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Sample records for juvenile arthritis disease

  1. Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... joints. This form of JIA may turn into rheumatoid arthritis. It may involve 5 or more large and ... no known prevention for JIA. Alternative Names Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA); Juvenile chronic polyarthritis; Still disease; Juvenile spondyloarthritis ...

  2. Juvenile Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juvenile arthritis (JA) is arthritis that happens in children. It causes joint swelling, pain, stiffness, and loss of motion. It can affect any joint, but ... of JA that children get is juvenile idiopathic arthritis. There are several other forms of arthritis affecting ...

  3. Ankle arthritis predicts polyarticular disease course and unfavourable outcome in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbjörnsson, Anna-Clara; Aalto, Kristiina; Broström, Eva W

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the occurrence, clinical characteristics and prognostic factors associated with ankle arthritis in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). METHODS: 440 children with JIA were followed for eight years in a prospective Nordic population-based cohort study. Data...... on remission was available for 427 of these children. Occurrence of clinically assessed ankle arthritis was analysed in relation to JIA category, clinical characteristics and remission data eight years after disease onset. RESULTS: In 440 children with JIA, 251 (57%) experienced ankle arthritis during...... the first eight years of disease. Ankle arthritis was least common in the persistent oligoarticular category (25%) and most common in children with extended oligoarticular (83%) and polyarticular RF-negative (85%) JIA. Children who developed ankle arthritis during the first year of disease were younger...

  4. What Is Juvenile Arthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Initiative Breadcrumb Home Health Topics English Español Juvenile Arthritis Basics In-Depth Download Download EPUB Download PDF What is it? Points To Remember About Juvenile Arthritis Juvenile arthritis is the term used to describe ...

  5. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenan Barut

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is the most common chronic rheumatic disease of unknown aetiology in childhood and predominantly presents with peripheral arthritis. The disease is divided into several subgroups, according to demographic characteristics, clinical features, treatment modalities and disease prognosis. Systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis, which is one of the most frequent disease subtypes, is characterized by recurrent fever and rash. Oligoarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis, common among young female patients, is usually accompanied by anti-nuclear antibodie positivity and anterior uveitis. Seropositive polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis, an analogue of adult rheumatoid arthritis, is seen in less than 10% of paediatric patients. Seronegative polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis, an entity more specific for childhood, appears with widespread large- and small-joint involvement. Enthesitis-related arthritis is a separate disease subtype, characterized by enthesitis and asymmetric lower-extremity arthritis. This disease subtype represents the childhood form of adult spondyloarthropathies, with human leukocyte antigen-B27 positivity and uveitis but commonly without axial skeleton involvement. Juvenile psoriatic arthritis is characterized by a psoriatic rash, accompanied by arthritis, nail pitting and dactylitis. Disease complications can vary from growth retardation and osteoporosis secondary to treatment and disease activity, to life-threatening macrophage activation syndrome with multi-organ insufficiency. With the advent of new therapeutics over the past 15 years, there has been a marked improvement in juvenile idiopathic arthritis treatment and long-term outcome, without any sequelae. The treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients involves teamwork, including an experienced paediatric rheumatologist, an ophthalmologist, an orthopaedist, a paediatric psychiatrist and a physiotherapist. The primary goals

  6. Assessment of disease activity in juvenile idiopathic arthritis. The number and the size of joints matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berntson, Lillemor; Wernroth, Lisa; Fasth, Anders

    2007-01-01

    Variables for assessment of disease activity of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) were studied, in order to develop a disease activity score for children with JIA.......Variables for assessment of disease activity of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) were studied, in order to develop a disease activity score for children with JIA....

  7. Juvenil idiopatisk arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herlin, Troels

    2002-01-01

    The new classification of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is described in this review. Clinical characteristics divide JIA in to subtypes: systemic, oligoarticular (persistent and extended type), RF-positive and--negative polyarticular, enthesitis-related arthritis and psoriatic arthritis...

  8. Radiographic abnormalities of the wrist in adult-onset still disease: Comparison with juvenile chronic arthritis and rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjorkengren, A.G.; Pathria, M.N.; Terkeltaub, R.; Esdaile, J.; Weisman, M.; Sartoris, D.J.; Resnick, D.

    1987-01-01

    Pericapitate involvement of the wrist has been described as characteristic of adult-onset Still disease, a relatively rare disorder that is often diagnosed by exclusion after extensive and frequently invasive tests. To evaluate the diagnostic value of carpal radiography in cases of adult-onset Still disease, a retrospective blinded analysis of 48 patients, 16 each with adult-onset Still disease, juvenile chronic arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis, was performed. Pericapitate articular alterations without radiocarpal involvement were found to be frequent in the setting of adult-onset Still disease but distinctly unusual among patients with rheumatoid arthritis. In juvenile chronic arthritis, severe pericapitate involvement was frequent, but generally occurred in conjunction with radiocarpal joint abnormalities

  9. TREATMENT FOR GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE AMONG CHILDREN, SUFFERING FROM JUVENILE ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.M. Bzarova

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the evaluation results of esomeprazol efficacy in the complex therapy for gastroesophageal reflux disease among 152 children aged between 3 and 18, suffering from juvenile arthritis. The treatment scheme used in treatment induced the remission of gastro esophageal reflux disease among 45% of patients, conduced to considerable decrease of the esophagus affect intensity among 53% of patients, epithelized erosions of the mucous coat of esophagus among 30 of 32 children. The medication did not cause any clinically significant side responses among the cured children (even younger ones and may be applied to treat gastro esophageal reflux disease among the patients, suffering from juvenile arthritis.Key words: gastroesophageal reflux disease, children, treatment, reflux, esomeprazol, esophagitis, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

  10. Overlap of disease susceptibility loci for rheumatoid arthritis and juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinks, Anne; Eyre, Steve; Ke, Xiayi; Barton, Anne; Martin, Paul; Flynn, Edward; Packham, Jon; Worthington, Jane; Thomson, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been extremely successful in the search for susceptibility risk factors for complex genetic autoimmune diseases. As more studies are published, evidence is emerging of considerable overlap of loci between these diseases. In juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), another complex genetic autoimmune disease, the strategy of using information from autoimmune disease GWAS or candidate gene studies to help in the search for novel JIA susceptibility loci has been successful, with confirmed association with two genes, PTPN22 and IL2RA. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease that shares similar clinical and pathological features with JIA and, therefore, recently identified confirmed RA susceptibility loci are also excellent JIA candidate loci. Objective To determine the overlap of disease susceptibility loci for RA and JIA. Methods Fifteen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at nine RA-associated loci were genotyped in Caucasian patients with JIA (n=1054) and controls (n=3531) and tested for association with JIA. Allele and genotype frequencies were compared between cases and controls using the genetic analysis software, PLINK. Results Two JIA susceptibility loci were identified, one of which was a novel JIA association (STAT4) and the second confirmed previously published associations of the TRAF1/C5 locus with JIA. Weak evidence of association of JIA with three additional loci (Chr6q23, KIF5A and PRKCQ) was also obtained, which warrants further investigation. Conclusion All these loci are good candidates in view of the known pathogenesis of JIA, as genes within these regions (TRAF1, STAT4, TNFAIP3, PRKCQ) are known to be involved in T-cell receptor signalling or activation pathways. PMID:19674979

  11. JUVENILE RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

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    I N Sartika

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA is the most common rheumatic condition in children. JRA is defined as persistent arthritis in 1 or more joints for at least 6 weeks, with the onset before age 16 years. The etiology of JRA is unknown. Antigen activated CD4+ T cell stimulate monocytes, macrophages, and synovial fibroblasts to produce the cytokines Interleukin-1 (IL-1, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor ? (TNF-? and to secrete matrix metalloproteinases, which lead to chronic inflammation due to infiltration of inflammatory cell, angiogenesis, destruction of cartilage and bone with pannus formation. The 3 major subtypes of JRA are based on the symptoms at disease onset and are designated systemic onset, pauciarticular onset, and polyarticular onset. For all patients, the goals of therapy are to decrease chronic joint pain and suppress the inflammatory process. Poor prognostic have been observed in patients with polyarticular onset, rheumatoid factor, persistent morning stiffness, tenosynovitis, involvement of the small joints, rapid appearance of erosions, active late onset childhood, subcutaneous nodules, or antinuclear antibody.

  12. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: relation to growth and disease activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnhart, Birgitte; Juul, Anders; Nielsen, Susan

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) has been identified as a prognostic marker of progressive joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis. In this population based study we evaluated associations between plasma concentrations of COMP, disease activity, and growth velocity...... in patients with recent-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). COMP levels in JIA and healthy children were compared with those in healthy adults. Plasma levels of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-1), which has been associated with COMP expression and growth velocity, were studied in parallel. METHODS......: 87 patients with JIA entered the study, including oligoarticular JIA (n = 34), enthesitis-related arthritis (n = 8), polyarticular rheumatoid factor (RF)-positive JIA (n = 2), polyarticular RF-negative JIA (n = 27), systemic JIA (n = 6), and undifferentiated JIA (n = 10). Plasma levels of COMP were...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease to fight microbial invaders and facilitate tissue repair. Normally, the body stops the inflammatory response after healing is complete to prevent damage to its own cells and tissues. In people with juvenile idiopathic arthritis , the inflammatory ...

  14. Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naz, S.; Mushtaq, A.; Bari, A.; Maqsud, A.; Khan, M. Z.; Ahmad, T. M.; Saira Rehman

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the spectrum of clinical presentation, laboratory parameters and drug therapy in patients with Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis (JRA). Study Design: Case series. Place and Duration of Study: The Children's Hospital and The Institute of Child Health, Lahore, from October 2008 to October 2011. Methodology: All patients who fulfilled the American College of Rheumatology criteria for JRA were enrolled. Their clinical features, investigations done and treatment received for JRA were noted. Statistical analysis of data was done on SPSS version 16.0 for obtaining descriptive statistics. Results: Out of 185 patients, 50.3% (n = 93) were females; 54% (n = 100) were between 10 - 15 years of age. Polyarthritis was found in 71.9% (n = 133) followed by oligoarthritis (22.7%, n = 42) and systemic onset disease (5.4%, n = 10). Morning stiffness (78%) and fever (68%) were the most common clinical presentations. All patients with systemic onset disease had fever (n = 10) followed by skin rash, hepatosplenomegaly and lymphadenopathy. Uveitis was found in 2 patients, and both belonged to the oligoarticular group. Rheumatoid factor was found in 10.27% (n = 19) of all patients. All patients were given non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Disease modifying agents (methotrexate) were given to 43.8% (n = 81). Steroids were used in 61% (n = 113) of patients either with NSAIDs alone or NSAIDs plus methotrexate. Conclusion: Disease profile of JRA at the study centre showed that polyarthritis is the commonest type. Recognition of subtypes will help in planning the management of these patients. (author)

  15. Ultrasonographic examination in juvenile idiopathic arthritis is better than clinical examination for identification of intraarticular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Erik; Strandberg, Charlotte; Andersen, Steen

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is formally based on clinical examination, but ultrasound (US) examination is used increasingly. Our purpose was to compare US and clinical examination in the assessment of synovitis in JIA.......The diagnosis of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is formally based on clinical examination, but ultrasound (US) examination is used increasingly. Our purpose was to compare US and clinical examination in the assessment of synovitis in JIA....

  16. Atherosclerosis in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Jednacz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the arteries. Clinical consequences of the atherosclerotic process occur in the adult population, however atherosclerotic process begins in childhood. The classic risk factors for atherosclerosis include obesity, dyslipidaemia, age, gender or family history. In recent years, attention has been drawn to the similarity between atherosclerotic inflammatory processes and inflammatory changes in the course of systemic connective tissue disease, in particular systemic lupus etythematosus (SLE or rheumatoid arthritis (RA. There is also observed the similarity of the pathogenetic background of development of atherosclerosis and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA. Elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines are observed in the course of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Also homocysteine concentrations, which may play a significant role in the development of atherosclerotic lesions, are observed higher in patients with JIA. Some studies revealed higher carotid intima-media thickness (IMT index values in children with JIA. In view of the fact that atherosclerotic process begins as early as in childhood, the introduction of appropriate preventive measures in children is a matter of utmost importance.

  17. Distribution pattern of MRI abnormalities within the knee and wrist of juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients: signature of disease activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nusman, Charlotte M.; Hemke, Robert; Schonenberg, Dieneke; Dolman, Koert M.; van Rossum, Marion A. J.; van den Berg, J. Merlijn; Kuijpers, Taco W.; Maas, Mario

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study in clinically active juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) was to assess the frequency and distribution pattern of synovitis as hallmark of disease and additional soft-tissue and bony abnormalities on MRI in the knee and wrist as two target joints. MRI datasets of 153 clinically

  18. [Physiotherapy for juvenile idiopathic arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spamer, M; Georgi, M; Häfner, R; Händel, H; König, M; Haas, J-P

    2012-07-01

    Control of disease activity and recovery of function are major issues in the treatment of children and adolescents suffering from juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Functional therapies including physiotherapy are important components in the multidisciplinary teamwork and each phase of the disease requires different strategies. While in the active phase of the disease pain alleviation is the main focus, the inactive phase requires strategies for improving motility and function. During remission the aim is to regain general fitness by sports activities. These phase adapted strategies must be individually designed and usually require a combination of different measures including physiotherapy, occupational therapy, massage as well as other physical procedures and sport therapy. There are only few controlled studies investigating the effectiveness of physical therapies in JIA and many strategies are derived from long-standing experience. New results from physiology and sport sciences have contributed to the development in recent years. This report summarizes the basics and main strategies of physical therapy in JIA.

  19. Retrocalcaneal bursitis in juvenile chronic arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Goldenstein-Schainberg, C; Homsi, C; Rodrigues Pereira, R M; Cossermelli, W

    1992-01-01

    Retrocalcaneal bursitis has been described in various adult rheumatic diseases and septic bursitis unrelated to previous bursal disease has been reported in children. The case is reported here of a girl with juvenile chronic arthritis who developed non-septic retrocalcaneal bursitis; the diagnosis was suggested by a combination of clinical and radiographic studies and was confirmed by ultrasonography.

  20. Retrocalcaneal bursitis in juvenile chronic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenstein-Schainberg, C; Homsi, C; Rodrigues Pereira, R M; Cossermelli, W

    1992-01-01

    Retrocalcaneal bursitis has been described in various adult rheumatic diseases and septic bursitis unrelated to previous bursal disease has been reported in children. The case is reported here of a girl with juvenile chronic arthritis who developed non-septic retrocalcaneal bursitis; the diagnosis was suggested by a combination of clinical and radiographic studies and was confirmed by ultrasonography. Images PMID:1444631

  1. Validity and predictive ability of the juvenile arthritis disease activity score based on CRP versus ESR in a Nordic population-based setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordal, E B; Zak, M; Aalto, K

    2012-01-01

    To compare the juvenile arthritis disease activity score (JADAS) based on C reactive protein (CRP) (JADAS-CRP) with JADAS based on erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) (JADAS-ESR) and to validate JADAS in a population-based setting.......To compare the juvenile arthritis disease activity score (JADAS) based on C reactive protein (CRP) (JADAS-CRP) with JADAS based on erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) (JADAS-ESR) and to validate JADAS in a population-based setting....

  2. Heart Disease, Hypertension, Gestational Diabetes Mellitus, and Preeclampsia/Eclampsia in Mothers With Juvenile Arthritis: A Nested Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Debbie E; Vinet, Évelyne; Bérard, Anick; Duffy, Ciarán; Hazel, Beth; Meshefedjian, Garbis; Sylvestre, Marie-Pierre; Bernatsky, Sasha

    2017-02-01

    To determine whether women with a history of juvenile arthritis are at higher risk for heart disease and hypertension and for developing adverse maternal outcomes: gestational diabetes mellitus, maternal hypertension, and preeclampsia/eclampsia. We designed a nested case-control study from a cohort of first-time mothers with prior physician billing codes suggesting juvenile arthritis, and a matched comparison group without juvenile arthritis. For the nested case-control design, we selected 3 controls for each case for the outcomes of heart disease (n = 403), prepregnancy hypertension (n = 66), gestational diabetes mellitus (n = 285), maternal hypertension (n = 561), and preeclampsia/eclampsia (n = 236). We used conditional logistic regression, adjusting for maternal age and education. Having juvenile arthritis was associated with heart disease (odds ratio [OR] 2.44 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.15-5.15]) but not with gestational hypertension, diabetes mellitus, or preeclampsia/eclampsia. All 66 cases of prepregnancy hypertension had juvenile arthritis. Having prepregnancy hypertension was strongly associated with preeclampsia/eclampsia (OR 8.05 [95% CI 2.69-24.07]). Women with a history of juvenile arthritis had a higher risk of heart disease. This risk signals the potential importance of cardiac prevention strategies in juvenile arthritis. As this was a retrospective study, it was not possible to correct for some relevant potential confounders. Further studies should assess the impact of medications, disease severity, and other factors (e.g., obesity) on cardiac outcomes in juvenile arthritis. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  3. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis in adulthood: fulfilment of classification criteria for adult rheumatic diseases, long-term outcomes and predictors of inactive disease, functional status and damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira-Ramos, Filipa; Eusébio, Mónica; M Martins, Fernando; Mourão, Ana Filipa; Furtado, Carolina; Campanilho-Marques, Raquel; Cordeiro, Inês; Ferreira, Joana; Cerqueira, Marcos; Figueira, Ricardo; Brito, Iva; Canhão, Helena; Santos, Maria José; Melo-Gomes, José A; Fonseca, João Eurico

    2016-01-01

    To determine how adult juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients fulfil classification criteria for adult rheumatic diseases, evaluate their outcomes and determine clinical predictors of inactive disease, functional status and damage. Patients with JIA registered on the Rheumatic Diseases Portuguese Register (Reuma.pt) older than 18 years and with more than 5 years of disease duration were included. Data regarding sociodemographic features, fulfilment of adult classification criteria, Health Assessment Questionnaire, Juvenile Arthritis Damage Index-articular (JADI-A) and Juvenile Arthritis Damage Index-extra-articular (JADI-E) damage index and disease activity were analysed. 426 patients were included. Most of patients with systemic JIA fulfilled criteria for Adult Still's disease. 95.6% of the patients with rheumatoid factor (RF)-positive polyarthritis and 57.1% of the patients with RF-negative polyarthritis matched criteria for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). 38.9% of the patients with extended oligoarthritis were classified as RA while 34.8% of the patients with persistent oligoarthritis were classified as spondyloarthritis. Patients with enthesitis-related arthritis fulfilled criteria for spondyloarthritis in 94.7%. Patients with psoriatic arthritis maintained this classification. Patients with inactive disease had lower disease duration, lower diagnosis delay and corticosteroids exposure. Longer disease duration was associated with higher HAQ, JADI-A and JADI-E. Higher JADI-A was also associated with biological treatment and retirement due to JIA disability and higher JADI-E with corticosteroids exposure. Younger age at disease onset was predictive of higher HAQ, JADI-A and JADI-E and decreased the chance of inactive disease. Most of the included patients fulfilled classification criteria for adult rheumatic diseases, maintain active disease and have functional impairment. Younger age at disease onset was predictive of higher disability and decreased the

  4. Alteration of fecal microbiota profiles in juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Associations with HLA-B27 allele and disease status.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Di Paola

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Alteration of gut microbiota is involved in several chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, and gut microbial pro-arthritogenic profiles have been hypothesized. Intestinal inflammation may be involved in spondyloarthropathies and in a subset of patients affected by Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA, the most common chronic rheumatic disease of childhood. We compared the fecal microbiota composition of JIA patients with healthy subjects (HS, evaluating differences in microbial profiles between sub-categories of JIA, such as enthesitis-related arthritis (JIA-ERA, in which inflammation of entheses occurs, and polyarticular JIA, non-enthesitis related arthritis (JIA-nERA. Through taxon-level analysis, we discovered alteration of fecal microbiota components that could be involved in subclinical gut inflammation, and promotion of joint inflammation. We observed abundance in Ruminococcaceae in both JIA categories, reduction in Clostridiaceae and Peptostreptococcaceae in JIA-ERA, and increase in Veillonellaceae in JIA-nERA, respectively compared with HS. Among the more relevant genera, we found an increase in Clostridium cluster XIVb, involved in colitis and arthritis, in JIA-ERA patients compared with HS, and a trend of decrease in Faecalibacterium, known for anti-inflammatory properties, in JIA-nERA compared with JIA-ERA and HS. Differential abundant taxa identified JIA patients for the HLA-B27 allele, including Bilophila, Clostridium cluster XIVb, Oscillibacter and Parvimonas. Prediction analysis of metabolic functions showed that JIA-ERA metagenome was differentially enriched in bacterial functions related to cell motility and chemotaxis, suggesting selection of potential virulence traits. We also discovered differential microbial profiles and intra-group variability among active disease and remission, suggesting instability of microbial ecosystem in autoimmune diseases with respect to healthy status. Similarly

  5. Periodontal and hematological characteristics associated with aggressive periodontitis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Anne Havemose; Westergaard, Jytte; Stoltze, Kaj

    2006-01-01

    Periodontitis shares several clinical and pathogenic characteristics with chronic arthritis, and there is some degree of coexistence. The aims of this study were to elucidate whether patients with localized aggressive periodontitis (LAgP), generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAgP), juvenile...... idiopathic arthritis (JIA), and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) share periodontal and hematological characteristics distinguishing them from individuals free of diseases....

  6. Temporomandibular Joint Involvement in Association With Quality of Life, Disability, and High Disease Activity in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frid, Paula; Nordal, Ellen; Bovis, Francesca; Giancane, Gabriella; Larheim, Tore A; Rygg, Marite; Pires Marafon, Denise; De Angelis, Donato; Palmisani, Elena; Murray, Kevin J; Oliveira, Sheila; Simonini, Gabriele; Corona, Fabrizia; Davidson, Joyce; Foster, Helen; Steenks, Michel H; Flato, Berit; Zulian, Francesco; Baildam, Eileen; Saurenmann, Rotraud K; Lahdenne, Pekka; Ravelli, Angelo; Martini, Alberto; Pistorio, Angela; Ruperto, Nicolino

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the demographic, disease activity, disability, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) differences between children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and their healthy peers, and between children with JIA with and without clinical temporomandibular joint (TMJ) involvement and its determinants. This study is based on a cross-sectional cohort of 3,343 children with JIA and 3,409 healthy peers, enrolled in the Pediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation HRQOL study or in the methotrexate trial. Potential determinants of TMJ involvement included demographic, disease activity, disability, and HRQOL measures selected through univariate and multivariable logistic regression. Clinical TMJ involvement was observed in 387 of 3,343 children with JIA (11.6%). Children with TMJ involvement, compared to those without, more often had polyarticular disease course (95% versus 70%), higher Juvenile Arthritis Disease Activity Score (odds ratio [OR] 4.6), more disability, and lower HRQOL. Children with TMJ involvement experienced clearly more disability and lower HRQOL compared to their healthy peers. The multivariable analysis showed that cervical spine involvement (OR 4.6), disease duration >4.4 years (OR 2.8), and having more disability (Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index >0.625) (OR 1.6) were the most important determinants for TMJ involvement. Clinical TMJ involvement in JIA is associated with higher disease activity, higher disability, and impaired HRQOL. Our findings indicate the need for dedicated clinical and imaging evaluation of TMJ arthritis, especially in children with cervical spine involvement, polyarticular course, and longer disease duration. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  7. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis-associated uveitis

    OpenAIRE

    Clarke, Sarah; Sen, Ethan; Ramanan, Athimalaipet

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common rheumatic disease of childhood, with JIA-associated uveitis its most common extra-articular manifestation. JIA-associated uveitis is a potentially sight-threatening condition and thus carries a considerable risk of morbidity. The aetiology of the condition is autoimmune in nature with the predominant involvement of CD4(+) T cells. However, the underlying pathogenic mechanisms remain unclear, particularly regarding interplay between geneti...

  8. Non-HLA gene polymorphisms in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: associations with disease outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberdi-Saugstrup, M; Enevold, C; Zak, M; Nielsen, S; Nordal, E; Berntson, L; Fasth, A; Rygg, M; Müller, K

    2017-09-01

    To test the hypothesis that non-HLA single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with the risk of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) are risk factors for an unfavourable disease outcome at long-term follow-up. The Nordic JIA cohort is a prospective multicentre study cohort of patients from the Nordic countries. In all, 193 patients met the inclusion criteria of having an 8 year follow-up assessment and available DNA sample. Seventeen SNPs met the inclusion criteria of having significant associations with JIA in at least two previous independent study cohorts. Clinical endpoints were disease remission, actively inflamed joints and joints with limitation of motion (LOM), articular or extra-articular damage, and history of uveitis. Evidence of associations between genotypes and endpoints were found for STAT4, ADAD1-IL2-IL21, PTPN2, and VTCN1 (p = 0.003-0.05). STAT4_rs7574865 TT was associated with the presence of actively inflamed joints [odds ratio (OR) 20.6, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.2-> 100, p = 0.003] and extra-articular damage (OR 7.9, 95% CI 1-56.6, p = 0.057). ADAD1_rs17388568 AA was associated with a lower risk of having joints with LOM (OR 0.1, 95% CI 0-0.55, p = 0.016). PTPN2_rs1893217 CC was associated with a lower risk of having joints with LOM (OR 0.2, 95% CI 0-0.99, p = 0.026), while VTCN1_rs2358820 GA was associated with uveitis (OR 3.5, 95% CI 1-12.1, p = 0.029). This exploratory study, using a prospectively followed JIA cohort, found significant associations between long-term outcome and SNPs, all previously associated with development of JIA and involved in immune regulation and signal transduction in immune cells.

  9. Cytokine profiles in peripheral blood and whole blood cell cultures associated with aggressive periodontitis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Anne Havemose; Sørensen, Lars Korsbaek; Stoltze, Kaj

    2005-01-01

    Cytokines play a key role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases. An obvious question is whether patients with aggressive periodontitis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, or rheumatoid arthritis share blood cytokine profiles distinguishing them from individuals free of disease.......Cytokines play a key role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases. An obvious question is whether patients with aggressive periodontitis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, or rheumatoid arthritis share blood cytokine profiles distinguishing them from individuals free of disease....

  10. Uveitis and Juvenile Psoriatic Arthritis or Psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salek, Sherveen S; Pradeep, Archana; Guly, Catherine; Ramanan, Athimalaipet V; Rosenbaum, James T

    2018-01-01

    To describe the phenotype of the uveitis that accompanies juvenile psoriatic arthritis or psoriasis. Observational case series. Setting: Two university-based referral clinics: 1 in England, 1 in the United States. Five children with uveitis and psoriatic arthritis and 1 with uveitis and psoriasis Observational Procedure: Retrospective chart review. Demographics of subjects such as age and sex; description of ocular and joint disease; surgical and other complications; medical treatment. Five of the 6 children in this series had the onset of disease at or before age 6 (P = .0008 compared to expected age of onset for psoriatic arthritis in childhood). All children in this series had an inadequate response to topical corticosteroids. Most of the children were treated with systemic corticosteroids for many months, yet all of them went on to require methotrexate. Therapy with systemic methotrexate did not suffice, as all the patients also required some form of biologic therapy. Five of 6 had surgeries such as vitrectomy, cataract extraction, or a procedure for glaucoma control. The observations suggest that the uveitis that accompanies juvenile psoriatic arthritis might be a distinct disease that is particularly severe when its onset affects children aged 6 years or younger. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Impact of juvenile idiopathic arthritis on schooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouaddi Ilham

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA is the most common arthropathy of childhood. Different diseases affect school attendance to varying degrees. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA on Moroccan children’s schooling. Methods Thirty-three children with JIA were included in this study, having been previously diagnosed according to the classification criteria of the International League of Associations for Rheumatology (ILAR. Seventy-four healthy children were recruited to serve as controls. Data was obtained for all children on their school level, educational performance, and attendance. The rate of absenteeism due to health complications was noted. Results All healthy children were able to attend school (p Conclusions Our study suggested that the schooling of children with JIA was negatively impacted due to the disorder. More studies, with a larger sample of children, are needed to confirm our findings.

  12. How common is clinically inactive disease in a prospective cohort of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis? The importance of definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoop-Worrall, Stephanie J W; Verstappen, Suzanne M M; Baildam, Eileen; Chieng, Alice; Davidson, Joyce; Foster, Helen; Ioannou, Yiannis; McErlane, Flora; Wedderburn, Lucy R; Thomson, Wendy; Hyrich, Kimme L

    2017-08-01

    Many criteria for clinically inactive disease (CID) and minimal disease activity (MDA) have been proposed for juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). It is not known to what degree each of these criteria overlap within a single patient cohort. This study aimed to compare the frequency of MDA and CID across different criteria in a cohort of children with JIA at 1 year following presentation. The Childhood Arthritis Prospective Study recruits children at initial presentation to paediatric or adolescent rheumatology in seven UK centres. Children recruited between October 2001 and December 2013 were included. The proportions of children with CID and MDA at 1 year were calculated using four investigator-defined and eight published composite criteria. Missing data were accounted for using multiple imputation under different assumptions. In a cohort of 1415 children and adolescents, 67% patients had no active joints at 1 year. Between 48% and 61% achieved MDA and between 25% and 38% achieved CID using published criteria. Overlap between criteria varied. Of 922 patients in MDA by either the original composite criteria, Juvenile Arthritis Disease Activity Score (JADAS) or clinical JADAS cut-offs, 68% were classified as in MDA by all 3 criteria. Similarly, 44% of 633 children with CID defined by either Wallace's preliminary criteria or the JADAS cut-off were in CID according to both criteria. In a large JIA prospective inception cohort, a majority of patients have evidence of persistent disease activity after 1 year. Published criteria to capture MDA and CID do not always identify the same groups of patients. This has significant implications when defining and applying treat-to-target strategies. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  13. Pain intensity in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis with respect to the level of their activity and disease acceptance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grażyna Cepuch

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Being diagnosed with a chronic disease, such as juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA, may adversely affect the activity of a young person. Additionally, the pain associated with the disease may cause difficulty accepting it. The aim was to assess the intensity of pain as well as the degree of activity and acceptance of the disease in young people aged 14–18 years with JIA. Material and methods : The study group consisted of youth of both genders suffering from JIA aged 14–18 years during remission of the disease. The study included 50 people and used the following: numerical rating scale (NRS 0–10, Cantril ladder, activity scale of own authorship (grouped items of the questionnaire form subscales of: tiredness, physical activity, social and intellectual activity and Acceptance of Illness Scale (AIS. Statistical analysis included the following tests: Mann-Whitney U test, Wilcoxon’s, χ2 test, Fisher’s, and Spearman rank correlation. The statistical significance level was set as p value below 0.05. Results : The majority of the respondents observed currently do not feel pain or feel pain of low intensity. The young people are physically, psychologically and socially active. The majority of patients accept their illness. The patients who suffer from pain on the NRS scale within 4–7 points do not adapt to living with the disease as do patients without pain or experiencing pain of low intensity. There was a strong correlation between acceptance of the disease at the time of the study determined by the Cantril ladder and AIS. Conclusions : 1. The pain suffered by patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA has undoubtedly a negative impact on their activity and acceptance of the disease. 2. It seems to be crucial to recognize pain as a significant determinant of acceptance of the disease.

  14. Ghrelin levels in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: relation to anti-tumor necrosis factor treatment and disease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagiozoglou-Lampoudi, Thomais; Trachana, Maria; Agakidis, Charalampos; Pratsidou-Gertsi, Polyxeni; Taparkou, Anna; Lampoudi, Sotiria; Kanakoudi-Tsakalidou, Florentia

    2011-10-01

    Studies in adults with rheumatoid arthritis reported low serum ghrelin that increased following anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) infusion. Data on juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) are lacking. The aim of this pilot study was to explore serum ghrelin levels in patients with JIA and the possible association with anti-TNF treatment, disease activity, and nutritional status. Fifty-two patients with JIA (14/52 on anti-TNF treatment) were studied. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis was inactive in 3 of 14 anti-TNF-treated patients and in 11 of 38 non-anti-TNF-treated patients. The nutritional status, energy intake/requirements, appetite, and fasting serum ghrelin levels were assessed. Ghrelin control values were obtained from 50 individuals with minor illness matched for age, sex, and body mass index. Ghrelin levels in patients with JIA were significantly lower than in controls (P ghrelin levels were comparable to control values only in 3 patients with anti-TNF-induced remission. Ghrelin in non-anti-TNF-treated patients in remission was low. Multiple regression analysis showed that disease activity (P = .002, CI = -84.16 to -20.01) and anti-TNF treatment (P = .003, CI = -82.51 to -18.33) were significant independent predictors of ghrelin after adjusting for other potential confounders. Ghrelin did not correlate with nutritional status, energy balance, and appetite. Serum ghrelin is low in patients with JIA and is restored to values similar to those in controls following anti-TNF-induced remission. Our study provides evidence that TNF blockade is independently associated with serum ghrelin, which possibly contributes to anti-TNF-induced remission. These preliminary results could form the basis for future research. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Exercise therapy in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takken, T.; van Brussel, M.; Engelbert, R. H. H.; van der Net, J.; Kuis, W.; Helders, P. J. M.

    2008-01-01

    Exercise therapy is considered an important component of the treatment of arthritis. The efficacy of exercise therapy has been reviewed in adults with rheumatoid arthritis but not in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). To assess the effects of exercise therapy on functional ability,

  16. Arthritis and Rheumatic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Topics Arthritis and Rheumatic Diseases Arthritis and Rheumatic Diseases Arthritis is often used to refer to any ... primary immunodeficiency syndrome March 11, 2013 Arthritis and Rheumatic Disease News Research Brief | January 9, 2017 Tofacitinib Shows ...

  17. Anakinra as first-line disease-modifying therapy in systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis: report of forty-six patients from an international multicenter series

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nigrovic, Peter A.; Mannion, Melissa; Prince, Femke H. M.; Zeft, Andrew; Rabinovich, C. Egla; van Rossum, Marion A. J.; Cortis, Elisabetta; Pardeo, Manuela; Miettunen, Paivi M.; Janow, Ginger; Birmingham, James; Eggebeen, Aaron; Janssen, Erin; Shulman, Andrew I.; Son, Mary Beth; Hong, Sandy; Jones, Karla; Ilowite, Norman T.; Cron, Randy Q.; Higgins, Gloria C.

    2011-01-01

    To examine the safety and efficacy of the interleukin-1 (IL-1) receptor antagonist anakinra as first-line therapy for systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Patients with systemic JIA receiving anakinra as part of initial disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) therapy were identified

  18. Juvenil idiopatisk arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herlin, Troels

    2002-01-01

    . In addition to the clinical characteristics, genetic and biochemical differences suggest that JIA could be regarded as a general term covering various diseases. Complications described are uveitis, temporomandibular joint affection and growth disturbances. The therapeutic strategy should be planned...... shown a promising effect in severe polyarticular JIA refractory to methotrexate treatment. Udgivelsesdato: 2002-Aug-19...

  19. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis – an update on its diagnosis and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-12-03

    Dec 3, 2015 ... Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common form of chronic arthritis in children and the most ... A swollen knee and uveitis in a young girl, for instance, is ..... Methotrexate for treating juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

  20. Quantitative MR characterization of disease activity in the knee in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a longitudinal pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Workie, Dagnachew W.; Graham, T.B.; Laor, Tal; Racadio, Judy M.; Rajagopal, Akila; O'Brien, Kendall J.; Bommer, Wendy A.; Shire, Norah J.; Dardzinski, Bernard J.

    2007-01-01

    The development of a quantifiable and noninvasive method of monitoring disease activity and response to therapy is vital for arthritis management. The purpose of this study was to investigate the utility of quantitative dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) based on pharmacokinetic (PK) modeling to evaluate disease activity in the knee and correlate the results with the clinical assessment in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). A group of 17 children with JIA underwent longitudinal clinical and laboratory assessment and DCE-MRI of the knee at enrollment, 3 months, and 12 months. A PK model was employed using MRI signal enhancement data to give three parameters, K trans ' (min -1 ), k ep (min -1 ), and V p ' and to calculate synovial volume. The PK parameters, synovial volumes, and clinical and laboratory assessments in most children were significantly decreased (P < 0.05) at 12 months when compared to the enrollment values. There was excellent correlation between the PK and synovial volume and the clinical and laboratory assessments. Differences in MR and clinical parameter values in individual subjects illustrate persistent synovitis when in clinical remission. A decrease in PK parameter values obtained from DCE-MRI in children with JIA likely reflects diminution of disease activity. This technique may be used as an objective follow-up measure of therapeutic efficacy in patients with JIA. MR imaging can detect persistent synovitis in patients considered to be in clinical remission. (orig.)

  1. Genetic architecture distinguishes systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis from otherforms of juvenile idiopathic arthritis: clinical and therapeutic implications

    OpenAIRE

    Ombrello, Michael J.; Arthur, Victoria L.; Remmers, Elaine F.; Hinks, Anne; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Grom, Alexei A.; Foell, Dirk; Martini, Alberto; Gattorno, Marco; Ozen, Seza; Prahalad, Sampath; Zeft, Andrew S.; Bohnsack, John F.; Ilowite, Norman T.; Mellins, Elizabeth D.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a heterogeneous group of conditions unified by the presence of chronic childhood arthritis without an identifiable cause. Systemic JIA (sJIA) is a rare form of JIA characterized by systemic inflammation. sJIA is distinguished from other forms of JIA by unique clinical features and treatment responses that are similar to autoinflammatory diseases. However approximately half of children with sJIA develop destructive, longstanding arthritis that...

  2. Elevated tissue transglutaminase antibodies in juvenile idiopathic arthritis children: Relation to neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio and disease activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasha E. Gheith

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Subclinical gut inflammation is described in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA, so has joint involvement been related to celiac disease (CD. The well-known involvement of tissue transglutaminase (tTG in the pathogenesis of CD stimulated progress in the field of autoimmune diseases. Aim of the work: To screen JIA children for tTG antibodies and to detect its relation to the neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR and disease activity. Patients and methods: The study included 44 JIA children with 44 matched controls. All subjects had no GIT symptoms suggestive of CD. Disease activity was assessed using the juvenile arthritis disease activity score in 27 joints (JADAS-27. The tTG antibodies (IgA and IgG were assessed. Results: The patients mean age was 12.5 ± 2.8 years and disease duration 5.01 ± 2.9 years; Female:Male 3.4:1. The mean JADAS-27 score was 12.6 ± 2.04. tTG antibodies were positive in 43.2% of the patients compared to 18.2% control (p = 0.01. Antibodies positivity was comparable according to gender and subtypes. The NLR in JIA children (1.62 ± 0.58 was significantly higher than in control (1.3 ± 0.5 (p = 0.006. Those with positive tTG antibodies had a significantly reduced body mass index (p = 0.02 and increased NLR (p = 0.02 compared to those with negative tTG. Only NLR and JADAS-27 would significantly predict antibodies positivity (p = 0.037 and p = 0.04, respectively. Conclusion: Increased tTG antibodies are frequent in JIA children raising the possibility of an associated subclinical CD. Markedly reduced BMI and increased NLR could forecast the presence of these antibodies. In addition to the JADAS-27, the NLR is a simple test that could predict this association and could be a useful biomarker.

  3. Exercise testing and fitness training in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Singh-Grewal, D.

    2010-01-01

    Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis is the commonest rheumatic disease of childhood affecting 1:1000 children under the age of 16 years. Children with JIA have long been sidelined from physical activity due to active disease or irrational concerns that activity may in some way worsen disease. Children

  4. Synovial and inflammatory diseases in childhood: role of new imaging modalities in the assessment of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damasio, Maria Beatrice; Malattia, Clara; Martini, Alberto; Toma, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) represents a group of heterogeneous diseases characterized by a chronic inflammatory process primarily targeting the synovial membrane. A persistent synovitis is associated with an increased risk of osteocartilaginous damage. With the advent of effective structure-modifying treatment for JIA, it may be possible to significantly reduce or even completely prevent structural damage and associated functional disability. The trend towards early suppression of inflammation, in order to prevent erosive disease, shifts the emphasis away from conventional radiographic detectable structural damage to the slightest traces of early joint damage, and drives the need for alternative imaging techniques more sensitive in detecting early signs of disease activity and damage. In this regard MRI and US are playing an increasing role in the evaluation of arthritic joints. This article will review the key aspects of the current status and recent important advances of imaging techniques available to investigate the child with rheumatic disease, briefly discussing conventional radiography, and particularly focusing on MRI and US. In this era of advancing imaging technology, knowledge of the relative values of available imaging techniques is necessary to optimize the management of children with JIA. (orig.)

  5. Contrast-enhanced MRI compared with the physical examination in the evaluation of disease activity in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemke, Robert; Maas, Mario; Veenendaal, Mira van; Kuijpers, Taco W.; Dolman, Koert M.; Rossum, Marion A.J. van; Berg, J.M. van den

    2014-01-01

    To assess the value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in discriminating between active and inactive juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients and to compare physical examination outcomes with MRI outcomes in the assessment of disease status in JIA patients. Consecutive JIA patients with knee involvement were prospectively studied using an open-bore MRI. Imaging findings from 146 JIA patients were analysed (59.6 % female; mean age, 12.9 years). Patients were classified as clinically active or inactive. MRI features were evaluated using the JAMRIS system, comprising validated scores for synovial hypertrophy, bone marrow oedema, cartilage lesions and bone erosions. Inter-reader reliability was good for all MRI features (intra-class correlation coefficient [ICC] = 0.87-0.94). No differences were found between the two groups regarding MRI scores of bone marrow oedema, cartilage lesions or bone erosions. Synovial hypertrophy scores differed significantly between groups (P = 0.016). Nonetheless, synovial hypertrophy was also present in 14 JIA patients (35.9 %) with clinically inactive disease. Of JIA patients considered clinically active, 48.6 % showed no signs of MRI-based synovitis. MRI can discriminate between clinically active and inactive JIA patients. However, physical examination is neither very sensitive nor specific in evaluating JIA disease activity compared with MRI. Subclinical synovitis was present in >35 % of presumed clinically inactive patients. (orig.)

  6. Juvenile chronic arthritis into adulthood: a long-term follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zak, M; Pedersen, F K

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate a group of 65 adults with a history of or persistent juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA), on average, 26.4 yr after disease onset.......To evaluate a group of 65 adults with a history of or persistent juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA), on average, 26.4 yr after disease onset....

  7. American College of Rheumatology provisional criteria for defining clinical inactive disease in select categories of juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Carol A; Giannini, Edward H; Huang, Bin; Itert, Lukasz; Ruperto, Nicolino

    2011-07-01

    To prospectively validate the preliminary criteria for clinical inactive disease (CID) in patients with select categories of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). We used the process for development of classification and response criteria recommended by the American College of Rheumatology Quality of Care Committee. Patient-visit profiles were extracted from the phase III randomized controlled trial of infliximab in polyarticular-course JIA (i.e., patients considered to resemble those with select categories of JIA) and sent to an international group of expert physician raters. Using the physician ratings as the gold standard, the sensitivity and specificity were calculated using the preliminary criteria. Modifications to the criteria were made, and these were sent to a larger group of pediatric rheumatologists to determine quantitative, face, and content validity. Variables weighted heaviest by physicians when making their judgment were the number of joints with active arthritis, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), physician's global assessment, and duration of morning stiffness. Three modifications were made: the definition of uveitis, the definition of abnormal ESR, and the addition of morning stiffness. These changes did not alter the accuracy of the preliminary set. The modified criteria, termed the "criteria for CID in select categories of JIA," have excellent feasibility and face, content, criterion, and discriminant validity to detect CID in select categories of JIA. The small changes made to the preliminary criteria set did not alter the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (0.954) or accuracy (91%), but have increased face and content validity. Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  8. [Juvenile idiopathic arthritis and oral health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobus, Agnieszka; Kierklo, Anna; Sielicka, Danuta; Szajda, Sławomir Dariusz

    2016-05-04

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common autoimmune inflammatory disease of connective tissue in children. It is characterized by progressive joint destruction which causes preserved changes in the musculoskeletal system. The literature describes fully clinical symptoms and radiological images in different subtypes of JIA. However, there is still a limited number of studies reporting on the medical condition of the oral cavity of ill children. JIA can affect hard and soft tissues of the oral cavity by: the general condition of the child's health, arthritis of the upper limbs, as the result of the pharmacotherapy, changes in secretion and composition of saliva, inflammation of the temporomandibular joint and facial deformity. The study summarizes the available literature on the condition of the teeth and periodontal and oral hygiene in the course of JIA. The presence of diverse factors that modify the oral cavity, such as facial growth, functioning of salivary glands, or the supervision and care provided by adults, prevents clear identification if JIA leads to severe dental caries and periodontal disease. Despite conflicting results in studies concerning the clinical oral status, individuals with JIA require special attention regarding disease prevention and maintenance of oral health.

  9. Impact of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Associated Uveitis in Early Adulthood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haasnoot, AJW; Vernie, Lenneke A; Rothova, Aniki; V D Doe, Patricia; Los, Leonoor I; Schalij-Delfos, Nicoline E; de Boer, Joke H

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Typically juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated uveitis (further referred as 'JIA-uveitis') has its onset in childhood, but some patients suffer its, sometimes visual threatening, complications or ongoing disease activity in adulthood. The objective of this study was to analyze

  10. Impact of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Associated Uveitis in Early Adulthood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haasnoot, Anne-Mieke J. W.; Vernie, Lenneke A.; Rothova, Aniki; van der Doe, Patricia; Los, Leonoor I.; Schalij-Delfos, Nicoline E.; de Boer, Joke H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Typically juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated uveitis (further referred as 'JIA-uveitis') has its onset in childhood, but some patients suffer its, sometimes visual threatening, complications or ongoing disease activity in adulthood. The objective of this study was to analyze

  11. Impact of juvenile idiopathic arthritis associated uveitis in early adulthood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haasnoot, A.-M.J.W. (Anne-Mieke J. W.); Vernie, L.A. (Lenneke A.); A. Rothová (Aniki); Doe, P.V.D. (Patricia V. D.); L.I. Los (Leonoor I.); N.E. Schalij-Delfos (Nicoline); J.H. de Boer (Joke)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Typically juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated uveitis (further referred as 'JIA-uveitis') has its onset in childhood, but some patients suffer its, sometimes visual threatening, complications or ongoing disease activity in adulthood. The objective of this study was

  12. Non-HLA gene polymorphisms in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alberdi-Saugstrup, M.; Enevold, C.; Zak, M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To test the hypothesis that non-HLA single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with the risk of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) are risk factors for an unfavourable disease outcome at long-term follow-up. Methods: The Nordic JIA cohort is a prospective multicentre study cohort...

  13. Analysis of the Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Immunization Schedule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. S. Namazova-Baranova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The connection between vaccination and autoimmune diseases (and rheumatic pathology in particular is still a subject of discussions. When discussing the possibility of vaccinating rheumatic patients we should take into account the ultra high dangers that infectious diseases pose for such patients, including those that can be prevented by vaccination. We should also take into account the experience of using various vaccine types in rheumatic patients, which illustrates of their high safety profile.Objective: Our aim was to study the immunization schedule in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.Methods: The evaluation of vaccine history and other anamnestic data in juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients was based on individual medical records (individual child’s card/preventive vaccination certificate, as well as questionnaires filled by mothers.Results: It has been determined that a significant proportion of children with vaccination schedule deviations are juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients. Almost one in four children with a confirmed rheumatic diagnosis has not been immunized against the major vaccine-preventable diseases. In one non-vaccinated group, there was a case of juvenile arthritis onset after recovering from measles. A small number of patient mothers connects the manifestation of rheumatic diseases with vaccination.Conclusion: Violations of vaccination status in JIA patients require corrections according to the results of clinical studies and the recommendations of international experts.

  14. Biological agents in polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amarilyo, Gil; Tarp, Simon; Foeldvari, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Although various biological agents are in use for polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (pJIA), head-to-head trials comparing the efficacy and safety among them are lacking. We aimed to compare the efficacy and safety of biological agents in pJIA using all currently...

  15. Orofacial pain, jaw function, and temporomandibular disorders in adult women with a history of juvenile chronic arthritis or persistent juvenile chronic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakke, M.; Zak, M.; Jensen, B.L.

    2001-01-01

    Orofacial pain, jaw function, temporomandibular disorders, adult women persistent juvenil chronic arthritis......Orofacial pain, jaw function, temporomandibular disorders, adult women persistent juvenil chronic arthritis...

  16. Overview of the radiology of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, P.A.; Job-Deslandre, C.H.; Lalande, G.; Adamsbaum, C.

    2000-01-01

    Plain films remain the basic tool for diagnosis and follow-up evaluation of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). In this paper, we review the new classification of JIA: systemic arthritis, oligoarthritis (persistent), oligoarthritis (extended), polyarticular arthritis (rheumatoid factor negative), polyarticular arthritis (rheumatoid factor positive), enthesitis related arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and unclassified arthritis. We will also review regional abnormalities of three stages: an early stage, an intermediate stage, a late stage, as well as the differential diagnosis

  17. Physiotherapy in pauciarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuk, Beata; Kaczor, Zofia; Zuk-Drążyk, Berenika; Księżopolska-Orłowska, Krystyna

    2014-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common arthropathy of childhood and adolescence. This term encompasses a group of chronic systemic inflammatory diseases of the connective tissue which cause arthritis in patients under 16 years of age lasting at least 6 weeks. The authors presented the characteristic features of physiotherapy based on functional examination results on the basis of two cases of girls with pauciarticular JIA treated according to an established pharmacological regimen. Physiotherapy should be introduced at an early stage of the disease. Kinesiotherapy preceded by history-taking and a functional examination of the patient, has to focus on both primary and secondary joint lesions.

  18. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis-associated uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Sarah L N; Sen, Ethan S; Ramanan, Athimalaipet V

    2016-04-27

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common rheumatic disease of childhood, with JIA-associated uveitis its most common extra-articular manifestation. JIA-associated uveitis is a potentially sight-threatening condition and thus carries a considerable risk of morbidity. The aetiology of the condition is autoimmune in nature with the predominant involvement of CD4(+) T cells. However, the underlying pathogenic mechanisms remain unclear, particularly regarding interplay between genetic and environmental factors. JIA-associated uveitis comes in several forms, but the most common presentation is of the chronic anterior uveitis type. This condition is usually asymptomatic and thus screening for JIA-associated uveitis in at-risk patients is paramount. Early detection and treatment aims to stop inflammation and prevent the development of complications leading to visual loss, which can occur due to both active disease and burden of disease treatment. Visually disabling complications of JIA-associated uveitis include cataracts, glaucoma, band keratopathy and macular oedema. There is a growing body of evidence for the early introduction of systemic immunosuppressive therapies in order to reduce topical and systemic glucocorticoid use. This includes more traditional treatments, such as methotrexate, as well as newer biological therapies. This review highlights the epidemiology of JIA-associated uveitis, the underlying pathogenesis and how affected patients may present. The current guidelines and criteria for screening, diagnosis and monitoring are discussed along with approaches to management.

  19. Australian Paediatric Rheumatology Group standards of care for the management of juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, Jane; Murray, Kevin; Boros, Christina; Chaitow, Jeffrey; Allen, Roger C; Akikusa, Jonathan; Adib, Navid; Piper, Susan E; Singh-Grewal, Davinder

    2014-09-01

    This standards document outlines accepted standards of management for children, adolescents and young adults with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) in Australia. This document acknowledges that the chronic inflammatory arthritis conditions (JIA) in childhood are different diseases from inflammatory arthritis in adults and that specific expertise is required in the care of children with arthritis. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2014 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  20. Clinical and Biochemical Characteristics of Children with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, S.; Ali, S. R.; Ishaque, S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the clinical and biochemical characteristics of children with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) at a tertiary care centre in Karachi, Pakistan. Study Design: A descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Paediatric Rheumatology Clinic of The Aga Khan University Hospital (AKUH), Karachi, from January 2008 to December 2011. Methodology: Clinical and laboratory profile and outcome of children less than 15 years of age attending the Paediatric Rheumatology Clinic of the Aga Khan University, Karachi with the diagnosis of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis according to International League against Rheumatism were studied. These children were classified into different types of JIA; their clinical and laboratory characteristics, response to therapy and outcome was evaluated. Results: Sixty eight patients satisfying the criteria of International League against Rheumatism (ILAR) for Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis were enrolled during the study period of four consecutive years, their age ranged from 9 months to 15 years. Mean age at onset was 6.45 +- 4.03 years while mean age at diagnosis was 7.60 +- 3.93 years. Polyarticular was the most predominant subtype with 37 (54%) patients, out of these, 9 (24%) were rheumatoid factor positive. An almost equal gender predisposition was observed. Fever and arthritis were the most common presenting symptoms, with only 2 patients presenting with uveitis. Conclusion: The clinico-biochemical characteristics of JIA at the study centre showed a pattern distinct with early onset of disease, high frequency of polyarticular type and a higher rheumatoid factor (QRA) and ANA positivity in girls. (author)

  1. Preliminary definition of improvement in juvenile arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannini, E H; Ruperto, N; Ravelli, A; Lovell, D J; Felson, D T; Martini, A

    1997-07-01

    To identify a core set of outcome variables for the assessment of children with juvenile arthritis (JA), to use the core set to develop a definition of improvement to determine whether individual patients demonstrate clinically important improvement, and to promote this definition as a single efficacy measure in JA clinical trials. A core set of outcome variables was established using a combination of statistical and consensus formation techniques. Variables in the core set consisted of 1) physician global assessment of disease activity; 2) parent/patient assessment of overall well-being; 3) functional ability; 4) number of joints with active arthritis; 5) number of joints with limited range of motion; and 6) erythrocyte sedimentation rate. To establish a definition of improvement using this core set, 21 pediatric rheumatologists from 14 countries met, and, using consensus formation techniques, scored each of 72 patient profiles as improved or not improved. Using the physicians' consensus as the gold standard, the chi-square, sensitivity, and specificity were calculated for each of 240 possible definitions of improvement. Definitions with sensitivity or specificity of definitions to discriminate between the effects of active agent and those of placebo, using actual trial data, was then observed. Each definition was also ranked for face validity, and the sum of the ranks was then multiplied by the kappa statistic. The definition of improvement with the highest final score was as follows: at least 30% improvement from baseline in 3 of any 6 variables in the core set, with no more than 1 of the remaining variables worsening by >30%. The second highest scoring definition was closely related to the first; the third highest was similar to the Paulus criteria used in adult rheumatoid arthritis trials, except with different variables. This indicates convergent validity of the process used. We propose a definition of improvement for JA. Use of a uniform definition will help

  2. Uveitis associated with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Ethan S; Dick, Andrew D; Ramanan, Athimalaipet V

    2015-06-01

    Uveitis is a potentially sight-threatening complication of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). JIA-associated uveitis is recognized to have an autoimmune aetiology characterized by activation of CD4(+) T cells, but the underlying mechanisms might overlap with those of autoinflammatory conditions involving activation of innate immunity. As no animal model recapitulates all the features of JIA-associated uveitis, questions remain regarding its pathogenesis. The most common form of JIA-associated uveitis is chronic anterior uveitis, which is usually asymptomatic initially. Effective screening is, therefore, essential to detect early disease and commence treatment before the development of visually disabling complications, such as cataracts, glaucoma, band keratopathy and cystoid macular oedema. Complications can result from uncontrolled intraocular inflammation as well as from its treatment, particularly prolonged use of high-dose topical corticosteroids. Accumulating evidence supports the early introduction of systemic immunosuppressive drugs, such as methotrexate, as steroid-sparing agents. Prospective randomized controlled trials of TNF inhibitors and other biologic therapies are underway or planned. Future research should aim to identify biomarkers to predict which children are at high risk of developing JIA-associated uveitis or have a poor prognosis. Such biomarkers could help to ensure that patients receive earlier interventions and more-potent therapy, with the ultimate aim of reducing loss of vision and ocular morbidity.

  3. Doença de Graves associada à artrite idiopática juvenil Graves' disease associated with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa de Matos Santos Mendonça Marques

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Os autores relatam o caso de uma menina de 10 anos de idade com diagnóstico de doença de Graves (DG, em tratamento com propiltiouracil, que desenvolveu uveíte e artrite poliarticular e cuja mãe também tem DG e lúpus discoide. São discutidos os diagnósticos diferenciais de artrite inflamatória que surge em uma criança com doença tireoidiana autoimune medicada com drogas antitireóideas.The authors report the case of a 10-year-old girl with Graves' disease (GD, treated with propylthiouracil, who developed uveitis and polyarticular arthritis, and whose mother also had GD and discoid lupus. The differential diagnosis of inflammatory arthritis that appears in a child with autoimmune thyroid disease managed with antithyroid drugs is discussed.

  4. Subpopulations Within Juvenile Psoriatic Arthritis: A Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew L. Stoll

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The presentation of juvenile psoriatic arthritis (JPsA has long been recognized to be clinically heterogeneous. As the definition of JPsA expanded to accommodate atypical manifestations of psoriasis in young children, studies began to reflect an increasingly clear biphasic distribution of age of onset, with peaks in the first few years of life and again in early adolescence. These two subpopulations differ in gender ratio, pattern of joint involvement, laboratory findings and potentially response to therapy. Intriguingly, a similar distribution of age of onset has been observed in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA, and correlates with patterns of HLA association. While a secure classification of subpopulations within JPsA awaits improved pathophysiologic understanding, future research must consider the possibility that different disease mechanisms may be operative in distinct subsets of patients with this disorder.

  5. Advances in the treatment of polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Kate; Wedderburn, Lucy R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review To review recent advances in the management strategies of polyarticular course juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and identify unanswered questions and avenues for further research. Recent findings There is evidence for an early, aggressive, treat-to-target approach for polyarticular JIA. Clinical disease activity criteria have been recently defined and validated, including criteria for inactive disease and the juvenile arthritis disease activity score (JADAS). There is a need for evidence-based, defined disease targets and biomarkers for prediction of response, including targets for remission induction, and guidelines on drug withdrawal. Recent treatment consensus plans and guidelines are discussed and compared, including the 2015 NHS England clinical policy statement, the 2014 Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance (CARRA) treatment plans and the 2011 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) guidelines. Evidence for new agents such as tocilizumab, rituximab, golimumab, ustekinumab, certolizumab and tofacitinib is promising: the recent clinical trials are summarized here. Stratification of individual patient treatment remains a goal, and predictive biomarkers have been shown to predict success in the withdrawal of methotrexate therapy. Summary There are promising advances in the treatment approaches, disease activity criteria, clinical guidelines, pharmaceutical choices and individually stratified therapy choices for polyarticular JIA. PMID:26147756

  6. Efficacy of adalimumab in young children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and chronic uveitis: a case series

    OpenAIRE

    La Torre, Francesco; Cattalini, Marco; Teruzzi, Barbara; Meini, Antonella; Moramarco, Fulvio; Iannone, Florenzo

    2014-01-01

    Background Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is a relatively common chronic disease of childhood, and is associated with persistent morbidity and extra-articular complications, one of the most common being uveitis. The introduction of biologic therapies, particularly those blocking the inflammatory mediator tumor necrosis factor-α, provided a new treatment option for juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients who were refractory to standard therapy such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, corti...

  7. CLINICAL CASE OF TOCILIZUMAB THERAPY IN A PATIENT WITH SYSTEMIC JUVENILE IDIOPATHIC ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Alexeeva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a case of successful application of a monoclonal antibodies drug to interleukin 6 receptors (tocilizumab at severe systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis with the development of secondary hemophagocytic syndrome. Tocilizumab treatment secured a decrease in clinical and laboratory parameters of the disease activity, life quality improvement, systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis and hemophagocytic syndrome remission and allowed avoiding the per os prescription of glucocorticoids.

  8. CYCLOSPORIN A IN THERAPY FOR JUVENILE ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E S Fedorov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes approaches to using cyclosporin A (CsA in juvenile arthritis (JA. It shows the benefits of combination basic therapy with CsA and methotrexate included into a treatment regimen mainly for systemic JA and JA involving the eye (uveitis versus monotherapy with the above drugs. Attention is drawn to that the oral dose of glucocorticoids may be decreased when CsA is incorporated into the treatment regimen. CsA is shown to be of value as the drug of choice for the therapy of such a menacing complication of systemic JA as the macrophage activation syndrome

  9. Exercise therapy in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a Cochrane Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takken, T.; van Brussel, M.; Engelbert, R. H. H.; van der Net, J.; Kuis, W.; Helders, P. J. M.

    2008-01-01

    Exercise therapy is considered an important component of the treatment of arthritis. The efficacy of exercise therapy has been reviewed in adults with rheumatoid arthritis but not in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). To assess the effects of exercise therapy on functional ability,

  10. EFFICACY OF ETANERCEPT IN TREATMENT OF VARIOUS TYPES OF JUVENILE IDIOPATHIC ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Yu. Konopel'ko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to assess efficacy and safety of etanercept in treatment of various types of juvenile idiopathic arthritis in children under conditions of real clinical practice. Patients and methods: 52 children were included into the study, among them 16 were with systemic and 36 with juvenile idiopathic arthritis without extra-articular involvement. Results: etanercept treatment was the most efficient in patients with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis without extra-articular involvement. In 6 and 12 months of the treatment 50 and 70% improvement according to the ACRpedi criteria were established in 31/36 (86% and 28/36 (78% of the patients, respectively. In 24 months in 5 (29% of 17 children remained in the study remission stage of the diseases was confirmed. Conclusions: etanercept treatment was not associated with significant unfavorable effects, which allows to recommend this drug for treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis without extra-articular involvent and resistant to standard anti-rheumatic therapy.

  11. Imaging in juvenile idiopathic arthritis with a focus on ultrasonography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurell, Louise; Court-Payen, Michel; Boesen, Mikael

    2013-01-01

    Early therapeutic intervention and use of new highly efficacious treatments have improved the outcome in many patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), but have also led to the need for more precise methods to evaluate disease activity. In adult rheumatology, numerous studies have...... US studies have been conducted. Sonographic assessment of disease activity has, however, been proven to be more informative than clinical examination and is also readily available at points of care. This review summarises the literature on imaging in JIA, focusing on US and the important role...

  12. Experience of the Tocilizumab Application in Systemic Onset Juvenile Arthritis

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    A. V. Krasnopol’skaja

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article provides information on the unfavourable course of systemic onset juvenile arthritis, resistant to immunosuppressive therapy with methotrexate in combination with cyclosporine, and pulse therapy with methylprednisolone and methotrexate. We describe the successful use of genetically engineered biological drug tocilizumab in the patient with systemic onset juvenile arthritis. After the first injection, pain was already significantly reduced; after the second, fever was relieved and non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs were cancelled; after the third, lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly disappeared and the child’s functional activity improved significantly. After 12 months of treatment, an inactive phase of the disease was achieved, the joints’ kinetics (with the exception of the right hip were almost entirely restored and the patient’s quality of life had significantly improved. At the same time, metabolic disorders and changes in the cardiovascular system were reversed. This example demonstrated the high effectiveness of interleukin-6 antagonist tocilizumab in systemic arthritis, which allowed arresting joint affection as well as extra-articular manifestations of the disease, providing normal puberty, the restoration of growth and sexual development.

  13. Comparação entre o Disease Activity Score-28 e o Juvenile Arthritis Disease Activity Score na artrite idiopática juvenil

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    Renata Campos Capela

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introdução A avaliação de atividade da artrite reumatoide e da artrite idiopática juvenil é feita por meio de instrumentos distintos, respectivamente pelo DAS-28 e pelo JADAS. Objetivo Comparar o DAS-28 e o JADAS com a pontuação de 71, 27 e 10 articulações, na artrite idiopática juvenil. Método Foram avaliadas 178 visitas em oito pacientes com artrite idiopática juvenil, participantes de um ensaio clínico controlado de fase III, testando eficácia e segurança do abatacepte. Pontuaram-se as articulações ativas e limitadas, a avaliação global pelo médico e pelos pais em escala analógica visual de 0-10 cm e a velocidade de hemossedimentação convertida em escala de 0-10, em todas as visitas. A comparação entre os índices de atividade entre diferentes observações foi por Anova ou modelo ajustado Gama. As observações pareadas entre o DAS-28 e o JADAS 71, 27 e 10, respectivamente, foram analisadas por meio de regressão linear. Resultados Houve diferença significativa entre as medidas individuais, exceto a VHS, nos primeiros quatro meses de tratamento com biológico, quando cinco entre os oito pacientes atingiram a resposta ACR-Pedi 30, com melhora. Os índices DAS-28, JADAS 71, 27 e 10 também apresentaram diferença relevante durante o período de observação. O ajustamento por meio de regressão linear entre o DAS-28 e o JADAS resultou em fórmulas matemáticas para conversão: [DAS-28 = 0,0709 (JADAS 71 + 1,267] (R2 = 0,49; [DAS-28 = 0,084 (JADAS 27 + 1,7404] (R2 = 0,47 e [DAS-28 = 0,1129 (JADAS-10 + 1,5748] (R2 = 0,50. Conclusão A conversão da pontuação do DAS-28 e do JADAS 71, 27 e 10 por esse modelo matemático permitiria a aplicação equivalente de ambos em adolescentes com artrite.

  14. MR imaging of arthropathies of juvenile arthritis and hemophilia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yulish, B.S.; Lieberman, J.; Mulopoulos, G.P.; Strandjord, S.; Newman, A.; Goodfellow, D.; Bryan, P.J.; Modic, M.T.

    1986-01-01

    The arthropathies of juvenile arthritis and hemophilia have in common abnormal hyperplastic synovium leading to marginal bone erosion, articular cartilage destruction, subchondral bone exposure, and dissolution and ultimately collapse of the affected joint. The authors examined children and young adults with juvenile arthritis and hemophilia by MR imaging and found that they could identify hyperplastic synovium, articular cartilage lesions, bone erosions, and joint effusions. This has therapeutic implications since identification of progressive synovial hyperplasia and/or early cartilage or marginal bone erosion may lead to earlier synovectomy in patients with hemophilia or switch to second line drugs in patients with juvenile arthritis, in an attempt to prevent progressive joint destruction

  15. The pattern of juvenile idiopathic arthritis; a retrospective Egyptian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ehab

    subtype specially at rural areas which differed from Western and Gulf countries pattern. ... version 18) and the following statistical measures ..... the results of Abdwani et al27 at 2015 (an Omani ... Ravelli A, Martini A. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

  16. IL-1 inhibition in systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis

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    Gabriella Giancane

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA is the form of childhood arthritis whose treatment is most challenging. The demonstration of the prominent involvement of interleukin (IL-1 in disease pathogenesis has provided the rationale for the treatment with biologic medications that antagonize this cytokine. The three IL-1 blockers that have been tested so far (anakinra, canakinumab and rilonacept have all been proven effective and safe, although only canakinumab is currently approved for use in sJIA. The studies on IL-1 inhibition in sJIA published in the past few years suggest that children with fewer affected joints, higher neutrophil count, younger age at disease onset, shorter disease duration, or, possibly, higher ferritin level may respond better to anti-IL-1 treatment. In addition, it has been postulated that use of IL-1 blockade as first-line therapy may take advantage of a window of opportunity, in which disease pathophysiology can be altered to prevent the occurrence of chronic arthritis. In this review, we analyze the published literature on IL-1 inhibitors in sJIA and discuss the rationale underlying the use of these medications, the results of therapeutic studies, and the controversial issues.

  17. Consenso em reumatologia pediátrica: parte I - definição dos critérios de doença inativa e remissão em artrite idiopática juvenil/artrite reumatóide juvenil Consensus in pediatric rheumatology: part I - criteria definition of inactive disease and remission in juvenile idiopathic arthritis / juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Machado

    2005-02-01

    provided the basis for the development of a consensus conference using the nominal group technique (NGT to reach consensus on questions not solvable by the questionnaire format. One hundred and thirty PR from 34 countries responded the Delphi questionnaires and 20 PR from 9 countries attended a 2-day consensus conference. RESULTS: Consensus results were: criteria for inactive disease should include: 1 no active arthritis; 2 no fever, rash, serositis, splenomegaly, or generalised lymphadenopathy attributable to JIA/JRA; 3 no active uveitis; 4 normal ESR or CRP (if both are tested, both must be normal; 5 a physician's global assessment of disease activity rated at the best score possible and indicating no disease activity. CONCLUSIONS: According to consensus vote, 6 continuous months of inactive disease are necessary before classifying a patient as in remission on medication; 12 months off medication while maintaining inactive disease are necessary to classify a patient as in remission off medication. The criteria for in remission off medications should predict with 95% accuracy that a patient has a 20% probability of disease relapse within the next 5 years.

