduces the status of the space education and outreach programs of each organization and presents the future direction of space

  7. Educational and Community Outreach Efforts by the United States Polar Rock Repository during the International Polar Year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunow, A.; Codispoti, J. E.

    2010-12-01

    The US Polar Rock Repository (USPRR) houses more than 19,000 rock samples from polar regions and these samples are made available to the scientific, educational and museum community. The USPRR has been active in promoting polar earth science to educational and community groups. During the past year, outreach efforts reached over 12,000 people. The USPRR outreach involve tours of the facility, school presentations, online laboratory exercises, working with the Columbus Metro Parks, teaching at summer camps, teaching special geology field assignments at the middle school level, as well as offering an ‘Antarctic Rock Box’ that contains representative samples of the three types of rocks, minerals, fossils, and books and activities about geology and Antarctica. The rock box activities have been designed and reviewed by educators and scientists to use as an educational supplement to the Earth Science course of study. The activities have been designed around the Academic Content Standards: k-12 Science manual published by the Ohio Department of Education to ensure that the activities and topics are focused on those mandated by the state of Ohio. The USPRR website has a Virtual Web Antarctic Expedition with many activities for Middle to High School age students. The students learn about how to plan a field season, safety techniques, how to make a remote field camp, identify what equipment is needed, learn about the different transportation choices, weather issues, understanding GPS, etc. Educational and community networks have been built in part, by directly contacting individuals at an institution and partnering with them on educational outreach. The institutions have been very interested in doing this because it brings scientists to the classroom and to the public. This type of outreach has also served as an opening for children to consider possible career choices in science that they may not have considered before. In many of the presentations, a female geologist

  8. Meeting Classroom Needs: Designing Space Physics Educational Outreach for Science Education Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urquhart, M. L.; Hairston, M.

    2008-12-01

    As with all NASA missions, the Coupled Ion Neutral Dynamics Investigation (CINDI) is required to have an education and public outreach program (E/PO). Through our partnership between the University of Texas at Dallas William B. Hanson Center for Space Sciences and Department of Science/Mathematics Education, the decision was made early on to design our educational outreach around the needs of teachers. In the era of high-stakes testing and No Child Left Behind, materials that do not meet the content and process standards teachers must teach cannot be expected to be integrated into classroom instruction. Science standards, both state and National, were the fundamental drivers behind the designs of our curricular materials, professional development opportunities for teachers, our target grade levels, and even our popular informal educational resource, the "Cindi in Space" comic book. The National Science Education Standards include much more than content standards, and our E/PO program was designed with this knowledge in mind as well. In our presentation we will describe how we came to our approach for CINDI E/PO, and how we have been successful in our efforts to have CINDI materials and key concepts make the transition into middle school classrooms. We will also present on our newest materials and high school physics students and professional development for their teachers.

  9. Use of mobile electronic devices as educational tool in pediatric community outreach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Jill B; Sadana, Chirag; Eisenberg, Elise S; Daronch, Marcia; Moursi, Amr M

    2011-11-01

    The introduction of mobile electronic devices, as opposed to paper forms, in pediatric outreach programs of the New York University College of Dentistry is discussed. Since 2007, students have been receiving training on how to operate a personal digital assistant (PDA) and use it in community outreach for non-invasive oral-facial screenings and patient education. The shift from using paper forms to electronic media had a positive impact among the academic community, as it resulted in saving time and reducing the possibility of data collection errors. It may represent a significant improvement in data collection and patient education; and it provides an opportunity to enhance research and quality assessment.

  10. The Education and Public Outreach Plan for UCLA's Institute for Planets and Exoplanets (iPLEX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glesener, G. B.; Jewitt, D. C.; Curren, I. S.

    2012-12-01

    Increasing the number and diversity of students pursuing and completing STEM education is a crucial part of UCLA's Institute for Planets and Exoplanets (iPLEX)'s goal of promoting research on planetary systems around the sun and other stars. Cultivating students' interest and success in STEM subject areas from K-12 to the bachelor's degree is an important factor in student retention. As they pursue a bachelor's degree in a STEM major, many become discouraged and decide not to finish with this type of degree; women, underrepresented minorities (URM), and students of low socioeconomic status (SES) have the highest attrition rates (Bayer 2010). Focusing primarily on students at the high school and community college levels, our education and public outreach plan utilizes the multidisciplinary science of astrobiology as a resource for building stronger learning environments in STEM education. By implementing formal education programs that encourage and foster student learning in STEM fields, we intend to (1) increase the efficiency with which students move from high school into STEM-related undergraduate programs, (2) improve the corresponding transfer rate from community colleges to advanced degree programs in STEM at the 4-year university level, and (3) create more opportunities for students to become involved in meaningful research as they progress in their studies. To ensure the success of these programs, we will partner with teachers from local high schools and community colleges, and UCLA's Center X. By being geographically located in Los Angeles County, having one of the highest URM populations in the United States (US Census Bureau, 2007), and partnering with Hampton University (HU) in Virginia, whose student body is 91% African American, we are in a position to make a large impact on diversity. To further ensure the success of our EPO, an independent evaluator will measure and track the following program objectives: increase (1) post-secondary STEM enrollment

  11. Effective Practices for Evaluating Education and Public Outreach Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkerson, S.

    2013-12-01

    Stephanie Baird Wilkerson, PhD Carol Haden EdD Magnolia Consulting,LLC Education and public outreach (EPO) program developers and providers seeking insights regarding effective practices for evaluating EPO activities programs benefit from understanding why evaluation is critical to the success of EPO activities and programs, what data collection methods are appropriate, and how to effectively communicate and report findings. Based on our extensive experience evaluating EPO programs, we will share lessons learned and examples of how these practices play out in actual evaluation studies. EPO program developers, providers, and evaluators must consider several factors that influence which evaluation designs and data collection methods will be most appropriate, given the nature of EPO programs. Effective evaluation practices of EPO programs take into account a program's phase of development, duration, and budget as well as a program's intended outcomes. EPO programs that are just beginning development will have different evaluation needs and priorities than will well-established programs. Effective evaluation practices consider the 'life' of a program with an evaluation design that supports a program's growth through various phases including development, revision and refinement, and completion. It would be premature and inappropriate to expect the attainment of longer-term outcomes of activities during program development phases or early stages of implementation. During program development, EPO providers should clearly define program outcomes that are feasible and appropriate given a program's scope and expected reach. In many respects, this directly relates to the amount of time, or duration, intended audiences participate in EPO programs. As program duration increases so does the likelihood that the program can achieve longer-term outcomes. When choosing which outcomes are reasonable to impact and measure, program duration should be considered. Effective evaluation

  12. Outreach and education in urban Los Angeles Schools: integration of research into middle and high school science curriculum through the NSF GK-12 SEE-LA program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, J. C.; Hogue, T. S.; Moldwin, M. B.; Nonacs, P.

    2012-12-01

    A National Science Foundation Graduate Teaching Fellows in K- 12 Education program at UCLA (SEE-LA; http://measure.igpp.ucla.edu/GK12-SEE-LA/ ) partners UCLA faculty and graduate students (fellows) with urban middle and high school science teachers and their students to foster programs of science and engineering exploration that bring the environment of Los Angeles into the classroom. UCLA science and engineering graduate fellows serve as scientists-in-residence at four partner schools to integrate inquiry-based science lessons, facilitate advancements in science content teaching, and ultimately, to improve their own science communication skills. As part of their fellowship, graduate students are required to develop three "major" lessons, including one based on their PhD research at UCLA. During the first four years of the project, the SEE-LA fellows have developed a range of research-based activities, including lessons on sustainable fisheries, ecosystems and remote sensing, earthquakes, urban water quality including invertebrate observations, and post-fire soil chemistry, among others. This presentation will provide an overview of the SEE-LA GK-12 program and development of research lessons that also address California State Science Standards. We also discuss potential sustainability of GK-12 type outreach and education programs. The SEE-LA program has provided development of graduate student communication and teaching skills while also contributing significantly to the integration of science education into K-12 curriculum in Los Angeles schools.

  13. The Teen Outreach Reproductive Challenge: Improving Adolescent Health Care Delivery through Peer Education Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMairo, Pauline; Dischell, Jackie; Jouthe, Sorahya A.; Horner, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    The Teen Outreach Reproductive CHallenge (TORCH) is a peer education program that provides information on various topics relevant to adolescent sexual health to a diverse audience, ranging from teens to health care providers. This information is disseminated through various projects by a group of New York City high-school students who are…

  14. Assessing the Long-Term Impacts of Water Quality Outreach and Education Efforts on Agricultural Landowners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson-Smith, Douglas B.; McEvoy, Jamie P.

    2011-01-01

    We assess the long-term effectiveness of outreach and education efforts associated with a water quality improvement project in a watershed located in northern Utah, USA. Conducted 15 years after the original project began, our research examines the lasting impacts of different extension activities on landowners' motivations to participate and…

  15. The Teen Outreach Reproductive Challenge: Improving Adolescent Health Care Delivery through Peer Education Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMairo, Pauline; Dischell, Jackie; Jouthe, Sorahya A.; Horner, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    The Teen Outreach Reproductive CHallenge (TORCH) is a peer education program that provides information on various topics relevant to adolescent sexual health to a diverse audience, ranging from teens to health care providers. This information is disseminated through various projects by a group of New York City high-school students who are…

  16. Lay Outreach Workers and the Ohio Migrant and Seasonal Farm Workers Health Education Needs Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Olga L.

    The Migrant and Seasonal Farm Workers Project sought to determine the health education needs of this indigent population in Ohio using the help of lay outreach workers. A bilingual needs assessment survey was developed containing questions on demographics, place of permanent residence, points of travel after working in Ohio, and type of work and…

  17. Models for Information Assurance Education and Outreach: A Report on Year 2 Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianjun

    2014-01-01

    "Models for Information Assurance Education and Outreach" (MIAEO) is an NSF-funded, three-year project to support hands-on explorations in "network security" and "cryptography" through Research Experience Vitalizing Science-University Program (REVS-UP) at California State University, Bakersfield. In addition, the…

  18. NASA Science Mission Directorate Forum Support of Scientists and Engineers to Engage in Education and Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxner, S.; Grier, J.; Meinke, B. K.; Schneider, N. M.; Low, R.; Schultz, G. R.; Manning, J. G.; Fraknoi, A.; Gross, N. A.; Shipp, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    For the past six years, the NASA Science Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) Forums have supported the NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) and its E/PO community by enhancing the coherency and efficiency of SMD-funded E/PO programs. The Forums have fostered collaboration and partnerships between scientists with content expertise and educators with pedagogy expertise. As part of this work, in collaboration with the AAS Division of Planetary Sciences, we have interviewed SMD scientists, and more recently engineers, to understand their needs, barriers, attitudes, and understanding of education and outreach work. Respondents told us that they needed additional resources and professional development to support their work in education and outreach, including information about how to get started, ways to improve their communication, and strategies and activities for their teaching and outreach. In response, the Forums have developed and made available a suite of tools to support scientists and engineers in their E/PO efforts. These include "getting started" guides, "tips and tricks" for engaging in E/PO, vetted lists of classroom and outreach activities, and resources for college classrooms. NASA Wavelength (http://nasawavelength.org/), an online repository of SMD funded activities that have been reviewed by both educators and scientists for quality and accuracy, provides a searchable database of resources for teaching as well as ready-made lists by topic and education level, including lists for introductory college classrooms. Additionally, we have also supported scientists at professional conferences through organizing oral and poster sessions, networking activities, E/PO helpdesks, professional development workshops, and support for students and early careers scientists. For more information and to access resources for scientists and engineers, visit http://smdepo.org.

  19. Outreach and Astronomy-Education Activities of the University of Arizona Astronomy Club

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGraw, Allison M.; Hardegree-Ullman, K.; Walker-LaFollette, A.; Towner, A. P.

    2014-01-01

    The University of Arizona Astronomy Club provides unique outreach experiences for all ages. Our undergraduates work together to volunteer their time for various types of outreach events. This club uses several techniques to execute astronomy education such as hands-on 3D models, exciting demonstrations of scientific phenomena, and multiple small telescopes for both solar and night-time viewing. The students bring the models and telescopes to locations both on and off campus; from dark sky locations in the desert southwest to elementary schools, our undergraduates are willing to teach astronomy just about anywhere.

  20. Outreach and Engagement Education for Graduate Students in Natural Resources: Developing a Course to Enrich a Graduate Outreach Requirement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latimore, Jo A.; Dreelin, Erin A.; Burroughs, Jordan Pusateri

    2014-01-01

    Scientists need to engage stakeholders in natural resource management; however, few graduate programs prepare students to conduct outreach and engagement. Given this need, the authors' goals were to (1) create a one-credit course that introduced outreach and engagement practices and participatory approaches, (2) improve the quality of graduate…

  1. Twelve Years of Education and Public Outreach with the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Cominsky, Lynn; Simonnet, Aurore; Education, the Fermi

    2013-01-01

    During the past twelve years, NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has supported a wide range of Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) activities, targeting K-14 students and the general public. The purpose of the Fermi E/PO program is to increase student and public understanding of the science of the high-energy Universe, through inspiring, engaging and educational activities linked to the mission's science objectives. The E/PO program has additional more general goals, including increasing the diversity of students in the Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) pipeline, and increasing public awareness and understanding of Fermi science and technology. Fermi's multi-faceted E/PO program includes elements in each major outcome category: Higher Education; Elementary and Secondary Education; Informal Education and Public Outreach.

  2. Successes of a new NSF Research Experience for Teachers (RET): Water-Energy Education for the Next Generation (WE2NG) Empowers K-12 Educators to Train Our Future Scientists to Solve Critical STEM Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaine, A. C.; Martin, A. C.; Hogue, T. S.

