WorldWideScience

Sample records for justice collaborative model

  1. Advancing the Interdisciplinary Collaborative Health Team Model: Applying Democratic Professionalism, Implementation Science, and Therapeutic Alliance to Enact Social Justice Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    This essay reframes the interdisciplinary collaborative health team model by proposing the application of 3 foundational pillars-democratic professionalism, implementation science, and therapeutic alliance to advance this practice. The aim was to address challenges to the model, enhance their functional capacity, and explicate and enact social justice practices to affect individual health outcomes while simultaneously addressing health inequities. The pillars are described and examples from the author's dissertation research illustrate how the pillars were used to bring about action. Related theories, models, and frameworks that have negotiation, capacity building, collaboration, and knowledge/task/power sharing as central concepts are presented under each of the pillars.

  2. Models of distributive justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Jonathan

    2007-01-01

    Philosophical disagreement about justice rages over at least two questions. The most immediate is a substantial question, concerning the conditions under which particular distributive arrangements can be said to be just or unjust. The second, deeper, question concerns the nature of justice itself. What is justice? Here we can distinguish three views. First, justice as mutual advantage sees justice as essentially a matter of the outcome of a bargain. There are times when two parties can both be better off by making some sort of agreement. Justice, on this view, concerns the distribution of the benefits and burdens of the agreement. Second, justice as reciprocity takes a different approach, looking not at bargaining but at the idea of a fair return or just price, attempting to capture the idea of justice as equal exchange. Finally justice as impartiality sees justice as 'taking the other person's point of view' asking 'how would you like it if it happened to you?' Each model has significantly different consequences for the question of when issues of justice arise and how they should be settled. It is interesting to consider whether any of these models of justice could regulate behaviour between non-human animals.

  3. Parental involvement with the criminal justice system and the effects on their children: a collaborative model for researching vulnerable families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akesson, Bree; Smyth, J McGregor; Mandell, Donald J; Doan, Thao; Donina, Katerina; Hoven, Christina W

    2012-01-01

    Despite the existing body of research examining the effects of imprisonment on incarcerated adults, as of yet, there is no solid empirical evidence for understanding the effects of parental involvement with the criminal justice system involvement (CJSI) on children and families. Accordingly, Columbia University-New York State's Child Psychiatric Epidemiology Group (CPEG), supported by a strong collaboration with The Bronx Defenders, a holistic public defender providing free legal representation, is conducting a longitudinal study examining the effects of parental involvement with the criminal justice system on this population. The study aims to understand, over time, the impact of parental CJSI on their children's mental health, including the effects of the collateral legal damage of CJSI (such as eviction and deportation), substance use, the development of risky behaviors leading to the child's potential involvement with the criminal justice system, as well as protective factors and identification of potential intervention points, which has the ability to inform public policy.

  4. The Environmental Justice Collaborative Problem-Solving Cooperative Agreement Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Environmental Justice Collaborative Problem-Solving (CPS) Cooperative Agreement Program provides financial assistance to eligible organizations working on or planning to work on projects to address local environmental and/or public health issues

  5. Organizational Justice and Collaboration Among Nurses as Correlates of Violent Assaults by Patients in Psychiatric Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekurinen, Virve Maaret; Välimäki, Maritta; Virtanen, Marianna; Salo, Paula; Kivimäki, Mika; Vahtera, Jussi

    2017-05-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that poor organizational justice and collaboration among nurses are associated with increased stress among nurses, which, in turn, increases the likelihood of violent assaults by patients. A cross-sectional survey was conducted of nurses in 90 psychiatric inpatient wards in five hospital districts and one regional hospital in Finland. A total of 758 nurses (registered nurses or enrolled/mental health nurses) responded to the survey. Self-administered postal questionnaires were used to assess organizational justice, collaboration, nurses' stress, and violent assaults by patients. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used in model testing. SEM did not support a role for stress in mediating between organizational justice, collaboration between nurses, and violent assaults by patients, given that stress levels were not dependent to a significant degree on organizational justice, nor were patients' assaults dependent on stress levels. However, low organizational justice and poor collaboration between nurses were associated with increased reports of violent assaults by patients in psychiatric inpatient settings (pcollaboration between staff members, and violent assaults by patients are linked in psychiatric inpatient settings. Evaluating a variety of factors, including issues related to organizational justice and collaboration among nurses, may be useful to minimize assaults by patients in psychiatric settings.

  6. Stop, Collaborate, and Listen: Lessons Learned from Collaborating with a Houston Environmental Justice Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, C.; Arellano, Y.; Phartiyal, P.

    2016-12-01

    Scientists are increasingly showing interest in conducting research at the community level, yet community groups often struggle with lack of access to scientific information. Collaborations between the two are mutually beneficial: scientists can include assessment of societal implications in their research, and community-specific scientific evidence can be used by local groups to inform public decisions that benefit community interests. Recognizing the need for and utility of such partnerships, the Center for Science and Democracy at the Union of Concerned Scientists, a science-based policy and advocacy organization, partnered with Texas Environmental Justice Advocacy Services (TEJAS), an environmental justice organization based in Manchester in Houston, to provide the technical support and resources needed to strengthen TEJAS' advocacy work. Working closely with TEJAS, we connected community members with local experts, developed educational products to inform community members about environmental health risks in their neighborhoods, published a report highlighting chemical safety issues in the community, and assisted in constructing a community survey to assess residents' health concerns. The products were created with the intention of raising the profile of these issues with local government and regional EPA officials. This talk will discuss the projects done in collaboration with TEJAS, as well as important lessons learned that offer insight into best practices for other organizations and technical experts to partner with community groups on local projects.

  7. PERLINDUNGAN HUKUM TERHADAP JUSTICE COLLABORATOR TERKAIT PENANGANAN TINDAK PIDANA KORUPSI DI INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rika Ekayanti

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The discussion in this thesis raised regarding Legal Protection against Justice Collaborator in the handling of corruption in Indonesia. The objectives of this study are to be analyzed with both forms of regulation and identify the type of protection provided by the laws of the State of Indonesia justice collaborator and determine the accuracy of the strength of the evidential value of the testimony in the trial of a justice collaborator, by analyzing the legal provisions in the legislation other law relating to witnesses. This type of research is used in a scientific journal this is the kind of normative legal research, because there is disharmony norm based research in the form of a legal vacuum regarding the setting justice collaborator in formal laws and regulations in Indonesia, as well as the legal ambiguities in the text of the legislation on Article 10 paragraph (2 Law No.. 13 of 2006 on the Protection of Witnesses and Victims of the justice collaborator testimony that can be used as consideration to give the judge for leniency. Having regard to the development of the current law that requires courage and willingness of law enforcement in combating corruption as an extraordinary crime, it is necessary to break the law through the use of an instrument justice collaborator.

  8. The Growth of Higher Educators for Social Justice: Collaborative Professional Development in Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molly K. Ness, PhD

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we investigate what happened when, contrary to the typical isolation of faculty in higher education, a group of higher educators from various disciplines in a graduate school of education met regularly to discuss issues related to our teaching and social justice. More specifically, we explored the following research question: How does collaboration among higher educators from various disciplines shape their beliefs and practices of teaching for social justice? Over three years of collaboration and conversation, not only did we expand our own knowledge and understandings of notions of social justice, but we began to take important steps towards increasing our social justice actions in our teaching. This article explores our efforts to create a self-directed professional development group of higher educators and provides suggestions for similarly interested higher educators.

  9. Health, Traffic, and Environmental Justice: Collaborative Research and Community Action in San Francisco, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciammas, Charlie; Seto, Edmund; Bhatia, Rajiv; Rivard, Tom

    2009-01-01

    Health impacts on neighborhood residents from transportation systems can be an environmental justice issue. To assess the effects of transportation planning decisions, including the construction of an intraurban freeway, on residents of the Excelsior neighborhood in southeast San Francisco, PODER (People Organizing to Demand Environmental and Economic Rights), a local grassroots environmental justice organization; the San Francisco Department of Public Health; and the University of California, Berkeley, collaborated on participatory research. We used our findings regarding traffic-related exposures and health hazards in the area to facilitate community education and action to address transportation-related health burdens on neighborhood residents. PMID:19890147

  10. COLLABORATIVE (PARTNERSHIP AS A FORM OF "RESTORATIVE JUSTICE" IN CONFLICT RESOLUTION FOREST RESOURCES MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Surono

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Conflict management of forest resources among communities around forest areas often occur in various regions, particularly in some national parks and forest management as Perhutani in Java and Inhutani outside Java. These conflicts indicate the forest resources management has not effectively made a positive impact in improving communities welfare around forest areas. Although the provisions of Article 3 in conjunction with Article 68 of Law No. 41 of 1999 on Forestry, provide the basis for communities around the forest rights of forest areas, but in reality there are still people around forest areas that do not enjoy such rights and it is this which often leads to conflicts in the management of forest resources. In the event of conflict, the solution can be done collaboratively (partnership which is one form of restorative justice is an alternative dispute resolution (ADR. Keywords: collaborative, conflict, restorative justice, forest resources.

  11. Rewarded delation in Spain: instruments for the promotion of collaboration with justice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Ortiz

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available There are two classical debates in Spain, referred to the attribution or not of the investigating phase to the Prosecution Office, and the introduction of the discretionary power (principle of opportunity in our Justice system. Besides them, there is a new legal debate about the convenience of articulating legal measures that encourage the collaboration with the justice, and especially, the confessions and denunciations of criminal repentants, as instruments that would favor the obtaining of valuable information and sources of evidence, especially referred to white-collar crime. This study exposes the different legal figures used currently in Spain as incentives to reward the delation of collaborators, witnesses and defendants, and examines its evolution with a view to their future incorporation into the Spanish procedural law.

  12. Collaborative Hierarchical Sparse Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Sprechmann, Pablo; Sapiro, Guillermo; Eldar, Yonina C

    2010-01-01

    Sparse modeling is a powerful framework for data analysis and processing. Traditionally, encoding in this framework is done by solving an l_1-regularized linear regression problem, usually called Lasso. In this work we first combine the sparsity-inducing property of the Lasso model, at the individual feature level, with the block-sparsity property of the group Lasso model, where sparse groups of features are jointly encoded, obtaining a sparsity pattern hierarchically structured. This results in the hierarchical Lasso, which shows important practical modeling advantages. We then extend this approach to the collaborative case, where a set of simultaneously coded signals share the same sparsity pattern at the higher (group) level but not necessarily at the lower one. Signals then share the same active groups, or classes, but not necessarily the same active set. This is very well suited for applications such as source separation. An efficient optimization procedure, which guarantees convergence to the global opt...

  13. Special Justice for Peace: A Transitional Justice Model According to Modern Tendencies and Orientations of Law and Justice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Arturo Gómez Pavajeau

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses the constitutional implications of the peace agreement about Colombia’s armed conflict. It examines constitutional rules and international instruments about human rights, confronting the agreement with justice criteria in the national and international context, to underline the role of justice for the definitive solution of the conflict. By using the methodology of opposing concepts, it reviews the implications of formal justice and material justice, to establish the superiority of the last one and it’s relation with social justice; it analyses the differences between individual justice and global justice, to demonstrate the need to obtain an integral justice; it contrasts alternative justice and traditional justice, to propose an integrated justice; it explains that justice based upon the formal syllogism should be overcome by a justice based upon equity, to obtain a justice anchored in the Constitution, universal and concentrated in the human rights; it hypothesizes that justice supported in the atonement and retribution should be overcome by a justice that is preventive and restorative, that allows the construction of a justice focused in the future, without ignoring the past; it clarifies that justice with one jurisdiction and special justice are the components of a integrative transitional justice; it explains the presence of justice in different institutions with different functions and justice concentrated in one institution, although with different functions, because there is a search for an integrative justice; it exposes the search for a constitutional and political justice, discussing the vision of justice as a triumph of the force or the scandalous concession of benefits; it exalts that it is a justice in search of a positive discrimination, not a negative discrimination, overcoming the discussion between justice for the powerful and justice for the weak; finally, it considers that it is a justice

  14. A Comparison of Four Restorative Conferencing Models. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazemore, Gordon; Umbreit, Mark

    This bulletin focuses on four restorative conferencing models within the juvenile justice system: victim-offender mediation; community reparative boards; family group conferencing; and circle sentencing. The bulletin first describes each of the four restorative justice models, presenting information on background, concept, procedures and goals,…

  15. The Researcher-Practitioner Partnership Study (RPPS): Experiences From Criminal Justice System Collaborations Studying Violence Against Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Tami P; Price, Carolina; McPartland, Tara; Hunter, Bronwyn A; Fisher, Bonnie S

    2016-06-05

    The benefits of researcher-practitioner (R-P) collaborations focused on violence against women (VAW) are many. Such projects support researchers and practitioners working together to create uniquely comprehensive projects that have the potential to change practices, policies, and services. Extant literature is limited in that it has (a) focused on the experiences of a very limited number of collaborations, (b) ignored collaborations conducted in the context of the criminal justice system, and (c) excluded as a focus the products that result from the collaborations and their dissemination. Therefore, the goal of this qualitative study is to identify the essential elements to consider for successful R-P collaborations on VAW research in the criminal justice system.

  16. Contextual Modelling of Collaboration System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wafaa DACHRY

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Faced with new environmental constraints, firms decide to collaborate in collective entities and adopt new patterns of behavior. So, this firms’ collaboration becomes an unavoidable approach. Indeed, our aim interest in our study is to propose a collaborative information system for supply chain. Our proposed platform ensures cooperation and information sharing between partners in real time. In fact, several questions have to be asked: What is the information nature may be shared between partners? What processes are implemented between actors? What functional services are supported by the platform? In order to answer these questions, we present, in this article, our methodological approach of modelling, called CMCS (Contextual Modelling of Collaborative System

  17. Russian Model Of The Administrative Justice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalja I. Jaroshenko

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available On December 25, 2014 it would be twenty-one year since the Constitution of the Russian Federation was adopted on the national referendum on December 12, 1993. During this time, almost all constitutional provisions are implemented. The key point of course was the judicial reform in Russia, launched simultaneously with the adoption of Constitution of the Russian Federation. Adopted the new Civil Procedural Code, Criminal Procedural Code, Arbitration Procedural Code of the Russian Federation, Federal Constitutional Law "On the Constitutional Court of the Russian Federation", Federal Constitutional Law "On the courts of general jurisdiction in Russia", Federal Constitutional Law "On the Supreme Court of the Russian Federation". However, during twenty-one year of Russian Constitution work, the question on establishment of administrative courts in our country has not been resolved. Merger of the Supreme Court and the Supreme Arbitration Court of the Russian Federation, which happened in the year 2014, also shown the need to resolve the status of administrative courts in Russia. Previously submitted to the State Duma of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation the draft of the Federal Constitutional Law "On the Federal Administrative Courts in the Russian Federation" and is on the revision, which does not correspond to changes in the judicial system of the Russian Federation. Despite the failure of the Federal Constitutional Law "On the Federal Administrative Courts in the Russian Federation", in the opinion of the author, and it should be called that way, it Russia has already developed an own model of the Russian administrative justice, which is very specific.

  18. Innovating through collaborative business models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerding, Allan Næs; Kringelum, Louise Tina Brøns

    -ered as a coherent system. The generalization is explicated in terms of different domi-nant market logics in which collaborative efforts can be positioned. Underlying this presentation, the paper argues that business model innovation involves uncertainty to the degree that innovation is based on cooperative efforts......, and that there exists a dialec-tical relationship between sources of selection and sources of survival, which tend to re-inforce one another. This constitutes a new aspect of business model innovation....

  19. Process model patterns for collaborative work

    OpenAIRE

    Lonchamp, Jacques

    1998-01-01

    Colloque avec actes et comité de lecture.; As most real work is collaborative in nature, process model developers have to model collaborative situations. This paper defines generic collaborative patterns, ie, pragmatic and abstract building blocks for modelling recurrent situations. The first part specifies the graphical notation for the solution description. The second part gives some current patterns for the collaborative production of a single document in isolation and for the synchronizat...

  20. Analysis and evaluation of collaborative modeling processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ssebuggwawo, D.

    2012-01-01

    Analysis and evaluation of collaborative modeling processes is confronted with many challenges. On the one hand, many systems design and re-engineering projects require collaborative modeling approaches that can enhance their productivity. But, such collaborative efforts, which often consist of the

  1. The Dimensions of Social Justice Model: Transforming Traditional Group Work into a Socially Just Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratts, Manivong J.; Anthony, Loni; Santos, KristiAnna Nicole T.

    2010-01-01

    Social justice is a complex and abstract concept that can be difficult to discuss and integrate within group work. To address this concern, this article introduces readers to the Dimensions of Social Justice Model. The model provides group leaders with a conceptual framework for understanding the degree to which social justice is integrated within…

  2. Task modeling for collaborative authoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veer, van der Gerrit; Kulyk, Olga; Vyas, Dhaval; Kubbe, Onno; Ebert, Achim; Dittmar, A.; Forbrig, P.

    2011-01-01

    Motivation –Task analysis for designing modern collaborative work needs a more fine grained approach. Especially in a complex task domain, like collaborative scientific authoring, when there is a single overall goal that can only be accomplished only by collaboration between multiple roles, each req

  3. Social and psychological aspects of criminal juvenile justice in the world practice (Anglo-Saxon model of juvenile justice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.S. Oshevsky

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The article is the final part of the review of existing foreign models of juvenile criminal justice system. We analyze the principles of juvenile justice in the criminal trial: protective orientation, personalization and social richness of the trial, the emphasis on educational influences. We present the foreign experience of incorporating social, psychological and clinical special knowledge into specialized justice concerning juvenile offenders. We analyze modern trends in the development of juvenile justice in the United States and Canada. We present material related to methods of risk assessment of re-offending among adolescents. We highlight approaches to complex long-term follow-up of juvenile offenders in Anglo-Saxon juvenile justice. We describe some aspects of the probation service using the method of case management. In the context of the accepted “National Strategy for Action for the Benefit of Children for 2012-2017”, the prospects for the development of specialized criminal justice for young offenders in the Russian Federation are discussed

  4. A Field Study of Participant Reactions to a Developmental Assessment Centre: Testing an organisational justice model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael M Harris

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Although assessment centres are being increasingly employed for developmental purposes, there has been a dearth of research regarding them. We investigated an organisational justice theory model suggested by Cohen-Charash and Spector (2001 in this relatively novel context. The model included antecedents (e.g., perceived validity, organisational justice perceptions (i.e., distributive justice and procedural justice, and one outcome (i.e., feedback utility perceptions. Most of our hypotheses were supported, suggesting much evidence for this model. The predicted effect for perceived fakability was not supported. Contrary to our hypothesis, distributive justice perceptions were at least as important as procedural justice perceptions in predicting feedback utility perceptions. A direct test of the effect of context on organisational justice theory is recommended.

  5. A latent model for collaborative filtering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langseth, Helge; Nielsen, Thomas Dyhre

    2012-01-01

    Recommender systems based on collaborative filtering have received a great deal of interest over the last two decades. In particular, recently proposed methods based on dimensionality reduction techniques and using a symmetrical representation of users and items have shown promising results....... Following this line of research, we propose a probabilistic collaborative filtering model that explicitly represents all items and users simultaneously in the model. Experimental results show that the proposed system obtains significantly better results than other collaborative filtering systems (evaluated...

  6. Addressing Dilemmas of Social Justice Mathematics Instruction through Collaboration of Students, Educators, and Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokka, Kari

    2015-01-01

    Social justice mathematics educators explicitly aim to develop students' sociopolitical consciousness in addition to teaching mathematics content (Gutiérrez 2013; Gutstein 2006). Sociopolitical consciousness refers to Paulo Freire's (1970) concept of "conscientização," or learning to perceive social, political, and economic…

  7. How to Drag with a Worn-Out Mouse? Searching for Social Justice through Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penteado, Miriam Godoy; Skovsmose, Ole

    2009-01-01

    We consider what a concern for social justice in terms of social inclusion might mean for teacher education, both practising and prospective, with particular reference to the use of information and communication technology (ICT) in mathematics education taking place at a borderland school. Our discussion proceeds through the following steps: (1)…

  8. The Growth of Higher Educators for Social Justice: Collaborative Professional Development in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness, Molly K.; George, Marshall A.; Turner, Kristen Hawley; Bolgatz, Jane

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we investigate what happened when, contrary to the typical isolation of faculty in higher education, a group of higher educators from various disciplines in a graduate school of education met regularly to discuss issues related to our teaching and social justice. More specifically, we explored the following research question: How…

  9. How to drag with a worn-out mouse? Searching for social justice through collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penteado, Miriam Godoy; Skovsmose, Ole

    2009-01-01

    We consider what a concern for social justice in terms of social inclusion might mean for teacher education, both practising and prospective, with particular reference to the use of information and communication technology (ICT) in mathematics education taking place at a borderland school. Our...

  10. How to drag with a worn-out mouse? Searching for social justice through collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penteado, Miriam Godoy; Skovsmose, Ole

    2009-01-01

    We consider what a concern for social justice in terms of social inclusion might mean for teacher education, both practising and prospective, with particular reference to the use of information and communication technology (ICT) in mathematics education taking place at a borderland school. Our......, establishing networks, identifying new approaches, moving beyond prototypical research, and getting in contact. This brings us to (5) final considerations, where we return to the notion of social justice....... discussion proceeds through the following steps: (1) We explore what a borderland position might denote to address what social inclusion might mean. (2) We consider the significance of mathematics education and the use of ICT for processes of social inclusion. (3) We briefly refer to the Interlink Network...

  11. Business models of the collaborative economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    Collaborative business models are often equated with disruptive commercial endeavors, epitomized by a handful large global sharing platforms. They represent a certain archetype of business model, extracting profit from market-mediated peer exchanges. A narrow focus on for-profit models obstructs...... coming to terms with the full scope of the collaborative economy phenomena, driven by purposes and actors beyond commercial market domains. This chapter attempts to broaden this perspective by reviewing alternative value creation mechanisms and presents emerging business model archetypes....

  12. A Model for Collaborative Runtime Verification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Testerink, Bas; Bulling, Nils; Dastani, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Runtime verification concerns checking whether a system execution satisfies a given property. In this paper we propose a model for collaborative runtime verification where a network of local monitors collaborates in order to verify properties of the system. A local monitor has only a local view on

  13. A Model for Collaborative Runtime Verification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Testerink, Bas; Bulling, Nils; Dastani, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Runtime verification concerns checking whether a system execution satisfies a given property. In this paper we propose a model for collaborative runtime verification where a network of local monitors collaborates in order to verify properties of the system. A local monitor has only a local view on t

  14. Social Work-Business Sector Collaboration in Pursuit of Economic Justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wonhyung

    2016-07-01

    This article examines social workers' perceptions, experiences, and prospects regarding working in the business sector after participating in an MSW field practicum with a local microlending program. Social workers' insights suggest that cross-sector collaboration leads to vast opportunities not only for the populations served by the collaborative efforts, but also for social work as a profession. However, several challenges are evealed, including social workers' unfamiliarity with business operations, the business sector's narrow understanding of social workers' roles, and divisions between participants in interprofessional collaboration. This article calls for enhancing the role of social work to maximize its impact on economic development through further research and tangible cross-sector projects.

  15. Models for intercultural collaboration and negotiation

    CERN Document Server

    Sycara, Katia; Abbe, Allison

    2013-01-01

    This book bridges the gap in modelling collaboration and negotiation between computational sciences and social sciences. It opens up the field for cross fertilization of ideas and methods in both communities.

  16. Human Centered Hardware Modeling and Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stambolian Damon; Lawrence, Brad; Stelges, Katrine; Henderson, Gena

    2013-01-01

    In order to collaborate engineering designs among NASA Centers and customers, to in clude hardware and human activities from multiple remote locations, live human-centered modeling and collaboration across several sites has been successfully facilitated by Kennedy Space Center. The focus of this paper includes innovative a pproaches to engineering design analyses and training, along with research being conducted to apply new technologies for tracking, immersing, and evaluating humans as well as rocket, vehic le, component, or faci lity hardware utilizing high resolution cameras, motion tracking, ergonomic analysis, biomedical monitoring, wor k instruction integration, head-mounted displays, and other innovative human-system integration modeling, simulation, and collaboration applications.

  17. Exploring the Neural Basis of Fairness: A Model of Neuro-Organizational Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beugre, Constant D.

    2009-01-01

    Drawing from the literature in neuroeconomics, organizational justice, and social cognitive neuroscience, I propose a model of neuro-organizational justice that explores the role of the brain in how people form fairness judgments and react to situations of fairness and/or unfairness in organizations. The model integrates three levels of analysis:…

  18. Exploring the Neural Basis of Fairness: A Model of Neuro-Organizational Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beugre, Constant D.

    2009-01-01

    Drawing from the literature in neuroeconomics, organizational justice, and social cognitive neuroscience, I propose a model of neuro-organizational justice that explores the role of the brain in how people form fairness judgments and react to situations of fairness and/or unfairness in organizations. The model integrates three levels of analysis:…

  19. Virtual Business Collaboration Conceptual Knowledge Model (VBCKM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morcous Massoud Yassa

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Within the context of virtual business collaboration modeling, many pervious works have been accepted to consider some essential virtual business collaborative models. A practical dynamic virtual organization may be a combination of those models and some other elemental features with some modifications to meet the business opportunity requirements. Therefore, some guidelines and rules are needed to help in constructing a practical collaboration model. This work aims to determine the essential features that must be considered in order to automate the creation of dynamic virtual organization. By integrate “Select-and-Modify” approach with “CommonKADS” methodology, the work of this paper propose a strategy-driven approach for virtual business collaboration modeling construction. Also, some generic knowledge-based components have been designed to support this creation, which can increase the flexibility of the knowledge-based approach facilitates future integration. This paper is considered as integration and extension to the recent work “New Federated Collaborative Networked Organization Model (FCNOM”, which has proposed an integrated framework that combines the existed collaborative-networked organization perspectives, as well as, proposes new.

  20. Saving Our Criminal Justice System: The Efficacy of a Collaborative Social Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamatani, Hide; Spjeldnes, Solveig

    2011-01-01

    On a typical day in 2008, 776,573 individuals were behind bars in nearly 3,500 U.S. jails. Yet the potential benefits of social services in achieving lower recidivism rates and successful reintegration are understudied in jail populations. This three-year study investigated the effects of collaboration-based in-jail services and postrelease…

  1. Saving Our Criminal Justice System: The Efficacy of a Collaborative Social Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamatani, Hide; Spjeldnes, Solveig

    2011-01-01

    On a typical day in 2008, 776,573 individuals were behind bars in nearly 3,500 U.S. jails. Yet the potential benefits of social services in achieving lower recidivism rates and successful reintegration are understudied in jail populations. This three-year study investigated the effects of collaboration-based in-jail services and postrelease…

  2. Business models of the collaborative economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    coming to terms with the full scope of the collaborative economy phenomena, driven by purposes and actors beyond commercial market domains. This chapter attempts to broaden this perspective by reviewing alternative value creation mechanisms and presents emerging business model archetypes.......Collaborative business models are often equated with disruptive commercial endeavors, epitomised by a handful large global sharing platforms. They represent a certain archetype of business model, extracting profit from market-mediated peer exchanges. A narrow focus on for-profit models obstructs...

  3. Generative Models for Global Collaboration Relationships

    CERN Document Server

    Ciftcioglu, Ertugrul N; Basu, Prithwish

    2016-01-01

    When individuals interact with each other and meaningfully contribute toward a common goal, it results in a collaboration, as can be seen in many walks of life such as scientific research, motion picture production, or team sports. The artifacts resulting from a collaboration (e.g. papers, movies) are best captured using a hypergraph model, whereas the relation of who has collaborated with whom is best captured via an abstract simplicial complex (SC). In this paper, we propose a generative algorithm GeneSCs for SCs modeling fundamental collaboration relations, primarily based on preferential attachment. The proposed network growth process favors attachment that is preferential not to an individual's degree, i.e., how many people has he/she collaborated with, but to his/her facet degree, i.e., how many maximal groups or facets has he/she collaborated within. Unlike graphs, in SCs, both facet degrees (of nodes) and facet sizes are important to capture connectivity properties. Based on our observation that sever...

  4. Strategic collaboration on business model innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerding, Allan Næs; Kringelum, Louise Tina Brøns

    The present paper focuses on collaboration as a source of hybridization of the market in the case of business model innovation. The basic argument is that while hybridization economizes on transaction costs, it also gives rise to transaction costs. In effect, transaction costs appears...... as a dialectical phenomenon. The argument is illustrated by a narrative of a case of radical business model innovation. The narrative shows how collaborators economize on transaction costs by developing a mutual understanding and shared interpretation of business model innovation, but at the same time gives rise...

  5. A new security model for collaborative environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Deborah [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Lorch, Markus [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Thompson, Mary [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Perry, Marcia [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2003-06-06

    Prevalent authentication and authorization models for distributed systems provide for the protection of computer systems and resources from unauthorized use. The rules and policies that drive the access decisions in such systems are typically configured up front and require trust establishment before the systems can be used. This approach does not work well for computer software that moderates human-to-human interaction. This work proposes a new model for trust establishment and management in computer systems supporting collaborative work. The model supports the dynamic addition of new users to a collaboration with very little initial trust placed into their identity and supports the incremental building of trust relationships through endorsements from established collaborators. It also recognizes the strength of a users authentication when making trust decisions. By mimicking the way humans build trust naturally the model can support a wide variety of usage scenarios. Its particular strength lies in the support for ad-hoc and dynamic collaborations and the ubiquitous access to a Computer Supported Collaboration Workspace (CSCW) system from locations with varying levels of trust and security.

  6. Knowledge Encapsulation Framework for Collaborative Social Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowell, Andrew J.; Gregory, Michelle L.; Marshall, Eric J.; McGrath, Liam R.

    2009-03-24

    This paper describes the Knowledge Encapsulation Framework (KEF), a suite of tools to enable knowledge inputs (relevant, domain-specific facts) to modeling and simulation projects, as well as other domains that require effective collaborative workspaces for knowledge-based task. This framework can be used to capture evidence (e.g., trusted material such as journal articles and government reports), discover new evidence (covering both trusted and social media), enable discussions surrounding domain-specific topics and provide automatically generated semantic annotations for improved corpus investigation. The current KEF implementation is presented within a wiki environment, providing a simple but powerful collaborative space for team members to review, annotate, discuss and align evidence with their modeling frameworks. The novelty in this approach lies in the combination of automatically tagged and user-vetted resources, which increases user trust in the environment, leading to ease of adoption for the collaborative environment.

  7. A latent model for collaborative filtering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langseth, Helge; Nielsen, Thomas Dyhre

    Recommender systems based on collaborative filtering have received a great deal of interest over the last decade. Typically, these types of systems either take a user-centered or an item-centered approach when making recommendations, but by employing only one of these two perspectives we may...... unintentionally leave out important information that could otherwise have improved the recommendations. In this paper, we propose a collaborative filtering model that contains an explicit representation of all items and users. Experimental results show that the proposed system obtains significantly better results...... than other collaborative filtering systems (evaluated on the MovieLens data set). Furthermore, the explicit representation of all users and items allows the model to e.g. make group-based recommendations balancing the preferences of the individual users....

  8. University - industry collaborations: models, drivers and cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrismann, Dominic; Patel, Dhavalkumar

    2015-01-01

    The way academic institutions and pharmaceutical companies have been approaching collaborations has changed significantly in recent years. A multitude of interaction models were tested and critical factors that drive successful collaborations have been proposed. Based on this experience the current consensus in the pharmaceutical industry is to pursue one of two strategies: an open innovation approach to source discoveries wherever they occur, or investing selectively into scientific partnerships that churn out inventions that can be translated from bench to bedside internally. While these strategies may be intuitive, to form and build sustainable relationships between academia and large multinational healthcare enterprises is proving challenging. In this article we explore some of the more testing aspects of these collaborations, approaches that various industrial players have taken and provide our own views on the matter. We found that understanding and respecting each other's organisational culture and combining the intellectual and technological assets to answer big scientific questions accelerates and improves the quality of every collaboration. Upon discussing the prevailing cooperation models in the university - industry domain, we assert that science-driven collaborations where risks and rewards are shared equally without a commercial agenda in mind are the most impactful.