  18. Long term outcomes following achievement of clinically inactive disease in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: the importance of definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoop-Worrall, Stephanie Jw; Verstappen, Suzanne Mm; McDonagh, Janet E; Baildam, Eileen; Chieng, Alice; Davidson, Joyce; Foster, Helen; Ioannou, Yiannis; McErlane, Flora; Wedderburn, Lucy R; Thomson, W; Hyrich, Kimme L

    2018-04-12

    Potential targets for treat-to-target strategies in JIA are minimal disease activity (MDA) and clinically inactive disease (CID). Short and long-term outcomes following achievement of MDA and CID on the cJADAS10 and CID on Wallace's preliminary criteria were compared. Children recruited to the Childhood Arthritis Prospective Study, a UK multicentre inception cohort, were selected if recruited prior to January 2011 and diagnosed with oligoarthritis or rheumatoid factor negative or positive polyarthritis. At one year following diagnosis, children were assessed for MDA on the cJADAS10 and CID on both Wallace's preliminary criteria and the cJADAS10. Associations were tested between these disease states and i) functional ability, ii) absence of limited joints, iii) psychosocial health and v) pain at one year and annually to five years. Of 832 children, 70% were female and the majority had oligoarthritis (68%). At one year, 21% had achieved CID according to both definitions, 7% on Wallace's preliminary criteria only, 16% on cJADAS10 only and 56% on neither. Only 10% of children in the entire cohort achieved MDA without also having CID. Achieving either early CID state was associated with greater absence of limited joints. However, only CID on cJADAS10 was associated with improved functional ability and psychosocial health. Achieving CID was superior to MDA in terms of short and long-term pain and the absence of limited joints. CID on the cJADAS10 may be a preferable treatment target to CID on Wallace's preliminary criteria in terms of both feasibility of application and long-term outcomes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Experience with conservative rehabilitation in patients with juvenile chronic arthritis

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    T. A. Shelepina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to estimate a need for conservative rehabilitation treatment in patients with juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA.Material and methods. Data on the principles and procedures of rehabilitation treatment were analyzed in patients with JCA on the basis of 25- year experience. The need for these packages of measures in 1999, 2008, and 2014 was compared. Standard procedures for joints at different sites were described. According to the degree of joint functions, there were rehabilitation treatment packages: corrective, mobilization, and general health-improving.Results and discussion. All patients with juvenile arthritis need rehabilitation (physical, psychological, and social. Comparison of the total number of patients who had received rehabilitation treatment in 1999, 2008, and 2014 showed a small trend towards its reduction. This is due to the smaller number of patients with dysfunctions and to the larger number of those without movement disorders who had received adequate treatment in early periods of the disease. The high percentage of patients having limited joint functions needs a mobilization package. Analysis of the data available in the literature and the authors' experience may lead to the conclusion that all patients with JCA need exercise therapy. The latter is a major procedure for physical rehabilitation and should be included in the standards for adjuvant treatment during basic medical therapy. Emphasis is laid on the importance of the early initiation of treatment to prevent incapacitating deformity at early stages of the disease.

  20. Variants in TNFAIP3, STAT4 and c12orf30 loci associated with multiple auto-immune diseases are also associated with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prahalad, Sampath; Hansen, Sterling; Whiting, April; Guthery, Stephen L.; Clifford, Bronte; McNally, Bernadette; Zeft, Andrew S.; Bohnsack, John F.; Jorde, Lynn B.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Subtypes of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) share phenotypic features with other autoimmune disorders. We investigated several genetic variants associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other autoimmune disorders for association with JIA, to test the hypothesis that clinically distinct phenotypes share common genetic susceptibility factors. Methods Cases were 445 children with JIA, and controls were 643 healthy adults. Eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 7 loci [TNFAIP3 (rs10499194 and rs6920220), RSBN1 (rs6679677), C12ORF30 (rs17696736), TRAF1 (rs3761847), IL2RA (rs2104286), PTPN2 (rs2542151), and STAT4 (rs7574865)] were genotyped by the TaqMan assay. Alleles and genotypes were analyzed for association with JIA and JIA subtypes. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated. Results The strongest associations were observed for TNFAIP3 variants rs10499194 (OR: 0.74 (0.61-0.91); p <0.004), and TNFAIP3 rs6920220 (OR: 1.3 (1.05-1.61); p <0.02). We also observed associations between JIA and STAT4 (OR: 1.24 (1.02-1.51); p <0.03) and C12ORF30 (OR: 1.2 (1.01-1.43); p <0.04) variants. The PTPN2 variant rs2542151 deviated from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and was excluded from analyses. Variants in IL2RA, TRAF1, and RSBN1 were not associated with JIA. After stratification by JIA subtype, TNFAIP3 and C12ORF30 variants were associated with oligoarticular JIA, while the STAT4 variant was associated primarily with polyarticular JIA. Conclusions We have demonstrated associations between JIA and variants in TNFAIP3, STAT4 and C12ORF30 regions that have previously shown associations with other autoimmune diseases, including RA and systemic lupus erythematosus. Our results suggest that clinically distinct autoimmune phenotypes share common genetic susceptibility factors. PMID:19565500

  1. IL-6 blockade in systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis - achievement of inactive disease and remission (data from the German AID-registry).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielak, M; Husmann, E; Weyandt, N; Haas, J-P; Hügle, B; Horneff, G; Neudorf, U; Lutz, T; Lilienthal, E; Kallinich, T; Tenbrock, K; Berendes, R; Niehues, T; Wittkowski, H; Weißbarth-Riedel, E; Heubner, G; Oommen, P; Klotsche, J; Foell, Dirk; Lainka, E

    2018-04-05

    Systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA) is a complex disease with an autoinflammatory component of unknown etiology related to the innate immune system. A major role in the pathogenesis has been ascribed to proinflammatory cytokines like interleukin-6 (IL-6), and effective drugs inhibiting their signaling are being developed. This study evaluates sJIA patients treated with the IL-6 inhibitor tocilizumab (TCZ) concerning clinical response rate, disease course and adverse effects in a real-life clinical setting. In 2009 a clinical and research consortium was established, including an online registry for autoinflammatory diseases (AID) ( https://aid-register.de ). Data for this retrospective TCZ study were documented by 13 centers. From 7/2009 to 4/2014, 200 patients with sJIA were recorded in the AID-registry. Out of these, 46 (19 m, 27 f, age 1-18 years) received therapy with TCZ. Long term treatment (median 23 months) has been documented in 24/46 patients who were evaluated according to Wallace criteria (active disease 6/24, inactive disease 5/24, remission 13/24 cases). Under observation co-medication were used in 40/46 cases. Adverse events were reported in 11/46 patients. The clinical response rate (no clinical manifestation, no increased inflammation parameters) within the first 12 weeks of treatment was calculated to be 35%. Out of 200 sJIA children reported in the German AID-registry, 46 were treated with TCZ, showing a clinical response rate of 35% during the first 12 weeks, and inactive disease and/or remission under medication in 75% after one year. Adverse events were seen in 24% and severe adverse events in 4%. The AID-Registry is funded by the BMBF (01GM08104, 01GM1112D, 01GM1512D).

  2. Safety and efficacy of meningococcal c vaccination in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zonneveld-Huijssoon, Evelien; Ronaghy, Arash; van Rossum, Marion A. J.; Rijkers, Ger T.; van der Klis, Fiona R. M.; Sanders, Elisabeth A. M.; Vermeer-de Bondt, Patricia E.; Hoes, Arno W.; van der Net, Jan Jaap; Engels, Carla; Kuis, Wietse; Prakken, Berent J.; van Tol, Maarten J. D.; Wulffraat, Nico M.

    2007-01-01

    To determine whether vaccinations aggravate the course of autoimmune diseases such as juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and whether the immune response to vaccinations may be hampered by immunosuppressive therapy for the underlying disease. In this multicenter cohort study, 234 patients with JIA

  3. Safety of measles, mumps and rubella vaccination in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijstek, Marloes W; Pileggi, Gecilmara C S; Zonneveld-Huijssoon, Evelien; Armbrust, Wineke; Hoppenreijs, Esther P A H; Uiterwaal, Cuno S P M; Kuis, Wietse; Wulffraat, Nico M

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effect of measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccination on disease activity in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Methods: A retrospective observational multicentre cohort study was performed in 314 patients with JIA, born between 1989 and 1996. Disease

  4. Uveíte na artrite idiopática juvenil Uveitis in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana M. Roberto

    2002-02-01

    üente na população de pacientes com AIJ associada com uveíte (60% do que naqueles sem uveíte (12% (pObjective: to evaluate the frequency of chronic anterior uveitis in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and its association with the presence of antinuclear antibodies. Patients and methods: we retrospectively studied 72 patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. All of them were submitted to slit-lamp examination of the anterior chamber at diagnosis. Both antinuclear antibodies and rheumatoid factor were determined. Patients with positive results for antinuclear antibodies were evaluated every three months and those with negative results were assessed every six months.Results: forty patients were male (55.5% and 36 were Caucasoid (50%. The mean age at the onset of juvenile idiopathic arthritis was 6.4 years (range = 1 to 14 years and the mean age at the beginning of the study was 10.4 years (1 to 19 years. According to the type of disease at onset, 32 were pauciarticular (44.4% (17 boys and 15 girls, 30 were polyarticular (41.6% (17 boys and 13 girls and 10 were systemic (14% (6 boys and 4 girls. We observed chronic anterior uveitis in five patients (6.5% (mean age = 11.4 years. Among them, four (80% had pauciarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis at disease onset (three girls with type I juvenile idiopathic arthritis and positive antinuclear antibodies and one boy with type I juvenile idiopathic arthritis and negative antinuclear antibodies and one girl with polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (negative antinuclear antibodies and rheumatoid factor. In this group, the mean age at the onset of juvenile idiopathic arthritis was 5.1 years and the mean age of uveitis onset was 9 years. Antinuclear antibodies were positive in 3/5 patients (60% with uveitis. Antinuclear antibodies were positive in 12% of the patients without uveitis (n = 67. Among the patients with uveitis, three had only one flare and the other two had four flares with cataract. The

  5. Update on the medical treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashkes, Philip J; Laxer, Ronald M

    2006-12-01

    Many exciting developments in the treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) have emerged recently, including new tools to assess the results of clinical trials (eg, the definition of remission and a radiologic scoring tool). New controlled studies examined the equivalence of meloxicam to naproxen, the efficacy of leflunomide but the superiority of methotrexate, and the use of infliximab in polyarthritis JIA. Initial studies have shown the potential of anti-interleukin (IL)-1 and anti-IL-6 receptor antibody therapy for systemic JIA. Corticosteroid-sparing medications including the use of "biologic modifiers" for JIA-associated uveitis have been described. Evidence-based guidelines for the main subtypes of JIA have been published. However, good evidence on the treatment of several disease subtypes is still lacking. Studies of new medications and the use of combination therapy, including aggressive induction therapy early in the disease course, are necessary to continue improving the outcome of JIA patients.

  6. Clinical Case of Tocilizumab Use in a Patient with Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. M. Spivakovskiy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a case of using genetically engineered biopharmaceutical tocilizumab in a child with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis. On the initial stage, the treatment was characterized by resistance to high doses of glucocorticoids and cytostatic drugs. Successful termination of visceral and articular manifestations of systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis and normalization of laboratory indicators of disease activity in the setting of use of interleukin 6 receptor blocker were described. We observed stable improvement of the child’s condition during a year-long follow-up in the setting of the selected anti-inflammatory therapy pattern. 

  7. Judicious use of biologicals in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yongdong; Wallace, Carol

    2014-11-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a chronic inflammatory disorder that may cause joint destruction. Biological treatments targeting specific cytokines and cell interactions have transformed the outcomes of JIA. This review focuses on the selection of patients for and the timing and selection of biological treatment in JIA. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors remain the first choice for polyarticular JIA, followed by abatacept and tocilizumab. Monoclonal-antibody TNF inhibitors and abatacept are usually chosen for methotrexate-resistant uveitis. Recent clinical trials of canakinumab, rilonacept, and tocilizumab have obtained great improvement in both systemic and arthritic features in chronic systemic JIA patients. Current guidelines support the early use of a short-acting IL-1 antagonist for macrophage activation syndrome, a life-threatening complication. TREAT and ACUTE studies suggest that a therapeutic window of opportunity during early disease may exist in JIA. Early initiation of biological therapy may be associated with slower progression of joint damage and longer remission.

  8. MRI findings of juvenile psoriatic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Edward Y.; Kleinman, Paul K.; Sundel, Robert P.; Kim, Susan; Zurakowski, David

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of juvenile psoriatic arthritis (JpsA) in children in order to facilitate early diagnosis and proper management. Two pediatric radiologists retrospectively reviewed in consensus a total of 37 abnormal MRI examinations from 31 pediatric patients (nine boys, 22 girls; age range 1-17 years; mean age 9.4 years) who had a definite diagnosis of JpsA and underwent MRI. Each MRI was evaluated for synovium abnormality (thickening and enhancement), joint effusion (small, moderate, and large), bone marrow abnormality (edema, enhancement, and location of abnormality), soft tissue abnormality (edema, enhancement, atrophy, and fatty infiltration), tendon abnormality (thickening, edema, tendon sheath fluid, and enhancement), and articular abnormality (joint space narrowing and erosion). The distribution of abnormal MRI findings among the six categories for the 37 MRI examinations was evaluated. The number of abnormal MRI findings for each MRI examination was assessed. Age at MRI examination and all six categories of abnormal MRI findings according to gender were evaluated. There were a total 96 abnormal MRI findings noted on 37 abnormal MRI examinations from 31 pediatric patients. The 37 abnormal MRI examinations included MRI of the hand (n=8), knee (n = 8), ankle (n = 5), pelvis (n = 5), temporomandibular joint (n = 4), wrist (n = 3), foot (n = 2), elbow (n = 1), and shoulder (n = 1). Twenty-eight diffuse synovial thickening and/or enhancement were the most common MRI abnormality (29.2%). Joint effusion comprised 22 abnormal MRI findings (22.9%). There were 16 abnormal MRI bone marrow edema and/or enhancement findings (16.7%), and in seven (7.3%) the edema involved non-articular sites. Soft tissue abnormality manifested as edema and/or enhancement constituted 14 abnormal MRI findings (14.5%). There were ten MRI abnormalities (10.4%) involving tendons. Articular abnormality seen as joint space

  9. MRI findings of juvenile psoriatic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Edward Y.; Kleinman, Paul K. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Children' s Hospital Boston, MA (United States); Sundel, Robert P.; Kim, Susan [Harvard Medical School, Rheumatology Program, Division of Immunology and the Department of Pediatrics, Boston, MA (United States); Children' s Hospital Boston, MA (United States); Zurakowski, David [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Boston, MA (United States); Children' s Hospital Boston, MA (United States)

    2008-11-15

    The aim of this study was to describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of juvenile psoriatic arthritis (JpsA) in children in order to facilitate early diagnosis and proper management. Two pediatric radiologists retrospectively reviewed in consensus a total of 37 abnormal MRI examinations from 31 pediatric patients (nine boys, 22 girls; age range 1-17 years; mean age 9.4 years) who had a definite diagnosis of JpsA and underwent MRI. Each MRI was evaluated for synovium abnormality (thickening and enhancement), joint effusion (small, moderate, and large), bone marrow abnormality (edema, enhancement, and location of abnormality), soft tissue abnormality (edema, enhancement, atrophy, and fatty infiltration), tendon abnormality (thickening, edema, tendon sheath fluid, and enhancement), and articular abnormality (joint space narrowing and erosion). The distribution of abnormal MRI findings among the six categories for the 37 MRI examinations was evaluated. The number of abnormal MRI findings for each MRI examination was assessed. Age at MRI examination and all six categories of abnormal MRI findings according to gender were evaluated. There were a total 96 abnormal MRI findings noted on 37 abnormal MRI examinations from 31 pediatric patients. The 37 abnormal MRI examinations included MRI of the hand (n=8), knee (n = 8), ankle (n = 5), pelvis (n = 5), temporomandibular joint (n = 4), wrist (n = 3), foot (n = 2), elbow (n = 1), and shoulder (n = 1). Twenty-eight diffuse synovial thickening and/or enhancement were the most common MRI abnormality (29.2%). Joint effusion comprised 22 abnormal MRI findings (22.9%). There were 16 abnormal MRI bone marrow edema and/or enhancement findings (16.7%), and in seven (7.3%) the edema involved non-articular sites. Soft tissue abnormality manifested as edema and/or enhancement constituted 14 abnormal MRI findings (14.5%). There were ten MRI abnormalities (10.4%) involving tendons. Articular abnormality seen as joint space

  10. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis outcome and prognosis according to catamnesis evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O V Semenova

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study outcome and prognosis in pts with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA. Material and methods. 239 JIA pts with disease duration of 10 years and more were analyzed. 80 children and adolescents before 18 years old (66 girls and 14 boys were included in group 1. Arthritis clinical and laboratory activity, radiological stage and functional status according to Steinbroker and CHAQ questionnaire were assessed. 159 grown up pts (109 female and 50 male suffering from JIA from childhood were included in group 2. They were examined using Stanford Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ and a specially developed social status questionnaire. Results. Half pts of group 1 had recurrence of the disease during examination but activity in most cases did not exceed stage I or 2 (54% and 31% respectively. Joint destructive changes were revealed in 50% of pts. 80% of pts had radiological signs of secondary osteoarthritis. Amyloidosis was revealed in 2 from 27 pts with systemic type of JIA. 68% of pts had 1 or 2 functional class. 1/3 of pts did not have functional limitations (CHAQ=0. 13% of pts had maximal disability with CHAQ ranging from 2,1 to 3,0 (pts with polyarticular and systemic types of JIA. Most grown up pts (59% considered their health as good. Substantial part of them worked or learned. 10 pts did not worked because of the disease (1,5%. 61% of pts did not have functional limitations (HAQ=0. 32% of pts were disabled. Most of them had 3 or 2 disability degree and had possibility to work. Conclusion. Substantial part of pts with longstanding JIA have stabilization of the disease or remission. Recurrent course of the disease was characterized by decrease of activity. Most children and grown ups with longstanding disease have relatively benign functional outcome. Pts with polyarticular and systemic types of JIA require especial attention because they have maximal risk of joint destruction with severe disability.

  11. Ultrasonography and color Doppler in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurell, Louise; Court-Payen, Michel; Nielsen, Susan

    2012-01-01

    The wrist region is one of the most complex joints of the human body. It is prone to deformity and functional impairment in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), and is difficult to examine clinically. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of ultrasonography (US) with Doppler in diagnosis...

  12. Body composition in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: effect ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: the aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between macronutrient intake, body composition (lean body mass and fat mass) and bone mineral content in Moroccan children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Methods: a cross-sectional study, conducted between May 2010 and June 2011, covering ...

  13. The adolescent experience in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: A narrative approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fuchs, C.E.

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation focused on the self-experience of adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) or chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). Although the etiology and nosology of JIA and CFS are fundamentally different, some commonalities in the emotional experience of adolescents dealing with these

  14. Handwriting difficulties in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haberfehlner, Helga; Visser, Bart; Daffertshofer, Andreas; van Rossum, Marion Aj; Roorda, Leo D.; van der Leeden, Marike; Dekker, Joost; Hoeksma, Agnes F.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to describe handwriting difficulties of primary school children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), and to investigate possible correlations with hand function and writing performance. In a cross-sectional approach, 15 children with JIA and reported handwriting

  15. Challenges in the management of juvenile idiopathic arthritis with etanercept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare E Pain

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Clare E Pain, Liza J McCannAlder Hey Children’s NHS Foundation Trust, Eaton Road, Liverpool, UKAbstract: Biologic agents have been designed with the help of immunological studies to target particular areas of the immune system which are thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of disease. Etanercept is a soluble anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α agent licensed for the treatment of active poly-articular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA in children aged 4 to 17 years who have failed to respond to methotrexate alone, or who have been intolerant of methotrexate. The safety and efficacy of etanercept in this patient group has been established by one randomized controlled trial and several longitudinal studies. This, together with the fact that until recently etanercept was the only anti-TNF licensed in JIA, has made it the most common first choice biologic for many clinicians. However, there are still many unanswered questions about etanercept, including its efficacy and safety in different subtypes of JIA, in children under 4 years of age and in those with uveitis. There are still concerns about the long term safety of TNF antagonists in the pediatric age group and unanswered questions about increased risks of malignancy and infection. Although adult studies are useful to improve understanding of these risks, they are not a substitute for good quality pediatric research and follow-up studies. Adult trials often include greater numbers of patients. However, they evaluate a different population and drug behavior may vary in children due to differences in metabolism, growth and impact on a developing immune system. In addition, rheumatoid arthritis is a different disease than JIA. Clinicians need to carefully weigh up the risk benefit ratio of anti-TNF use in children with JIA and push for robust clinical trials to address the questions that remain unanswered. This article summarizes the evidence available for use of etanercept in children

  16. US Evaluation of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis and Osteoarticular Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Jie C; Lee, Kenneth S; Thapa, Mahesh M; Rosas, Humberto G

    2017-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and osteoarticular infection can cause nonspecific articular and periarticular complaints in children. Although contrast material-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging is the reference standard imaging modality, musculoskeletal ultrasonography (US) is emerging as an important adjunct imaging modality that can provide valuable information relatively quickly without use of radiation or the need for sedation. However, diagnostic accuracy requires a systemic approach, familiarity with various US techniques, and an understanding of maturation-related changes. Specifically, the use of dynamic, Doppler, and/or multifocal US assessments can help confirm sites of disease, monitor therapy response, and guide interventions. In patients with JIA, ongoing synovial inflammation can lead to articular and periarticular changes, including synovitis, tenosynovitis, cartilage damage, bone changes, and enthesopathy. Although these findings can manifest in adult patients with rheumatoid arthritis, important differences and pitfalls exist because of the unique changes associated with an immature and maturing skeleton. In patients who are clinically suspected of having osteoarticular infection, the inability of US to evaluate the bone marrow decreases its sensitivity. Therefore, the US findings should be interpreted with caution because juxtacortical inflammation is suggestive, but neither sensitive nor specific, for underlying osteomyelitis. Similarly, the absence of a joint effusion makes septic arthritis extremely unlikely but not impossible. US findings of JIA and osteoarticular infection often overlap. Although certain clinical scenarios, laboratory findings, and imaging appearances can favor one diagnosis over the other, fluid analysis may still be required for definitive diagnosis and optimal treatment. US is the preferred modality for fluid aspiration and administering intra-articular corticosteroid therapy. © RSNA, 2017.

  17. Risk of Serious Infection in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Patients Associated With Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitors and Disease Activity in the German Biologics in Pediatric Rheumatology Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Ingrid; Horneff, Gerd

    2017-04-01

    To examine the effects of tumor necrosis factor inhibitors on the risk for serious infections and other influencing factors in a registry. Patients exposed for the first time to etanercept, adalimumab, or methotrexate and serious infections were identified in the German Biologic Registry for Pediatric Rheumatology (BIKER) registry. Serious infection rates per 1,000 observation-years and relative risks were calculated. Cox regression identified risk factors and provided hazard ratios (HRs) for occurrence of infections. A total of 3,350 patients with 5,919 observation-years fulfilled the inclusion criteria for the study. The first biologic agents were etanercept (1,720 cases) and adalimumab (177 cases). A total of 1,453 patients were treated with methotrexate and no biologic agent. In total, 28 serious infections were reported in 26 patients (4.7 per 1,000 patient-years), 5 with methotrexate (1.6 per 1,000 patient-years), 21 with etanercept (8.1 per 1,000 patient-years), and 2 with adalimumab (9.7 per 1,000 patient-years). Significant univariate risk factors for infection were therapy with biologic agents, disease duration before therapy start, corticosteroid medication, nonbiologic premedications, higher clinical Juvenile Arthritis Disease Activity Score including maximal 10 joints (cJADAS10) at therapy start, and higher mean cJADAS10 during therapy. In multivariate Cox regression, only biologic therapy and cJADAS10 at therapy start remained significant. Risk for infection was increased by etanercept (univariate HR 6.0 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 2.0-17.5]) or adalimumab (HR 7.3 [95% CI 1.3-40.0]) compared to methotrexate as well as by an elevated cJADAS10 at therapy start (HR 1.1 [95% CI 1.0-1.2] per unit increase). The total rate of serious infections reported in the BIKER registry seems low. Treatment with etanercept or adalimumab increases the risk for serious infection slightly, compared to methotrexate. Disease activity expressed by cJADAS10 appears to

  18. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the wrist in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nusman, Charlotte M. [Emma Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lavini, Cristina; Hemke, Robert; Caan, Matthan W.A.; Maas, Mario [Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Schonenberg-Meinema, Dieneke; Berg, J.M. van den; Kuijpers, Taco W. [Emma Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dolman, Koert M. [Sint Lucas Andreas Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Reade Institute location Jan van Breemen, Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rossum, Marion A.J. van [Reade Institute location Jan van Breemen, Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Emma Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2017-02-15

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI provides information on the heterogeneity of the synovium, the primary target of disease in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). To evaluate the feasibility of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in the wrist of children with JIA using conventional descriptive measures and time-intensity-curve shape analysis. To explore the association between enhancement characteristics and clinical disease status. Thirty-two children with JIA and wrist involvement underwent dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI with movement-registration and were classified using validated criteria as clinically active (n = 27) or inactive (n = 5). Outcome measures included descriptive parameters and the classification into time-intensity-curve shapes, which represent the patterns of signal intensity change over time. Differences in dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI outcome measures between clinically active and clinically inactive disease were analyzed and correlation with the Juvenile Arthritis Disease Activity Score was determined. Comprehensive evaluation of disease status was technically feasible and the quality of the dynamic dataset was improved by movement registration. The conventional descriptive measure maximum enhancement differed significantly between clinically active and inactive disease (P = 0.019), whereas time-intensity-curve shape analysis showed no differences. Juvenile Arthritis Disease Activity Score correlated moderately with enhancing volume (P = 0.484). Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI is a promising biomarker for evaluating disease status in children with JIA and wrist involvement. Conventional descriptive dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI measures are better associated with clinically active disease than time-intensity-curve shape analysis. (orig.)

  19. Nocardia brasiliensis infection mimicking juvenile idiopathic arthritis in a 4-year-old girl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapur, Nitin; Adib, Navid; Grimwood, Keith

    2013-11-01

    Nocardia are ubiquitous environmental saprophytes that cause pneumonia and disseminated disease in immunocompromised patients. They can also cause localized cutaneous and soft tissue infections in healthy people after direct percutaneous inoculation. Nocardia arthritis is rare in both forms of the disease. Here we present the first published case of a child with septic arthritis caused by N brasiliensis. Importantly, this otherwise well 4-year-old girl had no known history of trauma but presented with transient cutaneous lesions and a 6-week history of arthritis involving the right fourth digit proximal interphalangeal joint without accompanying fever or raised systemic inflammatory markers. She received a diagnosis of juvenile idiopathic arthritis and underwent antiinflammatory and immunosuppressant therapy. After 2 months she developed frank septic arthritis, which necessitated a surgical joint washout, from which an intraoperative swab grew N brasiliensis. The patient received 6 months of high-dose trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and remains well more than 4 years after treatment. This unusual case highlights the importance of considering an indolent infection from slow-growing organisms, including Nocardia, when diagnosing the oligoarthritis subtype of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. This is especially relevant when a single joint is involved and response to antiinflammatory therapy is suboptimal because antiinflammatory agents may mask evolving signs of infection.

  20. Bayesian comparative effectiveness study of four consensus treatment plans for initial management of systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis: FiRst-Line Options for Systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis Treatment (FROST).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigrovic, Peter A; Beukelman, Timothy; Tomlinson, George; Feldman, Brian M; Schanberg, Laura E; Kimura, Yukiko

    2018-03-01

    Systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis is a rare febrile arthritis of childhood characterized by a potentially severe course, including prolonged glucocorticoid exposure, growth failure, destructive arthritis, and life-threatening macrophage activation syndrome. Early cytokine-blocking biologic therapy may improve long-term outcomes, although some systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients respond well to non-biologic treatment, leaving optimal management undefined. Consequently, treatment of new-onset systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis by expert clinicians varies widely. To describe a pragmatic, observational comparative effectiveness study that takes advantage of diversity in the management of a rare disease: FiRst-Line Options for Systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis Treatment (FROST), comparing non-biologic and biologic consensus treatment plans for new-onset systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis within the 60-center Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance Registry (CARRA). FiRst-Line Options for Systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis Treatment (FROST) is a multicenter, prospective, non-randomized study that compares four Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance (CARRA) consensus treatment plans for new-onset systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis: (1) glucocorticoids alone, (2) methotrexate, (3) interleukin-1 blockade, and (4) interleukin-6 blockade. Patients consenting to participation in the Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance (CARRA) Registry are started on one of four Consensus Treatment Plans at the discretion of the treating physician. The outcome of primary interest is clinically inactive disease off glucocorticoids at 9 months, comparing non-biologic (Consensus Treatment Plans 1 + 2) versus biologic (Consensus Treatment Plans 3 + 4) strategies. Bayesian analytic methods will be employed to evaluate response rates, using propensity scoring to balance treatment groups for potential

  1. Ongoing disease activity and changing categories in a long-term nordic cohort study of juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordal, Ellen; Zak, Marek; Aalto, Kristiina

    2011-01-01

    ), including biologic medications, were used in 58.0% of the children during the observation period. Ongoing disease activity was mostly mild, but 22.9% developed some JIA-related damage. At the last follow-up, remission off medication was found in 42.4% of the children, 8.9% were in remission on medication...... results underline the need to identify early predictors of outcome, to further improve therapy and to continue long-term follow-up of children with JIA....

  2. MRI and ultrasound in children with juvenile chronic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamer, S.; Sebag, G.H.

    2000-01-01

    In this era of advancing imaging technology, a knowledge of the relative values of available imaging techniques is necessary to optimize the management of children with juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA). After clinical examination, plain films remain the initial investigation. The need for radiation protection must be a priority in children with JCA. Conventional radiographs allow grouping of the various arthritides (on the base of the distribution and pattern of joint space changes) and staging of disease progression. Ultrasound (US) is very sensitive in the detection of joint effusions, especially in the hip, and guides fluid aspiration. US and Doppler can be used for the evaluation of synovial hypertrophy and activity. Arthrography and to a certain extent nuclear studies have been replaced by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI can demonstrate articular cartilage, joint effusion, synovial hypertrophy, cortical and medullary bone, cartilage and bone perfusion, and fibrocartilaginous structures (menisci and ligaments). Contrast enhanced MRI is the most sensitive modality to determine whether an arthritic condition is present. However, it does not assist in establishing a specific diagnosis. MRI determines accurately the activity and the extent of the disease and is particularly useful in the early detection of articular damage. Finally, MRI is of major importance in the evaluation of response to local therapy (especially steroids) and the detection of complications

  3. Anti-chromatin antibodies in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Gerloni

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the prevalence and clinical significance of anti-chromatin antibodies (Abs in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA. Methods: IgG anti-chromatin Abs were detected by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, in sera of 94 children with JRA (10 children with systemic, 38 with polyarticular and 46 with oligoarticular disease onset. As control group, 33 age- and-sex-matched healthy children (HC were also examined. Results: Abs to chromatin were detected in 24/94 (25,5% of children suffering from JRA. Particularly, the higher prevalence of anti-chromatin Abs has been found in children with oligoarticular (30,4% and polyarticular (23,7% onset JRA. In these groups Abs titers were significantly higher compared to systemic JRA and HC (p=0.003. Anti-chromatin Abs were observed more frequently in patients with oligoarticular disease and chronic uveitis (21,7%. Furthermore, higher levels of anti-chromatin Abs has been found in all the patients treated with anti-TNFα therapy (p<0.0001. Conclusions: our results confirm previous data about the prevalence of anti-chromatin Abs in JRA. These Abs were significantly higher in the group of patients with oligoarticular onset with past or present hystory of ocular involvement and in the group with polyarticular JRA treated with biologic therapy. A long-term follow-up study could be useful to evaluate the potential utility of these autoantibodies.

  4. Treatment of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis-Associated Uveitis

    OpenAIRE

    Oray, Merih; Tu?al-Tutkun, ?lknur

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric uveitis may be a serious health problem because of the lifetime burden of vision loss due to severe complications if the problem is not adequately treated. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated uveitis is characterized by insidious onset and potentially blinding chronic anterior uveitis. Periodic ophthalmologic screening is of utmost importance for early diagnosis of uveitis. Early diagnosis and proper immunomodulatory treatment are essential for good visual progno...

  5. Abnormal muscle MRI in a patient with systemic juvenile arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, M.L.; Levinson, L.; Pachman, L.M.; Poznanski, A.

    1995-01-01

    Although myositis has been described in children with systemic-onset juvenile arthritis (JA), its documentation by MRI has not been reported. We describe a 13-year-old boy with systemic-onset JA, severe myalgia, and elevated muscle enzymes, but normal muscle strength, who had an MRI consistent with myositis. Magnetic resonance imaging can identify the specific location of myositis, allowing more precise definition of a potential complication of systemic JA. (orig.)

  6. Abnormal muscle MRI in a patient with systemic juvenile arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, M.L. [Dept. of Pediatrics, Northwestern Univ. Medical School, Chicago, IL (United States); Levinson, L. [Dept. of Pediatrics, Northwestern Univ. Medical School, Chicago, IL (United States); Pachman, L.M. [Dept. of Pediatrics, Northwestern Univ. Medical School, Chicago, IL (United States); Poznanski, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Northwestern Univ. Medical School, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Although myositis has been described in children with systemic-onset juvenile arthritis (JA), its documentation by MRI has not been reported. We describe a 13-year-old boy with systemic-onset JA, severe myalgia, and elevated muscle enzymes, but normal muscle strength, who had an MRI consistent with myositis. Magnetic resonance imaging can identify the specific location of myositis, allowing more precise definition of a potential complication of systemic JA. (orig.)

  7. A survey of foot problems in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, G; Gardner-Medwin, J; Watt, G F; Woodburn, J

    2008-12-01

    Evidence suggests that foot problems are common in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), with prevalence estimates over 90%. The aim of this survey was to describe foot-related impairment and disability associated with JIA and foot-care provision in patients managed under modern treatment paradigms, including disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) and biologic therapies. The Juvenile Arthritis Foot Disability Index (JAFI), Child Health Assessment Questionnaire (CHAQ), and pain visual analogue scale (VAS) were recorded in 30 consecutive established JIA patients attending routine outpatient clinics. Foot deformity score, active/limited joint counts, walking speed, double-support time (s) (DS) and step length symmetry index % (SI) were also measured. Foot-care provision in the preceding 12 months was determined from medical records. Sixty-three per cent of children reported some foot impairment, with a median (range) JAFI subscale score of 1 (0-3); 53% reported foot-related activity limitation, with a JAFI subscale score of 1 (0-4); and 60% reported participation restriction, with a JAFI subscale score of 1 (0-3). Other reported variables were CHAQ 0.38 (0-2), VAS pain 22 (0-79), foot deformity 6 (0-20), active joints 0 (0-7), limited joints 0 (0-31), walking speed 1.09 m/s (0.84-1.38 m/s), DS 0.22 s (0.08-0.26 s) and SI +/-4.0% (+/-0.2-+/-31.0%). A total of 23/30 medical records were reviewed and 15/23 children had received DMARDS, 8/23 biologic agents and 20/23 multiple intra-articular corticosteroid injections. Ten children received specialist podiatry care comprising footwear advice, orthotic therapy and silicone digital splints together with intrinsic muscle strengthening exercises. Despite frequent use of DMARD/biologic therapy and specialist podiatry-led foot care, foot-related impairment and disability persists in some children with JIA.

  8. Family resilience and adaptive coping in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: protocol for a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia Saetes

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This systematic review is the first step in a study investigating the resilience methods and processes in families of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. In particular, this review will focus on chronic or persistent pain, as a common symptom of juvenile idiopathic arthritis, which is the most common rheumatic disease in childhood. The experience of persistent pain can add to the functional disability associated with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Resilience has relevance to all areas of paediatric psychology, and targeted attention to child, sibling, and parent strengths within the context of paediatric chronic pain and juvenile idiopathic arthritis in particular will augment the field on numerous levels. The objective is to determine which resilience processes are associated with a favourable quality of life in terms of academic, communication, emotional, interpersonal, physical, psychological, and social well-being in families of children with chronic pain associated with JIA. Methods/design This systematic review will be conducted and reported in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement and the PRESS (Peer Review of Electronic Search Strategies guideline. Longitudinal, cross-sectional, and treatment studies written in English will be included, as will grey literature (i.e. conference abstracts and dissertations. Studies involving participants who are 6–18 years of age, have been diagnosed with juvenile idiopathic arthritis, are experiencing chronic pain, and are currently undergoing treatment will be included regardless of sex, arthritis type, and type of treatment. Studies including siblings who are 6–18 years of age and the patient’s parents will be included. Discussion Research exploring resilience within the adult population is accruing. Shifting our focus to protective factors of resilience in the context of paediatric chronic pain, specifically

  9. APPRAISAL OF NIMESULIDE EFFICIENCY, TOLERANCE AND SAFETY AMONG CHILDREN WITH JUVENILE ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.I. Alexeeva

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes nimesulide application experience among children with juvenile arthritides against the insufficient efficiency of a therapy by other non steroid anti-inflammatory medications. The researchers show that nimesulide is an efficient non steroid anti-inflammatory medication for the patients, suffering from oligo- and limited poly arthritis of the I–II activity degree. Nimesulide also provided for the reliable regression of the clinical and laboratory activity manifestations of a disease and, what is more important, among most patients without applications of the local glucocorticosteroidbassisted therapy. Nimesulide is characterized by good tolerance and low toxicity, which is along with the permit to use it among children aged 2 and over, allows one to consider this drug as one of the medications to choose for the treatment of the inflammatory joint diseases among children.Key words: children, juvenile arthritis, nimesulide.

  10. Long-term efficacy of adalimumab in the treatment of uveitis associated with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotaniemi K

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Kaisu Kotaniemi1,2, Hanna Säilä2, Hannu Kautiainen31Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland; 2Orton Orthopaedic Hospital and Rehabilitation Unit, Helsinki, Finland; 3Unit of Primary Health Care, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, FinlandBackground: The purpose of this study was to investigate the long-term effects of adalimumab, a tumor necrosis factor alpha antagonist, in the treatment of uveitis associated with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.Methods: Adalimumab was initiated in 94 patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis to treat active arthritis and/or active associated uveitis. In 18 patients, therapy was discontinued after a short period because of inefficacy or side effects. The activity of uveitis (using Standardized Uveitis Nomenclature [SUN] criteria and clinical examination and arthritis (number of swollen or active joints was evaluated at the start and at end of the study.Results: At the end of the study, uveitis was under good clinical control in two thirds of 54 patients (31% did not need any local treatment and 35% used only 1–2 corticosteroid drops a day, and one third had active uveitis (at least three corticosteroid drops a day. According to SUN criteria, adalimumab treatment for uveitis showed improved activity (a two-fold decrease in uveitis activity in 28% of patients, with a moderate response in 16 patients, no change in a further 16 patients, and worsening activity (a two-fold increase in uveitis activity in 13% of patients. The overall proportion of patients with active arthritis decreased. At the beginning of the study, 69% of patients with uveitis had more than two active joints, and at the end of the study only 27% had active joint disease. In 27 patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis without uveitis on adalimumab, the number of active joints decreased from 93% to 59%. Systemic corticosteroid treatment could be stopped in 22% of patients with uveitis and in 11% of those without uveitis. Most of the

  11. THE EXPERIENCE OF ADALIMUMAB USE IN A PATIENT WITH PAUTSIARTICULAR JUVENILE ARTHRITIS AND UVEITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.I. Alexeeva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the observation of early debut and the severe course of the juvenile polyarthritis involving the eyes, refractory to treatment by classical immunosuppressants. Successful use of the genetically engineered biological drug — adalimumab is described:  by the 4th week of therapy the acute inflammatory changes in affected joints were stopped, range of motion in them fully recovered; to the 8th week uveitis remission was registered, laboratory values of the disease activity were normalized: erythrocyte sedimentation rate, serum concentration of C-reactive protein. Key words: children, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, rheumatoid uveitis, adalimumab. (Pediatric pharmacology. — 2011; 8 (6: 119–124.

  12. Estudo comparativo de testes diagnósticos para olho seco entre crianças saudáveis e portadoras de artrite reumatóide juvenil Comparative study of diagnostic tests for dry eye disease between healthy and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayter Silva de Paula

    2004-10-01

    clinically and underwent tests for keratoconjunctivitis sicca: Schirmer's 1, tear film break-up time and rose bengal staining tests. RESULTS: Six children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis presented one or more symptoms of keratoconjunctivitis sicca (40% and five of them (83.3% presented meibomitis or other signs of this disease. In group 2, no child presented symptoms or signs of keratoconjunctivitis sicca. Mean Schirmer test did not differ between group 1 and 2 (p=0.156. However, the mean tear film break-up time was significantly reduced in group 1 (p=0.0005 and the mean rose Bengal staining score in group 1 was significantly greater than in group 2 (p=0.0038. Five of the fifteen children of group 1 (33% have two or more abnormal tests and were diagnosed as having definite keratoconjunctivitis sicca, while four children (26% were labeled with probable keratoconjunctivitis sicca. No child of group 2 had more than one positive test. CONCLUSIONS: Signs and symptoms of keratoconjunctivitis sicca appear to be a common ocular finding in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis children. Although only tear film break-up time and rose bengal staining score were significantly different in these groups, there was a trend toward worsening of the other dry eye tests in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis children.

  13. OPTIMIZATION OF PHARMACEUTICAL CARE FOR JUVENILE RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS AT THE REGIONAL LEVEL

    OpenAIRE

    A. A. Skripko; L. N. Geller; G. G. Radnaev; Т. V. Hadanova

    2017-01-01

    Clinical practice and content analysis of scientifi c literature indicate that for treatment of the immune-infl amatory disease called juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA), the use of only basic medicines (BM) is not suffi cient.The aim of the study is the organization of pharmacotherapy of JRA patients by genetically engineered biological preparations (GEBP), affecting the immune processes of the body directly.Materials and methods: the theory of marketing, content analysis, the ABC-analysis,...

  14. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis in the Era of International Cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uziel, Yosef

    2017-01-30

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common chronic disease of childhood. Improved understanding of its pathogenesis has led to international cooperation in clinical studies. Multicenter, international collaborations and research facilitate rapid enrollment of enough patients to enable a variety of studies, including those of epidemiology, diagnostic and classification criteria, genetic disease predisposition, pathogenesis, outcomes, and treatment protocols. In the last 20 years, the vision of the Pediatric Rheumatology International Trial Organization (PRINTO) has become a reality of worldwide collaboration in pediatric rheumatology research, including North American and European research groups. Major advances have been made in treating systemic JIA and its main complication, macrophage-activating syndrome (MAS). Single Hub and Access Point to Pediatric Rheumatology in Europe (SHARE) is a project of the European Society of Pediatric Rheumatology with the goal of improving clinical care. Based on evidence in the scientific literature, position papers regarding optimal clinical approaches and care have been published. Formal, validated assessment tools to evaluate response to treatment have been developed. Recommendations have been established to encourage international research collaborations, especially in light of major advances achieved in the genetics of pediatric rheumatologic diseases and the need to share biological samples among different countries and continents. Every participating country has disease information available for patients and families. Additionally, educational programs and updated syllabi for pediatric rheumatology have been written to promote similar, high-level academic training in different countries. These efforts have resulted in significant improvements in treatment and in patient prognosis. However, improved cooperation is needed to enhance research with biological and genetic samples. The Israeli Research Group for

  15. EFFICACY OF RECURRENT RITUXIMAB TREATMENT IN PATIENT WITH SEVERE REFRACTORY SYSTEMIC JUVENILE RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.I. Alexeeva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The article contains clinical case description of a severe systemic juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, that was refractory to classic immunosuppressant therapy. The disease was characterized by such extraarticular manifestations as fever, lymphadenopathy,  hepatosplenomegaly, polyserositis, generalized joint involvement and high activity in lab tests. As a result of severe clinical course of the disease, patients develop bilateral aseptic bone necrosis in coxofemoral joints and coxarthrosis. Against the background of glucocorticosteroid treatment the patient has developed hormone-dependency and hormone resistance. Inclusion into the treatment of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (rituximab has stopped systemic manifestations of the disease, inflammation in the joints, normalized lab activity rates. The positive therapeutic effect allowed to perform surgery due to bilateral coxarthrosis. These results show that rituximab is highly effective in children with systemic juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, that is resistant to classic immunosupressants and glucocorticoides. Key words: children, systemic juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, rituximab, recurrent treatment, prosthetics, hip joint. (Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. — 2011; 10 (5: 157–163.

  16. Osteoprotegerin in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis: cross talk between ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ehab

    arthritis (JRA) and to determine its relation to clinical and laboratory markers of disease ... osteoprotegerin were assayed by ELISA in the patient and control groups. Joints were .... Assay procedure: Diluted standards, quality controls and ...

  17. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnhart, Birgitte; Juul, Anders; Nielsen, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) has been identified as a prognostic marker of progressive joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis. In this population based study we evaluated associations between plasma concentrations of COMP, disease activity, and growth velocity in patients...

  18. Efficacy of adalimumab in young children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and chronic uveitis: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Torre, Francesco; Cattalini, Marco; Teruzzi, Barbara; Meini, Antonella; Moramarco, Fulvio; Iannone, Florenzo

    2014-05-24

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is a relatively common chronic disease of childhood, and is associated with persistent morbidity and extra-articular complications, one of the most common being uveitis. The introduction of biologic therapies, particularly those blocking the inflammatory mediator tumor necrosis factor-α, provided a new treatment option for juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients who were refractory to standard therapy such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, corticosteroids and/or methotrexate. The first case was a 2-year-old girl with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and uveitis who failed to respond to treatment with anti-inflammatories, low-dose corticosteroids and methotrexate, and had growth retardation. Adalimumab 24 mg/m2 every 2 weeks and prednisone 0.5 mg/kg/day were added to methotrexate therapy; steroid tapering and withdrawal started after 1 month. After 2 months the patient showed good control of articular and ocular manifestations, and she remained in remission for 1 year, receiving adalimumab and methotrexate with no side effects, and showing significant improvement in growth. Case 2 was a 9-year-old boy with an 8-year history of juvenile idiopathic arthritis and uveitis that initially responded to infliximab, but relapse occurred after 2 years off therapy. After switching to adalimumab, and adjusting doses of both adalimumab and methotrexate based on body surface area, the patient showed good response and corticosteroids were tapered and withdrawn after 6 months; the patient remained in remission taking adalimumab and methotrexate. The final case was a 5-year-old girl with juvenile idiopathic arthritis for whom adalimumab was added to methotrexate therapy after three flares of uveitis. The patient had two subsequent episodes of uveitis that responded well to local therapy, but was then free of both juvenile idiopathic arthritis and uveitis symptoms, allowing methotrexate and then adalimumab to be stopped; the patient remained in drug

  19. THERAPEUTIC CAPABILITIES OF ETHANERCEPT IN TREATMENT OF SYSTEMIC JUVENILE RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.I. Alexeeva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a clinical case of severe systemic juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, refractory to traditional immunosuppressive treatment and with insufficient efficacy of chimeric homogenous anti-TNF-a antibodies. The patient received 2 courses of anti-Blymphocyte’s- CD20-antibodies that helped to arrest all systemic manifestations of the disease. Articular syndrome was arrested only with the help of soluble receptors to TNF a — ethanercept, given in following dose — 0.4 mg per kg of body mass. The patient has been on treatment with ethanercept for 24 weeks. Joint tenderness and exudation were diminished already after the first 4 weeks of treatment, also there was a dramatic increase in joint motion range. After 6 months of therapy we have managed to improve the patients and his family quality of life.Key words: children, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, ethanercept, treatment.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2011; 10 (3: 141–149

  20. Growth Abnormalities in Children with Type 1 Diabetes, Juvenile Chronic Arthritis, and Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cosimo Giannini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Children and adolescents with chronic diseases are commonly affected by a variable degree of growth failure, leading to an impaired final height. Of note, the peculiar onset during childhood and adolescence of some chronic diseases, such as type 1 diabetes, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and asthma, underlines the relevant role of healthcare planners and providers in detecting and preventing growth abnormalities in these high risk populations. In this review article, the most relevant common and disease-specific mechanisms by which these major chronic diseases affect growth in youth are analyzed. In addition, the available and potential targeting strategies to restore the physiological, hormonal, and inflammatory pattern are described.

  1. Proposed outcome measures for prospective clinical trials in juvenile idiopathic arthritis-associated uveitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiligenhaus, Arnd; Foeldvari, Ivan; Edelsten, Clive

    2012-01-01

    To develop a set of core outcome measures for use in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and longitudinal observational studies in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated uveitis.......To develop a set of core outcome measures for use in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and longitudinal observational studies in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated uveitis....

  2. INFLUENCE OF PHYSIOTHERAPY ON CLINICAL AND IMMUNOLOGICAL PARAMETERS IN CHILDREN WITH JUVENILE RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    OpenAIRE

    T.L. Nastausheva; L.T. Dmitrieva

    2008-01-01

    Clinical and immunological status has been evaluated in 85 children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (RA) before and after physiotherapeutic procedures: electrophoresis with dimexid and magnetotherapy. The control group of 31 children did not follow physiotherapeutic procedures. The following results were fixed: clinical indices and immunological status of children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis have been changed in a larger degree in case of magnetotherapy.

  3. Studies on physical performance and functional ability in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takken, T.

    2003-01-01

    There is a growing interest in the physical training possibilities of children with juvenile arthritis. In the first Chapter a brief introduction on physical fitness and physical training is given including an overview of the existing studies in juvenile arthritis patients. In Chapter 2, we

  4. Rehabilitation in children with juvenile chronic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häfner, R; Truckenbrodt, H; Spamer, M

    1998-05-01

    Chronic childhood arthritis impairs joint function and may result in severe physical handicap. Joint pain and inflammation trigger a vicious cycle that often ends in joint damage and fixed deformities. A comprehensive rehabilitation programme must start early to restore loss of function and prevent permanent handicap. It is dominated by a physiotherapeutic regimen consisting of pain relief, movement expansion, training of muscular coordination and finally re-integration of a physiological movement pattern. The approaches of occupational therapy become integrated into the treatment programme, concentrating on joint protection and self-care training. Additional aids support the aim of joint restoration. They include individual splinting, adapted footwear and walking aids. Depending on the child's age and developmental status different aspects of rehabilitation dominate. Small children need adequate mobility to promote their psychosocial development. In later years integration into school life and the peer group becomes important. Adolescents require help for an adequate vocational training and self-care support. Last but not least, parental education and integration of the whole family into the rehabilitation programme markedly improve the patient's prognosis.

  5. Controversies in juvenile idiopathic arthritis-associated uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zierhut, Manfred; Heiligenhaus, Arnd; deBoer, Joke; Cunningham, Emmett T; Tugal-Tutkun, Ilknur

    2013-06-01

    Abstract Juvenile idiopathic arthritis-associated uveitis (JIAU) accounts for a sizable proportion of uveitis cases in children and is an important cause of ocular morbidity in uveitis patients in this age group. The authors present the results of a survey conducted to obtain a better understanding of the current views and practices of ophthalmologists involved in the care of children with JIAU. A detailed questionnaire consisting of 54 questions addressing epidemiology, diagnosis, and therapy of JIAU was distributed to 67 uveitis specialists. The responses from 37 completed questionnaires were tabulated for this report. While the experts often agreed on aspects of the epidemiologic and clinical features of JIAU and its complications, considerable diversity of responses was noted-particularly with regard to practice patterns. Regarding diagnostics and disease monitoring, all experts favored ANA testing, whereas two-thirds also suggested HLA-B27 typing. Laser flare photometry was available to and routinely used by almost one-third of the experts. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) was used by more than half. The survey revealed an overall consensus on therapeutic strategies, including the use of both conventional immunosuppressive and biologic agents. Methotrexate was the initial choice for immunosuppression by most respondents. Most would add an anti-TNF-alpha agent following failure of traditional immunosuppressive therapy, and adalimumab was favored by almost half of the experts. Questions addressing the management of individual situations, such as the treatment of macular edema and perioperative management, revealed considerable differences in therapeutic approaches. The results of this survey support the development of international guidelines for the management of JIAU.

  6. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis and the temporomandibular joint

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yasser Mohammed

    2012-02-01

    Feb 1, 2012 ... The mean total MRI score was significantly higher in patients with active disease compared ... with disease activity score and C-reactive protein as a marker of inflammation. ... out aids or assistive devices, hygiene, reach, grip, and activities. ... cient (r) to assess strength and direction of the linear relation-.

  7. Coronary artery abnormalities in children with systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefèvre-Utile, Alain; Galeotti, Caroline; Koné-Paut, Isabelle

    2014-05-01

    Still's disease (Systemic-onset Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: SoJIA) is characterised by high-spiking daily fevers, arthritis and evanescent rashes. Diagnosis of Still's disease is often challenging. Infectious diseases and other inflammatory conditions, especially in young children, Kawasaki disease may look similar. Clinicians often rely on echocardiographic evidence of coronary artery abnormalities to differentiate between Kawasaki disease and Still's disease. Coronary artery dilation would typically favour the diagnosis of Kawasaki disease. We present four children with Still's disease and coronary artery abnormalities who were initially misdiagnosed as Kawasaki disease. The first patient had pericarditis and an irregular wall of the left coronary artery, without dilation on echocardiography. The second patient had a left coronary artery dilatation and a pericarditis. The third patient had thickened left coronary artery walls, and the fourth patient had a hyperechogenicity of the left and right coronary arteries. They received IVIG without success. The diagnosis of Still's disease was made secondary with evidence of persistent arthritis. All but one patient finally needed biologic treatments. Coronary abnormalities may be observed during various febrile conditions and do not exclude the diagnosis of Still's disease. Copyright © 2013 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Gene engineering biological therapy for juvenile arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kh Mikhel's

    2011-01-01

    However, GEBA therapy cannot completely cure the disease as before despite the progress achieved. GEBAs have potentially a number of serious side effects, among which there are severe infections and there is a risk of developing malignancies and autoimmune processes. Their administration requires careful monitoring to reveal the early development of serious adverse reactions, thus preventing a poor outcome.

  9. Safety of tocilizumab in the treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Sandra Helena; Xavier, Ricardo Machado

    2017-04-01

    Tocilizumab (TCZ) is a recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody and IL-6 receptor antagonist, currently approved for the treatment of systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA) and polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (pJIA) in children aged 2 years or older refractory to conventional treatment. The most common adverse events in patients treated with TCZ were infections, especially in the respiratory tract. The most frequent laboratory abnormalities were altered liver function, neutropenia and elevated cholesterol levels. Areas covered: The safety of TCZ in the treatment of children with JIA was determined based on a review of published clinical trials, including two multicenter studies of patients with sJIA and pJIA (the TENDER and CHERISH trials, respectively). The frequency of adverse events (AEs), serious adverse events (SAEs) and deaths reported in these studies was analyzed and discussed. Expert opinion: TCZ was effective and well tolerated in the treatment of severe forms of sJIA and pJIA, and can be considered a treatment of choice for these conditions. The risk of infections and laboratory abnormalities, such as neutropenia, should be constantly monitored. There is still a need for comparative studies of the risks and benefits of biological agents in patients with refractory JIA.

  10. 99mTc-DPD uptake in juvenile arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stender Hansen, E.; Holm, I.E.; Buenger, C.; Knudsen, V.; Noer, I.; Bach Christensen, S.

    1986-01-01

    Unilateral arthritis of the knee was induced in mongrel puppies by intraarticular injections of 1% Carragheenan. Bone metabolism was studied by a scintimetric technique on static 99m Tc-diphosphonate bone scans every 2nd week during the induction of arthritis for 3 months and monthly in a postarthritic phase of another 3 months. Changes in uptake of radionuclide were present after 2 weeks. The induction phase was characterized by a decreased uptake in the calcification layer of the juxta-articular growth plates and a moderately increased epiphyseal uptake. The postarthritic phase was characterized by normalization of growth plate uptake and a marked increase in epiphyseal uptake. Using contact autoradiography, the epiphyseal uptake was seen mainly in a narrow subchondral and subsynovial bone layer, around bone cysts and osteophytes, whereas central epiphyseal bone was osteopenic with decreased uptake of tracer. The study suggests that the early scintigraphic appearance of juvenile non-suppurative arthritis may be an overall decrease in uptake of 99m Tc-diphosphonate due to a depression of growth plate metabolism. (author)

  11. Handwriting difficulties in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberfehlner, Helga; Visser, Bart; Daffertshofer, Andreas; van Rossum, Marion Aj; Roorda, Leo D; van der Leeden, Marike; Dekker, Joost; Hoeksma, Agnes F

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to describe handwriting difficulties of primary school children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), and to investigate possible correlations with hand function and writing performance. In a cross-sectional approach, 15 children with JIA and reported handwriting difficulties were included together with 15 healthy matched controls. Impairments (signs of arthritis or tenosynovitis, reduced grip force and limited range of motion of the wrist (wrist-ROM)), activity limitations (reduced quality and speed of handwriting, pain during handwriting), and participation restrictions (perceived handwriting difficulties at school) were assessed and analysed. Although selected by the presence of handwriting difficulties, the majority of the JIA children (73%) had no active arthritis of the writing hand, and only minor hand impairments were found. Overall, the JIA children performed well during the short handwriting test, but the number of letters they wrote per minute decreased significantly during the 5-minute test, compared to the healthy controls. JIA patients had significantly higher pain scores on a 100 mm Visual Analogue Scale, compared to the healthy controls. The actual presence of arthritis, and limitation in grip force and wrist-ROM did not correlate with reported participation restrictions with regard to handwriting at school. The JIA children reported pain during handwriting, and inability to sustain handwriting for a longer period of time. The results of this pilot study show that JIA children with handwriting difficulties, experience their restrictions mainly through pain and the inability to sustain handwriting for a longer period of time. No correlations could be found with impairments.

  12. The role of heme oxygenase-1 in systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Akitaka; Mori, Masaaki; Naruto, Takuya; Nakajima, Shoko; Miyamae, Takako; Imagawa, Tomoyuki; Yokota, Shumpei

    2009-01-01

    We have determined the serum levels of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in 56 patients with systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis (s-JIA) and compared these with serum HO-1 levels in healthy controls and patients with other pediatric rheumatic diseases. Serum HO-1 levels were measured by the sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The mean serum HO-1 level in s-JIA patients during the active phase was 123.6 +/- 13.83 ng/ml, which was significantly higher than that in patients with polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (p-JIA), Kawasaki disease, systemic lupus erythematosus or mixed connective tissue disease (P < 0.0005). The serum levels of HO-1, cytokines and cytokine receptors in patients with s-JIA were also assessed at both the active and inactive phases. The serum HO-1 level in patients with s-JIA in the active phase was found to be significantly greater than that in patients with the disease in the inactive phase (P < 0.0001). An assessment of the relationships between serum HO-1 levels and other laboratory parameters or cytokines in patients with s-JIA did not reveal any strong correlations. These results suggest that the serum level of HO-1 may be a useful marker for the differential diagnosis of s-JIA. Further study will be necessary to elucidate the mechanism of HO-1 production and to clarify the role of HO-1 in the disease process.

  13. A commentary on TREAT: The trial of early aggressive drug therapy in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baildam Eileen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA is a category of JIA where multiple joints are affected by chronic inflammation, and where serious and lasting damage to joints is the expected natural history in untreated disease. There is evidence of response to disease-modifying antirheumatic and biologic drugs, but little evidence of permanent remission from any of the existing therapeutic trials. The TREAT trial by Wallace et al., recently published in Arthritis and Rheumatism, used a collaborative multicenter approach to studying early aggressive treatment of polyarticular JIA in an attempt to achieve full clinical inactive disease after 6 months of treatment. The study's main finding that the earlier in the disease course that treatment is started, the better the chance of disease control, has provided evidence that there is a 'window of opportunity' for treating JIA as there is in adult rheumatoid arthritis (RA. The study provides both a platform and an impetus for concentrating future treatment trials on early rather than established disease and investigating a standard of starting treatment within 10 to 12 weeks.

  14. Treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis-associated uveitis: challenges and update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinovich, C Egla

    2011-09-01

    To update the current understanding of the risk factors for poor outcomes in juvenile idiopathic arthritis-related uveitis. In addition, current therapies, both traditional and biological, are reviewed. Male sex, independent of age or antinuclear antibody status, is associated with increased ocular morbidity. Having anterior chamber inflammation on first exam increases the risk of developing vision-threatening eye complications. Presence of one complication increases the risk of developing another. Risk of cataract development associated with topical glucocorticoid use is better defined. Longer duration of remission on therapy has been found to decrease the risk of disease flare after discontinuation of methotrexate. Recent studies of both nonbiological and biological therapies for arthritis-related uveitis are discussed. With a better understanding of risk factors associated with the ocular morbidity of uveitis associated with juvenile idiopathic arthritis, aggressive therapies can be targeted for improved visual outcomes. Alternative treatments to avoid long-term corticosteroid use include the use of antimetabolites and biological therapies. More prospective comparator studies and/or use of multicenter databases are needed to better understand best treatments.

  15. The French version of the Juvenile Arthritis Multidimensional Assessment Report (JAMAR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quartier, Pierre; Hofer, Michael; Wouters, Carine; Truong, Thi Thanh Thao; Duong, Ngoc-Phoi; Agbo-Kpati, Kokou-Placide; Uettwiller, Florence; Melki, Isabelle; Mouy, Richard; Bader-Meunier, Brigitte; Consolaro, Alessandro; Bovis, Francesca; Ruperto, Nicolino

    2018-04-01

    The Juvenile Arthritis Multidimensional Assessment Report (JAMAR) is a new parent/patient reported outcome measure that enables a thorough assessment of the disease status in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). We report the results of the cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the parent and patient versions of the JAMAR in the French language. The reading comprehension of the questionnaire was tested in 10 JIA parents and patients. Each participating centre was asked to collect demographic, clinical data and the JAMAR in 100 consecutive JIA patients or all consecutive patients seen in a 6-month period and to administer the JAMAR to 100 healthy children and their parents. The statistical validation phase explored descriptive statistics and the psychometric issues of the JAMAR: the three Likert assumptions, floor/ceiling effects, internal consistency, Cronbach's alpha, interscale correlations and construct validity (convergent and discriminant validity). A total of 100 JIA patients (23% systemic, 45% oligoarticular, 20% RF negative polyarthritis, 12% other categories) and 122 healthy children, were enrolled at the paediatric rheumatology centre of the Necker Children's Hospital in Paris. Notably, none of the enrolled JIA patients is affected with psoriatic arthritis. The JAMAR components discriminated well healthy subjects from JIA patients. All JAMAR components revealed good psychometric performances. In conclusion, the French version of the JAMAR is a valid tool for the assessment of children with JIA and is suitable for use both in routine clinical practice and clinical research.

  16. Clinical Observation of Employment of Umbilical Cord Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cell for Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liming Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA, known as Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, is the most common type of arthritis in children aged under 17. It may cause sequelae due to lack of effective treatment. The goal of this study is to explore the therapeutic effect of umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs for JIA. Ten JIA patients were treated with UC-MSCs and received second infusion three months later. Some key values such as 28-joint disease activity score (DAS28, TNF-α, IL-6, and regulatory T cells (Tregs were evaluated. Data were collected at 3 months and 6 months after first treatment. DAS28 score of 10 patients was between 2.6 and 3.2 at three months after infusion. WBC, ESR, and CRP were significantly decreased while Tregs were remarkably increased and IL-6 and TNF-α were declined. Similar changes of above values were found after 6 months. At the same time, the amount of NSAIDS and steroid usage in patients was reduced. However, no significant changes were found comparing the data from 3 and 6 months. These results suggest that UC-MSCs can reduce inflammatory cytokines, improve immune network effects, adjust immune tolerance, and effectively alleviate the symptoms and they might provide a safe and novel approach for JIA treatment.

  17. Glucocorticoid receptor gene polymorphism and juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scheplyagina Larisa A

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The glucocorticoid receptor gene (NR3C1 has been suggested as a candidate gene affecting juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA course and prognosis. The purpose of this study is to investigate the glucocorticoid receptor gene BclI polymorphism (rs41423247 in JIA patients, the gene's role in susceptibility to juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and its associations with JIA activity, course and bone mineralization. Methods One hundred twenty-two Caucasian children with JIA and 143 healthy ethnically matched controls were studied. We checked markers of clinical and laboratory activity: morning stiffness, Ritchie Articular Index (RAI, swollen joint count (SJC, tender joint count (TJC, physician's visual analog scale (VAS, hemoglobin level (Hb, leukocyte count (L, platelet count (Pl, Westergren erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, C-reactive protein (CRP, albumin, DAS and DAS28. Bone mineralization was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA of lumbar spine L1-L4. Assessments of bone metabolism included osteocalcin, C-terminal telopeptide (CTT, parathyroid hormone (PTH, total and ionized calcium, inorganic phosphate and total alkaline phosphatase (TAP. BclI polymorphism was genotyped by polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism. Results No association was observed between glucocorticoid receptor gene polymorphism and the presence or absence of JIA. In girls with JIA, the presence of the G allele was associated with an unfavorable arthritis course, a younger age of onset of arthritis (p = 0.0017, and higher inflammatory activity. The higher inflammatory activity was demonstrated by the following: increased time of morning stiffness (p = 0.02, VAS (p = 0.014, RAI (p = 0.048, DAS (p = 0.035, DAS28 (p = 0.05, Pl (p = 0.003, L (p = 0.046, CRP (p = 0.01. In addition, these patients had bone metabolism disturbances as follows: decreased BA (p = 0.0001, BMC (p = 0.00007, BMD (0.005 and Z score (p = 0.002; and

  18. Impact of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Associated Uveitis in Early Adulthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernie, Lenneke A.; Rothova, Aniki; v. d. Doe, Patricia; Los, Leonoor I.; Schalij-Delfos, Nicoline E.; de Boer, Joke H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Typically juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated uveitis (further referred as ‘JIA-uveitis’) has its onset in childhood, but some patients suffer its, sometimes visual threatening, complications or ongoing disease activity in adulthood. The objective of this study was to analyze uveitis activity, complications and visual prognosis in adulthood. Methods In this multicenter study, 67 adult patients (129 affected eyes) with JIA-uveitis were retrospectively studied for best corrected visual acuity, visual fields, uveitis activity, topical/systemic treatments, ocular complications, and ocular surgeries during their 18th, 22nd and 30th year of life. Because treatment strategies changed after the year 1990, outcomes were stratified for onset of uveitis before and after 1990. Results Sixty-two of all 67 included patients (93%) had bilateral uveitis. During their 18th life year, 4/52 patients (8%) had complete remission, 28/52 (54%) had uveitis activity and 37/51 patients (73%) were on systemic immunomodulatory treatment. Bilateral visual impairment or legal blindness occurred in 2/51 patients (4%); unilateral visual impairment or legal blindness occurred in 17/51 patients (33%) aged 18 years. The visual prognosis appeared to be slightly better for patients with uveitis onset after the year 1990 (for uveitis onset before 1990 (n = 7) four patients (58%) and for uveitis onset after 1990 (n = 44) 13 patients (30%) were either visual impaired or blind). At least one ocular surgery was performed in 10/24 patients (42%) between their 18th and 22nd year of life. Conclusions Bilateral visual outcome in early adulthood in patients with JIA-uveitis appears to be fairly good, although one third of the patients developed one visually impaired or blind eye. However, a fair amount of the patients suffered from ongoing uveitis activity and needed ongoing treatment as well as surgical interventions. Awareness of these findings is important for ophthalmologists and

  19. Substance use and sexual function in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Weelden, Marlon; Lourenço, Benito; Viola, Gabriela R; Aikawa, Nadia E; Queiroz, Lígia B; Silva, Clovis A

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate alcohol/tobacco/illicit drug use and sexual function in adolescent juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and healthy controls. 174 adolescents with pediatric rheumatic diseases were selected. A cross-sectional study with 54 JIA patients and 35 controls included demographic/anthropometric data and puberty markers assessments, physician-conducted CRAFFT (car/relax/alone/forget/friends/trouble) screen tool for substance abuse/dependence high risk and a questionnaire that evaluated sexual function, bullying and alcohol/tobacco/illicit drug use. Clinical/laboratorial data and treatment were also assessed in JIA. The median current age was similar between JIA patients and controls [15(10-19) vs. 15(12-18) years, p=0.506]. Frequencies of alcohol/tobacco/illicit drug use were high and similar in both JIA and controls (43% vs. 46%, p=0.829). However, age at alcohol onset was significantly higher in those with JIA [15(11-18) vs. 14(7-18) years, p=0.032], particularly in polyarticular onset (p=0.040). High risk for substance abuse/dependence (CRAFFT score≥2) was found in both groups (13% vs. 15%, p=1.000), likewise bullying (p=0.088). Further analysis of JIA patients regarding alcohol/tobacco/illicit drug use showed that the median current age [17(14-19) vs. 13(10-19)years, p<0.001] and education years [11(6-13) vs. 7(3-12)years, p<0.001] were significant higher in those that used substances. Sexual activity was significantly higher in the former group (48% vs. 7%, p<0.001). A positive correlation was evidenced between CRAFFT score and current age in JIA patients (p=0.032, r=+0.296). A high risk for substance abuse/dependence was observed in both JIA and controls. JIA substance users were more likely to have sexual intercourse. Therefore, routine screening is suggested in all visits of JIA adolescents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  20. Tocilizumab: The evidence for its place in the treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herlin, Troels

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is one of the most common chronic diseases with childhood onset. It comprises different subtypes of which the systemic onset subtype is often resistant to treatment. With the advent of biological treatment with tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha......)-inhibitors, the clinical outcome of JIA has improved considerably, but only for subtypes other than systemic JIA. Substantial evidence shows that the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) plays a pivotal role in systemic JIA. The blockage of IL-6 action by tocilizumab, a humanized anti-IL-6-receptor monoclonal...

