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Sample records for juxtahepatic venous injuries

  1. Wartime major venous vessel injuries.

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    Hudorovic, Narcis

    2008-02-01

    The aim of this study is to declare our experience and to identify the important factors that influence the mortality and morbidity in patients with combat-related penetrating wounds of the abdomen (CR-PWA) with major venous vessel injuries. Twenty-six wounded with combat-related injuries of major abdominal venous vessels, admitted in the University Clinic cardiovascular surgery department during the period from 1 August 1991 through 30 October 1995, were analyzed. Patients with concomitant injured arteries and extra-abdominal injuries (n=150; 85.2%) were excluded from this study. The Penetrating Abdominal Trauma Index (PATI) score for each patient was calculated. Fifteen patients (57.69%) sustained with PATI score greater than 25 died. The mean duration of hospitalization was 16 days (range 0-86). The average hospitalization time for those surviving their complications was 17 days with a PATI of 25 or less, and 43 days with a score more than 25. Three clinical assessments of the long-term outcome were performed after a median of about 3, 5 and 10 years, respectively. Surviving patients (42.31%) were symptom free and had normal Duplex scans as well as no other surgical related complications. Higher PATI scores, postoperative complications and reoperations exert an unfavorable effect on patient outcome.

  2. Management of Peripheral and Truncal Venous Injuries

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    Triantafillos G. Giannakopoulos

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Civilian injuries are increasing according to the World Health Organization, and this is attributed mainly to road traffic accidents and urban interpersonal violence. Vascular injuries are common in these scenarios and are associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Associated peripheral venous trauma is less likely to lead to death and controversy remains whether ligation or repair should be the primary approach. Conversely, non-compressible truncal venous insult can be lethal due to exsanguination, thus a high index of suspicion is crucial. Operative management is demanding with fair results but recent endovascular adjuncts demonstrate promising results and seem to be the way forward for these serious conditions.

  3. Venous injury in abusive head trauma

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    Choudhary, Arabinda K. [Nemours A. I. duPont Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, Wilmington, DE (United States); Bradford, Ray; Thamburaj, K.; Boal, Danielle K.B. [Hershey Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Hershey, PA (United States); Dias, Mark S. [Hershey Medical Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Hershey, PA (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Abusive head trauma (AHT) is an important cause of serious brain injury in infants and young children who have characteristic clinical and imaging findings that are discordant with the clinical history provided. Recent attention has focused on abnormalities of the cranial venous sinuses and cortical veins, both on MRI and at autopsy. Although many have interpreted these to be secondary to the AHT, some have recently argued that these venous abnormalities represent primary cortical sinus and venous thrombosis that leads secondarily to subdural hemorrhage and secondary brain injury. Direct trauma to the veins and sinuses has been reported at autopsy in AHT, but there has been no systematic study of venous abnormalities in cases of AHT. The purpose of this study was to define the incidence and characteristics of venous and sinus abnormalities in AHT. We included all children <36 months of age who were diagnosed with abusive head trauma between 2001 and 2012 and who had MRI and magnetic resonance (MR) venography as part of their diagnostic workup. We analyzed age, gender and clinical findings. MRI and MR venography were analyzed independently by two neuroradiologists with a focus on abnormalities involving the intracranial veins and venous sinuses. A total of 45 children were included. The median age was 3 months (range 15 days to 31 months) and 28 were boys (62%). Clinical findings included retinal hemorrhage in 71% and extracranial fractures in 55%. CT or MRI demonstrated subdural hemorrhage in 41 (91%); none had subdural effusions. In 31 cases (69%) MR venography demonstrated mass effect on the venous sinuses or cortical draining veins, with either displacement or partial or complete effacement of the venous structures from an adjacent subdural hematoma or brain swelling. We also describe the lollipop sign, which represents direct trauma to the cortical bridging veins and was present in 20/45 (44%) children. Evidence of displacement or compression of cortical veins

  4. Time is now: venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in blunt splenic injury.

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    Kwok, Amy M; Davis, James W; Dirks, Rachel C; Wolfe, Mary M; Kaups, Krista L

    2016-12-01

    The safety and timing of venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis in patients with blunt splenic injuries is not well known. We hypothesized that early initiation of VTE prophylaxis does not increase failure of nonoperative management or transfusion requirements in these patients. A retrospective review of trauma patients with blunt splenic injury was performed. Patients were compared based on initiation and timing of VTE prophylaxis (72 hours). Patients who received VTE prophylaxis were matched with those who did not. Primary outcomes included were operation or angioembolization. A total of 497 patients (256 received VTE prophylaxis and 241 did not) were included. There was no difference in the number of interventions based on presence of or time to VTE prophylaxis initiation. Early initiation (<48 hours) of VTE prophylaxis is safe in patients with blunt splenic injuries treated nonoperatively, and may be safe as early as 24 hours. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Venous thromboembolic events in isolated severe traumatic brain injury

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    Shahin Mohseni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of prophylactic anticoagulation on the incidence of venous thromboembolic events (VTE in patients suffering from isolated severe traumatic brain injury (TBI. Materials and Methods: Retrospective matched case-control study in adult patients sustaining isolated severe TBI (head AIS ≥3, with extracranial AIS ≤2 receiving VTE prophylaxis while in the surgical intensive care unit from 1/2007 through 12/2009. Patients subjected to VTE prophylaxis were matched 1:1 by age, gender, glasgow coma scale (GCS score at admission, presence of hypotension on admission, injury severity score, and head abbreviated injury scale (AIS score, with patients who did not receive chemical VTE prophylaxis. The primary outcome measure was VTE. Secondary outcomes were SICU and hospital length of stay (HLOS, adverse effects of anticoagulation, and mortality. Results: After propensity matching, 37 matched pairs were analysed. Cases and controls had similar demographics, injury characteristics, rate of craniotomies/craniectomies, SICU LOS, and HLOS. The median time of commencement of VTE prophylaxis was 10 days. The incidence of VTE was increased 3.5-fold in the controls compared to the cases (95% CI 1.0-12.1, P=0.002. The mortality was higher in patients who did not receive anticoagulation (19% vs. 5%, P=0.001. No adverse outcomes were detected in the anticoagulated patients. Conclusion: Prophylactic anticoagulation decreases the overall risk for clinically significant VTE in patients with severe isolated TBI. Prospective validation of the timing and safety of chemical VTE prophylaxis in these instances is warranted.

  6. Secondary venous ischemic injury ameliorations through medical treatment in rats

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    Suleyman Tas

    2016-12-01

    Results: The treatment groups had greater flap viability and glutathione levels, and lower levels of malondialdehyde, myeloperoxidase, and neutrophil count. The differences between the control, monotherapy and combination therapy groups were significant (p < 0.05. Conclusions: The beneficial effect of allopurinol, previously demonstrated in primary ischemia models and arterial ischemia models, was also seen in the secondary venous ischemia model. Dual and triple combinations were more effective than monotherapies in terms of the viability of the flap. These results supported our hypothesis that combination therapies with these agents progressively decrease ischemic damage. [Hand Microsurg 2016; 5(3.000: 137-143

  7. [Injuries to blood vessels near the heart caused by central venous catheters].

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    Abram, J; Klocker, J; Innerhofer-Pompernigg, N; Mittermayr, M; Freund, M C; Gravenstein, N; Wenzel, V

    2016-11-01

    Injuries to blood vessels near the heart can quickly become life-threatening and include arterial injuries during central venous puncture, which can lead to hemorrhagic shock. We report 6 patients in whom injury to the subclavian artery and vein led to life-threatening complications. Central venous catheters are associated with a multitude of risks, such as venous thrombosis, air embolism, systemic or local infections, paresthesia, hemothorax, pneumothorax, and cervical hematoma, which are not always immediately discernible. The subclavian catheter is at a somewhat lower risk of catheter-associated sepsis and symptomatic venous thrombosis than approaches via the internal jugular and femoral veins. Indeed, access via the subclavian vein carries a substantial risk of pneumo- and hemothorax. Damage to the subclavian vein or artery can also occur during deliberate and inadvertent punctures and result in life-threatening complications. Therefore, careful consideration of the access route is required in relation to the patient and the clinical situation, to keep the incidence of complications as low as possible. For catheterization of the subclavian vein, puncture of the axillary vein in the infraclavicular fossa is a good alternative, because ultrasound imaging of the target vessel is easier than in the subclavian vein and the puncture can be performed much further from the lung.

  8. Superficial Dorsal Vein Injury/Thrombosis Presenting as False Penile Fracture Requiring Dorsal Venous Ligation

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    Arash Rafiei, MD

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: Early exploration of patients with suspected penile fracture provides excellent results with maintenance of erectile function. Also, in the setting of dorsal vein thrombosis, ligation preserves the integrity of the penile tissues and avoids unnecessary complications from conservative management. Rafiei A, Hakky TS, Martinez D, Parker J, and Carrion R. Superficial dorsal vein injury/thrombosis presenting as false penile fracture requiring dorsal venous ligation. Sex Med 2014;2:182–185.

  9. Role of acute elevation of portal venous pressure by exogenous glucagon on gastric mucosal injury in rats with portal hypertension.

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    Tsui, C P; Sung, Joseph J Y; Leung, Felix W

    2003-07-18

    Time-course studies revealed the increased susceptibility of the gastric mucosa to noxious injury in portal hypertension correlates with the level of elevated portal venous pressure and hyperglucagonemia. Whether acute elevation of portal venous pressure by exogenous glucagon aggravates such injury is not known. We tested the hypothesis that glucagon in a dose sufficient to acutely elevate portal venous pressure aggravates noxious injury of the gastric mucosa in rats with portal hypertension. Infusion of a portal hypotensive dose of somatostatin should reverse these changes. In anesthetized rats with portal vein ligation, glucagon, somatostatin or the combination was administered intravenously in a randomized, coded fashion. Acidified ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injury was determined. Portal venous pressure and gastric mucosal perfusion and oxygenation (reflectance spectrophotometry) were monitored to confirm the effects of the respective intravenous treatments. Exogenous glucagon exacerbated acidified ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injury. The exacerbation was attenuated by somatostatin. These changes paralleled the portal hypertensive and hypotensive effects of glucagon and somatostatin, respectively. Our data suggest that a unique mechanism is triggered with the onset of portal hypertension. In an antagonistic manner, glucagon and somatostatin modulate this novel mechanism that controls portal venous pressure and susceptibility of the gastric mucosa to noxious injury.

  10. Risk of venous thromboembolism in patients with splenic injury and splenectomy. A nationwide cohort study.

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    Lin, Jiun-Nong; Chen, Hsuan-Ju; Lin, Ming-Chia; Lai, Chung-Hsu; Lin, Hsi-Hsun; Yang, Chih-Hui; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    The spleen is a crucial organ in humans. However, little is known about the association of venous thromboembolism (VTE) with splenic injury and splenectomy in trauma patients. The aim of this study was to determine the subsequent risk of VTE following splenic injury and splenectomy. A nationwide retrospective cohort study was conducted by analysing data from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. We included 6,162 splenic injury patients (3,033 splenectomised and 3,129 nonsplenectomised patients) and 24,648 comparison patients who were selected by frequency match based on sex, age, and the index year during 2000-2006. All patients were followed until the occurrence of VTE, 31 December, 2011, death, or withdrawal from the insurance program. The age of patients with splenic injury was 41.93 ± 16.44 years. The incidence rates of VTE were 11.81, 8.46, and 5.21 per 10,000 person-years in the splenic injury patients with splenectomy, splenic injury patients without splenectomy, and comparison patients, respectively. Compared with the comparison cohort, splenic injury patients with splenectomy exhibited a 2.21-fold risk of VTE (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.43-3.43), whereas those without splenectomy exhibited a 1.71-fold risk of VTE (95% CI, 1.05-2.80). The overall incidence rate of VTE was 1.97-fold higher in the splenic injury cohort than the comparison cohort (95% CI, 1.38-2.81). Although splenectomy increased the risk of VTE 1.35-fold compared with no splenectomy, the difference was not statistically significant (95% CI, 0.74-2.45). These results may alert physicians and patients to the complications of splenic injury and splenectomy.

  11. MRI evidence for altered venous drainage and intracranial compliance in mild traumatic brain injury.

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    Andreas Pomschar

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To compare venous drainage patterns and associated intracranial hydrodynamics between subjects who experienced mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI and age- and gender-matched controls. METHODS: Thirty adult subjects (15 with mTBI and 15 age- and gender-matched controls were investigated using a 3T MR scanner. Time since trauma was 0.5 to 29 years (mean 11.4 years. A 2D-time-of-flight MR-venography of the upper neck was performed to visualize the cervical venous vasculature. Cerebral venous drainage through primary and secondary channels, and intracranial compliance index and pressure were derived using cine-phase contrast imaging of the cerebral arterial inflow, venous outflow, and the craniospinal CSF flow. The intracranial compliance index is the defined as the ratio of maximal intracranial volume and pressure changes during the cardiac cycle. MR estimated ICP was then obtained through the inverse relationship between compliance and ICP. RESULTS: Compared to the controls, subjects with mTBI demonstrated a significantly smaller percentage of venous outflow through internal jugular veins (60.9±21% vs. controls: 76.8±10%; p = 0.01 compensated by an increased drainage through secondary veins (12.3±10.9% vs. 5.5±3.3%; p<0.03. Mean intracranial compliance index was significantly lower in the mTBI cohort (5.8±1.4 vs. controls 8.4±1.9; p<0.0007. Consequently, MR estimate of intracranial pressure was significantly higher in the mTBI cohort (12.5±2.9 mmHg vs. 8.8±2.0 mmHg; p<0.0007. CONCLUSIONS: mTBI is associated with increased venous drainage through secondary pathways. This reflects higher outflow impedance, which may explain the finding of reduced intracranial compliance. These results suggest that hemodynamic and hydrodynamic changes following mTBI persist even in the absence of clinical symptoms and abnormal findings in conventional MR imaging.

  12. Incidence and sequelae of symptomatic venous thromboembolic disease among patients with traumatic brain injury.

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    Lai, J M; Yablon, S A; Ivanhoe, C B

    1997-05-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a potentially life-threatening complication among patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, few reports describe the incidence of this important disease. We reviewed the incidence of symptomatic VTE among 124 consecutive admissions with TBI to a free-standing rehabilitation hospital over an 18-month period. Four patients manifested evidence of VTE within 2 months of injury: two with leg swelling, one with an oedematous arm, and one with respiratory distress. None of the patients with suspected VTE received prophylactic anticoagulant therapy. Diagnosis of VTE was confirmed with venograph in two of the four patients. Although VTE is frequently asymptomatic, the incidence of symptomatic VTE (1.6%) among this series of rehabilitation inpatients with TBI still appears surprisingly low. These results have implications regarding the utility of non-invasive diagnostic screening of asymptomatic VTE and routine anticoagulant prophylaxis of high-risk patients with TBI.

  13. Congestive kidney failure in cardiac surgery: the relationship between central venous pressure and acute kidney injury.

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    Gambardella, Ivancarmine; Gaudino, Mario; Ronco, Claudio; Lau, Christopher; Ivascu, Natalia; Girardi, Leonard N

    2016-11-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) in cardiac surgery has traditionally been linked to reduced arterial perfusion. There is ongoing evidence that central venous pressure (CVP) has a pivotal role in precipitating acute renal dysfunction in cardiac medical and surgical settings. We can regard this AKI driven by systemic venous hypertension as 'kidney congestive failure'. In the cardiac surgery population as a whole, when the CVP value reaches the threshold of 14 mmHg in postoperative period, the risk of AKI increases 2-fold with an odds ratio (OR) of 1.99, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) of 1.16-3.40. In cardiac surgery subsets where venous hypertension is a hallmark feature, the incidence of AKI is higher (tricuspid disease 30%, carcinoid valve disease 22%). Even in the non-chronically congested coronary artery bypass population, CVP measured 6 h postoperatively showed significant association to renal failure: risk-adjusted OR for AKI was 5.5 (95% CI 1.93-15.5; P = 0.001) with every 5 mmHg rise in CVP for patients with CVP <9 mmHg; for CVP increments of 5 mmHg above the threshold of 9 mmHg, the risk-adjusted OR for AKI was 1.3 (95% CI 1.01-1.65; P = 0.045). This and other clinical evidence are discussed along with the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms, involving the supremacy of volume receptors in regulating the autonomic output in hypervolaemia, and the regional effect of venous congestion on the nephron. The effect of CVP on renal function was found to be modulated by ventricular function class, aetiology and acuity of venous congestion. Evidence suggests that acute increases of CVP should be actively treated to avoid a deterioration of the renal function, particularly in patients with poor ventricular fraction. Besides, the practice of treating right heart failure with fluid loading should be avoided in favour of other ways to optimize haemodynamics in this setting, because of the detrimental effects on the kidney function.

  14. Application of a venous conduit as a stent for repairing rabbit facial nerve injury

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    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Recently,many investigators have tried to use natural biomaterials,such as,artery,vein,decalcified bone,etc.,as conduits for nerve repair.However,immunological rejection of conduits made of natural biomaterials limits their application.Therefore,it is essential to identify more suitable types of biomaterials.OBJECTIVE:To observe the characteristics of a bioengineering processing method using venous conduit as a stent for repairing facial nerve injury.DESIGN:A controlled observational experiment.SETTING:Animal Laboratories of the Third Hospital Affiliated to Sun Yat-sen University and the 157 Hospital.MATERIALS:Thirty-three male New Zealand rabbits of pure breed,weighing 1.5 to 2.0 kg,were provided by Medical Experimental Animal Room of Sun Yat-sen University.The protocol was carried out in accordance with animal ethics guidelines for the use and care of animals.Venous conduits and autogenous nerves were transplanted into the left and right cheeks,respectively.Eleven animals were chosen for anatomical observations at 5,10 and 15 weeks after surgery.METHODS:This experiment was carried out in the Animal Laboratories of the Third Hospital Affiliated to Sun Yat-sen University and the 157 Hospital between May and November 2006.After animals were anesthetized,15 mm of retromandibular vein was harvested for preparing a venous conduit.Approximately 3 cm of low buccal branch of facial nerve was exposed.A segment of 1.2 cm nerve was resected from the middle,and a gap of 1.5 cm formed due to bilateral retraction.The prepared venous conduit of 1.5 cm was sutured to the outer membrane of the severed ends of the nerve.Muscle and skin were sutured layer by layer.Using the same above-mentioned method,the low buccal branch of right autogenous facial nerve was resected,and the left facial nerve segment from the same animal was transplanted using end-to-end neurorrhaphy for control.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:①Post-operatively,food intake,vibrissae activity and wound healing of

  15. Different patterns of intestinal response to injury after arterial, venous or arteriovenous occlusion in rats

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    Francisco Javier Guzmán-de la Garza; Carlos Rodrigo Cámara-Lemarroy; Gabriela Alarcón-Galván; Paula Cordero-Pérez; Linda Elsa Mu(n)oz-Espinosa; Nancy Esthela Fernández-Garza

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the differences in injury patterns caused by arterial, venous or arteriovenous mesenteric occlusion.METHODS: Male Wistar rats were separated equally into four groups. Occlusion was performed by clamping the superior mesenteric artery (A), the mesenteric vein (V) or both (AV) for 30 min, followed by 60 min of reperfusion. A control group received sham surgery only. Intestinal sections were examined for histological damage and serum tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), endothelin-1 (ET-1), P-selectin, antithrombin Ⅲ (ATⅢ) and soluble intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) concentrations were measured.RESULTS: All groups showed significant mucosal injury compared to controls. Furthermore, mucosal injury was significantly more severe in the V and AV groups compared to the A group (3.6 ± 0.55, 3.4 ± 0.55 and 2 ± 0.71, respectively, P = 0.01). ICAM-1 was similarly elevated in all groups, with no significant differences between the groups. P-selectin levels were significantly elevated in the V and AV groups but not the A group (1.4 ± 0.5 ng/mL, 2.52 ± 0.9 ng/mL and 0.02 ± 0.01 ng/mL,respectively, P = 0.01) and ET-1 was significantly elevated in the A and V groups but not the AV group (0.32 ± 0.04 pg/mL, 0.36 ± 0.05 pg/mL and 0.29 ± 0.03 pg/mL, respectively, P = 0.01) compared to sham controls. ATⅢ levels were markedly depleted in the V and AV groups, but not in the A group (29.1 ± 5.2 pg/mL,31.4 ± 21.8 pg/mL and 55.8 ± 35.6 pg/mL ,respectively, P = 0.01), compared to controls. Serum TNF-α was significantly increased in all groups compared to sham controls (1.32 ± 0.87 ng/mL, 1.79 ± 0.20 ng/mL and 4.4 ± 0.69 ng/mL, for groups A, V and AV,respectively, P = 0.01), with higher values in the AV group.CONCLUSION: Different patterns of response to ischemia/reperfusion are associated with venous, arterial or arteriovenous occlusion. Venous and arteriovenous occlusion was associated with the most severe alterations.

  16. Association of Mechanism of Injury With Risk for Venous Thromboembolism After Trauma.

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    Karcutskie, Charles A; Meizoso, Jonathan P; Ray, Juliet J; Horkan, Davis; Ruiz, Xiomara D; Schulman, Carl I; Namias, Nicholas; Proctor, Kenneth G

    2017-01-01

    To date, no study has assessed whether the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) varies with blunt or penetrating trauma. To test whether the mechanism of injury alters risk of VTE after trauma. A retrospective database review was conducted of adults admitted to the intensive care unit of an American College of Surgeons-verified level I trauma center between August 1, 2011, and January 1, 2015, with blunt or penetrating injuries. Univariate and multivariable analyses identified independent predictors of VTE. Differences in risk factors for VTE with blunt vs penetrating trauma. In 813 patients with blunt trauma (mean [SD] age, 47 [19] years) and 324 patients with penetrating trauma (mean [SD] age, 35 [15] years), the rate of VTE was 9.1% overall (104 of 1137) and similar between groups (blunt trauma, 9% [n = 73] vs penetrating trauma, 9.6% [n = 31]; P = .76). In the blunt trauma group, more patients with VTE than without VTE had abnormal coagulation results (49.3% vs 35.7%; P = .02), femoral catheters (9.6% vs 3.9%; P = .03), repair and/or ligation of vascular injury (15.1% vs 5.4%; P = .001), complex leg fractures (34.2% vs 18.5%; P = .001), Glasgow Coma Scale score less than 8 (31.5% vs 10.7%; P trauma group, more patients with VTE than without VTE had abnormal coagulation results (64.5% vs 44.4%; P = .03), femoral catheters (16.1% vs 5.5%; P = .02), repair and/or ligation of vascular injury (54.8% vs 25.3%; P vascular injury (OR, 3.32; 95% CI, 1.37-8.03), Abbreviated Injury Score for the abdomen greater than 2 (OR, 2.77; 95% CI, 1.19-6.45), and age 40 to 59 years (OR, 2.69; 95% CI, 1.19-6.08) predicted VTE, with an area under the receiver operator curve of 0.760. Although rates of VTE are the same in patients who experienced blunt and penetrating trauma, the independent risk factors for VTE are different based on mechanism of injury. This finding should be a consideration when contemplating prophylactic treatment protocols.

  17. Risk of pulmonary embolism with repair or ligation of major venous injury following penetrating trauma.

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    Allen, Casey J; Hsu, Albert; Murray, Clark R; Meizoso, Jonathan P; Ray, Juliet J; Schulman, Carl I; Livingstone, Alan S; Lineen, Edward B; Ginzburg, Enrique; Namias, Nicholas; Proctor, Kenneth G

    2015-03-01

    There are many benefits of repair over ligation of major venous injuries (MVIs) following penetrating trauma, but the risk of pulmonary embolism (PE) is not well defined. We hypothesized that rates of PE are comparable between repair and ligation of MVI. All penetrating trauma patients with MVI requiring an operation from 2003 to 2012 (n = 158) were retrospectively reviewed. Propensity scores were based on a logistic regression model using patient and injury characteristics. A 1:1 fixed ratio nearest neighbor matching was performed to compare outcomes of the repair and ligation cohorts. Data are reported as mean ± SD if parametric, or median (interquartile range) if not, and compared using a t test, Mann-Whitney U-test, χ2, or Fisher's exact test, as appropriate. The population was 89% male, age 32 ± 12 years, 74% gunshot wound, Injury Severity Score of 19 ± 13, length of stay of 9 (18) days, 3.8% PE, and a mortality of 21.5%. Repair was performed in 37% (n = 59), ligation was performed in 60% (n = 94), and 3% required both. With ligation versus repair, ligation patients were generally more critically injured; 48-hour survival was 78% versus 93% (p = 0.0083), initial Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score was 12 ± 5 versus 14 ± 3 (p = 0.003), initial base excess was -9 ± 8 versus -5 ± 5 mEq/L (p = 0.003), more packed red blood cells were transfused (12 (14) U vs. 9 (12) U; p = 0.032), and major arterial injury was more likely (86% vs. 42%, p propensity-matched cohorts. In those who developed a PE, all were receiving standard thromboprophylaxis. Following penetrating trauma, the risk of PE between repair and ligation of MVI is comparable. Epidemiologic study, level III.

  18. Daily vs twice daily enoxaparin in the prevention of venous thromboembolic disorders during rehabilitation following acute spinal cord injury.

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    Hebbeler, Sara L; Marciniak, Christina M; Crandall, Susan; Chen, David; Nussbaum, Steven; Mendelewski, Susan

    2004-01-01

    Subcutaneous administration of low molecular weight heparin (eg, enoxaparin) has been shown to be safe and effective in the prevention of acute venous thromboembolic (TE) disease following acute spinal cord injury (SCI) in the rehabilitation setting. However, emerging evidence suggests that different dosing strategies may be equivalent. To determine whether subcutaneous enoxaparin, 40 mg once daily, when compared with subcutaneous enoxaparin, 30 mg twice daily, is equally safe and effective in the prevention of venous TE disease in patients with SCI. Retrospective chart review. A freestanding, inpatient, acute, rehabilitation hospital. One hundred and twenty-nine patients admitted from June 2000 through June 2002 for inpatient rehabilitation following an acute SCI who received either enoxaparin, 40 mg once daily, or enoxaparin, 30 mg twice daily, for prophylaxis for TE disease. Equivalent prophylaxis efficacy was seen in both enoxaparin groups. Symptomatic venous thromboembolism did not differ, with deep vein thromboses occurring in 1 of 49 (2.0%) patients receiving twice-daily enoxaparin, and 1 of 80 (1.25%) patients receiving once-daily enoxaparin (chi2 = 0.125, NS). Pulmonary embolism was seen in 1 of 49 (2.0%) patients treated with twice-daily enoxaparin and in none of the patients in the once-daily group (chi2 = 1.64, NS). Bleeding complications also did not differ between the 2 treatment groups; these were observed in 2 of 49 (4.1%) patients receiving twice-daily enoxaparin and in 5 of 80 (6.3%) patients receiving once-daily enoxaparin (chi2 = 0.228, NS). Subcutaneous enoxaparin administered once or twice daily is equally effective for the prevention of venous TE disease. Both dosing strategies are associated with a low incidence of bleeding in patients with SCI who are undergoing rehabilitation.

  19. Venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in patients with traumatic brain injury: a systematic review [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/12f

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    Yohalakshmi Chelladurai

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: There is considerable practice variation and clinical uncertainty about the choice of prophylaxis for preventing venous thromboembolism in patients with traumatic brain injury. We performed a systematic review to assess both the effectiveness and safety of pharmacologic and mechanical prophylaxis, and the optimal time to initiate pharmacologic prophylaxis in hospitalized patients with traumatic brain injury. Data sources and study selection: MEDLINE®, EMBASE®, SCOPUS, CINAHL, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, clinicaltrial.gov, and the Cochrane Library were searched in July 2012 to identify randomized controlled trials and observational studies reporting on the effectiveness or safety of venous thromboembolism prevention in traumatic brain injury patients. Data extraction: Paired reviewers extracted detailed information from included articles on standardized forms and assessed the risk of bias in each article. Data synthesis: Twelve studies (2 randomized controlled trials and 10 cohort studies evaluated the effectiveness and safety of venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in patients with traumatic brain injury. Five of the included studies assessed the optimal timing of initiation of pharmacological prophylaxis. Low grade evidence supports the effectiveness of enoxaparin over control in reducing deep vein thrombosis. Low grade evidence also supports the safety of unfractionated heparin over control in reducing mortality in patients with traumatic brain injury. Evidence was insufficient for remaining comparisons and outcomes including the optimal timing of initiation of pharmacoprophylaxis. Conclusion: There is some evidence that pharmacoprophylaxis improves deep vein thromboses and mortality outcomes in patients hospitalized with traumatic brain injury. Additional studies are required to strengthen this evidence base.

  20. Timing of Pharmacologic Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis in Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: A Propensity-Matched Cohort Study.

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    Byrne, James P; Mason, Stephanie A; Gomez, David; Hoeft, Christopher; Subacius, Haris; Xiong, Wei; Neal, Melanie; Pirouzmand, Farhad; Nathens, Avery B

    2016-10-01

    Patients with severe traumatic brain injury (sTBI) are at high risk for developing venous thromboembolism (VTE). Nonetheless, pharmacologic VTE prophylaxis is often delayed out of concern for precipitating extension of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH). The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of early vs late VTE prophylaxis in patients with sTBI, and to characterize the risk of subsequent ICH-related complication. Adults with isolated sTBI (head Abbreviated Injury Scale score ≥3 and total Glasgow Coma Scale score ≤8) who received VTE prophylaxis with low-molecular-weight or unfractionated heparin were derived from the American College of Surgeons Trauma Quality Improvement Program (2012 to 2014). Patients were divided into EP (Propensity score matching was used to minimize selection bias. The primary end point was VTE (pulmonary embolism or deep vein thrombosis). Secondary outcomes were defined as late neurosurgical intervention (≥72 hours) or death. We identified 3,634 patients with sTBI. Early prophylaxis was given in 43% of patients. Higher head injury severity, presence of ICH, and early neurosurgery were associated with late prophylaxis. Propensity score matching yielded a well-balanced cohort of 2,468 patients. Early prophylaxis was associated with lower rates of both pulmonary embolism (odds ratio = 0.48; 95% CI, 0.25-0.91) and deep vein thrombosis (odds ratio = 0.51; 95% CI, 0.36-0.72), but no increase in risk of late neurosurgical intervention or death. In this observational study of patients with sTBI, early initiation of VTE prophylaxis was associated with decreased risk of pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis, but no increase in risk of late neurosurgical intervention or death. Early prophylaxis may be safe and should be the goal for each patient in the context of appropriate risk stratification. Copyright © 2016 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Superficial Dorsal Vein Injury/Thrombosis Presenting as False Penile Fracture Requiring Dorsal Venous Ligation

    OpenAIRE

    Arash Rafiei, MD; Tariq S. Hakky, MD; Daniel Martinez, MD; Justin Parker, MD; Rafael Carrion, MD

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Conditions mimicking penile fracture are extremely rare and have been seldom described. Aim: To describe a patient with false penile fracture who presented with superficial dorsal vein injury/thrombosis managed with ligation. Methods: A 33‐year‐old male presented with penile swelling and ecchymosis after intercourse. A penile ultrasound demonstrated a thrombosed superficial dorsal vein but also questionable fracture of the tunica albuginea. As the thrombus was expanding, h...

  2. Divergent effects of Tlr9 deletion in experimental late venous thrombosis resolution and vein wall injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewyer, Nicholas A; El-Sayed, Osama M; Luke, Catherine E; Elfline, Megan; Kittan, Nicolai; Allen, Ron; Laser, Adriana; Oostra, Carson; Comerota, Anthony; Hogaboam, Cory; Kunkel, Steven L; Henke, Peter K

    2015-11-01

    Deep-vein thrombosis (DVT) resolves via a sterile inflammatory response. Defining the inflammatory response of DVT may allow for new therapies that do not involve anticoagulation. Previously, we have shown that Toll-like receptor 9 (Tlr9) gene deleted mice had impaired venous thrombosis (VT) resolution. Here, we further characterise the role of Tlr9 signalling and sterile inflammation in chronic VT and vein wall responses. First, we found a human precedent exists with Tlr9+ cells present in chronic post thrombotic intraluminal tissue. Second, in a stasis VT mouse model, endogenous danger signal mediators of uric acid, HMGB-1, and neutrophil extracellular traps marker of citrullinated histone-3 (and extracellular DNA) were greater in Tlr9-/- thrombi as compared with wild-type (WT), corresponding with larger VT at 8 and 21 days. Fewer M1 type (CCR2+) monocyte/macrophages (MØ) were present in Tlr9-/- thrombi than WT controls at 8 days, suggesting an impaired inflammatory cell influx. Using bone marrow-derived monocyte (BMMØ) cell culture, we found decreased fibrinolytic gene expression with exposure to several endogenous danger signals. Next, adoptive transfer of cultured Tlr9+/+ BMMØ to Tlr9-/- mice normalised VT resolution at 8 days. Lastly, although the VT size was larger at 21 days in Tlr9-/- mice and correlated with decreased endothelial antigen markers, no difference in fibrosis was found. These data suggest that Tlr9 signalling in MØ is critical for later VT resolution, is associated with necrosis clearance, but does not affect later vein wall fibrosis. These findings provide insight into the Tlr9 MØ mechanisms of sterile inflammation in this disease process.

  3. Incidence and prophylaxis of deep venous thrombosis in outpatients with injury of the lower limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujath, P; Spannagel, U; Habscheid, W

    1993-03-01

    253 outpatients were included in a prospective randomized study. All patients had incidence of injuries of the lower limb immobilized by a plaster cast. 126 patients (group I) received a subcutaneous injection of Fraxiparin daily, and 127 patients (group II) received no thromboprophylaxis. Without prophylaxis 21 (16.5%) cases developed a thrombosis, and with prophylaxis a thrombosis could be proven in 6 (4.8%) patients only (p immobilized by a plaster cast, a thromboprophylaxis with a low-molecular-weight heparin is recommended.

  4. Endovascular repair of inadvertent arterial injury induced by central venous catheterization using a vascular closure device: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, So Hee; Jang, Woo Jin; Oh, Ju Heyon; Song, Yun Gyu [Samsung Changwon Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Central venous catheterization can cause various complications. Inadvertent subclavian artery catheterization was performed during insertion of a central venous catheter in a 73-year-old man suffering from panperitonitis due to small-bowel perforation. Endovascular treatment was conducted to treat the injured subclavian artery with a FemoSeal vascular closure device.

  5. A microcontroller-based simulation of dural venous sinus injury for neurosurgical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Daniel R; Siler, Dominic A; Whitney, Nathaniel; Selden, Nathan R

    2017-06-02

    OBJECTIVE Surgical simulation has the potential to supplement and enhance traditional resident training. However, the high cost of equipment and limited number of available scenarios have inhibited wider integration of simulation in neurosurgical education. In this study the authors provide initial validation of a novel, low-cost simulation platform that recreates the stress of surgery using a combination of hands-on, model-based, and computer elements. Trainee skill was quantified using multiple time and performance measures. The simulation was initially validated using trainees at the start of their intern year. METHODS The simulation recreates intraoperative superior sagittal sinus injury complicated by air embolism. The simulator model consists of 2 components: a reusable base and a disposable craniotomy pack. The simulator software is flexible and modular to allow adjustments in difficulty or the creation of entirely new clinical scenarios. The reusable simulator base incorporates a powerful microcomputer and multiple sensors and actuators to provide continuous feedback to the software controller, which in turn adjusts both the screen output and physical elements of the model. The disposable craniotomy pack incorporates 3D-printed sections of model skull and brain, as well as artificial dura that incorporates a model sagittal sinus. RESULTS Twelve participants at the 2015 Western Region Society of Neurological Surgeons postgraduate year 1 resident course ("boot camp") provided informed consent and enrolled in a study testing the prototype device. Each trainee was required to successfully create a bilateral parasagittal craniotomy, repair a dural sinus tear, and recognize and correct an air embolus. Participant stress was measured using a heart rate wrist monitor. After participation, each resident completed a 13-question categorical survey. CONCLUSIONS All trainee participants experienced tachycardia during the simulation, although the point in the simulation

  6. Use of Multifrequency Bioimpedance Analysis in Male Patients with Acute Kidney Injury Who Are Undergoing Continuous Veno-Venous Hemodiafiltration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harin Rhee

    Full Text Available Fluid overload is a well-known predictor of mortality in patients with acute kidney injury (AKI. Multifrequency bioimpedance analysis (MF-BIA is a promising tool for quantifying volume status. However, few studies have analyzed the effect of MF-BIA-defined volume status on the mortality of critically ill patients with AKI. This retrospective medical research study aimed to investigate this issue.We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients with AKI who underwent continuous veno-venous hemodiafiltration (CVVHDF from Jan. 2013 to Feb. 2014. Female patients were excluded to control for sex-based differences. Volume status was measured using MF-BIA (Inbody S20, Seoul, Korea at the time of CVVHDF initiation, and volume parameters were adjusted with height squared (H2. Binary logistic regression analyses were performed to test independent factors for prediction of in-hospital mortality.A total of 208 male patients were included in this study. The mean age was 65.19±12.90 years. During the mean ICU stay of 18.29±27.48 days, 40.4% of the patients died. The in-hospital mortality rate increased with increasing total body water (TBW/H2 quartile. In the multivariable analyses, increased TBW/H2 (OR 1.312(1.009-1.705, p=0.043 and having lower serum albumin (OR 0.564(0.346-0.919, p=0.022 were independently associated with higher in-hospital mortality. When the intracellular water (ICW/H2 or extracellular water (ECW/H2 was adjusted instead of the TBW/H2, only excess ICW/H2 was independently associated with increased mortality (OR 1.561(1.012-2.408, p=0.044.MF-BIA-defined excess TBW/H2 and ICW/H2 are independently associated with higher in-hospital mortality in male patients with AKI undergoing CVVHDF.

  7. Venous thrombosis: an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, C.W.

    1986-07-01

    Venous thromboembolic disease contributes to morbidity and mortality in certain groups of hospitalized patients, particularly those who have undergone surgery. Although principles of treatment have changed relatively little during the past 20 years, significant advances have been made in the diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Venography, once the only reliable diagnostic technique, has been largely replaced by noninvasive tests: impedance plethysmography, venous Doppler, /sup 125/I-radiofibrinogen-uptake test, and phleborheography. Virchow's triad of stasis, vessel injury, and hypercoagulability remains a valid explanation of the pathogenesis of thrombus formation, but laboratory and clinical data have refined our knowledge of how these factors interact to result in clinically significant disease. Knowledge of the natural history of venous thrombosis, plus heightened awareness of the long-term morbidity and expense associated with the postphlebitic syndrome, have led to increased interest in preventing DVT. Clinically and economically, venous thrombosis is best managed by prevention. 61 references.

  8. [Protective effect of retrograde venous perfusion of cryogenic liquid via accessory hemiazygos vein and treated with resveratrol on spinal cord injury in swine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zheng-fang; Guo, Hui-ming; Fu, Qi; Li, Xiao-hui; Fan, Rui-xin; Fan, Xiao-ping; Chen, Ji-mei; Zhuang, Jian; Zhu, Ping

    2013-12-01

    To observe the protective effect of retrograde venous perfusion of cryogenic liquid via accessory hemiazygos vein and treated with resveratrol on spinal cord injury and evaluate the expression changes of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2) after spinal cord ischemia reperfusion injury (SCII) in swine. Eighteen swine were divided into 3 groups: group I/R (n = 6, operation group), group CL (n = 6, retrograde venous perfusion of cryogenic liquid), group CL+Res (n = 6, retrograde venous perfusion of cryogenic liquid and treated with resveratrol after ischemia). In the group I/R, the aorta was clamped for 60 minutes and then removed. In the group CL and CL+Res, 9 g/L cold (4 °C) saline solution (perfusion rate, 16.65 ml/min) was infused into the accessory hemiazygos vein during ischemia.In the group CL+Res, the swine were treated with resveratrol (10 mg/kg) after spinal cord ischemia. Arterial pressure, blood gas analysis and the spinal canal and nasopharyngeal temperature changes were monitored during the surgery. Nervous function were assessed at 6 hours, 1, 2 days, 1, 2, 4 weeks and MAP-2 expression were detected at 4 weeks after reperfusion by using Western blot analysis in spinal cord tissue. After operation 18 swine were all survival. Behavioral scores of all groups decreased until 1 week after reperfusion and increased as time went by. The scores of group CL and CL+Res were higher than group I/R (F = 8.612, 17.276 and 11.985, P = 0.035,0.011 and 0.023) at 6 hours, 1, 2 days, group CL+Res were higher than group CL(P = 0.021) at 1 days after surgery. After descending aortic cross clamping, the spinal canal and nasopharyngeal temperature were obviously decreased in all groups and dropped to the lowest at 60 minutes after ischemia and 20 minutes after reperfusion in group I/R and the other groups respectively(F = 23.187-55.029, P cryogenic liquid via accessory hemiazygos vein and treated with resveratrol can relieve the ischemia-induced spinal cord injury in

  9. [Impact of sera from children with active Henoch-Schönlein purpura on human umbilical venous endothelial cells (HUVECs) and protective effects of methylprednisolone against HUVECs injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lin; Yuan, Li-Ping; Fei, Wen-Jun; Deng, Fang; Zhang, Qin; Hu, Bo; Lu, Ling

    2012-01-01

    To observe the changes of human umbilical venous endothelial cells (HUVECs) induced by the sera from children with active Henoch-Sch-nlein purpura (HSP) and the protective effects of methylprednisolone against HUVECs injury. HUVECs were divided into four groups based on the culture conditions: blank control group, normal serum group, HSP serum group, and HSP serum plus methylprednisolone group. The levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-8 in the supernatants of each group were detected using ELISA and the nitric oxide (NO) level by nitrate reductase determination. Moreover, the expressions of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and Fractalkine in HUVECs were examined by semiquantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot, respectively. The levels of IL-8, TNF-α, and NO in the HSP serum group were significantly higher than those in the blank control and normal serum groups (Pinflamation.

  10. Effect of cerebral blood flow on consciousness and outcome after head injury. Assessment by jugular bulb venous metabolism and IMP-SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imaizumi, Shigeki; Onuma, Takehide; Motohashi, Osamu; Kameyama, Motonobu; Ishii, Kiyoshi [Sendai City Hospital (Japan)

    2002-10-01

    This study was performed to elucidate the therapeutical value of arteriojugularvenous oxygen difference (AVDO{sub 2}) in the ultra-emergent period after head injury. Rational therapeutic strategy after severe head injury needs information concerning the dynamical change of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and metabolism. We monitored the cerebral venous metabolism within 6 hours after head injury until the day IMP-SPECT was performed. Whole brain cerebral blood flow detected by IMP-SPECT and AVDO{sub 2} at the same day was compared, which restored to the period within 6 hours after head injury. From this procedure, we could outline cerebral blood flow conditions by only AVDO{sub 2} without IMP-SPECT in the ultra-emergent period. Eighty-six patients with head injury who were carried to our emergency center in the period of recent 2 years aged ranging from 15 to 94 years were the subjects. They all performed jugular bulb cannulation within 6 hours after the accident (Martin's phase I: day 0) to know saturation of jugular vein (SjO{sub 2}), AVDO{sub 2} and AVL. They were monitored until the day IMP-SPECT was performed (Martin's phase II; day 1-3 or phase III; day 4-15). The correlation between CBF and AVDO{sub 2}. The effect of CBF and cerebral venous metabolism on consciousness and outcome was also analyzed. CBF and AVDO{sub 2} in phase II and III were reversely correlated (p<0.0001). Normal CBF corresponded with 5.0 vol% in AVDO{sub 2}. AVDO{sub 2} in all cases changed 6.2 vol% at phase I, 4.5 vol% at phase II and 5.1 vol% at phase III. Glasgow comascale (GCS) on admission under 8 (n=47) and over 9 (n=39) significantly differed in AVDO{sub 2} and CBF in the period of II and III. The patients with favorable consciousness showed low AVDO{sub 2} and hyperemia afterwards. Dead cases in phase I (n=19) showed high AVDO{sub 2} and low SjO{sub 2}. The patients with severe disability (SD) (n=13) showed high AVDO{sub 2} and low CBF and the patients with good recovery (GR

  11. Jugular venous oximetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avanish Bhardwaj

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of saturation of venous blood as it drains out of brain by sampling it from the jugular bulb provides us with an estimate of cerebral oxygenation, cerebral blood flow and cerebral metabolic requirement. Arterio-jugular venous difference of the oxygen content (AVDO 2 and jugular venous oxygen saturation (SjVO 2 values per se helps clinicians in identifying the impairment of cerebral oxygenation due to various factors thereby prompting implementation of corrective measures and the prevention of secondary injury to the brain due to ischaemia. SjVO 2 values are also used for prognostication of patients after traumatic brain injury and in other clinical situations. Sampling and measuring SjVO 2 intermittently or continuously using fibreoptic oximetry requires the tip of the catheter to be placed in the jugular bulb, which is a relatively simple bedside procedure. In the review below we have discussed the relevant anatomy, physiology, techniques, clinical applications and pitfalls of performing jugular venous oximetry as a tool for measurement of cerebral oxygenation.

  12. Development of a fatal noncompressible truncal hemorrhage model with combined hepatic and portal venous injury in normothermic normovolemic swine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ujwal R Yanala

    Full Text Available Noncompressible truncal hemorrhage and brain injury currently account for most early mortality of warfighters on the battlefield. There is no effective treatment for noncompressible truncal hemorrhage, other than rapid evacuation to a surgical facility. The availability of an effective field treatment for noncompressible truncal hemorrhage could increase the number of warfighters salvaged from this frequently-lethal scenario. Our intent was to develop a porcine model of noncompressible truncal hemorrhage with a ∼ 50% one-hour mortality so that we could develop new treatments for this difficult problem. Normovolemic normothermic domestic swine (barrows, 3 months old, 34-36 kg underwent one of three injury types through a midline incision: 1 central stellate injury (N = 6; 2 excision of a portal vein branch distal to the main PV trunk (N = 6; or 3 hemi-transection of the left lateral lobe of the liver at its base (N = 10. The one-hour mortality of these injuries was 0, 82, and 40%, respectively; the final mean arterial pressure was 65, 24, and 30 mm Hg, respectively; and the final hemoglobin was 8.3, 2.3, and 3.6 g/dL, respectively. Hemi-transection of the left lateral lobe of the liver appeared to target our desired mortality rate better than the other injury mechanisms.

  13. Development of a fatal noncompressible truncal hemorrhage model with combined hepatic and portal venous injury in normothermic normovolemic swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanala, Ujwal R; Johanning, Jason M; Pipinos, Iraklis I; Larsen, Gustavo; Velander, William H; Carlson, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    Noncompressible truncal hemorrhage and brain injury currently account for most early mortality of warfighters on the battlefield. There is no effective treatment for noncompressible truncal hemorrhage, other than rapid evacuation to a surgical facility. The availability of an effective field treatment for noncompressible truncal hemorrhage could increase the number of warfighters salvaged from this frequently-lethal scenario. Our intent was to develop a porcine model of noncompressible truncal hemorrhage with a ∼ 50% one-hour mortality so that we could develop new treatments for this difficult problem. Normovolemic normothermic domestic swine (barrows, 3 months old, 34-36 kg) underwent one of three injury types through a midline incision: 1) central stellate injury (N = 6); 2) excision of a portal vein branch distal to the main PV trunk (N = 6); or 3) hemi-transection of the left lateral lobe of the liver at its base (N = 10). The one-hour mortality of these injuries was 0, 82, and 40%, respectively; the final mean arterial pressure was 65, 24, and 30 mm Hg, respectively; and the final hemoglobin was 8.3, 2.3, and 3.6 g/dL, respectively. Hemi-transection of the left lateral lobe of the liver appeared to target our desired mortality rate better than the other injury mechanisms.

  14. Advanced Hemostatic Dressing Development Program: Animal Model Selection Criteria and Results of a Study of Nine Hemostatic Dressings in a Model of Severe Large Venous Hemorrhage and Hepatic Injury in Swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-09-01

    may be related to enhanced platelet procoagulant activity and annexin V binding.46 Another derivative of gallic acid , bis- muth subgallate, appears to...is described. We studied the effects of nine hemostatic dressings on blood loss using a model of severe venous hemorrhage and hepatic injury in swine...Methods: Swine were treated using one of nine hemostatic dressings. Dress- ings used the following primary active ingredients: microfibrillar

  15. Venous Ultrasound (Extremities)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound - Venous (Extremities) Venous ultrasound uses sound waves to ... limitations of Venous Ultrasound Imaging? What is Venous Ultrasound Imaging? Ultrasound is safe and painless, and produces ...

  16. Determinants of Calcium Infusion Rate During Continuous Veno-venous Hemofiltration with Regional Citrate Anticoagulation in Critically Ⅲ Patients with Acute Kidney Injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    De-Lin Liu; Li-Feng Huang; Wen-Liang Ma; Qi Ding; Yue Han; Yue Zheng; Wen-Xiong Li

    2016-01-01

    Background:It is unclear that how to decide the calcium infusion rate during continuous veno-venous hemofiltration (CVVH) with regional citrate anticoagulation (RCA).This study aimed to assess the determinants of calcium infusion rate during CVVH with RCA in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury (AKI).Methods:A total of 18 patients with AKI requiring CVVH were prospectively analyzed.Postdilution CVVH was performed with a fixed blood flow rate of 150 ml/min and a replacement fluid flow rate of 2000 ml/h for each new circuit.The infusion of 4% trisodium citrate was started at a rate of 29.9 mmol/h prefilter and adjusted according to postfilter ionized calcium.The infusion of 10% calcium gluconate was initiated at a rate of 5.5 mmol/h and adjusted according to systemic ionized calcium.The infusion rate oftrisodium citrate and calcium gluconate as well as ultrafiltrate flow rate were recorded at 1,2,4,6,12,and 24 h after starting CVVH,respectively.The calcium loss rate by CVVH was also calculated.Results:Fifty-seven sessions of CVVH were performed in 18 AKI patients.The citrate infusion rate,calcium loss rate by CVVH,and calcium infusion rate were 31.30 (interquartile range:2.70),4.60 ± 0.48,and 5.50 ± 0.35 mmol/h,respectively.The calcium infusion rate was significantly higher than that of calcium loss rate by CVVH (P < 0.01).The correlation coefficient between the calcium and citrate infusion rates,and calcium infusion and calcium loss rates by CVVH was-0.031 (P > 0.05) and 0.932 (P < 0.01),respectively.In addition,calcium infusion rate (mmol/h) =1.77 + 0.8 × (calcium loss rate by CVVH,mmol/h).Conclusions:The calcium infusion rate correlates significantly with the calcium loss rate by CVVH but not with the citrate infusion rate in a fixed blood flow rate during CVVH with RCA.

  17. Profilaxia de tromboembolismo venoso em pacientes com lesão cerebral traumática Venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in patients with traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanya L. Zakrison

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Traumatismo crânio-encefálico (TCE, com hemorragia intracraniana associada (HIC ocorre com frequência em trauma. Pacientes vítimas de trauma também estão em alto risco de desenvolver complicações venosas tromboembólicas (TEV. Heparina de Baixo Peso Molecular (HBPM é utilizada em pacientes de trauma, como profilaxia para reduzir o risco de eventos de TEV. Ainda não está claro, no entanto, se a HBPM é segura para uso em pacientes com trauma com HIC por receio da progressão do hematoma. O Clube de Revista "Telemedicina Baseada em Evidências: Cirurgia do Trauma e Emergência (TBE-CiTE" realizou uma apreciação crítica de três estudos recentes e mais relevantes no tocante ao momento de início da profilaxia, à segurança e ao uso de HBPM em pacientes com trauma e HIC. Especificamente, três estudos foram revisados: i uma revisão crítica da literatura sobre o tema, ii um estudo multicêntrico, estudo de coorte retrospectivo avaliando a segurança de HBPM em pacientes com trauma, e com HIC e iii um estudo piloto randomizado, avaliando a viabilidade e as taxas de eventos de progressão de HIC, servindo como base para futuros ensaios clínicos randomizados (ECR sobre o tema. Alguns resultados são conflitantes, com o maior nível de evidência sendo o ECR piloto demonstrando a segurança para o uso precoce de HBPM no TCE associado com HIC. Grande parte desta pesquisa, porém, foi gerada por um único centro e, consequentemente, carece de validade externa. Além disso, as recomendações clínicas não podem ser geradas com base em estudos-piloto. Diretrizes baseadas em evidências e recomendações não podem ser feitas, neste momento, até a realização de outros estudos sobre este assunto desafiador.Traumatic brain injury (TBI with associated intracranial hemorrhage (ICH occurs frequently in trauma. Trauma patients are also at high risk of developing venous thromboembolic (VTE complications. Low Molecular Weight Heparin (LMWH is

  18. Diagnosis and treatment of venous ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Lauren; Seraj, Samina

    2010-04-15

    Venous ulcer, also known as stasis ulcer, is the most common etiology of lower extremity ulceration, affecting approximately 1 percent of the U.S. population. Possible causes of venous ulcers include inflammatory processes resulting in leukocyte activation, endothelial damage, platelet aggregation, and intracellular edema. The primary risk factors for venous ulcer development are older age, obesity, previous leg injuries, deep venous thrombosis, and phlebitis. On physical examination, venous ulcers are generally irregular, shallow, and located over bony prominences. Granulation tissue and fibrin are typically present in the ulcer base. Associated findings include lower extremity varicosities, edema, venous dermatitis, and lipodermatosclerosis. Venous ulcers are usually recurrent, and an open ulcer can persist for weeks to many years. Severe complications include cellulitis, osteomyelitis, and malignant change. Poor prognostic factors include large ulcer size and prolonged duration. Evidence-based treatment options for venous ulcers include leg elevation, compression therapy, dressings, pentoxifylline, and aspirin therapy. Surgical management may be considered for ulcers that are large in size, of prolonged duration, or refractory to conservative measures.

  19. Experimental extracorporeal membrane oxygenation reduces central venous pressure: an adjunct to control of venous hemorrhage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Magnus; Talving, Peep; Palmér, Kenneth; Frenckner, Björn; Riddez, Louis; Broomé, Michael

    2010-07-01

    Venoarterial ECMO has been utilized in trauma patients to improve oxygenation, particularly in the setting of pulmonary contusions and ARDS. We hypothesized that venoarterial ECMO could reduce the central venous pressure in the trauma scenario, thus, alleviating major venous hemorrhage. Ten swine were cannulated for venoarterial ECMO. Central venous pressure, mean arterial pressure, portal vein pressure and portal vein flow were recorded at three different flow rates in both a hemodynamic normal state and a setting of increased central venous pressure and right ventricular load, mimicking acute lung injury. Venoarterial ECMO reduced the central venous pressure (CVP( sup)) from 9.4+/-0.8 to 7.3+/-0.7 mmHg (p<0.01) and increased the mean arterial pressure from 103+/-8 to 119+/-10 mmHg (p<0.01) in the normal hemodynamic state. In the state of increased right ventricular load, the CVP(sup) declined from 14.3+/-0.4 to 11.0+/-0.7mmHg (p<0.01) and the mean arterial pressure (MAP) increased from 66+/-6 to 113 +/-5 mmHg (p<0.01). Venoarterial ECMO reduces systemic venous pressure while maintaining or improving systemic perfusion in both a normal circulatory state and in the setting of increased right ventricular load associated with acute lung injury. ECMO may be a useful tool in reducing blood loss during major venous hemorrhage in both trauma and selected elective surgery.

  20. Overview of venous thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abad Rico, José Ignacio; Llau Pitarch, Juan Vicente; Rocha, Eduardo

    2010-12-14

    Thrombosis occurs at sites of injury to the vessel wall, by inflammatory processes leading to activation of platelets, platelet adherence to the vessel wall and the formation of a fibrin network. A thrombus that goes on to occlude a blood vessel is known as a thromboembolism. Venous thromboembolism begins with deep vein thrombosis (DVT), which forms in the deep veins of the leg (calf) or pelvis. In some cases, the DVT becomes detached from the vein and is transported to the right-hand side of the heart, and from there to the pulmonary arteries, giving rise to a pulmonary embolism (PE). Certain factors predispose patients toward the development of venous thromboembolism (VTE), including surgery, trauma, hospitalization, immobilization, cancer, long-haul travel, increased age, obesity, major medical illness and previous VTE; in addition, there may also be a genetic component to VTE. VTE is responsible for a substantial number of deaths per annum in Europe. Anticoagulants are the mainstay of both VTE treatment and VTE prevention, and many professional organizations have published guidelines on the appropriate use of anticoagulant therapies for VTE. Treatment of VTE aims to prevent morbidity and mortality associated with the disease, and any long-term complications such as VTE recurrence or post-thrombotic syndrome. Generally, guidelines recommend the use of low molecular weight heparins (LMWH), unfractionated heparin (UFH) or fondaparinux for the pharmacological prevention and treatment of VTE, with the duration of therapy varying according to the baseline characteristics and risk profile of the individual. Despite evidence showing that the use of anticoagulation prevents VTE, the availability of several convenient, effective anticoagulant therapies and the existence of clear guideline recommendations, thromboprophylaxis is underused, particularly in patients not undergoing surgery. Greater adherence to guideline-recommended therapies, such as LMWH, which can be

  1. [Femoral venous catheter: an unusual complication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, P; Mora, A; Trambert, P; Maler, E; Courant, P

    2000-08-01

    We report an erratic course of a venous femoral catheter which was in the abdominal cavity in a patient with an haemoperitoneum and an hepatic injury. This complication led to an inefficiency of the transfusion and a worsening of the haemoperitoneum.

  2. To what extent might deep venous thrombosis and chronic venous insufficiency share a common etiology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, P Colm; Agutter, P S

    2009-08-01

    According to the valve cusp hypoxia hypothesis (VCHH), deep venous thrombosis is caused by sustained non-pulsatile (streamline) venous blood flow. This leads to hypoxemia in the valve pockets; hypoxic injury to the inner (parietalis) endothelium of the cusp leaflets activates the elk-1/egr-1 pathway, leading to leukocyte and platelet swarming at the site of injury and, potentially, blood coagulation. Here, we propose an extension of the VCHH to account for chronic venous insufficiency. First, should the foregoing events not proceed to frank thrombogenesis, the valves may nevertheless be chronically injured and become incompetent. Serial incompetence in lower limb valves may then generate ''passive'' venous hypertension. Second, should ostial valve thrombosis obstruct venous return from muscles via tributaries draining into the femoral vein, as Virchow illustrated, ''active'' venous hypertension may supervene: muscle contraction would force the blood in the vessels behind the blocked ostial valves to re-route. Passive or active venous hypertension opposes return flow, leading to luminal hypoxemia and vein wall distension, which in turn may impair vasa venarum perfusion; the resulting mural endothelial hypoxia would lead to leukocyte invasion of the wall and remodelling of the media. We propose that varicose veins result if gross active hypertension stretches the valve ''rings'', rendering attached valves incompetent caudad to obstructed sites, replacing normal centripetal flow in perforating veins with centrifugal flow and over-distending those vessels. We also discuss how hypoxemia-related venous/capillary wall lesions may lead to accumulation of leukocytes, progressive blockage of capillary blood flow, lipodermosclerosis and skin ulceration.

  3. Neonatal Venous Thromboembolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina M. Haley

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Neonates are the pediatric population at highest risk for development of venous thromboembolism (VTE, and the incidence of VTE in the neonatal population is increasing. This is especially true in the critically ill population. Several large studies indicate that the incidence of neonatal VTE is up almost threefold in the last two decades. Central lines, fluid fluctuations, sepsis, liver dysfunction, and inflammation contribute to the risk profile for VTE development in ill neonates. In addition, the neonatal hemostatic system is different from that of older children and adults. Platelet function, pro- and anticoagulant proteins concentrations, and fibrinolytic pathway protein concentrations are developmentally regulated and generate a hemostatic homeostasis that is unique to the neonatal time period. The clinical picture of a critically ill neonate combined with the physiologically distinct neonatal hemostatic system easily fulfills the criteria for Virchow’s triad with venous stasis, hypercoagulability, and endothelial injury and puts the neonatal patient at risk for VTE development. The presentation of a VTE in a neonate is similar to that of older children or adults and is dependent upon location of the VTE. Ultrasound is the most common diagnostic tool employed in identifying neonatal VTE, but relatively small vessels of the neonate as well as frequent low pulse pressure can make ultrasound less reliable. The diagnosis of a thrombophilic disorder in the neonatal population is unlikely to change management or outcome, and the role of thrombophilia testing in this population requires further study. Treatment of neonatal VTE is aimed at reducing VTE-associated morbidity and mortality. Recommendations for treating, though, cannot be extrapolated from guidelines for older children or adults. Neonates are at risk for bleeding complications, particularly younger neonates with more fragile intracranial vessels. Developmental alterations in the

  4. Central Venous Catheter-Related Hydrothorax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Se Hun Kim

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This report describes a case of 88-year-old women who developed central venous catheter-related bilateral hydrothorax, in which left pleural effusion, while right pleural effusion was being drained. The drainage prevented accumulation of fluid in the right pleural space, indicating that there was neither extravasation of infusion fluid nor connection between the two pleural cavities. The only explanation for bilateral hydrothorax in this case is lymphatic connections. Although vascular injuries by central venous catheter can cause catheter-related hydrothorax, it is most likely that the positioning of the tip of central venous catheter within the lymphatic duct opening in the right sub-clavian-jugular confluence or superior vena cava causes the catheter-related hydrothorax. Pericardial effusion can also result from retrograde lymphatic flow through the pulmonary lymphatic chains.