  9. Spy Works: A Collaborative Creative Writing Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Charlotte

    2001-01-01

    Students in a creative writing class at McLean High School (Virginia) were asked to write an original piece of spy fiction. A four-way collaboration model, which utilized the strengths and expertise of a teacher, library media specialist, business partner (the technology division of the CIA), and vendor, provided students with unusual learning…

  10. Model and Simulation for Collaborative VRPSPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Li

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the collaborative vehicle routing problem of multiple distribution centers with simultaneous pickup and delivery considering the constraint of the number of vehicles and vehicle’s work time, and the fairness of routing arrangement. The objective functions include minimizing the number of utilized vehicles, the travel distance, and the standard deviation of maximum load and vehicle’s utilized time. This paper proposes a mutiobjective mathematical programming model to formulate this problem. And a TS algorithm with Lagrangian Relaxation Approach is designed. This algorithm gives the maximum lower bound of the solutions, achieves the optimal feasible solutions by routes assignment and adjustment strategies. The Tabu Search is embedded with a random neighborhood ordering with restart and shaking methods. The experimental results show that the proposed algorithm presented satisfactory solutions, and the collaborative routing arrangement is more economical, fair, and reasonable than non-collaborative arrangement.

  11. Collaborative deliberation: a model for patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwyn, Glyn; Lloyd, Amy; May, Carl; van der Weijden, Trudy; Stiggelbout, Anne; Edwards, Adrian; Frosch, Dominick L; Rapley, Tim; Barr, Paul; Walsh, Thom; Grande, Stuart W; Montori, Victor; Epstein, Ronald

    2014-11-01

    Existing theoretical work in decision making and behavior change has focused on how individuals arrive at decisions or form intentions. Less attention has been given to theorizing the requirements that might be necessary for individuals to work collaboratively to address difficult decisions, consider new alternatives, or change behaviors. The goal of this work was to develop, as a forerunner to a middle range theory, a conceptual model that considers the process of supporting patients to consider alternative health care options, in collaboration with clinicians, and others. Theory building among researchers with experience and expertise in clinician-patient communication, using an iterative cycle of discussions. We developed a model composed of five inter-related propositions that serve as a foundation for clinical communication processes that honor the ethical principles of respecting individual agency, autonomy, and an empathic approach to practice. We named the model 'collaborative deliberation.' The propositions describe: (1) constructive interpersonal engagement, (2) recognition of alternative actions, (3) comparative learning, (4) preference construction and elicitation, and (5) preference integration. We believe the model underpins multiple suggested approaches to clinical practice that take the form of patient centered care, motivational interviewing, goal setting, action planning, and shared decision making. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Collaboro: a collaborative (meta modeling tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Luis Cánovas Izquierdo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Software development is becoming more and more collaborative, emphasizing the role of end-users in the development process to make sure the final product will satisfy customer needs. This is especially relevant when developing Domain-Specific Modeling Languages (DSMLs, which are modeling languages specifically designed to carry out the tasks of a particular domain. While end-users are actually the experts of the domain for which a DSML is developed, their participation in the DSML specification process is still rather limited nowadays. In this paper, we propose a more community-aware language development process by enabling the active participation of all community members (both developers and end-users from the very beginning. Our proposal, called Collaboro, is based on a DSML itself enabling the representation of change proposals during the language design and the discussion (and trace back of possible solutions, comments and decisions arisen during the collaboration. Collaboro also incorporates a metric-based recommender system to help community members to define high-quality notations for the DSMLs. We also show how Collaboro can be used at the model-level to facilitate the collaborative specification of software models. Tool support is available both as an Eclipse plug-in a web-based solution.

  13. "Flipping the Coin": Models for Social Justice in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, Tony

    1998-01-01

    Offers a rationale for developing a theory of social justice to support educational research. Using the work of John Rawls and others, explores injustices present within schools and classrooms observable through experiences of powerlessness, violence, exploitation, marginalization, and cultural imperialism. Calls for a transformational focus for…

  14. A Heuristic Model of Criminology and Criminal Justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalman, Marvin

    The differences between criminology and criminal justice are assessed by comparing them to a more abstract typology. This typology is comprised of four basic elements: the focal concerns of the fields; career patterns of professionals; the extent to which the fields are theoretically based and are disciplines, sciences, and professions; and the…

  15. "Flipping the Coin": Models for Social Justice in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, Tony

    1998-01-01

    Offers a rationale for developing a theory of social justice to support educational research. Using the work of John Rawls and others, explores injustices present within schools and classrooms observable through experiences of powerlessness, violence, exploitation, marginalization, and cultural imperialism. Calls for a transformational focus for…

  16. Study on affecting factors of collaborative product development based on collaboration hierarchy model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiaodong; LI Yingzi; ZHANG Zhiqiang

    2007-01-01

    Aiming at the levels of collaborative degree in web-based product development,a collaboration hierarchy model of this product development is developed in this paper.Based on the model,the affecting factors on collaboration levels are analyzed systematically from many aspects,such as technology,organization and business.A gap analysis method is studied in detail,and is applied in a real project.The application shows that it can solve the diverse problems of collaborative product development effectively,and help enterprises find out the critical factors that affect the collaboration.

  17. New Federated Collaborative Networked Organization Model (FCNOM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morcous M. Yassa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Formation of Collaborative Networked Organization (CNO usually comes upon expected business opportunities and needs huge of negotiation during its lifecycle, especially to increase the Dynamic Virtual Organization (DVO configuration automation. Decision makers need more comprehensive information about CNO system to support their decisions. Unfortunately, there is no single formal modeling, tool, approach or any comprehensive methodology that covers all perspectives. In spite of there are some approaches to model CNO have been existed, these approaches model the CNO either with respect to the technology, or business without considering organizational behavior, federation modeling, and external environments. The aim of this paper is to propose an integrated framework that combines the existed modeling perspectives, as well as, proposes new ones. Also, it provides clear CNO boundaries. By using this approach the view of CNO environment becomes clear and unified. Also, it minimizes the negotiations within CNO components during its life cycle, supports DVO configuration automation, as well as, helps decision making for DVO, and achieves harmonization between CNO partners. The proposed FCNOM utilizes CommonKADS methodology organization model for describing CNO components. Insurance Collaborative Network has been used as an example to proof the proposed FCNOM model.

  18. Process and data fragmentation-oriented enterprise network integration with collaboration modelling and collaboration agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Wang, Ze-yuan; Cao, Zhi-chao; Du, Rui-yang; Luo, Hao

    2015-08-01

    With the process of globalisation and the development of management models and information technology, enterprise cooperation and collaboration has developed from intra-enterprise integration, outsourcing and inter-enterprise integration, and supply chain management, to virtual enterprises and enterprise networks. Some midfielder enterprises begin to serve for different supply chains. Therefore, they combine related supply chains into a complex enterprise network. The main challenges for enterprise network's integration and collaboration are business process and data fragmentation beyond organisational boundaries. This paper reviews the requirements of enterprise network's integration and collaboration, as well as the development of new information technologies. Based on service-oriented architecture (SOA), collaboration modelling and collaboration agents are introduced to solve problems of collaborative management for service convergence under the condition of process and data fragmentation. A model-driven methodology is developed to design and deploy the integrating framework. An industrial experiment is designed and implemented to illustrate the usage of developed technologies in this paper.

  19. An actor-focused model of justice rule adherence and violation: the role of managerial motives and discretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Brent A; Colquitt, Jason A; Paddock, E Layne

    2009-05-01

    Research on organizational justice has focused primarily on the receivers of just and unjust treatment. Little is known about why managers adhere to or violate rules of justice in the first place. The authors introduce a model for understanding justice rule adherence and violation. They identify both cognitive motives and affective motives that explain why managers adhere to and violate justice rules. They also draw distinctions among the justice rules by specifying which rules offer managers more or less discretion in their execution. They then describe how motives and discretion interact to influence justice-relevant actions. Finally, the authors incorporate managers' emotional reactions to consider how their actions may change over time. Implications of the model for theory, research, and practice are discussed. (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved.

  20. Crossing boundaries in a collaborative modeling workspace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morisette, Jeffrey T.; Cravens, Amanda; Miller, Brian; Talbert, Marian; Talbert, Colin; Jarnevich, Catherine S.; Fink, Michelle; Decker, Karin; Odell, Eric

    2017-01-01

    There is substantial literature on the importance of bridging across disciplinary and science–management boundaries. One of the ways commonly suggested to cross boundaries is for participants from both sides of the boundary to jointly produce information (i.e., knowledge co-production). But simply providing tools or bringing people together in the same room is not sufficient. Here we present a case study documenting the mechanisms by which managers and scientists collaborated to incorporate climate change projections into Colorado’s State Wildlife Action Plan. A critical component of the project was the use of a collaborative modeling and visualization workspace: the U.S. Geological Survey’s Resource for Advanced Modeling (RAM). Using video analysis and pre/post surveys from this case study, we examine how the RAM facilitated cognitive and social processes that co-produced a more salient and credible end product. This case provides practical suggestions to scientists and practitioners who want to implement actionable science.

  1. Addressing contrasting cognitive models in scientific collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diviacco, P.

    2012-04-01

    If the social aspects of scientific communities and their internal dynamics is starting to be recognized and acknowledged in the everyday lives of scientists, it is rather difficult for them to find tools that could support their activities consistently with this perspective. Issues span from gathering researchers to mutual awareness, from information sharing to building meaning, with the last one being particularly critical in research fields as the geo-sciences, that deal with the reconstruction of unique, often non-reproducible, and contingent processes. Reasoning here is, in fact, mainly abductive, allowing multiple and concurrent explanations for the same phenomenon to coexist. Scientists bias one hypothesis over another not only on strictly logical but also on sociological motivations. Following a vision, scientists tend to evolve and isolate themselves from other scientists creating communities characterized by different cognitive models, so that after some time these become incompatible and scientists stop understanding each other. We address these problems as a communication issue so that the classic distinction into three levels (syntactic, semantic and pragmatic) can be used. At the syntactic level, we highlight non-technical obstacles that condition interoperability and data availability and transparency. At the semantic level, possible incompatibilities of cognitive models are particularly evident, so that using ontologies, cross-domain reconciliation should be applied. This is a very difficult task to perform since the projection of knowledge by scientists, in the designated community, is political and thus can create a lot of tension. The strategy we propose to overcome these issues pertains to pragmatics, in the sense that it is intended to acknowledge the cultural and personal factors each partner brings into the collaboration and is based on the idea that meaning should remain a flexible and contingent representation of possibly divergent views

  2. Collaborative Inquiry Learning: Models, tools, and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Thorsten; Urhahne, Detlef; Schanze, Sascha; Ploetzner, Rolf

    2010-02-01

    Collaborative inquiry learning is one of the most challenging and exciting ventures for today's schools. It aims at bringing a new and promising culture of teaching and learning into the classroom where students in groups engage in self-regulated learning activities supported by the teacher. It is expected that this way of learning fosters students' motivation and interest in science, that they learn to perform steps of inquiry similar to scientists and that they gain knowledge on scientific processes. Starting from general pedagogical reflections and science standards, the article reviews some prominent models of inquiry learning. This comparison results in a set of inquiry processes being the basis for cooperation in the scientific network NetCoIL. Inquiry learning is conceived in several ways with emphasis on different processes. For an illustration of the spectrum, some main conceptions of inquiry and their focuses are described. In the next step, the article describes exemplary computer tools and environments from within and outside the NetCoIL network that were designed to support processes of collaborative inquiry learning. These tools are analysed by describing their functionalities as well as effects on student learning known from the literature. The article closes with challenges for further developments elaborated by the NetCoIL network.

  3. Structure and Process in Collaboration: Florida's Collaborative Model Project as a Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Fleet, Alanson A.

    The Collaboration Model Project Council, at the University of Florida, represents an attempt to establish interinstitutional collaboration among (1) a university and two community colleges, (2) three county public school systems, (3) the teachers' associations of three counties, (4) community parents and citizens of three counties, and (5) college…

  4. Fieldwork Using the Professional Development Schools Model: Developing a Social Justice Orientation and Multicultural Competency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Amy L.; Krell, Megan M.; Hayden, Laura A.; Gracia, Robert; Denitzio, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Practicum fieldwork was conducted in an urban high school setting using a Professional Development Schools (PDS) model, with a focus on multicultural and social justice counseling competencies (MSJCC). Interpretative phenomenological analysis was used to analyze the journal responses of 16 counseling students to ascertain MSJCC development during…

  5. Foundations for a multiscale collaborative Earth model

    KAUST Repository

    Afanasiev, M.

    2015-11-11

    We present a computational framework for the assimilation of local to global seismic data into a consistent model describing Earth structure on all seismically accessible scales. This Collaborative Seismic Earth Model (CSEM) is designed to meet the following requirements: (i) Flexible geometric parametrization, capable of capturing topography and bathymetry, as well as all aspects of potentially resolvable structure, including small-scale heterogeneities and deformations of internal discontinuities. (ii) Independence of any particular wave equation solver, in order to enable the combination of inversion techniques suitable for different types of seismic data. (iii) Physical parametrization that allows for full anisotropy and for variations in attenuation and density. While not all of these parameters are always resolvable, the assimilation of data that constrain any parameter subset should be possible. (iv) Ability to accommodate successive refinements through the incorporation of updates on any scale as new data or inversion techniques become available. (v) Enable collaborative Earth model construction. The structure of the initial CSEM is represented on a variable-resolution tetrahedral mesh. It is assembled from a long-wavelength 3-D global model into which several regional-scale tomographies are embedded. We illustrate the CSEM workflow of successive updating with two examples from Japan and the Western Mediterranean, where we constrain smaller scale structure using full-waveform inversion. Furthermore, we demonstrate the ability of the CSEM to act as a vehicle for the combination of different tomographic techniques with a joint full-waveform and traveltime ray tomography of Europe. This combination broadens the exploitable frequency range of the individual techniques, thereby improving resolution. We perform two iterations of a whole-Earth full-waveform inversion using a long-period reference data set from 225 globally recorded earthquakes. At this early stage

  6. Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Michelle L.

    2010-01-01

    This article explores collaboration between library media educators and regular classroom teachers. The article focuses on the context of the issue, positions on the issue, the impact of collaboration, and how to implement effective collaboration into the school system. Various books and professional journals are used to support conclusions…

  7. A Research Framework for Understanding the Practical Impact of Family Involvement in the Juvenile Justice System: The Juvenile Justice Family Involvement Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Sarah Cusworth; Bishop, Asia S; Pullmann, Michael D; Bauer, Grace

    2015-12-01

    Family involvement is recognized as a critical element of service planning for children's mental health, welfare and education. For the juvenile justice system, however, parents' roles in this system are complex due to youths' legal rights, public safety, a process which can legally position parents as plaintiffs, and a historical legacy of blaming parents for youth indiscretions. Three recent national surveys of juvenile justice-involved parents reveal that the current paradigm elicits feelings of stress, shame and distrust among parents and is likely leading to worse outcomes for youth, families and communities. While research on the impact of family involvement in the justice system is starting to emerge, the field currently has no organizing framework to guide a research agenda, interpret outcomes or translate findings for practitioners. We propose a research framework for family involvement that is informed by a comprehensive review and content analysis of current, published arguments for family involvement in juvenile justice along with a synthesis of family involvement efforts in other child-serving systems. In this model, family involvement is presented as an ascending, ordinal concept beginning with (1) exclusion, and moving toward climates characterized by (2) information-giving, (3) information-eliciting and (4) full, decision-making partnerships. Specific examples of how courts and facilities might align with these levels are described. Further, the model makes predictions for how involvement will impact outcomes at multiple levels with applications for other child-serving systems.

  8. The Role of Mental Models in Collaborative Sketching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Wei; Sun, Lingyun; Chen, Shi; Yang, Zhiyuan; Liu, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Designers often collaborate to explore creative ideas, especially during the early stages of conceptual design, and their mental models, as the framework of design tasks, greatly influence the collaborative sketching process. Such models have multiple kinds of differences and each kind might have unique effects, yet previous studies analyzed these…

  9. Collaborative business modeling for systemic and sustainability innovations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohrbeck, René; Konnertz, L.; Knab, S.

    2013-01-01

    firms have collaborated to envision and create new business models in the energy industry. After describing this collaborative business modelling (CBM) approach, we discuss its strengths and limitations and compare it to two alternative methods of strategy and innovation planning: scenario technique...

  10. The Role of Mental Models in Collaborative Sketching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Wei; Sun, Lingyun; Chen, Shi; Yang, Zhiyuan; Liu, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Designers often collaborate to explore creative ideas, especially during the early stages of conceptual design, and their mental models, as the framework of design tasks, greatly influence the collaborative sketching process. Such models have multiple kinds of differences and each kind might have unique effects, yet previous studies analyzed these…

  11. Collaborative annotation of 3D crystallographic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, J; Henderson, M; Khan, I

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the AnnoCryst system-a tool that was designed to enable authenticated collaborators to share online discussions about 3D crystallographic structures through the asynchronous attachment, storage, and retrieval of annotations. Annotations are personal comments, interpretations, questions, assessments, or references that can be attached to files, data, digital objects, or Web pages. The AnnoCryst system enables annotations to be attached to 3D crystallographic models retrieved from either private local repositories (e.g., Fedora) or public online databases (e.g., Protein Data Bank or Inorganic Crystal Structure Database) via a Web browser. The system uses the Jmol plugin for viewing and manipulating the 3D crystal structures but extends Jmol by providing an additional interface through which annotations can be created, attached, stored, searched, browsed, and retrieved. The annotations are stored on a standardized Web annotation server (Annotea), which has been extended to support 3D macromolecular structures. Finally, the system is embedded within a security framework that is capable of authenticating users and restricting access only to trusted colleagues.

  12. Demand Activated Manufacturing Architecture (DAMA) model for supply chain collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CHAPMAN,LEON D.; PETERSEN,MARJORIE B.

    2000-03-13

    The Demand Activated Manufacturing Architecture (DAMA) project during the last five years of work with the U.S. Integrated Textile Complex (retail, apparel, textile, and fiber sectors) has developed an inter-enterprise architecture and collaborative model for supply chains. This model will enable improved collaborative business across any supply chain. The DAMA Model for Supply Chain Collaboration is a high-level model for collaboration to achieve Demand Activated Manufacturing. The five major elements of the architecture to support collaboration are (1) activity or process, (2) information, (3) application, (4) data, and (5) infrastructure. These five elements are tied to the application of the DAMA architecture to three phases of collaboration - prepare, pilot, and scale. There are six collaborative activities that may be employed in this model: (1) Develop Business Planning Agreements, (2) Define Products, (3) Forecast and Plan Capacity Commitments, (4) Schedule Product and Product Delivery, (5) Expedite Production and Delivery Exceptions, and (6) Populate Supply Chain Utility. The Supply Chain Utility is a set of applications implemented to support collaborative product definition, forecast visibility, planning, scheduling, and execution. The DAMA architecture and model will be presented along with the process for implementing this DAMA model.

  13. A recruitment and selection process model: the case of the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development

    OpenAIRE

    Thebe, T P; 12330841 - Van der Waldt, Gerrit

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to report on findings of an empirical investigation conducted at the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development. The aim of the investigation was to ascertain the status of current practices and challenges regarding the processes and procedures utilised for recruitment and selection. Based on these findings the article further outlines the design of a comprehensive process model for human resource recruitment and selection for the Department. The model...

  14. A Model Collaborative Platform for Geoscience Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, S.; Manduca, C. A.; Iverson, E. A.

    2012-12-01

    generated author profiles highlight the contributions an individual has made through any of the projects with an option for customization by the author. An overarching portal site provides a unified view of resources within this diverse set of geoscience education projects. The SERC CMS provides a common platform upon which individual projects can build their own identities, while allowing cross-project pollination and synergies to be realized without significant extra investment by each project. This is a sustainable model for a collaborative platform that takes advantage of the energy and resources of individual projects to advance larger community goals.

  15. Collaborative Art Practices in HE: Mapping and Developing Pedagogical Models

    OpenAIRE

    Wilsmore, R; Alix, C; Dobson, E.; University of Huddersfield; University of Hull; University of York St John; The Higher Education Academy; Palatine

    2010-01-01

    This project asks ‘How is interdisciplinary collaboration "taught" in HE institutions?’ and ‘What pedagogical models can be identified and developed?’\\ud Performing and Creative Arts departments in HE institutions engage students in collaborative practice within a singular discipline or across disciplines, through interdisciplinary or hybridised art forms, as curricula or extra-curricula activity. Where students are engaged with interdisciplinary collaboration within the curriculum, tuition m...

  16. Collaborative Online Teaching: A Model for Gerontological Social Work Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, Amy E.; Walsh, Christine A.; Azulai, Anna; Gulbrandsen, Cari; Tong, Hongmei

    2015-01-01

    Social work students and faculty are increasingly embracing online education and collaborative teaching. Yet models to support these activities have not been adequately developed. This paper describes how a team of instructors developed, delivered, and evaluated an undergraduate gerontological social work course using a collaborative online…

  17. Scalable learning of probabilistic latent models for collaborative filtering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langseth, Helge; Nielsen, Thomas Dyhre

    2015-01-01

    Collaborative filtering has emerged as a popular way of making user recommendations, but with the increasing sizes of the underlying databases scalability is becoming a crucial issue. In this paper we focus on a recently proposed probabilistic collaborative filtering model that explicitly...

  18. Model Coupling in Resource Economics: Conditions for Effective Interdisciplinary Collaboration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MacLeod, Miles; Nagatsu, Michiru

    2016-01-01

    In this article we argue for the importance of studying interdisciplinary collaborations by focusing on the role that good choice and design of model-building frameworks and strategies can play overcoming the inherent difficulties of collaborative research. We provide an empirical study of particula

  19. Integrated modelling requires mass collaboration (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R. V.

    2009-12-01

    add, “and are the plans sustainable?” To return to the present, although, it is now possible to ask the first question and obtain an answer through linked modelling; we are still at a very early stage and the associated uncertainties are large. The process of linking and running linked systems is not yet the simple, reliable process needed for widespread uptake. At this point, it is useful to look back over the development process which has taken us from paper maps to GIS and Google Maps; it was the result of tens of thousands of PhD and MSc projects over forty years. During the development of the OpenMI, it was quickly appreciated that to transform integrated modelling from something possible in a research lab to something that had the ease of use and reliability of Google Maps would require a similar process but on a far greater scale; one far larger than any single organisation or state could support. A dramatic change to the research and development process would be needed. Using the OpenMI Association’s strategy as an example, the presentation will describe how through openness, sharing and mass collaboration made possible by inexpensive communications and computing power and adoption of a minimum set of standards, the innovation and enterprise of thousands of individuals across the world can be brought to bear upon the problems.

  20. An Integrated Learning Model In Collaboration With Industrial Partners

    OpenAIRE

    Schedin, Staffan; OSAMA A. B. HASSAN

    2014-01-01

    We present a recently developed learning model of work integrated learning in the Bachelor programs in Mechanical Engineering as well as Electronic and Computer Engineering at Umeå University, Sweden. The model is based on an organized collaboration with our industrial partners in the surrounding geographic region. As a part of the collaboration, each participating student is guaranteed internships at a chosen company over the summer period. In the model, company based projects are integrated...

  1. Collaborative deliberation: A model for patient care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elwyn, G.; Lloyd, A.; May, C.; Weijden, T.T. van der; Stiggelbout, A.; Edwards, A.; Frosch, D.L.; Rapley, T.; Barr, P.; Walsh, T.; Grande, S.W.; Montori, V.; Epstein, R.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Existing theoretical work in decision making and behavior change has focused on how individuals arrive at decisions or form intentions. Less attention has been given to theorizing the requirements that might be necessary for individuals to work collaboratively to address difficult decisio

  2. Model for Active Learning: Collaborative Peer Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Lois; Hebert, Catherine

    1998-01-01

    A discussion of collaborative peer teaching as a method of college instruction looks at theoretical support for the approach and describes experiences with three courses using it: freshman composition; American studies; and international diversity. Perceived benefits of the experiences for both teachers and students are examined. (MSE)

  3. Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Meme; Pryor, Boori Monty

    2000-01-01

    Describes, in the words of two Australian authors (one Aboriginal and one European-Australian), how they work together when they write books together, and how their collaboration goes beyond the two of them. (SR)

  4. The Transitional Justice Models and the Justifications of Means of Dealing with the Past

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Krotoszynski

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The development of transitional justice measures can be fully understood only when one takes into account the values, rationales and justifications that lie at the roots of various ways of dealing with past wrongs. Seeing transitional justice as an ontologically complex structure, the article aims to relate the legal instruments that concentrate on past abusers to the axiological layer of settling accounts with the past. In order to do so, three basic models of transitional justice – a retribution model, a historical clarification model and a thick line model – all based on the measures implemented during democratic change, are presented. Then, with the use of a classic division between consequentialist and deontological argumentation, the article describes transitional justice justifications. Next, the values emblematic for each of the models are identified. Finally, the article proposes a structure of transitional justice moral reasoning that may guide transitional decision-making process on the axiological level. El desarrollo de medidas de justicia transicional sólo puede entenderse en su totalidad cuando se tienen en cuenta los valores, razones y justificaciones que subyacen en las raíces de las diversas maneras de tratar con los errores del pasado. Al ver la justicia transicional como una estructura ontológicamente compleja, el artículo pretende relacionar los instrumentos jurídicos que se concentran en los agresores del pasado con la capa axiológica de ajustar cuentas con el pasado. Para conseguirlo, se presentan tres modelos básicos de justicia transicional -un modelo de retribución, un modelo de esclarecimiento histórico y un modelo de línea gruesa-, todos basados en las medidas aplicadas durante un cambio democrático. Seguidamente, el artículo describe las justificaciones de la justicia transicional, con el uso de una división clásica entre argumentación consecuencialista y deontológica. A continuación, se

  5. Communicate and collaborate by using building information modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mondrup, Thomas Fænø; Karlshøj, Jan; Vestergaard, Flemming

    Building Information Modeling (BIM) represents a new approach within the Architecture, Engineering, and Construction (AEC) industry, one that encourages collaboration and engagement of all stakeholders on a project. This study discusses the potential of adopting BIM as a communication...

  6. Reference models for forming organisational or collaborative pedagogical best practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, Chien-Sing; Koper, Rob; Kommers, Piet; Hedberg, John

    2008-01-01

    Lee, Chien-Sing, Koper, R., Kommers, P., & Hedberg, John (Eds.) (2008). Reference models for forming organisational or collaborative pedagogical best practices [special issue]. International Journal of Continuing Engineering Education and Life-Long Learning, 18(1).

  7. Variable Relation Parametric Model on Graphics Modelon for Collaboration Design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Yu-de; ZHAO Han; LI Yan-feng

    2005-01-01

    A new approach to variable relation parametric model for collaboration design based on the graphic modelon has been put forward. The paper gives a parametric description model of graphic modelon, and relating method for different graphic modelon based on variable constraint. At the same time, with the aim of engineering application in the collaboration design, the autonmous constraint in modelon and relative constraint between two modelons are given. Finally, with the tool of variable and relation dbase, the solving method of variable relating and variable-driven among different graphic modelon in a part, and doubleacting variable relating parametric method among different parts for collaboration are given.

  8. Collaborative problem solving with a total quality model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volden, C M; Monnig, R

    1993-01-01

    A collaborative problem-solving system committed to the interests of those involved complies with the teachings of the total quality management movement in health care. Deming espoused that any quality system must become an integral part of routine activities. A process that is used consistently in dealing with problems, issues, or conflicts provides a mechanism for accomplishing total quality improvement. The collaborative problem-solving process described here results in quality decision-making. This model incorporates Ishikawa's cause-and-effect (fishbone) diagram, Moore's key causes of conflict, and the steps of the University of North Dakota Conflict Resolution Center's collaborative problem solving model.

  9. Collaborative learning model inquiring based on digital game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jiugen; Xing, Ruonan

    2012-04-01

    With the development of computer education software, digital educational game has become an important part in our life, entertainment and education. Therefore how to make full use of digital game's teaching functions and educate through entertainment has become the focus of current research. The thesis make a connection between educational game and collaborative learning, the current popular teaching model, and concludes digital game-based collaborative learning model combined with teaching practice.

  10. Some Aspects of Mathematical Model of Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yasuyuki; Yasutake, Koichi; Yamakawa, Osamu

    2012-01-01

    There are some mathematical learning models of collaborative learning, with which we can learn how students obtain knowledge and we expect to design effective education. We put together those models and classify into three categories; model by differential equations, so-called Ising spin and a stochastic process equation. Some of the models do not…

  11. Related work on reference modeling for collaborative networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Afsarmanesh, H.; Camarinha-Matos, L.M.; Camarinha-Matos, L.M.; Afsarmanesh, H.

    2008-01-01

    Several international research and development initiatives have led to development of models for organizations and organization interactions. These models and their approaches constitute a background for development of reference models for collaborative networks. A brief survey of work on modeling t

  12. On the relationship between justice judgments, outcomes and identity orientations among Iranian EFL learners: A structural equation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed Ayatollah Razmjoo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available One problem which can be observed in the field of EFL/ESL learning is that a number of English major BA and MA students are not highly committed to their major and decide not to continue their graduate studies. Sometimes even graduate students from English majors prefer to extend their education or work in an unrelated field. This might be attributed to the extent to which they perceive evaluation procedures and outcomes as fair. Considering this, the present study investigates first the relationships between justice judgments, outcomes and identity orientations. The study, then, uses structural equation modeling in order to examine whether identity orientation has any mediating effect on the relationship between justice judgment and outcomes. Participants were74 students in Department of Foreign Languages and Linguistics, Shiraz University selected based on convenience sampling. They filled out three questionnaires on distributive and procedural justice judgments, rule compliance and outcome satisfaction, and personal and social identity orientations. The collected data was then analyzed using descriptive statistics, correlation, and structural equation modeling. Based on the obtained findings, procedural justice had significant positive correlation with rule compliance and distributive justice was significantly correlated with outcome satisfaction. The generated structural equation model also indicated that justice judgments only directly affected outcomes and identity had no mediating effect on the causal relationship between the two.

  13. A Computational Trust Model for Collaborative Ventures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weigang Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The conceptual notion of trust and its underlying computational methods has been an important issue for researchers in electronic communities. While the independent trust evaluation is suitable in certain circumstances, such unilateral process falls short in supporting mutual evaluation between partners. Perceived reputation, the depth and breadth of trust, Trust Perception (TP, Repeat Collaborators at a Threshold (RCT and a collective trust index (c index have all been defined to specify the optimal trust criteria. Approach: By taking the evaluator’s own trust level as a threshold to identify compatible partners, a mutual balance between excess and deficiency in trust has been addressed. Since the number of repeated collaborations which signify retested confidence is more straightforward to capture than the manually provided feedback ratings, we have developed computational definitions for the above-mentioned concepts. Results and Conclusion: The results from the experiments based on the eBay dataset shows that the c index can be used to classify PowerSellers into normally distributed and comprehensible categories that can facilitate mutual evaluation.

  14. Advancing Collaboration through Hydrologic Data and Model Sharing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarboton, D. G.; Idaszak, R.; Horsburgh, J. S.; Ames, D. P.; Goodall, J. L.; Band, L. E.; Merwade, V.; Couch, A.; Hooper, R. P.; Maidment, D. R.; Dash, P. K.; Stealey, M.; Yi, H.; Gan, T.; Castronova, A. M.; Miles, B.; Li, Z.; Morsy, M. M.

    2015-12-01

    HydroShare is an online, collaborative system for open sharing of hydrologic data, analytical tools, and models. It supports the sharing of and collaboration around "resources" which are defined primarily by standardized metadata, content data models for each resource type, and an overarching resource data model based on the Open Archives Initiative's Object Reuse and Exchange (OAI-ORE) standard and a hierarchical file packaging system called "BagIt". HydroShare expands the data sharing capability of the CUAHSI Hydrologic Information System by broadening the classes of data accommodated to include geospatial and multidimensional space-time datasets commonly used in hydrology. HydroShare also includes new capability for sharing models, model components, and analytical tools and will take advantage of emerging social media functionality to enhance information about and collaboration around hydrologic data and models. It also supports web services and server/cloud based computation operating on resources for the execution of hydrologic models and analysis and visualization of hydrologic data. HydroShare uses iRODS as a network file system for underlying storage of datasets and models. Collaboration is enabled by casting datasets and models as "social objects". Social functions include both private and public sharing, formation of collaborative groups of users, and value-added annotation of shared datasets and models. The HydroShare web interface and social media functions were developed using the Django web application framework coupled to iRODS. Data visualization and analysis is supported through the Tethys Platform web GIS software stack. Links to external systems are supported by RESTful web service interfaces to HydroShare's content. This presentation will introduce the HydroShare functionality developed to date and describe ongoing development of functionality to support collaboration and integration of data and models.