  1. PHARMACOECONOMIC ISSUES OF ADALIMUMAB THERAPY IN JUVENILE IDIOPATHIC ARTHRITIS

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    K. Simpson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA is the most common type of arthritis in children and is associated with reduced quality of life and increased health care costs. Objective. To evaluate the cost effectiveness of the tumour necrosis factor inhibitor adalimumab (ADA vs. non-biologic therapy for the treatment of JIA in Russian children and adolescents. Materials and Methods. A Markov model was developed on the basis of the DE038 clinical trial, which compared ADA plus methotrexate (MTX vs. placebo plus MTX for the treatment of JIA in children aged 4–17 years. Cost-effectiveness analyses were performed from the standpoint of the Russian health care system and society as a whole. Base case analyses followed 11-year-old patients with JIA for a period of 7 years (until the age of 18 years or over an expected lifetime. Additional analyses followed patients aged 7 years at treatment initiation for a period of 11 years or over a simulated lifetime. The cost of treating severe JIA was assumed to be the same as reported in a published investigation. The cost of ADA therapy was based on the expected cost assuming inclusion in the List of Vital and Essential Medicinal Products. This took into account the Value Added Tax and a 10% trade mark-up. Treatment outcomes were measured in quality-adjusted life years (QALYs. Results and Discussion. Over a 7-year time horizon, the incremental cost-utility ratio (ICUR for ADA vs. conventional nonbiologic therapy in the treatment of JIA in 11-year-old patients was 1,571,500 roubles/QALY when using a health care system perspective and 1,515,000 roubles/QALY when using a societal perspective. Over a simulated patient lifetime, the corresponding ICURs were 286,300 roubles/QALY and 275,300 roubles/QALY, respectively. Over an 11-year time horizon, the ICUR for ADA vs. conventional non-biologic therapy in the treatment of JIA in patients aged 7 years at the start of therapy was 852,400 roubles/QALY when

  2. Yellow Fever Vaccine in Patients With Rheumatic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-05

    Systemic Lupus; Rheumatoid Arthritis; Spondyloarthritis; Inflammatory Myopathy; Systemic Sclerosis; Mixed Connective Tissue Disease; Takayasu Arteritis; Granulomatosis With Polyangiitis; Sjogren's Syndrome; Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis; Juvenile Dermatomyositis

  3. Participation in Leisure Activities by Children and Adolescents with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallo, Sabrina; Majnemer, Annette; Duffy, Ciarán M; Feldman, Debbie Ehrmann

    2015-09-01

    To describe leisure activities of children and adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) in terms of diversity, intensity, and enjoyment, and to identify potential determinants. One hundred seven children and adolescents aged 8-17 years diagnosed with JIA and their families participated in this cross-sectional study. Participants answered the Children's Assessment of Participation and Enjoyment, which measures involvement in leisure (recreation, active physical, social, skill-based, self-improvement). Disease characteristics and sociodemographic factors were abstracted from the child's medical file. In terms of intensity, individuals with JIA were more often engaged in informal rather than formal leisure activities [t(106) = 45.5, p leisure activities in children and adolescents with arthritis may allow healthcare professionals to assess children's health needs with more precision and promote a healthier lifestyle.

  4. [Macrophage activation syndrome in a patient with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Anna Carolina Faria Moreira Gomes; Ferreira, Gilda Aparecida; Guimarães, Luciano Junqueira; Guimarães, Raquel Rosa; Santos, Flávia Patrícia Sena Teixeira

    2015-01-01

    Machrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is a rare and potentially fatal disease, commonly associated with chronic rheumatic diseases, mainly juvenile idiopathic arthritis. It is included in the group of secondary forms of haemophagocytic syndrome, and other causes are lymphoproliferative diseases and infections. Its most important clinical and laboratorial manifestations are non-remitting fever, splenomegaly, bleeding, impairment of liver function, cytopenias, hypoalbuminemia, hypertriglyceridemia, hypofibrinogenemia and hyperferritinemia. The treatment needs to be started quickly, and the majority of cases have a good response with corticosteroids and cyclosporine. The Epstein-Barr virus is described as a possible trigger for many cases of MAS, especially in these patients in treatment with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blockers. In these refractory cases, etoposide (VP16) should be administered, associated with corticosteroids and cyclosporine. Our objective is to describe a rare case of MAS probably due to EBV infection in a subject with systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis, which achieved complete remission of the disease after therapy guided by 2004-HLH protocol. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  5. Association of neopterin as a marker of immune system activation and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mones M. Abu Shady

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate neopterin plasma concentrations in patients with active juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA and correlate them with disease activity.METHODS: Sixty patients diagnosed as active JIA, as well as another 60 apparently healthy age- and gender-matched children as controls, were recruited from the Pediatrics Allergy and Immunology Clinic, Ain Shams University. Disease activity was assessed by the Juvenile Arthritis Disease Activity Score 27 (JADAS-27. Laboratory investigations were performed for all patients, including determination of hemoglobin concentration (Hgb, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, and C-reactive protein. Serum concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-a, interleukin-6 (IL-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1, and neopterin were measured.RESULTS: Significant differences were found between JIA patients and controls with regard to the mean levels of Hgb, ESR, TNF-a, IL-6, and MCP-1 (p 0.05. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that JADAS- 27 and ESR were the main variables associated with serum neopterin in JIA patients (p < 0.05.CONCLUSION: The elevation of plasma neopterin concentrations in early JIA patients may indicate stimulation of immune response. Serum neopterin can be used as a sensitive marker for assaying background inflammation and disease activity score in JIA patients.

  6. Degree of muscle fatigue in children with chronic juvenile arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sekulić Aleksandra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our work was to identify gradient of the muscle fatigue of some muscle groups, among children with chronic juvenile arthritis, which are restricted in function by existing limitation in range of motions. Four patients in age of 9,5, with mentioned diagnosis were examined. Healthy subjects, with same ages were control group. Manuel muscle test, range of motion test and EMG examination were performed. Results shown significance difference in degree of muscle fatigue among observed patients, which explain decrease of muscle efficiency and must be taken when intensity of kinesitherapic treatment has to be done. It is concluded that structural changes on locomotory system induce secondary hypertrophy or atrophy of the muscle system and increase of muscle fatigue when activity of certain muscles is performed.

  7. Premature subclinical atherosclerosis in children and young adults with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Anna-Helene; Fuhlbrigge, Robert C; Karup Pedersen, Freddy

    2016-01-01

    Many studies show that Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) is associated with early subclinical signs of atherosclerosis. Chronic inflammation per se may be an important driver but other known risk factors, such as dyslipidemia, hypertension, insulin insensitivity, a physically inactive lifestyle...

  8. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis-associated uveitis: Data from a region in western Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Asproudis

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Ioannis Asproudis1, Felekis Taxiarchis1, Elena Tsanou2, Spiridon Gorezis2, Eikaterini Karali3, Sapfo Alfantaki3, Antigoni Siamopoulou-Mauridou3, Miltiadis Aspiotis11University Eye Clinic of Ioannina, Greece; 2Epirus Vision Center, Ioannina, Greece; 3Department of Child Health, University of Ioannina, GreeceObjective: To evaluate the characteristics and visual prognosis of juvenile idiopathic arthritis-associated uveitis (JIA.Methods: A retrospective review was performed on 56 patients who met the criteria for JIA to identify those with uveitis and related complications. Patients were referred to and were examined in the Pediatric Department of the University Hospital of Ioannina, between 1995 and 2007.Results: The prevalence of JIA-associated uveitis was high. Despite this and the related complications, the final visual outcome was satisfactory in the majority of the cases. Authors did not observe any correlation between prognosis and sex, age at the onset of uveitis or arthritis, pattern of arthritis, or positivity for antinuclear antibodies (ANA.Conclusion: We found a remarkably high prevalence of uveitis and related ocular complications in 7 (28% of the patients, and the rate of poor visual outcome was 12%.Keywords: idiopathic arthritis, uveitis, visual complications, autoimmune disease

  9. Contrast-enhanced MRI features in the early diagnosis of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemke, Robert; Maas, Mario [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kuijpers, Taco W.; Schonenberg-Meinema, Dieneke [University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Nusman, Charlotte M. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rossum, Marion A.J. van; Berg, J.M. van den [University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Reade, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dolman, Koert M. [Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Reade, Amsterdam (Netherlands); St. Lucas Andreas Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-11-15

    To determine whether clinical, laboratory or Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) measures differentiate Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) from other forms of active childhood arthritis. We prospectively collected data of 80 treatment-naive patients clinically suspected of JIA with active non-infectious arthritis of (at least) one knee for <12 months duration. Upon presentation patients underwent clinical and laboratory assessments and contrast-enhanced MRI. MRI was not used as a diagnostic criterion. Forty-four (55 %) patients were clinically diagnosed with JIA, whereas in 36 (45 %) patients the diagnosis of JIA was discarded on clinical or laboratory findings. MRI-based synovitis was present in 27 (61.4 %) JIA patients and in 7 (19.4 %) non-JIA patients (P < 0.001). Five factors (male gender, physician's global assessment of overall disease activity, joints with limited range of motion, HLA-B27, MRI-based synovitis) were associated with the onset of JIA. In multivariate analysis MRI-based synovitis proved to be independently associated with JIA (OR 6.58, 95 % CI 2.36-18.33). In patients with MRI-based synovitis, the RR of having JIA was 3.16 (95 % CI 1.6-6.4). The presence of MRI-based synovitis is associated with the clinical onset of JIA. Physical examination could be supported by MRI, particularly to contribute in the early differentiation of different forms of non-infectious childhood arthritis. (orig.)

  10. Contrast-enhanced MRI features in the early diagnosis of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemke, Robert; Maas, Mario; Kuijpers, Taco W.; Schonenberg-Meinema, Dieneke; Nusman, Charlotte M.; Rossum, Marion A.J. van; Berg, J.M. van den; Dolman, Koert M.

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether clinical, laboratory or Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) measures differentiate Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) from other forms of active childhood arthritis. We prospectively collected data of 80 treatment-naive patients clinically suspected of JIA with active non-infectious arthritis of (at least) one knee for <12 months duration. Upon presentation patients underwent clinical and laboratory assessments and contrast-enhanced MRI. MRI was not used as a diagnostic criterion. Forty-four (55 %) patients were clinically diagnosed with JIA, whereas in 36 (45 %) patients the diagnosis of JIA was discarded on clinical or laboratory findings. MRI-based synovitis was present in 27 (61.4 %) JIA patients and in 7 (19.4 %) non-JIA patients (P < 0.001). Five factors (male gender, physician's global assessment of overall disease activity, joints with limited range of motion, HLA-B27, MRI-based synovitis) were associated with the onset of JIA. In multivariate analysis MRI-based synovitis proved to be independently associated with JIA (OR 6.58, 95 % CI 2.36-18.33). In patients with MRI-based synovitis, the RR of having JIA was 3.16 (95 % CI 1.6-6.4). The presence of MRI-based synovitis is associated with the clinical onset of JIA. Physical examination could be supported by MRI, particularly to contribute in the early differentiation of different forms of non-infectious childhood arthritis. (orig.)

  11. Methotrexate therapy may prevent the onset of uveitis in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulou, Charalampia; Kostik, Mikhail; Böhm, Marek; Nieto-Gonzalez, Juan Carlos; Gonzalez-Fernandez, Maria Isabel; Pistorio, Angela; Martini, Alberto; Ravelli, Angelo

    2013-09-01

    To evaluate whether early treatment with methotrexate (MTX) prevents the onset of uveitis in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. The clinical charts of all consecutive patients seen between January 2002 and February 2011 who had a disease duration uveitis had occurred. A total of 254 patients with a median disease duration of 0.3 year were included. Eighty-six patients (33.9%) were treated with MTX, whereas 168 patients (66.1%) did not receive MTX. During the 2-year follow-up, 211 patients (83.1%) did not develop uveitis, whereas 43 patients (16.9%) had uveitis a median of 1.0 year after the first visit. The frequency of uveitis was lower in MTX-treated than in MTX-untreated patients (10.5% vs 20.2%, respectively, P = .049). Survival analysis confirmed that patients treated with MTX had a lower probability of developing uveitis. Early MTX therapy may prevent the onset of uveitis in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Because our study may be affected by confounding by indication, the potential of MTX to reduce the incidence of ocular disease should be investigated in a randomized controlled trial. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. QUALITY OF LIFE IN CHILDREN WITH JUVENILE RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS TREATED WITH INFLIXIMAB

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    R.V. Denisova

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA is chronic disease, leading to early incapacitating injury in patients. Treatment of JRA with new expensive biological agents allows obtaining long term remission of disease and improving its prognosis. Estimation of quality of life is one of the main effectiveness criteria of treatment. A quality of life in children who were 2–4 years old treated with infliximab was estimated. 43 patients with different types of JRA were examined. A quality of life was estimated with the help of questionnaire PEDSQL generic core scale, PEDSQL rheumatology module. Index of functional disability was estimated by childhood health assessment questionnaire (CHAQ. Significant increase of quality of life rates and decrease of index of functional disability was registered in 6 weeks of therapy with infliximab. The rates of quality of life in patients with JRA treated with infliximab were significantly equal to that in healthy children in the same age in 6, 12 and 24 months of treatment. Thus, treatment with infliximab significantly increases quality of life in children in 2–4 years old with JRA and their families, decreases negative influence of disease on child's living, improves physical activity and emotional state of patients, and allows improving contact between patients and healthy children in the same age.Key words: children, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, quality of life, infliximab.

  13. INFLUENCE OF PHYSIOTHERAPY ON CLINICAL AND IMMUNOLOGICAL PARAMETERS IN CHILDREN WITH JUVENILE RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

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    T.L. Nastausheva

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Clinical and immunological status has been evaluated in 85 children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (RA before and after physiotherapeutic procedures: electrophoresis with dimexid and magnetotherapy. The control group of 31 children did not follow physiotherapeutic procedures. The following results were fixed: clinical indices and immunological status of children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis have been changed in a larger degree in case of magnetotherapy.

  14. Medication use in juvenile uveitis patients enrolled in the Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Lauren A; Zurakowski, David; Angeles-Han, Sheila T; Lasky, Andrew; Rabinovich, C Egla; Lo, Mindy S

    2016-02-16

    There is not yet a commonly accepted, standardized approach in the treatment of juvenile idiopathic uveitis when initial steroid therapy is insufficient. We sought to assess current practice patterns within a large cohort of children with juvenile uveitis. This is a cross-sectional cohort study of patients with uveitis enrolled in the Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance (CARRAnet) registry. Clinical information including, demographic information, presenting features, disease complications, and medications were collected. Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests were used to assess for associations between medications and clinical characteristics. Ninety-two children with idiopathic and 656 with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated uveitis were identified. Indication (arthritis or uveitis) for medication use was not available for JIA patients; therefore, detailed analysis was limited to children with idiopathic uveitis. In this group, 94 % had received systemic steroids. Methotrexate (MTX) was used in 76 % of patients, with oral and subcutaneous forms given at similar rates. In multivariable analysis, non-Caucasians were more likely to be treated initially with subcutaneous MTX (P = 0.003). Of the 53 % of patients treated with a biologic DMARD, all received a tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor. TNF inhibitor use was associated with a higher frequency of cataracts (52 % vs 21 %; P = 0.001) and antinuclear antibody positivity (49 % vs 29 %; P = 0.04), although overall complication rates were not higher in these patients. Among idiopathic uveitis patients enrolled in the CARRAnet registry, MTX was the most commonly used DMARD, with subcutaneous and oral forms equally favored. Patients who received a TNF inhibitor were more likely to be ANA positive and have cataracts.

  15. Efficacy and Safety of Prolonged Rituximab Treatment in Patients with Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

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    E. I. Alexeeva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to assess efficacy and safety of rituximab treatment in children with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis under prolonged follow-up. Patients and methods: results of treatment of 60 children (33 girls and 27 boys with systemic variant of juvenile idiopathic arthritis being followed-up in rheumatology department of the Federal State Institution «Scientific Centre of Children Health» of RAMS (FSI «SCCH» RAMS were analyzed. The mean age of children was 8,7 years. The mean duration of disease course at the moment of first rituximab administration was 5,3 years. At the beginning of rituximab therapy all children had active articular syndrome, severe systemic manifestations and significantly increased laboratory markers of activity. As the signs of improvement the authors used pediatric criteria of the American College of Rheumatology. The treatment was approved by the local ethic committee of the FSI «SCCH» RAMS; the patients’ representatives and patients older than 14 years old had signed informed agreement. Results: remission was induced in 26 of 60 (43% patients: in 9 of them after the 1st course of treatment, in 8 — after the 2nd, in 6 — after the 3d and in 3 — after the 4th. The maximal duration of remission was 5 years 4 months, minimal — 6 months. Other genetically engineered drugs were administered to 34 (57% of the patients: due to the primary inefficiency in 15, secondary inefficiency — in 10; due to partial inefficiency — in 9 children. The drug was well-tolerated in most of the patients. Undesirable effects were represented by transfusional reactions to the rituximab infusion, infections with different severity and granulocytopenia. Conclusions: rituximab has high efficiency in patients with severe systemic variant of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. The drug induced remission in patients who had been considered almost incurable, with low status of physical and social adaptation.

  16. Proteinuria in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: Making the case for early urinary screening

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    Anshuman Saha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis (SOJIA can be associated with proteinuria due to various renal pathologies. We report two pediatric cases with SOJIA and nephrotic syndrome secondary to renal amyloidosis, a very rare complication in children. Once present, amyloidosis heralds a poor prognosis for the patient, though early detection may allow some improvement if the inflammatory arthritis is controlled.

  17. Reduced articular cartilage thickness in joints without a history of active arthritis in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pradsgaard, Dan Østergaard; Spannow, Anne Helene; Heuck, Carsten

    Background: The functional disability experienced in juvenile idiopathic arthritis is primarily caused by degeneration of the osteocartilaginous structures due to the inflammatory process in the synovium. It is therefore essential for evaluating the therapeutic efficacy to closely monitor...... in joint cartilage thickness (Cth) between healthy children and JIA children measured by US (1). But are there any differences in Cth measured by US between healthy children and joints without a history of activity among JIA children’s. Aim: To investigate a possible effect of the inflammatory process...... on joints never directly affected by arthritic activity during the history of the child’s disease course. Furthermore we wanted to compare joint cartilage thickness within the JIA group in joints with or without a history of activity. Methods: We included 95 Danish JIA children. Age, mean (range) 10...

  18. Association of neopterin as a marker of immune system activation and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mones M. Abu Shady

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate neopterin plasma concentrations in patients with active juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA and correlate them with disease activity. Methods: Sixty patients diagnosed as active JIA, as well as another 60 apparently healthy age- and gender-matched children as controls, were recruited from the Pediatrics Allergy and Immunology Clinic, Ain Shams University. Disease activity was assessed by the Juvenile Arthritis Disease Activity Score 27 (JADAS-27. Laboratory investigations were performed for all patients, including determination of hemoglobin concentration (Hgb, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, and C-reactive protein. Serum concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α, interleukin-6 (IL-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1, and neopterin were measured. Results: Significant differences were found between JIA patients and controls with regard to the mean levels of Hgb, ESR, TNF-α, IL-6, and MCP-1 (p  0.05. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that JADAS- 27 and ESR were the main variables associated with serum neopterin in JIA patients (p  0,05. A análise de regressão linear múltipla mostrou que o JADAS-27 e a TSE foram as principais variáveis associadas à neopterina sérica em pacientes com AIJ (p < 0,05. Conclusão: A elevação das concentrações plasmáticas de neopterina em pacientes com AIJ precoce pode indicar um estímulo de resposta imune. A neopterina sérica pode ser usada como um indicador sensível para analisar o histórico de inflamações e o escore de atividade da doença em pacientes com AIJ. Keywords: MCP-1, TNF-α, Rheumatoid arthritis, Palavras-chave: MCP-1, FNT-α, Artrite reumatoide

  19. Adalimumab plus Methotrexate for Uveitis in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanan, Athimalaipet V; Dick, Andrew D; Jones, Ashley P; McKay, Andrew; Williamson, Paula R; Compeyrot-Lacassagne, Sandrine; Hardwick, Ben; Hickey, Helen; Hughes, Dyfrig; Woo, Patricia; Benton, Diana; Edelsten, Clive; Beresford, Michael W

    2017-04-27

    Adalimumab, a fully human anti-tumor necrosis factor α monoclonal antibody, is effective in the treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). We tested the efficacy of adalimumab in the treatment of JIA-associated uveitis. In this multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial, we assessed the efficacy and safety of adalimumab in children and adolescents 2 years of age or older who had active JIA-associated uveitis. Patients who were taking a stable dose of methotrexate were randomly assigned in a 2:1 ratio to receive either adalimumab (at a dose of 20 mg or 40 mg, according to body weight) or placebo, administered subcutaneously every 2 weeks. Patients continued the trial regimen until treatment failure or until 18 months had elapsed. They were followed for up to 2 years after randomization. The primary end point was the time to treatment failure, defined according to a multicomponent intraocular inflammation score that was based on the Standardization of Uveitis Nomenclature criteria. The prespecified stopping criteria were met after the enrollment of 90 of 114 patients. We observed 16 treatment failures in 60 patients (27%) in the adalimumab group versus 18 treatment failures in 30 patients (60%) in the placebo group (hazard ratio, 0.25; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.12 to 0.49; Ptreatment failure than placebo among children and adolescents with active JIA-associated uveitis who were taking a stable dose of methotrexate. Patients who received adalimumab had a much higher incidence of adverse events and serious adverse events than those who received placebo. (Funded by the NIHR Health Technology Assessment Programme and Arthritis Research UK; SYCAMORE EudraCT number, 2010-021141-41 .).

  20. O adulto com artrite idiopática juvenil poliarticular The adult patient with polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liz Wallin

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Crianças com a forma poliarticular da artrite idiopática juvenil (AIJ, ao entrarem na idade adulta, têm um quadro similar ao de pacientes com artrite reumatoide (AR de início no adulto. No presente estudo comparam-se características clínicas e imunológicas desses dois grupos de pacientes. Para isso, foram estudados vinte adultos com AIJ poliarticular e cinquenta pacientes com AR (pareados para sexo e tempo de duração de doença, para presença de autoanticorpos, nódulos subcutâneos, síndrome de Sjögren secundária, hipotireoidismo e para a determinação de índices funcionais e antropométricos. Encontraram-se, nesses dois grupos, características similares, exceto pela presença de fator reumatoide (menor no grupo de AIJ poliarticular; P = 0,026 e menor IMC nos pacientes com AIJ poliarticular (P When children with polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA reach adulthood, they have a condition similar to that of patients with adult onset rheumatoid arthritis (RA. In the present study, the clinical and immunological characteristics of these two groups of patients are compared. The presence of autoantibodies, subcutaneous nodules, secondary Sjögren syndrome, and hypothyroidism, was determined in 20 adult patients with polyarticular JIA and in 50 patients with RA (paired for gender and duration of the disease, as well as the determination of functional and anthropometric indexes. Both groups had similar characteristics, except for the presence of rheumatoid factor (lower in the polyarticular JIA group; P = 0.026 and lower BMI in patients with polyarticular JIA (P < 0.001.

  1. The German version of the Juvenile Arthritis Multidimensional Assessment Report (JAMAR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzinger, Dirk; Foell, Dirk; Horneff, Gerd; Foeldvari, Ivan; Tzaribachev, Nikolay; Tzaribachev, Catrin; Minden, Kirsten; Kallinich, Tilmann; Ganser, Gerd; Clara, Lucia; Haas, Johannes-Peter; Hügle, Boris; Huppertz, Hans-Iko; Weller, Frank; Consolaro, Alessandro; Bovis, Francesca; Ruperto, Nicolino

    2018-04-01

    The Juvenile Arthritis Multidimensional Assessment Report (JAMAR) is a new parent/patient reported outcome measure that enables a thorough assessment of the disease status in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). We report the results of the cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the parent and patient versions of the JAMAR in the German language. The reading comprehension of the questionnaire was tested in 10 JIA parents and patients. The participating centres were asked to collect demographic and clinical data along the JAMAR questionnaire in 100 consecutive JIA patients or all consecutive patients seen in a 6-month period and to administer the JAMAR to 100 healthy children and their parents. The statistical validation phase explored descriptive statistics and the psychometric issues of the JAMAR: the three Likert assumptions, floor/ceiling effects, internal consistency, Cronbach's alpha, interscale correlations, test-retest reliability, and construct validity (convergent and discriminant validity). A total of 319 JIA patients (2.8% systemic, 36.7% oligoarticular, 23.5% RF negative polyarthritis, and 37% other categories) and 100 healthy children were enrolled in eight centres. The JAMAR components discriminated well healthy subjects from JIA patients. All JAMAR components revealed good psychometric performances. In conclusion, the German version of the JAMAR is a valid tool for the assessment of children with JIA and is suitable for use both in routine clinical practice and in clinical research.

  2. Experience of Using Tocilizumab in a Patient with Polyarticular Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis with Cervical Spine Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Ligostaeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes a case of polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis lesions of the cervical spine. This clinical example demonstrates the high efficiency of tocilizumab in a patient with polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis with lesions of the cervical spine. After the first injection of tocilizumab a decrease in the following was observed: pain in the cervical spine and affected joints, severity of functional disorders in the temporomandibular joint and the interphalangeal joints, cervical spine; a 30% improvement in the JADAS, ACRpedi30 was achieved. By the 8th week of therapy the proliferative changes in the joints of the hands and arthralgia decreased, as well as the duration of morning stiffness. After 3 months there was a decrease in the activity of Jia (DAS28, and the erythrocyte sedimentation rate and serum concentrations of C-reactive protein. Adverse effects during therapy with tocilizumab were not observed. The disease activity decreased, (assessed using the visual analog scale (VAS, as well as the functional impairment (assessed using the Children Health Assessment Questionnaire (CHAQ. The emotional status and quality of life of the child and her family improved significantly.

  3. The Serbian version of the Juvenile Arthritis Multidimensional Assessment Report (JAMAR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susic, Gordana; Vojinovic, Jelena; Vijatov-Djuric, Gordana; Stevanovic, Dejan; Lazarevic, Dragana; Djurovic, Nada; Novakovic, Dusica; Consolaro, Alessandro; Bovis, Francesca; Ruperto, Nicolino

    2018-04-01

    The Juvenile Arthritis Multidimensional Assessment Report (JAMAR) is a new parent/patient-reported outcome measure that enables a thorough assessment of the disease status in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). We report the results of the cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the parent and patient versions of the JAMAR in the Serbian language. The reading comprehension of the questionnaire was tested in 10 JIA parents and patients. Each participating centre was asked to collect demographic, clinical data and the JAMAR in 100 consecutive JIA patients or all consecutive patients seen in a 6-month period and to administer the JAMAR to 100 healthy children and their parents. The statistical validation phase explored descriptive statistics and the psychometric issues of the JAMAR: the three Likert assumptions, floor/ceiling effects, internal consistency, Cronbach's alpha, interscale correlations, test-retest reliability, and construct validity (convergent and discriminant validity). A total of 248 JIA patients (5.2% systemic, 44.3% oligoarticular, 23.8% RF-negative polyarthritis, 26.7% other categories) and 100 healthy children were enrolled in three centres. The JAMAR components discriminated healthy subjects from JIA patients. All JAMAR components revealed good psychometric performances. In conclusion, the Serbian version of the JAMAR is a valid tool for the assessment of children with JIA and is suitable for use both in routine clinical practice and clinical research.

  4. [Uveitis associated with juvenile idiopathic arthritis : Optimization of immunomodulatory therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiligenhaus, A; Tappeiner, C; Walscheid, K; Heinz, C

    2016-05-01

    Uveitis associated with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA-associated uveitis) is a vision-threatening disorder with a high complication rate. Besides early diagnosis within screening programs an adequate therapy is essential for improvement of the long-term prognosis. Corticosteroid therapy is often insufficient. In addition to conventional immunosuppression, immunomodulatory drugs, so-called biologicals, are novel highly effective treatment modalities. A systematic search of the literature was carried out for biologicals currently used in the treatment of JIA-associated uveitis. Review of current publications, summary of treatment guidelines and discussion of treatment options for therapy refractive patients. In accordance with the current recommendations tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors are administered if uveitis inactivity cannot be achieved with topical corticosteroids and in the next stage with immunosuppressants (methotrexate preferred). According to the currently available data adalimumab is then preferred. When the effectiveness of TNF inhibitors ceases during long-term administration and/or recurrences, other biological response modifiers are attractive treatment options (e. g. lymphocyte inhibitors or specific receptor antagonists). The TNF inhibitors are of major importance for the treatment of JIA-associated uveitis. Prospective studies and registries would be desirable in order to be able to compare the value of TNF inhibitors and other biologicals and for optimization of treatment recommendations.

  5. Treatment of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis-Associated Uveitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İlknur Tuğal-Tutkun

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric uveitis may be a serious health problem because of the lifetime burden of vision loss due to severe complications if the problem is not adequately treated. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA-associated uveitis is characterized by insidious onset and potentially blinding chronic anterior uveitis. Periodic ophthalmologic screening is of utmost importance for early diagnosis of uveitis. Early diagnosis and proper immunomodulatory treatment are essential for good visual prognosis. The goal of treatment is to achieve enduring drug-free remission. The choice of therapeutic regimen needs to be tailored to each individual case. One must keep in mind that patients under immunomodulatory treatment should be monitored closely due to possible side effects. Local and systemic corticosteroids have long been the mainstay of therapy; however, long-term corticosteroid therapy should be avoided due to serious side effects. Steroid-sparing agents in the treatment of JIA-associated uveitis include antimetabolites and biologic agents in refractory cases. Among the various immunomodulatory agents, methotrexate is generally the first choice, as it has a well-established safety and efficacy profile in pediatric cases and does not appear to increase the risk of cancer. Other classic immunomodulators that may also be used in combination with methotrexate include azathioprine, mycophenolate mofetil, and cyclosporin A. Biologic agents, primarily tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors including infliximab or adalimumab, should be considered in cases of treatment failure with classic immunomodulatory agents.

  6. Treatment of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis-Associated Uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oray, Merih; Tuğal-Tutkun, İlknur

    2016-04-01

    Pediatric uveitis may be a serious health problem because of the lifetime burden of vision loss due to severe complications if the problem is not adequately treated. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated uveitis is characterized by insidious onset and potentially blinding chronic anterior uveitis. Periodic ophthalmologic screening is of utmost importance for early diagnosis of uveitis. Early diagnosis and proper immunomodulatory treatment are essential for good visual prognosis. The goal of treatment is to achieve enduring drug-free remission. The choice of therapeutic regimen needs to be tailored to each individual case. One must keep in mind that patients under immunomodulatory treatment should be monitored closely due to possible side effects. Local and systemic corticosteroids have long been the mainstay of therapy; however, long-term corticosteroid therapy should be avoided due to serious side effects. Steroid-sparing agents in the treatment of JIA-associated uveitis include antimetabolites and biologic agents in refractory cases. Among the various immunomodulatory agents, methotrexate is generally the first choice, as it has a well-established safety and efficacy profile in pediatric cases and does not appear to increase the risk of cancer. Other classic immunomodulators that may also be used in combination with methotrexate include azathioprine, mycophenolate mofetil, and cyclosporin A. Biologic agents, primarily tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors including infliximab or adalimumab, should be considered in cases of treatment failure with classic immunomodulatory agents.

  7. Audiovestibular function in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Gharib, Amani Mohamed; El-Barbary, Amal Mohamad; Aboelhawa, Marwa Ahmed; Elkholy, Radwa Mostafa

    2016-10-01

    It was found that JIR children had potential sensory neural hearing loss and vestibular affection. Therefore, this study recommends: early complete audiologic evaluation of JIA child followed by regular follow-up, including TOAEs, extended high-frequency audiometry, and VNG. This follow-up is important for preliminary diagnosis and management in order to prevent the negative impact of hearing loss on a child's life. The aim of this study was to assess hearing in children with Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and compare them with a healthy control group. In addition to conventional audiometry, extended high-frequency audiometry and Transient otoacoustic emission (TOAEs) were used. This study also tried to investigate the vestibular function in JIR children by videonystagmography (VNG). The study group comprised of 28 children with JIR and 28 healthy children. All subjects were examined audiologically using basic audiological evaluation, high-frequency audiometry, TOAEs, and VNG. Children with JIR had apparent normal peripheral hearing in conventional audiometry; sub-clinical sensory neural hearing loss was detected. This sub-clinical hearing loss appeared in statistically significant difference between them and normal in high-frequency audiometry and TOAEs. VNG test results showed affected tracking and second tests.

  8. A critical appraisal of radiographic scoring systems for assessment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doria, Andrea S.; Babyn, Paul S.; Feldman, Brian

    2006-01-01

    Assessing structural damage to joints over time is essential for evaluating the effectiveness of therapeutic interventions for patients with inflammatory arthritis. Although radiography is able to quantify joint damage, the changes found with conventional radiography early in the disease course are nonspecific, and late radiographic changes are often irreversible. Although many clinical trials on drug development for children still use radiographic scales as endpoints for the study, more specific therapies have been developed for juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) that would enable imaging to ''fine-tune'' patients to placement into specific treatment algorithms. As a result, new imaging scales to identify early abnormalities are clearly needed. Many pediatric rheumatology centers around the world persistently apply adult-designed radiographic scoring systems to evaluate the progression of JIA. Few pediatric-targeted radiographic scales are available for assessment of progression of JIA in growing joints, and the clinimetric and psychometric properties of such scales have been poorly investigated. We present a critique to the evaluative, discriminative, and predictive roles of the van der Heijde modification of Sharp's radiographic method, a scale originally designed to assess damage to joints of adults with rheumatoid arthritis, when it is applied to a pediatric population. We discuss the advantages and drawbacks of this radiographic scoring system for assessing growing joints and the ability of MRI to overcome inadequacies of conventional radiography. (orig.)

  9. The Greek version of the Juvenile Arthritis Multidimensional Assessment Report (JAMAR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratsidou-Gertsi, Polyxeni; Trachana, Maria; Kanakoudi-Tsakalidou, Florence; Tsitsami, Elena; Tsinti, Maria; Vougiouka, Olga; Siamopoulou, Antigoni; Alfantaki, Sapfo; Stavrakidou, Maria; Consolaro, Alessandro; Bovis, Francesca; Ruperto, Nicolino

    2018-04-01

    The Juvenile Arthritis Multidimensional Assessment Report (JAMAR) is a new parent/patient-reported outcome measure that enables a thorough assessment of the disease status in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). We report the results of the cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the parent and patient versions of the JAMAR in the Greek language. The reading comprehension of the questionnaire was tested in 10 JIA parents and patients. Each participating centre was asked to collect demographics, clinical data, and the JAMAR from 100 consecutive JIA patients or all consecutive patients seen in a 6-month period and to administer the JAMAR to 100 healthy children and their parents. The statistical validation phase explored descriptive statistics and the psychometric issues of the JAMAR: the three Likert assumptions, floor/ceiling effects, internal consistency, Cronbach's alpha, interscale correlations, test-retest reliability, and construct validity (convergent and discriminant validity). The Greek JAMAR was fully cross-culturally adapted with two forward and three backward translations. A total of 272 JIA patients (5.9% systemic, 57.7% oligoarticular, 21.3% RF negative poly-arthritis, 15.1% other categories), and 100 healthy children were enrolled in all centres. The JAMAR components discriminated well-healthy subjects from JIA patients; notably, there was no significant difference between healthy subjects and their affected peers in psychosocial quality of life and school-related items. All JAMAR components revealed good psychometric performances. In conclusion, the Greek version of the JAMAR is a valid tool for the assessment of children with JIA and is suitable for use both in routine clinical practice and in clinical research.

  10. EFFICACY OF ABATACEPT IN A PATIENT WITH POLYARTICULAR JUVENILE IDIOPATHIC ARTHRITIS REFRACTORY TO TNF-α

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. M. Spivakovskii

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the experience of the application of genetically engineered biological drug and an inhibitor of T lymphocyte costimulation – abatacept – at a standard dose in a child with polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis. The disease was characterized by the development of uveitis, as well as the ineffectiveness of two inhibitors of tumour necrosis factor α treatment. Successful relief of acute inflammatory reaction of the joints on the background of the normalization of laboratory indicators of disease severity in the application of abatacept in combination with methotrexate was detected. The study gave the characteristics of the dynamics of clinical recovery of the patient and described the dynamic changes of clinical and laboratory symptoms. A steady improvement of the child under nine-month follow-up on the background of the selected scheme basic anti-inflammatory therapy should be noted. 

  11. Accelerometry-based monitoring of daily physical activity in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, M; Twilt, M; Andersen, L B

    2015-01-01

    with regard to disease activity and physical variables and to compare the data with those from healthy age- and gender-matched controls.Method: Patients underwent an evaluation of disease activity, functional ability, physical capacity, and pain. Accelerometer monitoring was assessed using the GT1M Acti...... range of motion (ROM). No correlation was found between PA and pain scores, functional ability, and hypermobility. Patients with involvement of ankles or hips demonstrated significantly lower levels of PA.Conclusions: Children with JIA are less physically active and have lower physical capacity......Objectives: Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) may cause functional impairment, reduced participation in physical activity (PA) and, over time, physical deconditioning. The aim of this study was to objectively monitor daily free-living PA in 10-16-year-old children with JIA using accelerometry...

  12. Gene Expression Deconvolution for Uncovering Molecular Signatures in Response to Therapy in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ang Cui

    Full Text Available Gene expression-based signatures help identify pathways relevant to diseases and treatments, but are challenging to construct when there is a diversity of disease mechanisms and treatments in patients with complex diseases. To overcome this challenge, we present a new application of an in silico gene expression deconvolution method, ISOpure-S1, and apply it to identify a common gene expression signature corresponding to response to treatment in 33 juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA patients. Using pre- and post-treatment gene expression profiles only, we found a gene expression signature that significantly correlated with a reduction in the number of joints with active arthritis, a measure of clinical outcome (Spearman rho = 0.44, p = 0.040, Bonferroni correction. This signature may be associated with a decrease in T-cells, monocytes, neutrophils and platelets. The products of most differentially expressed genes include known biomarkers for JIA such as major histocompatibility complexes and interleukins, as well as novel biomarkers including α-defensins. This method is readily applicable to expression datasets of other complex diseases to uncover shared mechanistic patterns in heterogeneous samples.

  13. Seroprevalence of parvovirus B19 IgG in children affected by juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissbrich, Benedikt; Süß-Fröhlich, Yvonne; Girschick, Hermann J

    2007-01-01

    Parvovirus (PV) B19 is the causative agent of the childhood disease erythema infectiosum. An association of PV B19 with chronic arthropathies, sometimes resembling rheumatoid arthritis or juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), has repeatedly been described. Other studies, however, have failed to identify any such relationship. In order to study further whether there is a link between PV B19 and JIA, we determined the prevalence of PV B19 specific IgG antibodies in serum samples from children with rheumatoid diseases and compared it with the prevalence in unaffected children We reasoned that if there is an association between PV B19 and JIA, then the prevalence of PV B19 IgG in the children with JIA should be higher than in the control group. PV B19 IgG status was tested in 406 children with JIA and related diseases, and in 146 children constituting a control group. The percentage of PV B19 IgG positive children was not significantly elevated in the disease subgroups compared with age-matched control groups. In conclusion, our findings do not support the hypothesis that human parvovirus B19 is involved in the pathogenesis of JIA. PMID:17760961

  14. Disk abnormality coexists with any degree of synovial and osseous abnormality in the temporomandibular joints of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkhus, Eva; Smith, Hans-Joergen; Arvidsson, Linda Z.; Larheim, Tore A.; Flatoe, Berit; Hetlevik, Siri O.

    2016-01-01

    MRI manifestation of temporomandibular joint arthritis is frequently reported in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. However, little attention has been paid to temporomandibular joint disk abnormalities. To assess combinations of MRI findings in the symptomatic temporomandibular joint in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis with focus on disk abnormalities. This was a retrospective study of 46 patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis, mean age 12 years (range: 5-17 years). Mean disease duration was 70 months (standard deviation: 61 months). MR images of 92 temporomandibular joints were scored for thickness of abnormally enhancing synovium (synovitis), joint effusion, bone marrow oedema, abnormal bone shape, bone erosion and disk abnormalities. The 92 temporomandibular joints were categorized as A: No synovitis and normal bone shape (30/92; 33%), B: Synovitis and normal bone shape (14/92: 15%), C: Synovitis and abnormal bone shape (38/92; 41%) and D: No synovitis but abnormal bone shape (10/92; 11%). Thirty-six of the 46 patients (78%) had synovitis and 33/46 (72%) had abnormal bone shape, most frequently in combination (30/46; 65%). Disk abnormalities (flat disk, fragmented disk, adherent disk and displaced disk) were found in 29/46 patients (63%). Disk abnormalities were found in all categories of juvenile idiopathic arthritis involved temporomandibular joints (B: 8/14 [57%]; C: 25/38 [66%] and D: 7/10 [70%]). Disk displacement was found in half of the joints (7/14) in category B. Synovitis was most pronounced in this category. Disk abnormalities were frequent. Disk displacement also occurred in joints with early temporomandibular joint arthritis, i.e., with normal bone shape. Other disk abnormalities were found in joints with bone abnormalities. Attention should be paid to disk abnormalities both in early and long-standing temporomandibular joint arthritis in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. (orig.)

  15. Disk abnormality coexists with any degree of synovial and osseous abnormality in the temporomandibular joints of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkhus, Eva; Smith, Hans-Joergen [Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Oslo (Norway); University of Oslo, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Oslo (Norway); Arvidsson, Linda Z.; Larheim, Tore A. [University of Oslo, Department of Maxillofacial Radiology, Institute of Clinical Dentistry, Oslo (Norway); Flatoe, Berit; Hetlevik, Siri O. [Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Department of Rheumatology, Oslo (Norway); University of Oslo, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Oslo (Norway)

    2016-03-15

    MRI manifestation of temporomandibular joint arthritis is frequently reported in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. However, little attention has been paid to temporomandibular joint disk abnormalities. To assess combinations of MRI findings in the symptomatic temporomandibular joint in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis with focus on disk abnormalities. This was a retrospective study of 46 patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis, mean age 12 years (range: 5-17 years). Mean disease duration was 70 months (standard deviation: 61 months). MR images of 92 temporomandibular joints were scored for thickness of abnormally enhancing synovium (synovitis), joint effusion, bone marrow oedema, abnormal bone shape, bone erosion and disk abnormalities. The 92 temporomandibular joints were categorized as A: No synovitis and normal bone shape (30/92; 33%), B: Synovitis and normal bone shape (14/92: 15%), C: Synovitis and abnormal bone shape (38/92; 41%) and D: No synovitis but abnormal bone shape (10/92; 11%). Thirty-six of the 46 patients (78%) had synovitis and 33/46 (72%) had abnormal bone shape, most frequently in combination (30/46; 65%). Disk abnormalities (flat disk, fragmented disk, adherent disk and displaced disk) were found in 29/46 patients (63%). Disk abnormalities were found in all categories of juvenile idiopathic arthritis involved temporomandibular joints (B: 8/14 [57%]; C: 25/38 [66%] and D: 7/10 [70%]). Disk displacement was found in half of the joints (7/14) in category B. Synovitis was most pronounced in this category. Disk abnormalities were frequent. Disk displacement also occurred in joints with early temporomandibular joint arthritis, i.e., with normal bone shape. Other disk abnormalities were found in joints with bone abnormalities. Attention should be paid to disk abnormalities both in early and long-standing temporomandibular joint arthritis in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. (orig.)

  16. Juvenile Gaucher disease simulating osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.H.; Ortega, J.A.; Heisel, M.A.

    1981-01-01

    A case in which several imaging procedures suggested juvenile Gaucher disease in a child who presented with symptomatology of osteomyelitis is discussed. The 20-month girl was given a Technetium-99m radionuclide skeletal examination which revealed intense uptake of tracer agents along the shaft of the right femur. It was also found that the liver and spleen were dramatically Ga-67 avid. The bone pain symptomatology suggested an osteomyelitis of the femur, but skeletal scintigraphy with Tc-99m-labeled bone tracer demonstrated photopenic areas involving the femur, suggesting that the bone pain may have been due to marrow packed with Gaucher cells. This overexpansion of the marrow may lead to microfractures with remodeling seen radiographically as periosteal new bone and scintigraphically as increased periosteal deposition of tracer agent. The radiogallium study was useful to exclude an underlying osteomyelitis in the involved femurs. Although juvenile Gaucher disease is unusual, it should be considered in any child who presents with the constellation of hepatosplenomegaly and bone pain simulating osteomyelitis

  17. Juvenile Gaucher disease simulating osteomyelitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, J.H.; Ortega, J.A.; Heisel, M.A.

    1981-10-01

    A case in which several imaging procedures suggested juvenile Gaucher disease in a child who presented with symptomatology of osteomyelitis is discussed. The 20-month girl was given a Technetium-99m radionuclide skeletal examination which revealed intense uptake of tracer agents along the shaft of the right femur. It was also found that the liver and spleen were dramatically Ga-67 avid. The bone pain symptomatology suggested an osteomyelitis of the femur, but skeletal scintigraphy with Tc-99m-labeled bone tracer demonstrated photopenic areas involving the femur, suggesting that the bone pain may have been due to marrow packed with Gaucher cells. This overexpansion of the marrow may lead to microfractures with remodeling seen radiographically as periosteal new bone and scintigraphically as increased periosteal deposition of tracer agent. The radiogallium study was useful to exclude an underlying osteomyelitis in the involved femurs. Although juvenile Gaucher disease is unusual, it should be considered in any child who presents with the constellation of hepatosplenomegaly and bone pain simulating osteomyelitis.

  18. Medication adherence in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liana Silveira Adriano

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate pharmacological treatment adherence of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis, attended in an outpatient pharmacy at a tertiary hospital in northeastern Brazil. Methods: The analysis of adherence was performed along with caregivers, through a structured questionnaire based on Morisky, Green and Levine, which enabled the categorization of adherence in “highest”, “moderate” or “low” grades, and through evaluating medication dispensing registers, which classified the act of getting medications at the pharmacy as “regular” or “irregular”. Drug Related Problems (DRP were identified through the narrative of caregivers and classified according to the Second Granada Consensus. Then, a pharmaceutical orientation chart with information about the therapeutic regimen was applied, in order to function as a guide for issues that influenced adherence. Results: A total of 43 patients was included, with a mean age of 11.12 years, and 65.1% (n = 28 were female. Applying the questionnaire, it was found “highest” adherence in 46.5% (n = 20 patients, “moderate” adherence in 48.8% (n = 21, and “low” adherence in 4.7% (n = 2. Through an analysis of the medication dispensing registers, a lower level of adherence was observed: only 25.6% (n = 11 of the participants received “regularly” the medications. Twenty-six DRP was identified, and 84.6% (n = 22 were classified as real. There were no significant associations between socio-demographic variables and adherence, although some caregivers have reported difficulty in accessing the medicines and in understanding the treatment. Conclusion: Our findings showed problems in the adherence process related to inattention, forgetfulness and irregularity in getting medicines, reinforcing the need for the development of strategies to facilitate a better understanding of treatment and to ensure adherence.

  19. Orofacial symptoms related to temporomandibular joint arthritis in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: smallest detectable difference in self-reported pain intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoustrup, Peter; Kristensen, Kasper D; Verna, Carlalberta; Küseler, Annelise; Herlin, Troels; Pedersen, Thomas K

    2012-12-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) inflammation in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) may lead to mandibular growth disturbances and interfere with optimal joint and muscle function. Orofacial symptoms are common clinical findings in relation to TMJ arthritis in adolescence. Knowledge about their clinical manifestation is important for TMJ arthritis diagnosis, treatment choice, and outcome evaluation. The aim of our prospective observational study was to evaluate and describe the frequency, the main complaints, and the localization of TMJ arthritis-related orofacial symptoms. The smallest detectable differences (SDD) for minimal, average, and maximal pain were estimated. Thirty-three patients with JIA and arthritis-related orofacial symptoms in relation to 55 affected TMJ were included in our questionnaire study (mean age 14.11 yrs). Calculation of the SDD was based on a duplicate assessment 45 min after the first questionnaire was completed. The majority of the patients had common orofacial symptoms during mastication and maximal mouth opening procedures. Persistent orofacial symptoms were rare. The TMJ area in combination with the masseter muscle region was the orofacial region where symptoms were most common. The SDD for minimal, average, and maximal pain were between 10 and 14 mm on a visual analog scale. Our study offers new knowledge about TMJ arthritis-related orofacial symptoms that may aid diagnosis and clinical decision-making. We suggest that TMJ arthritis-related orofacial symptoms could be understood as products of the primary TMJ inflammation in combination with secondary myogenic and functional issues.

  20. Clinical features of children with enthesitis-related juvenile idiopathic arthritis / juvenile spondyloarthritis followed in a French tertiary care pediatric rheumatology centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goirand, Maxime; Breton, Sylvain; Chevallier, Frédéric; Duong, Ngoc-Phoi; Uettwiller, Florence; Melki, Isabelle; Mouy, Richard; Wouters, Carine; Bader-Meunier, Brigitte; Job-Deslandre, Chantal; Quartier, Pierre

    2018-04-02

    Childhood-onset spondyloarthropathies usually start with enthesitis and peripheral arthritis. However, axial disease may develop afterward. Patients are most often classified, following revised (Edmonton 2011) ILAR criteria, as enthesitis-related arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, or unclassified juvenile idiopathic arthritis, particularly in cases of psoriasis in the patient or a first-degree relative. In adults, peripheral spondyloarthritis is classified by ASAS criteria. We retrospectively studied patients with childhood-onset spondyloarthropathies followed for more than one year in our referral centre. We did not exclude patients with a personal or familial history of psoriasis. We included 114 patients followed between January 2008 and December 2015 for a median of 2.5 years (IQR = 2.3). Sixty-nine per-cent of patients fulfilled the revised ILAR classification criteria for enthesitis-related arthritis, and 92% the ASAS criteria for peripheral spondyolarthritis (p <  0.001). Axial disease and sacroiliitis were rare at disease onset. However, they appeared during follow-up in 63% and 47% of cases respectively, after a median disease duration of 2.6 (IC 95% [2.2-4.4]) and 5.3 years (IC 95% [4.1-7.7]), respectively. Multivariable analysis showed that familial history of spondyloarthritis was associated with the presence of sacroiliitis and active disease at the latest follow-up (OR = 3.61 [1.5-8.7], p <  0.01 and 2.98 [1.2-7.3], p = 0.02, respectively). Axial involvement developed in most patients within five years. Revised Edmonton criteria were less sensitive than ASAS criteria to classify patients as having childhood-onset spondyloarthropathies. The main risk factor for both sacroiliitis and persistent active disease was a familial history of spondyloarthritis.

  1. EFFICACY AND SAFETY OF ALENDRONIC ACID IN PATIENTS WITH JUVENILE RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS AND OSTEOPOROSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.O. Lisitsin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Search for and practical application of new medications to treat of osteoporosis is one of the critical issues in pediatric rheumatology. The article reviews the efficacy and safety of alendronic acid in 64 subjects with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and systemic osteoporosis. It is demonstrated that alendronate-based therapy in weekly 1 mg/kg doses over 12 months facilitated reliably increased bonedensity, decreased intensity of pain syndrome, and lowered C-terminal telopeptide serum concentration, which indicates improved bone metabolism processes.Key words: juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis, children, treatment, bisphosphonates, alendronic acid. (Pediatric Pharmacology. – 2010; 7(1:48-54

  2. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis and athletic participation: are we adequately preparing for sports integration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taxter, Alysha; Foss, Kim Barber; Melson, Paula; Ford, Kevin R; Shaffer, Michael; Myer, Gregory D

    2012-09-01

    Children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) now have well-controlled disease due to improved therapies and management strategies. Children with JIA are more active than in the past and often participate in dynamic, high-loading sports. Standard measures of disease control include examination findings, laboratory values, and patient-directed surveys. However, these standards do not address the subtle deficits in biomechanics and neuromuscular control, which could place affected joints at higher risk for injury. Currently, there are limited evidence-based guidelines to structure conditioning recommendations as to the fitness and mechanics needed to provide safe integration into sports in this population; therefore, tools that objectively measure function with high accuracy and precision may be warranted. Previous work using 3-dimensional motion analysis demonstrated usefulness in guiding physical therapy treatment to correct these deficits. The use of a multidisciplinary team, including physical therapy, rheumatology, and sports medicine, is crucial for preparing these children to return to play. We suggest that the child transition into a sport preparatory-conditioning program to address any underlying deficits. A pediatric exercise specialist who is sensitive to the needs of this population can work with a physical therapist to then appropriately integrate the child safely into sport. Encouraging an active lifestyle is vital to the management of JIA and does not worsen the symptoms associated with childhood arthritis.

  3. Lack of Association between STAT4 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms and Iranian Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslani, Saeed; Mahmoudi, Mahdi; Salmaninejad, Arash; Poursani, Shiva; Ziaee, Vahid; Rezaei, Nima

    2017-06-01

    Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) is a common chronic systemic autoimmune disease in children. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of signal transducer and activator of transcription 4 (STAT4) gene are suspected to have association with the risk of autoimmune diseases. Previous investigations have indicated that the STAT4 rs7574865 T allele was significantly associated with rheumatoid arthritis. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the association of STAT4 SNPs with JRA in Iranian population. T allele of STAT4 rs7574865 SNP was less frequent in patients than in controls, and the difference was not significant (p = 0.19, OR = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.44 -1.17). In addition, G allele of this SNP was frequent but not significant in JRA patients (p = 0.19, OR = 1.38, 95% CI: 0.85-2.25). Neither alleles nor genotypes of rs7601754 SNP of STAT4 gene demonstrated associations with JRA. We recognize that gene variants of STAT4 did not affect JRA susceptibility in Iranian population.

  4. Retrospective Study Evaluating Treatment Decisions and Outcomes of Childhood Uveitis Not Associated with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardar, Elham; Dusser, Perrine; Rousseau, Antoine; Bodaghi, Bahram; Labetoulle, Marc; Koné-Paut, Isabelle

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate treatment, ocular complications and outcomes of children with pediatric uveitis not associated with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. This was a retrospective chart review of pediatric uveitis in children under 16 years of age, recruited from the pediatric rheumatology department at Bicêtre Hospital from 2005 to 2015. Patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis-associated and infectious uveitis were excluded. We used the Standardization of Uveitis Nomenclature Working Group to classify uveitis, disease activity, and treatment end points. We enrolled 56 patients and 102 affected eyes. The mean age at diagnosis was 10 ± 3.5 years (range 3-15), and the mean follow-up 4.2 ± 3.3 years (1-15). The main diagnoses were idiopathic (55%), Behçet disease (15%), and sarcoidosis (5%). The main localization was panuveitis in 44 of 102 eyes (43%). Corticosteroid sparing treatment was needed in 62 of 102 eyes (60%). Second-line therapies included methotrexate and azathioprine, and the third-line therapy was a biologic agent, mainly infliximab, in 33 of 102 eyes (32%). Infliximab achieved uveitis inactivity in 14 of 18 eyes (80%), in all etiologies. Severe complications were present in 68 of 102 eyes (67%). The most common were synechiae 33% of eyes, cataract (20%), and macular edema (25%). Of these, 37% were present at diagnosis. Remission was achieved in 22 of 102 eyes (21%). Conventional therapies were insufficient to treat many of the cases of posterior or panuveitis. This study underlines the need for earlier and more aggressive treatment and antitumor necrosis factor-α therapy was rapidly efficient in most cases of refractory uveitis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Reiter disease or reactive arthritis?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppinger, S; Schmitt, J; Meurer, M

    2006-04-01

    There is an ongoing international discussion on whether the condition reactive arthritis should be named after a former Nazi functionary. The German dermatological community should participate in this debate. In 1916, Hans Reiter described a disease with the symptoms urethritis, conjunctivitis, and arthritis, which was later named after him. After becoming titular professor in May 1918, Reiter was appointed director of the regional public health department Mecklenburg-Schwerin in 1926. At the same time he taught social hygiene at the University of Rostock, where he was appointed full professor in 1928. In 1931, Hans Reiter became a member of the National Socialist German Workers Party (NSDAP). In July 1932 he was elected representative of the NSDAP to the seventh assembly of Mecklenburg-Schwerin. After becoming its acting director in July 1933, Reiter was appointed president of the Reich public health department in Berlin on October 1, 1933. Both his excellent professional qualifications, as well as his National Socialist attitudes, were considered key criteria for taking over this important position. As the president of the Reich public health department, Reiter was said to have known about the conduct of experiments with typhus-fever at the concentration camp Buchenwald in which 250 humans died. From the end of the Second World War until 1947, Reiter was imprisoned in the Nuremberg Prison for War Criminals, but never convicted of a crime.

  6. A randomised controlled trial of the clinical effectiveness, safety and cost-effectiveness of adalimumab in combination with methotrexate for the treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis associated uveitis (SYCAMORE Trial)

    OpenAIRE

    Ramanan, Athimalaipet V; Dick, Andrew D; Benton, Diana; Compeyrot-Lacassagne, Sandrine; Dawoud, Dalia; Hardwick, Ben; Hickey, Helen; Hughes, Dyfrig; Jones, Ashley; Woo, Patricia; Edelsten, Clive; Beresford, Michael W

    2014-01-01

    Background Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common rheumatic disease in children. Children with JIA are at risk of inflammation of the uvea in the eye (uveitis). Overall, 20% to 25% of paediatric uveitis is associated with JIA. Major risk factors for development of uveitis in JIA are oligoarticular pattern of arthritis, an age at onset of arthritis of less than seven years of age, and antinuclear antibody positivity. In the initial stages of mild to moderate inflammation the uv...

  7. A randomised controlled trial of the clinical effectiveness, safety and cost-effectiveness of adalimumab in combination with methotrexate for the treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis associated uveitis (SYCAMORE Trial)

    OpenAIRE

    Ramanan, A. V.; Benton, D.; Dick, A. D.; Compeyrot-Lacassagne, S.; Woo, P.; Edelsten, C.; Hardwick, B.; Hickey, H.; Jones, A.; Beresford, M. W.; Dawoud, D.; Hughes, D.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common rheumatic disease in children. Children with JIA are at risk of inflammation of the uvea in the eye (uveitis). Overall, 20% to 25% of paediatric uveitis is associated with JIA. Major risk factors for development of uveitis in JIA are oligoarticular pattern of arthritis, an age at onset of arthritis of less than seven years of age, and antinuclear antibody positivity. In the initial stages of mild to moderate inflammation the u...

  8. Nailfold capillaroscopy in juvenile rheumatic diseases: known measures, patterns and indications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhold, K; Becker, M O

    2014-01-01

    Nailfold capillaroscopy has become an established method in adults for the evaluation of structural abnormalities of the microcirculation associated with rheumatic disease. It is a cornerstone for the diagnostic work-up of patients with Raynaud's phenomenon and the early diagnosis of systemic sclerosis. However, this non-invasive examination may also be valuable in children and adolescents with rheumatic diseases. Based on the scarce data available, this review focuses on capillaroscopic findings in healthy children and adolescents as well as in children with juvenile systemic sclerosis, juvenile dermatomyositis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and Raynaud's phenomenon. In addition, it outlines the potential benefits and limitations of nailfold capillaroscopy for routine care in paediatric rheumatology.

  9. Prediction of methotrexate intolerance in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a prospective, observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijkhuizen, Evert Hendrik Pieter; Bulatović Ćalasan, Maja; Pluijm, Saskia M F; de Rotte, Maurits C F J; Vastert, Sebastiaan J; Kamphuis, Sylvia; de Jonge, Robert; Wulffraat, Nico M

    2015-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) is an effective and safe drug in the treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Despite its safety, MTX-related gastrointestinal adverse effects before and after MTX administration, termed MTX intolerance, occur frequently, leading to non-compliance and potentially premature MTX termination. The aim of this study was to construct a risk model to predict MTX intolerance. In a prospective JIA cohort, clinical variables and single nucleotide polymorphisms were determined at MTX start. The Methotrexate Intolerance Severity Score was employed to measure MTX intolerance in the first year of treatment. MTX intolerance was most prevalent at 6 or 12 months after MTX start, which was defined as the outcome for the prediction model. The model was developed in 152 patients using multivariable logistic regression analysis and subsequently internally validated using bootstrapping. The prediction model included the following predictors: JIA category, antinuclear antibody, parent/patient assessment of pain, Juvenile Arthritis Disease Activity Score-27, thrombocytes, alanine aminotransferase and creatinine. The model classified 77.5% of patients correctly, and 66.7% of patients after internal validation by bootstrapping. The lowest predicted risk of MTX intolerance was 18.9% and the highest predicted risk was 85.9%. The prediction model was transformed into a risk score (range 0-17). At a cut-off of ≥6, sensitivity was 82.0%, specificity 56.1%, positive predictive value was 58.7% and negative predictive value 80.4%. This clinical prediction model showed moderate predictive power to detect MTX intolerance. To develop into a clinically usable tool, it should be validated in an independent cohort and updated with new predictors. Such an easy-to-use tool could then assist clinicians in identifying patients at risk to develop MTX intolerance, and in turn to monitor them closely and intervene timely in order to prevent the development of MTX intolerance

  10. The importance of an ophthalmologic examination in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-García, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Uveitis occurs within the first year of arthritis onset in 73% of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) considered at risk. The intraocular inflammation is characterized by an insidious onset and a silent and chronic clinical course capable of producing significant visual loss due to complications such as: cataract formation, secondary glaucoma, maculopathy and optic neuropathy. The absence of initial signs and symptoms, along with a deficient ophthalmic monitoring produce a delay in diagnosis with serious consequences. It has been estimated that 47% of JIA patients at risk for developing uveitis are legally blind (20/200 or worse) at least in one eye at the time of their first visit to the ophthalmologist. To reduce ocular complications and improve their visual outcome, it is necessary that rheumatologists refer all patients recently diagnosed (within the first month) with JIA for an ophthalmic evaluation, and maintain periodical follow-up visits based on classification and risk category of the disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. US findings of metacarpophalangeal joints in children with idiopathic juvenile arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karmazyn, Boaz; Bowyer, Suzanne L.; Murphy Schmidt, Kara; Ballinger, Susan H.; Beam, Thuy T.; Buckwalter, Kenneth; Ying, Jun

    2007-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common cause of chronic arthritis in children, with frequent involvement of the metacarpophalangeal joints (MCPJ). To compare US findings with those of radiography and clinical examination. All MCPJs in 20 children with JIA (17 females, median age 9.7 years, range 3.6 to 16.8 years) were evaluated clinically and imaged with gray-scale and color Doppler US, and 90 MCPJs were also imaged radiographically. Each MCPJ was graded on physical examination from 0 (normal) to 4 (severe) by the patient's rheumatologist. US demonstrated abnormalities in 64 of 200 MCPJs (32.0%), including pannus vascularity and/or tenosynovitis in 55 joints (27.5%) (pannus vascularity in 43, tenosynovitis in 40) and bone destruction in 25 joints (12.5%). Overall, US abnormalities and physical examination scores were significantly associated (P < 0.001). However, interobserver agreement between US and clinical evaluation was poor (kappa 0.1) and between US and radiography was only fair (kappa 0.4). US of the MCPJ in children with JIA can demonstrate cartilage thinning, bone erosions, and pannus vascularity. Abnormal US findings are significantly correlated with severity of disease as evaluated clinically. (orig.)

  12. US findings of metacarpophalangeal joints in children with idiopathic juvenile arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karmazyn, Boaz [Riley Hospital for Children, Radiology, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Bowyer, Suzanne L.; Murphy Schmidt, Kara; Ballinger, Susan H.; Beam, Thuy T. [Indiana University, Pediatric Rheumatology, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Buckwalter, Kenneth [University Hospital, Radiology, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Ying, Jun [University of Cincinnati, Biostatistics, Institute for the Study of Health, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2007-05-15

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common cause of chronic arthritis in children, with frequent involvement of the metacarpophalangeal joints (MCPJ). To compare US findings with those of radiography and clinical examination. All MCPJs in 20 children with JIA (17 females, median age 9.7 years, range 3.6 to 16.8 years) were evaluated clinically and imaged with gray-scale and color Doppler US, and 90 MCPJs were also imaged radiographically. Each MCPJ was graded on physical examination from 0 (normal) to 4 (severe) by the patient's rheumatologist. US demonstrated abnormalities in 64 of 200 MCPJs (32.0%), including pannus vascularity and/or tenosynovitis in 55 joints (27.5%) (pannus vascularity in 43, tenosynovitis in 40) and bone destruction in 25 joints (12.5%). Overall, US abnormalities and physical examination scores were significantly associated (P < 0.001). However, interobserver agreement between US and clinical evaluation was poor (kappa 0.1) and between US and radiography was only fair (kappa 0.4). US of the MCPJ in children with JIA can demonstrate cartilage thinning, bone erosions, and pannus vascularity. Abnormal US findings are significantly correlated with severity of disease as evaluated clinically. (orig.)

  13. Comics as an educational tool for children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelson, Amir; Rabinowicz, Noa; Reis, Yonit; Amarilyo, Gil; Harel, Liora; Hashkes, Philip J; Uziel, Yosef

    2017-09-02

    This study examined whether the comic book Neta and the Medikidz Explain JIA would improve disease-related knowledge and treatment adherence among patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). In this prospective cohort study, JIA patients answered 20 multiple-choice knowledge questions about their disease, before and after reading the comic book. Demographic, clinical, health-related quality of life and adherence data were recorded and correlated to the responses. We studied 61 patients with a mean age of 14 ± 3.3 (range 8-18) years, 67% female, 83% Jewish and 17% non-Jewish. Thirty-nine percent had oligoarthritis, 13% systemic, 32% polyarthritis 11% psoriatic and 5% enthesitis-related type JIA. The disease was active in 46%, 40% were treated with biologics/disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs, and 34% were in remission on medication. Among the 53 patients who completed before and after quizzes, average score increased from 63 to 80% (P comic book. Twenty-seven patients who also completed the quiz 1 year after the first reading retained their knowledge (79%). We did not find a statistically significant correlation between knowledge and age, sex, disease subtype, or Child Health Questionnaire quality of life scores. Adherence to medication use, physical therapy and rheumatology clinic visits were high at baseline; thus, these did not change after reading the comic. The comic booklet Neta and the Medikidz Explain JIA is a good educational tool for increasing disease-related knowledge in children with JIA.