  5. Lifestyle and venous thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pomp, Elisabeth Rebekka

    2008-01-01

    In the Multiple Environmental and Genetic Assessment of risk factors for venous thrombosis (MEGA study), a large population-based case-control study, we investigated lifestyle factors as risk factors for venous thrombosis. Overweight, smoking and alcohol consumption were addressed and pregnancy and

  6. Comparison between capillary, venous and arterial levels of protein S100B in patients with severe brain pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrand, Ramona; Romner, Bertil; Reinstrup, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Protein S100B is soon in clinical use as a sensitive marker after mild traumatic head injury in adults. Initial studies of S100B in pediatric head injury have shown promising results. Venous sampling can be challenging in children and capillary samples are often a preferred option. The aim...... of the study was to investigate the relation between capillary, venous and arterial measurements of protein S100B, primarily by determining whether capillary S100B differ from venous and if capillary S100B can predict venous S100B levels, and secondarily, if arterial S100B samples can substitute venous samples...

  7. Reference values for venous and capillary S100B in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrand, Ramona; Romner, Bertil; Lanke, Jan

    2011-01-01

    The current management guidelines for pediatric mild head injury (MHI) liberally recommend computed tomography (CT) and frequent admission. Serum protein S100B, currently used in management of adult head injury, has recently shown potential for reducing unnecessary CT scans after pediatric mild...... head injury. Capillary sampling in children is commonly used when venous sampling fails or is inappropriate. We present reference values for both venous and capillary samples of protein S100B in children....

  8. [Inadvertent thoracic duct puncture during right axially central venous cannulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Shingo; Itagaki, Taiga; Adachi, Yushi; Ishii, Yasuhiro; Taniguchi, Midzuki; Doi, Matsuyuki; Sato, Shigehito

    2010-10-01

    A case of inadvertent thoracic duct puncture during right axially central venous cannulation is reported. The catheterization was performed under the real time ultrasound guidance technique and the coronal view image was continuously displayed. After confirming the feelings of venous puncture, clear yellow fluid was aspired into the connected syringe to the needle. Initially, an accidental thoracic puncture with subsequent pleural fluid aspiration was suspected;however, no finding of pleural effusion was observed with ultrasound imaging and computed tomography. Thus, an accidental thoracic duct puncture and the subsequent lymph fluid aspiration were suspected. Even in a right side approach for central venous catheterization, thoracic duct injury might ensure.

  9. Idiopathic venous thromboembolism and thrombophilia

    OpenAIRE

    Sinescu, C; Hostiuc, M; Bartos, D.

    2011-01-01

    During the past decade idiopathic venous thromboembolism has become a separate entity, a chronic illness which has required prolonged anticoagulation and other prevention strategies to avoid recurrences. This article reviews recent developments regarding unprovoked venous thromboembolism and its relation with thrombophilia. In the beginning, the latest definition of idiopathic venous thromboembolism is presented. The article continues with statistics about thrombophilia, related venous thromb...

  10. Central venous catheter - flushing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... during cancer treatment Bone marrow transplant - discharge Central venous catheter - dressing change Peripherally inserted central catheter - flushing Sterile technique Surgical wound care - open Review Date 9/22/2016 Updated by: ...

  11. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renowden, Shelley [Frenchay Hospital, Bristol BS16 1LE (United Kingdom)

    2004-02-01

    A comprehensive synopsis on cerebral venous thrombosis is presented. It emphasizes the various aetiologies, the wide clinical spectrum and the unpredictable outcome. Imaging techniques and pitfalls are reported and the therapeutic options are discussed. (orig.)

  12. Blunt abdominal trauma – An important cause of portal venous pseuodoaneurysm

    OpenAIRE

    Wallis, Adam; Rogers, Timothy; Pope, Ian; Callaway, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Aneurysms and pseudoaneurysms of the portal venous system are rarely seen following abdominal trauma but clinicians need to be aware of them as possible vascular complications following blunt trauma. This case report of a 10 year old boy following a handlebar injury demonstrates a clear causal relationship between trauma and portal venous pseudoaneurysm. Portal venous aneurysms have a prevalence of less than 0.4% and most are found in patients with underlying hepatocellular disease. Many are ...

  13. Nonclinical aspects of venous thrombosis in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struble, Evi; Harrouk, Wafa; DeFelice, Albert; Tesfamariam, Belay

    2015-09-01

    Pregnancy is a hypercoagulable state which carries an excess risk of maternal venous thrombosis. Endothelial injury, alterations in blood flow and activation of the coagulation pathway are proposed to contribute to the hypercoagulability. The risk for thrombosis may be accentuated by certain drugs and device implants that directly or indirectly affect the coagulation pathway. To help ensure that these interventions do not result in adverse maternal or fetal outcomes during pregnancy, gravid experimental animals can be exposed to such treatments at various stages of gestation and over a dosage range that would identify hazards and inform risk assessment. Circulating soluble biomarkers can also be evaluated for enhancing the assessment of any increased risk of venous thrombosis during pregnancy. In addition to traditional in vivo animal testing, efforts are under way to incorporate reliable non-animal methods in the assessment of embryofetal toxicity and thrombogenic effects. This review summarizes hemostatic balance during pregnancy in animal species, embryofetal development, biomarkers of venous thrombosis, and alterations caused by drug-induced venous thrombosis.

  14. The aetiology of deep venous thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, P C; Agutter, P S

    2006-09-01

    Most ideas about the pathogenesis of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) are dominated by a 'consensus model' first articulated around 1962. This model invokes 'Virchow's triad' and attributes thrombogenesis in veins to some combination of 'hypercoagulability', 'stasis' and 'intimal injury'. This arose as a by-product of studies on the mechanisms of haemostasis and bleeding diatheses that were at best only indirectly relevant to thrombosis, and there are reasons for doubting the causal significance of 'hypercoagulability' and 'stasis' in the aetiology of DVT. Proponents of the consensus model make little reference to a substantial literature, mostly historical, that: (a) emphasizes the significance of the venous valve pockets (VVP) and blood rheology in DVT pathogenesis; and (b) describes morphological features specific to venous thrombi that a valid aetiological model must explain. This literature provides the basis for an alternative hypothesis of DVT aetiology, published some 30 years ago, which has been experimentally corroborated and is compatible with recent cell and molecular biological studies of the venous endothelium. We review this alternative hypothesis, considering its potential value for future research on DVT and embolism, and its significance for clinical practice.

  15. [Homocysteine and venous thromboembolism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnerat, C; Hayoz, D

    1997-09-06

    Congenital homocysteinuria is a rare inherited metabolic disorder with early onset atherosclerosis and arterial and venous trombosis. Moderate hyperhomocysteinemia is more frequently encountered and is recognized as an independent cardiovascular risk factor. Several case-control studies demonstrate an association between venous thromboembolism and moderate hyperhomocysteinemia. A patient with moderate hyperhomocysteinemia has a 2-3 relative risk of developing an episode of venous thromboembolism. The occurrence of mild hyperhomocysteinemia in heterozygotes for the mutation of Leiden factor V involves a 10-fold increase in the risk of venous thromboembolism. The biochemical mechanism by which homocysteine may promote thrombosis is not fully recognized. Homocysteine inhibits the expression of thrombomodulin, the thrombin cofactor responsible for protein C activation, and inhibits antithrombin-III binding. Treatment with folic acid reduces the plasma level of homocysteinemia, but no study has demonstrated its efficacy in reducing the incidence of venous thromboembolism or atherosclerosis. Hyperhomocysteinemia should be included in the screening of abnormalities of hemostasis and thrombosis in patients with idiopathic thromboembolism, and mild hyperhomocysteinemia may justify a trial of folic acid.

  16. Ileofemoral venous thrombectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindhagen, J; Haglund, M; Haglund, U; Holm, J; Scherstén, T

    1978-01-01

    Twentyeight patients with ileofemoral venous thrombosis were treated surgically. Five of the patients had moderate degree of venous congestion, 18 patients had phlegmasia alba dolens and five patients had phlegmasia coerulea dolens. The mean age was 54 years, range 15-80 years, and 15 were men and 13 were women. In all cases the thrombosis was verified by phlebography. Thrombectomy was performed with a Fogarty venous thrombectomy catheter. Peroperative phlebography was used in most cases to guarantee complete extraction of thrombotic material. No operative pulmonary embolism or mortality was encountered. Postoperative continuous heparin infusion in the thrombectomized segment was used for the first week followed by dicumarol treatment. The patients were followed from 6 months to 4 years postoperatively. In two patients thrombectomy was not possible to perform. One of these patients developed a pronounced postthrombotic syndrome, the other developed venous congestion of more moderate degree. Excellent long-term time results were obtained in 82% of the patients and satisfactory in 14%. Thrombectomy is an efficient treatment of ileofemoral venous thrombosis.

  17. Old and new risk factors for upper extremity deep venous thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, J.W.; Doggen, Catharina Jacoba Maria; Osanto, S.; Rosendaal, F.R.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Well known risk factors for upper extremity deep venous thrombosis are the presence of a central venous catheter (CVC) and malignancy, but other potential risk factors, such as surgery, injury and hormone replacement therapy (HRT), have not yet been explored. Methods: We performed a

  18. Unsuspected lower extremity deep venous thrombosis simulating musculoskeletal pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parellada, Antoni J.; Reiter, Sean B.; Glickman, Peter L.; Kloss, Linda A. [Frankford Hospitals, DII - Diagnostic Imaging, Inc., Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Morrison, William B. [Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Carrino, John A. [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Patel, Pinecca [Frankford Hospitals, Jefferson Health System, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2006-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to highlight the critical role that MRI may play in diagnosing unsuspected lower extremity deep venous thrombosis and to stress the importance of scrutinizing MRI studies of the lower extremity showing apparently non-specific muscle edema for any evidence of intramuscular venous thrombosis. The imaging studies of four patients in whom deep venous thrombosis was unsuspected on clinical grounds, and first diagnosed on the basis of MRI findings, were reviewed by two musculoskeletal radiologists in consensus. In all four patients the initial clinical suspicion was within the scope of musculoskeletal injuries (gastrocnemius strain, n=3; ruptured Baker cyst, n=1), explaining the choice of MRI over ultrasound as the first diagnostic modality. All patients showed marked reactive edema in the surrounding soft tissues or muscles. Three patients showed MR evidence of branching rim-enhancing structures within intramuscular plexuses characteristic of venous thrombosis (gastrocnemius, n=1; sural, n=2); one patient showed a distended popliteal vein. Ultrasound was able to duplicate the MRI findings in three patients: one patient showed above-the-knee extension on ultrasound; neither of the two patients with intramuscular thrombosis demonstrated on ultrasound showed extension to the deep venous trunks. Intramuscular venous thrombosis can present as marked edema-like muscle changes on MRI, simulating primary musculoskeletal conditions. In the absence of clinical suspicion for deep venous thrombosis, only the identification of rim-enhancing branching intramuscular tubular structures will allow the correct diagnosis to be made. (orig.)

  19. Hormonal contraception and venous thromboembolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lidegaard, Øjvind; Milsom, Ian; Geirsson, Reynir Tomas;

    2012-01-01

    New studies about the influence of hormonal contraception on the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) have been published.......New studies about the influence of hormonal contraception on the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) have been published....

  20. Models of the venous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehlsen, J

    2000-01-01

    of the venous system require at least three elements: a resistor, a capacitor and an inductor, with the latter being of more importance in the venous than in the arterial system. Non-linearities must be considered in pressure/flow relations in the small venules, during venous collapse, or low flow conditions...

  1. Venous thromboembolism: The intricacies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dutta T

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Venous thromboembolism (VTE has been a subject of great interest of late. Since Rudolph Virchow described the famous Virchow′s triad in 1856, there have been rapid strides in the understanding of the pathogenesis and factors responsible for it. Discovery of various thrombophilic factors, both primary and acquired, in the last 40 years has revolutionized prognostication and management of this potentially life-threatening condition due to its associated complication of pulmonary thromboembolism. Detailed genetic mapping and linkage analyses have been underlining the fact that VTE is a multifactorial disorder and a complex one. There are many gene-gene and gene-environment interactions that alter and magnify the clinical picture in this disorder. Point in case is pregnancy, where the risk of VTE is 100-150 times increased in the presence of Factor V Leiden, prothrombin mutation (Prothrombin 20210A and antithrombin deficiency. Risk of VTE associated with long-haul air flight has now been well recognized. Thrombotic events associated with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS are 70% venous and 30% arterial. Deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism are the most common venous events, though unusual cases of catastrophes due to central vein thrombosis like renal vein thrombosis and Budd-Chiari syndrome (catastrophic APS may occur.

  2. Chronic venous disorders

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    evaluated by clinical assessment and duplex ultrasound. The rate ... History and physical examination. The most common ... deep venous thrombosis or phlebitis, use of anticoagulation therapy, unexplained ... veins and pulsed Doppler assessment of the direction of ... effective in healing ulcers and preventing recurrences ...

  3. Venous oxygen saturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartog, Christiane; Bloos, Frank

    2014-12-01

    Early detection and rapid treatment of tissue hypoxia are important goals. Venous oxygen saturation is an indirect index of global oxygen supply-to-demand ratio. Central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO2) measurement has become a surrogate for mixed venous oxygen saturation (SvO2). ScvO2 is measured by a catheter placed in the superior vena cava. After results from a single-center study suggested that maintaining ScvO2 values >70% might improve survival rates in septic patients, international practice guidelines included this target in a bundle strategy to treat early sepsis. However, a recent multicenter study with >1500 patients found that the use of central hemodynamic and ScvO2 monitoring did not improve long-term survival when compared to the clinical assessment of the adequacy of circulation. It seems that if sepsis is recognized early, a rapid initiation of antibiotics and adequate fluid resuscitation are more important than measuring venous oxygen saturation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Central venous line - infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    A central venous line (CVL) is a long, soft, plastic tube that is put into a large vein in the chest. WHY IS A CVL USED? A CVL is often put in when a baby cannot get a ... (MCC). A CVL can be used to give nutrients or medicines to a ...

  5. Venous Thromboembolism in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵永强

    2005-01-01

    @@ Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) are two manifesttions of venous thromboembolism (VTE) . Although the controversy remained,it has been widely accepted for many years that Chinese people have lower incidence of VTE than Caucasians with the different etiology and clinical features.

  6. Cerebral Venous Thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassi, Samia Ben; Touati, Nahla; Baccouche, Hela; Drissi, Cyrine; Romdhane, Neila Ben; Hentati, Fayçal

    2016-01-01

    Data regarding cerebral venous thrombosis in North Africa are scarce. This study aims to identify the clinical features, risk factors, outcome, and prognosis of cerebral venous thrombosis in Tunisia. Data of 160 patients with radiologically confirmed cerebral venous thrombosis, hospitalized in Mongi Ben Hmida National Institute of Neurology (Tunis, Tunisia), were retrospectively collected and analyzed. The mean age was 37.3 years with a female predominance (83.1%). The mode of onset was subacute in most cases (56.2%). Headache was the most common symptom (71.3%), and focal neurologic symptoms were the main clinical presentation (41.8%). The most common sites of thrombosis were the superior sagittal sinus (65%) and the lateral sinus (60.6%). More than 1 sinus was involved in 114 (71.2%) patients. Parenchymal lesions observed in 85 (53.1%) patients did not correlate with cerebral venous thrombosis extent. Major risk factors were obstetric causes (pregnancy and puerperium) found in 46 (38.6% of women aged <50 years) patients, followed by anemia (28.1%) and congenital or acquired thrombophilia (16.2%). Mortality rate was of 6.6%. Good outcome at 6 months (modified Rankin Scale ≤2) was observed in 105 (87.5%)of 120 patients available for follow-up. Predictors of poor outcome were altered consciousness and elevated plasma C-reactive protein levels. Clinical and radiologic presentation of cerebral venous thrombosis in Tunisia was quite similar to other parts of the world with, however, a particularly high frequency of obstetric causes. Plasma C-reactive protein level should be considered as a prognostic factor in CVT.

  7. Venous thromboembolism and pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maristella D’Uva

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Maristella D’Uva1, Pierpaolo Di Micco2, Ida Strina1, Giuseppe De Placido1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Human Reproduction, “Federico II” University of Naples, Naples, Italy; 2Internal Medicine Division, Buonconsiglio Fatebenefratelli Hospital of Naples, Naples, ItalyAbstract: In recent decades, the association between a hypercoagulable state and its causes and adverse pregnancy outcome, in particular recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL has been studied extensively. Although the first studies were focused only on the association between thrombophilia and RPL, subsequent studies underlined also a potential role of antithrombotic treatment to prevent vascular complication such as venous thromboembolism (VTE during pregnancy. Thromboprophylaxis should be considered also for pregnant subjects carriers of molecular thrombophilia or that previously experienced VTE, in order to prevent VTE during pregnancy, while antithrombotic treatment for VTE should be performed during all pregnant periods.Keywords: thrombophilia, venous thromboembolism, recurrent pregnancy loss, factor V Leiden

  8. Venous thromboembolism in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Pereira

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Venous thromboembolism is rare among children and has a multi-factorial aetiology. It’s important to establish the diagnosis and evaluate the functional prognosis. Case report: A previously healthy 11 year old adolescent was observed in the emergency room with clinical signs of superficial venous thrombosis of the upper limb. Laboratorial evaluation showed a sedimentation rate, coagulation study, autoimmune antibodies and homocysteine with normal values. Testing for heritable thrombophilia revealed prothrombin mutation (G20210A, heterozigosity and mutation of PAI-1 (4G e -844A, both of which are associated with hypercoagulable state and indication to do prophylaxis with low molecular weight heparin in higher risk situations. Discussion/Conclusion: The rarity of thromboembolic events at this age and the atypical localization lead to an exhaustive laboratorial evaluation. Thrombophilia mutations may clinically become evident in adolescence, and its detection is important because of children’s lifestyle and the need of prophylactic treatment in some situations.

  9. Venous Leg Ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivas, Alejandra; Lev-Tov, Hadar; Kirsner, Robert S

    2016-08-02

    This issue provides a clinical overview of venous leg ulcers, focusing on prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and practice improvement. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers.

  10. Venous leg ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, E Andrea

    2011-12-21

    Leg ulcers usually occur secondary to venous reflux or obstruction, but 20% of people with leg ulcers have arterial disease, with or without venous disorders. Between 1.5 and 3.0/1000 people have active leg ulcers. Prevalence increases with age to about 20/1000 in people aged over 80 years. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of standard treatments, adjuvant treatments, and organisational interventions for venous leg ulcers? What are the effects of advice about self-help interventions in people receiving usual care for venous leg ulcers? What are the effects of interventions to prevent recurrence of venous leg ulcers? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2011 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 101 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: compression bandages and stockings, cultured allogenic (single or bilayer) skin replacement, debriding agents, dressings (cellulose, collagen, film, foam, hyaluronic acid-derived, semi-occlusive alginate), hydrocolloid (occlusive) dressings in the presence of compression, intermittent pneumatic compression, intravenous prostaglandin E1, larval therapy, laser treatment (low-level), leg ulcer clinics, multilayer elastic system, multilayer elastomeric (or non-elastomeric) high-compression regimens or bandages, oral treatments (aspirin, flavonoids, pentoxifylline, rutosides, stanozolol, sulodexide

  11. Novel biomarkers of arterial and venous ischemia in microvascular flaps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerard K Nguyen

    Full Text Available The field of reconstructive microsurgery is experiencing tremendous growth, as evidenced by recent advances in face and hand transplantation, lower limb salvage after trauma, and breast reconstruction. Common to all of these procedures is the creation of a nutrient vascular supply by microsurgical anastomosis between a single artery and vein. Complications related to occluded arterial inflow and obstructed venous outflow are not uncommon, and can result in irreversible tissue injury, necrosis, and flap loss. At times, these complications are challenging to clinically determine. Since early intervention with return to the operating room to re-establish arterial inflow or venous outflow is key to flap salvage, the accurate diagnosis of early stage complications is essential. To date, there are no biochemical markers or serum assays that can predict these complications. In this study, we utilized a rat model of flap ischemia in order to identify the transcriptional signatures of venous congestion and arterial ischemia. We found that the critical ischemia time for the superficial inferior epigastric fasciocutaneus flap was four hours and therefore performed detailed analyses at this time point. Histolgical analysis confirmed significant differences between arterial and venous ischemia. The transcriptome of ischemic, congested, and control flap tissues was deciphered by performing Affymetrix microarray analysis and verified by qRT-PCR. Principal component analysis revealed that arterial ischemia and venous congestion were characterized by distinct transcriptomes. Arterial ischemia and venous congestion was characterized by 408 and 1536>2-fold differentially expressed genes, respectively. qRT-PCR was used to identify five candidate genes Prol1, Muc1, Fcnb, Il1b, and Vcsa1 to serve as biomarkers for flap failure in both arterial ischemia and venous congestion. Our data suggests that Prol1 and Vcsa1 may be specific indicators of venous congestion and

  12. Ultrasound elastography for determination of the age of venous thrombi : evaluation of thrombus evolution in patients after sclerotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Paluch, Łukasz; Nawrocka-Laskus, Ewa; Dąbrowska, Agnieszka; Popiela, Tadeusz; Walecki, Jerzy

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Venous thrombosis is a multicausal disease involving intravenous clot formation. It may occur spontaneously or after provoking events, such as traumatic injuries to the pelvis, upper and lower extermities, immobilization, intravascular procedures, including venous catheterization or injection. Color Doppler ultrasonography is a rapid and non-invasive technique for evaluation of venous disease. It is a very sensitive method for detection of thrombi, but has some limitations, e.g. i...

  13. Understanding Guyton's venous return curves

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Beard, Daniel A; Feigl, Eric O

    2011-01-01

    ...) was experimentally increased the right atrial pressure decreased, Arthur Guyton and coworkers proposed an interpretation that right atrial pressure represents a back pressure restricting venous return...

  14. Medical management of venous ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascarella, Luigi; Shortell, Cynthia K

    2015-03-01

    Venous disease is the most common cause of chronic leg ulceration and represents an advanced clinical manifestation of venous insufficiency. Due to their frequency and chronicity, venous ulcers have a high socioeconomic impact, with treatment costs accounting for 1% of the health care budget in Western countries. The evaluation of patients with venous ulcers should include a thorough medical history for prior deep venous thrombosis, assessment for an hypercoagulable state, and a physical examination. Use of the CEAP (clinical, etiology, anatomy, pathophysiology) Classification System and the revised Venous Clinical Severity Scoring System is strongly recommended to characterize disease severity and assess response to treatment. This venous condition requires lifestyle modification, with affected individuals performing daily intervals of leg elevation to control edema; use of elastic compression garments; and moderate physical activity, such as walking wearing below-knee elastic stockings. Meticulous skin care, treatment of dermatitis, and prompt treatment of cellulitis are important aspects of medical management. The pharmacology of chronic venous insufficiency and venous ulcers include essentially two medications: pentoxifylline and phlebotropic agents. The micronized purified flavonoid fraction is an effective adjunct to compression therapy in patients with large, chronic ulceration.

  15. Models of the venous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehlsen, J

    2000-01-01

    Cardiac output is largely controlled by venous return, the driving force of which is the energy remaining at the postcapillary venous site. This force is influenced by forces acting close to the right atrium, and internally or externally upon the veins along their course. Analogue models....... The venous capacitance is also non-linear, but may be considered linear under certain conditions. The models have to include time varying pressure sources created by respiration and skeletal muscles, and if the description includes the upright position, the partly unidirectional flow through the venous...

  16. Chronic Venous Disease under pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Reeder, Suzan

    2013-01-01

    textabstractIn chapter 1 we provide a general introduction of this thesis. Chronic venous disease (CVD) is a common medical condition that affects 2-64% of the worldwide population and leads to leg ulcers in 1% of the Western population. Venous leg ulceration (VLU) has an unfavorable prognosis with regard to non-healing and recurrence rates. Annually 6% of the total healthcare costs are spent on the treatment of venous diseases. CVD results from ambulatory venous hypertension and is the conse...

  17. Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Milena Castellar-Leones, Sandra; Alcala-Cerra, Gabriel; Rafael Moscote-Salazar, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis (CSVT) is a rare phenomenon that can be seen with some frequency in young patients. CSVT is a multifactorial condition with gender-related specific causes, with a wide clinical presentation, the leading causes differ between developed and developing countries, converting CSVT in a condition characterized by a highly variable clinical spectra, difficult diagnosis, variable etiologies and prognosis that requires fine medical skills and a high suspicious index. Patients who presents with CSVT should underwent to CT-scan venography (CVT) and to the proper inquiry of the generating cause. This disease can affect the cerebral venous drainage and related anatomical structure. The symptoms may appear in relation to increased intracranial pressure imitating a pseudotumorcerebri. Prognosis depends on the early detection. Correcting the cause, generally the complications can be prevented. Mortality trends have diminished, and with the new technologies, surely it will continue. This work aims to review current knowledge about CSVT including its pathogenesis, etiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:24347950

  18. Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernando Raphael Alvis-Miranda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis (CSVT is a rare phenomenon that can be seen with some frequency in young patients. CSVT is a multifactorial condition with gender-related specific causes, with a wide clinical presentation, the leading causes differ between developed and developing countries, converting CSVT in a condition characterized by a highly variable clinical spectra, difficult diagnosis, variable etiologies and prognosis that requires fine medical skills and a high suspicious index. Patients who presents with CSVT should underwent to CT-scan venography (CVT and to the proper inquiry of the generating cause. This disease can affect the cerebral venous drainage and related anatomical structure. The symptoms may appear in relation to increased intracranial pressure imitating a pseudotumorcerebri. Prognosis depends on the early detection. Correcting the cause, generally the complications can be prevented. Mortality trends have diminished, and with the new technologies, surely it will continue. This work aims to review current knowledge about CSVT including its pathogenesis, etiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment.

  19. Chronic Venous Disease under pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.W.I. Reeder (Suzan)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractIn chapter 1 we provide a general introduction of this thesis. Chronic venous disease (CVD) is a common medical condition that affects 2-64% of the worldwide population and leads to leg ulcers in 1% of the Western population. Venous leg ulceration (VLU) has an unfavorable prognosis with

  20. Models of the venous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehlsen, J

    2000-01-01

    . The venous capacitance is also non-linear, but may be considered linear under certain conditions. The models have to include time varying pressure sources created by respiration and skeletal muscles, and if the description includes the upright position, the partly unidirectional flow through the venous...

  1. Chronic Venous Disease under pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.W.I. Reeder (Suzan)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractIn chapter 1 we provide a general introduction of this thesis. Chronic venous disease (CVD) is a common medical condition that affects 2-64% of the worldwide population and leads to leg ulcers in 1% of the Western population. Venous leg ulceration (VLU) has an unfavorable prognosis with

  2. Presacral venous bleeding during mobilization in rectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casal Núñez, Jose Enrique; Vigorita, Vincenzo; Ruano Poblador, Alejandro; Gay Fernández, Ana María; Toscano Novella, Maria Ángeles; Cáceres Alvarado, Nieves; Pérez Dominguez, Lucinda

    2017-01-01

    AIM To analyze the anatomy of sacral venous plexus flow, the causes of injuries and the methods for controlling presacral hemorrhage during surgery for rectal cancer. METHODS A review of the databases MEDLINE® and Embase™ was conducted, and relevant scientific articles published between January 1960 and June 2016 were examined. The anatomy of the sacrum and its venous plexus, as well as the factors that influence bleeding, the causes of this complication, and its surgical management were defined. RESULTS This is a review of 58 published articles on presacral venous plexus injury during the mobilization of the rectum and on techniques used to treat presacral venous bleeding. Due to the lack of cases published in the literature, there is no consensus on which is the best technique to use if there is presacral bleeding during mobilization in surgery for rectal cancer. This review may provide a tool to help surgeons make decisions regarding how to resolve this serious complication. CONCLUSION A series of alternative treatments are described; however, a conventional systematic review in which optimal treatment is identified could not be performed because few cases were analyzed in most publications.

  3. Management of venous malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Gresham T; Braswell, Leah

    2012-12-01

    Venous malformations (VMs) frequently occur in the head and neck with a predilection for the parotid gland, submandibular triangle, buccal space, muscles of mastication, lips, and upper aerodigestive tract. They are composed of congenitally disrupted ectatic veins with inappropriate connections and tubular channels. Because VMs have poorly defined boundaries and a tendency to infiltrate normal tissue, they require calculated treatment decisions in the effort to preserve surrounding architecture. Sclerotherapy, surgical excision, neodymium:yttrium aluminum garnet laser therapy, or a combination of these modalities is employed in the management of VMs. Although many small VMs can be cured, the objective is often to control the disease with periodic therapy. Location, size, and proximity to vital structures dictate the type of therapy chosen. Vigilance with long-term follow up is important. This review outlines current diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to simple and extensive cervicofacial VMs. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  4. Venous thromboembolism in women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Group, ESHRE Capri Workshop; Skouby, Sven Olaf

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a specific reproductive health risk for women. METHODS Searches were performed in Medline and other databases. The selection criteria were high-quality studies and studies relevant to clinical reproductive medicine. Summaries were presented and discussed...... is associated with an inherited thrombophilia in men and women. Changes in the coagulation system and in the risk of clinical VTE in women also occur during pregnancy, with the use of reproductive hormones and as a consequence of ovarian stimulation when hyperstimulation syndrome and conception occur together...... therapy (HRT) increases the VTE risk 2- to 4-fold. There is a synergistic effect between thrombophilia and the various reproductive risks. Prevention of VTE during pregnancy should be offered to women with specific risk factors. In women who are at high risk, CHC and HRT should be avoided. CONCLUSIONS...

  5. Provisional Matrix Deposition in Hemostasis and Venous Insufficiency: Tissue Preconditioning for Nonhealing Venous Ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Tony J.; Broadbent, James A.; McGovern, Jacqui A.; Broszczak, Daniel A.; Parker, Christina N.; Upton, Zee

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Chronic wounds represent a major burden on global healthcare systems and reduce the quality of life of those affected. Significant advances have been made in our understanding of the biochemistry of wound healing progression. However, knowledge regarding the specific molecular processes influencing chronic wound formation and persistence remains limited. Recent Advances: Generally, healing of acute wounds begins with hemostasis and the deposition of a plasma-derived provisional matrix into the wound. The deposition of plasma matrix proteins is known to occur around the microvasculature of the lower limb as a result of venous insufficiency. This appears to alter limb cutaneous tissue physiology and consequently drives the tissue into a ‘preconditioned’ state that negatively influences the response to wounding. Critical Issues: Processes, such as oxygen and nutrient suppression, edema, inflammatory cell trapping/extravasation, diffuse inflammation, and tissue necrosis are thought to contribute to the advent of a chronic wound. Healing of the wound then becomes difficult in the context of an internally injured limb. Thus, interventions and therapies for promoting healing of the limb is a growing area of interest. For venous ulcers, treatment using compression bandaging encourages venous return and improves healing processes within the limb, critically however, once treatment concludes ulcers often reoccur. Future Directions: Improved understanding of the composition and role of pericapillary matrix deposits in facilitating internal limb injury and subsequent development of chronic wounds will be critical for informing and enhancing current best practice therapies and preventative action in the wound care field. PMID:25785239

  6. Unicompartmental muscle edema: an early sign of deep venous thrombosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Patrick T. [Mayo Clinic Scottsdale, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, 13400 E. Shea Boulevard, Scottsdale, AZ 85259 (United States); Ilaslan, Hakan [Mayo Clinic Rochester, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)

    2003-01-01

    The finding of muscle edema restricted to a single muscle compartment on MRI usually indicates a diagnosis of traumatic injury, myositis, denervation or neoplasm. This case demonstrates that deep venous thrombosis can also be the cause of isolated deep posterior compartment muscle edema in the calf and should be considered in the differential diagnosis even in the absence of diffuse soft tissue or subcutaneous edema. (orig.)

  7. Epidemiology of recurrent venous thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.D. Ribeiro

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Venous thrombosis, including deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, is a common disease that frequently recurs. Recurrence can be prevented by anticoagulants, but this comes at the risk of bleeding. Therefore, assessment of the risk of recurrence is important to balance the risks and benefits of anticoagulant treatment. This review briefly outlines what is currently known about the epidemiology of recurrent venous thrombosis, and focuses in more detail on potential new risk factors for venous recurrence. The general implications of these findings in patient management are discussed.

  8. Chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency and venous stenoses in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blinkenberg, M; Akeson, P; Sillesen, H;

    2012-01-01

    The traditional view that multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease has recently been challenged by the claim that MS is caused by chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI). Although several studies have questioned this vascular theory, the CCSVI controversy is still ongoing. Our...... aim was to assess the prevalence of CCSVI in Danish MS patients using sonography and compare these findings with MRI measures of venous flow and morphology....

  9. Doppler ultrasound study and venous mapping in chronic venous insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Carriazo, M; Gómez de las Heras, C; Mármol Vázquez, P; Ramos Solís, M F

    2016-01-01

    Chronic venous insufficiency of the lower limbs is very prevalent. In recent decades, Doppler ultrasound has become the method of choice to study this condition, and it is considered essential when surgery is indicated. This article aims to establish a method for the examination, including venous mapping and preoperative marking. To this end, we review the venous anatomy of the lower limbs and the pathophysiology of chronic venous insufficiency and explain the basic hemodynamic concepts and the terminology required to elaborate a radiological report that will enable appropriate treatment planning and communication with other specialists. We briefly explain the CHIVA (the acronym for the French term "cure conservatrice et hémodynamique de l'insuffisance veineuse en ambulatoire"=conservative hemodynamic treatment for chronic venous insufficiency) strategy, a minimally invasive surgical strategy that aims to restore correct venous hemodynamics without resecting the saphenous vein. Copyright © 2015 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. In the absence of a central venous catheter, risk of venous thromboembolism is low in critically injured children, adolescents, and young adults: evidence from the National Trauma Data Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Sarah H; Candrilli, Sean D

    2011-05-01

    To describe the incidence and risk factors of venous thromboembolism in a large sample of critical care pediatric, adolescent, and young adult trauma patients. The National Trauma Data Bank-the largest and most complete aggregation of trauma registry data in the United States. Seven hundred eighty-four level I to level IV trauma centers. Patients ≤ 21 yrs of age who spent at least 1 day in a critical care unit during a trauma admission between 2001 and 2005. To characterize differences between patients with and without venous thromboembolism, we extracted variables regarding patient demographics, injury pattern and severity, procedures, total length of stay, and intensive care unit and ventilator days. Odds ratios for predictors of venous thromboembolism were estimated with a logistic regression model. Among the 135,032 critical care patients analyzed, venous thromboembolism was uncommon (6 per 1,000 discharges). Placement of a central venous catheter was a significant predictor of venous thromboembolism (odds ratio = 2.24; p central venous catheter were of even greater magnitude, particularly in adolescents and young adults. The risk of venous thromboembolism in critical care patients without a central venous catheter was central venous access.

  11. Central Venous Catheterization Complication: Delayed Diagnosis of Venous Perforation and Hemothorax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Bağcı

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical complications of central venous catheterization (CVC include artery puncture, vein injuries, catheter malposition (CM, pneumothorax, hemothorax, air embolism, subcutaneous hematoma and arrhythmia. This report was aimed to present the case developing hemothorax due to multilumen catheter (MLC malposition following venous perforation which is overlooked during CVC. A 21-year old female patient was planned urgent surgery due to a sharp object injury on the right arm. MLC was inserted to left internal jugular vein (IJV using the seldinger technique in the second attempt. Despite administration of erythrocyte suspension, fluid and noradrenaline infusion through the MLC, patient’s Hct did not increase, hypotension and tachycardia were continued. Catheter was not used and peripheral venous vascular access was used for replacement and infusions. Postoperatively, opacity covering the left hemithorax was detected on the chest radiograph, marked pleural effusion and pneumothorax on the left side was detected on thorax computed tomography. MLC was removed and tube thoracostomy drainage was administered. Hemorrhagic fluid was drained from thorax. Conservative treatment was deemed appropriate since stable vital signs after chest tube application. The complication rate is low and success rate is high in CVC from IJV. Malposition is rare in CVC application from right IJV than in CVC application from left IJV. There is a sharp curve in CVC from the left IJV, which frequently leads to malposition of the MLC. CM should be suspected with no aspiration of blood through catheter or aspiration of another substance such as air, chylous fluid, etc. and non-pulsatile blood flow. If dyspnea, tachycardia, tachypnea, hypotension and desaturation develop after catheter administration we should be alert.

  12. Central venous catheter - dressing change

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... during cancer treatment Bone marrow transplant - discharge Central venous catheter - flushing Peripherally inserted central catheter - flushing Sterile technique Surgical wound care - open Review Date 9/17/2016 Updated by: ...

  13. Venous Thromboembolism and Atherosclerosis link

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘泽霖

    2011-01-01

    @@ Past always venous thrombosis and arterial thrombo-sis as a separate system to be discussed, the main reason is because there is between the anatomical and pathologi-cal physiological differences, the clinical manifestations are very different.

  14. Venous complications of pancreatitis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aswani, Yashant; Hira, Priya

    2015-01-31

    Pancreatitis is notorious to cause vascular complications. While arterial complications include pseudoaneurysm formation with a propensity to bleed, venous complications can be quite myriad. Venous involvement in pancreatitis often presents with thrombosis. From time to time case reports and series of unusual venous complications associated with pancreatitis have, however, been described. In this article, we review multitudinous venous complications in the setting of pancreatitis and propose a system to classify pancreatitis associated venous complications.

  15. Hepatic venous outflow obstruction: Three similar syndromes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ulas Darda Bayraktar; Soley Seren; Yusuf Bayraktar

    2007-01-01

    Our goal is to provide a detailed review of venoocclusive disease (VOD), Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS),and congestive hepatopathy (CH), all of which results in hepatic venous outflow obstruction. This is the first article in which all three syndromes have been reviewed,enabling the reader to compare the characteristics of these disorders. The histological findings in VOD, BCS,and CH are almost identical: sinusoidal congestion and cell necrosis mostly in perivenular areas of hepatic acini which eventually leads to bridging fibrosis between adjacent central veins. Tender hepatomegaly with jaundice and ascites is common to all three conditions.However, the clinical presentation depends mostly on the extent and rapidity of the outflow obstruction.Although the etiology and treatment are completely different in VOD, BCS, and CH; the similarities in clinical manifestations and liver histology may suggest a common mechanism of hepatic injury and adaptation in response to increased sinusoidal pressure.

  16. Successful Management of a Patient with Refractory Ventricular Fibrillation (VF) due to Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI) and Lung Injury by Transition from Percutaneous Cardiopulmonary Support (PCPS) to Veno-Venous Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Atsushi; Isoda, Kikuo; Gatate, Yodo; Akita, Koji; Daida, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    A 69-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with cardiopulmonary arrest. Percutaneous cardio-pulmonary support (PCPS) using the right femoral artery and vein was initiated, because ventricular fibrillation continued. Although we succeeded in defibrillation after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), a chest radiograph indicated a pneumothorax in the right lung and a pulmonic contusion in the left lung caused by cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Two days after PCI, partial pressure of arterial oxygen (PaO2) from the right radial artery suddenly decreased, and his cardiac function showed improvement on an echocardiogram. To avoid additional brain damage, we converted the treatment to veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation by changing the blood returning site of PCPS from the right femoral artery to the right jugular vein. Thereafter, the patient's PaO2 level gradually improved.

  17. Efeito da hidrocortisona sobre a lesão de reperfusão e reparação da mucosa após isquemia venosa experimental no jejuno de eqüinos Effect of hydrocortisone on reperfusion injury and on mucosal repair after experimental venous ischemia in the equine jejunum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.E.S. Alves

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Os efeitos do succinato sódico de hidrocortisona (SSH nas lesões de isquemia e reperfusão no jejuno foram estudados em 12 eqüinos submetidos a isquemia total arteriovenosa e venosa no jejuno. Após uma hora de isquemia, seis eqüinos receberam 4,0mg/kg/IV de SSH (grupo T e os demais receberam placebo (grupo NT. Foram colhidas amostras para avaliação histomorfológica após uma e duas horas de isquemia e uma, duas e 12 horas de reperfusão, sendo as alterações quantificadas por meio de escores. Os escores para infiltração de neutrófilos, edema e hemorragia foram equivalentes entre os grupos T e NT. No segmento submetido a isquemia venosa o agravamento da lesão na mucosa durante a reperfusão foi significativo (PIn order to evaluate the effect of hydrocortisone sodium succinate (HSS for treatment of intestinal ischemia-reperfusion, 12 halothane-anesthetized horses were subjected to both venous and arteriovenous ischemia of the jejunum. After one hour of ischemia, HSS (4.0 mg/kg/IV was administered to six animals (T group. The other six horses received saline (NT group. Biopsy specimens were obtained after one and two hours of ischemia, and one, two and 12 hours after reperfusion. These samples were evaluated to assess the degree of mucosal damage and infiltration of neutrophils, hemorrhage, and edema. The scores for neutrophil infiltration, edema and hemorrhage did not differ between T and NT groups in both models of ischemia. However, in the jejunum subjected to venous ischemia, the scores for mucosal lesion increased significantly (P<0.05 after two hours of reperfusion only in the NT group, indicating that HSS prevented reperfusion injury. The scores for mucosal damage were equivalent after 12 hours of reperfusion following arteriovenous ischemia in T and NT groups. In contrast, mucosal lesion due to venous ischemia were more severe in the NT group (P<0.01, indicating that intestinal repair was stimulated by HSS. These results

  18. Contemporary diagnosis of venous malformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee BB

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available BB Lee,1 I Baumgartner21Department of Surgery, George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA; 2Swiss Cardiovascular Center, University Hospital Bern, Bern, SwitzerlandAbstract: Venous malformation is a congenital vascular malformation resulting from defective development during various stages of embryogenesis and selectively affecting the venous system. Depending on the embryologic stage when the developmental arrest occurred, the clinical presentation of venous malformation is extremely variable in location, extent, severity, natural progression, and hemodynamic impact. Extratruncular lesions occur in the earlier stages of embryonic life, and retain characteristics unique to mesenchymal cells (angioblasts, growing and proliferating when stimulated internally (eg, by menarche, pregnancy, and hormones or externally (eg, by trauma or surgery. These lesions also have a significant hemodynamic impact on the venous system involved, in addition to the risk of localized intravascular coagulopathy. However, truncal lesions, as defective developments along the late stage, no longer carry the risk of proliferation and recurrence due to lack of mesenchymal characteristics. Although, they often have serious hemodynamic consequences due to direct involvement of the main vein trunk. Therefore, a thorough clinical history and careful physical examination should be followed by an appropriate combination of noninvasive and less invasive tests (eg, Doppler ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography to confirm the clinical impression as well as to define the extent and severity of the venous malformation. Invasive tests, eg, phlebography or angiography, are seldom needed for the diagnosis per se. Additional evaluation for coagulation abnormalities, eg, D-dimer and fibrinogen levels, is generally recommended, especially for the treatment of surgery and endovascular candidates with extensive lesions to assess the localized intravascular

  19. Venous chest anatomy: clinical implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chasen, M.H.; Charnsangavej, C. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, The University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    1998-03-01

    This article provides a practical approach to the clinical implications and importance of understanding the collateral venous anatomy of the thorax. Routine radiography, conventional venography, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging studies provide correlative anatomic models for the demonstration of how interconnecting collateral vascular networks within the thorax maintain venous stability at all times. Five major systems comprise the collateral venous network of the thorax ( Fig. 1 ). These include the paravertebral, azygos-hemiazygos, internal mammary, lateral thoracic, and anterior jugular venous systems (AJVS). The five systems are presented in the following sequence: (a) a brief introduction to the importance of catheter position and malposition in understanding access to the thoracic venous system, (b) the anatomy of the azygos-hemiazygos systems and their relationship with the paravertebral plexus, (c) the importance of the AJVS, (d) 'loop' concepts interconnecting the internal mammary and azygos-hemiazygos systems by means of the lateral thoracic and intercostal veins, and (e) the interconnecting venous networks on the thoracic side of the thoracoabdominal junction. Certain aspects of the venous anatomy of the thorax will not be discussed in this chapter and include (a) the intra-abdominal anastomoses between the superior and inferior vena cavae (IVC) via the internal mammary, lateral thoracic, and azygos-hemiazygos systems (beyond the scope of this article), (b) potential collateral vessels involving vertebral, parascapular, thyroidal, thymic, and other smaller veins that might anastomose with the major systems, and (c) anatomic variants and pitfalls that may mimic pathologic conditions (space limitations). (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  20. Venous hemodynamic changes in lower limb venous disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Byung Boong; Nicolaides, Andrew N; Myers, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    ). Their aim was to confirm or dispel long-held hemodynamic principles and to provide a comprehensive review of venous hemodynamic concepts underlying the pathophysiology of lower limb venous disorders, their usefulness for investigating patients and the relevant hemodynamic changes associated with various......There are excellent guidelines for clinicians to manage venous diseases but few reviews to assess their hemodynamic background. Hemodynamic concepts that evolved in the past have largely remained unchallenged in recent decades, perhaps due to their often complicated nature and in part due...... not provide the physiological basis for understanding the hemodynamics of flow, pressure, compliance and resistance. Hemodynamic investigations appear to provide a better correlation with post-treatment clinical outcome and quality of life than ultrasound findings. There is a far better prospect...

  1. Cerebral venous thrombosis in childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huisman, T.A.G.M.; Martin, E.; Willi, U.V. [Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiology, University Children' s Hospital Zurich (Switzerland); Holzmann, D. [Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology, University Children' s Hospital Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2001-09-01

    This was a retrospective study to determine different etiologies of cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) in childhood and to correlate extent and location of thrombosis with the etiology and the age of the child as well as the final outcome. In addition, the radiologic approach is discussed. This was a retrospective analysis of 19 children with CVT. The children were examined by contrast-enhanced dynamic CT. Radiologic findings were correlated with the etiology of CVT. Cerebral venous thrombosis is not as infrequent in children as has been thought. Cerebral venous thrombosis in children can occur due to trauma (n=9), infections (n=7), or coagulation disorders (n=3). Extent and location of thrombosis, as well as complications, final outcome, and therapy, depend on the etiology. Computed tomography remains a valuable primary imaging modality in the diagnosis of CVT in the acutely injured or diseased child. (orig.)

  2. Dutch Venous Ulcer guideline update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maessen-Visch, M Birgitte; de Roos, Kees-Peter

    2014-05-01

    The revised guideline of 2013 is an update of the 2005 guideline "venous leg ulcer". In this special project four separate guidelines (venous leg ulcer, varicose veins, compression therapy and deep venous disorders) were revised and developed simultaneously. A meeting was held including representatives of any organisation involved in venous disease management including patient organizations and health insurance companies. Eighteen clinical questions where defined, and a new strategy was used to accelerate the process. This resulted in two new and two revised guidelines within one year. The guideline committee advises use of the C of the CEAP classification as well as the Venous Clinical Severity Score (VCSS) and a Quality of life (QoL) score in the assessment of clinical signs. These can provide insight into the burden of disease and the effects of treatment as experienced by the patient. A duplex ultrasound should be performed in every patient to establish the underlying aetiology and to evaluate the need for treatment (which is discussed in a separate guideline). The use of the TIME model for describing venous ulcers is recommended. There is no evidence for antiseptic or antibiotic wound care products except for a Cochrane review in which some evidence is presented for cadexomer iodine. Signs of infection are the main reason for the use of oral antibiotics. When the ulcer fails to heal the use of oral aspirin and pentoxifylline can be considered as an adjunct. For the individual patient, the following aspects should be considered: the appearance of the ulcer (amount of exudate) according to the TIME model, the influence of wound care products on moisturising the wound, frequency of changing compression bandages, pain and allergies. The cost of the dressings should also be considered. Education and training of patients t improves compliance with compression therapy but does not influence wound healing rates.

  3. A young man with nonhealing venous ulcers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vloedbeld, M. G.; Venema, A. W.; Smit, A. J.

    2006-01-01

    A 35-year-old man presented with nonhealing ulcers at an atypical location on his left foot, caused by a combination of venous insufficiency (after deep venous thrombosis) and arterial insufficiency. The underlying cause was Buerger's disease.

  4. [Automatic regulator of venous pressure and venous outflow in the perfusion system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, L M; Levinskiĭ, M M; Kharnas, S Sh; Cherniak, V A

    1976-01-01

    A scheme for automatic regulation of the venous pressure and venous blood outflow during extracorporeal circulation is proposed. The system consists of a photoelectric sensor placed on a tube led out of the major venous trunkline, a converter and an electromechanical eccentric clamp that compresses the venous trunkline, all of which secures stabilization of the controlled values.

  5. Medical image of the week: anomalous pulmonary venous circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rivas-Perez H

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 51 year old woman was admitted for treatment of acute kidney injury. A dialysis catheter and central line were inserted with ultrasound guidance. Thoracic CT scan (Figure 1 showed the tip of the left central line deviated laterally beyond the expected margin of the aortic wall (arrow. Blood gases were measured showing a partial pressure of oxygen of 154 mm Hg. Arterial line transducer was connected and tracing was consistent with venous system pressures. A CT angiogram revealed the left internal jugular catheter was within the left superior pulmonary vein which was anomalously draining to the left brachiocephalic vein. This explained the arterial-like oxygenation and venous pressure tracing on arterial transducer. The central line was removed without the need of surgical intervention.

  6. Central venous line complications and tip detection

    OpenAIRE

    Ameneh Rezaee Gheshlaghi; Hamid Zamani Moghadam Dolu; Elham Pishbin; Maryam Salehi

    2015-01-01

    Central venous line is one of a creative instrument that saves human’s life in critical medical situation. Central venous line access is frequently involved in the disease management. It is used for rapid fluid therapy, transvenous pacemakers, infusion of some medications, hemodialysis or plasmapheresis and etc. Most of the emergency departments have some staffs that are trained for central venous line insertion but related complications occur during central venous line placement.Central veno...

  7. Venous manifestations of spinal arteriovenous fistulas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andersson, T; van Dijk, JMC; Willinsky, RA

    2003-01-01

    Impairment of the spinal cord venous outflow may create symptoms caused by venous hypertension and congestion. This has been referred to as venous congestive myelopathy. Spinal dural arteriovenous fistulas, as well as some of the epidural arteriovenous fistulas and perimedullary spinal cord arteriov

  8. Anomalous pulmonary venous return: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Gyeong Min; Kang, MinJin; Lee, Han Bee; Bae, Kyung Eun; Lee, Jaehe; Kim, Jae Hyung; Jeong, Myeong Ja; Kang, Tae Kyung [Sanggye Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    Partial anomalous pulmonary venous return is a type of congenital pulmonary venous anomaly. We present a rare type of partial pulmonary venous return, subaortic vertical vein drains left lung to superior vena cava, accompanying hypoplasia of the ipsilateral lung and pulmonary artery. We also review the previous report and relationship of these structures.

  9. Hormonal contraceptives and venous thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stegeman, Berendina Hendrika (Bernardine)

    2013-01-01

    Oral contraceptive use is associated with venous thrombosis. However, the mechanism behind this remains unclear. The aim of this thesis was to evaluate genetic variation in the first-pass metabolism of contraceptives, to identify the clinical implications of hormonal contraceptive use after a

  10. Venous thrombosis : a patient's view

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korlaar, Inez van

    2006-01-01

    The studies described in this thesis had two main aims: 1) To study the quality of life of patients with venous thrombosis and to examine the role of illness perceptions in explaining the quality of life of these patients. 2) To assess the psychological consequences of genetic testing for thrombop

  11. Familial clustering of venous thromboembolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sindet-Pedersen, Caroline; Østergaard, Louise Bruun; Gundlund, Anna

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Identification of risk factors for venous thromboembolism (VTE) is of utmost importance to improve current prophylactic regimes and treatment guidelines. The extent to which a family history contributes to the risk of VTE needs further exploration. OBJECTIVES: To examine the relative ...

  12. Hormonal contraceptives and venous thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stegeman, Berendina Hendrika (Bernardine)

    2013-01-01

    Oral contraceptive use is associated with venous thrombosis. However, the mechanism behind this remains unclear. The aim of this thesis was to evaluate genetic variation in the first-pass metabolism of contraceptives, to identify the clinical implications of hormonal contraceptive use after a thromb

  13. Venous thrombosis : a patient's view

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korlaar, Inez van

    2006-01-01

    The studies described in this thesis had two main aims: 1) To study the quality of life of patients with venous thrombosis and to examine the role of illness perceptions in explaining the quality of life of these patients. 2) To assess the psychological consequences of genetic testing for

  14. Venous thromboembolic disease. CT evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodman, L. R. [Medical College of Wisconsin, Pulmonary Medicine and Intensive Care, Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2001-12-01

    Helical and multidetector CT has proven to be a valuable imaging modality for both pulmonary embolism and deep venous thrombosis. This paper will review the sensitivity and specificity of CT and discuss diagnostic algorithms utilizing CT and more established imaging technologies.

  15. Prophylaxis against venous thromboembolism in orthopedic surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Lin-tao; MA Bao-tong

    2006-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism ( VTE), which is manifested as deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE), represents a significant cause of death, disability,and discomfort. They are frequent complications of various surgical procedures. The aging population and the survival of more severely injured patients may suggest an increasing risk of thromboembolism in the trauma patients. Expanded understanding of the population at risk challenges physicians to carefully examine risk factors for VTE to identify high-risk patients who can benefit from prophylaxis. An accurate knowledge of evidence-based risk factors is important in predicting and preventing postoperative DVT, and can be incorporated into a decision support system for appropriate thromboprophylaxis use.Standard use of DVT prophylaxis in a high-risk trauma population leads to a low incidence of DVT. The incidence of VTE is common in Asia. The evaluation includes laboratory tests, Doppler test and phlebography. Screening Doppler sonography should be performed for surveillance on all critically injured patients to identify DVT. D-Dimer is a useful marker to monitor prophylaxis in trauma surgery patients. The optimal time to start prophylaxis is between 2 hours before and 10 hours after surgery, but the risk of PE continues for several weeks. Thromboprophylaxis includes graduated compression stockings and anticoagulants for prophylaxis. Anticoagulants include Warfarin, which belongs to Vitamin K antagonists, unfractionated heparin,low molecular weight heparins, factor Xa indirect inhibitor Fondaparinux, and the oral Ⅱa inhibitor Melagatran and ximelagatran. Recombinant human soluble thrombomodulin is a new and highly effective antithrombotic agent. Prophylactic placement of vena caval filters in selected trauma patients may decrease the incidence of PE. The indications for prophylactic inferior vena cava filter insertion include prolonged immobilization with multiple injuries, closed head injury, pelvic

  16. Prophylaxis against venous thromboembolism in orthopedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lin-tao; Ma, Bao-tong

    2006-08-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE), which is manifested as deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE), represents a significant cause of death, disability, and discomfort. They are frequent complications of various surgical procedures. The aging population and the survival of more severely injured patients may suggest an increasing risk of thromboembolism in the trauma patients. Expanded understanding of the population at risk challenges physicians to carefully examine risk factors for VTE to identify high-risk patients who can benefit from prophylaxis. An accurate knowledge of evidence-based risk factors is important in predicting and preventing postoperative DVT, and can be incorporated into a decision support system for appropriate thromboprophylaxis use. Standard use of DVT prophylaxis in a high-risk trauma population leads to a low incidence of DVT. The incidence of VTE is common in Asia. The evaluation includes laboratory tests, Doppler test and phlebography. Screening Doppler sonography should be performed for surveillance on all critically injured patients to identify DVT. D-Dimer is a useful marker to monitor prophylaxis in trauma surgery patients. The optimal time to start prophylaxis is between 2 hours before and 10 hours after surgery, but the risk of PE continues for several weeks. Thromboprophylaxis includes graduated compression stockings and anticoagulants for prophylaxis. Anticoagulants include Warfarin, which belongs to Vitamin K antagonists, unfractionated heparin, low molecular weight heparins, factor Xa indirect inhibitor Fondaparinux, and the oral IIa inhibitor Melagatran and ximelagatran. Recombinant human soluble thrombomodulin is a new and highly effective antithrombotic agent. Prophylactic placement of vena caval filters in selected trauma patients may decrease the incidence of PE. The indications for prophylactic inferior vena cava filter insertion include prolonged immobilization with multiple injuries, closed head injury, pelvic

  17. Opioid Abuse after Traumatic Brain Injury: Evaluation Using Rodent Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    rats induces structural changes in brain regions associated with reward/risk circuitry including the nucleus accumbens, amygdala, hippocampus , and...to injury, animals underwent surgical implantation of a chronic indwelling venous catheter under isoflurane anesthesia with morphine pretreatment. A

  18. Clinical aspects of venous thrombophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girolami, Antonio; Fabris, Fabrizio; Girolami, Bruno

    2002-01-01

    Venous thrombophilia is the result of clotting changes namely of a hypercoagulable state together with blood flow and vessel wall changes. There is no need for all these components to be present in order for thrombosis to occur. As the matter of fact, thrombosis may occur even if only one of these conditions is present. In clinical practice a combination of factors is usualy seen. In comparison with arterial thrombophilia, clotting changes and blood flow seen to play a major role in venous thrombosis. Venous thrombophilia may remain asynptomatic or may result in a series of clinical syndromes. The commonest of these are: 1. Superficial vein thrombosis, 2. Deep vein thrombosis of legs, 3. Deep vein thrombosis of arms, 4. Caval veins thrombosis, 5. Portal vein thrombosis, 6. Hepatic veins thrombosis, 7. Renal vein thrombosis, 8. Cerebral sinuses thrombosis, 9. Right heart thrombosis, 10. Miscellaneous (ovarian, adrenal veins thrombosis, etc.). Since the first two are widely and easily recognized, these is no need for an extensive discussion. Deep vein thromboses of upper limbs are not as frequent as those of lower limbs or of superficial phlebitis but they can still be recognized on clinical grounds and non invasive techniques. The remaining 7 syndromes are less common and therefore less frequently suspected and recognized. Of particular interest, among these less common manifestations of venous thrombophilia are hepatic vein and renal vein thrombosis. Hepatic veins thrombosis, sometimes part of inferior vena cava thrombosis is most frequently due to an isolated occlusion of hepatic veins thereby causing a form of venocclusive disease. Occasionally diagnosis may be difficult because of slow onset of symptoms (hepatomegaly, right flank pain, fever, ascites etc.). The same is true for renal vein thrombosis which may also be of difficult diagnosis since it causes proteinuria and flank pain. The proteinuria is often interpreted as due to a nephrotic syndrome which

  19. Radiologically-placed venous ports in children under venous anesthesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Joo Yeon; Jeon, Ung Bae; Choo, Ki Seok; Hwang, Jae Yeon; Kim, Yong Woo; Lee, Yun Jin; Nam, Sang Ool; Lim, Young Tak [Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of radiologic venous port placement in children under venous anesthesia. Between April 2009 and July 2011, 44 ports were implanted in 41 children (24 boys, 17 girls). The age of patients ranged from 9 months to 19 years (mean, 6.5 years) and their body weights ranged from 6.8 kg to 56.3 kg (mean, 23.2 kg). Right internal jugular vein access was used in 42 ports, right subclavian vein in 1, and left subclavian in 1. Durability and complications of port implantation were reviewed. The technical success rate was 100%. The catheter life was 10-661 days (mean 246 days). Two patients died during the follow-up period, 21 and 6 ports were removed at the end of treatment or as a result of complications, respectively. One port was removed and replaced by a Hickmann catheter. Three ports were explanted due to port-related sepsis, one due to a catheter kink, and two for unexplained fever or insertion site pain. The overall port-related infection was 3 cases (6.8%, 0.28/1000 catheter days). Venous port placement by interventional radiologists in children under intravenous sedation is relatively safe, with a high rate of technical success and low rate of complications.