  15. Evaluating stream health based environmental justice model performance at different spatial scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshvar, Fariborz; Nejadhashemi, A. Pouyan; Zhang, Zhen; Herman, Matthew R.; Shortridge, Ashton; Marquart-Pyatt, Sandra

    2016-07-01

    This study evaluated the effects of spatial resolution on environmental justice analysis concerning stream health. The Saginaw River Basin in Michigan was selected since it is an area of concern in the Great Lakes basin. Three Bayesian Conditional Autoregressive (CAR) models (ordinary regression, weighted regression and spatial) were developed for each stream health measure based on 17 socioeconomic and physiographical variables at three census levels. For all stream health measures, spatial models had better performance compared to the two non-spatial ones at the census tract and block group levels. Meanwhile no spatial dependency was found at the county level. Multilevel Bayesian CAR models were also developed to understand the spatial dependency at the three levels. Results showed that considering level interactions improved models' prediction. Residual plots also showed that models developed at the block group and census tract (in contrary to county level models) are able to capture spatial variations.

  16. Tracking topological entity changes in 3D collaborative modeling systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ChengYuan; He Fazhi; HuangZhiyong; Cai Xiantao; and Zhang Dejun

    2012-01-01

    One of the key problems in collaborative geometric modeling systems is topological entity correspondence when topolog- ical structure of geometry models on collaborative sites changes, ha this article, we propose a solution for tracking topological entity alterations in 3D collaborative modeling environment. We firstly make a thorough analysis and detailed categorization on the altera- tion properties and causations for each type of topological entity, namely topological face and topological edge. Based on collabora- tive topological entity naming mechanism, a data structure called TEST (Topological Entity Structure Tree) is introduced to track the changing history and current state of each topological entity, to embody the relationship among topological entities. Rules and algo- rithms are presented for identification of topological entities referenced by operations for correct execution and model consistency. The algorithm has been verified within the prototype we have implemented with ACIS.

  17. Psychometric Characteristics of the Social Justice Scale's Turkish Form and a Structural Equation Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirik, Ilker

    2015-01-01

    Problem Statement: In order to provide equal educational opportunities for students, teachers should encourage their students to have an effective voice concerning social justice. Studies reveal that teachers face trouble when transferring from the concept of social justice as theory to social justice as practice. A scale which will be developed…

  18. A Collaboration Service Model for a Global Port Cluster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith K.T. Toh

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The importance of port clusters to a global city may be viewed from a number of perspectives. The development of port clusters and economies of agglomeration and their contribution to a regional economy is underpinned by information and physical infrastructure that facilitates collaboration between business entities within the cluster. The maturity of technologies providing portals, web and middleware services provides an opportunity to push the boundaries of contemporary service reference models and service catalogues to what the authors propose to be "collaboration services". Servicing port clusters, portal engineers of the future must consider collaboration services to benefit a region. Particularly, service orchestration through a "public user portal" must gain better utilisation of publically owned infrastructure, to share knowledge and collaborate among organisations through information systems.

  19. Difficult Dialogues, Privilege and Social Justice: Uses of the Privileged Identity Exploration (PIE) Model in Student Affairs Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Sherry K.

    2007-01-01

    This article will introduce the Privileged Identity Exploration (PIE) Model. This model identifies eight (8) defense modes associated with behaviors individuals display when engaged in difficult dialogues about social justice issues. Implications for the model and ways it can be used to assist facilitators as they engage participants in…

  20. Organizational Justice in Schools: No Justice without Trust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoy, Wayne K.; Tarter, C. John

    2004-01-01

    The concept of organizational justice is defined, and, based on a review of the literature, ten principles of organizational justice are elaborated. Similarly, the elements of faculty trust are conceptualized and discussed. Then, a model of organizational justice and trust is proposed and tested using path analysis. The results underscore the…

  1. Working on What Works: A New Model for Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berzin, Stephanie; O'Brien, Kimberly; Tohn, Susan

    2012-01-01

    As the classroom is an influential setting for students, new models for collaboration between teachers and school social workers are essential for meeting student needs. This article discusses the literature and model for one such intervention, classroom solutions: working on what works. Through pilot data presented from nine classrooms and two…

  2. Childhood, Agency and Youth Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Roger

    2009-01-01

    This article seeks to reframe debates in the sphere of youth justice in order to move away from narrow and one-sided conceptualisations of young people who offend and appropriate forms of intervention with them. Whilst different positions have been adopted within the field of youth justice, largely around "justice" or "welfare" models of practice,…

  3. Juvenile Justice in Rural America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankovic, Joanne, Ed.; And Others

    Producing a much-needed organized body of literature about rural juvenile justice, 14 papers (largely from the 1979 National Symposium on Rural Justice) are organized to identify current issues, identify forces causing changes in current systems, review programs responding to rural juvenile justice problems, and provide planning models to aid…

  4. Enriching the Student Experience Through a Collaborative Cultural Learning Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInally, Wendy; Metcalfe, Sharon; Garner, Bonnie

    2015-01-01

    This article provides a knowledge and understanding of an international, collaborative, cultural learning model for students from the United States and Scotland. Internationalizing the student experience has been instrumental for student learning for the past eight years. Both countries have developed programs that have enriched and enhanced the overall student learning experience, mainly through the sharing of evidence-based care in both hospital and community settings. Student learning is at the heart of this international model, and through practice learning, leadership, and reflective practice, student immersion in global health care and practice is immense. Moving forward, we are seeking new opportunities to explore learning partnerships to provide this collaborative cultural learning experience.

  5. Collaborative business modeling for systemic and sustainability innovations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohrbeck, René; Konnertz, L.; Knab, S.

    2013-01-01

    firms have collaborated to envision and create new business models in the energy industry. After describing this collaborative business modelling (CBM) approach, we discuss its strengths and limitations and compare it to two alternative methods of strategy and innovation planning: scenario technique......Sustainability innovations are characterized by a systemic nature, and require that multiple organizations act in an orchestrated fashion. To jointly identify opportunities and plan sustainability innovations, new methods and approaches are needed. In this article we describe a case study where 8...

  6. Study of the ship design process model for collaborative design

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ze; Qiu, Chang-Hua; Wang, Neng-Jian

    2005-09-01

    The ship design process model is the basis for developing the ship collaborative design system under network environment. According to the characteristics of the ship design, a method for dividing the ship design process into, three layers is pat forward, that is project layer, design task layer and design activity layer, then the formalized definitions of the ship design process model, the decomposing principles of the ship design process and the architecture of the ship collaborative design (SDPM) system are presented. This method simplifies the activity network makes the optimization and adjustment of the design plan convenient and also makes the design process easier to control and change, at last the architecture of the ship collaborative design system is discussed.

  7. Study of the ship design process model for collaborative design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The ship design process model is the basis for developing the ship collaborative design system under network environment.According to the characteristics of the ship design, a method for dividing the ship design process into three layers is pat forward, that is project layer, design task layer and design activity layer, then the formalized definitions of the ship design process model, the decomposing principles of the ship design process and the architecture of the ship collaborative design (SDPM) system are presented. This method simplifies the activity network, makes the optimization and adjustment of the design plan convenient and also makes the design process easier to control and change, at last the architecture of the ship collaborative design system is discussed.

  8. Using a Participatory Culture-Specific Model to Increase the Effectiveness of Social Justice Courses in School Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graybill, Emily C.; Varjas, Kris; Meyers, Joel; Greenberg, Daphne; Roach, Andrew T.

    2013-01-01

    The Participatory Culture-Specific Model of Course Development (PCSMCD), adapted from the Participatory Culture-Specific Intervention Model, is a proposed framework to address challenges to social justice education by addressing the following four course variables: instructor characteristics, instructor experiences, student characteristics, and…

  9. Reflector Surface Modelling : A European Collaboration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albani, M; Balling, P.; Ettorre, M.; Gerini, G.; Maci, S.; Pontoppidan, K.; Sipus, Z.; Sjöberg, D.; Vecchi, G.; Vipiana, F.

    2007-01-01

    The topic of this paper is the work carried out in Work Package 2.3-2 of the EU network ACE. This work package is concerned with the modelling of the surfaces of modern reflector antennas. In particular the problems associated with homogenisation of periodic structures are described together with an

  10. Web-Based Modelling and Collaborative Simulation of Declarative Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slaats, Tijs; Marquard, Morten; Shahzad, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    two years we have taken this adoption of DCR Graphs to the next level and decided to treat the notation as a product of its own by developing a stand-alone web-based collaborative portal for the modelling and simulation of declarative workflows. The purpose of the portal is to facilitate end...

  11. Collaborative work model based on peer-to-peer network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Jian-zhong; FU Li; ZHANG Xuan-peng; XU Chuan-yun

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we incorporated peer-to-peer (P2P) concept with agent technology and put forward a collaborative work model based on peer-to-peer network (P2PCWM) after investigating into business demands of modern enterprises and problems prevailing in mainstream collaborative work systems based on central server. Theoretically, the P2PCWM can effectively overcome the problems in a conventional system with a central server and meet the practical demands of modern businesses. It is distinguished from other systems by its features of equality, openness, promptness, fairness, expandability and convenience.

  12. Information Filtering via Collaborative User Clustering Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Chu-Xu; Yu, Lu; Liu, Chuang; Liu, Hao; Yan, Xiao-Yong

    2013-01-01

    The past few years have witnessed the great success of recommender systems, which can significantly help users find out personalized items for them from the information era. One of the most widely applied recommendation methods is the Matrix Factorization (MF). However, most of researches on this topic have focused on mining the direct relationships between users and items. In this paper, we optimize the standard MF by integrating the user clustering regularization term. Our model considers not only the user-item rating information, but also takes into account the user interest. We compared the proposed model with three typical other methods: User-Mean (UM), Item-Mean (IM) and standard MF. Experimental results on a real-world dataset, MovieLens, show that our method performs much better than other three methods in the accuracy of recommendation.

  13. Information filtering via collaborative user clustering modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chu-Xu; Zhang, Zi-Ke; Yu, Lu; Liu, Chuang; Liu, Hao; Yan, Xiao-Yong

    2014-02-01

    The past few years have witnessed the great success of recommender systems, which can significantly help users to find out personalized items for them from the information era. One of the widest applied recommendation methods is the Matrix Factorization (MF). However, most of the researches on this topic have focused on mining the direct relationships between users and items. In this paper, we optimize the standard MF by integrating the user clustering regularization term. Our model considers not only the user-item rating information but also the user information. In addition, we compared the proposed model with three typical other methods: User-Mean (UM), Item-Mean (IM) and standard MF. Experimental results on two real-world datasets, MovieLens 1M and MovieLens 100k, show that our method performs better than other three methods in the accuracy of recommendation.

  14. Research collaboration, hazard modeling and dissemination in volcanology with Vhub

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma Lizana, J. L.; Valentine, G. A.

    2011-12-01

    Vhub (online at vhub.org) is a cyberinfrastructure for collaboration in volcanology research, education, and outreach. One of the core objectives of this project is to accelerate the transfer of research tools to organizations and stakeholders charged with volcano hazard and risk mitigation (such as observatories). Vhub offers a clearinghouse for computational models of volcanic processes and data analysis, documentation of those models, and capabilities for online collaborative groups focused on issues such as code development, configuration management, benchmarking, and validation. A subset of simulations is already available for online execution, eliminating the need to download and compile locally. In addition, Vhub is a platform for sharing presentations and other educational material in a variety of media formats, which are useful in teaching university-level volcanology. VHub also has wikis, blogs and group functions around specific topics to encourage collaboration and discussion. In this presentation we provide examples of the vhub capabilities, including: (1) tephra dispersion and block-and-ash flow models; (2) shared educational materials; (3) online collaborative environment for different types of research, including field-based studies and plume dispersal modeling; (4) workshops. Future goals include implementation of middleware to allow access to data and databases that are stored and maintained at various institutions around the world. All of these capabilities can be exercised with a user-defined level of privacy, ranging from completely private (only shared and visible to specified people) to completely public. The volcanological community is encouraged to use the resources of vhub and also to contribute models, datasets, and other items that authors would like to disseminate. The project is funded by the US National Science Foundation and includes a core development team at University at Buffalo, Michigan Technological University, and University

  15. A Model for Collaborative Learning in Undergraduate Climate Change Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teranes, J. L.

    2008-12-01

    Like several colleges and universities across the nation, the University of California, San Diego, has introduced climate change topics into many existing and new undergraduate courses. I have administered a program in this area at UCSD and have also developed and taught a new lower-division UCSD course entitled "Climate Change and Society", a general education course for non-majors. This class covers the basics of climate change, such as the science that explains it, the causes of climate change, climate change impacts, and mitigation strategies. The teaching methods for this course stress interdisciplinary approaches. I find that inquiry-based and collaborative modes of learning are particularly effective when applied to science-based climate, environmental and sustainability topics. Undergraduate education is often dominated by a competitive and individualistic approach to learning. In this approach, individual success is frequently perceived as contingent on others being less successful. Such a model is at odds with commonly stated goals of teaching climate change and sustainability, which are to equip students to contribute to the debate on global environmental change and societal adaptation strategies; and to help students become better informed citizens and decision makers. I present classroom-tested strategies for developing collaborative forms of learning in climate change and environmental courses, including team projects, group presentations and group assessment exercises. I show how critical thinking skills and long-term retention of information can benefit in the collaborative mode of learning. I find that a collaborative learning model is especially appropriate to general education courses in which the enrolled student body represents a wide diversity of majors, class level and expertise. I also connect collaborative coursework in interdisciplinary environmental topics directly to applications in the field, where so much "real-world" achievement in

  16. Preference transfer model in collaborative filtering for implicit data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin JU; Yun-tao QIAN; Min-chao YE

    2016-01-01

    Generally, predicting whether an item will be liked or disliked by active users, and how much an item will be liked, is a main task of collaborative fi ltering systems or recommender systems. Recently, predicting most likely bought items for a target user, which is a subproblem of the rank problem of collaborative fi ltering, became an important task in collaborative fi ltering. Traditionally, the prediction uses the user item co-occurrence data based on users’ buying behaviors. However, it is challenging to achieve good prediction performance using traditional methods based on single domain information due to the extreme sparsity of the buying matrix. In this paper, we propose a novel method called the preference transfer model for effective cross-domain collaborative fi ltering. Based on the preference transfer model, a common basis item-factor matrix and different user-factor matrices are factorized. Each user-factor matrix can be viewed as user preference in terms of browsing behavior or buying behavior. Then, two factor-user matrices can be used to construct a so-called ‘preference dictionary’ that can discover in advance the consistent preference of users, from their browsing behaviors to their buying behaviors. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed preference transfer model outperforms the other methods on the Alibaba Tmall data set provided by the Alibaba Group.

  17. Self-organized Collaboration Network Model Based on Module Emerging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongyong; Lu, Lan; Liu, Qiming

    Recently, the studies of the complex network have gone deep into many scientific fields, such as computer science, physics, mathematics, sociology, etc. These researches enrich the realization for complex network, and increase understands for the new characteristic of complex network. Based on the evolvement characteristic of the author collaboration in the scientific thesis, a self-organized network model of the scientific cooperation network is presented by module emerging. By applying the theoretical analysis, it is shown that this network model is a scale-free network, and the strength degree distribution and the module degree distribution of the network nodes have the same power law. In order to make sure the validity of the theoretical analysis for the network model, we create the computer simulation and demonstration collaboration network. By analyzing the data of the network, the results of the demonstration network and the computer simulation are consistent with that of the theoretical analysis of the model.

  18. Elements of a collaborative systems model within the aerospace industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphalen, Bailee R.

    2000-10-01

    Scope and method of study. The purpose of this study was to determine the components of current aerospace collaborative efforts. There were 44 participants from two selected groups surveyed for this study. Nineteen were from the Oklahoma Air National Guard based in Oklahoma City representing the aviation group. Twenty-five participants were from the NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston representing the aerospace group. The surveys for the aviation group were completed in reference to planning missions necessary to their operations. The surveys for the aerospace group were completed in reference to a well-defined and focused goal from a current mission. A questionnaire was developed to survey active participants of collaborative systems in order to consider various components found within the literature. Results were analyzed and aggregated through a database along with content analysis of open-ended question comments from respondents. Findings and conclusions. This study found and determined elements of a collaborative systems model in the aerospace industry. The elements were (1) purpose or mission for the group or team; (2) commitment or dedication to the challenge; (3) group or team meetings and discussions; (4) constraints of deadlines and budgets; (5) tools and resources for project and simulations; (6) significant contributors to the collaboration; (7) decision-making formats; (8) reviews of project; (9) participants education and employment longevity; (10) cross functionality of team or group members; (11) training on the job plus teambuilding; (12) other key elements identified relevant by the respondents but not included in the model such as communication and teamwork; (13) individual and group accountability; (14) conflict, learning, and performance; along with (15) intraorganizational coordination. These elements supported and allowed multiple individuals working together to solve a common problem or to develop innovation that could not have been

  19. The Healthy Aging Research Network: Modeling Collaboration for Community Impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belza, Basia; Altpeter, Mary; Smith, Matthew Lee; Ory, Marcia G

    2017-03-01

    As the first Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Prevention Research Centers Program thematic network, the Healthy Aging Research Network was established to better understand the determinants of healthy aging within older adult populations, identify interventions that promote healthy aging, and assist in translating research into sustainable community-based programs throughout the nation. To achieve these goals requires concerted efforts of a collaborative network of academic, community, and public health organizational partnerships. For the 2001-2014 Prevention Research Center funding cycles, the Healthy Aging Research Network conducted prevention research and promoted the wide use of practices known to foster optimal health. Organized around components necessary for successful collaborations (i.e., governance and infrastructure, shaping focus, community involvement, and evaluation and improvement), this commentary highlights exemplars that demonstrate the Healthy Aging Research Network's unique contributions to the field. The Healthy Aging Research Network's collaboration provided a means to collectively build capacity for practice and policy, reduce fragmentation and duplication in health promotion and aging research efforts, maximize the efficient use of existing resources and generate additional resources, and ultimately, create synergies for advancing the healthy aging agenda. This collaborative model was built upon a backbone organization (coordinating center); setting of common agendas and mutually reinforcing activities; and continuous communications. Given its successes, the Healthy Aging Research Network model could be used to create new and evaluate existing thematic networks to guide the translation of research into policy and practice.

  20. Multi-Task Collaboration CPS Modeling Based on Immune Feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiying Li

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a dynamic multi-task collaboration CPS control model based on the self-adaptive immune feedback is proposed and implemented in the smart home environment. First, the internal relations between CPS and the biological immune system are explored via their basic theories. Second, CPS control mechanism is elaborated through the analysis of CPS control structure. Finally, a comprehensive strategy for support is introduced into multi-task collaboration to improve the dynamic cognitive ability. At the same time, the performance of parameters is correspondingly increased by the operator of the antibody concentration and the selective pressure. Furthermore, the model has been put into service in the smart home laboratory. The experimental results show that this model can integrate user’s needs into the environment for properly regulating the home environment.

  1. Strategic collaborative model for evidence-based nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olade, Rosaline A

    2004-01-01

    To describe a model that has been developed to guide nurses and other health professionals in collaborative efforts toward evidence-based nursing practice. A review of literature was conducted using MEDLINE and CINAHL to search for articles on research utilization for evidence-based practice in health care delivery. Empirical studies; reviews; and theoretical, opinion, and information articles were included in the review in order to provide a more comprehensive view of the state of evidence-based nursing internationally. Findings revealed a number of barriers to evidence-based nursing practice, which have persisted over the last two decades, including inadequate knowledge of research among practicing nurses, lack of administrative support for research activities in clinical settings, lack of empowerment of nurses, and lack of needed mentoring from nursing research consultants. Barriers in the areas of nursing education and administrative support appear to be major. A need was identified for a pragmatic model that encourages cooperation and collaboration between educators/researchers in academia and the administrative leaders in the clinical facilities if evidence-based nursing practice is to become the norm. FRAMEWORK OF MODEL: The Tyler Collaborative Model is based on an eclectic approach to planned change for creating evidence-based practice. This model identifies a step-by-step process for change, while allowing for the opportunity to integrate any of the previously available methods of critical appraisal to determine the best evidence for practice in each clinical setting.

  2. Sustaining innovation collaboration models for a complex world

    CERN Document Server

    Carleton, Tamara

    2012-01-01

    In many ways, the process of innovation is a constant social dance, where the best dancers thrive by adapting new steps with multiple partners. The systematic and continuous generation of value in any innovation system relies on collaboration between different groups, who must overcome multiple, often competing agendas and needs to work together fruitfully over the long term. Featuring contributions from leading researchers, business leaders, and policymakers representing North America, Europe, India, Africa, and Australasia, this volume investigates different combinations of collaborative arrangements among innovation actors, many of which are changing conventional expectations of institutional relationships. Collectively, the authors demonstrate that no particular combination has emerged as the most dominant, or even resilient, model of innovation. Several authors expand on our understanding of the triple helix model, with both academics and practitioners looking to the quadruple helix (encompassing busines...

  3. Modelling Global Pattern Formations for Collaborative Learning Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grappiolo, Corrado; Cheong, Yun-Gyung; Khaled, Rilla;

    2012-01-01

    We present our research towards the design of a computational framework capable of modelling the formation and evolution of global patterns (i.e. group structures) in a population of social individuals. The framework is intended to be used in collaborative environments, e.g. social serious games...... and computer simulations of artificial societies. The theoretical basis of our research, together with current state of the art and future work, are briefly introduced....

  4. A COLLABORATIVE LOCATION MODEL FOR CELLULAR MOBILE POSITION LOCATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deng Ping; Liu Lin; Fan Pingzhi

    2004-01-01

    In cellular network, several Time Difference Of Arrival (TDOA) location algorithms can be applied to mobile position estimation. However, each algorithm has its own limitations and none of them is proved to be the most reliable one in different channel environments. In this paper Kleine-Ostmann's data fusion model is modified and a collaborative location model which incorporates position estimate of two TDOA location algorithms is proposed.Analysis and simulation show that more reliable and accurate mobile position estimation can be achieved based on this model.

  5. restorative justice, criminal justice and access to justice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    wide range of human rights that are enshrined in ... series, which tend to glorify the role of the prosecutor in a dramatic depiction of good versus bad. However, reality ... unpredictable transformation'.6 Models of practice ..... Funding and resources are also needed. 18 .... Restorative Justice Week, Protea Hotel, Umhlanga.

  6. Justice Globalism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilson, Erin; Steger, Manfred; Siracusa, Joseph; Battersby, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The pursuit of a global order founded on universal rules extends beyond economics into the normative spheres of law, politics and justice. Justice globalists claim universal principles applicable to all societies irrespective of religion or ideology. This view privileges human rights, democracy and

  7. Justice sociale

    OpenAIRE

    Jacquemain, Marc

    2007-01-01

    At first glance "social justice" cannot be considered as a "new word of power" since all powers have been reluctant to apply social justice. But if it is used to organize the "evaporation" of the reflexion on equality, then it can take a clearly conservative tone

  8. Justice Globalism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilson, Erin; Steger, Manfred; Siracusa, Joseph; Battersby, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The pursuit of a global order founded on universal rules extends beyond economics into the normative spheres of law, politics and justice. Justice globalists claim universal principles applicable to all societies irrespective of religion or ideology. This view privileges human rights, democracy and

  9. Organizational Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Travis

    2013-01-01

    Helping principals understand the importance of organizational justice is the first step in enhancing learning outcomes for all learners, regardless of their social class, race, abilities, sex, or gender. In schools, organizational justice may be defined as teachers' perceptions of fairness, respect, and equity that relate to their interactions…

  10. The social justice roots of the Mentors in Violence Prevention model and its application in a high school setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Jackson; Heisterkamp, H Alan; Fleming, Wm Michael

    2011-06-01

    The social justice roots and theory of the Mentors in Violence Prevention (MVP) model is presented, followed by an empirical study examining the influence of MVP in high school settings. Findings reveal students exposed to the MVP model are more likely to see forms of violence as being wrong and are more likely to take actions to intervene than students not exposed to the program. Findings support the premises on which MVP is founded.

  11. Astronomy across State Lines: A Collaborative Model for Astronomical Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Chelen H.; Barge, Jacqueline; Linahan, Marcella; York, Donald G.; Cante, David; Cook, Mary; Daw, Maeve; Donahoe, Katherine E.; Ford, Sydney; Haecker, Lille W.; Hibbs, Cecily A.; Hogan, Eleanor B.; Karos, Demetra N.; Kozikowski, Kendall G.; Martin, Taylor A.; Miranda, Fernando; Ng, Emily; Noel, Imany; O'Bryan, Sophie E.; Sharma, Vikrant; Zegeye, David

    2015-01-01

    Scientists do not work in isolation, nor should student scientists. In a collaborative effort, students from three high schools examined plates from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to estimate the number of galaxies that contain evidence of a black hole. Working under the direction of Don York, former SDSS director, the three teachers used Google hangouts to discuss weekly progress. At their home institutions, students examined optical spectra from SDSS Data Release 10 to determine if a quasar could be discerned. Both Type I and Type II quasars can be seen in the SDSS data. Seven teams of students from different schools compared their findings and collaborated online to discuss potential discoveries. This project can serve as a model for high school teachers who want to facilitate their students participating in an authentic research project. The keys to a successful project are working with a mentor who can guide the group through difficult concepts and communicating frequently throughout the project.

  12. Modeling a National Collaborative Digital Library for Malaysian Secondary Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.N. Edzan

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the conceptualisation of a model for a collaborative digital library specially tailored for Malaysian secondary schools, which will support classroom teaching and learning. The move towards collaboratively building the contents of a digital library is a fairly recent trend and it simulates an environment where partners are empowered to participate in building and up keeping the knowledge contents of the system. The conceptualisation of a Malaysian digital library is in line with the governments efforts in establishing SMART schools. However, various issues such as identifying local resources, ascertaining the needs of it users, and establishing a framework to meet these needs, must be addressed before the digital library can be fully implemented. It may be approached through the establishment of test beds in a particular learning institution, before nationwide implementation.

  13. C-HiLasso: A Collaborative Hierarchical Sparse Modeling Framework

    CERN Document Server

    Sprechmann, Pablo; Sapiro, Guillermo; Eldar, Yonina

    2010-01-01

    Sparse modeling is a powerful framework for data analysis and processing. Traditionally, encoding in this framework is performed by solving an L1-regularized linear regression problem, commonly referred to as Lasso or Basis Pursuit. In this work we combine the sparsity-inducing property of the Lasso model at the individual feature level, with the block-sparsity property of the Group Lasso model, where sparse groups of features are jointly encoded, obtaining a sparsity pattern hierarchically structured. This results in the Hierarchical Lasso (HiLasso), which shows important practical modeling advantages. We then extend this approach to the collaborative case, where a set of simultaneously coded signals share the same sparsity pattern at the higher (group) level, but not necessarily at the lower (inside the group) level, obtaining the collaborative HiLasso model (C-HiLasso). Such signals then share the same active groups, or classes, but not necessarily the same active set. This model is very well suited for ap...

  14. When do researchers collaborate? Toward a model of collaboration propensity in science and engineering research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnholtz, Jeremy P.

    Geographically distributed and multidisciplinary collaborations have proven invaluable in answering a range of important scientific questions, such as understanding and controlling disease threats like SARS and AIDS or exploring the nature of matter in particle physics. Despite this, however, collaboration can often be problematic. There are institutional obstacles, collaboration tools may be poorly designed, and group coordination is difficult. To better design technologies to support research activities, we need an improved understanding of why scientists collaborate and how their collaborations work. To achieve this improved understanding, this study compares two theoretical approaches to collaboration propensity---that is, the extent to which collaboration is perceived as useful by individual researchers. On one hand, cultural comparisons of disciplines suggest that collaboration propensity will be higher in disciplinary cultures that have a more collectivist orientation, as indicated by low levels of competition for individual recognition and few concerns about secrecy related to commercialization and intellectual property. In contrast, an approach based on social and organizational psychology suggests that collaboration propensity will vary as a function of resource concentration, fieldwide focus on a well-defined set of problems, and the need for and availability of help when difficult problems are encountered in day-to-day work. To explore this question, a mail survey of 900 academic researchers in three fields was conducted, along with 100 interviews with practicing researchers at 17 sites in the field. Results support a social and organizational psychological interpretation of collaboration propensity. That is, cultural factors such as competition for individual recognition and concerns about intellectual property were not perceived as significant impediments to collaboration. Instead, characteristics like resource concentration and frequent help

  15. ACE--Alliance for Clinical Enhancement: a collaborative model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirrier, G P; Granger, M; Todaro, M

    1993-01-01

    This paper introduces an innovative collaborative model developed by nursing educators and practitioners, the Alliance for Clinical Enhancement Program (ACE), that combines components of traditional internship and extender programs. The goals of ACE are opportunities for role socialization, role transition, and role modeling for nursing students; enhancing clinical competence and provision of financial assistance to the students; increased recruitment of RN graduates by the involved hospital; and decreased RN time spent on non-nursing tasks by hospital RNs. The total development, implementation, and analysis of ACE Program is discussed.

  16. Collaborative Product Configuration Model in Networked Manufacturing Based on Semantic Web%投稿须知

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Aim at the requirements of collaborative product configuration design in networked manufacturing, a collaborative product configuration model based on semantic web was exploredA semantic web-based structure of the collaborative product configuration model was proposedAnd a product configuration design workflow model was constructedThe collaborative product configuration ontology was constructed by definition of semantic-based metadata of collaborative product configuration information. The ontology was used for semantic annotation of information that dispersed in the network.So the product configuration information can shared between collaborative enterprises in networked manufacturing.And the efficiency of distribute information exchange and the collaborative product development level can be improved,The validity of the model was verified by applying the model into a networked collaborative design platform.

  17. Interprofessional collaboration: three best practice models of interprofessional education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, Diane R; Davidson, Richard A; Odegard, Peggy Soule; Maki, Ian V; Tomkowiak, John

    2011-04-08

    Interprofessional education is a collaborative approach to develop healthcare students as future interprofessional team members and a recommendation suggested by the Institute of Medicine. Complex medical issues can be best addressed by interprofessional teams. Training future healthcare providers to work in such teams will help facilitate this model resulting in improved healthcare outcomes for patients. In this paper, three universities, the Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, the University of Florida and the University of Washington describe their training curricula models of collaborative and interprofessional education.The models represent a didactic program, a community-based experience and an interprofessional-simulation experience. The didactic program emphasizes interprofessional team building skills, knowledge of professions, patient centered care, service learning, the impact of culture on healthcare delivery and an interprofessional clinical component. The community-based experience demonstrates how interprofessional collaborations provide service to patients and how the environment and availability of resources impact one's health status. The interprofessional-simulation experience describes clinical team skills training in both formative and summative simulations used to develop skills in communication and leadership.One common theme leading to a successful experience among these three interprofessional models included helping students to understand their own professional identity while gaining an understanding of other professional's roles on the health care team. Commitment from departments and colleges, diverse calendar agreements, curricular mapping, mentor and faculty training, a sense of community, adequate physical space, technology, and community relationships were all identified as critical resources for a successful program. Summary recommendations for best practices included the need for administrative support

  18. Interprofessional collaboration: three best practice models of interprofessional education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane R. Bridges

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Interprofessional education is a collaborative approach to develop healthcare students as future interprofessional team members and a recommendation suggested by the Institute of Medicine. Complex medical issues can be best addressed by interprofessional teams. Training future healthcare providers to work in such teams will help facilitate this model resulting in improved healthcare outcomes for patients. In this paper, three universities, the Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, the University of Florida and the University of Washington describe their training curricula models of collaborative and interprofessional education.The models represent a didactic program, a community-based experience and an interprofessional-simulation experience. The didactic program emphasizes interprofessional team building skills, knowledge of professions, patient centered care, service learning, the impact of culture on healthcare delivery and an interprofessional clinical component. The community-based experience demonstrates how interprofessional collaborations provide service to patients and how the environment and availability of resources impact one's health status. The interprofessional-simulation experience describes clinical team skills training in both formative and summative simulations used to develop skills in communication and leadership.One common theme leading to a successful experience among these three interprofessional models included helping students to understand their own professional identity while gaining an understanding of other professional's roles on the health care team. Commitment from departments and colleges, diverse calendar agreements, curricular mapping, mentor and faculty training, a sense of community, adequate physical space, technology, and community relationships were all identified as critical resources for a successful program. Summary recommendations for best practices included the need for administrative

  19. Rethinking Design Process: Using 3D Digital Models as an Interface in Collaborative Session

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Suining

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a pilot study for an alternative design process by integrating a designer-user collaborative session with digital models. The collaborative session took place in a 3D AutoCAD class for a real world project. The 3D models served as an interface for designer-user collaboration during the design process. Students not only learned…

  20. Rethinking Design Process: Using 3D Digital Models as an Interface in Collaborative Session

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Suining

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a pilot study for an alternative design process by integrating a designer-user collaborative session with digital models. The collaborative session took place in a 3D AutoCAD class for a real world project. The 3D models served as an interface for designer-user collaboration during the design process. Students not only learned…

  1. A transformation approach for collaboration based requirement models

    CERN Document Server

    Harbouche, Ahmed; Mokhtari, Aicha

    2012-01-01

    Distributed software engineering is widely recognized as a complex task. Among the inherent complexities is the process of obtaining a system design from its global requirement specification. This paper deals with such transformation process and suggests an approach to derive the behavior of a given system components, in the form of distributed Finite State Machines, from the global system requirements, in the form of an augmented UML Activity Diagrams notation. The process of the suggested approach is summarized in three steps: the definition of the appropriate source Meta-Model (requirements Meta-Model), the definition of the target Design Meta-Model and the definition of the rules to govern the transformation during the derivation process. The derivation process transforms the global system requirements described as UML diagram activities (extended with collaborations) to system roles behaviors represented as UML finite state machines. The approach is implemented using Atlas Transformation Language (ATL).