  14. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Onset in a Neonate: A Rare Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolreza Malek

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: A common type of chronic arthritis in children and adolescents is juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA.According to the International League of Associations for Rheumatology (ILAR classification, JIA diagnostic criteria include age under 16 years and disease duration of six-weeks. Based on the number of involved joints in the first sixmonths of disease onset, JIA is categorized into oligoarticular or polyarticular subtypes. Age is a characteristic factor in the diagnosis of disease subsets; it is worth mentioning that cases younger than six months of age are seldom found in any of the subtypes. Case report: In this report, we present a rare case of JIA in an infant, presenting at 20 days of age. Effusion of the right hip joint was one of the primary manifestations of the disease. During hospitalization, she went through sepsis workup and a four-week antibiotic therapy for management of lower limb pseudoparalysis. In spite of antibiotic therapy, she developed effusion of a second joint. According to the course and duration of symptoms and ILAR classification forJIA, oligoarticular JIA was diagnosed and treated.Conclusion: In this case, infectious diseases, such as tuberculosis and brucellosis, and malignancies were ruled out as a cause of inflammation through bone marrow aspiration, culture, and tests; ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging showed no lytic and sclerotic lesions or a fracture. Our experience showed a rare case of JIA and suggested that JIA must be considered in children with joint inflammation at any age

  15. Uveitis in childhood : Complications and treatment with emphasis on juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijssens, K.M.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to gain more insight into the development of complications in childhood uveitis and to evaluate the treatment options for these mostly sight-threatening conditions with emphasis on juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated uveitis. The second aim was to investigate

  16. Impact of Uveitis on Quality of Life in Adult Patients With Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haasnoot, Anne Mieke J.W.; Sint Jago, Naïlah F.M.; Tekstra, Janneke; de Boer, Joke H.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To establish the impact of uveitis on the quality of life (QoL) in adult patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Methods: Adult patients with a history of JIA, both with (n = 31) or without (n = 51) chronic anterior uveitis, were included. Their scores on 3 validated QoL

  17. The enigma of uveitis in juvenile idiopathic arthritis : Genetic, immunologic and clinical aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haasnoot, A.J.W.

    2018-01-01

    Uveitis associated with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a sight-threatening inflammation of the eye, affecting up to 30% of children with JIA. Despite the fact that the association of uveitis in JIA was already described by Ohm in 1910 and has a life-long impact, it remains a poorly

  18. Risk factors for the development of cataract requiring surgery in uveitis associated with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijssens, K.M.; Rothova, A.; van de Vijver, D.A.M.C.; Stilma, J.S.; de Boer, J.H.

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: To identify the possible risk factors for the development of cataract requiring surgery in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated uveitis. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. METHODS: Data of 53 children with JIA-associated uveitis, of whom 27 had undergone cataract

  19. TREATMENT APPROACH FOR JUVENILE IDIOPATHIC ARTHRITIS-RELATED UVEITIS: 2012 UPDATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Zulian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic anterior uveitis is the most common extra-articular complication of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. It is more frequent in the early onset forms with a higher prevalence in the oligoarticular (40% than in other juvenile idiopathic arthritis subtypes (5–14%. The risk for severe visual impairment is still high due to the development of sight-threatening complications (synechiae, band keratopathy, cataract, glaucoma, cystoid macular oedema. Treatment is not standardized and requires a complex decision-making process, involving a close collaboration between paediatric ophthalmologist and rheumatologist. Topical therapy alone is often inadequate to control ocular inflammation and bulbar injections are too invasive to perform in children therefore immunosuppressive treatment is often advocated. Low dose methotrexate is the second-line agent mostly used although no controlled studies comparing effects of early to late methotrexate treatment have been reported. Mycophenolate mofetil is effective in controlling inflammation in methotrexate -refractory patients. Its efficacy, however, seems to be more relevant in intermediate or posterior uveitis, than in juvenile idiopathic arthritis uveitis and scleritis. Anti-TNFα agents, namely infliximab and adalimimab showed effectiveness in open-label studies but no wide controlled trials have been reported so far. Adalimimab is as effective as infliximab but has an easier way of administration and a better drug tolerance. Abatacept should be used in anti-TNF refractory patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis uveitis.

  20. Constructing an Explanation of Illness with Children: A Sample Case Study of Juvenile Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capurso, Michele; Lo Bianco, Maria; Cortis, Elisabetta; Rossetti, Corrado

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to create a book to explain juvenile arthritis to newly diagnosed children, starting with the narratives of currently ill children. The development of the book followed a socio-constructivist approach and occurred over several stages, including: design of a comic-based workbook; conducting a workshop with ill children to listen to…

  1. Feasibility and efficacy of intraarticular steroids (IAS) in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Sumit; Gupta, Rajiva; Lodha, Rakesh; Kabra, S K

    2009-03-01

    Thirteen children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) were treated with intraarticular steroid injection of triamcilone acetonide as a day care procedure. More than half (53.4%) the children were free of pain, limp and NSAID's use, with improvement in functional score at 12 weeks. No side effects were reported during the period of the study.

  2. Fundamental movement skills, physical fitness and physical activity among Australian children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulsegge, G.; Henschke, N; Mckay, D.M.; Chaitow, J.; West, K.; Broderick, C.; Singh-Grewal, D.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To describe fundamental movement skills (FMS), physical fitness and level of physical activity among Australian children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and compare this with healthy peers. Methods: Children aged 6-16 years with JIA were recruited from hospital rheumatology clinics and

  3. Increased frequency of HLA-DPw2 in pauciarticular onset juvenile chronic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ødum, Niels; Morling, Niels; Friis, J

    1986-01-01

    Thirty-six unrelated Danish patients with pauciarticular Juvenile Chronic Arthritis (PJCA) and 120 controls were typed for HLA-DPw1-w6 and the local specificity CDPHEI with bulk-expanded Primed Lymphocyte Typing (PLT) cells. The frequency of HLA-DPw2 was 52.8% in PJCA patients and 16.7% in controls...

  4. Increased frequency of HLA-DPw2 in pauciarticular onset juvenile chronic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ødum, Niels; Morling, Niels; Friis, J

    1986-01-01

    Thirty-six unrelated Danish patients with pauciarticular Juvenile Chronic Arthritis (PJCA) and 120 controls were typed for HLA-DPw1-w6 and the local specificity CDPHEI with bulk-expanded Primed Lymphocyte Typing (PLT) cells. The frequency of HLA-DPw2 was 52.8% in PJCA patients and 16.7% in contro...

  5. DNA polymorphism of HLA class II genes in pauciarticular juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morling, N; Friis, J; Fugger, L

    1991-01-01

    We investigated the DNA restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II genes: HLA-DRB, -DQA, -DQB, DPA, and -DPB in 54 patients with pauciarticular juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (PJRA) and in healthy Danes. The frequencies of DNA fragments a...

  6. [METHOD FOR DETERMINING EROSIVE LESIONS OF THE GASTRIC MUCOUSA IN CHILDREN WITH JUVENILE ARTHRITIS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Listopadova, A P; Novikova, V P; Melnikova, I U; Petrovskiy, A N; Slizovskiy, N V

    2015-01-01

    To detect the clinical diagnostic criteria for non-invasive diagnosis of erosive gastritis in children with juvenile arthritis have been studied the 92 children aged 9 to 16 years (mean age-13,9 ± 2,3 years) with verified diagnosis of juvenile arthritis, of whom 10 had erosive gastritis (group 1) and 82 without erosions (group 2). A comparison of the groups on 23 grounds by analysis of contingency tables and the subsequent discriminant analysis, has developed a new non-invasive method for determining the erosive lesions of the mucous membrane of the stomach in children with juvenile arthritis, including a score of history, complaints and the results of laboratory studies the level of the G-17, pepsinogen I, pepsinogen II, and the ratio of pepsinogen I to pepsinogen II, the presence of autoantibodies to the H+, K+/ATPase of the parietal cells of the stomach, the test for occult blood "Colon View Hb and Hb/Hp". Developed a diagnostic table, including 11 features with scores each. The total score 27 or higher allows a high degree of probability to determine the erosive lesions of the gastric mucosa in children with juvenile arthritis.

  7. Arthritis in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Arthritis Page Content Article Body Arthritis is an inflammation ... with antibiotics, even if arthritis develops. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) has previously been ...

  8. Avaliação de provas de fase aguda em crianças e adolescentes com artrite idiopática juvenil e sua correlação com atividade da doença Acute phase reactants evaluation in children and adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and its correlation with disease activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Alencar M. F. Nicácio

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO:Analisar a relação entre as provas de fase aguda e a atividade clínica da artrite idiopática juvenil e avaliar a concordância entre velocidade de hemossedimentação e proteína C reativa (VHS e PCR na fase aguda da doença. MÉTODOS: Foi realizado estudo retrospectivo tipo coorte a partir da análise de prontuários de 30 crianças e adolescentes que preenchiam os critérios diagnósticos para artrite idiopática juvenil, estavam em atendimento em ambulatório de Reumatologia Pediátrica e haviam realizado as provas de fase aguda (VHS e PCR. RESULTADOS: Dos 30 pacientes, 21 (70% eram do sexo feminino e 19 (63,3% apresentavam o subtipo oligoarticular da doença. A média de idade de início dos sintomas foi 65,6 meses, a idade de diagnóstico de 85,3 e o tempo de evolução, 57,2 meses. As provas de fase aguda mostraram associação positiva com a atividade de doença. A anemia não teve relação com a atividade de doença. A concordância entre as duas provas de fase aguda foi superior a 80%. CONCLUSÕES: As provas de fase aguda mantêm relação positiva com a atividade da doença e o seu uso concomitante aumenta a especificidade.OBJECTIVE:To analyze the relationship between the acute phase reactants and the disease activity of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA and to evaluate the agreement between erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein during the acute phase of the disease. METHODS: a cohort retrospective study has been conducted based on the analysis of 30 children and adolescents who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of JIA. All of them were in current follow-up at the pediatric rheumatology outpatient clinic and had acute phase reactants blood tests performed. RESULTS: Studied population comprised 30 patients: 21 (70% of them were females and 19 (63.3% presented oligoarticular subtype. The mean age at disease onset was 65.6 months; the age at diagnosis was 85.3 months and the follow-up had 57.2 months of

  9. Recommendations of the ESSR Arthritis Subcommittee for the Use of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Musculoskeletal Rheumatic Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona; Jurik, Anne Grethe; Eshed, Iris

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the recommendations of the European Society of Musculoskeletal Radiology Arthritis Subcommittee regarding the standards of the use of MRI in the diagnosis of musculoskeletal rheumatic diseases. The recommendations discuss (1) the role of MRI in current classification criteria...... of musculoskeletal rheumatic diseases (including early diagnosis of inflammation, disease follow-up, and identification of disease complications); (2) the impact of MRI on the diagnosis of axial and peripheral spondyloarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and juvenile spondyloarthritis; (3) MRI protocols for the axial...

  10. Effects of the use of growth hormone in children and adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renan Bazuco Frittoli

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA often have impaired growth and short stature. There is evidence that the therapeutic use of growth hormone (GH is useful and safe in these patients. Objective: To analyze the effects of GH use in patients with JIA. Method: A systematic review of the literature over the last 18 years in Medline and Embase databases. The criteria were analyzed independently by the researchers. We used the following keywords: "growth hormone", "arthritis, juvenile", "arthritis, rheumatoid", "child" and "adolescent". Results: Among the 192 identified articles, 20 corresponded to the inclusion criteria. Seventeen longitudinal studies and 3 case reports were found. Most studies analyzed observed increased growth, muscle mass and bone mass using GH. Adverse effects observed were glucose intolerance, diabetes, bone deformities, osteonecrosis, reactivation of the disease and low final height. Conclusion: The majority of studies reported positive effects after the therapeutic use of GH, but some variability in response to treatment was observed. The combination of growth hormone with other drugs seems to be a good option.

  11. Three-dimensional morphological condylar and mandibular changes in a patient with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: interdisciplinary treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Farronato

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular joint (TMJ involvement is common but usually delayed in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA. We describe the case of a JIA patient with bilateral TMJ involvement, mandibular retrognathia, bone erosion, and severely restricted mouth opening. The use of cone beam computed tomography and a 3D diagnostic protocol in young patients with JIA provides reliable, accurate and precise quantitative data and images of the condylar structures and their dimensional relationships. Analgesics and conventional disease modifying antirheumatic drugs were ineffective, but interdisciplinary treatment with etanercept and a Herbst functional appliance improved functional TMJ movement and bone resorption.

  12. MOTION OR REST: WHAT IS MORE PREFERABLE FOR PATIENTS WITH JUVENILE IDIOPATHIC ARTHRITIS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Shelepina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reviews the literature dealing with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA prognosis, patient physical activity, its role in the development of functional problems that cause limited vital activity and reduced quality of life, as well as the efficiency of physical exercises (exercise therapy (ET in the treatment of this disease. It stresses the relationship between physical developmental delay in patients with JIA and the occurrence of psychological and social problems. There are data of publications about the need for physical loads for patients with various rheumatic diseases, as well as for adults. Special attention is paid to the good endurance of ET that is identified by a number of authors as an additional treatment for JIA patients, which improves their functional status, but fails to affect the course and outcome of the disease. The author analyzes survey papers on the multidisciplinary rehabilitation of children, adolescents in particular, and the importance of science-based propaganda of active lifestyle. By having analyzed the literature, the author concludes that it is expedient to include ET into standard treatment for patients with JIA. 

  13. High prevalence of methotrexate intolerance in juvenile idiopathic arthritis : development and validation of a methotrexate intolerance severity score

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bulatović, Maja; Heijstek, Marloes W; Verkaaik, Marleen; van Dijkhuizen, E H Pieter; Armbrust, Wineke; Hoppenreijs, Esther P A; Kamphuis, Sylvia; Kuis, Wietse; Egberts, Toine C G; Sinnema, Gerben; Rademaker, Carin M A; Wulffraat, Nico M

    OBJECTIVE: To design and validate a new questionnaire for identifying patients with methotrexate (MTX) intolerance, and to determine the prevalence of MTX intolerance in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) using this questionnaire. METHODS: The MTX Intolerance Severity Score (MISS)

  14. High prevalence of methotrexate intolerance in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: development and validation of a methotrexate intolerance severity score

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bulatovic, M.; Heijstek, M.W.; Verkaaik, M.; Dijkhuizen, E.H. van; Armbrust, W.; Hoppenreijs, E.P.A.H.; Kamphuis, S.; Kuis, W.; Egberts, T.C.; Sinnema, G.; Rademaker, C.M.A.; Wulffraat, N.M.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To design and validate a new questionnaire for identifying patients with methotrexate (MTX) intolerance, and to determine the prevalence of MTX intolerance in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) using this questionnaire. METHODS: The MTX Intolerance Severity Score (MISS)

  15. A report on clinical application of 99Tc-MDP treatment in patients with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Huilin; Chen Wanqian; Xie Mei; Liang Jun

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To asses clinical application of the Yunke therapy and observe the early curative effect in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. Methods: 9 patients of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis were enrolled. The age ranged 4.5-16 years old with medical history ranged 3-12 months. All patients had been treated using Yunke therapy. A high dose of 100 mg or 200 mg was given by intravenous infusion in alternative day for 2 to 3 times during the first course of treatment. Then a small dose of 5 mg alternate day was given by intravenous injection for 10-15 times during the second course and the treatment phase continue for 2-3 courses. Results: Significance curative effect was observed in all cases. Conclusion: Early clinical effect of the Yunke therapy was obvious in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. It was necessary that a specific dose be used for juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

  16. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA): a screening study to measure class II skeletal pattern, TMJ PDS and use of systemic corticosteroids.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mandall, Nicky A

    2010-03-01

    To screen patients with oligoarticular and polyarticular forms of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) to determine (i) the severity of their class II skeletal pattern; (ii) temporomandibular joint signs and symptoms and (iii) use of systemic corticosteroids.

  17. Evidence for Tocilizumab as a Treatment Option in Refractory Uveitis Associated with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tappeiner, Christoph; Mesquida, Marina; Adán, Alfredo; Anton, Jordi; Ramanan, Athimalaipet V; Carreno, Ester; Mackensen, Friederike; Kotaniemi, Kaisu; de Boer, Joke H; Bou, Rosa; de Vicuña, Carmen García; Heiligenhaus, Arnd

    2016-12-01

    To report on experience using the anti-interleukin 6 receptor antibody tocilizumab (TCZ) to treat severe and therapy-refractory uveitis associated with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Retrospective data were gathered from patients with JIA receiving TCZ treatment for uveitis. JIA and related uveitis data (disease onset, activity, structural complications, and topical and systemic antiinflammatory treatment) were evaluated at the start of TCZ (baseline) and every 3 months during TCZ therapy. A total of 17 patients (14 women) with active uveitis were included (mean age 15.3 ± 6.9 yrs, mean followup time 8.5 mos). In all patients, uveitis had been refractory to previous topical and systemic corticosteroids, methotrexate (MTX), and other synthetic and biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, including ≥ 1 tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) inhibitor. Uveitis inactivity was achieved in 10 patients after a mean of 5.7 months of TCZ treatment (in 3 of them, it recurred during followup) and persisted in the remaining 7 patients. By using TCZ, systemic corticosteroids or immunosuppressives could be spared in 7 patients. Macular edema was present in 5 patients at baseline and improved in all of them under TCZ treatment. Arthritis was active in 11 patients at the initial and in 6 at the final followup visit. TCZ appears to represent a therapeutic option for severe JIA-associated uveitis that has been refractory to MTX and TNF-α inhibitors in selected patients. The present data indicate that inflammatory macular edema responds well to TCZ in patients with JIA-associated uveitis.

  18. Protocol for the Foot in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis trial (FiJIA: a randomised controlled trial of an integrated foot care programme for foot problems in JIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendry Gordon J

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Foot and ankle problems are a common but relatively neglected manifestation of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Studies of medical and non-medical interventions have shown that clinical outcome measures can be improved. However existing data has been drawn from small non-randomised clinical studies of single interventions that appear to under-represent the adult population suffering from juvenile idiopathic arthritis. To date, no evidence of combined therapies or integrated care for juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients with foot and ankle problems exists. Methods/design An exploratory phase II non-pharmacological randomised controlled trial where patients including young children, adolescents and adults with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and associated foot/ankle problems will be randomised to receive integrated podiatric care via a new foot care programme, or to receive standard podiatry care. Sixty patients (30 in each arm including children, adolescents and adults diagnosed with juvenile idiopathic arthritis who satisfy the inclusion and exclusion criteria will be recruited from 2 outpatient centres of paediatric and adult rheumatology respectively. Participants will be randomised by process of minimisation using the Minim software package. The primary outcome measure is the foot related impairment measured by the Juvenile Arthritis Disability Index questionnaire's impairment domain at 6 and 12 months, with secondary outcomes including disease activity score, foot deformity score, active/limited foot joint counts, spatio-temporal and plantar-pressure gait parameters, health related quality of life and semi-quantitative ultrasonography score for inflammatory foot lesions. The new foot care programme will comprise rapid assessment and investigation, targeted treatment, with detailed outcome assessment and follow-up at minimum intervals of 3 months. Data will be collected at baseline, 6 months and 12 months from baseline

  19. TOTAL JOINT REPLACEMENT OF THE LOWER EXTREMITY IN PATIENTS WITH JUVENILE IDIOPATHIC ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Стюарт Б. Гудмэн

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Joint replacement of the lower extremity in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA is becoming more commonly performed worldwide. These young adults experience severe pain and disability from end-stage arthritis, and require joint replacement of the hip or knee to alleviate pain, and restore ambulation and function. These procedures are very challenging from the anesthesia and surgical point of view, due to small overall proportions, numerous bony and other deformities and soft tissue contractures. Joint replacement operations for JIA are best performed by experienced teams, where pre-operative and peri-operative care, and post-operative rehabilitation can be optimized in a collaborative, patient-centered environment.

  20. Safety and Efficacy of Anti-Pandemic H1N1 Vaccination in Rheumatic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-25

    Rheumatoid Arthritis; Spondyloarthritis; Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE); Dermatomyositis (DM); DMixed Connective Tissue Disease; Systemic Vasculitis; Systemic Sclerosis (SSc); Sjögren's Syndrome; Antiphospholipid Syndrome; Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis; Juvenile SLE; Juvenile DM

  1. Dental and facial characteristics of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis Características dentárias e faciais de pacientes com artrite idiopática juvenil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Savioli

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: It has been shown that the temporomandibular joint is frequently affected by juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and this degenerative disease, which may occur during facial growth, results in severe mandibular dysfunction. However, there are no studies that correlate oral health (tooth decay and gingival diseases and temporomandibular joint dysfunction in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. The aim of this study is to evaluate the oral and facial characteristics of the patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis treated in a large teaching hospital. METHOD: Thirty-six patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (26 female and 10 male underwent a systematic clinical evaluation of their dental, oral, and facial structures (DMFT index, plaque and gingival bleeding index, dental relationship, facial profile, and Helkimo's index. The control group was composed of 13 healthy children. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis was 10.8 years; convex facial profile was present in 12 juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients, and class II molar relation was present in 12 (P = .032. The indexes of plaque and gingival bleeding were significant in juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients with a higher number of superior limbs joints involved (P = .055. Anterior open bite (5 and temporomandibular joint noise (8 were present in the juvenile idiopathic arthritis group. Of the group in this sample, 94% (P = .017 had temporomandibular joint dysfunction, 80% had decreased mandibular opening (P = 0.0002, and mandibular mobility was severely impaired in 33% (P = .015. CONCLUSION: This study confirms that patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis a have a high incidence of mandibular dysfunction that can be attributed to the direct effect of the disease in the temporomandibular joint and b have a higher incidence of gingival disease that can be considered a secondary effect of juvenile idiopathic arthritis on oral health

  2. EVALUATION OF THICKNESS OF INTIMA-MEDIA COMPLEX OF COMMON CAROTID ARTERIES IN CHILDREN WITH JUVENILE ARTHRITIS AND SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.B. Sugak

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatic diseases in adults are associated with accelerated atherosclerosis, and its early signs can be stated by the thickening of intima-media complex of common carotid arteries (CCA. This symptom is detected during ultrasound examination in 49% of children with systemic lupus erythematosus, in 24% of patients with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and in 13% of children with juvenile spondylarthritis. Besides, 36% of children with systemic lupus erythematosus and 17% — with systemic type of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis had structure changes of CCA wall. A dependence of these disorders on cholesterol and glucose levels in blood serum, overweight and Cushing syndrome, age, duration and activity of a disease, levels of ESR, C-reactive protein and white blood cells was not showed. Authors detected a correlation between the thickness of intima-media complex of CCA and hemostasis parameters.Key words: children, juvenile arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, intima-media complex, ultrasound diagnostics.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2010;9(2:64-69

  3. Clinical patterns of juvenile idiopathic arthritis: A single tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Method: Medical records of patients with a diagnosis of chronic arthritis with ... One patient had the typical rash of systemic onset JIA (Still's) and another had uveitis. ... corticosteroids and methotrexate were used in 16/68 (23.5%) patients and ...

  4. Time to treatment as an important factor for the response to methotrexate in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, H M; Wessels, J A M; van der Straaten, R J H M; Brinkman, D M C; Suijlekom-Smit, L W A; Kamphuis, S S M; Girschick, H J; Wouters, C; Schilham, M W; le Cessie, S; Huizinga, T W J; Ten Cate, R; Guchelaar, H J

    2009-01-15

    Methotrexate (MTX) is the most commonly used disease-modifying antirheumatic drug in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Currently, individual response to MTX cannot be reliably predicted. Identification of clinical and genetic factors that influence the response to MTX could be helpful in realizing the optimal treatment for individual patients. A cohort of 128 JIA patients treated with MTX were studied retrospectively. Eleven clinical parameters and genotypes of 6 single nucleotide polymorphisms in 5 genes related to the mechanism of action of MTX were compared between MTX responders and nonresponders using a multivariate regression analysis. The time from diagnosis to start of MTX treatment, physician's global assessment at baseline, and the starting dose were significantly associated with the response to MTX at 6 months after initiation. Patients with a shorter time from diagnosis to start of MTX and a higher disease activity according to the physician but with a lower MTX dose showed an increased response. The effect of the starting dose on MTX response seemed to be mainly due to the influence of the systemic JIA subtype. The time from diagnosis to start of MTX treatment and physician's global assessment at baseline were highly correlated. Therefore, the precise effect size of each independent variable could not be determined. In children with JIA, the time from diagnosis to start of MTX appears to be an important factor for MTX response. Our results suggest that an earlier start of MTX treatment will lead to an increased response.

  5. Intravenous Laser Blood Irradiation and Tocilizumab in a Patient with Juvenile Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragos Andrei Chiran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents effects of intravenous laser blood irradiation (ILBI in a transient immunodeficiency patient with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA treated with an interleukin-6 receptor inhibitor (Tocilizumab. Biological agents induce JIA remission, but some patients do not respond favorably to this final therapeutic line of defense. ILBI was performed in a 16-year-old male patient, with JIA and transient immunodeficiency. When ILBI was introduced, the patient was receiving disease-modifying drugs, steroids, tocilizumab, and physical therapy. Because the disease was not well controlled, ILBI was applied in addition to other ongoing therapies. The patient underwent 1 session daily, and 10 successive sessions per month, repeated every 3 months, for 7 months. Patient evaluation was performed before ILBI was started and at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after ILBI initiation, using the ACR Pediatric response. The outcome was evaluated using Pediatric 50, 70, and 90 responses and compared to initial status, after 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. At the end of study, the titre of IgA and IgG levels returned to normal. Synergistic anti-inflammatory effect of ILBI was evident, if applied additionally in combination with tocilizumab, in a patient with a therapy-resistant severe form of JIA and related subacute transient immunodeficiency.

  6. The early magnetic resonance imaging features of the knee in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Karl; Wittkop, Berndt; Haigh, Fiona; Ryder, Clive; Gardner-Medwin, Janet M.

    2002-01-01

    AIMS: Early diagnosis of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) facilitates earlier more aggressive therapy, and improved outcome. Recognition of the features of early, untreated JIA on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) will improve disease detection and expedite treatment. This study aims to highlight the relevant MRI features. METHODS: MRI examinations of the knee joint were performed on 11 children with clinically confirmed, early, untreated JIA. The MRI images were obtained at a mean of 2 months after symptom onset and independently evaluated by two consultant paediatric radiologists. RESULTS: Abnormalities were found on all MRI examinations. Synovial hypertrophy, joint effusions, popliteal lymph nodes and soft tissue swelling were present in all patients. Gadolinium DTPA enhancement improved the detection of synovial hyperplasia. Metaphyseal splaying and condylar overgrowth were seen in five cases (41%), oedema of the lateral collateral ligament in two cases (18%) and superficial cartilage thinning in one case. Bony erosions and deep cartilage destruction were not demonstrated. CONCLUSION: MRI of the knee joint identifies early joint changes which are distinct from those in later disease. The presence of these features should alert the radiologist to the possible diagnosis of JIA and post gadolinium DTPA sequences should be performed. Gadolinium DPTA enhancement increases the sensitivity for the detection of inflammatory changes in JIA. Johnson, K. et al. (2002)

  7. Temporomandibular joint involvement in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: clinical predictors of magnetic resonance imaging signs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Argyropoulou, Maria I.; Margariti, Persefoni N.; Astrakas, Loukas; Kosta, Paraskevi [Medical School University of Ioannina, Department of Radiology, Ioannina (Greece); Karali, Aikaterini; Alfandaki, Sapfo; Siamopoulou, Antigoni [University of Ioannina, Department of Child Health, Medical School, Ioannina (Greece)

    2009-03-15

    The aim of the study was to define clinical predictors of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) involvement in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Forty-six patients, aged 2.08-36.7 years, with JIA (oligoartitular 18, polyarticular 17, systemic type 11) were examined with standard plain and contrast-enhanced sequences. Of 88 TMJs examined, an abnormal condyle was observed in 32%, flattened articular eminence in 27%, flattened articular disk in 17%, intra-articular fluid in 10%, enhancing pannus in 45% and restricted condylar motion in 9%. Logistic regression analysis revealed that for abnormal condyle and flattened articular eminence, independent predictors were type of JIA (P < 0.015), age at onset (P < 0.038), and duration of disease activity (P < 0.001). Plots of the logistic regression models showed that TMJ involvement approached certainty for systemic sooner than for the other JIA types. Pannus was present with probability >0.5 when the disease started before 4 years of age. In conclusion, the systemic type of JIA, young age at onset and long duration of activity are risk factors for TMJ damage. MRI of the TMJ should be performed in patients who are less than 4 years of age at the onset of JIA, and in those with the systemic type, whatever the age of onset. (orig.)

  8. Growth retardation and functional disability in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeed, S.; Zammurrad, S.; Rasheed, U.

    2017-01-01

    To determine the frequency of growth retardation and functional disability in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Methods: This descriptive cross sectional study was carried out at the Department of Rheumatology, Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences, Islamabad from March 2016 to December 2016. 92 patients with JIA were included in the study. Height and weight of each patient was recorded and BMI calculated. Functional Disability was determined by calculating the CHAQ Score, while disease activity was estimated through JADAS 27 score. Growth Retardation was defined as height, weight and/or BMI below the 3rd centile according to the CDC growth charts. A cut off of ?1 for CHAQ Score was used to define severe functional disability. Results: Out of 92 patients, there were 47 male (51.1%) and 45 (48.9%) females. Height, weight and BMI below 3rd centile was observed in 30(32.6%), 49(53.3%) and 41(44.6%) patients, respectively. The overall frequency of growth retardation was 64.1% (n=59) and severe functional disability (CHAQ Score ?1) was seen in 32.6% (n=30) of patients. Conclusions: Growth retardation was seen in more than half of patients with JIA and a significant proportion had severe functional disability. Severe functional disability was seen only in patients with active disease. (author)

  9. Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate as Baseline Predictor for the Development of Uveitis in Children With Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haasnoot, Arenda J W; van Tent-Hoeve, Maretta; Wulffraat, Nico M; Schalij-Delfos, Nicoline E; Los, Leonoor I; Armbrust, Wineke; Zuithoff, Nicolaas P A; de Boer, Joke H

    PURPOSE: To analyze inflammatory parameters as possible predictors for the development of uveitis in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients. Further, to analyze the predictive value of demographic and clinical factors at the onset of arthritis. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. METHODS: In

  10. Long-term treatment with rituximab in severe juvenile idiopathic arthritis-associated uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miserocchi, Elisabetta; Modorati, Giulio; Berchicci, Luigi; Pontikaki, Irene; Meroni, Pierluigi; Gerloni, Valeria

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate retrospectively the long-term efficacy of rituximab in patients with severe juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated uveitis. Eight patients (15 eyes) with severe and longstanding JIA uveitis, who had an inadequate response in controlling uveitis to one or more biologic agents including tumour necrosis factor blockers and abatacept, received rituximab therapy. Rituximab was given at a dose of 1000 mg per infusion on days 1 and 15 and then every 6 months. Clinical responses to treatment, including decrease in uveitis activity, visual acuity changes, reduction of concomitant local and systemic corticosteroid and/or immunosuppressants, and occurrence of adverse events, were assessed. Eight patients with a mean±SD age of 22.8±5.5 years were treated. The mean ocular disease duration was 17.7 years; the mean±SD follow-up time on rituximab was 44.75±4.9 months; and the mean number of rituximab infusions received was 8.75 (range 6-12). All patients achieved complete control of uveitis, but in two patients rituximab was discontinued due to inefficacy in treating arthritis. The decrease in uveitis activity was evident 4-5 months after the first infusion. Systemic corticosteroids and immunosuppressants used in association with rituximab were discontinued in five patients at the end of follow-up. None of the patients experienced visual worsening during the follow-up. No drug-related complications were encountered. Rituximab may be a promising effective treatment option for refractory uveitis associated with JIA leading to long-term quiescence of uveitis, particularly for patients who have not previously responded to other biologic therapies. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  11. Analysis of juvenile idiopathic arthritis associated uveitis in India over the last 16 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudharshan S

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA associated uveitis is one of the most common causes of visual morbidity in children. We report the systemic, clinical and investigational features of a cohort of all cases of JIA associated uveitis seen at our referral uveitis clinic between 1988 and 2004. Study Design: Retrospective case series Materials and Methods: All patients of JIA seen at the uveitis clinic of tertiary eye care hospital, between 1988 and 2004 with minimum follow up of 3 months were included. Complete history and ophthalmic evaluation and findings on each visit were noted. Ocular complications were identified and recorded. Results of laboratory investigations and diagnostic as well as therapeutic procedures were analyzed. A rheumatologist managed systemic status. Results: There were 40 patients (64 eyes with JIA. Thirty four patients (85% had pauciarticular type and 6 patients (15% had polyarticular type of JIA. Complicated cataract and band shaped keratopathy were seen in 38 eyes (63% and 37 eyes (62% respectively. Twenty-two patients (17 bilateral and 5 unilateral were treated with immunosuppressives and in 19 of these patients, the disease went into remission. Twenty-three eyes (38% had improvement in visual acuity while in 27 eyes (45%, the vision remained stable and in 10 eyes (17%, vision deteriorated despite therapy. Conclusion: In India, JIA associated uveitis commonly presented in pauciarticular type with preponderance in males. Rheumatoid arthritis factor and anti nuclear antibodies were not as common as compared to the western population. Among long-term treatment options, immunosuppressives are a better choice. Ocular surgery was performed when mandatory for visual rehabilitation.

  12. Update on the Treatment of Uveitis in Patients with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asproudis, Ioannis; Katsanos, Andreas; Kozeis, Nikolaos; Tantou, Alexandra; Konstas, Anastasios G

    2017-12-01

    Chronic uveitis is a common extra-articular manifestation of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. The classic clinical picture is one of chronic anterior uveitis, which usually remains asymptomatic until ocular complications arise. The risk of uveitis is increased in girls with an early onset of oligoarthritis and positive antinuclear antibodies. Even though the inflammation in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis is initially limited in the anterior part of the eye, chronic active inflammation may eventually cause significant damage to the posterior pole. Complications may include band keratopathy, cataract, secondary glaucoma, posterior synechiae, cystoid macular edema, and hypotony. The cooperation of ophthalmologists with rheumatologists may help define the best treatment plan. The ophthalmic therapeutic regimen includes topical corticosteroids and mydriatics, while in severe cases immunosuppressive and biological agents are introduced. Surgical management of complications might be needed.

  13. Anti-TNF therapy for juvenile idiopathic arthritis-related uveitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semeraro, Francesco; Arcidiacono, Barbara; Nascimbeni, Giuseppe; Angi, Martina; Parolini, Barbara; Costagliola, Ciro

    2014-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis-related uveitis is the most common type of uveitis in childhood and one of the main causes of visual impairment in children. The introduction of biological treatment has widened the range of therapeutic options for children with uveitis refractory to standard nonbiologic immunosuppressants. Data from clinical trials suggest that both adalimumab and infliximab have demonstrated effectiveness and safety in open-label studies, although no large, randomized, controlled trials have been reported so far. The role of etanercept in treating juvenile idiopathic arthritis-related uveitis is not yet well defined. In our experience, anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy has been shown to be more effective than steroids and/or methotrexate in treating uveitis. Up to now, tumor necrosis factor blocking compounds have been reserved for the treatment of the most severe cases of refractory uveitis, and larger prospective clinical trials are required in order to better assess the safety of these new compounds. PMID:24711694

  14. Anti-TNF therapy for juvenile idiopathic arthritis-related uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semeraro, Francesco; Arcidiacono, Barbara; Nascimbeni, Giuseppe; Angi, Martina; Parolini, Barbara; Costagliola, Ciro

    2014-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis-related uveitis is the most common type of uveitis in childhood and one of the main causes of visual impairment in children. The introduction of biological treatment has widened the range of therapeutic options for children with uveitis refractory to standard nonbiologic immunosuppressants. Data from clinical trials suggest that both adalimumab and infliximab have demonstrated effectiveness and safety in open-label studies, although no large, randomized, controlled trials have been reported so far. The role of etanercept in treating juvenile idiopathic arthritis-related uveitis is not yet well defined. In our experience, anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy has been shown to be more effective than steroids and/or methotrexate in treating uveitis. Up to now, tumor necrosis factor blocking compounds have been reserved for the treatment of the most severe cases of refractory uveitis, and larger prospective clinical trials are required in order to better assess the safety of these new compounds.

  15. Superior oblique tendon (Brown’s syndrome as the presenting finding in childhood onset HLA-B27-related enthesitis and juvenile idiopathic oligoarticular arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Pham

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We report two patients who presented with Brown’s syndrome. The first is a 7-year-old boy who at the time of his diagnosis was also found to have enthesitis and HLA-B27 positivity. The second patient was diagnosed with bilateral Brown’s syndrome at 13 months of age. At age 7 she developed a persistent oligoarticular arthritis and unilateral anterior iritis consistent with the oligoarticular Juvenile Idiopatic Arthritis (JIA phenotype. These cases highlight ophthalmologic findings and diagnostic considerations with respect to Brown’s syndrome and associated childhood onset rheumatologic disease.

  16. Long-term efficacy of adalimumab in the treatment of uveitis associated with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Kotaniemi, Kaisu; S?il?, Hanna; Kautiainen, Hannu

    2011-01-01

    Kaisu Kotaniemi1,2, Hanna Säilä2, Hannu Kautiainen31Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland; 2Orton Orthopaedic Hospital and Rehabilitation Unit, Helsinki, Finland; 3Unit of Primary Health Care, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, FinlandBackground: The purpose of this study was to investigate the long-term effects of adalimumab, a tumor necrosis factor alpha antagonist, in the treatment of uveitis associated with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.Methods: Adalimumab was...

  17. Foot related impairments and disability in juvenile idiopathic arthritis persist despite modern day treatment paradigms

    OpenAIRE

    Hendry, Gordon J; Gardner-Medwin, Janet; Watt, Gordon F; Woodburn, Jim; McColl, John H; Sturrock, Roger D

    2011-01-01

    Background: Foot problems such as synovitis, growth disturbance and deformity are considered common in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and have been previously reported in over 90% of cases. The medical management of JIA appears to have improved recently however little is known about the impact of new regimes on localised joints such as in the foot. This pilot study aimed to investigate the prevalence of foot related impairments and disability, and survey the medical and podiatric managem...

  18. Specialty Practice and Cost Considerations in the Management of Uveitis Associated With Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palestine, Alan G; Singh, Jasleen K; Kolfenbach, Jason R; Ozzello, Daniel J

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate whether cost, prior insurance authorization concerns, and subspecialty practice influence therapeutic decisions in the treatment of uveitis associated with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. A total of 2,965 pediatric ophthalmologists, uveitis specialists, retina specialists, and rheumatologists across the United States were surveyed via e-mail regarding their choice in long-term therapy for a hypothetical patient with uveitis associated with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Outcomes of interest were differences in therapy choice based on cost/prior authorization and specialty practice. There were significant differences in the use of methotrexate and biologics among specialists, both with and without consideration for cost and prior authorization. Physicians in four different specialties who treat uveitis associated with juvenile idiopathic arthritis agree on methotrexate as a first-line treatment choice and a biologic immunosuppressive medication as a second choice, but there are significant differences between the specialties in their use of these medications. Cost and insurance considerations did not affect therapy selection. [J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus. 2016;53(4):246-251.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. MRI assessment of tenosynovitis in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: inter- and intra-observer variability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambot, Karen; Brunelle, Francis; Boavida, Peter; Damasio, Maria Beatrice; Tanturri de Horatio, Laura; Barbuti, Domenico; Desgranges, Marie; Bader-Meunier, Brigitte; Quartier, Pierre; Malattia, Clara; Bracaglia, Claudia; Ording Mueller, Lil-Sofie; Elie, Caroline; Rosendahl, Karen

    2013-01-01

    There is sparse knowledge about grading tenosynovitis using MRI. The purpose of this study was to assess the reliability of a tenosynovitis MRI scoring system in juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and wrist involvement were enrolled in two paediatric centres, from October 2006 to January 2010. The extensor (compartments II, IV and VI) and flexor tendons were assessed for the presence of tenosynovitis on T1-weighted postcontrast fat-saturated MR images and were scored from 0 (normal) to 2 (moderate to severe) by two observers independently. Intra- and interobserver agreement was assessed. Ninety children (age range: 5-18.5 years) were included, of whom 34 had tenosynovitis involving extensors and 28 had tenosynovitis involving flexors. A total of 360 tendon areas were analysed, of which 114 had tenosynovitis (86/270 extensors and 28/90 flexors). Intra-reader 1 agreement was excellent for the extensors (k = 0.82-0.91) and for the flexors (k = 0.85); intra-reader 2 agreement was moderate to good for the extensors (k = 0.51-0.72) and good for the flexors (k = 0.64). Inter-reader agreement was good for the extensors (k = 0.69-0.73) and moderate for the flexors (k = 0.49). The proposed MRI scoring system for the assessment of wrist tenosynovitis in juvenile idiopathic arthritis appears feasible with an observer agreement sufficient for clinical use. (orig.)

  20. MRI assessment of tenosynovitis in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: inter- and intra-observer variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambot, Karen; Brunelle, Francis [Hopital Necker-Enfants Malades, Department of Paediatric Radiology, Paris (France); Boavida, Peter [Great Ormond Street Hospital, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Damasio, Maria Beatrice [Ospedale Pediatrico Gaslini, Department of Radiology, Genoa (Italy); Tanturri de Horatio, Laura; Barbuti, Domenico [Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesu, Department of Radiology, Rome (Italy); Desgranges, Marie; Bader-Meunier, Brigitte; Quartier, Pierre [Hopital Necker-Enfants Malades, Department of Paediatric Immunology, Hematology and Rheumatology, APHP French Reference Center ' ' Arthrites juveniles' ' , Paris (France); Malattia, Clara [University of Genoa, Department of Paediatrics, Genoa (Italy); Bracaglia, Claudia [Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesu, Department of Paediatrics, Rome (Italy); Ording Mueller, Lil-Sofie [Great Ormond Street Hospital, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); University Hospital of North Norway, Department of Radiology, Tromsoe (Norway); Elie, Caroline [Paris Descartes University, Department of Biostatistics, Hopital Necker-Enfants Malades, Paris (France); Rosendahl, Karen [Great Ormond Street Hospital, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Haukeland University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bergen (Norway)

    2013-07-15

    There is sparse knowledge about grading tenosynovitis using MRI. The purpose of this study was to assess the reliability of a tenosynovitis MRI scoring system in juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and wrist involvement were enrolled in two paediatric centres, from October 2006 to January 2010. The extensor (compartments II, IV and VI) and flexor tendons were assessed for the presence of tenosynovitis on T1-weighted postcontrast fat-saturated MR images and were scored from 0 (normal) to 2 (moderate to severe) by two observers independently. Intra- and interobserver agreement was assessed. Ninety children (age range: 5-18.5 years) were included, of whom 34 had tenosynovitis involving extensors and 28 had tenosynovitis involving flexors. A total of 360 tendon areas were analysed, of which 114 had tenosynovitis (86/270 extensors and 28/90 flexors). Intra-reader 1 agreement was excellent for the extensors (k = 0.82-0.91) and for the flexors (k = 0.85); intra-reader 2 agreement was moderate to good for the extensors (k = 0.51-0.72) and good for the flexors (k = 0.64). Inter-reader agreement was good for the extensors (k = 0.69-0.73) and moderate for the flexors (k = 0.49). The proposed MRI scoring system for the assessment of wrist tenosynovitis in juvenile idiopathic arthritis appears feasible with an observer agreement sufficient for clinical use. (orig.)

  1. Radiographic temporomandibular joint abnormality in adults with micrognathia and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larheim, T.A.; Haanaes, H.R.; Dale, K. (Oslo Univ. (Norway))

    1981-01-01

    Radiographic findings of the upper and lower jaw bone of 20 adult patients with micrognathia, bird face, and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis are reported. In all patients a symmetrically underdeveloped mandible with the chin posteriorly positioned was found at cephalometry. Arthritic lesion of the temporomandibular joint, mostly symmetric, with limitation of movement and secondary arthrosis, was observed in all patients. Complete absence of the mandibular head was frequent (75%). The fossa was generally flat, probably due to growth disturbance of the tubercle. Abnormal anterior position of the mandibular head occurred in almost half of the patients. The degree of mandibular growth disturbance seemed to be correlated to the severity of the arthritis, indicating the arthritis to be a causal mechanism of micrognathia.

  2. Bone mineral density in children with systemic lupus erythematosus and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashef, S.; Saki, F.; Karamizadeh, Z.; Kashef, Mohammed Amin

    2007-01-01

    Although there is increasing interest in bone metabolism in patients with rheumatic disorders, few data exist on bone mineral density (BMD) in children with rheumatic disorders or on the association of BMD with disease-related variables. We determined BMD in Iranian children with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) to evaluate the relationship between disease related variables and BMD. Twenty patients (13 girls and 7 boys) with SLE (n=5) and JRA (n=5) with a mean age of 13.10+-3.29 years (range, 6-17 years), attending a pediatric rheumatology clinic and 20 healthy controls (matched for age and sex with each patient) were enrolled in a cross-sectional study between 2001 and 2003. BMD (g/cm) of the femoral neck (BMD-F) and lumbar vertebrae (BMD-L) were measured by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). The correlation between BMD and cumulative dose of steroids, daily dose of steroid, disease duration, disease activity, height, weight and age was investigated. BMD in the patients (BMD-F=0.72+-0.15, BMD-L=0.70+-0.19) was significantly lower than controls (BMD-F=0.95+-0.17, BMD-L=0.98+-0.20, P<0.001). The severity of decreased BMD was more prominent in lumbar vertebrae than the femoral neck (P=0.04). None of the variables were consistently related to decrease in BMD. BMD was significantly lower in patients compared with controls. It was more prominent in lumbar vertebrae (trabecular bone). Although cumulative doses of steroids and disease duration appeared to have some influence on BMD, none were independently correlated with BMD. (author)

  3. Early detection of temporomandibular joint arthritis in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis - the role of contrast-enhanced MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalle, Thekla von; Stuber, Tina; Winkler, Peter [Olgahospital Klinikum Stuttgart, Pediatric Radiology, Radiologisches Institut, Stuttgart (Germany); Maier, Jan; Hospach, Toni [Olgahospital Klinikum Stuttgart, Pediatric Rheumatology, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2015-03-01

    Early treatment of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthritis is crucial in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) to prevent permanent functional impairment. As involvement of TMJs is often asymptomatic, contrast-enhanced MRI is regarded as the most sensitive noninvasive diagnostic tool. To evaluate the degree of contrast enhancement in TMJs of children and adolescents with JIA in comparison to normal controls from a previous study. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI of 50 children and adolescents with JIA (6.3 to 18 years of age; mean: 12 years) were retrospectively analysed. We assessed morphological abnormalities and postcontrast time-intensity curves of the soft joint tissue and the mandibular condyle. Ratios were calculated to quantify postcontrast signal intensities (SI) in relation to precontrast SI at initial (1 min postcontrast) and maximum (6 min postcontrast) increase. Time-intensity curves followed similar biphasic patterns in normal and pathological joints. In joints with morphological signs of arthritis, mean SI ratios were on average higher than in normal joints of the reference group, but ranges of values widely overlapped. Arthritis: mean initial increase of SI 62% (±2 S.D. 18-105%), mean maximum SI 106% higher than precontrast (±2 S.D. 46-166%). Normal: mean initial increase of SI 49% (±2 S.D. 14- 85%), mean maximum of SI 73% (±2 S.D. 23-123%). Given this considerable overlap of results in dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, the degree of contrast enhancement alone did not allow differentiation between TMJs with and without signs of inflammation. Thickening of the soft joint tissue seems to remain the earliest sign to reliably indicate TMJ arthritis. (orig.)

  4. Body experiences, emotional competence, and psychosocial functioning in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomba, Monica; Meini, Antonella; Molinaro, Anna; Cattalini, Marco; Oggiano, Silvia; Fazzi, Elisa; Neri, Francesca; Plebani, Alessandro; Nacinovich, Renata

    2013-08-01

    We investigated self-image, psychological functioning, and quality of life in children and adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Thirty-nine children with JIA were compared with 80 healthy peers. We first administered the Human Figure Drawing Test (HFDT) to all subjects; children also completed standardized questionnaires evaluating health-related quality of life (PEDSQL 4.0 Generic Core Scales) and the main aspects of psychological functioning: anxiety (SAFA-A) and depression (CDI). Parents were asked to complete the Child Behaviour Checklist (CBCL) and the PEDSQL 4.0. For each patient with JIA, clinical notes were gathered and a global disease assessment (visual analog scale--VAS) was performed. Compared to healthy peers, patients with JIA reported reduced maturity quotients at HFDT, more depressive traits, greater anxiety, and lower health-related quality of life. Among the subjects with JIA, HFDT revealed that adolescents had a greater impairment in all areas investigated. Furthermore, there was a significant correlation between the physical well-being rated by VAS and the perception of poorer quality of life in patients, mostly in the psychosocial domains. Children and adolescents with JIA exhibit emotional difficulties and a delay of psychological development leading to low self-esteem, a distorted self-image, more anxiety and depression traits, and a worse quality of life, when compared to healthy subjects.

  5. Temporomandibular joint involvement in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: clinical predictors of magnetic resonance imaging signs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argyropoulou, Maria I.; Margariti, Persefoni N.; Astrakas, Loukas; Kosta, Paraskevi; Karali, Aikaterini; Alfandaki, Sapfo; Siamopoulou, Antigoni

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to define clinical predictors of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) involvement in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Forty-six patients, aged 2.08-36.7 years, with JIA (oligoartitular 18, polyarticular 17, systemic type 11) were examined with standard plain and contrast-enhanced sequences. Of 88 TMJs examined, an abnormal condyle was observed in 32%, flattened articular eminence in 27%, flattened articular disk in 17%, intra-articular fluid in 10%, enhancing pannus in 45% and restricted condylar motion in 9%. Logistic regression analysis revealed that for abnormal condyle and flattened articular eminence, independent predictors were type of JIA (P 0.5 when the disease started before 4 years of age. In conclusion, the systemic type of JIA, young age at onset and long duration of activity are risk factors for TMJ damage. MRI of the TMJ should be performed in patients who are less than 4 years of age at the onset of JIA, and in those with the systemic type, whatever the age of onset. (orig.)

  6. Juvenile chronic arthritis: imaging of the knees and hips before and after intraarticular steroid injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eich, G.F. [Div. of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiology, Univ. Children`s Hospital, Zuerich (Switzerland); Halle, F. [Div. of Immunology and Hematology, Univ. Children`s Hospital, Zuerich (Switzerland); Hodler, J. [Div. of Radiology, Balgrist Orthopedic Univ. Clinic, Zuerich (Switzerland); Seger, R. [Div. of Immunology and Hematology, Univ. Children`s Hospital, Zuerich (Switzerland); Willi, U.V. [Div. of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiology, Univ. Children`s Hospital, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    1994-12-01

    Intraarticular steroid therapy in juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA) is performed because of high local efficacy with few side effects. Imaging is used for initial evaluation and for monitoring of treatment response. The aim of this study was to compare imaging findings in diseased hips and knees before and after therapy. A prospective study was performed on 10 patients (15 joints) scheduled for intraarticular therapy. Pretherapeutic assessment included clinical work-up, radiographs, ultrasound (US), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of affected joints. Following therapy, clinical and sonographic examinations were performed at 1 week and 1 month. MRI was repeated at 1 month. MRI and US demonstrated pannus formation and effusion, but differentiation was less distinct on US. Popliteal cysts and lymph nodes were visible in both modalities. MRI additionally revealed articular cartilage loss and subchondral cysts, not shown by US. Epiphyseal overgrowth and osteopenia were best seen radiographically. At present MRI is the best tool to assess the inflammatory changes of the joints in JCA. Initial staging of the joints may be done with plain films and MRI. US is useful to assess effusion and pannus and may be used to monitor treatment response. (orig.)

  7. Juvenile chronic arthritis: imaging of the knees and hips before and after intraarticular steroid injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eich, G.F.; Halle, F.; Hodler, J.; Seger, R.; Willi, U.V.

    1994-01-01

    Intraarticular steroid therapy in juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA) is performed because of high local efficacy with few side effects. Imaging is used for initial evaluation and for monitoring of treatment response. The aim of this study was to compare imaging findings in diseased hips and knees before and after therapy. A prospective study was performed on 10 patients (15 joints) scheduled for intraarticular therapy. Pretherapeutic assessment included clinical work-up, radiographs, ultrasound (US), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of affected joints. Following therapy, clinical and sonographic examinations were performed at 1 week and 1 month. MRI was repeated at 1 month. MRI and US demonstrated pannus formation and effusion, but differentiation was less distinct on US. Popliteal cysts and lymph nodes were visible in both modalities. MRI additionally revealed articular cartilage loss and subchondral cysts, not shown by US. Epiphyseal overgrowth and osteopenia were best seen radiographically. At present MRI is the best tool to assess the inflammatory changes of the joints in JCA. Initial staging of the joints may be done with plain films and MRI. US is useful to assess effusion and pannus and may be used to monitor treatment response. (orig.)

  8. Effects of growth hormone treatment on growth in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, D; Bechtold, S

    2009-11-01

    Several therapeutic trials have been conducted over the past decade to evaluate the role of exogenous growth hormone (GH) as a means of correcting the growth deficiency seen in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Early studies showed the benefit of GH treatment with respect to final height in patients with JIA. Of 13 patients receiving GH, 84% (11 patients) achieved a final height within their target range compared with only 22% (4 of 18 patients) of untreated patients. There are, however, factors that may limit the statural gains achieved with GH therapy including severe inflammation, severe statural deficiency at GH therapy initiation, long disease duration and delayed puberty. Data on the efficacy of GH replacement therapy in children with JIA and factors that influence the statural growth response will be reviewed. Results from therapeutic trials show that treatment with GH can decrease the statural deficit that occurs during the active phase of JIA, producing an adult height that is close to the genetically determined target height. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. EXPERIENCE OF TREATMENT OF THE TWINS SICK WITH JUVENILE IDIOPATHIC ARTHRITIS BY ABATACEPT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Kel'tsev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The case of clinical observation over twin brothers (boys E. and N suffering juvenile idiopathic arthritis is presented in the article. Boys fell ill with a difference in 1 year and 5 months at the age of 1 year and 9 months and 3 years 2 months, respectively. The disease proceeded wavily with the periods of remissions and exacerbations. Resistant articulate syndrome developed in July and November, 2009, respectively. Both children received NSAID, methotrexate combination in a dose of 10 mg/m2/week and sulphasalazine in a dose of 20 mg/kg of body weight per day. To the boy E. it was also prescripted prednisolon in a dose of 10 mg per day. Duration of antirheumatic therapy made 7 and 3 months, respectively. The therapy with a blocker of T-lymphocytes costimulation, abatacept, was initiated for the twins due to the inefficiency of treatment by immunodepressants and prednisolon at the boy E. In 6 weeks of the treatment 50% improvement, in 24 weeks — 90% improvement by criteria of the American College of Rheumatologists (ACRpedi were registered. The undesirable phenomena weren’t observed.

  10. EFFICACY OF DIFFERENT IMMUNOSUPPRESSIVE PROTOCOLS WITH CYCLOSPORINE AND METHOTREXATE FOR PATIENTS WITH SYSTEMIC VARIANT OF JUVENILE RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.I. Alexeeva

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The article provides information on efficiency of different protocols of therapy with cyclosporine and methotrexate for patients suffering from severe systemic juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA. it shows that a therapy combining cyclosporine with dosage of 4,4 ± 0,58 mg/kg of body per day and methotrexate with dosage of 8,1 ± 1,07 mg/m2 a week is more efficient than monotherapy with each of the same medications of same dosage. Combined use of immunosuppressants induces remission of articular syndrome and constitutional manifestations, as well as provides normalization of laboratory disease activity indications in more than 50% of cases of long clasting systemic variant of JRA on the average a year after the initiation of treatment. Combining cyclosporine with methotrexat improves the curative action of each of the medications without aggravation of their toxic influence. High efficiency of combining cyclosporine with methotrexate makes enables lowering the dosage of glucocorticoids to be taken orally, as well as not prescribing prednisolone to the severe cases of systemic variant of JRA.Key words: juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, treatment, cyclosporine, methotrexate, combined therapy, children.

  11. Clinical presentation of juvenile Huntington disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruocco Heloísa H.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the clinical presentation a group of patients with juvenile onset of Huntington disease. METHOD: All patients were interviewed following a structured clinical questioner. Patients were genotyped for the trinucleotide cytosine-adenine-guanine (CAG repeat in the Huntington Disease gene. High resolution brain MRI was performed in all patients. RESULTS: We identified 4 patients with juvenile onset of disease among 50 patients with Huntington disease followed prospectively in our Neurogenetics clinic. Age at onset varied from 3 to 13 years, there were 2 boys, and 3 patients had a paternal inheritance of the disease. Expanded Huntington disease allele sizes varied from 41 to 69 trinucleotide repeats. The early onset patients presented with rigidity, bradykinesia, dystonia, dysarthria, seizures and ataxia. MRI showed severe volume loss of caudate and putamen nuclei (p=0.001 and reduced cerebral and cerebellum volumes (p=0.01. CONCLUSION: 8% of Huntington disease patients seen in our clinic had juvenile onset of the disease. They did not present with typical chorea as seen in adult onset Huntington disease. There was a predominance of rigidity and bradykinesia. Two other important clinical features were seizures and ataxia, which related with the imaging findings of early cortical atrophy and cerebellum volume loss.

  12. Síndrome metabólica e artrite idiopática juvenil Metabolic syndrome and juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarisse de Almeida Zanette

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A Artrite Idiopática Juvenil (AIJ é a artropatia crônica mais prevalente na infância e na adolescência. A prevalência da síndrome metabólica, assim como da obesidade, vem apresentando rápido aumento, atingindo todas as faixas etárias, inclusive a infância. A síndrome metabólica é caracterizada por um conjunto de riscos para doença cardiovascular e diabetes melito tipo 2, abrangendo adiposidade abdominal, resistência à insulina, dislipidemias e hipertensão arterial sistêmica. Além desses componentes, a inflamação tem sido reconhecida cada vez mais como um fator importante na síndrome metabólica e na obesidade, e pacientes com doenças caracterizadas por processos inflamatórios crônicos, como a AIJ, poderiam representar grupos de risco especiais. Os glicocorticoides são utilizados rotineiramente no controle da inflamação da AIJ, em doses elevadas e com uso prolongado. O uso crônico do glicocorticoide pode induzir resistência à insulina, hipertensão arterial sistêmica e obesidade, aumentando o risco de desenvolver síndrome metabólica. O objetivo deste artigo é revisar a literatura sobre a prevalência dos diversos componentes da síndrome metabólica em pacientes com AIJ. Observamos que, nesses pacientes, os dados sobre síndrome metabólica e seus componentes são muito escassos e mais estudos se fazem necessários, tendo em vista o potencial impacto no aumento do risco de doença cardiovascular.Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA is the most prevalent chronic arthropathy in childhood and adolescence. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome, as well as obesity, is increasing rapidly in all age groups, including children. Metabolic syndrome is defined as a cluster of risk factors for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus, including abdominal obesity, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and hypertension. Besides those components, inflammation has been increasingly considered as a significant component of

  13. EXPERIENCE OF TREATMENT WITH INHIBITOR OF T-LYMPHOCYTES CO-STIMULATION ABATACEPT IN PATIENT WITH POLYARTICULAR TYPE OF JUVENILE RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.M. Bzarova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a case report of recurrent clinical course of polyarticular type of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, which is characterized with rapid development of disability, low quality of life, high index of functional insufficiency, torpid flow. The disease developed with intolerance to metotrexate and presence of contra-indications to blockers of tumor necrotizing factor _. Authors describe successful treatment with inhibitor of T-lymphocytes co-stimulation abatacept. The dose of drug was 10 mg/kg of body weight during 24 weeks. In two weeks after the beginning of treatment pain and exudative lesions in joints were lessened, joint range of motions significantly increased. The quality of life of patient and her family increased in 4 weeks of treatment with abatacept. The drug induced clinical and laboratory remission in 24 weeks.Key words: children, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, abatacept, treatment.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. – 2010;9(4:147-154

  14. Measurement of blood calprotectin (MRP-8/MRP-14) levels in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojko, Jaryna

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the investigation was to compare blood calprotectin (MRP8/14, S100A 8/9) levels in patients with systemic-onset, polyarticular, RF-negative and oligoarticular subtypes of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), and to explore links between blood calprotectin levels and clinical and laboratory markers of JIA activity. Measurement of calprotectin in blood serum was performed in 160 patients with JIA followed up at Lviv Regional Council Public Institution "Western-Ukrainian Specialised Children's Medical Centre". Seventeen patients with systemic-onset JIA (sJIA) and 49 patients with other JIA subtypes (RF-negative polyarthritis and oligoarthritis) in the active phase of the disease were included in this study. Determination of calprotectin levels in blood serum was performed using EK-MRP8/14 Buhlmann Calprotectin reagents (Buhlmann, Switzerland) by the ELISA method. The results of the investigations showed that blood calprotectin levels were higher in patients with systemic-onset subtype of the disease (median 13,800 ng/ml), and differed significantly from levels in healthy children (median 1,800 ng/ml, p = 0.00002), levels in patients with articular subtypes of JIA (median 2,700 ng/ml, p = 0.000008), and patients with RF-negative polyarthritis (median 3,800 ng/ml, p = 0.003226) and oligoarthritis (median 2,500 ng/ml, p = 0.000009). The highest blood calprotectin levels were found in patients with newly diagnosed sJIA, the median being 32,500 ng/ml (range: 13,800-177,000 ng/ml). Direct correlations were found between blood calprotectin and JADAS 27 activity score ( p = 0.000009), ESR ( p = 0.000079) and CRP ( p = 0.000058). Blood calprotectin level is one of the measures that can be used to confirm the diagnosis of sJIA and to monitor the disease activity and therapy effectiveness.

  15. Ultrasonography and color Doppler of proximal gluteal enthesitis in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a descriptive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomsen Carsten

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The presence of enthesitis (insertional inflammation in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA is difficult to establish clinically and may influence classification and treatment of the disease. We used ultrasonography (US and color Doppler (CD imaging to detect enthesitis at the small and deep-seated proximal insertion of the gluteus medius fascia on the posterior iliac crest where clinical diagnosis is difficult. The findings in JIA patients were compared with those obtained in healthy controls and with the patients' MRI results. Methods Seventy-six proximal gluteus medius insertions were studied clinically (tenderness to palpation of the posterior iliac crest and by US and CD (echogenicity, thickness, hyperemia in 38 patients with JIA and in 38 healthy controls, respectively (median age 13 years, range 7-18 years. In addition, an additional MRI examination of the sacroiliac joints and iliac crests was performed in all patients. Results In patients with focal, palpable tenderness, US detected decreased echogenicity of the entheses in 53% of the iliac crests (bilateral in 37% and unilateral in 32%. US also revealed significantly thicker entheses in JIA patients compared to healthy controls (p Conclusions According to US, the gluteus medius insertion was thicker in JIA patients than in controls, and it was hypoechoic (enthesitis in about half of the patients. These findings may represent chronic, inactive disease in some of the patients, because there was only limited Doppler flow and MRI contrast enhancement. The present study indicates that US can be useful as an adjunct to clinical examination for improved assessment of enthesitis in JIA. This may influence disease classification, ambition to treat, and choice of treatment regimen.

  16. The Experience of Successful Use of Adalimumab in a Patient With Juvenile Arthritis Associated With Enthesitis and Uveitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra M. Chomakhidze

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the case of successful use of human monoclonal antibodies to the tumor necrosis factor- adalimumab in a patient with a severe course of juvenile arthritis associated with enthesitis and uveitis resistant to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, methotrexate, glucocorticosteroids that have been applied topically and retrobulbarly. After the first adalimumab administration, the pain syndrome was stopped, the duration of morning stiffness was significantly reduced, the laboratory indices of the disease activity were normalized by the 4th week of treatment, uveitis activity was stopped, the inflammatory changes in the joints regressed and the phase of inactive disease was ascertained by the 12th week. The duration of remission of articular syndrome and uveitis during treatment with adalimumab was 26 months. Adverse reactions were not registered during therapy.

  17. High-sensitive CRP as a predictive marker of long-term outcome in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alberdi-Saugstrup, Mikel; Zak, Marek; Nielsen, Susan

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate whether C-reactive protein (CRP), including variation within the normal range, is predictive of long-term disease outcome in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA). Consecutive patients with newly diagnosed JIA were included prospectively from defined geographic areas of the Nordic...... countries from 1997 to 2000. Inclusion criteria were availability of a baseline serum sample within 12 months after disease onset and 8-year clinical assessment data. Systemic onset JIA was not included. CRP was measured by high-sensitive ELISA (detection limit of 0.2 mg/l). One hundred and thirty...... participants with a median follow-up time of 97 months (range 95–100) were included. At follow-up, 38% of the patients were in remission off medication. Absence of remission was associated with elevated level of CRP at baseline (odds ratio (OR) 1.33, confidence interval (CI) 1.08–1.63, p = 0.007). By applying...

  18. A Patient-Specific Foot Model for the Estimate of Ankle Joint Forces in Patients with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinold, Joe A I; Mazzà, Claudia; Di Marco, Roberto; Hannah, Iain; Malattia, Clara; Magni-Manzoni, Silvia; Petrarca, Maurizio; Ronchetti, Anna B; Tanturri de Horatio, Laura; van Dijkhuizen, E H Pieter; Wesarg, Stefan; Viceconti, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the leading cause of childhood disability from a musculoskeletal disorder. It generally affects large joints such as the knee and the ankle, often causing structural damage. Different factors contribute to the damage onset, including altered joint loading and other mechanical factors, associated with pain and inflammation. The prediction of patients' joint loading can hence be a valuable tool in understanding the disease mechanisms involved in structural damage progression. A number of lower-limb musculoskeletal models have been proposed to analyse the hip and knee joints, but juvenile models of the foot are still lacking. This paper presents a modelling pipeline that allows the creation of juvenile patient-specific models starting from lower limb kinematics and foot and ankle MRI data. This pipeline has been applied to data from three children with JIA and the importance of patient-specific parameters and modelling assumptions has been tested in a sensitivity analysis focused on the variation of the joint reaction forces. This analysis highlighted the criticality of patient-specific definition of the ankle joint axes and location of the Achilles tendon insertions. Patient-specific detection of the Tibialis Anterior, Tibialis Posterior, and Peroneus Longus origins and insertions were also shown to be important.

  19. Evaluation of Fitness and the Balance Levels of Children with a Diagnosis of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patti, Antonino; Maggio, Maria Cristina; Corsello, Giovanni; Messina, Giuseppe; Iovane, Angelo; Palma, Antonio

    2017-07-19

    Background: Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is a main cause of physical disability and has high economic costs for society. The purpose of this study was to assess the fitness levels and the postural and balance deficits with a specific test battery. Methods: Fifty-six subjects were enrolled in this study. Thirty-nine healthy subjects were included in the control group and seventeen in the juvenile idiopathic arthritis group. All subjects were evaluated using a posturography system. The fitness level was evaluated with a battery of tests (Abalakov test, sit-up test, hand grip test, backsaver sit and reach, the toe touch test). An unpaired t -test was used to determine differences. Pearson's correlation coefficient was used to evaluate the correlation between the tests. Results: The battery of tests demonstrated that subjects in the juvenile idiopathic arthritis group have lower fitness levels compared to the control group. The juvenile idiopathic arthritis group showed low postural control with respect to the control group. Pearson analysis of the juvenile idiopathic arthritis group data showed significant correlations between variables. Pearson's results from the control group data showed a similar trend. Conclusions: The results suggest that the battery of tests used could be an appropriate tool. However, we highlight that these conclusions need to be supported by other studies with a larger population scale.