  20. Novel optoacoustic system for noninvasive continuous monitoring of cerebral venous blood oxygenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Yuriy; Petrov, Irene Y.; Prough, Donald S.; Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    2012-02-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) and spinal cord injury are a major cause of death for individuals under 50 years of age. In the USA alone, 150,000 patients per year suffer moderate or severe TBI. Moreover, TBI is a major cause of combatrelated death. Monitoring of cerebral venous blood oxygenation is critically important for management of TBI patients because cerebral venous blood oxygenation below 50% results in death or severe neurologic complications. At present, there is no technique for noninvasive, accurate monitoring of this clinically important variable. We proposed to use optoacoustic technique for noninvasive monitoring of cerebral venous blood oxygenation by probing cerebral veins such as the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) and validated it in animal studies. In this work, we developed a novel, medical grade optoacoustic system for continuous, real-time cerebral venous blood oxygenation monitoring and tested it in human subjects at normal conditions and during hyperventilation to simulate changes that may occur in patients with TBI. We designed and built a highly-sensitive optoacoustic probe for SSS signal detection. Continuous measurements were performed in the near infrared spectral range and the SSS oxygenation absolute values were automatically calculated in real time using a special algorithm developed by our group. Continuous measurements performed at normal conditions and during hyperventilation demonstrated that hyperventilation resulted in approximately 12% decrease of cerebral venous blood oxygenation.

  1. Mixed Capillary Venous Retroperitoneal Hemangioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohit Godar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of mixed capillary venous hemangioma of the retroperitoneum in a 61-year-old man. Abdominal ultrasonography showed a mass to be hypoechoic with increased flow in color Doppler imaging. Dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography revealed a centripetal filling-in of the mass, located anterior to the left psoas muscle at the level of sacroiliac joint. On the basis of imaging features, preoperative diagnosis of hemangioma was considered and the mass was excised by laparoscopic method. Immunohistochemical studies were strongly positive for CD31 and CD34, and negative for calretinin, EMA, WT1, HMB45, Ki67, synaptophysin, and lymphatic endothelial cell marker D2–40. Histologically, the neoplasm was diagnosed as mixed capillary venous hemangioma.

  2. Hydrocephalus in cerebral venous thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuurbier, Susanna M; van den Berg, René; Troost, Dirk; Majoie, Charles B; Stam, Jan; Coutinho, Jonathan M

    2015-01-01

    Increased intracranial pressure is common in cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT), but hydrocephalus is rarely reported in these patients. We examined the frequency, pathophysiology and associated clinical manifestations of hydrocephalus in patients with CVT admitted to our hospital between 2000 and 2010 (prospectively since July 2006). Hydrocephalus was defined as a bicaudate index larger than the 95th percentile for age, and/or a radial width of the temporal horn of ≥ 5 mm. We excluded patients in whom hydrocephalus was caused by a disease other than CVT or if it was iatrogenic. 20 out of 99 patients with CVT had hydrocephalus. 6 patients with hydrocephalus were excluded from the analysis. Patients with hydrocephalus more often had focal neurological deficits (86 vs. 49%, p = 0.02) and were more frequently comatose (43 vs. 16%, p = 0.06), as compared to patients without hydrocephalus. Deep cerebral venous thrombosis (64 vs. 9%, p hydrocephalus. Intraventricular hemorrhage was present in 1 patient with hydrocephalus, compared to none among patients without hydrocephalus (7 vs. 0%, p = 0.15). Outcome at follow-up was worse in patients with hydrocephalus (mRS 0-1, 36 vs. 68%, p = 0.02; mortality 29 vs. 9%, p = 0.07). Hydrocephalus occurs more frequently in cerebral venous thrombosis than previously believed, especially in patients with deep cerebral venous thrombosis and edema of the basal ganglia. The presence of hydrocephalus is associated with a worse clinical outcome, but a direct causal relation is unlikely. Routine shunting procedures are not advisable.

  3. Prediction of Liver Function by Using Magnetic Resonance-based Portal Venous Perfusion Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao Yue, E-mail: yuecao@umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Wang Hesheng [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Johnson, Timothy D. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Pan, Charlie [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Hussain, Hero [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Balter, James M.; Normolle, Daniel; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Feng, Mary [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether liver function can be assessed globally and spatially by using volumetric dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging MRI (DCE-MRI) to potentially aid in adaptive treatment planning. Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients with intrahepatic cancer undergoing focal radiation therapy (RT) were enrolled in institution review board-approved prospective studies to obtain DCE-MRI (to measure regional perfusion) and indocyanine green (ICG) clearance rates (to measure overall liver function) prior to, during, and at 1 and 2 months after treatment. The volumetric distribution of portal venous perfusion in the whole liver was estimated for each scan. We assessed the correlation between mean portal venous perfusion in the nontumor volume of the liver and overall liver function measured by ICG before, during, and after RT. The dose response for regional portal venous perfusion to RT was determined using a linear mixed effects model. Results: There was a significant correlation between the ICG clearance rate and mean portal venous perfusion in the functioning liver parenchyma, suggesting that portal venous perfusion could be used as a surrogate for function. Reduction in regional venous perfusion 1 month after RT was predicted by the locally accumulated biologically corrected dose at the end of RT (P<.0007). Regional portal venous perfusion measured during RT was a significant predictor for regional venous perfusion assessed 1 month after RT (P<.00001). Global hypovenous perfusion pre-RT was observed in 4 patients (3 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and cirrhosis), 3 of whom had recovered from hypoperfusion, except in the highest dose regions, post-RT. In addition, 3 patients who had normal perfusion pre-RT had marked hypervenous perfusion or reperfusion in low-dose regions post-RT. Conclusions: This study suggests that MR-based volumetric hepatic perfusion imaging may be a biomarker for spatial distribution of liver function, which

  4. Ruptured venous aneurysm of cervicomedullary junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Aggarwal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ruptured venous aneurysm is often seen with arterio-venous malformation (AVM or developmental venous anomaly (DVA. However, isolated venous aneurysm is unusual. Case Description: We present a case of ruptured venous aneurysm that presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH and intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH. Digital substraction angiography (DSA revealed a saccular contrast filling pouch in the left lateral aspect of cervicomedullary junction (CMJ. Endovascular intervention was not a viable option. During surgery, a saccular pliable structure approx. 1.5 Χ 1 cm was found in the subarachnoid space that was clipped and excised. There were no arterial feeders, no evidence of surrounding AVM, and no dilated perimedullary vein. Conclusion: This is perhaps the first reported case of ruptured venous aneurysm (without associated AVM of CMJ, which was successfully managed surgically. The possible etiologies remain an unnoticed head trauma or a congenital vessel wall abnormality. Surgically clipping and excision remains the treatment of choice for such lesion.

  5. Calf venous compliance measured by venous occlusion plethysmography: methodological aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoog, Johan; Zachrisson, Helene; Lindenberger, Marcus; Ekman, Mikael; Ewerman, Lea; Länne, Toste

    2015-02-01

    Calf venous compliance (C calf) is commonly evaluated with venous occlusion plethysmography (VOP) during a standard cuff deflation protocol. However, the technique relies on two not previously validated assumptions concerning thigh cuff pressure (P cuff) transmission and the impact of net fluid filtration (F filt) on C calf. The aim was to validate VOP in the lower limb and to develop a model to correct for F filt during VOP. Strain-gauge technique was used to study calf volume changes in 15 women and 10 age-matched men. A thigh cuff was inflated to 60 mmHg for 4 and 8 min with a subsequent decrease of 1 mmHg s(-1). Intravenous pressure (P iv) was measured simultaneously. C calf was determined with the commonly used equation [Compliance = β 1 + 2β 2 × P cuff] describing the pressure-compliance relationship. A model was developed to identify and correct for F filt. Transmission of P cuff to P iv was 100 %. The decrease in P cuff correlated well with P iv reduction (r = 0.99, P < 0.001). Overall, our model showed that C calf was underestimated when F filt was not accounted for (all P < 0.01). F filt was higher in women (P < 0.01) and showed a more pronounced effect on C calf compared to men (P < 0.05). The impact of F filt was similar during 4- and 8-min VOP. P cuff is an adequate substitute for P iv in the lower limb. F filt is associated with an underestimation of C calf and differences in the effect of F filt during VOP can be accounted for with the correction model. Thus, our model seems to be a valuable tool in future studies of venous wall function.

  6. Transpleural central venous catheter discovered during thoracotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashima Malhotra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report an uncommon complication of subclavian central venous catheterization, discovered at thoracotomy. The central venous catheter (CVC was placed by left infraclavicular route after induction of general anesthesia. CVC was secured after aspiration of blood and satisfactory central venous tracing. On thoracotomy, CVC was noticed to traverse the pleural cavity while the tracing was normal. CVC was thus removed consequent to which bleeding from each puncture site was noticed, that were secured surgically.

  7. The impact of obesity on venous insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, A C; Belczak, C E Q; Campos, M B; Campos, R B; Harada, D S

    2015-08-01

    Association between chronic venous disease and obesity has recently been studied, with indications that it may worsen in obese patients. The aim of study was to correlate clinical classes of chronic venous disease according to Clinical Etiology Anatomy Pathophysiology (CEAP) classification and body mass index, as well as to compare the severity of chronic venous disease in obese and nonobese patients. This retrospective cross-sectional prevalence study was conducted at the Maringá State University and Belczak Vascular Center along a period of 2 years, consisting of a random sample of 482 patients with complaints compatible with chronic venous disease. Data obtained from patient's files included gender, age, weight and height (for calculating body mass index), and clinical class (C) of chronic venous disease according to CEAP classification. Statistical analysis included Spearman's correlation coefficient, Chi-square test (for comparing frequencies), and Student's t-test (for comparing means). Significant positive correlation between body mass index and clinical classes was established for women (0.43), but not for men (0.07). Obesity (body mass index  : ≥  : 30.0) was significantly more frequent in patients with chronic venous disease in clinical classes 3 (p venous disease in clinical class 1 (p venous disease in women, but not in men. It also corroborated the negative impact of obesity on the clinical severity of chronic venous disease.

  8. Central vein stenosis masquerading as venous thrombosis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nagapriya Vellalacheruvu; Naresh Monigari; Tom Devasia; Hashir Kareem

    2014-01-01

    .... 3 Learning points Central venous stenosis (CVS), although rare, is a known complication in patients requiring maintenance haemodialysis but symptomatic CVS requiring intervention is not common...

  9. Central venous line complications and tip detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ameneh Rezaee Gheshlaghi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Central venous line is one of a creative instrument that saves human’s life in critical medical situation. Central venous line access is frequently involved in the disease management. It is used for rapid fluid therapy, transvenous pacemakers, infusion of some medications, hemodialysis or plasmapheresis and etc. Most of the emergency departments have some staffs that are trained for central venous line insertion but related complications occur during central venous line placement.Central venous line might have some complications and complication follow-up should be considered. Thromboembolism and infection are two important medical complications. Arterial puncture, hematoma, pneumothorax and hemothorax are mechanical Central venous line complications. Chest X-ray and some other techniques should be used for detecting these complications.Central venous line tip misplace is a considerable problem for emergency department staffs, previously chest X-ray has been used for central venous line misplace detection. In some recent studies, contrast-enhanced ultrasonography and intravascular electrocardiography have been used for central venous line misplace.

  10. Characterizing the Risk Factors Associated With Venous Thromboembolism in Pediatric Patients After Central Venous Line Placement

    OpenAIRE

    Wisecup, Sarah; Eades, Shannan; Turiy, Yuliya

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: With the apparent increase in venous thromboembolism noted in the pediatric population, it is important to define which children are at risk for clots and to determine optimal preventative therapy. The purpose of this study was to determine the risk factors for venous thromboembolism in pediatric patients with central venous line placement.

  11. [Venous thromboembolism associated with long-term use of central venous catheters in cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debourdeau, P; Chahmi, D Kassab; Zammit, C; Farge-Bancel, D

    2008-06-01

    Increased incidence of cancers and the development of totally implanted venous access devices that contain their own port to deliver chemotherapy will lead to a greater than before numbers of central venous catheter-related thrombosis (CVCT). Medical consequences include catheter dysfunction and pulmonary embolism. Vessel injury caused by the procedure of CVC insertion is the most important risk factor for development of CVCT. This event could cause the formation of a fresh thrombus, which is reversible in the large majority of patients. In some cases, thrombus formation is not related to catheter insertion. The incidence of CVC-related DVT assessed by venography has been reported to vary from 30 to 60% but catheter-related DVT in adult patients is symptomatic in only 5% of cases. The majority of patients with CVC-related DVT is asymptomatic or has nonspecific symptoms: arm or neck swelling or pain, distal paresthesias, headache, congestion of subcutaneous collateral veins. In the case of clinical suspicion of CVC-related deep venous thrombosis (DVT), compressive ultrasonography (US), especially with doppler and color imaging, currently is first used to confirm the diagnosis. Consequently, contrast venography is reserved for clinical trials and difficult diagnostic situations. There is no consensus on the optimal management of patients with CVC-related DVT. Treatment of CVC-related VTE requires a five- to seven-day course of adjusted-dose unfractionated heparin or low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) followed by oral anticoagulants. Long-term LMWH that has been shown to be more effective than oral anticoagulant in cancer patients with lower limb DVT, could be used in these patients. The efficacy and safety of pharmacologic prophylaxis for CVC related thrombosis is not established and the last recommendations suggest that clinicians not routinely use prophylaxis to try to prevent thrombosis related to long-term indwelling CVCs in cancer patients. Additional studies

  12. The Impact of Central Venous Catheters on Pediatric Venous Thromboembolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffray, Julie; Bauman, Mary; Massicotte, Patti

    2017-01-01

    The use of central venous catheters (CVCs) in children is escalating, which is likely linked to the increased incidence of pediatric venous thromboembolism (VTE). In order to better understand the specific risk factors associated with CVC-VTE in children, as well as available prevention methods, a literature review was performed. The overall incidence of CVC-VTE was found to range from 0 to 74%, depending on the patient population, CVC type, imaging modality, and study design. Throughout the available literature, there was not a consistent determination regarding whether a particular type of central line (tunneled vs. non-tunneled vs. peripherally inserted vs. implanted), catheter material, insertion technique, or insertion location lead to an increased VTE risk. The patient populations who were found to be most at risk for CVC-VTE were those with cancer, congenital heart disease, gastrointestinal failure, systemic infection, intensive care unit admission, or involved in a trauma. Both mechanical and pharmacological prophylactic techniques have been shown to be successful in preventing VTE in adult patients, but studies in children have yet to be performed or are underpowered. In order to better determine true CVC-VTE risk factors and best preventative techniques, an increase in large, prospective pediatric trials needs to be performed. PMID:28168186

  13. The Impact of Central Venous Catheters on Pediatric Venous Thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffray, Julie; Bauman, Mary; Massicotte, Patti

    2017-01-01

    The use of central venous catheters (CVCs) in children is escalating, which is likely linked to the increased incidence of pediatric venous thromboembolism (VTE). In order to better understand the specific risk factors associated with CVC-VTE in children, as well as available prevention methods, a literature review was performed. The overall incidence of CVC-VTE was found to range from 0 to 74%, depending on the patient population, CVC type, imaging modality, and study design. Throughout the available literature, there was not a consistent determination regarding whether a particular type of central line (tunneled vs. non-tunneled vs. peripherally inserted vs. implanted), catheter material, insertion technique, or insertion location lead to an increased VTE risk. The patient populations who were found to be most at risk for CVC-VTE were those with cancer, congenital heart disease, gastrointestinal failure, systemic infection, intensive care unit admission, or involved in a trauma. Both mechanical and pharmacological prophylactic techniques have been shown to be successful in preventing VTE in adult patients, but studies in children have yet to be performed or are underpowered. In order to better determine true CVC-VTE risk factors and best preventative techniques, an increase in large, prospective pediatric trials needs to be performed.

  14. [Central venous blood gas analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marano, Marco; D'Amato, Anna; Guiotto, Giovanna; Schiraldi, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    The hemodialysis might interfere with patients hemodynamic, as the technique allows a sophisticated game with extra and intravascular fluids. As the cardiocirculatory response could sometimes be unpredictable, it is interesting to collect valuable information by reaching a deep understanding of the tissue metabolism which is mirrored by the blood gas analysis of variations in arterial and central venous blood samples. Particularly interesting are the time course variations of the central venous hemoglobin saturation (ScvO2), which are directly related to the patient with O2-demand as well as to the O2-Delivery (DO2). The ScvO2 is determined by four parameters (cardiac output, Hb concentration, arterial Hb saturation and O2 consumption): If the fluids subtraction during dialysis was about to determine an occult hypoperfusion, the ScvO2 reduction would be a timely warning sign to be considered. Moreover, while the normal veno-arterial PCO2 difference is 2-4 mmHg, whenever a mismatch between O2-demand and DO2arise, a larger v-aPCO2 difference should be observed.

  15. Venous thromboembolism in cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Fuat Eren

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Venous thromboembolism (VTE is a major complication of cancer and represents an important cause of morbidity and mortality. The incidence of VTE is 0.6-7.8% in patients with cancer more than double the incidence of VTE in patients without cancer. The risk of VTE which includes deep venous thrombosis (DVT and pulmonary embolism (PE is increased two to seven fold in patients with cancer. VTE risk is especially high among certain groups such as hospitalized patients with cancer and those receiving active antineoplastic therapy. Also cancer patients, who undergoing major surgery, are increased risk of VTE. Trauma, long-haul travel, increased age, obesity, previous VTE and genetic component are also predisposing factors for VTE. Patients with cancer who develop VTE should be managed multidisciplinary treatment guidelines. The primary goal of thromboprophylaxis in patients with cancer is to prevent VTE. The large majority of cancer patients should be treated with therapeutic doses of unfractioned heparin (UFH or low molecular weight heparin (LMWH. Prophylaxis should include cancer patients who underwent major surgery for cancer and patients with a history of VTE.

  16. The impact of continuous veno-venous hemofiltration on hemodynamics in patients with septic shock complicated by acute kidney injury%连续性静-静脉血液滤过对感染性休克合并急性肾损伤患者血流动力学的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐晓; 倪红英; 朱红阳; 金妮; 章仲恒

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the impact of continuous veno-venous hemofiltration on hemodynamics in patientswith septic shock complicated by acute kidney injury.MethodsMedical records of patients with septic shock complicated by a-cute kidney injury were retrospectively reviewed. Hemodynamic monitoring was performed by using PiCCO system. The measurement was performed during and between CRRT sessions. Heart rate, mean arterial pressure, oxygenation index and dose of dobamine were recorded.ResultsDuring and between CRRT sessions, the cardiac indices were (4.73 ±0.87)L·min-1·m-2 and(4.67±0.85)L·min-1·m-2, respectively; the global end diastolic volume indices were 780.60 ± 110.13 and 783.55 ±113.28 ml/m2, respectively; the extravascular lung water indices were (10.97 ±3.35) and (10.84 ±3.54)ml/kg, respectively. There was no significant difference in any parameters measured during and between CRRT sessions (P>0.05). MAP and PaO2/FiO2 were markedly improved after treatment, while HR and the dose of dobamine were reduced after treatment (P<0.05 or 0.01).ConclusionCVVHhas no impact on hemodynamic stability and the accuracy of PiCCO monitoring in patients with septic shock complicated by acute kidney injury, but might have beneficial effect on patient's outcome.%目的 分析连续性静-静脉血液滤过(CVVH)对感染性休克合并急性肾损伤(AKI)患者血流动力学的影响.方法 对行CVVH治疗的感染性休克合并AKI患者的临床资料作一回顾性分析.使用PICCO监测仪对实施CVVH治疗的患者进行血流动力学监测,每例患者分别在暂停CVVH期间及治疗时进行检测,并记录所测数据,同时记录HR、有创平均动脉压(MAP)、氧合指数(PaO2/FiO2)及去甲肾上腺素维持剂量等变化.结果 暂停CVVH期间及治疗时心脏指数的平均值分别为(4.73±0.87)和(4.67±0.85)L·min-1·m-2,全心舒张末期容积指数的平均值分别为(780.60±110.13)和(783.55±113.28) ml/m2,血管外肺水

  17. Influence of comprehensive nursing intervention on the deep venous thrombosis of the patients with severe craniocerebral injury%综合护理干预对脑外伤后昏迷患者下肢深静脉血栓形成的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施伟华

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨综合护理干预对脑外伤后昏迷患者下肢深静脉血栓形成的影响。方法将200例脑外伤后昏迷患者随机分为对照组和观察组各100例。对照组患者给予常规护理,观察组患者在常规护理基础上给予早期肢体功能锻炼、采取下肢弹力袜和间歇充气加压泵等保护血管预防下肢深静脉血栓形成的护理措施。比较2组住院期间下肢肿胀、下肢深静脉血栓形成、肺栓塞发生率。结果住院期间观察组和对照组下肢肿胀的发生率分别为9%和17%,下肢深静脉血栓形成发生率分别为5%和10%,肺栓塞发生率分别为0%和2%,观察组显著低于对照组。结论加强对脑外伤后昏迷患者下肢深静脉血栓形成的预防干预措施,可显著减少下肢深静脉血栓的发生率,改善患者预后。%Objective To explore the effect of comprehensive nursing intervention on the deep venous throm-bosis of the patients with severe craniocerebral injury.Methods A total of 200 patients with severe craniocerebral inju-ry were randomly divided into two observation group and control group.Control group adopted conventional nursing, Ob-servation group adopted conventional nursing and comprehensive nursing intervention, which contained of whole process of rehabilitation training, body position intervention, wear of elastic stockings and intermittent pneumatic compression pumps.Lower limb swelling, incidence of DVT and pulmonary embolism during hospitalization in the two groups were compared.Results The incidence of lower limb swelling in the observation group and control group were 9%and 17%respectively, the incidences of DVT were 5%and 10%respectively, the incidences of pulmonary embolism of observa-tion group were 0% and 2% respectively, which were significantly lower than those of control group.Conclusions Comprehensive nursing intervention can effectively prevent the occurrence of DVT after severe

  18. Developmental Venous Anomaly: Benign or Not Benign

    Science.gov (United States)

    AOKI, Rie; SRIVATANAKUL, Kittipong

    2016-01-01

    Developmental venous anomalies (DVAs), previously called venous angiomas, are the most frequently encountered cerebral vascular malformations. However, DVA is considered to be rather an extreme developmental anatomical variation of medullary veins than true malformation. DVAs are composed of dilated medullary veins converging centripetally into a large collecting venous system that drains into the superficial or deep venous system. Their etiology and mechanism are generally accepted that DVAs result from the focal arrest of the normal parenchymal vein development or occlusion of the medullary veins as a compensatory venous system. DVAs per se are benign and asymptomatic except for under certain unusual conditions. The pathomechanisms of symptomatic DVAs are divided into mechanical, flow-related causes, and idiopathic. However, in cases of DVAs associated with hemorrhage, cavernous malformations (CMs) are most often the cause rather than DVAs themselves. The coexistence of CM and DVA is common. There are some possibilities that DVA affects the formation and clinical course of CM because CM related to DVA is generally located within the drainage territory of DVA and is more aggressive than isolated CM in the literature. Brain parenchymal abnormalities surrounding DVA and cerebral varix have also been reported. These phenomena are considered to be the result of venous hypertension associated with DVAs. With the advance of diagnostic imagings, perfusion study supports this hypothesis demonstrating that some DVAs have venous congestion pattern. Although DVAs should be considered benign and clinically silent, they can have potential venous hypertension and can be vulnerable to hemodynamic changes. PMID:27250700

  19. Risk factors for venous thromboembolism during pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thomas Bo; Gerds, Thomas Alexander; Grøn, Randi;

    2013-01-01

    Pregnant women are at an increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Risk factors for VTE among pregnant women are not sufficiently investigated.......Pregnant women are at an increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Risk factors for VTE among pregnant women are not sufficiently investigated....

  20. An unusual Complication of Central Venous Cannulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashvini Kumar

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Central venous catheter (CVC hub fracture is a rare complication of central venous cannulation. We report a case where catheter hub fracture was detected immediately after CVC insertion. Causes of catheter hub fracture and its complications are discussed.

  1. Sex-specific aspects of venous thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roach, Rachel Elizabeth Jo

    2014-01-01

    Venous thrombosis is a disease that occurs in 1-2 per 1000 people per year. At the time of their first venous thrombosis, approximately 50% of women are exposed to reproductive risk factors (oral contraception, postmenopausal hormone therapy, pregnancy and the puerperium). In this thesis, we showed

  2. U turn to venous air embolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Harsimran

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a definitive risk of venous air embolism when the fluid infusion is complete and the drip set is still open in a glass bottle.We have devised a novel way of preventing the chances of air embolism when the fluid in the glass bottle finishes. It really gives a "U" turn to the chances of venous air embolism.

  3. Reflection on the cause and avoidance of recurrent venous leg ulcers: an interpretive descriptive approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Ann; Edwards, Helen; Finlayson, Kathleen

    2017-08-09

    To gain insight into the experience of recurrent venous leg ulcers from the individual's perspective and provide knowledge on potential risks of recurrence not previously investigated. Venous leg ulcers are a consequence of chronic venous disease and frequently recur. They are costly and can impact on physical and psychological health. Despite research suggesting the risk can be reduced through compression and lifestyle changes, recurrence rates are often high. This study provides an insight into individual's perceptions of the cause of their ulcers and how they try to avoid them. A qualitative design guided by the Chronic Illness Trajectory Model and Social Cognitive Theory. A purposive sample of three males and four females were recruited from a community nursing clinic.Participants were ulcer free, had experienced at least two previous venous leg ulcers and could speak and comprehend English. An interpretive descriptive approach was taken using semi-structured interviews and thematic analysis. Three themes each containing three categories emerged: The Increasing Influence of the Recurring Wound on Mind and Body, Reflection on Past Experiences and Optimism in the Face of Adversity. Most participants reported traumatic injury and lower leg surgery triggered ulcer recurrence. Failure to replace compression stockings was also deemed a cause. Compression was reported essential but some participants were unaware of the level they were wearing and how often it should be replaced. Other preventive activities included avoiding injury and securing immediate assistance if wounding occurred. Clinicians need to be aware that lower leg surgery may trigger recurrent venous ulceration and that individuals require ongoing emotional, physical and financial support throughout the trajectory of venous disease. The continued use of old compression stockings should be avoided and recurrence prevented by adoption of evidence based practice rather than reflection on past experiences

  4. Clinical overview of venous thromboembolism

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    terms of epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment exist between the two.3 .... ileofemoral DVT who only received anticoagulation therapy. It develops as ... Leg fractures: 80%. • Injuries ... that a complete history and detailed physical examination.

  5. Clinical quality indicators of venous leg ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Monica L; Mainz, Jan; Soernsen, Lars T

    2005-01-01

    In the clinical setting, diagnosis and treatment of venous leg ulcers can vary considerably from patient to patient. The first step to reducing this variation is to document venous leg ulcer care through use of quantitative scientific documentation principles. This requires the development of valid...... and reliable evidence-based quality indicators of venous leg ulcer care. A Scandinavian multidisciplinary, cross-sectional panel of wound healing experts developed clinical quality indicators on the basis of scientific evidence from the literature and subsequent group nominal consensus of the panel......; an independent medical doctor tested the feasibility and reliability of these clinical indicators, assessing the quality of medical technical care on 100 consecutive venous leg ulcer patients. Main outcome measures were healing, recurrence, pain, venous disease diagnosis, differential diagnosis and treatment...

  6. Combined therapy of Ulmo honey (Eucryphia cordifolia and ascorbic acid to treat venous ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariano del Sol Calderon

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to assess the clinical effect of topical treatment using Ulmo honey associated with oral ascorbic acid in patients with venous ulcers. METHOD: longitudinal and descriptive quantitative study. During one year, 18 patients were assessed who were clinically diagnosed with venous ulcer in different stages, male and female, adult, with a mean injury time of 13 months. Ulmo honey was topically applied daily. The dressing was applied in accordance with the technical standard for advanced dressings, combined with the daily oral consumptions of 500 mg of ascorbic acid. The monitoring instrument is the assessment table of venous ulcers. RESULTS: full healing was achieved in 100% of the venous ulcers. No signs of complications were observed, such as allergies or infection. CONCLUSION: the proposed treatment showed excellent clinical results for the healing of venous ulcers. The honey demonstrated debriding and non-adherent properties, was easy to apply and remove and was well accepted by the users. The described results generated a research line on chronic wound treatment.

  7. 超声造影引导射频凝固治疗肝内不同级别门静脉创伤的动物实验研究%The evaluation of radiofrequency coagulation under the guidance of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography in treating different branches of portal venous injury: an experimental study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    焦子育; 罗渝昆; 唐杰; 吕发勤; 刘强; 武荣; 陈继业

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨超声造影(CEUS)引导射频凝固治疗肝门静脉创伤的价值.方法 8只健康巴马猪,每只猪在超声引导下建立4个门静脉段及段以下分支血管创伤灶,该4个损伤门静脉内径(d)分别为:d <1 mm、1 mm≤d<2 mm、2 mm≤d<3 mm、d≥3 mm,并依次编入A、B、C、D组.采用CEUS引导下射频凝固法对各组创伤灶进行治疗.治疗前记录门静脉流速,计算每分钟血流量;治疗后2 h记录治疗时间、止血效果、CEUS无增强区最大切面面积,治疗后2周行病理学检查.结果成功建立32个门静脉创伤灶.治疗前A、B、C、D组每分钟血流量分别为(3.9±0.6)、(11.9±3.3)、(39.2±12.3)、(76.3±21.7)mL,组间差异有统计学意义(F=54.0,P=0.00),且A组与C组、A组与D组、B组与C组、B组与D组、C组与D组间差异均有统计学意义(q=7.93、16.27、6.13、14.48、8.34,P均<0.05).所有肝门静脉段及段以下分支创伤均获得有效止血.A、B、C、D组止血时间分别为(98.5±16.8)、(110.8±24.1)、(137.2±31.3)、(154.5±39.6)s,组间差异有统计学意义(F=6.01,P=0.00),且A组与C组、A组与D组、B组与D组间差异有统计学意义(q=3.75、5.42、4.23,P均<0.05).A、B、C、D组CEUS无增强区最大切面面积分别为(7.4±2.8)、(11.6±3.1)、(14.9±4.3)、(17.1±4.9)cm2,组间差异有统计学意义(F=9.52,P=0.00),且A组与C组、A组与D组、B组与D组间差异有统计学意义(q=5.48、7.09、4.02,P均<0.05).结论 CEUS引导射频凝固技术是一种方便、快捷、有效的猪肝门静脉段及段以下创伤止血方法.%Objective To discuss the value of radiofrequency coagulation under the guidance of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography( CEUS ) in the treatment of portal venous injury. Methods The experiment was performed in 8 healthy swine. Vascular injuries in the segmental and subsegmental branches of portal vein in each animal were created in diameters( d ) as followed: d < 1 mm, 1 mm≤d <2 mm, 2 mm ≤ d < 3 mm

  8. A Case of Arterial and Venous Tear during Single Lead Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S. Green

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcutaneous lead extraction can be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The risk of causing concomitant arterial and venous injury is rare. We report a case of marginal artery rupture with coronary sinus rupture after a CS lead extraction. A 71-year-old male was admitted for extraction of a 6-year-old implantable cardioverter-defibrillator lead due to fracture from insulation break. During the lead extraction, blood pressure fell precipitously and echocardiographic findings were consistent with pericardial effusion. After unsuccessful pericardiocentesis, open chest sternotomy and evacuation of hematoma was performed. Subsequent surgical repair of several injuries was completed including the distal coronary sinus, a large degloving injury of posterior portion of the heart, and first obtuse marginal branch bleed. This case demonstrates that when performing transcutaneous lead extraction (TLE with laser sheath, a degloving injury can cause arterial rupture with concomitant coronary sinus injury. A multidisciplinary team-based approach can ensure patient safety. Learning Objective. Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator leads will falter over time. With the advancement of new technology for extraction more frequent and serious complications will occur. Active fixation CS leads present unique challenges. In the presence of hemodynamic changes during extraction the occurrence of both an arterial and venous injury must be considered.

  9. Haemoptysis due to pulmonary venous stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silke Braun

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Haemoptysis is a potentially life-threatening condition with the need for prompt diagnosis. In about 10–20% of all cases the bleeding source remains unexplained with the standard diagnostic approach. The aim of this article is to show the necessity of widening the diagnostic approach to haemoptysis with consideration of pulmonary venous stenosis as a possible cause of even severe haemoptysis and haemoptoe. A review of the literature was performed using the Medline/PubMed database with the terms: “pulmonary venous stenosis”, “pulmonary venous infarction” and “haemoptysis”. Further references from the case reports were considered. 58 case reports and case collections about patients with haemoptysis due to pulmonary venous stenosis were detected. This review gives an overview about the case reports and discusses the underlying pathophysiology and the pros and cons of different imaging techniques for the detection of pulmonary venous stenosis. Several conditions predispose to the obstruction of the mediastinal pulmonary veins. Clinical findings are unspecific and may be misleading. Pulmonary venous stenosis can be detected using several imaging techniques, yet three-dimensional magnetic resonance-angiography and three-dimensional contrast-enhanced computed tomography are the most appropriate. Pulmonary venous stenosis should be considered in patients with haemoptysis.

  10. Cerebral venous outflow and cerebrospinal fluid dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clive B. Beggs

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this review, the impact of restricted cerebral venous outflow on the biomechanics of the intracranial fluid system is investigated. The cerebral venous drainage system is often viewed simply as a series of collecting vessels channeling blood back to the heart. However there is growing evidence that it plays an important role in regulating the intracranial fluid system. In particular, there appears to be a link between increased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF pulsatility in the Aqueduct of Sylvius and constricted venous outflow. Constricted venous outflow also appears to inhibit absorption of CSF into the superior sagittal sinus. The compliance of the cortical bridging veins appears to be critical to the behaviour of the intracranial fluid system, with abnormalities at this location implicated in normal pressure hydrocephalus. The compliance associated with these vessels appears to be functional in nature and dependent on the free egress of blood out of the cranium via the extracranial venous drainage pathways. Because constricted venous outflow appears to be linked with increased aqueductal CSF pulsatility, it suggests that inhibited venous blood outflow may be altering the compliance of the cortical bridging veins.

  11. Upper Body Venous Compliance Exceeds Lower Body Venous Compliance in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watenpaugh, Donald E.

    1996-01-01

    Human venous compliance hypothetically decreases from upper to lower body as a mechanism for maintenance of the hydrostatic indifference level 'headward' in the body, near the heart. This maintains cardiac filling pressure, and thus cardiac output and cerebral perfusion, during orthostasis. This project entailed four steps. First, acute whole-body tilting was employed to alter human calf and neck venous volumes. Subjects were tilted on a tilt table equipped with a footplate as follows: 90 deg, 53 deg, 30 deg, 12 deg, O deg, -6 deg, -12 deg, -6 deg, O deg, 12 deg, 30 deg, 53 deg, and 90 deg. Tilt angles were held for 30 sec each, with 10 sec transitions between angles. Neck volume increased and calf volume decreased during head-down tilting, and the opposite occurred during head-up tilt. Second, I sought to cross-validate Katkov and Chestukhin's (1980) measurements of human leg and neck venous pressures during whole-body tilting, so that those data could be used with volume data from the present study to calculate calf and neck venous compliance (compliance = (Delta)volume/(Delta)pressure). Direct measurements of venous pressures during postural chances and whole-body tilting confirmed that the local changes in venous pressures seen by Katkov and Chestukhin (1980) are valid. The present data also confirmed that gravitational changes in calf venous pressure substantially exceed those changes in upper body venous pressure. Third, the volume and pressure data above were used to find that human neck venous compliance exceeds calf venous compliance by a factor of 6, thereby upholding the primary hypothesis. Also, calf and neck venous compliance correlated significantly with each other (r(exp 2) = 0.56). Fourth, I wished to determine whether human calf muscle activation during head-up tilt reduces calf venous compliance. Findings from tilting and from supine assessments of relaxed calf venous compliance were similar, indicating that tilt-induced muscle activation is

  12. [Use of mesoglycan in venous pathology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scondotto, G; Catena, G; Aloisi, D

    1997-12-01

    Twenty-five female patients suffering from primary venous insufficiency of the lower limbs underwent parenteral and oral treatment with mesoglycan for 3 months. In addition to an evaluation of the subjective and objective parameters linked to venous insufficiency, all patients underwent lower limb venous echo colour-Doppler and videocapillaroscopy using an optic probe in a perimalleolar or periulcerous site. At the end of treatment, all patients reported an improvement in subjective parameters, which was confirmed by a reduction of distal edema in 22 out of 25 cases. There was also an improvement in capillaroscopic findings (reduction of edema of pericapillary connective tissue, reduction of capillary and venular ectasia.

  13. [Ultrasound-guided peripheral venous access].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuzier, Régis; Rougé, Pierre; Pierre, Sébastien

    2016-02-01

    International guidelines advocate the use of first-line ultrasound for central venous catheter, particularly for the internal jugular vein. The role of ultrasound in peripheral venous access remains questionable. In some specific situations, such as pediatrics, obesity and patients with poor venous network, problems to cannulate peripheral vein may occur. Success rate of peripheral intravenous access increases with the diameter of the vein and for a depth of the vein between 0.3 and 1.5 cm. The type of puncture (long-axis or short-axis) and the type of catheters have little influence on the success rate. Specific considerations have to be taken concerning infection control.

  14. Current opinion on iliofemoral venous thrombectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, G L

    1976-02-01

    Iliofemoral venous thrombosis is discussed and a technique of iliofemoral venous thrombectomy is presented. Operative phlebography is recommended. The personal recommendations of leading American vascular surgeons in treating the patient with acute iliofemoral venous thrombosis are presented. I recommend thrombectomy for phlegmasia cerulea dolens, and in previously healthy, young ambulatory patients with phlegmasia alba dolens who are seen within 48 hours following thrombosis and have failed to show clinical improvement after a trial of bed rest, elevation of the lower extremities, and intravenous heparin. The majority of patients seen with phlegmasia alba dolens will best be served with nonoperative treatment.

  15. Current perspective of venous thrombosis in the upper extremity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flinterman, L.E.; Meer, van der F.J.M.; Rosendaal, F.R.; Doggen, C.J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Venous thrombosis of the upper extremity is a rare disease. Therefore, not as much is known about risk factors, treatment and the risk of recurrence as for venous thrombosis of the leg. Only central venous catheters and strenuous exercise are commonly known risk factors for an upper extremity venous

  16. The possibility for use of venous flaps in plastic surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baytinger, V. F., E-mail: baitinger@mail.tomsknet.ru; Kurochkina, O. S., E-mail: kurochkinaos@yandex.ru; Selianinov, K. V.; Baytinger, A. V. [Research Institute of Microsurgery, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Dzyuman, A. N. [Siberian State Medical University, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-17

    The use of venous flaps is controversial. The mechanism of perfusion of venous flaps is still not fully understood. The research was conducted on 56 white rats. In our experimental work we studied two different models of venous flaps: pedicled venous flap (PVF) and pedicled arterialized venous flap (PAVF). Our results showed that postoperative congestion was present in all flaps. However 66.7% of all pedicled venous flaps and 100% of all pedicled arterialized venous flaps eventually survived. Histological examination revealed that postoperatively the blood flow in the skin of the pedicled arterialized venous flap became «re-reversed» again; there were no differences between mechanism of survival of venous flaps and other flaps. On the 7-14th day in the skin of all flaps were processes of neoangiogenesis and proliferation. Hence the best scenario for the clinical use of venous flaps unfolds when both revascularization and skin coverage are required.

  17. The possibility for use of venous flaps in plastic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baytinger, V. F.; Kurochkina, O. S.; Selianinov, K. V.; Baytinger, A. V.; Dzyuman, A. N.

    2015-11-01

    The use of venous flaps is controversial. The mechanism of perfusion of venous flaps is still not fully understood. The research was conducted on 56 white rats. In our experimental work we studied two different models of venous flaps: pedicled venous flap (PVF) and pedicled arterialized venous flap (PAVF). Our results showed that postoperative congestion was present in all flaps. However 66.7% of all pedicled venous flaps and 100% of all pedicled arterialized venous flaps eventually survived. Histological examination revealed that postoperatively the blood flow in the skin of the pedicled arterialized venous flap became «re-reversed» again; there were no differences between mechanism of survival of venous flaps and other flaps. On the 7-14th day in the skin of all flaps were processes of neoangiogenesis and proliferation. Hence the best scenario for the clinical use of venous flaps unfolds when both revascularization and skin coverage are required.

  18. Upper-extremity deep venous thrombosis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Cuc; Hunt, Daniel

    2011-05-01

    Upper-extremity deep venous thrombosis is less common than lower-extremity deep venous thrombosis. However, upper-extremity deep venous thrombosis is associated with similar adverse consequences and is becoming more common in patients with complex medical conditions requiring central venous catheters or wires. Although guidelines suggest that this disorder be managed using approaches similar to those for lower-extremity deep venous thrombosis, studies are refining the prognosis and management of upper-extremity deep venous thrombosis. Physicians should be familiar with the diagnostic and treatment considerations for this disease. This review will differentiate between primary and secondary upper-extremity deep venous thromboses; assess the risk factors and clinical sequelae associated with upper-extremity deep venous thrombosis, comparing these with lower-extremity deep venous thrombosis; and describe an approach to treatment and prevention of secondary upper-extremity deep venous thrombosis based on clinical evidence.

  19. Venous Thromboembolism in Critical Illness and Trauma: Pediatric Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chima, Ranjit S.; Hanson, Sheila J.

    2017-01-01

    Critically ill children and those sustaining severe traumatic injuries are at higher risk for developing venous thromboembolism (VTE) than other hospitalized children. Multiple factors including the need for central venous catheters, immobility, surgical procedures, malignancy, and dysregulated inflammatory state confer this increased risk. As well as being at higher risk of VTE, this population is frequently at an increased risk of bleeding, making the decision of prophylactic anticoagulation even more nuanced. The use of pharmacologic and mechanical prophylaxis remains variable in this high-risk cohort. VTE pharmacologic prophylaxis is an accepted practice in adult trauma and intensive care to prevent VTE development and associated morbidity, but it is not standardized in critically ill or injured children. Given the lack of pediatric specific guidelines, prevention strategies are variably extrapolated from the successful use of mechanical and pharmacologic prophylaxis in adults, despite the differences in developmental hemostasis and thrombosis risk between children and adults. Whether the burden of VTE can be reduced in the pediatric critically ill or injured population is not known given the lack of robust data. There are no trials in children showing efficacy of mechanical compression devices or prophylactic anticoagulation in reducing the rate of VTE. Risk stratification using clinical factors has been shown to identify those at highest risk for VTE and allows targeted prophylaxis. It remains unproven if such a strategy will mitigate the risk of VTE and its potential sequelae. PMID:28349046

  20. Treatment of hepatic venous stenosis by transfemoral venous balloon dilation following living donor liver transplantation: a case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weiwei Jiang; Yangsui Liu; Lianbao Kong

    2009-01-01

    Hepatic venous stenosis may be a cause of graft failure in living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). Balloon dilation and metallic frame approaches have been used successfully to treat hepatic venous stenosis. Here, we report the effect of transfemoral venous balloon dilation for treating a child with hepatic venous stenosis after LDLT.

  1. Imaging of head and neck venous malformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flis, Christine M.; Connor, Stephen E. [King' s College Hospital, Neuroradiology Department, London (United Kingdom)

    2005-10-01

    Venous malformations (VMs) are non proliferative lesions that consist of dysplastic venous channels. The aim of imaging is to characterise the lesion and define its anatomic extent. We will describe the plain film, ultrasound (US) (including colour and duplex Doppler), computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), conventional angiographic and direct phlebographic appearances of venous malformations. They will be illustrated at a number of head and neck locations, including orbit, oral cavity, superficial and deep facial space, supraglottic and intramuscular. An understanding of the classification of such vascular anomalies is required to define the correct therapeutic procedure to employ. Image-guided sclerotherapy alone or in combination with surgery is now the first line treatment option in many cases of head and neck venous malformations, so the radiologist is now an integral part of the multidisciplinary management team. (orig.)

  2. A Rare Venous Port Complication: Supraventriculer Tachycardia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamer Yoldaş

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Implantable central venous port catheters are widely used in the management of children with cancer undergoing long term chemotherapy. These catheters can manifest a number of complications such as arrhythmia. Central venous port catheter was placed on a ten years old boy for chemotherapy. Before insertion of port catheter his physical examination, laboratory parameters, electrocardiography and echocardiography were normal. The patient felt palpitations shortly after the insertion of the port catheter. At that time the heart rate was 200 beats/minute but immediately normal sinus rhythm was restored. A chest roentgenogram revealed that the distal fragment of the port catheter was inside the right atrium. The port catheter was pulled back somewhat and then tachycardia attacks stopped. To our knowledge there are a few reports of supraventricular tachycardia (SVT in children associated with central venous port catheter. Here we aimed to present a pediatric case with SVT after placement of central venous port catheter and his management.

  3. [Emphysematous gastritis with concomitant portal venous air].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Min Yeong; Kim, Jin Il; Kim, Jae Young; Kim, Hyun Ho; Jo, Ik Hyun; Seo, Jae Hyun; Kim, Il Kyu; Cheung, Dae Young

    2015-02-01

    Emphysematous gastritis is a rare form of gastritis caused by infection of the stomach wall by gas forming bacteria. It is a very rare condition that carries a high mortality rate. Portal venous gas shadow represents elevation of intestinal luminal pressure which manifests as emphysematous gastritis or gastric emphysema. Literature reviews show that the mortality rate is especially high when portal venous gas shadow is present on CT scan. Until recently, the treatment of emphysematous gastritis has been immediate surgical intervention. However, there is a recent trend of avoiding surgery because of the frequent occurrence of post-operative complications such as anastomosis leakage. In addition, aggressive surgical treatment has failed to show significant improvement in prognosis. Recently, the authors experienced a case of emphysematous gastritis accompanied by portal venous gas which was treated successfully by conservative treatment without immediate surgical intervention. Herein, we present a case of emphysematous gastritis with concomitant portal venous air along with literature review.

  4. Venous thromboembolism: awareness and practice of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MJP

    thromboprophylaxis among physicians in a tertiary-care hospital. Ekwere TA1* ... Background: Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a major public health challenge globally due to its ... multicenter study conducted in Canada to determine the ...

  5. Clinical quality indicators of venous leg ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Monica L; Mainz, Jan; Soernsen, Lars T

    2005-01-01

    and reliable evidence-based quality indicators of venous leg ulcer care. A Scandinavian multidisciplinary, cross-sectional panel of wound healing experts developed clinical quality indicators on the basis of scientific evidence from the literature and subsequent group nominal consensus of the panel......%) were assessed for venous surgery. Distal arterial pressure was measured following initial examination in 33 of the patients (34%). All patients (100%) were prescribed compression therapy. Of the 98 patients, 11 (11%) had ulcers recur in 3 months and 72 (73%) healed in 12 months, which is in line......; an independent medical doctor tested the feasibility and reliability of these clinical indicators, assessing the quality of medical technical care on 100 consecutive venous leg ulcer patients. Main outcome measures were healing, recurrence, pain, venous disease diagnosis, differential diagnosis and treatment...

  6. Links between arterial and venous disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prandoni, P

    2007-09-01

    An increasing body of evidence suggests the likelihood of a link between arterial and venous disease. According to the results of recent studies, atherosclerosis and venous thromboembolism (VTE) share common risk factors, including age, obesity, diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome. Atherosclerosis has the potential to promote the development of thrombotic disorders in the venous system. Another scenario assumes that the two clinical conditions are simultaneously triggered by biological stimuli responsible for activating coagulation and inflammatory pathways in both the arterial and the venous system. Several recent studies have consistently shown that patients with VTE of unknown origin are at a higher risk of cardiovascular diseases, including atherosclerotic complications, than patients with secondary VTE and matched control individuals. Future studies are needed to clarify the nature of this association, to assess its extent and to evaluate its implications for clinical practice.

  7. Current perspective of venous thrombosis in the upper extremity

    OpenAIRE

    Flinterman, L.E.; Meer, van der, D; Rosendaal, F.R.; Doggen, C. J. M.

    2008-01-01

    Venous thrombosis of the upper extremity is a rare disease. Therefore, not as much is known about risk factors, treatment and the risk of recurrence as for venous thrombosis of the leg. Only central venous catheters and strenuous exercise are commonly known risk factors for an upper extremity venous thrombosis. In this review an overview of the different risk factors, possible treatments and the complications for patients with a venous thrombosis of the upper extremity is given

  8. Entrapment of guidewire during central venous catheterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarun S.

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Central venous catheterization (CVC is common in the setting of ICU for various reasons like monitoring of CVP, fluid administration and vasopressor or drug infusions. Guidewires are routinely used in the Seldinger technique during central venous catheter placement CVC placement is not innocuous as numerous complications may occur, with varying frequency and severity. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(7.000: 3080-3081

  9. Prospects of Jugular Venous Pulse Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M D Bhattarai

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available There is no controversy regarding the current clinical method of examination of waveform of jugular vein pulse. However there are limitations of clinical assessment of central venous pressure by jugular vein pressure measurement from the level of sternal angle. There are variations in the reported distances from sternal angle to right atrium as well as to upper limit of JVP. In erect position, anterior end of fourth intercostal space is at about the level of mid-right atrium. In patients with visible JVP at neck in erect position, measurement of CVP can be done more accurately directly from the anterior end of fourth intercostal space. For others, the position of mid-right atrium can be marked in lateral chest wall first in erect position at the mid-point of an anteroposterior line from anterior end of fourth intercostal space to back. Subsequently in reclining position, the vertical height of venous pressure can be measured from the horizontal plane of the midpoint marked at lateral chest wall to visible upper limit of JVP. Such measurement can be done in a more reliable way with venous pressure (VP manometer with its indicator rod at the horizontal plane of mid-right atrium and with its horizontal surface at upper limit of JVP. The venous pressure manometer can also be used to measure relatively less reliable upper limb venous pressure (ULVP, as indicated by the vertical distance at which veins of upper limb collapse, especially when JVP is not visualized due to subnormal CVP as in hypovolemia. Keywords: CVP, JVP, right atrium, sternal angle, upper limp venous pressure, venous pressure, venous pressure manometer

  10. Central Venous Line and Acute Neurological Deficit: A Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SeyedHossein Ahmadi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Central venous catheter (CVC insertion is a practical way to assess patients hemodynamic specially in cardiovascular surgery but this relatively simple junior level procedure is not risk free and its common reported complications include; pneumothorax, hydrothorax, hemothorax, local hematoma, cardiac tamponade, vascular injury, thrombosis, embolism, and catheter disruption. Here in this article we are going to present 6 patients with very unusual presentation of CVC complication which was neurological deficit presented by agitation , unconsciousness, disorientation to time and place and  hemiparesis. All patients undergone neurologic consult and brain computed tomography. Final diagnosis was brain ischemic damage and finally we kept them on conservative management; fortunately we did not have any permanent damage.

  11. A sensitive venous bleeding model in haemophilia A mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pastoft, Anne Engedahl; Lykkesfeldt, Jens; Ezban, M.

    2012-01-01

    Haemostatic effect of compounds for treating haemophilia can be evaluated in various bleeding models in haemophilic mice. However, the doses of factor VIII (FVIII) for normalizing bleeding used in some of these models are reported to be relatively high. The aim of this study was to establish...... a sensitive venous bleeding model in FVIII knock out (F8-KO) mice, with the ability to detect effect on bleeding at low plasma FVIII concentrations. We studied the effect of two recombinant FVIII products, N8 and Advate(®), after injury to the saphenous vein. We found that F8-KO mice treated with increasing...... doses of either N8 or Advate(®) showed a dose-dependent increase in the number of clot formations and a reduction in both average and maximum bleeding time, as well as in average blood loss. For both compounds, significant effect was found at doses as low as 5 IU kg(-1) when compared with vehicle...

  12. A comparison of central venous and arterial base deficit as a predictor of survival in acute trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelzer, Thomas M; Perron, Andrew D; Thomason, Michael H; Sing, Ronald F

    2008-02-01

    The arterial base deficit has been demonstrated to be a marker of shock and predictive of survival in injured patients. The venous blood, however, may better reflect tissue perfusion. Its usefulness in trauma is unknown. We compared central venous with arterial blood gas analysis to determine which was a better predictor of survival in injured patients. A prospective, nonrandomized series of acutely injured patients was investigated. Patients who had an arterial blood gas analysis for acid-base determination had a simultaneous central venous blood gas analysis and routine blood tests. Patient demographics, Injury Severity Score, and survival past 24 hours were recorded. Arterial and venous blood samples were analyzed for pH, PCO2, PO2, HCO3, hemoglobin-oxygen saturation, base deficit, and lactate. One hundred patients were enrolled. There were 76 survivors and 24 nonsurvivors. Wilcoxon rank sum test and multivariate logistic regression were used for each recorded variable; only central venous base deficit was predictive of survival past 24 hours (P = .0081). Specifically, arterial base deficit was not predictive of survival past 24 hours. In a prospective series of acutely injured patients, central venous base deficit, not arterial base deficit, was predictive of survival past 24 hours.

  13. Microcirculation and venous ulcers: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascarella, Luigi; Schönbein, Geert W Schmid; Bergan, John J

    2005-11-01

    Recent histological and immunocytochemical analyses of venous leg ulcers suggest that lesions observed in the different stages of chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) may be related to an inflammatory process. This inflammatory process leads to fibrosclerotic remodeling of the skin and then to ulceration. The vascular network of the most superficial layers of the skin appears to be the target of the inflammatory reaction. Hemodynamic forces such as venous hypertension, circulatory stasis, and modified conditions of shear stress appear to play an important role in an inflammatory reaction accompanied by leukocyte activation which clinically leads to CVI: venous dermatitis and venous ulceration. The leukocyte activation is accompanied by the expression of integrins and by synthesis and release of many inflammatory molecules, including proteolytic enzymes, leukotrienes, prostaglandin, bradykinin, free oxygen radicals, cytokines, and possibly other classes of inflammatory mediators. The inflammatory reaction perpetuates itself, leading to liposclerotic skin and subcutaneous tissue remodeling. In light of the mechanisms of venous ulcer formation cited above, therapy in the future might be directed against leukocyte activation in order to diminish the magnitude of the inflammatory response. With this in mind, the attention of many investigators has been drawn to two different drugs with an anti-inflammatory effect: pentoxifylline and flavonoids.

  14. The chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamboni, P; Galeotti, R

    2010-12-01

    Chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) is a syndrome characterized by stenosies of the internal jugular and/or azygous veins (IJVs-AZ) with opening of collaterals and insufficient drainage proved by reduced cerebral blood flow and increased mean transit time in cerebral MRI perfusional study. The present review is aimed to give a comprehensive overview of the actual status of the art of the diagnosis and treatment of this condition. As far as the origin of venous narrowing is concerned, phlebographic studies of the IJVs and AZ systems demonstrated that venous stenoses were likely to be truncular venous malformations; mostly, they are intraluminal defects such as malformed valve, septa webs. CCSVI condition has been found to be strongly associated with multiple sclerosis (MS), a disabling neurodegenerative and demyelinating disease considered autoimmune in nature. In several epidemiological observations performed at different latitudes on patients with different genetic backgrounds, the prevalence of CCSVI in MS ranges from 56% to 100%. To the contrary, by using venous MR and/or different Doppler protocols, CCSVI was not detected with the same prevalence. Two pilot studies demonstrated the safety and feasibility in Day Surgery of the endovascular treatment of CCSVI by means of balloon angioplasty (PTA). It determines a significant reduction of postoperative venous pressure. Restenosis rate was found out elevated in the IJVs, but negligible in the AZ. However, PTA seems to positively influence clinical and QoL parameters of the associated MS and warrants further randomized control trials.

  15. What happens after venous thromboembolism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baglin, T

    2009-07-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) comprises deep vein thrombosis (DVT) with or without symptomatic pulmonary embolus (PE). The incidence of a first episode of VTE is 1.5 per 1000 person-years [1] (J Thromb Haemost, 2007;5:692-9) with a per-person lifetime incidence of 5% [2] (Arch Intern Med 1998;158:585-93). The risk of recurrence after DVT and PE is similar but the pattern of recurrence tends to reflect the initial event, for example recurrence with PE is more common in patients with previous PE [3] (Circulation 2003;107:122-30). At least 50% of patients, who present with symptomatic DVT, have asymptomatic PE and conversely, a majority presenting with symptomatic PE have asymptomatic DVT [3] (Circulation 2003;107:122-30). This suggests that whilst DVT and PE are manifestations of the same pathology, the phenotypic expression of the disease is predetermined. This may be an important consideration for long-term anticoagulant therapy as the risk of fatal PE is the greatest in patients with previous PE [4] (Ann Intern Med 2007;147:766-74). At present, the only factor reported to be associated with the pattern of VTE is the factor V Leiden mutation [5] (Thromb Haemost 1999;81:345-8). This suggests that the kinetics of thrombin generation and the resulting fibrinolytic response may influence clot structure and likelihood of embolization.

  16. Venous catheterization with ultrasound navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasatkin, A. A.; Urakov, A. L.; Nigmatullina, A. R.

    2015-11-01

    By ultrasound scanning it was determined that respiratory movements made by chest of healthy and sick person are accompanied by respiratory chest rise of internal jugular veins. During the exhalation of an individual diameter of his veins increases and during the breath it decreases down to the complete disappearing if their lumen. Change of the diameter of internal jugular veins in different phases can influence significantly the results of vein puncture and cauterization in patients. The purpose of this research is development of the method increasing the efficiency and safety of cannulation of internal jugular veins by the ultrasound visualization. We suggested the method of catheterization of internal jugular veins by the ultrasound navigation during the execution of which the puncture of venous wall by puncture needle and the following conduction of J-guide is carried out at the moment of patient's exhalation. This method decreases the risk of complications development during catheterization of internal jugular vein due to exclusion of perforating wound of vein and subjacent tissues and anatomical structures.

  17. Venous catheterization with ultrasound navigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasatkin, A. A., E-mail: ant-kasatkin@yandex.ru; Nigmatullina, A. R. [Izhevsk State Medical Academy, Kommunarov street, 281, Izhevsk, Russia, 426034 (Russian Federation); Urakov, A. L., E-mail: ant-kasatkin@yandex.ru [Institute of Mechanics Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, T.Baramzinoy street 34, Izhevsk, Russia, 426067, Izhevsk (Russian Federation); Izhevsk State Medical Academy, Kommunarov street, 281, Izhevsk, Russia, 426034 (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-17

    By ultrasound scanning it was determined that respiratory movements made by chest of healthy and sick person are accompanied by respiratory chest rise of internal jugular veins. During the exhalation of an individual diameter of his veins increases and during the breath it decreases down to the complete disappearing if their lumen. Change of the diameter of internal jugular veins in different phases can influence significantly the results of vein puncture and cauterization in patients. The purpose of this research is development of the method increasing the efficiency and safety of cannulation of internal jugular veins by the ultrasound visualization. We suggested the method of catheterization of internal jugular veins by the ultrasound navigation during the execution of which the puncture of venous wall by puncture needle and the following conduction of J-guide is carried out at the moment of patient’s exhalation. This method decreases the risk of complications development during catheterization of internal jugular vein due to exclusion of perforating wound of vein and subjacent tissues and anatomical structures.