  2. A TRANSFORMATION APPROACH FOR COLLABORATION BASED REQUIREMENT MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Harbouche

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Distributed software engineering is widely recognized as a complex task. Among the inherent complexitiesis the process of obtaining a system design from its global requirement specification. This paper deals withsuch transformation process and suggests an approach to derive the behavior of a given systemcomponents, in the form of distributed Finite State Machines, from the global system requirements, in theform of an augmented UML Activity Diagrams notation. The process of the suggested approach issummarized in three steps: the definition of the appropriate source Meta-Model (requirements Meta-Model, the definition of the target Design Meta-Model and the definition of the rules to govern thetransformation during the derivation process. The derivation process transforms the global systemrequirements described as UML diagram activities (extended with collaborations to system rolesbehaviors represented as UML finite state machines. The approach is implemented using AtlasTransformation Language (ATL.

  3. Modeling Context, Collaboration, and Civilization in End-User Informatics

    CERN Document Server

    Maney, George A

    2007-01-01

    End-user informatics applications are Internet data web management automation solutions. These are mass modeling and mass management collaborative communal consensus solutions. They are made and maintained by managerial, professional, technical and specialist end-users. In end-user informatics the end-users are always right. So it becomes necessary for information technology professionals to understand information and informatics from the end-user perspective. End-user informatics starts with the observation that practical prose is a mass consensus communal modeling technology. This high technology is the mechanistic modeling medium we all use every day in all of our practical pursuits. Practical information flows are the lifeblood of modern capitalist communities. But what exactly is practical information? It's ultimately physical information, but the physics is highly emergent rather than elementary. So practical reality is just physical reality in deep disguise. Practical prose is the medium that we all us...

  4. Dimensionality of organizational justice in a call center context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, Douglas; Haley, Lynn M; McNally, Jeffrey J

    2012-04-01

    Summary.-Employees in three call centers were surveyed about their perceptions of organizational justice. Four factors were measured: distributive justice, procedural justice, interpersonal justice, and informational justice. Structural equation modeling was employed to test whether a two-, three-, or four-factor model best fit the call center data. A three-factor model of distributive, procedural, and informational justice provided the best fit to these data. The three-factor model that showed the best fit does not conform to any of the more traditional models identified in the organizational justice literature. This implies that the context in which organizational justice is measured may play a role in identifying which justice factors are relevant to employees. Findings add to the empirical evidence on the dimensionality of organizational justice and imply that dimensionality of organizational justice is more context-dependent than previously thought.

  5. A Collaborative Network Model for Agrifood Transactions on Regional Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpentesta, Antonio P.; Ammirato, Salvatore

    The paper deals with a collaborative agrifood network in a regional scenario where producers of high typical and quality goods and consumer groups are involved in agrifood transactions as well as information and knowledge exchanges through an e-business platform. While producers are engaged in providing consumers with useful and timely information about healthiness, environmentally friendliness and most importantly, food quality of their products, consumers are engaged in giving prompt and understandable feedbacks to the producers. In this sense, the network is a form of proactive learning community. Starting from some basic socio-economic assumptions on a reference territory, we present an organizational model that can be adopted to foster the development of the regional area where it is applied. An instantiation of the model for a selected territory (the District of High Quality Productions in Sibari, Calabria, Italy) and first results, coming from two pilot tests, have been summarized as well.

  6. Web-Based Modelling and Collaborative Simulation of Declarative Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slaats, Tijs; Marquard, Morten; Shahzad, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    As a provider of Electronic Case Management solutions to knowledge-intensive businesses and organizations, the Danish company Exformatics has in recent years identified a need for flexible process support in the tools that we provide to our customers. We have addressed this need by adapting DCR......-user discussions on how knowledge workers really work, by enabling collaborative simulation of processes. In earlier work we reported on the integration of DCR Graphs as a workflow execution formalism in the existing Exformatics ECM products. In this paper we report on the advances we have made over the last two...... years, we describe the new declarative process modelling portal, discuss its features, describe the process of its development, report on the findings of an initial evaluation of the usability of the tool, resulting from a tutorial on declarative modelling with DCR Graphs that we organized at last years...

  7. Scrum integration in stage-gate models for collaborative product development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Anita Friis; Slavensky, Andreas; Nguyen, Vivi Thuy

    2013-01-01

    to differentiate from low-cost competitors and increase PD performance, some industrial manufacturers now seek competitive advantage by experimenting with new ways for collaborative PD. This includes integrating customer-focused agile process models, like Scrum, from the software industry into their existing PD...... models. Thus, instead of replacing traditional stage-gate models agile methods are currently integrated in existing PD models generating hybrid solution for collaborative PD. This paper includes a study of three industrial cases that have successfully integrated Scrum into a stage-gate process model...... for collaborative PD. The paper introduces the three functional hybrid models, including impact on PD performance, PD roles and customer collaboration....

  8. An Evaluation of a Service-Learning Model for Criminal Justice Undergraduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschinger-Blank, Nancy Beth; Simons, Lori; Kenyon, Alexandra

    2009-01-01

    A triangulation mixed-methods design was used to measure differences in service-learning outcomes for 32 students enrolled in criminal justice courses during the academic years 2003 (n = 16) and 2005 (n = 16). Results show that service-learners increase their political awareness and course value but experience a decrease in problem-solving skills…

  9. An Approach for Maintaining Models of an E-Commerce Collaboration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodenstaff, L.; Wombacher, A.; Wieringa, R.J.; Reichert, M.U.

    2008-01-01

    To keep an overview on complex e-commerce collaborations several models are used to describe them. When models overlap in describing a collaboration, the overlapping information should not contradict. Models are of different nature and maintained by different people. Therefore, keeping model-overlap

  10. The Answering Process for Multiple-Choice Questions in Collaborative Learning: A Mathematical Learning Model Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yasuyuki; Nishi, Shinnosuke; Muramatsu, Yuta; Yasutake, Koichi; Yamakawa, Osamu; Tagawa, Takahiro

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a mathematical model for collaborative learning and the answering process for multiple-choice questions. The collaborative learning model is inspired by the Ising spin model and the model for answering multiple-choice questions is based on their difficulty level. An intensive simulation study predicts the possibility of…

  11. An Approach for Maintaining Models of an E-Commerce Collaboration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodenstaff, L.; Wombacher, Andreas; Reichert, M.U.; Wieringa, Roelf J.

    To keep an overview on complex E-Commerce collaborations several models are used to describe them. When models overlap in describing a collaboration, the overlapping information should not contradict. Models are of different nature and maintained by different people. Therefore, keeping model-overlap

  12. Collaborative Modelling and Co-Simulation with DESTECS: A Pilot Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pierce, Ken; Gamble, Garl; Ni, Yunyun; Broenink, Johannes F.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a collaborative modelling ex- ercise using the DESTECS framework. The DESTECS approach allows engineers and software designers to collaborate to produce system models that contain a discrete-event (DE) model of a controller and continuous-time (CT) model of a plant. We call

  13. Exploring the Impact of Students' Learning Approach on Collaborative Group Modeling of Blood Circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shinyoung; Kang, Eunhee; Kim, Heui-Baik

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the effect on group dynamics of statements associated with deep learning approaches (DLA) and their contribution to cognitive collaboration and model development during group modeling of blood circulation. A group was selected for an in-depth analysis of collaborative group modeling. This group constructed a model in a…

  14. Clinical Interdisciplinary Collaboration Models and Frameworks From Similarities to Differences: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdizadeh, Mousa; Heydari, Abbas; Moonaghi, Hossien Karimi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: So far, various models of interdisciplinary collaboration in clinical nursing have been presented, however, yet a comprehensive model is not available. The purpose of this study is to review the evidences that had presented model or framework with qualitative approach about interdisciplinary collaboration in clinical nursing. Methods: All the articles and theses published from 1990 to 10 June 2014 which in both English and Persian models or frameworks of clinicians had presented model or framework of clinical collaboration were searched using databases of Proquest, Scopus, pub Med, Science Direct, and Iranian databases of Sid, Magiran, and Iranmedex. In this review, for published articles and theses, keywords according with MESH such as nurse-physician relations, care team, collaboration, interdisciplinary relations and their Persian equivalents were used. Results: In this study contexts, processes and outcomes of interdisciplinary collaboration as findings were extracted. One of the major components affecting on collaboration that most of the models had emphasized was background of collaboration. Most of studies suggested that the outcome of collaboration were improved care, doctors and nurses’ satisfaction, controlling costs, reducing clinical errors and patient’s safety. Conclusion: Models and frameworks had different structures, backgrounds, and conditions, but the outcomes were similar. Organizational structure, culture and social factors are important aspects of clinical collaboration. So it is necessary to improve the quality and effectiveness of clinical collaboration these factors to be considered. PMID:26153158

  15. Enabling Cross-Discipline Collaboration Via a Functional Data Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindholm, D. M.; Wilson, A.; Baltzer, T.

    2016-12-01

    Many research disciplines have very specialized data models that are used to express the detailed semantics that are meaningful to that community and easily utilized by their data analysis tools. While invaluable to members of that community, such expressive data structures and metadata are of little value to potential collaborators from other scientific disciplines. Many data interoperability efforts focus on the difficult task of computationally mapping concepts from one domain to another to facilitate discovery and use of data. Although these efforts are important and promising, we have found that a great deal of discovery and dataset understanding still happens at the level of less formal, personal communication. However, a significant barrier to inter-disciplinary data sharing that remains is one of data access.Scientists and data analysts continue to spend inordinate amounts of time simply trying to get data into their analysis tools. Providing data in a standard file format is often not sufficient since data can be structured in many ways. Adhering to more explicit community standards for data structure and metadata does little to help those in other communities.The Functional Data Model specializes the Relational Data Model (used by many database systems)by defining relations as functions between independent (domain) and dependent (codomain) variables. Given that arrays of data in many scientific data formats generally represent functionally related parameters (e.g. temperature as a function of space and time), the Functional Data Model is quite relevant for these datasets as well. The LaTiS software framework implements the Functional Data Model and provides a mechanism to expose an existing data source as a LaTiS dataset. LaTiS datasets can be manipulated using a Functional Algebra and output in any number of formats.LASP has successfully used the Functional Data Model and its implementation in the LaTiS software framework to bridge the gap between

  16. A Design of Product Collaborative Online Configuration Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoguo; Zheng, Jin; Zeng, Qian

    According to the actual needs of mass customization, the personalization of product and its collaborative design, the paper analyzes and studies the working mechanism of modular-based product configuration technology and puts forward an information model of modular product family. Combined with case-based reasoning techniques (CBR) and the constraint satisfaction problem solving techniques (CSP), we design and study the algorithm for product configuration, and analyze its time complexity. A car chassis is made as the application object, we provide a prototype system of online configuration. Taking advantage of this system, designers can make appropriate changes on the existing programs in accordance with the demand. This will accelerate all aspects of product development and shorten the product cycle. Also the system will provide a strong technical support for enterprises to improve their market competitiveness.

  17. Climate Justice: High-Status Ingroup Social Models Increase Pro-Environmental Action Through Making Actions Seem More Moral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweetman, Joseph; Whitmarsh, Lorraine E

    2016-01-01

    Recent work has suggested that our cognitive biases and moral psychology may pose significant barriers to tackling climate change. Here, we report evidence that through status and group-based social influence processes, and our moral sense of justice, it may be possible to employ such characteristics of the human mind in efforts to engender pro-environmental action. We draw on applied work demonstrating the efficacy of social modeling techniques in order to examine the indirect effects of social model status and group membership (through perceptions of efficacy, pro-environmental social identity and moral judgments of how fair it is for individuals to perform particular pro-environmental actions) on pro-environmental action tendencies. We find evidence that high- (vs. low-) status models increase pro-environmental action, in part, through making such actions seem morally fairer to undertake. This effect of high-status models only occurs when they share a meaningful ingroup membership with the target of influence. Further, we find evidence that this conditional effect of high-status models may also have a direct impact on action tendencies. While the exact behaviors that are influenced may vary across student and non-student samples, we argue that a focus on the "justice pathway" to action and the social-cognitive features of models may offer a good opportunity for cognitive and behavioral scientists to integrate insights from basic research with those stemming from more applied research efforts.

  18. Evaluating University-Industry Collaboration: The European Foundation of Quality Management Excellence Model-Based Evaluation of University-Industry Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauppila, Osmo; Mursula, Anu; Harkonen, Janne; Kujala, Jaakko

    2015-01-01

    The growth in university-industry collaboration has resulted in an increasing demand for methods to evaluate it. This paper presents one way to evaluate an organization's collaborative activities based on the European Foundation of Quality Management excellence model. Success factors of collaboration are derived from literature and compared…

  19. Symmetric Collaborative Filtering Using the Noisy Sensor Model

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Rita; Poole, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Collaborative filtering is the process of making recommendations regarding the potential preference of a user, for example shopping on the Internet, based on the preference ratings of the user and a number of other users for various items. This paper considers collaborative filtering based on explicitmulti-valued ratings. To evaluate the algorithms, weconsider only {em pure} collaborative filtering, using ratings exclusively, and no other information about the people or items.Our approach is ...

  20. Collaborative Visualization for Large-Scale Accelerator Electromagnetic Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schussman, Greg; /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    In the Phase I SBIR we proposed a ParaView-based solution to provide an environment for individuals to actively collaborate in the visualization process. The technical objectives of Phase I were: (1) to determine the set of features required for an effect collaborative system; (2) to implement a two-person collaborative prototype; and (3) to implement key collaborative features such as control locking and annotation. Accordingly, we implemented a ParaView-based collaboration prototype with support for collaborating with up to four simultaneous clients. We also implemented collaborative features such as control locking, chatting, annotation etc. Due to in part of the flexibility provided by the ParaView framework and the design features implemented in the prototype, we were able to support collaboration with multiple views, instead of a simple give as initially proposed in Phase I. In this section we will summarize the results we obtained during the Phase I project. ParaView is complex, scalable, client-server application framework built on top of the VTK visualization engine. During the implementation of the Phase I prototype, we realized that the ParaView framework naturally supports collaboration technology; hence we were able to go beyond the proposed Phase I prototype in several ways. For example, we were able to support for multiple views, enable server-as well as client-side rendering, and manage up to four heterogeneous clients. The success we achieved with Phase I clearly demonstrated the technical feasibility of the ParaView based collaborative framework we are proposing in the Phase II effort. We also investigated using the web browser as one of the means of participating in a collaborative session. This would enable non-visualization experts to participate in the collaboration process without being intimidated by a complex application such as ParaView. Hence we also developed a prototype web visualization applet that makes it possible for interactive

  1. Juvenile justice mental health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Christopher R; Penn, Joseph V

    2002-10-01

    should be screened and, when necessary, assessed for mental health and substance abuse disorders. The screening should occur at the youth's earliest point of contact with the juvenile justice system and should be available at all stages of juvenile justice processing. Whenever possible, youth with serious mental health disorders should be diverted from the juvenile justice system [58]. If delinquent youths do not receive the necessary evaluation, treatment, and rehabilitation, they face the real prospect of further incarceration in adult correctional facilities. Improved screening and treatment require better interagency collaboration, established standards of care, and continuing research on the mental health needs of youth in the juvenile justice system. Better mental health care for youth in the juvenile justice system supports the goal of rehabilitation. Mental health professionals should support these efforts as the appropriate response to meet the challenges of the new century.

  2. Sociology of justice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liebig, S.; Sauer, C.G.

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter, we provide an overview of the empirical justice research done so far within sociology and aim to contribute to a clearer understanding of what constitutes a sociological approach. In order to do so, we first introduce the multilevel model of sociological explanation and derive four

  3. Human Systems Engineering: A Leadership Model for Collaboration and Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Karen L.

    Human systems engineering (HSE) was created to introduce a new way of viewing collaboration. HSE emphasizes the role of leaders who welcome risk, commit to achieving positive change, and help others achieve change. The principles of HSE and its successful application to the collaborative process were illustrated through a case study representing a…

  4. Improved spring model-based collaborative indoor visible light positioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhijie; Zhang, WeiNan; Zhou, GuoFu

    2016-06-01

    Gaining accuracy with indoor positioning of individuals is important as many location-based services rely on the user's current position to provide them with useful services. Many researchers have studied indoor positioning techniques based on WiFi and Bluetooth. However, they have disadvantages such as low accuracy or high cost. In this paper, we propose an indoor positioning system in which visible light radiated from light-emitting diodes is used to locate the position of receivers. Compared with existing methods using light-emitting diode light, we present a high-precision and simple implementation collaborative indoor visible light positioning system based on an improved spring model. We first estimate coordinate position information using the visible light positioning system, and then use the spring model to correct positioning errors. The system can be employed easily because it does not require additional sensors and the occlusion problem of visible light would be alleviated. We also describe simulation experiments, which confirm the feasibility of our proposed method.

  5. A collaborative model for supporting community-based interdisciplinary education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Patricia A; Schifferdecker, Karen E; Pipas, Catherine F; Fall, Leslie H; Poor, Daniel A; Peltier, Deborah A; Nierenberg, David W; Brooks, W Blair

    2002-07-01

    Development and support of community-based, interdisciplinary ambulatory medical education has achieved high priority due to on-site capacity and the unique educational experiences community sites contribute to the educational program. The authors describe the collaborative model their school developed and implemented in 2000 to integrate institution- and community-based interdisciplinary education through a centralized office, the strengths and challenges faced in applying it, the educational outcomes that are being tracked to evaluate its effectiveness, and estimates of funds needed to ensure its success. Core funding of $180,000 is available annually for a centralized office, the keystone of the model described here. With this funding, the office has (1) addressed recruitment, retention, and quality of educators for UME; (2) promoted innovation in education, evaluation, and research; (3) supported development of a comprehensive curriculum for medical school education; and (4) monitored the effectiveness of community-based education programs by tracking product yield and cost estimates needed to generate these programs. The model's Teaching and Learning Database contains information about more than 1,500 educational placements at 165 ambulatory teaching sites (80% in northern New England) involving 320 active preceptors. The centralized office facilitated 36 site visits, 22% of which were interdisciplinary, involving 122 preceptors. A total of 98 follow-up requests by community-based preceptors were fulfilled in 2000. The current submission-to-funding ratio for educational grants is 56%. Costs per educational activity have ranged from $811.50 to $1,938, with costs per preceptor ranging from $101.40 to $217.82. Cost per product (grants, manuscripts, presentations) in research and academic scholarship activities was $2,492. The model allows the medical school to balance institutional and departmental support for its educational programs, and to better position

  6. Evaluation of a Danish pharmacist student-physician medication review collaboration model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaae, Susanne; Sørensen, Ellen Westh; Nørgaard, Lotte Stig

    2014-06-01

    Interprofessional collaboration between pharmacists and physicians to conduct joint home medication reviews (HMR) is important for optimizing the medical treatment of patients suffering from chronic illnesses. However, collaboration has proved difficult to achieve. The HMR programme "Medisam" was launched in 2009 at the University of Copenhagen with the aim of "developing, implementing and evaluating a collaboration model for HMRs and medicine reconciliations in Denmark". The Medisam programme involves patients, pharmacy internship students, the (pharmacist) supervisor of the pharmacy students and physicians. To explore if it was possible through the Medisam programme to obtain a fruitful HMR collaboration between pharmacy internship students and physicians as a means to develop HMR collaboration between trained pharmacists and physicians further. Ten matching pairs of student-physician collaboration were studied across Denmark. Semi-structured interviews about existing collaboration were conducted with pharmacy internship students in the HMR programme, their supervisors and physicians partners. The theoretical framework forming the analyses was derived especially from works of Bradley et al. (Res Soc Adm Pharm 8:36-46, 2012), and Snyder et al. (Res Soc Adm Pharm 6:307-23, 2010) on pharmacists/physician collaboration. The development of inter-professional collaboration between students and physicians according to the three collaboration drivers: trustworthiness, role specification and professional interaction. Full collaboration was not achieved. Physicians found collaboration satisfactory, students however expressed the need of more interaction with physicians. The written collaboration contracts did not ensure a possible need of students to re-negotiate roles and tasks, and did therefore not entirely ensure role specification. Developing mutual professional interdependence through students being recognized by physicians to contribute to improved patient outcomes

  7. CoLeMo: A Collaborative Learning Environment for UML Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weiqin; Pedersen, Roger Heggernes; Pettersen, Oystein

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the design, implementation, and evaluation of a distributed collaborative UML modelling environment, CoLeMo. CoLeMo is designed for students studying UML modelling. It can also be used as a platform for collaborative design of software. We conducted formative evaluations and a summative evaluation to improve the environment and…

  8. Collaboration among Social Work and Journalism Students and Faculty: An Instructional Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Susan; Ekman, Eve; English, Dierdre; Fujimori, Sachi

    2008-01-01

    The authors describe an instructional model designed to promote interdisciplinary collaboration among students pursuing master's degrees in social work and journalism. This unique model involved active collaboration among social work and journalism graduate students and faculty to create a single-issue magazine focused on a diverse range of social…

  9. CoLeMo: A Collaborative Learning Environment for UML Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weiqin; Pedersen, Roger Heggernes; Pettersen, Oystein

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the design, implementation, and evaluation of a distributed collaborative UML modelling environment, CoLeMo. CoLeMo is designed for students studying UML modelling. It can also be used as a platform for collaborative design of software. We conducted formative evaluations and a summative evaluation to improve the environment and…

  10. Forecasting the Unit Cost of a Product with Some Linear Fuzzy Collaborative Forecasting Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toly Chen

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Forecasting the unit cost of every product type in a factory is an important task. However, it is not easy to deal with the uncertainty of the unit cost. Fuzzy collaborative forecasting is a very effective treatment of the uncertainty in the distributed environment. This paper presents some linear fuzzy collaborative forecasting models to predict the unit cost of a product. In these models, the experts’ forecasts differ and therefore need to be aggregated through collaboration. According to the experimental results, the effectiveness of forecasting the unit cost was considerably improved through collaboration.

  11. Tool Support for Collaborative Teaching and Learning of Object-Oriented Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Klaus Marius; Ratzer, Anne Vinter

    2002-01-01

    Modeling is central to doing and learning object-oriented development. We present a new tool, Ideogramic UML, for gesture-based collaborative modeling with the Unified Modeling Language (UML), which can be used to collaboratively teach and learn modeling. Furthermore, we discuss how we have...... effectively used Ideogramic UML to teach object-oriented modeling and the UML to groups of students using the UML for project assignments....

  12. ICTP: A Successful Model of International Scientific Collaboration

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    The importance of international scientific collaboration in the changing world where the centre of gravity of fundamental research may be moving towards the east and the south is addressed. The unique role of ICTP in supporting global science is highlighted.

  13. An Outcome-Weighted Network Model for Characterizing Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholtens, Denise M.; Frailey, Conor N.; Gravenor, Stephanie J.; Kricke, Gayle E.; Soulakis, Nicholas D.

    2016-01-01

    Shared patient encounters form the basis of collaborative relationships, which are crucial to the success of complex and interdisciplinary teamwork in healthcare. Quantifying the strength of these relationships using shared risk-adjusted patient outcomes provides insight into interactions that occur between healthcare providers. We developed the Shared Positive Outcome Ratio (SPOR), a novel parameter that quantifies the concentration of positive outcomes between a pair of healthcare providers over a set of shared patient encounters. We constructed a collaboration network using hospital emergency department patient data from electronic health records (EHRs) over a three-year period. Based on an outcome indicating patient satisfaction, we used this network to assess pairwise collaboration and evaluate the SPOR. By comparing this network of 574 providers and 5,615 relationships to a set of networks based on randomized outcomes, we identified 295 (5.2%) pairwise collaborations having significantly higher patient satisfaction rates. Our results show extreme high- and low-scoring relationships over a set of shared patient encounters and quantify high variability in collaboration between providers. We identified 29 top performers in terms of patient satisfaction. Providers in the high-scoring group had both a greater average number of associated encounters and a higher percentage of total encounters with positive outcomes than those in the low-scoring group, implying that more experienced individuals may be able to collaborate more successfully. Our study shows that a healthcare collaboration network can be structurally evaluated to characterize the collaborative interactions that occur between healthcare providers in a hospital setting. PMID:27706199

  14. Outsourcing and Multi-Party Business Collaborations Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Lai Xu

    2007-01-01

    To remain competitive, enterprises have to integrate their business processes with their customers, suppliers, and business partners. Increasing collaboration includes not only a global multi-national enterprise, but also an organization with its relationship to and business processes with its business partners. Standards and technologies permit business partners to exchange information, collaborate, and carry out business transactions in a pervasive Web environment. There is however still ve...

  15. Due process model of procedural justice in performance appraisal: promotion versus termination scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Heloneida C; Cole, Nina D; Flint, Douglas A

    2006-12-01

    In a laboratory study, 318 student participants (148 male, 169 female, and one who did not report sex; M age 25.0, SD = 6.0) in introductory organizational behavior classes responded to scenarios in which performance appraisal resulted in either employee promotion or termination. Each scenario had varying levels of three procedural justice criteria for performance appraisal. For both promotion and termination outcomes, analysis showed that, as the number of criteria increased, perceptions of procedural fairness increased. A comparison between the two outcomes showed that perceptions of fairness were significantly stronger for the promotion outcome than for termination.

  16. A methodology proposal for collaborative business process elaboration using a model-driven approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Wenxin; Bénaben, Frédérick; Pingaud, Hervé

    2015-05-01

    Business process management (BPM) principles are commonly used to improve processes within an organisation. But they can equally be applied to supporting the design of an Information System (IS). In a collaborative situation involving several partners, this type of BPM approach may be useful to support the design of a Mediation Information System (MIS), which would ensure interoperability between the partners' ISs (which are assumed to be service oriented). To achieve this objective, the first main task is to build a collaborative business process cartography. The aim of this article is to present a method for bringing together collaborative information and elaborating collaborative business processes from the information gathered (by using a collaborative situation framework, an organisational model, an informational model, a functional model and a metamodel and by using model transformation rules).

  17. Basic model study on efficiency evaluation in collaborative design work process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Qiu; YANG Yu; LI Xiaoli; ZHAO Ningyu

    2007-01-01

    During the efficiency evaluation process of collaborative design work,because of the lack of efficiency evaluation models,a basic analytical model for collaborative design work efficiency evaluation is proposed in this paper.First,the characteristics of the networked collaborative design system work process were studied; then,in accordance with those characteristics,a basic analytical model is created.This model,which is built for centralized collaborative design work,includes an analytical frame,a process view model,a function view model and an information view model.Finally,the application process and steps of this basic analytical model are elaborated when used for efficiency evaluation through an experiment.

  18. Kantian Capitalism and the Stakeholder Model: the necessity of a corporate ethics of justice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Francés Gómez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Stakeholder theory is the main-stream way of conceiving organizations, especially for profit corporations. Corporations are described as a web of stakeholders before whom managers have a multi-fiduciary responsibility. Edward Freeman, the father of stakeholder theory, holds that a normative theory of stakeholder management would set those fiduciary responsibilities as truly moral duties, due to the fact that stakeholders possess intrinsic, as opposed to merely instrumental, value. This article criticizes the basis of Freeman’s defense of normative stakeholder theory. The crucial critical argument is that Freeman employs the very same normative foundation that the classic theory of the firm uses; while deriving a view of the corporation that is less precise than the classic one. As an alternative, it is proposed that the organization should be conceived as a realm for justice: a social context of interaction where all parties would find it rational to agree to criteria for distributing the benefits so that cooperation –as required to bring about those benefits– is secured. This approach founds obligations (among stakeholders without the need to resort to hypothesis as individual dignity or rights. However, the demands of justice might still be operationalized as rights of several kinds.

  19. Kantian Capitalism and the Stakeholder Model: the necessity of a corporate ethics of justice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Francés Gómez

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Stakeholder theory is the main-stream way of conceiving organizations, especially for profit corporations. Corporations are described as a web of stakeholders before whom managers have a multi-fiduciary responsibility. Edward Freeman, the father of stakeholder theory, holds that a normative theory of stakeholder management would set those fiduciary responsibilities as truly moral duties, due to the fact that stakeholders possess intrinsic, as opposed to merely instrumental, value. This article criticizes the basis of Freeman’s defense of normative stakeholder theory. The crucial critical argument is that Freeman employs the very same normative foundation that the classic theory of the firm uses; while deriving a view of the corporation that is less precise than the classic one. As an alternative, it is proposed that the organization should be conceived as a realm for justice: a social context of interaction where all parties would find it rational to agree to criteria for distributing the benefits so that cooperation –as required to bring about those benefits– is secured. This approach founds obligations (among stakeholders without the need to resort to hypothesis as individual dignity or rights. However, the demands of justice might still be operationalized as rights of several kinds.

  20. Resource Allocation Optimization Model of Collaborative Logistics Network Based on Bilevel Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-feng Xu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Collaborative logistics network resource allocation can effectively meet the needs of customers. It can realize the overall benefit maximization of the logistics network and ensure that collaborative logistics network runs orderly at the time of creating value. Therefore, this article is based on the relationship of collaborative logistics network supplier, the transit warehouse, and sellers, and we consider the uncertainty of time to establish a bilevel programming model with random constraints and propose a genetic simulated annealing hybrid intelligent algorithm to solve it. Numerical example shows that the method has stronger robustness and convergence; it can achieve collaborative logistics network resource allocation rationalization and optimization.

  1. Collaborative Cloud Manufacturing: Design of Business Model Innovations Enabled by Cyberphysical Systems in Distributed Manufacturing Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erwin Rauch

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Collaborative cloud manufacturing, as a concept of distributed manufacturing, allows different opportunities for changing the logic of generating and capturing value. Cyberphysical systems and the technologies behind them are the enablers for new business models which have the potential to be disruptive. This paper introduces the topics of distributed manufacturing as well as cyberphysical systems. Furthermore, the main business model clusters of distributed manufacturing systems are described, including collaborative cloud manufacturing. The paper aims to provide support for developing business model innovations based on collaborative cloud manufacturing. Therefore, three business model architecture types of a differentiated business logic are discussed, taking into consideration the parameters which have an influence and the design of the business model and its architecture. As a result, new business models can be developed systematically and new ideas can be generated to boost the concept of collaborative cloud manufacturing within all sustainable business models.

  2. Organizational justice and mental health: a multi-level test of justice interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Ronald; Abubakar, Amina; Arasa, Josephine Nyaboke

    2014-04-01

    We examine main and interaction effects of organizational justice at the individual and the organizational levels on general health in a Kenyan sample. We theoretically differentiate between two different interaction patterns of justice effects: buffering mechanisms based on trust versus intensifying explanations of justice interactions that involve psychological contract violations. Using a two-level hierarchical linear model with responses from 427 employees in 29 organizations, only interpersonal justice at level 1 demonstrated a significant main effect. Interactions between distributive and interpersonal justice at both the individual and the collective levels were found. The intensifying hypothesis was supported: the relationship between distributive justice and mental health problems was strongest when interpersonal justice was high. This contrasts with buffering patterns described in Western samples. We argue that justice interaction patterns shift depending on the economic conditions and sociocultural characteristics of employees studied.