    2016-12-01

    Colorado School of Mines (CSM) recently kicked-off a three year K-12 teacher training program with an inaugural six-week summer Research Experience for Teachers (RET). The WE2NG, or Water-Energy Education for the Next Generation program, hosted nine Colorado public school teachers, giving them content and tools to enhance curricula and STEM topics in the classroom. WE2NG is an NSF (National Science Foundation) RET program that seeks to advance public knowledge and dialogue on the water-energy nexus through integration of teachers, and ultimately their students, by infusing standards-based, active-learning lessons with cutting-edge research in the water-energy nexus. The teachers' experience begins with a six week summer program at CSM that consists of different activities collectively integrated to give participants a holistic understanding of STEM research from inception to actualization. Three days a week, the participants focus on integration into a mentor faculty's research projects concerning water and/or energy. During the other two days, participants benefit from research presentations and lab tours from participating faculty, technical workshops on interdisciplinary topics, interaction with industry via field trips and speakers, and professional collaborative STEM curriculum development training. However, the teachers' experience does not end with the summer program; WE2NG also establishes long-term collaborative relationships with the summer participants by providing classroom support throughout the academic year. Graduate and undergraduate students from CSM Centers on campus are paired with the teachers to provide significant, sustained support and act as liaisons throughout the academic year. This presentation will highlight successes and lessons learned during the first year of the program, including a summary of how collaboration between K-12 teachers, Mines faculty and industry leaders can radically impact STEM education in Colorado.

  3. Outreach Programmes for Education and Training: Contributions from the International Cartographic Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, W. E.; Fairbairn, D.

    2012-07-01

    Organisations like the International Cartographic Association champion programmes that develop and deliver education and training to cartographers and geospatial scientists, globally. This can be in the form of traditional university and training college programmes, short courses for professional and technical members of mapping agencies and as outreach initiatives to transfer knowledge about the discipline and its contemporary practices. Through its international community, the ICA undertakes the transfer of knowledge about cartography and GI Science by publishing books and special editions of journals and running workshops. Colleagues from the ICA community conduct these workshops on a volunteer basis, generally with the support of the national member organisation of ICA or the national mapping body. For example, the ICA promotes the generation of extensive publications, generally through its Commissions and Working Groups. The publications include books, journals and the ICA Newsletter. Outreach activities are especially pertinent to up skill colleagues from developing countries. Specialist programmes can be offered for professional and 'everyday' map users (from adults to children). The ICA can assist with its current programmes, designed to embrace professional and non-professional cartographers alike. This paper will address how education and outreach programmes can be supported by international associations, by offering programmes independently, or in partnership with sister associations and national and regional organisations and societies. As well, the paper will address the need to deliver education and outreach programmes not to just the professional international community, but also to map users and citizen map publishers.

  4. Building on the Existing Structures; an Outreach Strategy for Improving the Capacity for Education in the Inner Cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Margaret C.; Iglesias, Aquiles

    1996-01-01

    Describes design and implementation of the outreach and dissemination approach used by the National Center on Education in the Inner Cities, with emphases on building on existing structures for information dissemination, training, and technical support for research utilization. Application of the Model of Outreach and Utilization was guided by two…

  5. Promoting seismology education and research via the IRIS Education and Public Outreach Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taber, J. J.; Bravo, T. K.; Dorr, P. M.; Hubenthal, M.; Johnson, J. A.; McQuillan, P.; Sumy, D. F.; Welti, R.

    2015-12-01

    The Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology's Education and Public Outreach (EPO) program is committed to advancing awareness and understanding of seismology and geophysics, while inspiring careers in the Earth sciences. To achieve this mission, IRIS EPO combines content and research expertise of consortium membership with educational and outreach expertise of IRIS staff to create a portfolio of programs, products, and services that target a range of audiences, including grades 6-12 students and teachers, undergraduate and graduate students, faculty, and the general public. IRIS also partners with UNAVCO and other organizations in support of EarthScope where the facilities are well-suited for sustained engagement of multiple audiences. Examples of research-related EPO products and services include the following resources. Tools developed in collaboration with IRIS Data Services provide public and educational access to data, and to a suite of data products. Teachers can stream seismic data from educational or research sensors into their classroom, and the Active Earth Monitor display, designed for visitor centers, universities and small museums, provides views of recent data along with animations that explain seismology concepts, and stories about recent research. Teachable Moment slide sets, created in collaboration with the University of Portland within 24 hours of major earthquakes, provide interpreted USGS tectonic maps and summaries, animations, visualizations, and other event-specific information so educators can explore newsworthy earthquakes with their students. Intro undergraduate classroom activities have been designed to introduce students to some grand challenges in seismological research, while our Research Experiences for Undergraduates program pairs students with seismology researchers throughout the Consortium and provides the opportunity for the students to present their research at a national meeting. EPO activities are evaluated via a

  6. Geoconservation education, research and outreach : the experience of the University of Minho (Portugal)

    OpenAIRE

    Brilha, J. B.; Pereira, D. I.; Pereira, Paulo

    2012-01-01

    Geoconservation is an emerging geoscience. In order to gain recognition among the scientific community and in society in general, education lato sensu is of paramount importance. This work presents the experience of the University of Minho with geoconservation education during the past 10 years, namely with graduation and postgraduation courses, teachers training, research, and outreach. Working in those different levels enhanced the university internationalisation with an increase in student...

  7. Mission X in Japan, an Education Outreach Program Featuring Astronautical Specialties and Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niihori, Maki; Yamada, Shin; Matsuo, Tomoaki; Nakao, Reiko; Nakazawa, Takashi; Kamiyama, Yoshito; Takeoka, Hajime; Matsumoto, Akiko; Ohshima, Hiroshi; Mukai, Chiaki

    In the science field, disseminating new information to the public is becoming increasingly important, since it can aid a deeper understanding of scientific significance and increase the number of future scientists. As part of our activities, we at the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) Space Biomedical Research Office, started work to focus on education outreach featuring space biomedical research. In 2010, we launched the Mission X education program in Japan, named after “Mission X: Train Like an Astronaut” (hereinafter called “Mission X”), mainly led by NASA and European Space Agency (ESA). Mission X is an international public outreach program designed to encourage proper nutrition and exercise and teaching young people to live and eat like astronauts. We adopted Mission X's standpoint, and modified the program based on the originals to suit Japanese culture and the students' grade. Using astronauts as examples, this mission can motivate and educate students to instill and adopt good nutrition and physical fitness as life-long practices.Here we introduce our pilot mission of the “Mission X in Japan” education program, which was held in early 2011. We are continuing the education/public outreach to promote the public understanding of science and contribute to science education through lectures on astronautical specialties and knowledge.

  8. Education and Public Outreach of the Pierre Auger Cosmic Ray Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Gregory

    2012-03-01

    The scale and scope of the physics studied at the Auger Observatory offer significant opportunities for original outreach work. Education, outreach and public relations of the Auger collaboration are coordinated in a separate task whose goals are to encourage and support a wide range of education and outreach efforts that link schools and the public with the Auger scientists and the science of cosmic rays, particle physics, and associated technologies. The presentation will focus on the impact of the collaboration in Mendoza Province, Argentina, as: the Auger Visitor Center in Malarg"ue that has hosted over 60,000 visitors since 2001 and a third collaboration-sponsored science fair held on the Observatory campus in November 2010. The Rural Schools Program, which is run by Observatory staff and which brings cosmic-ray science and infrastructure improvements to remote schools, will be highlighted. Numerous online resources, video documentaries, and animations of extensive air showers have been created for wide public release. Increasingly, collaborators draw on these resources to develop Auger related displays and outreach events at their institutions and in public settings to disseminate the science and successes of the Observatory worldwide.

  9. Building Effective Scientist-Educator Communities of Practice: NASA's Science Education and Public Outreach Forums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwerin, T. G.; Peticolas, L. M.; Shipp, S. S.; Smith, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    Since 1993, NASA has embedded education and public outreach (EPO) in its Earth and space science missions and research programs on the principle that science education is most effective when educators and scientists work hand-in-hand. Four Science EPO Forums organize the respective NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Astrophysics, Earth Science, Heliophysics, and Planetary Science EPO programs into a coordinated, efficient, and effective nationwide effort. The result is significant, evaluated EPO impacts that support NASA's policy of providing a direct return-on-investment for the American public, advance STEM education and literacy, and enable students and educators to participate in the practices of science and engineering as embodied in the 2013 Next Generation Science Standards. This presentation by the leads of the four NASA SMD Science EPO Forums provides big-picture perspectives on NASA's effort to incorporate authentic science into the nation's STEM education and scientific literacy, highlighting tools that were developed to foster a collaborative community and examples of program effectiveness and impact. The Forums are led by: Astrophysics - Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI); Earth Science - Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES); Heliophysics - University of California, Berkeley; and Planetary Science - Lunar and Planetary Institute (LPI).

  10. A Case Study of How an Online Course Influenced Rural South Dakota K-12 Educators' Understanding and Interactions with Students in Poverty

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Doan, Debra

    2012-01-01

    Poverty has an effect on students, schools, and communities. Issues surrounding poverty interweave with education which affects student achievement. When educational development is not maximized, society pays the price in the forms of public health, crime, incarceration, resources, community involvement, and decisions made in the community.…

  11. A Case Study of How an Online Course Influenced Rural South Dakota K-12 Educators' Understanding and Interactions with Students in Poverty

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Doan, Debra

    2012-01-01

    Poverty has an effect on students, schools, and communities. Issues surrounding poverty interweave with education which affects student achievement. When educational development is not maximized, society pays the price in the forms of public health, crime, incarceration, resources, community involvement, and decisions made in the community.…

  12. A Case Study of How an Online Course Influenced Rural South Dakota K-12 Educators' Understanding and Interactions with Students in Poverty

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Doan, Debra

    2012-01-01

    Poverty has an effect on students, schools, and communities. Issues surrounding poverty interweave with education which affects student achievement. When educational development is not maximized, society pays the price in the forms of public health, crime, incarceration, resources, community involvement, and decisions made in the community.…

  13. Examining the Place of Geography in the American Social Studies Curriculum and the Efforts toward an Effective Teacher Education in K-12 Geography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cemalettin AYAS

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper primarily focuses on locating geography education in the American secondary social studies curriculum, and then examines the American teacher education in geography. Therefore, the paper first defines the common ground between social studies and geography, followed by a discussion regarding how geography as a school subject fits in to the social studies curriculum. It next analyzes the American experience in preparing pre- and in-service geography and/or social studies teachers as there have been quite efforts to that end due to the widespread “geographic illiteracy” in the American schools. As a result, the current paper attempts to provide the interested audience with a general perspective concerning the place of geography education in the American schools, and suggests a comprehensive teacher education model based on the related literature investigated

  14. K-12 Teaching and Physics Enrollment

    CERN Document Server

    Masood, Samina S

    2014-01-01

    We have collected and analyzed the relevant data from public schools in greater Houston area of Texas. Based and analyzed. Since the data is only limited to a few school, we are still working on getting more data so that we can compare and contrast the results adequately and understand the core of the enrollment issue at the national level. However, based on the raw data and partial analysis, we propose a few recommendations towards the improvement of science education in Texas Schools, in general, and greater Houston area schools in particular. Our results indicate that the quality of science education can be improved significantly if we focus on the improvement of high school education or even intermediate schools when students are first time exposed to science in a little technical way. Simply organizing teacher training programs at K-12 level as school education plays a pivotal role in the decrease in physics enrollment at the higher level. Similar analysis can actually be generalized to other states to f...

  15. Polarjugend.de - an IPY Education and Outreach Project of the German Youth Steering Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachs, T.; Kaiser, B.; Richter, A.; Schofield, R.; Lantuit, H.; Salmon, R.; Haase, D.

    2007-12-01

    The online network polarjugend.de is a project being initiated by the German Youth Steering Committee for the International Polar Year (GYSC) in cooperation with the International Youth Steering Committe and the IPY Education and Outreach. Two goals integral to the YSC are firstly the networking of young polar researchers across all disciplines early in their careers to enable collaboration, and secondly for this network to be involved in outreach to other youth. To meet these two aims with a project coordinated by the youth for the youth, the German YSC has created an online platform in German to facilitate the collaboration among high-school students, teachers and young polar researchers in and outside the classroom. The GYSC coordinates presentations and discussions at high schools throughout Germany by networking teachers and researchers and providing educational material and resources. The GYSC makes available brief online presentations and articles for further use in the classroom. An event calendar provides teachers and students with subject-relevant information on the Polar Regions. An online discussion forum considers student questions dealing with polar issues. The project aims at reducing the language barrier of polar education and outreach activities for a German- speaking audience by providing polar-related information and further means of communication specifically in German. The project is designed to continue beyond the timeline of the IPY, and the GYSC is confident that it will exert a lasting effect on German high-school education and the integration and discussion of Polar issues into the curriculum.

  16. The ATS Web Page Provides "Tool Boxes" for: Access Opportunities, Performance, Interfaces, Volume, Environments, "Wish List" Entry and Educational Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of the Access to Space website, including information on the 'tool boxes' available on the website for access opportunities, performance, interfaces, volume, environments, 'wish list' entry, and educational outreach.

  17. Supporting Research at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center Through Focused Education and Outreach Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireton, F.; Closs, J.

    2003-12-01

    NASA research scientists work closely with Science Systems and Applications, Inc. (SSAI) personnel at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) on a large variety of education and public outreach (E/PO) initiatives. This work includes assistance in conceptualizing E/PO plans, then carrying through in the development of materials, publication, cataloging, warehousing, and product distribution. For instance, outreach efforts on the Terra, Aqua, and Aura-still in development-EOS missions, as well as planetary and visualization programs, have been coordinated by SSAI employees. E/PO support includes convening and taking part in sessions at professional meetings and workshops. Also included is the coordination of exhibits at professional meetings such as the AGU, AAAS, AMS and educational meetings such as the National Science Teachers Association. Other E/PO efforts include the development and staffing of booths; arranges for booth space and furnishings; shipping of exhibition materials and products; assembling, stocking, and disassembling of booths. E/PO personnel work with organizations external to NASA such as the Smithsonian museum, Library of Congress, U.S. Geological Survey, and associations or societies such as the AGU, American Chemical Society, and National Science Teachers Association to develop products and programs that enhance NASA mission E/PO efforts or to provide NASA information for use in their programs. At GSFC, E/PO personnel coordinate the efforts of the education and public outreach sub-committees in support of the Space and Earth Sciences Data Analysis (SESDA) contract within the GSFC Earth Sciences Directorate. The committee acts as a forum for improving communication and coordination among related Earth science education projects, and strives to unify the representation of these programs among the science and education communities. To facilitate these goals a Goddard Earth Sciences Directorate Education and Outreach Portal has been developed to provide

  18. Education, outreach, and inclusive engagement: Towards integrated indicators of successful program outcomes in participatory science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haywood, Benjamin K; Besley, John C

    2014-01-01

    The use and utility of science in society is often influenced by the structure, legitimacy, and efficacy of the scientific research process. Public participation in scientific research (PPSR) is a growing field of practice aimed at enhancing both public knowledge and understanding of science (education outreach) and the efficacy and responsiveness of scientific research, practice, and policy (participatory engagement). However, PPSR objectives focused on "education outreach" and "participatory engagement" have each emerged from diverse theoretical traditions that maintain distinct indicators of success used for program development and evaluation. Although areas of intersection and overlap among these two traditions exist in theory and practice, a set of comprehensive standards has yet to coalesce that supports the key principles of both traditions in an assimilated fashion. To fill this void, a comprehensive indicators framework is proposed with the goal of promoting a more integrative and synergistic PPSR program development and assessment process.