  18. Comparison of continuous veno-venous hemofiltration and sustained low-efficiency daily dialysis for the treatment of critical patients with acute kidney injury%持续静静脉血液滤过和持续低效每日透析治疗重症急性肾损伤的临床研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王芳; 何强; 洪大情; 蒲蕾; 张月; 王莉

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨持续静静脉血液滤过(continuous veno-venous hemofiltration,CVVH)与持续低效每日透析(sustained low-efficiency dailY dialysiS,SLEDD)治疗重症急性肾损伤的疗效和安全性.方法 回顾性分析了四川省人民医院重症监护室41例合并急性肾损伤行血液净化治疗患者,其中CVVH组18例,SLEDD组23例,调查患者性别、年龄、原发病、治疗前急性生理学与慢性健康状况评分(acutephysiology and chroniC health evaluation,APACHE)Ⅱ、脏器衰竭数、急性肾损伤分级;血液净化治疗模式和剂量、血管通路、抗凝方式等.研究2种肾替代治疗模式对重症急性肾损伤患者血流动力学、溶质清除、电解质和酸碱平衡、疾病转归以及卫生经济学的影响.结果 2组问年龄、性别、脏器衰竭数、急性肾损伤分级差异无统计学意义(P>0.05),但CVVH组APACHE Ⅱ分值明显高于SLEDD组(P<0.05),死亡率也高于SLEDD组;比较SLEDD组(128次)与CVVH组(87次)透析记录,对血液动力学影响2组问差异无统计学意义(P>0.05);2组治疗前后电解质(除血钾外)和酸碱的差异无统计学意义(P>0.05),抗凝剂使用CVVH组明显高于SLEDD组(P<0.01),CVVH组治疗的日超滤量、液体入量和液体出量明显高于SLEDD组(均P<0.01),CVVH组治疗的工作时间、夜班时间和费用明显高于SLEDD组(P<0.01).结论 SLEDD使用相对短的时间、更少的抗凝剂,以较低的成本基本达到与CVVH治疗相当的效果.%Objective To observe the effectiveness and safety of continuous veno-venous hemofiltration (CVVH) and sustained low-efficiency daily dialysis (SLEDD) in critical patients with acute kidney injury (AKI).Method We retrospectively analyzed 41 AKI patients treated with CVVH (n=l8) or SLEDD (n=23) in the 2 ICUs in this hospital. Data for analysis included gender, age, primary disease, APACHEII score, number of dysfunction organs, AKI classification, blood purification modality and

  19. Application of daytime continuous veno-venous hemodiafiltration for the treatment of sepsis with acute kidney injury patients%日间静静脉血液透析滤过在脓毒血症合并急性肾损伤的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张汀; 王艳; 阿胜; 陈孟华

    2011-01-01

    目的研究日间静静脉血液透析滤过(continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration,CVVHDF)在脓毒血症合并急性肾损伤(acute kidney injury,AKI)患者治疗中的应用和影响预后的因素.方法观察分析宁夏医科大学总医院肾脏内科采用日间静静脉血液透析滤过以置换流量35~40ml/(kg·h)、透析液流量1500~2000 ml/h为方案救治的16例脓毒血症合并急性肾损伤患者的资料,评估临床特点和影响预后的因素.结果7例(43.8%)患者度过疾病的急性期(存活组),APACHE Ⅱ评分为(25.4±6.7);9例(56.2%)患者在急性期死亡(死亡组),APACHE Ⅱ评分为(34.4±4.3).对2组患者的临床资料、生化指标、机械通气状况、脏器损伤的特点、疾病的严重程度等因素进行分析,发现2组患者应用CVVHDF治疗前的机械通气状况、脏器衰竭数量、血钠、尿量之间差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).同时,死亡组APACHE Ⅱ评分(急性生理学与慢性健康状况评分Ⅱ)高于存活组,代谢性酸中毒严重程度明显.结论日间CVVHDF可降低脓毒血症合并急性肾损伤患者的死亡率.脓毒血症患者的预后受患者是否存在机械通气、脏器衰竭数量、血钠水平、代谢性酸中毒程度及APACHE Ⅱ分值的影响.%Objective To evaluate the clinical efficacy of continuous veno-venous hemodiafiltration (CWHDF) in treating critically ill patients with sepsis and acute renal injury. Methods The clinical features and factors affecting prognosis were retrospectively analyzed in 16 critically ill patients with sepsis and acute renal injury who received daytime CWHDF in this hospital from Jan. 2010 to Feb. 2011. Patients received this treatment schedule with CWHDF of 35-40 ml per kilogram of body weight per hour and 1500-2000 ml dialysate per hour. Results Seven patients (43.8%) survived the acute phase of their illness, with APACHE 11 score being 25.4 ± 6.7; whereas nine patients (56.2%) died during the acute phase, with

  20. Femoral venous oxygen saturation is no surrogate for central venous oxygen saturation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beest, Paul A.; van der Schors, Alice; Liefers, Henriette; Coenen, Ludo G. J.; Braam, Richard L.; Habib, Najib; Braber, Annemarije; Scheeren, Thomas W. L.; Kuiper, Michael A.; Spronk, Peter E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective:  The purpose of our study was to determine if central venous oxygen saturation and femoral venous oxygen saturation can be used interchangeably during surgery and in critically ill patients. Design:  Prospective observational controlled study. Setting:  Nonacademic university-affiliated t

  1. 低分子肝素、间歇性气压治疗预防颅脑创伤患者下肢深静脉血栓形成的临床分析%Clinical analysis on the effect of low molecular weight heparin and intermittent pneumatic compression against deep venous thrombosis following traumatic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓永兵; 肖虹; 胡晞; 刘科

    2013-01-01

    目的探讨低分子肝素、间歇性气压治疗对颅脑创伤患者下肢深静脉血栓( DVT)形成的预防效果。方法回顾分析我科2010年3月~2013年3月682例颅脑创伤患者临床资料。有148例应用低分子肝素( LMWH)药物预防;173例行间歇性气压治疗( IPC)物理预防;169例行LMWH、IPC联合预防;有192例未实施LMWH、IPC预防。下肢深静脉彩超或下肢CTV诊断DVT。结果 LMWH药物预防组,DVT 19例(12.83%); IPC预防组,DVT 23例(13.29%); LMWH、IPC联合预防组,DVT 14例(8.28%);未实施LMWH、IPC预防组,DVT 38例(19.80%)。 LMWH、IPC联合预防组、LMWH预防组、IPC预防组DVT发生率明显低于未实施LMWH、IPC预防组(P<0.05); LMWH、IPC联合预防组DVT发生率明显低于LMWH预防组或IPC物理预防组( P<0.05)。结论 LMWH、IPC对预防颅脑创伤患者下肢深静脉血栓形成有一定的临床疗效,且LMWH、IPC联合预防效果更好。%Objective To explore the efficacy and safety of low molecular -weight heparin ( LMWH) and intermittent pneumatic compression ( IPC) against deep venous thrombosis ( DVT) following traumatic brain injury (TBI).Methods The clinical data of 682 patients with TBI from Mar.2010 to Mar.2013 were analyzed retro-spectively.In those cases,148 cases received LMWH injection,173 cases received IPC prevention,169 cases re-ceived LMWH and IPC ,192 cases did not receive LMWH or IPC prevention .DVT was diagnosed by color duplex ultrasonography or computed tomo-venography(CTV).Results There were 19 cases of DVT (12.83%),23 cases of DVT (13.29%),14 cases of DVT (8.28%) and 38 cases of DVT (19.80%) in the group of LMWH preven-tion,group of IPC prevention,group of LMWH+IPC prevention and group of non-preventive measure,respectively. The incidence of DVT in group 1,2 and 3 was significantly lower than that in group 4 (P<0.05).The incidence of DVT in group 3 was significantly lower

  2. Pharmacologic treatment of venous leg ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dormandy, J A

    1995-01-01

    In terms of prevalence, total cost and morbidity, venous leg ulcers are probably by far the most important type of ulcerations in the leg. The macrocirculatory defect leading to a raised ambulatory venous pressure is now accepted as a common initial pathologic pathway. Most current treatment modalities, such as surgery or external compression, are designed to control the macrovascular defect. However, it is the microcirculatory consequences of the venous hypertension that give rise to the trophic skin changes and ultimately to ulceration. At this microcirculatory level, pharmacotherapy may be a useful adjunct in the treatment of venous leg ulcers. The microcirculatory pathophysiologic changes include decreased fibrinolytic activity, elevated plasma fibrinogen, microcirculatory thrombi, and inappropriate activation of the white blood cells. The oxidative burst from the activated white cells probably plays a key role by releasing locally leukocyte-derived free radicals, proteolytic enzymes, cytokines, platelet-activating factor, and a number of other noxious mediators. An important additional component in recalcitrant venous ulcers is co-existing arterial disease, which is probably present in 15-20% of cases. Decreased arterial perfusion pressure will further aggravate the ischemic changes caused by the venous hypertension. Pentoxifylline downregulates leukocyte activation, reduces leukocyte adhesion, and also has fibrinolytic effects. A number of clinical studies have therefore been carried out to examine the clinical efficacy of pentoxifylline in treatment of venous leg ulcers. Probably the largest published placebo-controlled, double-blind randomized study was reported in 1990. In this study, 80 patients received either pentoxifylline 400 mg three times a day orally or matching placebo for 6 months or until their reference ulcer healed if this occurred sooner. Complete healing of the reference ulcer occurred in 23 of the 38 patients treated with pentoxifylline

  3. Mixed total anomalous pulmonary venous connection: Case report with bilateral venous collectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayre, Raul O; Civetta, Julio D; Roldan, Alberto O; Rousseau, Juan J; Knudson, Ole A; Valdes-Cruz, Lilliam M

    2003-01-01

    We present a case report of a 3-month-old boy with a mixed total anomalous pulmonary venous connection. The patient had situs solitus, small atrial septal defect, and 2 separate venous collectors. The right pulmonary veins drained through a right-sided venous collector into the coronary sinus. The left-sided pulmonary veins drained through the left-sided venous collector directly into the right superior vena cava. The use of the echocardiogram and Doppler color flow mapping to establish a detailed morphologic analysis, the sites of connection, and the presence of pulmonary venous obstructions as well as the value of this information to facilitate a successful surgical repair are discussed.

  4. Back Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... extending from your neck to your pelvis. Back injuries can result from sports injuries, work around the house or in the garden, ... back is the most common site of back injuries and back pain. Common back injuries include Sprains ...

  5. Electrical Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it can pass through your body and cause injuries. These electrical injuries can be external or internal. You may have one or both types. External injuries are skin burns. Internal injuries include damage to ...

  6. Familial risk of venous thromboembolism: a nationwide cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, H T; Riis, A H; Diaz, L J

    2011-01-01

    Background: Venous thromboembolism has genetic determinants, but population-based data on familial risks are limited. Objectives: To examine the familial risk of venous thromboembolism. Methods: We undertook a nationwide study of a cohort of patients with deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary...... and expected number of venous thromboembolism cases among siblings, using population-specific, gender-specific and age-specific incidence rates. Results: We identified 30 179 siblings of 19 599 cases of venous thromboembolism. The incidence among siblings was 2.2 cases per 1000 person-years, representing...... with pulmonary embolism. Conclusion: Venous thromboembolism has a strong familial component....

  7. Radiologic placement of tunneled central venous catheter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, Seong Tae; Yang, Po Song; Yang, Dong Hunn; Kim, Ki Tae; Kim, Choon Yul; Shinn, Kyung Sub [The Catholic Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Eun Joo [Korea Veterans Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of fluoroscopy-guided, radiologic placement of a tunneled central venous catheter into the superior vena cava (SVC). Thirty five patients underwent tunneled central venous catheter placement to facilitate long-term chemotherapy. They included 33 leukemic patients, one colon cancer patient, and one multiple myeloma patient. After confirming central venous patency with a injection of contrast media via the peripheral cephalic or basilic vein in the wrist joint, the subclavian vein was punctured under fluoroscopic guidance. A 7F double lumen TPN catheter was placed into the SVC through a subcutaneous tunnel in the anterior chest wall. Catheter placements were successful in all patients. The mean procedure time was 17.2minutes, mean fluooscopy time was 1.3minutes, mean number of punctures was 1.4, and mean volume of injhected contrast media was 43.5cc. Only two of all leukemic patients developed mild hematomas at the puncture site, but these soon resolved themselves. None of the patients developed pneumothorax or hemothorax. But late complications included local infection in two patients (6%) and thrombotic occlusion of the catheter in one (3%). The occluded catheter was successfully recanalized with Urokinase infusion. Fluoroscopy-guided, radiologic placement of a tunneled central venous catheter is an easy and safe method, and useful for patients requiring long-term venous access.

  8. Infections associated with the central venous catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drasković, Biljana; Fabri, Izabella; Benka, Anna Uram; Rakić, Goran

    2014-01-01

    Central venous catheters are of an essential importance to critically ill patients who require long-term venous access for various purposes. Their use made the treatment much easier, but still they are not harmless and are prone to numerous complications. Catheter infections represent the most significant complication in their use. The frequency of infections varies in different patient care settings, but their appearance mostly depends on the patient's health condition, catheter insertion time, localization of the catheter and type of the used catheter. Since they are one of the leading causes of nosocomial infections and related to significant number of morbidity and mortality in intensive care units, it is very important that maximal aseptic precautions are taken during the insertion and the maintenance period. Prevention of infection of the central venous catheters demands several measures that should be applied routinely.

  9. Increased rheumatoid factor and deep venous thrombosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer-Olesen, Christine L; Nielsen, Sune F; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2015-01-01

    in the general population. METHODS: We included 54628 participants from the Copenhagen City Heart Study (1981-83) and the Copenhagen General Population Study (2004-12), all with a measured concentration of IgM rheumatoid factor and without autoimmune rheumatic disease or venous thromboembolism. The main outcome...... was incident deep venous thrombosis. There were no losses to follow-up. RESULTS: During 368381 person-years, 670 individuals developed deep venous thrombosis. A rheumatoid factor concentration ≥ vs ... ratios of 9.0 (95% CI 3.1-26) for 1-year follow-up, 4.3 (2.2-8.5) for 5-year follow-up, and 3.1 (1.7-5.6) for up to 32 years of follow-up. Compared with rheumatoid factor concentrations

  10. Complex central venous catheter insertion for hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Steven; Belfield, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Despite the introduction of payment by results in the UK, there has been no decrease in central venous catheter (CVC) use. In part, this may relate to a requirement to dialyse through a CVC while autogenous access matures. Mortality data have improved in parallel and patients on hemodialysis live longer, which may lead to an increased exposure to CVCs.Exposure to CVCs carries a significant risk of infection and occlusion requiring their repositioning or exchange. The mid to long-term sequelae of CVC use is central venous occlusion leaving clinical teams with an ever increasing challenge to find adequate venous access.In this article, we will discuss the challenges faced by operators inserting CVCs into the hemodialysis-dependent patient who has exhausted more tradition insertion sites. These include translumbar caval catheters, transocclusion and transcollateral catheters, transjugular Inferior Vena Cava catheter positioning, and transhepatic catheters. We will demonstrate the techniques employed, complications, and anticipated longevity of function.

  11. Can venous base excess replace arterial base excess as a marker of early shock and a predictor of survival in trauma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijaya, Ramesh; Ng, Jia Hui; Ong, Lester; Wong, Andrew Siang Yih

    2016-02-01

    Arterial base excess is an established marker of shock and predictor of survival in trauma patients. However, venous blood is more quickly and easily obtained. This study aimed to determine if venous base excess could replace arterial base excess as a marker in trauma patients at presentation and if venous base excess is predictive of survival at 24 hours and one week. This was a prospective study of 394 trauma patients presenting to the emergency department of a tertiary hospital over a 17-month period. Data on base excess at presentation, vital signs, shock index (SI), injury severity score (ISS), and mortality at 24 hours and one week was collected and analysed. Arterial and venous blood gas tests were performed on 260 and 134 patients, respectively. Patients were stratified into groups based on their SI and ISS for analysis. There was no statistical difference between mean venous blood gas and arterial blood gas levels at presentation when SI > 0.7, regardless of ISS (p > 0.05). The mortality rate was 4.57%. Both venous and arterial base excess was lower in nonsurvivors compared to survivors (p arterial base excess (11.53 vs. 4.28 and 11.41 vs. 2.66, respectively). In conclusion, venous base excess can replace arterial base excess in trauma patients as a means of identifying and prognosticating early shock. Copyright © Singapore Medical Association.

  12. News in Pathogenesis of Chronic Venous Insufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazuchova J

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This review article is concentrating on the news in the pathophysiology of chronic venous insufficiency (CVD. Despite ongoing progress in understanding the molecular aspects of CVD the exact mechanism of its development remains unclear. Many different factors may play role in the pathogenesis of CVD, including changes in hydrostatic pressure, valvular incompetence, increased capillary permeability, endothelial dysfunction, activation of leukocytes, deep venous obstruction, capillary microthrombosis, ineffective function of calf muscle pump, biochemical and structural changes in the vessel wall, extracellular matrix alteration, and several other mechanisms. A better understanding of the pathophysiology is an important step in the finding of new potential treatment.

  13. Lay Stress on Study of Venous Thromboembolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘泽霖

    2002-01-01

    @@ Venous thromboembolism (VTE) including deep vein thrombosis(DVT) and pulmonary embolism(PE).Its occurs in about 1 per 1 000 individuals per years.Thrombosis is a serious disorder. It may be fatal by PE (case fatality rate of venous thrombosis is estimated at 1% to 2%)(Figure 1 ). A substantial proportion of these deaths occur in the postoperative period, and many events are fatal before diagnosis can be made and therapy initiated. Just as well, the prophylactic treatment of thrombosis is focused on preventing first events and recurrences through adequate knowledge about risks and risk factors.

  14. Venous thrombosis: the history of knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannucci, P M

    2002-01-01

    Venous thrombosis is a frequent disease. It is surprising, therefore, that no case truly compatible with a diagnosis of venous thrombosis was apparently reported in the antiquity. There is no case that could be reasonably attributed to a venous thrombus in the writings of Hippocrates, Galenus, Celius Aurelianus, Ibn an-Nafiz, Avicenna and others. Venous thrombosis is not among the many diseases mentioned in the Bible. The term "leucophlegmasia", first used by Hippocrates and then by Celius Aurelianus, refers to cases of bilateral leg edema, most likely due to conditions such as heart failure, liver cirrhosis and renal insufficiency. Nothing compatible with a diagnosis of venous thrombosis can be found in pieces of art from ancient Egypt, Greece, Rome, Persia and South America. While in these sources there are sometimes representations of varicose veins and ulcers, unilateral leg edema or other pictures compatible with venous thrombosis are not featured. The first well documented case of venous thrombosis is depicted in a beautifully illustrated manuscript written in the 13th century and currently preserved in Paris at the Bibliothèque Nationale (MS Fr 2829, Folio 87). The manuscript describes the case of a young man from Normandy named Raoul who at the age of twenty developed unilateral edema in the right ankle that subsequently extended up to the thigh, with no obvious symptoms in the contralateral leg. Raoul was advised to visit the tomb of Saint Louis who was buried in the church of Saint Denis, where the patient spent several days confessing his sins and praying the saint. Afterwards he chose to collect the dust accumulating below the stone that covered the tomb and to apply it on the fistulae and ulcers of his foot. The openings stopped running and were filled with flesh. He was first obliged to use crutches but subsequently he could walk with a cane, to be eventually able to dispose of all devices, even though his foot throbbed a little. Raoul was cured as

  15. Assessment of Venous Thrombosis in Animal Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Steven P; Evans, Colin E; Patel, Ashish S; Modarai, Bijan; Saha, Prakash; Smith, Alberto

    2016-02-01

    Deep vein thrombosis and common complications, including pulmonary embolism and post-thrombotic syndrome, represent a major source of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Experimental models of venous thrombosis have provided considerable insight into the cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate thrombus formation and subsequent resolution. Here, we critically appraise the ex vivo and in vivo techniques used to assess venous thrombosis in these models. Particular attention is paid to imaging modalities, including magnetic resonance imaging, micro-computed tomography, and high-frequency ultrasound that facilitate longitudinal assessment of thrombus size and composition.

  16. Imaging characteristics of two patients with isolated cortical venous thrombosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shunchang Han; Hui Zhang; Guoguang Fan; Baohai Sun

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Over the past twenty years, improvements in neuroimaging have greatly improved the ability to diagnose cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, as well as isolated cortical venous thrombosis. Neuroimaging allows for variations to be detected in the cortical vein and venous sinus. Diagnosis of thromboses in the venous system should not depend entirely on angiography of undeveloped veins or venous sinus. Currently, the combination of magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance venography is the gold standard for diagnosing cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, rather than digital subtraction angiography. This article summarizes clinical manifestations, results from computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in two cases of isolated cortical venous thrombosis, analyzed relevant literature, and discussed the clinical and imaging characteristics of isolated cortical venous thromboses.

  17. Complement C3 and High Risk of Venous Thromboembolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Ina; Nielsen, Sune Fallgaard; Nordestgaard, Børge Grønne

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Complement activation may contribute to venous thromboembolism, including deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. We tested the hypothesis that high complement C3 concentrations are associated with high risk of venous thromboembolism in the general population. METHODS: We...... similar for deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism separately. The multivariable-adjusted hazard ratio for venous thromboembolism for a 1-g/L increase in complement C3 was 2.43 (1.74-3.40). CONCLUSIONS: High concentrations of complement C3 were associated with high risk of venous thromboembolism...... included 80 517 individuals without venous thromboembolism from the Copenhagen General Population Study recruited in 2003-2012. Plasma complement C3 concentrations were measured at baseline, and venous thromboembolism (n = 1176) was ascertained through April 2013 in nationwide registries. No individuals...

  18. Effect of Pingyangmycin on human venous malformation endothelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Fang Zhao; Zhi Jun Sun; Yu Lin Jia; Jun Jia; Ya Meng Si; Ji Hong Zhao; Wen Feng Zhang

    2008-01-01

    @@ Purpose: Venous malformations are common vascular anomalies with a propensity of the head and neck. Intralesional injection of Pingyangmycin (PYM, bleomycin A5 hydrochloride) is a widely used sclerotherapy method for the treatment of venous malformation.

  19. [Lower limb venous angiodysplasia as a cause of chronic venous insufficiency: specific diagnosis and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, V N; Sapelkin, S V; Karmazanovskiĭ, G G; Kuntsevich, G I

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents a current understanding of chronic venous insufficiency that develops in venous forms of dysplasia. Management of venous dysplasia must be based on multidisciplinary approach including comprehensive diagnosis (predominantly noninvasive), integrative surgical and non-surgical treatment. Modern therapy must be complex and carried out in highly specialized facilities. Best functional and esthetic results can be achieved only through combined therapy. When surgical or non-surgical interventions are inappropriate or impossible, management focus must be placed on clinical control of vascular anomaly (follow-up and compression-based conservative treatment) aimed at minimization of its unfavorable impact on vital functions and at quality of life improvement.

  20. Risk factors for a first and recurrent venous thrombosis

    OpenAIRE

    Flinterman, Linda Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to identify new risk factors for first and recurrent venous thrombosis of both the upper and lower extremity, and assess the incidence of recurrence and mortality after a first venous thrombosis. An overview was provided of the current literature on risk factors and treatment for a first venous thrombosis of the upper extremity (chapter 2). We investigated the association between levels of coagulation factors, blood group and a first venous thrombosis of the upper e...

  1. Physical activity, immobilization and the risk of venous thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stralen, Karlijn Janneke van

    2008-01-01

    Deep venous thrombosis is a common disease. Already in 1856 it was suggested that immobilization could cause venous thrombosis. However, so far little research has shown whether exercise or ambulation could decrease the risk of venous thrombosis. We performed a historical review regarding the role o

  2. The recalcitrant venous leg ulcer - A never ending story?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.W.I. Reeder (Suzan); M.B. Maessen-Visch (Birgitte); S.I. Langendoen; K.P. de Roos; H.A.M. Neumann (Martino)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: In general, four particular causes of recalcitrant venous leg ulcers may be distinguished. These are foot pump insufficiency, chronic venous compartment syndrome and non-re-canalized popliteal vein thrombosis. The fourth cause of recalcitrant venous leg ulcers is lipodermat

  3. Clinical application of hepatic venous occlusion for hepatectomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Ze-ya; YANG Yuan; ZHOU Wei-ping; LI Ai-jun; FU Si-yuan; WU Meng-chao

    2008-01-01

    Background Most liver resections require clamping of the hepatic pedicle (Pringle maneuver) to avoid excessive blood loss. But Pringle maneuver can not control backflow bleeding of hepatic vein, Resection of liver tumors involving hepatic veins may cause massive hemorrhage or air embolism from the injuries of the hepatic veins. Although total hepatic vascular exclusion can prevent bleeding of the hepatic veins effectively, it also may result in systemic hemodynamic disturbance because of the inferior vena cava being clamped. Hepatic venous occlusion, a new technique, can control the inflow and outflow of the liver without clamping the vena cava.Methods A total of 71 cases of liver tumors underwent resection with occlusion of more than one of the main hepatic veins. All tumors involved the second porta hepatis and at least one main hepatic vein. Ligation or occlusion with serrefines, tourniquets and auricular clamps were used in hepatic venous occlusion.Results Of the 71 patients, ligation of the hepatic veins was used in 28 cases, occlusion with a tourniquet in 26, and occlusion with a serrefine in 17. Right hepatic veins were occluded in 38 cases, both right and middle hepatic veins in 2,the common trunk of the left and middle hepatic veins in 24, branches of the left and middle hepatic veins in 2, and all three hepatic veins in 5. Thirty-five cases underwent hemihepatic vascular occlusion, 4 alternate hemihepatic vascular occlusion, 23 portal triad clamping plus selective hepatic vein occlusion, and 9 portal triad clamping plus total hepatic vein occlusion. The third porta hepatis was isolated in 26 cases. The amount of intraoperative blood loss averaged (540±283) (range 100 to 1000) ml in the group of total hemihepatic vascular occlusion and in the group of alternate hemihepatic vascular occlusion, (620±317) (range 200-6000) ml in the group of portal triad clamping plus selective or total hepatic vein occlusion. All tumors were completely removed

  4. Microalbuminuria and Risk of Venous Thromboembolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahmoodi, Bakhtawar K.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Veeger, Nic J. G. M.; Matthews, Abigail G.; Navis, Gerjan; Hillege, Hans L.; van der Meer, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Context Microalbuminuria (albuminuria 30-300 mg per 24-hour urine collection) is a well-known risk marker for arterial thromboembolism. It is assumed that microalbuminuria reflects generalized endothelial dysfunction. Hence, microalbuminuria may also predispose for venous thromboembolism (VTE). Obje

  5. Treatment of Cancer-Associated Venous Thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.L. van Sluis; H.R. Buller

    2009-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is an important complication in cancer patients, which is associated with bad outcome. Increased recurrence rates and bleeding complications as compared to non-cancer patients during the treatment of VTE, require special attention. This review aims to summarize the avail

  6. Arterial and venous blood gas analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieser, Teresa M

    2013-08-01

    Arterial and venous blood gases provide useful information regarding pulmonary function as well as acid-base balance. The goal of this article is to discuss the collection of blood gases, common errors in analysis, and what information can be gleaned from a blood gas analysis. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Arterial and Venous Thrombosis in Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew D. Blann

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The most frequent ultimate cause of death is myocardial arrest. In many cases this is due to myocardial hypoxia, generally arising from failure of the coronary macro- and microcirculation to deliver enough oxygenated red cells to the cardiomyocytes. The principle reason for this is occlusive thrombosis, either by isolated circulating thrombi, or by rupture of upstream plaque. However, an additionally serious pathology causing potentially fatal stress to the heart is extra-cardiac disease, such as pulmonary hypertension. A primary cause of the latter is pulmonary embolus, considered to be a venous thromboembolism. Whilst the thrombotic scenario has for decades been the dominating paradigm in cardiovascular disease, these issues have, until recently, been infrequently considered in cancer. However, there is now a developing view that cancer is also a thrombotic disease, and notably a disease predominantly of the venous circulation, manifesting as deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. Indeed, for many, a venous thromboembolism is one of the first symptoms of a developing cancer. Furthermore, many of the standard chemotherapies in cancer are prothrombotic. Accordingly, thromboprophylaxis in cancer with heparins or oral anticoagulation (such as Warfarin, especially in high risk groups (such as those who are immobile and on high dose chemotherapy, may be an important therapy. The objective of this communication is to summarise current views on the epidemiology and pathophysiology of arterial and venous thrombosis in cancer.

  8. Lymphatic and venous function in lipoedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwood, C A; Bull, R H; Evans, J; Mortimer, P S

    1996-01-01

    Lipoedema is a common but infrequently recognized condition causing bilateral enlargement of the legs in women. Although generally considered to be the result of an abnormal deposition of subcutaneous fat with associated oedema, the precise mechanisms responsible for oedema formation have yet to be fully established. In order to evaluate the possible role of lymphatic or venous dysfunction in the pathogenesis of lipoedema, 10 patients were investigated by photoplethysmography (venous function) and quantitative lymphoscintigraphy (lymphatic function). The results were compared with those from patients with primary lymphoedema and those from healthy volunteers. The results demonstrated minor abnormalities of venous function in only two patients. One patient had moderately impaired lymphatic function in both legs and seven patients had a marginal degree of impairment in one or both legs. However, in none of these cases did the impairment attain the low levels seen in true lymphoedema. Lipoedema appears to be a distinct clinical entity best classified as a lipodystrophy rather than a direct consequence of any primary venous or lymphatic insufficiency.

  9. Diagnosing deep venous thrombosis in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudega, Rudolphus

    2005-01-01

    In patients suspected of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in primary care, it is a challenge to discriminate the patients with DVT from those without DVT. The risk of missing the diagnosis and the risk of unnecessary referral and treatment with a potential harmful therapy has to be balanced by the prima

  10. Venous infraction of developmental venous anomaly: A case report with perfusion imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Youn; Kim, Hye Jeong; Hyun, Su Jeong; Kim, Hee Yeong; Kim, Han Myun; Hwang, Ji Young; Hong, Hye Suk; Woo, Ji Young; Yang, Ik [Dept. of Radiology, Kangnam Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eun Soo [Dept. of Radiology, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    Developmental venous anomaly (DVA) is a common congenital venous malformation characterized by dilated medullary veins in caput medusa configuration and a draining vein. Despite the high incidence of DVAs, they are benign anatomic variations and rarely cause symptoms. Here, we report computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings with perfusion images of acute infarction from underlying DVA in a 63-year-old female patient who presented with acute onset of neurologic symptoms and recovered without any neurologic deficit.

  11. Pycnogenol® in chronic venous insufficiency and related venous disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulati, Om P

    2014-03-01

    The present review provides an update of the biological profile of Pycnogenol in the light of its use in the treatment of chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) and related venous disorders such as deep vein thrombosis (DVT), post-thrombotic syndrome, long haul air-travel-related leg oedema, venous ulcers and acute haemorrhoids. Pycnogenol is a French maritime pine bark extract produced from the outer bark of Pinus pinaster Ait. subsp. atlantica. Its strong antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and vasodilator activities, antithrombotic effects and collagen stabilizing properties make it uniquely able to target the multi facet pathophysiology of CVI and related venous disorders. Clinical studies have shown that it can reduce oedema of the legs in CVI, reduce the incidence of deep venous thrombosis during long haul flights and enhance the healing of venous ulcers and haemorrhoidal episodes by topical application and/or oral administration. This review highlights clinical research findings on the safety, compliance and efficacy of Pycnogenol, including its use in combination products.

  12. Cerebral venous thrombosis presenting with cerebellar ataxia and cortical blindness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Sassi, Samia; Mizouni, Habiba; Nabli, Fatma; Kallel, Lamia; Kefi, Mounir; Hentati, Fayçal

    2010-01-01

    Venous infarction in the cerebellum has been reported only rarely, probably because of the abundant venous collateral drainage in this region. Bilateral occipital infarction is a rare cause of visual loss in cerebral venous thrombosis. We describe a 50-year-old woman with a history of ulcerative colitis who developed acute cerebellar ataxia and cortical blindness. She had bilateral cerebellar and occipital lesions related to sigmoid venous thrombosis and achieved complete recovery with anticoagulation therapy. Cerebral venous thrombosis should be considered in cases of simultaneous cerebellar and occipital vascular lesions.

  13. Eye Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    The structure of your face helps protect your eyes from injury. Still, injuries can damage your eye, sometimes severely enough that you could lose your vision. Most eye injuries are preventable. If you play sports or ...

  14. Sports Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sometimes you can injure yourself when you play sports or exercise. Accidents, poor training practices, or improper ... can also lead to injuries. The most common sports injuries are Sprains and strains Knee injuries Swollen ...

  15. Analysis of peripheral vascular injuries: A social catastrophe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Süleyman Yazıcı

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective:In the current study, peripheral vascular injuries caused from weapons and the associated clinical outcomes were retrospectively investigated. Methods:Two hundred patients who received a surgical procedure for a vascular injury between January 2009 and December 2011 were included in the study. The patients were evaluated retrospectively; type of injury, localization, characteristics, and type of surgical application were classified. Results: Weapon-related penetrating injuries were classified as gunshot injuries (n=55, 28%, stab wounds (n =143, 71%, and mine injuries (n= 2, 1%. There were 77 interposition applications (71 arterial and 6 venous with saphene vein grafts, 16 arterial interposition applications with polytetrafluoroethylene grafts, and 11 venous ligations. A total of 170 direct repairs (134 arterial and 36 venous were performed. Postoperative amputation was required in none of the cases, advanced intensive care unit follow-up was required for four patients (2%; two cases were referred with hypovolemic shock and two case were referred with asystole, and a postoperative follow-up period for any mortality was not observed. Conclusion:Some regions contain higher levels of warinjuries. Therefore, these regions require specialized intervention centres. A large amount of these injuries arevascular, and surgery and rapid interventions are essential for reducing mortality and morbidity rates. Successful results can be obtained in these cases through the collaboration of various medical disciplines.

  16. Normal venous anatomy and physiology of the lower extremity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notowitz, L B

    1993-06-01

    Venous disease of the lower extremities is common but is often misunderstood. It seems that the focus is on the exciting world of arterial anatomy and pathology, while the topic of venous anatomy and pathology comes in second place. However, venous diseases such as chronic venous insufficiency, leg ulcers, and varicose veins affect much of the population and may lead to disability and death. Nurses are often required to answer complex questions from the patients and his or her family about the patient's disease. Patients depend on nurses to provide accurate information in terms they can understand. Therefore it is important to have an understanding of the normal venous system of the legs before one can understand the complexities of venous diseases and treatments. This presents an overview of normal venous anatomy and physiology.

  17. Advances in diagnosis and treatment of cerebral venous system diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-yun LIU

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral venous system diseases include cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT, venous sinus stenosis, carotid cavernous fistula (CCF, intracranial arteriovenous malformation (AVM and so on. In recent years, due to the rapid development of neuroimaging and interventional technology, more and more cerebral venous system diseases have been timely diagnosed and treated, such as magnetic resonance black-blood thrombus imaging (MRBTI in the diagnosis of CVT, stenting in the treatment of venous sinus stenosis, micro coil plus Onyx glue or covered stents in the treatment of CCF, which allow us to make a deeper recognition of cerebral venous system diseases. Therefore, this paper will introduce the latest diagnosis and treatment of cerebral venous system diseases. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2016.11.006

  18. Injury Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Certification Import Safety International Recall Guidance Civil and Criminal Penalties Federal Court Orders & Decisions Research & Statistics Research & Statistics Technical Reports Injury Statistics NEISS Injury ...

  19. [Medial venous catheter or midline (MVC)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrero Caballero, Ma Carmen; Montealegre Sanz, María; Cubero Pérez, Ma Antonia

    2014-01-01

    Current clinical practice is characterised for importance of the patient's quality of life and the need to reduce the costs of their treatment. We search intravenous therapy alternatives that meet the needs of the patient, reducing the complications associated with the use of venous catheters. Scientific evidence shows that there are midline venous catheters that offer patients and professionals the possibility of extending the duration of infusion therapy, using more venous compatibility materials, and with less risk of infection. The Midlines are becoming in a safe an efficient device for intravenous therapy, continuous and intermittent infusion, provided the necessary care by expert nurses. Midline catheters are peripheral venous access devices between 3 to 10 inches in length (8 to 25 cm). Midlines are usually placed in an upper arm vein, such as the brachial or cephalic, and the distal extreme ends below the level of the axillary line. Midlines catheters implanted in the cephalic or deep basilica veins get more blood flow. This large blood volume justifies the lower risk of mechanical or chemical phlebitis. Midlines are routinely used for two to six weeks. Due that the extrem of these catheters does not extend beyond the axillary line, there are limitations for its use: type of infused drugs, velocity of infusion, etc. In general, solutions that have pH 5 to 9, or an osmolarity less than 500 mOsm are appropriate for infusion through a Midline. Its use is recommended in case of treatments over 7 days with low irritant capacity fluids. According to the Infusion Nurses Society's standards of practice, Midline catheters are appropriate for all intravenous fluids that would normally be administered through a short peripheral IV Importantly, due that the catheter does not pass through the central veins, Midlines can be placed without a chest X-ray to confirm placement. For certain situations, Midlines are suitable for acute units and even for care home settings

  20. Brain Oxygen Monitoring via Jugular Venous Oxygen Saturation in a Patient with Fulminant Hepatic Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yerim Kim

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Fulminant hepatic failure (FHF is often accompanied by a myriad of neurologic complications, which are associated with high morbidity and mortality. Although appropriate neuromonitoring is recommended for early diagnosis and to minimize secondary brain injury, individuals with FHF usually have a high chance of coagulopathy, which limits the ability to use invasive neuromonitoring. Jugular bulb venous oxygen saturation (JvO2 monitoring is well known as a surrogate direct measures of global brain oxygen use. We report the case of a patient with increased intracranial pressure due to FHF, in which JvO2 was used for appropriate brain oxygen monitoring.

  1. Computed Tomograpy Venography diagnosis of iliocaval venous obstruction in advanced chronic venous insufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Henrique Rossi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective:Iliocaval obstruction is associated with venous hypertension symptoms and may predispose to deep venous thrombosis (DVT. Ultrasonography may fail to achieve noninvasive diagnosis of these obstructions. The possibility of using Computed Tomography Venography (CTV for these diagnoses is under investigation.Methods:Patients with CVI graded at CEAP clinical classes 3 to 6 and previous treatment failure underwent evaluation with CTV. Percentage obstruction was rated by two independent examiners. Obstruction prevalence and its associations with risk factors and CEAP classification were analyzed.Results:A total of 112 limbs were prospectively evaluated. Mean patient age was 55.8 years and 75.4% were women. Obstructions involved the left lower limb in 71.8% of cases and 35.8% of patients reported a medical history of deep venous thrombosis. Overall, 57.1% of imaging studies demonstrated venous obstruction of at least 50% and 10.7% showed obstruction of >80%. The only risk factor that was found to be independently associated with a significantly higher incidence of >50% venous obstruction was a medical history of DVT (p=0.035 (Fisher's exact test. There was a positive relationship between clinical classification (CEAP and degree of venous obstruction in the limbs studied (Chi-square test for linear trend; p=0.011.Conclusion:Patients with advanced CVI are often affected by obstructions in the iliocaval venous territory and CTV is able to diagnose the degree of obstruction. There is a positive association between degree of obstruction and both previous history of DVT and severity of symptoms of CVI.

  2. Risk factors for venous thrombosis associated with peripherally inserted central venous catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Longfang; Zhao, Qianru; Yang, Xiangmei

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the risk factors associated with an increased risk of symptomatic peripherally inserted central venous catheter (PICC)-related venous thrombosis. Retrospective analyses identified 2313 patients who received PICCs from 1 January 2012 to 31 December 2013. All 11 patients with symptomatic PICC-related venous thrombosis (thrombosis group) and 148 who did not have thromboses (non-thrombosis group) were selected randomly. The medical information of 159 patients (age, body mass index (BMI), diagnosis, smoking history, nutritional risk score, platelet count, leucocyte count as well as levels of D-dimer, fibrinogen, and degradation products of fibrin) were collected. Logistic regression analysis was undertaken to determine the risk factors for thrombosis. Of 2313 patients, 11 (0.47%) were found to have symptomatic PICC-related venous thrombosis by color Doppler ultrasound. Being bedridden for a long time (odds ratio [(OR]), 17.774; P=0.0017), D-dimer >5 mg/L (36.651; 0.0025) and suffering from one comorbidity (8.39; 0.0265) or more comorbidities (13.705; 0.0083) were the major risk factors for PICC-catheter related venous thrombosis by stepwise logistic regression analysis. Among 159 patients, the prevalence of PICC-associated venous thrombosis in those with ≥1 risk factor was 10.34% (12/116), in those with ≥2 risk factors was 20.41% (10/49), and in those with >3 risk factors was 26.67% (4/15). Being bedridden >72 h, having increased levels of D-dimer (>5 mg/L) and suffering from comorbidities were independent risk factors of PICC-related venous thrombosis.

  3. Central venous obstruction in the thorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin, G; Jones, R G; Willis, A P

    2015-06-01

    Central venous stenosis and occlusion can occur secondary to a spectrum of conditions ranging from aggressive malignancy to benign extrinsic anatomical compression in otherwise healthy individuals. Irrespective of aetiology, significant morbidity in the acute setting and long term can occur unless prompt accurate diagnosis and appropriate management is initiated, the radiologist being central to both. The present review will provide radiologists with a thorough illustration and explanation of the range of central venous conditions in the thorax (including deep vein thrombosis, thoracic outlet syndrome, haemodialysis, and malignancy related causes), the salient imaging findings and interventional management using case examples from the authors' practice. Copyright © 2015 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. [Venous thromboembolism in patients with cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecumberri, Ramón; Feliu, Jesús; Rocha, Eduardo

    2006-06-03

    The association between neoplastic diseases and venous thromboembolism (VTE) is known since long time ago. The nature of this association is bidirectional. On one hand, cancer increases the incidence of venous thrombosis and, on the other hand, the hemostatic system does play a key role in the tumorigenesis process. However, despite recent advances in the field, prophylaxis and treatment of VTE in cancer patients is still a challenge, due to the complexity of this type of patients. This review is focused on some important points regarding management of VTE in cancer patients such as physiopathology, epidemiology, search for hidden malignancy, prognostic impact, prophylaxis in the medical and surgical setting, or initial and long-term treatment.

  5. [Prevention of venous thromboembolism in musculoskeletal surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabinger-Fasching, Ingrid; Eichinger-Hasenauer, Sabine; Grohs, Josef; Hochreiter, Josef; Kastner, Norbert; Korninger, Hans Christian; Kozek-Langenecker, Sibylle; Marlovits, Stefan; Niessner, Herwig; Rachbauer, Franz; Ritschl, Peter; Wurnig, Christian; Windhager, Reinhard

    2014-05-01

    Musculoskeletal surgery is associated with a high risk of venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. The introduction of direct oral anticoagulants (DOAK) has broadened the possibilities for prevention of venous thromboembolism in the course of orthopedic and trauma surgery. Addressing this recent development, the Austrian Societies of Orthopedics and Orthopedic Surgery (ÖGO), Trauma Surgery (ÖGU), Hematology and Oncology (OeGHO) and of Anaesthesiology, Reanimation und Intensive Care Medicine (ÖGARI) have taken the initiative to create Austrian guidelines for the prevention of thromboembolism after total hip and knee replacement, hip fracture surgery, interventions at the spine and cases of minor orthopedic and traumatic surgery. Furthermore, the pharmacology of the DOAK and the pivotal trial data for each of the three currently available substances - apixaban, dabigatran, and rivaroxaban - are briefly presented. Separate chapters are dedicated to "anticoagulation and neuroaxial anesthesia" and "bridging".

  6. External jugular venous aneurysm: A clinical curiosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Debajyoti; Jain, Bhupendra Kumar; Garg, Pankaj Kumar; Tandon, Anupama

    2013-01-01

    Jugular venous aneurysm is an extremely rare condition. The patients presented with a painless swelling in the neck that appears while coughing, straining, bending, or breath holding. Detection of a soft and compressible swelling in the course of an external jugular vein (EJV) superficial to the sternomastoid muscle, non-filling on compression of the EJV during Valsalva maneuver clinches the diagnosis of EJV aneurysm. Color Doppler ultrasound allows precise delineation of the lesion and is considered the gold standard for confirming the diagnosis. Surgical excision is indicated mostly for cosmetic reasons and symptomatic aneurysms. We, herein, report a patient with saccular external jugular venous aneurysm to highlight the typical clinical presentation and diagnosis of this rare entity. PMID:23633867

  7. Venous Thromboembolism in Patients With Thrombocytopenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baelum, Jens Kristian; Moe, Espen Ellingsen; Nybo, Mads

    2017-01-01

    . OBJECTIVES: To identify VTE risk factors and describe treatment and outcome (bleeding episodes and mortality) in patients with thrombocytopenia. PATIENTS/METHODS: Patients with thrombocytopenia (platelet count ... with anticoagulants. There was no difference in bleeding incidence between cases and controls. CONCLUSIONS: Several known VTE risk factors also seems to apply in patients with thrombocytopenia. Also, patients with thrombocytopenia may be VTE risk stratified based on platelet count and comorbidities. Finally, patients......BACKGROUND: Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a frequent and potentially lethal condition. Venous thrombi are mainly constituted of fibrin and red blood cells, but platelets also play an important role in VTE formation. Information about VTE in patients with thrombocytopenia is, however, missing...

  8. Deep venous thrombosis of the upper extremity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klitfod, Lotte; Broholm, R; Baekgaard, N

    2013-01-01

    to the condition. Malignancy and therapeutic interventions are major risk factors for the secondary deep vein thrombosis in combination with the patient's characteristics, comorbidities and prior history of deep vein thrombosis. Complications: recurrent deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism and Post......Upper extremity deep venous thrombosis (UEDVT) occurs either spontaneously, as a consequence of strenuous upper limb activity (also known as the Paget-Schroetter syndrome) or secondary to an underlying cause. Primary and secondary UEDVT differs in long-term sequelae and mortality. This review...... will focus on the clinical presentation, risk factors, diagnosis, and treatment strategies of UEDVT. In the period from January to October 2012 an electronic literature search was performed in the PubMed/MEDLINE database, and 27 publications were included. Clinical presentation: swelling, pain and functional...

  9. Congenital pseudoarthrosis associated with venous malformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Hadidy, A.; Haroun, A.; Al-Ryalat, N. [Jordan University Hospital, Radiology Department, P.O. Box 340621, Amman (Jordan); Hamamy, H. [Endocrinology and Genetics, National Center for Diabetes, Amman (Jordan); Al-Hadidi, S. [Jordan University Hospital, Departments of Orthopedics, Amman (Jordan)

    2007-06-15

    Congenital pseudoarthrosis is a pathologic entity that may be isolated, or may be associated with neurofibromatosis. We report the case of a 3-year-old female with congenital pseudoarthrosis involving the right tibia and fibula. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and complementary magnetic resonance angiogram (MRA) revealed a lobulated mass with vivid enhancement, which led to the diagnosis of venous malformation. This is the first report of congenital pseudoarthrosis caused by the presence of a vascular malformation. (orig.)

  10. Epidemiology and Risk Factors for Venous Thrombosis

    OpenAIRE

    Cushman, Mary

    2007-01-01

    Venous thrombosis, including deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, occurs at an annual incidence of about 1 per 1000 adults. Rates increase sharply after around age 45 years, and are slightly higher in men than women in older age. Major risk factors for thrombosis, other than age, include exogenous factors such as surgery, hospitalization, immobility, trauma, pregnancy and the puerperium and hormone use, and endogenous factors such as cancer, obesity, and inherited and acquired disorde...

  11. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis with autoimmune thyroiditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer Aggarwal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral Venous Thrombosis ( CVT is a multifactorial condition which is described as idiopathic in 12.5% of patients. Hyperthyroidism has been associated with CVT in many case reports, and increased levels of factor VIII and von Willebrand factor (vWF have been proposed as the possible link in this association, but only few rare case reports have described an association of hypothyroidism with CVT. We report here a case of autoimmune thyroiditis presenting with CVT.

  12. Venous malformations: clinical diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behravesh, Sasan; Yakes, Wayne; Gupta, Nikhil; Naidu, Sailendra; Chong, Brian W; Khademhosseini, Ali; Oklu, Rahmi

    2016-12-01

    Venous malformation (VM) is the most common type of congenital vascular malformation (CVM). They are present at birth and are often symptomatic, causing morbidity and pain. VMs can be challenging to diagnose and are often confused with hemangioma in terminology as well as with imaging. An accurate clinical history and cross-sectional imaging are critical for diagnosis and for devising management. This manuscript will review imaging approaches to diagnosing VMs and current treatment strategies.

  13. The controversy on chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Zamboni

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this review is to analyze the actual scientific controversy on chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI and its association with both neurodegenerative disorders and multiple sclerosis (MS. We revised all published studies on prevalence of CCSVI in MS patients, including ultrasound and catheter venography series. Furthermore, we take into consideration other publications dealing with the pathophysiologic consequences of CCSVI in the brain, as well as ecent data characterizing the pathology of the venous wall in course of CCSVI. Finally, safety and pilot data on effectiveness of endovascular CCSVI treatment were further updated. Studies of prevalence show a big variability in prevalence of CCSVI in MS patients assessed by established ultrasonographic criteria. This could be related to high operator dependency of ultrasound. However, 12 studies, by the means of more objective catheter venography, show a prevalence >90% of CCSVI in MS. Global hypo-hypoperfusion of the brain, and reduced cerebral spinal fluid dynamics in MS was shown to be related to CCSVI. Postmortem studies and histology corroborate the 2009 International Union of Phlebology (UIP Consensus decision to insert CCSVI among venous malformations. Finally, safety of balloon angioplasty of the extracranial veins was certainly demonstrated, while prospective data on the potential effectiveness of endovascular treatment of CCSVI support to increase the level of evidence by proceeding with a randomized control trial (RCT. Taking into account the current epidemiological data, including studies on catheter venography, the autoptic findings, and the relationship between CCSVI and both hypo-perfusion and cerebro-spinal fluid flow, we conclude that CCSVI can be definitively inserted among the medical entities. Research is still inconclusive in elucidating the CCSVI role in the pathogenesis of neurological disorders. The controversy between the vascular and the

  14. What's new: Management of venous leg ulcers: Approach to venous leg ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, Afsaneh; Sibbald, R Gary; Phillips, Tania J; Miller, O Fred; Margolis, David J; Marston, William; Woo, Kevin; Romanelli, Marco; Kirsner, Robert S

    2016-04-01

    Leg ulcerations are a common problem, with an estimated prevalence of 1% to 2% in the adult population. Venous leg ulcers are primarily treated in outpatient settings and often are managed by dermatologists. Recent advances in the diagnosis and treatment of leg ulcers combined with available evidence-based data will provide an update on this topic. A systematized approach and the judicious use of expensive advanced therapeutics are critical. Specialized arterial and venous studies are most commonly noninvasive. The ankle brachial pressure index can be performed with a handheld Doppler unit at the bedside by most clinicians. The vascular laboratory results and duplex Doppler findings are used to identify segmental defects and potential operative candidates. Studies of the venous system can also predict a subset of patients who may benefit from surgery. Successful leg ulcer management requires an interdisciplinary team to make the correct diagnosis, assess the vascular supply, and identify other modifiable factors to optimize healing. The aim of this continuing medical education article is to provide an update on the management of venous leg ulcers. Part I is focused on the approach to venous ulcer diagnostic testing.

  15. Multiple venous thrombosis complicating central venous cannulation in a non cancer patient - a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Ce; Menkiti, Id; Desalu, I; Thomas, Mo

    2013-01-01

    Central venous catheterization is a common procedure for critically ill patients. Like all procedures, it has its complications, one of which is thrombosis. Reports of thrombosis are commoner among cancer patients. We present a 37 year old non cancer patient who developed thrombi in both right and left internal jugular veins, 10 and 13 days respectively after insertion of central venous catheter. This was detected by ultrasound scans of the neck while attempting re-cannulation for parenteral feeding. She also had left lower limb deep venous thrombosis, confirmed by doppler scan, which was managed with low molecular weight heparin and warfarin. The patient was subsequently treated with streptokinase. A repeat scan of the internal jugular veins 4 days after thrombolysis revealed a reduction in size of the thrombi. Symptoms of deep venous thrombosis improved and she was transferred to the wards where she made remarkable improvement. This case illustrates the potential usefulness of ultrasound guided-central line insertion in patients who have had central venous lines inserted previously in order to detect thrombi.

  16. Severe hypoxemia during veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation: exploring the limits of extracorporeal respiratory support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liane Brescovici Nunes

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Veno-venous extracorporeal oxygenation for respiratory support has emerged as a rescue alternative for patients with hypoxemia. However, in some patients with more severe lung injury, extracorporeal support fails to restore arterial oxygenation. Based on four clinical vignettes, the aims of this article were to describe the pathophysiology of this concerning problem and to discuss possibilities for hypoxemia resolution. METHODS: Considering the main reasons and rationale for hypoxemia during veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, some possible bedside solutions must be considered: 1 optimization of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation blood flow; 2 identification of recirculation and cannula repositioning if necessary; 3 optimization of residual lung function and consideration of blood transfusion; 4 diagnosis of oxygenator dysfunction and consideration of its replacement; and finally 5 optimization of the ratio of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation blood flow to cardiac output, based on the reduction of cardiac output. CONCLUSION: Therefore, based on the pathophysiology of hypoxemia during veno-venous extracorporeal oxygenation support, we propose a stepwise approach to help guide specific interventions.

  17. Venous access: options, approaches and issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asch, M.R. [Univ. of Toronto, Mount Sinai Hospital, Dept. of Medical Imaging, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2001-06-01

    Venous access is an essential part of medical practice. It is needed to obtain blood samples to make the diagnosis and to administer fluids or medicines as part of treatment. Although relatively new in the history of medicine, the placement and maintenance of the various venous access devices now occupies a significant portion of many vascular and interventional radiology practices. Thus, it is important to have a thorough understanding of these devices and their uses. The first long-term venous access devices were used in 1973. These were placed via a surgical cut-down on the subclavian vein. In 1982, the first subcutaneous implantable ports were described. These procedures were initially performed by surgeons, but over the last 5-10 years, both the insertion and management of these devices has shifted to interventional radiologists. Peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) lines have almost completely supplanted the use of standard central lines (Fig. 1). A number of factors have facilitated this - namely, ready and less expensive room access, outpatient procedure and radiologists' accessibility and familiarity with image-guidance procedures and catheters and guide wires. (author)

  18. Developmental venous anomaly in the newborn brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horsch, S. [Erasmus MC-Sophia Children' s Hospital, Department of Neonatology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Helios Klinikum Berlin-Buch, Department of Neonatology, Berlin (Germany); Govaert, P. [Erasmus MC-Sophia Children' s Hospital, Department of Neonatology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Cowan, F.M. [Hammersmith Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Benders, M.J.N.L.; Groenendaal, F.; Vries, L.S. de [University Medical Centre Utrecht, Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, Department of Neonatology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Lequin, M.H. [Erasmus MC/Sophia Children' s Hospital, Department of Paediatric Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Saliou, G. [University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Le Kremlin-Bicetre (France)

    2014-07-15

    Cerebral developmental venous anomaly (DVA) is considered a benign anatomical variant of parenchymal venous drainage; it is the most common vascular malformation seen in the adult brain. Despite its assumed congenital origin, little is known about DVA in the neonatal brain. We report here the first cohort study of 14 neonates with DVA. Fourteen infants (seven preterm) with DVA diagnosed neonatally using cranial ultrasound (cUS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) from three tertiary neonatal units over 14 years are reviewed. DVA was first detected on cUS in 6 and on MRI in 8 of the 14 infants. The cUS appearances of DVA showed a focal fairly uniform area of increased echogenicity, often (86 %) adjacent to the lateral ventricle and located in the frontal lobe (58 %). Blood flow in the dilated collector vein detected by Doppler ultrasound (US) varied between cases (venous flow pattern in ten and arterialized in four). The appearance on conventional MRI was similar to findings in adults. Serial imaging showed a fairly constant appearance to the DVAs in some cases while others varied considerably regarding anatomical extent and flow velocity. This case series underlines that a neonatal diagnosis of DVA is possible with carefully performed cUS and MRI and that DVA tends to be an incidental finding with a diverse spectrum of imaging appearances. Serial imaging suggests that some DVAs undergo dynamic changes during the neonatal period and early infancy; this may contribute to why diagnosis is rare at this age. (orig.)

  19. Transpulmonary passage of venous air emboli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, B. D.; Hills, B. A.

    1985-01-01

    Twenty-seven paralyzed anesthetized dogs were embolized with venous air to determine the effectiveness of the pulmonary vasculature for bubble filtration or trapping. Air doses ranged from 0.05 to 0.40 ml/kg min in 0.05-ml increments with ultrasonic Doppler monitors placed over arterial vessels to detect any microbubbles that crossed the lungs. Pulmonary vascular filtration of the venous air infusions was complete for the lower air doses ranging from 0.05 to 0.30 ml/kg min. When the air doses were increased to 0.35 ml/kg min, the filtration threshold was exceeded with arterial spillover of bubbles occurring in 50 percent of the animals and reaching 71 percent for 0.40 ml/kg min. Significant elevations were observed in pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance. Systemic blood pressure and cardiac output decreased, whereas left ventricular end-diastolic pressure remained unchanged. The results indicate that the filtration of venous bubbles by the pulmonary vasculature was complete when the air infusion rates were kept below a threshold value of 0.30 ml/kg min.

  20. Ethanol sclerotherapy of peripheral venous malformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rimon, U. E-mail: rimonu@sheba.health.gov.il; Garniek, A.; Galili, Y.; Golan, G.; Bensaid, P.; Morag, B

    2004-12-01

    Background: venous malformations are congenital lesions that can cause pain, decreased range of movement, compression on adjacent structures, bleeding, consumptive coagulopathy and cosmetic deformity. Sclerotherapy alone or combined with surgical excision is the accepted treatment in symptomatic malformations after failed treatment attempts with tailored compression garments. Objectives: to report our experience with percutaneous sclerotherapy of peripheral venous malformations with ethanol 96%. Patients and methods: 41 sclerotherapy sessions were performed on 21 patients, aged 4-46 years, 15 females and 6 males. Fourteen patients were treated for painful extremity lesions, while five others with face and neck lesions and two with giant chest malformations had treatment for esthetic reasons. All patients had a pre-procedure magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study. In all patients, 96% ethanol was used as the sclerosant by direct injection using general anesthesia. A minimum of 1-year clinical follow-up was performed. Follow-up imaging studies were performed if clinically indicated. Results: 17 patients showed complete or partial symptomatic improvement after one to nine therapeutic sessions. Four patients with lower extremity lesions continue to suffer from pain and they are considered as a treatment failure. Complications were encountered in five patients, including acute pulmonary hypertension with cardiovascular collapse, pulmonary embolus, skin ulcers (two) and skin blisters. All patients fully recovered. Conclusion: sclerotherapy with 96% ethanol for venous malformations was found to be effective for symptomatic improvement, but serious complications can occur.

  1. Nonoperative Management of Splenic Injury in Combat: 2002-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    MILITARY MEDICINE, 180, 3:29, 2015 Nonoperative Management of Splenic Injury in Combat: 2002–2012 CPT Thomas A. Mitchell, MC USA*; Timothy E. Wallum...n = 9), abdominal compartment syndrome (n = 6), intra-abdominal abscess (n = 3), and dehiscence/evisceration (n = 3). The incidence of deep venous

  2. Visceral injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisner, D H; Blaisdell, F W

    1992-06-01

    Abdominal visceral injuries are encountered by every surgeon who deals with trauma. It is simple and useful to divide abdominal visceral injuries into those caused by penetrating mechanisms of injury and those due to blunt mechanisms. Determination of the need for operative intervention is generally easier after penetrating trauma. Gunshot wounds to the abdomen should be explored, as should stab wounds to the anterior abdomen that penetrate the fascia. A midline incision is the standard approach to abdominal visceral injuries because of its ease and versatility. Abdominal exploration should be consistent and systemic so as not to miss significant injuries. Hollow viscus injury is most common after penetrating injury, while blunt injury most often results in injury to solid viscera. Diagnostic and operative aspects of the treatment of specific visceral injuries are reviewed.