  3. A Technology-Neutral Role-Based Collaboration Model for Software Ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stanciulescu, Stefan; Rabiser, Daniela; Seidl, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    efforts and information of ongoing development efforts. Finally, using the collaborations defined in the formalism we model real artifacts from Marlin, a firmware for 3D printers, and we show that for the selected scenarios, the five collaborations were sufficient to raise awareness and make implicit...

  4. University Student Knowledge of Alcohol: A Collaborative Model of Assessment and Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minatoya, Lydia Yuriko; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Surveyed college students' (N=180) knowledge of the effects of alcohol. The collaborative effort between a university counseling center and health center showed that while 70 percent of the students rated themselves as informed drinkers, their answers were less accurate. The study also provided a model of innovative collaboration. (JAC)

  5. An interaction-based access control model (IBAC) for collaborative services

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altunay, Mine; /Fermilab; Byrd, Gregory T.; Brown, Doug E.; Dean, Ralph A.; /North Carolina State U.

    2008-04-01

    A collaboration is a collection of services that work together to achieve a common goal. Although collaborations help when tackling difficult problems, they lead to security issues. First, a collaboration is often performed by services that are drawn from different security domains. Second, a service interacts with multiple peer services during the collaboration. These interactions are not isolated from one another--e.g., data may flow through a sequence of different services. As a result, a service is exposed to multiple peer services in varying degrees, leading to different security threats. We identify the types of interactions that can be present in collaborations, and discuss the security threats due to each type. We propose a model for representing the collaboration context so that a service can be made aware of the existing interactions. We provide an access control model for a service participating in a collaboration. We couple our access control model with a policy model, so that the access requirements from collaborations can be expressed and evaluated.

  6. The Application of Collaborative Business Intelligence Technology in the Hospital SPD Logistics Management Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tongzhu; Shen, Aizong; Hu, Xiaojian; Tong, Guixian; Gu, Wei

    2017-06-01

    We aimed to apply collaborative business intelligence (BI) system to hospital supply, processing and distribution (SPD) logistics management model. We searched Engineering Village database, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) and Google for articles (Published from 2011 to 2016), books, Web pages, etc., to understand SPD and BI related theories and recent research status. For the application of collaborative BI technology in the hospital SPD logistics management model, we realized this by leveraging data mining techniques to discover knowledge from complex data and collaborative techniques to improve the theories of business process. For the application of BI system, we: (i) proposed a layered structure of collaborative BI system for intelligent management in hospital logistics; (ii) built data warehouse for the collaborative BI system; (iii) improved data mining techniques such as supporting vector machines (SVM) and swarm intelligence firefly algorithm to solve key problems in hospital logistics collaborative BI system; (iv) researched the collaborative techniques oriented to data and business process optimization to improve the business processes of hospital logistics management. Proper combination of SPD model and BI system will improve the management of logistics in the hospitals. The successful implementation of the study requires: (i) to innovate and improve the traditional SPD model and make appropriate implement plans and schedules for the application of BI system according to the actual situations of hospitals; (ii) the collaborative participation of internal departments in hospital including the department of information, logistics, nursing, medical and financial; (iii) timely response of external suppliers.

  7. University-Industry Research Collaboration: A Model to Assess University Capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramo, Giovanni; D'Angelo, Ciriaco Andrea; Di Costa, Flavia

    2011-01-01

    Scholars and policy makers recognize that collaboration between industry and the public research institutions is a necessity for innovation and national economic development. This work presents an econometric model which expresses the university capability for collaboration with industry as a function of size, location and research quality. The…

  8. Using Five Stage Model to Design of Collaborative Learning Environments in Second Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orhan, Sevil; Karaman, M. Kemal

    2014-01-01

    Specifically Second Life (SL) among virtual worlds draws attention of researchers to form collaborative learning environments (Sutcliffe & Alrayes, 2012) since it could be used as a rich platform to simulate a real environment containing many collaborative learning characteristics and interaction tools within itself. Five Stage Model (FSM)…

  9. A Technology-Neutral Role-Based Collaboration Model for Software Ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stanciulescu, Stefan; Rabiser, Daniela; Seidl, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    efforts and information of ongoing development efforts. Finally, using the collaborations defined in the formalism we model real artifacts from Marlin, a firmware for 3D printers, and we show that for the selected scenarios, the five collaborations were sufficient to raise awareness and make implicit...

  10. E-Learning Systems Support of Collaborative Agreements: A Theoretical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Sandra; Quemada, Juan

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces a theoretical model for developing integrated degree programmes through e-learning systems as stipulated by a collaboration agreement signed by two universities. We have analysed several collaboration agreements between universities at the national, European, and transatlantic level as well as various e-learning frameworks. A…

  11. Model(ing) Law: The ICTY, the International Criminal Justice Template, and Reconciliation in the Former Yugoslavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlson, Kerstin Bree

    2013-01-01

    My project uses the case study of the ICTY and reconciliation in the Balkans to address the larger topic of the capacity of international criminal tribunals (ICTs) as transitional justice mechanisms. I argue that the ICTY operates under the (flawed) received wisdom of the IMT at Nuremberg, what I...

  12. Integrated production-distribution planning optimization models: A review in collaborative networks context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Andres

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Researchers in the area of collaborative networks are more and more aware of proposing collaborative approaches to address planning processes, due to the advantages associated when enterprises perform integrated planning models. Collaborative production-distribution planning, among the supply network actors, is considered a proper mechanism to support enterprises on dealing with uncertainties and dynamicity associated to the current markets. Enterprises, and especially SMEs, should be able to overcome the continuous changes of the market by increasing their agility. Carrying out collaborative planning allows enterprises to enhance their readiness and agility for facing the market turbulences. However, SMEs have limited access when incorporating optimization tools to deal with collaborative planning, reducing their ability to respond to the competition. The problem to solve is to provide SMEs affordable solutions to support collaborative planning. In this regard, new optimisation algorithms are required in order to improve the collaboration within the supply network partners. As part of the H2020 Cloud Collaborative Manufacturing Networks (C2NET research project, this paper presents a study on integrated production and distribution plans. The main objective of the research is to identify gaps in current optimization models, proposed to address integrated planning, taking into account the requirements and needs of the industry. Thus, the needs of the companies belonging to the industrial pilots, defined in the C2NET project, are identified; analysing how these needs are covered by the optimization models proposed in the literature, to deal with the integrated production-distribution planning.

  13. Simulation Modeling and Statistical Network Tools for Improving Collaboration in Military Logistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    AFRL-RH-WP-TR-2009-0110 Simulation Modeling and Statistical Network Tools for Improving Collaboration in Military Logistics...SUBTITLE Simulation Modeling and Statistical Network Tools for Improving Collaboration in Military Logistics 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8650-07-1-6848...8 1 1.0 SUMMARY This final technical report describes the research findings of the project Simulation Modeling and Statistical Network

  14. Peer Collaboration: A Model to Support Counsellor Self-Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, Constance A.; Phelan, Anne M.

    2007-01-01

    In the context of a larger case study on how continuous learning in the workplace could be achieved through the implementation of peer collaboration, the process of how counsellors engaged in self-care within a large health care organization became clearer. This article is based on data derived from a qualitative analysis of nine transcribed…

  15. An Acquisition Leader’s Model for Building Collaborative Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    together is success.” - Henry Ford “The achievements of an organization are the results of the combined effort of each individual.” – Vince...stakeholders. That is, collaboration factors should be measured with key stakeholders where teamwork is needed to accomplish the mission

  16. PV Performance Modeling Methods and Practices: Results from the 4th PV Performance Modeling Collaborative Workshop.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stein, Joshua [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-03-01

    In 2014, the IEA PVPS Task 13 added the PVPMC as a formal activity to its technical work plan for 2014-2017. The goal of this activity is to expand the reach of the PVPMC to a broader international audience and help to reduce PV performance modeling uncertainties worldwide. One of the main deliverables of this activity is to host one or more PVPMC workshops outside the US to foster more international participation within this collaborative group. This report reviews the results of the first in a series of these joint IEA PVPS Task 13/PVPMC workshops. The 4th PV Performance Modeling Collaborative Workshop was held in Cologne, Germany at the headquarters of TÜV Rheinland on October 22-23, 2015.

  17. From "sit and listen" to "shake it out yourself": Helping urban middle school students to bridge personal knowledge to scientific knowledge through a collaborative environmental justice curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeh, Shamu Fenyvesi

    Science education and environmental education are not meeting the needs of marginalized communities such as urban, minority, and poor communities (Seller, 2001; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency [EPA], 1996). There exists an equity gap characterized by the racial and socioeconomic disparities in: levels of participation in scientific and environmental careers and environmental organizations (Lewis & James, 1995; Sheppard, 1995), access to appropriate environmental education programs (U.S. EPA, 1996), exposure to environmental toxins (Bullard, 1993), access to environmental amenities and legal protections (Bullard, 1993), and in grades and standardized test scores in K-12 science (Jencks & Phillips, 1998; Johnston & Viadero, 2000). Researchers point to the cultural divide between home and school culture as one of the reasons for the equity gap in science education (Barton, 2003; Delpit, 1995; Seiler, 2001). This study is designed to address the equity gap by helping students connect personal/cultural knowledge to scientific knowledge. A collaborative action research study was conducted in 8th-grade science classrooms of low-income African American and Latino students. The participating teacher and the researcher developed, enacted and evaluated a curriculum that elicited students' personal and cultural knowledge in the investigation of local community issues. Using qualitative methods, data were collected through student and teacher interviews, observation, and written documents. Data were analyzed to answer questions on student participation and learning, bridging between personal and scientific knowledge, and student empowerment. The most compelling themes from the data were described as parts of three stories: tensions between the empire of school and the small student nation, bridging between the two nations, and students gaining empowerment. This study found that the bridging the curriculum intended was successful in that many students brought personal

  18. Leadership for Social Justice and the Characteristics of Traditional Societies: Ponderings on the Application of Western-Grounded Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oplatka, Izhar; Arar, Khalid Husny

    2016-01-01

    Leadership for social justice has been receiving increasing attention in recent years as more and more scholars have explored the ways by which educational leaders can lead for social justice in schools (e.g. Arar, 2015; Ayers, Quin, & Stovall, 2009; Fua, 2007; Furman, 2012; Jean-Marie, Normore, & Brooks, 2009; Lindsey & Lindsey, 2011;…

  19. Report on Integrating Activities and Models for Collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Lillian; Dirckinck-Holmfeld, Lone; Ryberg, Thomas;

    environments. A part of the focus of the ERT is developing synergies between the partners by strengthening existing relationships, and creating new networks to develop and research into conditions for joint research on conditions for productive learning in networked learning environments and networked learning......This report is the deliverable for work package (WP) 28.3 “Integrated network and activities for the exchange of and collaboration between Master students, PhD students and professors” of the European Research Team (ERT) on Conditions for Productive Networked Learning Environments. The objective...... of WP28.3 is to build up an integrated network and activities for the exchange and collaboration between Master students, professional masters, PhD students and professors and to establish a virtual community around the research area of conditions for productive learning in networked learning...

  20. Modeling the Individual Within the Group: an Interdisciplinary Approach to Collaborative Knowledge Construction

    OpenAIRE

    Lund, Kristine

    2016-01-01

    Constructing knowledge with others is fundamental for all human activity, and many disciplines have sought to understand how the individual, other people, and the context, all influence collaborative knowledge construction, be it individual or group knowledge. The goal of this Habilitation à Diriger des Recherches is to present an analytical model of the relations of the individual to the group in situations of collaborative knowledge construction. The model is inspired by the work of Levinso...

  1. A Multiple Source Approach to Organisational Justice: The Role of the Organisation, Supervisors, Coworkers, and Customers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustin Molina

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The vast research on organisational justice has focused on the organisation and the supervisor. This study aims to further this line of research by integrating two trends within organisational justice research: the overall approach to justice perceptions and the multifoci perspective of justice judgments. Specifically, this study aims to explore the effects of two additional sources of justice, coworker-focused justice and customer-focused justice, on relevant employees’ outcomes—burnout, turnover intentions, job satisfaction, and workplace deviance— while controlling the effect of organisation-focused justice and supervisor-focused justice. Given the increased importance attributed to coworkers and customers, we expect coworker-focused justice and customer-focused justice to explain incremental variance in the measured outcomes, above and beyond the effects of organisation-focused justice and supervisor-focused justice. Participants will be university students from Austria and Germany employed by service organisations. Data analysis will be conducted using structural equation modeling.

  2. (The Need for A Model of Translational Mind Science Justice Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip Atiba Goff

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite the historical importance of translational research to social psychological investigations of social justice issues, the culture and incentives of contemporary social psychology are ambivalent towards non-experimental field research. This ambivalence poses a significant impediment to social psychology’s role in societal change. This paper offers a brief history of how the field evolved from a relative emphasis on translating social psychology from the laboratory to the field (and back to the present moment. In doing so, we enumerate the most significant impediments to contemporary translational social psychology, namely that conducting translational research often involves greater cost, greater difficulty advancing psychological theory, and more time navigating logistics compared with basic laboratory research. Finally, using the example of recent multi-investigator research on race and gender equity in policing, we outline emerging strategies for how to conduct translational research amidst contemporary impediments, and offer modest suggestions for how the field can better facilitate this kind of research in the future. Taken together this review offers a set of theoretical and practical suggestions for easing the path from research to societal change.

  3. Partnerships for success: A collaborative support model to enhance the first year student experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Einfalt

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent discourse about engaging first year students calls for more collaboration in terms of adopting a holistic approach to course delivery and support. This paper discusses a collaborative support model operating at a regional Australian university since 2008. In particular, it describes a collaborative support initiative emerging from this model that is based on providing an informal consultative space where students can drop-in and gain assessment support for research, writing and content. A focus group, online surveys and interviews with co-ordinators were conducted to evaluate the impact of this initiative. Findings suggest that this collaborative support model impacts on the first year student experience by: raising awareness about academic skills and the processes for researching and writing; promoting peer learning opportunities; building confidence and providing suitable support for a diverse range of students.

  4. A model of using social media for collaborative learning to enhance learners’ performance on learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waleed Mugahed Al-Rahmi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Social media has been always described as the channel through which knowledge is transmitted between communities and learners. This social media has been utilized by colleges in a way to encourage collaborative learning and social interaction. This study explores the use of social media in the process of collaborative learning through learning Quran and Hadith. Through this investigation, different factors enhancing collaborative learning in learning Quran and Hadith in the context of using social media are going to be examined. 340 respondents participated in this study. The structural equation modeling (SEM was used to analyze the data obtained. Upon analysis and structural model validities, the study resulted in a model used for measuring the influences of the different variables. The study reported direct and indirect significant impacts of these variables on collaborative learning through the use of social media which might lead to a better performance by learners.

  5. Community Collaboration to Improve Schools: Introducing a New Model from Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson-Butcher, Dawn; Lawson, Hal A.; Bean, Jerry; Flaspohler, Paul; Boone, Barbara; Kwiatkowski, Amber

    2008-01-01

    Conventional school improvement models traditionally involve "walled-in" approaches. These models focus primarily on academic learning strategies in response to standards-based accountabilities. Although positive outcomes have been documented, expanded school improvement models such as the Ohio Community Collaboration Model for School…

  6. GMOs and Global Justice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Kristian Høyer

    2012-01-01

    claims to justice. This article investigates how GMOs might generate claims to global justice and what type of justice is involved. The paper argues that the debate on GMOs and global justice can be categorized into three views, i.e., the cosmopolitan, the pluralist, and the sceptic. The cosmopolitan...... on the premise that global cooperation on GMO production provides the relevant basis for assessing the use of GMOs by the standard of global distributive justice....

  7. Development of collaborative-creative learning model using virtual laboratory media for instrumental analytical chemistry lectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurweni, Wibawa, Basuki; Erwin, Tuti Nurian

    2017-08-01

    The framework for teaching and learning in the 21st century was prepared with 4Cs criteria. Learning providing opportunity for the development of students' optimal creative skills is by implementing collaborative learning. Learners are challenged to be able to compete, work independently to bring either individual or group excellence and master the learning material. Virtual laboratory is used for the media of Instrumental Analytical Chemistry (Vis, UV-Vis-AAS etc) lectures through simulations computer application and used as a substitution for the laboratory if the equipment and instruments are not available. This research aims to design and develop collaborative-creative learning model using virtual laboratory media for Instrumental Analytical Chemistry lectures, to know the effectiveness of this design model adapting the Dick & Carey's model and Hannafin & Peck's model. The development steps of this model are: needs analyze, design collaborative-creative learning, virtual laboratory media using macromedia flash, formative evaluation and test of learning model effectiveness. While, the development stages of collaborative-creative learning model are: apperception, exploration, collaboration, creation, evaluation, feedback. Development of collaborative-creative learning model using virtual laboratory media can be used to improve the quality learning in the classroom, overcome the limitation of lab instruments for the real instrumental analysis. Formative test results show that the Collaborative-Creative Learning Model developed meets the requirements. The effectiveness test of students' pretest and posttest proves significant at 95% confidence level, t-test higher than t-table. It can be concluded that this learning model is effective to use for Instrumental Analytical Chemistry lectures.

  8. Probe on Network-based Collaborative Maintenance Model for After-sales Equipment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xiaohui; SHENG Tianwen; YI Shuping

    2009-01-01

    In order to make equipment run safely, economically and continuously, some new maintenance models were put forward to improve the equipment after-sale maintenance service, such as E-maintenance, third-party maintenance, etc. To certain extent, the models solved the problem of the distance between the manufacturer and customer and the dispersion of the maintenance technologies, however, those resources are still widely distributed and do not collaborate efficiently. In this paper, a network-based collaborative maintenance service model was proposed for after-sales equipment to solve the problem of maintenance resources integration. Concretely, equipment designers, maintainers, spare parts suppliers and maintenance experts were grouped together to establish dynamic alliance. The leader of the alliance is the manufacturer under guaranty period or equipment user exceeding the guaranty period. The process of maintenance service was divided into three stages which are fault diagnosis, maintenance decision and maintenance implementation. The sub-alliances were established to carry out maintenance work at each stage. In addition, the business process of network-based collaborative maintenance was analyzed and collaborative business system for equipment's after-sales collaborative maintenance service was designed. In the end, an informational economics model of network-based collaborative maintenance was established to demonstrate the effectiveness of this maintenance model.

  9. Three Tier Unified Process Model for Requirement Negotiations and Stakeholder Collaborations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niazi, Muhammad Ashraf Khan; Abbas, Muhammad; Shahzad, Muhammad

    2012-11-01

    This research paper is focused towards carrying out a pragmatic qualitative analysis of various models and approaches of requirements negotiations (a sub process of requirements management plan which is an output of scope managementís collect requirements process) and studies stakeholder collaborations methodologies (i.e. from within communication management knowledge area). Experiential analysis encompass two tiers; first tier refers to the weighted scoring model while second tier focuses on development of SWOT matrices on the basis of findings of weighted scoring model for selecting an appropriate requirements negotiation model. Finally the results are simulated with the help of statistical pie charts. On the basis of simulated results of prevalent models and approaches of negotiations, a unified approach for requirements negotiations and stakeholder collaborations is proposed where the collaboration methodologies are embeded into selected requirements negotiation model as internal parameters of the proposed process alongside some external required parameters like MBTI, opportunity analysis etc.

  10. Capability Model for Case-Based Reasoning in Collaborative Commerce Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Collaborative commerce (c-commerce) has become an innovative business paradigm that helps companies achieve high operational performance through inter-organizational collaboration. This paper presents an effective case-based reasoning (CBR) capability model for solution selection in c-commerce applications, as CBR is widely used in knowledge management and electronic commerce.Based on the case-based competence model suggested by Smyth and McKenna, a directed graph was used to represent the collaborative reasoning history of CBR systems, where information of reasoning process ability was extracted. Experiment was carried out on a travel dataset. By integrating case-based competence and reasoning process ability, the capability is more suitable to reflect the real ability of CBR systems. The result shows that the proposed method can effectively evaluate the capability of CBR systems and enhance the performance of collaborative case-based reasoning in c-commerce environment.

  11. The Collaborative Management Model on Developing the Infrastructure of the Pomalaa’s Airport, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr.Sc. Abdul Sabaruddin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Collaborative management of public sector is being introduced as a new approach to solve the problems which is mainly on the restrictiveness of bureaucracy in answering such public demand. Therefore, collaboration approach presents new actors out of the government in processing the public sectors. The relationship among actors in its collaboration is well developed through consensus to gain valuable decision to all. Based on the problems mentioned, this study focuses on the model of collaborative management on developing the infrastructure of an airport. To answer the objective of the study, therefore, this research applied qualitative approach in which the respondents are those who were being involved in construction process of the airport. The data gained from interview will be analysed through interactive model consisting of some procedures; data reduction, data presentation, verification of the data/ drawing conclusion. The result showed that collaborative management model in infrastructure development of the airport was a management model, in this case collective action based on the principle of synergetic participation. In this context, there was no single actor on the development of infrastructure of the airport. Through collective action, the related aspects, in this case the development of infrastructure, was transparently communicated to avoid miscommunication among the members. Therefore, the actors which were being involved on the collaboration bore the needs reasonably and also there was no such member who were being burden. Thus, the implication of collaboration based on the consensus, the collaboration on the development of infrastructure of the airport is on the basis of participative, which pointed out the appointment and the continuation of the development.

  12. Developing a Teaching Model Using an Online Collaboration Approach for a Digital Technique Practical Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muchlas

    2015-01-01

    This research is aimed to produce a teaching model and its supporting instruments using a collaboration approach for a digital technique practical work attended by higher education students. The model is found to be flexible and relatively low cost. Through this research, feasibility and learning impact of the model will be determined. The model…

  13. Capacity-Related Innovations Resulting from the Implementation of a Community Collaboration Model for School Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson-Butcher, Dawn; Lawson, Hal A.; Iachini, Aidyn; Bean, Gerald; Flaspohler, Paul D.; Zullig, Keith

    2010-01-01

    A new genus of district and school improvement models entails partnerships with other organizations and new working relationships with families, community leaders, and youths. The Ohio Community Collaboration Model for School Improvement (OCCMSI) is one such model. It enables partners to leverage family and community resources for learning,…

  14. Scrum integration in stage-gate models for collaborative product development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Anita Friis; Slavensky, Andreas; Nguyen, Vivi Thuy

    2013-01-01

    The relevance of collaborative Product Development (PD) is rising with the decrease of product life cycles combined with growing customer demands. Industrial manufacturers now experience competition in the global market, where differentiation is necessary for survival. Hence, in order...... models. Thus, instead of replacing traditional stage-gate models agile methods are currently integrated in existing PD models generating hybrid solution for collaborative PD. This paper includes a study of three industrial cases that have successfully integrated Scrum into a stage-gate process model...

  15. Collaborative product and process model: Multiple Viewpoints approach

    CERN Document Server

    Geryville, Hichem; Ouzrout, Yacine; Sapidis, Nikolaos

    2007-01-01

    The design and development of complex products invariably involves many actors who have different points of view on the problem they are addressing, the product being developed, and the process by which it is being developed. The actors' viewpoints approach was designed to provide an organisational framework in which these different perspectives or points of views, and their relationships, could be explicitly gathered and formatted (by actor activity's focus). The approach acknowledges the inevitability of multiple interpretation of product information as different views, promotes gathering of actors' interests, and encourages retrieved adequate information while providing support for integration through PLM and/or SCM collaboration. In this paper, we present our multiple viewpoints approach, and we illustrate it by an industrial example on cyclone vessel product.

  16. Cooperation Models, Motivation and Objectives behind Farm–School Collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyg, Pernille Malberg; Mikkelsen, Bent Egberg

    2016-01-01

    and teachers. Findings show distinct differences in motivation. Farmers want to create transparency in their production, ensure support for the agricultural profession or promote food and agricultural literacy. The idealistic motivation of teaching children about food and agriculture weighs higher than...... economic incentives. Teachers display academic motives for engaging in farm visits, but also a broader focus on shaping children’s world views, connectedness to food and nature and fostering life skills. The farm can be an important setting for promoting food, agricultural and ecological literacy. We...... people and their ability to understand the food system. Thus, efforts are made to promote food literacy through strengthening of farm–school links. The case-study research from Denmark investigates existing cooperation arrangements in farm–school collaboration and the underlying motivation of the farmers...

  17. Multidisciplinary collaboration as a sustainable research model for device development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Ankur

    2013-02-01

    The concurrent problems of research sustainability and decreased clinician involvement with medical device development can be jointly addressed through a novel, multidisciplinary solution. The University of Rochester Cardiovascular Device Design Program is a sustainable program in medical device design supported through a collaboration between the Schools of Medicine and Engineering. This article provides a detailed description of the motivation for starting the program, the current structure of the program, the methods of financial sustainability, and the direct impact it intends to have on the national vascular surgery community. The further expansion of this program and encouragement for development of similar programs throughout the country aims to address many of our current challenges in both research funding and device development education.

  18. Enabling model checking for collaborative process analysis: from BPMN to `Network of Timed Automata'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallek, Sihem; Daclin, Nicolas; Chapurlat, Vincent; Vallespir, Bruno

    2015-04-01

    Interoperability is a prerequisite for partners involved in performing collaboration. As a consequence, the lack of interoperability is now considered a major obstacle. The research work presented in this paper aims to develop an approach that allows specifying and verifying a set of interoperability requirements to be satisfied by each partner in the collaborative process prior to process implementation. To enable the verification of these interoperability requirements, it is necessary first and foremost to generate a model of the targeted collaborative process; for this research effort, the standardised language BPMN 2.0 is used. Afterwards, a verification technique must be introduced, and model checking is the preferred option herein. This paper focuses on application of the model checker UPPAAL in order to verify interoperability requirements for the given collaborative process model. At first, this step entails translating the collaborative process model from BPMN into a UPPAAL modelling language called 'Network of Timed Automata'. Second, it becomes necessary to formalise interoperability requirements into properties with the dedicated UPPAAL language, i.e. the temporal logic TCTL.

  19. Fuzzy comprehensive evaluation model of interuniversity collaborative learning based on network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenhui, Ma; Yu, Wang

    2017-06-01

    Learning evaluation is an effective method, which plays an important role in the network education evaluation system. But most of the current network learning evaluation methods still use traditional university education evaluation system, which do not take into account of web-based learning characteristics, and they are difficult to fit the rapid development of interuniversity collaborative learning based on network. Fuzzy comprehensive evaluation method is used to evaluate interuniversity collaborative learning based on the combination of fuzzy theory and analytic hierarchy process. Analytic hierarchy process is used to determine the weight of evaluation factors of each layer and to carry out the consistency check. According to the fuzzy comprehensive evaluation method, we establish interuniversity collaborative learning evaluation mathematical model. The proposed scheme provides a new thought for interuniversity collaborative learning evaluation based on network.

  20. Online collaboration and model sharing in volcanology via VHub.org

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, G.; Patra, A. K.; Bajo, J. V.; Bursik, M. I.; Calder, E.; Carn, S. A.; Charbonnier, S. J.; Connor, C.; Connor, L.; Courtland, L. M.; Gallo, S.; Jones, M.; Palma Lizana, J. L.; Moore-Russo, D.; Renschler, C. S.; Rose, W. I.

    2013-12-01

    VHub (short for VolcanoHub, and accessible at vhub.org) is an online platform for barrier free access to high end modeling and simulation and collaboration in research and training related to volcanoes, the hazards they pose, and risk mitigation. The underlying concept is to provide a platform, building upon the successful HUBzero software infrastructure (hubzero.org), that enables workers to collaborate online and to easily share information, modeling and analysis tools, and educational materials with colleagues around the globe. Collaboration occurs around several different points: (1) modeling and simulation; (2) data sharing; (3) education and training; (4) volcano observatories; and (5) project-specific groups. VHub promotes modeling and simulation in two ways: (1) some models can be implemented on VHub for online execution. VHub can provide a central warehouse for such models that should result in broader dissemination. VHub also provides a platform that supports the more complex CFD models by enabling the sharing of code development and problem-solving knowledge, benchmarking datasets, and the development of validation exercises. VHub also provides a platform for sharing of data and datasets. The VHub development team is implementing the iRODS data sharing middleware (see irods.org). iRODS allows a researcher to access data that are located at participating data sources around the world (a cloud of data) as if the data were housed in a single virtual database. Projects associated with VHub are also going to introduce the use of data driven workflow tools to support the use of multistage analysis processes where computing and data are integrated for model validation, hazard analysis etc. Audio-video recordings of seminars, PowerPoint slide sets, and educational simulations are all items that can be placed onto VHub for use by the community or by selected collaborators. An important point is that the manager of a given educational resource (or any other

  1. Context-Aware Mobile Collaborative Systems: Conceptual Modeling and Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis G. Montané-Jiménez

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A Mobile Collaborative System (MCOS enable the cooperation of the members of a team to achieve a common goal by using a combination of mobile and fixed technologies. MCOS can be enhanced if the context of the group of users is considered in the execution of activities. This paper proposes a novel model for Context-Aware Mobile COllaborative Systems (CAMCOS and a functional architecture based on that model. In order to validate both the model and the architecture, a prototype system in the tourism domain was implemented and evaluated.

  2. Modelling and analysis of inventory replenishment for perishable agricultural products with buyer-seller collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Dongjie; Lai, K. K.; Leung, Stephen C. H.; Liang, Liang

    2011-07-01

    In this article, we study the inventory replenishment model for perishable agricultural products in a simple two-level supply chain. Collaborative forecasting is introduced into the inventory replenishment decisions to avoid overstocking and understocking of agricultural products, and to maximise profits. We analyse the model with ordering cost, holding cost, shortage cost, deterioration cost and opportunity lost cost of perishable agricultural products. Extensive numerical analysis is carried out to study the performance of the inventory policy. The optimal replenishment policy that minimises the total cost can be obtained from the model. It has demonstrated that the supply chain cost decreases with supplier and retailer's collaborative forecasting.

  3. Mentoring and Organizational Justice: An Empirical Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scandura, Terri A.

    1997-01-01

    Usable responses from 197 of 300 Australian managers indicated those who had mentors perceived more organizational justice than those who had not. Career, psychosocial, and role modeling functions of mentoring were significantly and positively related to perceptions of distributive and procedural justice. (SK)

  4. Crippling Sexual Justice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stormhøj, Christel

    2015-01-01

    . The article develops a normative and analytical framework, encompassing the multiple structural conditions, the virtues of citizens, and the emotional dimension of belonging, which enable or hamper justice. It integrates theories of democratic citizenship, belonging, and social justice, and provides...

  5. THE PROPOSED MODEL OF COLLABORATIVE VIRTUAL LEARNING ENVIRONMENT FOR INTRODUCTORY PROGRAMMING COURSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahfudzah OTHMAN

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the proposed model of the collaborative virtual learning system for the introductory computer programming course which uses one of the collaborative learning techniques known as the “Think-Pair-Share”. The main objective of this study is to design a model for an online learning system that facilitates the collaborative learning activities in a virtual environment such as online communications and pair or small group discussions. In order to model the virtual learning environment, the RUP methodology has been used where it involves the data collection phase and the analysis and design phase. Fifty respondents have been randomly selected to participate in the data collection phase to investigate the students’ interest and learning styles as well as their learning preferences. The results have shown the needs for the development of online small group discussions that can be used as an alternative learning style for programming courses. The proposed design of the virtual learning system named as the Online Collaborative Learning System or OCLS is being depicted using the object-oriented models which are the use-case model and class diagram in order to show the concise processes of virtual “Think-Pair-Share” collaborative activities. The “Think-Pair-Share” collaborative learning technique that is being used in this model has been chosen because of its simplicity and relatively low-risk. This paper also presents the proposed model of the system’s architecture that will become the guidelines for the physical development of OCLS using the web-based applications.

  6. Team automata : a formal approach to the modeling of collaboration between system components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, Maurice Henri ter

    2003-01-01

    This thesis studies formal aspects of team automata, a mathematical framework introduced in 1997 by C.A. Ellis to model components of groupware systems and their interconnections. We focus on the flexibility that team automata offer when modeling collaboration between system components

  7. Expanding the Professional Development School Model: Developing Collaborative Partnerships with School Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foust, Gretchen E.; Goslee, Patricia A.