  20. Treating juvenile idiopathic arthritis to target: recommendations of an international task force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravelli, Angelo; Consolaro, Alessandro; Horneff, Gerd; Laxer, Ronald M; Lovell, Daniel J; Wulffraat, Nico M; Akikusa, Jonathan D; Al-Mayouf, Sulaiman M; Antón, Jordi; Avcin, Tadej; Berard, Roberta A; Beresford, Michael W; Burgos-Vargas, Ruben; Cimaz, Rolando; De Benedetti, Fabrizio; Demirkaya, Erkan; Foell, Dirk; Itoh, Yasuhiko; Lahdenne, Pekka; Morgan, Esi M; Quartier, Pierre; Ruperto, Nicolino; Russo, Ricardo; Saad-Magalhães, Claudia; Sawhney, Sujata; Scott, Christiaan; Shenoi, Susan; Swart, Joost F; Uziel, Yosef; Vastert, Sebastiaan J; Smolen, Josef S

    2018-06-01

    Recent therapeutic advances in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) have made remission an achievable goal for most patients. Reaching this target leads to improved outcomes. The objective was to develop recommendations for treating JIA to target. A Steering Committee formulated a set of recommendations based on evidence derived from a systematic literature review. These were subsequently discussed, amended and voted on by an international Task Force of 30 paediatric rheumatologists in a consensus-based, Delphi-like procedure. Although the literature review did not reveal trials that compared a treat-to-target approach with another or no strategy, it provided indirect evidence regarding an optimised approach to therapy that facilitated development of recommendations. The group agreed on six overarching principles and eight recommendations. The main treatment target, which should be based on a shared decision with parents/patients, was defined as remission, with the alternative target of low disease activity. The frequency and timeline of follow-up evaluations to ensure achievement and maintenance of the target depend on JIA category and level of disease activity. Additional recommendations emphasise the importance of ensuring adequate growth and development and avoiding long-term systemic glucocorticoid administration to maintain the target. All items were agreed on by more than 80% of the members of the Task Force. A research agenda was formulated. The Task Force developed recommendations for treating JIA to target, being aware that the evidence is not strong and needs to be expanded by future research. These recommendations can inform various stakeholders about strategies to reach optimal outcomes for JIA. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  1. Intra-articular injection in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: factors associated with a good response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Luiza Garcia Cunha

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: Intra-articular injection of corticosteroids (IIC for treatment of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA is increasingly used in Pediatric Rheumatology. Objectives: To describe the clinical course of patients undergoing IIC in our Pediatric Rheumatology Unit. Methods: Retrospective study of patients with JIA undergoing IIC from January 2008 to December 2012, with a minimum follow-up of six months after the injection. Good response to IIC was set as the presence of inactivity on the infiltrated joint by at least six months. Results: Eighty-eight patients underwent a total of 165 IICs. Of these, 75% were girls and 35.2% had persistent oligoarticular JIA. The mean age at diagnosis was 6.8 years, and when IIC was carried out, 12.2 years. Regarding patients, younger age at diagnosis (p = 0.037 and the occurrence of uveitis in the course of the disease (p = 0.015 were associated with good response to IIC. From 165 IICs, 63% had a good response and joints remained inactive for a median of 18.1 months. The type of joint injection (p = 0.001, lesser values stated in the overall visual analog scale by the physician (p = 0.015 and by parents/patient (p = 0.01 have been associated with a good response to IIC. Nine adverse events (5.4% were observed. Conclusion: In our study, more than half of the joints showed a good response to IIC. Younger patients at diagnosis and uveitis during the course of the disease had good response to IIC. Knees, wrists and elbows were the joints that best responded to IIC. IIC proved to be a safe procedure.

  2. Agreement between physicians and parents in rating functional ability of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buoncompagni Antonella

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To investigate concordance between physicians and parents in rating the degree of functional ability of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA. Methods The attending physician and a parent were asked to rate independently the level of physical functioning of 155 patients with disease duration ≥ 5 years on a 6-point scale ranging from 1 = no disability (i.e. the child can do without difficulty all activities that children of his/her age can do to 6 = severe disability (i.e. all activities are difficult for the child. At study visit, measures of JIA activity and damage were assessed. Agreement was evaluated with weighted kappa (0.80 excellent agreement. Physician/parent evaluations were divided in 3 groups: 1 concordance; 2 parent over-rating = parent assessment over-rated relative to physician assessment; 3 physician over-rating = physician assessment over-rated relative to parent assessment. Factors affecting concordance/discordance were evaluated by means of Kruskal-Wallis or Chi-square/Fisher exact test. Results Concordance, parent over-rating and physician over-rating were observed in 107 (69%, 29 (18.7% and 19 (12.3% evaluations, respectively. Kappa value was 0.69. Parent over-rating was associated with greater intensity of pain (p = 0.01 and higher Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire (C-HAQ score (p = 0.004, whereas physician over-rating was associated with more severe joint disease (p = 0.04 to Conclusion Physicians and parents revealed fair concordance in rating functional ability of children with JIA. Parent over-rating was associated with greater child's pain and worse C-HAQ score, whereas physician over-rating was associated with greater severity of joint inflammation and damage.

  3. A systematic review of the effectiveness of strategies for reducing fracture risk in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis with additional data on long-term risk of fracture and cost of disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, J; Ashcroft, D; O'Neill, T; Elliott, R; Adams, J; Roberts, C; Rooney, M; Symmons, D

    2008-03-01

    To review outcome measures and treatment costs in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and low bone mineral density (BMD) and/or fragility fractures. To review evidence for effectiveness and safety of bisphosphonates and calcium and/or vitamin D in these children. To assess long-term bone health in adults with JIA. Major databases were searched up to July 2005 for effectiveness studies and up to January 2005 for costs. A structured search strategy was conducted. For the evaluation of long-term bone health, outcome data were derived from two cohorts of adult patients with JIA. As there were few published cost data, an ongoing UK longitudinal study (CAPS) provided background data on the cost of managing JIA. Sixteen studies (78 children with JIA) were included. At baseline, the children had BMD below the expected values for age- and sex-matched children; treatment with bisphosphonates increased BMD with mean percentage increases in spine BMD varying from 4.5 to 19.1%. None of the studies with control groups compared results between the intervention and control groups, they only compared each group with its own baseline. Overall, studies were heterogeneous in design, of variable quality and with no consistency in methods of assessing and reporting outcomes. Hence, data could not be combined or an effect size calculated. A further 43 papers were included in the safety review; side-effects were generally transient. Two studies assessed treatment with calcium and/or vitamin D; BMD was increased from 0.75 to 0.830 g/cm2 after 6 months and BMD Z-score from -2.8 to -2.3 after 6 months and -2.4 after 1 year. There are relatively few long-term studies on the occurrence of low BMD and fragility fractures in children with JIA, with most studies only following children for 1 or 2 years. However, the long- and short-term data indicate that children with JIA have a lower BMD and more fractures than children without JIA. There are very few data on long-term bone health

  4. Assessment of bone mineral density in adults with a history of juvenile chronic arthritis: a cross-sectional long-term followup study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zak, M; Hassager, C; Lovell, D J

    1999-01-01

    To assess bone mineral density (BMD) and bone turnover in adults with a history of juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA) or persistent JCA, and to identify predictors of reduced BMD.......To assess bone mineral density (BMD) and bone turnover in adults with a history of juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA) or persistent JCA, and to identify predictors of reduced BMD....

  5. Joint cartilage thickness and automated determination of bone age and bone health in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Twilt, Marinka; Pradsgaard, Dan; Spannow, Anne Helene

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: BoneXpert is an automated method to calculate bone maturation and bone health index (BHI) in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Cartilage thickness can also be seen as an indicator for bone health and arthritis damage. The objective of this study was to evaluate...... the relation between cartilage thickness, bone maturation and bone health in patients with JIA. METHODS: Patients with JIA diagnosed according ILAR criteria included in a previous ultrasonography (US) study were eligible if hand radiographs were taken at the same time as the US examination. Of the 95 patients...... 67 met the inclusion criteria. RESULTS: Decreased cartilage thickness was seen in 27% of the examined joints. Decreased BHI was seen in half of the JIA patient, and delayed bone maturation was seen in 33% of patients. A combination of decreased BHI and bone age was seen in 1 out of 5 JIA patients...

  6. Intravoxel incoherent motion magnetic resonance imaging of the knee joint in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilbert, Fabian; Sauer, Alexander; Koestler, Herbert [University Hospital Wuerzburg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Wuerzburg (Germany); Holl-Wieden, Annette [University Hospital Wuerzburg, Department of Paediatrics, Wuerzburg (Germany); Neubauer, Henning [University Hospital Wuerzburg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Wuerzburg (Germany); University Hospital Ulm, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Ulm (Germany)

    2017-05-15

    MRI of synovitis relies on use of a gadolinium-based contrast agent. Diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) visualises thickened synovium but is of limited use in the presence of joint effusion. To investigate the feasibility and diagnostic accuracy of diffusion-weighted MRI with intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) for diagnosing synovitis in the knee joint of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Twelve consecutive children with confirmed or suspected juvenile idiopathic arthritis (10 girls, median age 11 years) underwent MRI with contrast-enhanced T1-weighted imaging and DWI at 1.5 T. Read-out segmented multi-shot DWI was acquired at b values of 0 s/mm{sup 2}, 200 s/mm{sup 2}, 400 s/mm{sup 2} and 800 s/mm{sup 2}. We calculated the IVIM parameters perfusion fraction (f) and tissue diffusion coefficient (D). Diffusion-weighted images at b=800 s/mm{sup 2}, f parameter maps and post-contrast T1-weighted images were retrospectively assessed by two independent readers for synovitis using the Juvenile Arthritis MRI Scoring system. Seven (58%) children showed synovial hypertrophy on contrast-enhanced imaging. Diagnostic ratings for synovitis on DWI and on f maps were fully consistent with contrast-enhanced imaging, the diagnostic reference. Two children had equivocal low-confidence assessments on DWI. Median f was 6.7±2.0% for synovitis, 2.1±1.2% for effusion, 5.0±1.0% for muscle and 10.6±5.7% for popliteal lymph nodes. Diagnostic confidence was higher based on f maps in three (25%) children and lower in one child (8%), as compared to DWI. DWI with IVIM reliably visualises synovitis of the knee joint. Perfusion fraction maps differentiate thickened synovium from joint effusion and hence increase diagnostic confidence. (orig.)

  7. [The temporomandibular joint in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: what radiologists need to look for on magnetic resonance imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Hoz Polo, M; Navallas, M

    2014-01-01

    The term "juvenile idiopathic arthritis" (JIA) encompasses a group of arthritis of unknown cause with onset before the age of 16 years that last for at least 6 weeks. The prevalence of temporomandibular joint involvement in published series ranges from 17% to 87%. Temporomandibular joint involvement is difficult to detect clinically, so imaging plays a key role in diagnosis and monitoring treatment. MRI is the technique of choice for the study of arthritis of the temporomandibular joint because it is the most sensitive technique for detecting acute synovitis and bone edema. Power Doppler ultrasonography can also detect active synovitis by showing the hypervascularization of the inflamed synovial membrane, but it cannot identify bone edema. This article describes the MRI technique for evaluating the temporomandibular joint in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis, defines the parameters to look for, and illustrates the main findings. Copyright © 2013 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Rheumatic patients at work : a study of labour force participations and its determinants in rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and juvenile chronic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chorus, A.M.J.

    2004-01-01

    This thesis at the University of Maastricht, defended at May 7, 2004, yields several important and new findings with regard to work related quality of life, participation in the labour force and its determinants of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and juvenile

  9. A radiographic classification system in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis applied to the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dale, K.; Paus, A.C.; Laires, K.

    1994-01-01

    A new radiographic grading system for evaluation of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) for the knee is presented. The classification is based on known arthritic criteria in childhood. Joints with erosion are given a higher score than growth disturbances alone. Signs of osteoarthrosis including joint space narrowing were excluded from the classification. The femorotibial and patello-femoral joints are assessed together. Verbal definitions are used for the classification, but, regarding the erosions, standard reference films are used. The intra- and inter-observer variations of the method were low. (P < 0.01) (orig.)

  10. Comparison between three radiographic techniques for examination of the temporomandibular joints in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larheim, T.A.

    1981-01-01

    Comparison between orthopantomography, conventional radiography and lateral tomography for diagnosing arthritic lesions in the temporomandibular joints of 42 children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis showed that each method seems to have diagnostic limitations. Concordance values of about 70 per cent were obtained. Most often destructive lesions of both the mandibular head and the fossa were observed at tomography. Secondary arthrosis, particularly sclerosis of the fossa, was most often diagnosed at conventional radiography. A combination of radiographic techniques seems to be most reliable for diagnosing arthritic joint abnormalities in children. (Auth.)

  11. Etanercept In the treatment of AA-amyloidosis in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Mihels

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study effect of etanercept, an antagonist of serum A amyloid production in the AA amyloidosis treatment in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA. Material and methods. Etanercept was administered to all pts with AA amyloidosis admitted to Garmisch-Paterkirchen pediatric rheumatological clinic beginning with 2000. C-reactive protein (CRP, degree of proteinuria and serum creatinin were used as preliminary outcome measures. Results. 11 pts with seronegative JIA (6 boys and 5 girls were included in the study. Mean follow up duration was l,9±l.01 years. 8 children had systemic, 2 - olygoarticular and one - polyarticular disease onset. Before the study all pts had CRP level elevation (1,03-8,29 mg/dl, mean 4,53 mg/dl. 8 from 11 had marked proteinuria (364-7400 mg/24 hours, mean 1186 mg/24 hours. 2 from 11 had serum creatinin elevation. During etanercept treatment CRP level normalized in 2 and significantly decreased in 4 pts. Proteinuria decreased in 4 from 8 pts. Significant change of creatinin level was not achieved. One girl who did not have improvement during etanercept treatment showed CRP normalization and decrease of proteinuria when the drug was changed to infliximab. Conclusion. Treatment with etanercept provided improvement in almost 2/3 from 11 pts with JIA and AA amyloidosis. Etanercept may be the drug of choice in pts with normal creatinine level in the absence of proteinuria. When it fails another tumor necrosis factor antagonist such as infliximab should be used. It is necessary to extend volume and duration of the study to get more reliable data on etanercept efficacy in JIA pts with AA amyloidosis.

  12. Orthodontic and dentofacial orthopedic management of juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bremen, J; Ruf, S

    2011-08-01

    To systematically review the literature published on orthodontic treatment principles in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Several electronic databases (PubMed, Medpilot, Web of Science, and DIMDI) and orthodontic and rheumatologic literature were systematically searched for studies published until May 2010. The articles were rated by two independent reviewers and included after three selection steps (title-abstract-full text). Articles had to be studies performed on ≥ 5 patients with a disease onset before the age of 16. The selection process resulted in the inclusion of three publications on dentofacial orthopedics and six on combined surgical orthodontic therapy. The three studies on dentofacial orthopedics aimed to improve the mandibular retrusion by means of removable functional appliances (activator). Whereas these orthodontic approaches comprised relatively large and homogeneous patient samples (14, 22, and 72 subjects, aged 6-16), the surgical studies were basically case series with a large age span of the patients (5-12 subjects, aged 10-44). In these surgical treatment approaches, orthodontics was limited to pre-surgical leveling and post-surgical finishing, while the skeletal discrepancy was treated surgically by a variety of techniques (costochondral grafts, bilateral sagittal spilt osteotomy, Le Fort I, and genioplasty). The treatment goals of both approaches were improvement of esthetics and function and/or pain reduction, and both approaches showed satisfactory results. Because of the heterogeneity of the subject material and the low level of evidence of the papers, it is difficult to draw any conclusions on the orthodontic/dentofacial orthopedic management of JIA. It appears as if removable functional appliances may be beneficial in adolescent patients with JIA. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  13. Lack of association between the chemokine receptor 5 polymorphism CCR5delta32 in rheumatoid arthritis and juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kvien Tore K

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The chemokine receptor CCR5 has been detected at elevated levels on synovial T cells, and a 32 bp deletion in the CCR5 gene leads to a non-functional receptor. A negative association between the CCR5Δ32 and rheumatoid arthritis (RA has been reported, although with conflicting results. In juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA, an association with CCR5 was recently reported. The purpose of this study was to investigate if the CCR5Δ32 polymorphism is associated with RA or JIA in Norwegian cohorts. Methods 853 RA patients, 524 JIA patients and 658 controls were genotyped for the CCR5Δ32 polymorphism. Results The CCR5Δ32 allele frequency was 11.5% in the controls vs. 10.4% in RA patients (OR = 0.90; P = 0.36 and 9.7% in JIA patients (OR = 0.85; P = 0.20. No decreased homozygosity was observed for CCR5Δ32, as previously suggested. Conclusion Our data do not support an association between the CCR5Δ32 allele and Norwegian RA or JIA patients. Combining our results with those from a recently published meta-analysis still provide evidence for a role for CCR5Δ32 in RA, albeit substantially weaker than the effect first reported.

  14. Modern methods of early diagnostics of juvenile arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chernenkov Y.V.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The problem of inflammatory diseases of joints is one of the most important issues in the pediatrics. Nowadays the significant attention in this sphere is paid to the search of new accurate criteria of diagnostics. It will help estimate the severity of disease, determine the prognosis, choose the method of treatment and monitoring and evaluate the efficacy of the therapy.

  15. Ultrasonography and color Doppler in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurell, Louise; Court-Payen, Michel; Nielsen, Susan

    2011-01-01

    hypertrophy, effusion) and by color Doppler (synovial hyperemia) before and 4 weeks after US-guided steroid injection. Results US detected 121 compartments with active disease (joints, tendon sheaths and 1 ganglion cyst). Multiple compartments were involved in 80% of the ankle regions. The talo-crural joint...

  16. CEFTRIAXONE EFFICIENCY AMONG PATIENTS, SUFFERING FROM JUVENILE ARTHRITIS AND RECEIVING IMMUNOSUPPRESSIVE THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Chomakhidze

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is dedicated to diagnostics and treatment of infectious complications among children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, receiving immunosuppressive therapy. The research involves 92 children with different variants of the illness run, who received immunosuppressive therapy. All the patients showed development of the systemic inflammatory response manifestations. The researchers used the definition of the procalcytonine levels as a marker for the bacterial infectiondevelopment. All the patients showed it higher than 0,5 ng/ml, while 7 patients — higher than 10 ng/ml. keeping in mind several courses of the antibacterial therapy in the anamnesis and presence of the combined bacterial infection, ceftriaxone was prescribed to all the children. As a result of the ceftriaxone based therapy, reduction of the clinical and laboratory manifestations of the bacterial infection was noted among more than 90% of patients. The development of the allergic reaction was noted in 1 case, and leukopenia was also found in 1 patient.Key words: children, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, ceftriaxone.

  17. Anti-TNF therapy for juvenile idiopathic arthritis-related uveitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semeraro F

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Francesco Semeraro,1 Barbara Arcidiacono,2 Giuseppe Nascimbeni,1 Martina Angi,1 Barbara Parolini,2 Ciro Costagliola31Eye Clinic, Department of Neurological Sciences and Vision, University of Brescia, Brescia, Italy; 2Department of Ophthalmology, S. Anna Hospital, Brescia, Italy; 3Eye Clinic, Department of Health Sciences, University of Molise, Campobasso, ItalyAbstract: Juvenile idiopathic arthritis-related uveitis is the most common type of uveitis in childhood and one of the main causes of visual impairment in children. The introduction of biological treatment has widened the range of therapeutic options for children with uveitis refractory to standard nonbiologic immunosuppressants. Data from clinical trials suggest that both adalimumab and infliximab have demonstrated effectiveness and safety in open-label studies, although no large, randomized, controlled trials have been reported so far. The role of etanercept in treating juvenile idiopathic arthritis-related uveitis is not yet well defined. In our experience, anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy has been shown to be more effective than steroids and/or methotrexate in treating uveitis. Up to now, tumor necrosis factor blocking compounds have been reserved for the treatment of the most severe cases of refractory uveitis, and larger prospective clinical trials are required in order to better assess the safety of these new compounds.Keywords: adalimumab, etanercept, infliximab

  18. Anti-adalimumab antibodies in juvenile idiopathic arthritis-related uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinonen, Sanna T; Aalto, Kristiina; Kotaniemi, Kaisu M; Kivelä, Tero T

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the association of adalimumab trough levels and anti-adalimumab antibodies with activity of uveitis in juvenile idiopathic arthritis-related uveitis. This was a retrospective observational case series in a clinical setting at the Department of Ophthalmology, Helsinki University Hospital, Finland in 2014-2016. Thirty-one paediatric patients with chronic anterior juvenile idiopathic arthritis-related uveitis in 58 eyes and who had been on adalimumab ≥6 months were eligible for the study. Uveitis activity during adalimumab treatment, adalimumab trough levels and anti-adalimumab antibody levels were recorded. Anti-adalimumab antibody levels ≥12 AU /ml were detected in nine patients (29%). This level of anti-adalimumab antibodies was associated with a higher grade of uveitis (puveitis that was not in remission (p=0.001) and with lack of concomitant methotrexate therapy (p=0.043). In patients with anti-adalimumab antibody levels uveitis (p=0.86). Adalimumab treatment might be better guided by monitoring anti-adalimumab antibody formation in treating JIA-related uveitis.

  19. Effect of Adalimumab on Refractory Arthritis in Juvenile Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathy with Anti-MDA5 Autoantibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takako Miyamae

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A 10-year-old girl manifested persistent fever, skin rash, leg pain, fatigue, and joint pain. Based on muscle weakness, elevated muscle-derived enzymes, magnetic resonance imaging, and skin biopsy results, the diagnosis was juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (JIIM. Chest CT was normal; the anti-melanoma differentiation-associated protein-5 (anti-MDA5 autoantibody was positive. Initial manifestations subsided after prednisolone (PSL and methotrexate treatment. After the PSL dosage was decreased, the patient presented with metacarpophalangeal (MCP joint pain and swelling in both index fingers, synovial fluid, and signals on power Doppler ultrasound. The arthritis was refractory to cyclosporine and tacrolimus. Radiography showed progressive MCP joint space narrowing and joint erosion. Adalimumab was initiated 14 months after disease onset. There was a mildly increased matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP3 level, an erythrocyte sedimentation ratio (ESR, and a normal CRP level. Adalimumab resulted in decreased MCP joint pain and swelling. PSL was discontinued 10 months after adalimumab initiation; after 9 more months of adalimumab, there were no significant ultrasonography findings. MMP3 and ESR levels normalized during treatment. Radiography after 2 years of adalimumab showed further progressive MCP joint space narrowing restricting dorsiflexion. This report clarified that anti-MDA5-positive JIIM joint manifestations were due to active synovitis and that adalimumab is required for severe cases. Further experience is needed to determine the pathology, severity, and prognosis of this type of arthritis.

  20. MRI assessment of bone marrow in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: intra- and inter-observer variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanturri de Horatio, Laura; Barbuti, Domenico; Toma, Paolo [Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesu, Department of Radiology, Rome (Italy); Damasio, Maria Beatrice [Ospedale G. Gaslini, Department of Radiology, Genoa (Italy); Bracaglia, Claudia [Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesu, Department of Paediatrics, Rome (Italy); Lambot-Juhan, Karen [Hopital Necker-Enfants Malades, Department of Radiology, Paris (France); Boavida, Peter [Great Ormond Street Hospital, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Ording Mueller, Lil-Sofie [University Hospital North Norway, Department of Radiology, Tromsoe (Norway); Malattia, Clara [Ospedale G. Gaslini, Department of Pediatrics, Genoa (Italy); Rava, Lucilla [Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesu, Department of Epidemiology, Rome (Italy); Rosendahl, Karen [Great Ormond Street Hospital, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Haukeland University Hospital, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Bergen (Norway)

    2012-06-15

    Bone marrow oedema (BMO) is included in MRI-based scoring systems of disease activity in adults with rheumatoid arthritis. Similar systems in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) are lacking. To assess the reproducibility in a multi-centre setting of an MRI BMO scoring system in children with JIA. Seventy-six wrist MRIs were read twice, independently, by two experienced paediatric radiologists. BMO was defined as ill-defined lesions within the trabecular bone, returning high and low signal on T2- and T1-weighted images respectively, with or without contrast enhancement. BMO extension was scored for each of 14 bones at the wrist from 0 (none) to 3 (extensive). The intra-observer agreement was moderate to excellent, with weighted kappa ranging from 0.85 to 1.0 and 0.49 to 1.0 (readers 1 and 2 respectively), while the inter-observer agreement ranged from 0.41 to 0.79. The intra- and inter-observer intraclass correlation coefficients were excellent and satisfactory, respectively. The scoring system was reliable and may be used for grading bone marrow abnormality in JIA. The relatively large variability in aggregate scores, particularly between readers, underscores the need for thorough standardisation. (orig.)

  1. MRI assessment of bone marrow in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: intra- and inter-observer variability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanturri de Horatio, Laura; Barbuti, Domenico; Toma, Paolo; Damasio, Maria Beatrice; Bracaglia, Claudia; Lambot-Juhan, Karen; Boavida, Peter; Ording Mueller, Lil-Sofie; Malattia, Clara; Rava, Lucilla; Rosendahl, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Bone marrow oedema (BMO) is included in MRI-based scoring systems of disease activity in adults with rheumatoid arthritis. Similar systems in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) are lacking. To assess the reproducibility in a multi-centre setting of an MRI BMO scoring system in children with JIA. Seventy-six wrist MRIs were read twice, independently, by two experienced paediatric radiologists. BMO was defined as ill-defined lesions within the trabecular bone, returning high and low signal on T2- and T1-weighted images respectively, with or without contrast enhancement. BMO extension was scored for each of 14 bones at the wrist from 0 (none) to 3 (extensive). The intra-observer agreement was moderate to excellent, with weighted kappa ranging from 0.85 to 1.0 and 0.49 to 1.0 (readers 1 and 2 respectively), while the inter-observer agreement ranged from 0.41 to 0.79. The intra- and inter-observer intraclass correlation coefficients were excellent and satisfactory, respectively. The scoring system was reliable and may be used for grading bone marrow abnormality in JIA. The relatively large variability in aggregate scores, particularly between readers, underscores the need for thorough standardisation. (orig.)

  2. Fibromyalgia Complicating Disease Management in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbasi, L.; Haidri, F. R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate frequency of fibromyalgia in rheumatoid arthritis and its effect on disease activity score. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: The Indus Hospital, Karachi, from December 2010 to May 2011. Methodology: All adult patients of either gender diagnosed as rheumatoid arthritis on the basis of clinical, laboratory and X-ray criteria were included in the study. The sample data was separated into two groups depending on presence or absence of fibromyalgia and 28 joint disease activity score (DAS-28) value was evaluated. Results: There were 31 (25.83%) patients with rheumatoid arthritis and fibromyalgia (RAFM) out of the total 120. The median (IQR) age of patients was 40 (32 - 51) years. All were females. The overall female frequency was 79 (88.8%). The median (IQR) DAS-28 score in RA group was 4.9 (3.66 - 5.71), while the median (IQR) DAS-28 score in RAFM was 7.04 (6.62 - 7.64) [p < 0.0001]. The number of patient getting combination therapy of DMARD in RAFM group was 61.3% while in RA group was 42.7%. Conclusion: DAS-28 was found to be significantly higher in RAFM patients probably because of higher perception of pain. (author)

  3. EFFECTIVENESS AND SAFETY OF INFLIXIMAB IN PATIENTS WITH EARLY AND LATE JUVENILE RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Е.I. Alexeeva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents results of a study of effectiveness and safety of infliximab — monoclonal antibodies to the tumor necrotizing factor (TNF in treatment of 100 patients11 months — 17 years old with early and late articular types of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. The duration of treatment was 3 months — 2 years. Infliximap was delivered intravenously by scheme: infusion on 0, 2nd, 6th weeks and then every 8th week. The single dose of infliximab in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis was 6.7 (5.5; 9.0 mg/kg, with late type — 6.0 (5.0; 7.0 mg/kg of body weight. 102 weeks of treatment with anti-TNF-agent provided development of clinical remission, decrease and normalization of laboratory tests of disease’s activity, total restoration of joint’s function, increase of quality of life (on 97% in patients with early type, and 72% 0 in ones with late type. The drug was abolished in 39 (39% of patients, 23% — due to the development of secondary inefficiency, and 11% — due to the development of unfavorable effects.Key words: children, early and late rheumatoid arthritis, treatment, infliximab.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. – 2010;9(3:30-42

  4. Rheumatoid arthritis associated interstitial lung disease: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Assayag

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis is a common inflammatory disease affecting about 1% of the population. Interstitial lung disease is a serious and frequent complication of rheumatoid arthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis associated interstitial lung disease (RA-ILD is characterized by several histopathologic subtypes. This article reviews the proposed pathogenesis and risk factors for RA-ILD. We also outline the important steps involved in the work-up of RA-ILD and review the evidence for treatment and prognosis.

  5. Linkage Between Periodontal Disease and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmstrup, Palle; Nielsen, Claus Henrik

    2016-01-01

    The past decades have significantly widened the perspectives of the chronic oral infectious disease known as periodontitis. The disease is regarded as a bacterial infection resulting in low-grade inflammation of the periodontal tissues, and both the associated release of pro-inflammatory mediators...... and the presence of bacteria in the periodontal pockets, which, as the result of daily procedures, may spread after penetration of the vasculature, are possible mediators of systemic consequences. The present chapter deals with the possible association of periodontitis with rheumatoid arthritis, which may possess...

  6. Facial Asymmetry Evaluation in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Patients Based On Cone-Beam Computed Tomography And 3D Photography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Economou, Stalo; Stoustrup, Peter Bangsgaard; Kristensen, Kasper Dahl

    AIMS: The aim of the study was to assess the degree of and correlation between facial hard and soft tissue asymmetry in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis, identify valid soft tissue points for clinical examination and assess the smallest clinical detectable level of dentofacial asymmetr...

  7. Long-term ocular complications in aphakic versus pseudophakic eyes of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis-associated uveitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijssens, K. M.; Los, L. I.; Rothova, A.; Schellekens, P. A. W. J. F.; van de Does, P.; Stilma, J. S.; de Boer, H. J.

    Aim To evaluate the long-term follow-up of aphakic and pseudophakic eyes of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated uveitis with a special interest in whether intraocular lens implantation increases the risk of developing ocular complications. Methods Data were obtained from the

  8. Extremes in vitamin K status of bone are related to bone ultrasound properties in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Summeren, M. J. H.; Vermeer, C.; Engelbert, R. H. H.; Schurgers, L. J.; Takken, T.; Fischer, K.; Kuis, W.

    2008-01-01

    Osteopenia is a common complication of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). In adults, low bone density and increased fracture risk are associated with low vitamin K status of bone. The vitamin K-dependent protein osteocalcin plays an important role in bone metabolism. Its activity depends upon

  9. A survey of national and multi-national registries and cohort studies in juvenile idiopathic arthritis : challenges and opportunities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beukelman, Timothy; Anink, Janneke; Berntson, Lillemor; Duffy, Ciaran; Ellis, Justine A; Glerup, Mia; Guzman, Jaime; Horneff, Gerd; Kearsley-Fleet, Lianne; Klein, Ariane; Klotsche, Jens; Magnusson, Bo; Minden, Kirsten; Munro, Jane E; Niewerth, Martina; Nordal, Ellen; Ruperto, Nicolino; Santos, Maria Jose; Schanberg, Laura E; Thomson, Wendy; van Suijlekom-Smit, Lisette; Wulffraat, Nico; Hyrich, Kimme

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To characterize the existing national and multi-national registries and cohort studies in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and identify differences as well as areas of potential future collaboration. METHODS: We surveyed investigators from North America, Europe, and Australia about

  10. A survey of national and multi-national registries and cohort studies in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: Challenges and opportunities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beukelman, T. (Timothy); J. Anink (Janneke); Berntson, L. (Lillemor); Duffy, C. (Ciaran); J.A. Ellis; Glerup, M. (Mia); Guzman, J. (Jaime); G. Horneff (Gerd); Kearsley-Fleet, L. (Lianne); Klein, A. (Ariane); Klotsche, J. (Jens); Magnusson, B. (Bo); K. Minden (Kirsten); Munro, J.E. (Jane E.); Niewerth, M. (Martina); Nordal, E. (Ellen); N. Ruperto (Nicolino); Santos, M.J. (Maria Jose); Schanberg, L.E. (Laura E.); W. Thomson (Wendy); L.W.A. van Suijlekom-Smit (Lisette); N.M. Wulffraat (Nico); Hyrich, K. (Kimme)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: To characterize the existing national and multi-national registries and cohort studies in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and identify differences as well as areas of potential future collaboration. Methods: We surveyed investigators from North America, Europe, and

  11. Autoantibodies to IL-1 alpha in sera from umbilical cords, children, and adults, and from patients with juvenile chronic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, K; Hansen, M B; Zak, M

    1996-01-01

    umbilical cords (n = 11), children (n = 45), and adults (n = 20), as well as in 51 patients with juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA) of pauciarticular (n = 34), polyarticular (n = 8), or systemic onset type (n = 9). RESULTS. The frequency of positive sera was significantly lower in children than in cord blood...

  12. OPTIMIZATION OF PHARMACEUTICAL CARE FOR JUVENILE RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS AT THE REGIONAL LEVEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Skripko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical practice and content analysis of scientifi c literature indicate that for treatment of the immune-infl amatory disease called juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA, the use of only basic medicines (BM is not suffi cient.The aim of the study is the organization of pharmacotherapy of JRA patients by genetically engineered biological preparations (GEBP, affecting the immune processes of the body directly.Materials and methods: the theory of marketing, content analysis, the ABC-analysis, sociological survey, pharmacoeconomic methods.Results and discussion. Depending on the individual characteristics of patients, the clinical picture of the disease can manifest itself in different ways, which requires justifi cation of the necessary schemes of GEBP pharmacotherapy at each stage of the carried out treatment. In the course of studying the organization of pharmaceutical assistance at the inpatient stage, we carried out a content analysis of 175 medical records of the patients (aged 2–17 years old of the cardiologic department of Irkutsk State Children’s Clinical Hospital, in the dynamics of a few years (2015–2017, and the expert assessment of the degree of GEBP demand was carried out by the doctors. The analysis of the pharmacotherapy has shown that GEBP is used as monotherapy in patients with intolerance to basic medicines or to combinations with basic medicines. It is irrational to start the GIBP treatment immediately because of possible side effects and their high cost. According to the content analysis of the reports of the regional Ministry of Health on preferential drug provision of handicapped children, both in hospital and at outpatient treatment stage, the pharmacotherapy schemes including Adalimumab, Abatacept, Infl iximab, Tocilizumab, Etanercept are most in demand.Conclusion. The study of the organization of GEBP pharmacotherapy, the expert assessment carried out by the doctors, the results of the marketing analysis of the

  13. Contrast-enhanced MRI of the knee in children unaffected by clinical arthritis compared to clinically active juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nusman, Charlotte M.; Hemke, Robert; Benninga, Marc A.; Kindermann, Angelika; Schonenberg-Meinema, Dieneke; Berg, J.M. van den; Kuijpers, Taco W.; Rossum, Marion A.J. van; Maas, Mario

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate enhancing synovial thickness upon contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the knee in children unaffected by clinical arthritis compared with clinically active juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients. A secondary objective was optimization of the scoring method based on maximizing differences on MRI between these groups. Twenty-five children without history of joint complaints nor any clinical signs of joint inflammation were age/sex-matched with 25 clinically active JIA patients with arthritis of at least one knee. Two trained radiologists, blinded for clinical status, independently evaluated location and extent of enhancing synovial thickness with the validated Juvenile Arthritis MRI Scoring system (JAMRIS) on contrast-enhanced axial fat-saturated T1-weighted MRI of the knee. Enhancing synovium (≥2 mm) was present in 13 (52 %) unaffected children. Using the total JAMRIS score for synovial thickening, no significant difference was found between unaffected children and active JIA patients (p = 0.091). Additional weighting of synovial thickening at the JIA-specific locations enabled more sensitive discrimination (p = 0.011). Mild synovial thickening is commonly present in the knee of children unaffected by clinical arthritis. The infrapatellar and cruciate ligament synovial involvement were specific for JIA, which - in a revised JAMRIS - increases the ability to discriminate between JIA and unaffected children. (orig.)

  14. Contrast-enhanced MRI of the knee in children unaffected by clinical arthritis compared to clinically active juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nusman, Charlotte M.; Hemke, Robert [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Benninga, Marc A.; Kindermann, Angelika [University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Schonenberg-Meinema, Dieneke; Berg, J.M. van den; Kuijpers, Taco W. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rossum, Marion A.J. van [University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Reade, Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Maas, Mario [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-04-15

    To evaluate enhancing synovial thickness upon contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the knee in children unaffected by clinical arthritis compared with clinically active juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients. A secondary objective was optimization of the scoring method based on maximizing differences on MRI between these groups. Twenty-five children without history of joint complaints nor any clinical signs of joint inflammation were age/sex-matched with 25 clinically active JIA patients with arthritis of at least one knee. Two trained radiologists, blinded for clinical status, independently evaluated location and extent of enhancing synovial thickness with the validated Juvenile Arthritis MRI Scoring system (JAMRIS) on contrast-enhanced axial fat-saturated T1-weighted MRI of the knee. Enhancing synovium (≥2 mm) was present in 13 (52 %) unaffected children. Using the total JAMRIS score for synovial thickening, no significant difference was found between unaffected children and active JIA patients (p = 0.091). Additional weighting of synovial thickening at the JIA-specific locations enabled more sensitive discrimination (p = 0.011). Mild synovial thickening is commonly present in the knee of children unaffected by clinical arthritis. The infrapatellar and cruciate ligament synovial involvement were specific for JIA, which - in a revised JAMRIS - increases the ability to discriminate between JIA and unaffected children. (orig.)

  15. Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance consensus treatment plans for juvenile idiopathic arthritis-associated and idiopathic chronic anterior uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeles-Han, Sheila T; Lo, Mindy S; Henderson, Lauren A; Lerman, Melissa A; Abramson, Leslie; Cooper, Ashley M; Parsa, Miriam F; Zemel, Lawrence S; Ronis, Tova; Beukelman, Timothy; Cox, Erika; Sen, H Nida; Holland, Gary N; Brunner, Hermine I; Lasky, Andrew; Rabinovich, C Egla

    2018-05-28

    Systemic immunosuppressive treatment of pediatric chronic anterior uveitis (CAU), both juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated and idiopathic varies, making it difficult to identify best treatments. The Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance (CARRA) developed consensus treatment plans (CTPs) for CAU for the purpose of reducing practice variability and allowing future comparison of treatments by comparative effectiveness analysis techniques. A core group of pediatric rheumatologists, ophthalmologists with uveitis expertise, and a lay advisor comprised the CARRA uveitis workgroup who performed literature review on pharmacologic treatments, held teleconferences, and developed a case-based survey administered to the CARRA membership to delineate treatment practices. We utilized 3 face-to-face consensus meetings using nominal group technique to develop CTPs. The survey identified areas of treatment practice variability. We developed 2 CTPs for the treatment of CAU, case definitions, and monitoring parameters. The first CTP is directed at children naïve to steroid-sparing medication, and the second at children initiating biologic therapy with options for methotrexate, adalimumab and infliximab. We defined a core dataset and outcome measures with data collection at 3 and 6 months after therapy initiation. The CARRA membership voted acceptance of the CTPs with a >95% (N = 233) approval. Using consensus methodology, two standardized CTPs were developed for systemic immunosuppressive treatment of CAU. These CTPs are not meant as treatment guidelines, but are designed for further pragmatic research within the CARRA research network. Use of these CTPs in a prospective comparison effectiveness study should improve outcomes by identifying best practice options. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. Abatacept in the treatment of severe, longstanding, and refractory uveitis associated with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tappeiner, Christoph; Miserocchi, Elisabetta; Bodaghi, Bahram; Kotaniemi, Kaisu; Mackensen, Friederike; Gerloni, Valeria; Quartier, Pierre; Lutz, Thomas; Heiligenhaus, Arnd

    2015-04-01

    Abatacept (ABA), a selective T cell costimulation modulator that binds to CD80 and CD86 on antigen-presenting cells, was investigated for its antiinflammatory effect in treating severe chronic uveitis associated with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Our retrospective study was conducted by members of the Multinational Interdisciplinary Working Group for Uveitis in Childhood (MIWGUC). Patients with JIA who are receiving ABA treatment for active uveitis were included. In all patients, uveitis had been refractory to previous topical and systemic corticosteroids, immunosuppressives, and at least 1 tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitor. A standardized protocol was used to document uveitis (MIWGUC) and arthritis. Baseline visit and visits at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months before and after ABA start were evaluated. Primary outcome measure was defined as achievement of uveitis inactivity; secondary outcome measures were tapering of corticosteroid and/or immunosuppressive treatment, and occurrence of complications. In all, 21 patients (16 female) with active uveitis (n = 21) and arthritis (n = 18) were included (mean age 11.8 ± 3.6 yrs). In 7 of 18 patients with active arthritis at baseline, inactivity was achieved following ABA treatment. Uveitis inactivity was achieved in 11 patients, but recurred later in 8 of them, and remained active in another 10 cases. Systemic corticosteroids or immunosuppression were tapered in 3 patients, but uveitis recurred in all of them during further followup. Ocular complications secondary to uveitis were present in 17 patients at baseline, while 3 patients developed new ocular complications during followup. A sustained response to ABA was uncommon in patients with severe and refractory uveitis.

  17. Hand and wrist arthritis of Behcet disease: Imaging features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugawara, Shunsuke; Ehara, Shigeru; Hitachi, Shin; Sugimoto, Hideharu

    2010-01-01

    Background: Reports on arthritis in Behcet disease are relatively scarce, and imaging features vary. Purpose: To document the various imaging features of articular disorders of the hand and wrist in Behcet disease. Material and Methods: Four patients, four women aged 26 to 65 years, fulfilling the diagnostic criteria of Behcet disease, with imaging findings of hand and wrist arthritis, were seen in two institutions. Radiography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging were studied to elucidate the pattern and distribution. Results: Both non-erosive arthritis and erosive arthritis of different features were noted: one with non-erosive synovitis of the wrist, one with wrist synovitis with minimal erosion, and two with erosive arthritis of the distal interphalangeal joint. Conclusion: Imaging manifestations of arthritis of Behcet disease vary, and may be similar to other seronegative arthritides

  18. Cardiovascular disease in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naranjo, Antonio; Sokka, Tuulikki; Descalzo, Miguel

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: We analyzed the prevalence of cardiovascular (CV) disease in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and its association with traditional CV risk factors, clinical features of RA, and the use of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) in a multinational cross...... by patients. The clinical assessment included a review of clinical features of RA and exposure to DMARDs over the course of RA. Comorbidities were recorded; CV morbidity included myocardial infarction, angina, coronary disease, coronary bypass surgery, and stroke. Traditional risk factors recorded were...... any CV event and age and male gender and between extra-articular disease and myocardial infarction. Prolonged exposure to methotrexate (HR 0.85; 95% CI 0.81 to 0.89), leflunomide (HR 0.59; 95% CI 0.43 to 0.79), sulfasalazine (HR 0.92; 95% CI 0.87 to 0.98), glucocorticoids (HR 0.95; 95% CI 0.92 to 0...

  19. Juvenile Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... OII) Timed Up & Go (TUG) Western Ontario & McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) Young Investigators Resources for Doctoral Students/Post-Doctoral Fellows Evidence-Based Practice for Academic Researchers Responsible Data Management in Research Career Planning Treatments Patient ...

  20. Intravenous immunoglobulin therapy leading to dramatic improvement in a patient with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis and severe pericarditis resistant to steroid pulse therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizawa-Yashiro, Tomomi; Oki, Eishin; Tsuruga, Kazushi; Nakahata, Tohru; Ito, Etsuro; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2012-05-01

    A 7-year-old Japanese boy with a 4-month history of systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (s-JIA) experienced disease flare with spiking fever, exanthema and arthralgia. He then developed progressive dyspnea due to severe pericarditis, and proinflammatory hypercytokinemia was suspected. Methylprednisolone pulse therapy was ineffective and echocardiography showed massive pericardial effusion had persisted. Alternatively, subsequent intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy resulted in dramatic resolution of the pericardial effusion, and his general condition significantly improved within a few days. This case report may lend further support the use of IVIG for selected patients with s-JIA and severe pericarditis.

  1. Arthritis - resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resources - arthritis ... The following organizations provide more information on arthritis : American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons -- orthoinfo.aaos.org/menus/arthritis.cfm Arthritis Foundation -- www.arthritis.org Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- www. ...

  2. Usefulness of Adalimumab in the Treatment of Refractory Uveitis Associated with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-De-Vicuña, Carmen; Díaz-Llopis, Manuel; Salom, David; Bou, Rosa; Díaz-Cascajosa, Jesus; Cordero-Coma, Miguel; Ortega, Gabriela; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; Suarez-De-Figueroa, Marta; Cruz-Martínez, Juan; Fonollosa, Alex; Blanco, Ricardo; García-Aparicio, Ángel María; Benítez-Del-Castillo, Jose M.; Antón, Jordi

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To assess the efficacy and safety of adalimumab in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and associated refractory uveitis. Design. Multicenter, prospective case series. Methods. Thirty-nine patients (mean [SD] age of 11.5 [7.9] years) with JIA-associated uveitis who were either not responsive to standard immunosuppressive therapy or intolerant to it were enrolled. Patients aged 13–17 years were treated with 40 mg of adalimumab every other week for 6 months and those aged 4–12 years received 24 mg/m2 body surface. Results. Inflammation of the anterior chamber (2.02 [1.16] versus 0.42 [0.62]) and of the posterior segment (2.38 [2.97] versus 0.35 [0.71] decreased significantly between baseline and the final visit (P treatment for JIA-associated refractory uveitis and may reduce steroid requirement. PMID:24489444

  3. Towards Establishing a Standardized Magnetic Resonance Imaging Scoring System for Temporomandibular Joints in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolend, Mirkamal A; Twilt, Marinka; Cron, Randy Q

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The temporomandibular joints (TMJs) are frequently affected in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Early detection is challenging, as major variation is present in scoring TMJ pathology on Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Consensus-driven development and validation...... of a MRI scoring system for TMJs has important clinical utility in timely improvement of diagnosis, and serving as an outcome measure. We report on a multi-institutional collaboration towards developing a TMJ MRI scoring system for JIA. METHODS: Seven readers independently assessed MRI scans from 21...... preferable for assessing minor joint changes over time. Eight items were considered sufficiently reliable and/or important for integration into the consensus scoring system: bone marrow edema and enhancement (avICC=0.57-0.61; %SDD=±45-63% prior to re-defining), condylar flattening (0.95-0.96; ±23...

  4. Síndrome da ativação do macrófago em paciente com artrite idiopática juvenil poliarticular Macrophage activation syndrome in a patient with polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acir Rachid

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available A linfohistiocitose hemofagocítica caracteriza-se por ativação e proliferação excessiva de linfócitos e macrófagos. Quando associada à artrite idiopática juvenil é também conhecida por "síndrome de ativação do macrófago", sendo uma complicação potencialmente fatal desta doença. Apresentamos o caso de uma mulher de 26 anos portadora de artrite idiopática juvenil (poliartrite, fator reumatóide negativo, com diagnóstico aos 13 anos, em uso de antiinflamatórios não esteroidais (diclofenaco, nimesulide. Admitida com quadro de resposta inflamatória sistêmica, febre, linfonodomegalia, esplenomegalia, anemia, trombocitopenia, hipofibrinogenemia, hiperferritinemia, hipertrigliceridemia e achados de hematofagocitose na medula óssea. Os autores discutem aspectos relacionados com a patogênese, diagnóstico e tratamento desta doença pouco conhecida.Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis is characterized by massive lymphocyte and macrophage activation and proliferation. When observed in association with juvenile idiopathic arthritis it is also called "macrophage activation syndrome" being a potentially lethal complication of this disease. We report the case of a 26 years old woman with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (polyarthritis, rheumatoid factor negative since 13 years old, receiving nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (diclofenac, nimesulide. She was admitted with systemic inflammatory response, fever, lymph node enlargement, splenomegaly, anemia, thrombocytopenia, hypofibrinogenemia, hyperferritinemia, hypertriglyceridemia and bone marrow hemophagocytosis. Aspects related to pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of this little known disease are discussed.

  5. Síndrome CINCA: um diagnóstico diferencial da artrite idiopática juvenil CINCA syndrome: a differential diagnosis of the juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Naomi Naka

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available A síndrome CINCA (crônico-infantil-neurológica-cutâneaarticular é uma enfermidade inflamatória multissistêmica rara, de início no período neonatal e caracterizada por febre, exantema cutâneo, envolvimento articular e do sistema nervoso central. É também conhecida pela literatura médica norte-americana como NOMID (doença multissistêmica inflamatória de início neonatal. Relatamos o caso de uma criança de 3 anos de idade admitida em nosso serviço com história de febre e exantema cutâneo desde o período neonatal. Apresentou crises convulsivas no sexto mês de vida e artrite simétrica de joelhos desde o nono mês. Na admissão, mostrava-se toxemiada, pálida, com um exantema maculopapular generalizado e artrite de joelhos e tornozelos. Apresentava ainda retardo de crescimento e desenvolvimento. Achados laboratoriais incluíram anemia, leucocitose, trombocitose, níveis elevados de proteína C reativa e meningite asséptica no exame do liquor. Os outros exames foram negativos. Os achados radiográficos dos joelhos, quadris e tornozelos foram anormais. A criança recebeu tratamento com antiinflamatório não hormonal, corticosteróide e metotrexato, com melhora apenas da dor e da febre. A etiologia da síndrome CINCA permanece desconhecida e nenhum tratamento tem se mostrado eficaz. Essa doença deve ser distinguida da forma sistêmica da artrite idiopática juvenil (AIJ, o principal diagnóstico diferencial.CINCA syndrome (chronic-infantile-neurological-cutaneousarticular is a rare multisystemic inflammatory disease with neonatal onset characterized by fever, skin rash, articular, and central nervous system involvement. This syndrome is known in the North American medical literature as infantile onset multisystem inflammatory disease (NOMID. We describe the case of a 3-yearold child admitted in our service with fever and skin rash since the neonatal period. She presented seizures at 6 months-old and bilateral arthritis of the

  6. Increased Fas and Bcl-2 Expression on Peripheral Blood T and B Lymphocytes from Juvenile-Onset Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, but not from Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis and Juvenile Dermatomyositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernadete L. Liphaus

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Defective regulation of apoptosis may play a role in the development of autoimmune diseases. Fas and Bcl-2 proteins are involved in the control of apoptosis. The aims of this study were to determine the expression of Fas antigen and Bcl-2 protein on peripheral blood T and B lymphocytes from patients with juvenile-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA and juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM. Thirty-eight patients with JSLE, 19 patients with JRA, 10 patients with JDM and 25 healthy controls entered the study. Freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC were stained for lymphocyte markers CD3, CD4, CD8, CD19 and for Fas and Bcl-2 molecules. Expressions were measured by three-color flow cytometry. Statistical analysis was performed using Kruskal–Wallis test. Percentages of freshly isolated T lymphocytes positively stained for Fas protein from JSLE patients were significantly increased compared to healthy controls, patients with JRA and patients with JDM. Percentages of B lymphocytes positive for Fas from JSLE patients were higher than healthy controls and JRA patients. In addition, Fas expression on T cells from patients with JRA was increased compared to JDM patients. Otherwise, Fas expression on T and B cells from JRA and JDM patients were similar to healthy controls. MFI of Bcl-2 positive T lymphocytes from JSLE patients were significantly increased compared to healthy controls and JRA patients. MFI of Bcl-2 protein on B lymphocytes from JSLE patients was similar to healthy controls and patients with JRA and JDM. Bcl-2 expression did not differ between JRA and JDM patients and healthy controls. In conclusion, increased expression of Fas and Bcl-2 proteins observed in circulating T and B lymphocytes from patients with JSLE, but not from patients with JRA and JDM, suggests that abnormalities of apoptosis may be related to the pathogenesis of JSLE and probably are not a result of chronic inflammation.

  7. Carpal erosions in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: repeatability of a newly devised MR-scoring system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boavida, Peter [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Lambot-Juhan, Karen [Hospital Necker Enfants Malades, Department of Radiology, Paris (France); Ording Mueller, Lil-Sofie [Oslo University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Oslo (Norway); Damasio, Beatrice; Malattia, Clara [Ospedale Pediatrico Gaslini, Department of Rheumatology, Genoa (Italy); Tanturri de Horatio, Laura [Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesu, Department of Radiology, Rome (Italy); Owens, Catherine M. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); UCL, Institute of Child Health, London (United Kingdom); Rosendahl, Karen [Haukeland University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bergen (Norway); University of Bergen, Department of Clinical Medicine, Bergen (Norway)

    2015-12-15

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is characterized by synovial inflammation, with potential risk of developing progressive joint destruction. Personalized state-of-the-art treatment depends on valid markers for disease activity to monitor response; however, no such markers exist. To evaluate the reliability of scoring of carpal bone erosions on MR in children with JIA using two semi-quantitative scoring systems. A total of 1,236 carpal bones (91 MR wrist examinations) were scored twice by two independent pediatric musculoskeletal radiologists. Bony erosions were scored according to estimated bone volume loss using a 0-4 scale and a 0-10 scale. An aggregate erosion score comprising the sum total carpal bone volume loss was calculated for each examination. The 0-4 scoring system resulted in good intra-reader agreement and moderate to good inter-observer agreement in the assessment of individual bones. Fair and moderate agreement were achieved for inter-reader and intra-reader agreement, respectively, using the 0-10 scale. Intra- and particularly inter-reader aggregate score variability were much less favorable, with wide limits of agreement. Further analysis of erosive disease patterns compared with normal subjects is required, and to facilitate the development of an alternative means of quantifying disease. (orig.)

  8. Carpal erosions in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: repeatability of a newly devised MR-scoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boavida, Peter; Lambot-Juhan, Karen; Ording Mueller, Lil-Sofie; Damasio, Beatrice; Malattia, Clara; Tanturri de Horatio, Laura; Owens, Catherine M.; Rosendahl, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is characterized by synovial inflammation, with potential risk of developing progressive joint destruction. Personalized state-of-the-art treatment depends on valid markers for disease activity to monitor response; however, no such markers exist. To evaluate the reliability of scoring of carpal bone erosions on MR in children with JIA using two semi-quantitative scoring systems. A total of 1,236 carpal bones (91 MR wrist examinations) were scored twice by two independent pediatric musculoskeletal radiologists. Bony erosions were scored according to estimated bone volume loss using a 0-4 scale and a 0-10 scale. An aggregate erosion score comprising the sum total carpal bone volume loss was calculated for each examination. The 0-4 scoring system resulted in good intra-reader agreement and moderate to good inter-observer agreement in the assessment of individual bones. Fair and moderate agreement were achieved for inter-reader and intra-reader agreement, respectively, using the 0-10 scale. Intra- and particularly inter-reader aggregate score variability were much less favorable, with wide limits of agreement. Further analysis of erosive disease patterns compared with normal subjects is required, and to facilitate the development of an alternative means of quantifying disease. (orig.)

  9. Methotrexate is an effective treatment for chronic uveitis associated with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foeldvari, Ivan; Wierk, Angela

    2005-02-01

    To assess the effectiveness of methotrexate (MTX) in the treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) associated uveitis, which is still one of the most common causes of visual impairment. A retrospective chart review of patients with the diagnosis of uveitis associated with JIA between July 1, 2002, and December 31, 2002. Four hundred sixty-seven patients with JIA were followed. Thirty-eight had uveitis: 31 associated with oligoarticular JIA and 7 with psoriatic JIA. Twenty-five of the 38 patients received MTX; in 23 patients uveitis was the indication for MTX therapy. In the MTX treated group 46/50 eyes had uveitis, the mean (range) age at onset of uveitis was 7.82 years (1.8-15.8), and the mean age at onset of arthritis was 7.25 years (1.25-15.7). MTX treatment was started an average of 11.4 months (0-72) after the onset of uveitis. The mean MTX dose was 15.6 mg/m2. Remission occurred after 4.25 months (1-12). Mean duration of remission was 10.3 months (3-27). The total duration of MTX therapy was 661 months and patients were in remission for 417/661 months. In 6 patients MTX was discontinued after 12 months of remission. Four patients were still in remission after 7.5 months (1-14). MTX seems to be an effective therapy for JIA associated uveitis.

  10. Assessment of the Body Composition and Parameters of the Cardiovascular Risk in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Jednacz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The study was aimed to evaluate cardiovascular risk parameters, body mass index (BMI centiles for sex and age, and body fat percentage using the electric bioimpedance method in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA. 30 children with JIA participated in the study. A control group included 20 children. Patients were well matched for the age and sex. The body mass and body fat percentage were determined using the segmental body composition analyser; the BMI centiles were determined. All patients had the following parameters determined: lipid profile, hsCRP, homocysteine, and IL-6. The intima media thickness (IMT was measured. Patients with JIA had significantly lower body weight, BMI, and the BMI centile compared to the control group. The IL-6 levels were significantly higher in patients with JIA compared to the control group. There were no differences between two groups with regard to the lipid profile, % content of the fat tissue, homocysteine levels, hsCRP, and IMT. Further studies are necessary to search for reasons for lower BMI and BMI centile in children with JIA and to attempt to answer the question of whether lower BMI increases the cardiovascular risk in these patients, similarly as in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA.

  11. Joint cartilage thickness and automated determination of bone age and bone health in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twilt, Marinka; Pradsgaard, Dan; Spannow, Anne Helene; Horlyck, Arne; Heuck, Carsten; Herlin, Troels

    2017-08-10

    BoneXpert is an automated method to calculate bone maturation and bone health index (BHI) in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Cartilage thickness can also be seen as an indicator for bone health and arthritis damage. The objective of this study was to evaluate the relation between cartilage thickness, bone maturation and bone health in patients with JIA. Patients with JIA diagnosed according ILAR criteria included in a previous ultrasonography (US) study were eligible if hand radiographs were taken at the same time as the US examination. Of the 95 patients 67 met the inclusion criteria. Decreased cartilage thickness was seen in 27% of the examined joints. Decreased BHI was seen in half of the JIA patient, and delayed bone maturation was seen in 33% of patients. A combination of decreased BHI and bone age was seen in 1 out of 5 JIA patients. Decreased cartilage thickness in the knee, wrist and MCP joint was negatively correlated with delayed bone maturation but not with bone health index. Delayed bone maturation and decreased BHI were not related to a thinner cartilage, but a thicker cartilage. No relation with JADAS 10 was found. The rheumatologist should remain aware of delayed bone maturation and BHI in JIA patients with cartilage changes, even in the biologic era.

  12. Methotrexate for the treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis: process to approval for JIA indication in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Masaaki; Naruto, Takuya; Imagawa, Tomoyuki; Murata, Takuji; Takei, Syuji; Tomiita, Minako; Itoh, Yasuhiko; Fujikawa, Satoshi; Yokota, Shumpei

    2009-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX), the primary treatment for the articular-type juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), is effective and brings about radiological improvement. Patient compliance is good, and it is recognized that its known side effects, namely, disruption of liver function and induction of pulmonary lesions, are unlikely to be severe at the low MTX doses that are administered. In Japan, MTX was granted approval in 1999 by the then Ministry of Health and Welfare specifically for treating rheumatoid arthritis in adult patients, allowing it be generally used in medical institutions for patients having National Health Insurance. However, in the pediatric field, its use outside the indications has so far been unavoidable, and has been left to the discretion of the physician. Finally, at the present conference, expansion of the indications of MTX for JIA was approved in Japan. It is noteworthy that this expansion of indications was achieved without requiring clinical trials on children sponsored by the pharmaceutical company: it was achieved rather by collecting necessary information through ongoing efforts (including collection and analysis of information about approval status in foreign countries, adequate evidence from the literature, implementation of a clinical use survey in Japan, etc.). It also merits attention that the maximum dose (10 mg/m2) was set on the basis of pharmacokinetic data from children, rather than relying on the dosing method and dose for adults.

  13. Consensus Treatment Plans for New-Onset Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitt, Esi Morgan; Kimura, Yukiko; Beukelman, Timothy; Nigrovic, Peter A.; Onel, Karen; Prahalad, Sampath; Schneider, Rayfel; Stoll, Matthew L.; Angeles-Han, Sheila; Milojevic, Diana; Schikler, Kenneth N.; Vehe, Richard K.; Weiss, Jennifer E.; Weiss, Pamela; Ilowite, Norman T.; Wallace, Carol A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective There is wide variation in therapeutic approaches to systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA) among North American rheumatologists. Understanding the comparative effectiveness of the diverse therapeutic options available for treatment of sJIA can result in better health outcomes. The Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance (CARRA) developed consensus treatment plans and standardized assessment schedules for use in clinical practice to facilitate such studies. Methods Case-based surveys were administered to CARRA members to identify prevailing treatments for new-onset sJIA. A 2-day consensus conference in April 2010 employed modified nominal group technique to formulate preliminary treatment plans and determine important data elements for collection. Follow-up surveys were employed to refine the plans and assess clinical acceptability. Results The initial case-based survey identified significant variability among current treatment approaches for new onset sJIA, underscoring the utility of standardized plans to evaluate comparative effectiveness. We developed four consensus treatment plans for the first 9 months of therapy, as well as case definitions and clinical and laboratory monitoring schedules. The four treatment regimens included glucocorticoids only, or therapy with methotrexate, anakinra or tocilizumab, with or without glucocorticoids. This approach was approved by >78% of CARRA membership. Conclusion Four standardized treatment plans were developed for new-onset sJIA. Coupled with data collection at defined intervals, use of these treatment plans will create the opportunity to evaluate comparative effectiveness in an observational setting to optimize initial management of sJIA. PMID:22290637

  14. Familial aggregation of arthritis-related diseases in seropositive and seronegative rheumatoid arthritis: a register-based case-control study in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisell, Thomas; Hellgren, Karin; Alfredsson, Lars; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Klareskog, Lars; Askling, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Our objective was to estimate the risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA) associated with a family history of non-RA arthritis-related diseases. This familial co-aggregation is of clinical interest since it is often encountered when assessing family history of RA specifically, but also informative on the genetic overlap between these diseases. Since anticitrullinated peptide antibodies/rheumatoid factor (RF)-positive and RF-negative RA have both specific and shared genetic factors, the familial co-aggregation was assessed separately for seropositive and seronegative disease. Nested case-control study in prospectively recorded Swedish total population data. The Multi-Generation Register identified first-degree relatives. RA and arthritis-related diseases were ascertained through the nationwide patient register. RA serology was based on International Classification of Diseases tenth revision coded diagnoses, mainly reflecting RF. Familial risks were calculated using conditional logistic regression. Results were replicated using the Swedish rheumatology register. Familial co-aggregation was found between RA and every studied arthritis-related disease, but the magnitude varied widely, from juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) (seropositive RA OR=3.98 (3.01 to 5.26); seronegative RA OR=5.70 (3.47 to 9.36)) to osteoarthritis (seropositive RA OR=1.03 (1.00 to 1.06); seronegative RA OR=1.05 (1.00 to 1.09)). The familial co-aggregation pattern of non-RA arthritis-related diseases was overall similar for seropositive and seronegative RA. Among those with family history of RA, relatives' other arthritis-related diseases conferred little or no additional risk. Although family history of several arthritis-related diseases may be useful to predict RA (eg, lupus and JIA), others (eg, osteoarthritis and arthralgia) are less useful. Seropositive and seronegative RA had rather similar familial co-aggregation patterns with arthritis-related diseases, suggesting that the two RA

  15. Development of a national audit tool for juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a BSPAR project funded by the Health Care Quality Improvement Partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McErlane, Flora; Foster, Helen E; Armitt, Gillian; Bailey, Kathryn; Cobb, Joanna; Davidson, Joyce E; Douglas, Sharon; Fell, Andrew; Friswell, Mark; Pilkington, Clarissa; Strike, Helen; Smith, Nicola; Thomson, Wendy; Cleary, Gavin

    2018-01-01

    Timely access to holistic multidisciplinary care is the core principle underpinning management of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Data collected in national clinical audit programmes fundamentally aim to improve health outcomes of disease, ensuring clinical care is equitable, safe and patient-centred. The aim of this study was to develop a tool for national audit of JIA in the UK. A staged and consultative methodology was used across a broad group of relevant stakeholders to develop a national audit tool, with reference to pre-existing standards of care for JIA. The tool comprises key service delivery quality measures assessed against two aspects of impact, namely disease-related outcome measures and patient/carer reported outcome and experience measures. Eleven service-related quality measures were identified, including those that map to current standards for commissioning of JIA clinical services in the UK. The three-variable Juvenile Arthritis Disease Activity Score and presence/absence of sacro-iliitis in patients with enthesitis-related arthritis were identified as the primary disease-related outcome measures, with presence/absence of uveitis a secondary outcome. Novel patient/carer reported outcomes and patient/carer reported experience measures were developed and face validity confirmed by relevant patient/carer groups. A tool for national audit of JIA has been developed with the aim of benchmarking current clinical practice and setting future standards and targets for improvement. Staged implementation of this national audit tool should facilitate investigation of variability in levels of care and drive quality improvement. This will require engagement from patients and carers, clinical teams and commissioners of JIA services. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology.

  16. Development of a national audit tool for juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a BSPAR project funded by the Health Care Quality Improvement Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    McErlane, Flora; Foster, Helen E; Armitt, Gillian; Bailey, Kathryn; Cobb, Joanna; Davidson, Joyce E; Douglas, Sharon; Fell, Andrew; Friswell, Mark; Pilkington, Clarissa; Strike, Helen; Smith, Nicola; Thomson, Wendy; Cleary, Gavin

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Objective Timely access to holistic multidisciplinary care is the core principle underpinning management of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Data collected in national clinical audit programmes fundamentally aim to improve health outcomes of disease, ensuring clinical care is equitable, safe and patient-centred. The aim of this study was to develop a tool for national audit of JIA in the UK. Methods A staged and consultative methodology was used across a broad group of relevant stakeholders to develop a national audit tool, with reference to pre-existing standards of care for JIA. The tool comprises key service delivery quality measures assessed against two aspects of impact, namely disease-related outcome measures and patient/carer reported outcome and experience measures. Results Eleven service-related quality measures were identified, including those that map to current standards for commissioning of JIA clinical services in the UK. The three-variable Juvenile Arthritis Disease Activity Score and presence/absence of sacro-iliitis in patients with enthesitis-related arthritis were identified as the primary disease-related outcome measures, with presence/absence of uveitis a secondary outcome. Novel patient/carer reported outcomes and patient/carer reported experience measures were developed and face validity confirmed by relevant patient/carer groups. Conclusion A tool for national audit of JIA has been developed with the aim of benchmarking current clinical practice and setting future standards and targets for improvement. Staged implementation of this national audit tool should facilitate investigation of variability in levels of care and drive quality improvement. This will require engagement from patients and carers, clinical teams and commissioners of JIA services. PMID:29069424

  17. Reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome secondary to systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis: A case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pingping; Li, Xiaofeng; Li, Yating; Wang, Jing; Zeng, Huasong; Zeng, Xiaofeng

    2015-01-01

    Reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome (RPLS) is a clinical syndrome based on changes in clinical imaging, and it has been reported to mainly occur in adults. However, it has been recently discovered that RPLS is also prevalent in infant patients, particularly in those using glucocorticoids, immunosuppressant medications and cytotoxic drugs. The current study presents a 5-year-old male with a previous diagnosis of systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis (SoJIA) and macrophage-activation syndrome who developed posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome during treatment with glucocorticoids, disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and biological agent (etanercept) therapy. After ~5 days of treatment, the patient made a complete clinical recovery; the magnetic resonance imaging reviewed 2 weeks later showed that the previous hyper-intensity signal had disappeared and the multiple lesions in the brain had been completely absorbed. The case report shows that, conforming to recent literature, SoJIA in infants should be considered a risk factor for developing RPLS. The clinical manifestations of the disease are multiple, but usually reversible, and the patients mostly have a good prognosis. Rapid diagnosis and treatment is essential as early treatment may prevent progression to irreversible brain damage. By increasing the awareness of RPLS, the patient care may improve and further insight may be gained.

  18. Physical Examination Tools Used to Identify Swollen and Tender Lower Limb Joints in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: A Scoping Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellas, Antoni; Singh-Grewal, Davinder; Santos, Derek; Coda, Andrea

    2018-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common form of rheumatic disease in childhood and adolescents, affecting between 16 and 150 per 100,000 young persons below the age of 16. The lower limb is commonly affected in JIA, with joint swelling and tenderness often observed as a result of active synovitis. The objective of this scoping review is to identify the existence of physical examination (PE) tools to identify and record swollen and tender lower limb joints in children with JIA. Two reviewers individually screened the eligibility of titles and abstracts retrieved from the following online databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and CINAHL. Studies that proposed and validated a comprehensive lower limb PE tool were included in this scoping review. After removal of duplicates, 1232 citations were retrieved, in which twelve were identified as potentially eligible. No studies met the set criteria for inclusion. Further research is needed in developing and validating specific PE tools for clinicians such as podiatrists and other allied health professionals involved in the management of pathological lower limb joints in children diagnosed with JIA. These lower limb PE tools may be useful in conjunction with existing disease activity scores to optimise screening of the lower extremity and monitoring the efficacy of targeted interventions.