  3. Venous hemodynamic changes in lower limb venous disease: the UIP consensus according to scientific evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byung B; Nicolaides, Andrew N; Myers, Kenneth; Meissner, Mark; Kalodiki, Evi; Allegra, Claudio; Antignani, Pier L; Bækgaard, Niels; Beach, Kirk; Belcaro, Giovanni; Black, Stephen; Blomgren, Lena; Bouskela, Eliete; Cappelli, Massimo; Caprini, Joseph; Carpentier, Patrick; Cavezzi, Attilio; Chastanet, Sylvain; Christenson, Jan T; Christopoulos, Demetris; Clarke, Heather; Davies, Alun; Demaeseneer, Marianne; Eklöf, Bo; Ermini, Stefano; Fernández, Fidel; Franceschi, Claude; Gasparis, Antonios; Geroulakos, George; Gianesini, Sergio; Giannoukas, Athanasios; Gloviczki, Peter; Huang, Ying; Ibegbuna, Veronica; Kakkos, Stavros K; Kistner, Robert; Kölbel, Tilo; Kurstjens, Ralph L; Labropoulos, Nicos; Laredo, James; Lattimer, Christopher R; Lugli, Marzia; Lurie, Fedor; Maleti, Oscar; Markovic, Jovan; Mendoza, Erika; Monedero, Javier L; Moneta, Gregory; Moore, Hayley; Morrison, Nick; Mosti, Giovanni; Nelzén, Olle; Obermayer, Alfred; Ogawa, Tomohiro; Parsi, Kurosh; Partsch, Hugo; Passariello, Fausto; Perrin, Michel L; Pittaluga, Paul; Raju, Seshadri; Ricci, Stefano; Rosales, Antonio; Scuderi, Angelo; Slagsvold, Carl E; Thurin, Anders; Urbanek, Tomasz; M VAN Rij, Andre; Vasquez, Michael; Wittens, Cees H; Zamboni, Paolo; Zimmet, Steven; Ezpeleta, Santiago Z

    2016-06-01

    There are excellent guidelines for clinicians to manage venous diseases but few reviews to assess their hemodynamic background. Hemodynamic concepts that evolved in the past have largely remained unchallenged in recent decades, perhaps due to their often complicated nature and in part due to emergence of new diagnostic techniques. Duplex ultrasound scanning and other imaging techniques which evolved in the latter part of the 20th century have dominated investigation. They have greatly improved our understanding of the anatomical patterns of venous reflux and obstruction. However, they do not provide the physiological basis for understanding the hemodynamics of flow, pressure, compliance and resistance. Hemodynamic investigations appear to provide a better correlation with post-treatment clinical outcome and quality of life than ultrasound findings. There is a far better prospect for understanding the complete picture of the patient's disability and response to management by combining ultrasound with hemodynamic studies. Accordingly, at the instigation of Dr Angelo Scuderi, the Union Internationale de Phlebologie (UIP) executive board commissioned a large number of experts to assess all aspects of management for venous disease by evidence-based principles. These included experts from various member societies including the European Venous Forum (EVF), American Venous Forum (AVF), American College of Phlebology (ACP) and Cardiovascular Disease Educational and Research Trust (CDERT). Their aim was to confirm or dispel long-held hemodynamic principles and to provide a comprehensive review of venous hemodynamic concepts underlying the pathophysiology of lower limb venous disorders, their usefulness for investigating patients and the relevant hemodynamic changes associated with various forms of treatment. Chapter 1 is devoted to basic hemodynamic concepts and normal venous physiology. Chapter 2 presents the mechanism and magnitude of hemodynamic changes in acute deep vein

  4. Spiral CT venography in central venous obstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Jin Wook; Park, Jae Hyung; Im, Jung Gi; Han, Moon Hee; Kim, In One; Chang, Kee Hyun; Yeon, Kyung Mo [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Song, Chi Sung [Boramae Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-11-01

    To determine the clinical usefulness of spiral computed tomographic (CT) venography for the evaluation of central venous obstruction. The authors prospectively performed a total of 29 spiral CT venography procedures in 25 consecutive patients with suspected central venous obstrucion. Diluted contrast media were directly injected into the peripheral veins of the hand or the foot. Scan parameters were 3mm X-ray beam collimation, table speed of 4-6cm/sec, scan time of 32-40sec, and injection delay of 20 sec. Axial images were reconstructed at 2-mm intervals, and using shaded surface display(SSD), maximum intensity projection(MIP), and multiplanar reformation(MPR), 3-D reconstruction was performed. In all cases, ascending venograp-hy(n=3D13) and/or direct catheter venography (n=3D21) was performed within 2 days of CT venography. With regard to site, extent, extent, severity, and cause of obstruction and collateral circulation, we compared the results of CT and contrast venography. In 24 patients, a total of 56 sites of central venous obstruction or stenosis (>50%) were demonstrated. The causes of obstruction were venous thrombosis(n=3D6), malignant tumors(n=3D4), arteriovenous fistula for hemodialysis(n=3D5), extrinsic compression(n=3D2), coincidence of extrinsic compression and arteriovenous fistula(n=3D1), pacemaker(n=3D1), mediastinal inflammatory pseudotumor(n=3D1), spinal tuberculosis(n=3D1), membranous obstruction of the hepatic inferior vena cava(n=3D1), Behcet's disease(n=3D1), or unknown cause(n=3D1). When compared with ascending venography(n=3D13), CT venography was superior for evaluation of the extent and cause of obstruction and collateral circulation in two, four and one case(s), respectively. For the evaluation of site and severity of obstruction, CT venography was equal to ascending venography. In two cases, direct catheter venography (n=3D21) was superior to CT venography for evaluating the obstruction site, but in three, five and one case

  5. Chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simka M

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Marian Simka Department of Nursing, College of Applied Sciences, Ruda Slaska, Poland Abstract: This review summarizes the research to date on chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI. CCSVI was initially defined as a clinical syndrome comprising stenoses of the internal jugular and/or azygos veins, characterized by collateral venous outflows and reduced cerebral blood flow, and was found primarily in patients with multiple sclerosis. However, the published evidence on CCSVI is very discordant. Catheter venography studies gave a regular picture, with the majority of patients with multiple sclerosis presenting with demonstrable outflow abnormalities in the veins draining the central nervous system. The prevalence of these lesions was over 50%, and even higher (about 90% when more liberal definition of an abnormality or intravascular sonography was used. Further, the results of magnetic resonance venography studies have been quite consistent, in that stenoses of the internal jugular veins have been found in 25%–70% of patients with multiple sclerosis. In contrast, Doppler sonography studies have revealed CCSVI in 0% to 100% of patients. The research is currently suggesting that CCSVI is not a single entity, but rather a group of different anatomic and functional venous abnormalities. Regarding venous outflow from the brain, a patient can present either with diminished inflow to the internal jugular veins resulting from decreased cerebral circulation or with externally compressed or hypoplastic internal jugular veins or stenotic jugular valves. Considering these many faces of CCSVI, it becomes more comprehensible as to why the results of the studies, especially those utilizing Doppler sonography, have been so discordant. Not only were investigators using different diagnostic modalities and distinct protocols, but they were not looking for the same pathology. Since these abnormalities were indeed differently prevalent in patients and

  6. Critical care of traumatic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xiaofeng; Kowalski, Robert G; Sciubba, Daniel M; Geocadin, Romergryko G

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 11 000 people suffer traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI) in the United States, each year. TSCI incidences vary from 13.1 to 52.2 per million people and the mortality rates ranged from 3.1 to 17.5 per million people. This review examines the critical care of TSCI. The discussion will focus on primary and secondary mechanisms of injury, spine stabilization and immobilization, surgery, intensive care management, airway and respiratory management, cardiovascular complication management, venous thromboembolism, nutrition and glucose control, infection management, pressure ulcers and early rehabilitation, pharmacologic cord protection, and evolving treatment options including the use of pluripotent stem cells and hypothermia.

  7. Clinical features of venous insufficiency and the risk of venous thrombosis in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engbers, Marissa J; Karasu, Alev; Blom, Jeanet W; Cushman, Mary; Rosendaal, Frits R; van Hylckama Vlieg, Astrid

    2015-11-01

    Venous thrombosis is common in older age, with an incidence of 0·5-1% per year in those aged >70 years. Stasis of blood flow is an important contributor to the development of thrombosis and may be due to venous insufficiency in the legs. The risk of thrombosis associated with clinical features of venous insufficiency, i.e., varicose veins, leg ulcers and leg oedema, obtained with a standardized interview was assessed in the Age and Thrombosis Acquired and Genetic risk factors in the Elderly (AT-AGE) study. The AT-AGE study is a case-control study in individuals aged 70 years and older (401 cases with a first-time venous thrombosis and 431 control subjects). We calculated odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) adjusted for age, sex and study centre. Varicose veins and leg ulcer were associated with a 1·6-fold (95% CI 1·2-2·3) and 3·3-fold increased risk of thrombosis (95% CI 1·6-6·7), respectively, while the risk was increased 3·0-fold (95% CI 2·1-4·5) in the presence of leg oedema. The risk of thrombosis was highest when all three risk factors occurred simultaneously (OR: 10·5; 95% CI 1·3-86·1). In conclusion, clinical features of venous insufficiency, i.e., varicose veins, leg ulcers and leg oedema, are risk factors for venous thrombosis in older people.

  8. Compression therapies for chronic venous leg ulcers: interventions and adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latz CA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Christopher A Latz,1 Kellie R Brown,2 Ruth L Bush11Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine, Bryan, TX, USA; 2Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, USAAbstract: Compression therapy has been the mainstay for the treatment of lower extremity edema, venous insufficiency, and particularly, venous ulcerative disease. Though modern surgical treatments exist, none are completely effective without good compressive options to allow for decreased swelling and better oxygenation of damaged tissues. This review article will describe the pathophysiology and presentation of lower extremity venous ulcerations, as well as current options for compression therapy. The benefits, along with the major pitfall of nonadherence, will also be discussed.Keywords: venous disease, chronic venous insufficiency, venous ulceration

  9. Human cerebral venous outflow pathway depends on posture and central venous pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gisolf, J; van Lieshout, J J; van Heusden, K

    2004-01-01

    and central venous pressure (CVP) on the distribution of cerebral outflow over the internal jugular veins and the vertebral plexus, using a mathematical model. Input to the model was a data set of beat-to-beat cerebral blood flow velocity and CVP measurements in 10 healthy subjects, during baseline rest...... and during a Valsalva manoeuvre in both body positions, correlate highly with model simulation of the jugular cross-sectional area (R(2) = 0.97). The results suggest that the cerebral venous flow distribution depends on posture and CVP: in supine humans the internal jugular veins are the primary pathway...

  10. [Venous thrombosis associated with central venous catheter use in patients with cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias Rey, Leticia; Fernández Pérez, Isaura; Barbagelata López, Cristina; Rivera Gallego, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    The use of central venous catheters for various applications (administration of chemotherapy, blood products and others) in patients with cancer is increasingly frequent. The association between thrombosis and catheter use has been fully established but aspects such as its causes, diagnosis, prophylaxis and treatment have not. We describe a case of thrombosis in a patient with cancer treated with chemotherapy who carried a central venous catheter. We also perform a review of the risk factors, the role of the prophylaxis and the treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Venous Return and Clinical Hemodynamics: How the Body Works during Acute Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Tao; Baker, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Venous return is a major determinant of cardiac output. Adjustments within the venous system are critical for maintaining venous pressure during loss in circulating volume. This article reviews two factors that are thought to enable the venous system to compensate during acute hemorrhage: 1) changes in venous elastance and 2) mobilization of…

  12. Venous Return and Clinical Hemodynamics: How the Body Works during Acute Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Tao; Baker, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Venous return is a major determinant of cardiac output. Adjustments within the venous system are critical for maintaining venous pressure during loss in circulating volume. This article reviews two factors that are thought to enable the venous system to compensate during acute hemorrhage: 1) changes in venous elastance and 2) mobilization of…

  13. Tricuspid valve endocarditis following central venous cannulation: The increasing problem of catheter related infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Babu Kale

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A central venous catheter (CVC is inserted for measurement of haemodynamic variables, delivery of nutritional supplements and drugs and access for haemodialysis and haemofiltration. Catheterization and maintenance are common practices and there is more to the technique than routine placement as evident when a procedure-related complication occurs. More than 15% of the patients who receive CVC placement have some complications and infectious endocarditis involving the tricuspid valve is a rare and serious complication with high morbidity and mortality. Overenthusiastic and deep insertion of the guide wire and forceful injection through the CVC may lead to injury of the tricuspid valve and predispose to bacterial deposition and endocarditis. We report a case of tricuspid valve endocarditis, probably secondary to injury of the anterior tricuspid leaflet by the guide wire or the CVC that required open heart surgery with vegetectomy and repair of the tricuspid valve.

  14. Antithrombotic Agents in the Prevention and Treatment of Venous Thromboembolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    包承鑫

    2004-01-01

    @@ Venous thromboembolism is a major health problem,carrying significant morbidity and mortality, with an incidence that exceeds I per 1 000. Independent risk factors for venous thromboembolism include increasing age, male gender, surgery, trauma, hospital or nursing home confinement, neurologic disease with extremity paresis, central venous catheter/transvenous pacemaker, prior superficial vein thrombosis, and varicose, among women, the risk factors include pregnancy, oral contraceptives, and hormone replacement therapy.

  15. An unusual cause of hydrocephalus: aqueductal developmental venous anomaly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yagmurlu, Banu; Fitoz, Suat; Atasoy, Cetin; Erden, ilhan [Ankara University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Ankara (Turkey); Deda, Gulhis; Unal, Ozlem [Ankara University School of Medicine, Division of Pediatric Neurology, Ankara (Turkey)

    2005-06-01

    Vascular malformations are infrequent causes of aqueductal stenoses, developmental venous anomaly (DVA) being the rarest among them. DVAs, also known as venous angiomas, are congenital in origin and characterized by dilatation of vessels in the superficial and deep venous system. Although they are usually clinically silent, they can be complicated by hemorrhage, seizures and neurologic deficits. Herein, we report MR imaging findings of a 7-year-old girl whose hydrocephalus was due to an abnormal vein coursing through the aqueduct. (orig.)

  16. Venous ulcers of the lower limb: Where do we stand?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Sasanka S

    2012-05-01

    Venous ulcers are the most common ulcers of the lower limb. It has a high morbidity and results in economic strain both at a personal and at a state level. Chronic venous hypertension either due to primary or secondary venous disease with perforator paucity, destruction or incompetence resulting in reflux is the underlying pathology, but inflammatory reactions mediated through leucocytes, platelet adhesion, formation of pericapillary fibrin cuff, growth factors and macromolecules trapped in tissue result in tissue hypoxia, cell death and ulceration. Duplex scan with colour flow is the most useful investigation for venous disease supplying information about patency, reflux, effects of proximal and distal compression, Valsalva maneuver and effects of muscle contraction. Most venous disease can be managed conservatively by leg elevation and compression bandaging. Drugs of proven benefit in venous disease are pentoxifylline and aspirin, but they work best in conjunction with compression therapy. Once ulceration is chronic or the patient does not respond to or cannot maintain conservative regime, surgical intervention treating the underlying venous hypertension and cover for the ulcer is necessary. The different modalities like sclerotherapy, ligation and stripping of superficial varicose veins, endoscopic subfascial perforator ligation, endovenous laser or radiofrequency ablation have similar long-term results, although short-term recovery is best with radiofrequency and foam sclerotherapy. For deep venous reflux, surgical modalities include repair of incompetent venous valves or transplant or transposition of a competent vein segment with normal valves to replace a post-thrombotic destroyed portion of the deep vein.

  17. Levoatriocardinal vein with normal intracardiac anatomy and pulmonary venous return

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ender Odemis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Levoatriocardinal vein (LACV is characterized by an abnormal connection between pulmonary and systemic venous return. This extremely rare cardiac malformation is usually associated with left-sided obstructive lesions including mitral atresia, hypoplastic left-heart syndrome, and abnormal pulmonary venous connection. Patients may have low systemic cardiac output and pulmonary venous obstruction symptoms. In this manuscript, we report a case with LACV and normal pulmonary venous return with absence of any intracardiac pathology. LACV was demonstrated with echocardiography, angiography, and computed tomography. Surgical correction was made successfully.

  18. Venous ulcers of the lower limb: Where do we stand?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chatterjee S Sasanka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Venous ulcers are the most common ulcers of the lower limb. It has a high morbidity and results in economic strain both at a personal and at a state level. Chronic venous hypertension either due to primary or secondary venous disease with perforator paucity, destruction or incompetence resulting in reflux is the underlying pathology, but inflammatory reactions mediated through leucocytes, platelet adhesion, formation of pericapillary fibrin cuff, growth factors and macromolecules trapped in tissue result in tissue hypoxia, cell death and ulceration. Duplex scan with colour flow is the most useful investigation for venous disease supplying information about patency, reflux, effects of proximal and distal compression, Valsalva maneuver and effects of muscle contraction. Most venous disease can be managed conservatively by leg elevation and compression bandaging. Drugs of proven benefit in venous disease are pentoxifylline and aspirin, but they work best in conjunction with compression therapy. Once ulceration is chronic or the patient does not respond to or cannot maintain conservative regime, surgical intervention treating the underlying venous hypertension and cover for the ulcer is necessary. The different modalities like sclerotherapy, ligation and stripping of superficial varicose veins, endoscopic subfascial perforator ligation, endovenous laser or radiofrequency ablation have similar long-term results, although short-term recovery is best with radiofrequency and foam sclerotherapy. For deep venous reflux, surgical modalities include repair of incompetent venous valves or transplant or transposition of a competent vein segment with normal valves to replace a post-thrombotic destroyed portion of the deep vein.

  19. MRA for diagnosis of venous thromboembolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sostman, H. D. [Cornell University, Weill Medical College, Chair of Radiology, New York (United States)

    2001-12-01

    Direct imaging of pulmonary embolism (PE) and deep vein thrombosis (DVT) with CT, and potentially with MR, will continue to replace V/Q scintigraphy. Venous imaging with MR far detecting DVT is used in a few centers, and their published accuracy figures are impressive. Recent studies of MR pulmonary angiography for PE reported that sensitivity of MRA was 85-100%, specificity 95-96%, but this data must be confirmed in other centers and patient populations. MR has advantages compared with CT, which make it worthwhile to continue MR development. Ionizing radiation and iodinated contrast material are not used. Imaging the pulmonary arteries and then imaging whichever venous region is of clinical interest is practical in a single examination. Repeated examinations can be performed safely. New contrast materials will facilitate the practically and accuracy of the MR technique and perfusion imaging may increase sensitivity. MR also has disadvantages compared with CT. It does not image effectively the non-vascular compartment of the lungs. It is more expensive, patient monitoring is more cumbersome, and a routine technique, which embodies all of MR's potential advantages, has not been packaged and tested. Accordingly, helical CT is a realistic option in clinical management of patients with suspected PE in most centers, while clinical application of MR is limited to centers with appropriate MR expertise and technology. However, MR has a number of fundamental characteristics that make it potentially ideal modality for evaluating patients with suspected acute venous thromboembolic disease and further clinical research with MRA is warranted.

  20. Daily nursing care on patients undergoing venous-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation: a challenging procedure!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redaelli, Sara; Zanella, Alberto; Milan, Manuela; Isgrò, Stefano; Lucchini, Alberto; Pesenti, Antonio; Patroniti, Nicolò

    2016-12-01

    Daily nursing in critical care patients may alter vital parameters, especially in the most critically ill patients. The aim of our study was to evaluate feasibility and safety of daily nursing on patients undergoing venous-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (vv-ECMO) for severe respiratory failure. Daily nursing was performed following defined phases (sponge bath, elevation with scooping stretcher, change position of endotracheal tube, dressing replacement). We recorded physiological and ECMO parameters before and during daily nursing in 5 patients for several days (total: 25 daily nursing) and adverse events: desaturation, hypertension, reduction of mixed venous oxygen saturation, arterial oxygen saturation or ECMO blood flow and elevation in minute ventilation. Sedative drug dosage and additional bolus were recorded. Daily nursing was performed in 92 % of cases (23/25), with a minimum of two adverse events per daily nursing. Hypertension and tachycardia were mostly recorded at the beginning, while desaturation, reduction in mixed venous oxygen saturation and blood flow were recorded during elevation with scooping stretcher. Increase in minute ventilation was frequent in spontaneous breathing patients. Additional bolus of sedation was required before and/or during nursing. Daily nursing significantly alters physiologic parameters; thus, it should be performed only when physicians are readily available to treat adverse events.

  1. Predictors of Venous Thromboembolic Events Associated with Central Venous Port Insertion in Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Hohl Moinat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Insertion of central venous port (CVP catheter in the cancer population is associated with increased incidence of venous thromboembolic events (VTE. However, trials have shown limited benefit of antithrombotic treatment to prevent catheter-related venous thrombosis. This prospective observational cohort study was designed to assess the incidence of VTE closely related to CVP implantation in patients with cancer and undergoing chemotherapy, and to identify a high risk subgroup of patients. Between February 2006 and December 2011, 1097 consecutive cancer patients with first CVP implantation were included. Catheter-related VTE were defined as deep venous thrombosis in the arm, with or without pulmonary embolism (PE, or isolated PE. The incidence of CVP-associated VTE was 5.9% (IC95 4.4–7.3% at 3 months, and 11.3% (IC95 9.4–13.2% at 12 months. The incidence of any VTE was 7.6% (IC95 6.0–9.3% at 3 months, and 15.3% (IC95 13.1–17.6% at 12 months. High Khorana risk score and lung cancer were significant predictors of 3 month VTE. In conclusion, this large cohort study of patients with first CVP catheter implantation confirms the high incidence of VTE associated with the CVP implantation and allow identifying high risk patients who may benefit from thromboprophylaxis.

  2. Recent research on venous thromboembolism in China: a brief report from China Venous Thromboembolism Study Group

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAI Zhen-guo; ZHAN Xi; YANG Yuan-hua; WANG Chen

    2010-01-01

    @@ Venous thromboembolism (VTE), including deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary thrombo-embolism (PTE), carries significant mortality and morbidity. As a result of the increasing awareness and improvement in diagnostic facilities, the hospital admissions have increased dramatically in China. Recent publications have reported the increasing incidences of PTE and DVT in hospitalized patients.~(1-3)

  3. Liver CT with portal-venous contrast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schild, H.; Mildenberger, P.; Schweden, F.; Eckmann, A.; Nagel, K.; Knuth, A.; Boerner, N.; Thelen, M.; Junginger, T.

    1987-12-01

    Contrast administration through the superior mesenteric or splenic arteries provided additional information in 22 out of 31 patients, when compared with intravenous contrast bolus for CT of the liver. In 11 patients, the demonstration of a tumour lead to a change in treatment. False positive findings occurred in four of the 31 patients. In 2 patients intrahepatic lesions were overlooked, but were found during angiography carried out at the same examination. The diagnosis of intrahepatic space-occupying lesions is discussed as well as the CT appearances of portal-venous liver perfusion.

  4. Cerebral venous thrombosis: An Indian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepa Dash

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT is an uncommon cause of stroke with extremely varied clinical presentations, predisposing factors, imaging findings, and outcomes, and thus can be extremely challenging to diagnose. Accurate and prompt diagnosis of CVT is crucial because timely and appropriate therapy can reverse the disease process and significantly reduce the risk of acute complications and long-term squel. In this article, we have reviewed the epidemiology, causative factors, clinical features, diagnosis and treatment of CVT from an Indian perspective. Over the last decade, a change in trends in the causative factors has been noted from India.

  5. Unilateral Pseudotumoral Presentation of Cerebral Venous Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Halley Carvalho Pimentel

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT is an unusual cause of stroke. It is more common in middle-aged women and deep CVT lesions are usually bilateral. CVT can have very diverse clinical presentations and mimic other conditions. We report two women with CVT initially diagnosed as tumors (unilateral pseudotumoral presentation of CVT successfully treated with intravenous heparin. Early diagnosis was important and completely reversed the symptoms. The diagnosis of CVT should be remembered when clinical picture is compatible even if brain imaging suggests unilateral tumor.

  6. Sickle Cell Trait Causing Splanchnic Venous Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Saxena

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sickle cell trait is considered as a benign condition as these individuals carry only one defective gene and typically have their life span similar to the normal population without any health problems related to sickle cell. Only under extreme conditions, red cells become sickled and can cause clinical complications including hematuria and splenic infarction. Although twofold increased risk of venous thrombosis has been described in African Americans, there is no data available from Indian population. We here report a case of sickle cell trait from India whose index presentation was thrombosis of unusual vascular territory.

  7. [Pain in venous thrombosis of the leg].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriet, J P

    1992-01-01

    According to D. Reinharez, pain and edema are the commonest presenting symptoms in phlebology. Pain is one of the most classical symptoms of an ordinary deep venous thrombosis, a valuable feature when present, in the form of deep tension, heaviness, swelling and a feeling of dead weight. It is often absent or slight. It may consist merely of a dull cramp, or of an "undefinable" (C. Bourde) odd, heavy leg. It generally affects the calf but may involve the sole of the foot, the heel, the thigh, the groin or even the true pelvis. This feeling, although "imprecise and variable" (P. Wallois, P. Griton) is highly suggestive. It increases on standing and walking in the form of unilateral uncomfortable tension, heaviness or painful swelling, which maybe a source of worry or even anxiety to the patient. Tenderness on palpation of venous tracts and their stretching is more suggestive. In the opinion of M. Duruble, Neuhof's sign (feeling of tender fullness of the calf) is more reliable than Homans' sign (pain in the calf caused by passive dorsiflexion of the foot, with the lower limb in extension) which essentially stretches only the posterior tibial venous system. The value of Sigg's sign (pain in the popliteal fossa on passive extension of the knee) is controversial. Far more rare is phlegmasia coerulea dolens or Grégoire's blue leg, complicating phlegmasia alba dolens or of sudden onset, with initial very severe or even "intolerable" pain (J.J. Pinot) in Scarpa's triangle, rapidly spreading to the limb. In varicose phlebitis (M. Perrin) or superficial thrombophlebitis or varico-phlebitis (A.A. Ramelet) or superficial venitis (J.P. Henriet), pain most often consists of moderate burning tension overlying the thrombosed vein(s), increased by palpation and mobilisation. Sometimes severe initially, it is exacerbated by the slightest touch. In total, pain, regardless of its characteristics, its site and/or its severity, is one of the most constant clinical features of venous

  8. Direct oral anticoagulants and venous thromboembolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Franchini

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Venous thromboembolism (VTE, consisting of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, is a major clinical concern associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The cornerstone of management of VTE is anticoagulation, and traditional anticoagulants include parenteral heparins and oral vitamin K antagonists. Recently, new oral anticoagulant drugs have been developed and licensed, including direct factor Xa inhibitors (e.g. rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban and thrombin inhibitors (e.g. dabigatran etexilate. This narrative review focusses on the characteristics of these direct anticoagulants and the main results of published clinical studies on their use in the prevention and treatment of VTE.

  9. Correlation of mixed venous and central venous oxygen saturation and its relation to cardiac index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramakrishna M

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: The clinical applicability of substitution of central venous oxygen saturation for mixed venous oxygen saturations in monitoring global tissue hypoxia is still a matter of controversy. Hence aim of the study is comparison of paired samples of mixed venous and central venous oxygen saturation and comparison in relation to cardiac index in varying hemodynamic conditions. Materials and Methods: Prospective clinical observation: Postoperative cardiac surgical ITU: 60 adult patients,> 18 years of age of either sex: A PAC was inserted through ® IJV, triple lumen catheter was inserted through ® IJV. Blood samples were taken from distal tip of PAC and central venous catheters. An arterial blood sample was drawn from either radial or femoral arterial line. Measurements: Continuous cardiac output monitoring. Analysis of blood samples for hemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation. Mixed venous oxygen saturations and central venous oxygen saturations were compared. The study was carried over a period of 30h in the postoperative period and samples were taken at 6h intervals. Patients were classified into three groups as follows depending on the CI: Low (< 2.5 L/m 2, medium (2.5-4 L/m 2, high (> 4 L/m2 and correlated with Svo 2 and Scvo 2 . Results: 298 Comparative sets of samples were obtained. Svo2 was consistently lower than Scvo2 throughout the study period. The difference was statistically significant. By using Bland - Altman plot, the mean difference between Svo 2 and Scvo 2 (Svo 2 -Scvo 2 was - 2.9% ± 5.14 and confidence limits are + 7.17% and - 12.97%. The co-efficient r is > 0.7 throughout the study period for all paired samples. The correlation Svo 2 and Scvo 2 with cardiac index in all the three groups were> 0.7. Conclusion: Scvo 2 and Svo 2 are closely related and are interchangeable. Even though individual values differ trends in Scvo 2 may be substituted for trend in Svo 2

  10. Head Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ATV) Safety Balance Disorders Knowing Your Child's Medical History First Aid: Falls First Aid: Head Injuries Preventing Children's Sports Injuries Getting Help: Know the Numbers Concussions Stay Safe: Baseball Concussions Concussions: Getting Better Sports and Concussions Dealing ...

  11. Ear Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fundamentals Heart and Blood Vessel Disorders Hormonal and Metabolic Disorders Immune Disorders Infections Injuries and Poisoning Kidney and ... Fundamentals Heart and Blood Vessel Disorders Hormonal and Metabolic Disorders Immune Disorders Infections Injuries and Poisoning Kidney and ...

  12. Birth Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Are Up to Date Additional Content Medical News Birth Injury By Arthur E. Kopelman, MD, Professor of ... Problems in Newborns Overview of Problems in Newborns Birth Injury Prematurity Postmaturity Small for Gestational Age (SGA) ...

  13. Injury Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Visits Prevent Poison! ACEP Observes 50th National Poison Prevention Week Small, Shiny and Dangerous: ACEP Puts the Spotlight on Children Swallowing Objects Like Magnets, Coins or Batteries School & Sports Injuries Safety Helmets Save Lives, Prevent Traumatic Brain Injury ...

  14. Knee Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bursitis . Symptoms of bursitis in the knee include warmth, tenderness, swelling, and pain on the front of ... injury without the aid of a television screen. Physical Therapy Depending on the type of knee injury ...

  15. Inhalation Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you can inhale that can cause acute internal injuries. Particles in the air from fires and toxic ... and lung diseases worse. Symptoms of acute inhalation injuries may include Coughing and phlegm A scratchy throat ...

  16. Spinal injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000029.htm Spinal injury To use the sharing features on this page, ... move anyone who you think may have a spinal injury, unless it is absolutely necessary. For example, if ...

  17. Genital injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... each side of a bar, such as a monkey bar or the middle of a bicycle Symptoms ... Names Scrotal trauma; Straddle injury; Toilet seat injury Images Female reproductive anatomy Male reproductive anatomy Normal female ...

  18. Venous rupture complicating hemodialysis access angioplasty: percutaneous treatments and outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    La, Young Jong; Goo, Dong Erk; Kim, Dae Ho; Lee, Hae Kyoung; Hong, Hyun Suk; Kwon, Gui Hyang; Choi, Duk Lin; Ynag, Sung Boo [College of Medicine, Soonchunhyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-03-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of percutaneous management and prognosis in venous rupture during angioplasty of hemodialytic arteriovenous fistulas. Among 814 patients who underwent angioplasty on account of inadequate hemodialysis, 63(39 women and 24 men aged 20-78 (mean, 55.8) years) were included in this study. All 63 had peripheral venous stenosis. Venous rupture was diagnosed when contrast leakage was seen at venography after percutaneous angioplasty (PTA). In order to manage venous rupture, the sites at which this occurred were compressed manually for 3-5 minutes or blood flow was blocked with a balloon catheter for the same period. In one case, a stent was inserted at the rupture site. Using the Kaplan-Meier method, we investigated the patency rate of arteriovenous fistula (AVF) in cases of successful PTA. We also compared PTA patency rates in cases with and without peripheral venous rupture. Venous rupture occurred in 38 cephalic, 16 brachial, and 9 basilic veins. In 63 patients, bleeding stopped and in 54 (85.7 %) of thee, PTA was successful. Among the nine failed cases, dilatation was incomplete in five, though bleeding had stopped. In patients with brachial and cephalic vein rupture the venous tract at the rupture site was not located. Two patients underwent surgery: one of these experienced brachial venous rupture, with incontrollable bleeding, and the other had nerve compression symptoms due to hematoma. Among 54 patients in whom PTA was successful, the primary and secondary six-months rates for angioaccess were 47.9% and 81.2%, and the mean patency period was 6.1 and 15.8 months, respectively. In cases of non-venous rupture, the mean patency period was 9.6 months, significantly longer than in cases involving venous rupture (p=0.02). Venous rupture occurring during the PTA of hemodialytic AVF can be managed percutaneously.

  19. Altered Venous Function during Long-Duration Spaceflights

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    Jacques-Olivier Fortrat

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Venous adaptation to microgravity, associated with cardiovascular deconditioning, may contribute to orthostatic intolerance following spaceflight. The aim of this study was to analyze the main parameters of venous hemodynamics with long-duration spaceflight.Methods: Venous plethysmography was performed on 24 cosmonauts before, during, and after spaceflights aboard the International Space Station. Venous plethysmography assessed venous filling and emptying functions as well as microvascular filtration, in response to different levels of venous occlusion pressure. Calf volume was assessed using calf circumference measurements.Results: Calf volume decreased during spaceflight from 2.3 ± 0.3 to 1.7 ± 0.2 L (p < 0.001, and recovered after it (2.3 ± 0.3 L. Venous compliance, determined as the relationship between occlusion pressure and the change in venous volume, increased during spaceflight from 0.090 ± 0.005 to 0.120 ± 0.007 (p < 0.01 and recovered 8 days after landing (0.071 ± 0.005, arbitrary units. The index of venous emptying rate decreased during spaceflight from −0.004 ± 0.022 to −0.212 ± 0.033 (p < 0.001, arbitrary units. The index of vascular microfiltration increased during spaceflight from 6.1 ± 1.8 to 10.6 ± 7.9 (p < 0.05, arbitrary units.Conclusion: This study demonstrated that overall venous function is changed during spaceflight. In future, venous function should be considered when developing countermeasures to prevent cardiovascular deconditioning and orthostatic intolerance with long-duration spaceflight.

  20. Radiographic signs of non-venous placement of intended central venous catheters in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Erin C. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Taylor, George A. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) are commonly used in children, and inadvertent arterial or extravascular cannulation is rare but has potentially serious complications. To identify the radiographic signs of arterial placement of CVCs. We retrospectively reviewed seven cases of arterially malpositioned CVCs on chest radiograph. These cases were identified through departmental quality-assurance mechanisms and external consultation. Comparison of arterial cases was made with 127 age-matched chest radiographs with CVCs in normal, expected venous location. On each anteroposterior (AP) radiograph we measured the distance of the catheter tip from the right lateral border of the thoracic spine, and the angle of the vertical portion of the catheter relative to the midline. On each lateral radiograph we measured the angle of the vertical portion of each catheter relative to the anterior border of the thoracic spine. When bilateral subclavian catheters were present, the catheter tips were described as crossed, overlapping or uncrossed. On AP radiographs, arterially placed CVCs were more curved to the left, with catheter tip positions located farther to the left of midline than normal venous CVCs. When bilateral, properly placed venous catheters were present, all catheters crossed at the level of the superior vena cava (SVC). When one of the bilateral catheters was in arterial position, neither of the catheters crossed or the inter-catheter crossover distance was exaggerated. On lateral radiographs, there was a marked anterior angulation of the vertical portion of the catheter (mean angle 37 ± 15 standard deviation [SD] in arterial catheters versus 5.9 ± 8.3 SD in normally placed venous catheters). Useful radiographic signs suggestive of unintentional arterial misplacement of vascular catheters include leftward curvature of the vertical portion of the catheter, left-side catheter tip position, lack of catheter crossover on the frontal radiograph, as well as exaggerated

  1. Orienteering injuries

    OpenAIRE

    Folan, Jean M.

    1982-01-01

    At the Irish National Orienteering Championships in 1981 a survey of the injuries occurring over the two days of competition was carried out. Of 285 individual competitors there was a percentage injury rate of 5.26%. The article discusses the injuries and aspects of safety in orienteering.

  2. Preditores de injúria renal aguda em pacientes submetidos ao transplante ortotópico de fígado convencional sem desvio venovenoso Predictors of acute kidney injury in patients undergoing a conventional orthotopic liver transplant without veno-venous bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olival Cirilo L. da Fonseca-Neto

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available RADICAL: Injúria renal aguda é uma das complicações mais comuns do transplante ortotópico de fígado. A ausência de critério universal para sua definição nestas condições dificulta as comparações entre os estudos. A técnica convencional para o transplante consiste na excisão total da veia cava inferior retro-hepática durante a hepatectomia nativa. Controvérsias sobre o efeito da técnica convencional sem desvio venovenoso na função renal continuam. OBJETIVO: Estimar a incidência e os fatores de risco de injúria renal aguda entre os receptores de transplante ortotópico de fígado convencional sem desvio venovenoso. MÉTODOS: Foram avaliados 375 pacientes submetidos a transplante ortotópico de fígado. Foram analisadas as variáveis pré, intra e pós-operatórias em 153 pacientes submetidos a transplante ortotópico de fígado convencional sem desvio venovenoso. O critério para a injúria renal aguda foi valor da creatinina sérica > 1,5 mg/dl ou débito urinário BACKGROUND: Acute kidney injury is one of the most common complications of orthotopic liver transplantation. The absence of universal criteria for definition of these conditions make comparisons difficult between studies. The conventional technique for transplantation is the total excision of the inferior vena cava during liver retro-native hepatectomy. Controversies about the effect of the conventional technique without venovenous bypass on renal function remain. AIM: To estimate the incidence and risk of acute kidney injury factors among recipients of orthotopic liver transplantation without conventional venovenous bypass. METHODS: Was studied 375 patients undergoing orthotopic liver transplantation. Variables were analyzed in preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative complications in 153 patients undergoing orthotopic liver transplantation without conventional venovenous bypass. The criterion for acute kidney injury was serum creatinine > 1.5 mg/dl or

  3. Compression Stockings for Treating Venous Leg Ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Benigni

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. In order to treat venous leg ulcers, it is recommended to use high pressure compression (30–40 mmHg at the ankle. Compression stockings which are not operator dependant could be the best option because of their pressure control. However 30–40 mmHg compression stockings are often hard to put on. Putting two lower pressure compression stockings over each other could be a good therapeutic alternative. Objectives. To compare the in vitro pressures given by the manufacturers of 2 antiulcer kits with the in vivo interface pressures measured in healthy subjects and to evaluate the stiffness and friction indices from those kits based on the interface pressure in order to assess their clinical properties. Material and Methods. Using a Kikuhime pressure device, interface pressure was measured in 12 healthy subjects at the reference point B1. One stiffness index (Static Stiffness Index (SSI and a friction index have been calculated. Results. Mediven Ulcer kit gets the recommended pressures whereas Jobst’s Ulcer Care kit does not for treating a venous leg ulcer. Jobst’s Ulcer Care transmits entirely the pressure in relation to a friction index close to 1. Conclusion. This antiulcer kit study underlines that in vivo and in vitro pressures can be different (Jobst’s Ulcer Care kit and Mediven Ulcer kit. In order not to lose pressure, it is important to take into account the friction index when superimposing two stockings.

  4. Chronic Infection and Venous Thromboembolic Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epaulard, Olivier; Foote, Alison; Bosson, Jean-Luc

    2015-09-01

    Venous thromboembolic disease often arises as a complication of another pathological condition and/or triggering event. Infectious diseases result from both the direct action of the pathogens themselves and their effect on the immune system. The resulting inflammatory process and the coagulation and fibrinolysis processes share common pathways, explaining why infection is associated with thrombosis. In this brief overview, besides certain chronic infectious diseases, we also consider some acute infections, as the mechanisms are likely to be similar, particularly in the initial infective stage or the more acute episodes of a chronic infection. The infectious agent can be viral, bacterial, fungal, or parasitic. However, the literature on the link between infections and venous thromboembolism (VTE) is uneven, favoring infections that are found in more developed countries where physicians have access to VTE diagnostic tools. Thus, large epidemiological studies in this field are restricted to a limited number of the common chronic infectious diseases such as tuberculosis, while for other infections, particularly parasitic and fungal infections, the link with VTE is only evoked in a few scattered case reports.

  5. Risk Factors for Cerebral Venous Thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvis, Suzanne M; Middeldorp, Saskia; Zuurbier, Susanna M; Cannegieter, Suzanne C; Coutinho, Jonathan M

    2016-09-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a rare thrombotic disorder involving the cerebral veins and dural sinuses. In contrast to more common sites of venous thromboembolism (VTE), such as the legs and lungs, CVT mainly affects young adults and children, and women are affected three times more often than men. Although presenting symptoms are variable, headache is usually the first symptom, often in combination with focal neurologic deficits and epileptic seizures. The primary therapy for CVT consists of heparin followed by oral anticoagulation for at least 3 to 6 months. The mortality in the acute phase is 5 to 10% and a substantial proportion of survivors suffer from long-term disabilities. A large number of risk factors have been linked to CVT, although the scientific evidence for an association varies considerably between risk factors. Some risk factors, such as hereditary thrombophilia, correspond with risk factors for more common sites of VTE, whereas others, such as head trauma, are specific to CVT. In most patients, at least one risk factor can be identified. In this review, we provide an overview of the risk factors for CVT.

  6. Central Vein Preservation in Critical Venous Access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, J; Paul, A; Patel, S; Davenport, M; Ade-Ajayi, N

    2016-08-01

    Introduction The lack of suitable veins in children with critical central venous access requirements is a major obstacle to optimal care and is potentially life-threatening. We present outcomes following the use of vein-preserving (VP) surgical techniques, notably the sheath exchange for tunneled lines (SETL). Materials and Methods A retrospective, single observer analysis of a prospectively maintained departmental logbook as well as the medical records of patients. Two broad groups of central line replacements were identified; those inserted following removal of a previous line and a traditional "plastic-free" (PF) period and those exchanged without such an interval. Results Overall, 19 lines were directly exchanged during the study period and compared with 34 inserted after a PF period. Similar catheter life spans and infection rates were demonstrated in each group; 125 (range, 78-173) days in VP exchanges versus 122 (range, 70-175) days in PF replacements (p = 0.41). Line Sepsis resulting in removal or change of line occurred at 103 (range, 60-147) days in VP group versus 104 (range, 45-164) days in PF (p = 0.73). Conclusion For children with critical venous access requirements, direct line exchange procedures are a robust and reproducible means of vein preservation. The outcomes compare favorably with those following the more traditional removal, a PF period and reinsertion.

  7. [Association between venous thrombosis and dyslipidemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Raso, Aránzazu; Ene, Gabriela; Miranda, Carolina; Vidal, Rosa; Mata, Raquel; Llamas Sillero, M Pilar

    2014-07-07

    Venous and arterial thrombosis, despite being historically considered as distinct conditions, share certain risk factors. Dyslipidemia is a clinical condition with a relatively high prevalence in the population and has been associated with an increased thrombotic risk. Lipids and lipoproteins modulate the expression and/or function of thrombotic, fibrinolytic and rheological factors. We have developed a descriptive, retrospective, comparative, cross-sectional study including a group of 313 patients with venous thromboembolism (VTE). We collected basic demographic data, cardiovascular risk factors and thrombotic complications. All patients were subjected to a lipid profile study with determination of total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol (cHDL), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (cLDL) and triglycerides. The multivariable analysis showed that dyslipidemia was a risk factor for VTE (odds ratio [OR] 3.87, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 2.72-5.56; Pcomplications, recurrence and post-thrombotic syndrome. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  8. Epidemiological study of venous thromboembolism in a big Danish cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Severinsen, Marianne Tang; Kristensen, Søren Risom; Overvad, Kim

    Introduction: Epidemiological data on venous thromboembolism (VT), i.e. pulmonary emboli (PE) and deep venous thrombosis (DVT) are sparse. We have examined VT-diagnoses registered in a big Danish Cohort study.  Methods: All first-time VT diagnoses in The Danish National Patient Register were...

  9. Venous aneurysm complicating arteriovenous fistula access and matrix metalloproteinases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serra Raffaele

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: An arteriovenous fistula (AVF for placed for hemodialysis may be burdened by one particular complication-the formation of a venous aneurysm. It has been shown that matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL could represent markers of disease in both venous and arterial vessels.

  10. Venous Thrombosis and Atherosclerosis is There a link

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU MIN-JUAN; LiU Ze-lin

    2008-01-01

    @@ Venous thrombosis and arterial thrombotic disorders have long been viewed as separate pathophysiological entities, partly as a result of the obvious anatomical differences, as well as their distinct clinical presentations. Recently, the potential association between venous thromboembolism(VTE) and atherosclerosis was described for the first time in 2003. Subsequently, numerous investigations have addressed the topic.

  11. Do we have to anticoagulated patients with cerebral venous thrombosis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feher, G; Illes, Z; Hargroves, D

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a rare form of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Although anticoagulation is recommended for the initial and long term treatment with regards to thrombotic risks for patients with CVT, the role of anticogalution has not been fully elucidated. The aim...... and the outcome of a second event as good as that of the first one irrespective of underlying risk factors....

  12. Risk factors for a first and recurrent venous thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flinterman, Linda Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to identify new risk factors for first and recurrent venous thrombosis of both the upper and lower extremity, and assess the incidence of recurrence and mortality after a first venous thrombosis. An overview was provided of the current literature on risk factors and treatm

  13. Central venous oxygen saturation during hypovolaemic shock in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, P; Iversen, H; Secher, N H

    1993-01-01

    We compared central venous oxygen saturation and central venous pressure (CVP) as indices of the effective blood volume during 50 degrees head-up tilt (anti-Trendelenburg's position) induced hypovolaemic shock in eight healthy subjects. Head-up tilt increased thoracic electrical impedance from 31...

  14. Central venous catheters and catheter locks in children with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handrup, Mette Møller; Møller, Jens Kjølseth; Schrøder, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    To determine if the catheter lock taurolidine can reduce the number of catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) in pediatric cancer patients with tunneled central venous catheters (CVC).......To determine if the catheter lock taurolidine can reduce the number of catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) in pediatric cancer patients with tunneled central venous catheters (CVC)....

  15. Thrombin Avtivable Fibrinolysis Inhibitor in Venous and Arterial Thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.L.E. de Bruijne

    2011-01-01

    textabstractVenous and arterial thromboses are major causes of morbidity and mortality. Venous thrombosis is the result of pathological occlusive clot formation in the veins. It occurs mainly in the deep veins of the leg (deep vein thrombosis), from which parts of the clot frequently embolize to the

  16. Gymnastics injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caine, Dennis J; Nassar, Larry

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to review the distribution and determinants of injury rates as reported in the pediatric gymnastics injury literature, and to suggest measures for the prevention of injury and directions for further research. An extensive search of Pubmed was conducted using the Text and MeSH words "gymnastics" and "injury" and limited to the pediatric population (0-18 years). The review focused on studies using denominator-based designs and on those published in the English language. Additional references were obtained from hand searches of the reference lists. Unpublished injury data from the USA Gymnastics National Women's Artistic Gymnastics Championships during 2002-04 were also analyzed. Comparison of study results was compromised due to the diversity of study populations, variability of injury definition across studies, and changes in rules and equipment across years. Notwithstanding, this review of the literature reveals a reasonably consistent picture of pediatric gymnastics injuries. The incidence and severity of injuries is relatively high, particularly among advanced level female gymnasts. Body parts particularly affected by injury vary by gender and include the ankle, knee, wrist, elbow, lower back, and shoulder. Ankle sprains are a particular concern. Overuse and nonspecific pain conditions, particularly the wrist and low back, occur frequently among advanced-level female gymnasts. Factors associated with an increased injury risk among female gymnasts include greater body size and body fat, periods of rapid growth, and increased life stress. Above all, this overview of the gymnastics injury literature underscores the need to establish large-scale injury surveillance systems designed to provide current and reliable data on injury trends in both boys and girls gymnastics, and to be used as a basis for analyzing injury risk factors and identifying dependable injury preventive measures.

  17. CEREBRAL VENOUS THROMBOSIS AND TURNER SYNDROME: A RARE REPORTED ASSOCIATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guler, A; Alpaydin, S; Bademkiran, F; Sirin, H; Celebisoy, N

    2015-01-01

    Turner Syndrome is the only known viable chromosomal monosomy, characterised by the complete or partial absence of an X chromosome. It's the most common chromosomal abnormality in females. Apart from the well known dysmorphic features of the syndrome, it has been associated with a number of vascular pathologies; mainly involving the cardiovascular, renovascular, peripheral vascular and cerebrovascular system. It seems striking that thromboembolism is not considered as a feature of the syndrome. Most of the thromboembolism cases are related to the arterial vascular system; except for some rare reported portal venous thrombosis cases, peripheral venous thrombosis cases and to the best of our knowledge a single case of cerebral venous thrombosis with Dandy Walker malformation and polymicrogyria. We herein report a cerebral venous thrombosis case with Turner Syndrome. With no other found underlying etiology, we want to highlight that Turner Syndrome, itself, may have a relationship not only with the cerebral arterial vascular system pathologies but also with the cerebral venous thrombosis.

  18. Unilateral Loss of Spontaneous Venous Pulsations in an Astronaut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mader, Thomas H.; Gibson, C. Robert; Lee, Andrew G.; Patel, Nimesh; Hart, Steven; Pettit, Donald R.

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous venous pulsations seen on the optic nerve head (optic disc) are presumed to be caused by fluctuations in the pressure gradient between the intraocular and retrolaminar venous systems. The disappearance of previously documented spontaneous venous pulsations is a well-recognized clinical sign usually associated with a rise in intracranial pressure and a concomitant bilateral elevation of pressure in the subarachnoid space surrounding the optic nerves. In this correspondence we report the unilateral loss of spontaneous venous pulsations in an astronaut 5 months into a long duration space flight. We documented a normal lumbar puncture opening pressure 8 days post mission. The spontaneous venous pulsations were also documented to be absent 21 months following return to Earth.. We hypothesize that these changes may have resulted from a chronic unilateral rise in optic nerve sheath pressure caused by a microgravity-induced optic nerve sheath compartment syndrome.

  19. Bicycling injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberman, Marc R

    2013-01-01

    Bicycling injuries can be classified into bicycle contact, traumatic, and overuse injuries. Despite the popularity of cycling, there are few scientific studies regarding injuries. Epidemiological studies are difficult to compare due to different methodologies and the diverse population of cyclists studied. There are only three studies conducted on top level professionals. Ninety-four percent of professionals in 1 year have experienced at least one overuse injury. Most overuse injuries are mild with limited time off the bike. The most common site of overuse injury is the knee, and the most common site of traumatic injury is the shoulder, with the clavicle having the most common fracture. Many overuse and bicycle contact ailments are relieved with simple bike adjustments.

  20. THE AZYGOS VENOUS SYSTEM AND ITS ANATOMICAL VARIATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madiki Sudhakara Rao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available AIMS AND OBJECTIVES Azygos veins are important cavocaval and portacaval junctions, which form a collateral circulation in caval vein occlusion and in portal hypertension, cirrhosis of liver. The unpaired azygos venous system consists of azygos vein, hemiazygos vein and accessory azygos vein. This system of veins, along with its mediastinal, bronchial and oesophageal tributaries drains most of the body wall of trunk, namely posterior abdominal and thoracic wall. Anatomical variations of this unpaired azygos venous system are clinically important. AIMS To study and report the occurrence of anatomical variations of the unpaired azygos venous system in the region of East Godavari District, Andhra Pradesh (India. METHODS The present study was carried out in the Department of Anatomy, KIMS & RF, Amalapuram and G.S.L. Medical College, Rajahmundry over a period of 2 years. The present study was conducted on 60 cadavers (irrespective of age and sex. The entire course of the azygos venous system in these 60 cadavers was carefully observed and documented. RESULTS Anatomical variations were present in 16.66% of cases, out of which three distinct types were identified. 6.6% exhibited two separate azygos venous systems with no communications, 5% with communication between the left brachiocephalic vein and the azygos vein and 5% presence of post-aortic venous channels. CONCLUSION Variations of azygos venous system may be wrongly dubbed as aneurysm, lymphadenopathy or other abnormalities while reporting a CT scan of mediastinum. Venous anomalies are also detected only during surgery. The most troublesome intraoperative hazard is haemorrhage, which is mainly of venous origin. To avoid such situations is to have an awareness and knowledge of the expected venous anomalies.

  1. Association of varicosities and concomitant deep venous thrombosis in patients with superficial venous thrombosis, a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baggen, Vivan J M; Chung, Kaman; Koole, Koos; Sarneel, Michelle H J; Rutten, Frans H; Hajer, Gideon R

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In patients with superficial venous thrombosis (SVT) co-existence of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) can be present. Varicosities are considered as a risk factor for both SVT and DVT separately. However, current evidence is contradictory whether varicosities are associated with an increased

  2. Improvements of venous tone with pycnogenol in chronic venous insufficiency: an ex vivo study on venous segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcaro, Gianni; Dugall, Mark; Luzzi, Roberta; Hosoi, M; Corsi, Marcello

    2014-03-01

    This study evaluated the stretching and dilatation of venous segments ex vivo in subjects with primary varicose veins in comparison with comparable segments from subjects that used the supplement Pycnogenol (150 mg/d) for 3 months before surgery. Subjects with varicose veins and chronic venous insufficiency voluntarily used Pycnogenol for a period of at least 3 months. The segments of veins removed with surgery (in 30 subjects that had used Pycnogenol and in 10 comparable control subjects that had not used the supplement) were compared with normal, unused vein segments harvested for bypass grafting. The segments were suspended and a weight was attached to the distal part of the veins for 3 minutes and dilated with pressurized water. Digital images were recorded; the veins were measured before and after stretching to evaluate elongation. The manipulation of the vein segment was minimal. Tests were completed within 20 minutes after harvesting the veins. All segments were 4 cm long. The stretching test indicated a significantly higher level of passive elongation in control, varicose segments (2.29; 0.65 mm) in comparison with 1.39; 0.2 mm in vein segments from Pycnogenol-using patients. The dilation test showed an average higher dilation (2.19; 0.3 mm) in control varicose veins in comparison with varicose veins from Pycnogenol-using patients (1.32; 0.7 mm) (p Pycnogenol-using subjects (p Pycnogenol. Varicose segments had a more significant persistent dilatation and elongation in comparison with normal vein segments. Pycnogenol seems to decrease passive dilatation and stretching and gives vein walls a greater tonic recovery and elasticity that allows the vein to recover its original shape after dynamic stresses.

  3. Injury - kidney and ureter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidney damage; Toxic injury of the kidney; Kidney injury; Traumatic injury of the kidney; Fractured kidney; Inflammatory injury of the kidney; Bruised kidney; Ureteral injury; Pre-renal failure - injury, ...

  4. Venous thromboembolism in 13 Indonesian patients undergoing major orthopedic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karmel L. Tambunan

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To estimate the incidence of VTE in Indonesian patients undergoing major orthopedic surgery and not receiving thromboprophylaxis.Methods: This was an open clinical study of consecutive Indonesian patients undergoing major orthopedic surgery, conducted in 3 centers in Jakarta. Bilateral venography was performed between days 5 and 8 after surgery to detect the asymptomatic and to confi rm the symptomatic VTE. These patients were followed up to one month after surgery.Results: A total of 17 eligible patients were studied, which a median age of 69 years and 76.5% were females. Sixteen out of the 17 patients (94.1% underwent hip fracture surgery (HFS. The median time from injury to surgery was 23 days (range 2 to 197 days, the median duration of surgery was 90 minutes (range 60 to 255 minutes, and the median duration of immobilization was 3 days (range 1 to 44 days. Thirteen out of the 17 patients were willing to undergo contrast venography. A symptomatic VTE was found in 9 patients (69.2% at hospital discharge. Symptomatic VTE was found in 3 patients (23.1%, all corresponding to clinical signs of DVT and none with clinical sign of PE. These patients were treated initially with a low molecular weight heparin, followed by warfarin. Sudden death did not occur up to hospital discharge. From hospital discharge until 1-month follow-up, there were no additional cases of symptomatic VTE. No sudden death, bleeding complication, nor re-hospitalization was found in the present study.Conclusion: The incidence of asymptomatic (69.2% and symptomatic (23.1% VTE after major orthopedic surgery without thromboprophylaxis in Indonesian patients (SMART and AIDA, and still higher than the results of the Western studies. A larger study is required to establish the true incidence, and more importantly, that the use of thromboprophylaxis in these patients is warranted. (Med J Indones 2009; 18: 249-56Keywords: venous thromboembolism (VTE, orthopedic surgery, Indonesia

  5. VENOUS INSUFFICIENCY AND THROMBOEMBOLIC DISEASE IN BARIATRIC SURGERY PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonno van BELLEN

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Context Morbid obesity is associated with various co-morbidities, including chronic venous insufficiency. Bariatric surgery is the only effective treatment for morbid obesity, but with potential risks and possible complications, including venous thromboembolism. Objective To determine the prevalence of clinical and ultrasonographic signs of chronic venous insufficiency in morbid obese patients in preparation for bariatric surgery and the incidence of post-operative venous thromboembolic disease. Methods Patients on work-up for bariatric surgery of Centro Terapêutico Especializado em Fígado (CETEFI and Pro-Gastro surgical teams of the Hospital Beneficência Portuguesa de São Paulo were included. The analysed data were pre-operative findings for venous insufficiency (CEAP - clinical, etiological, anatomical, physiopathologic - classification and venous ultrassonographic findings, type of surgery (open or laparoscopic, abdominal circumference, body mass index (BMI and post-operative ultrassonography search for venous insufficiency and deep venous thrombosis. Results Between March 2007 and December 2009, 95 patients candidates for bariatric surgery had clinical and duplex scan evaluation of the lower limbs venous system. Of the 95 patients, 53 were submitted to the surgical procedure. There was a predominance of women (77.9%, the average age was 38.5 years, average preoperative weight 124.6 kg and average BMI of 45.5 kg/m2. Regarding obesity, 16.8% were obese, and 83.1% were morbidly obese. In relation to the venous findings, 86.3% of the patients did fit CEAP classification less than 3 and 13.7% greater than or equal to 3. Among the post-operative complications, there were four cases of wound infection. Three patients developed post-operative distal venous thrombosis (7.5%, but no one had clinically manifested pulmonary embolism. Conclusion No relation between BMI, CEAP classification and venous ultrassonographic findings were found. Although

  6. Obesity and lower limb venous disease - The epidemic of phlebesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Huw Ob; Popplewell, Matthew; Singhal, Rishi; Smith, Neil; Bradbury, Andrew W

    2017-05-01

    Introduction Lower limb venous disease affects up to one half, and obesity up to one quarter, of the adult population. Many people are therefore affected by, and present to health services for the treatment of both conditions. This article reviews the available evidence of pathophysiological and clinical relationship between obesity and varicose veins, chronic venous insufficiency and ulceration and deep vein thrombosis. Methods A literature search of PubMed and Cochrane libraries was performed in accordance with PRISMA statement from 1946 to 2015, with further article identification from following cited references for articles examining the relationship between obesity and venous disease. Search terms included obesity, overweight, thrombosis, varicose veins, CEAP, chronic venous insufficiency, treatment, endovenous, endothermal, sclerotherapy, bariatric surgery and deep vein thrombosis. Results The proportion of the population suffering from lower limb venous disease and obesity is increasing. Obesity is an important risk factor for all types of lower limb venous disease, and obese patients with lower limb venous disease are more likely to be symptomatic as a result of their lower limb venous disease. The clinical diagnosis, investigation, imaging and treatment of lower limb venous disease in obese people present a number of challenges. The evidence base underpinning medical, surgical and endovenous management of lower limb venous disease in obese people is limited and such treatment may be associated with worse outcomes and increased risks when compared to patients with a normal body mass index. Conclusion Lower limb venous disease and obesity are both increasingly common. As such, phlebologists will be treating ever greater numbers of obese patients with lower limb venous disease, and clinicians in many other specialties are going to be treating a wide range of obesity-related health problems in people with or at risk of lower limb venous disease. Unfortunately

  7. Human cerebral venous outflow pathway depends on posture and central venous pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gisolf, J; van Lieshout, J J; van Heusden, K

    2004-01-01

    and central venous pressure (CVP) on the distribution of cerebral outflow over the internal jugular veins and the vertebral plexus, using a mathematical model. Input to the model was a data set of beat-to-beat cerebral blood flow velocity and CVP measurements in 10 healthy subjects, during baseline rest...... and a Valsalva manoeuvre in the supine and standing position. The model, consisting of 2 jugular veins, each a chain of 10 units containing nonlinear resistances and capacitors, and a vertebral plexus containing a resistance, showed blood flow mainly through the internal jugular veins in the supine position...... and during a Valsalva manoeuvre in both body positions, correlate highly with model simulation of the jugular cross-sectional area (R(2) = 0.97). The results suggest that the cerebral venous flow distribution depends on posture and CVP: in supine humans the internal jugular veins are the primary pathway...

  8. Venous thromboembolism: have we made headway?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a primary cause of preventable hospital death. The need for effective VTE prophylaxis has been recognized by the Surgical Care Improvement Program (SCIP) and the Joint Commission, which is offering VTE prevention as a core measure set, starting October 1, 2009. The adoption of SCIP VTE measures and mandate to publicly report these rates offers the opportunity to improve the use of prophylaxis in surgical patients and reduce VTE-related morbidity, mortality, and costs. Essential to this reduction is a team approach to implementing real-time interventions. Crucial to the success of the team is early identification of each patient's VTE risk and a mechanism to provide key information to ensure that the physician prescribes appropriate prophylaxis. In addition, it may be the nurse who is responsible for ensuring that a patient receives the appropriate prophylaxis, as well as being the first clinician to observe the clinical signs of a VTE event.