    2014-01-01

    The Professional Development School (PDS) model, a successful collaborative partnership model between university teacher education programs and P-12 schools, focuses on ''preparing future educators, providing current educators with ongoing professional development, encouraging joint school-university faculty investigation of…

  8. The Scope of Practice of Occupational Therapy in U.S. Criminal Justice Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Jaime P; Moreton, Emily M; Sitterly, Audra M

    2016-09-01

    In the past 40 years, prison populations in the U.S. have nearly quadrupled while funding for rehabilitation, education and other programmes has been cut. Despite accounting for a small fraction of the world's population more than 20% of the worlds incarcerated population is in the U.S. and the rate of recidivism remains alarmingly high. Occupational therapists have the capability to play a significant role in addressing the needs of persons within the criminal justice system. However, the profession has been slow to delineate of the role occupational therapy within criminal justice settings. This study sought to provide a descriptive analysis of current occupational therapy roles and practices within the U.S. criminal justice system. Using survey research methods, the researchers collected data from respondents (N = 45; Response Rate + 51.7%) to establish a baseline of the scope of practices employed by occupational therapists working in the U.S. criminal justice system. U.S. practitioners work within institutional and community based criminal justice settings. Primary practice models, assessments and group interventions were catalogued. Respondents strongly valued the creation of networking to build the professions' presence within criminal justice settings. Occupational therapy in the criminal justice system remains an emerging practice arena. Understanding the current scope of practice in the U.S. and creating a mechanism for collaboration may help increase the depth, breadth and overall growth of the profession's role in these settings. The sampling method does not guarantee a representative sample of the population and is limited to practice within the United States. Survey design may not have allowed for respondents to fully describe their practice experiences. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Modeling of Task Establishment and Allocation for Collaborative Virtual Maintenance Training of Complex Equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangyang Li

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we propose the maintenance task establishment method based on fault simulation models. Maintenance task allocation model based on Multi-Agent System and High Level Architecture is presented to manage and coordinate the dynamic task allocating process of multi operators and it can make the intelligent decision for their collaborative maintenance operation at each step. Object information template is designed with the Extensible Markup Language to perform interactive communication of the heterogeneous data and information in the different models of collaborative virtual maintenance training system, which ensures the efficient share of the data resource for the collaborative maintenance operations. Finally, the simulation research on a mechanical-electronic-hydraulic integrated subsystem in complex equipment is done and the simulation execution and results show the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  10. Required Collaborative Work in Online Courses: A Predictive Modeling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Marlene A.; Kellogg, Deborah L.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a predictive model that assesses whether a student will have greater perceived learning in group assignments or in individual work. The model produces correct classifications 87.5% of the time. The research is notable in that it is the first in the education literature to adopt a predictive modeling methodology using data…

  11. Justice and medical ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillon, R

    1985-07-20

    Justice, in the sense of fair adjudication between conflicting claims, is held to be relevant to a wide range of issues in medical ethics. Several differing concepts of justice are briefly described, including Aristotle's formal principle of justice, libertarian theories, utilitarian theories, Marxist theories, the theory of John Rawls, and the view--held, for example, by W.D. Ross--that justice is essentially a matter of reward for individual merit.

  12. Integrating Deliberative Justice Theory into Social Work Policy Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Helen

    2011-01-01

    Deliberation that upholds the social work values of justice and inclusion is an essential component of the policy-making process; yet most social welfare policy curricula focus instead on the goals of distributive justice. This article presents a model that demonstrates how deliberative justice can be easily incorporated into beginning level…

  13. Integrating Deliberative Justice Theory into Social Work Policy Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Helen

    2011-01-01

    Deliberation that upholds the social work values of justice and inclusion is an essential component of the policy-making process; yet most social welfare policy curricula focus instead on the goals of distributive justice. This article presents a model that demonstrates how deliberative justice can be easily incorporated into beginning level…

  14. Juvenile Justice in Milwaukee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Gary L.; Greer, Lanetta

    2010-01-01

    Historically, there have been several attempts made to address issues surrounding juvenile delinquency. The Wisconsin Legislature outlines the objectives of the juvenile justice system in the Juvenile Justice Code in s. 939.01, ?to promote a juvenile justice system capable of dealing with the problem of juvenile delinquency, a system which will…

  15. The Development of Teacher and Teacher-Librarian Collaboration Scale and the Examination Structures of Collaboration Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Hon Chen

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was twofold. The first purpose was to construct the Collaboration Scale for primary and secondary school teacher and teacher-librarian of Taiwan. Teachers and teacher-librarians were selected from five municipals in the south of Taiwan. Fifty-nine teacher-librarians, 76 teachers and 2 principals from 60 primary and secondary schools participated in this study for the testing of scale quality. Results indicated as follows: 1. The Collaboration Scale consisted of 22 items, divided into three factors, which were integrated instruction, teacher-librarian as resource, and traditional role of teacher-librarian. 2. The Collaboration Scale had reasonable coefficient of internal consistency reliability and content validity. 3. Exploratory factor analysis showed that The Collaboration Scale had acceptable construct validity. Three factors explained variance 60.23%and had high correlations of the Collaboration Scale separately. The second purpose was to examine the facets of teacher and teacher-librarians collaboration. Results indicated that teacher and teacher-librarians had low-end collaboration, most of the cooperation existed in teacher-librarians provided materials or resources for the teachers; high-end collaboration, integrated instruction appear to be less prevalent among participants in this study.

  16. How Collaborative Business Modeling Can Be Used to Jointly Explore Sustainability Innovations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konnertz, Lars; Rohrbeck, René; Knab, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    in the German energy market, where business modeling has been used in a collaborative fashion. After describing this collaborative business modeling (CBM) approach, we discuss its strengths and limitations and compare it to the alternative methods of innovation planning: scenario technique and roadmapping. We...... find that it has its particular strengths in creating a multitude of ideas and solutions, overcoming the obstacle of different terminologies and facilitating planning, implementation and decision-making. We conclude that in a situation where fundamental discussions and understanding about new markets...... are needed, CBM can contribute to explore a new business field with a holistic perspective....

  17. A Conceptual Model to Implement an Interactive and Collaborative Enterprise 2.0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico CONSOLI

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To implement an interactive and collaborative Enterprise 2.0 it is important to have, inside the company, organizational and technological preconditions. In this model of advanced enterprise, internal workers must collaborate among themselves to communicate with all external subjects of the supply chain for achieving business goals. The implementation process is a critical and complex procedure that requires a strategic plan in the introduction and adoption of the innovation. In this paper the single actions to follow, for the implementation of the new model of business, with all determinant factors and variables, are described.

  18. The collaborative model of fieldwork education: a blueprint for group supervision of students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Debra J; DeIuliis, Elizabeth D

    2015-04-01

    Historically, occupational therapists have used a traditional one-to-one approach to supervision on fieldwork. Due to the impact of managed care on health-care delivery systems, a dramatic increase in the number of students needing fieldwork placement, and the advantages of group learning, the collaborative supervision model has evolved as a strong alternative to an apprenticeship supervision approach. This article builds on the available research to address barriers to model use, applying theoretical foundations of collaborative supervision to practical considerations for academic fieldwork coordinators and fieldwork educators as they prepare for participation in group supervision of occupational therapy and occupational therapy assistant students on level II fieldwork.

  19. Wiki management a revolutionary new model for a rapidly changing and collaborative world

    CERN Document Server

    Collins, Rod

    2013-01-01

    We now live in a "wiki" world where mass collaboration is not only possible-it's often the best solution. Conventional management thought assumes that command-and-control is the most effective way to organize the efforts of large numbers of people, but rapid change and increasing complexity have rendered that model obsolete. As a result, most managers today lack the skills and knowledge needed to succeed in an age when networks are proving smarter and faster than hierarchies. Designing organizations for mass collaboration demands a new and very different model-wiki management.

  20. How Collaborative Business Modeling Can Be Used to Jointly Explore Sustainability Innovations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konnertz, Lars; Rohrbeck, René; Knab, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    in the German energy market, where business modeling has been used in a collaborative fashion. After describing this collaborative business modeling (CBM) approach, we discuss its strengths and limitations and compare it to the alternative methods of innovation planning: scenario technique and roadmapping. We...... find that it has its particular strengths in creating a multitude of ideas and solutions, overcoming the obstacle of different terminologies and facilitating planning, implementation and decision-making. We conclude that in a situation where fundamental discussions and understanding about new markets...... are needed, CBM can contribute to explore a new business field with a holistic perspective....

  1. Introducing the Collaborative Learning Modeling Language (ColeML)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundsgaard, Jeppe

    2014-01-01

    with a few basic concepts, 2) the language should make possible a visual graphic representation of the model, 3) elements of the model should be able to change status during the articulation, 4) the system should accept unfinished models, 5) models should be able to be built by integrating other models......, and differentiating teaching. Technology can help respond to these challenges (Brush & Saye, 2008; Bundsgaard, 2009, 2010; Ge, Planas, & Er, 2010; Helic, Krottmaier, Maurer, & Scerbakov, 2005; Daniel Schneider & Synteta, 2005; D. Schneider, Synteta, & Frété, 2002), but platforms are very expensive to build from...... the ground up. If these platforms are to find their way into everyday teaching and learning, they have to be easy and cheap to develop. Thus there is a need for easy to use application programming platforms. This paper argues that a visual modeling programming language would be an important part...

  2. WeedML: a Tool for Collaborative Weed Demographic Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Holst, Niels

    2010-01-01

    WeedML is a proposed standard to formulate models of weed demography, or maybe even complex models in general, that are both transparent and straightforward to re-use as building blocks for new models. The paper describes the design and thoughts behind WeedML which relies on XML and object-oriented systems development. Proof-of-concept software is provided as open-source C++ code and executables that can be downloaded freely.

  3. Interrogative Model of Inquiry and Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakkarainen, Kai; Sintonen, Matti

    2002-01-01

    Examines how the Interrogative Model of Inquiry (I-Model), developed for the purposes of epistemology and philosophy of science, could be applied to analyze elementary school students' process of inquiry in computer-supported learning. Suggests that the interrogative approach to inquiry can be productively applied for conceptualizing inquiry in…

  4. Show them the money? The role of pay, managerial need support, and justice in a self-determination theory model of intrinsic work motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olafsen, Anja H; Halvari, Hallgeir; Forest, Jacques; Deci, Edward L

    2015-08-01

    The link between money and motivation has been a debated topic for decades, especially in work organizations. However, field studies investigating the amount of pay in relation to employee motivation is lacking and there have been calls for empirical studies addressing compensation systems and motivation in the work domain. The purpose of this study was to examine outcomes associated with the amount of pay, and perceived distributive and procedural justice regarding pay in relation to those for perceived managerial need support. Participants were 166 bank employees who also reported on their basic psychological need satisfaction and intrinsic work motivation. SEM-analyses tested a self-determination theory (SDT) model, with satisfaction of the competence and autonomy needs as an intervening variable. The primary findings were that amount of pay and employees' perceived distributive justice regarding their pay were unrelated to employees' need satisfaction and intrinsic work motivation, but procedural justice regarding pay did affect these variables. However, managerial need support was the most important factor for promoting need satisfaction and intrinsic work motivation both directly, indirectly, and as a moderator in the model. Hence, the results of the present organizational field study support earlier laboratory experiments within the SDT framework showing that monetary rewards did not enhance intrinsic motivation. This seems to have profound implications for organizations concerned about motivating their employees.

  5. A Collaborative Scheduling Model for the Supply-Hub with Multiple Suppliers and Multiple Manufacturers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates a collaborative scheduling model in the assembly system, wherein multiple suppliers have to deliver their components to the multiple manufacturers under the operation of Supply-Hub. We first develop two different scenarios to examine the impact of Supply-Hub. One is that suppliers and manufacturers make their decisions separately, and the other is that the Supply-Hub makes joint decisions with collaborative scheduling. The results show that our scheduling model with the Supply-Hub is a NP-complete problem, therefore, we propose an auto-adapted differential evolution algorithm to solve this problem. Moreover, we illustrate that the performance of collaborative scheduling by the Supply-Hub is superior to separate decision made by each manufacturer and supplier. Furthermore, we also show that the algorithm proposed has good convergence and reliability, which can be applicable to more complicated supply chain environment.

  6. Fiia: A Model-Based Approach to Engineering Collaborative Augmented Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Christopher; Smith, J. David; Phillips, W. Greg; Graham, T. C. Nicholas

    Augmented reality systems often involve collaboration among groups of people. While there are numerous toolkits that aid the development of such augmented reality groupware systems (e.g., ARToolkit and Groupkit), there remains an enormous gap between the specification of an AR groupware application and its implementation. In this chapter, we present Fiia, a toolkit which simplifies the development of collaborative AR applications. Developers specify the structure of their applications using the Fiia modeling language, which abstracts details of networking and provides high-level support for specifying adapters between the physical and virtual world. The Fiia.Net runtime system then maps this conceptual model to a runtime implementation. We illustrate Fiia via Raptor, an augmented reality application used to help small groups collaboratively prototype video games.

  7. The Undergraduate ALFALFA Team: A Model for Involving Undergraduates in Large Astronomy Collaborations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, David W.; Koopmann, Rebecca A.; Haynes, Martha P.; Undergraduate ALFALFA Team, ALFALFA Team

    2016-01-01

    The NSF-sponsored Undergraduate ALFALFA (Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA) Team (UAT) has allowed faculty and students from a wide range of public and private colleges and especially those with small astronomy programs to learn how science is accomplished in a large collaboration while contributing to the scientific goals of a legacy radio astronomy survey. This effort has been made possible through the collaboration of the ALFALFA PIs and graduate students, Arecibo Observatory staff, and the faculty at 19 undergraduate-focussed institutions. In this talk, we will discuss how the UAT model works for the ALFALFA project and lessons learned from our efforts over the 8 years of grant funding. We will provide suggestions on how the model could be applied to other legacy projects, particularly in such areas as online collaboration and software usage by undergraduates. This work has been supported by NSF grants AST-0724918/0902211, AST-075267/0903394, AST-0725380, and AST-1211005.

  8. A model for mold collaborative manufacturing execution system based on Web Service

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Lizhong; Wang Yanbin; Gao Guoan

    2006-01-01

    Mold manufacturing Extended Enterprise (EE) has the following characteristics: distributed in locality, tight cooperation and frequent information exchange. It needs a collaborative, highly efficient, reliable and intelligent manufacturing management system. The background of the Collaborative Manufacturing is introduced. A mold Collaborative Manufacturing Execution System (c-MES) is proposed. The feature of Web Service platform is analyzed. The necessity and feasibility of importing the Web Service to mold c-MES are discussed. Based on Web Service, the model of mold c-MES is built. Every module's function is described in detail, including the functions it supplies and the mechanism of information interaction among them. The feasibility of mold c-MES model is validated by a real mold manufacturing case.

  9. Using PoF models to predict system reliability considering failure collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiguo Zeng

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Existing Physics-of-Failure-based (PoF-based system reliability prediction methods are grounded on the independence assumption, which overlooks the dependency among the components. In this paper, a new type of dependency, referred to as failure collaboration, is introduced and considered in reliability predictions. A PoF-based model is developed to describe the failure behavior of systems subject to failure collaboration. Based on the developed model, the Bisection-based Reliability Analysis Method (BRAM is exploited to calculate the system reliability. The developed methods are applied to predicting the reliability of a Hydraulic Servo Actuator (HSA. The results demonstrate that the developed methods outperform the traditional PoF-based reliability prediction methods when applied to systems subject to failure collaboration.

  10. Social justice in medical education: strengths and challenges of a student-driven social justice curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrose, Adrian Jacques H; Andaya, January M; Yamada, Seiji; Maskarinec, Gregory G

    2014-08-01

    In the current rapidly evolving healthcare environment of the United States, social justice programs in pre-medical and medical education are needed to cultivate socially conscious and health professionals inclined to interdisciplinary collaborations. To address ongoing healthcare inequalities, medical education must help medical students to become physicians skilled not only in the biomedical management of diseases, but also in identifying and addressing social and structural determinants of the patients' daily lives. Using a longitudinal Problem-Based Learning (PBL) methodology, the medical students and faculty advisers at the University of Hawai'i John A. Burns School of Medicine (JABSOM) developed the Social Justice Curriculum Program (SJCP) to supplement the biomedical curriculum. The SJCP consists of three components: (1) active self-directed learning and didactics, (2) implementation and action, and (3) self-reflection and personal growth. The purpose of introducing a student-driven SJ curriculum is to expose the students to various components of SJ in health and medicine, and maximize engagement by using their own inputs for content and design. It is our hope that the SJCP will serve as a logistic and research-oriented model for future student-driven SJ programs that respond to global health inequalities by cultivating skills and interest in leadership and community service.

  11. Social Justice in Medical Education: Strengths and Challenges of a Student-Driven Social Justice Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andaya, January M; Yamada, Seiji; Maskarinec, Gregory G

    2014-01-01

    In the current rapidly evolving healthcare environment of the United States, social justice programs in pre-medical and medical education are needed to cultivate socially conscious and health professionals inclined to interdisciplinary collaborations. To address ongoing healthcare inequalities, medical education must help medical students to become physicians skilled not only in the biomedical management of diseases, but also in identifying and addressing social and structural determinants of the patients' daily lives. Using a longitudinal Problem-Based Learning (PBL) methodology, the medical students and faculty advisers at the University of Hawai‘i John A. Burns School of Medicine (JABSOM) developed the Social Justice Curriculum Program (SJCP) to supplement the biomedical curriculum. The SJCP consists of three components: (1) active self-directed learning and didactics, (2) implementation and action, and (3) self-reflection and personal growth. The purpose of introducing a student-driven SJ curriculum is to expose the students to various components of SJ in health and medicine, and maximize engagement by using their own inputs for content and design. It is our hope that the SJCP will serve as a logistic and research-oriented model for future student-driven SJ programs that respond to global health inequalities by cultivating skills and interest in leadership and community service. PMID:25157325

  12. Collaborative Project. Mode and Intermediate Waters in Earth System Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarmiento, Jorge L. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Dufour, Carolina [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Rodgers, Keith B. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    2015-12-16

    The focus of this grant was on diagnosing the physical mechanisms controlling upper ocean water mass formation and carbon distribution in Earth System Models (ESMs), with the goal of improving the physics that controls their formation.

  13. A Collaboration Service Model for a Global Port Cluster

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Toh, Keith K.T; Welsh, Karyn; Hassall, Kim

    2010-01-01

    ... between business entities within the cluster. The maturity of technologies providing portals, web and middleware services provides an opportunity to push the boundaries of contemporary service reference models and service catalogues to what...

  14. Sustaining Community-University Collaborations: The Durham University Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Russell

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Durham University has initiated a community outreach and engagement program based on an evolving multifaceted model. This article analyses the components of the model and looks at how our work at Durham has become increasingly embedded in the structures and processes of the university as it has developed. The strengths and weaknesses in what has been achieved are highlighted, as is the future vision for the further development of this innovative community-university program. Keywords Public engagement; community partnerships; employer supported volunteering; corporate social responsibility

  15. The Cohort Model: Lessons Learned When Principals Collaborate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umekubo, Lisa A.; Chrispeels, Janet H.; Daly, Alan J.

    2015-01-01

    This study explored a formal structure, the cohort model that a decentralized district put in place over a decade ago. Schools were clustered into cohorts to facilitate professional development for leadership teams for all 44 schools within the district. Drawing upon Senge's components of organizational learning, we used a single case study design…

  16. Guiding Principles for Language Assessment Reform: A Model for Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Brent A.; Andrade, Maureen Snow

    2010-01-01

    Traditionally, practitioners interested in language test reform have focused on the qualities within an examination which result in either positive or negative impacts on participants, institutions, and society. Recent views suggest a multifaceted interaction among factors affecting language test reform. We introduce a model for test reform that…

  17. Social Justice: A Model for Unraveling the Ethics of Administrative Discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKerrow, K.

    2006-01-01

    This article attempts to capitalize on the current efforts to examine the traditional discourse, to consider one that focuses on ethics, to examine resistance to alternative discourses, and to provide a tentative educational administration curriculum model that reflects ethics at the core of everything that is taught in educational administration…

  18. Reason, Intuition, and Social Justice: Elaborating on Parson's Career Decision-Making Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartung, Paul J.; Blustein, David L.

    2002-01-01

    Nearly a century ago, Frank Parsons established the Vocation Bureau in Boston and spawned the development of the counseling profession. Elaborating on Parsons's socially responsible vision for counseling, the authors examine contemporary perspectives on career decision making that include both rational and alternative models and propose that these…

  19. Modeling a green inventory routing problem for perishable products with horizontal collaboration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soysal, M.; Bloemhof-Ruwaard, J.M.; Haijema, R.; Vorst, van der J.G.A.J.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing concerns on energy use, emissions and food waste require advanced models for food logistics management. Our interest in this study is to analyse the benefits of horizontal collaboration related to perishability, energy use (CO2 emissions) from transportation operations and logistics costs

  20. Industrial and Academic Collaboration: Hybrid Models for Research and Innovation Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Freitas, Sara; Mayer, Igor; Arnab, Sylvester; Marshall, Ian

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores how, in the light of global economic downturn and rising student populations, new academic-industrial models for research collaboration based upon specific technological expertise and knowledge can be developed as potential mechanisms for preserving and extending central university research infrastructure. The paper explores…

  1. Analyzing the Impact of a Data Analysis Process to Improve Instruction Using a Collaborative Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Rebecca B.

    2006-01-01

    The Data Collaborative Model (DCM) assembles assessment literacy, reflective practices, and professional development into a four-component process. The sub-components include assessing students, reflecting over data, professional dialogue, professional development for the teachers, interventions for students based on data results, and re-assessing…

  2. Notes on One Model for Inter-Institutional Collaboration in Institutional Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Kenneth M.

    This paper briefly describes one model for interinstitutional cooperation in a continuing program of institutional research activities involving planned patterns of data collection and analysis (surveys, tests, follow-up data on student progress, etc.). Some of the advantages of continuing collaboration by several colleges with a central resource…

  3. Opening the Black Box of Clinical Collaboration in Integrated Care Models for Frail, Elderly Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Stampa, Matthieu; Vedel, Isabelle; Bergman, Howard; Novella, Jean-Luc; Lechowski, Laurent; Ankri, Joel; Lapointe, Liette

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to understand better the clinical collaboration process among primary care physicians (PCPs), case managers (CMs), and geriatricians in integrated models of care. Methods: We conducted a qualitative study with semistructured interviews. A purposive sample of 35 PCPs, 7 CMs, and 4 geriatricians was selected in…

  4. Industrial and Academic Collaboration: Hybrid Models for Research and Innovation Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Freitas, Sara; Mayer, Igor; Arnab, Sylvester; Marshall, Ian

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores how, in the light of global economic downturn and rising student populations, new academic-industrial models for research collaboration based upon specific technological expertise and knowledge can be developed as potential mechanisms for preserving and extending central university research infrastructure. The paper explores…

  5. Utilizing the Active and Collaborative Learning Model in the Introductory Physics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Nguyen Hoai

    2014-01-01

    Model of active and collaborative learning (ACLM) applied in training specific subject makes clear advantage due to the goals of knowledge, skills that students got to develop successful future job. The author exploits the learning management system (LMS) of Hanoi National University of Education (HNUE) to establish a learning environment in the…

  6. Speech-Language Pathologist and General Educator Collaboration: A Model for Tier 2 Service Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Gina D.; Bellon-Harn, Monica L.

    2014-01-01

    Tier 2 supplemental instruction within a response to intervention framework provides a unique opportunity for developing partnerships between speech-language pathologists and classroom teachers. Speech-language pathologists may participate in Tier 2 instruction via a consultative or collaborative service delivery model depending on district needs.…

  7. Collaborative Models of Instruction: The Empirical Foundations of Inclusion and Co-Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis, Michael; Vaughn, Sharon; Swanson, Elizabeth; Mcculley, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    A summary of inclusion and co-teaching syntheses was conducted to better understand the evidence base associated with collaborative models of instruction. Six syntheses were identified: four investigated inclusion, and two investigated co-teaching. Collectively, the syntheses represented 146 studies. The syntheses investigated research on…

  8. Learn by Doing: A Collaborative Model for Training Teacher-Candidate Students in Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruef, Michael B.; Nefdt, Nicolette; Openden, Daniel; Elmensdorp, Sharon; Harris, Kathleen C.; Robinson, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    With the large number of students with autism entering the educational system, the need for empirically supported treatment (EST) in the classroom and special education teachers with training in autism and ESTs is necessary now more than ever. This paper describes a collaborative model between 2 universities aimed at providing teacher-candidate…

  9. Developing a Tiered Response Model for Social-Emotional Learning through Interdisciplinary Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maras, Melissa A.; Thompson, Aaron M.; Lewis, Christie; Thornburg, Kathy; Hawks, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    A tiered response model for social-emotional learning (SEL) is needed to address the significant mental health needs of young people in this country. In collaboration with other school mental health professionals, school psychologists have a unique expertise that situates them to be systems change agents in this work. This article describes a…

  10. Agent-Based Modeling of Collaborative Problem Solving. Research Report. ETS RR-16-27

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergner, Yoav; Andrews, Jessica J.; Zhu, Mengxiao; Gonzales, Joseph E.

    2016-01-01

    Collaborative problem solving (CPS) is a critical competency in a variety of contexts, including the workplace, school, and home. However, only recently have assessment and curriculum reformers begun to focus to a greater extent on the acquisition and development of CPS skill. One of the major challenges in psychometric modeling of CPS is…

  11. Women, Poverty, and Public Policy: A Community-Based Model for Collaborative Outreach Scholarship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleiter, Mary Kay; Rhoades, Katherine A.; Statham, Anne

    2004-01-01

    The Women and Poverty Public Education Initiative (WPPEI), established by the University of Wisconsin Women's Studies Consortium Outreach Office in 1994, developed a collaborative outreach scholarship model that paired women from the poverty community with women's studies faculty from universities in eight Wisconsin communities to study the…

  12. Modeling a green inventory routing problem for perishable products with horizontal collaboration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soysal, M.; Bloemhof-Ruwaard, J.M.; Haijema, R.; Vorst, van der J.G.A.J.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing concerns on energy use, emissions and food waste require advanced models for food logistics management. Our interest in this study is to analyse the benefits of horizontal collaboration related to perishability, energy use (CO2 emissions) from transportation operations and logistics costs

  13. COMPASS: Collaborative Organizational Model to Promote Aligned Support Structures. Final Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holliday, Lisa; Philp, Joel

    2015-01-01

    In 2010, Iredell-Statesville Schools was awarded an Investing in Innovation grant (i3) from the Office of Innovation and Improvement within the Federal Department of Education. Collaborative Organizational Model to Promote Aligned Support Structures (COMPASS) is a development grant that seeks to meet the needs of students with disabilities,…

  14. A global service-learning experience for nursing students in Tanzania: a model for collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreye, Judy; Oetker-Black, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    This article addresses a model for creating a short-term global service-learning program. The Global Standards for the Initial Education of Professional Nurses and Midwives guided the development of a collaborative program involving a school of nursing in the Midwestern United States and one in Tanzania. Evaluation of the school of nursing and subsequent collaborative planning led to development and implementation of a 3-week global service-learning experience for nursing students. International academic partnerships, developed in accordance with WHO standards, will enhance educational experiences for nursing students both in the United States and abroad. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Collaborative design for embedded systems co-modelling and co-simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Fitzgerald, John; Verhoef, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    One of the most significant challenges in the development of embedded and cyber-physical systems is the gap between the disciplines of software and control engineering. In a marketplace, where rapid innovation is essential, engineers from both disciplines need to be able to explore system designs collaboratively, allocating responsibilities to software and physical elements, and analyzing trade-offs between them.To this end, this book presents a framework that allows the very different kinds of design models - discrete-event (DE) models of software and continuous time (CT) models of the physical environment - to be analyzed and simulated jointly, based on common scenarios. The individual chapters provide introductions to both sides of this co-simulation technology, and give a step-by-step guide to the methodology for designing and analyzing co-models. They are grouped into three parts: Part I introduces the technical basis for collaborative modeling and simulation with the Crescendo technology. Part II contin...

  16. [Fusing empowerment concept into patient-centered collaborative care model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chia-Chen; Lin, Chiu-Chu

    2014-12-01

    Chronic diseases are incurable, long-term illnesses. To improve quality of life, patients with chronic diseases must adjust their own personal lifestyle to cope with their diseases and eventually learn to achieve a balance between disease control and daily life. Therefore, self-management necessarily plays a key role in chronic disease management. Different from physician-centered healthcare, the self-management practiced by chronic disease patients is more patient-centered with a greater emphasis on active patient participation. The main goal of this article is to elucidate the essence of the empowerment concept. An example of diabetes care, this article introduces a detailed five-step application as a basic model for incorporating the empowerment concept into the healthcare of patients with chronic disease. The author suggests that healthcare providers apply the empowerment model in clinical practice to assist patients to maintain an optimal balance between their health status and personal lives.

  17. Collaborative Semantic Annotation of Images : Ontology-Based Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien E. ZOMAHOUN

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the quest for models that could help to represen t the meaning of images, some approaches have used contextual knowledge by building semantic hierarchi es. Others have resorted to the integration of imag es analysis improvement knowledge and images interpret ation using ontologies. The images are often annotated with a set of keywords (or ontologies, w hose relevance remains highly subjective and relate d to only one interpretation (one annotator. However , an image can get many associated semantics because annotators can interpret it differently. Th e purpose of this paper is to propose a collaborati ve annotation system that brings out the meaning of im ages from the different interpretations of annotato rs. The different works carried out in this paper lead to a semantic model of an image, i.e. the different means that a picture may have. This method relies o n the different tools of the Semantic Web, especial ly ontologies.

  18. Collaborative Model for Acceleration of Individualized Therapy of Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    receive salvage therapy that results in only a few weeks of disease stability. We have proposed to employ a team science , systems biology based approach...Pertea, G., Mortazavi, A., Kwan, G., van Baren, M.J., Salzberg, S.L., Wold , B.J., and Pachter, L. 2010. Transcript assembly and quantification by...tumor xenografts (PDTX) have been widely used in predictive biomarker development and pathway modeling in cancer research. However, it has not been

  19. Transfer Learning for Collaborative Filtering Using a Psychometrics Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haijun Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In a real e-commerce website, usually only a small number of users will give ratings to the items they purchased, and this can lead to the very sparse user-item rating data. The data sparsity issue will greatly limit the recommendation performance of most recommendation algorithms. However, a user may register accounts in many e-commerce websites. If such users’ historical purchasing data on these websites can be integrated, the recommendation performance could be improved. But it is difficult to align the users and items between these websites, and thus how to effectively borrow the users’ rating data of one website (source domain to help improve the recommendation performance of another website (target domain is very challenging. To this end, this paper extended the traditional one-dimensional psychometrics model to multidimension. The extended model can effectively capture users’ multiple interests. Based on this multidimensional psychometrics model, we further propose a novel transfer learning algorithm. It can effectively transfer users’ rating preferences from the source domain to the target domain. Experimental results show that the proposed method can significantly improve the recommendation performance.

  20. The role of professional and team commitment in nurse-physician collaboration: A dual identity model perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caricati, Luca; Guberti, Monica; Borgognoni, Patrizia; Prandi, Carmen; Spaggiari, Ivana; Vezzani, Emanuela; Iemmi, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Nurse-physician collaboration involves healthcare operators from different professions working together. The dual identity model predicts that nurse-physician interprofessional collaboration could improve if these operators feel they belong to both their professional category and care unit. This study tested this prediction by analyzing the effect of professional and team commitments on interprofessional collaboration between nurses and physicians in a hospital based in Northern Italy. A cross-section questionnaire survey was administered to 270 nurses and 95 physicians. Results indicate that interprofessional collaboration is positively affected by team commitment, while professional commitment had no effect. In accordance with the dual identity model, results indicate that interprofessional collaboration is higher when: (i) both professional and team commitment is high, and (ii) when team commitment is high and professional commitment is low. These results support dual identity model predictions and suggest that interprofessional collaboration can be increased by bolstering both team and professional commitment of nurses and physicians.

  1. Collaborative drug therapy management: case studies of three community-based models of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Margie E; Earl, Tara R; Gilchrist, Siobhan; Greenberg, Michael; Heisler, Holly; Revels, Michelle; Matson-Koffman, Dyann

    2015-03-26

    Collaborative drug therapy management agreements are a strategy for expanding the role of pharmacists in team-based care with other providers. However, these agreements have not been widely implemented. This study describes the features of existing provider-pharmacist collaborative drug therapy management practices and identifies the facilitators and barriers to implementing such services in community settings. We conducted in-depth, qualitative interviews in 2012 in a federally qualified health center, an independent pharmacy, and a retail pharmacy chain. Facilitators included 1) ensuring pharmacists were adequately trained; 2) obtaining stakeholder (eg, physician) buy-in; and 3) leveraging academic partners. Barriers included 1) lack of pharmacist compensation; 2) hesitation among providers to trust pharmacists; 3) lack of time and resources; and 4) existing informal collaborations that resulted in reduced interest in formal agreements. The models described in this study could be used to strengthen clinical-community linkages through team-based care, particularly for chronic disease prevention and management.