  19. Role of vitamin D receptor (VDR gene polymorphism in the pathogenesis of juvenile idiopathic arthritis: Theoretical and practical aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Kostik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA is a chronic inflammatory joint disease associated with impaired immune system performance. The specific features of JIA may be genetically determined.Objective: to assess JIA activity in children with vitamin D receptor (VDR gene ApaI and BsmI polymorphism genotypes.Subjects and methods. The investigation enrolled 71 patients with JIA. When included in the investigation, all the patients were in an active state of disease. JIA activity was assessed using the most commonly used clinical and laboratory indicators, including the Ritchie articular index (RAI, JADAS10, JADAS27, JADAS71, CDAI, DAS, and DAS28. Molecular genetic studies determined VDR gene ApaI and BsmI polymorphisms by polymerase chain reaction, followed by restriction analysis.Results. The boys who were carriers of a bb BsmI polymorphic marker in the VDR gene had a significantly higher activity of JIA measured by RAI (p=0.03, DAS (p<0.05, JADAS10 (p=0.04, JADAS27 (p=0.04, and JADAS71 (p=0.04 than those who were carriers of B allele (BB + Bb genotypes.Conclusion. The carriage of the VDR gene bb BsmI genotype of the polymorphic marker is associated with high JIA activity, which may be regarded as a marker of poor prognosis in boys with JIA.

  20. MRI of the wrist in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: erosions or normal variants? A prospective case-control study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ording Muller, Lil-Sofie; Boavida, Peter; Avenarius, Derk; Eldevik, Odd Petter; Damasio, Beatrice; Malattia, Clara; Lambot-Juhan, Karen; Tanturri, Laura; Owens, Catherine M.; Rosendahl, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Bony depressions at the wrist resembling erosions are frequently seen on MRI in healthy children. The accuracy of MRI in detecting early bony destruction is therefore questionable. We compared findings on MRI of the wrist in healthy children and those with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) to investigate markers for true disease. We compared the number and localisation of bony depressions at the wrist in 85 healthy children and 68 children with JIA, ages 5-15 years. The size of the wrist was assessed from a radiograph of the wrist performed on the same day as the MRI. No significant difference in the number of bony depressions in the carpal bones was seen between healthy children and children with JIA at any age. Depressions are found in similar locations in the two groups, except for a few sites, where bony depressions were seen exclusively in the JIA group, particularly at the CMC joints. The wrist was significantly smaller in children with JIA (P < 0.001). Using adult scoring systems and standard MR sequences in the assessment of bone destruction in children may lead to overstaging or understaging of disease. At present, standard MRI sequences cannot easily be used for assessment of early signs of erosions in children. (orig.)

  1. Genetic Predictors of Poor Prognosis in Portuguese Patients with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: Data from Reuma.pt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourão, Ana Filipa; Santos, Maria José; Mendonça, Sílvia; Oliveira-Ramos, Filipa; Salgado, Manuel; Estanqueiro, Paula; Melo-Gomes, José; Martins, Fernando; Lopes, Ana; Bettencourt, Bruno Filipe; Bruges-Armas, Jácome; Costa, José; Furtado, Carolina; Figueira, Ricardo; Brito, Iva; Branco, Jaime; Fonseca, João Eurico; Canhão, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. This study aimed to assess the genetic determinants of poor outcome in Portuguese patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Methods. Our study was conducted in Reuma.pt, the Rheumatic Diseases Portuguese Register, which includes patients with JIA. We collected prospectively patient and disease characteristics and a blood sample for DNA analysis. Poor prognosis was defined as CHAQ/HAQ >0.75 at the last visit and/or the treatment with biological therapy. A selected panel of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with susceptibility was studied to verify if there was association with poor prognosis. Results. Of the 812 patients with JIA registered in Reuma.pt, 267 had a blood sample and registered information used to define “poor prognosis.” In univariate analysis, we found significant associations with poor prognosis for allele A of TNFA1P3/20 rs6920220, allele G of TRAF1/C5 rs3761847, and allele G of PTPN2 rs7234029. In multivariate models, the associations with TRAF1/C5 (1.96 [1.17–3.3]) remained significant at the 5% level, while TNFA1P3/20 and PTPN2 were no longer significant. Nevertheless, none of associations found was significant after the Bonferroni correction was applied. Conclusion. Our study does not confirm the association between a panel of selected SNP and poor prognosis in Portuguese patients with JIA. PMID:26504858

  2. MRI of the wrist in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: erosions or normal variants? A prospective case-control study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ording Muller, Lil-Sofie [University Hospital North Norway, Department of Radiology, Tromsoe (Norway); Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Boavida, Peter [Homerton University Hospital, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Avenarius, Derk; Eldevik, Odd Petter [University Hospital North Norway, Department of Radiology, Tromsoe (Norway); Damasio, Beatrice [Ospedale Pediatrico Gaslini, Department of Radiology, Genoa (Italy); Malattia, Clara [Ospedale Pediatrico Gaslini, Department of Rhematology, Genoa (Italy); Lambot-Juhan, Karen [Hopital Necker Enfants Malades, Department of Radiology, Paris (France); Tanturri, Laura [Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesu, Department of Radiology, Rome (Italy); Owens, Catherine M. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); UCL, Institute of Child Health, London (United Kingdom); Rosendahl, Karen [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); UCL, Institute of Child Health, London (United Kingdom); Haukeland University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bergen (Norway); University of Bergen, Department of Surgical Sciences, Bergen (Norway)

    2013-07-15

    Bony depressions at the wrist resembling erosions are frequently seen on MRI in healthy children. The accuracy of MRI in detecting early bony destruction is therefore questionable. We compared findings on MRI of the wrist in healthy children and those with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) to investigate markers for true disease. We compared the number and localisation of bony depressions at the wrist in 85 healthy children and 68 children with JIA, ages 5-15 years. The size of the wrist was assessed from a radiograph of the wrist performed on the same day as the MRI. No significant difference in the number of bony depressions in the carpal bones was seen between healthy children and children with JIA at any age. Depressions are found in similar locations in the two groups, except for a few sites, where bony depressions were seen exclusively in the JIA group, particularly at the CMC joints. The wrist was significantly smaller in children with JIA (P < 0.001). Using adult scoring systems and standard MR sequences in the assessment of bone destruction in children may lead to overstaging or understaging of disease. At present, standard MRI sequences cannot easily be used for assessment of early signs of erosions in children. (orig.)

  3. Association of IRF5 polymorphisms with susceptibility to macrophage activation syndrome in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagimachi, Masakatsu; Naruto, Takuya; Miyamae, Takako; Hara, Takuma; Kikuchi, Masako; Hara, Ryoki; Imagawa, Tomoyuki; Mori, Masaaki; Sato, Hidenori; Goto, Hiroaki; Yokota, Shumpei

    2011-04-01

    Systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis (systemic JIA) and macrophage activation syndrome (MAS), the most devastating complication of systemic JIA, are characterized by abnormal levels of proinflammatory cytokines. Interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) is a member of the IRF family of transcription factors, and acts as a master transcription factor in the activation of genes encoding proinflammatory cytokines. Polymorphisms in the IRF5 gene have been associated with susceptibility to autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and rheumatoid arthritis. Our aim was to assess associations of IRF5 gene polymorphisms with susceptibility to systemic JIA and MAS. Three IRF5 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (rs729302, rs2004640, and rs2280714) were genotyped using TaqMan assays in 81 patients with systemic JIA (33 with MAS, 48 without) and 190 controls. There were no associations of the IRF5 gene polymorphisms or haplotypes under study with susceptibility to systemic JIA. There was a significant association of the rs2004640 T allele with MAS susceptibility (OR 4.11; 95% CI 1.84, 9.16; p = 0.001). The IRF5 haplotype (rs729302 A, rs2004640 T, and rs2280714 T), which was reported as conferring an increased risk of SLE, was significantly associated with MAS susceptibility in patients with systemic JIA (OR 4.61; 95% CI 1.73, 12.3; p < 0.001). IRF5 gene polymorphism is a genetic factor influencing susceptibility to MAS in patients with systemic JIA, and IRF5 contributes to the pathogenesis of MAS in these patients.

  4. Psoriasis and associated variables in classification and outcome of juvenile idiopathic arthritis - an eight-year follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekelund, Maria; Aalto, Kristiina; Fasth, Anders

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To study the impact of psoriasis and features associated with psoriasis on classification and outcome in a population-based follow-up cohort of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). METHODS: In all, 440 children with JIA were followed for a median of 8 years...... in a prospective Nordic population-based cohort study. Data for remission was available for 427 of these children. The presence of psoriasis, psoriasis-like rash, dactylitis, nail pitting, enthesitis, tenosynovitis and heredity was assessed in relation to ILAR classification and remission. RESULTS: Clinical...... findings associated with psoriasis developed consecutively during the 8-year period. Six of 14 children with psoriasis were not classified as juvenile psoriatic arthritis according to the ILAR criteria at 8 year follow-up. Dactylitis was more common in children with early onset of JIA. After 8 years we...

  5. Reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome secondary to systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis: A case report and review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    ZHANG, PINGPING; LI, XIAOFENG; LI, YATING; WANG, JING; ZENG, HUASONG; ZENG, XIAOFENG

    2014-01-01

    Reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome (RPLS) is a clinical syndrome based on changes in clinical imaging, and it has been reported to mainly occur in adults. However, it has been recently discovered that RPLS is also prevalent in infant patients, particularly in those using glucocorticoids, immunosuppressant medications and cytotoxic drugs. The current study presents a 5-year-old male with a previous diagnosis of systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis (SoJIA) and macrophage-...

  6. Effects of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis on Kinematics and Kinetics of the Lower Extremities Call for Consequences in Physical Activities Recommendations

    OpenAIRE

    Hartmann, M.; Kreuzpointner, F.; Haefner, R.; Michels, H.; Schwirtz, A.; Haas, J. P.

    2010-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients (n = 36) with symmetrical polyarticular joint involvement of the lower extremities and healthy controls (n = 20) were compared concerning differences in kinematic, kinetic, and spatio-temporal parameters with 3D gait analysis. The aims of this study were to quantify the differences in gait between JIA patients and healthy controls and to provide data for more detailed sport activities recommendations. JIA-patients showed reduced walking speed and s...

  7. Long-term safety of etanercept and adalimumab compared to methotrexate in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klotsche, Jens; Niewerth, Martina; Haas, Johannes-Peter; Huppertz, Hans-Iko; Zink, Angela; Horneff, Gerd; Minden, Kirsten

    2016-05-01

    Published evidence on the long-term safety of etanercept (ETA) and adalimumab (ADA) in patients with polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (pJIA) is still limited. To investigate the rates of serious adverse events (SAE) and of events of special interest (ESI) under ETA and ADA treatment. Patients with pJIA were prospectively observed in the national JIA biological register, Biologika in der Kinderrheumatologie, and its follow-up register, Juvenile arthritis Methotrexate/Biologics long-term Observation. We calculated the relative risks of SAE and ESI for ETA and ADA compared with methotrexate (MTX). Among the 1414 patients treated with ETA (n=1414; 4461 exposure years (EY)) and ADA (n=320; 493 EY), significantly more SAE, infections and medically important infections were observed (ETA: 4.5, 5.7, 0.9; ADA: 4.7, 11.4, 0.4 per 100 EY) compared with those treated with MTX alone (n=1455; 2.907 EY; 2.6, 5.5, 0.5 per 100 EY). The risk for malignancies was not significantly increased for ETA and ADA compared with MTX (0.09, 0.27 and 0.07/100 person-years). Patients under ETA monotherapy developed more frequently incident inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and incident uveitis (0.5 and 0.8/100 EY) than patients treated by ETA in combination with MTX (0.1 and 0.2/100 EY) or MTX alone (0.03 and 0.1/100 EY). Our data confirm the acceptable long-term tolerability of ETA and ADA in pJIA. However, whether the onset of IBD and uveitis during ETA monotherapy is a paradoxical effect or an inadequate response to therapy remains unclear and requires further investigation in this growing cohort. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  8. [Rheumatoid arthritis as a connective tissue disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Targońska-Stępniak, Bożena

    2018-01-01

    The available data indicate that seropositive rheumatoid arthritis (RA) develops as a result of systemic, autoimmune reaction directed against a range of "self" peptides/proteins that have undergone specific forms of post-translational modification. The development and progress of autoimmunity may be triggered by non-specific, local inflammatory processes outside the joints, for example in the oral or respiratory mucous membrane. The disease occurs in genetically susceptible individuals under the influence of environmental risk factors that promote autoimmunity and consequently the inflammatory process. Smoking is particularly linked with RA pathogenesis. Synovitis of multiple, symmetrical, peripheral joints is the most typical feature of RA which results in irreversible damage to joints structure and as a consequence in disability of patients. However, the inflammatory process in the course of RA has a systemic, constitutional nature. Therefore, extra-articular symptoms with internal organ involvement may occur additionally to synovitis, what is an unfavorable prognostic factor. Extra-articular manifestations of RA are associated with the high disease activity both inflammatory and immunological. They occur in patients with severe form of the disease and contribute to a significant lifespan reduction. This is usually associated with progressive atherosclerosis and cardiovascular complications. The systemic inhibition of an abnormal immune system activity is the mainstay of the effective RA treatment. The currently used disease modifying antirheumatic drugs affect the activity and function of different constituents of the immune system, including B and T lymphocytes and the main pro-inflammatory cytokines, and contribute to autoimmune and inflammatory processes.

  9. [Determination of 25(OH)D serum levels in children with systemic lupus erythematosus and juvenile idiopathic arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosiles, Vanessa Hernández; Salazar, Carolina Duarte; Velazquez, Rocío Maldonado; Ruiz, Rodolfo Rivas; Clark, Patricia

    It is well recognized that vitamin D has a direct effect in bone and muscle and has been associated as well with some rheumatologic diseases. Reports in children are scarce. The aim of this study was to determine the concentration level of 25(OH)D in a group of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and compare them with healthy controls. Vitamin D (25(OH)D) was measured with isotope-dilution liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (ID-LC-MS/MS), PTH with immunoradiometric assay (IRMA), calcium, phosphorus and alkaline phosphatase by colorimetric assay in 37 patients with SLE, 37 patients with JIA and 79 healthy controls. Mean 25(OH)D concentration levels were as follows: SLE 18.9±7.92ng/ml, JIA 21.97±5.55ng/ml and 23.6±3.07ng/ml in healthy controls. There was a significant difference between SLE patients vs. healthy controls (p <0.05); 29.7% of SLE patients, 35.1% of JIA patients and 31.6% of healthy controls had deficient levels of vitamin D. One third of the total sample of children in this study had deficient levels of vitamin D. Patients with SLE presented a significant difference compared with healthy controls. Copyright © 2015 Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  10. Experience in the use of tocilizumab in patient with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis and type 1 diabetes

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    E. A. Ligostaeva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the experience of using tocilizumab in a patient with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA refractory to therapy with classical immunosuppressants, coupled with type 1 diabetes. Already after the first injection of tocilizumab there was a decrease in the severity of the disease’s systemic manifestations, pain in the affected joints and functional disorders. A 30% improvement by JADAS index, ACRPedi was reached. By the 8th week of therapy, proliferative changes in wrist joints and arthralgias reduced and the duration of morning stiffness decreased. After 3 months, JIA’s activity decreased (DAS 28 scale; erythrocyte sedimentation rate and serum concentrations of C-reactive protein decreased; hemoglobin concentration and the number of erythrocytes increased. After 6 months of treatment, clinical and laboratory remission (DAS 28 < 2.6 started. On the background of tocilizumab treatment, systemic manifestations of the disease stopped, laboratory and articular JIA’s activity decreased and there was no need for the introduction of glucocorticoids. There also has been a positive dynamics of glycemia, which allowed reducing the dose of insulin. There were no adverse events during treatment with tocilizumab. The disease’s activity on a visual analog scale has also decreased, as well as functional insufficiency by Children Heals Assessment Questionnaire.

  11. The Pattern of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis in a Single Tertiary Center in Saudi Arabia

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    Mohammad H. Al-Hemairi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA is the most common chronic arthritis in children. Our aim is to describe demographic, clinical, and laboratory characteristics and treatment of JIA patients followed up in Pediatric Rheumatology clinic in a tertiary center in Saudi Arabia. Methods. Medical records of all patients who are followed up between January 2007 and January 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. Data were collected about demographic, clinical, and laboratory features and treatment. Results. Total patients were 82, males were 31 (37.8%, and mean age of JIA onset was 7.1 ± 3.6 yr. Mean follow-up duration was 2.67±1.6 yr. Systemic onset JIA (SoJIA was the commonest (36.5%, followed by polyarticular in 29.2% and oligoarticular in 28%. Large and small joints are involved in 76 (92% and 30 (36.6%, respectively. Main extra-articular feature was fever in 34 (41.4%. Uveitis was diagnosed in 7 (8.5% and in 5 (21.7% of oligoarticular JIA. Anemia was found in 49 (59.7%, high ESR in 45 (54.8%, and leukocytosis and thrombocytosis in 33 (40.2%. Positive ANA was found in 30 (36.5% mainly in oligoarticular subtype as 12 (52% patients (out of 23 had this positive test. 9 patients (10.9% required NSAIDs only, 6 patients (7.3% required NSAIDs and intra-articular steroids only, and 19 (23% required NSAIDs, methotrexate, steroids, and biologics. Conclusion. SoJIA is the most common JIA subtype in our study. A population based rather than a single center study will give more details about JIA characteristics in Saudi Arabia

  12. PADI4 and the HLA-DRB1 shared epitope in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisa, Kaori; Yanagimachi, Masakatsu D; Naruto, Takuya; Miyamae, Takako; Kikuchi, Masako; Hara, Rhoki; Imagawa, Tomoyuki; Yokota, Shumpei; Mori, Masaaki

    2017-01-01

    Both genetic and environmental factors are associated with susceptibility to juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Many studies have reported that both a 'shared epitope' (SE) encoded by several HLA-DRB1 alleles and the peptidyl arginine deiminase type 4 (PADI4) gene polymorphisms are associated with susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, it is uncertain whether JIA and RA share the latter genetic risk factor. Therefore, here we investigated relationships between HLA-SE and PADI4 polymorphisms with clinical subtypes of JIA. JIA patients (39 oligoarthritis, 48 RF-positive polyarthritis, 19 RF-negative polyarthritis and 82 systemic) and 188 healthy controls were genotyped for HLA-DRB1 by PCR-sequence-specific oligonucleotide probe methodology. Three PADI4 gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs2240340, rs2240337 and rs1748033, were genotyped using TaqMan SNP Genotyping Assays. Frequencies of the HLA-SE were higher in RF-positive polyarticular JIA than in healthy controls. RF-positive polyarticular JIA was associated with HLA-SE (OR = 5.3, 95% CI = 2.5-11.9, pc < 0.001). No associations were found between clinical subtypes of JIA and PADI4 allele frequency. Nonetheless, rs2240337 in the PADI4 gene was significantly associated with anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody (ACPA)-positivity in JIA. The A allele at rs2240337 was a significant risk factor for ACPA positivity in JIA (OR = 5.6, 95% CI = 1.71-23.7 pc = 0.03). PADI4 gene polymorphism is associated with ACPA-positivity in JIA. The association of HLA-SE with RF-positive polyarticular JIA as well as RA is confirmed in Japanese. Thus, HLA-SE and PADI4 status both influence JIA clinical manifestations.

  13. PADI4 and the HLA-DRB1 shared epitope in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

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    Kaori Hisa

    Full Text Available Both genetic and environmental factors are associated with susceptibility to juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA. Many studies have reported that both a 'shared epitope' (SE encoded by several HLA-DRB1 alleles and the peptidyl arginine deiminase type 4 (PADI4 gene polymorphisms are associated with susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis (RA. However, it is uncertain whether JIA and RA share the latter genetic risk factor. Therefore, here we investigated relationships between HLA-SE and PADI4 polymorphisms with clinical subtypes of JIA.JIA patients (39 oligoarthritis, 48 RF-positive polyarthritis, 19 RF-negative polyarthritis and 82 systemic and 188 healthy controls were genotyped for HLA-DRB1 by PCR-sequence-specific oligonucleotide probe methodology. Three PADI4 gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, rs2240340, rs2240337 and rs1748033, were genotyped using TaqMan SNP Genotyping Assays.Frequencies of the HLA-SE were higher in RF-positive polyarticular JIA than in healthy controls. RF-positive polyarticular JIA was associated with HLA-SE (OR = 5.3, 95% CI = 2.5-11.9, pc < 0.001. No associations were found between clinical subtypes of JIA and PADI4 allele frequency. Nonetheless, rs2240337 in the PADI4 gene was significantly associated with anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody (ACPA-positivity in JIA. The A allele at rs2240337 was a significant risk factor for ACPA positivity in JIA (OR = 5.6, 95% CI = 1.71-23.7 pc = 0.03.PADI4 gene polymorphism is associated with ACPA-positivity in JIA. The association of HLA-SE with RF-positive polyarticular JIA as well as RA is confirmed in Japanese. Thus, HLA-SE and PADI4 status both influence JIA clinical manifestations.

  14. Sternoclavicular Arthritis as a Clinical Presentation for Lyme Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramgopal, Sriram; Rosenkranz, Margalit; Nowalk, Andrew J; Zuckerbraun, Noel S

    2018-04-01

    Lyme disease is caused by Borrelia burgdorferi and can lead to dermatologic, neurologic, cardiac, and musculoskeletal manifestations. The arthritis of Lyme disease is typically monoarticular, with the knee being most commonly involved. Lyme arthritis of small joints has not previously been well described. We report 3 children who presented with sternoclavicular joint swelling and who were found to have Lyme disease based on enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blot. This description of sternoclavicular Lyme arthritis highlights the importance of considering Lyme disease in the differential and diagnostic workup of new onset, small joint arthritis in patients presenting from or with travel to Lyme endemic regions. Copyright © 2018 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  15. Impact of Antiinflammatory Treatment on the Onset of Uveitis in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: Longitudinal Analysis From a Nationwide Pediatric Rheumatology Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tappeiner, Christoph; Schenck, Sandra; Niewerth, Martina; Heiligenhaus, Arnd; Minden, Kirsten; Klotsche, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Based on a nationwide database, this study analyzed the influence of methotrexate (MTX), tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors, and a combination of the 2 medications on uveitis occurrence in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients. Data from the National Paediatric Rheumatological Database in Germany were used in this study. Between 2002 and 2013, data from JIA patients were annually documented at the participating pediatric rheumatologic sites. Patients with a JIA disease duration of treatment on the occurrence of uveitis was evaluated by discrete-time survival analysis. A total of 3,512 JIA patients (mean ± SD age 8.3 ± 4.8 years, 65.7% female, 53.2% antinuclear antibody positive, and mean ± SD age at arthritis onset 7.8 ± 4.8 years) fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Mean ± SD total followup time was 3.6 ± 2.4 years. Uveitis developed in a total of 180 patients (5.1%) within 1 year after arthritis onset. Uveitis onset after the first year was observed in another 251 patients (7.1%). Disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) treatment in the year before uveitis onset significantly reduced the risk for uveitis as follows: MTX: hazard ratio (HR) 0.63, P = 0.022; TNF inhibitors: HR 0.56, P uveitis risk (HR 0.29, P uveitis onset. Early MTX use within the first year of disease and the combination of MTX with a TNF inhibitor had the highest protective effect. © 2016 The Authors. Arthritis Care & Research published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Rheumatology.

  16. Methotrexate treatment may prevent uveitis onset in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: experiences and subgroup analysis in a cohort with frequent methotrexate use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostik, Mikhail M; Gaidar, Ekaterina V; Hynnes, Alla Y; Dubko, Margarita F; Masalova, Vera V; Snegireva, Ludmil S; Chikova, Irina A; Isupova, Eugenia A; Nikitina, Tatiana N; Serogodskaya, Elena D; Kalashnikova, Olga V; Ravelli, Angelo; Chasnyk, Vyacheslav G

    2016-01-01

    To re-evaluate the ability of methotrexate (MTX) to prevent the onset of uveitis in Russian children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). The clinical charts for all consecutive patients who received a stable management for at least 2 years with or without MTX were reviewed. Patients who were given systemic medications other than MTX (except NSAID) and patients with systemic arthritis, rheumatoid factor-positive arthritis, or enthesitis-related arthritis were excluded. Each patient was examined after at least a 2-year follow-up period after the first visit to establish whether uveitis had occurred. A total of 281 patients with a median disease duration of 3.8 years were included. 191 patients (68%) were treated with MTX. During the observation period, 64 patients (22.8%) developed uveitis, a median of 1.6 year after disease onset. The frequency of uveitis was lower in MTX-treated than in MTX-untreated patients (11.5% vs. 46.7%, respectively, OR=6.7 (95%CI:3.7-12.3), p=0.0000001). Survival analysis confirmed that patients treated with MTX had a lower probability of developing uveitis (HR=4.35, p=0.000001). In subgroup analysis it was shown that MTX was more preventive in boys than in girls, and in patients with JIA onset age of over 5 years compared to those with disease onset less than 5 years. The data of survival analysis of MTX prevention has shown that benefits do not depend on the number of active joints and ANA status. MTX therapy may prevent the onset of uveitis in children with JIA. Further randomised controlled trials are required to confirm our results.

  17. Total radiation dosage from X-ray examinations in rheumatoid arthritis and other chronic skeletal diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldursson, H.; Gustafsson, M.

    1977-01-01

    Young patients with rheumatoid arthritis and other chronic diseases of the skeleton are increasingly being operated on with replacement of major joints. The great number of associated X-ray examinations performed on these patients has caused some anxiety amongst orthopaedic surgeons. Two patients with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis have been studied. An attempt was made to calculate the total radiation dose to bone marrow and gonads. For lack of recommendations for the maximum permissible radiation dose to patients, the dose calculated has been compared with the maximum permissible dose of radiation workers, and with the dose limit for non-occupational irradiation of individuals. The yearly absorbed dose in these two patients is much lower than the maximum permissible dose of radiation workers and only slightly higher than the dose limit for non-occupational exposure of individuals. (author)

  18. Treatment preferences in juvenile idiopathic arthritis – a comparative analysis in two health care systems

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    Hugle Boris

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Variations in the treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA may impact on quality of care. The objective of this study was to identify and compare treatment approaches for JIA in two health care systems. Methods Paediatric rheumatologists in Canada (n=58 and Germany/Austria (n=172 were surveyed by email, using case-based vignettes for oligoarticular and seronegative polyarticular JIA. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics; responses were compared using univariate analysis. Results Total response rate was 63%. Physicians were comparable by age, level of training and duration of practice, with more Canadians based in academic centres. For initial treatment of oligoarthritis, only approximately half of physicians in both groups used intra-articular steroids. German physicians were more likely to institute DMARD treatment in oligoarthritis refractory to NSAID (p Conclusions Treatment of oligo- and polyarticular JIA with DMARD is mostly uniform, with availability and funding obviously influencing physician choice. Usage of intra-articular steroids is variable within physician groups. Physiotherapy has a fundamentally different role in the two health care systems.

  19. Inter- and intrareader variability in the interpretation of two radiographic classification systems for juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doria, Andrea S.; Castro, Claudio C. de; Sernik, Renato A.; Vitule, Luis F.; Arantes, Paula R.; Lucato, Leandro; Germano, Marco A.N.; Cerri, Giovanni G.; Kiss, Maria Helena B.; Silva, Carlos H.M.; Zerbini, Cristiano A.F.

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate the inter- and intrareader variability for interpretation of a modified Larsen's radiographic classification system for juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) focused on osteochondral lesions and a conventional Larsen's classification system, compared to a reference MR scoring system of corresponding images. Seventy-five radiographs of 60 children with JRA, performed within a short interval of time from the MR examinations, were independently evaluated by three experienced radiologists, three diagnostic imaging residents and three rheumatologists, in two separate sessions, according to the two different classification methods, blinded to the corresponding MR images. The inter- and intrareader concordance rates between the two radiographic classification systems and the MR-related radiographs were respectively poor and poor/moderate. The interobserver range of weighted kappa values for the conventional and the modified Larsen's system respectively was 0.25-0.37 vs 0.19-0.39 for radiologists, 0.25-0.37 vs 0.18-0.30 for residents and 0.19-0.51 vs 0.17-0.29 for rheumatologists. The intrareader rate ranged from 0.17-0.55 for radiologists, 0.2-0.56 for residents, and 0.14-0.59 for rheumatologists. Although the proposal of a new radiographic classification system for JRA focused on osteochondral abnormalities sounds promising, the low inter- and intrareader concordance rates with an MR-related radiographic system makes the clinical applicability of such a radiographic system less suitable. (orig.)

  20. Concealed concern: fathers' experiences of having a child with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite-Jones, J M; Madill, A

    2008-01-01

    Despite increased research into families of chronically ill children, more needs to be known about the father's experience. We address this issue through asking: 'What is it like to be the father of a child with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis?' (JIA). Four members of eight families with an adolescent diagnosed with JIA, including seven fathers, were interviewed and transcripts analysed using grounded theory. This study suggests that fathers of children with JIA experience several severe losses which are exacerbated through comparisons they make between their own situation and that of fathers of healthy children. In addition, the fathers faced several constraints which reduced their opportunities to communicate with their ill child through shared activities. Fathers appeared to conceal their distress by adopting strategies of denial and distraction however their adjustment was facilitated, to some extent, by social support. They could also develop greater acceptance of their situation over time as the care of their ill child became assimilated into family life and constraints upon their life gradually reduced through the increased maturity of their son or daughter with JIA. These findings have implications for healthcare professionals and voluntary organisations.

  1. Principles on the use of imaging studies in the diagnosis and management of juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. T. Vatutin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the basic principles on the use of imaging studies in the diagnosis and management of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA, which have been elaborated by the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR jointly with the Pediatric Rheumatology European Society (PreS. These principles will render certain assistance to practitioners in diagnosing and treating patients with JIA. Undoubtedly, there have been no answers to many questions so far. This primarily applies to the necessity of understanding the standards for the possibility to interpret the pathological process, to harmonize the respective MRI protocols, to identify bone marrow edema, erosions, and synovitis, and to determine the suitability of these or those examinations in order to reveal changes in individual joints. There are considerable conceptual differences in approaches to diagnostic techniques in adults and children. The EULAR-PReS experts assume that some studies may be impracticable or economically inaccessible and this may hinder their introduction into clinical practice. However, most techniques, including ultrasonography, are quite affordable. The practical application of these techniques certainly requires a high professionalism of specialists in functional diagnosis and other instrumental studies.

  2. Temporomandibular joint involvement in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: treatment with an orthodontic appliance

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    M. Gattinara

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and purpose: About 65% of children suffering from juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA shows a more or less marked involvement of temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ with altered mandibular growth, resorption of the condyles, occlusary instability, reduced chewing ability and facial dysmorphia. The purpose of our study is to prevent and to treat the progressive evolution of JIA on craniofacial growth and morphology with a functional appliance; surgery should be considered only in so far as the adequacy of TMJ movement is concemed. Methods: From 1992 until now 72 children with proved JIA and TMJ involvement have been treated (50 females, 22 males, aged 6 to 16 years old. TMJ involvement was bilateral in 61% and unilateral in 39% of patients. A diagnostic workup was carried out involving tomograms of TMJ and cephalometric radiograph and analysis. The authors used a bimaxillary activator in the attempt to modify the unfavourable growth pattern and provide a gradual ante-rotation of the jaw. Results: Almost all JIA patients showed satisfactory long term results, easing of pain, reduced skeletal discrepancy, increased function and good facial profile. Conclusions: The long term results of this study indicate that orthopaedic therapy might control the vicious circle of the malocclusion in children with JIA, preventing exacerbation of mandibular clockwise rotation. Surgical intervention for the improvement of TMJ function should be considered only if a severe restricted state is imminent.

  3. Azathioprine as a treatment option for uveitis in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, J C; Roesel, M; Heinz, C; Michels, H; Ganser, G; Heiligenhaus, A

    2011-02-01

    To investigate the therapeutic value of azathioprine as monotherapy or combined with other immunosuppressive drugs for uveitis in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). A retrospective multicentre study including 41 children with JIA (28 (68.2%) female) with unilateral or bilateral (n=28) chronic anterior uveitis. Azathioprine was used to treat uveitis that was active in patients receiving topical or systemic corticosteroids, methotrexate or other immunosuppressive drugs. The primary end point was assessment of uveitis inactivity. Secondary end points comprised dose sparing of topical steroids and systemic corticosteroids, and immunosuppression. At 1 year, uveitis inactivity was achieved in 13/17 (76.5%) patients by using azathioprine as systemic monotherapy and in 5/9 (56.6%) as combination therapy. During the entire azathioprine treatment period (mean 26 months), inactivity was obtained in 16/26 patients (61.5%) with monotherapy and in 10/15 (66.7%) when combined with other immunosuppressives (p=1.0). With azathioprine, dosages of systemic immunosuppression and steroids could be reduced by ≥ 50% (n=12) or topical steroids reduced to ≤ 2 drops/eye/day in six patients. In three patients (7.3%), azathioprine was discontinued because of nausea and stomach pain. Conclusions Azathioprine may be reconsidered in the stepladder approach for the treatment of JIA-associated uveitis. The addition of azathioprine may also be beneficial for patients not responding properly to methotrexate.

  4. Infrapatellar bursitis in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqanatish, Jubran T; Petty, Ross E; Houghton, Kristin M; Guzman, Jaime; Tucker, Lori B; Cabral, David A; Cairns, Robyn A

    2011-02-01

    Children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) may infrequently present with localized anterior knee pain or swelling, in addition to generalize knee pain induced by JIA. We report five cases of deep infrapatellar bursitis in children with JIA. The clinical features, radiological findings, management, and outcome of five children with JIA and deep infrapatellar bursitis are reviewed. Three boys and two girls with a mean age of 9.8 years (range 6-14 years) were reviewed. Four children had persistent oligoarticular JIA, and one child had extended oligoarticular JIA. The presentation of deep infrapatellar bursitis was variable. In only one patient was the bursal swelling painful. Knee magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in four patients and demonstrated coexistent knee joint synovitis in three. Treatment included targeted corticosteroid injections into the deep infrapatellar bursa in two cases with complete resolution. One case was treated with corticosteroid injection by an outside health care provider with poor clinical response. Two cases are being treated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and methotrexate. Deep infrapatellar bursitis can occur as an isolated finding or concurrently with knee joint synovitis in patients with JIA. Awareness of this entity is important because direct injection of the bursa may be needed for treatment, as the bursa does not communicate with the knee joint. Furthermore, when bursitis is suspected in JIA, MRI can be helpful to confirm the diagnosis, detect concurrent knee joint synovitis, and exclude other pathologies.

  5. Nitrous Oxide sedation for intra-articular injection in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

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    Harel Liora

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intra-articular corticosteroid injection in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA is often associated with anxiety and pain. Recent reports advocate the use of nitrous oxide (NO, a volatile gas with analgesic, anxiolytic and sedative properties. Objective To prospectively evaluate the effectiveness and safety of NO analgesia for intra-articular corticosteroid injection in JIA, and to assess patients and staff satisfaction with the treatment. Methods NO was administered to JIA patients scheduled for joint injection. The patient, parent, physician and nurse completed visual-analog scores (VAS (0–10 for pain, and a 5-point satisfaction scale. Change in heart rate (HR during the procedure was recorded in order to examine physiologic response to pain and stress. Patient's behavior and adverse reactions were recorded. Results 54 procedures (72 joints were performed, 41 females, 13 males; 39 Jewish, 13 Arab; mean age was 12.2 ± 4.7 year. The median VAS pain score for patients, parents, physicians and nurses was 3. The HR increased ≥ 15% in 10 patients. They had higher VAS scores as evaluated by the staff. The median satisfaction level of the parents and staff was 3.0 and 5.0 respectively. Adverse reactions were mild. Conclusion NO provides effective and safe sedation for JIA children undergoing intra-articular injections.

  6. Application of Rasch analysis to the parent adherence report questionnaire in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toupin April, Karine; Higgins, Johanne; Ehrmann Feldman, Debbie

    2016-07-28

    Adherence to treatment in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is associated with better outcomes. Assessing patient adherence in JIA, as well as attitudes and beliefs about prescribed treatments, is important for the clinician in order to optimize patient management. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Parent (proxy-report) Adherence Report Questionnaires (PARQ), which assesses beliefs and behaviors related to adherence to treatments prescribed for JIA. A Rasch analysis was conducted on data collected with parents of children with JIA from two studies in which the PARQ was used as a measure of adherence. The PARQ showed preliminary evidence of multidimensionality with two factors, accounting for 38 % and 27 % of the variance respectively. The PARQ in its original version does not adhere to expectations of the Rasch model. A transformed version of the PARQ obtained by deletion of the general adherence scale and modification of visual analog scales into 5-point likert scales improved fit to the model and showed preliminary evidence of unidimensionality. The PARQ was transformed based on the results of the Rasch analysis. The transformed version of the PARQ shows preliminary evidence of unidimensionality and may allow computation of a total score, although further testing is needed to verify these findings.

  7. Sleep disturbances and neurobehavioral functioning in children with and without juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Teresa M; Ringold, Sarah; Metz, Jonika; Archbold, Kristen; Lentz, Martha; Wallace, Carol A; Landis, Carol A

    2011-07-01

    To compare sleep disturbances and neurobehavioral function in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) to age- and sex-matched control children. Children (n = 116) ages 6-11 years with (n = 70) and without (n = 46) JIA and their parents participated. Parents completed questionnaires on sleep habits, sleep behavior, and school competence of their children; children completed computerized neurobehavioral performance tests. Compared to control children, children with JIA had a statistically significant (P sleep disturbance score and higher scores on 6 of 8 subscales (all P Sleep Habits Questionnaire (CSHQ). There were no group differences on neurobehavioral performance test scores. However, regardless of group, children with an overall CSHQ score above an established cutoff for clinically significant sleep disturbances had slower mean simple reaction time (t = -2.2, P sleep disturbance score predicted reaction time (P sleep disturbances, but performed as well as control children on a series of standardized computer tests of neurobehavioral performance. Children with more disturbed sleep had slower reaction times. Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  8. Dynamics of body composition and bone in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis treated with growth hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechtold, Susanne; Ripperger, Peter; Dalla Pozza, Robert; Roth, Johannes; Häfner, Renate; Michels, Hartmut; Schwarz, Hans Peter

    2010-01-01

    GH has a positive impact on growth, bone, and muscle development. The objectives of this study were to demonstrate the effects of GH treatment on regional body composition and bone geometry at final height in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). In this longitudinal study, parameters of bone mineral density and geometry as well as muscle and fat cross-sectional area (CSA) in the nondominant forearm were recorded using peripheral quantitative computed tomography at yearly intervals until final height in 12 patients (seven females) receiving GH treatment. Data at final height were compared with 13 patients (nine females) with JIA not treated with GH. Patients were treated with GH for a mean of 5.35 +/- 0.7 yr. Correcting for height, total bone CSA (+0.89 +/- 0.5 sd) and muscle CSA (+1.14 +/- 0.6 sd) increased significantly and normalized at final height. Compared with JIA patients without GH at final height, there was a significantly higher muscle CSA and a lower fat CSA in GH-treated patients. Additionally, in relation to total bone CSA, there was significantly more cortical and less marrow CSA in boys with GH treatment. During GH treatment, there was a significant increase and normalization of total bone and muscle CSA at final height. In accordance with an anabolic effect of GH, fat mass stabilized at the lower limit of healthy children. At final height, cortical and marrow CSA, relative to total bone CSA, were normalized in GH-treated patients.

  9. Consensus-based recommendations for the management of uveitis associated with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: the SHARE initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantin, Tamas; Foeldvari, Ivan; Anton, Jordi; de Boer, Joke; Czitrom-Guillaume, Severine; Edelsten, Clive; Gepstein, Raz; Heiligenhaus, Arnd; Pilkington, Clarissa A; Simonini, Gabriele; Uziel, Yosef; Vastert, Sebastian J; Wulffraat, Nico M; Haasnoot, Anne-Mieke; Walscheid, Karoline; Pálinkás, Annamária; Pattani, Reshma; Györgyi, Zoltán; Kozma, Richárd; Boom, Victor; Ponyi, Andrea; Ravelli, Angelo; Ramanan, Athimalaipet V

    2018-03-28

    In 2012, a European initiative called S ingle Hub and Access point for pediatric Rheumatology in Europe (SHARE) was launched to optimise and disseminate diagnostic and management regimens in Europe for children and young adults with rheumatic diseases. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common rheumatic disease in children and uveitis is possibly its most devastating extra-articular manifestation. Evidence-based guidelines are sparse and management is mostly based on physicians' experience. Consequently, treatment practices differ widely, within and between nations. To provide recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of JIA-associated uveitis. Recommendations were developed by an evidence-informed consensus process using the European League Against Rheumatism standard operating procedures. A committee was constituted, consisting of nine experienced paediatric rheumatologists and three experts in ophthalmology from Europe. Recommendations derived from a validated systematic literature review were evaluated by an Expert Committee and subsequently discussed at two consensus meetings using nominal group techniques. Recommendations were accepted if >80% agreement was reached (including all three ophthalmologists). In total, 22 recommendations were accepted (with >80% agreement among experts): 3 on diagnosis, 5 on disease activity measurements, 12 on treatment and 2 on future recommendations. The SHARE initiative aims to identify best practices for treatment of patients suffering from JIA-associated uveitis. Within this remit, recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of JIA-associated uveitis have been formulated by an evidence-informed consensus process to suggest a standard of care for JIA-associated uveitis patients throughout Europe. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  10. Are Bicipital Synovial Cysts in Children with Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis still a Significant Clinical Challenge?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyvsgaard, Nini; Herlin, Troels

    2015-01-01

    -onset painless swelling on the flexor aspect of the proximal upper arm. This type of synovial cyst has been described as a complication to systemic onset JIA (sJIA). Patients usually have active disease when the cysts develop and most cysts resolve with the medical treatment for arthritis. In some cases...... prednisolone between two and eleven months prior (initial dosage 1-1.5 mg/kg, followed by an attempt to taper off the dose). Two of these patients were also in methotrexate (MTX) treatment. None of the patients had received anti-IL1 nor anti-IL-6 biologics. The remaining patient presented with the cyst...

  11. Successful Treatment of Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis after Kidney Transplantation with Plasma Exchange and Abatacept in a Patient with Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis

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    Hannelore Sprenger-Mähr

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS after renal transplantation is difficult to treat. Recently a series of four patients unresponsive to plasma exchange (PE and rituximab, who were successfully treated with abatacept, has been reported. We present a 26-year-old Caucasian patient who suffered from juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and developed severe proteinuria eleven days after transplantation. An allograft biopsy was suggestive of recurrent focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. He did not respond to PE therapy. A first dose of abatacept produced partial remission. Four weeks later proteinuria again increased and a second biopsy showed progression of disease. After another ineffective course of PE he was given a second dose of abatacept, which was followed by rapid, complete, and sustained resolution of proteinuria. This treatment caused a significant increase in BK and JC viremia. Whether abatacept ameliorated proteinuria via an effect on podocytes or on the patient’s primary disease remains speculative.

  12. A study of school adjustment, self-concept, self-esteem, general wellbeing and parent child relationship in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Anita; Yadav, T P

    2013-03-01

    To assess school adjustment, self-concept, self-esteem, general wellbeing and parent-child relationship in children with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA)and to study the correlation of these parameters with chronicity of disease, number of active joints, laboratory parameters of disease activity and JIA subtypes. A total of 64 children (32 cases and 32 controls) were recruited for analysis. Self report questionnaires which included PGI General Wellbeing Measure, Adjustment Inventory for School Students, Parent Child Relationship Scale, Self Esteem Inventory and Self Concept Questionnaires were used to assess all the enrolled subjects. Cases had significantly lower general physical well being (p self-esteem, self-concept, adjustment in school, general wellbeing and evokes disturbed parent-child relationship.

  13. No association between vitamin D levels around time of birth and later risk of developing oligo- and polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, S. U.; Pipper, C. B.; Alberdi-Saugstrup, M.

    2017-01-01

    -hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] around time of birth would be associated with increased risk of oligo- or polyarticular JIA. Method: We conducted a case–cohort study of validated cases diagnosed with oligo- and polyarticular JIA (1993–2012) and controls matched on date of birth. Cases and controls were born......Objectives: Basic and epidemiological studies on rheumatic autoimmune diseases have suggested an association between vitamin D levels around time of birth and disease risk. The literature on vitamin D and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is scarce. We hypothesized that low levels of 25...... regression and a two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to test for season and birth year 25(OH)D variations. A total of 300 matched pairs were included in the statistical analyses. Results: No significant association was found between levels of 25(OH)D and JIA risk in the adjusted model [OR (per 25...

  14. Relapse rate of uveitis post-methotrexate treatment in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinina Ayuso, Viera; van de Winkel, Evelyne Leonce; Rothova, Aniki; de Boer, Joke Helena

    2011-02-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of methotrexate (MTX) and the effect of its withdrawal on relapse rate of uveitis associated with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Retrospective case series. Data of 22 pediatric JIA patients who were being treated with MTX for active uveitis were studied retrospectively. Relapse rate after the withdrawal of MTX was established. Anterior chamber (AC) inflammation, topical steroid use during the first year of MTX treatment, and associations of relapses after the withdrawal were evaluated statistically. Duration of MTX treatment and its withdrawal was determined individually in collaboration with a rheumatologist with an intention to continue the treatment for at least 1 year and to withdraw in case of inactivity of uveitis and arthritis. Inactivity of uveitis was defined as the presence of ≤0.5+ cells in the AC. Eighteen patients (18/22; 82%) showed improvement of their uveitis with a significant decrease in activity of AC inflammation after a minimal period of 3 months of MTX treatment. A topical steroid-sparing effect was observed when MTX was administered for a period of 3 to 9 months. MTX was discontinued because of inactive uveitis in 13 patients. In 9 patients (8/13; 69%) a relapse of uveitis was observed after a mean time of 7.5 months (± SD 7.3). Six patients (6/13; 46%) had a relapse within the first year after the withdrawal. Relapse-free survival after withdrawal of MTX was significantly longer in patients who had been treated with MTX for more than 3 years (P = .009), children who were older than 8 years at the moment of withdrawal (P = .003), and patients who had an inactivity of uveitis of longer than 2 years before withdrawal of MTX (P = .033). Longer inactivity under MTX therapy was independently protective for relapses after the withdrawal (hazard ratio = 0.07; 95% confidence interval 0.01-0.86; P = .038), which means that 1-year increase of duration of inactive uveitis before the withdrawal of MTX results in a

  15. Baseline ultrasound examination as possible predictor of relapse in patients affected by juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lucia, Orazio; Ravagnani, Viviana; Pregnolato, Francesca; Hila, Arvena; Pontikaki, Irene; Gattinara, Maurizio; Romano, Micol; Gerloni, Valeria; Pieropan, Sara; Murgo, Antonella; Rossini, Maurizio; Cimaz, Rolando; Meroni, Pier Luigi

    2018-02-06

    To define the correlation between joint ultrasonography and clinical examination in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and to assess whether synovitis detected by ultrasonography in clinically inactive patients predicts arthritis flares. 88 consecutive patients with JIA-46 (52%) with persistent oligoarthritis, 15 (17%) with extended oligoarthritis, 15 (17%) with rheumatoid factor-negative polyarthritis and 12 (14%) with other forms of JIA, all clinically inactive for a minimum of 3 months-underwent ultrasound (US) assessment of 44 joints. Joints were scanned at study entry for synovial hyperplasia, joint effusion and power Doppler (PD) signal. Patients were followed clinically for 4 years. US was abnormal in 20/88 (22.7%) patients and in 38/3872 (0.98%) joints. Extended oligoarthritis and rheumatoid factor-negative polyarthritis were more frequent in US-positive than in US-negative patients (35.0% vs 11.8% and 30.0% vs 13.2%, respectively; P=0.005). During 4 years of follow-up, 41/88 (46.6%) patients displayed a flare; 26/68 (38.2%) were US-negative and 15/20 (75%) were US-positive at baseline. Abnormality on US examination, after correction for therapy modification, significantly increased the risk of flare (OR=3.8, 95% CI 1.2 to 11.5). The combination of grey scale and PD abnormalities displayed a much higher predictive value of relapse (65%, 13/20) than grey scale alone (33%, 6/18). US abnormalities are a strong predictor of relapse at individual patient level. Irrespective of treatment, the risk of flare in US-positive versus US-negative patients was almost four times higher. In case of US abnormalities, patients should be carefully followed regardless of both the International League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wallace categories. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  16. Coeliac Disease With Rheumatoid Arthritis: An Unusual Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warjri, Synrang Batngen; Ete, Tony; Beyong, Taso; Barman, Bhupen; Lynrah, Kyrshanlang G; Nobin, Hage; Perme, Obang

    2015-02-01

    Coeliac disease has a significant association with many autoimmune disorders. It shares many common genetic and immunological features with other autoimmune diseases. Gluten, a gut-derived antigen, is the driver of the autoimmunity seen in coeliac disease. The altered intestinal permeability found in coeliac patients, coupled with a genetic predisposition and altered immunological response, may result in a systemic immune response that is directed against sites other than the gut. Gut-derived antigens may have a role in the pathogenesis of other autoimmune disorders including rheumatoid arthritis. Here we report a case of adult coeliac disease associated with rheumatoid arthritis.

  17. Reabilitação em artrite idiopática juvenil Rehabilitation in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Cristina Bueno

    2007-06-01

    adequadamente os diversos tipos de exercícios.INTRODUCTION AND AIMS: juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA may cause permanent physical disabilities in children and adolescents. This study aimed to describe the several kinds of rehabilitation procedures, ranging from evaluation to prescription of exercises, as well as the elaboration of a practical rehabilitation guide for JIA patients. SOURCES OF DATA: the research was based on data from Medline and Lilacs. The opinion of experts working on the Pediatric Rheumatology service from Lar Escola São Francisco and Universidade Federal de São Paulo was considered on the debate of several topics. SUMMARY: JIA patients may present pain and limitation of joint movement thereby leading to decrease in physical capacity, affecting both aerobic and anaerobic activities. In addition to the joint compromise, cardiac and autonomic dysfunctions collaborate on this process, impairing sport and everyday activities. The American College of Rheumatology recommends 30-minute activity with moderate intensity, two to three times weekly. Hydrotherapy is associated to treatment adherence, besides helping in decreasing pain perception and adding to cope with daily activities. Other rehabilitation modalities, such as massage, education, joint protection, energy conservation, and splints are also considered in the present review. CONCLUSION: there are few studies in the literature focusing on rehabilitation in children with JIA. Particularly, there is a lack of studies concerning aspects of adequate prescription of exercises, weight-bearing, number of series and repetitions, as well as the best choice regarding ground or water activity. We believe that additional information is needed in order to improve the physical care to these patients.

  18. EFFECTIVENESS AND SAFETY OF RECOMBINANT HUMAN GRANULOCYTIC COLONY-STIMULATING FACTOR IN TREATMENT OF GRANULOCYTOPENIA DEVELOPED DURING IMMUNOSUPPRESSIVE THERAPY IN PATIENTS WITH JUVENILE RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.I. Alexeeva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of patients with severe clinical course of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA is difficult problem. During the last years genetically engineered biological drugs are used equally with traditional immunosuppressive agents in treatment of severe forms of juvenile arthritis. High effectiveness of these drugs can be accompanied with development of unfavorable effects, for example, febrile neutropenia. The article presents results of a study of effectiveness and safety of recombinant human granulocytic colony-stimulating factor — filgrastim (Leucostim — in treatment of granulocytopenia developed during immunosuppressive therapy in 16 patients with JRA. It was shown that administration of filgrastim arrests leucopenia in 100% of patients and granulocytopenia — in 93% of patients in 24 hours after first injection. High effectiveness of drug was combined with good tolerability and safety.Key words: children, treatment, granulocytopenia, filgrastim, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. – 2010;9(4:94-100

  19. Aspectos da sexualidade e gravidez em adolescentes com artrite idiopática juvenil (AIJ Sexuality aspects and pregnancy of adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA

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    Clovis Artur Almeida Silva

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho tem como objetivo descrever aspectos da sexualidade, gravidez e pós-parto de três adolescentes com artrite idiopática juvenil (AIJ. No período entre 1983 e 2004, 4.638 pacientes foram acompanhados na Unidade de Reumatologia Pediátrica do Departamento de Pediatria da FMUSP, entre os quais 537 (11,5% apresentaram o diagnóstico de AIJ (critérios do ILAR. Entre os pacientes com AIJ, três engravidaram durante o seguimento ambulatorial. A idade da primeira atividade sexual variou de 16 a 18 anos. A paciente 1 apresentou uma gestação gemelar a termo, permanecendo em atividade da doença durante toda a gravidez, em uso de 15mg/dia de prednisona. As pacientes 2 e 3 encontravam-se em remissão da doença, sem uso de medicamentos, apresentando gestação a termo sem intercorrências. A paciente 2, porém, evoluiu com recidiva da doença um ano após o parto. Todos os recém-nascidos foram adequados para idade gestacional e evoluíram adequadamente no período neonatal. Apenas a paciente 1 necessitou de prednisona, naproxeno e cloroquina na amamentação. O aumento da gravidez na adolescência é uma realidade nos serviços de reumatologia pediátrica, o que impõe novos debates sobre os aspectos da sexualidade e contracepção nessa população.The objective of the present study is to describe the sexuality aspects, pregnancy and postpartum in three adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA. From 1983 to 2004, 4,638 patients were followed at the Pediatric Rheumatology Unit of the Pediatric Department of FMUSP, of which 537 (11.5% were diagnosed with JIA (ILAR criteria and three of these patients became pregnant during the follow-up period. The age at their first sexual intercourse ranged from 16 to 18 years old. Patient 1 presented a twin pregnancy, with active disease throughout pregnancy, and was on 15 mg of prednisone per day. Patients 2 and 3 were at disease remission, with no drug treatment, and had full

  20. Regular Aerobic Training Combined with Range of Motion Exercises in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

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    Mine Doğru Apti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess the effects of regular aerobic training combined with range of motion (ROM exercises on aerobic capacity, quality of life, and function in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA. Methods. Thirty patients with JIA and 20 healthy age-matched controls (mean age ± SD, 11.3 ± 2.4 versus 11.0 ± 2.3, resp.; P>0.05 were included. All patients performed aerobic walking (4 days a week for 8 weeks and active and passive ROM exercises of involved joints. All patients completed the childhood health assessment questionnaire (CHAQ and the child health questionnaire. ROM measurements of joints were performed by using universal goniometer. Aerobic capacity was determined by measuring peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak during an incremental treadmill test. Results. Peak oxygen uptake and exercise duration were significantly lower in JIA group than in controls (32.5 ± 6.6 versus 35.9 ± 5.8 and 13.9 ± 1.9 versus 15.0 ± 2.0, resp.; P<0.05 for both. Eight-week combined exercise program significantly improved exercise parameters of JIA patients (baseline versus postexercise VO2peak and exercise duration, 32.5 ± 6.6 to 35.3 ± 7.9 and 13.9 ± 1.9 to 16.3 ± 2.2, resp.; P<0.001 for both. Exercise intervention significantly improved CHAQ scores in JIA patients (0.77 ± 0.61 to 0.20 ± 0.28, P<0.001. Conclusion. We suggest that regular aerobic exercise combined with ROM exercises may be an important part of treatment in patients with JIA.

  1. Surfing for juvenile idiopathic arthritis: perspectives on quality and content of information on the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinson, Jennifer N; Tucker, Lori; Huber, Adam; Harris, Heather; Lin, Carmen; Cohen, Lindsay; Gill, Navreet; Lukas-Bretzler, Jacqueline; Proulx, Laurie; Prowten, David

    2009-08-01

    To determine the quality and content of English language Internet information about juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) from the perspectives of consumers and healthcare professionals. Key words relevant to JIA were searched across 10 search engines. Quality of information was appraised independently by 2 health professionals, 1 young adult with JIA, and a parent using the DISCERN tool. Concordance of the website content (i.e., accuracy and completeness) with available evidence about the management of JIA was determined. Readability was determined using Flesch-Kincaid grade level and Reading Ease Score. Out of the 3000 Web pages accessed, only 58 unique sites met the inclusion criteria. Of these sites only 16 had DISCERN scores above 50% (indicating fair quality). These sites were then rated by consumers. Most sites targeted parents and none were specifically developed for youth with JIA. The overall quality of website information was fair, with a mean DISCERN quality rating score of 48.92 out of 75 (+/- 6.56, range 34.0-59.5). Overall completeness of sites was 9.07 out of 16 (+/- 2.28, range 5.25-13.25) and accuracy was 3.09 out of 4 (+/- 0.86, range 2-4), indicating a moderate level of accuracy. Average Flesch-Kincaid grade level and Reading Ease Score were 11.48 (+/- 0.74, range 10.1-12.0) and 36.36 (+/- 10.86, range 6.30-48.1), respectively, indicating that the material was difficult to read. Our study highlights the paucity of high quality Internet health information at an appropriate reading level for youth with JIA and their parents.

  2. [Recommendations for the use of methotrexate in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, I; Antón, J; López Robledillo, J C; de Inocencio, J; Gamir, M L; Merino, R; Lacruz, L; Camacho, M; Rua, M J; Bustabad, S; Díaz Cordovés-Rego, G

    2016-03-01

    To develop a consensus document of recommendations for the use of methotrexate (MTX) in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). A group of eleven experts proposed several clinical questions on the use of MTX in patients with JIA. A systematic review was conducted and the evidence and recommendations for each question were extracted. The results were discussed and validated by the experts in a work session to establish the final recommendations. MTX is recommended as the first drug for inducing remission in JIA, and its indication should be made according to the clinical category of the patient. Prior to treatment, it is recommended to perform a complete blood count, including white cells, levels of liver enzymes, serum creatinine, and other analytical parameters according to specific risk factors. Treatment should be initiated with a dose of 10-15 mg/m(2)/week. In cases of uveitis or polyarthritis, an initial dose of 15 mg/m(2)/week should be considered. For a better bioavailability and tolerability, it is preferable to administer MTX parenterally if the dose is ≥15 mg/m(2)/week. It is necessary to periodically perform an analytical monitoring of the patient and to assess possible alterations in liver enzymes to make changes if necessary. Combinations with biological agents may be necessary, as well as the concomitant addition of folic or folinic acid. This document describes the main recommendations for the appropriate use of MTX in JIA patients, according to scientific evidence and clinical experience. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Tocilizumab: a review of its use in the treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frampton, James E

    2013-12-01

    Tocilizumab (RoActemra(®); Actemra(®)) is a recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody that acts as an interleukin-6 receptor antagonist. Both in the US and EU, tocilizumab has been approved for the treatment of two subtypes of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), namely systemic JIA (sJIA) and polyarticular JIA (pJIA), in patients aged ≥2 years. These approvals are based on favorable results from two randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multinational, phase III trials in which patients aged 2-17 years with active sJIA (TENDER) or pJIA (CHERISH) received an intravenous dose of tocilizumab based on bodyweight every 2 or 4 weeks, respectively. Tocilizumab met the primary endpoint in both of these ongoing, multi-part studies. That is, in TENDER, significantly more tocilizumab recipients than placebo recipients achieved a JIA American College of Rheumatology (ACR) 30 response plus absence of fever, as assessed at the end of a 12-week double-blind treatment period, while in CHERISH, significantly fewer tocilizumab recipients than placebo recipients experienced a JIA ACR 30 flare during a 24-week double-blind withdrawal period (all patients had previously received open-label tocilizumab in a 16-week lead-in phase). Tocilizumab was generally well tolerated in the TENDER trial. Infections (e.g. upper respiratory tract infection and pharyngitis or nasopharyngitis) accounted for just over one-third of all reported adverse events in this trial; tocilizumab-treated patients appeared to have an approximately 11 % risk of a serious infection per year of treatment. Clinical laboratory abnormalities included neutropenia and elevated aminotransferase levels. The tolerability profile of tocilizumab in CHERISH was generally consistent with that of the drug in TENDER.

  4. Cellular interactions of synovial fluid γδ T cells in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendersky, Anna; Marcu-Malina, Victoria; Berkun, Yackov; Gerstein, Maya; Nagar, Meital; Goldstein, Itamar; Padeh, Shai; Bank, Ilan

    2012-05-01

    The pathogenesis of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is thought to involve multiple components of the cellular immune system, including subsets of γδ T cells. In this study, we conducted experiments to define the functional roles of one of the major synovial fluid (SF) T cell subsets, Vγ9(+)Vδ2(+) (Vγ9(+)) T cells, in JIA. We found that as opposed to CD4(+) T cells, equally high percentages (∼35%) of Vγ9(+) T cells in SF and peripheral blood (PB) produced TNF-α and IFN-γ. Furthermore, stimulation with isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP), a metabolite in the mevalonate pathway, which is a specific potent Ag for Vγ9Jγ1.2(+) T cells, similarly amplified cytokine secretion by SF and PB Vγ9(+) T cells. Significantly, the SF subset expressed higher levels of CD69 in situ, suggesting their recent activation. Furthermore, 24-h coculturing with SF-derived fibroblasts enhanced CD69 on the SF > PB Vγ9(+) T cells, a phenomenon strongly augmented by zoledronate, a farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase inhibitor that increases endogenous intracellular IPP. Importantly, although Vγ9(+) T cell proliferation in response to IPP was significantly lower in SF than PBMC cultures, it could be enhanced by depleting SF CD4(+)CD25(+)FOXP3(+) cells (regulatory T cells). Furthermore, coculture with the Vγ9(+) T cells in medium containing zoledronate or IPP strongly increased SF-derived fibroblasts' apoptosis. The findings that IPP-responsive proinflammatory synovial Vγ9(+) T cells for which proliferation is partly controlled by regulatory T cells can recognize and become activated by SF fibroblasts and then induce their apoptosis suggest their crucial role in the pathogenesis and control of synovial inflammation.

  5. The relationship between physical activity levels and pain in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limenis, Elizaveta; Grosbein, Haddas A; Feldman, Brian M

    2014-02-01

    Pain and reduced physical activity levels are common in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Currently, there is no consensus about the role of physical activity in managing pain in JIA. The purpose of our study was to assess the relationship between physical activity level and pain in children ages 11 to 18 years with JIA. A random sample of 50 patients with JIA were approached by mailed questionnaires. Physical activity was determined using the Physical Activity Questionnaire (PAQ). Pain measures included the Numerical Rating Scale (pain severity), SUPER-KIDZ body diagram (number of painful areas), and the Child Activities Limitations Inventory-21 (pain interference). Generalized linear models were used to assess the relationship between physical activity and pain, as well as the roles of sex and age. The response rate was 84%. Thirty-four respondents completed the questionnaire package. The median age was 15 years. The mean PAQ score was 2.16/5. Physical activity declines with increasing age in youth with JIA (r = 0.53, p = 0.0014). Lower physical activity is associated with greater pain interference (r = 0.39, p = 0.0217) and more severe pain (r = 0.35, p = 0.0422). Children with JIA report significantly less activity than healthy children based on PAQ scores, with physical activity declining throughout adolescence. Physical activity is inversely related to pain interference and severity in children with JIA. Our findings suggest that physical activity interventions may play an important role in the management of pain in JIA.

  6. Fundamental movement skills, physical fitness and physical activity among Australian children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulsegge, Gerben; Henschke, Nicholas; McKay, Damien; Chaitow, Jeffrey; West, Kerry; Broderick, Carolyn; Singh-Grewal, Davinder

    2015-04-01

    To describe fundamental movement skills (FMS), physical fitness and level of physical activity among Australian children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and compare this with healthy peers. Children aged 6-16 years with JIA were recruited from hospital rheumatology clinics and private rheumatology rooms in Sydney, Australia. All children attended an assessment day, where FMS were assessed by a senior paediatric physiotherapist, physical fitness was assessed using the multistage 20-metre shuttle run test, and physical activity and physical and psychosocial well-being were assessed with questionnaires. These results were compared with age- and gender-matched peers from the NSW Schools Physical Activity and Nutrition Survey and the Health of Young Victorians Study using logistic regression analysis. Twenty-eight children with JIA participated in this study. There were no differences in the proportion of children who had mastered FMS between children with JIA and their healthy peers (P > 0.05). However, there was a trend for children with JIA to have poorer physical fitness and be less physically active than healthy peers. Parents of children with JIA indicated more physical and psychosocial impairments among their children and themselves compared with parents of healthy children (P < 0.05). This is the first study in Australia to compare FMS, physical activity and fitness in children with JIA and their peers. While older children with JIA appear to have poorer physical fitness and physical activity levels than their peers, there is no difference in FMS. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2014 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  7. How do parents of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA perceive their therapies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nageswaran Savithri

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complementary and alternative medical (CAM therapies are commonly used by pediatric patients with chronic medical conditions. Little is known about parents' perceptions of these therapies. This study describes the views of parents of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA regarding conventional and CAM therapies. Methods Parents of children with JIA seen at a pediatric rheumatology clinic were surveyed between June 1 and July 31, 2007. Questionnaires asked about patients' use of over 75 therapies in the past 30 days, their perceived helpfulness (0 = not helpful; 3 = very helpful, perceived side effects (0 = none; 3 = severe, and whether each therapy would be recommended to other patients with JIA (Yes, No, Not sure. Results Questionnaires were returned by 52/76 (68% parents; patients' average age was 10.9 years and 87% were Caucasian. Medications were used by 45 (88% patients; heat (67% and extra rest (54% were also commonly used. CAM therapies were used by 48 (92%, e.g., massage (54%, vitamins and other supplements (54%, avoiding foods that worsened pain (35% and stress management techniques (33%. Among the therapies rated by 3 or more parents, those that scored 2.5 or higher on helpfulness were: biologic medications, methotrexate, naproxen, wheelchairs, orthotics, heat, vitamins C and D, music, support groups and prayer. CAM therapies had 0 median side effects and parents would recommend many of them to other families. Conclusion JIA patients use diverse therapies. Parents report that many CAM therapies are helpful and would recommend them to other parents. These data can be used in counseling patients and guiding future research.

  8. [Low bone mineral density in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: Prevalence and related factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo Zavala, Rocío; Núñez Cuadros, Esmeralda; Martín Pedraz, Laura; Díaz-Cordovés Rego, Gisela; Sierra Salinas, Carlos; Urda Cardona, Antonio

    2017-10-01

    Height adjustment is currently recommended for Z-score bone mineral density (BMD) assessed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. At present there are no studies that evaluate the prevalence of low BMD in paediatric patients with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) in Spain following current recommendations. To evaluate low BMD in JIA in paediatric patients with JIA in Spain following the latest recommendations, as well as to assess associated factors. Observational cross-sectional study of Spanish JIA patients from 5 to 16 years-old, followed-up in a Paediatric Rheumatology Unit between July 2014 and July 2015. Anthropometric, clinical and treatment data were recorded. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, and bone metabolism parameters were collected, and a completed diet and exercise questionnaire was obtained. A total of 92 children participated. The population prevalence estimation of low BMD was less than 5% (95% CI). A significant positive correlation was found in the multiple linear regression analysis between the body mass index percentile (B: 0.021; P<.001) and lean mass index (B: 0.0002; P=.012), and BMD Z-score adjusted for height (Z-SAH). A significant negative correlation was found between fat mass index (B: -0.0001; P=.018) and serum type I collagen N-propeptide (B: -0,0006; P=.036) and Z-SAH. Low BMD prevalence in JIA patients in our population is low. An adequate nutritional status and the prevalence of lean over fat mass seem to promote the acquisition of bone mass. Those JIA patients with lower BMD could be subjected to an increase of bone turnover. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Clinical responsiveness of self-report functional assessment measures for children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis undergoing intraarticular corticosteroid injections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, G Ted; Wright, F Virginia; Lang, Bianca A; Birdi, Nina; Oen, Kim; Stephens, Derek; McComas, Joan; Feldman, Brian M

    2005-12-15

    The Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire (CHAQ), Juvenile Arthritis Functional Assessment Report (JAFAR), and Juvenile Arthritis Functional Status Index (JASI) are widely used functional measures for juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) that differ in content, format, and completion time. We compared the responsiveness and child-parent agreement of the JAFAR, CHAQ, and JASI in a prospective, multicenter study. Children and adolescents from 5 rheumatology centers were enrolled. Subjects were about to undergo therapy (intraarticular corticosteroid injections [IAS] and methotrexate or hip surgery (MTX/hip]) expected to produce a functional improvement. All subjects were studied before the intervention and at 6 weeks and 6 months posttreatment. At each study visit, the 3 measures were administered in randomized, balanced order to both parents and children. A total of 92 subjects (mean age 12.8 years) were enrolled in the study, 74 of which were in the IAS group. The responsiveness of all 3 measures was moderate to strong. The standardized response mean at 6 weeks for the IAS group on the JAFAR, CHAQ, and JASI was 0.41 (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 0.18, 0.64), 0.70 (95% CI 0.47, 0.93), and 0.36 (95% CI 0.13, 0.59), respectively. The CHAQ was somewhat more responsive to change at 6 weeks (IAS group: relative efficiency 0.34 [JAFAR], 0.27 [JASI]), but less responsive at 6 months (MTX/hip group: relative efficiency 5.1 [JAFAR], 3.9 [JASI]). All 3 questionnaires showed acceptable parent-child agreement, and overall, there were few differences between the 3 questionnaires. The functional outcome measures currently used for JIA are all adequately responsive for use in trials or in the clinic setting. The choice of which measure to use should therefore be based on the time available for completion, the intended clinical/research use, and the depth of content required.