  19. Planning and Delivering Instruction with Increasing Class Sizes in Educational Administration Program Coursework: Modeling Leadership Skills for New Professors Transitioning from K-12 Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebbins, Gary

    2009-01-01

    Increased class sizes and advising responsibilities are the new realities in California's graduate programs of Educational Administration. In order to effectively meet new challenges, professors must make adjustments in venue, plan meticulously, utilize technology, distribute leadership, and implement alternative grading systems. This is a…

  20. The New 3 E's of Education: Enabled, Engaged, Empowered--How Today's Students Are Leveraging Emerging Technologies for Learning. Speak Up 2010 National Findings: K-12 Students & Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Project Tomorrow, 2011

    2011-01-01

    For the past eight years, the Speak Up National Research Project has endeavored to stimulate new discussions around these kinds of questions and to provide a context to help education, parent, policy and business leaders think beyond today and envision tomorrow. This report is the first in a two part series to document the key national findings…

  1. Media Literacy, Social Networking, and the Web 2.0 Environment for the K-12 Educator. Minding the Media: Critical Issues for Learning and Teaching. Volume 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Abreu, Belinha S.

    2011-01-01

    This book, a resource for educators, uses the theme of media literacy as a lens through which to view and discuss social networking and Web 2.0 environments. There is ongoing and positive research on the participatory culture created by youth who are heavily involved in the new digital technologies, yet schools tend to avoid these mediums for fear…

  2. Evaluation of the Skills of K-12 Students Regarding the National Educational Technology Standards for Students (NETS*S) in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt, Adile Askim; Çoklar, Ahmet Naci; Kiliçer, Kerem; Yildirim, Yusuf

    2008-01-01

    The goal of teaching technology used in every field of daily life as well as in every stage of education, is to have individuals acquire the necessary skills in technology use. In this era, these skills are among the essentials for individuals to discover the world with the help of technology. This study was carried out on students who completed…

  3. Education and public outreach at the Carl Sagan Solar Observatory of the University of Sonora

    OpenAIRE

    Julio Saucedo-Morales; Pablo Loera-González

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the importance of small solar observatories for EPO (Education and Public Outreach), mentioning why they are relevant and what kind of equipment and software require. We stress the fact that technological advances have made them affordable and that they should be widely available. This work is a result of our experience with one: The Carl Sagan Solar Observatory (CSSO). We briefly describe its status and the solar data obtained daily with students participation. We present examples...

  4. K-12 Marketplace Sees Major Flow of Venture Capital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, Katie

    2012-01-01

    The flow of venture capital into the K-12 education market has exploded over the past year, reaching its highest transaction values in a decade in 2011, industry observers say. They attribute that rise to such factors as a heightened interest in educational technology; the decreasing cost of electronic devices such as tablet computers, laptops,…

  5. An Overview of Science Education and Outreach Activities at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. DeLooper; A. DeMeo; P. Lucas; A. Post-Zwicker; C. Phillips; C. Ritter; J. Morgan; P. Wieser; A. Percival; E. Starkman; G. Czechowicz

    2000-11-07

    The U. S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) has an energetic science education program and outreach effort. This overview describes the components of the programs and evaluates the changes that have occurred in this effort during the last several years. Efforts have been expanded to reach more students, as well as the public in general. The primary goal is to inform the public regarding the fusion and plasma research at PPPL and to excite students so that they can appreciate science and technology. A student's interest in science can be raised by tours, summer research experiences, in-classroom presentations, plasma expos, teacher workshops and web-based materials. The ultimate result of this effort is a better-informed public, as well as an increase in the number of women and minorities who choose science as a vocation. Measuring the results is difficult, but current metrics are reviewed. The science education and outreach programs are supported by a de dicated core group of individuals and supplemented by other members of the PPPL staff and consultants who perform various outreach and educational activities.

  6. Public Outreach and Educational Experiences in Mexico and Latin American communities in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andres De Leo-Winkler, Mario; Canalizo, Gabriela; Pichardo, Barbara; Arias, Brenda

    2015-08-01

    I have created and applied diverse methods in public outreach at National Autonomous Univerisity of Mexico (UNAM) since 2001.A student-led volunteer astronomical club has been created, the biggest in Mexico. We serve over 10,000 people per year. We have created public outreach activities for the general audience: archeo-astronomical outings, scientific movie debates, conferences, courses, public telescope viewings. We have also worked with juvenile delinquents to offer them scientific opportunities when released from jail.I've also created and worked the social media for the Institute of Astronomy UNAM, which is currently the biggest social media site on astronomy in Spanish in the world. I've created and organized a mass photo exhibition (over 1 million people served) for the Institute of Astronomy, UNAM which was citizen-funded through an online platform, the first of its kind in the country. Together with my colleages, we created workshops on astronomy for children with the Mexican's government funding.I've participated in several radio and television programs/capsules designed to bring astronomy to the general audience, one in particular ("Astrophysics for Dummies") was very successful in nation-wide Mexican radio.I am currently applying all experiences to develop a new public outreach project on astronomy for the University of California - Riverside and its on-campus and surrounding Latin American communities. We are offering new workshops for blind and deaf children. We want to integrate the Latino community to our outreach activities and offer science in their language in a simple and entertaining fashion. We have also successfully applied astrophotography as a course which brings social-science and arts undergraduate students into natural sciences.Sharing experiences, success and failure stories will help new and experienced educators and public outreach professionals learn and better from past experiences.

  7. K-12 Teacher Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemenway, Mary Kay

    2013-06-01

    For many school subjects, teachers enlist in professional development activities to fulfill certification requirements to update themselves on recent developments in their field. For astronomy, in addition to certification, many teachers need to acquire basic knowledge and skills since their background is often deficient. Thus, a main goal of professional development workshops is to enhance the knowledge base of the participants. But their needs go beyond what can be acquired in a book or lecture. In response to guidelines of the National Science Education Standards (1996), the participants should actively investigate phenomena and interpret results, be introduced to resources that expand their knowledge, build on their current understanding, and incorporate reflection on the process and outcomes of understanding science through inquiry. Examples of how these elements are incorporated into workshops that emphasize activities and teacher-to-teacher interaction over lecture are offered in this presentation. Setting realistic goals for workshops of different lengths (from one day to one month) and evaluating the results are also components of teacher professional development.

  8. Laboratory Earth Under the Lens: Diachronic Evaluation of an Integrated Graduate-Level On-Line Earth System Science Course Series for K-12 Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, R.; Gosselin, D. C.; Haney, C.; Larson-Miller, C.; Bonnstetter, R.; Mandryk, C.

    2012-12-01

    Educational research strives to identify the pedagogies that promote student learning. However, the body of research identifying the characteristics of effective teacher preparation is "least strong for science," and is largely based on studies of the effectiveness of individual courses or workshops (NRC 2010). The National Research Council's "Preparing Teachers: Building Evidence for Strong Policy," (2010) provides a mandate for teacher education providers to conduct research on program-scale effectiveness. The high priority research agenda identified by the NRC is expected to elicit understanding of the aspects of teacher preparation that critically impact classroom student learning outcomes. The Laboratory Lens project is designed to identify effective practices in a teacher education program, with specific reference to the content domain of Earth science. Now in its fifth year, the Masters of Applied Science (MAS) program at UNL offers a variety of science courses, ranging from entomology to food science. The six-course Lab Earth series serves as the backbone of the Specialization for Science Educators within the MAS program, and provides comprehensive content coverage of all Earth science topics identified in the AAAS Benchmarks. "How People Learn," (NRC 2009) emphasizes that expert knowledge includes not only factual knowledge, but also the well-developed conceptual framework critical to the ability to, "remember, reason, and solve problems." A focus of our research is to document the process by which the transition from novice to expert takes place in Lab Earth's on-line teacher participants. A feature of our research design is the standardization of evaluation instruments across the six courses. We have used data derived from implementation of the Community of Inquiry Survey (COI) in pilot offerings to ensure that the course sequence is effective in developing a community of learners, while developing their content knowledge. A pre- and post- course

  9. Education and Outreach for Breast Imaging and Breast Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-07-01

    the project was the development of an educational intervention ( flip chart ) for physicians to use in the clinic setting when discussing breast...Procedure Scheduling on Breast Biopsy Patient Outcomes The first phase of this project is the development of an educational flip chart for...breast biopsy and breast cancer survivors to guide the content of the flip chart b) Develop outline and overall format c) Identify/develop

  10. A Tale of Two scientists and their Involvement in Education & Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell, J.

    2004-12-01

    Many scientists, when faced with developing an education and outreach plan for their research proposals, are unclear on what kinds of impacts they can have on broader non scientist audiences. Many scientists feel their only options are to develop a website or invite a teacher to get involved in their sampling or research cruises. Scientists, who are constrained by time and resources, are not aware of the range of education and outreach options available to them and of the great value their involvement can bring to the public. In an recent survey at the National Science Foundation sponsored ORION conference (January 2004), respondents stated that the greatest public benefits to having scientists involved in public education are (1) that they can present the benefits and relevance of research (26%), (2) focus awareness on environmental issues (26%), (3) serve as models for teachers and motivators for children (25%) and (4) increase public understanding, awareness and appreciation of science (about 22%). As a member of the Mid-Atlantic Center for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence (MACOSEE), the Institute of Marine & Coastal Sciences (IMCS) at Rutgers University is dedicated to helping scientists and educators realize the benefits of working together to advance ocean discovery and make known the vital role of the ocean in our lives. A website called "Scientist Connection" (www.macosee.net) was developed to help busy scientists choose a role in education and outreach that will make the most of their talent and time. The goal of the web site is to help scientists produce a worthwhile education project that complements and enriches their research. In this session, the author will present two case studies that demonstrate very different but effective approaches to scientist's involvement in education and outreach projects. In the first case, we will chronicle how a team of biologists and oceanographers in the Rutgers University, Coastal Ocean Observation Laboratory (or

  11. The National Space Science and Technology Center's Education and Public Outreach Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, G. N.; Denson, R. L.

    2004-12-01

    The objective of the National Space Science and Technology Center's (NSSTC) Education and Public Outreach program (EPO) is to support K-20 education by coalescing academic, government, and business constituents awareness, implementing best business/education practices, and providing stewardship over funds and programs that promote a symbiotic relationship among these entities, specifically in the area of K-20 Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) education. NSSTC EPO Program's long-term objective is to showcase its effective community-based integrated stakeholder model in support of STEM education and to expand its influence across the Southeast region for scaling ultimately across the United States. The Education and Public Outreach program (EPO) is coordinated by a supporting arm of the NSSTC Administrative Council called the EPO Council (EPOC). The EPOC is funded through federal, state, and private grants, donations, and in-kind contributions. It is comprised of representatives of NSSTC Research Centers, both educators and scientists from the Alabama Space Science and Technology Alliance (SSTA) member institutions, the Alabama Space Grant Consortium and the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Education Office. Through its affiliation with MSFC and the SSTA - a consortium of Alabama's research universities that comprise the NSSTC, EPO fosters the education and development of the next generation of Alabama scientists and engineers by coordinating activities at the K-20 level in cooperation with the Alabama Department of Education, the Alabama Commission on Higher Education, and Alabama's businesses and industries. The EPO program's primary objective is to be Alabama's premiere organization in uniting academia, government, and private industry by way of providing its support to the State and Federal Departments of Education involved in systemic STEM education reform, workforce development, and innovative uses of technology. The NSSTC EPO

  12. A Modern Explorer's Journey - using events for innovative multipurpose educational outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilja Bye, Bente

    2014-05-01

    Earth observations are important across the specter of geo-sciences. The Group on Earth Observations (GEO) is coordinating efforts to build a Global Earth Observation System of Systems, or GEOSS. The lack of dedicated funding to support specific Science &Technology activities in support of GEOSS is one of the most important obstacles to engaging the Science &Technology communities in its implementation. Finding resources to outreach and capacity building is likewise a challenge. The continuation of GEO and GEOSS rely on political support which again is influenced by public opinions. The GEO Ministerial Summit in 2014 was an event that both needed visibility and represented an opportunity to mobilize the GEO community in producing outreach and educational material. Through the combined resources from two of GEO tasks in the GEO work plan, a multipurpose educational outreach project was planned and executed. This project addressed the following issues: How can the GEO community mobilize resources for its work plan projects in the Societal Benefit Area Water? How can we produce more educational and capacity building material? How can the GEO community support the GEO secretariat related to public relations (material and otherwise) Based on activities described in the GEO work plan, a showcase video and online campaign consisting on a series of webinars were developed and produced. The video and webinars were linked through a common reference: the water cycle. Various aspects of the water cycle ranging from general to more technical and scientific education were covered in the webinars, while the video called A Modern Explorer's Journey focused on story telling with a more emotional appeal. The video was presented to the Ministers at the GEO Ministerial Summit and distributed widely to the GEO community and through social media and articles (as embedded YouTube and more). A discussion of challenges and successes of this event-based educational outreach project will be

  13. Establishing a K-12 Circuit Design Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inceoglu, Mustafa M.

    2010-01-01

    Outreach, as defined by Wikipedia, is an effort by an organization or group to connect its ideas or practices to the efforts of other organizations, groups, specific audiences, or the general public. This paper describes a computer engineering outreach project of the Department of Computer Engineering at Ege University, Izmir, Turkey, to a local…

  14. Multiple Perspectives on the Topic of Scientists and Education and Public Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peticolas, L. M.