  2. Collaborative modelling for active involvement of stakeholders in urban flood risk management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Evers

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an approach to enhance the role of local stakeholders in dealing with urban floods. The concept is based on the DIANE-CM project (Decentralised Integrated Analysis and Enhancement of Awareness through Collaborative Modelling and Management of Flood Risk of the 2nd ERANET CRUE funding initiative. The main objective of the project was to develop and test an advanced methodology for enhancing the resilience of local communities to flooding. Through collaborative modelling, a social learning process was initiated that enhances the social capacity of the stakeholders due to the interaction process. The other aim of the project was to better understand how data from hazard and vulnerability analyses and improved maps, as well as from the near real-time flood prediction, can be used to initiate a public dialogue (i.e. collaborative mapping and planning activities in order to carry out more informed and shared decision-making processes and to enhance flood risk awareness. The concept of collaborative modelling was applied in two case studies: (1 the Cranbrook catchment in the UK, with focus on pluvial flooding; and (2 the Alster catchment in Germany, with focus on fluvial flooding. As a result of the interactive and social learning process, supported by sociotechnical instruments, an understanding of flood risk was developed amongst the stakeholders and alternatives for flood risk management for the respective case study area were jointly developed and ranked as a basis for further planning and management.

  3. Predicting User Acceptance of Collaborative Technologies: An Extension of the Technology Acceptance Model for E-Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Ronnie; Vogel, Doug

    2013-01-01

    Collaborative technologies support group work in project-based environments. In this study, we enhance the technology acceptance model to explain the factors that influence the acceptance of Google Applications for collaborative learning. The enhanced model was empirically evaluated using survey data collected from 136 students enrolled in a…

  4. Evolutionary Game Theory-Based Collaborative Sensing Model in Emergency CRAHNs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasirekha GVK

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Game theory has been a tool of choice for modeling dynamic interactions between autonomous systems. Cognitive radio ad hoc networks (CRAHNs constituted of autonomous wireless nodes are a natural fit for game theory-based modeling. The game theory-based model is particularly suitable for “collaborative spectrum sensing” where each cognitive radio senses the spectrum and shares the results with other nodes such that the targeted sensing accuracy is achieved. Spectrum sensing in CRAHNs, especially when used in emergency scenarios such as disaster management and military applications, needs to be not only accurate and resource efficient, but also adaptive to the changing number of users as well as signal-to-noise ratios. In addition, spectrum sensing mechanism must also be proactive, fair, and tolerant to security attacks. Existing work in collaborative spectrum sensing has mostly been confined to resource efficiency in static systems using request-based reactive sensing resulting in high latencies. In this paper, evolutionary game theory (EGT is used to model the behavior of the emergency CRAHNS, providing an efficient model for collaborative spectrum sensing. The resulting implementation model is adaptive to the changes in its environment such as signal-to-noise ratio and number of users in the network. The analytical and simulation models presented validate the system design and the desired performance.

  5. An Extended Non-Lane-Based Optimal Velocity Model with Dynamic Collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhipeng Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Incorporating the effects of the lane width in traffic, in this paper, we propose a dynamical model based on the strategy of three-vehicle cooperation driving. We obtain the smoother acceleration distribution in the new model through considering the dynamic collaboration with the nearest preceding vehicle and the nearest following vehicle. It is proved that the stability of the new model is greatly improved compared to the early non-lane-based car following model by using the linear stability theory. We find that when the parameter of lateral separation distance is identified, the amplitude of traffic congestion decreases with increasing the strength of dynamic collaboration in the simulation experiments. In addition, we apply the new extended model to simulate the motions of cars starting from a traffic signal and the dissipating of the traffic congestion; it is found that our new model can predict realistic delay time and kinematic wave speed and obtained a faster dissipation speed of traffic congestion than the traffic flow model without considering the dynamic collaboration.

  6. An Intelligent Mediating Model for Collaborative e-Learning Management Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akanbi Caleb Olufisoye

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available E-learning management systems(e- LMSs lack ontologies for sharing their domain knowledge learning objects with others due to differences or non-uniformity in architectures, platforms, protocols and representations. The effect of this on e-learners is that collaboration with other e-LMS during learning processes is not permitted. Hence, learning process is restricted only to the knowledge base of a particular E-LMS adopted by an institution, which may limit the mastery level of learners. To provide a remedy to this problem, an intelligent multi-agent mediating system model is proposed in this study using hybrid rule and case based reasoning scheme. Unified Modeling Language(UML is used as a design tool to specify the active and passive entities of the model in form class The model proposed provides a collaborative platform for sharing of the learning objects across multiple e-LMSs, during learning processes.

  7. Collaborative recovery: an integrative model for working with individuals who experience chronic and recurring mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oades, Lindsay; Deane, Frank; Crowe, Trevor; Lambert, W Gordon; Kavanagh, David; Lloyd, Chris

    2005-09-01

    Recovery is an emerging movement in mental health. Evidence for recovery-based approaches is not well developed and approaches to implement recovery-oriented services are not well articulated. The collaborative recovery model (CRM) is presented as a model that assists clinicians to use evidence-based skills with consumers, in a manner consistent with the recovery movement. A current 5 year multisite Australian study to evaluate the effectiveness of CRM is briefly described. The collaborative recovery model puts into practice several aspects of policy regarding recovery-oriented services, using evidence-based practices to assist individuals who have chronic or recurring mental disorders (CRMD). It is argued that this model provides an integrative framework combining (i) evidence-based practice; (ii) manageable and modularized competencies relevant to case management and psychosocial rehabilitation contexts; and (iii) recognition of the subjective experiences of consumers.

  8. Leadership for Social Justice: Social Justice Pedagogies

    OpenAIRE

    Bogotch, Ira; Reyes-Guerra, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between educational leadership and practices of social justice is now entering its second decade with respect to empirical research studies. There have been three distinct research agendas: the first involves attempts to define the meaning(s) of educational leadership for social justice; the second is the descriptive documentation of school leadership behaviors which address social injustices and inequities within schools; and, the third focuses on the development of leadersh...

  9. Collaborative Emission Reduction Model Based on Multi-Objective Optimization for Greenhouse Gases and Air Pollutants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-chun Meng

    Full Text Available CO2 emission influences not only global climate change but also international economic and political situations. Thus, reducing the emission of CO2, a major greenhouse gas, has become a major issue in China and around the world as regards preserving the environmental ecology. Energy consumption from coal, oil, and natural gas is primarily responsible for the production of greenhouse gases and air pollutants such as SO2 and NOX, which are the main air pollutants in China. In this study, a mathematical multi-objective optimization method was adopted to analyze the collaborative emission reduction of three kinds of gases on the basis of their common restraints in different ways of energy consumption to develop an economic, clean, and efficient scheme for energy distribution. The first part introduces the background research, the collaborative emission reduction for three kinds of gases, the multi-objective optimization, the main mathematical modeling, and the optimization method. The second part discusses the four mathematical tools utilized in this study, which include the Granger causality test to analyze the causality between air quality and pollutant emission, a function analysis to determine the quantitative relation between energy consumption and pollutant emission, a multi-objective optimization to set up the collaborative optimization model that considers energy consumption, and an optimality condition analysis for the multi-objective optimization model to design the optimal-pole algorithm and obtain an efficient collaborative reduction scheme. In the empirical analysis, the data of pollutant emission and final consumption of energies of Tianjin in 1996-2012 was employed to verify the effectiveness of the model and analyze the efficient solution and the corresponding dominant set. In the last part, several suggestions for collaborative reduction are recommended and the drawn conclusions are stated.

  10. Collaborative Emission Reduction Model Based on Multi-Objective Optimization for Greenhouse Gases and Air Pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qing-chun; Rong, Xiao-xia; Zhang, Yi-min; Wan, Xiao-le; Liu, Yuan-yuan; Wang, Yu-zhi

    2016-01-01

    CO2 emission influences not only global climate change but also international economic and political situations. Thus, reducing the emission of CO2, a major greenhouse gas, has become a major issue in China and around the world as regards preserving the environmental ecology. Energy consumption from coal, oil, and natural gas is primarily responsible for the production of greenhouse gases and air pollutants such as SO2 and NOX, which are the main air pollutants in China. In this study, a mathematical multi-objective optimization method was adopted to analyze the collaborative emission reduction of three kinds of gases on the basis of their common restraints in different ways of energy consumption to develop an economic, clean, and efficient scheme for energy distribution. The first part introduces the background research, the collaborative emission reduction for three kinds of gases, the multi-objective optimization, the main mathematical modeling, and the optimization method. The second part discusses the four mathematical tools utilized in this study, which include the Granger causality test to analyze the causality between air quality and pollutant emission, a function analysis to determine the quantitative relation between energy consumption and pollutant emission, a multi-objective optimization to set up the collaborative optimization model that considers energy consumption, and an optimality condition analysis for the multi-objective optimization model to design the optimal-pole algorithm and obtain an efficient collaborative reduction scheme. In the empirical analysis, the data of pollutant emission and final consumption of energies of Tianjin in 1996-2012 was employed to verify the effectiveness of the model and analyze the efficient solution and the corresponding dominant set. In the last part, several suggestions for collaborative reduction are recommended and the drawn conclusions are stated.

  11. Collaborative Project: Improving the Representation of Coastal and Estuarine Processes in Earth System Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryan, Frank [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Dennis, John [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); MacCready, Parker [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Whitney, Michael [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2016-10-20

    This project aimed to improve long term global climate simulations by resolving and enhancing the representation of the processes involved in the cycling of freshwater through estuaries and coastal regions. This was a collaborative multi-institution project consisting of physical oceanographers, climate model developers, and computational scientists. It specifically targeted the DOE objectives of advancing simulation and predictive capability of climate models through improvements in resolution and physical process representation.

  12. Final Report Collaborative Project: Improving the Representation of Coastal and Estuarine Processes in Earth System Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryan, Frank [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States); Dennis, John [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States); MacCready, Parker [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States); Whitney, Michael M. [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    2016-09-30

    This project aimed to improve long term global climate simulations by resolving and enhancing the representation of the processes involved in the cycling of freshwater through estuaries and coastal regions. This was a collaborative multi-institution project consisting of physical oceanographers, climate model developers, and computational scientists. It specifically targeted the DOE objectives of advancing simulation and predictive capability of climate models through improvements in resolution and physical process representation.

  13. Staying the Course: Collaborative Modeling to Support Adaptive and Resilient Water Resource Governance in the Inland Northwest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allyson Beall King

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Water resource governance, much like the systems it endeavors to manage, must be resilient and adaptive. Effective, resilient and adaptive water resource governance requires continuing stakeholder engagement to address the complex nature of human and natural systems. Engagement is an adaptive and iterative process of education and empowerment, building relationships and trust, and facilitating collaboration. Collaborative modeling is a methodology that integrates diverse stakeholder perspectives, fosters discussions, and creates space for problem identification and consensus-based strategies and solutions to current water resource challenges. We define collaborative modeling broadly, such that it includes a wide range of systems thinking exercises, as well as dynamic models. By focusing on the relationships and interconnections in the system, collaborative modeling facilitates clarification of mental models and the communication of science. We will describe our work in two interstate basins and how it has evolved over time as these basins strive to develop collaborative governance, and find solutions for their water resource challenges.

  14. Collaborative learning model with virtual team in ubiquitous learning environment using creative problem solving process

    OpenAIRE

    Laisema, Sitthichai; Wannapiroon, Panita

    2014-01-01

    The purposes of this research study were: 1) to develop a Collaborative Learning Model with Virtual Team in u-Learning Environment using Creative Problem-solving Process(U-CCPS Model); 2) to evaluate a U-CCPS Model. The research procedures were divided into two phases. The first phase was to develop U-CCPS Model, and the second phase was to evaluate U-CCPS Model. The sample group in this study consisted of five experts using purposive sampling. Data were analyzed by arithmetic mean and standa...

  15. Development of a socio-ecological environmental justice model for watershed-based management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Georgina M.; Nejadhashemi, A. Pouyan; Zhang, Zhen; Woznicki, Sean A.; Habron, Geoffrey; Marquart-Pyatt, Sandra; Shortridge, Ashton

    2014-10-01

    The dynamics and relationships between society and nature are complex and difficult to predict. Anthropogenic activities affect the ecological integrity of our natural resources, specifically our streams. Further, it is well-established that the costs of these activities are born unequally by different human communities. This study considered the utility of integrating stream health metrics, based on stream health indicators, with socio-economic measures of communities, to better characterize these effects. This study used a spatial multi-factor model and bivariate mapping to produce a novel assessment for watershed management, identification of vulnerable areas, and allocation of resources. The study area is the Saginaw River watershed located in Michigan. In-stream hydrological and water quality data were used to predict fish and macroinvertebrate measures of stream health. These measures include the Index of Biological Integrity (IBI), Hilsenhoff Biotic Index (HBI), Family IBI, and total number of Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera (EPT) taxa. Stream health indicators were then compared to spatially coincident socio-economic data, obtained from the United States Census Bureau (2010), including race, income, education, housing, and population size. Statistical analysis including spatial regression and cluster analysis were used to examine the correlation between vulnerable human populations and environmental conditions. Overall, limited correlation was observed between the socio-economic data and ecological measures of stream health, with the highest being a negative correlation of 0.18 between HBI and the social parameter household size. Clustering was observed in the datasets with urban areas representing a second order clustering effect over the watershed. Regions with the worst stream health and most vulnerable social populations were most commonly located nearby or down-stream to highly populated areas and agricultural lands.

  16. Justice and Negotiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druckman, Daniel; Wagner, Lynn M

    2016-01-01

    This review article examines the literature regarding the role played by principles of justice in negotiation. Laboratory experiments and high-stakes negotiations reveal that justice is a complex concept, both in relation to attaining just outcomes and to establishing just processes. We focus on how justice preferences guide the process and outcome of negotiated exchanges. Focusing primarily on the two types of principles that have received the most attention, distributive justice (outcomes of negotiation) and procedural justice (process of negotiation), we introduce the topic by reviewing the most relevant experimental and field or archival research on the roles played by these justice principles in negotiation. A discussion of the methods used in these studies precedes a review organized in terms of a framework that highlights the concept of negotiating stages. We also develop hypotheses based on the existing literature to point the way forward for further research on this topic.

  17. HydroShare: An online, collaborative environment for the sharing of hydrologic data and models (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarboton, D. G.; Idaszak, R.; Horsburgh, J. S.; Ames, D.; Goodall, J. L.; Band, L. E.; Merwade, V.; Couch, A.; Arrigo, J.; Hooper, R. P.; Valentine, D. W.; Maidment, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    HydroShare is an online, collaborative system being developed for sharing hydrologic data and models. The goal of HydroShare is to enable scientists to easily discover and access data and models, retrieve them to their desktop or perform analyses in a distributed computing environment that may include grid, cloud or high performance computing model instances as necessary. Scientists may also publish outcomes (data, results or models) into HydroShare, using the system as a collaboration platform for sharing data, models and analyses. HydroShare is expanding the data sharing capability of the CUAHSI Hydrologic Information System by broadening the classes of data accommodated, creating new capability to share models and model components, and taking advantage of emerging social media functionality to enhance information about and collaboration around hydrologic data and models. One of the fundamental concepts in HydroShare is that of a Resource. All content is represented using a Resource Data Model that separates system and science metadata and has elements common to all resources as well as elements specific to the types of resources HydroShare will support. These will include different data types used in the hydrology community and models and workflows that require metadata on execution functionality. HydroShare will use the integrated Rule-Oriented Data System (iRODS) to manage federated data content and perform rule-based background actions on data and model resources, including parsing to generate metadata catalog information and the execution of models and workflows. This presentation will introduce the HydroShare functionality developed to date, describe key elements of the Resource Data Model and outline the roadmap for future development.

  18. HMF-Geophysics: A Model for Collaborative Research in Hydrogeophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, R.; Crook, N.; Bales, R.; Moore, J.; Papanicolaou, T.; Welty, C.

    2008-05-01

    CUAHSI is developing, with the support of the NSF, a Hydrologic Measurement Facility (HMF). HMF-Geophysics is the near-surface geophysics module of HMF. Over the three years of the NSF grant (2005-08) we will determine, through broad community consultation, how best to utilize geophysical instrumentation and engage geophysical expertise in addressing key challenges in the hydrologic sciences. Our goal is to put in place the infrastructure needed to develop and maintain partnerships between the hydrologic and geophysical communities so that geophysical methods are used in a way that represents the state-of-the-science. Our current model consists of a central "node" that conducts feasibility studies to determine how/if geophysical methods could be of use in a hydrologic research project. In addition to the central node we have developed a system of affiliated nodes, individuals at 14 institutions who have committed to support HMF-Geophysics activities by offering equipment, software, and expertise. Once a feasibility study has shown the value of geophysics at a particular site, we match the hydrology PI with one of the nodes to develop the full-scale research project. We have conducted feasibility studies at 6 sites: Reynolds Creek Watershed, the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest, and four WATERS test- beds, the latter are described below. The objective of the Baltimore test-bed is to quantify the urban water cycle, with an emphasis on groundwater, using the Gwynns Falls watershed as a pilot study area. Electrical resistivity imaging, ground penetrating radar, and seismic refraction were assessed as a means of determining depth to bedrock or to the water table within the riparian zone of urbanized streams. A regional time-lapse microgravity survey was conducted at the 200 sq- km watershed scale to infer the storage change in the underlying aquifers. Research in the Crown of the Continent test-bed in Montana is focused on understanding the interactions between the

  19. Collaborative Service Arrangements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winter, Søren; J. May, Peter

    2007-01-01

    in particular differs among collaborators. Our modeling of the influence of collaboration on perceived employment outcomes suggests that these impacts are relatively minor. They are greater when there is active involvement of municipal employment managers in fostering cooperative relationships...... with collaborators. In short, collaboration requires a healthy and active relationship to foster improved outcomes. These findings have implications for future research about collaborative service delivery concerning the measurement of collaboration, different bases for it, and potential impacts....

  20. Collaborative Service Arrangements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    J. May, Peter; Winter, Søren

    in particular differs among collaborators. Our modeling of the influence of collaboration on perceived employment outcomes suggests that these impacts are relatively minor. They are greater when there is active involvement of municipal employment managers in fostering cooperative relationships...... with collaborators. In short, collaboration requires a healthy and active relationship to foster improved outcomes. These findings have implications for future research about collaborative service delivery concerning the measurement of collaboration, different bases for it, and potential impacts....

  1. A Proposed Model for Measuring Performance of the University-Industry Collaboration in Open Innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca Draghici

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims to present a scientific approach to the creation, testing and validation of a model for performance measurement for university-industry collaboration (UIC. The main idea of the design process is to capitalize on existing success factors, facilitators and opportunities (motivation factors, knowledge transfer channels and identified benefits and to diminish or avoid potential threats and barriers that might interfere with such collaborations. The main purpose of the applied methodology is to identify solutions and measures to overcome the disadvantages, conflicts or risk issues and to facilitate the open innovation of industrial companies and universities. The methodology adopted was differentiated by two perspectives: (1 a business model reflecting the university perspective along with an inventory of key performance indicators (KPIs; (2 a performance measurement model (including performance criteria and indicators and an associated methodology (assimilated to an audit that could help companies increase collaboration with universities in the context of open innovation. In addition, in order to operationalize the proposed model (facilitating practical implementation, an Excel tool has been created to help identifying potential sources of innovation. The main contributions of the research concern the expansion of UICs knowledge to enhance open innovation and to define an effective performance measurement model and instrument (tested and validated by a case study for companies.

  2. The Community Surface Dynamics Modeling System: Experiences on Building a Collaborative Modeling Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overeem, I.; Hutton, E.; Kettner, A.; Peckham, S. D.; Syvitski, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    The Community Surface Dynamics Modeling System - CSDMS- develops a software platform with shared and coupled modules for modeling earth surface processes as a community resource. The framework allows prediction of water, sediment and nutrient transport through the landscape and seacape. The underlying paradigm is that the Earth surface we live on is a dynamic system; topography changes with seasons, with landslides and earthquakes, with erosion and deposition. The Earth Surface changes due to storms and floods, and important boundaries, like the coast, are ever-moving features. CSDMS sets out to make better predictions of these changes. Earth surface process modeling bridges the terrestrial, coastal and marine domains and requires understanding of the system over a range of time scales, which inherently needs interdisciplinarity. Members of CSDMS (~830 in July 2012) are largely from academic institutions (˜75%), followed by federal agencies (˜17%), and oil and gas companies (˜5%). Members and governmental bodies meet once annually and rely additionally on web-based information for communication. As an organization that relies on volunteer participation, CSDMS faces challenges to scientific collaboration. Encouraging volunteerism among its members to provide and adapt metadata and model code to be sufficiently standardized for coupling is crucial to building an integrated community modeling system. We here present CSDMS strategies aimed at providing the appropriate technical tools and cyberinfrastructure to support a variety of user types, ranging from advanced to novice modelers. Application of these advances in science is key, both into the educational realm and for managers and decision-makers. We discuss some of the implemented ideas to further organizational transparency and user engagement in small-scale governance, such as advanced trackers and voting systems for model development prioritization through the CSDMS wiki. We analyzed data on community

  3. Filling the void in geriatric mental health: the Geropsychiatric Nursing Collaborative as a model for change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Cornelia; Buckwalter, Kathleen C; Dudzik, Pamela M; Evans, Lois K

    2011-01-01

    Mental health for older adults is a looming public health problem. Yet, geriatric mental health specialists are a scarce commodity, and few generalists have had formal education in either geriatrics or mental health. A multilevel collaboration using a diffusion of innovation model served to achieve change nationally in preparing entry-and advanced practice-level nurses to improve the mental health of older Americans. The John A. Hartford Foundation Geropsychiatric Nursing Collaborative at the American Academy of Nursing is the exemplar described here. The Geropsychiatric Nursing Collaborative developed and infused mental health competency enhancements for generalist and specialist nurses; identified and disseminated teaching-learning strategies to convey related key concepts using the POGOe (Portal of Geriatric Online Education) website; raised awareness through multiple presentations and publications; and notified deans of every school of nursing about these new resources. Fully embracing diffusion of innovation principles, the Geropsychiatric Nursing Collaborative is achieving change in this critical area of nursing practice. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A Collaborative System Software Solution for Modeling Business Flows Based on Automated Semantic Web Service Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion SMEUREANU

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, business interoperability is one of the key factors for assuring competitive advantage for the participant business partners. In order to implement business cooperation, scalable, distributed and portable collaborative systems have to be implemented. This article presents some of the mostly used technologies in this field. Furthermore, it presents a software application architecture based on Business Process Modeling Notation standard and automated semantic web service coupling for modeling business flow in a collaborative manner. The main business processes will be represented in a single, hierarchic flow diagram. Each element of the diagram will represent calls to semantic web services. The business logic (the business rules and constraints will be structured with the help of OWL (Ontology Web Language. Moreover, OWL will also be used to create the semantic web service specifications.

  5. The Chronic Care Model: A Collaborative Approach to Preventing and Treating Asthma in Infants and Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessel, Lois; Spain, Jacqueline

    2005-01-01

    The authors that a collaborative approach between parents and professionals is the best way to care for a young child with asthma. They use Ed Wagner's transdisciplinary 1998 Chronic Care Model as their preferred method for collaboration. More than 5 million children in the U.S. are currently affected by asthma, and a growing body of evidence…

  6. Toward a Collaborative, Transformative Model of Non-Profit Leadership: Some Conceptual Building Blocks

    OpenAIRE

    Bramwell Osula; Eddie C. W. Ng

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the authors propose extending the construct of non-profit leadership to accommodate collaborative and transformational themes. The suggestion is that the resultant broader definition accords with the modern context within which non-profits now operate and feeds into a more resilient model of non-profit leadership. The paper begins with a review of emergent trends in leadership theory and the changing context of the non-profit sector. The argument is made that the extraordinary...

  7. Using a clinical collaborative model for nursing education: application for clinical teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Denise J; Zambroski, Cheryl H; Cadena, Sandra V

    2012-01-01

    The promise of a clinical collaborative model (CCM) is that it engages hospital partners in a mutually beneficial partnership by providing the entire student clinical experience in one institution. The CCM prepares students for the day-to-day reality of patient care through the use of individual staff nurse preceptors, enhancing the relationship between the student and hospital upon graduation. The authors describe a successful paradigm for student nurse clinical education across the baccalaureate program.

  8. Collaborative Development Planning Model of Supporting Product in Platform Innovation Ecosystem

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Zhang; Hamid Reza Karimi; Qingpu Zhang; Shaobo Wu

    2014-01-01

    In order to improve the market value of the product, the platform enterprise often participates in the development process of supporting product of emerging industry's platform innovation ecosystem. This paper puts forward a revenue sharing contract between the platform company and the supporting company by creating a collaborative development model of the supporting product in the ecosystem, and this paper studies the platform enterprise investment resource property's (complementary or subst...

  9. Job Cognition and Justice Influencing Organizational Attachment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeeta Sahu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Organizational attachment echoes the psychological bond between employee and employer relations, differing from affective component of commitment in terms of employees’ psychological and behavioral involvement. This study examines the extent to which employee perception about procedural, distributive justice and job cognition contributes toward organizational attachment in India. The effect of justice and job cognition variables relates differently to previous studies from western part of the globe. First, in past studies, procedural justice predicted commitment, whereas, for Indian employees, distributive justice contributed to organizational attachment. Second, the contribution of extrinsic job cognition in organizational attachment was evident in the model developed using Structural Equation Modeling (SEM; AMOS. Organizations must take cognizance of the outcomes exhibited by the behavior of managers while following the laid down policies and processes. Cognition of fairness at workplace and attachment can play key role in limiting retention. Practical implications and future research directions are discussed.

  10. Perspectival Computational Thinking for Learning Physics: A Case Study of Collaborative Agent-based Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Farris, Amy Voss

    2014-01-01

    We examine the process through which computational thinking develops in a perspectival fashion as two middle school students collaborate with each other in order to develop computational models of two graphs of motion. We present an interaction analysis of the students' discourse and computational modeling, and analyze how they came to a joint understanding of the goal of the modeling activity. We show that this process involves bringing about coherence between multiple perspectives: the object in motion, the computational agent, the other student, and graphs of motion.

  11. An optimization model for the costs allocation in spare parts collaborative networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronzoni, Chiara; Ferrara, Andrea; Grassi, Andrea

    2017-07-01

    The paper focuses on the aftermarket spare parts in the automotive industry. In particular, only products with infrequent and low quantity demand are considered. This work is an extention of a previuos work by the same authors in which a stochastic model for the optimal inventory policy of spare parts has been presented. In this paper the authors improved what has been called "the second layer" in the previous model, that is the products allocation among a collaborative network of distributors. The improvement is related to the basic model and to the introducion of new products in the network.

  12. A new model in teaching undergraduate research: A collaborative approach and learning cooperatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neal, Pamela V; McClellan, Lynx Carlton; Jarosinski, Judith M

    2016-05-01

    Forming new, innovative collaborative approaches and cooperative learning methods between universities and hospitals maximize learning for undergraduate nursing students in a research course and provide professional development for nurses on the unit. The purpose of this Collaborative Approach and Learning Cooperatives (CALC) Model is to foster working relations between faculty and hospital administrators, maximize small group learning of undergraduate nursing students, and promote onsite knowledge of evidence based care for unit nurses. A quality improvement study using the CALC Model was implemented in an undergraduate nursing research course at a southern university. Hospital administrators provided a list of clinical concerns based on national performance outcome measures. Undergraduate junior nursing student teams chose a clinical question, gathered evidence from the literature, synthesized results, demonstrated practice application, and developed practice recommendations. The student teams developed posters, which were evaluated by hospital administrators. The administrators selected several posters to display on hospital units for continuing education opportunity. This CALC Model is a systematic, calculated approach and an economically feasible plan to maximize personnel and financial resources to optimize collaboration and cooperative learning. Universities and hospital administrators, nurses, and students benefit from working together and learning from each other.

  13. Food justice and Christian ethics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinrich Bedford-Strohm

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The article dealt with the moral and political problem of international food justice in which the deep contradiction between the present situation of malnourishment and starvation in large parts of the global population on the one hand and the biblical notion of the preferential option for the poor on the other hand was described. This ecumenically widely accepted notion was clarified in several aspects. How deeply this is rooted in the history of Christian social thought was shown by Martin Luther�s writings on the economy which have remained relatively unknown in the churches and in the scholarly world. The article then presented three models of Christian economic ethic: the technical economic model, the utopian economic model and the public theological economic model. On the basis of the public theological model seven challenges for international food justice were presented. The basis for these challenges is an understanding of globalisation which guarantees just participation for everyone and deals with nature in an ecologically sustainable way. The interests of small farmers are the basis for judging the activities of big agro-corporations. Public theology is the background for an active involvement of the churches as agents of a global civil society to promote international food justice.

  14. Citizenship and social justice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.P.J. Bernts (Ton); L. d' Anjou (Leo); D. Houtman (Dick)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractDiscussions on the problems of the welfare state are increasingly framed in terms of citizenship rather than social justice. The popularity of the concept of citizenship raises the question of its implications for social justice theory and research. In this article it is argued that wher

  15. Imagining Social Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArdle, Felicity; Knight, Linda; Stratigos, Tina

    2013-01-01

    This article examines how creativity and the arts can assist teachers who teach from a social justice perspective, and how knowledge built through meaningful experiences of difference can make a difference. Just as imagining is central to visual arts practice, so too is the capacity to imagine a necessity for social justice. The authors ask what…

  16. Citizenship and social justice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.P.J. Bernts (Ton); L. d' Anjou (Leo); D. Houtman (Dick)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractDiscussions on the problems of the welfare state are increasingly framed in terms of citizenship rather than social justice. The popularity of the concept of citizenship raises the question of its implications for social justice theory and research. In this article it is argued that

  17. Justice as Europe's Signifier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roy, Suryapratim; Kochenov, Dimitry; de Burca, Grainne; Williams, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Drawing on the fact that justice is never explained in European legal discourse, but is used in conjunction with other principles and institutional decisions, this contribution argues that justice is used as a rhetorical tool to provide legitimacy to such principles and decisions. An analogous

  18. Renewing Juvenile Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macallair, Daniel; Males, Mike; Enty, Dinky Manek; Vinakor, Natasha

    2011-01-01

    The Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice (CJCJ) was commissioned by Sierra Health Foundation to critically examine California's juvenile justice system and consider the potential role of foundations in promoting systemic reform. The information gathered by CJCJ researchers for this report suggests that foundations can perform a key leadership…

  19. Citizenship and social justice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.P.J. Bernts (Ton); L. d' Anjou (Leo); D. Houtman (Dick)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractDiscussions on the problems of the welfare state are increasingly framed in terms of citizenship rather than social justice. The popularity of the concept of citizenship raises the question of its implications for social justice theory and research. In this article it is argued that wher

  20. Distributive justice through taxation: European perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeiro, João Sérgio

    2006-01-01

    This article elaborates on the possibility of having distributive justice through taxes at European level. That possibility will be based on the verification of a set of conditions such as fiscal sovereignty, political community, welfare model; and personal taxes, which, according to the author, must be present at the level of the European Union in order to achieve that normative principle (distributive justice). Throughout the discussion, upon acknowledgement that those requirements are stil...

  1. Designing Collaborative Developmental Standards by Refactoring of the Earth Science Models, Libraries, Workflows and Frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirvis, E.; Iredell, M.