  10. EXPERIENCE OF THE ADALIMUMAB APPLICATION FOR THE PATIENT WITH EARLY DEBUT OF JUVENILE IDIOPATHIC ARTHRITIS AND UVEITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. B. Isaeva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The case of early debut and heavy course of juvenile idiopathic arthritis in the patient at the age of 1 year and 8 months, associated with uveitis refractory to the therapy by methotrexate and nonsteroid antiinflammatory preparations is presented. The given clinical example shows high therapeutic efficiency of the adalimumab. To the 8th week of treatment inflammatory changes in conjunctiva were stopped, to the 12th week the stage of inactive illness was registered, i.e. the patient had no inflammatory changes in joints, uveitis activity signs, increase of laboratory indicators of illness activity. Duration of remission of articulate syndrome and uveitis made 9 months.

  11. Can the Methotrexate Therapy Prevent the Development of Uveitis in Patients with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: Results of a Retrospective Study

    OpenAIRE

    M. M. Kostik; E. V. Gaydar; M. F. Dubko; V. V. Masalova; L. S. Snegireva; I. A. Chikova; E. A. Isupova; T. N. Nikitina; E. D. Serogodskaya; O. V. Kalashnikova; A. Ravelli; V. G. Chasnyk

    2015-01-01

    Background: Uveitis is one of the most common extra-articular manifestations of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Currently, the possibility of reducing the risk of uveitis in children with JIA by using methotrexate has been studied.Objective: Our aim was to analyze the results of treatment of children with JIA by studying the relation between the use of methotrexate and the risk of uveitis.Methods: A retrospective uncontrolled study. The case histories of patients with JIA who were treate...

  12. Facial morphology in children and adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and moderate to severe temporomandibular joint involvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hsieh, Yuh-Jia; Darvann, Tron Andre; Hermann, Nuno V.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aims of this study were to (1) assess lateral facial morphology in children and adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and moderate to severe temporomandibular joint (TMJ) involvement, (2) compare the lateral facial morphology of these subjects with and without TMJ...... morphologies between the groups. Lateral projections of oriented 3D photographs were superimposed on the lateral cephalograms. The results of the lateral 3D photographic analysis were correlated with those of lateral cephalometric analysis. Results: Group 3 showed the most severe growth disturbances, including...

  13. Facial growth and oral function in a case of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis during an 8-year period

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreiborg, S; Bakke, M; Kirkeby, S

    1990-01-01

    The present report is a detailed analysis of facial growth and oral function in a girl with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis of the temporomandibular joints. She was followed from 9 to 17 years of age prior to and after orthognathic surgery. Facial growth was assessed by facial photographs, dental...... on these observations it is suggested that the conventional treatment strategy with postponement of orthodontic or orthognathic surgical treatment until cessation of growth is abandoned and that early treatment should be undertaken to maintain occlusal stability throughout the growth period....

  14. Methotrexate intolerance in oral and subcutaneous administration in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a cross-sectional, observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijkhuizen, E H Pieter; Pouw, Juliëtte N; Scheuern, Andrea; Hügle, Boris; Hardt, Sven; Ganser, Gerd; Kümmerle-Deschner, Jasmin Beate; Horneff, Gerd; Holzinger, Dirk; Bulatović Ćalasan, Maja; Wulffraat, Nico M

    2016-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) is the cornerstone disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug (DMARD) in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). In Dutch patients, MTX intolerance occurred frequently and was associated with subcutaneous (SC) administration. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of MTX intolerance and its association with the route of administration in a German cohort of JIA patients. A cross-sectional study of JIA patients on MTX was performed. Primary outcome was MTX intolerance, which was determined using the validated Methotrexate Intolerance Severity Score (MISS) questionnaire. The prevalence of gastrointestinal adverse effects and MTX intolerance was compared between patients on MTX SC and MTX administered orally (PO). Of 179 JIA patients on MTX, 73 (40.8%) were intolerant. The odds of MTX intolerance were higher in patients using MTX exclusively SC compared to exclusively PO (adjusted odds ratio 3.37 [95% confidence interval 1.19-10.0]). There was strong evidence that the former experienced more behavioural complaints (76.1% vs. 47.4%, p=0.001) and weak evidence that they experienced more abdominal pain after MTX intake (43.5% vs. 27.4%, p=0.056). The prevalence of MTX intolerance was high and exclusively SC administration of MTX was associated with MTX intolerance and behavioural adverse effects. The prevalence of gastrointestinal adverse effects was at least as high as in patients on MTX PO. The frequently held assumption that SC causes fewer side effects than PO seems unwarranted. Definite answers about the differences between SC and PO administration with respect to safety and efficacy should be obtained by randomised trials.

  15. Can the Methotrexate Therapy Prevent the Development of Uveitis in Patients with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: Results of a Retrospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Kostik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Uveitis is one of the most common extra-articular manifestations of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA. Currently, the possibility of reducing the risk of uveitis in children with JIA by using methotrexate has been studied.Objective: Our aim was to analyze the results of treatment of children with JIA by studying the relation between the use of methotrexate and the risk of uveitis.Methods: A retrospective uncontrolled study. The case histories of patients with JIA who were treated for at least 2 years after the onset of the disease were studied. The results of treatment of patients who received and who did not receive methotrexate were studied (standard therapy — non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and intra-articular injections of glucocorticoids. The established cases of uveitis were taken into account.Results: The study analyzed the results of observation of 281 children with JIA. In the methotrexate group, uveitis was detected in 22/191 (11.5%, and in the control group — in 42/90 (46.7% of patients (OR 6.7; 95% CI 3.7–12.3. The time period between the onset of JIA and development of uveitis in two groups under study was the same and equal to 24 (12; 67 and 17 months (7; 35, respectively (p = 0.232. Multivariate regression analysis showed that the main predictors of uveitis were oligoarticular course of JIA (HR = 1.89, positive antinuclear antibody test (HR = 2.14, onset of JIA under the age of 5 (HR = 2.56, female gender (HR = 1.82,and the absence of methotrexate in the therapy (HR = 0.24.Conclusion: The treatment with methotrexate may reduce the risk of uveitis in patients with JIA. To confirm this hypothesis, randomized studies are needed.

  16. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging can play a role in predicting flare in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nusman, Charlotte M., E-mail: c.m.nusman@amc.uva.nl [Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Diseases, Emma Children’s Hospital, Academic Medical Center Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hemke, Robert; Lavini, Cristina [Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Schonenberg-Meinema, Dieneke [Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Diseases, Emma Children’s Hospital, Academic Medical Center Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rossum, Marion A.J. van [Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Reade Institute location Jan van Breemen, Doctor Jan van Breemenstraat 2, 1056 AB Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Pediatrics, Emma Children’s Hospital, Academic Medical Center Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dolman, Koert M. [Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Reade Institute location Jan van Breemen, Doctor Jan van Breemenstraat 2, 1056 AB Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Pediatrics, Sint Lucas Andreas Hospital, Jan Tooropstraat 164, 1061 AE, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Berg, J. Merlijn van den [Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Diseases, Emma Children’s Hospital, Academic Medical Center Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Maas, Mario [Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kuijpers, Taco W. [Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Diseases, Emma Children’s Hospital, Academic Medical Center Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Subclinical synovitis is present in 40% of the inactive JIA patients. • One third of the inactive JIA patients flared during 2-year clinical follow-up. • DCE-MRI can play a role in predicting clinical flare in JIA patients. - Abstract: Purpose: The study was performed to determine whether conventional and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) parameters of a previously affected target joint in patients with clinically inactive juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) have prognostic meaning for a flare of joint inflammation during follow-up. Material and methods: Thirty-two JIA patients with clinically inactive disease at the time of MRI of the knee were prospectively included. DCE-MRI provided both descriptive measures and time-intensity-curve shapes, representing functional properties of the synovium. Conventional MRI outcome measures included validated scores for synovial hypertrophy, bone marrow edema, cartilage lesions and bone erosions. During a 2-year period the patients were monitored by their pediatric rheumatologist and clinical flares were registered. Results: MRI analysis revealed synovial hypertrophy in 13 (39.4%) of the clinically inactive patients. Twelve patients (37.5%) had at least one flare during 2-year clinical follow-up. Persistently inactive and flaring patients differed significantly in the maximum enhancement of the synovium on the DCE-MRI (p < 0.05), whereas no difference was found between these two groups in any of the baseline scores of conventional MRI. Conclusions: Our prospective clinical follow-up study indicates that the assessment of ‘maximum enhancement’ upon DCE-MRI may be able to predict a clinical flare within 2 years in inactive JIA patients.

  17. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging can play a role in predicting flare in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nusman, Charlotte M.; Hemke, Robert; Lavini, Cristina; Schonenberg-Meinema, Dieneke; Rossum, Marion A.J. van; Dolman, Koert M.; Berg, J. Merlijn van den; Maas, Mario; Kuijpers, Taco W.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Subclinical synovitis is present in 40% of the inactive JIA patients. • One third of the inactive JIA patients flared during 2-year clinical follow-up. • DCE-MRI can play a role in predicting clinical flare in JIA patients. - Abstract: Purpose: The study was performed to determine whether conventional and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) parameters of a previously affected target joint in patients with clinically inactive juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) have prognostic meaning for a flare of joint inflammation during follow-up. Material and methods: Thirty-two JIA patients with clinically inactive disease at the time of MRI of the knee were prospectively included. DCE-MRI provided both descriptive measures and time-intensity-curve shapes, representing functional properties of the synovium. Conventional MRI outcome measures included validated scores for synovial hypertrophy, bone marrow edema, cartilage lesions and bone erosions. During a 2-year period the patients were monitored by their pediatric rheumatologist and clinical flares were registered. Results: MRI analysis revealed synovial hypertrophy in 13 (39.4%) of the clinically inactive patients. Twelve patients (37.5%) had at least one flare during 2-year clinical follow-up. Persistently inactive and flaring patients differed significantly in the maximum enhancement of the synovium on the DCE-MRI (p < 0.05), whereas no difference was found between these two groups in any of the baseline scores of conventional MRI. Conclusions: Our prospective clinical follow-up study indicates that the assessment of ‘maximum enhancement’ upon DCE-MRI may be able to predict a clinical flare within 2 years in inactive JIA patients.

  18. A CASE OF EPSTEIN-BARR VIRAL INFECTION PROCEEDED UNDER THE MASK OF THE SYSTEMIC VARIANT OF THE JUVENILE RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.M. Bzarova

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the treatment of Epstein–Barr viral infection under the mask of the systemic variant of the juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. The clinical presentations of the disease included fever, rash, lymphadenopathy, hepatomegaly, polyarticular syndrome and high lab activity indices. the serologic research uncovered the antibodies to the Epstein–Barr virus in diagnostic titers, which allowed the researchers to verify the diagnosis. A child underwent the treatment with the immunoglobulin of a man with the high concentration of antibodies to cytomegalovirus, which induced the remission of the systemic representations, articular syndrome accompanied B normalization of the lab activity indices and reduction of the antibody titers towards the Epstein–Barr virus.Key words: children, treatment, immune globulin intravenous, septic syndrome, epstein–barr virus.

  19. Is early rheumatoid arthritis the same disease process as late rheumatoid arthritis?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tak, P. P.

    2001-01-01

    Thoughts on treatment for the early control of synovitis have stimulated research on pathobiological events at the site of inflammation in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis. Several studies have thus been conducted to examine synovial biopsy samples at various stages of the disease. The most

  20. Autoimmune Arthritides, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Psoriatic Arthritis, or Peripheral Spondyloarthritis Following Lyme Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvikar, Sheila L; Crowley, Jameson T; Sulka, Katherine B; Steere, Allen C

    2017-01-01

    To describe systemic autoimmune joint diseases that develop following Lyme disease, and to compare their clinical features with those of Lyme arthritis (LA). We reviewed records of all adult patients referred to our LA clinic over a 13-year period, in whom we had diagnosed a systemic autoimmune joint disease following Lyme disease. For comparison, records of patients enrolled in our LA cohort over the most recent 2-year period were analyzed. Levels of IgG antibodies to Borrelia burgdorferi and to 3 Lyme disease-associated autoantigens were measured. We identified 30 patients who had developed a new-onset systemic autoimmune joint disorder a median of 4 months after Lyme disease (usually manifested by erythema migrans [EM]). Fifteen had rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 13 had psoriatic arthritis (PsA), and 2 had peripheral spondyloarthritis (SpA). The 30 patients typically had polyarthritis, and those with PsA or SpA often had previous psoriasis, axial involvement, or enthesitis. In the comparison group of 43 patients with LA, the usual clinical picture was monoarticular knee arthritis, without prior EM. Most of the patients with systemic autoimmune joint disorders were positive for B burgdorferi IgG antibodies, as detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, but had significantly lower titers and lower frequencies of Lyme disease-associated autoantibodies than patients with LA. Prior to our evaluation, these patients had often received additional antibiotics for presumed LA, without benefit. We prescribed antiinflammatory agents, most commonly disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, resulting in improvement. Systemic autoimmune joint diseases (i.e., RA, PsA, SpA) may follow Lyme disease. Development of polyarthritis after antibiotic-treated EM, previous psoriasis, or low-titer B burgdorferi antibodies may provide insight into the correct diagnosis. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  1. Dynamics of Destructive Joint Changes in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis in Children who Received Methotrexate or Methotrexate-Tocilizumab Combination: a Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A. Davydova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Destructive joint damages in juvenile arthritis inevitably lead to persistent disability in adulthood. These consequences can be avoided by resorting to early therapy of the disease.Objective. Our aim was to assess the dynamics of destructive joint changes in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA in children, depending on a basic therapy.Methods. We studied the treatment results of children with systemic-onset JIA with active joint syndrome without active  systemic manifestations hospitalized in the regional clinical  cardiological health center. JIA activity criteria at the time of  hospitalization: 3 joints with active arthritis; the assessment of the disease activity by a doctor 3 points out of 10; the assessment of  wellbeing by the patient or a parent 3 points out of 10; the  appointment of basic therapy no later than 6 months from the  disease onset. Treatment results were compared in the groups of  methotrexate (hospitalization from January 2008 to December 2010 and methotrexate + tocilizumab (January 2014 — September 2016. The main outcome of JIA therapy was the severity of joint  destruction in 6, 12 and 24 months as determined by the modified  Sharpe ratio according to radiographs obtained from patients' medical records.Results. The study groups were comparable in terms of sex and age of the patients, JIA onset age, the disease activity at the time of  hospitalization, and the initial assessment of joint destruction —  (median 165 (131; 187 and 162 (124; 171 (p = 0.116. Under  pressure of therapy, the modified Sharpe score in the group of  methotrexate monotherapy was higher than in the group of combined therapy: in 6 months — 142 (126; 163 and 87 (72; 112 (p < 0.001; in 12 months — 166 (121; 210 and 75 (29; 89 (p <  0.001; in 24 months — 165 (113; 198 and 52 (26; 73 (p <  0.001. At the first administration of tocilizumab, 4 children had nausea and abdominal pain, and 3 children had

  2. Patterns of radiographic damage to cervical spine in polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients presenting to tertiary care hospital in pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khyzer, E.; Aftab, T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To see the radiographic cervical spine damage in polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (PJIA) coming to a tertiary care hospital in Islamabad, Pakistan. Study Design: Cross-sectional descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: The study was conducted in department of Rheumatology at Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences from Jun 2013 to Dec 2013. Subjects and Methods: A total of 50 patients of PJIA coming to Rheumatology Outpatient Department were recruited in the study after informed consent. Radiographs of cervical spine were performed for each patient in antero-posterior, lateral with flexion and extension and open-mouth views. Radiographs were reviewed for the following eatures: loss of cervical lordosis, odontoid process erosion, anterior atlantoaxial subluxation, C1-C2 arthritis, atlantoaxial impaction, inflammation of disc, apophyseal joint arthritis, anterior ankylosis, apophyseal joint ankylosis, anterior and posterior subaxial subluxation and growth disturbances. Data was analysed using SPSS version 18. Results: Out of the total 50 patients, 28 (56%) were females while 22 (44%) were males. The mean duration of pJIA was 5.54 +- 3.28 years. Radiological cervical spine involvement was seen in 52% patients. The most common structural lesions were anterior atlantoaxial subluxation (30%), C1-C2 arthritis (22%) erosion of the odontoid process (18%), and apophyseal joint arthritis (16%). Loss of cervical lordosis was found in 7(14%) patients. There was no growth disturbances observed in vertebra. Conclusion: Cervical spine involvement is common in patients of PJIA. It is mostly asymptomatic, so routine cervical spine radiographs in all patients suffering from PJIA is recommended. (author)

  3. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available Appointments • Support Our Research Arthritis Information Disease Information Rheumatoid Arthritis Psoriatic Arthritis Ankylosing Spondylitis Osteoarthritis Gout Lyme Disease Osteoporosis News Rheumatoid Arthritis News ...

  4. Uveitis Events During Adalimumab, Etanercept, and Methotrexate Therapy in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: Data From the Biologics in Pediatric Rheumatology Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foeldvari, Ivan; Becker, Ingrid; Horneff, Gerd

    2015-11-01

    Uveitis is a major extraarticular quality of life-restricting manifestation of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). The aim of the study is to describe the occurrence of uveitis in JIA patients receiving tumor necrosis factor inhibitors or methotrexate (MTX). Patients' characteristics, treatment, and the reported first occurrence of uveitis as an adverse event were searched in the Biologics in Pediatric Rheumatology Registry. The rates per exposed patients, exposure time, and time until event were calculated. Uveitis was reported as an adverse event in 75 of 3,467 patients; 51 of 2,844 patients were receiving MTX, 37 of 1,700 patients were receiving etanercept, and 13 of 364 patients were receiving adalimumab. Patients with uveitis were younger (mean ± SD age 4.6 ± 4.2 versus 7.4 ± 4.5 years; P uveitis diagnosis before starting treatment more often had a uveitis event (n = 28, 8.4%; OR 8.5, P uveitis event occurred: 11 while taking MTX (3.2 per 1,000 patient-years), 2 while taking etanercept monotherapy (1.9 per 1,000 patient-years), and 3 while taking etanercept and MTX combination (0.9 per 1,000 patient-years). A new uveitis event occurred early in the disease course after a median disease duration of 1.5 years (interquartile range [IQR] 1.3-3.8) while taking etanercept and 1.8 years (IQR 1.8-2.1) for the MTX cohort. A recurrent uveitis event was reported after a disease duration of 7.6 years (IQR 4.3-10.0) in the etanercept cohort and 4.8 years (IQR 1.0-5.8) in the MTX cohort. Univariate analysis showed that MTX, but not etanercept or adalimumab, led to a lower rate of uveitis. Patients with a history of uveitis had higher risks for uveitis events while taking both etanercept and adalimumab. Methotrexate turned out to be protective. Few patients developed a first uveitis event while taking etanercept, while the rate is comparable to that with MTX. Uveitis may not be attributed to be an adverse drug reaction to etanercept. © 2015, American

  5. Education and employment in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis - a standardized comparison to the German general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlichtiger, Jenny; Haas, Johannes-Peter; Barth, Swaantje; Bisdorff, Betty; Hager, Lisa; Michels, Hartmut; Hügle, Boris; Radon, Katja

    2017-05-22

    Although several studies show that JIA-patients have significantly lower employment rates than the general population, the research on educational and occupational attainments in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) remain conflicting most likely due to small sample sizes. Therefore, aim of this study is to compare the educational achievements and employment status of 3698 JIA-patients with the German general population (GGP). "SEPIA" was a large cross-sectional study on the current status of a historic cohort of JIA-patients treated in a single center between 1952 and 2010. For the analyses of education and employment a sub-cohort was extracted, including only adult cases with a confirmed diagnosis of JIA (N = 2696). Participants were asked to fill out a standardized written questionnaire on education and employment. Outcome measures (education/unemployment) were directly standardized to the GGP using data obtained from the National Educational Panel Study 2013 (N = 11,728) and the German Unemployment Statistics 2012 of the Federal Statistical Office (N = 42,791,000). After age- and sex-standardization, 3% (95% Confidence Interval 1.9 to 4.1%) more of the JIA-patients (26%) than of the GGP (23%) had only reached primary education. In contrast, parents of JIA-patients had similar levels of education as parents in the GGP. With a standardized difference of 0.2% (95% CI: 0.16 to 0.19%), the unemployment rate in JIA-patients was slightly, but not significantly higher than in the GGP. Stratifying for disease duration and the current treatment status, differences were confirmed for persons diagnosed before 2001, whilst for patients diagnosed after 2000, differences were found only in JIA-patients with ongoing disease. Medium and high educational achievements did not differ statistically significant between JIA patients and the GPP. Educational achievements in German JIA-patients are significantly lower than in the GGP. Furthermore we were able to

  6. Unstimulated salivary flow, pH, proteins and oral health in patients with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobus, Agnieszka; Kierklo, Anna; Zalewska, Anna; Kuźmiuk, Anna; Szajda, Sławomir Dariusz; Ławicki, Sławomir; Bagińska, Joanna

    2017-06-02

    There have been inconsistent conclusions regarding salivary abnormalities and their effect on oral health of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) patients. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the flow rate and selected biochemical parameters of unstimulated whole saliva in correlation to oral health in JIA children. Thirty-four JIA patients and 34 age- and sex-matched controls not affected by JIA (C) were divided into two groups: with mixed and permanent dentition. DMFT/dmft, gingival and simplified oral hygiene indices were evaluated. Salivary flow rate, pH, lysozyme, lactoferrin, salivary protein concentrations and peroxidase activity were assessed. The salivary flow rate was significantly lower in the total JIA group (0.41 ml/min) as compared with the C (0.51 ml/min) and in the permanent dentition of JIA children (0.43 ml/min) as compared with the C (0.61 ml/min). A significantly lower pH was observed in total (6.74), mixed (6.7) and permanent (6.76) dentition of JIA groups in comparison to the C (7.25, 7.21, 7.28 respectively). The specific activity of peroxidase was significantly higher in JIA patients (total 112.72 IU/l, mixed dentition 112.98 IU/l, permanent dentition 112.5 IU/l) than in the C group (total 70.03 IU/l, mixed dentition 71.83 IU/l, permanent dentition 68.61 IU/l). The lysozyme concentration in JIA patients (total and permanent dentition groups) was significantly higher than in the C group. There were no significant differences in lactoferrin and salivary protein concentrations. There were no statistically significant differences in oral status between JIA patients and C, respectively: DMFT = 5.71, dmft = 3.73, OHI-S = 0.95, GI = 0.25 and DMFT 5.71, dmft = 3.73, OHI-S = 0.85, GI = 0.24. The specific activity of peroxidase in the unstimulated whole saliva was inversely correlated with the GI index, whereas the salivary lysozyme concentration was inversely correlated with the dmft index in JIA patients. In

  7. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients and their skeletal status: possible role of vitamin D receptor gene polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostik, M M; Smirnov, A M; Demin, G S; Scheplyagina, L A; Larionova, V I

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated bone mineralization and metabolism changes related to vitamin D receptor (VDR) polymorphic genotypes in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. One hundred and ninety eight children (82 boys and 116 girls) were included in our study. Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured by lumbar spine DXA. Osteocalcin, CTX, parathyroid hormone, total and ionized calcium, inorganic phosphate, total alkaline phosphatase activity was utilized for assessment of bone metabolism. Molecular testing: TaqI (rs731236) and Cdx2 (rs11568820) polymorphisms of VDR were detected by RFLP. No differences in TaqI and Cdx2 haplotypes, genotypes and alleles distribution related with normal and low BMD (Zscore 90th percentile) had the highest frequency of allele A-contained genotypes (GA+AA) of Cdx2 VDR (p = 0.009). Girls with TT TaqI VDR, who never been treated by glucocorticoides had lower BMD-Zscore than C allele carriers (TT = -0.94SD [IQR: -2.1;-0.5], TC+CC = -0.62SD [IQR: -1.26;0.39], p = 0.03). Girls with Tanner I with TT had higher total and ionized Ca level than carriers of C allele (Ca: TT = 2.43 ± 0.15 mmol/l, TC+CC = 2.28 ± 0.2 mmol/l, p = 0.024; Ca(2+): TT = 1.15 ± 0.08 mmol/l, TC+CC = 1.06 ± 0.13 mmol/l, p = 0.026). Presence of TT genotype negatively correlated with BMD-Zscore (r = -0.28, p = 0.04), and positively with frequency of LBMD (r = 0.3, p = 0.037). Boy with GG Cdx2 genotype had lower total Ca (GG = 2.3 ± 0.17 mmol/l, GA+AA = 2.43 ± 0.17 mmol/l, p = 0.004) compare with carriers of A allele. Pubertal boys (Tanner IV-V) with GG had higher CTX (GG = 1.75 ± 0.11 ng/ml, GA+AA = 1.06 ± 0.07 ng/ml, p = 0.04. TT genotype of TaqI and GG genotype of Cdx2 VDR is a negative factor impact bone mineralization metabolism and linear growth.

  8. Frequency of abnormal hand and wrist radiographs at time of diagnosis of polyarticular juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Tom; Reed, Ann M; Nelson, Audrey M; Thomas, Kristen B; Patton, Alice; Hoffman, Alan D; Achenbach, Sara; O'Fallon, William M

    2002-10-01

    To determine the frequency of radiographic abnormalities in hand/wrist radiographs of children with newly diagnosed polyarticular juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (polyJRA) because radiographs of small joints are an important tool in assessing outcomes in RA and there are clinical similarities between RA and polyJRA. A medical record review was performed to identify cases of polyJRA seen at Mayo Clinic from January 1, 1994, to December 31, 2001. Hand/wrist radiographs, obtained at the time of diagnosis, were reviewed by 3 radiologists with attention to periarticular osteopenia, joint space narrowing (JSN), or erosion. At least 2 radiologists had to independently identify abnormal findings on the same radiograph. The relative carpal length (RCL), judged by Poznanski's method, was also determined. From the review of 159 medical records, 60 cases of newly diagnosed polyJRA were identified. Twenty-five of these had hand/wrist radiographs at diagnosis; 18 sets were available for this study. Of those, 2/3 were female, 6% (1/18) had subcutaneous nodules, 7% (1/14) had elevated levels of serum rheumatoid factor, and 44% (7/16) had elevated serum levels of antinuclear antibodies. Median age at diagnosis was 10.2 years, median duration of hand/wrist symptoms at diagnosis was 10 months, and median number of joints with either swelling, pain on range of motion (ROM), or limited ROM was 14.5. Sixty-one percent of radiographs taken at the time of diagnosis of polyJRA were abnormal. While 44% had periarticular osteopenia, 28% had either erosions or JSN. Six (33%) had RCL > 2 SD below the mean for age. Five (83%) of those with RCL, > 2 SD below the mean for age, had periarticular osteopenia, JSN, or erosion. We conclude the frequency of abnormal hand/wrist radiographs is very high very early in the course of polyJRA. More studies are needed to determine to what extent these radiographic abnormalities correlate with clinical outcomes.

  9. Association of HLA-A*02:06 and HLA-DRB1*04:05 with clinical subtypes of juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagimachi, Masakatsu; Miyamae, Takako; Naruto, Takuya; Hara, Takuma; Kikuchi, Masako; Hara, Ryoki; Imagawa, Tomoyuki; Mori, Masaaki; Kaneko, Tetsuji; Goto, Hiroaki; Morita, Satoshi; Mizuki, Nobuhisa; Kimura, Akinori; Yokota, Shumpei

    2011-03-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is one of the most common forms of pediatric chronic arthritis. JIA is a clinically heterogeneous disease. Therefore, the genetic background of JIA may also be heterogeneous. The aim of this study was to investigate associations between human leukocyte antigen (HLA) and susceptibility to JIA and/or uveitis, which is one of the most devastating complications of JIA. A total of 106 Japanese articular JIA patients (67 with polyarthritis and 39 with oligoarthritis) and 678 healthy controls were genotyped for HLA-A, -B and -DRB1 by PCR-sequence-specific oligonucleotide probe methodology. HLA-A(*)02:06 was the risk factor for JIA accompanied by uveitis after adjustment for clinical factors (corrected P-value < 0.001, odds ratio (OR) 11.7, 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.2-43.0). On the other hand, HLA-DRB1(*)04:05 was associated with polyarticular JIA (corrected P-value < 0.001, OR 2.9, 95% CI 1.7-4.8). We found an association of HLA-A(*)02:06 with susceptibility to JIA accompanied by uveitis, which might be considered a separate clinical JIA entity. We also found an association between HLA-DRB1(*)04:05 and polyarticular JIA. Thus, clinical subtypes of JIA can be classified by the presence of the specific HLA alleles, HLA-A(*)02:06 and DRB1(*)04:05.

  10. Gas bubble disease monitoring and research of juvenile salmonids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maule, A.G.; Beeman, J.; Hans, K.M.; Mesa, M.G.; Haner, P.; Warren, J.J.

    1997-10-01

    This document describes the project activities 1996--1997 contract year. This report is composed of three chapters which contain data and analyses of the three main elements of the project: field research to determine the vertical distribution of migrating juvenile salmonids, monitoring of juvenile migrants at dams on the Snake and Columbia rivers, and laboratory experiments to describe the progression of gas bubble disease signs leading to mortality. The major findings described in this report are: A miniature pressure-sensitive radio transmitter was found to be accurate and precise and, after compensation for water temperature, can be used to determine the depth of tagged-fish to within 0.32 m of the true depth (Chapter 1). Preliminary data from very few fish suggest that depth protects migrating juvenile steelhead from total dissolved gas supersaturation (Chapter 1). As in 1995, few fish had any signs of gas bubble disease, but it appeared that prevalence and severity increased as fish migrated downstream and in response to changing gas supersaturation (Chapter 2). It appeared to gas bubble disease was not a threat to migrating juvenile salmonids when total dissolved gas supersaturation was < 120% (Chapter 2). Laboratory studies suggest that external examinations are appropriate for determining the severity of gas bubble disease in juvenile salmonids (Chapter 3). The authors developed a new method for examining gill arches for intravascular bubbles by clamping the ventral aorta to reduce bleeding when arches were removed (Chapter 3). Despite an outbreak of bacterial kidney disease in the experimental fish, the data indicate that gas bubble disease is a progressive trauma that can be monitored (Chapter 3)

  11. Imaging of juvenile spondyloarthritis. Part I: Classifications and radiographs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwona Sudoł-Szopińska

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile spondyloarthropathies are manifested mainly by symptoms of peripheral arthritis and enthesitis. By contrast with adults, children rarely present with sacroiliitis and spondylitis. Imaging and laboratory tests allow early diagnosis and treatment. Conventional radiographs visualize late inflammatory lesions and post-inflammatory complications. Early diagnosis is possible with the use of ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging. The first part of the article presents classifications of juvenile spondyloarthropathies and discusses their radiographic presentation. Typical radiographic features of individual types of juvenile spondyloarthritis are listed (including ankylosing spondylitis, juvenile psoriatic arthritis, reactive arthritis and arthritis in the course of inflammatory bowel diseases. The second part will describe changes visible on ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging. In patients with juvenile spondyloarthropathies, these examinations are conducted to diagnose inflammatory lesions in peripheral joints, tendon sheaths, tendons and bursae. Moreover, magnetic resonance imaging also visualizes early inflammatory changes in the axial skeleton and subchondral bone marrow edema, which is considered an early sign of inflammation.

  12. Promoting physical activity in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis through an internet-based program: Results of a pilot randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lelieveld, O.; Armbrust, W.; Geertzen, J.; De Graaf, I.; Van Leeuwen, M.; Sauer, P.; Van Weert, E.; Bouma, J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) are less physically active than healthy peers. Therefore we developed an internet-based intervention to improve physical activity (PA). The aim of the study was to examine the effectiveness of the program in improving PA. Relevance: Evidence

  13. Ultrasonography and color Doppler in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: diagnosis and follow-up of ultrasound-guided steroid injection in the ankle region. A descriptive interventional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurell, Louise; Court-Payen, Michel; Nielsen, Susan

    2011-01-01

    The ankle region is frequently involved in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) but difficult to examine clinically due to its anatomical complexity. The aim of the study was to evaluate the role of ultrasonography (US) of the ankle and midfoot (ankle region) in JIA. Doppler-US detected synovial h...

  14. Subcutaneous golimumab for children with active polyarticular-course juvenile idiopathic arthritis : results of a multicentre, double-blind, randomised-withdrawal trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brunner, Hermine I; Ruperto, Nicolino; Tzaribachev, Nikolay; Horneff, Gerd; Chasnyk, Vyacheslav G.; Panaviene, Violeta Vladislava; Abud-Mendoza, Carlos; Reiff, Andreas; Alexeeva, Ekaterina; Rubio-Pérez, Nadina; Keltsev, Vladimir; Kingsbury, Daniel J.; Del Rocio Maldonado Velázquez, Maria; Nikishina, Irina; Silverman, Earl D.; Joos, Rik; Smolewska, Elzbieta; Bandeira, Márcia; Minden, Kirsten; van Royen-Kerkhof, Annet; Emminger, Wolfgang; Foeldvari, Ivan; Lauwerys, Bernard R.; Sztajnbok, Flavio; Gilmer, Keith E.; Xu, Zhenhua; Leu, Jocelyn H.; Kim, Lilianne; Lamberth, Sarah L.; Loza, Matthew J.; Lovell, Daniel J.; Martini, Alberto

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This report aims to determine the safety, pharmacokinetics (PK) and efficacy of subcutaneous golimumab in active polyarticular-course juvenile idiopathic arthritis (polyJIA). METHODS: In this three-part randomised double-blinded placebo-controlled withdrawal trial, all patients received

  15. Development of a standardized method of assessment of radiographs and radiographic change in juvenile idiopathic arthritis - Introduction of the Dijkstra composite score

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rossum, MAJ; Zwinderman, AH; van Soesbergen, RM; Wieringa, H; Fiselier, TJW; Franssen, MJAM; ten Cate, R; van Suijlekom-Smit, LWA; Wulffraat, NM; van Luijk, WHJ; Oostveen, JCM; Kuis, W; Dijkmans, BAC

    Objective. To evaluate the sensitivity to change of a newly developed radiologic assessment tool, the Dijkstra score, and to develop a numeric composite score and progressor classification scheme to apply in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) trials. Methods. A placebo-controlled trial of

  16. Promoting physical activity in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis through an internet-based program : results of a pilot randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lelieveld, Otto; Armbrust, Wineke; Geertzen, Jan H. B.; de Graaf, Inez; van Leeuwen, Miek A.; Sauer, Pieter J. J.; van Weert, Ellen; Bouma, Jelte

    OBJECTIVE: Patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) are less physically active than healthy peers. Therefore, we developed an Internet-based intervention to improve physical activity (PA). The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of the program in improving PA. METHODS: PA was

  17. Short term effectiveness and experiences of a peer guided web-based self-management intervention for young adults with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Ammerlaan (Judy); H. van Os-Medendorp (Harmieke); de Boer-Nijhof, N. (Nienke); Scholtus, L. (Lieske); A.A. Kruize (Aike); P.A. van Pelt (Philomine); B.J. Prakken (Berent); J.W.J. Bijlsma (Hans)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: A web-based self-management intervention guided by peer-trainers was developed to support young adults' self-management in coping with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA). To investigate its effectiveness, a randomized controlled trial (RCT) was conducted. In addition, the

  18. Feasibility of a Website and a Hospital-Based Online Portal for Young Adults With Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis : Views and Experiences of Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ammerlaan, Judy Jw; Scholtus, Lieske W; Drossaert, Constance Hc; van Os-Medendorp, Harmieke; Prakken, Berent; Kruize, Aike A; Bijlsma, Johannes JW

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To improve knowledge and to encourage active involvement of young adults with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), an informative website with written and video information and an online portal with access to the personal medical record, self-monitoring, and e-consult functionalities

  19. Feasibility of a Website and a Hospital-Based Online Portal for Young Adults With Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: Views and Experiences of Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ammerlaan, Judy J.W.; Scholtus, Lieske W.; Drossaert, Constance H.C.; van Os-Medendorp, Harmieke; Prakken, Berent; Kruize, Aike A.; Bijlsma, Johannes J.W.

    2015-01-01

    Background: To improve knowledge and to encourage active involvement of young adults with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), an informative website with written and video information and an online portal with access to the personal medical record, self-monitoring, and e-consult functionalities

  20. Prevalence of chronic diseases at the onset of inflammatory arthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ursum, J.; Korevaar, J.C.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Peters, M.J.L.; Schellevis, F.G.; Nurmohamed, M.T.; Nielen, M.M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: To explore the prevalence of chronic diseases at the onset of inflammatory arthritis (IA) in the general practice and compare this to a group of control patients without IA. Methods: In this nested-case-control study, data were used from the Netherlands Information Network of eneral

  1. Minimal disease activity for rheumatoid arthritis: a preliminary definition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wells, George A.; Boers, Maarten; Shea, Beverley; Brooks, Peter M.; Simon, Lee S.; Strand, C. Vibeke; Aletaha, Daniel; Anderson, Jennifer J.; Bombardier, Claire; Dougados, Maxime; Emery, Paul; Felson, David T.; Fransen, Jaap; Furst, Dan E.; Hazes, Johanna M. W.; Johnson, Kent R.; Kirwan, John R.; Landewé, Robert B. M.; Lassere, Marissa N. D.; Michaud, Kaleb; Suarez-Almazor, Maria; Silman, Alan J.; Smolen, Josef S.; van der Heijde, Desiree M. F. M.; van Riel, Piet L. C. M.; Wolfe, Fred; Tugwell, Peter S.

    2005-01-01

    Agreement on response criteria in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has allowed better standardization and interpretation of clinical trial reports. With recent advances in therapy, the proportion of patients achieving a satisfactory state of minimal disease activity (MDA) is becoming a more important

  2. Minimal disease activity for rheumatoid arthritis: a preliminary definition.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wells, G.A.; Boers, M.; Shea, B.; Brooks, P.M.; Simon, L.S.; Strand, C.V.; Aletaha, D.; Anderson, J.; Bombardier, C.; Dougados, M.; Emery, P.; Felson, D.T.; Fransen, J.; Furst, D.E.; Hazes, J.M.W.; Johnson, K.; Kirwan, J.; Landewe, R.B.; Lassere, M.N.; Michaud, K.; Suarez-Almazor, M.; Silman, A.J.; Smolen, J.S.; Heijde, D.M.F.M. van der; Riel, P.L.C.M. van; Wolfe, F.; Tugwell, P.S.

    2005-01-01

    Agreement on response criteria in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has allowed better standardization and interpretation of clinical trial reports. With recent advances in therapy, the proportion of patients achieving a satisfactory state of minimal disease activity (MDA) is becoming a more important

  3. Chronic kidney disease in rheumatoid arthritis at Kenyatta National ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of chronic kidney disease among patients with rheumatoid arthritis on follow up at the rheumatology outpatient clinic at Kenyatta National Hospital. Design: Descriptive, cross-sectional study. Setting: Rheumatology outpatient clinic at the Kenyatta National Hospital, a public national ...

  4. Síndrome de ativação macrofágica em pacientes com artrite idiopática juvenil Macrophage activation syndrome in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério do Prado

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available A síndrome de ativação macrofágica (SAM é uma complicação rara das doenças reumáticas crônicas, particularmente a artrite idiopática juvenil (AIJ de início sistêmico. Este processo pode ser desencadeado por agentes infecciosos virais e bacterianos, neoplásicos, drogas antiinflamatórias não esteroidais ou drogas modificadoras da doença, mudanças abruptas das medicações e doenças reumáticas. O quadro clínico inicia-se com irritação do sistema nervoso central, acompanhado de falências hepática e renal, além de pancitopenia. Relatamos três casos de pacientes com AIJ do nosso serviço que desenvolveram SAM com descrição das características clínicas, evolutivas e de tratamento.The macrophage activation syndrome (MAS is an uncommon complication of chronic rheumatic diseases, specially systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA. It can be triggered by infectious (viral or bacterial or malignant diseases, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory or disease modified anti-rheumatic drugs, changes in the therapy and rheumatic diseases. The clinical features present at the onset are related mainly with central nervous system involvement, hepatic and renal failure and pancytopenia. We describe the clinical, evolutive features and treatment of three patients with JIA that developed MAS.

  5. A randomised controlled trial of the clinical effectiveness, safety and cost-effectiveness of adalimumab in combination with methotrexate for the treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis associated uveitis (SYCAMORE Trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanan, Athimalaipet V; Dick, Andrew D; Benton, Diana; Compeyrot-Lacassagne, Sandrine; Dawoud, Dalia; Hardwick, Ben; Hickey, Helen; Hughes, Dyfrig; Jones, Ashley; Woo, Patricia; Edelsten, Clive; Beresford, Michael W

    2014-01-09

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common rheumatic disease in children. Children with JIA are at risk of inflammation of the uvea in the eye (uveitis). Overall, 20% to 25% of paediatric uveitis is associated with JIA. Major risk factors for development of uveitis in JIA are oligoarticular pattern of arthritis, an age at onset of arthritis of less than seven years of age, and antinuclear antibody positivity. In the initial stages of mild to moderate inflammation the uveitis is asymptomatic. This has led to current practice of screening all children with JIA for uveitis. Approximately 12% to 38% of patients with JIA develop uveitis in seven years following onset of arthritis. In 30% to 50% of children with JIA-associated uveitis structural complications are present at diagnosis. Furthermore about 50% to 75% of those with severe uveitis will eventually develop visual impairment secondary to ocular complications such as cataract and glaucoma. Defining the severity of inflammation and structural complications in uveitis patients is now possible following Standardised Uveitis Nomenclature (SUN) guidelines, and modified to incorporate the consensus of end point and outcome criteria into the design of randomised trials. Despite current screening and therapeutic options (pre-biologics) 10% to 15% of children with JIA-associated uveitis may develop bilateral visual impairment and certified legally blind. To date, there remains no controlled trial evidence of benefits of biologic therapy. This study will randomise 154 patients aged 2 to 18 years with active JIA-associated uveitis (despite methotrexate (MTX) treatment for at least 12 weeks). All participants will be treated for 18 months, with follow up of 3 years from randomisation (continuing on MTX throughout). All participants will receive a stable dose of MTX and in addition either adalimumab (20 mg/0.8 ml for patientstreatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis associated uveitis. ISRCTN10065623.

  6. Syndromes that simulate a juvenile systemic arthritis; on purpose of a case of NOMID/CINCA syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamarra Iglesias, Antonio; Rojas, Adriana; Calvo P, Enrique; Restrepo S, Jose Felix

    2004-01-01

    We report a years old female with NOMID/CINCA syndrome, and we reviewed of this rare pathology. We discuss the differential diagnosis of this disease with all of the syndromes in the childhood that resemble a systemic arthritis, specially when this appears before the two years of age

  7. Antibiotic prophylaxis for haematogenous bacterial arthritis in patients with joint disease: a cost effectiveness analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Krijnen (Pieta); C.J. Kaandorp; E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); D. van Schaardenburg (Dirkjan); H.J. Moens; J.D.F. Habbema (Dik)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: To assess the cost effectiveness of antibiotic prophylaxis for haematogenous bacterial arthritis in patients with joint disease. METHODS: In a decision analysis, data from a prospective study on bacterial arthritis in 4907 patients with joint

  8. Measures of rheumatoid arthritis disease activity in Australian clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Andrew; Bagga, Hanish

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate which rheumatoid arthritis (RA) disease activity measures are being collected in patients receiving glucocorticoids, non-biologic or biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) in Australian rheumatology practice. Methods. A retrospective audit of medical records was conducted from eight rheumatology practices around Australia. Each rheumatologist recruited 30 consecutive eligible patients into the review, 10 of whom must have been receiving a biological agent for rheumatoid arthritis. Disease activity measures and radiographic assessments were collected from each patient's last consultation. For biologic patients, disease activity measures were also collected from when the patient was first initiated on the biological agent. Results. At last consultation, the disease measures that were recorded most often were ESR (89.2%), haemoglobin (87.5%), and CRP (84.2%). DAS28 was infrequently recorded (16.3%). The rate of recording disease activity measures for patients receiving biologic DMARDs decreased over time (mean 27 months). Conclusion. This review has shown inconsistency of RA activity measures being recorded in Australian rheumatology clinical practice. An accurate assessment of the disease process is necessary to effectively target rheumatoid arthritis patients to treat in order to achieve optimal outcomes.

  9. Measures of Rheumatoid Arthritis Disease Activity in Australian Clinical Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Andrew; Bagga, Hanish

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate which rheumatoid arthritis (RA) disease activity measures are being collected in patients receiving glucocorticoids, non-biologic or biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) in Australian rheumatology practice. Methods. A retrospective audit of medical records was conducted from eight rheumatology practices around Australia. Each rheumatologist recruited 30 consecutive eligible patients into the review, 10 of whom must have been receiving a biological...

  10. Effect of Electromyographic Biofeedback Training on Pain, Quadriceps Muscle Strength, and Functional Ability in Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eid, Mohamed Ahmed Mahmoud; Aly, Sobhy M; El-Shamy, Shamekh M

    2016-12-01

    To investigate the effects of electromyographic (EMG) biofeedback training on pain, quadriceps strength, and functional ability in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA). This is a randomized controlled study; 36 children (11 boys and 25 girls) with polyarticular JRA, with ages ranging from 8 to 13 years, were selected and assigned randomly, using computer-generated random numbers, into 2 groups. The control group (n = 18) received the conventional physical therapy program, whereas the study group (n = 18) received the same program as the control group in addition to EMG biofeedback-guided isometric exercises for 3 days a week for 12 weeks. Pain, peak torque of quadriceps strength, and functional ability were evaluated before, after 6 weeks, and at the end of 12 weeks of the treatment program. By 6 weeks, significant differences were observed in the study group (P biofeedback may be a useful intervention modality to reduce pain, improve quadriceps strength, and functional performance in JRA.

  11. VibroCV: a computer vision-based vibroarthrography platform with possible application to Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiens, Andrew D; Prahalad, Sampath; Inan, Omer T

    2016-08-01

    Vibroarthrography, a method for interpreting the sounds emitted by a knee during movement, has been studied for several joint disorders since 1902. However, to our knowledge, the usefulness of this method for management of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) has not been investigated. To study joint sounds as a possible new biomarker for pediatric cases of JIA we designed and built VibroCV, a platform to capture vibroarthrograms from four accelerometers; electromyograms (EMG) and inertial measurements from four wireless EMG modules; and joint angles from two Sony Eye cameras and six light-emitting diodes with commercially-available off-the-shelf parts and computer vision via OpenCV. This article explains the design of this turn-key platform in detail, and provides a sample recording captured from a pediatric subject.

  12. A comparison of disease burden in rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and axial spondyloarthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigitte Michelsen

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study was to compare disease burden in rheumatoid arthritis (RA, psoriatic arthritis (PsA and axial spondyloarthritis (ax-SpA.In this cross-sectional study, all the RA (1093, PsA (365 and ax-SpA (333 patients who visited the out-patient clinic of the Hospital of Southern Norway Trust during the year 2013 were included; the RA patients all had a RA diagnosis verified by the treating rheumatologist, the PsA patients all fulfilled the ClASsification for Psoriatic ARthritis (CASPAR criteria and the ax-SpA patients all fulfilled the Assessment of SpondyloArthritis international Society (ASAS classification criteria for ax-SpA. Patient-reported health status, demographic variables, medications, and composite scores of disease activity were assessed. The main analyses were performed using General Linear Models adjusted for age, sex and multiple comparisons. Correlation analyses were performed using Spearman's rho.The reported pain, joint pain, patient's global assessment and fatigue were similar in PsA and ax-SpA, but significantly lower in RA. The 28-joint Disease Activity Score (DAS28 (0.3±0.1, p = 0.003, Clinical Disease Activity Index (CDAI (1.0±0.4, p = 0.028 and Routine Assessment of Patient Index Data 3 (RAPID3 (0.4±0.1, p = 0.004 were all significantly higher in PsA vs. RA. RAPID3 showed moderate to high correlation with DAS28 (rho = 0.521, p<0.001 and CDAI (rho = 0.768, p<0.001 in RA and PsA, and with Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI (rho = 0.902, p<0.001 and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI (0.865, p<0.001 in ax-SpA and PsA.In conclusion, patient- reported outcome measures were similar in our population of PsA and ax-SpA patients, but significantly lower for the RA patients. Composite disease activity measures were lower in RA than in PsA and ax-SpA, but the magnitude of these differences was small and probably not of clinical significance. Our study indicates that

  13. Minimal Disease Activity as a Treatment Target in Psoriatic Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gossec, Laure; McGonagle, Dennis; Korotaeva, Tatiana

    2018-01-01

    As in other inflammatory rheumatic diseases, the objective of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) treatment is the achievement of a defined target. Recent recommendations propose aiming for remission or low disease activity; however, a consensual definition of remission is lacking. A state of minimal disease....... Since its development, MDA has been used increasingly in studies and clinical trials. In this article, the potential use of MDA as a treatment target in PsA is reviewed. The frequencies of MDA achievement with biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs are summarized based on data from registries...

  14. Burden of childhood-onset arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassett Afton L

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Juvenile arthritis comprises a variety of chronic inflammatory diseases causing erosive arthritis in children, often progressing to disability. These children experience functional impairment due to joint and back pain, heel pain, swelling of joints and morning stiffness, contractures, pain, and anterior uveitis leading to blindness. As children who have juvenile arthritis reach adulthood, they face possible continuing disease activity, medication-associated morbidity, and life-long disability and risk for emotional and social dysfunction. In this article we will review the burden of juvenile arthritis for the patient and society and focus on the following areas: patient disability; visual outcome; other medical complications; physical activity; impact on HRQOL; emotional impact; pain and coping; ambulatory visits, hospitalizations and mortality; economic impact; burden on caregivers; transition issues; educational occupational outcomes, and sexuality. The extent of impact on the various aspects of the patients', families' and society's functioning is clear from the existing literature. Juvenile arthritis imposes a significant burden on different spheres of the patients', caregivers' and family's life. In addition, it imposes a societal burden of significant health care costs and utilization. Juvenile arthritis affects health-related quality of life, physical function and visual outcome of children and impacts functioning in school and home. Effective, well-designed and appropriately tailored interventions are required to improve transitioning to adult care, encourage future vocation/occupation, enhance school function and minimize burden on costs.

  15. Switched Memory B Cells Are Increased in Oligoarticular and Polyarticular Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis and Their Change Over Time Is Related to Response to Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marasco, Emiliano; Aquilani, Angela; Cascioli, Simona; Moneta, Gian Marco; Caiello, Ivan; Farroni, Chiara; Giorda, Ezio; D'Oria, Valentina; Marafon, Denise Pires; Magni-Manzoni, Silvia; Carsetti, Rita; De Benedetti, Fabrizio

    2018-04-01

    To investigate whether abnormalities in B cell subsets in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) correlate with clinical features and response to treatment. A total of 109 patients diagnosed as having oligoarticular JIA or polyarticular JIA were enrolled in the study. B cell subsets in peripheral blood and synovial fluid were analyzed by flow cytometry. Switched memory B cells were significantly increased in patients compared to age-matched healthy controls (P < 0.0001). When patients were divided according to age at onset of JIA, in patients with early-onset disease (presenting before age 6 years) the expansion in switched memory B cells was more pronounced than that in patients with late-onset disease and persisted throughout the disease course. In longitudinal studies, during methotrexate (MTX) treatment, regardless of the presence or absence of active disease, the number of switched memory B cells increased significantly (median change from baseline 36% [interquartile range {IQR} 15, 66]). During treatment with MTX plus tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFi), in patients maintaining disease remission, the increase in switched memory B cells was significantly lower than that in patients who experienced active disease (median change from baseline 4% [IQR -6, 32] versus 41% [IQR 11, 73]; P = 0.004). The yearly rate of increases in switched memory B cells was 1.5% in healthy controls, 1.2% in patients who maintained remission during treatment with MTX plus TNFi, 4.7% in patients who experienced active disease during treatment with MTX plus TNFi, and ~4% in patients treated with MTX alone. Switched memory B cells expand during the disease course at a faster rate in JIA patients than in healthy children. This increase is more evident in patients with early-onset JIA. TNFi treatment inhibits this increase in patients who achieve and maintain remission, but not in those with active disease. © 2018, American College of Rheumatology.

  16. Physiotherapy and occupational therapy for juvenile chronic arthritis: custom and practice in five centres in the UK, USA and Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackett, J; Johnson, B; Parkin, A; Southwood, T

    1996-07-01

    Physiotherapy and occupational therapy are widely accepted as being of central importance for the treatment of juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA). However, these approaches have rarely been subject to critical scrutiny. The aims of this report are to highlight some of the inter-centre similarities and differences observed in the implementation of physical and occupational therapy for JCA, and to emphasize the need for scientifically controlled research in this area. During a series of visits to several paediatric rheumatology units in the UK, USA and Canada, three aspects of the service were noted: treatment philosophy, physical interventions used for the treatment of JCA and quality-of-life and independence training activities. There was general consensus with the philosophy that early physical intervention was a vital part of the treatment plan for JCA, although all therapists were concerned that compliance with treatment modalities was poor. Differences between units in the approach to acute arthritis, the use of foot orthoses and wrist splints, the treatment of joint contractures and the use of general quality-of-life training activities were noted. Although it was widely recognized that controlled research into the efficacy of physical intervention was needed, no centre had a co-ordinated plan for such investigations.

  17. Rheumatoid disease without arthritis; clinical case of pulmonary fibrosis, rheumatoid nodulosis and positive rheumatoid factor without arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochoa Franco, Julian Andres; Canas Davila, Carlos Alberto

    2003-01-01

    We reported a case of a patient suffering pulmonary fibrosis rapidly progressive and a positive rheumatoid factor test with the presence of HLA DR11 y HLADR17, without arthritis, We discuss how rare is this clinical appearance, and remark the concept that rheumatoid arthritis is a systemic disease, with a wide clinical presentation, that some authors with a right criteria have called rheumatoid disease

  18. Predictors of Flare Following Etanercept Withdrawal in Patients with Rheumatoid Factor-negative Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Who Reached Remission while Taking Medication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquilani, Angela; Pires Marafon, Denise; Marasco, Emiliano; Nicolai, Rebecca; Messia, Virginia; Perfetti, Francesca; Magni-Manzoni, Silvia; De Benedetti, Fabrizio

    2018-05-01

    To evaluate the rate of flare after etanercept (ETN) withdrawal in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) who attained clinical remission while taking medication, and to identify predictors of flare. Patients were included with oligo- (oJIA) and rheumatoid factor-negative polyarticular JIA (pJIA) who received a first course of ETN for at least 18 months, maintained clinically inactive disease (CID) for at least 6 months during treatment, and were followed for 12 months after ETN withdrawal. Demographic and clinical features were collected at onset, at baseline (initiation of ETN), and at time of disease flare. After ETN withdrawal, 66 of the 110 patients enrolled (60%) flared with arthritis (of whom 7 flared with concurrent anterior uveitis; none with uveitis alone). The median time to flare was 4.3 months (interquartile range 2.5-6.4) with no evident differences between oJIA and pJIA. The number and type of joints involved at baseline and characteristics of ETN treatment/discontinuation were not associated with flare. Patients who flared were more frequently males (p = 0.034), positive for antinuclear antibody (ANA; p = 0.047), and had higher values of C-reactive protein (CRP; p = 0.012) at baseline. These variables remained significantly associated with flare in a multivariate logistic analysis, a model accounting for only 14% of the variability of the occurrence of the flare. Our results show that a significant proportion of patients with JIA who maintain CID for at least 6 months experience a relapse after ETN withdrawal. Male sex, presence of ANA, and elevated CRP at baseline were associated with higher risk of flare.

  19. STAT4 rs7574865 G/T and PTPN22 rs2488457 G/C polymorphisms influence the risk of developing juvenile idiopathic arthritis in Han Chinese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhi-Dan; Wang, Fei-Fei; Huang, Hui; Huang, Na; Ma, Hui-Hui; Guo, Yi-Hong; Zhang, Ya-Yuan; Qian, Xiao-Qing; Yu, Hai-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a common autoimmune disease characterized by environmental influences along with several predisposing genes in the pathogenesis. The protein tyrosine phosphatase nonreceptor 22 (PTPN22) and signal transducer and activator of transcription factor 4 (STAT4) have been recognized as susceptibility genes for numerous autoimmune diseases. Associations of STAT4 rs7574865 G/T and PTPN22 (rs2488457 G/C and rs2476601 C/T) polymorphisms with JIA have repeatedly been replicated in several Caucasian populations. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of three polymorphisms mentioned above on the risk of developing JIA in Han Chinese patients. Genotyping was performed on a total of 137 Chinese patients with JIA (JIA group) and 150 sex and age frequency-matched healthy volunteers (Control group). The single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) were determined by using direct sequencing of PCR-amplified products. There were significant differences of PTPN22 rs2488457 G/C and STAT4 rs7574865 G/T polymorphisms between both groups. However, no significant difference was observed in distribution frequencies of PTPN22 rs2476601 polymorphism. The association with the PTPN22 rs2488457 G/C polymorphism remained significant in the stratifications by age at onset, ANA status, splenomegaly, lymphadenectasis and involvement joints. As with the STAT4 rs7574865 G/T polymorphisms, the enthesitis-related arthritis and presence of hepatomegaly had strong effect on the association. Our data strengthen STAT4 rs7574865 G/T and PTPN22 rs2488457 G/C polymorphisms as susceptibility factors for JIA.

  20. STAT4 rs7574865 G/T and PTPN22 rs2488457 G/C polymorphisms influence the risk of developing juvenile idiopathic arthritis in Han Chinese patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Dan Fan

    Full Text Available Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA is a common autoimmune disease characterized by environmental influences along with several predisposing genes in the pathogenesis. The protein tyrosine phosphatase nonreceptor 22 (PTPN22 and signal transducer and activator of transcription factor 4 (STAT4 have been recognized as susceptibility genes for numerous autoimmune diseases. Associations of STAT4 rs7574865 G/T and PTPN22 (rs2488457 G/C and rs2476601 C/T polymorphisms with JIA have repeatedly been replicated in several Caucasian populations. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of three polymorphisms mentioned above on the risk of developing JIA in Han Chinese patients. Genotyping was performed on a total of 137 Chinese patients with JIA (JIA group and 150 sex and age frequency-matched healthy volunteers (Control group. The single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP were determined by using direct sequencing of PCR-amplified products. There were significant differences of PTPN22 rs2488457 G/C and STAT4 rs7574865 G/T polymorphisms between both groups. However, no significant difference was observed in distribution frequencies of PTPN22 rs2476601 polymorphism. The association with the PTPN22 rs2488457 G/C polymorphism remained significant in the stratifications by age at onset, ANA status, splenomegaly, lymphadenectasis and involvement joints. As with the STAT4 rs7574865 G/T polymorphisms, the enthesitis-related arthritis and presence of hepatomegaly had strong effect on the association. Our data strengthen STAT4 rs7574865 G/T and PTPN22 rs2488457 G/C polymorphisms as susceptibility factors for JIA.

  1. Genome Engineering for Personalized Arthritis Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkar, Shaunak S; Brunger, Jonathan M; Willard, Vincent P; Wu, Chia-Lung; Gersbach, Charles A; Guilak, Farshid

    2017-10-01

    Arthritis represents a family of complex joint pathologies responsible for the majority of musculoskeletal conditions. Nearly all diseases within this family, including osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and juvenile idiopathic arthritis, are chronic conditions with few or no disease-modifying therapeutics available. Advances in genome engineering technology, most recently with CRISPR-Cas9, have revolutionized our ability to interrogate and validate genetic and epigenetic elements associated with chronic diseases such as arthritis. These technologies, together with cell reprogramming methods, including the use of induced pluripotent stem cells, provide a platform for human disease modeling. We summarize new evidence from genome-wide association studies and genomics that substantiates a genetic basis for arthritis pathogenesis. We also review the potential contributions of genome engineering in the development of new arthritis therapeutics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Síndrome de ativação macrofágica associada com artrite idiopática juvenil sistêmica Macrophage activation syndrome associated with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clovis Artur A. Silva

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Descrever as características da síndrome de ativação macrofágica associada a artrite idiopática juvenil. DESCRIÇÃO DOS CASOS: Foram analisados retrospectivamente os prontuários de 462 pacientes com artrite idiopática juvenil. Destes, sete (1,5% pacientes desenvolveram síndrome de ativação macrofágica; todos tinham a forma sistêmica da doença. A mediana de idade de início da artrite idiopática juvenil foi de 3 anos e 10 meses, e a mediana do tempo de duração da artrite idiopática juvenil antes da síndrome de ativação macrofágica foi de 8 anos e 4 meses. Todos os pacientes apresentaram febre, icterícia, hepatoesplenomegalia, sangramentos, pancitopenia e elevação das enzimas hepáticas e dos tempos de coagulação e bilirrubina direta. Três casos apresentaram infecções associadas e um caso desenvolveu a síndrome de ativação macrofágica 2 semanas após a introdução de sulfasalazina. Três pacientes morreram. Proliferação macrofágica e hemofagocitose foram evidenciadas em cinco. A terapêutica da síndrome de ativação macrofágica incluiu pulsoterapia com metilprednisolona em todos, ciclosporina em três, plasmaférese em dois e gamaglobulina endovenosa em dois. COMENTÁRIOS: A síndrome de ativação macrofágica é uma complicação da artrite idiopática juvenil sistêmica com alta morbidade e mortalidade.OBJECTIVE: To describe the characteristics of macrophage activation syndrome associated with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. DESCRIPTION: This is a retrospective study involving 462 patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Seven (1.5% of those patients suffered from systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis and developed macrophage activation syndrome. The median age of the juvenile idiopathic arthritis onset was 3 years and 10 months and the median duration of juvenile idiopathic arthritis before macrophage activation syndrome was 8 years and 4 months. All of them presented with fever

  3. Rheumatoid Arthritis: Can It Affect the Lungs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheumatoid arthritis: Can it affect the lungs? Can rheumatoid arthritis affect your lungs? Answers from April Chang-Miller, ... know. Arthritis Foundation. http://www.arthritis.org/about-arthritis/types/rheumatoid-arthritis/articles/lung-disease-rheumatoid-arthritis.php. Accessed ...

  4. Impairment of microcirculation in juvenile idiopathic arthritis - studies by nailfold videocapillaroscopy and correlation with serum levels of sICAM and VEGF.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slawomir Chlabicz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Impairment of vascular endothelium plays a key role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases including juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA and atherosclerosis. We hypothesized that structural abnormalities of the smallest blood vessels (capillaries might exist and reflect endothelial dysfunction in children with JIA. Microcirculation was studied, by means of nailfold videocapillaroscopy with computer-associated image analysis, in 43 patients with JIA and compared with 20 healthy children. Moreover, capillaroscopic findings were correlated with the activity of the disease and the levels of serum biomarkers of endothelial injury, namely soluble intercellular adhesion molecule (sICAM and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF. We found that in JIA patients capillaries were significantly wider and longer than in healthy controls. Moreover, irregular capillaries and dilated subpapillary venous plexus were found significantly more frequently in JIA in comparison with the control group. Serum levels of sICAM and VEGF were significantly higher in JIA patients with capillary abnormalities than in JIA patients with normal capillaroscopy. Our study indicates that there are structural changes in the microcirculation of patients with JIA and that these changes might reflect endothelial injury. Whether capillaroscopy might have a role in early identification of JIA patients being at higher risk of atherosclerosis requires further studies.

  5. Assessment of the Therapeutic Effect of Total Glucosides of Peony for Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongsong Cai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA is the most common rheumatic disease in children; some clinical trials have reported the effects of total glucosides of peony (TGP in the treatment of JIA. However, no systematic review has yet been conducted. In this study, we assessed the efficacy and safety in patients with JIA enrolled in randomized controlled trials (RCTs of TGP. We extracted data for studies searched from 8 electronic databases that were searched and also evaluated the methodological quality of the included studies. We assessed the following outcome measures: overall response rate, pain, tender joint count (TJC, swollen joint count (SJC, duration of morning stiffness (DMS, grip strength (GS, rheumatoid factor (RF, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, C-reactive protein (CRP, and adverse effects (AEs in short term (4–8 weeks, intermediate term (9–26 weeks, and long term (>26 weeks. The final analysis showed that TGP acted as a unique nonbiologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (nonbiologic DMARD, and its therapeutic effects were safe and efficacious for the treatment of JIA with few AEs. However, more high-quality RCTs are needed to confirm these therapeutic effects.

  6. SUCCESSFUL USE OF ETANERCEPT IN A PATIENT WITH POLYARTICULAR JUVENILE IDIOPATHIC ARTHRITIS WITH AN OVERVIEW OF THE PREDICTORS OF A GOOD RESPONSE TO ONGOING THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna V. Karaseva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The  article  presents  a case  of  polyarticular  juvenile  idiopathic  arthritis  resistant  to  methotrexate  therapy  and  nonsteroidal  antiinflammatory drugs.  The child was prescribed  a tumor necrosis  factor   inhibitor etanercept  at a dose  of 0.4 mg/kg body weight2 times/week. The treatment  with etanercept  induced remission of the disease, ensured the function restoration  in the joints. The predictors  of a good response  to etanercept  were the younger  age, the short  course  of the disease,  the use of a small number of immunosuppressants  before prescription of etanercept, the absence of concomitant use of glucocorticosteroids,  and the absence of uveitis.

  7. Assessment of the Therapeutic Effect of Total Glucosides of Peony for Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yongsong; Yuan, Qiling; Xu, Ke; Zhu, Jialin; Li, Yuanbo; Wu, Xiaoqing; Yang, Le

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common rheumatic disease in children; some clinical trials have reported the effects of total glucosides of peony (TGP) in the treatment of JIA. However, no systematic review has yet been conducted. In this study, we assessed the efficacy and safety in patients with JIA enrolled in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of TGP. We extracted data for studies searched from 8 electronic databases that were searched and also evaluated the methodological quality of the included studies. We assessed the following outcome measures: overall response rate, pain, tender joint count (TJC), swollen joint count (SJC), duration of morning stiffness (DMS), grip strength (GS), rheumatoid factor (RF), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), and adverse effects (AEs) in short term (4–8 weeks), intermediate term (9–26 weeks), and long term (>26 weeks). The final analysis showed that TGP acted as a unique nonbiologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (nonbiologic DMARD), and its therapeutic effects were safe and efficacious for the treatment of JIA with few AEs. However, more high-quality RCTs are needed to confirm these therapeutic effects. PMID:27525026

  8. Improvement of reduced serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein levels in systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients treated with the anti-interleukin-6 receptor monoclonal antibody tocilizumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Shoko; Naruto, Takuya; Miyamae, Takako; Imagawa, Tomoyuki; Mori, Masaaki; Nishimaki, Shigeru; Yokota, Shumpei

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we determined serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) levels in systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA) patients during both the active and the remission phases to investigate how the growth cartilage turnover changed under tocilizumab treatment. Specimens were collected from 201 healthy children under 16 years of age with no growth impairment, and paired sera were collected from 11 sJIA patients treated with tocilizumab. Disease activity was assessed from white blood cell count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, and ferritin, and the COMP concentration was determined by sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Serum COMP concentrations were found independent of age, and the mean value in healthy children was 17.74+/-5.6 U/L. The mean serum COMP in sJIA patients during the active phase was 10.75+/-3.9 U/L, lower than that of healthy children. The mean serum COMP in the remission phase (14.89+/-3.9 U/L) was significantly higher than that in the active period (P<0.05). These results suggested that in sJIA patients, a reduced serum COMP concentration is a useful marker of active disease and growth impairment, and that the growth cartilage turnover suppressed during the active phase is improved in the remission phase under tocilizumab treatment.