    2011-12-01

    This presentation aims to share the author's understanding of the complex topic of scientist involvement in and attitudes about Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) by approaching the topic from four viewpoints. The first perspective is from the author's own journey starting as a post-doctoral fellow engaged in limited ways in education and public outreach to full-time E/PO professional. The second perspective comes from discussions with scientists on the topic of E/PO. Evaluation data of scientists' involvement in a community college space science seminar series provides a third perspective. And the final perspective approaches the topic from the vantage point of research on scientist involvement in E/PO. From these multiple perspectives, there is evidence that that there exists ample passion for education and outreach in the scientific community. However, the path from passion to meaningful engagement of audiences and understandings of educational pedagogies continues to be difficult for a variety of reasons, such as: 1) a tendency to teach as one was taught rather than changing teaching practices based on research on how people learn, 2) a lack of time to collaborate and partner with appropriate educational professionals or institutions, 3) a lack of awareness (or a lack of time to develop an awareness) of an audience need or audience baseline understandings, and 4) a belief that science is supra-cultural and can be shared outside of a cultural context. It is suggested that the most effective way for scientists to engage in E/PO is to develop professional relationships with educators in the field of education and outreach for which the scientist is passionate (such as a middle school teacher if the passion lies in sharing science with middle school students.) E/PO professionals can also support and guide the passion with an understanding of best practices in E/PO. Spending time within the culture of the audience one wishes to work with can also be helpful in

  15. Nihithewak Ithiniwak, Nihithewatisiwin and science education: An exploratory narrative study examining Indigenous-based science education in K--12 classrooms from the perspectives of teachers in Woodlands Cree community contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michell, Herman Jeremiah

    This study was guided by the following research questions: What do the stories of teachers in Nihithewak (Woodlands Cree) school contexts reveal about their experiences and tendencies towards cultural and linguistic-based pedagogical practices and actions in K-12 classrooms? How did these teachers come to teach this way? How do their beliefs and values from their experiences in science education and cultural heritage influence their teaching? Why do these teachers do what they do in their science classroom and instructional practices? The research explores Indigenous-based science education from the perspectives and experiences of science teachers in Nihithewak school contexts. Narrative methodology (Clandinin & Connelly, 2000) was used as a basis for collecting and analyzing data emerging from the research process. The results included thematic portraits and stories of science teaching that is connected to Nihithewak and Nihithewatisiwin (Woodlands Cree Way of Life). Major data sources included conversational interviews, out-of-class observations and occasional in-class observations, field notes, and a research journal. An interview guide with a set of open-ended and semi-structured questions was used to direct the interviews. My role as researcher included participation in storied conversations with ten selected volunteer teachers to document the underlying meanings behind the ways they teach science in Nihithewak contexts. This research is grounded in socio-cultural theory commonly used to support the examination and development of school science in Indigenous cultural contexts (Lemke, 2001; O'Loughlin, 1992). Socio-cultural theory is a framework that links education, language, literacy, and culture (Nieto, 2002). The research encapsulates a literature review that includes the history of Aboriginal education in Canada (Battiste & Barman, 1995; Kirkness, 1992; Perley, 1993), Indigenous-based science education (Cajete, 2000; Aikenhead, 2006a), multi

  16. Outreach and education from EuroGeoMoonMars2009 Field Campaign in Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foing, Bernard H.

    The goal of the EuroGeoMoonMars mission at Utah Desert Research station(from 24 January to 28 February 2009) was to demonstrate instruments from ExoGeoLab pilot project, to support the interpretation of ongoing lunar and planetary missions, to validate a procedure for surface in-situ and return science, to study human performance aspects, and perform outreach and education projects. The EuroGeoMoonMars campaign included four sets of objectives: 1) Technology demonstration aspects: a set of instruments were deployed, tested, assessed, and training was provided to scientists using them in subsequent rotations 2) Research aspects: a series of field science and exploration investigations were conducted in geology, geochemistry, biology, astronomy, with synergies with space missions and research from planetary surfaces and Earth extreme environments. 3) Human crew related aspects, i.e. (a) evaluation of the different functions and interfaces of a planetary habitat, (b) crew time organization in this habitat, (c) evaluation of man-machine interfaces of science and technical equipment; 4) Education, outreach, communications, multi-cultural public relations Outreach, education and inspiration: We produced written, pictures, and video materials that can be used for education, outreach and public relations. Daily reports were posted on the MDRS website. We had during the Technical crew preparation, the visit of film producer Mark Arabella and film crew for a Moon related National Geographics documentary "Earth without the Moon". Two media crew visitors stayed also in the Hab to film our activities documenting the operational, research, human, simulation, imaginative and fantasy aspects of Moon-Mars-extreme Earth exploration. They contributed a journalist report, and even performed an EVA outreach filming a sortie to Hanksville village on Earth. Other film and journalists visited the EuroGeoMars crew for interviews and exchange. Specific crew reports were also prepared for

  17. Working with School Systems: Educational Outreach and Action Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingfield, Marvin; Salam, Shereen

    This guide explains how individuals and American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee (ADC) chapters can work with school systems to reduce discrimination against students of Arab background and to educate teachers and other students about the cultures of the Middle East. Arab Americans can make a difference in the school systems by personal…

  18. Ecological monitoring: Outreach to educators in the community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, J.A.; Haarmann, T.K.; Foxx, T.S.

    1997-04-01

    Reporting Environmental Data was a one-week institute for elementary and middle school teachers and principals. Participants gained insight into Los Alamos National Laboratory`s environmental monitoring programs through performing monitoring in the field. A teacher educator collaborated with a plant ecologist, an entomologist, and two master teachers to provide this institute. During the institute, there were field experiences with forest and insect sampling followed by research and summarizing results. The goals for the institute were all met. These included the following: have scientists lead field experiences with forest and insect sampling which mirror their actual laboratory practices; create understanding of the scope of the environmental monitoring program at Los Alamos National Laboratory; establish links between the professional standards for science and mathematics education and institute activities, use computer technology as both a research tool and to produce a technical summary; create educational environments. Los Alamos National Laboratory is very interested in continually improving communication with the surrounding community, especially when that communication deals with environmental surveillance. The summer institute was an effective way to involve teachers in hands-on experiences with environmental monitoring. This, in turn, taught those educators about the extent of environmental monitoring. Now those teachers are using their experiences to develop curriculum for students.

  19. The National Climate Assessment: A Treasure Trove for Education, Communications and Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaffrey, M.; Berbeco, M.; Connolly, R.; Niepold, F., III; Poppleton, K. L. I.; Cloyd, E.; Ledley, T. S.

    2014-12-01

    Required by Congress under the Global Change Act of 1990 to inform the nation on the findings of current climate research, the Third U.S. National Climate Assessment (NCA), released in May 2014, is a rich resource for climate change education, communications and outreach (ECO). Using a website design with mobile applications in mind, NCA takes advantage of mobile learning technology which is revolutionizing how, when and where learning occurs. In an effort to maximize the "teachable moments" inherent in the assessment, a community of experts from the National Center for Science Education and the CLEAN Network, working under the auspices of the National Climate Assessment Network (NCAnet) Education Affinity Group, have developed a series of NCA Learning Pathways that match key NCA messages and resources with reviewed educational materials and trusted online information sources, thereby adding pedagogical depth to the assessment. The NCA Learning Pathways, which focus on the regional chapters of the report, are designed make climate change science more local, human, relevant and, if properly framed by educators and communicators, hopeful for learners. This paper touches on the challenges and opportunities of infusing climate education, communications and outreach into curriculum and society, and details the development and content of NCA Learning Pathways, which are available online through NOAA's Climate.gov website: http://www.climate.gov/teaching

  20. Engaging Scientists in NASA Education and Public Outreach: Tools for Scientist Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxner, Sanlyn; Meinke, B. K.; Hsu, B.; Shupla, C.; Grier, J. A.; E/PO Community, SMD

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Science Education and Public Outreach Forums support the NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) and its education and public outreach (E/PO) community through a coordinated effort to enhance the coherence and efficiency of SMD-funded E/PO programs. The Forums foster collaboration between scientists with content expertise and educators with pedagogy expertise. We present tools and resources to support astronomers’ engagement in E/PO efforts. Among the tools designed specifically for scientists are a series of one-page E/PO-engagement Tips and Tricks guides, a sampler of electromagnetic-spectrum-related activities, and NASA SMD Scientist Speaker’s Bureau (http://www.lpi.usra.edu/education/speaker). Scientists can also locate resources for interacting with diverse audiences through a number of online clearinghouses, including: NASA Wavelength, a digital collection of peer-reviewed Earth and space science resources for educators of all levels (http://nasawavelength.org), and EarthSpace (http://www.lpi.usra.edu/earthspace), a community website where faculty can find and share teaching resources for the undergraduate Earth and space sciences classroom. Learn more about the opportunities to become involved in E/PO and to share your science with students, educators, and the general public at http://smdepo.org.

  1. Hobbits, Hogwarts, and the Heavens: The use of fantasy literature and film in astronomy outreach and education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Kristine

    2011-06-01

    Due in part to recent (and ongoing) film adaptations, the fantasy series of C.S. Lewis (The Chronicles of Narnia), J.K. Rowling (Harry Potter), Philip Pullman (His Dark Materials), and J.R.R. Tolkien (The Silmarillion, The Hobbit, and The Lord of the Rings) are being introduced to a new audience. Many astronomers and astronomy educators are unaware of the wide variety of astronomical references contained in each series, and the myriad possible uses of these works in astronomy education and outreach. This paper highlights activities which educators, planetariums, and science centers have already developed to utilise these works in their education and outreach programs.

  2. Public Education and Outreach for Observing Solar Eclipses and Transits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.

    2015-08-01

    The general public is often very interested in observing solar eclipses, with widespread attention from newspapers and other sources often available only days before the events. Recently, the 2012 eclipse's partial phases in Australia and the 2015 eclipse's partial phases throughout Europe as well as western Asia and northern Africa, were widely viewed. The 21 August 2017 eclipse, whose totality will sweep across the Continental United States from northwest to southeast, will have partial phases visible throughout the U.S., Canada, Mexico, Central America, and into South America. The 2019 and 2020 partial phases of total eclipses will be visible throughout South America, and partial phases from annular eclipses will be visible from other parts of the world. The 9 May 2016 transit of Mercury will be best visible from the Western Hemisphere, Europe, and Africa. Many myths and misunderstandings exist about the safety of observing partial phases, and it is our responsibility as astronomers and educators to transmit accurate information and to attempt the widest possible distribution of such information. The Working Group on Public Education at Eclipses and Transits, formerly of Commission 46 on Education and Development and now of New Commission 11, tries to coordinate the distribution of information. In collaboration with the Solar Division's Working Group on Solar Eclipses, their website at http://eclipses.info is a one-stop shop for accurate information on how to observe eclipses, why it is interesting to do so, where they will be visible (with links to online maps and weather statistics), and how encouraging students to observe eclipses can be inspirational for them, perhaps even leading them to realize that the Universe can be understood and therefore renewing the strength of their studies. Links to information about transits of Mercury and Venus are also included.

  3. Evaluate the Impact of your Education and Outreach Program Using the Quantitative Collaborative Impact Analysis Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalice, D.; Davis, H. B.

    2015-12-01

    The AGU scientific community has a strong motivation to improve the STEM knowledge and skills of today's youth, and we are dedicating increasing amounts of our time and energy to education and outreach work. Scientists and educational project leads can benefit from a deeper connection to the value of evaluation, how to work with an evaluator, and how to effectively integrate evaluation into projects to increase their impact. This talk will introduce a method for evaluating educational activities, including public talks, professional development workshops for educators, youth engagement programs, and more. We will discuss the impetus for developing this method--the Quantitative Collaborative Impact Analysis Method--how it works, and the successes we've had with it in the NASA Astrobiology education community.

  4. WATERS - Integrating Science and Education Through the Development of an Education & Outreach Program that Engages Scientists, Students and Citizens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschenbach, E. A.; Conklin, M. H.

    2007-12-01

    The need to train students in hydrologic science and environmental engineering is well established. Likewise, the public requires a raised awareness of the seriousness of water quality and availability problems. The WATERS Network (WATer and Environmental Research Systems Network ) has the potential to significantly change the way students, researchers, citizens, policy makers and industry members learn about environmental problems and solutions regarding water quality, quantity and distribution. This potential can be met if the efforts of water scientists, computer scientists, and educators are integrated appropriately. Successful pilot projects have found that cyberinfrastructure for education and outreach needs to be developed in parallel with research related cyberinfrastructure. We propose further integration of research, education and outreach activities. Through the use of technology that connects students, faculty, researchers, policy makers and others, WATERS Network can provide learning opportunities and teaching efficiencies that can revolutionize environmental science and engineering education. However, there are a plethora of existing environmental science and engineering educational programs. In this environment, WATERS can make a greater impact through careful selection of activities that build upon its unique strengths, that have high potential for engaging the members, and that meet identified needs: (i) modernizing curricula and pedagogy (ii) integrating science and education, (iii) sustainable professional development, and (iv) training the next generation of interdisciplinary water and social scientists and environmental engineers. National and observatory-based education facilities would establish the physical infrastructure necessary to coordinate education and outreach activities. Each observatory would partner with local educators and citizens to develop activities congruent with the scientific mission of the observatory. An unprecedented

  5. Nebraska Science Standards: Grades K-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebraska Department of Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This publication presents the Nebraska Science Standards for Grades K-12. The standards are presented according to the following grades: (1) Grades K-2; (2) Grades 3-5; (3) Grades 6-8; and (4) Grades 9-12.

  6. Best Practices in Administration of K-12 Dance Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henneman, Suzanne E.

    2013-01-01

    The role of administering K-12 dance education programs is both exciting and invigorating. Being part of the decision-making process, problem solving with teams of colleagues, establishing routines and initiatives, creating "something from nothing," and watching programs grow is appealing to dance teachers as creative and critical…

  7. Teachers' Curriculum Guide to the Hayward Shoreline, K-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachle, Leo; And Others

    This teaching guide gives environmental education ideas for grades K-12. The field trips and activities all relate to the Hayward shoreline of the San Francisco, California, Bay. Included in the guide are 44 science activities, 15 social science activities, and 18 humanities activities. Each activity description gives the experience level, site…

  8. Best Practices in Administration of K-12 Dance Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henneman, Suzanne E.