  9. Management of varicose veins and venous insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, Allen

    2012-12-26

    Chronic venous disease, reviewed herein, is manifested by a spectrum of signs and symptoms, including cosmetic spider veins, asymptomatic varicosities, large painful varicose veins, edema, hyperpigmentation and lipodermatosclerosis of skin, and ulceration. However, there is no definitive stepwise progression from spider veins to ulcers and, in fact, severe skin complications of varicose veins, even when extensive, are not guaranteed. Treatment options range from conservative (eg, medications, compression stockings, lifestyle changes) to minimally invasive (eg, sclerotherapy or endoluminal ablation), invasive (surgical techniques), and hybrid (combination of ≥1 therapies). Ms L, a 68-year-old woman with varicose veins, is presented. She has had vein problems over the course of her life. Her varicose veins recurred after initial treatment, and she is now seeking guidance regarding her current treatment options.

  10. Venous thromboembolism with inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hugh James Freeman

    2008-01-01

    Venous thrombosis and thromboembolism appear to be increased in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.Although several acquired and genetic risk factors are known,about half that develop a thromboembolic event have no identifiable risk factor.Control of the inflammatory process is thought to be the key factor in risk reduction for thrombotic events.Prophylactic use of anticoagulants is not universally recommended,but possible use should be reviewed in an individual patient after evaluation of the risks,such as hemorrhage,compared to potential benefits.Particular consideration should be given if there has been a prior thrombotic event,if hospitalization will require surgery,or if an underlying coagulation disorder is present.

  11. Controversies in the diagnosis of venous thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gal, G; Righini, M

    2015-06-01

    Over the last decades, important advances have been made in the diagnosis of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Current diagnostic strategies rely on the sequential use of non-invasive diagnostic tests, based on the pretest clinical probability of disease. Diagnostic tests include D-dimer measurement, leg vein compression ultrasonography, chest computed tomography pulmonary angiography, or ventilation perfusion (V/Q) lung scan. The safety and cost-effectiveness of these strategies have been extensively validated. They have been widely implemented in clinical practice and have replaced the historical gold standard diagnostic tests (venography and pulmonary angiography). However, new challenges arise, including a lower clinical suspicion threshold and concerns on potential over-diagnosis of VTE. Moreover, the diagnostic management remains suboptimal in many subgroups of patients with suspected VTE: patients with prior VTE, pregnant women, or elderly patients.

  12. [Prophylaxis of venous thromboembolism after severe stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riabinkina, Iu V; Gnedovskaia, E V; Piradov, M A; Kuntsevich, G I

    2010-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE), a deep and superficial thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, is a very important problem of severe stroke. Pulmonary embolism (PE) significantly influences the course and outcome of severe stroke. The cause of this effect lies not only in severe patient's condition, high risk of VTE and difficulties in diagnosis of VTE but in still common limits in prophylaxis and treatment of PE in severe stroke, first of all, in brain hemorrhages and large brain infarctions with secondary hemorrhage. The paper presents the main principles and methods of prophylaxis of VTE in severe stroke. The suggested approach allows to decrease the frequency of VTE and fatal outcomes in severe stroke in the modern neuro-intensive care units.

  13. Contraception-related venous thromboembolism in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Sarah H

    2014-02-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a rare but serious complication of combined hormonal contraception. While the absolute risk of VTE is low in adolescents, thrombotic events in contraception users younger than the age of 20 years account for 5 to 10% of total contraception-related VTE events in population studies, because of the high frequency of contraception use in adolescents. An increased risk of VTE exists not only with oral contraceptives, but also the contraceptive patch and vaginal ring. Most adolescents who experience contraception-related VTE have additional transient or inherited thrombotic risk factors at the time of VTE. Although the presence of inherited thrombophilia impacts the risk of contraception-related VTE, thrombophilia screening before contraception prescribing should be targeted only to high-risk populations. Pediatric institutions, caregivers, and young women need to be aware of the risk of VTE with estrogen-containing contraception, and maintain a high index of suspicion for this complication in women using these agents.

  14. Role of surgery in iliofemoral venous thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, R B

    1986-05-01

    Thrombectomy has a limited but definite role in the clinical management of patients with iliofemoral venous thrombosis. It is best applied selectively to achieve specific goals in two different groups of patients at either end of the disease spectrum. In relatively active healthy young patients with phlegmasia alba dolens operated on relatively soon after thrombosis, better protection against the late postthrombotic sequelae can be achieved. Patients with malignancy, underlying coagulopathy, or those who are inactive or have a limited life expectancy due to age or concurrent disease should not be operated on for bland thrombosis. At the other extreme, when phlegmasia cerulea dolens causes painful tense swelling, increases compartmental or decreases ankle pressures, and threatens limb viability in spite of heparinization and leg elevation, thrombectomy should be performed.

  15. Statins and prevention of venous thromboembolism: Myth or reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaertner, Sébastien; Cordeanu, Eléna-Mihaela; Nouri, Salah; Mirea, Corina; Stephan, Dominique

    2016-03-01

    The pleiotropic effects of statins, beyond their cholesterol-lowering properties, are much debated. In primary prevention, several observational cohort and case-control studies appear to show that statins reduce the incidence of venous thromboembolism by about 30%. In a single randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial (JUPITER), which included 17,000 patients, rosuvastatin 20mg/day reduced the risk of venous thromboembolism by 43%. However, these patients were at low risk of venous thromboembolism, and the frequency of the event was, in principle, low. In secondary prevention, several observational studies and post-hoc analyses of randomized clinical trials have suggested that statins may prevent recurrence of venous thromboembolism. However, none of these studies had enough scientific weight to form the basis of a recommendation to use statins for secondary prevention. The putative preventive effect of statins appears to be independent of plasma cholesterol concentration and could be a pharmacological property of the statin class, although a dose-effect relationship has not been demonstrated. The mechanism through which statins might prevent venous thrombosis is thought to involve their anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects or perhaps a more specific action, by blocking the degradation of antithrombotic proteins. A mechanism involving the action of statins on interactions between risk factors for atherosclerosis and venous thromboembolism is supported by some studies, but not all. In the absence of firm evidence, statins cannot currently be recommended for primary or secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism.

  16. Paragliding injuries.

    OpenAIRE

    Krüger-Franke, M; Siebert, C H; Pförringer, W

    1991-01-01

    Regulations controlling the sport of paragliding were issued in April 1987 by the German Department of Transportation. The growing popularity of this sport has led to a steady increase in the number of associated injuries. This study presents the incidence, localization and degree of injuries associated with paragliding documented in Germany, Austria and Switzerland. The 283 injuries suffered by 218 paragliders were documented in the period 1987-1989: 181 occurred during landing, 28 during st...

  17. Absence of venous valves in mice lacking Connexin37.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munger, Stephanie J; Kanady, John D; Simon, Alexander M

    2013-01-15

    Venous valves play a crucial role in blood circulation, promoting the one-way movement of blood from superficial and deep veins towards the heart. By preventing retrograde flow, venous valves spare capillaries and venules from being subjected to damaging elevations in pressure, especially during skeletal muscle contraction. Pathologically, valvular incompetence or absence of valves are common features of venous disorders such as chronic venous insufficiency and varicose veins. The underlying causes of these conditions are not well understood, but congenital venous valve aplasia or agenesis may play a role in some cases. Despite progress in the study of cardiac and lymphatic valve morphogenesis, the molecular mechanisms controlling the development and maintenance of venous valves remain poorly understood. Here, we show that in valved veins of the mouse, three gap junction proteins (Connexins, Cxs), Cx37, Cx43, and Cx47, are expressed exclusively in the valves in a highly polarized fashion, with Cx43 on the upstream side of the valve leaflet and Cx37 on the downstream side. Surprisingly, Cx43 expression is strongly induced in the non-valve venous endothelium in superficial veins following wounding of the overlying skin. Moreover, we show that in Cx37-deficient mice, venous valves are entirely absent. Thus, Cx37, a protein involved in cell-cell communication, is one of only a few proteins identified so far as critical for the development or maintenance of venous valves. Because Cxs are necessary for the development of valves in lymphatic vessels as well, our results support the notion of common molecular pathways controlling valve development in veins and lymphatic vessels.

  18. Nontraumatic vascular emergencies: imaging and intervention in acute venous occlusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haage, Patrick; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Technology Aachen, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52057 Aachen (Germany); Krings, Timo [Department of Neuroradiology, University of Technology Aachen, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52057 Aachen (Germany)

    2002-11-01

    Risk factors for acute venous occlusion range from prolonged immobilization to hypercoagulability syndromes, trauma, and malignancy. The aim of this review article is to illustrate the different imaging options for the diagnosis of acute venous occlusion and to assess the value of interventional strategies for venous thrombosis treatment in an emergency setting. First, diagnosis and treatment of the most common form of venous occlusion, at the level of the lower extremities, is presented, followed by pelvic vein and inferior vena cava occlusion, mesenteric venous thrombosis, upper extremity occlusion, acute cerebral vein thrombosis, and finally acute venous occlusion of hemodialysis access. In acute venous occlusion of the lower extremity phlebography is still the reference gold standard. Presently, duplex ultrasound with manual compression is the most sensitive and specific noninvasive test. Limitations of ultrasonography include isolated distal calf vein occlusion, obesity, and patients with lower extremity edema. If sonography is nondiagnostic, venography should be considered. Magnetic resonance venography can differentiate an acute occlusion from chronic thrombus, but because of its high cost and limited availability, it is not yet used for the routine diagnosis of lower extremity venous occlusion only. Regarding interventional treatment, catheter-directed thrombolysis can be applied to dissolve thrombus in charily selected patients with symptomatic occlusion and no contraindications to therapy. Acute occlusion of the pelvic veins and the inferior vena cava, often due to extension from the femoropopliteal system, represents a major risk for pulmonary embolism. Color flow Doppler imaging is often limited owing to obesity and bowel gas. Venography has long been considered the gold standard for identifying proximal venous occlusion. Both CT scanning and MR imaging, however, can even more accurately diagnose acute pelvis vein or inferior vena cava occlusion. MRI is

  19. Paragliding injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger-Franke, M; Siebert, C H; Pförringer, W

    1991-06-01

    Regulations controlling the sport of paragliding were issued in April 1987 by the German Department of Transportation. The growing popularity of this sport has led to a steady increase in the number of associated injuries. This study presents the incidence, localization and degree of injuries associated with paragliding documented in Germany, Austria and Switzerland. The 283 injuries suffered by 218 paragliders were documented in the period 1987-1989: 181 occurred during landing, 28 during starting procedures and nine during flight. The mean patient age was 29.6 years. There were 34.9% spinal injuries, 13.4% upper extremity injuries and 41.3% lower limb injuries. Over half of these injuries were treated surgically and in 54 instances permanent disability remained. In paragliding the lower extremities are at greatest risk of injury during landing. Proper equipment, especially sturdy footwear, exact training in landing techniques as well as improved instruction in procedures during aborted or crash landings is required to reduce the frequency of these injuries.

  20. Extensive portal venous gas: Unlikely etiology and outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffany P. Schatz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Portal venous gas or hepatic portal venous gas (HPVG found on imaging portends grave outcomes for patients suffering from ischemic bowel disease or mesenteric ischemia. HPVG is more rarely seen with severe but treatable abdominal infection as well as multiple benign conditions, and therefore must be aggressively evaluated. We report a 70-year old female who developed extensive intra- and extra-hepatic portal venous gas, pneumatosis intestinalis and free air associated with a perforation of the jejunojejunostomy after a gastrectomy for gastric carcinoma.

  1. Extensive portal venous gas: Unlikely etiology and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatz, Tiffany P; Nassif, Mohammed O; Farma, Jeffrey M

    2015-01-01

    Portal venous gas or hepatic portal venous gas (HPVG) found on imaging portends grave outcomes for patients suffering from ischemic bowel disease or mesenteric ischemia. HPVG is more rarely seen with severe but treatable abdominal infection as well as multiple benign conditions, and therefore must be aggressively evaluated. We report a 70-year old female who developed extensive intra- and extra-hepatic portal venous gas, pneumatosis intestinalis and free air associated with a perforation of the jejunojejunostomy after a gastrectomy for gastric carcinoma.

  2. Venous anomalies as potentially lethal risk factors during ordinary catheterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savino Occhionorelli

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Venous malformations are rare but possible findings too, constituting a further risk factor for central venous catheter procedures. Herein we describe a case of death because of an innominate vein perforation by a catheter that incidentally was tucked into a sacciform malformation. Even if the technology advancement is constantly offering us new investigation tools, up to now diagnostic options are limited in the detection of those malformations that could potentially lead to dramatic complications as the described one. The present work raises the awareness about rare venous anomalies and their potential clinical implications. A proper literature review and diagnostic implementation proposal are reported.

  3. Imaging of the complications of peripherally inserted central venous catheters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amerasekera, S.S.H. [Department of Radiology, Good Hope Hospital, Sutton Coldfield, Birmingham (United Kingdom)], E-mail: steve.amerasekera@nhs.net; Jones, C.M.; Patel, R.; Cleasby, M.J. [Department of Radiology, Good Hope Hospital, Sutton Coldfield, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2009-08-15

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) are widely used to provide central venous access, often in chronically ill patients with long-term intravenous access requirements. There are a number of significant complications related to both insertion and maintenance of PICC lines, including catheter malposition, migration, venous thrombosis, and line fracture. The incidence of these complications is likely to rise as the number of patients undergoing intravenous outpatient therapy increases, with a corresponding rise in radiologist input. This paper provides an overview of the relevant peripheral and central venous anatomy, including anatomical variations, and outlines the complications of PICC lines. Imaging examples demonstrate the range of radiological findings seen in these complications.

  4. Imaging of the complications of peripherally inserted central venous catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amerasekera, S S H; Jones, C M; Patel, R; Cleasby, M J

    2009-08-01

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) are widely used to provide central venous access, often in chronically ill patients with long-term intravenous access requirements. There are a number of significant complications related to both insertion and maintenance of PICC lines, including catheter malposition, migration, venous thrombosis, and line fracture. The incidence of these complications is likely to rise as the number of patients undergoing intravenous outpatient therapy increases, with a corresponding rise in radiologist input. This paper provides an overview of the relevant peripheral and central venous anatomy, including anatomical variations, and outlines the complications of PICC lines. Imaging examples demonstrate the range of radiological findings seen in these complications.

  5. [Implantable subcutaneous venous access. 1. Reasons that justify its use].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postigo Mota, S; Durán Gómez, N; Lavado García, J M; Rey Sánchez, P; Canal Macías, M L; Pedrera Zamorano, J D

    2002-02-01

    Chemotherapy treatment or the administering parenteral feeding requires permanent venous access during weeks, months or perhaps years. To have available an adequate venous access while treating gravely ill patients is fundamental in order to guarantee the perfusion of fluids blood transfusions administration of medicines, to supply intravenous feeding, to draw blood samples, etc. In this article, which will have a follow-up which concentrates on proper handling, the authors expose the reasons why subcutaneous venous access implants and used as well as how to deal with one of their main complications; extravasation. A bibliography will accompany the follow-up article.

  6. Traumatic dural venous sinus thrombosis: A Mini Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moscote-Salazar Luis Rafael

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The dural venous sinus thrombosis is a benign disease, representing about 1% of cerebral vascular events. In some cases the development of the disease increased intracranial pressure or symptomatic epilepsy. The development towards a dural venous sinus thrombosis is rare, but is a condition to be considered before the development of ischemic vascular events and a history of recent head trauma. Intracranial hematomas or skull fractures can lead to the establishment of obstructive pathology of the dural venous sinuses. The knowledge of this entity is necessary for the critical care staff and neurosurgery staff.

  7. Role of sodium tetradecyl sulfate in venous malformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saraf Sanjay

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Venous malformations are one of the commonest anomalies of the vascular tree and their management has always remained a major challenge. Surgery and other treatment modalities are not always satisfactory and have a higher morbidity, recurrence and complication rate. The author retrospectively analyzed 40 patients of venous malformations who underwent sclerotherapy with sodium tetradecyl sulfate solely or as an adjunct to surgery. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of sodium tetradecyl sulfate sclerotherapy in the treatment of venous malformations.

  8. Acute Mesenteric Venous Thrombosis with a Vaginal Contraceptive Ring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wesley Eilbert

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Mesenteric venous thrombosis is a rare cause of abdominal pain, which if left untreated may result in bowel infarction, peritonitis and death. The majority of patients with this illness have a recognizable, predisposing prothrombotic condition. Oral contraceptives have been identified as a predisposing factor for mesenteric venous thrombosis in reproductive-aged women. In the last fifteen years new methods of hormonal birth control have been introduced, including a transdermal patch and an intravaginal ring. In this report, we describe a case of mesenteric venous thrombosis in a young woman caused by a vaginal contraceptive ring. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(4:395-397.

  9. Effectiveness of mesoglycan in patients with previous deep venous thrombosis and chronic venous insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreozzi, G M

    2007-12-01

    Retrospective analysis of mesoglycan therapeutic activity in venous disorders. The clinical data have been selected from the outpatient database of the Chair of Angiology of the University of Catania (from 1988 to 1997) through a cross survey between the prescription commercial name of mesoglycan and the key words varicose veins, deep venous thrombosis (DVT), chronic venous insufficiency (CVI), post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS), venous thrombosis, venous ulcer. Patients have been selected on the basis of definite data relative to principal diagnosis, clinical history, clinical and instrumental objective phlebological picture, posology and duration of treatment, follow-up visits in the first three years following the first observation. Group 1: 56 patients with first episode DVT; Group 2: 27 patients with recurrent DVT; Group 3: 182 patients with CVI (107 with primitive CVI and 75 with secondary CVI). The selected patients data have been included in new databases. DVT patients were evaluated for recurrence prevalence during the follow-up period (6, 12, 18, 24, 30 and 36 months). In Group 2 the recurrence prevalence in the normal follow-up period was evaluated and, in addition, the clinical chronology of the recurrence previous to observation was drawn, in order to find out the recurrence prevalence of the thrombotic episode preceding our observation. The two prevalence trends ( mesoglycan treatment and episode preceding our observation) have been compared with the Student t test. CVI patients (Group 3) were classified according to CEAP classification criteria. The effectiveness of treatment was assessed according to the changes in the scores of venous dysfunction of CEAP classification (disability score; pain; oedema; skin color change; cutaneous ulcer). The mean and standard deviation of the considered scores have been evaluated with the Student t test comparing each series with the immediately previous series and with the T0 series. The mean dose of mesoglycan was 50

  10. [Reliability of venous blood gas analysis and radionuclide angiography in post-traumatic dystrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scola, A; Scola, E

    2017-06-01

    The diagnosis "post-traumatic dystrophy" (PTD) was first defined with clinical and paraclinical criteria by Scola et al. in 2013. The objectivity and reliability of the paraclinical criteria (venous blood gas analysis [vBGA], radionuclide angiography [RNA]), and recommendations for therapy should be assessed in a prospective study. In five patients with clinical signs of post-traumatic nonbacterial inflammation of the hand, both diagnosis and a 3‑week hospital treatment were carried out in accordance with the publication mentioned above. The primary traumata (four fractures and one soft-tissue injury) were located in either the hand or the forearm. Unsuccessful outpatient treatment always led to hospital admission. One patient with severe osteopenia in the hand skeleton was treated with bisphosphonates for 6 months. All patients fulfilled the clinical and paraclinical criteria for the diagnosis of PTD. On admission, an elevated venous partial pressure of oxygen was found by vBGA in the affected hand (∆pO2 mean 22 ± 3 mm Hg) and a hyperperfusion due to arteriovenous shunts was measured using RNA (mean 75 ± 47%). The symptomatic treatment was extremely well tolerated; by the time of discharge, all patients achieved full functioning of the hand with minor loss of strength (venous ∆pO2 mean 5 ± 3 mm Hg). The osteopenia in the one patient treated with bisphosphonates showed recalcification after 6 months. The reliability of clinical and paraclinical criteria for PTD were confirmed. vBGA and RNA seem to be good parameters for confirming the diagnosis of PTD. "Rubor," a symptom traditionally interpreted as "hyperemia," contradicts the paraclinical findings and leads to the assumption that the cause of this post-traumatic syndrome is microvascular dysfunction.

  11. The risk of venous thrombosis in individuals with a history of superficial vein thrombosis and acquired venous thrombotic risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Rachel E J; Lijfering, Willem M; van Hylckama Vlieg, Astrid; Helmerhorst, Frans M; Rosendaal, Frits R; Cannegieter, Suzanne C

    2013-12-19

    Superficial vein thrombosis (SVT) increases the risk of venous thrombosis fourfold to sixfold. As most individuals with SVT do not develop venous thrombosis, additional risk factors may explain the risk of developing a venous thrombosis. In the Multiple Environmental and Genetic Assessment of risk factors for venous thrombosis study, we assessed the risk of venous thrombosis in individuals with previous SVT and a mild thrombotic risk factor (smoking or overweight/obesity), a strong risk factor (surgery, hospitalization, plaster cast immobilization, or malignancy), or a reproductive factor in women (oral contraception, postmenopausal hormone therapy, or pregnancy/puerperium). Individuals with previous SVT alone had a 5.5-fold (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.4-6.8) increased risk of venous thrombosis. This was 9.3 (95% CI, 7.2-12.1) combined with a mild thrombotic risk factor, 31.4 (95% CI, 14.6-67.5) with a strong risk factor, and 34.9 (95% CI, 19.1-63.8) in women with a reproductive risk factor. The highest separate risk estimates were found for SVT with surgery (42.5; 95% CI, 10.2-177.6), hospitalization (49.8; 95% CI, 11.9-209.2), or oral contraception (43.0; 95% CI, 15.5-119.3 in women). In conclusion, the risk of venous thrombosis is markedly increased in individuals with previous SVT who have an acquired thrombotic risk factor.

  12. Rowing injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumball, Jane S; Lebrun, Constance M; Di Ciacca, Stephen R; Orlando, Karen

    2005-01-01

    Participation in the sport of rowing has been steadily increasing in recent decades, yet few studies address the specific injuries incurred. This article reviews the most common injuries described in the literature, including musculoskeletal problems in the lower back, ribs, shoulder, wrist and knee. A review of basic rowing physiology and equipment is included, along with a description of the mechanics of the rowing stroke. This information is necessary in order to make an accurate diagnosis and treatment protocol for these injuries, which are mainly chronic in nature. The most frequently injured region is the low back, mainly due to excessive hyperflexion and twisting, and can include specific injuries such as spondylolysis, sacroiliac joint dysfunction and disc herniation. Rib stress fractures account for the most time lost from on-water training and competition. Although theories abound for the mechanism of injury, the exact aetiology of rib stress fractures remains unknown. Other injuries discussed within, which are specific to ribs, include costochondritis, costovertebral joint subluxation and intercostal muscle strains. Shoulder pain is quite common in rowers and can be the result of overuse, poor technique, or tension in the upper body. Injuries concerning the forearm and wrist are also common, and can include exertional compartment syndrome, lateral epicondylitis, deQuervain's and intersection syndrome, and tenosynovitis of the wrist extensors. In the lower body, the major injuries reported include generalised patellofemoral pain due to abnormal patellar tracking, and iliotibial band friction syndrome. Lastly, dermatological issues, such as blisters and abrasions, and miscellaneous issues, such as environmental concerns and the female athlete triad, are also included in this article.Pathophysiology, mechanism of injury, assessment and management strategies are outlined in the text for each injury, with special attention given to ways to correct

  13. Report of an unusual combination of arterial, venous and neural variations in a cadaveric upper limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troupis, Theodore G; Michalinos, Adamantios; Manou, Vasiliki; Vlastos, Dimitrios; Johnson, Elizabeth O; Demesticha, Theano; Skandalakis, Panayiotis

    2014-01-01

    In this study an unusual combination of arterial, venous and neural variations discovered during dissection of cervical, axillary and brachial area of a cadaver is described. Variations are thoroughly described and literature is briefly reviewed. Lateral cord of brachial plexus was not formed; Eight Cervical root divided into anterior and posterior division before uniting with First Thoracic root and Upper Trunk was unusually short. Axillary artery gave origin to a superficial brachial artery and then continued as deep brachial artery. Multiple variations in typical axillary artery branches were present including existence of inferior pectoral artery. Cephalic vein was absent. A variety of interventions, from relative simple as central venous catheter placement to most complicated as brachial plexus injury repair demand thorough knowledge of area's regional anatomy. Familiarity with anatomic variations allows more precise and careful interventions. Research on these variations is valuable for anatomists and embryologists but also for clinicians because it may provide useful information for non - typical cases but also helps in raising a high level of suspicion.

  14. Arterial Misplacement of a Femoral Central Venous Catheter Complicated with Acute Arterial Occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung-Lung Hung

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Femoral vein catheterization is often carried out during resuscitation and in critical care units. It is usually achieved via a blind, external landmark-guided technique, through manual localization of the femoral artery. However, this approach can be challenging in patients with severe shock because of absence or ambiguity of the arterial pulse. We report a case of inadvertent cannulation, with a large-bore catheter, of the right femoral artery, which was mistaken as a venous route for medication and massive transfusion. The large cannula caused direct mechanical obstruction, while intra-arterial medications induced vascular injury and vasospasm. Both factors led to thrombosis and occlusion of the right external iliac artery, thus jeopardizing the distal blood supply, and ultimately resulting in muscle necrosis of the involved limb, and the need for thrombectomy and extensive fasciotomy to salvage the extremity. This case highlights that correct placement of a central venous catheter should be clearly ascertained before the catheter is used for medical treatment, especially when catheterization is performed in shock status.

  15. Ocular Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... eye and face protection is essential to prevent injuries. Sports such as hockey, baseball, racquet ball, squash, and shooting require protective goggles or full face mask wear at all times. Do fireworks still cause eye injuries? Each year hundreds of individuals (often children) sustain ...

  16. Whiplash injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malanga, Gerard; Peter, Jason

    2005-10-01

    Whiplash injuries are very common and usually are associated with rear-end collisions. However, a whiplash injury can be caused by any event that results in hyperextension and flexion of the cervical spine. These injuries are of serious concern to all consumers due to escalating cost of diagnosis, treatment, insurance, and litigation. Most acute whiplash injury cases respond well to conservative treatments, which result in resolution of symptoms usually within weeks to a few months after the injury occurred. Chronic whiplash injuries often are harder to diagnose and treat and often result in poor outcomes. Current research shows that various structures in the cervical spine receive nociceptive innervation and potentially may be the cause of chronic pain symptoms. One potential pain generator showing promise is the facet or zygapophyseal joints. Various researchers have proven that these joints are injured during whiplash injuries and that diagnosis and temporary pain relief can be obtained with facet joint injections. The initial evaluation of any patient should follow an organized and stepwise approach, and more serious causes of neck pain must first be ruled out through the history, physical examination, and diagnostic testing. Treatment regimens should be evidence-based, focusing on treatments that have proven to be effective in treating acute and chronic whiplash injuries.

  17. Central venous catheter placement: where is the tip?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, George M

    2012-09-01

    The insertion of central venous catheters is a common bedside procedure performed in intensive care units. Here, we present a case of an 82-year-old man who underwent insertion of a central venous catheter in the internal jugular vein without perceived complications. Postprocedural radiographs showed rostral migration of the catheter, and computed tomography performed coincidentally showed cannulation of the jugular bulb at the level of the jugular foramen. To our knowledge, this is the first report to document migration of a central venous catheter from the internal jugular vein into the dural sinuses, as confirmed by computed tomography. The case highlights the importance of acquiring postprocedural radiographs for all insertions of central venous catheters to confirm catheter placement.

  18. Deep venous thrombosis and postthrombotic syndrome: invasive management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comerota, A J

    2015-03-01

    Invasive management of postthrombotic syndrome encompasses the two ends of the deep vein thrombosis spectrum, patients with acute iliofemoral deep vein thrombosis and those with chronic postthrombotic iliofemoral venous obstruction. Of all patients with acute deep vein thrombosis, those with involvement of the iliofemoral segments have the most severe chronic postthrombotic morbidity. Catheter-based techniques now permit percutaneous treatment to eliminate thrombus, restore patency, potentially maintain valvular function, and improve quality of life. Randomized trial data support an initial treatment strategy of thrombus removal. Failure to eliminate acute thrombus from the iliofemoral system leads to chronic postthrombotic obstruction of venous outflow. Debilitating chronic postthrombotic symptoms of the long-standing obstruction of venous outflow can be reduced by restoring unobstructed venous drainage from the profunda femoris vein to the vena cava.

  19. [Perioperative acute kidney injury and failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhor, Vibol; Journois, Didier

    2014-04-01

    Perioperative period is very likely to lead to acute renal failure because of anesthesia (general or perimedullary) and/or surgery which can cause acute kidney injury. Characterization of acute renal failure is based on serum creatinine level which is imprecise during and following surgery. Studies are based on various definitions of acute renal failure with different thresholds which skewed their comparisons. The RIFLE classification (risk, injury, failure, loss, end stage kidney disease) allows clinicians to distinguish in a similar manner between different stages of acute kidney injury rather than using a unique definition of acute renal failure. Acute renal failure during the perioperative period can mainly be explained by iatrogenic, hemodynamic or surgical causes and can result in an increased morbi-mortality. Prevention of this complication requires hemodynamic optimization (venous return, cardiac output, vascular resistance), discontinuation of nephrotoxic drugs but also knowledge of the different steps of the surgery to avoid further degradation of renal perfusion. Diuretics do not prevent acute renal failure and may even push it forward especially during the perioperative period when venous retourn is already reduced. Edema or weight gain following surgery are not correlated with the vascular compartment volume, much less with renal perfusion. Treatment of perioperative acute renal failure is similar to other acute renal failure. Renal replacement therapy must be mastered to prevent any additional risk of hemodynamic instability or hydro-electrolytic imbalance.

  20. Air pollution and venous thrombosis: a meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Liang; Wang, Qing-yun; Cheng, Zhi-Peng; Hu, Bei; Liu, Jing-di; Hu, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to air pollution has been linked to cardiovascular and respiratory disorders. However, the effect of air pollution on venous thrombotic disorders is uncertain. We performed a meta-analysis to assess the association between air pollution and venous thrombosis. PubMed, Embase, EBM Reviews, Healthstar, Global Health, Nursing Database, and Web of Science were searched for citations on air pollutants (carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, ozone, and particulate matters) and v...

  1. Venous air embolism following insufflation of the urethra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanlinthout, L; Boghaert, A; Thienpont, L

    1986-01-01

    Venous air embolism following urethral inflation only scarcely documented: an extensive search of the literature yielded four papers relating to this subject. We report a new case of venous air embolism due to this uncommon etiology. Careful study revealed some common pathogenetic features with previously reported cases. Some important precautions can diminish the likelihood of gas embolism and reduce its fatal outcome in situations, similar to the kind mentioned.

  2. Personal Computer System for Automatic Coronary Venous Flow Measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Dew, Robert B.

    1985-01-01

    We developed an automated system based on an IBM PC/XT Personal computer to measure coronary venous blood flow during cardiac catheterization. Flow is determined by a thermodilution technique in which a cold saline solution is infused through a catheter into the coronary venous system. Regional temperature fluctuations sensed by the catheter are used to determine great cardiac vein and coronary sinus blood flow. The computer system replaces manual methods of acquiring and analyzing temperatur...

  3. DELAYED BILATERAL HYDROTHORAX AFTER CENTRAL VENOUS CATHERIZATION: A CASE REPORT

    OpenAIRE

    Arpana; Moses Charles D; Kutappa; Deepa

    2014-01-01

    : Central venous catheterization is a common procedure in anesthetic management of patients undergoing major surgery or care of critically ill patients. Delayed complication such as hydrothorax, hydromediastinum or cardiac tamponade is extremely rare with a few case reports. We report a case of bilateral hydrothorax due to migration of the tip of the central venous catheter from within the vein into the mediastinum following subclavian vein catheterization.

  4. The up-to-date management of venous thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Anob M

    2015-08-01

    There have been a number of developments in the management of venous thromboembolism over the past few years. Old questions, such as thrombolysis, have been revisited in recent trials. New initiatives, such as ambulatory care pathways, are being established across the country. This conference brought together doctors from the UK, USA, Spain and Australia to review the up-to-date management of venous thromboembolism. © Royal College of Physicians 2015. All rights reserved.

  5. Prolonged venous bleeding due to traditional treatment with leech bite: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altun Hasan

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The medicinal leech, Hirudo medicinalis, has been used in the treatment of many diseases for thousands of years. In Turkey, it is used most commonly in the management of venous diseases of lower extremities. Case presentation A 25-year-old Turkish woman presented to our emergency room with bleeding from her left leg. She had been treated for varicose veins in her lower extremities with leeches about 24 hours before admission to the emergency room. The bleeding was controlled by applying pressure with sterile gauze upon the wound, and she was discharged. She returned after four hours having started bleeding again. Hemostasis was achieved by vein ligation under local anesthesia. Conclusions Leech bite should be evaluated as a special injury. Prolonged bleeding can be seen after leech bites. In such cases, hemostasis either with local pressure or ligation of the bleeding vessel is mandatory.

  6. Adipsic diabetes insipidus and venous thromboembolism (VTE): recommendations for addressing its hypercoagulability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miljic, Dragana; Miljic, Predrag; Doknic, Mirjana; Pekic, Sandra; Stojanovic, Marko; Petakov, Milan; Popovic, Vera

    2014-01-01

    Adipsic diabetes insipidus (ADI) is a rare disorder. It can occur after transcranial surgery for craniopharyngeoma, suprasellar pituitary adenoma and anterior communicating artery aneurysm but also with head injury, toluene exposure and developmental disorders. It is often associated with significant hypothalamic dysfunction and complications like obesity, sleep apnea, thermoregulatory disorders, seizures and venous thromboembolism (VTE). Morbidity and mortality data have been reported as single case reports with only one large series suggesting increased risk for VTE in patients with ADI. Here we report a mini-series of four patients with ADI and VTE. Post-surgery immobilization, obesity, infection, with prolonged hospitalization, hemoconcentration and changes in coagulation which might be induced by inadequate hormone treatment in the postoperative period (high doses of glucocorticoids, sex steroids and DDAVP replacement) may all contribute to the pathogenesis of VTE. Thromboprophylactic treatment after pituitary surgery and during episodes of hypernatremia is therefore warranted.

  7. “Tennis leg”: gastrocnemius injury is a far more common cause than plantaris rupture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joelle R. Harwin, BS

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We report a typical case of “tennis leg”, in which the main finding was a fluid collection between the medial head of the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles. Since the first clinical description of this entity in 1883, the injury has been attributed to rupture of the plantaris tendon. However, recent studies of this condition with sonography and magnetic resonance imaging have shown that most of these cases are actually due to injury to the gastrocnemius and/or soleus muscles, and up to 10% are due to deep venous thrombosis masquerading as muscle injury. The plantaris muscle and tendon are only rarely involved in this injury.

  8. Portal-venous gas unrelated to mesenteric ischemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiesner, Walter; Mortele, Koenraad J.; Ji, Hoon; Ros, Pablo R. [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Glickman, Jonathan N. [Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2002-06-01

    The aim of this study was to report on 8 patients with all different non-ischemic etiologies for portal-venous gas and to discuss this rare entity and its potentially misleading CT findings in context with a review of the literature. The CT examinations of eight patients who presented with intrahepatic portal-venous gas, unrelated to bowel ischemia or infarction, were reviewed and compared with their medical records with special emphasis on the pathogenesis and clinical impact of portal-venous gas caused by non-ischemic conditions. The etiologies for portal-venous gas included: abdominal trauma (n=1); large gastric cancer (n=1); prior gastroscopic biopsy (n=1); prior hemicolectomy (n=1); graft-vs-host reaction (n=1); large paracolic abscess (n=1); mesenteric recurrence of ovarian cancer superinfected with clostridium septicum (n=1); and sepsis with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n=1). The clinical outcome of all patients was determined by their underlying disease and not negatively influenced by the presence of portal-venous gas. Although the presence of portal-venous gas usually raises the suspicion of bowel ischemia and/or intestinal necrosis, this CT finding may be related to a variety of non-ischemic etiologies and pathogeneses as well. The knowledge about these conditions may help to avoid misinterpretation of CT findings, inappropriate clinical uncertainty and unnecessary surgery in certain cases. (orig.)

  9. Atrial natriuretic peptide increases resistance to venous return in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chien, Y.W.; Frohlich, E.D.; Trippodo, N.C.

    1987-05-01

    To examine mechanisms by which administration of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) decreases venous return, the authors compared the hemodynamic effects of ANP furosemide (FU), and hexamethonium (HEX) with those of vehicle (VE) in anesthetized rats. Compared with VE, ANP reduced mean arterial pressure, central venous pressure, and cardiac index and increased calculated resistance to venous return. /sup 141/Ce-labeled microspheres were used to determine cardiac output. Mean circulatory filling pressure, distribution of blood flow between splanchnic organs and skeletal muscles, and total peripheral resistance remained unchanged. FU increased urine output similar to that of ANP, yet produced no hemodynamic changes, dissociating diuresis, and decreased cardiac output. HEX lowered arterial pressure through a reduction in total peripheral resistance without altering cardiac output or resistance to venous return. The results confirm previous findings that ANP decreases cardiac output through a reduction in venous return and suggest that this results partly from increased resistance to venous return and not from venodilation or distribution of blood flow.

  10. Deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in psychiatric settings

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    Els G. Van Neste

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism are serious, possibly life-threatening events which are often ignored in psychiatric settings. This article investigates which psychiatric patients are at increased risk of developing a venous thromboembolism. To our knowledge we are the first to perform a literature review of clinical studies relating venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism to psychotropic drugs and mental disorders. Methods: A Medline search for English studies using the appropriate search terms was performed. In addition, cross references of the relevant articles` literature references were considered. We withheld 12 observational studies, 29 case-reports and one review-article. Results: We found evidence that low potency antipsychotic drugs like chlorpromazine and thioridazine, and clozapine for treatment of resistant schizophrenia have an increased risk of venous thromboembolism. There is no evidence that antidepressants, benzodiazepines or mood stabilizers have a similar effect. Also psychiatric conditions like physical restraint, catatonia and neuroleptic malignant syndrome are related to a higher incidence of deep venous thrombosis. Conclusions: Limitations of the studies and hypotheses about underlying biological mechanisms are reviewed. The rationale for prophylactic measures is discussed and recommendations to prevent deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism are given.

  11. Aneurysms of the superficial venous system: classification and treatment

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    Ronald G. Bush

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Superficial venous aneurysms are rarely described and they may remain indolent or become the source for pulmonary emboli. A system of classification and treatment protocol according to size and location is proposed. Three hundred thirty patients were evaluated for symptomatic venous disease (C2-C6 over a 2-year period. A proposed designation for venous aneurysm is described. Patients fulfilling this criterion are described in reference to site of involvement, histologic findings, and method of treatment. Five percent of patients met the criteria for venous aneurysm. Nine aneurysms of the greater saphenous vein were identified. Three aneurysms were proximal to the subterminal valve and the rest were distal. Six aneurysms of the anterior accessory greater saphenous vein (AAGSV were identified. Three aneurysms of the AAGSV spontaneously thrombosed. Two patients presented with aneurysms of the small saphenous vein. Histology revealed thickened intima, smooth muscle and adventitia. Aneurysm designation relates to diameter of normal and contiguous vein. All superficial venous aneurysms in close proximity to the junction of the femoral or popliteal vein should be ligated. Classification of venous aneurysms should include the AAGSV, which may present with spontaneous thrombosis.

  12. Iliac Artery and Vein Injury Without Pelvic Fracture Due To Blunt Trauma: A Rare Case

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    Mustafa Cuneyt Cicek

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Iliac vascular injuries have high morbidity and mortality rates. Penetrant abdominal and pelvic vascular injuries are more common compared to blunt traumas. Pelvic vascular injuries associated with blunt trauma are quite likely to occur in accompaniment with pelvic fracture. A 23 year old male patient was admitted to the emergency room due to a motorcycle accident. Shock picture was prevalent in the patient. Shaft fracture was present in left femur and flow was not detected in arterial and venous colour Doppler ultrasonography. Patient underwent emergency surgery. Left main iliac artery and vein were normal, however, external iliac vein was lacerated in two spots, and blood vessel wall integrity was damaged in one part of left external iliac artery. Clinical presentation and traumatic retroperitoneal hematoma management of iliac artery and venous injuries due to blunt trauma without pelvic fracture are discussed in the presented case.

  13. Review of venous anatomy for venographic interpretation in chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, John D; Siskin, Gary P; Mandato, Kenneth; Englander, Meridith; Herr, Allen

    2011-12-01

    Chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) represents a recently described condition that may potentially contribute to the symptoms experienced by patients with multiple sclerosis. The evaluation of a prospective patient for CCSVI often involves an invasive evaluation with venography of the internal jugular and azygos veins. The purpose of this article is to review the normal anatomy of the internal jugular, vertebral, and azygos veins, as an understanding of these veins is necessary for appropriate interpretation of the venograms obtained to evaluate patients for CCSVI.

  14. Venous compression syndrome of internal jugular veins prevalence in patients with multiple sclerosis and chronic cerebro-spinal venous insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandolesi, Sandro; Niglio, Tarcisio; Orsini, Augusto; De Sio, Simone; d'Alessandro, Alessandro; Mandolesi, Dimitri; Fedele, Francesco; d'Alessandro, Aldo

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of the incidence of Venous Compression Syndrome (VCS) with full block of the flow of the internal jugular veins (IJVs) in patients with Multiple Sclerosis and Chronic cerebro-spinal venous insufficiency. We included 769 patients with MS and CCSVI (299 males, 470 females) and 210 controls without ms and ccsvi (92 males, 118 females). each subject was investigated by echo-color-doppler (ecd). morphological and hemodynamic ecd data were recorded by a computerized mem-net maps of epidemiological national observatory on ccsvi and they were analyzed by mem-net clinical analysis programs. VCS of IJVs occurs in 240 subjects affected by CCSVI and MS (31% of total) and in 12 controls (6% of total). The differences between the two groups are statistical significant (X² = 36.64, pCerebro-Spinal Venous Insufficiency, Multiple Sclerosis, Venous Compression Syndrome.

  15. [The peculiarities of diagnosis and treatment of chronic venous insufficiency and venous forms of lower extremity dysplasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapelkin, S V; Dan, V N; Karmazanovskĭ, G G; Kuntsevich, G I

    2006-12-01

    The authors present the modern viewpoint concerning the problem of chronic venous insufficiency in the cases of venous forms of dysplasia. The treatment of patients with of venous forms of dysplasia should be based on the principles of interdisciplinary approach, which stipulates both the careful diagnosis on the basis of mainly non-invasive methods and integration of surgical and conservative treatment methods. Today such treatment should be combined and conducted within the multi-purpose highly specialized institution. Only the combination of all treatment methods will allow achieving the best functional and esthetic results. In the cases when indications are absent and conduction of surgical or any other treatment method is impossible it is necessary control the venous anomaly (dynamical follow-up, compression as a basic variant of conservative therapy). It will allow minimizing the unfavorable influence on vital functions and improving the patient's life quality.

  16. MECHANISMS UNDERLYING MATERNAL VENOUS ADAPTATION IN PREGNANCY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Cresta Wedel; Mandala, Maurizio; Barron, Carolyn; Bernstein, Ira; Osol, George

    2009-01-01

    To define the effects of pregnancy on mechanical properties and reactivity, mesenteric veins from late pregnant (LP) and virgin control (NP) rats were pressurized to determine gestational changes in size and distensibility. Reactivity studies used an adrenergic constrictor (norepinephrine, NE) and an endothelium-mediated vasodilator (acetylcholine, ACh). The contribution of nitric oxide (NO) to endothelial function was evaluated with pharmacologic inhibition of NO synthase. Roles of NO and cGMP in smooth muscle vasodilation were determined by using an NO donor with and without cGMP inhibition using ODQ, a selective inhibitor of guanylyl cyclase. In pregnancy, endothelium-dependent vasodilation markedly increased (largely due to endogenous NO), smooth muscle response to NO decreased (primarily related to cGMP production), and NE sensitivity decreased considerably, with no changes in vessel size or distensibility. Our results identify a pro-vasodilatory state in the systemic venous system which would serve to facilitate the accommodation to plasma volume expansion requisite for normal pregnancy. PMID:19318688

  17. Liver Abscesses after Peritoneal Venous Shunt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideto Kawaratani

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A 70-year-old man was referred to our hospital for high-grade fever with chills. He has visited our hospital for alcoholic liver cirrhosis and diabetes mellitus for over 20 years. Nine months earlier, he had received a peritoneal venous shunt (Denver shunt® because of refractory ascites. Laboratory examinations revealed elevated C-reactive protein and liver dysfunction. Ultrasonography and abdominal enhanced computed tomography showed multiple small abscesses in the right lobe of the liver. Blood culture test did not detect the pathogenic bacteria of liver abscesses. The patient was treated with antibiotics for more than 2 months and cured from the infection, but 3 months later, he developed high-grade fever again. He had a recurrence of multiple small liver abscesses involving both lobes of the liver. He was treated with antibiotics, and the abscesses disappeared within a month. After the antibiotic treatment, he had selective intestinal decontamination with kanamycin. He has had no recurrence of liver abscess for over a year. To our knowledge, this is the first report of liver abscess in a cirrhotic patient with Denver shunt. Clinicians should bear liver abscess in mind when treating patients with high-grade fever and liver dysfunction following Denver shunt implantation.

  18. Imaging Diagnosis of Splanchnic Venous Thrombosis

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    S. Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Splanchnic vein thrombosis (SVT is a broad term that includes Budd-Chiari syndrome and occlusion of veins that constitute the portal venous system. Due to the common risk factors involved in the pathogenesis of these clinically distinct disorders, concurrent involvement of two different regions is quite common. In acute and subacute SVT, the symptoms may overlap with a variety of other abdominal emergencies while in chronic SVT, the extent of portal hypertension and its attendant complications determine the clinical course. As a result, clinical diagnosis is often difficult and is frequently reliant on imaging. Tremendous improvements in vascular imaging in recent years have ensured that this once rare entity is being increasingly detected. Treatment of acute SVT requires immediate anticoagulation. Transcatheter thrombolysis or transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt is used in the event of clinical deterioration. In cases with peritonitis, immediate laparotomy and bowel resection may be required for irreversible bowel ischemia. In chronic SVT, the underlying cause should be identified and treated. The imaging manifestations of the clinical syndromes resulting from SVT are comprehensively discussed here along with a brief review of the relevant clinical features and therapeutic approach.

  19. Pulmonary Venous Obstruction in Cancer Patients

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    Chuang-Chi Liaw

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We study the clinical significance and management of pulmonary venous obstruction in cancer patients. Methods. We conducted a prospective cohort study to characterize the syndrome that we term “pulmonary vein obstruction syndrome” (PVOS between January 2005 and March 2014. The criteria for inclusion were (1 episodes of shortness of breath; (2 chest X-ray showing abnormal pulmonary hilum shadow with or without presence of pulmonary edema and/or pleural effusion; (3 CT scan demonstrating pulmonary vein thrombosis/tumor with or without tumor around the vein. Results. Two hundred and twenty-two patients developed PVOS. Shortness of breath was the main symptom, which was aggravated by chemotherapy in 28 (13%, and medical/surgical procedures in 21 (9% and showed diurnal change in intensity in 32 (14%. Chest X-rays all revealed abnormal pulmonary hilum shadows and presence of pulmonary edema in 194 (87% and pleural effusion in 192 (86%. CT scans all showed pulmonary vein thrombosis/tumor (100% and surrounding the pulmonary veins by tumor lesions in 140 patients (63%. PVOS was treated with low molecular weight heparin in combination with dexamethasone, and 66% of patients got clinical/image improvement. Conclusion. Physicians should be alert to PVOS when shortness of breath occurs and chest X-ray reveals abnormal pulmonary hilum shadows.

  20. Bilateral Pneumothoraces Following Central Venous Cannulation

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    F. Pazos

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the occurrence of a bilateral pneumothoraces after unilateral central venous catheterization of the right subclavian vein in a 70-year-old patient. The patient had no history of pulmonary or pleural disease and no history of cardiothoracic surgery. Two days earlier, she had a median laparotomy under general and epidural anaesthesia. Prior to the procedure, the patient was hemodynamically stable and her transcutaneous oxygen saturation was 97% in room air. We punctured the right pleural space before cannulation of the right subclavian vein. After the procedure, the patient slowly became hemodynamically instable with respiratory distress. A chest radiograph revealed a complete left-side pneumothorax and a mild right-side pneumothorax. The right-side pneumothorax became under tension after left chest tube insertion. The symptoms finally resolved after insertion of a right chest tube. After a diagnostic work-up, we suspect a congenital “Buffalo chests” explaining bilateral pneumothoraces and a secondary tension pneumothorax.

  1. Inflammation as a cause of venous thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saghazadeh, Amene; Rezaei, Nima

    2016-03-01

    Inflammatory markers are highly amenable to appraise and adjust and could already serve as a diagnostic indicator and also as a predictor of prognosis over the management of many health problems. Inflammation is implicated in venous thromboembolism (VTE). However there is still an intense curiosity about whether it is a cause or only a consequence of the thromboembolic process. The more likely scenario is that some inflammatory mediators contribute to the development of VTE, which per se induces an inflammatory reaction. Here we will review evidences supporting the role of inflammation as a cause of VTE. Genetic association studies have provided possible links between inflammation-related genetic variants, especially cytokines (e.g. IL-1, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, and IL-13), and VTE, leading to establish the fundamental role of genetic background in predisposition to VTE and variable inflammatory processes in individuals. Additionally, several inflammation-related conditions including aging, autoimmune disease, cancer, cardiovascular diseases, hormone replacement therapy, infectious diseases, metabolic diseases, overweight or obesity, pregnancy or postpartum, respiratory diseases, and trauma have been associated with an increased risk of VTE. At this moment, despite their theoretical potential, to achieve the implementation of the inflammation-related laboratory tests in practice is a long task and future studies with larger sample sizes are required to address whether the properties of the inflammatory process, particularly intensity and duration, are useful in determining the risk of VTE and following outcomes.

  2. 产后下肢深静脉血栓的病因及预防%Cause and Prevention of Postpartum Deep Venous Thrombosis of Lower Extremities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱芳; 赵小魁; 吴萍; 黄文英; 线小英

    2012-01-01

    目的:探讨产后下肢深静脉血栓形成的原因及预防.方法:对我院2006年1月至2010年12月发生的8例产后下肢深静脉血栓形成的病例资料进行回顾性分析.结果:所有病例经治疗后症状改善,复查超声提示血栓消失.无一例发生肺栓塞.结论:产后下肢深静脉血栓形成与血液高凝状态、血流缓慢以及静脉壁损伤等因素有关.严格掌握剖宫产手术指征,降低剖宫产率,产后早下床活动以促进静脉回流可预防深静脉血栓形成.%Objective: To investigate the causes and prevention methods of postpartum deep venous thrombosis of lower extremities. Methods: Clinical data of 8 patients with postpartum deep vein thrombosis of lower extremities were analyzed and summarized in our department from January, 2006 to December, 2010. Result: After the treatment, the symptoms and signs of all the cases were relieved. Ultrasound showed that deep venous thrombosis was disappeared. No one pulmonary embolism occurred. Conclusion: Factors which induced postpartum deep venous thrombosis of lower extremities are related to blood hypercoagulability, slow blood flow and venous endothelium injury, and so on. The indications of cesarean section should be controlled to reduce the rate of cesarean section. Early postpartum activities are taken to accelerate the venous refluence, which can prevent deep venous thrombosis of lower extremities.

  3. [What are the guidelines for using a venous segment for an arterial bypass? General review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichelle, J-M; Cormier, F; Franco, G; Luizy, F

    2010-06-01

    venous graft is a useful technique when endarterectomy is difficult or not satisfactory. The graft must be harvested from the calf, without valves, have a diameter of 5mm and be harvested without injury.

  4. A comparison of central venous-arterial and mixed venous-arterial carbon dioxide tension gradient in circulatory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, K M; Harding, R; Chamberlain, J

    2007-10-01

    The arterial and mixed venous carbon dioxide tension gradient has been shown to increase when there is a decrease in cardiac output. Monitoring central venous gases is an attractive alternative to monitoring mixed venous gases in circulatory failure because central venous catheterisation is a less invasive procedure than pulmonary artery catheterisation. This study aims to evaluate the agreement between central venous-arterial carbon dioxide (CVA-CO2) and mixed venous-arterial carbon dioxide (SVA-CO2) tension gradients and assess whether CVA-CO2 tension gradient can be used to predict cardiac output in circulatory failure. Samples of arterial, central venous and mixed venous blood were obtained from 16 patients with circulatory failure at different inspired oxygen concentrations and cardiac indexes within 24 hours of study enrolment. CVA-CO2 and SVA-CO2 tension gradient were not interchangeable numerically (bias = 0.14 mmHg, 95% limits of agreement: -3.0 to 3.2 mmHg). CVA-CO2 (Spearman correlation coefficient r = -0.385) and SVA-CO, (r = -0.578) tension gradient were significantly correlated with the cardiac index but the cardiac index only accounted for 21% and 32% of the variability of CVA-CO, and SVA-CO2 tension gradient, respectively. The ability of CVA-CO2 tension gradient (area under the ROC curve = 0.77, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.49-0.99; P = 0.08) to predict a low cardiac output state (cardiac index tension gradient appeared to be limited to their negative predictive value to exclude a low cardiac output state when CVA-CO, or SVA-CO, tension gradient was normal (< or =5 mmHg).

  5. Severe Acute Respiratory Failure due to Inhalation of Baby Powder and Successfully Treated with Venous-Venous Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panarello, Giovanna; Occhipinti, Giovanna; Piazza, Marcello; Capitanio, Guido; Vitulo, Patrizio; Gridelli, Bruno; Pilato, Michele; Arcadipane, Antonio

    2015-12-15

    Accidental inhalation of powder is a potential problem for infants. The clinical effects of inhaling powder depend on the powder contents, degree of aspiration, and the child's underlying systemic response. We present a case of accidental inhalation of rice starch powder in a 17-month-old girl, which led to severe acute respiratory distress syndrome responsive to conventional treatment, ultimately requiring venous-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

  6. Forty-five-degree two-stage venous cannula: advantages over standard two-stage venous cannulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, D R; Desai, J B

    1997-01-01

    We present a 45-degree two-stage venous cannula that confers advantage to the surgeon using cardiopulmonary bypass. This cannula exits the mediastinum under the transverse bar of the sternal retractor, leaving the rostral end of the sternal incision free of apparatus. It allows for lifting of the heart with minimal effect on venous return and does not interfere with the radially laid out sutures of an aortic valve replacement using an interrupted suture technique.

  7. Identification of the Upward Movement of Human CSF In Vivo and its Relation to the Brain Venous System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreha-Kulaczewski, Steffi; Joseph, Arun A; Merboldt, Klaus-Dietmar; Ludwig, Hans-Christoph; Gärtner, Jutta; Frahm, Jens

    2017-03-01

    CSF flux is involved in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases and cognitive impairment after traumatic brain injury, all hallmarked by the accumulation of cellular metabolic waste. Its effective disposal via various CSF routes has been demonstrated in animal models. In contrast, the CSF dynamics in humans are still poorly understood. Using novel real-time MRI, forced inspiration has been identified recently as a main driving force of CSF flow in the human brain. Exploiting technical advances toward real-time phase-contrast MRI, the current work analyzed directions, velocities, and volumes of human CSF flow within the brain aqueduct as part of the internal ventricular system and in the spinal canal during respiratory cycles. A consistent upward CSF movement toward the brain in response to forced inspiration was seen in all subjects at the aqueduct, in 11/12 subjects at thoracic level 2, and in 4/12 subjects at thoracic level 5. Concomitant analyses of CSF dynamics and cerebral venous blood flow, that is, in epidural veins at cervical level 3, uniquely demonstrated CSF and venous flow to be closely communicating cerebral fluid systems in which inspiration-induced downward flow of venous blood due to reduced intrathoracic pressure is counterbalanced by an upward movement of CSF. The results extend our understanding of human CSF flux and open important clinical implications, including concepts for drug delivery and new classifications and therapeutic options for various forms of hydrocephalus and idiopathic intracranial hypertension.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Effective disposal of brain cellular waste products via CSF has been demonstrated repeatedly in animal models. However, CSF dynamics in humans are still poorly understood. A novel quantitative real-time MRI technique yielded in vivo CSF flow directions, velocities, and volumes in the human brain and upper spinal canal. CSF moved upward toward the head in response to forced inspiration. Concomitant analysis

  8. Compression of the posterior fossa venous sinuses by epidural hemorrhage simulating venous sinus thrombosis: CT and MR findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Sumit; Ramakrishnaiah, Raghu H.; Hegde, Shilpa V.; Glasier, Charles M. [University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Pediatric Radiology, Little Rock, AR (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Posterior fossa dural venous sinus thrombus is a well-described complication of head trauma, especially when fracture crosses the dural sinus grooves or in association with epidural hemorrhage. We have found that post-traumatic posterior fossa epidural hematoma compressing a dural venous sinus can mimic dural venous thrombus. To discuss the CT and MRI findings of posterior fossa epidural hemorrhages simulating sinus thrombosis, to make radiologists aware of this important imaging pitfall. We describe radiologic findings in four children in whom a posterior fossa epidural hemorrhage mimicked dural venous sinus thrombus. Routine CT head and CT venography were obtained on Toshiba volume and helical CT scanners. MRI and MR venography were performed on a Philips scanner. In all cases there was medial displacement and compression of the posterior fossa dural venous sinuses without intraluminal thrombosis. The epidural hemorrhage was seen tracking along sinus grooves in the occipital bone, peeling the dura containing the sinuses from the calvarium and compressing the sinus, simulating thrombosis on axial CT views. Both venous sinus thrombosis and posterior fossa epidural hemorrhages in children are well-described complications of head trauma. Posterior fossa epidural hemorrhage can mimic a sinus thrombus by compressing and displacing the sinuses. It is important to recognize this pitfall because treatment of a suspected thrombus with anticoagulation can worsen epidural hemorrhage. (orig.)

  9. The incidence of venous thromboembolism and practice of deep venous thrombosis prophylaxis in hospitalized cirrhotic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alqahtani Saad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cirrhotic patients are characterized by a decreased synthesis of coagulation and anticoagulation factors. The coagulopathy of cirrhotic patients is considered to be auto-anticoagulation. Our aim was to determine the incidence and predictors of venous thromboembolism (VTE and examine the practice of deep venous thrombosis (DVT prophylaxis among hospitalized cirrhotic patients. Methods A retrospective cohort study was performed in a tertiary teaching hospital. We included all adult patients admitted to the hospital with a diagnosis of liver cirrhosis from January 1, 2009 to December 31, 2009. We grouped our cohort patients in two groups, cirrhotic patients without VTE and cirrhotic with VTE. Results Over one year, we included 226 cirrhotic patients, and the characteristics of both groups were similar regarding their clinical and laboratory parameters and their outcomes. Six patients (2.7% developed VTE, and all of the VTEs were DVT. Hepatitis C was the most common (51% underlying cause of liver cirrhosis, followed by hepatitis B (22%; 76% of the cirrhotic patients received neither pharmacological nor mechanical DVT prophylaxis. Conclusion Cirrhotic patients are at risk for developing VTE. The utilization of DVT prophylaxis was suboptimal.

  10. Correlation of central venous pressure with venous blood gas analysis parameters; a diagnostic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim-Taleghani, Sima; Fatemi, Alireza; Alavi Moghaddam, Mostafa; Shojaee, Majid; Abushouk, Abdelrahman Ibrahim; Forouzanfar, Mohammad Mehdi; Baratloo, Alireza

    2017-03-01

    This study was conducted to assess the correlation between central venous pressure (CVP) and venous blood gas (VBG) analysis parameters, to facilitate management of severe sepsis and septic shock in emergency department. This diagnostic study was conducted from January 2014 until June 2015 in three major educational medical centers, Tehran, Iran. For patients selected with diagnosis of septic shock, peripheral blood sample was taken for testing the VBG parameters and the anion gap (AG) was calculated. All the mentioned parameters were measured again after infusion of 500 cc of normal saline 0.9% in about 1 h. Totally, 93 patients with septic shock were enrolled, 63 male and 30 female. The mean age was 72.53 ± 13.03 and the mean Shock Index (SI) before fluid therapy was 0.79 ± 0.30. AG and pH showed significant negative correlations with CVP, While HCO3 showed a significant positive correlation with CVP. These relations can be affected by the treatment modalities used in shock management such as fluid therapy, mechanical ventilation and vasopressor treatment. It is likely that there is a significant statistical correlation between VBG parameters and AG with CVP, but further research is needed before implementation of the results of this study.