  9. Pixel-by-pixel analysis of DCE-MRI curve shape patterns in knees of active and inactive juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemke, Robert; Lavini, Cristina; Maas, Mario; Nusman, Charlotte M.; Berg, J.M. van den; Schonenberg-Meinema, Dieneke; Kuijpers, Taco W.; Dolman, Koert M.; Rossum, Marion A.J. van

    2014-01-01

    To compare DCE-MRI parameters and the relative number of time-intensity curve (TIC) shapes as derived from pixel-by-pixel DCE-MRI TIC shape analysis between knees of clinically active and inactive juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients. DCE-MRI data sets were prospectively obtained. Patients were classified into two clinical groups: active disease (n = 43) and inactive disease (n = 34). Parametric maps, showing seven different TIC shape types, were created per slice. Statistical measures of different TIC shapes, maximal enhancement (ME), maximal initial slope (MIS), initial area under the curve (iAUC), time-to-peak (TTP), enhancing volume (EV), volume transfer constant (K trans ), extravascular space fractional volume (V e ) and reverse volume transfer constant (k ep ) of each voxel were calculated in a three-dimensional volume-of-interest of the synovial membrane. Imaging findings from 77 JIA patients were analysed. Significantly higher numbers of TIC shape 4 (P = 0.008), median ME (P = 0.015), MIS (P = 0.001) and iAUC (P = 0.002) were observed in clinically active compared with inactive patients. TIC shape 5 showed higher presence in the clinically inactive patients (P = 0.036). The pixel-by-pixel DCE-MRI TIC shape analysis method proved capable of differentiating clinically active from inactive JIA patients by the difference in the number of TIC shapes, as well as the descriptive parameters ME, MIS and iAUC. (orig.)

  10. Readout-segmented multi-shot diffusion-weighted MRI of the knee joint in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Alexander; Li, Mengxia; Holl-Wieden, Annette; Pabst, Thomas; Neubauer, Henning

    2017-10-12

    Diffusion-weighted MRI has been proposed as a new technique for imaging synovitis without intravenous contrast application. We investigated diagnostic utility of multi-shot readout-segmented diffusion-weighted MRI (multi-shot DWI) for synovial imaging of the knee joint in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Thirty-two consecutive patients with confirmed or suspected JIA (21 girls, median age 13 years) underwent routine 1.5 T MRI with contrast-enhanced T1w imaging (contrast-enhanced MRI) and with multi-shot DWI (RESOLVE, b-values 0-50 and 800 s/mm 2 ). Contrast-enhanced MRI, representing the diagnostic standard, and diffusion-weighted images at b = 800 s/mm 2 were separately rated by three independent blinded readers at different levels of expertise for the presence and the degree of synovitis on a modified 5-item Likert scale along with the level of subjective diagnostic confidence. Fourteen (44%) patients had active synovitis and joint effusion, nine (28%) patients showed mild synovial enhancement not qualifying for arthritis and another nine (28%) patients had no synovial signal alterations on contrast-enhanced imaging. Ratings by the 1st reader on contrast-enhanced MRI and on DWI showed substantial agreement (κ = 0.74). Inter-observer-agreement was high for diagnosing, or ruling out, active arthritis of the knee joint on contrast-enhanced MRI and on DWI, showing full agreement between 1st and 2nd reader and disagreement in one case (3%) between 1st and 3rd reader. In contrast, ratings in cases of absent vs. little synovial inflammation were markedly inconsistent on DWI. Diagnostic confidence was lower on DWI, compared to contrast-enhanced imaging. Multi-shot DWI of the knee joint is feasible in routine imaging and reliably diagnoses, or rules out, active arthritis of the knee joint in paediatric patients without the need of gadolinium-based i.v. contrast injection. Possibly due to "T2w shine-through" artifacts, DWI does not reliably

  11. Systemic onset juveniile chronic arthritis (JCA) in a Nigerian boy: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA) is a chronic arthritis affecting children below age of 16 years. The systemic onset subgroup is also known as Still's disease. There are several distinct subgroups. There is paucity of literature of this disease entity in our environment due to under diagnosis of the disease. Method: ...

  12. Long-Term Health-Related Quality of Life in German Patients with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis in Comparison to German General Population

    OpenAIRE

    Barth, Swaantje; Haas, Johannes-Peter; Schlichtiger, Jenny; Molz, Johannes; Bisdorff, Betty; Michels, Hartmut; Hügle, Boris; Radon, Katja

    2016-01-01

    Objective Aims of the study were to investigate health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in adult patients with former diagnosis of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA), to compare their HRQOL with the general population and to identify factors related to a poor outcome. Methods In 2012, a cross-sectional survey was performed by mailing a questionnaire to a large cohort of former and current patients of the German Centre for Rheumatology in Children and Adolescents. Only adult patients (?18 year...

  13. Rheumatoid Arthritis-Associated Interstitial Lung Disease and Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis: Shared Mechanistic and Phenotypic Traits Suggest Overlapping Disease Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulin, Francisco; Doyle, Tracy J; Fletcher, Elaine A; Ascherman, Dana P; Rosas, Ivan O

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of clinically evident interstitial lung disease in patients with rheumatoid arthritis is approximately 10%. An additional 33% of undiagnosed patients have interstitial lung abnormalities that can be detected with high-resolution computed tomography. Rheumatoid arthritis-interstitial lung disease patients have three times the risk of death compared to those with rheumatoid arthritis occurring in the absence of interstitial lung disease, and the mortality related to interstitial lung disease is rising. Rheumatoid arthritis-interstitial lung disease is most commonly classified as the usual interstitial pneumonia pattern, overlapping mechanistically and phenotypically with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, but can occur in a non-usual interstitial pneumonia pattern, mainly nonspecific interstitial pneumonia. Based on this, we propose two possible pathways to explain the coexistence of rheumatoid arthritis and interstitial lung disease: (i) Rheumatoid arthritis-interstitial lung disease with a non-usual interstitial pneumonia pattern may come about when an immune response against citrullinated peptides taking place in another site (e.g. the joints) subsequently affects the lungs; (ii) Rheumatoid arthritis-interstitial lung disease with a usual interstitial pneumonia pattern may represent a disease process in which idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis-like pathology triggers an immune response against citrullinated proteins that promotes articular disease indicative of rheumatoid arthritis. More studies focused on elucidating the basic mechanisms leading to different sub-phenotypes of rheumatoid arthritis-interstitial lung disease and the overlap with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis are necessary to improve our understanding of the disease process and to define new therapeutic targets.

  14. Cross-cultural adaptation, reliability, and validity of the Turkish version of PedsQL 3.0 Arthritis Module: a quality-of-life measure for patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarakci, E; Baydogan, S N; Kasapcopur, O; Dirican, A

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the cultural adaptation, validity, and reliability of a Turkish version of the pediatric quality-of-life inventory (PedsQL) 3.0 Arthritis Module in a population with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). A total of 169 patients with JIA and their parents were enrolled in the study. The Turkish version of the childhood health assessment questionnaire (CHAQ) was used to evaluate the validity of related domains in the PedsQL 3.0 Arthritis Module. Both the PedsQL 3.0 Arthritis Module and CHAQ were filled out by children over 8 years of age and by the parents of children 2-7 years of age. Internal reliability was poor to excellent (Cronbach's alpha coefficients 0.56-0.84 for self-reporting and 0.63-0.82 for parent reporting), and interobserver reliability varied from good to excellent (intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) 0.79-0.91 for self-reporting and 0.80-0.88 for parent reporting) for the total scores of the PedsQL 3.0 Arthritis Module. Parent-child concordance for all scores was moderate to excellent (ICC 0.42-0.92). The PedsQL 3.0 Arthritis Module and CHAQ were highly positively correlated, with coefficients from 0.21 to 0.76, indicating concurrent validity. We demonstrated the reliability and validity of quality-of-life measurement using the Turkish version of the PedsQL 3.0 Arthritis Module in our sociocultural context. The PedsQL 3.0 Arthritis Module can be utilized as a tool for the evaluation of quality of life in patients with JIA aged 2-18 years.

  15. Repeated exposure to antibiotics in infancy: a predisposing factor for juvenile idiopathic arthritis or a sign of this group's greater susceptibility to infections?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvonen, Miika; Virta, Lauri J; Pokka, Tytti; Kröger, Liisa; Vähäsalo, Paula

    2015-03-01

    Previous exposure to antibiotics has been associated with the pathogenesis of several autoimmune diseases. Our objective was to explore whether childhood exposure to antibiotics would be associated with the risk of developing juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). The material was collected from national registers containing all children born in 2000-2010 in Finland and diagnosed with JIA by the end of December 2012 (n = 1298) and appropriate controls (n = 5179) matched for age, sex, and place of birth. All purchases of antibiotics were collected from birth until the index date (i.e., the date of special reimbursement for JIA medications). A conditional logistic regression was performed to evaluate the association between the exposure to antibiotics and the risk of JIA. The risk of JIA increased with the number of antibiotic purchases from birth to the index date: for ≥ 1 purchases versus none, OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.3-1.9 with an upward trend in OR (p Antibiotic groups lincosamides and cephalosporins showed the strongest association with JIA (OR 6.6, 95% CI 3.7-11.7, and OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.4-1.8, respectively). Overall exposure to antibiotics before 2 years of age was associated with an increased risk of JIA (OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.2-1.6), with the trend test of OR (p antibiotics may predispose individuals to develop JIA. Alternatively, the apparent association may reflect shared susceptibility to infections and JIA.

  16. ASSESSMENT OF THE QUALITY OF LIFE OF PATIENTS WITH THE JUVENILE IDIOPATHIC ARTHRITIS TREATED BY THE ETANERCEPT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Fetisova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To assess the influence of the genetically engineered biologic drug etanercept on the quality of life of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA. Patients and methods: The research included 85 children with poly-and oligoarticular variant of the JIA at the age of 5 (2; 17 years. The assessment of the quality of life of patients was carried out by means of the parental version of a special questionnaireCHAQ (Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire, Health Utilities Index Mark 3 (HUI3 questionnaire. The doctor and parents of the patient also assessed the global activity of the illness by the 100-mm visual analog scale (VAS before the etanercept prescription and in 1, 6 and 12 months. All patients before the etanercept prescription received immunodepressants. Results: Fast dynamics of the increase of an average point of the quality of life (the response in 1 month after the therapy beginning was noted by the attributes of a questionnaire of HUI3 «emotions» — from 0.82 (± 0.18 to 0.90 (± 0.13, p =0.001, «cognitive abilities» — from 0.85 (± 0.17 to 0.91 (± 0.18, p =0.006, and «pain» — from 0.78 (± 0.23 to 0.91 (± 0.1, p < 0.001. In 12 months of the treatment the average point of the quality of life raised also by such attributes as «locomotivity» — from 0.85 (± 0.3 to 0.99 (± 0.06, p < 0.0001, and «fine motor skills» — from 0.9 (± 0.19 to 0.98 (± 0.05, p < 0.001. Conclusion: Treatment with the etanercept provided the improvement of the quality of life of children with the JIA and their families, improvement of physical activity and emotional state of patients.Key words: children, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, etanercept, quality of life, Health Utilities Index Mark 3.

  17. Treatment of Cushing's disease in juveniles with intestinal pituitary irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassar, J.; Doyle, F.H.; Mashiter, K.; Joplin, G.F.

    1979-01-01

    Nine juvenile patients (five boys and four girls aged 10-18) with Cushing's disease were treated with pituitary implantation of 198 Au and/or 90 Y. No patient had any surgical complication from this procedure. At the latest assessment. 3 months to 17 years after operation, Cushing's disease was in remission in all the patients; the response time following operation was a few days to 3 months. Radiology of the pituitary fossa at time of pituitary implantation was normal in all patients and remains so. The final height in six patients is 149-172 cm (59-67.5 inches) and three patients who continue to grow have increased by 13.6 and 3 cm since implantation. Only one patient required full pituitary hormone replacement therapy, and he had been previously treated by external irradiation, and one other patient failed to complete puberty. In all the other seven sexual maturation is normal and one has fathered two children. It is concluded that pituitary implantation with interstitial irradiation is a satisfactory form of treatment for Cushing's disease in juveniles. (author)

  18. Experience of Parenteral Administration of Methotrexate in a Female Patient Suffering from Early Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis and Uveitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Т. V. Sleptsova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Represented here is a case of early juvenile idiopathic arthritis associated with uveitis diagnosed in a three-year-old female patient subject to treatment with the standard methotrexate dosage. At the initial stage of treatment, the child demonstrated severe articular syndrome, inflammatory reactions affecting eyeball surfaces, increased laboratory indicators of the illness and functional insufficiency. Successful overcoming of methotrexate resistance through dosage increased up to 20 mg/m2 of body surface per week was described. Over three months of subcutaneous methotrexate treatment with a 15 mg/m2-per-week dose, the child showed milder joint exudation an, arthralgia, less lengthy morning stiffness, although there was no 50% improvement based on ACRpedi criteria, and uveitis was first recognized in the subactive phase. The dose was increased up to 20 mg/m2 per week. By the eighth week of methotrexate treatment, uveal inflammation reversed. Non-active phase and remission were detected in 6 and 12 months respectively. The remission has persisted for 6 years. No side effects have been observed throughout methotrexate treatment. 

  19. Methotrexate for uveitis associated with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: value and requirement for additional anti-inflammatory medication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiligenhaus, A; Mingels, A; Heinz, C; Ganser, G

    2007-01-01

    To study the value of methotrexate (MTX) and the requirement for additional anti-inflammatory drugs for the treatment of severe chronic iridocyclitis associated with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Institutional study of 35 consecutive patients with JIA started on MTX as the single systemic immunosuppressive drug for the treatment of associated iridocyclitis. The clinical epidemiologic data, course of visual acuity (VA), development of complications, and the need for additional anti-inflammatory drugs were analyzed. Mean follow-up with MTX treatment was 27.6 months. Uveitic complications were present in 31 patients before MTX treatment. With MTX, quiescence of uveitis was obtained with (n=21) or without (n=4) additional topical steroids. Additional systemic immunosuppressive drugs were required in another 7 patients: cyclosporine A (n=4), azathioprine (n=1), infliximab (n=1), or etanercept (n=1). Three patients had active uveitis at the end of the follow-up period. During MTX therapy, uveitis first developed in the unaffected fellow eyes in 2 patients, and secondary glaucoma or ocular hypertension occurred in 7 patients. The VA deteriorated in 6, improved in 13, and was stable in the remaining eyes. The data suggest that MTX is very effective in controlling inflammation of uveitis in patients with JIA. However, additional topical steroids or systemic immunosuppressive drugs are often required.

  20. Effects of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis on Kinematics and Kinetics of the Lower Extremities Call for Consequences in Physical Activities Recommendations

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    M. Hartmann

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA patients (n=36 with symmetrical polyarticular joint involvement of the lower extremities and healthy controls (n=20 were compared concerning differences in kinematic, kinetic, and spatio-temporal parameters with 3D gait analysis. The aims of this study were to quantify the differences in gait between JIA patients and healthy controls and to provide data for more detailed sport activities recommendations. JIA-patients showed reduced walking speed and step length, strongly anterior tilted pelvis, reduced maximum hip extension, reduced knee extension during single support phase and reduced plantar flexion in push off. Additionally the roll-off procedure of the foot was slightly decelerated. The reduced push off motion in the ankle was confirmed by lower peaks in ankle moment and power. The gait of JIA-patients can be explained as a crouch-like gait with hyperflexion in hip and knee joints and less plantar flexion in the ankle. A preventive mobility workout would be recommendable to reduce these restrictions in the future. Advisable are sports with emphasis on extension in hip, knee, and ankle plantar flexion.

  1. Poncet's disease: Reactive arthritis accompanying tuberculosis. Two case reports and a review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.-J.A. Kroot (Eric-Jan); J.M.W. Hazes (Mieke); E.M. Colin (Edgar); R.J.E.M. Dolhain (Radboud)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractObjective. Reactive arthritis (ReA) in tuberculosis (TB) is known as Poncet's disease. It is a rare aseptic form of arthritis observed in patients with active TB. We present two such patients and review the literature on Poncet's disease. Methods. Two patients who were identified with

  2. Prevalência de anticorpos contra peptídeos cíclicos citrulinados na artrite idiopática juvenil The prevalence of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra H. Machado

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Avaliar a presença de anticorpos contra peptídeos cíclicos citrulinados em uma coorte de pacientes com artrite idiopática juvenil. MÉTODOS: A presença de anticorpos contra peptídeos cíclicos citrulinados foi avaliada por ensaio imunoenzimático (ELISA no soro de pacientes com artrite idiopática juvenil com idade inferior a 18 anos, acompanhados no ambulatório de reumatologia pediátrica do Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, com tempo de diagnóstico de doença de, no mínimo, 6 meses. Também foi estudada a presença do fator reumatóide IgM e do fator antinuclear em células Hep-2 RESULTADOS: Foram analisadas amostras séricas de 45 pacientes com artrite idiopática juvenil. A presença de títulos elevados de anticorpos contra peptídeos cíclicos citrulinados foi encontrada somente no soro de uma criança (2%, a qual apresentava quadro de poliartrite com fator reumatóide reagente. CONCLUSÕES: O anticorpo contra peptídeos cíclicos citrulinados pode ser detectado em crianças com artrite idiopática juvenil, mas em freqüência muito inferior aos adultos com artrite reumatóide. Torna-se importante avaliar se anticorpos contra peptídeos cíclicos citrulinados podem identificar os pacientes com artrite idiopática juvenil com potencial de evolução para artrite reumatóide do adulto.OBJECTIVES: To assess the presence of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies in a cohort of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. METHODS: Anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies was tested for with an enzyme linked immunoabsorbent assay (ELISA in serum samples of patients from the Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, all less than 18 years old and with previous diagnosis for at least 6 months. IgMRF (rheumatoid factor and antinuclear antibodies in Hep-2 cells were also assayed. RESULTS: Serum samples were analyzed from 45 patients. The presence of high levels of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies was found

  3. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of ... Hopkins Rheumatology Arthritis Center Lupus Center Lyme Disease Clinical Research Center Myositis Center Scleroderma Center Sjogren’s Syndrome ...

  4. O papel dos inibidores do fator de necrose tumoral no tratamento da artrite idiopática juvenil The role of tumor necrosis factor inhibitors in the treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Martin

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available A artrite idiopática juvenil (AIJ é uma doença crônica que pode evoluir para uma incapacidade permanente, necessitando muitas vezes de tratamento agressivo. Enquanto alguns pacientes não respondem ao metotrexato ou imunossupressores, outros não os toleram. Nestes casos, o uso dos inibidores de fator de necrose tumoral (TNF ou anti-TNF é indicado. Conforme demonstrado por estudos multicêntricos e randomizados, o etanercepte apresenta eficácia no controle da doença, com efeito máximo nos primeiros três meses e até dois anos de tratamento contínuo. Não há publicação de estudos controlados com o infliximabe nem com o adalimumabe, mas seus efeitos parecem ser semelhantes aos do etanercepte. Estes agentes são relativamente seguros, podendo ser observadas complicações infecciosas, como a tuberculose e o herpes zoster. Raramente, podem ocorrer eventos auto-imunes, linfoproliferativos e sintomas gerais, como febre e cefaléia. No entanto, é importante salientar que apesar dos inibidores do TNF serem benéficos para muitas crianças com AIJ refratária, seus efeitos colaterais a longo prazo permanecem indefinidos, de forma que sua indicação deve ser criteriosa. Ademais, o alto custo destas drogas limita seu uso, especialmente em nosso país.Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA is a chronic disease that may result in permanent disability, requiring sometimes aggressive treatment. While some patients may have an inadequate response to methotrexate and to other immunosuppressive drugs, others do not tolerate them. In these patients tumor necrosis factor inhibitors such as etanercept, infliximab and adalimumab are indicated. Multicentric and randomized studies have shown that etanercept is efficacious in disease control, reaching best effects within the first three months of therapy with sustained clinical improvement up to two years of continuous treatment. There are no published controlled studies involving children receiving

  5. Paediatric rheumatology: clinical practice review. Physiotherapy and occupational therapy for juvenile chronic arthritis: custom and practice in five centres in the UK, USA and Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackett; Johnson; Parkin; Southwood

    1996-07-01

    Physiotherapy and occupational therapy are widely accepted as being of central importance for the treatment of juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA). However, these approaches have rarely been subject to critical scrutiny. The aims of this report are to highlight some of the inter-centre similarities and differences observed in the implementation of physical and occupational therapy for JCA, and to emphasize the need for scientifically controlled research in this area. During a series of visits to several paediatric rheumatology units in the UK, USA and Canada, three aspects of the service were noted: treatment philosophy, physical interventions used for the treatment of JCA and quality-of life and independence training activities. There was general consensus with the philosophy that early physical intervention was a vital part of the treatment plan for JCA, although all therapists were concerned that compliance with treatment modalities was poor. Differences between units in the approach to acute arthritis, the use of foot othoses and wrist splints, the treatment of joint contractures and the use of general quality-of-life training activities were noted. Although it was widely recognized that controlled research into the efficacy of physical intervention was needed, no centre had a co-ordinated plan for such investigations. Keywords: Juvenile chronic arthritis, Physiotherapy, Occupational therapy

  6. Leflunomide is associated with a higher flare rate compared to methotrexate in the treatment of chronic uveitis in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bichler, J; Benseler, S M; Krumrey-Langkammerer, M; Haas, J-P; Hügle, B

    2015-01-01

    Chronic anterior uveitis is a serious complication of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA); disease flares are highly associated with loss of vision. Leflunomide (LEF) is used successfully for JIA joint disease but its effectiveness in uveitis has not been determined. The aim of this study was to determine whether LEF improves flare rates of uveitis in JIA patients compared to preceding methotrexate (MTX) therapy. A single-centre retrospective study of consecutive children with JIA and chronic anterior uveitis was performed. All children initially received MTX and were then switched to LEF. Demographic, clinical, and laboratory data, dose and duration of MTX and LEF therapy, concomitant medications and rate of anterior uveitis flares, as determined by an expert ophthalmologist, were obtained. Flare rates were compared using a generalized linear mixed model with a negative binomial distribution. A total of 15 children were included (80% females, all antinuclear antibody positive). The median duration of MTX therapy was 51 (range 26-167) months; LEF was given for a median of 12 (range 4-47) months. Anti-tumour necrosis factor (anti-TNF-α) co-medication was given to four children while on MTX. By contrast, LEF was combined with anti-TNF-α treatment in six children. On MTX, JIA patients showed a uveitis flare rate of 0.0247 flares/month, while LEF treatment was associated with a significantly higher flare rate of 0.0607 flares/month (p = 0.008). Children with JIA had significantly more uveitis flares on LEF compared to MTX despite receiving anti-TNF-α co-medication more frequently. Therefore, LEF may need to be considered less effective in controlling chronic anterior uveitis.

  7. The family journey-to-diagnosis with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a cross-sectional study of the changing social media presence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modica, Renee F; Lomax, Kathleen Graham; Batzel, Pamela; Shapardanis, Leah; Katzer, Kimberly Compton; Elder, Melissa E

    2016-01-01

    Children with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (SJIA) often encounter a delay between symptom onset and disease diagnosis, partly due to the broad differential of fever and lack of symptom recognition by providers. Families often seek multiple medical opinions and post on social media about their frustrations. This linguistic analysis observed the changing language patterns and social media posting behaviors of parents in the time leading to, during, and after SJIA diagnosis. Public social media sites were manually reviewed by a linguistic team to evaluate posts about SJIA from US-based parents. A total of 3,979 posts between July 2001 and January 2015 were reviewed from 108 sites. Pre-SJIA diagnosis parents sought answers and shared status updates on social media, focusing primarily on the following three site types: alternative/natural lifestyle forums (39%), Facebook (27%), and disease-specific forums (17%). Posts during early prediagnosis phases were characterized by expressive language showing confidence in health care providers and trust in parental instincts. At later prediagnosis stages, parents continued to use social media, but the posts demonstrated increased frustration with delays in diagnosis and gaps in communication with providers. More objective symptom descriptions and a greatly reduced child-centered emotional focus were observed as parents shifted into caregiving roles. Once the diagnosis of SJIA was confirmed, parents used straightforward, less expressive language, and Facebook (47%) to make "announcement" posts and increased their use of SJIA websites (30%). With treatment initiation, the posts demonstrated a slow return of expressive language and an increased parental understanding of the "new normal". Parents use different language styles, frames of reference, and websites before and after SJIA diagnosis. Gaps in parent-provider communication, especially before diagnosis, and their new roles as caregivers lead to parental use of social

  8. Development of the Digital Arthritis Index, a Novel Metric to Measure Disease Parameters in a Rat Model of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A. Lim

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite a broad spectrum of anti-arthritic drugs currently on the market, there is a constant demand to develop improved therapeutic agents. Efficient compound screening and rapid evaluation of treatment efficacy in animal models of rheumatoid arthritis (RA can accelerate the development of clinical candidates. Compound screening by evaluation of disease phenotypes in animal models facilitates preclinical research by enhancing understanding of human pathophysiology; however, there is still a continuous need to improve methods for evaluating disease. Current clinical assessment methods are challenged by the subjective nature of scoring-based methods, time-consuming longitudinal experiments, and the requirement for better functional readouts with relevance to human disease. To address these needs, we developed a low-touch, digital platform for phenotyping preclinical rodent models of disease. As a proof-of-concept, we utilized the rat collagen-induced arthritis (CIA model of RA and developed the Digital Arthritis Index (DAI, an objective and automated behavioral metric that does not require human-animal interaction during the measurement and calculation of disease parameters. The DAI detected the development of arthritis similar to standard in vivo methods, including ankle joint measurements and arthritis scores, as well as demonstrated a positive correlation to ankle joint histopathology. The DAI also determined responses to multiple standard-of-care (SOC treatments and nine repurposed compounds predicted by the SMarTRTM Engine to have varying degrees of impact on RA. The disease profiles generated by the DAI complemented those generated by standard methods. The DAI is a highly reproducible and automated approach that can be used in-conjunction with standard methods for detecting RA disease progression and conducting phenotypic drug screens.

  9. Inflammatory Arthritis, Sacroiliitis, and Morphea: Evidence of a Systemic Inflammatory Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Omair, Mohammed A.; Johnson, Sindhu R.

    2013-01-01

    Morphea is a skin disease characterized by local skin inflammation and fibrosis. Extracutaneous manifestations have been described with this disease including inflammatory arthritis. We describe a case of morphea who developed inflammatory polyarthritis and sacroiliitis coincident with new skin lesions.

  10. The effect of genotype on methotrexate polyglutamate variability in juvenile idiopathic arthritis and association with drug response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Mara L; Gaedigk, Roger; van Haandel, Leon; Thomas, Bradley; Lasky, Andrew; Hoeltzel, Mark; Dai, Hongying; Stobaugh, John; Leeder, J Steven

    2011-01-01

    The response to and toxicity of methotrexate (MTX) are unpredictable in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Intracellular polyglutamation of MTX, assessed by measuring concentrations of MTX polyglutamates (MTXGlu), has been demonstrated to be a promising predictor of drug response. Therefore, this study was aimed at investigating the genetic predictors of MTXGlu variability and associations between MTXGlu and drug response in JIA. The study was designed as a single-center cross-sectional analysis of patients with JIA who were receiving stable doses of MTX at a tertiary care children's hospital. After informed consent was obtained from the 104 patients with JIA, blood was withdrawn during routine MTX-screening laboratory testing. Clinical data were collected by chart review. Genotyping for 34 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 18 genes within the MTX metabolic pathway was performed. An ion-pair chromatographic procedure with mass spectrometric detection was used to measure MTXGlu1-7. Analysis and genotyping of MTXGlu was completed in the 104 patients. K-means clustering resulted in 3 distinct patterns of MTX polyglutamation. Cluster 1 had low red blood cell (RBC) MTXGlu concentrations, cluster 2 had moderately high RBC MTXGlu1+2 concentrations, and cluster 3 had high concentrations of MTXGlu, specifically MTXGlu3-5. SNPs in the purine and pyrimidine synthesis pathways, as well as the adenosine pathway, were significantly associated with cluster subtype. The cluster with high concentrations of MTXGlu3-5 was associated with elevated liver enzyme levels on liver function tests (LFTs), and there were higher concentrations of MTXGlu3-5 in children who reported gastrointestinal side effects and had abnormal findings on LFTs. No association was noted between MTXGlu and active arthritis. MTXGlu remains a potentially useful tool for determining outcomes in patients with JIA being treated with MTX. The genetic predictors of MTXGlu variability may also

  11. COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF THE EFFICACY AND SAFETY OF TREATMENT USING ADALIMUMAB IN COMBINATION WITH METHOTREXATE AND METHOTREXATE MONOTHERAPY IN CHILDREN WITH POLYARTICULAR JUVENILE IDIOPATHIC ARTHRITIS IN COMBINATION WITH UVEITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. А. Kel’tsev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA is the most common rheumatic disease in children and it is characterized by a primary lesion of the joints, organs and tissues with the formation of multiple organ failure of varying severity. The article describes the results of studying the efficacy and safety of adalimumab in combination with methotrexate (n = 26 and methotrexate monotherapy (n = 17 when treating the patients with polyarticular JIA and uveitis refractory to the basic immunosuppressive therapy. It was shown that the combination therapy induced the remission of arthritis in children with JIA in a shorter period of time. After 1 year, the disease remission was recorded in 42% of children in the treatment group and in 18% of children in the comparison group, the uveitis remission — in 26 (54% of 48 eyes and 2 (7% of 28 eyes with signs of lesions, respectively. It should be noted that adalimumab in combination with methotrexate was well tolerated and no serious adverse effects were recorded. Thus, the introduction of adalimumab in the treatment regimen of children with JIA and uveitis refractory to the basic immunosuppressive therapy allowed for the rapid disease remission while preserving the effect in a significant number of patients during the following year.

  12. MCID/Low Disease Activity State Workshop: low disease activity state in rheumatoid arthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wells, G.A.; Boers, M.; Shea, B.; Anderson, J.; Felson, D.T.; Johnson, K.; Kirwan, J.; Lassere, M.N.; Robinson, V.; Simon, L.S.; Strand, V.; Riel, P.L.C.M. van; Tugwell, P.S.

    2003-01-01

    The MCID (minimal clinically important difference) module of OMERACT 5 developed a research agenda that led to the conclusion that a state of low disease activity for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) would need to be defined. To develop such a definition the various concepts and terminologies, the process

  13. Ottawa Panel Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines for Foot Care in the Management of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosseau, Lucie; Toupin-April, Karine; Wells, George; Smith, Christine A; Pugh, Arlanna G; Stinson, Jennifer N; Duffy, Ciarán M; Gifford, Wendy; Moher, David; Sherrington, Catherine; Cavallo, Sabrina; De Angelis, Gino; Loew, Laurianne; Rahman, Prinon; Marcotte, Rachel; Taki, Jade; Bisaillon, Jacinthe; King, Judy; Coda, Andrea; Hendry, Gordon J; Gauvreau, Julie; Hayles, Martin; Hayles, Kay; Feldman, Brian; Kenny, Glen P; Li, Jing Xian; Briggs, Andrew M; Martini, Rose; Feldman, Debbie Ehrmann; Maltais, Désirée B; Tupper, Susan; Bigford, Sarah; Bisch, Marg

    2016-07-01

    To create evidence-based guidelines evaluating foot care interventions for the management of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). An electronic literature search of the following databases from database inception to May 2015 was conducted: MEDLINE (Ovid), EMBASE (Ovid), Cochrane CENTRAL, and clinicaltrials.gov. The Ottawa Panel selection criteria targeted studies that assessed foot care or foot orthotic interventions for the management of JIA in those aged 0 to ≤18 years. The Physiotherapy Evidence Database scale was used to evaluate study quality, of which only high-quality studies were included (score, ≥5). A total of 362 records were screened, resulting in 3 full-text articles and 1 additional citation containing supplementary information included for the analysis. Two reviewers independently extracted study data (intervention, comparator, outcome, time period, study design) from the included studies by using standardized data extraction forms. Directed by Cochrane Collaboration methodology, the statistical analysis produced figures and graphs representing the strength of intervention outcomes and their corresponding grades (A, B, C+, C, C-, D+, D, D-). Clinical significance was achieved when an improvement of ≥30% between the intervention and control groups was present, whereas P>.05 indicated statistical significance. An expert panel Delphi consensus (≥80%) was required for the endorsement of recommendations. All included studies were of high quality and analyzed the effects of multidisciplinary foot care, customized foot orthotics, and shoe inserts for the management of JIA. Custom-made foot orthotics and prefabricated shoe inserts displayed the greatest improvement in pain intensity, activity limitation, foot pain, and disability reduction (grades A, C+). The use of customized foot orthotics and prefabricated shoe inserts seems to be a good choice for managing foot pain and function in JIA. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation

  14. Successful treatment of methotrexate intolerance in juvenile idiopathic arthritis using eye movement desensitization and reprocessing - treatment protocol and preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höfel, Lea; Eppler, Bruno; Storf, Magdalena; Schnöbel-Müller, Elizabeth; Haas, Johannes-Peter; Hügle, Boris

    2018-02-13

    Methotrexate (MTX), commonly used in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), frequently has to be discontinued due to intolerance with anticipatory and associative gastrointestinal adverse effects. Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) is a psychological method where dysfunctional experiences and memories are reprocessed by recall combined with bilateral eye movements. The objective of this study was to assess efficacy of EMDR for treatment of MTX intolerance in JIA patients. We performed an open prospective study on consecutive JIA patients with MTX intolerance. Intolerance was determined using the Methotrexate Intolerance Severity Score (MISS) questionnaire prior to treatment, directly after treatment and after four months. Health-related quality of life was determined using the PedsQL prior to and four months after treatment. Patients were treated according to an institutional EMDR protocol with 8 sessions over two weeks. Changes in MISS and PedsQL were analyzed using non-parametric statistics. Eighteen patients with MTX intolerance (median MISS at inclusion 16.5, IQR = 11.75-20.25) were included. Directly after treatment, MTX intolerance symptoms were significantly improved (median MISS 1 (IQR = 0-2). After four months, median MISS score was at 6.5 (IQR = 2.75-12.25, p = 0.001), with 9/18 patients showing MISS scores ≥6. Median PedsQL after 4 months improved significantly from 77.6% to 85.3% (p = 0.008). MTX intolerance in children with JIA was effectively treated using an EMDR protocol, with lasting effect over a period of 4 months. EMDR treatment can potentially increase quality of life of affected patients and enable continued MTX treatment.

  15. Th1-Induced CD106 Expression Mediates Leukocytes Adhesion on Synovial Fibroblasts from Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggi, Laura; Margheri, Francesca; Luciani, Cristina; Capone, Manuela; Rossi, Maria Caterina; Chillà, Anastasia; Santarlasci, Veronica; Mazzoni, Alessio; Cimaz, Rolando; Liotta, Francesco; Maggi, Enrico; Cosmi, Lorenzo; Del Rosso, Mario; Annunziato, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that subsets of human T helper cells can orchestrate leukocyte adhesion to synovial fibroblasts (SFbs), thus regulating the retention of leukocytes in the joints of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients. Several cell types, such as monocytes/macrophages, granulocytes, T and B lymphocytes, SFbs and osteoclasts participate in joint tissue damage JIA. Among T cells, an enrichment of classic and non-classic Th1 subsets, has been found in JIA synovial fluid (SF), compared to peripheral blood (PB). Moreover, it has been shown that IL-12 in the SF of inflamed joints mediates the shift of Th17 lymphocytes towards the non-classic Th1 subset. Culture supernatants of Th17, classic and non-classic Th1 clones, have been tested for their ability to stimulate proliferation, and to induce expression of adhesion molecules on SFbs, obtained from healthy donors. Culture supernatants of both classic and non-classic Th1, but not of Th17, clones, were able to induce CD106 (VCAM-1) up-regulation on SFbs. This effect, mediated by tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, was crucial for the adhesion of circulating leukocytes on SFbs. Finally, we found that SFbs derived from SF of JIA patients expressed higher levels of CD106 than those from healthy donors, resembling the phenotype of SFbs activated in vitro with Th1-clones supernatants. On the basis of these findings, we conclude that classic and non-classic Th1 cells induce CD106 expression on SFbs through TNF-α, an effect that could play a role in leukocytes retention in inflamed joints.

  16. The many shades of enhancement: timing of post-gadolinium images strongly influences the scoring of juvenile idiopathic arthritis wrist involvement on MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieter, Jasper F.M.M.; Nusman, Charlotte M.; Hemke, Robert; Maas, Mario [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Tanturri de Horatio, Laura [Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesu, Department of Radiology, Rome (Italy); Ording Mueller, Lil-Sofie [Oslo University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Oslo (Norway); Avenarius, Derk F.M. [Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Tromsoe, Tromsoe (Norway); Rossum, Marion A.J. van [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Emma Children' s Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Malattia, Clara [Ospedale Pediatrico Gaslini, Department of Paediatrics, Genoa (Italy); Rosendahl, Karen [Haukeland University Hospital, Radiology Department, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Bergen (Norway); University of Bergen, Department of Clinical Medicine, K1, Bergen (Norway)

    2016-10-15

    Potential long-term side effects of treatment for juvenile idiopathic arthritis are concerning. This has necessitated accurate tools, such as MRI, to monitor treatment response and allow for personalized therapy. To examine the extent to which timing of post-contrast MR images influences the scoring of inflammatory change in the wrist in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. We studied two sets of post-contrast 3-D gradient echo MRI series of the wrist in 34 children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. These images were obtained immediately after administration of intravenous contrast material and again after approximately 10 min. The dataset was drawn from a prospective multicenter project conducted 2006-2010. We assessed five wrist locations for synovial enhancement, effusion and overall inflammation. Examinations were scored by one radiologist in two sessions - the first was based on the early post-contrast images, and the later session, for which the previous findings were masked, was based on the later post-contrast images. Fifty-two of the 170 locations (30.6%) received a higher synovial enhancement score based on the late post-contrast images as compared to the early images. Sixty of the 170 (35%) locations received a higher total inflammation score. The mean scores of synovial enhancement and total inflammation were significantly higher when based on the late post-contrast images as compared to the early post-contrast images. An MRI-based scoring system for the presence and degree of synovitis should be based on a standardized MR-protocol with a fixed interval between intravenous contrast injection and post-contrast images. (orig.)

  17. Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) associated interstitial lung disease (ILD).

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Dwyer, David N

    2013-10-01

    Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is the most common Connective Tissue Disease (CTD) and represents an increasing burden on global health resources. Interstitial lung disease (ILD) has been recognised as a complication of RA but its potential for mortality and morbidity has arguably been under appreciated for decades. New studies have underscored a significant lifetime risk of ILD development in RA. Contemporary work has identified an increased risk of mortality associated with the Usual Interstitial Pneumonia (UIP) pattern which shares similarity with the most devastating of the interstitial pulmonary diseases, namely Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF). In this paper, we discuss recent studies highlighting the associated increase in mortality in RA-UIP. We explore associations between radiological and histopathological features of RA-ILD and the prognostic implications of same. We emphasise the need for translational research in this area given the growing burden of RA-ILD. We highlight the importance of the respiratory physician as a key stakeholder in the multidisciplinary management of this disorder. RA-ILD focused research offers the opportunity to identify early asymptomatic disease and define the natural history of this extra articular manifestation. This may provide a unique opportunity to define key regulatory fibrotic events driving progressive disease. We also discuss some of the more challenging and novel aspects of therapy for RA-ILD.

  18. Long-Term Health-Related Quality of Life in German Patients with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis in Comparison to German General Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swaantje Barth

    Full Text Available Aims of the study were to investigate health-related quality of life (HRQOL in adult patients with former diagnosis of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA, to compare their HRQOL with the general population and to identify factors related to a poor outcome.In 2012, a cross-sectional survey was performed by mailing a questionnaire to a large cohort of former and current patients of the German Centre for Rheumatology in Children and Adolescents. Only adult patients (≥18 years with a diagnosis compatible with JIA were included (n = 2592; response 66%. The questionnaire included information about HRQOL (EQ5D, disease-related questions and socio-demographics. Prevalence and 95% confidence intervals (CI of problems with mobility, self-care, usual activities, pain and anxiety/depression were standardized to the German general population. Factors associated with low HRQOL in JIA patients were identified using logistic regression models.Sixty-two percent of the study population was female; age range was 18-73 years. In all dimensions, JIA patients reported statistically significantly more problems than the general population with largest differences in the pain dimension (JIA patients 56%; 95%CI 55-58%; general population 28%; 26-29% and the anxiety/depression dimension (28%; 27-29% vs. 4%; 4-5%. Lower HRQOL in JIA patients was associated with female sex, older age, lower level of education, still being under rheumatic treatment and disability.HRQOL in adult JIA patients is considerably lower than in the general population. As this cohort includes historic patients the new therapeutic schemes available today are expected to improve HRQOL in future.

  19. Long-Term Health-Related Quality of Life in German Patients with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis in Comparison to German General Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Swaantje; Haas, Johannes-Peter; Schlichtiger, Jenny; Molz, Johannes; Bisdorff, Betty; Michels, Hartmut; Hügle, Boris; Radon, Katja

    2016-01-01

    Aims of the study were to investigate health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in adult patients with former diagnosis of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA), to compare their HRQOL with the general population and to identify factors related to a poor outcome. In 2012, a cross-sectional survey was performed by mailing a questionnaire to a large cohort of former and current patients of the German Centre for Rheumatology in Children and Adolescents. Only adult patients (≥18 years) with a diagnosis compatible with JIA were included (n = 2592; response 66%). The questionnaire included information about HRQOL (EQ5D), disease-related questions and socio-demographics. Prevalence and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of problems with mobility, self-care, usual activities, pain and anxiety/depression were standardized to the German general population. Factors associated with low HRQOL in JIA patients were identified using logistic regression models. Sixty-two percent of the study population was female; age range was 18-73 years. In all dimensions, JIA patients reported statistically significantly more problems than the general population with largest differences in the pain dimension (JIA patients 56%; 95%CI 55-58%; general population 28%; 26-29%) and the anxiety/depression dimension (28%; 27-29% vs. 4%; 4-5%). Lower HRQOL in JIA patients was associated with female sex, older age, lower level of education, still being under rheumatic treatment and disability. HRQOL in adult JIA patients is considerably lower than in the general population. As this cohort includes historic patients the new therapeutic schemes available today are expected to improve HRQOL in future.

  20. Influence of polymorphisms within the methotrexate pathway genes on the toxicity and efficacy of methotrexate in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagimachi, Masakatsu; Naruto, Takuya; Hara, Takuma; Kikuchi, Masako; Hara, Ryoki; Miyamae, Takako; Imagawa, Tomoyuki; Mori, Masaaki; Kaneko, Tetsuji; Morita, Satoshi; Goto, Hiroaki; Yokota, Shumpei

    2011-02-01

    We investigated whether several polymorphisms within the methotrexate (MTX) pathway genes were related to the toxicity and efficacy of MTX in 92 Japanese patients with articular-type juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Eight gene polymorphisms within the MTX pathway genes, namely, RFC, BCRP, MTHFR (two), FPGS, γ-glutamyl hydrolase (GGH; two) and ATIC, were genotyped using TaqMan assays. Liver dysfunction was defined as an increase in alanine transaminase to five times the normal upper limit. Non-responders to MTX were defined as patients refractory to MTX and were therefore treated with biologics. The non-TT genotype at GGH T16C was associated with a high risk of liver dysfunction (P=0.028, odds ratio=6.90, 95% confidence interval 1.38-34.5), even after adjustment for the duration of MTX treatment. A longer interval from disease onset to treatment (8.5 and 21.3 months, P=0.029) and rheumatoid factor positivity (P=0.026, odds ratio=2.87, 95% confidence interval 1.11-7.39) were associated with lower efficacy of MTX. The non-TT genotype at GGH T16C was associated with a high risk of liver dysfunction, presumably because the C allele of GGH C16T may reduce the activity of GGH. The time interval before MTX treatment and rheumatoid factor positivity were associated with the efficacy of MTX treatment. The pharmacogenetics of the MTX pathway genes affects the toxicity and efficacy of MTX in Japanese JIA patients. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  1. Features of Onset and Clinical Course of Reactive Arthritis in Children

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    I.S. Lebets

    2013-09-01

    Results. Reactive arthritis of chlamydial etiology is characterized by lesion of large and medium-sized joints of the lower limbs, which is often accompanied by short-term morning stiffness and rapid onset of transient hypomyatrophy. Reiter’s disease may develop rarely. Mycoplasma-induced reactive arthritis is characterized by debut with arthritis of knee, ankle, wrist and small joints of the hand, the development of bursitis and hypomyatrophy. Feature of Ureaplasma arthritis is the formation of bursitis in the heel and tendinitis. Reactive arthritis associated with elevated titers to antistreptolysin O differs with polymorphism of articular syndrome manifestations and, to some extent, of similarity with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. Unspecified reactive arthritis has a number of the general features with others reactive arthritis and it is characterized by rather benign clinical course, long preservation of joints function and low laboratory activity. Relapse rate of reactive arthritis increases with an increase of duration of illness.

  2. Association of neopterin as a marker of immune system activation and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis activity

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    Mones M. Abu Shady

    2015-07-01

    Conclusion: The elevation of plasma neopterin concentrations in early JIA patients may indicate stimulation of immune response. Serum neopterin can be used as a sensitive marker for assaying background inflammation and disease activity score in JIA patients.

  3. Biological therapy and development of neoplastic disease in patients with juvenile rheumatic disease: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Patricia L. Pereira

    Full Text Available Abstract Juvenile rheumatic diseases affect the musculoskeletal system and begin before the age of 18. These conditions have varied, identifiable or unknown etiologies, but those of an autoimmune inflammatory nature have been associated with an increased risk of development of cancer, regardless of treatment. This study aims to assess, through a systematic review of the literature according to Prisma (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses quality criteria, the risk of cancer in patients with juvenile rheumatic disease, and its association with biological agents. The criteria described by the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology initiative were used in order to assess the methodological quality of those individual items selected in this study. We analyzed nine publications, from a total of 251 papers initially selected. There was an increase in cancer risk in the population with juvenile rheumatic disease versus the general population. Most specified cancers were of a lymphoproliferative nature. Seven studies did not specify the treatment or not defined an association between treatment and cancer risk. Only one study has suggested this association; in it, their authors observed high risk in patients diagnosed in the last 20 years, a period of the advent of new therapies. One study found an increased risk in a population not treated with biological agents, suggesting a disease in its natural course, and not an adverse effect of therapy. Studies have shown an increased risk of malignancy associated with juvenile rheumatic disease, and this may be related to disease activity and not specifically to the treatment with biological agents.

  4. Changes in Soluble CD18 in Murine Autoimmune Arthritis and Rheumatoid Arthritis Reflect Disease Establishment and Treatment Response.

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    Tue Wenzel Kragstrup

    Full Text Available In rheumatoid arthritis (RA immune activation and presence of autoantibodies may precede clinical onset of disease, and joint destruction can progress despite remission. However, the underlying temporal changes of such immune system abnormalities in the inflammatory response during treat-to-target strategies remain poorly understood. We have previously reported low levels of the soluble form of CD18 (sCD18 in plasma from patients with chronic RA and spondyloarthritis. Here, we study the changes of sCD18 before and during treatment of early RA and following arthritis induction in murine models of rheumatoid arthritis.The level of sCD18 was analyzed with a time-resolved immunoflourometric assay in 1 plasma from early treatment naïve RA patients during a treat-to-target strategy (the OPERA cohort, 2 plasma from chronic RA patients, 3 serum from SKG and CIA mice following arthritis induction, and 4 supernatants from synovial fluid mononuclear cells (SFMCs and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from 6 RA patients cultured with TNFα or adalimumab.Plasma levels of sCD18 were decreased in chronic RA patients compared with early RA patients and in early RA patients compared with healthy controls. After 12 months of treatment the levels in early RA patients were similar to healthy controls. This normalization of plasma sCD18 levels was more pronounced in patients with very early disease who achieved an early ACR response. Plasma sCD18 levels were associated with radiographic progression. Correspondingly, the serum level of sCD18 was decreased in SKG mice 6 weeks after arthritis induction compared with healthy littermates. The sCD18 levels in both SKG and CIA mice exhibited a biphasic course after arthritis induction with an initial increase above baseline followed by a decline. Shedding of CD18 from RA SFMC and RA PBMC cultures was increased by TNFα and decreased by adalimumab.The plasma sCD18 levels were altered in patients with RA, in mice

  5. Pentosidine in synovial fluid in osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis: relationship with disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J R; Takahashi, M; Suzuki, M; Kushida, K; Miyamoto, S; Inoue, T

    1998-12-01

    Pentosidine is an advanced glycation endproduct formed by glycosylation and oxidation. Our aim was to develop a means to measure pentosidine in synovial fluid (SF), and to compare its concentration in SF in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and to investigate the relationship between its concentration in SF and the disease activity of RA. SF was collected from knee joints in 31 patients with RA and 40 with OA, who had hydrarthrosis. One patient with RA and 7 with OA who had the complication of diabetes mellitus or chronic renal failure made up the DM/CRF group, and the remaining patients made up the RA group (n = 30) and the OA group (n = 33). Pentosidine was measured by the direct HPLC method with column switching after hydrolysis of SF. Pentosidine was detected in all SF and was greater in RA (83.9 +/- 46.0 nmol/l, mean +/- SD) than in OA (40.1 +/- 19.6 nmol/l). Three DM/CRF patients undergoing hemodialysis had markedly high pentosidine levels (482.5 +/- 280.8 nmol/l). There was a significant correlation between pentosidine and C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and Lansbury Index (p Patients with RA were divided into high and low activity groups according to the CRP and Lansbury Index. Pentosidine was significantly higher in the high activity group (CRP > or = 2.0 mg/dl and Lansbury Index > or = 50%) than in the low activity group (CRP < 2.0 and/or Lansbury Index < 50) (100.9 +/- 42.8 vs 58.5 +/- 39.6 nmol/; p = 0.0013). Pentosidine in synovial fluid was higher in RA than in OA. Pentosidine levels in SF were related to the disease activity in RA.

  6. Interleukin-23 in early disease development in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas; Hvid, M; Johansen, C

    2015-01-01

    randomized to methotrexate (MTX) plus adalimumab (ADA; n = 75) or MTX plus placebo-ADA (PLA; n = 76). Plasma samples were obtained at baseline and at months 3, 6, and 12 together with values for C-reactive protein (CRP), the 28-joint Disease Activity Score based on CRP (DAS28CRP), scores on the Clinical......OBJECTIVES: To investigate the levels of interleukin (IL)-23 in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (eRA) and the effect of anti-tumour necrosis factor (anti-TNF)-α treatment on IL-23 levels. METHOD: Treatment-naïve eRA patients from the OPERA cohort were included (n = 151). Patients were...... Disease Activity Index (CDAI) and the Simplified Disease Activity Index (SDAI), visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain/fatigue/physician global and total Sharp/van der Heijde score (TSS). IL-23 was measured at each time point. RESULTS: IL-23 levels decreased significantly in the ADA group from 20.6 pg...

  7. Role of Diet in Influencing Rheumatoid Arthritis Disease Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badsha, Humeira

    2018-01-01

    Background: Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) frequently ask their doctors about which diets to follow, and even in the absence of advice from their physicians, many patients are undertaking various dietary interventions. Discussion: However, the role of dietary modifications in RA is not well understood. Several studies have tried to address these gaps in our understanding. Intestinal microbial modifications are being studied for the prevention and management of RA. Some benefits of vegan diet may be explained by antioxidant constituents, lactobacilli and fibre, and by potential changes in intestinal flora. Similarly, Mediterranean diet shows anti-inflammatory effects due to protective properties of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and vitamins, but also by influencing the gut microbiome. Gluten-free and elemental diets have been associated with some benefits in RA though the existing evidence is limited. Long-term intake of fish and other sources of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids are protective for development of RA. The benefits of fasting, anti-oxidant supplementation, flavanoids, and probiotics in RA are not clear. Vitamin D has been shown to influence autoimmunity and specifically decrease RA disease activity. The role of supplements such as fish oils and vitamin D should be explored in future trials to gain new insights in disease pathogenesis and develop RA-specific dietary recommendations. Conclusion: Specifically more research is needed to explore the association of diet and the gut microbiome and how this can influence RA disease activity. PMID:29515679

  8. Leisure in Children and Adolescents with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallo, Sabrina; April, Karine Toupin; Grandpierre, Viviane; Majnemer, Annette; Feldman, Debbie Ehrmann

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review is to describe participation in social and physical leisure activities among children and adolescents with JIA, as well as identify potential determinants of leisure participation. Methods Electronic databases were systematically searched for articles published up until June 2013 pertaining to participation in leisure activities among youth with JIA and other rheumatic diseases. Studies were included if they measured involvement in either social or physical leisure activities. Selection and quality appraisal of articles were completed independently by two authors. Results Eight hundred and ninety-three articles were found through electronic and reference search. One hundred and nine full articles were reviewed to assess for eligibility. Twelve articles met inclusion criteria and findings were reviewed. Most focused on describing participation in physical rather than social activities. Results suggest that youth with JIA participated less in both social and physical leisure activities as compared to healthy peers, and those with JIA did not meet national recommendations for physical activity. Potential determinants of leisure participation were socio-demographic (age, sex), anthropometric (height, weight) and disease-related (JIA subtype, disease duration, pain, number of swollen or painful joints, stiffness, fatigue, well-being) factors. Conclusion Characterization of leisure activity remains limited and mostly focused on physical activity in JIA. Assessment of more comprehensive outcome measures is warranted to obtain a better description of leisure in this population. Evidence of the influence of contextual factors as potential determinants of involvement in leisure among children with pediatric rheumatologic diseases is needed. PMID:25329390

  9. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis in a patient with previous diagnosis of severe congenital lupus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rotstein Grein, I. H.; Armbrust, W.; van der Molen, A. M.; van Royen-Kerkhof, A.

    Neonatal lupus (NL) is an acquired autoimmune disease of the newborn, caused by transplacental passage of the maternal autoantibodies anti SS-A/Ro and anti SS-B/La. When the clinical picture starts directly at birth, it is known as congenital lupus (CL). The clinical manifestations are variable.

  10. EFFECT OF INFLIXIMAB ON DYNAMICS OF FUNCTIONAL CLASS AND RADIOLOGICAL SIGN OF BONE AND CARTILAGINOUS TISSUES ALTERATION OF JOINTS IN PATIENTS WITH DIFFERENT TYPES OF JUVENILE ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.I. Alexeeva

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available An objective of this trial was evaluation of effect of treatment with blocker of tumor necrosis factor infliximab on dynamics of functional class and radiological changes of bone and cartilaginous tissue of joints in children with different clinical types of juvenile arthritis (JA. Infliximab was used according to standard scheme on 0, 2, 6 and then every 8 week by intravenous infusion. Mean single dose of infliximab was 6,8 ± 2,3 mg/kg. All children were treated with immunosuppressive agents (ciclosporin in 6% of patients, methotrexate in 60%, ciclosporin combined with methotrexate — 20%, ciclosporin with leflunomide — 5%, leflunomide with methotreate — 4% combined with anti cytokine treatment. 7 children were treated with oral glucocorticoids in mean dose 0,37 mg/kg daily. disorders in joint function and structural changes of joints of different severity (radiological sign were discovered in all patients before starting of treatment with infliximab. Duration of observation was 6 week — 2 years. Authors made a conclusion that treatment with infliximab prevents progressing of bone and cartilaginous destruction in all types of AJ, not depending on intensity of its clinical activity. This medication provides for full functional recovery of joints and elimination of features of disablement in patients with good clinical activity.Key words: children, juvenile arthritis, infliximab, treatment.

  11. Using Big Data to Evaluate the Association between Periodontal Disease and Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, Michael A; Comer, Angela C; DiRenzo, Dana D; Yesha, Yelena; Rishe, Naphtali D

    2015-01-01

    An association between periodontal disease and rheumatoid arthritis is believed to exist. Most investigations into a possible relationship have been case-control studies with relatively low sample sizes. The advent of very large clinical repositories has created new opportunities for data-driven research. We conducted a retrospective cohort study to measure the association between periodontal disease and rheumatoid arthritis in a population of 25 million patients. We demonstrated that subjects with periodontal disease were roughly 1.4 times more likely to have rheumatoid arthritis. These results compare favorably with those of previous studies on smaller cohorts. Additional work is needed to identify the mechanisms behind this association and to determine if aggressive treatment of periodontal disease can alter the course of rheumatoid arthritis.

  12. Comparing cardiovascular risk factors, disease and treatment in participants with rheumatoid arthritis and without arthritis in a population based study

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O’Driscoll, N

    2017-05-01

    Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is associated with a significant increase in mortality compared to the general population, with cardiovascular disease (CVD) the leading cause of death. The aim of this study is to compare the prevalence and treatment of modifiable CV risk factors and history of CVD in those with RA and those without arthritis in Ireland. Data from the Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA), a population-representative cohort study of people in Ireland aged 50 or over, was used. Participants with RA (n=457) were twice as likely to be obese (OR 2.02, 95% CI 1.99 to 2.06) compared to those without arthritis (n=4,063). Participants with RA were also more likely to be physically inactive (OR 1.73, 95% CI 1.69 to 1.76) and taking antihypertensive medication than those without arthritis. Exercise can have a beneficial impact on CVD and specific interventions to increase physical activity in those with RA may be warranted

  13. Associations between interleukin-10 polymorphisms and susceptibility to juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harsini, Sara; Saghazadeh, Amene; Nedjat, Saharnaz; Rezaei, Nima

    2018-03-01

    Cytokine genes, including interleukin-10 (IL-10), are known to play important roles in the pathogenesis of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). This study aims to determine whether the IL-10 polymorphisms confer susceptibility to JIA. A meta-analysis was performed on the associations between the IL-10 -1082 G/A, -592 C/A, and -819 C/T polymorphisms and JIA. A total number of 7 studies involving 1,785 patients and 6,142 controls were considered in the meta-analysis. Meta-analysis of the IL-10 -592 C/A and -819 C/T polymorphisms showed no association with JIA in the study participants, or in Caucasian or Middle Eastern participants. Meta-analysis of the IL-10 -1082 A allele in all study participants, Caucasian and Middle Eastern, showed significant associations with RA (overall ORs were 1.17, 1.15, and 1.41, respectively). Meta-analysis of the AA versus GG genotype of the IL-10 -1082 G/A polymorphism revealed significant associations with JIA (OR = 3.66, 95% CI = 1.44-9.29, P = 0.006) in participants from Middle Eastern countries. Additionally, meta-analysis of the GG versus AA+GA genotypes of the IL-10 -1082 G/A polymorphism revealed the GG genotype as the protective factor against JIA in the Middle Eastern subgroup (OR = 0.44, 95% CI = 0.20-0.94, P = 0,04). Moreover, meta-analysis of the IL-10 -1082 A allele in 4 studies on Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium showed a significant association with JIA (OR = 1.17, 95% CI = 1.07-1.28, P = 0.0009). No association was found between the IL-10 (-1082, -819, -592) ACC, ATA, and GCC haplotypes and JIA. These results suggest that the IL-10 -1082 G/A polymorphism confers susceptibility to JIA.

  14. Immunization With a Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine in Children With Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Without Systemic Manifestations: a Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina I. Alexeeva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA have an increased risk of being infected. Approximately half of all serious infections in children with JIA are associated with airway involvement.Objective. Our aim was to study the efficacy and safety of the pneumococcal 13-valent conjugate vaccine (PCV in children with JIA.Methods. In a prospective cohort study, 5 groups were formed:  children with JIA in the remission phase on methotrexate therapy  (group 1 or etanercept (group 2, with JIA in the active phase prior  to the appointment of methotrexate (group 3 or etanercept (group  4, control group (conditionally healthy children. 0.5 ml of the 13-valent PCV was administered once subcutaneously during therapy in patients in the remission phase or 3 weeks before the appointment  of methotrexate or etanercept in patients in the active phase. The  main study outcome was the proportion of patients with a protective  ( 40 mg/L level of specific anti-pneumococcal antibodies (anti-SPP IgG to Streptococcus pneumoniae 4 weeks after vaccination. In  addition, we assessed the incidence of infectious events before and  after vaccination as well as changes in the content of a high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, S100 protein, and post-vaccination period.Results. The study included 125 children. Four weeks after  vaccination, the protective level of anti-SPP IgG was established in  21 (84% patients in the 1st, 23 (92% in the 2nd, 22 (88% in the  3rd, 24 (96% in the 4th and 5th groups (p =1.0. Increase in the  concentration of S100 protein and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein  after vaccination was not noted. JIA exacerbation episodes were not  recorded in any patient. After immunization, the total number of infectious events decreased in all observed groups (p 0.001. Serious adverse events were not registered during the study.Conclusion. Vaccination with the 13-valent PCV in children with JIA  is highly effective

  15. Total pubertal growth in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis treated with growth hormone: analysis of a single center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechtold, S; Beyerlein, A; Ripperger, P; Roeb, J; Dalla Pozza, R; Häfner, R; Haas, J P; Schmidt, H

    2012-10-01

    Growth failure is a permanent sequelae in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). The aim of the study was to compare pubertal growth in control and growth hormone (GH) treated JIA subjects. 64 children with JIA at a mean age of 10.38 ± 2.80 years were enrolled and followed until final height (measured in standard deviation (SD) scores). 39 children (20 m) received GH therapy and 24 (9 m) served as controls. GH dose was 0.33 mg/kg/week. Linear regression analysis was performed to identify factors influencing total pubertal growth. Mean total pubertal growth was 21.1 ± 1.3 cm (mean ± SD) in GH treated JIA patients and 13.8 ± 1.5 cm in controls. Final height was significantly higher with GH treatment (-1.67 ± 1.20 SD) compared to controls (-3.20 ± 1.84 SD). Linear regression model identified age at onset of puberty (ß=-4.2,CI: -5.9, -2.6 in controls and ß=-2.3,CI: -3.6, -1.1 in GH treated) as the main factor for total pubertal growth. Final height SDS was determined by the difference to target height at onset of puberty (ß=-0.59;CI: -0.80, -0.37 in controls and ß=-0.30,CI: -0.52, -0.08 in GH treated), age at onset of puberty (ß=0.47;CI:0.02,0.93 in controls and 0.23;CI: -0.00,0.46 in GH treated) and height gain during puberty (ß=0.13;CI:0.05,0.21 in controls and ß=0.11;CI:0.07,0.16 in GH treated). Total pubertal growth in JIA patients treated with GH was increased by a factor of 1.5 greater in comparison to controls leading to a significantly better final height. To maximize final height GH treatment should be initiated early to reduce the height deficit at onset of puberty. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Reduced physical activity in children and adolescents with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis despite satisfactory control of inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Anna-Helene; Nielsen, Susan; Muller, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    proteins may be a cause of vascular damage, but general physical inactivity could be an important contributor. Pain and fatigue are common complaints in patients with JIA and may well lead to an inactive sedentary lifestyle. For this reason we assessed the physical activity (PA) objectively in patients...... minute, cpm) (475.6 vs. 522.7, p = 0.0000018) and in minutes per day spent with cpm >1500 (67.9 vs. 76.4, p = 0.0000014), with cpm >2000 (moderate physical activity) (48.4 vs. 52.8, p = 0.0001, and with cpm >3000 (high physical activity) (24.7 vs. 26.5, p = 0.00015). A negative association (β = -0.213, p...... = 0.014) between active disease in weight bearing joints and high physical activity remained the only significant association between disease related factors and PA. Of the girls 19% and of the boys 45% (vs. 39% and 61% in the reference group) met standards set by Danish Health Authorities for daily...

  17. Temporomandibular joint involvement in a cohort of patients with Juvenile Idiopatic Arthritis and evaluation of the effect induced by functional orthodontic appliance: clinical and radiographic investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portelli, M; Matarese, G; Militi, A; Logiudice, G; Nucera, R; Lucchese, A

    2014-03-01

    The aim of the study was to assess possible correlations between the clinical parameters of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthritis and pathologic MRI findings of the TMJ in patients affected by juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), and the effect of a functional orthodontic therapy on the evolution of TMJ disorders. A prospective clinical and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) investigation was conducted on a sample of 53 patients (41 female, 12 male) with JIA, treated for 24 months with an Andresen appliance. The involvement of TMJ was defined by clinical and radiological signs. NMR assessments were performed in closed and maximum opening mouth position before (T0) and at the end of functional orthodontic therapy (T1). Fifteen patients showed physical and radiologic TMJ abnormalities. Changes were not uniformly distributed among the different JIA subtypes. Patients with poliarticular JIA (≥5 peripheral joints affected) showed more destructive bony changes. No correlation existed between clinical symptoms and NMR alterations. Approximately one half of the patients experienced significant improvement of the TMJ and muscular pain using the Andresen appliance. The prevalence of TMJ involvement in patients suffering of JIA, and the improvement of TMJ and muscular pain associated with the use of functional appliance found in the present study, suggest an alert for TMJ dysfunction in patients with JIA and demonstrate the utility of functional orthodontic therapy in preventing the morbidities associated with TMJ arthritis in JIA.

  18. A Qualitative Study of Fitness Instructors' Experiences Leading an Exercise Program for Children with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutzal, Carolyn E.; Wright, F. Virginia; Stephens, Samantha; Schneiderman-Walker, Jane; Feldman, Brian M.

    2009-01-01

    Children with arthritis face challenges when they try to increase their physical activity. The study's objective was to identify elements of a successful community-based exercise program for children with arthritis by investigating the perspectives of fitness instructors who led the program. This qualitative study used a phenomenological approach.…

  19. Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this research; and the dissemination of information on research progress in these diseases. Contact Us NIAMS Archive Viewers and Players Social Media Moderation Policy FOIA Privacy Statement Accessibility Disclaimer Digital Strategy ...

  20. A biopsychosocial investigation of pediatric chronic pain with special focus on juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomholt, Johanne Jeppesen

    was still a problem for a subgroup of children, though they were in remission with biological agents. More focus on pain management is needed. Pain management was addressed in study 3, where a cognitive behavioral therapy program was developed and evaluated in a waitlist-controlled trial with children...... as a chronic pain diagnosis, and the pain is caused by the inflammations in the joint. The amount of pain experienced by a child with JIA may be modulated by psychological, social, and biological factors. The general purpose of the present thesis is twofold. First, the purpose is to investigate biopsychosocial...... increased quality of life, reductions in anxiety levels and pain catastrophizing, and improvements in adaptive pain cognitions; the latter were expressed as strengthened beliefs in the ability to control pain and self-efficacy. After controlling for disease activity, no differences between the intervention...

  1. 2016 Classification criteria for macrophage activation syndrome complicating systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis : A European league against Rheumatism/American college of Rheumatology/Paediatric rheumatology international trials organisation collaborative initiative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ravelli, Angelo; Minoia, Francesca; Davì, Sergio; Horne, Anna Carin; Bovis, Francesca; Pistorio, Angela; Aricò, Maurizio; Avcin, Tadej; Behrens, Edward M.; De Benedetti, Fabrizio; Filipovic, Lisa; Grom, Alexei A.; Henter, Jan Inge; Ilowite, Norman T.; Jordan, Michael B.; Khubchandani, Raju; Kitoh, Toshiyuki; Lehmberg, Kai; Lovell, Daniel J.; Miettunen, Paivi; Nichols, Kim E.; Ozen, Seza; Schmid, Jana Pachlopnik; Ramanan, Athimalaipet V.; Russo, Ricardo; Schneider, Rayfel; Sterba, Gary; Uziel, Yosef; Wallace, Carol; Wouters, Carine; Wulffraat, Nico; Demirkaya, Erkan; Brunner, Hermine I.; Martini, Alberto; Ruperto, Nicolino; Cron, Randy Q.

    2016-01-01

    To develop criteria for the classification of macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) in patients with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). A multistep process, based on a combination of expert consensus and analysis of real patient data, was conducted. A panel of 28 experts was first asked to

  2. Retrospective Cohort Study of Effectiveness and Safety of Adalimumab Use in Children with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis in the Republic of Bashkortostan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Maliyevskiy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Methotrexate is the first-line drug for treating patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA. If it is ineffective or intolerable, prescription of genetically engineered biopharmaceuticals is indicated. Objective: The study was aimed at assessing effectiveness and safety of genetically engineered biopharmaceutical adalimumab for treating children with J