    2013-01-01

    The role of administering K-12 dance education programs is both exciting and invigorating. Being part of the decision-making process, problem solving with teams of colleagues, establishing routines and initiatives, creating "something from nothing," and watching programs grow is appealing to dance teachers as creative and critical…

  9. The Role of the Modern Planetarium as an Effective Tool in Astronomy Education and Public Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albin, Edward F.

    2016-01-01

    As the planetarium approaches its 100th anniversary, today's planetarium educator must reflect on the role of such technology in contemporary astronomy education and outreach. The projection planetarium saw "first light" in 1923 at the Carl Zeiss factory in Jena, Germany. During the 20th century, the concept of a star projector beneath a dome flourished as an extraordinary device for the teaching of astronomy. The evolution of digital technology over the past twenty years has dramatically changed the perception / utilization of the planetarium. The vast majority of modern star theaters have shifted entirely to fulldome digital projection systems, abandoning the once ubiquitous electromechanical star projector altogether. These systems have evolved into ultra-high resolution theaters, capable of projecting imagery, videos, and any web-based media onto the dome. Such capability has rendered the planetarium as a multi-disciplinary tool, broadening its educational appeal to a wide variety of fields -- including life sciences, the humanities, and even entertainment venues. However, we suggest that what is at the heart of the planetarium appeal is having a theater adept at projecting a beautiful / accurate star-field. To this end, our facility chose to keep / maintain its aging Zeiss V star projector while adding fulldome digital capability. Such a hybrid approach provides an excellent compromise between presenting state of the art multimedia while at the same time maintaining the ability to render a stunning night sky. In addition, our facility maintains two portable StarLab planetariums for outreach purposes, one unit with a classic electromechanical star projector and the other having a relatively inexpensive fulldome projection system. With a combination of these technologies, it is possible for the planetarium to be an effective tool for astronomical education / outreach well into the 21st century.

  10. Education and Outreach Programs Offered by the Center for High Pressure Research and the Consortium for Materials Properties Research in Earth Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, G. A.

    2003-12-01

    Major research facilities and organizations provide an effective venue for developing partnerships with educational organizations in order to offer a wide variety of educational programs, because they constitute a base where the culture of scientific investigation can flourish. The Consortium for Materials Properties Research in Earth Sciences (COMPRES) conducts education and outreach programs through the Earth Science Educational Resource Center (ESERC), in partnership with other groups that offer research and education programs. ESERC initiated its development of education programs in 1994 under the administration of the Center for High Pressure Research (CHiPR), which was funded as a National Science Foundation Science and Technology Center from 1991 to 2002. Programs developed during ESERC's association with CHiPR and COMPRES have targeted a wide range of audiences, including pre-K, K-12 students and teachers, undergraduates, and graduate students. Since 1995, ESERC has offered inquiry-based programs to Project WISE (Women in Science and Engineering) students at a high school and undergraduate level. Activities have included projects that investigated earthquakes, high pressure mineral physics, and local geology. Through a practicum known as Project Java, undergraduate computer science students have developed interactive instructional tools for several of these activities. For K-12 teachers, a course on Long Island geology is offered each fall, which includes an examination of the role that processes in the Earth's interior have played in the geologic history of the region. ESERC has worked with Stony Brook's Department of Geosciences faculty to offer courses on natural hazards, computer modeling, and field geology to undergraduate students, and on computer programming for graduate students. Each summer, a four-week residential college-level environmental geology course is offered to rising tenth graders from the Brentwood, New York schools in partnership with

  11. NASA and Earth Science Week: a Model for Engaging Scientists and Engineers in Education and Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwerin, T. G.; deCharon, A.; Brown de Colstoun, E. C.; Chambers, L. H.; Woroner, M.; Taylor, J.; Callery, S.; Jackson, R.; Riebeek, H.; Butcher, G. J.

    2014-12-01

    Earth Science Week (ESW) - the 2nd full week in October - is a national and international event to help the public, particularly educators and students, gain a better understanding and appreciation for the Earth sciences. The American Geosciences Institute (AGI) organizes ESW, along with partners including NASA, using annual themes (e.g., the theme for 2014 is Earth's Connected Systems). ESW provides a unique opportunity for NASA scientists and engineers across multiple missions and projects to share NASA STEM, their personal stories and enthusiasm to engage and inspire the next generation of Earth explorers. Over the past five years, NASA's ESW campaign has been planned and implemented by a cross-mission/cross-project group, led by the NASA Earth Science Education and Pubic Outreach Forum, and utilizing a wide range of media and approaches (including both English- and Spanish-language events and content) to deliver NASA STEM to teachers and students. These included webcasts, social media (blogs, twitter chats, Google+ hangouts, Reddit Ask Me Anything), videos, printed and online resources, and local events and visits to classrooms. Dozens of NASA scientists, engineers, and communication and education specialists contribute and participate each year. This presentation will provide more information about this activity and offer suggestions and advice for others engaging scientists and engineers in education and outreach programs and events.

  12. Community-Driven Support in the Hydrologic Sciences through Data, Education and Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, E.

    2015-12-01

    The Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Science, Inc. (CUAHSI) is a non-profit funded by the National Science Foundation to support water science research and education. As outlined in the CUAHSI Education and Outreach Strategy, our objectives are: 1) helping the member institutions communicate water science; 2) cross-disciplinary water education; 3) dissemination of research; 4) place-based water education using data services; and 5) broadening participation. Through the CUAHSI Water Data Center, online tools and resources are available to discover, download, and analyze multiple time-series water datasets across various parameters. CUAHSI supports novel graduate student research through the Pathfinder Fellowship program which has enhanced the interdisciplinary breadth of early-career research. Public outreach through the Let's Talk About Water film symposium and cyberseminar programs have proven effective in distributing research, leading to more recent development of virtual training workshops. By refining and building upon CUAHSI's existing programs, new training opportunities, collaborative projects, and community-building activities for the hydrologic sciences have come to fruition, such as the recent National Flood Interoperability Experiment with the NOAA's National Water Center.

  13. Educational outreach at the NSF Engineering Research Center for Data Storage Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, James E., Jr.

    1996-07-01

    An aspect of the National Science Foundation Engineering Research Center in Data Storage Systems (DSSC) program that is valued by our sponsors is the way we use our different educational programs to impact the data storage industry in a positive fashion. The most common way to teach data storage materials is in classes that are offered as part of the Carnegie Mellon curriculum. Another way the DSSC attempts to educate students is through outreach programs such as the NSF Research Experiences for Undergraduates and Young Scholars programs, both of which have been very successful and place emphasis and including women, under represented minorities and disable d students. The Center has also established cooperative outreach partnerships which serve to both educate students and benefit the industry. One example is the cooperative program we have had with the Magnetics Technology Centre at the National University of Singapore to help strengthen their research and educational efforts to benefit U.S. data storage companies with plants in Singapore. In addition, the Center has started a program that will help train outstanding students from technical institutes to increase their value as technicians to the data storage industry when they graduate.

  14. Bringing Terra Science to the People: 10 years of education and public outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riebeek, H.; Chambers, L. H.; Yuen, K.; Herring, D.

    2009-12-01

    The default image on Apple's iPhone is a blue, white, green and tan globe: the Blue Marble. The iconic image was produced using Terra data as part of the mission's education and public outreach efforts. As far-reaching and innovative as Terra science has been over the past decade, Terra education and public outreach efforts have been equally successful. This talk will provide an overview of Terra's crosscutting education and public outreach projects, which have reached into educational facilities—classrooms, museums, and science centers, across the Internet, and into everyday life. The Earth Observatory web site was the first web site designed for the public that told the unified story of what we can learn about our planet from all space-based platforms. Initially conceived as part of Terra mission outreach in 1999, the web site has won five Webby awards, the highest recognition a web site can receive. The Visible Earth image gallery is a catalogue of NASA Earth imagery that receives more than one million page views per month. The NEO (NASA Earth Observations) web site and WMS (web mapping service) tool serves global data sets to museums and science centers across the world. Terra educational products, including the My NASA Data web service and the Students' Cloud Observations Online (S'COOL) project, bring Terra data into the classroom. Both projects target multiple grade levels, ranging from elementary school to graduate school. S'COOL uses student observations of clouds to help validate Terra data. Students and their parents have puzzled over weekly "Where on Earth" geography quizzes published on line. Perhaps the most difficult group to reach is the large segment of the public that does not seek out science information online or in a science museum or classroom. To reach these people, EarthSky produced a series of podcasts and radio broadcasts that brought Terra science to more than 30 million people in 2009. Terra imagery, including the Blue Marble, have

  15. Twelve Years of Education and Public Outreach with the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cominsky, Lynn R.; McLin, K. M.; Simonnet, A.; Fermi E/PO Team

    2013-04-01

    During the past twelve years, NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has supported a wide range of Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) activities, targeting K-14 students and the general public. The purpose of the Fermi E/PO program is to increase student and public understanding of the science of the high-energy Universe, through inspiring, engaging and educational activities linked to the mission’s science objectives. The E/PO program has additional more general goals, including increasing the diversity of students in the Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) pipeline, and increasing public awareness and understanding of Fermi science and technology. Fermi's multi-faceted E/PO program includes elements in each major outcome category: ● Higher Education: Fermi E/PO promotes STEM careers through the use of NASA data including research experiences for students and teachers (Global Telescope Network), education through STEM curriculum development projects (Cosmology curriculum) and through enrichment activities (Large Area Telescope simulator). ● Elementary and Secondary education: Fermi E/PO links the science objectives of the Fermi mission to well-tested, customer-focused and NASA-approved standards-aligned classroom materials (Black Hole Resources, Active Galaxy Education Unit and Pop-up book, TOPS guides, Supernova Education Unit). These materials have been distributed through (Educator Ambassador and on-line) teacher training workshops and through programs involving under-represented students (after-school clubs and Astro 4 Girls). ● Informal education and public outreach: Fermi E/PO engages the public in sharing the experience of exploration and discovery through high-leverage multi-media experiences (Black Holes planetarium and PBS NOVA shows), through popular websites (Gamma-ray Burst Skymap, Epo's Chronicles), social media (Facebook, MySpace), interactive web-based activities (Space Mysteries, Einstein@Home) and activities by

  16. Effective Models for Scientists Engaging in Meaningful Education and Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel-Storr, Jacob; Gurule, Isaiah; InsightSTEM Teacher-Scientist-Communicator-Learner Team

    2017-01-01

    We present a central paradigm, extending the model of "Teacher-Scientist" partnerships towards a new philosophy of "Scientist-Instructor-Learner-Communicator" Partnerships. In this paradigm modes of, and expertise in, communication, and the learners themselves, are held is as high status as the experts and teachers in the learning setting.We present three distinctive models that rest on this paradigm in different educational settings. First a model in which scientists and teachers work together with a communications-related specialist to design and develop new science exploration tools for the classroom, and gather feedback from learners. Secondly, we present a model which involves an ongoing joint professional development program helping scientists and teachers to be co-communicators of knowledge exploration to their specific audience of learners. And thirdly a model in which scientists remotely support classroom research based on online data, while the teachers and their students learn to become effective communicators of their genuine scientific results.This work was funded in part by the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and by NASA awards NNX16AC68A and NNX16AJ21G. All opinions are those of the authors.

  17. Effective Models for Scientists Engaging in Meaningful Education and Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel-Storr, Jacob; InsightSTEM SILC Partnership Team

    2016-10-01

    We present a central paradigm, extending the model of "Teacher-Scientist" partnerships towards a new philosophy of "Scientist-Instructor-Learner-Communicator" Partnerships. In this paradigm modes of, and expertise in, communication, and the learners themselves, are held is as high status as the experts and teachers in the learning setting.We present three distinctive models that rest on this paradigm in different educational settings. First a model in which scientists and teachers work together with a communications-related specialist to design and develop new science exploration tools for the classroom, and gather feedback from learners. Secondly, we present a model which involves an ongoing joint professional development program helping scientists and teachers to be co-communicators of knowledge exploration to their specific audience of learners. And thirdly a model in which scientists remotely support classroom research based on online data, while the teachers and their students learn to become effective communicators of their genuine scientific results.This work was funded in part by the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and by NASA awards NNX16AC68A and NNX16AJ21G. All opinions are those of the authors.

  18. Education and public outreach during the spring equinox, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zueck, S. L.; Lara, A.

    2012-12-01

    We organized for third occasion a solar physics activities during the spring equinox of 2012. On March 20 a group of researchers and their graduate students, amateur astronomers and educators all of them members of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM) went to a beautiful village named Tepoztlan, Morelos, located 30 minutes from the City and Mexico. We give lectures and install solar telescopes in the garden of the former convent of Tepoztlan near a mountain considered sacred. During the equinox day the mountain is climbed by thousands of individuals to catch solar energy that they consider vital, specially during a year that many of them consider the end of a era. Through media and advertisements we invite visitors to our free event. We expected to hear different assumptions about our closest star, the Sun, and interact with different socio-cultural views at the same time that we presented our concepts of science in a every day language.

  19. “SIMPLE Sciernce ”——基于图像的中小学简化科学教育数字图书馆%SIMPLE Science: Image-Based Learning Digital Library for K-12 Education

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘燕权; 王群

    2011-01-01

    SIMPLE Science is a digital library project aiming to "overcome barriers to mainstream use of image processing and analysis (IPA) in K-12 education''. It attempts to make IPA accessible and easy to use, provide extensive and updateable archives of imaging data, and design a pedagogical structure that supports national education standards for middle school education. The article provides an extended review on the comtruction and status of the digital library, including project background, resources organization, technological structures, service features, as well as comments and suggestions made by the authors.%SIMPLE Science是一个通过利用图像处理及分析技术(IPA)辅助青少年学习的数字图书馆,通过提供图片信息、教学计划、课程活动使得图像处理和分析能够作为一种学习工具得以使用,同时也为教育工作者在教学过程中使用图像信息提供便利条件.文章对该项目的建设及现状进行了综合性的评析,包括项目概述、数字资源及组织、技术特征、服务特点等.

  20. Mobile and Web Game Development: Using Videogames as an Educational and Outreach Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaime, Fernando I.