  11. Head Injuries

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    ... object that's stuck in the wound. previous continue Concussions Concussions — the temporary loss of normal brain function due ... also a type of internal head injury. Repeated concussions can permanently damage the brain. In many cases, ...

  12. ACL Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... while doing things like skiing, playing soccer or football, and jumping on a trampoline.When you injure your ACL, it can be a partial or full tear. Other injuries can occur at the same time. These include ...

  13. Local thrombolysis for patients of severe cerebral venous sinus thrombosis during puerperium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Xin-bin, E-mail: gxb3906080@sina.com [Department of Interventional Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, 1 Jianshe Road, Zhengzhou, 450052 (China); Fu, Zhenqiang, E-mail: fuzhenqiang1005@163.com [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, 1 Jianshe Road, Zhengzhou, 450052 (China); Song, Lai-jun, E-mail: laijunsong@sina.com [Department of Neurosurgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, 1 Jianshe Road, Zhengzhou, 450052 (China); Guan, Sheng, E-mail: gsradio@126.com [Department of Interventional Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, 1 Jianshe Road, Zhengzhou, 450052 (China)

    2013-01-15

    Objective: To explore and evaluate the efficacy of intrasinus thrombolysis (IST) in patients with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) during postpartum period. Methods: 11 patients during postpartum period with CVST who received IST during July 2007–November 2011 were included. Urokinase was infused into the sinuses via a microcatheter. Magnetic resonance venography (MRV) was performed to assess the recanalization of venous sinuses. Results: Before discharge, the intracranial pressure in 11 patients was under 200 mmH{sub 2}O. MRV confirmed that venous sinus of 9 patients were smooth. The cortex venous and deep venous recovered to normal. Venous sinus of 2 patients recanalized partly, and cortex venous and deep venous had compensation. 9 patients had good outcome and 2 patients had only mild deficits. Conclusion: Intrasinus thrombolysis is safe and effective in patients with severe cerebral venous sinus thrombosis during postpartum period.

  14. Computer-assisted venous thrombosis volume quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puentes, John; Dhibi, Mounir; Bressollette, Luc; Guias, Bruno; Solaiman, Basel

    2009-03-01

    Venous thrombosis (VT) volume assessment, by verifying its risk of progression when anticoagulant or thrombolytic therapies are prescribed, is often necessary to screen life-threatening complications. Commonly, VT volume estimation is done by manual delineation of few contours in the ultrasound (US) image sequence, assuming that the VT has a regular shape and constant radius, thus producing significant errors. This paper presents and evaluates a comprehensive functional approach based on the combination of robust anisotropic diffusion and deformable contours to calculate VT volume in a more accurate manner when applied to freehand 2-D US image sequences. Robust anisotropic filtering reduces image speckle noise without generating incoherent edge discontinuities. Prior knowledge of the VT shape allows initializing the deformable contour, which is then guided by the noise-filtering outcome. Segmented contours are subsequently used to calculate VT volume. The proposed approach is integrated into a system prototype compatible with existing clinical US machines that additionally tracks the acquired images 3-D position and provides a dense Delaunay triangulation required for volume calculation. A predefined robust anisotropic diffusion and deformable contour parameter set enhances the system usability. Experimental results pertinence is assessed by comparison with manual and tetrahedron-based volume computations, using images acquired by two medical experts of eight plastic phantoms and eight in vitro VTs, whose independently measured volume is the reference ground truth. Results show a mean difference between 16 and 35 mm(3) for volumes that vary from 655 to 2826 mm(3). Two in vivo VT volumes are also calculated to illustrate how this approach could be applied in clinical conditions when the real value is unknown. Comparative results for the two experts differ from 1.2% to 10.08% of the smallest estimated value when the image acquisition cadences are similar.

  15. Treatment of pregnancy related venous thromboembolism

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    Mitić Gorana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism during pregnancy are complicated since the use of antithrombotic drugs carries a certain risk to the mother, the fetus or both. Coumarins cross the placental barrier and may be responsible for bleeding, teratogenicity and central nervous system abnormalities. The risk of embriopathy is particularly high between 6 and 12 weeks of gestation. Treatement. Heparin is the treatment of choice for thrombosis during pregnancy because it is entirely safe for the fetus, unlike oral anticoagulants. The frequency of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia and osteoporosis is significantly lower if LMWH is applied, so this heparin type is preferable to UFH during pregnancy. Treatment of women with VTE during pregnancy, especially those with thrombophilia, requires individualized dosing and duration of antithrombotic thrapy. Peripartal management. In order to avoid the peripartum anticoagulant heparin effect and possible bleeding, heparin should be discontinued prior to the delivery and reintroduced after the parturition. PROPHYLACTIC REGIMEn. Prophylactic antithrombotic regimen during subsequent pregnancies should also be individualized. The use of low molecular weight heparins is becoming more widespread. They have reliable pharmacokinetics, require less frequent injections than unfractionated heparin and carry a lower risk of treatment complications. LMW heparins are safe and effective and they are replacing UFH as the anticoagulant of choice during pregnancy. Both UFH and LMWH are not secreted into breast milk and can be safely given to nursing mothers. Warfarin does not induce an anticoagulant effect in the breast-fed infant, so it can be safely used in women who require postpartum anticoagulant therapy.

  16. Venous thromboembolism: Past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulman, Sam; Ageno, Walter; Konstantinides, Stavros V

    2017-06-28

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE), the third most frequent acute cardiovascular syndrome, is associated with a considerable disease burden which continues to grow along with the longer life expectancy of the population worldwide. In the past century, parenteral heparin prophylaxis was established for hospitalised patients at elevated risk of VTE. More recently, non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) with a direct inhibiting effect on factor Xa or thrombin, underwent extensive testing in clinical trials and have been approved for patients undergoing hip or knee replacement. Clinical investigation is ongoing in further areas of thromboprophylaxis, including medical prophylaxis in patients and high-risk situations in the outpatient setting. The diagnostic approach to suspected VTE is now based on advanced imaging techniques and robust diagnostic algorithms which ensure high sensitivity and specificity. Nevertheless, the role of clinical, or pre-test, probability assessment remains crucial to avoid overdiagnosis and treatment errors. Advances in reperfusion strategies, along progressive establishment of the NOACs as the new standard of anticoagulation treatment, have simplified the management of VTE, improving outcomes and particularly safety. While new molecular targets for anticoagulation are being investigated in the quest to further reduce bleeding risk, adjusting the initial regimen to the patient's risk and finding the optimal duration of anticoagulation after an index VTE event will be some of the top priorities in the years to come. Importantly, and in parallel to new drugs and technical advances in imaging, incentives such as hospital accreditation and funding based on evidence-based practice need to be implemented to increase guideline adherence.

  17. Iliocaval Confluence Stenting for Chronic Venous Obstructions

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    Graaf, Rick de, E-mail: r.de.graaf@mumc.nl [Maastricht University Medical Centre (MUMC), Department of Radiology (Netherlands); Wolf, Mark de, E-mail: markthewolf@gmail.com [Maastricht University Medical Centre (MUMC), Department of Surgery (Netherlands); Sailer, Anna M., E-mail: anni.sailer@mumc.nl [Maastricht University Medical Centre (MUMC), Department of Radiology (Netherlands); Laanen, Jorinde van, E-mail: jorinde.van.laanen@mumc.nl; Wittens, Cees, E-mail: c.wittens@me.com [Maastricht University Medical Centre (MUMC), Department of Surgery (Netherlands); Jalaie, Houman, E-mail: hjalaie@ukaachen.de [University Hospital Aachen, Department of Surgery (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    PurposeDifferent techniques have been described for stenting of venous obstructions. We report our experience with two different confluence stenting techniques to treat chronic bi-iliocaval obstructions.Materials and MethodsBetween 11/2009 and 08/2014 we treated 40 patients for chronic total bi-iliocaval obstructions. Pre-operative magnetic resonance venography showed bilateral extensive post-thrombotic scarring in common and external iliac veins as well as obstruction of the inferior vena cava (IVC). Stenting of the IVC was performed with large self-expandable stents down to the level of the iliocaval confluence. To bridge the confluence, either self-expandable stents were placed inside the IVC stent (24 patients, SECS group) or high radial force balloon-expandable stents were placed at the same level (16 patients, BECS group). In both cases, bilateral iliac extensions were performed using nitinol stents.ResultsRecanalization was achieved for all patients. In 15 (38 %) patients, a hybrid procedure with endophlebectomy and arteriovenous fistula creation needed to be performed because of significant involvement of inflow vessels below the inguinal ligament. Mean follow-up was 443 ± 438 days (range 7–1683 days). For all patients, primary, assisted-primary, and secondary patency rate at 36 months were 70, 73, and 78 %, respectively. Twelve-month patency rates in the SECS group were 85, 85, and 95 % for primary, assisted-primary, and secondary patency. In the BECS group, primary patency was 100 % during a mean follow-up period of 134 ± 118 (range 29–337) days.ConclusionStenting of chronic bi-iliocaval obstruction shows relatively high patency rates at medium follow-up. Short-term patency seems to favor confluence stenting with balloon-expandable stents.

  18. Malfunction of Totally Implantable Central Venous Ports

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    Kim

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Malfunctions of totally implantable central venous ports (TICVPs have become a problem, as the usage of TICVPs has increased enormously. Objectives This study evaluated factors related with catheter malfunctions of TICVPs. Patients and Methods Between January 2010 and June 2012, 1,740 TICVPs in 1,740 patients (874 men and 866 women with an average age of 57.7 ± 12.8 years (range: 15 - 91 years were implanted by an interventional radiology team at our institute. Catheter malfunctions were retrospectively analyzed. In the prospective study, we randomly allocated 176 patients to two kinds of TICVPs in a 1:1 assignment ratio. The primary outcome was the malfunction of TICVPs. Results In the retrospective study, the 32 malfunctioning TICVPs were caused by fibrin sheath formations (n = 15, chamber thrombosis (n = 8, TICVP rotation (n = 5, catheter migration (n = 2, and blood clots within the catheters (n = 2. Multivariate analysis showed that being female was a significant factor for poor patency rates of TICVPs (hazard ratio: 5.06; 95% confidence interval (CI 1.32 - 19.46, P = 0.018. In the prospective study, two chamber thromboses occurred in Celsite® (n = 1 and Humanport® (n = 1. The primary patency rates of both Celsite® and Humanport® were 98.9% at 6 months, respectively. Conclusion Our data suggest that catheter malfunctions of TICVPs are more common in females than males. The incidence of TICVP malfunctions does not differ between the two devices (Celsite® vs. Humanport®.

  19. Subclavian central venous catheter-related thrombosis in trauma patients: incidence, risk factors and influence of polyurethane type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, Ariane; Petit, Laurent; Masson, Françoise; Cottenceau, Vincent; Bertrand-Barat, Josseline; Freyburger, Geneviève; Pinaquy, Catherine; Léger, Alain; Cochard, Jean-François; Sztark, François

    2013-05-29

    The incidence of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) related to a central venous catheter varies considerably in ICUs depending on the population included. The aim of this study was to determine subclavian central venous catheter (SCVC)-related DVT risk factors in severely traumatized patients with regard to two kinds of polyurethane catheters. Critically ill trauma patients needing a SCVC for their usual care were prospectively included in an observational study. Depending on the month of inclusion, patients received one of the two available products in the emergency unit: either an aromatic polyurethane SCVC or an aliphatic polyurethane SCVC. Patients were screened weekly by ultrasound for SCVC-related DVT. Potential risk factors were collected, including history-related, trauma-related and SCVC-related characteristics. A total of 186 patients were included with a median Injury Severity Sore of 30 and a high rate of severe brain injuries (21% of high intracranial pressure). Incidence of SCVC-related DVT was 37% (95% confidence interval: 26 to 40) in patients or 20/1,000 catheter-days. SCVC-related DVT occurred within 8 days in 65% of cases. There was no significant difference in DVT rates between the aromatic polyurethane and aliphatic polyurethane SCVC groups (38% vs. 36%). SCVC-related DVT independent risk factors were age>30 years, intracranial hypertension, massive transfusion (>10 packed red blood cell units), SCVC tip position in the internal jugular or in the innominate vein, and ipsilateral jugular catheter. SCVC-related DVT concerned one-third of these severely traumatized patients and was mostly clinically silent. Incidence did not depend on the type of polyurethane but was related to age>30 years, intracranial hypertension or misplacement of the SCVC. Further studies are needed to assess the cost-effectiveness of routine screening in these patients in whom thromboprophylaxis may be hazardous.

  20. Clinical features in patients with simultaneous cerebral arterial and venous lesions (with literature survey

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    Lee Peng Chew

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, only few cases of simultaneous cerebral arterial and venous thrombosis were reported. However, there might be high probability of coexisted cerebral arterial and venous changes. It is worthy to study the reasons and frequency of these coexisted vascular changes contributing to the development of clinical pictures. We analyzed 12 cases of simultaneous cerebral and/or neck vascular changes based on vascular images and ultrasonography which were divided into 4 groups: coexistence of simultaneous arterial and venous thrombosis; venous thrombosis with arterial hypoplasia; arterial thrombosis, arteritis or dissections with venous sinus hypoplasia; coexistence of arterial and venous hypoplasia.

  1. Anatomical evaluation of penile venous system by CT cavernosography in patients with erectile dysfunction and venous leakage

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    P Famili

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Erectile dysfunction is an important problem in men and an organic cause is found in about 50% of cases. When a vasculogenic etiology is suspected, imaging assessments are of great help. Cavernosography is traditionally recognized as an imaging modality for evaluation of venous leakage in men with impotency. We employed CT cavernosography as a novel technique for demonstrating penile venous anatomy and leaking veins.Methods: In the present case series study, we recruited 45 patients with erectile dysfunction by convenient sampling at Hazrat Rasoul Akram Hospital in Tehran, Iran, during one year (1390. The patients had previously been diagnosed with venous incompetency by Doppler study. After intracavernosal injection of prostaglandin E1, we injected sterile normal saline into the corpora cavernosa to achieve penile erection. Later, we injected contrast media into the corpus cavernosum, which was followed by CT scan of the penis and pelvic area to show the venous anatomy and leakage sites.Results: The mean age of the patients was 35.8±8.9 years. 36 (80% patients had venous leakage in crural veins, 27 (60% in cavernosal veins, 27 (60% in circumflex veins, 24 (52.3% in urethral veins, 21 (46.7% in deep dorsal vein, 3 (6.7% in para-arterial veins and 3 (6.7% in corpus spongiosum. Conclusion: The results of this study show the high prevalence of venous leakage in patients referring for erectile dysfunction. Moreover, CT cavernosography was shown to be a useful method for evaluating penile venous system and its related leakage sites which are important for surgical planning.

  2. [Present and future in the management of venous vascular diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavorník, Peter; Dukát, Andrej; Gašpar, Ľudovít; Gavorníková, Eva

    2015-02-01

    The prevalence and the incidence of chronic and acute venous vascular disease has been shown to be globally very high, in both industrialized and developing countries. Chronic venous diseases of lower extremities are being an integral part of the third millennium's deadly angiopandemy, at the present time. The rate of the most severe cases with advanced stage of venous failure is approximately twice as high in the population (2.1 %) as has been assumed so far. Among venoactive drugs (VAD), micronized purified flavonoid fraction (MPFF) of diosmin hesperidin remains the agent with the highest degree of recommendation and it also indicated to pharmacotherapeutical support of leg ulcer healing, along with sulodexide and pentoxifylline. Compressive sclerotherapy, liquid or foam, is a safe and effective invasive method to treat telangiectasias, reticular varicose veins and subcutaneous varicose veins. Direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC) represent one of the therapeutic and preventive options of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and of venous thromboembolism (VTE) with a limitation in patients with malignant conditions and in pregnancy. The most effective is triple simultaneous pharmaco-kinezio-mechano-phlebothromboemboloprophylaxis. Superficial vein thromboses longer than 5 cm are indicated to anticoagulant therapy too.

  3. Preliminary clinical investigations of a new noninvasive venous pulse oximeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Daniel; Smith, Peter R.; Caine, Michael P.; Spyt, Tomasz; Boehm, Maria; Machin, David

    2003-10-01

    For decades, the monitoring of mixed venous oxygen saturation, SvO2 has been performed invasively using fibre-optic catheters. This procedure is not without risk as complications may arise from catheterisation. The group has devised a new non-invasive venous oximetry method which involves inducing regular modulations of the venous blood volume and associated measurement of those modulations using optical means. A clinical investigation was conducted in Glenfield Hospital, UK to evaluate the sensitivity of the new technique to haemodynamic changes such as Cardiac Output (CO) in intraoperative and postoperative cardiac patients. Preliminary trials on patients recovering from cardiac surgery yielded an average correlation of r = 0.72 between CO at different Intra Aortic Balloon Pump (IABP) augmentation levels and SvO2 measured by the new venous oximeter. In intraoperative patients undergoing off-pump cardiac surgery, SvO2 recorded by the new technique responded to unplanned events such as a cardiac arrest. CONCLUSION: The new venous oximetry technique is a promising technique which responds to haemodynamic changes such as CO and with further development might offer an alternative means of monitoring SvO2 non-invasively.

  4. Urinary hemosiderin: role in evaluation of chronic venous insufficiency

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    Ashish Lal Shrestha

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Chronic venous insufficiency (CVI leads to skin changes with dermal hemosiderin deposition. We studied the presence of hemosiderin in the urine to assess if this could be used as a biochemical marker for CVI. Hereby we present a case control study conducted in a tertiary care centre in South India. There were 100 cases with evidence of advanced CVI (the Clinical-Etiology-Anatomy-Pathophysiology classification: C5, C6 confirmed by duplex scanning. Controls were 50 patients with leg ulcers due to other etiologies. All patients were subjected to urinary hemosiderin testing. In all 100 patients with CVI (C5 and C6 disease axial venous reflux was confirmed by duplex ultrasound. Superficial venous reflux was noted in 71% of patients and deep venous reflux in 54.%. Primary venous insufficiency was the etiology in 81% of patients. Only 4/100 patients had detectable amounts of hemosiderin in the urine. Urine hemosiderin testing to determine presence or absence of CVI yielded the following values: positive predictive value-80%; negative predictive value-33%; sensitivity-4% and specificity-98%. The test could not be recommended as a marker of CVI. In Indian patients urinary hemosiderin is not a useful screening test in CVI.

  5. Uncontrolled seizures resulting from cerebral venous sinus thrombosis complicating neurobrucellosis

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    Fardin Faraji

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is a rare form of stroke caused by thrombosis in venous sinuses of the brain. In this study, we reported on a patient with venous sinus thrombosis and brucellosis who presented with uncontrolled seizure despite being treated with anti-epileptic drugs at high doses. The case was a 33-year-old woman with a history of controlled complex partial seizure who presented with headache, asthenia, and uncontrolled seizure for one month. She was febrile and a brain CT scan indicated hemorrhagic focus in the left posterior parietal and the temporal lobe. Magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance venography also proved venous sinus thrombosis in the left transverse sinus. Besides [In addition], a laboratory assessment confirmed brucellosis. Following the treatment with anti-coagulant, anti-brucellosis, and anti-epileptic agents, the patient was discharged in good condition with medical orders. Clinical suspicion and accurate evaluation of a patient′s history is the most important clue in diagnosis and treatment of brucellosis and cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, especially in uncontrolled seizure in patients who had previously been under control.

  6. Dorsalis pedis arterialized venous flap for hand and foot reconstruction

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    YU Guang; LEI Hong-yu; GUO Shuang; HUANG Jian-hua; YU Hao

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To report the results of repair of skin defects in the extremities with arterialized venous flap harvested from the lateral aspect of the dorsum of the foot.Methods:Six cases of skin and soft tissue defects over the foot and hands were resurfaced by free arterialized venous flaps,including five patients with skin defects of the hands,and one with defects at the dorsum of the foot.The flaps were harvested from the lateral aspect of the dorsum of the foot with the sizes ranging from 2 cm×5.5 cm to 6 cm×11 cm.Two veins at the proximal margin of the flap were retained,one of which was anastomosed to a recipient bed artery to provide arterial inflow and the other was anastomosed to a recipient bed vein for venous outflow.Results:All flaps demonstrated mild edema and survived completely.Blisters appeared on four flaps.Using this technique,we achieved good functional and cosmetic results in this series.Conclusions:Dorsalis pedis arterialized venous flap with rich vascular communications could enhance peripheral perfusion and decrease congestion of venous flaps,thereby improves reliability and utility for extremity reconstruction.

  7. Placement of an implantable central venous access device

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    Kim, Tae Hoon; Lee, Young Suk [Dan Kook Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Hospital

    1998-03-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of placement of a central venous catheter with infusion port into the superior vena cava. Central venous catheters with a infusion port were implanted in 21 patients (M:F=4:17, age range:15-63, mean age: 41) diagnosed as suffering from breast cancer (n=9), lymphoma (n=7), thymoma (n=2) rhabdomyosarcoma(n=2) and rectal cancer (n=1). The per(n=9), lymphoma(n=7), thymoma (n=2) rhabdomyosarcoma (n=2) and rectal cancer (n=1). The peripheral portion of the subclavian vein was punctured under fluoroscopic guidance during injection of contrast media at the site of the ipsilateral peripheral vein (20 cases) and under ultrasonographic guidance (1 case). 9.6F central venous catheters placed in the superior vena cava via the subclavian vein and the connected infusion ports were implanted in the subcutaneous pocket near the puncture site of the right anterosuperior chest wall. Radiologic placement under fluoroscopic guidance of a central venous catheter with a infusion port is easy, safe and useful for patients requiring long-term venous access. (author). 21 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Central Venous Access via Middle Approach Using the Seldinger Guidewire

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    Miguel Muñoz Cepero

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: In recent years, venous access via middle approach with the technique described by English has been frequently used, leading to lower risk of pneumothorax and arterial puncture. In addition, it is easy to perform. Objective: to characterize the performance of central venous access via the middle approach to the internal jugular vein using the Seldinger guidewire in patients with hematologic diseases and/or anticoagulant therapy. Methods: a descriptive study was conducted from January to December 2009 in the Surgical Unit of the Dr. Gustavo Aldereguía Lima University General Hospital in Cienfuegos. Central venous access via middle approach using the technique described by English was performed in 47 patients suffering from hematologic diseases. Variables analysed were: number of attempts, indications and complications. Results: 43 central venous catheterizations were successful (91.48 %, 35 of them were achieved in the first attempt. The use of cytostatics was indicated in more than half of the cases (55.31 %. Complications were observed in 5 patients; arterial puncture was the most common (6.38 %. Conclusions: central venous access via the middle approach using the Seldinger guidewire is a suitable option for patients with hematologic diseases. It minimizes complications in patients treated with anticoagulants. In general, it is easily accessible and has a high success rate.

  9. Bortezomib protects from varicose-like venous remodeling.

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    Pfisterer, Larissa; Meyer, Ralph; Feldner, Anja; Drews, Oliver; Hecker, Markus; Korff, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    Despite the high prevalence of venous diseases that are associated with and based on the structural reorganization of the venous vessel wall, not much is known about their mechanistic causes. In this context, we demonstrated that the quantity of myocardin, a transcriptional regulator of the contractile and quiescent smooth muscle cell phenotype, was diminished in proliferating synthetic venous smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) of human and mouse varicose veins by 51 and 60%, respectively. On the basis of the relevance of proteasomal activity for such phenotypic changes, we hypothesized that the observed VSMC activation is attenuated by the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib. This drug fully abolished VSMC proliferation and loss of myocardin in perfused mouse veins and blocked VSMC invasion in collagen gels by almost 80%. In line with this, topical transdermal treatment with bortezomib diminished VSMC proliferation by 80%, rescued 90% of VSMC myocardin abundance, and inhibited varicose-like venous remodeling by 67 to 72% in a mouse model. Collectively, our data indicate that the proteasome plays a pivotal role in VSMC phenotype changes during venous remodeling processes. Its inhibition protects from varicose-like vein remodeling in mice and may thus serve as a putative therapeutic strategy to treat human varicose veins.

  10. Air pollution and venous thrombosis: a meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Liang; Wang, Qing-Yun; Cheng, Zhi-Peng; Hu, Bei; Liu, Jing-Di; Hu, Yu

    2016-09-01

    Exposure to air pollution has been linked to cardiovascular and respiratory disorders. However, the effect of air pollution on venous thrombotic disorders is uncertain. We performed a meta-analysis to assess the association between air pollution and venous thrombosis. PubMed, Embase, EBM Reviews, Healthstar, Global Health, Nursing Database, and Web of Science were searched for citations on air pollutants (carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, ozone, and particulate matters) and venous thrombosis. Using a random-effects model, overall risk estimates were derived for each increment of 10 μg/m3 of pollutant concentration. Of the 485 in-depth reviewed studies, 8 citations, involving approximately 700,000 events, fulfilled the inclusion criteria. All the main air pollutants analyzed were not associated with an increased risk of venous thrombosis (OR = 1.005, 95% CI = 0.998-1.012 for PM2.5; OR = 0.995, 95% CI = 0.984-1.007 for PM10; OR = 1.006, 95% CI = 0.994-1.019 for NO2). Based on exposure period and thrombosis location, additional subgroup analyses provided results comparable with those of the overall analyses. There was no evidence of publication bias. Therefore, this meta analysis does not suggest the possible role of air pollution as risk factor for venous thrombosis in general population.

  11. Venous and arterial thrombosis: Two aspects of the same disease?

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    Paolo Prandoni

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Paolo PrandoniDepartment of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Sciences, Thromboembolism Unit, University Hospital of Padua Padua, ItalyAbstract: An increasing body of evidence suggests the likelihood of a link between venous and arterial thrombosis. The two vascular complications share several risk factors, such as age, obesity, diabetes mellitus, blood hypertension, hypertriglyceridemia, and metabolic syndrome. Moreover, there are many examples of conditions accounting for both venous and arterial thrombosis, such as the antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, hyperhomocysteinemia, malignancies, infections, and the use of hormonal treatment. Finally, several recent studies have consistently shown that patients with venous thromboembolism are at a higher risk of arterial thrombotic complications than matched control individuals. We, therefore, speculate the two vascular complications are simultaneously triggered by biological stimuli responsible for activating coagulation and inflammatory pathways in both the arterial and the venous system. Future studies are needed to clarify the nature of this association, to assess its extent, and to evaluate its implications for clinical practice.Keywords: venous thromboembolism, deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, atherosclerosis

  12. Review of the cost of venous thromboembolism

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    Fernandez MM

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Maria M Fernandez,1 Susan Hogue,1 Ronald Preblick,2 Winghan Jacqueline Kwong2 1RTI-Health Solutions, Market Access and Outcomes Strategy, Research Triangle Park, NC, 2Daiichi Sankyo, Inc., Health Economics & Outcomes Research, Parsippany, NJ, USA Background: Venous thromboembolism (VTE is the second most common medical complication and a cause of excess length of hospital stay. Its incidence and economic burden are expected to increase as the population ages. We reviewed the recent literature to provide updated cost estimates on VTE management. Methods: Literature search strategies were performed in PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Collaboration, Health Economic Evaluations Database, EconLit, and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts from 2003–2014. Additional studies were identified through searching bibliographies of related publications. Results: Eighteen studies were identified and are summarized in this review; of these, 13 reported data from the USA, four from Europe, and one from Canada. Three main cost estimations were identified: cost per VTE hospitalization or per VTE readmission; cost for VTE management, usually reported annually or during a specific period; and annual all-cause costs in patients with VTE, which included the treatment of complications and comorbidities. Cost estimates per VTE hospitalization were generally similar across the US studies, with a trend toward an increase over time. Cost per pulmonary embolism hospitalization increased from $5,198–$6,928 in 2000 to $8,764 in 2010. Readmission for recurrent VTE was generally more costly than the initial index event admission. Annual health plan payments for services related to VTE also increased from $10,804–$16,644 during the 1998–2004 period to an estimated average of $15,123 for a VTE event from 2008 to 2011. Lower costs for VTE hospitalizations and annualized all-cause costs were estimated in European countries and Canada. Conclusion: Costs for VTE treatment are

  13. Life-threatening Cerebral Venous Thrombosis: a case report

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    Daniel Agustin Godoy

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVT can compromise dural sinus, cerebral veins or both. It is an uncommon condition and it is more prevalent in young women. Several prothrombotic states are the principal predisposing factors. Clinical spectrum of presentation is wide, so this entity requires a high suspect index for correct and prompt diagnosis. CVT may develop serious complications that can be life-threatening such as hemorrhagic venous infarctions, cerebral edema, and intracranial hypertension. This report describes the case of a woman who was in treatment for unspecific vaginal bleeding with oral contraceptives. Suddenly she deteriorated to coma with severe respiratory compromise. Neuroimaging showed thrombosis of multiple venous sinus. Physiological neuroprotection, osmotherapy, mechanical ventilation and anticoagulation therapy were the keystones of treatment. In a few months, the patient has recovered a good functional status, while maintaining a motor deficit on the right hand.

  14. Sarcoidosis mimicking a venous ulcer: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Smita S; Romanelli, Paolo; Kirsner, Robert S

    2009-11-01

    Sarcoidosis--a chronic, multisystem disease of unknown etiology characterized by noncaseating granulomas--may cause ulcerative lesions, particularly in African American women. A case of ulcerative sarcoidosis mimicking a venous ulcer is presented. The patient is a 44-year-old African American hypertensive, obese woman with a nonhealing medially based lower leg ulcer of 3 years' duration clinically consistent with a venous ulcer. The ulcer did not heal with compression therapy and pentoxifylline. Subsequent biopsies showed granulomatous inflammation consistent with sarcoidosis. When intralesional triamcinolone was added to compression therapy, the ulcer resolved after 3 months. Given its propensity toward formation on the lower extremities and ulcerative and atrophic appearance, ulcerative sarcoidosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a venous ulcer refractory to standard therapy, especially in African American women.

  15. Cortical venous thrombosis following exogenous androgen use for bodybuilding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sveinsson, Olafur; Herrman, Lars

    2013-02-05

    There are only a few reports of patients developing cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) after androgen therapy. We present a young man who developed cortical venous thrombosis after using androgens to increase muscle mass. He was hospitalised for parasthesia and dyspraxia in the left hand followed by a generalised tonic-clonic seizure. At admission, he was drowsy, not fully orientated, had sensory inattention, pronation drift and a positive extensor response, all on the left side. The patient had been using anabolic steroids (dainabol 20 mg/day) for the last month for bodybuilding. CT angiography showed a right cortical venous thrombosis. Anticoagulation therapy was started with intravenous heparin for 11 days and oral anticoagulation (warfarin) thereafter. A control CT angiography 4 months later showed resolution of the thrombosis. He recovered fully.

  16. No evidence for thrombophilia in patients with retinal venous occlusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Kirstine; Heegaard, Steffen; Hvas, Anne-Mette

    2016-01-01

    Retinal venous occlusion represents a common retinal disorder that untreated often leads to severely reduced vision. While general risk factors for vascular disease are known to increase the risk of an event, the role of thrombophilia is controversial. The purpose of this systematic review...... was to evaluate the evidence for thrombophilia investigation in patients presenting with retinal venous occlusion. Eligible studies were identified by a MESH-based search in PubMed 11–13 of March 2015. The level of evidence was stated according to the guidelines published by the GRADE working group using three...... synthesis. The majority of studies were small case–control studies, and only one large cohort study was identified. No randomized controlled trials were retrieved. All the studies were categorized as low quality of evidence. Systematic thrombophilia screening in patients presenting with retinal venous...

  17. New insights into the mechanisms of venous thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackman, Nigel

    2012-07-01

    Venous thrombosis is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in industrialized countries, especially in the elderly. Many risk factors have been identified for venous thrombosis that alter blood flow, activate the endothelium, and increase blood coagulation. However, the precise mechanisms that trigger clotting in large veins have not been fully elucidated. The most common site for initiation of the thrombus appears to be the valve pocket sinus, due to its tendency to become hypoxic. Activation of endothelial cells by hypoxia or possibly inflammatory stimuli would lead to surface expression of adhesion receptors that facilitate the binding of circulating leukocytes and microvesicles. Subsequent activation of the leukocytes induces expression of the potent procoagulant protein tissue factor that triggers thrombosis. Understanding the mechanisms of venous thrombosis may lead to the development of new treatments.

  18. Central venous access: techniques and indications in oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcy, Pierre-Yves [Antoine Lacassagne Anticancer Research Institute, Department of Radiodiagnostics and Interventional Radiology, Nice, Cedex 1 (France)

    2008-10-15

    Long lines can be inserted centrally or peripherally through patent veins into the central venous system down to the atrial caval junction. Traditionally surgeons, anesthetists, cardiologists and more recently interventional radiologists have been placing them using vein cutdown or percutaneous needle puncture techniques. Typical candidates for implanted venous catheters are cancer patients undergoing long-term chemotherapy. The most important issues, in addition to the patency of central veins and the history of previous indwelling catheters, pacewires or venous thrombosis, are the patient's performance status, body mass index, medical history and respiratory status, and the relevant technique. The present article will give an overview of the radiological and surgical implantation techniques and will highlight the impact of imaging means on the technical feasibility, assessment and treatment of device-related complications. (orig.)

  19. Varicose Veins: Role of Mechanotransduction of Venous Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atta, Hussein M.

    2012-01-01

    Varicose veins affect approximately one-third of the adult population and result in significant psychological, physical, and financial burden. Nevertheless, the molecular pathogenesis of varicose vein formation remains unidentified. Venous hypertension exerted on veins of the lower extremity is considered the principal factor in varicose vein formation. The role of mechanotransduction of the high venous pressure in the pathogenesis of varicose vein formation has not been adequately investigated despite a good progress in understanding the mechanomolecular mechanisms involved in transduction of high blood pressure in the arterial wall. Understanding the nature of the mechanical forces, the mechanosensors and mechanotransducers in the vein wall, and the downstream signaling pathways will provide new molecular targets for the prevention and treatment of varicose veins. This paper summarized the current understanding of mechano-molecular pathways involved in transduction of hemodynamic forces induced by blood pressure and tries to relate this information to setting of venous hypertension in varicose veins. PMID:22489273

  20. Varicose Veins: Role of Mechanotransduction of Venous Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein M. Atta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Varicose veins affect approximately one-third of the adult population and result in significant psychological, physical, and financial burden. Nevertheless, the molecular pathogenesis of varicose vein formation remains unidentified. Venous hypertension exerted on veins of the lower extremity is considered the principal factor in varicose vein formation. The role of mechanotransduction of the high venous pressure in the pathogenesis of varicose vein formation has not been adequately investigated despite a good progress in understanding the mechanomolecular mechanisms involved in transduction of high blood pressure in the arterial wall. Understanding the nature of the mechanical forces, the mechanosensors and mechanotransducers in the vein wall, and the downstream signaling pathways will provide new molecular targets for the prevention and treatment of varicose veins. This paper summarized the current understanding of mechano-molecular pathways involved in transduction of hemodynamic forces induced by blood pressure and tries to relate this information to setting of venous hypertension in varicose veins.

  1. Venous malformations: classification, development, diagnosis, and interventional radiologic management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legiehn, Gerald M; Heran, Manraj K S

    2008-05-01

    Venous malformations are categorized as low-flow vascular malformations within the domain of vascular anomalies and are the most common vascular malformation encountered clinically. Venous malformations are by definition present at birth, undergo pari passu growth, and present clinically because of symptoms related to mass effect or stasis. Although diagnosis can usually be made by clinical history and examination, differentiation from other vascular and nonvascular entities often requires an imaging work-up that includes ultrasound, CT, MR imaging, and diagnostic phlebography. All decisions regarding imaging work-up and decision to treat must be coordinated though referral and discussions with a multidisciplinary team and be based on clearly defined clinical indications. Percutaneous image-guided sclerotherapy has become the mainstay of treatment for venous malformations and involves the introduction of any one of a number of endothelial-cidal sclerosants into the vascular spaces of the lesion, with each sclerosant possessing its own unique spectrum of advantages and disadvantages.

  2. New anticoagulants for the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon J McRae

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Simon J McRae, Jeffrey S GinsbergDepartment of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, CanadaAbstract: Anticoagulant therapy is effective at preventing the development of venous thromboembolism in high-risk patients, and reduces morbidity and mortality in individuals with established thromboembolic disease. Vitamin K antagonists and heparins are currently the most commonly used anticoagulant drugs, but they have practical limitations. Therefore, new antithrombotic agents with predictable dose-responses (thereby decreasing the need for monitoring without compromising efficacy or safety, ideally available in an oral formulation and with a rapidly reversible anticoagulant effect, are needed. New drugs fulfilling some of the above criteria have been developed and have proven to be effective agents for the treatment and prevention of venous thromboembolism.Keywords: venous thromboembolism, anticoagulants, antithrombotic

  3. Immediate complications of percutaneous central venous cannulation in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dheer, Geetika; Chaudhry, Gurmeet Kaur; Singh, Tejinder

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To study the incidence of immediate complications associated with percutaneous central venous catheterization. Materials and Methods: A total of 103 central venous catheters were inserted in 70 children over a period of 18 months, governed by a uniform protocol. Sixty-three percent of the catheters were inserted in neonates, 23.3% in infants and 13.6% in children between 1 and 12 years of age. Statistical Analysis Used: Software SPSS version 15. Results: There were a total of 41 insertion-related immediate complications, of which 75.6% were in neonates. Neonatal age, hemodynamic instability and more number of attempts to catheterize the vein had a higher risk of insertion-related problems. There was no mortality directly as a result of the procedure. Conclusion: In our practice, it was observed that complications were fewer with increasing familiarity with the procedure. Hence, percutaneous central venous catheterization is a safe procedure when performed in experienced hands. PMID:22121313

  4. Immediate complications of percutaneous central venous cannulation in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geetika Dheer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the incidence of immediate complications associated with percutaneous central venous catheterization. Materials and Methods: A total of 103 central venous catheters were inserted in 70 children over a period of 18 months, governed by a uniform protocol. Sixty-three percent of the catheters were inserted in neonates, 23.3% in infants and 13.6% in children between 1 and 12 years of age. Statistical Analysis Used: Software SPSS version 15. Results: There were a total of 41 insertion-related immediate complications, of which 75.6% were in neonates. Neonatal age, hemodynamic instability and more number of attempts to catheterize the vein had a higher risk of insertion-related problems. There was no mortality directly as a result of the procedure. Conclusion: In our practice, it was observed that complications were fewer with increasing familiarity with the procedure. Hence, percutaneous central venous catheterization is a safe procedure when performed in experienced hands.

  5. Prophylaxis for venous thrombo-embolism in neurocritical care: a critical appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raslan, Ahmed M; Fields, Jeremy D; Bhardwaj, Anish

    2010-04-01

    Venous thrombo-embolism (VTE) is frequently encountered in critically ill neurological and neurosurgical patients admitted to intensive care units. This patient population includes those with brain neoplasm, intracranial hemorrhage, ischemic stroke, subarachnoid hemorrhage, pre- and post-operative patients undergoing neurosurgical procedures and those with traumatic brain injury, and acute spinal cord injury (SCI). There is a wide variability in clinical practice for thromboprophylaxis in these patients, in part due to paucity of data based on randomized clinical trials. Here, we review the current literature on the incidence of VTE in the critically ill neurological and neurosurgical patients as well as appraise available data to support particular practice paradigms for specific subsets of these patients. Data synthesis was conducted via search of Medline, Cochrane databases, and manual review of article bibliographies. Critically ill neurological and neurosurgical patients have higher susceptibility to VTE. Intermittent compression devices with or without anti-thrombotics is generally the method of choice for thromboprophylaxis. Low molecular weight heparin is the method of choice in certain patient subgroups such as those with SCI and ischemic stroke. Inferior vena cava filters may play a role in thromboprophylaxis in selected cases. Without clear guidelines that can be universally applied to this diverse group of patients, prophylaxis for VTE should be tailored to the individual patient with cautious assessment of benefits versus risks. There is a need for higher level evidence to guide VTE prophylaxis in certain subgroups of this patient population.

  6. Venous Thromboembolism After Knee Arthroscopy in Undiagnosed Familial Thrombophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jetty, Vybhav; Glueck, Charles J; Freiberg, Richard A; Wang, Ping

    2016-11-01

    Venous thromboembolism is uncommon after knee arthroscopy, and there are no guidelines for thromboprophylaxis in elective routine knee arthroscopy. Preoperative evaluation of common thrombophilias should provide guidance for postarthroscopy thromboprophylaxis in otherwise healthy patients who are at high risk for venous thromboembolism. This study assessed 10 patients with venous thromboembolism after total hip or knee arthroplasty. Patients were assessed if venous thromboembolism occurred within 6 months after knee arthroscopy (n=10) or total hip or knee arthroplasty (n=21). This study assessed gene mutations (factor V Leiden, prothrombin G20210A, plasminogen activator inhibitor, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase) and serologic thrombophilias (high levels of factors VIII and XI, homocysteine, anticardiolipin immunoglobulin G and immunoglobulin M antibodies, and lupus anticoagulant; low antigenic protein C, S, and free S; and antithrombin III deficiency). The same coagulation data were obtained for normal subjects (n=110). The major thrombophilias in the arthroscopy group were factor V Leiden heterozygosity (40%), high factor VIII level (50%), and high homocysteine (30%). The respective values in control subjects were 2% (P=.0004), 7% (P=.0011), and 5% (P=.02). When the arthroscopy group was compared with the 21 patients who had venous thromboembolism after total hip or knee arthroplasty, the sole difference was factor V Leiden heterozygosity, which was 40% vs 0%, respectively (P=.007). Although venous thromboembolism after knee arthroscopy is uncommon, to identify high-risk patients and guide postoperative thromboprophylaxis, the authors suggest routine preoperative measurement of 3 common familial thrombophilias: factor V Leiden, factor VIII, and homocysteine. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(6):e1052-e1057.].

  7. How to objectively assess jugular primary venous obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Zamboni

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Last January The Lancet published the article by Traboulsee et al. Prevalence of extracranial venous narrowing on catheter venography in people with multiple sclerosis, their sibilings, and unrelated healthy controls: a blinded, case control study. These Authors confirmed the presence of chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency with a high prevalence of about 70% in the Canadian population, but without significant differences between patients and healthy controls, yet. However, they used a criterion never published to assess stenosis, in alternative to the classic measurement of the diameter in the segment immediately preceding the narrowest point. Traboulsee et al. measure the stenosis along the entire length of the internal jugular vein, by comparing the maximum diameter with the narrowest point. It has been demonstrated, from normal anatomy findings, how the jugular bulb diameter normally exceeds 50% of the minimum diameter of the internal jugular vein, clearly showing the reason why Traboulsee et al. did not find significant differences between people with multiple sclerosis, their sibilings, and unrelated healthy controls. Furthermore, as the outcome measure of Traboulsee et al., wall stenosis is a neglected part of primary venous obstruction, because in the majority of cases obstruction is the consequence of intraluminal obstacles, as a considerable part of truncular venous malformations, and/or compression; rarely of external hypoplasia. Finally, several recently published methods can be adopted for objective assessment of restricted jugular flow in course of chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency, by the means of non invasive magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound and plethysmography. This may help us in improving the assessment of cerebral venous return in the near future.

  8. Imaging diagnosis of venous malformation in head and neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Doo Hoe; Kim, Dong Ik; Suh, Jung Ho; Jung, Tae Sub [College of Medicine, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-11-15

    The venous malformation in head and neck is a development vascular disease which arises from the arrest in the certain stage of vascular embryogenesis. However, the lesion extends along the fascia and has a tendency to recur after incomplete therapy. Retrospectively, the authors reviewed radiologic studies of 20 patients diagnosed as venous malformation during the last 5 years. The diagnosis was verified by histopathology (5 patients) and direct puncture angiography (15 patients). The radiologic studies included. CT with intravenous contrast injection (20 patients), RI angiography with 99mTc-pyrophosphate (6 patients), and direct puncture angiography (15 patients). Multiplicity of venous malformation was noted in 9 patients. On CT scan, the lesions had lobulated irregular shape, with heterogeneous appearance, showed delayed enhancing characteristics, and had the phleboliths (21 lesions). The venous malformations were located at the masticator space (including masseter muscle) (n = 12), retrobulbar space (n 6), submandibular space (n = 4), paravertebral space (n = 3) and so on. In two cases, the lesions were very extensive involving entire neck and parapharynx. On RI angiography using {sup 99m}Tc-pyrophosphate, all of the lesions showed persistent and delayed uptake. With direct puncture angiography the lesions could be classified as acinar pattern (n = 17) and mixed pattern (acinar and saccular) (n = 2). Venous connections were noted in 10 lesions. In conclusion, if a soft tissue mass on head and neck shows a heterogeneous attenuation density with or without calcified phlebolith on CT scan, RI angiography is recommended as a next diagnostic study. If it shows delayed persistent uptake, venous malformation can be suspected. Finally direct puncture angiography can verify the nature and extent of the lesion.

  9. Chronic venous insufficiency in Italy: the 24-cities cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiesa, R; Marone, E M; Limoni, C; Volonté, M; Schaefer, E; Petrini, O

    2005-10-01

    To assess the relationship between sex, age, geographical region, lower limb symptoms and the presence of trunk varicose veins and venous incompetence. Cross-sectional population study in 24 cities in the North, centre and South of Italy. Five thousand two hundred and forty-seven people were selected during spring and summer 2003 by advertising on television, in newspapers, and by leaflets in 24 Italian cities. In all 5187 (4457 [85.9%] women and 730 men [14.1%]) volunteers were assessed. The median age was 54 (range: 18-90) years for the women and 61 (range: 18-89) years for the men. Self-administered questionnaire on subjective symptoms of chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) in the lower limbs, and clinical examination, including colour duplex ultrasonography to assess the presence and severity of varicose veins. Overall only 22.7% of the subjects examined were free of visible signs of venous disease, with approximately 53% of the population over 50 years of age showing some venous reflux. People living in Southern Italy were more severely affected than those living in the North. Varicosities and telangiectases were the most frequent objective signs in both sexes. Trunk varicosities (27%) and saphenous reflux (41%) increased with age and were more common in men; in contrast, minor objective symptoms such as telangiectases (70%), as well as subjective symptoms such as heavy (79%) and tired legs (78%), were more common in women and were not age-related. Venous disease is very common in Italy, in particular in people living in the South. A correlation between varicose veins and venous incompetence is more marked in men, while minor objective and subjective symptoms prevail in women. The findings from this non-random sample closely match results from previous studies, in which random sampling was used.

  10. The maternal venous system: the ugly duckling of obstetrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomsin, K

    2013-01-01

    In pregnancy, both maternal vascular tone and cardiac function are considered key players to reach a normal outcome for both mother and child. This complex story of maternal hemodynamics is intensely discussed in current scientific literature, however the role of the maternal veins has been strongly underestimated. We developed and evaluated a set of measurable objective parameters which give an indication of venous function, i.e. the venous impedance index and the venous pulse transit time. These parameters turned out to be subject to changes throughout normal pregnancy and in preeclampsia enabling their use in gestational hemodynamic -studies. From our studies, we concluded that the venous system is a crucial determinant of cardiac output, which can be estimated by impedance cardiography. The introduction of these non-invasive techniques in obstetrics enables profiling the maternal cardiovascular system, integrating both arteries and veins, as well as maternal cardiac -function. Studying the cascade of cardiovascular changes throughout pregnancy using such non-invasive, easily applicable, and highly accessible methods opens perspectives to introduce this maternal cardiovascular profile in several -clinical settings. The early discrimination between low and high risk patients, together with the classification of different pregnancy disorders may help guiding the clinical work-up of the pregnant population regarding both prevention and treatment, as well as follow-up. We illustrate that the venous system, being an "ugly duckling" at first neglected by the medical world, transforms and matures into a beautiful swan, accepted by the obstetric world. We are confident that this is the beginning of many other studies regarding the maternal venous system, an important piece of the gestational physiology puzzle.

  11. [Arterial vascular injuries in fractures and dislocations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatek, S; Bürger, T; Halloul, Z; Westphal, T; Holmenschlager, F; Winckler, S

    2001-05-01

    We analyzed reasons, numbers and results of arterial lesions accompanying fractures (n = 21) and luxations (n = 6) in a 6-year-period (1993-1998) retrospectively. Traffic accidents were in nearly 50% responsible for the injuries. 8 patients had suffered multiple injuries. In 17 patients the lower, and in 10 patients the upper extremities were affected. The vascular wall was completely disrupted or severed in 74%. In 7 cases (26%), patients had suffered blunt or indirect arterial trauma with intima- and media-lacerations due to subcapital fracture of the humerus (n = 2), fractured femoral bone (n = 1), luxation of the knee joint (n = 3) or the elbow (n = 1). The mean preoperative time period was 6 hours and 20 minutes (2 to 16 hours) in patients with complete ischaemia. Vascular reconstruction was performed by interposition of an autologous vein graft or an autologous venous bypass (n = 20), by direct reconstruction and primary suturing (n = 2), by use of a venous patch plasty (n = 2) and, in a single case, by autologous bypass procedure. In one case, a crural artery was ligated, in another case with a Mangled Extremity Severity Score (MESS) of 7 points a primary amputation of the lower leg was necessary. In 5 patients (19%) secondary amputations were performed. No patient died. The final outcome is mostly influenced by the preoperative period of ischaemia.

  12. Increased venous thrombosis incidence in pregnancies after in vitro fertilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anette Tarp; Kesmodel, U S; Juul, S

    2014-01-01

    by in vitro fertilization (n = 18 787) were included. Venous thrombosis incidence rates in pregnancies after in vitro fertilization were compared with venous thrombosis incidence rates in reference pregnancies, by calculating incidence rate ratios. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE In total, 48 cases were...... FUNDING/COMPETING INTERESTS Expenses for the acquirement of data were covered by a grant from The Secretary of Doctors further education, Central Denmark Region. None of the authors have any competing interests to declare. TRIAL REGISTRATIONS NUMBER Not applicable....

  13. Management of venous ulcers: State of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marola, Silvia; Ferrarese, Alessia; Solej, Mario; Enrico, Stefano; Nano, Mario; Martino, Valter

    2016-09-01

    Venous ulceration is a complex and serious problem that affects 1-2% of the global elderly population (>65 years), and its incidence is constantly increasing. The population group with higher risk of development of venous ulceration is the elderly. These lesions have a significant negative impact on patients' quality of life. Our aim was to analyze the state of the art, starting with the medical literature review. The evidence supports that managing chronic wounds with a multidisciplinary wound care team significantly increases wound healing and reduces the severity of wound-associated pain and the required daily wound treatments compared with persons who are not managed by such a team.

  14. Venous Thromboembolism in Children with Cancer and Blood Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Richard H.; Thornburg, Courtney D.

    2017-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) in children is multifactorial and most often related to a combination of inherited and acquired thrombophilias. Children with cancer and blood disorders are often at risk for VTE due to disease-related factors such as inflammation and abnormal blood flow and treatment-related factors such as central venous catheters and surgery. We will review risk factors for VTE in children with leukemia, lymphoma, and solid tumors. We will also review risk factors for VTE in children with blood disorders with specific focus on sickle cell anemia and hemophilia. We will present the available evidence and clinical guidelines for prevention and treatment of VTE in these populations. PMID:28220143

  15. Intracranial dural arterio-venous fistula presenting with progressive myelopathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ogbonnaya, Ebere Sunny

    2011-01-01

    Spinal dural arterio-venous fistula (DAVF) is rare and usually involves the thoracic segments. The classical presentation is a slowly progressive ataxia. Clinical presentation of intracranial DAVF depends on the site of the DAVF, as well as the vessels involved. Patients may present with pulsatile tinnitus, occipital bruit, headache, dementia, visual impairment as well as neurological deterioration distant from the DAVF as a result of venous hypertension and cortical haemorrhage. The authors present a rare case of progressive myelopathy secondary to an intracranial DAVF.

  16. Repositioning of malpositioned or flipped central venous catheters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thalhammer, A.; Jacobi, V.; Balzer, J.; Vogl, T.J. [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Central Radiology Clinic, J.W. Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2002-03-01

    Primary misplaced or secondary flipped implanted catheters are located mostly in the right jugular vein. We demonstrate an effective method to replace fix implanted catheters such as Ports, Grochomg or Hickman catheters. Using a femoral venous approach, replacement into the superior vena cava can easily be done with a Sidewinder 1 catheter which is hooked over the misplaced central venous approach. In all our patients the method was successful. The repositioning technique described is simple, fast and has low costs. We can keep sterile conditions and do not need to solve the catheters' fixation. (orig.)

  17. Malfunctioning central venous catheters in children: a diagnostic approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnacle, Alex; Arthurs, Owen J.; Roebuck, Derek; Hiorns, Melanie P. [Great Ormond Street Hospital, Radiology Department, London (United Kingdom)

    2008-04-15

    Central venous access is increasingly becoming the domain of the radiologist, both in terms of the insertion of central venous catheters (CVCs) and in the subsequent management of these lines. This article seeks to provide an overview of the CVC types available for paediatric patients and a more detailed explanation of the spectrum of complications that may lead to catheter malfunction. A standard catheter contrast study or 'linogram' technique is described. The normal appearances of such a study and a detailed pictorial review of abnormal catheter studies are provided, together with a brief overview of how information from catheter investigations can guide the management of catheter complications. (orig.)

  18. Erythrocyte volume in acidified venous blood from exercising limbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Beaumont, W.; Rochelle, R. H.

    1973-01-01

    Five male volunteers performed arm exercises in the sitting position by cranking the pedals of a bicycle ergometer at 50 revolutions per min. The initial mechanical work load of 0 kgm/min was increased every minute by 75 kgm/min until exhaustion occurred. The data obtained show a significant acidification of the venous blood from the working arms and a substantial increase in venous pCO2 during this type of muscular activity. However, the erythrocyte volume remained unaltered during the exercise.

  19. [Cerebral venous thrombosis imagiologic features in a pregnant woman].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Maria Madalena; Rios, Ana Cristina; Fragata, Isabel; Baptista, José Tiago; Manaças, Rui; Reis, João

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a relatively rare but serious condition potentially reversible upon accurate diagnosis and adequate therapy. The peri-partum state and pregnancy are predisposing factors and TVC accounts for about 6% of maternal deaths. Its clinical symptoms depend on the the thrombus site and extension, and also on the existing collateral vessels network. We present the case of a 33 year-old woman, 13 weeks pregnant, that complained of headaches and whose cranial magnetic resonance imaging revealed a subtotal oclusión of the superior sagittal sinus. We discuss the imaging features of dural venous thrombosis in the acute phase.

  20. Adrenal venous sampling in a patient with adrenal Cushing syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Builes-Montaño, Carlos Esteban; Villa-Franco, Carlos Andrés; Román-Gonzalez, Alejandro; Velez-Hoyos, Alejandro; Echeverri-Isaza, Santiago

    2015-01-01

    The primary bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia or the independent adrenocorticotropic hormone bilateral nodular adrenal hyperplasia is a rare cause hypercortisolism, its diagnosis is challenging and there is no clear way to decide the best therapeutic approach. Adrenal venous sampling is commonly used to distinguish the source of hormonal production in patients with primary hyperaldosteronism. It could be a useful tool in this context because it might provide information to guide the treatment. We report the case of a patient with ACTH independent Cushing syndrome in whom the use of adrenal venous sampling with some modifications radically modified the treatment and allowed the diagnosis of a macronodular adrenal hyperplasia.

  1. A rare cause of cerebral venous thrombosis: cryptococcal meningoencephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senadim, Songul; Alpaydin Baslo, Sezin; Tekin Güveli, Betül; Dedei Daryan, Metin; Kantaroglu, Elif; Ozturk, Oya; Atakli, Dilek

    2016-07-01

    Cryptococcal meningoencephalitis (CM) is a serious central nervous system infection caused by Cryptococcus neoformans, seen mostly in immunocompromised hosts and less in immunocompetent patients. The vast majority of cryptococcosis cases are seen as human immunodeficiency virus infections with advanced immunosuppression. Meningitis and meningoencephalitis are the most common clinical manifestations. Nevertheless, immunocompetent patients with CM are rarely reported. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is a rare complication of CM. Here, we report an immunocompetent patient with CM from a non-endemic area, who presented with an acute onset and atypical symptoms associated with cerebral venous thrombosis.

  2. Endovascular therapy for chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency in multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc A. Lazzaro

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent reports have emerged suggesting that multiple sclerosis (MS may be due to abnormal venous outflow from the central nervous system, termed Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency (CCSVI. These reports have generated strong interest and controversy over the prospect of a treatable cause of this chronic debilitating disease. This review aims to describe the proposed association between CCSVI and MS, summarize the current data, and discuss the role of endovascular therapy and the need for rigorous randomized clinical trials to evaluate this association and treatment.

  3. Central Venous Disease in Hemodialysis Patients: An Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modabber, Milad, E-mail: mmodabber@gmail.com [McMaster University, Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine (Canada); Kundu, Sanjoy [Scarborough Hospital and Scarborough Vascular Ultrasound, The Vein Institute of Toronto (Canada)

    2013-08-01

    Central venous occlusive disease (CVD) is a common concern among the hemodialysis patient population, with the potential to cause significant morbidity. Endovascular management of CVD, comprising percutaneous balloon angioplasty and bare-metal stenting, has been established as a safe alternative to open surgical treatment. However, these available treatments have poor long-term patency, requiring close surveillance and multiple repeat interventions. Recently, covered stents have been proposed and their efficacy assessed for the treatment of recalcitrant central venous stenosis and obstruction. Moreover, newly proposed algorithms for the surgical management of CVD warrant consideration. Here, we seek to provide an updated review of the current literature on the various treatment modalities for CVD.

  4. Facial Sports Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find an ENT Doctor Near You Facial Sports Injuries Facial Sports Injuries Patient Health Information News media interested in ... should receive immediate medical attention. Prevention Of Facial Sports Injuries The best way to treat facial sports injuries ...

  5. Effectiveness of Sclerotherapy, Surgery, and Laser Therapy in Patients With Venous Malformations: A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vleuten, C.J.M. van der; Kater, A.; Wijnen, M.H.W.A.; Schultze Kool, L.J.; Rovers, M.M.

    2014-01-01

    Because the best possible treatment for venous malformations is unclear, this study systematically reviews the available literature regarding the effectiveness of different treatment options for the patient group. Venous malformations result from incorrect development of the veins during embryogenes

  6. Oral contraceptives and venous thromboembolism: a five-year national case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lidegaard, Øjvind; Edström, Birgitte; Kreiner, Svend

    2002-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism; Oral contraceptives; Pulmonary embolism; Third-generation; Second-generation; Pill Scare......Venous thromboembolism; Oral contraceptives; Pulmonary embolism; Third-generation; Second-generation; Pill Scare...

  7. Renal perfusion with venous blood extends the permissible suprarenal clamp time in abdominal aortic surgery

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pichlmaier, Maximilian; Hoy, Ludwig; Wilhelmi, Mathias; Khaladj, Nawid; Haverich, Axel; Teebken, Omke E

    2008-01-01

    ... suprarenal clamping for aortic reconstructive surgery. Renal perfusion was achieved using a roller pump supplied with venous blood from a central venous catheter under medium-level heparinization to feed two perfusion balloon catheters...

  8. Comparison of complication rates between umbilical and peripherally inserted central venous catheters in newborns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnts, I.J.J.; Bullens, L.M.; Groenewoud, J.M.M.; Liem, K.D.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the complication rates between umbilical central venous catheters and peripherally inserted central venous catheters in newborns and to investigate whether other variables might increase complication rates. DESIGN: A retrospective observational study. SETTING: A Level III neona

  9. Implementation of a children's hospital-wide central venous catheter insertion and maintenance bundle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Helder MScN (Onno); R.F. Kornelisse (René); C. van der Starre (Cynthia); D. Tibboel (Dick); C.W.N. Looman (Caspar); R.M.H. Wijnen (René); M.J. Poley (Marten); E. Ista (Erwin)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Central venous catheter-associated bloodstream infections in children are an increasingly recognized serious safety problem worldwide, but are often preventable. Central venous catheter bundles have proved effective to prevent such infections. Successful implementation requir

  10. Thoracoscopic Resection of a Rare Case of Hemangioma of the Azygos Venous Arch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Husai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemangioma of the azygos venous arch is an exceedingly rare incident. This is a case of a thoracoscopic complete resection of a hemangioma of the azygos venous arch in a 37-year-old woman.