    2012-01-01

    Few tools reach out to capture the imagination and interests of children like video games do. As such, the development of educational applications that foster young minds' interest in science and technology become of the utmost importance. To this end, I spent my summer internship developing outreach and educational applications in conjunction with JPL's Space Place team. This small, but dedicated, team of people manages three NASA websites that focus on presenting science and technology information in such a manner that young children can understand it and develop an interest in the subjects. Besides the websites, with their plethora of educational content presented through hands-on activities, games and informative articles, the team also creates and coordinates the distribution of printed material to museums, astronomy clubs and a huge network of educators.

  1. Muggles, Meteoritic Armor, and Menelmacar: Using Fantasy Series in Astronomy Education and Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, K.; Bednarski, M.

    2008-11-01

    Due in part to recent (and ongoing) film adaptations, the fantasy series of C.S. Lewis (The Chronicles of Narnia), J.K. Rowling (Harry Potter), Philip Pullman (His Dark Materials), and J.R.R. Tolkien (The Silmarillion, The Hobbit, and The Lord of the Rings) are being introduced to a new audience of young (and not so young) readers. Many astronomers and astronomy educators are unaware of the wide variety of astronomical references contained in each series. The first portion of this workshop will introduce participants to these references, and highlight activities which educators, planetariums, and science centers have already developed to utilize these works in their education and outreach programs. In the second segment of the workshop, participants will develop ideas for activities and materials relevant to their individual circumstances, including standards-based education materials.

  2. Mobile and Web Game Development: Using Videogames as an Educational and Outreach Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaime, Fernando I.

    2012-01-01

    Few tools reach out to capture the imagination and interests of children like video games do. As such, the development of educational applications that foster young minds' interest in science and technology become of the utmost importance. To this end, I spent my summer internship developing outreach and educational applications in conjunction with JPL's Space Place team. This small, but dedicated, team of people manages three NASA websites that focus on presenting science and technology information in such a manner that young children can understand it and develop an interest in the subjects. Besides the websites, with their plethora of educational content presented through hands-on activities, games and informative articles, the team also creates and coordinates the distribution of printed material to museums, astronomy clubs and a huge network of educators.

  3. Seeing is believing: an educational outreach activity on disinfection practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetu Isabelle

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Skin and soft-tissue infections are very common among persons who inject drugs. They occur when microbes pass under the protective layer of the skin and proliferate. This happens when harm reduction recommendations such as skin aseptia before injection and sterile injection equipment usage are not properly followed. Methods A group of active drug users involved in a health promotion project as peer educators were asked about their formation needs. To address their inquiries concerning skin and soft-tissue infections, we devised with them a series of workshops touching upon common infections, the microflora, and microbial transmission. Results Participants learned to identify common infections and how to properly react in case of an abscess, cellulitis or phlebitis. They saw microscopic objects, found out about the high prevalence of microbes in their environment and on their skin, and could appreciate the efficiency of different washing and disinfection techniques. They visualized how easily microbes can spread from person to person and from contaminated objects to persons. Conclusion In the weeks following this activity, some participants demonstrated and reported healthy behavioural changes regarding their own injection practices. Furthermore, they shared their newfound knowledge and began enforcing its application among people they inject drugs with. Most participants greatly appreciated this activity and valued it as being highly efficient and tangible. Note: A French version of this paper is available on the Journal's web site [see Additional file 1]. Additional File 1 Article en Français (article in French. Une version française de l'article a été préparée par les auteurs. Elle est disponible à partir du site Web du Harm Reduction Journal. Click here for file

  4. Educational outreach to general practitioners reduces children's asthma symptoms: a cluster randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sladden Michael

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Childhood asthma is common in Cape Town, a province of South Africa, but is underdiagnosed by general practitioners. Medications are often prescribed inappropriately, and care is episodic. The objective of this study is to assess the impact of educational outreach to general practitioners on asthma symptoms of children in their practice. Methods This is a cluster randomised trial with general practices as the unit of intervention, randomisation, and analysis. The setting is Mitchells Plain (population 300,000, a dormitory town near Cape Town. Solo general practitioners, without nurse support, operate from storefront practices. Caregiver-reported symptom data were collected for 318 eligible children (2 to 17 years with moderate to severe asthma, who were attending general practitioners in Mitchells Plain. One year post-intervention follow-up data were collected for 271 (85% of these children in all 43 practices. Practices randomised to intervention (21 received two 30-minute educational outreach visits by a trained pharmacist who left materials describing key interventions to improve asthma care. Intervention and control practices received the national childhood asthma guideline. Asthma severity was measured in a parent-completed survey administered through schools using a symptom frequency and severity scale. We compared intervention and control group children on the change in score from pre-to one-year post-intervention. Results Symptom scores declined an additional 0.84 points in the intervention vs. control group (on a nine-point scale. p = 0.03. For every 12 children with asthma exposed to a doctor allocated to the intervention, one extra child will have substantially reduced symptoms. Conclusion Educational outreach was accepted by general practitioners and was effective. It could be applied to other health care quality problems in this setting.

  5. Canadian Geoscience Education Network (CGEN): Fostering Excellence in Earth Science Education and Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haidl, F. M.; Vodden, C.; Bates, J. L.; Morgan, A. V.

    2009-05-01

    CGEN, the outreach arm of the Canadian Federation of Earth Sciences, is a network of more than 270 individuals from all over Canada who work to promote geoscience education and public awareness of science. CGEN's priorities are threefold: to improve the quality of Earth science education delivered in our primary and secondary schools; to raise public awareness about the Earth sciences and their impact on everyday life; and to encourage student interest in the Earth sciences as a career option. These priorities are supported by CGEN's six core programs: 1) The national EdGEO program (www.edgeo.org), initiated in the 1970s, supports Earth science workshops for teachers. These workshops, organized by teams of local educators and geoscientists, provide teachers with "enhanced knowledge, classroom resources and increased confidence" to more effectively teach Earth science. In 2008, a record 521 teachers attended 14 EdGEO workshops. 2) EarthNet (www.earthnet-geonet.ca) is a virtual resource centre that provides support for teachers and for geoscientists involved in education and outreach. In 2008, EarthNet received a $11,500 grant from Encana Corporation to develop energy-related content. 3) The new Careers in Earth Science website (www.earthsciencescanada.com/careers), launched in October 2008, enhances CGEN's capacity to encourage students to pursue a career in the Earth sciences. This project exemplifies the value of collaboration with other organizations. Seven groups provided financial support for the project and many other organizations and individuals contributed in-kind support. 4) Geoscape Canada and Waterscape Canada, programs led by the Geological Survey of Canada, communicate practical Earth science information to teachers, students, and other members of communities across Canada through a series of electronic and hard-copy posters and other resources. Many of the resources created from 1998 to 2007 are available online (www.geoscape.nrcan.gc.ca). A northern

  6. Science in the Parks: An Alternative Model for Physics Education Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Adam

    2010-10-01

    Science in the Parks is a community outreach program that brings informal science education to children and their families in the Ogden, UT area. Rather than hosting a traditional science camp on a university campus or other facility, this program brings science to kids in the parks in their own neighborhoods and where they already visit a federally funded free-lunch program. Over a six-week, six-park tour, the program reaches thousands of children, draws in 50 different undergraduate volunteers in various programs, and presents 5 different scientific themes in a carnival-like atmosphere. This presentation will describe the philosophy, strategies, and outcomes of the program.

  7. The Big Picture, Polar Ambassadors, and Polar Days; International Outreach and Education During and Beyond IPY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, R. A.; Zicus, S.; Pauls, M.; McCaffrey, M.; Carlson, D.; Huffman, L. T.

    2007-12-01

    The International Polar Year (IPY) 2007-8 has begun, and it's not just for scientists. Teachers, artists, students, polar visitors, explorers, young scientists, arctic residents, journalists, photographers, and film-makers are all interested. IPY is an incredible opportunity to involve the public with polar science and raise awareness about critical issues facing the polar regions. An overview of the IPY international education and outreach strategy will be presented highlighting activities that encourage polar scientists to work directly with the global community to raise awareness about the polar regions, and the importance of their research. Examples include International Polar Days, IPY in Google Earth, and the Polar Ambassador Programme.

  8. Lessons for the Scientist-Communicator: Education & Public Outreach in The Dark Energy Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Rachel

    2017-01-01

    The Dark Energy Survey (DES) Collaboration is an international astronomy collaboration of 400 scientists (graduate student to professor) from 30 institutions. Our education and public outreach (EPO) program is a unique, grass-roots effort that sets new standards for large science collaborations. We describe several in-person and online initiatives in which scientists develop connections with local communities and reach global audiences. We also present some of the organizational and logistical challenges of our EPO experience and the lessons learned that will be invaluable for future large-scale projects.

  9. NASA Astrophysics Education and Public Outreach: Engaging Educators and Students in Exploring the Cosmic Frontier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, Brandon L.; Eisenhamer, Bonnie; Smith, Denise Anne; Jirdeh, Hussein; Summers, Frank; Darnell, John T.; Ryer, Holly

    2015-08-01

    NASA’s Frontier Fields is an ambitious three-year Great Observatories program that will expand our understanding of galaxy formation and evolution in the early universe. The program includes six deep-field observations of strong-lensing galaxy clusters that will be taken in parallel with six deep “blank fields.” The observations allow astronomers to look deeper into the universe than ever before, and potentially uncover galaxies that are as much as 100 times fainter than what the telescopes can typically observe. The Frontier Fields science program is ideal for informing audiences about scientific advances and topics in STEM. The study of galaxy properties, statistics, optics, and Einstein’s theory of general relativity naturally leverages off of the science returns of the Frontier Fields program. As a result, the Space Telescope Science Institute’s Office of Public Outreach (OPO) has initiated an E/PO project to follow the progress of the Frontier Fields.For over two decades, the Hubble E/PO program has sought to bring the wonders of the universe to the education community, the youth, and the public, and engage audiences in the adventure of scientific discovery. Program components include standards-based curriculum-support materials, exhibits and exhibit components, professional development workshops, and direct interactions with scientists. We are also leveraging our new social media strategy to bring the science program to the public in the form of an ongoing blog. The main underpinnings of the program’s infrastructure are scientist-educator development teams, partnerships, and an embedded program evaluation component. OPO is leveraging this existing infrastructure to bring the Frontier Fields science program to the education community and the public in a cost-effective way.This talk features the goals and current status of the Frontier Fields E/PO program, with a particular emphasis on our education goals and achievements. We also highlight OPO

  10. I Love My Sun: An Educational Space Weather Outreach Tool for Children and Senior People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulunay, Yurdanur; Tulunay, Ersin

    2014-05-01

    In the present day society, there is a vital need for setting up education and outreach activities in the Space Weather field for creating a healthy environment for the proper development of Space Weather markets along with the fundamental and applied research activities. It is important to educate children about the important role that the Sun has in their lives. This presentation gives an educational outreach tool entitled "I Love My Sun" that has been developed for school children in the approximate age group 7 through 11 years. Its main objective is to make children aware of space weather, the Sun, Sun-Earth relations and how they, the children, are part of this global picture. Children are given a lecture about the Sun; this is preceded and followed by the children drawing a picture of the Sun. The activity was initiated by Y. Tulunay in Ankara, Turkey as national project in the context of the 50th anniversary of Space Age and IHY activities. Since then it has been extended into a spatial (Europe) and temporal dimensions. A metric has been developed to facilitate an objective evaluation of the outcomes of the Events. In this presentation, the background behind the "I Love My Sun" initiative is given and it is described how to perform an "I Love My Sun" event. Impressions and main results from the case studies are given. As a new extension, preliminary examples are also given concerning senior people.

  11. Scientists: Get Involved in Planetary Science Education and Public Outreach! Here’s How!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxner, Sanlyn; Dalton, H.; Shipp, S.; CoBabe-Ammann, E.; Scalice, D.; Bleacher, L.; Wessen, A.

    2013-10-01

    The Planetary Science Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) Forum is a team of educators, scientists, and outreach professionals funded by NASA’s Science Mission Directorate (SMD) that supports SMD scientists currently involved in E/PO - or interested in becoming involved in E/PO efforts - to find ways to do so through a variety of avenues. There are many current and future opportunities and resources for scientists to become engaged in E/PO. The Forum provides tools for responding to NASA SMD E/PO funding opportunities (webinars and online proposal guides), a one-page Tips and Tricks guide for scientists to engage in education and public outreach, and a sampler of activities organized by thematic topic and NASA’s Big Questions in planetary science. Scientists can also locate resources for interacting with diverse audiences through a number of online clearinghouses, including: NASA Wavelength, a digital collection of peer-reviewed Earth and space science resources for educators of all levels (http://nasawavelength.org); the Year of the Solar System website (http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/yss), a presentation of thematic resources that includes background information, missions, the latest in planetary science news, and educational products, for use in the classroom and out, for teaching about the solar system organized by topic - volcanism, ice, astrobiology, etc.; and EarthSpace (http://www.lpi.usra.edu/earthspace), a community website where faculty can find and share resources and information about teaching Earth and space sciences in the undergraduate classroom, including class materials, news, funding opportunities, and the latest education research. Also recently developed, the NASA SMD Scientist Speaker’s Bureau (http://www.lpi.usra.edu/education/speaker) offers an online portal to connect scientists interested in getting involved in E/PO projects - giving public talks, classroom visits, and virtual connections - with audiences. Learn more about the

  12. Outreach and Technical Assistance Network. Third Year Evaluation Report. February 1, 1992-January 31, 1993. An Adult Education 2000 Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacienda La Puente Unified School District, City of Industry, CA. Outreach and Technical Assistance Network.

    The Outreach and Technical Assistance Network (OTAN) was developed to disseminate resources to California adult educators. During the project's third year, staff development and information services were provided to 321 funded agencies. In collaboration with the Educational Telecommunications Network, OTAN staff organized the Adult Learning…

  13. Education and public outreach at the Carl Sagan Solar Observatory of the University of Sonora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Saucedo-Morales

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the importance of small solar observatories for EPO (Education and Public Outreach, mentioning why they are relevant and what kind of equipment and software require. We stress the fact that technological advances have made them affordable and that they should be widely available. This work is a result of our experience with one: The Carl Sagan Solar Observatory (CSSO. We briefly describe its status and the solar data obtained daily with students participation. We present examples of the data obtained in the visible, Ca II and two in Hα. Data which is widely used for education. Finally we talk about the capability for remote operation as an open invitation for collaboration in educational and scientific projects.

  14. Education and public outreach at the Carl Sagan Solar Observatory of the University of Sonora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saucedo-Morales Julio; Loera-González, Pablo

    2013-05-01

    We discuss the importance of small solar observatories for EPO (Education and Public Outreach), mentioning why they are relevant and what kind of equipment and software require. We stress the fact that technological advances have made them affordable and that they should be widely available. This work is a result of our experience with one: The Carl Sagan Solar Observatory (CSSO). We briefly describe its status and the solar data obtained daily with students participation. We present examples of the data obtained in the visible, Ca II and two in Hα. Data which is widely used for education. Finally we talk about the capability for remote operation as an open invitation for collaboration in educational and scientific projects.

  15. Cure4Kids for Kids: school-based cancer education outreach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Kirk Villalobos, Aubrey; Quintana, Yuri; Ribeiro, Raul C

    2012-01-01

    In 2006, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital created Cure4Kids for Kids, a school-based outreach program. The objectives of this community education program are to teach about cancer and healthy lifestyles and to inspire an interest in science and health-related careers. A multidisciplinary team of St. Jude and outside experts developed and pilot tested age-appropriate educational materials and activities with 4th grade students. Eight schools and more than 800 children have participated in the program since 2006. Teachers and students have demonstrated a very positive response to the program for it being both fun and educational. Cure4Kids for Kids resources have been collected into a teacher's kit and are now freely available online at www.cure4kids.org/kids.

  16. NASA SMD Science Education and Public Outreach Forums: A Five-Year Retrospective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Denise A.; Peticolas, Laura; Schwerin, Theresa; Shipp, Stephanie

    2014-06-01

    NASA’s Science Mission Directorate (SMD) created four competitively awarded Science Education and Public Outreach Forums (Astrophysics, Heliophysics, Planetary Science, Earth Science) in 2009. The objective is to enhance the overall coherence of SMD education and public outreach (E/PO), leading to more effective, efficient, and sustainable use of SMD science discoveries and learning experiences. We summarize progress and next steps towards achieving this goal with examples drawn from Astrophysics and cross-Forum efforts. Over the past five years, the Forums have enabled leaders of individual SMD mission and grant-funded E/PO programs to work together to place individual science discoveries and learning resources into context for audiences, conveying the big picture of scientific discovery based on audience needs. Forum-organized collaborations and partnerships extend the impact of individual programs to new audiences and provide resources and opportunities for educators to engage their audiences in NASA science. Similarly, Forum resources support scientists and faculty in utilizing SMD E/PO resources. Through Forum activities, mission E/PO teams and grantees have worked together to define common goals and provide unified professional development for educators (NASA’s Multiwavelength Universe); build partnerships with libraries to engage underserved/underrepresented audiences (NASA Science4Girls and Their Families); strengthen use of best practices; provide thematic, audience-based entry points to SMD learning experiences; support scientists in participating in E/PO; and, convey the impact of the SMD E/PO program. The Forums have created a single online digital library (NASA Wavelength, http://nasawavelength.org) that hosts all peer-reviewed SMD-funded education materials and worked with the SMD E/PO community to compile E/PO program metrics (http://nasamissionepometrics.org/). External evaluation shows the Forums are meeting their objectives. Specific examples

  17. Effect of educational outreach on general practice prescribing of antibiotics and antidepressants: A two-year randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enriquez-puga, Andres; Baker, Richard; Paul, Sanjoy; Villoro-Valdes, Renata

    2009-01-01

    Objective Prescribing of broad spectrum antibiotics and antidepressants in general practice often does not accord with guidelines. The aim was to determine the effectiveness of educational outreach in improving the prescribing of selected antibiotics and antidepressants, and whether the effect is sustained for two years. Design Single blind randomized trial. Setting Twenty-eight general practices in Leicestershire, England. Intervention Educational outreach visits were undertaken, tailored to barriers to change, 14 practices receiving visits for reducing selected antibiotics and 14 for improving antidepressant prescribing. Main outcome measures Number of items prescribed per 1000 registered patients for amoxicillin with clavulanic acid (co-amoxiclav) and quinolone antibiotics, and average daily quantities per 1000 patients for lofepramine and fluoxetine antidepressants, measured at the practice level for six-month periods over two years. Results There was no effect on the prescribing of co-amoxiclav, quinolones, or fluoxetine, but prescribing of lofepramine increased in accordance with the guidelines. The increase persisted throughout two years of follow-up. Conclusion A simple, group-level educational outreach intervention, designed to take account of identified barriers to change, can have a modest but sustained effect on prescribing levels. However, outreach is not always effective. The context in which change in prescribing practice is being sought, the views of prescribers concerning the value of the drug, or other unrecognised barriers to change may influence the effectiveness of outreach. PMID:19958063

  18. NASA Astrophysics Education and Public Outreach Forum: Product and Activity Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryer, Holly; Eisenhamer, B.; Knisely, L.; McCallister, D.; Smith, D. A.

    2013-01-01

    The NASA Science Education and Public Outreach Forums (SEPOFs) have been working together to conduct a detailed analysis of SMD E/PO products and activities. The goal of this effort is to characterize individual SMD E/PO products and the collection as a whole, while identifying gaps in the SMD E/PO portfolio. The Astrophysics Forum has undertaken the task of analyzing the astrophysics portfolio of formal, informal, and outreach products and programs. The astrophysics analysis team has been characterizing products based upon AAAS Project 2061 benchmarks addressed, target audience, instructional strategies used, and types of assessments included. All formal education activities that have been analyzed to date have been compiled into a populated database that includes analyzed activities from all four SEPOFs. The database will be used to inform the development of a product and resources catalog. It also will be used to begin a gap analysis for SMD products and activities. Ultimately, we hope to help end users easily find resources, we hope to identify progressions and connections between SMD E/PO resources and programming, and we hope to provide guidance to the E/PO community in developing materials that will help bridge gaps for both NASA SMD and target audiences. This poster highlights the astrophysics product analysis process, and the preliminary findings and results of product analysis to date.

  19. Education and Public Outreach activities in Radio astronomy with the SKA South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oozeer, N.; Bassett, B. A.; de Boer, K.

    2014-10-01

    A Human Capital Development (HCD) program is a crucial part of any large organisation, and especially for large new research facilities such as the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) Africa. HCD provides a way of developing and channeling new minds into a very demanding field that ensures sustainability of the project and a multitude of spin-off benefits. Apart from educating learners at various levels, the HCD program must also inspire and educate the general public about the projects via an active outreach program. We highlight the various types of outreach activities that have been carried out in South Africa and the other SKA Africa partner countries. While there exist many teaching models we introduce and explore a novel concept of peer teaching for research known as the Joint Exchange Development Initiative (JEDI) and present some of its results. The JEDI workshops have resulted in a considerable number of learners embarking on advanced careers in science and research, and the demand is still growing.

  20. Desert Research and Technology Studies (DRATS) 2010 Education and Public Outreach (EPO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Heather L.

    2013-10-01

    The Exploration Systems Mission Directorate, Directorate Integration Office conducts analog field test activities, such as Desert Research and Technology Studies (DRATS), to validate exploration system architecture concepts and conduct technology demonstrations. Education and Public Outreach (EPO) activities have been a part of DRATS missions in the past to engage students, educators, and the general public in analog activities. However, in 2010, for the first time, EPO was elevated as a principal task for the mission and metrics were collected for all EPO activities. EPO activities were planned well in advance of the mission, with emphasis on creating a multitude of activities to attract students of all ages. Web-based and social media interaction between August 31 and September 14, 2010 resulted in 62,260 DRATS Flickr views; 10,906 views of DRATS videos on YouTube; 1,483 new DRATS Twitter followers; and a 111% increase in DRATS Facebook fan interactions. Over 7,000 outreach participants were directly involved in the DRATS 2010 analog mission via student visitations at both the integrated dry-runs prior to the field mission and during the field mission; by participating in live, interactive webcasts and virtual events; and online voting to determine a traverse site as part of the NASA initiative for Participatory Exploration (PE).

  1. Outreach and Education in the Life Sciences A Case Study of the U.S. Department of Energy National Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, Richard E.; Burbank, Roberta L.; Mahy, Heidi A.

    2010-03-15

    This project was intended to assess the impact of the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Agency (DOE/NNSA) -sponsored education and outreach activities on the Biological Weapons Convention (BWC) in DOE national laboratories. Key activities focused on a series of pilot education and outreach workshops conducted at ten national laboratories. These workshops were designed to increase awareness of the BWC, familiarize scientists with dual-use concerns related to biological research, and promote the concept of individual responsibility and accountability

  2. Explorations in Education and Public Outreach in Space Sciences - a Wisconsin Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limaye, S. S.; Pertzborn, R. A.

    1999-09-01

    To better serve the Education and Public Outreach needs of federally funded space science research programs at the University of Wisconsin, an Office of Space Science Education has recently been established on the University of Wisconsin-Madison campus. This office also acts as the campus focus for the Wisconsin Space Grant Consortium, and has undertaken a broad spectrum of interdisciplinary space science programs in the past several years. These activities range from a public exhibition focusing on current space exploration in conjunction with the DPS '98 meeting in Madison, WI that attracted over 5,000 students and teachers from across the state, to organizing state-of-the-art HDTV presentations on earth remote sensing topics at a Milwaukee science museum. Programs for students have included development and support of a six week solar system exploration program in the Milwaukee Public Schools for at-risk students, a two week college access program for minority middle school students, the NASA/QEM/SHARP Plus program for minority high school students, and a web based journal for middle school science projects (SPARK). Teacher professional development efforts include summer workshops for academic credit, year-round classroom support for pilot school programs, and support for development of standards-based curriculum in both space science and earth remote sensing topics. Public outreach activities have included evening family activities and public lectures at the Space Place, an off-campus outreach center, and an ask-a-scientist web based program. These efforts continue to affirm the need for effective outreach programs for diverse and multigenerational communities. In spite of the growing recognition at both the state and federal level for an improved level of literacy in the space-related sciences, sustainable support, program opportunities and logistical implementation continue to pose significant challenges. We gratefully acknowledge the support we have received

  3. Evolving Perspectives on Astronomy Education and Public Outreach in Hawai'i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Ka'iu; Slater, T.; Hamilton, J.; Takata, V.

    2012-01-01

    For the last several decades, well meaning astronomers and educators have worked diligently to provide astronomy education experiences to Native Hawaiians and visitors across all the islands. Much of the early education and public outreach (EPO) work was based on a philosophical perspective based on the notion of, "if we just make them aware of how wonderful astronomy is, then everyone will naturally support the development of astronomy in the islands.” In support of this goal, numerous teacher workshops were delivered and the first generation of the Maunakea Observatories Visitors’ Center was developed and funded. These projects were most frequently developed using Mainland thinking, in a Mainland style, with a Mainland agenda. Consequently, these efforts often failed to create even moderate impacts, whether in educational settings, or in terms of public outreach. In recent years, our understanding of effective EPO has evolved. This evolution has led to a shift in the locus of control, from the Mainland to the Islands; and in content, from "astronomy only” to "astronomy as part of the whole.” We have come to understand that successfully transformative EPO requires intertwining astronomy with teaching about culture, language and context. In response, the `Imiloa Astronomy Center was expanded to convolve historical and modern astronomy with Hawaiian culture and language. Moreover, the most successful astronomy EPO programs in the islands have been redesigned to reflect meaningful collaborations of schools, businesses, and the larger community that situate astronomy as part of a larger educational work of honoring the traditions of the past while simultaneously transforming the future. This evolution in thinking may serve as a model for the astronomy community's interaction with other regional communities.

  4. Problems Associated with a Lack of Cohesive Policy in K-12 Pre-College Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, John; Fontenot, A. Dean; Tate, Derrick

    2011-01-01

    This article identifies a number of issues associated with current STEM education reform efforts, especially with regard to efforts to integrate engineering education into the K-12 curriculum. Precollege engineering is especially problematic in STEM reform since there is no well-established tradition of engineering in the K-12 curriculum. This…

  5. Educational outreach and collaborative care enhances physician's perceived knowledge about Developmental Coordination Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaines, Robin; Missiuna, Cheryl; Egan, Mary; McLean, Jennifer

    2008-01-24

    Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) is a chronic neurodevelopmental condition that affects 5-6% of children. When not recognized and properly managed during the child's development, DCD can lead to academic failure, mental health problems and poor physical fitness. Physicians, working in collaboration with rehabilitation professionals, are in an excellent position to recognize and manage DCD. This study was designed to determine the feasibility and impact of an educational outreach and collaborative care model to improve chronic disease management of children with DCD. The intervention included educational outreach and collaborative care for children with suspected DCD. Physicians were educated by and worked with rehabilitation professionals from February 2005 to April 2006. Mixed methods evaluation approach documented the process and impact of the intervention. Physicians: 750 primary care physicians from one major urban area and outlying regions were invited to participate; 147 physicians enrolled in the project. Children: 125 children were identified and referred with suspected DCD. The main outcome was improvement in knowledge and perceived skill of physicians concerning their ability to screen, diagnose and manage DCD. At baseline 91.1% of physicians were unaware of the diagnosis of DCD, and only 1.6% could diagnose condition. Post-intervention, 91% of participating physicians reported greater knowledge about DCD and 29.2% were able to diagnose DCD compared to 0.5% of non-participating physicians. 100% of physicians who participated in collaborative care indicated they would continue to use the project materials and resources and 59.4% reported they would recommend or share the materials with medical colleagues. In addition, 17.6% of physicians not formally enrolled in the project reported an increase in knowledge of DCD. Physicians receiving educational outreach visits significantly improved their knowledge about DCD and their ability to identify and

  6. Educational outreach and collaborative care enhances physician's perceived knowledge about Developmental Coordination Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Missiuna Cheryl