  11. Iatrogenic skin injury in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardesai, Smeeta R; Kornacka, Maria K; Walas, Wojciech; Ramanathan, Rangasamy

    2011-02-01

    Although neonatal care has become more and more meticulous with significant changes in technology in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) in the past 50 years, iatrogenic cutaneous injuries continue to occur. Although the incidence of severe injuries is decreasing because the more difficult procedures are being replaced by improved techniques, skin injuries have not yet been completely eliminated. However, the nature and causes of cutaneous injuries have changed, and the injuries are frequent but generally minor. The major risk factors are low birth weight, gestational age, length of stay, a central venous line, mechanical ventilation, and support with continuous positive airway pressure. The rate of iatrogenic events is about 57% at gestational ages of 24-27 weeks, compared with 3% at term. There are no current comprehensive reviews of iatrogenic cutaneous injury. The purpose of this review is to describe the iatrogenic cutaneous injuries that may occur in the newborns as a consequence of perinatal and postnatal medical procedures. With increased survival of extremely-low-birth-weight (ELBW) infants and changing modes of management in the NICU, neonatologists must make every effort to recognize injuries and prevent their occurrence in the NICU.

  12. Sigmoid and transverse sinus thrombosis after closed head injury presenting with unilateral hearing loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brors, D. [Univ. Hospital Wuerzburg (Germany). Dept. of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head- and Neck-Surgery; Dept. of Ear, Nose and Throat Diseases, Head, Neck and Facial Plastic Surgery, Klinikum Fulda (Germany); Schaefers, M. [Dept. of Neurology, University Hospital Wuerzburg (Germany); Schick, B.; Draf, W. [Dept. of Ear, Nose and Throat Diseases, Head, Neck and Facial Plastic Surgery, Klinikum Fulda (Germany); Dazert, S. [Univ. Hospital Wuerzburg (Germany). Dept. of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head- and Neck-Surgery; Kahle, G. [Department of Radiology, Hospital Fulda (Germany)

    2001-02-01

    Sinus thrombosis has rarely been associated with closed head injury; more often, thrombosis of the sigmoid or transverse sinus is caused by otogenic inflammations or tumours, or occurs during pregnancy. Symptoms are frequently vague, while untreated thrombus progression may be fatal due to venous congestion and infarction. We report a 32-year-old man presenting with right hearing loss, tinnitus and headache 2 days after a closed head injury. Neurological examination showed no additional abnormality. The EEG showed focal bifrontal slowing. CT revealed a fracture of the occipital bone. MRI and MRA demonstrated complete thrombosis of the right sigmoid and transverse sinuses. After 2 weeks of intravenous heparin therapy followed by warfarin, the patient's hearing improved and MRI and MRA showed complete recanalisation of the sigmoid and transverse sinuses. Venous sinus thrombosis can be an undetected sequel to head injury. Appropriate imaging studies should be carried out to enable therapy to be started as soon as possible. (orig.)

  13. Recurrent cerebral venous infarcts and superior vena cava obstruction: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozzao, A. [Department of Radiology, University of Rome ``Tor Vergata``, Rome (Italy)]|[Istituto di Radiologia, Ospedale S. Eugenio, Piazzale dell`Umanesimo 10 I-00144 Roma (Italy); Gallucci, M. [Department of Neuroradiology, University of L`Aquila, L`Aquila (Italy); Marsili, L. [Department of Neuroradiology, University of L`Aquila, L`Aquila (Italy); Cerone, G. [Department of Neurology, Collemaggio Hospital, L`Aquila (Italy)

    1997-06-01

    We report a patient with repeated venous infarcts in the occipital lobe and occlusion of the superior vena cava. The pathogenetic relationships between the superior vena cava occlusion and the brain infarcts are discussed. High pressure in the superior venous territory and incomplete patency of the transverse sinus are probably responsible for the venous infarcts. (orig.). With 4 figs.

  14. The effect of flight-related behaviour on the risk of venous thrombosis after air travel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreijer, Anja J.M.; Cannegieter, Suzanne C.; Doggen, Catharina Jacoba Maria; Rosendaal, Frits R.

    2009-01-01

    In a case–control study including 11 033 participants (The Multiple Environmental and Genetic Assessment of risk factors for venous thrombosis study) on risk factors of venous thrombosis, we studied the effect of flight-related behaviour on the risk of venous thrombosis after air travel. Patients

  15. [Treatment of patients with venous leg ulcers: what if compression therapy alone is no longer beneficial?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Montfrans, C. van; Boer, E.M. de; Jansma, E.P.; Gibbs, S.; Mekkes, J.R.; Vleuten, C.J.M. van der; Maessen-Visch, M.B.

    2013-01-01

    - Non-healing venous leg ulcers are a cumbersome problem for the patient and the physician.- Adequate compression therapy that reduces venous pressure is the cornerstone of treatment.- For each patient treatment of superficial venous insufficiency should be considered.- Adjuvant surgical, physical o

  16. Air travel and venous thrombosis : results of the WRIGHT study : Part I: Epidemiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, Saskia

    2009-01-01

    In venous thrombosis, a blood clot develops in a vein, usually a deep vein of the leg, causing obstruction of the blood flow. Venous thrombosis is a multicausal disease, in which genes and environment interact. One of the environmental factors that increases the risk of venous thrombosis is long dis

  17. The posterior intercostal vein : A thermoregulatory gateway to the internal vertebral venous plexus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogland, P. V.; Wessels, Q.; Vorster, W.; Groen, R. J. M.; Wettstein, R.; Greyling, L. M.; Kotze, S. H.

    The internal vertebral venous plexus (IVVP) plays a putative role in thermoregulation of the spinal cord. Cold cutaneous venous blood may cool, while warm venous blood from muscles and brown fat areas may warm the spinal cord. The regulating mechanisms for both cooling and warming are still unknown.

  18. Malpostion of subclavin central venous cannulation into ipsilateral jugular vein -An unusal case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Central venous catheterization (CVC via infraclavicular subclavian approach in neurosurgical pat ients is very common practice. Malpositioning of central venous catheter inserted into subclavian vein is a known and dreaded complication. Malpositioning of catheter tip into ipsilateral jugular vein is an unusual occurrence. We hereby describe a case whe re a subclavian central venous catheter malpositioned into ipsilateral jugular vein

  19. Malpostion of subclavin central venous cannulation into ipsilateral jugular vein -An unusal case report

    OpenAIRE

    Vishal; Sumantra; Rajnikant; Dilpreet; Shweta

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Central venous catheterization (CVC) via infraclavicular subclavian approach in neurosurgical pat ients is very common practice. Malpositioning of central venous catheter inserted into subclavian vein is a known and dreaded complication. Malpositioning of catheter tip into ipsilateral jugular vein is an unusual occurrence. We hereby describe a case whe re a subclavian central venous catheter malpositioned into ipsilateral jugular vein

  20. Genetic risk factors for venous thrombosis : key players or minor risk modifiers?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vossen, Carolina Yvonne

    2005-01-01

    Venous thrombosis is a common disease, which manifests itself mostly in the deep veins of the leg, with a reported incidence of 1-2 per 1000 individuals per year. Several genetic risk factors have been identified for venous thrombosis. It is, however, difficult to predict the risk of venous

  1. Difference in hepatic tissue oxygenation between total vascular exclusion and inflow occlusion of the liver and the possible role of hepatic venous blood under liver ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, T; Asanuma, Y; Kusano, T; Sasaki, N; Shindo, Y; Koyama, K

    1998-01-01

    The difference between total vascular exclusion (TVE) and inflow occlusion (IO) of the liver was assessed by the extent of DNA injury in rats and by hepatic tissue oxygen saturation (SahtO2) in pigs. Moreover, the role of hepatic venous blood under liver ischemia was discussed. Seventy percent of the rat livers were exposed to complete IO (hepatic artery + portal vein) or to TVE (IO + hepatic vein) for 30 or 60 min. DNA strand breaks following blood flow interception were measured using the in situ nick translation technique as an indicator of liver damage. IO/TVE were performed on pigs as well under portosystemic bypass, and the oxygen saturation of the hepatic venous blood (SahvO2) was altered by changing the fraction of inspiratory oxygen or by oxygenating the inferior caval blood using an extracorporeal membrane oxygenator. The changes in SahtO2 were measured sequentially using near-infrared spectroscopy. The results were as follows: (1) DNA injury occurred more severely under TVE than under IO of the rat liver at the end of ischemia, as well as 30 min after revascularization. (2) SahtO2 during TVE was significantly lower than that during IO. (3) The increase in SahvO2 by oxygenation of the inferior caval blood resulted in the elevation of SahtO2 under IO. In conclusion, TVE could cause greater damage to the liver than IO due to the lack of the hepatic venous blood. Hepatic venous blood might play an important role in hepatic tissue oxygenation in the case of hepatic blood flow interception.

  2. Management of traumatic vascular injuries to the neck: a 7-year experience at a Level I trauma center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Jon D; Ahmed, Naveed; Donnellan, Kimberly A; Schmieg, Robert E; Porter, John M; Mitchell, Marc E

    2012-03-01

    Injury to the carotid artery results in significant mortality and morbidity. The general consensus is to repair all injuries to the common and internal carotid arteries. Ligation is usually reserved for neurologic or hemodynamic instability. We report our experience at a Level I trauma center with vascular injuries to the neck. Retrospective chart review of all patients with vascular injuries in the neck resulting from either blunt or penetrating trauma treated at a Level I trauma center between January 2000 and February 2007. Demographics and outcomes were collected from a chart review. Twenty-five patients with vascular injuries to the neck were identified. There were 13 carotid artery injuries (CAI), five internal jugular vein (IJV) injuries, and 13 external jugular vein (EJV) injuries. Of the carotid artery injuries, six (50%) underwent operative repair (4 primary repairs and 2 bypasses), five (38%) were managed nonoperatively, and one was treated using endovascular techniques. No patient had a postoperative decrease in Glasgow Coma Scale score. There were five isolated IJV injuries (3 primary repair and 2 ligations). Four of the venous injuries (all internal jugular veins) were repaired and the remaining 13 were ligated. Vascular injuries to the neck have significant mortality and morbidity. Treatment of these injuries must be individualized. All CAI in noncomatose patients should be repaired if hemodynamically stable. All IJV injuries should be repaired but may be ligated if hemodynamically unstable. All EJV injuries can be ligated without reservation regardless of neurological status.

  3. Injuries of the Portal Vein in Patients With Blunt Abdominal Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Henne-Bruns

    1993-01-01

    four or more organs. Additionally, in 11.8% of these cases (n = 8 a major vascular injury (portal vein n = 5, vena cava n = 2, mesenteric root n = 1 was found. Injuries to the portal vein were always associated with complete rupture of the pancreas, requiring distal pancreatic resection in four cases and a duodenum preserving resection of the head of the pancreas in one. In two of these patients the portal vein had to be reconstructed with a Goretex prosthetic graft. Mortality was 14.7% for the whole group (n = 68 and 0% for patients with additional portal venous injuries.

  4. Idiopathic extensive spontaneous venous thrombosis (a case report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pathare A

    1989-04-01

    Full Text Available Two patients with extensive spontaneous venous thrombosis are reported. Both had documented evidence of polyserositis, transient abnormalities of liver function tests along with normal coagulograms. Although one patient had a short, self-limiting illness, the other required treatment with coumarin derivatives. The relevant literature is discussed.

  5. Diagnosing thoracic venous aneurysm: A contemporary imaging perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohit Aggarwal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Thoracic venous aneurysms are a rare clinical entity and contrast-enhanced computed tomography has been the cornerstone of their diagnosis. We are reporting a rare case of isolated left brachiocephalic vein aneurysm, which was surgically managed, highlighting the role of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging as a definitive diagnostic modality in this patient.

  6. Acute on Chronic Venous Thromboembolism on Therapeutic Anticoagulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byron Bassi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of proximal venous thromboembolism in a patient who presented to the ED with lower extremity pain is presented. Making this diagnosis is very important as fifty percent of patients with symptomatic proximal DVTs will go on to develop PE without treatment. This report underscores the utility of bedside ultrasonography in the emergency department.

  7. Upper extremity venous thrombosis. Case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemmers, D W; Thorpe, P E; Knibbe, M A; Beard, D W

    1990-02-01

    Upper extremity venous thrombosis is a clinical entity with numerous etiologic factors. Only 2% of all cases of deep venous thrombosis involve the upper extremity, and the incidence of pulmonary embolism related to thrombosis in this location is approximately 12%. Primary or "effort" thrombosis of the upper limb is related to the inherent anatomical structure of the thoracic outlet and axillary region. Secondary thrombosis may have such diverse origins as trauma, infection, congestive heart failure, central venous catheters, neoplasms, septic phlebitis, intravenous drug use, and hypercoagulable states. Patients present with peripheral edema and prominent superficial veins, and neurologic symptoms (pain and paresthesias) are usually present as well. Clinical diagnosis is confirmed by venography or sonography. Treatment regimens include conservative measures, thrombolysis with fibrinolytic agents, and surgical correction of indicated thoracic outlet and axillary structures. We present an unusual case in which upper extremity venous thrombosis in a young healthy female athlete was associated with the presence of cervical ribs. The patient was successfully treated with focal thrombolysis and surgical resection of her ipsilateral cervical rib.

  8. Venous reserve capacity & autonomic function in formerly preeclamptic women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krabbendam, I.

    2009-01-01

    Formerly preeclamptic women with pre-pregnant low plasma volume have a three-fold higher chance to develop recurrent gestational hypertensive disease than women with normal plasma volume. Previous studies have suggested that those women with low plasma volume have relatively low venous capacitance a

  9. Association of Traditional Cardiovascular Risk Factors with Venous Thromboembolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahmoodi, Bakhtawar K; Cushman, Mary; Næss, Inger Anne

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: -There is much controversy surrounding the association of traditional cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors with venous thromboembolism (VTE). METHODS: - We performed an individual level random-effect meta-analysis including 9 prospective studies with measured baseline CVD risk fa...

  10. Deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism following physical restraint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, S B; Jensen, T N; Bolwig, T

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We describe a case of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) following the use of physical restraint in a patient with a diagnosis of acute delusional psychotic disorder. METHOD: A new case report of DVT and PE associated with prolonged physical restraint is presented...

  11. Scintigraphic demonstration of lower extremity periostitis secondary to venous insufficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gensburg, R.S.; Kawashima, A.; Sandler, C.M.

    1988-07-01

    The scintigraphic findings on bone imaging in two patients with extensive lower extremity periostitis secondary to venous insufficiency are presented. One of these patients had bilateral disease. The use of (/sup 67/Ga)citrate scanning in an attempt to exclude concurrent osteomyelitis is also addressed.

  12. A mathematical model of continuous arterio-venous hemodiafiltration (CAVHD)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Akcahuseyin (Emin); H.H. Vincent (Jeroen); F.J. van Ittersum (Frans); W.A. van Duyl (Wim); M.A.D.H. Schalekamp (Maarten)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractAbstract Continuous arterio-venous hemodiafiltration (CAVHD) differs from conventional hemofiltration and dialysis by the interaction of convection and diffusion, the use of very low dialysate flow rates and by the deterioration of membrane conditions during the treatment. In order to st

  13. [Cortical venous thrombosis after a diagnostic lumbar puncture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeilschifter, W; Neumann-Haefelin, T; Hattingen, E; Singer, O C

    2009-10-01

    We present the case of a 49-year-old female patient who underwent a lumbar puncture in the context of an extended diagnostic work-up after a transient ischemic attack. A few days later the patient who suffered from severe post-lumbar puncture headache, developed a lobar hemorrhage due to a cortical venous thrombosis requiring decompression surgery.

  14. Development of Needle Insertion Manipulator for Central Venous Catheterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yo; Hong, Jaesung; Hamano, Ryutaro; Hashizume, Makoto; Okada, Kaoru; Fujie, Masakatsu G.

    Central venous catheterization is a procedure, which a doctor insert a catheter into the patient’s vein for transfusion. Since there are risks of bleeding from arterial puncture or pneumothorax from pleural puncture. Physicians are strictly required to make needle reach up into the vein and to stop the needle in the middle of vein. We proposed a robot system for assisting the venous puncture, which can relieve the difficulties in conventional procedure, and the risks of complication. This paper reports the design structuring and experimental results of needle insertion manipulator. First, we investigated the relationship between insertion force and angle into the vein. The results indicated that the judgment of perforation using the reaction force is possible in case where the needling angle is from 10 to 20 degree. The experiment to evaluate accuracy of the robot also revealed that it has beyond 0.5 mm accuracy. We also evaluated the positioning accuracy in the ultrasound images. The results displays that the accuracy is beyond 1.0 mm and it has enough for venous puncture. We also carried out the venous puncture experiment to the phantom and confirm our manipulator realized to make needle reach up into the vein.

  15. Grade Management in Establishing Pediatric Peripheral Venous Access

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Min Yan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Establishing venous access is a challenging job for pediatric nurses, especially in the emergency department. Measures to ensure higher success rates on the first attempt are important to provide quality nursing care. Objectives To explore the effect of grade management on the success of establishing peripheral venous access in the child population of China and to analyze the factors influencing failed IV access on the first attempt. Methods This is an observational study on children aged 0 - 16 years old undergoing peripheral venous catheterization in a children’s hospital. Patient information was collected before attempting each puncture. Logistic regression was used to identify independent factors for success prediction. Results A total of 1,016 subjects enrolled. The success rate of intravenous puncture on the first attempt was 86.02%. This can be influenced by several factors, such as patient age, department, venous condition, and nurse experience. The success rate within two attempts was 96.85%; the number of catheters used per IV attempt was 1.21. Conclusions To date, only a few studies have explored the success rate of peripheral IV catheterization in the pediatric population of China. Grade management of peripheral veins and pediatric nurses facilitated higher first-attempt success than in previously published reports. Failures of catheterization were multifactorial. The success rate of peripheral intravenous insertion in children can be improved through applying assistance devices or enhancing the venipuncture skills of pediatric nurses.

  16. How I treat pregnancy-related venous thromboembolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middeldorp, S.

    2011-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) complicates ~ 1 to 2 of 1000 pregnancies, with pulmonary embolism being a leading cause of maternal mortality and deep vein thrombosis an important cause of maternal morbidity, also on the long term. However, a strong evidence base for the management of pregnancy-related

  17. The surgical treatment of ilio-femoral venous obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illuminati, G; Caliò, F G; D'Urso, A; Mancini, P; Papaspyropoulos, V; Ceccanei, G; Lorusso, R; Vietri, F

    2004-01-01

    A series of 9 patients of a mean age of 48 years, operated on for compression of the ilio-femoral venous axis is reported. The cause of obstruction was external compression in 3 cases, a retroperitoneal sarcoma in 1 case, and an infrarenal aortic aneurysm in 2. Two patients presented with a Cockett's syndrome, 3 with a chronic ilio-femoral thrombosis, and one with a post-traumatic segmentary stenosis. Treatment consisted in a resection/Dacron grafting of 2 infrarenal aortic aneurysms, one femoro-caval bypass graft, 2 transpositions of the right common iliac artery in the left hypogastric artery for Cockett's syndrome, 3 Palma's operations for chronic thrombosis, and one internal jugular vein interposition for segmentary stenosis. There were no postoperative deaths and no early thromboses of venous reconstructions performed. All the patients were relieved of symptoms during the follow-up period, whose mean length was 38 months. The cause of venous obstruction and the presence of symptoms which are resistant to medical treatment are the main indications to ilio-femoral venous revascularization. The choice of the optimal treatment in each single case yields satisfactory results.

  18. Necrotizing enterocolitis with recurrent hepatic portal venous gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollman, J H; Smith, W L; Tsang, R C

    1976-03-01

    Two separate episodes of pneumatosis intestinalis and hepatic portal venous gas were observed in a premature infant with necrotizing enterocolitis. Although HPVG has previously been considered an ominous roentgenographic sign, the infant survived without surgical intervention. As in several cases reported by others, clinical and roentgenographic signs of NEC reappeared when enteric feedings were restarted prior to 10 days of medical therapy.

  19. Right Gastric Venous Drainage: Angiographic Analysis in 100 Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seong, Nak Jong [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Jin Wook; Kim, Hyo Cheol; Park, Jae Hyung; Jae, Hwan Jun [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); An, Sang Bu [National Cancer Center, Ilsan (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Baik Hwan [Chonbuk National University Hospital, Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    To evaluate the pattern of right gastric venous drainage by use of digital subtraction angiography. A series of 100 consecutive patients who underwent right gastric arteriography during transcatheter arterial chemoembolization for hepatocellular carcinoma were included in this study. Angiographic findings were retrospectively analyzed with respect to the presence or absence of the right and aberrant gastric veins, multiplicity of draining veins, aberrant right gastric venous drainage sites, and the termination pattern of aberrant right gastric veins (ARGVs). We also compared the relative size of the right and left gastric veins. A total of 49 patients collectively had 66 ARGVs. The common drainage sites for the ARGVs included the hepatic segment IV (n = 35) and segment I (n = 15). The termination pattern of ARGV could be classified into 4 different types. The most common type was termination as a superficial parenchymal blush formation in small areas without demonstrable portal branches. A statistically significant difference was found for the dominance of the right gastric vein in gastric venous drainage between the two groups with or without ARGV (p < 0.05, Fisher's exact test). In the group of patients without ARGV (n = 51), the right gastric vein was equal to (n = 9) or larger than (n = 17) the left gastric vein in 26 patients (26 of 51, 51%). The incidence of ARGV is higher than expected with four distinct types in its termination pattern. The right gastric vein may play a dominant role in gastric venous drainage.

  20. A RARE CASE OF A MALPOSITIONED CENTRAL VENOUS CATHE TER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasquinha Vinay

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: A Malpositioned Central Venous Catheter is a common but serious complication of central line placement 1-2 .However malpositioning into the contralateral subc lavian is extremely unusual. The authors describe a case in which a cat heter is inserted via a right sided infraclavicular approach and malpositions itself into the contralateral subclavian vein.

  1. Pneumothorax as a complication of central venous catheter insertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsotsolis, Nikolaos; Tsirgogianni, Katerina; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Baka, Sofia; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Karavergou, Anastasia; Rapti, Aggeliki; Trakada, Georgia; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Karapantzos, Ilias; Karapantzou, Chrysanthi; Barbetakis, Nikos; Zissimopoulos, Athanasios; Kuhajda, Ivan; Andjelkovic, Dejan; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Zarogoulidis, Paul

    2015-03-01

    The central venous catheter (CVC) is a catheter placed into a large vein in the neck [internal jugular vein (IJV)], chest (subclavian vein or axillary vein) or groin (femoral vein). There are several situations that require the insertion of a CVC mainly to administer medications or fluids, obtain blood tests (specifically the "central venous oxygen saturation"), and measure central venous pressure. CVC usually remain in place for a longer period of time than other venous access devices. There are situations according to the drug administration or length of stay of the catheter that specific systems are indicated such as; a Hickman line, a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) line or a Port-a-Cath may be considered because of their smaller infection risk. Sterile technique is highly important here, as a line may serve as a port of entry for pathogenic organisms, and the line itself may become infected with organisms such as Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative Staphylococci. In the current review we will present the complication of pneumothorax after CVC insertion.

  2. Computed tomography diagnosis of partial anomalous pulmonary venous drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posniak, H V; Dudiak, C M; Olson, M C

    1993-01-01

    A case of the rarely occurring partial anomalous pulmonary venous drainage of the right upper lobe into the azygos arch is presented. Computed tomography (CT) clearly demonstrated the abnormal vessel coursing through the right upper lobe and draining into the azygos arch.

  3. Incidental venous thromboembolism in cancer patients: prevalence and consequence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douma, Renée A.; Kok, Maayke G.M.; Verberne, Lisa M.; Kamphuisen, Pieter W.; Büller, Harry R.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Careful re-evaluation of CT-scans for cancer staging frequently reveals unsuspected venous thromboembolism (VTE) on CT-scans. However, it is unknown how often these findings lead to anticoagulant treatment in daily clinical practice. Methods: Reports from thoracic and/or abdominal CT-s

  4. Detection of occult cancer in patients with idiopathic venous thrombosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holt, Marianne Ingerslev; Knudsen, Søren Tang; Andersen, Birthe Søgaard;

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic venous thrombosis (VTE) is frequently associated with underlying malignancy. Thus, it is tempting to search for underlying cancer in these patients. However, extensive screening is cost-intensive and no survival benefit has been demonstrated. Based on a review of the literature, we...

  5. [Blood groups as a risk factor in venous thrombosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández Cañete, C M; Alvarez Dieguez, R; González Sánchez M de la, C; Díaz Hernández, C; Sánchez Montiel, M E

    1993-01-01

    We report 173 patients with venous thrombosis (or post-thrombotic syndrome) demonstrated by phlebography. We show up the importance of blood groups as risk factor, being very significant the A group. Female sex is associated with a high incidence of this pathology. A frequent location is the left lower limb.

  6. Novel oral anticoagulants in the treatment of cerebral venous thrombosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feher, G; Illes, Z; Komoly, S;

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is an uncommon cause of stroke with extremely diverse clinical features, predisposing factors, brain imaging findings, and outcome. Anticoagulation is the cornerstone of CVT management, however, it is not supported by high-quality evicence. Novel oral anticoagulan...

  7. Extra-abdominal venous thromboses at unusual sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, Ida; De Stefano, Valerio

    2012-09-01

    Venous thrombosis typically involves the lower extremities. Rarely, it can occur in cerebral, splanchnic, or renal veins, with a frightening clinical impact. Other rare manifestations are upper-extremity deep vein thrombosis, that can complicate with pulmonary embolism and post-thrombotic syndrome, and retinal vein occlusion, significantly affecting the quality of life. This review is focused on venous thromboses at unusual extra-abdominal sites. Local infections or cancer are frequent in cerebral sinus-venous thrombosis. Upper-extremity deep vein thrombosis is mostly due to catheters or effort-related factors. Common risk factors are inherited thrombophilia and oral contraceptive use. Acute treatment is based on heparin; in cerebral sinus-venous thrombosis, local or systemic fibrinolysis should be considered in case of clinical deterioration. Vitamin-K antagonists are recommended for 3-6 months; indefinite anticoagulation is suggested for recurrent thrombosis or unprovoked thrombosis and permanent risk factors. However, such recommendations mainly derive from observational studies; there are no data about long-term treatment of retinal vein occlusion.

  8. Statins, fibrates, and venous thromboembolism: A meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Squizzato, A.; Galli, M.; Romualdi, E.; Dentali, F.; Kamphuisen, P.W.; Guasti, L.; Venco, A.; Ageno, W.

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aims: Recent data suggest a possibile benefit of lipid-lowering drugs, in particular statins, in preventing venous thromboembolism (VTE). The aim of this systematic review of the literature is to assess the effect of lipid-lowering drugs on VTE occurrence. Materials and methods: MEDLINE a

  9. Detection of occult cancer in patients with idiopathic venous thrombosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holt, Marianne Ingerslev; Knudsen, Søren Tang; Andersen, Birthe Søgaard

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic venous thrombosis (VTE) is frequently associated with underlying malignancy. Thus, it is tempting to search for underlying cancer in these patients. However, extensive screening is cost-intensive and no survival benefit has been demonstrated. Based on a review of the literature, we rec...

  10. Severe venous neointimal hyperplasia prior to dialysis access surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Timmy; Chauhan, Vibha; Krishnamoorthy, Mahesh; Wang, Yang; Arend, Lois; Mistry, Meenakshi J.; El-Khatib, Mahmoud; Banerjee, Rupak; Munda, Rino; Roy-Chaudhury, Prabir

    2011-01-01

    Background. Venous neointimal hyperplasia is the most common cause of arteriovenous (AV) fistula and graft dysfunction following dialysis access surgery. However, the pathogenetic impact of pre-existing venous neointimal hyperplasia at the time of AV access creation on final clinical success is currently unknown in the setting of advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. The aim of this study was to perform a detailed histological, morphometric, and immunohistochemical analysis of vein specimens in advanced CKD and ESRD patients collected at the time of new vascular access placement. Methods. Vein samples from 12 patients were collected at the time of AV access creation near the site of AV anastomosis. Histological, immunohistochemistry and morphometric studies were performed on these vein samples. Results. Examination of the tissue specimens obtained at the time of surgery showed neointimal hyperplasia in 10 of 12 specimens, ranging from minimal to very severe. The majority of cells within the neointima were myofibroblasts with a minority of contractile smooth muscle cells present. Conclusion. Our work represents a detailed description of the morphometric and cellular phenotypic lesions present in the veins of CKD and ESRD patients, prior to dialysis access placement. These studies (i) suggest the future possibility of a new predictive marker (pre-existing venous neointimal hyperplasia) for AV dialysis access dysfunction and (ii) open the door for the future development of novel local therapies for optimization of the venous substrate on which the dialysis access is created. PMID:21220751

  11. Statins, fibrates, and venous thromboembolism: A meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Squizzato, A.; Galli, M.; Romualdi, E.; Dentali, F.; Kamphuisen, P.W.; Guasti, L.; Venco, A.; Ageno, W.

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aims: Recent data suggest a possibile benefit of lipid-lowering drugs, in particular statins, in preventing venous thromboembolism (VTE). The aim of this systematic review of the literature is to assess the effect of lipid-lowering drugs on VTE occurrence. Materials and methods: MEDLINE

  12. Gene Expression Changes in Venous Segment of Overflow Arteriovenous Fistula

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    Yasuhiro Hashimoto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The objective of this study was to characterize coordinated molecular changes in the structure and composition of the walls of venous segments of arteriovenous (AV fistulas evoked by overflow. Methods. Venous tissue samples were collected from 6 hemodialysis patients with AV fistulas exposed to overflow and from the normal cephalic veins of 4 other hemodialysis patients. Total RNA was extracted from the venous tissue samples, and gene expression between the 2 groups was compared using Whole Human Genome DNA microarray 44 K. Microarray data were analyzed by GeneSpring GX software and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Results. The cDNA microarray analysis identified 397 upregulated genes and 456 downregulated genes. Gene ontology analysis with GeneSpring GX software revealed that biological developmental processes and glycosaminoglycan binding were the most upregulated. In addition, most upregulation occurred extracellularly. In the pathway analysis, the TGF beta signaling pathway, cytokines and inflammatory response pathway, hypertrophy model, and the myometrial relaxation and contraction pathway were significantly upregulated compared with the control cephalic vein. Conclusion. Combining microarray results and pathway information available via the Internet provided biological insight into the structure and composition of the venous wall of overflow AV fistulas.

  13. How I treat pregnancy-related venous thromboembolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Middeldorp

    2011-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) complicates ~ 1 to 2 of 1000 pregnancies, with pulmonary embolism being a leading cause of maternal mortality and deep vein thrombosis an important cause of maternal morbidity, also on the long term. However, a strong evidence base for the management of pregnancy-related

  14. Human plasma DNP level after severe brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Yi-lu; XIN Hui-ning; FENG Yi; FAN Ji-wei

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To determine the relationship between DNP level after human severe brain injury and hyponatremia as well as isorrhea.Methods: The peripheral venous plasma as control was collected from 8 volunteers. The peripheral venous plasma from 14 severe brain injury patients were collected in the 1, 3, 7 days after injury. Radioimmunoassay was used to detect the DNP concentration. Meanwhile, daily plasma and urine electrolytes, osmotic pressure as well as 24 h liquid intake and output volume were detected.Results: The normal adult human plasma DNP level was 62. 46 pg/ml ± 27. 56 pg/ml. In the experimental group, the plasma DNP levels were higher from day 1 today 3 in 8 of the 14 patients than those in the control group (P1 =0.05, P3 =0.03). Negative fluid balance occurred in 8 patients and hyponatremia in 7 patients. The increase of plasma DNP level was significantly correlated with the development of a negative fluid balance (r=-0.69,P<0.01) and hyponatremia (x2 =4.38, P<0.05).Conclusions: The increase of plasma DNP level is accompanied by the enhancement of natriuretic and diuretic responses in severe brain-injured patients, which is associated with the development of a negative fluid balance and hyponatremia after brain injury.

  15. Cerebral Venous-Sinus Thrombosis: A Case Series Analysis

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    Nahid Ashjazadeh

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cerebral venous-sinus thrombosis is an uncommon form but important cause of stroke, especially in young-aged women. Methods: We performed a retrospective descriptive-analytical study in which 124 patients with cerebral venous-sinus thrombosis, who referred to Nemazee Hospital, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences from January 2000 to March 2008, were included, and their demographic, etiologic, radiological and prognostic characteristics were evaluated. Results: The patients' mean age was 34.01±10.25. Eighty seven (70.16% were women and 37 (29.83% were men. The most frequent clinical manifestations were headache, papilledema and seizures. Fifty seven (65.51% women took oral contraceptive pills. Twenty of 57 women (35.08% took the pill longer than one month to be able to fast in Ramadan or perform the Hajj ceremonies. In the mean time they developed cerebral venous-sinus thrombosis. Superior sagital sinus, with or without lateral sinuses, was the most involved area (70.96%. High mortality and morbidity rates (14.51% and 35.48%, respectively were found in patients. Poor prognostic factors at the time of admission were stupor and coma (P=0.001 and evidence of hemorrhage in primary CT scan (P=0.005. Conclusion: Taking oral contraceptive pills was a main factor associated with cerebral venous-sinus thrombosis. Clinical manifestations, prognostic factors, common involved sinuses and image findings of this study were similar to those of other studies. Health care policy makers should design a plan to warn susceptible women of the risk of cerebral venous-sinus thrombosis, and to educate them the ways to prevent it

  16. Clinical correlates of chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency in multiple sclerosis

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    Weinstock-Guttman Bianca

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI is a vascular condition characterized by anomalies of the primary veins outside the skull that has been reported to be associated with MS. In the blinded Combined Transcranial (TCD and Extracranial Venous Doppler Evaluation (CTEVD study, we found that prevalence of CCSVI was significantly higher in multiple sclerosis (MS vs. healthy controls (HC (56.1% vs. 22.7%, p  The objective was to evaluate the clinical correlates of venous anomalies indicative of CCSVI in patients with MS. Methods The original study enrolled 499 subjects; 163 HC, 289 MS, 21 CIS and 26 subjects with other neurological disorders who underwent a clinical examination and a combined Doppler and TCD scan of the head and neck. This analysis was restricted to adult subjects with MS (RR-MS: n = 181, SP-MS: n = 80 and PP-MS: n = 12. Disability status was evaluated by using the Kurtzke Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS and MS severity scale (MSSS. Results Disability was not associated with the presence (≥2 venous hemodynamic criteria or the severity of CCSVI, as measured with venous hemodynamic insufficiency severity score (VHISS. However, the severity of CCSVI was associated with the increased brainstem functional EDSS sub-score (p = 0.002. In logistic regression analysis, progressive MS (SP-MS or PP-MS vs. non-progressive status (including RR-MS was associated with CCSVI diagnosis (p = 0.004, OR = 2.34, CI = 1.3–4.2. Conclusions The presence and severity of CCVSI in multiple sclerosis correlate with disease status but has no or very limited association with clinical disability.

  17. The Same Angiographic Factors Predict Venous and Arterial Graft Patency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudino, Mario; Niccoli, Giampaolo; Roberto, Marco; Cammertoni, Federico; Cosentino, Nicola; Falcioni, Elena; Panebianco, Mario; D’Amario, Domenico; Crea, Filippo; Massetti, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To evaluate the value of angiographic factors in predicting failure of both venous and arterial coronary artery bypass graft. We retrieved from our angiographic database 148 patients who underwent venous and/or arterial CABG and for whom a control coronary angiography at more than 1 month after surgery was available. Pre-CABG and follow-up angiographies were analyzed in order to evaluate diameter stenosis (DS,%), stenosis length (mm), Bogaty score (extent index), Sullivan score, and Gensini score for the extent of coronary artery disease, and Jeopardy Duke score for the extent of myocardial area supplied by an artery. Thirty-nine patients (26%) experienced graft failure at follow-up (mean follow-up 11.3 ± 4.6 months). Patients with venous graft failure [26 (20%)] had significantly smaller DS (P = 0.013), shorter stenosis length (P = 0.01), and lower extent index (P = 0.015), Sullivan score (P = 0.013), Gensini score (P = 0.04) as compared with those without venous graft failure. Patients with arterial graft failure [13 (11%)] had significantly lower DS (P = 0.008), shorter stenosis length (P = 0.001), and lower extent index (P = 0.03) and Sullivan score (P = 0.023) as compared with those without arterial graft failure. Venous and arterial graft failure are associated with less severe stenosis and less extensive atherosclerosis of the grafted vessel. PMID:26735525

  18. Overuse Injury: How to Prevent Training Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... http://www.niams.nih.gov/Health_Info/Sports_Injuries/sports_injuries_ff.asp. Accessed Dec. 21, 2015. Tips for ... cfm?topic=A00132. Accessed Dec. 21, 2015. Overuse injury. The American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine. http://www.stopsportsinjuries.org/overuse-injury.aspx. ...

  19. [Clinico-histopathological correlations of venous wall modifications in chronic venous insufficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironiuc, A; Palcau, L; Andercou, O; Rogojan, L; Todoran, M; Gordan, G

    2008-01-01

    The interest manifested for the conjunctive tissue pathology leaded to the study of the structural disorder that appears in the varicose veins walls. The study is a prospective one initiated in March 2007 made on 11 patients with varicose disease hospitalized at Cluj-Napoca within Surgery Clinic no. II. The purpose of this study is to point out the histopathological modifications in the varicose venous wall (great saphenous vein cross, communicating veins, perforating veins), as well as the correlation of histopathological results with the evolutive stage of chronic vein insufficiency (CEAP classification) and with the clinical score at these patients. The histopathological (HP) results for 2 of the patients revealed hypertrophy of the media, intimal hyperplasia (stage II) corresponding to a CEAP 3. Six patients were integrated in HP stage III due to the partial intimal fibrosis corresponding to a CEAP 6 for one case, CEAP 4 one case, CEAP 3 four cases. One patient had HP stage I with CEAP 3 and two patients had HP stage IV corresponding to CEAP 5, respectively CEAP 6.

  20. Contribution of recurrent venous thrombosis and inherited thrombophilia to the pathogenesis of postthrombotic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreidy, Raghid

    2015-01-01

    Postthrombotic syndrome (PTS) is a common complication of deep vein thrombosis. This study aims to assess the role of recurrent venous thrombosis and inherited thrombophilia in the pathogenesis of PTS. A series of 206 patients diagnosed with lower extremity venous thrombosis were retrospectively reviewed. The PTS was observed in 30.58% of the patients. Recurrent venous thrombosis was identified in 3.4% of the patients without PTS and in 33.3% of patients with PTS (P thrombophilia alone or in association with recurrent venous thrombosis was more commonly detected when PTS was moderate to severe (P = .04 and thrombophilia is present either alone or in association with recurrent venous thrombosis.

  1. Risk factors for cerebral venous thrombosis and deep venous thrombosis in patients aged between 15 and 50 years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, Karen; Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; Vroomen, Patrick C A J; van der Meer, Jannes; De Keyser, Jacques; Luijckx, Gert-Jan

    2009-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) and deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism (DVT/PE) are associated with many risk factors. It is unclear why CVT occurs less often than DVT/PE. Age dependent risk factors may play a role. The aim of our study was to compare risk factors in a uniform age group of

  2. JUGULAR CENTRAL VENOUS CATHETER PLACEMENT THROUGH A MODIFIED SELDINGER TECHNIQUE FOR LONG-TERM VENOUS ACCESS IN CHELONIANS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo, Mariana A; Divers, Stephen

    2016-03-01

    Long-term or repeated venous access in chelonians is difficult to obtain and manage, but can be critically important for administration of medications and blood sampling in hospitalized patients. Jugular catheterization provides the most rapid and secure route for vascular access, but catheters can be difficult to place, and maintaining catheter patency may be challenging. Long multilumen polyurethane catheters provide flexibility and sampling access, and minimize difficulties, such as catheter displacement, that have been encountered with traditional over-the-needle catheters. We describe placement of 4 Fr. 13-cm polyurethane catheters in three chelonians with the use of a modified Seldinger technique. Venous access was obtained with the use of an over-the-needle catheter, which allowed placement of a 0.018-in.-diameter wire, over which the polyurethane catheter was placed. Indwelling time has ranged between 1 and 4 mo currently. All tortoises were sedated for this procedure. Polyurethane central catheters provide safe, long-term venous access that allows clinicians to perform serial blood sampling as well as intravenous administration of medications, anesthetic agents, and fluids. A jugular catheter can also allow central venous pressure measurement. Utilization of central line catheters was associated with improvements in diagnostic efficiency and therapeutic case management, with minimal risks and complications.

  3. Management of Combat Vascular Injuries Using Modern Imaging: Are We Getting Better?

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    Samy S. Nitecki

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Vascular injuries often result in life threatening hemorrhage or limb loss. When they present with a single entry or exit wound, surgery is immediately indicated. With multiple injuries, however, imaging such as CTA is necessary for diagnosis and choice of treatment. Methods. For all combat-related vascular cases admitted to our medical center during the Lebanon wars in 1982 and 2006, we compiled and compared presenting signs and symptoms, means of diagnosis, treatments, and results. Results. 126 patients with vascular injuries were admitted (87 in 1982, 39 in 2006. 90% were male; mean age of 29 years (range 20–53. All injuries were accompanied by insult to soft tissue, bones, and viscera. 75% presented with injury to arteries in the extremities. 75% of these patients presented with limb ischemia, and 25% sustained massive blood loss. Treatments included venous interposition graft, end-to-end anastomosis, venous patch, endovascular technique (only in 2006, and ligation/observation. Complications included thrombosis and wound infections. Mortality and amputations occurred only in 1982, and this may be attributed to the use of imaging, advanced technique, and shorter average time from injury to hospital (7 hours. Conclusions. We recommend CTA as the first line modality for diagnosis of vascular injuries, as its liberal use allowed for early and appropriate treatment. Treatment outcomes improved with fast and effective resuscitation, liberal use of tourniquets and fasciotomies, and meticulous treatment by a multidisciplinary team.

  4. An Unusual Complication of Foam Sclerotherapy: Acute Kidney Injury

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    Müge EREK

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Sclerotherapy, in which an irritant solution is administered, is a method used to treat venous failure that results in complete venous destruction due to endothelial reaction and fibrosis. In recent years, foam sclerotherapy, in which a sclerosing agent (aethyl sclerole and air are mixed until they turn into foam and the resultant mixture is injected into noticeable veins directly and into other veins under ultrasonography in doses depending on the diameters of the varices, has been introduced. The drugs or gases used in foam sclerotherapy can cause local or systemic complications. Foam affects vessel endothelial cells and causes severe spasm in the vessel. It has been reported that endothelin-1 levels are high after foam sclerotherapy compared to the initial levels and that neurological complications vary with the endothelin levels. In this report, we present a case of acute kidney injury due to acute tubular necrosis probably caused by endothelin release following foam sclerotherapy.

  5. MRI phenotypes of localized intravascular coagulopathy in venous malformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Kevin S.H. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Dowd, Christopher F.; Hess, Christopher P. [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Mathes, Erin F.; Frieden, Ilona J. [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Dermatology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Rosbe, Kristina W. [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Otolaryngology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Hoffman, William Y. [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Surgery, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2015-10-15

    The incidence of localized intravascular coagulopathy (LIC) in venous malformations varies with lesion size and location, as well as the presence of palpable phleboliths. The development of LIC can cause pain and hemorrhage and can progress to disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (DIC) and thromboembolic disease resulting in death in some cases. Early recognition of LIC can relieve symptoms and prevent progression to life-threatening complications. The aim of this work was to identify MRI features of venous malformation associated with LIC. We hypothesized that venous malformations with larger capacitance, slower flow and less physiological compression (greater stasis) were more likely to be associated with LIC. In this HIPAA-compliant and IRB-approved study, we retrospectively reviewed clinical records and MRI for consecutive patients undergoing evaluation of venous malformations at our multidisciplinary Birthmarks and Vascular Anomalies Center between 2003 and 2013. Inclusion required consensus diagnosis of venous malformation and availability of laboratory data and MRI; patients on anticoagulation or those previously undergoing surgical or endovascular treatment were excluded. LIC was diagnosed when D-dimer exceeded 1,000 ng/mL and/or fibrinogen was less than 200 mg/dL. Two board-certified radiologists assessed the following MRI features for each lesion: morphology (spongiform vs. phlebectatic), presence of phleboliths, size, location (truncal vs. extremity), and tissue type(s) involved (subcutis, muscle, bone and viscera). Univariate logistic regression analyses were used to test associations between LIC and MRI findings, and stepwise regression was applied to assess the significance of the individual imaging predictors. Seventy patients, 37 with LIC, met inclusion criteria during the 10-year study period (age: 14.5 +/- 13.6 years [mean +/- standard deviation]; 30 male, 40 female). Both elevated D-dimer and low fibrinogen were associated with the presence of

  6. Arterial vs venous blood gas differences during hemorrhagic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Kristopher Burton; Christmas, Ashley Britton; Heniford, Brant Todd; Sing, Ronald Fong; Messick, Joseph

    2014-05-04

    To characterize differences of arterial (ABG) and venous (VBG) blood gas analysis in a rabbit model of hemorrhagic shock. Following baseline arterial and venous blood gas analysis, fifty anesthetized, ventilated New Zealand white rabbits were hemorrhaged to and maintained at a mean arterial pressure of 40 mmHg until a state of shock was obtained, as defined by arterial pH ≤ 7.2 and base deficit ≤ -15 mmol/L. Simultaneous ABG and VBG were obtained at 3 minute intervals. Comparisons of pH, base deficit, pCO2, and arteriovenous (a-v) differences were then made between ABG and VBG at baseline and shock states. Statistical analysis was applied where appropriate with a significance of P blood gases for the following parameters: pH was significantly decreased in both arterial (7.39 ± 0.12 to 7.14 ± 0.18) and venous blood gases (7.35 ± 0.15 to 6.98 ± 0.26, P arterial (-0.9 ± 3.9 mEq/L vs -17.8 ± 2.2 mEq/L) and venous blood gasses (-0.8 ± 3.8 mEq/L vs -15.3 ± 4.1 mEq/L, P arterial blood (40.0 ± 9.1 mmHg vs 28.9 ± 7.1 mmHg) but an increase in venous blood (46.0 ± 10.1 mmHg vs 62.8 ± 15.3 mmHg), although these trends were non-significant. For calculated arteriovenous differences between baseline and shock states, only the pCO2 difference was shown to be significant during shock. In this rabbit model, significant differences exist in blood gas measurements for arterial and venous blood after hemorrhagic shock. A widened pCO2 a-v difference during hemorrhage, reflective of poor tissue oxygenation, may be a better indicator of impending shock.

  7. Costoclavicular venous decompression in patients with threatened arteriovenous hemodialysis access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Carolyn; Dugan, Michelle; Gillespie, David; Doyle, Adam; Illig, Karl

    2011-07-01

    Autologous arteriovenous fistulas are frequently threatened by central venous obstruction. Although this is frequently ascribed to indwelling catheters and neointimal venous remodeling, we believe that extrinsic compression of the subclavian vein as it passes through the costoclavicular junction (CCJ) may play a significant role in a subset of dialysis patients. We reviewed our experience with CCJ decompression for arteriovenous fistula dysfunction at our institution. Decompression followed principles for venous thoracic outlet syndrome: bony decompression with thorough venolysis, followed by central venography through the fistula and endoluminal treatment, if necessary. Patients underwent transaxillary first rib resection, or claviculectomy in the supine position in cases when reconstruction was anticipated. In all cases, the minimum exposure included 360° mobilization of the subclavian vein with resection of surrounding cicatrix to the jugular/innominate junction. A total of 10 patients requiring decompression between November 2008 and February 2010 were included. All had severe arm swelling, four had dialysis dysfunction (postcannulation bleeding or maturation failure), two had severe arm pain, and one had a pseudoaneurysm. All patients had subclavian vein stenosis at the CCJ by venography or intravascular ultrasound. The majority of patients had balloon dilation (mean: 2.3 attempts) without success. Six patients underwent transaxillary first rib resection and four had medial claviculectomy. No patients required surgical venous reconstruction. In all, 80% of fistulas remained functionally patent, and all but one patient (who underwent ligation) had complete relief of upper arm edema. Median hospital length of stay was 2 days and mean follow-up was 7 months (range, 1-13). There was no mortality or significant morbidity. Five patients later required central venoplasty (four subclavian, mean: 1.8 attempts and one innominate) and three had stents placed (two

  8. A comparison of blood gases and acid-base measurements in arterial, arterialized venous, and venous blood during short-term maximal exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linderman, J; Fahey, T D; Lauten, G; Brooker, A S; Bird, D; Dolinar, B; Musselman, J; Lewis, S; Kirk, L

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between blood gases and acid-base measurements in arterial, arterialized venous, and venous blood measured simultaneously during short-term maximal exercise. Ten well-trained male cyclists performed a graded maximal exercise test on a cycle ergometer to determine the power output corresponding to their peak oxygen consumption (test I), and a short-term maximal test on a cycle ergometer at peak power output (test II). During test II arterial, arterialized venous and venous blood were sampled simultaneously for determination of partial pressures of oxygen and carbon dioxide, pH, bicarbonate (HCO3-), base excess (BE), and lactate (La). Samples were taken at rest, the end of 1 min of exercise (1 ME), at the end of exercise (EE), and at 2 min of recovery (REC). During test II, subjects maintained a peak power output of 370.6 (62.1) W [mean (SD)] for 4.5, SD 1.6 min. Except at rest venous and arterialized venous measurements tended to be the same at all sampling intervals, but differed significantly from measurements in arterial blood (P less than 0.05). BE was the only variable that rendered consistently significant correlations between arterial and arterialized venous blood at each sampling interval. The pooled correlation coefficient between arterial and arterialized venous BE was r = 0.83 [regression equation: BEa = (0.84 BEav)-0.51]. Arterial La was significantly higher than venous La at 1 ME (2.8, 0.7 vs 0.8, 0.3 mmol.l-1) and higher than both venous and arterialized venous La at EE.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Risk factors and early diagnosis of cerebral venous sinus occlusion secondary to traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Li

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Paying close attention to the past medical history of DVT, skull fracture, and the imaging finding of an epidural hematoma that crosses the sinus are necessary for the early diagnosis of CVSO. CTV and MRV help in making an early diagnosis of CVSO.

  10. Stenting of the Superior Vena Cava and Left Brachiocephalic Vein with Preserving the Central Venous Catheter in Situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isfort, Peter; Penzkofer, Tobias; Goerg, Fabian; Mahnken, Andreas H. [University Hospital RWTH Aachen, Aachen(Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    Stenting of the central veins is well established for treating localized venous stenosis. The techniques regarding catheter preservation for central venous catheters in the superior vena cava have been described. We describe here a method for stent implantation in the superior vena cava and the left brachiocephalic vein, and principally via a single jugular venous puncture, while saving a left sided jugular central venous catheter in a patient suffering from central venous stenosis of the superior vena cava and the left brachiocephalic vein.

  11. Diagnosis of suspected venous thromboembolic disease in pregnancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scarsbrook, A.F. [Department of Radiology, Churchill Hospital, Oxford Radcliffe NHS Trust, Headington, Oxford (United Kingdom); Evans, A.L. [Department of Radiology, Churchill Hospital, Oxford Radcliffe NHS Trust, Headington, Oxford (United Kingdom); Owen, A.R. [Department of Radiology, Churchill Hospital, Oxford Radcliffe NHS Trust, Headington, Oxford (United Kingdom); Gleeson, F.V. [Department of Radiology, Churchill Hospital, Oxford Radcliffe NHS Trust, Headington, Oxford (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: fergus.gleeson@radiology.oxford.ac.uk

    2006-01-15

    Venous thromboembolic disease is a leading cause of maternal mortality during pregnancy. Early and accurate radiological diagnosis is essential as anticoagulation is not without risk and clinical diagnosis is unreliable. Although the disorder is potentially treatable, unnecessary treatment should be avoided. Most of the diagnostic imaging techniques involve ionizing radiation which exposes both the mother and fetus to finite radiation risks. There is a relative lack of evidence in the literature to guide clinicians and radiologists on the most appropriate method of assessing this group of patients. This article will review the role of imaging of suspected venous thromboembolic disease in pregnant patients, highlight contentious issues such as radiation risk, intravenous contrast use in pregnancy and discuss the published guidelines, as well as suggesting an appropriate imaging algorithm based on the available evidence.

  12. Involvement of systemic venous congestion in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio Gracia, J; Sánchez Marteles, M; Pérez Calvo, J I

    2017-04-01

    Systemic venous congestion has gained significant importance in the interpretation of the pathophysiology of acute heart failure, especially in the development of renal function impairment during exacerbations. In this study, we review the concept, clinical characterisation and identification of venous congestion. We update current knowledge on its importance in the pathophysiology of acute heart failure and its involvement in the prognosis. We pay special attention to the relationship between abdominal congestion, the pulmonary interstitium as filtering membrane, inflammatory phenomena and renal function impairment in acute heart failure. Lastly, we review decongestion as a new therapeutic objective and the measures available for its assessment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  13. Catheter embolization from implanted venous access devices: case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, M E

    1989-04-01

    Two cases of catheter embolization from implanted venous access devices are reported and the available literature is reviewed. The catheter from an implanted venous access device migrated into the right heart after slippage of the O-ring, which attaches the catheter to the infusion port. The distal 6 cm of an infusion port catheter embolized to the right heart after spontaneous fracture of the catheter at the point where it passed between the clavicle and first rib. Both catheters were removed percutaneously without complication. Risk factors for embolization were apparent on x-ray films with evidence of O-ring slippage in 1 case an obvious kinking of the catheter in the other. Symptoms of embolization included chest discomfort, right upper quadrant pain, and nausea. In 1 case, an extra heart sound, initially thought to be an S3, disappeared when the catheter was removed.

  14. Arterio-venous malformations of uterus - diagnostic and management dilemmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, H K; Puri, M; Patra, S; Trivedi, S S

    2015-01-01

    Keeping in mind the life-threatening consequences of curettage in cases of undiagnosed uterine arterio-venous malformation (AVM), its possibility should be considered in patients presenting with abnormal heavy uterine bleeding and negative Human Chorionic Gonadotropin (β-hCG) values. We collected a series of cases in which the patients presented with abnormal heavy uterine bleeding, some not responding to conservative treatment. In the presence of declining or low serum β-hCG levels and ultrasound Doppler showing increased vascularity, patients were investigated to detect the possible presence of uterine AVM. In those patients in whom angiographic confirmation of uterine AVM was made, embolisation was done and the outcome was followed. In those patients in whom hysterectomy was done the histopathogy specimen was studied for the possible cause of increased vascularity. Arterio-venous shunting seen on ultrasound does not always imply a uterine AVM and some cases can present diagnostic and management dilemmas.

  15. Delivery of Compression Therapy for Venous Leg Ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zarchi, Kian; Jemec, Gregor B E

    2014-01-01

    municipalities. Sixty-eight home care nurses who managed wounds in their everyday practice were included. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Participant-masked measurements of subbandage pressure achieved with an elastic, long-stretch, single-component bandage; an inelastic, short-stretch, single-component bandage......IMPORTANCE: Despite the documented effect of compression therapy in clinical studies and its widespread prescription, treatment of venous leg ulcers is often prolonged and recurrence rates high. Data on provided compression therapy are limited. OBJECTIVE: To assess whether home care nurses achieve...... adequate subbandage pressure when treating patients with venous leg ulcers and the factors that predict the ability to achieve optimal pressure. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: We performed a cross-sectional study from March 1, 2011, through March 31, 2012, in home care centers in 2 Danish...

  16. Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis in Plastic Surgery: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Sergio; Valdes, Jorge; Salama, Moises

    2016-06-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a major health concern because it increases morbidity and mortality after a surgical procedure. A number of well-defined, evidence-based guidelines are available delineating suitable use of prophylaxis to prevent deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. Despite the available literature, there are clear gaps between recommendations and clinical practice, affecting the incidence of VTE. Plastic surgeons underuse the substantiated literature and risk stratification tools that are available to decrease the incidence of VTE in the office-based surgical setting because of fear of bleeding or hematoma complications postoperatively. Venous thromboembolism creates an economic burden on both the patient and the healthcare system. The intent of this literature review is to determine existing VTE risk using assessment models available to aid in the implementation of protocols for VTE prevention, specifically for high-risk cosmetic surgical patients in office-based settings.

  17. Blood flow in the cerebral venous system: modeling and simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miraucourt, Olivia; Salmon, Stéphanie; Szopos, Marcela; Thiriet, Marc

    2017-04-01

    The development of a software platform incorporating all aspects, from medical imaging data, through three-dimensional reconstruction and suitable meshing, up to simulation of blood flow in patient-specific geometries, is a crucial challenge in biomedical engineering. In the present study, a fully three-dimensional blood flow simulation is carried out through a complete rigid macrovascular circuit, namely the intracranial venous network, instead of a reduced order simulation and partial vascular network. The biomechanical modeling step is carefully analyzed and leads to the description of the flow governed by the dimensionless Navier-Stokes equations for an incompressible viscous fluid. The equations are then numerically solved with a free finite element software using five meshes of a realistic geometry obtained from medical images to prove the feasibility of the pipeline. Some features of the intracranial venous circuit in the supine position such as asymmetric behavior in merging regions are discussed.

  18. Mathematical arterialization of venous blood in emergency medicine patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tygesen, Gitte Boier; Matzen, Helle; Grønkjær, Karen;

    2012-01-01

    .83; and Bland-Altman limits of agreement well within the limits of acceptable laboratory and clinical performance. The calculated values of arterial PO2 followed a set of predefined rules relating calculated and measured PO2 levels in all cases. The method represents an improvement on the use of venous blood......OBJECTIVES: Arterial punctures represent a painful and unpleasant experience. Acid-base and oxygenation status can be assessed from peripheral venous blood, but agreement with arterial values is not always clinically acceptable. This study evaluates a method for mathematically transforming...... alone where the correlation coefficients were as follows: group A, pH 0.85, PCO2 0.88; group B, pH 0.79, PCO2 0.59; and limits of agreement for PCO2 at the border of (group A) or beyond (group B) acceptable clinical limits. CONCLUSION: Application of the mathematical arterialization method may reduce...

  19. Low flow veno-venous ECMO: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón, M; Verdín, R; Galván, J; Gonzalez, M; Cárdenas, H; Campos, R; Vidrio, H; Amezcua, J

    1994-01-01

    Clinical use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) and carbon dioxide removal (ECCO 2R) have become well established techniques for the treatment of severe respiratory failure; however they require full cardiopulmonary bypass, representing major procedures with high morbidity. We theorized the possibility of an efficient low flow veno-venous extracorporeal membrane gas exchange method. Four mongrel 12 kg dogs were submitted to veno-venous extracorporeal membrane gas exchange via a jugular dialysis catheter using a low flow (10 ml/min) roller pump and a membrane oxygenator for a period of four hours. Respiratory rate was set at 4 breaths/min with a FiO 2 of 21% and ventilatory dead space was increased. Adequate gas exchange was obtained (pO 2139, pCO 224, Sat 99.4%), without major hemodynamic changes or hematuria. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of a low flow, less aggressive system. Further research should be considered.

  20. Giant venous aneurysm jeopardising internal mammary arterial graft patency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Caenegem, Olivier; le Polain de Waroux, Jean-Benoit; de Kerchove, Laurent; Coche, Emmanuel

    2012-09-01

    The authors report a 79-year old man with a history of coronary bypass surgery, presenting with acute heart failure and elevated troponin. Coronarography revealed a giant saphenous vein graft aneurysm, which was compressing the left internal mammary artery bypass graft. This was confirmed by a multislice enhanced-ECG gated cardiac CT, showing the venous aneurysm responsible for external compression of the arterial graft and its functional occlusion. Myocardial ischaemia, the mechanism leading to cardiac failure, was confirmed by hypoperfusion of the sub-endocardial area shown by the CT. The aneurysm was surgically removed without complications. The patient recovered and his cardiac function improved. This is the first recorded case of compression of the left internal mammary artery by an giant saphenous vein graft aneurysm having triggered severe myocardial ischaemia and heart failure. The authors review the incidence and complications of giant venous bypass graft aneurysms reported in the literature.