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD is a chronic neurodevelopmental condition that affects 5–6% of children. When not recognized and properly managed during the child's development, DCD can lead to academic failure, mental health problems and poor physical fitness. Physicians, working in collaboration with rehabilitation professionals, are in an excellent position to recognize and manage DCD. This study was designed to determine the feasibility and impact of an educational outreach and collaborative care model to improve chronic disease management of children with DCD. Methods The intervention included educational outreach and collaborative care for children with suspected DCD. Physicians were educated by and worked with rehabilitation professionals from February 2005 to April 2006. Mixed methods evaluation approach documented the process and impact of the intervention. Results Physicians: 750 primary care physicians from one major urban area and outlying regions were invited to participate; 147 physicians enrolled in the project. Children: 125 children were identified and referred with suspected DCD. The main outcome was improvement in knowledge and perceived skill of physicians concerning their ability to screen, diagnose and manage DCD. At baseline 91.1% of physicians were unaware of the diagnosis of DCD, and only 1.6% could diagnose condition. Post-intervention, 91% of participating physicians reported greater knowledge about DCD and 29.2% were able to diagnose DCD compared to 0.5% of non-participating physicians. 100% of physicians who participated in collaborative care indicated they would continue to use the project materials and resources and 59.4% reported they would recommend or share the materials with medical colleagues. In addition, 17.6% of physicians not formally enrolled in the project reported an increase in knowledge of DCD. Conclusion Physicians receiving educational outreach visits significantly

  7. Space Scientists in Education and Public Outreach: A Summary of NASA Resources for Effective Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grier, Jennifer A.; Buxner, Sanlyn; Schneider, Nick; Meinke, Bonnie; Shipp, Stephanie

    2015-11-01

    The NASA Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) Forums developed and provided resources for scientists through a five-year cooperative agreement. Through this work, the Fourms have supported scientists who are involved in E/PO and who wish to become involved. Forums have conducted interviews, facilitated education oral and poster sessions, provided ‘Help Desks’ for more information, curated activities, as well as produced guides, pamphlets, and tips sheets. Our interviews with over 30 planetary scientists allowed us to identify needs and target gaps in resources, ensuring we could provide scientists with effective support and products. Interviews were conducted in collaboration with the AAS Division of Planetary Sciences, with the goal of better understanding scientists’ requirements, barriers, attitudes, and perception of education and outreach work. We collected information about how scientists were engaged in E/PO activities (or not), what support they did or did not have, what resources they used in their efforts, and what resources they would like to have to support and improve their E/PO engagement. The Forums have convened and/or supported E/PO oral and poster sessions at a variety of annual meetings. These sessions allowed scientists to network, share lessons learned, and become aware of new resources and products. These meetings included the DPS, AAS, LPSC, AGU, ASP, IAU, and more. ‘Help Desks’ were offered to allow scientists the chance to have extended one-on-one conversations with E/PO providers in order to share their programs, and learn how to become involved. These have been particularly popular with early career scientists looking to extend their E/PO efforts. A host of education activities developed by the space science community have been archived at the NASA site “Wavelength” (nasawavelength.org). Special lists have been curated to allow scientists to easily target those activities that fit their particular needs, from engineering to

  8. Alberta K-12 ESL Proficiency Benchmarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Kathy; Ettrich, Mike

    2012-01-01

    The Alberta K-12 ESL Proficiency Benchmarks are organized by division: kindergarten, grades 1-3, grades 4-6, grades 7-9, and grades 10-12. They are descriptors of language proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The descriptors are arranged in a continuum of seven language competences across five proficiency levels. Several…

  9. Legitimizing Community Engagement with K-12 Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furco, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the issue of internal legitimization and its importance in securing high-quality community engagement in K-12 schools. Drawing on the literature from the fields of community engagement, school reform, school-university partnerships, and school-community partnerships, this article describes some of the prevailing challenges…

  10. Legitimizing Community Engagement with K-12 Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furco, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the issue of internal legitimization and its importance in securing high-quality community engagement in K-12 schools. Drawing on the literature from the fields of community engagement, school reform, school-university partnerships, and school-community partnerships, this article describes some of the prevailing challenges…

  11. Copyright Updates for K-12 Librarians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Wendell G.

    2016-01-01

    Copyright concerns continue to bedevil K-12 librarians, who are often called upon to act as the copyright officers in public schools. This article describes recent copyright developments of concern to these librarians in three areas: a recent court case involving a university library, pending legislation supported by ALA, and a regulatory update.…

  12. Academic Detailing in Diabetes: Using Outreach Education to Improve the Quality of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Michael A

    2016-10-01

    Most diabetes care is provided in primary care settings, but typical primary care clinicians struggle to keep up with the latest evidence on diabetes screening, pharmacotherapy, and monitoring. Accordingly, many patients with diabetes are not receiving optimal guideline-based therapy. Relying on front-line clinicians on their own to assess the huge volume of new literature and incorporate it into their practice is unrealistic, and conventional continuing medical education has not proven adequate to address gaps in care. Academic detailing, direct educational outreach to clinicians that uses social marketing techniques to provide specific evidence-based recommendations, has been proven in clinical trials to improve the quality of care for a range of conditions. By directly engaging with clinicians to assess their needs, identify areas for change in practice, and provide them with specific tools to implement these changes, academic detailing can serve as a tool to improve care processes and outcomes for patients with diabetes.

  13. The Impact of Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Education and Public Outreach Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxner, S.; Canipe, M.; Wenger, M.; Hsu, B.; Jones, A.; Hessen, K.

    2014-07-01

    The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Education and Public Outreach Program includes Lunar Workshops for Educators (LWEs) held at several sites throughout the U.S. and a large public engagement program, International Observe the Moon Night (InOMN). Program evaluation has revealed that LWEs result in growth in participants' knowledge related to current lunar discoveries and exploration of the Moon. Teachers learn about misconceptions about the Moon and ways to teach about lunar science and exploration to address students' misconceptions. The LWEs also impact the teaching practices of some participants more broadly to incorporate inquiry and other teaching techniques modeled in the workshops. InOMN events are social experiences in which visitors reported the value of seeing their children learning new things, being moved by seeing beautiful and valuable objects, and gaining information and knowledge. Each program has met the goal of engaging participants in the excitement of lunar exploration.

  14. Involvement of scientists in the NASA Office of Space Science education and public outreach program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck-Winchatz, Bernhard [DePaul University, NASA Space Science Center for Education and Public Outreach, 990 W Fullerton, Suite 4400, Chicago, IL 60614 (United States)

    2005-01-15

    Since the mid-1990's NASA's Office of Space Science (OSS) has embarked on an astronomy and space science education and public outreach (E/PO) program. Its goals are to share the excitement of space science discoveries with the public, and to enhance the quality of science, mathematics and technology education, particularly at the precollege level. A key feature of the OSS program is the direct involvement of space scientists. The majority of the funding for E/PO is allocated to flight missions, which spend 1%-2% of their total budget on E/PO, and to individual research grants. This paper presents an overview of the program's goals, objectives, philosophy, and infrastructure.

  15. Partner with the Experts: The EOS Aura Education and Public Outreach Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockman, S.

    2001-12-01

    One of the challenges faced by NASA satellite missions is the creation and distribution educational and public outreach (EPO) material with a limited amount funding. This paper will detail the approach developed to support EOS Aura, a four-instrument atmospheric chemistry satellite that will launch in 2003. The mission focuses on collecting data to help answer three major science questions: Is the Earth's ozone layer recovering? Is air quality getting worse? How is Earth's climate changing? The Aura project has created several strategic partnerships within the formal and informal education communities that facilitate the development and dissemination of materials to foster the understanding of the Aura mission and its major science questions. Partners and programs include the American Chemical Society ChemMatters magazine, the Smithsonian Institution National Museum of Natural History "Forces of Change" program, and the GLOBE Program. Each of the Aura EPO collaborations is built around pre-existing programs within the partner organizations. The partner organizations bring formal and informal education expertise, pre-existing education products, networks of educators, and large target audiences to the Aura EPO program. The Aura mission provides funding, science and technological expertise, materials created for the mission such as physical models and scientific visualizations, as well as access to NASA's nationwide education network. The goal is to leverage limited EPO resources to reach educators, students and the public through a variety of mechanisms. This talk will highlight projects that have resulted from the Aura EPO strategic partnerships.

  16. Marketing University Outreach Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Ralph S., Jr., Ed.; And Others

    A collection of 12 essays and model program descriptions addresses issues in the marketing of university extension, outreach, and distance education programs. They include: (1) "Marketing and University Outreach: Parallel Processes" (William I. Sauser, Jr. and others); (2) "Segmenting and Targeting the Organizational Market"…

  17. The Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) Education and Outreach (E/PO) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peticolas, L. M.; Craig, N.; Odenwald, S. F.; Walker, A.; Russell, C. T.; Angelopoulos, V.; Willard, C.; Larson, M. B.; Hiscock, W. A.; Stoke, J. M.; Moldwin, M. B.

    2008-12-01

    During the pre-launch phase of NASA’s THEMIS mission, the Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) program successfully brought the excitement of THEMIS to the public, students and teachers through a variety of programs. The Geomagnetic Event Observation Network by Students (GEONS) was the main effort during this time, a project in which 13 magnetometers were placed in or near 13 rural schools across the country. High school teachers and a few middle school teachers at these and/or neighboring schools took part in a long-term professional development program based around space science and the magnetometer data. The teachers created week-long to semester-long projects during which their students worked on THEMIS lessons that they, their colleagues, and the E/PO team created. In addition to this program, THEMIS E/PO also launched the only Lawrence Hall of Science (LHS) Great Explorations in Mathematics and Science (GEMS) site in Nevada. This site provides a sustainable place for teacher professional development using hands-on GEMS activities, and has been used by teachers around the state of Nevada. Short-term professional development for K-12 teachers (one-hour to two-day workshops), with a focus on the Tribal College and Society for the Advancement of Chicanos and Native Americans in Science (SACNAS) communities have reached hundreds of teachers across the country. A Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) ViewSpace show on auroras and THEMIS was created and distributed, and shown in over a hundred science centers and museums nationwide. The THEMIS E/PO program developed and maintained a THEMIS E/PO Website for dissemination of (1) information and multimedia about the science and engineering of THEMIS, (2) updated news about the mission in language appropriate for the public, (3) the GEONS data, the GEONS teacher guides with classroom activities, and (4) information about the THEMIS E/PO program. Hundreds of thousands of visitors have viewed this website. In this

  18. Education Outreach in Village Schools during the SnowSTAR 2007 Alaska-Canada Barrenlands Traverse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solie, D.; Sturm, M.; Huntington, H.; Anderson, D.; Derksen, C.

    2008-12-01

    In spring 2007, the IPY expedition, SnowSTAR-2007, traveled 4200 kilometers by snow machine across much of Alaska and Northern Canada. The primary objectives of the trip were education outreach, and collaborative US/Canadian field measurements of the snow across the route. Starting in Fairbanks, Alaska and ending in Baker Lake, Nunavut, Canada near Hudson Bay 42 days later, the team visited numerous settlements in route. The primary outreach efforts during the expedition were the expedition website (http://www.barrenlands.org ), and in-school presentations and interactive science demonstrations. The website, aimed at school children as well as the general public, was updated daily from the field, and had strong national and international interest. We gave presentations (classrooms and all-school assemblies), in nine of the villages we visited. In the schools we demonstrated the equipment we use in the field, as well as two proven demonstrations of physical principles (acoustic resonance in a plastic sewer pipe and eddy current forces on a magnet falling through a copper water pipe). Video recordings from the expedition travel, science and village school presentations can be adapted for classroom use to show application of scientific principles as well as excite student interest in the physical and geo-sciences.

  19. Active Galactic Videos: A YouTube Channel for Astronomy Education and Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Carmen; Calahan, Jenny; Resi Baucco, Alexandria; Bullivant, Christopher William; Eckley, Ross; Ekstrom, W. Haydon; Fitzpatrick, M. Ryleigh; Genovese, Taylor Fay; Impey, Chris David; Libby, Kaitlin; McCaw, Galen; Olmedo, Alexander N.; Ritter, Joshua; Wenger, Matthew; Williams, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    Active Galactic Videos is an astronomy-focused YouTube channel run by a team at the University of Arizona. The channel has two main purposes: to produce educational content for public audiences, and to learn about astronomy and to open a window into the world of professional astronomy by showcasing the work done at Steward Observatory and in Southern Arizona. Our team consists of faculty, staff, and students from a variety of backgrounds including: astronomy, education, film, music, english, and writing. In addition to providing educational content for public audiences, this project provides opportunities for undergraduate students to learn about astronomy content, educational practice, and science communication while developing the practical skills needed to write, film, score, direct, and edit videos that effectively engage and teach viewers about topics in astronomy. The team has produced various styles of video: presentational, interviews, musical/poetic, and documentaries. In addition to YouTube, the Active Galactic Videos team maintains a social media presence on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. These help to widely distribute the content as well as to publicize the main Youtube channel. In addition to providing an overview of our educational work, this poster will present a year's worth of online analytics that we are using to better understand our audience, to examine what videos have been popular and successful and how people are accessing our content. We will present our experience in order to help others learn about improving astronomy education online, and astronomy communication and outreach in general.

  20. 美国校长信息化领导力提升项目的特点与启示%The Characteristics and lmplications of Educational Technology Leadership Promotion Programs for the K-12 School Principals in USA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王玥; 赵慧臣

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate international educational technology leadership programs for K-12 school principals in order to help school administrators and teachers gain a comprehensive understanding of train-ing modes of the education technology leadership. Under this background, the authors reviewed the literatures and materials obtained on the Internet, and analyzed the Educational Technology Leadership Program from the George Washington University, the School Technology Lead-ership Program provided by the university of Kentucky, and the Certified Education Technology Leader Certification Program supported by the Consortium for School Networking The educational technology leadership promotion programs for the primary and secondary school principals in USA provide valuable reference for us in the areas of training goals, admission forms, and the curriculum and external certifications. The characteristics of education technology leadership promotion programs for K-12 school principals include:1 ) multi-level training objectives to meet learners' individual choice;2) flexible forms of entrance and the network teach-ing mode to facilitate the learning arrangements of the learners from different space at different time;3 ) multidiscipli-nary cross curriculum, embodying the features of interdisciplinary pedagogy, educational technology, and manage-ment;4) a world-class faculty with reference to international standards, such as NEST-A. Based on our analysis, we think the educational technology leadership promotion for the school principals in Chi-na should:1 ) emphasize the characteristics of the education technology leadership of the principal technology accord-ing to the national standards of education technology;2)maximize the macro-effect of principal’s education technol-ogy leadership;3 ) select appropriate schools and promote the educational technology leadership certification of princi-pals;4 ) explore educational technology leadership degree