    2015-12-01

    The operational (OPS) NOAA National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) suite, traditionally, consist of a large set of multi- scale HPC models, workflows, scripts, tools and utilities, which are very much depending on the variety of the additional components. Namely, this suite utilizes a unique collection of the in-house developed 20+ shared libraries (NCEPLIBS), certain versions of the 3-rd party libraries (like netcdf, HDF, ESMF, jasper, xml etc.), HPC workflow tool within dedicated (sometimes even vendors' customized) HPC system homogeneous environment. This domain and site specific, accompanied with NCEP's product- driven large scale real-time data operations complicates NCEP collaborative development tremendously by reducing chances to replicate this OPS environment anywhere else. The NOAA/NCEP's Environmental Modeling Center (EMC) missions to develop and improve numerical weather, climate, hydrological and ocean prediction through the partnership with the research community. Realizing said difficulties, lately, EMC has been taken an innovative approach to improve flexibility of the HPC environment by building the elements and a foundation for NCEP OPS functionally equivalent environment (FEE), which can be used to ease the external interface constructs as well. Aiming to reduce turnaround time of the community code enhancements via Research-to-Operations (R2O) cycle, EMC developed and deployed several project sub-set standards that already paved the road to NCEP OPS implementation standards. In this topic we will discuss the EMC FEE for O2R requirements and approaches in collaborative standardization, including NCEPLIBS FEE and models code version control paired with the models' derived customized HPC modules and FEE footprints. We will share NCEP/EMC experience and potential in the refactoring of EMC development processes, legacy codes and in securing model source code quality standards by using combination of the Eclipse IDE, integrated with the

  2. Collaborative Testing as a Model for Addressing Equity in Student Success in STEM Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dileonardo, C.; James, B. R.

    2016-12-01

    Introductory Earth science classes at two-year colleges play a critical role as "gateway courses" for underrepresented student populations into undergraduate STEM programs. Students entering college underprepared in math and science typically receive their only exposure to science at the undergraduate level in introductory courses in the Earth and space sciences. In many colleges a huge disparity exists in these classes between success rates amongst students from groups traditionally represented in the STEM fields and those from underrepresented populations. Closing the equity gap in success in these courses is a major focus of many pilot projects nationally. This concern has also led to the adoption of new teaching and learning practices, based on research in learning, in introductory Earth science pedagogy. Models of teaching practices including greater engagement, active learning approaches, and collaborative learning structures seem to help with student achievement in introductory courses. But, whereas these practices might increase overall student success they have not proven to close the equity gap in achievement. De Anza a two-year college in the San Francisco bay area has a long history in the geology department of incorporating and testing teaching practices developed out of research in learning. Collaborative learning has infused every aspect of our learning approaches in the Earth sciences, including laboratory, fieldwork, and test preparation. Though these approaches seemed to have educational benefit the huge equity gap department-wide persisted between targeted and non-targeted populations. Three years ago collaborative testing models were introduced into our geology and meteorology classes. The mechanism included methods for directly comparing collaborative to individual testing. The net result was that targeted populations including African Americans, Latinos, and Filipinos increased steadily at around 3.5% per year from 66% to 73%. The overall

  3. Collaborative Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    and communities 13.Embedding social values in tourism management: Community currencies as laboratories of social entrepreneurship? Rita Cannas 14.Improvising Economy: Everyday encounters and tourism consumption Gunnar Thór Jóhannesson and Katrín Anna Lund 15.Community and connection: Exploring the outcomes......This book employs an interdisciplinary, cross-sectoral lens to explore the collaborative dynamics that are currently disrupting, re-creating and transforming the production and consumption of tourism. House swapping, ridesharing, voluntourism, couchsurfing, dinner hosting, social enterprise...... collaborative economy and tourism Dianne Dredge and Szilvia Gyimóthy PART I - Theoretical explorations 2.Definitions and mapping the landscape in the collaborative economy Szilvia Gyimóthy and Dianne Dredge 3.Business models of the collaborative economy Szilvia Gyimóthy 4.Responsibility and care...

  4. MULTI AGENT COLLABORATIVE DESIGN SYSTEM MODEL BASED ON THE INTERNET AND EXPERIMENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Development of complicated products is a project of system engineeringIt involves extensive and complicated knowledge,design meth ods and auxiliary technologyVarious factors affect each otherSo,modern produ ct development is a typical group problem with distributed and dynamic features It is apparent superiority to solve this problem with a multiagent system re presenting various knowledge domainsDistributed artificial intelligence knowle dge being used,the multiagent collaborative design system concept and model ba sed on Internet environment are put forwardThe realizing method of product developing agents,interactive process among multiagents,and organiz ation and implementing of the design project of the multiagent collaborative d esign system are discussed in detailApplication examples are also presented

  5. Collaborative evaluation and market research converge: an innovative model agricultural development program evaluation in Southern Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, John M; O'Sullivan, Rita

    2012-11-01

    In June and July 2006 a team of outside experts arrived in Yei, Southern Sudan through an AID project to provide support to a local agricultural development project. The team brought evaluation, agricultural marketing and financial management expertise to the in-country partners looking at steps to rebuild the economy of the war ravaged region. A partnership of local officials, agricultural development staff, and students worked with the outside team to craft a survey of agricultural traders working between northern Uganda and Southern Sudan the steps approach of a collaborative model. The goal was to create a market directory of use to producers, government officials and others interested in stimulating agricultural trade. The directory of agricultural producers and distributors served as an agricultural development and promotion tool as did the collaborative process itself.

  6. Maximum Spanning Tree Model on Personalized Web Based Collaborative Learning in Web 3.0

    CERN Document Server

    Padma, S

    2012-01-01

    Web 3.0 is an evolving extension of the current web environme bnt. Information in web 3.0 can be collaborated and communicated when queried. Web 3.0 architecture provides an excellent learning experience to the students. Web 3.0 is 3D, media centric and semantic. Web based learning has been on high in recent days. Web 3.0 has intelligent agents as tutors to collect and disseminate the answers to the queries by the students. Completely Interactive learner's query determine the customization of the intelligent tutor. This paper analyses the Web 3.0 learning environment attributes. A Maximum spanning tree model for the personalized web based collaborative learning is designed.

  7. [A brief review of research on chronic disease management based on collaborative care model in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huayan; Fuller, Jeffrey; Sun, Mei; Wang, Yong; Xu, Shuang; Feng, Hui

    2014-11-01

    To evaluate the situation for chronic disease management in China, and to seek the method for improving the collaborative management for chronic diseases in community. We searched literature between January 2008 and November 2013 from the Database, such as China Academic Journal Full-Text Database, and PubMed. The screening was strictly in accordance with the inclusion and exclusion criteria and a summary was made among the selected literature based on a collaboration model. We got 698 articles after rough screen and finally selected 33. All studies were involved in patient's self-management support, but only 9 studies mentioned the communication within the team, and 11 showed a clear team division of labor. Chronic disease community management in China displays some disadvantages. It really needs a general service team with clear roles and responsibilities for team members to improve the service ability of team members and provide patients with various forms of self management services.

  8. A web-based, collaborative modeling, simulation, and parallel computing environment for electromechanical systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoliang Yin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Complex electromechanical system is usually composed of multiple components from different domains, including mechanical, electronic, hydraulic, control, and so on. Modeling and simulation for electromechanical system on a unified platform is one of the research hotspots in system engineering at present. It is also the development trend of the design for complex electromechanical system. The unified modeling techniques and tools based on Modelica language provide a satisfactory solution. To meet with the requirements of collaborative modeling, simulation, and parallel computing for complex electromechanical systems based on Modelica, a general web-based modeling and simulation prototype environment, namely, WebMWorks, is designed and implemented. Based on the rich Internet application technologies, an interactive graphic user interface for modeling and post-processing on web browser was implemented; with the collaborative design module, the environment supports top-down, concurrent modeling and team cooperation; additionally, service-oriented architecture–based architecture was applied to supply compiling and solving services which run on cloud-like servers, so the environment can manage and dispatch large-scale simulation tasks in parallel on multiple computing servers simultaneously. An engineering application about pure electric vehicle is tested on WebMWorks. The results of simulation and parametric experiment demonstrate that the tested web-based environment can effectively shorten the design cycle of the complex electromechanical system.

  9. Data model for the collaboration between land administration systems and agricultural land parcel identification systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inan, Halil Ibrahim; Sagris, Valentina; Devos, Wim; Milenov, Pavel; van Oosterom, Peter; Zevenbergen, Jaap

    2010-12-01

    The Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) of the European Union (EU) has dramatically changed after 1992, and from then on the CAP focused on the management of direct income subsidies instead of production-based subsidies. For this focus, Member States (MS) are expected to establish Integrated Administration and Control System (IACS), including a Land Parcel Identification System (LPIS) as the spatial part of IACS. Different MS have chosen different solutions for their LPIS. Currently, some MS based their IACS/LPIS on data from their Land Administration Systems (LAS), and many others use purpose built special systems for their IACS/LPIS. The issue with these different IACS/LPIS is that they do not have standardized structures; rather, each represents a unique design in each MS, both in the case of LAS based or special systems. In this study, we aim at designing a core data model for those IACS/LPIS based on LAS. For this purpose, we make use of the ongoing standardization initiatives for LAS (Land Administration Domain Model: LADM) and IACS/LPIS (LPIS Core Model: LCM). The data model we propose in this study implies the collaboration between LADM and LCM and includes some extensions. Some basic issues with the collaboration model are discussed within this study: registration of farmers, land use rights and farming limitations, geometry/topology, temporal data management etc. For further explanation of the model structure, sample instance level diagrams illustrating some typical situations are also included.

  10. Performance Analysis Model of ManufacturingSystem under Collaborative Product Commerce

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鲁建厦; 竺炯林; 陈勇; 兰秀菊; 叶艳

    2004-01-01

    Based on an analysis of the relationship between electronic business (EB) and collaborative product commerce (CPC), the conception of CPC is illustrated rigorously. Development and classification of manufacturing systems are summarized. System features and goals on each stage of a manufacturing system are investigated. In particular, goals and feature characteristics of CPC manufacturing system are discussed. A figure of relationship between the feature and goal ofa CPC manufacturing system is given. A model of CPC manufacturing systems based on a set of five elements including goal, feature, topology, view, and process is proposed. Furthermore, four models of 3D function analysis for PFV, PTV, PTG, and PFG are established.

  11. Opinions, Conflicts and Consensus: Modeling Social Dynamics in a Collaborative Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Török, János; Yasseri, Taha; Miguel, Maxi San; Kaski, Kimmo; Kertész, János

    2012-01-01

    Information-communication technology promotes collaborative environments like Wikipedia where, however, controversiality and conflicts can appear. To describe the rise, persistence, and resolution of such conflicts we devise an extended opinion dynamics model where agents with different opinions perform a single task to make a consensual product. As a function of the convergence parameter describing the influence of the product on the agents, the model shows spontaneous symmetry breaking of the final consensus opinion represented by the medium. For the case when agents are replaced with new ones at a certain rate, a transition from mainly consensus to a perpetual conflict occurs, which is in qualitative agreement with the scenarios observed in Wikipedia.

  12. Development and validation of a measure and a model of general practitioner attitudes toward collaboration with pharmacists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van, Connie; Costa, Daniel; Mitchell, Bernadette; Abbott, Penny; Krass, Ines

    2013-01-01

    Collaboration between general practitioners (GPs) and community pharmacists has been shown to be effective in improving patient outcomes. However, little is known about GP attitudes toward collaborating with their pharmacist counterparts and variables that influence this interprofessional collaboration. To develop and validate, in the context of primary care in Australia 1) an instrument to measure GP attitudes toward collaborating with pharmacists and 2) a model that illustrates how GP attitudes (and other variables) influence GP-pharmacist collaborative behavior. The "Attitudes Toward Collaboration Instrument for GPs" (ATCI-GP) was developed to measure GP attitudes toward GP-pharmacist collaboration based on existing literature and qualitative interviews with GPs and community pharmacists. The ATCI-GP and a previously validated behavioral measure "Frequency of Interprofessional Collaboration Instrument for GPs" (FICI-GP) were included in a survey and administered to a sample of 1145 GPs in 12 divisions of general practice across Australia. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to assess the structure of the ATCI-GP. Structural equation modeling was used to determine how attitudes (measured by the ATCI-GP) and other variables, influence collaborative behavior (measured by the FICI-GP). Three hundred and seventy-six surveys were completed and returned for a response rate of 33%. PCA of the ATCI-GP suggested a two factor ("interactional and practitioner determinants" and "role for pharmacist in medication management") solution accounting for 66.2% of the variance. The model for GP-pharmacist collaboration demonstrated adequate fit (χ(2)/df = 2.27, CFI = .99, RMSEA = .060, 90% CI [.052-.069]). Factors found to predict collaboration included: 1) Interactional and practitioner determinants 2) environmental determinants and 3) GP perception of the pharmacists' role in medication management. The study provides evidence for the validity of the ATCI-GP for measuring

  13. Collaborative Visualization for Large-Scale Accelerator Electromagnetic Modeling (Final Report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William J. Schroeder

    2011-11-13

    This report contains the comprehensive summary of the work performed on the SBIR Phase II, Collaborative Visualization for Large-Scale Accelerator Electromagnetic Modeling at Kitware Inc. in collaboration with Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The goal of the work was to develop collaborative visualization tools for large-scale data as illustrated in the figure below. The solutions we proposed address the typical problems faced by geographicallyand organizationally-separated research and engineering teams, who produce large data (either through simulation or experimental measurement) and wish to work together to analyze and understand their data. Because the data is large, we expect that it cannot be easily transported to each team member's work site, and that the visualization server must reside near the data. Further, we also expect that each work site has heterogeneous resources: some with large computing clients, tiled (or large) displays and high bandwidth; others sites as simple as a team member on a laptop computer. Our solution is based on the open-source, widely used ParaView large-data visualization application. We extended this tool to support multiple collaborative clients who may locally visualize data, and then periodically rejoin and synchronize with the group to discuss their findings. Options for managing session control, adding annotation, and defining the visualization pipeline, among others, were incorporated. We also developed and deployed a Web visualization framework based on ParaView that enables the Web browser to act as a participating client in a collaborative session. The ParaView Web Visualization framework leverages various Web technologies including WebGL, JavaScript, Java and Flash to enable interactive 3D visualization over the web using ParaView as the visualization server. We steered the development of this technology by teaming with the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. SLAC has a computationally

  14. Collaborative modeling of the benefits and harms associated with different U.S. Breast cancer screening strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.S. Mandelblatt (Jeanne); N.K. Stout (Natasha); C.B. Schechter (Clyde); J.J. Van Den Broek (Jeroen J.); D.L. Miglioretti (Diana); M. Krapcho (Martin); A. Trentham-Dietz (Amy); D. Munoz (Diego); S.J. Lee (Sandra J.); D.A. Berry (Donald); N.T. van Ravesteyn (Nicolien); O. Alagoz (Oguzhan); K. Kerlikowske (Karla); A.N.A. Tosteson (Anna N.A.); A.M. Near (Aimee); A. Hoeffken (Amanda); Y. Chang (Yaojen); E.A.M. Heijnsdijk (Eveline); G. Chisholm (Gary); X. Huang (Xuelin); H. Huang (Hailiang); M.A. Ergun (Mehmet Ali); R. Gangnon (Ronald); B.L. Sprague (Brian L.); S. Plevritis (Sylvia); E. Feuer (Eric); H.J. de Koning (Harry); K.A. Cronin (Kathleen)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Controversy persists about optimal mammography screening strategies. Objective: To evaluate screening outcomes, taking into account advances in mammography and treatment of breast cancer. Design: Collaboration of 6 simulation models using national data on incidence, digital

  15. Concerning Justice and Music Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Estelle R.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, I explore matters concerning justice and music education. I briefly sketch responses to five interrelated questions: Why should music educators be interested in justice? What is meant by the term social justice and how is it distinguished from justice of other kinds? How do liberal views of humanity, particularly the preciousness of…

  16. Study on Multi-enterprise Collaborative Resource Planning Based Process-oriented Decision Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Jinhua; HE Yingying; LIU Jianming

    2006-01-01

    Aiming to share the information, knowledge and optimizing resource via collaborating with multiple external partners across their supply chains, the concept model and system framework of multi-enterprises collaborative resource planning (MECORP) are put forward. While there is Considerable pressure to improve the operation of MECORP system, their inherent complexity can make modelling a MECORP system a difficult task. Yet there could be considerable benefits in designing MECORP taking into account the operation of the system. In order to address the central research issue of developing of a methodology that can assist a manager in making decisions by modelling the operation of MECORP system. The methodology called process-oriented decision model (PODM) is presented in the paper. This uses an abstracted network to model MECORP system. The MECORP system supported by PODM, can effective optimize the manifold resource, coordinate the relationship of multiple partners and assist decision. Finally, an industry example of MECORP system is described to illustrate the application of PODM.

  17. Counseling psychology trainees' social justice interest and commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Matthew J; Sendrowitz, Kerrin

    2011-04-01

    Scholars within the field of counseling psychology have for some time now articulated eloquent and compelling calls for attending to social justice in the social sciences. To date, counseling psychologists have been at the forefront of addressing social justice issues in research, practice, and professional development. The present study advances empirical perspectives on social justice by testing the external validity of M. J. Miller et al.'s (2009) social-cognitive model of social justice interest and commitment in a sample of 229 doctoral trainees in counseling psychology. Present findings support the ability of the model to explain, in part, counseling psychology trainees' social justice interest and commitment. In addition, the present study provides novel findings that demonstrate the direct and indirect ways in which program training environment and personal moral imperative relate to social justice interest and commitment. Study limitations, future directions for research, and implications for training are discussed.

  18. Towards a Personalised, Learning Style Based Collaborative Blended Learning Model with Individual Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilona BÉRES

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we aim to describe the process by which our personalised web-based collaborative teaching/learning methodology (CECIP - Collaboration - Evaluation - Critical thinking - Individual assessment - learner Profile evolved originating from Vygotsky's theory and based on the (C collaborative construction of student's knowledge, (E developing evaluation and assessment skills, (C developing critical thinking skills, (I integrating individual evaluation and (P generating learner profile. Our CECIP methodology integrates individual learning style dimensions and their preferences into e-learning environment by filling out MBTI, Gardner, GEFT and Felder-Silverman questionnaires during our four-semester-research. The paper covers the theoretical foundations of Learning Styles giving analogies to preferred learning strategies. A three-part-research process is described through which the described CECIP model emerged: (1 analysing Learning Styles and Learning Management Systems that claim to support their work; (2 raising the background knowledge of students in cognitive psychology in order to improve design and evaluation methodologies of multimedia learning materials; (3 personalising tasks and assessment based on Bloom's Taxonomy.

  19. Collaborative cancer epidemiology in the 21st century: the model of cancer consortia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgio, Michael R; Ioannidis, John P A; Kaminski, Brett M; Derycke, Eric; Rogers, Scott; Khoury, Muin J; Seminara, Daniela

    2013-12-01

    During the last two decades, epidemiology has undergone a rapid evolution toward collaborative research. The proliferation of multi-institutional, interdisciplinary consortia has acquired particular prominence in cancer research. Herein, we describe the characteristics of a network of 49 established cancer epidemiology consortia (CEC) currently supported by the Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program (EGRP) at the National Cancer Institute (NCI). This collection represents the largest disease-based research network for collaborative cancer research established in population sciences. We describe the funding trends, geographic distribution, and areas of research focus. The CEC have been partially supported by 201 grants and yielded 3,876 publications between 1995 and 2011. We describe this output in terms of interdisciplinary collaboration and translational evolution. We discuss challenges and future opportunities in the establishment and conduct of large-scale team science within the framework of CEC, review future prospects for this approach to large-scale, interdisciplinary cancer research, and describe a model for the evolution of an integrated Network of Cancer Consortia optimally suited to address and support 21st-century epidemiology.

  20. Supporting Collaborative Model and Data Service Development and Deployment with DevOps

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, O.

    2016-12-01

    Adopting DevOps practices for model service development and deployment enables a community to engage in service-oriented modeling and data management. The Cloud Services Integration Platform (CSIP) developed the last 5 years at Colorado State University provides for collaborative integration of environmental models into scalable model and data services as a micro-services platform with API and deployment infrastructure. Originally developed to support USDA natural resource applications, it proved suitable for a wider range of applications in the environmental modeling domain. While extending its scope and visibility it became apparent community integration and adequate work flow support through the full model development and application cycle drove successful outcomes.DevOps provide best practices, tools, and organizational structures to optimize the transition from model service development to deployment by minimizing the (i) operational burden and (ii) turnaround time for modelers. We have developed and implemented a methodology to fully automate a suite of applications for application lifecycle management, version control, continuous integration, container management, and container scaling to enable model and data service developers in various institutions to collaboratively build, run, deploy, test, and scale services within minutes.To date more than 160 model and data services are available for applications in hydrology (PRMS, Hydrotools, CFA, ESP), water and wind erosion prediction (WEPP, WEPS, RUSLE2), soil quality trends (SCI, STIR), water quality analysis (SWAT-CP, WQM, CFA, AgES-W), stream degradation assessment (SWAT-DEG), hydraulics (cross-section), and grazing management (GRAS). In addition, supporting data services include soil (SSURGO), ecological site (ESIS), climate (CLIGEN, WINDGEN), land management and crop rotations (LMOD), and pesticides (WQM), developed using this workflow automation and decentralized governance.

  1. Restorative justice as social justice for victims of gendered violence: a standpoint feminist perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wormer, Katherine

    2009-04-01

    This article provides an overview of restorative justice as a process and examines its relevance to women who have been victimized by physical and sexual abuse. The starting point is the justice system with its roots in adversarial, offender-oriented practices of obtaining justice. The widespread dissatisfaction by battered women and rape victims and their advocates with the current system of mandatory law enforcement opens the door for consideration of alternative forms of dealing with domestic violence. Restorative justice strategies, as argued here, have several major advantages. Like social work, these strategies are solution-based rather than problem-based processes, give voice to marginalized people, and focus on healing and reconciliation. Moreover, restorative justice offers an avenue through which the profession of social work can re-establish its historic role in criminal justice. The four models most relevant to women's victimization are victim-offender conferencing, family group conferencing, healing circles, and community reparations. Each model is examined separately from a feminist standpoint. The discussion is informed by insights from the teachings of standpoint feminist theory and social work values, especially social justice.

  2. Managing depression in people with multimorbidity: a qualitative evaluation of an integrated collaborative care model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Sarah E; Chew-Graham, Carolyn; Adeyemi, Isabel; Coupe, Nia; Coventry, Peter A

    2015-03-05

    Patients with comorbid depression and physical health problems have poorer outcomes compared with those with single long term conditions (LTCs), or multiple LTCs without depression. Primary care has traditionally struggled to provide integrated care for this group. Collaborative care can reduce depression in people with LTCs but evidence is largely based on trials conducted in the United States that adopted separate treat to target protocols for physical and mental health. Little is known about whether collaborative care that integrates depression care within the management of LTCs is implementable in UK primary care, and acceptable to patients and health care professionals. Nested interview study within the COINCIDE trial of collaborative care for patients with depression and diabetes/CHD (ISRCTN80309252). The study was conducted in primary care practices in North West England. Professionals delivering the interventions (nurses, GPs and psychological well-being practitioners) and patients in the intervention arm were invited to participate in semi-structured qualitative interviews. Based on combined thematic analysis of 59 transcripts, we identified two major themes: 1) Integration: patients and professionals valued collaborative ways of working because it enhanced co-ordination of mental and physical health care and provided a sense that patients' health was being more holistically managed. 2) Division: patients and professionals articulated a preference for therapeutic and spatial separation between mental and physical health. Patients especially valued a separate space outside of their LTC clinic to discuss their emotional health problems. The COINCIDE care model, that sought to integrate depression care within the context of LTC management, achieved service level integration but not therapeutic integration. Patients preferred a protected space to discuss mental health issues, and professionals maintained barriers around physical and mental health expertise

  3. Collaborative production and experimental labor: two models of dissertation authorship in the eighteenth century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ku-ming Kevin

    2010-12-01

    This article examines two early modern models of dissertation authorship that both relied on extensive collaboration between the degree candidate and his supervisor. The dissertation conducted on the traditional model, practiced until the eighteenth century at German universities, was a joint product of the supervisor, who prepared the thesis in writing, and the degree candidate, who defended it in the oral disputation. The two collaborators shared the credit for a successfully defended thesis in different forms: right for public recognition and rights to use and reproduce the thesis. Instead of sharing the credit as two equal partners, each of them took advantage of his credit in ways that benefited his status. In the model that Albrecht von Haller introduced at Göttingen, the supervisor provided the student with a laboratory and experimental training, while the degree candidate wrote a thesis by himself based on the experiments he carried out, and defended the thesis without the supervisor chairing the disputation. The Haller model reveals two new elements that heralded the development of modern scientific education: divisibility of laboratory labor between the student's experimentation and the research program to which it belongs; and feasibility of the requirement of experimental work in return for the exclusive authorship of the doctoral thesis. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Collaborative Research: Separating Forced and Unforced Decadal Predictability in Models and Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tippett, Michael K. [Columbia University

    2014-04-09

    This report is a progress report of the accomplishments of the research grant “Collaborative Research: Separating Forced and Unforced Decadal Predictability in Models and Observa- tions” during the period 1 May 2011- 31 August 2013. This project is a collaborative one between Columbia University and George Mason University. George Mason University will submit a final technical report at the conclusion of their no-cost extension. The purpose of the proposed research is to identify unforced predictable components on decadal time scales, distinguish these components from forced predictable components, and to assess the reliability of model predictions of these components. Components of unforced decadal predictability will be isolated by maximizing the Average Predictability Time (APT) in long, multimodel control runs from state-of-the-art climate models. Components with decadal predictability have large APT, so maximizing APT ensures that components with decadal predictability will be detected. Optimal fingerprinting techniques, as used in detection and attribution analysis, will be used to separate variations due to natural and anthropogenic forcing from those due to unforced decadal predictability. This methodology will be applied to the decadal hindcasts generated by the CMIP5 project to assess the reliability of model projections. The question of whether anthropogenic forcing changes decadal predictability, or gives rise to new forms of decadal predictability, also will be investigated.

  5. Collaborative care for depression: a literature review and a model for implementation in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, Saeed

    2013-03-01

    Depression will soon be the leading cause of disability in developing countries but effective treatments are not widely available. There is compelling evidence for the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the multicondition collaborative care (MCC) model for depression in developing and developed countries. In the MCC model integrated care for depression is provided along with care for different non-communicable disorders. MCC has been shown to reduce hyperglycaemia and hyperlipidaemia and can lead to depression-free days when integrated care for depression and diabetes is provided. However, due to limited resources, it is not possible to make this effective model of care available at the population level. It is suggested that a public health intervention based on the MCC model can lead to better care for depression in developing countries. A public health programme of MCC which provides treatment for depression, diabetes and hypertension in a collaborative care programme will be a cost-effective way of providing treatment for depression in developing countries. This will cater for the leading cause of disability (unipolar depression) and the leading projected causes of mortality (ischaemic heart disease and cerebrovascular disease) in low-income and middle-income countries.

  6. Variations on Justice: Argentina's pre- and -post transitional justice and justice to-come

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaisman, Noa

    2015-01-01

    of these three kinds of justice and the changes they underwent in the past two decades. By offering a grounded analysis of justice in the pre- and the post-transitional justice phases in Argentina the paper contributes to ongoing debates about the meaning of justice and the possibility of reconciliation in post-conflict...

  7. Gearbox Reliability Collaborative Phase 1 and 2: Testing and Modeling Results; Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, J.; Guo, Y.; LaCava, W.; Link, H.; McNiff, B.

    2012-05-01

    The Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC) investigates root causes of wind turbine gearbox premature failures and validates design assumptions that affect gearbox reliability using a combined testing and modeling approach. Knowledge gained from the testing and modeling of the GRC gearboxes builds an understanding of how the selected loads and events translate into internal responses of three-point mounted gearboxes. This paper presents some testing and modeling results of the GRC research during Phase 1 and 2. Non-torque loads from the rotor including shaft bending and thrust, traditionally assumed to be uncoupled with gearbox, affect gear and bearing loads and resulting gearbox responses. Bearing clearance increases bearing loads and causes cyclic loading, which could contribute to a reduced bearing life. Including flexibilities of key drivetrain subcomponents is important in order to reproduce the measured gearbox response during the tests using modeling approaches.

  8. The Interrogative Model of Inquiry and Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakkarainen, Kai; Sintonen, Matti

    The purpose of the study was to examine how the Interrogative Modelof Inquiry (I-Model), developed by Jaakko Hintikka and Matti Sintonenfor the purposes of epistemology and philosophy of science, could be applied to analyze elementary schoolstudents'' process of inquiry in computer-supported learning. We review the basic assumptions of I-Model,report results of empirical investigation of the model in the context of computer-supportedcollaborative learning, and discuss pedagogical implications of the model. The results of the studyfurnished evidence that elementary school students were able to transform initially vagueexplanation-seeking question to a series of more specific subordinate questions while pursuing theirknowledge-seeking inquiry. The evidence presented indicates that, in an appropriate environment, it is entirelypossible for young students, with computer-supportfor collaborative learning, to engage in sophisticatedknowledge seeking analogous to scientific inquiry. We argue that the interrogative approach to inquiry canproductively be applied for conceptualizing inquiry in the context of computer-supported learning.

  9. Collaborative Business Models for Energy Efficient Solutions An Exploratory Analysis of Danish and German Manufacturers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyd, Britta; Brem, Alexander; Bogers, Marcel

    energy network and innovative business models for energy efficient solutions. In order to carry out the above research activities, a first-stage screening of Southern Danish and Northern German companies that are energy efficient and of high performance is crucial to our research. By conducting...... efficiency and innovation management. Then, based on the findings open and collaborative business models could be suggested. Open business models get more important because innovation no longer takes place within a single organization, but are distributed across stakeholders in a value network (Bogers & West......The growing dynamics of innovation and productivity affect businesses in most industries and countries. Companies face these challenges by constantly developing new technologies and business models - the logic with which they create and capture value (Afuah, 2014; Osterwalder & Pigneur, 2010; Zott...

  10. Like water for justice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joshi, D.

    2015-01-01

    The narrative of environmental justice is powerfully and passionately advocated by researchers, practitioners and activists across scale and space. Yet, because these struggles are multifaceted and pluralistic, rooted in complex, evolving “socio-material-political interminglings” the concept is

  11. Potential Environmental Justice Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — These data are from EJSCREEN, an environmental justice (EJ) screening and mapping tool that provides EPA with a nationally consistent dataset and methodology for...

  12. Post-Disaster Social Justice Group Work and Group Supervision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemak, Fred; Chung, Rita Chi-Ying

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses post-disaster group counseling and group supervision using a social justice orientation for working with post-disaster survivors from underserved populations. The Disaster Cross-Cultural Counseling model is a culturally responsive group counseling model that infuses social justice into post-disaster group counseling and…

  13. Toronto Heart Attack Collaborative: an administrative model that facilitated a successful city-wide integration initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Justin; McLellan, Barry; Escaf, Marnie; Dzavik, Vladimir; Michaud, Susan; Newton, Janet; Newman, Erone

    2014-01-01

    This article provides a description of the administrative model that enabled a city-wide integration effort between Greater Toronto Area hospitals and Toronto Emergency Medical Services in the care of patients within the city of Toronto with ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). This administrative structure, known as the Toronto Heart Attack Collaborative (THAC), enabled universal 24/7 access to primary percutaneous coronary intervention within Toronto, improving patient efficacy and outcomes. The lessons and administrative enablers from this experience may be useful for regions that are embarking on multi-centre integration efforts. This article presents a five-year perspective on the THAC integration effort.

  14. Gender and Climate Justice

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Agostino; Rosa Lizarde

    2012-01-01

    Ana Agostino and Rosa Lizarde explore the concept of climate justice as a rights approach to climate change. They propose that those in the South who are most affected by environmental changes need to receive justice from those in the North who are most responsible for climate change. They apply a gender lens to climate change, analyzing how women have been specifically hit by the phenomenon and how they are responding.

  15. JUSTICE FOR DISABLED PERSONS

    OpenAIRE

    Brčić Kuljiš, Marita

    2014-01-01

    Symbol of justice is a blindfolded lady. Blind to all diversity, it provides impartial law and equal treatment for all citizens. Their rationality, cooperativeness, autonomy and independence confirm their legal equality. However, what about the people who, for various reasons, do not meet those conditions? Can a political community apply the principles of (political) justice to them? Does it relate to them unfairly excluding them from political relationships or building relationships with the...

  16. Transitional justice and aid

    OpenAIRE

    Hellsten, Sirkku K.

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the current security-governance-development nexus, something that is often also discussed under the concept of transitional justice (TJ). The paper analyses how the ambiguous, evolving and expanding nature of the concept of TJ affects the planning, coordination, evaluation and assessment of aid given to conflict ridden, post-conflict or (post) authoritarian societies in order to strengthen their democracy. Special attention is paid to gender justice. Illustrations are draw...

  17. Justice, fairness, and enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savulescu, Julian

    2006-12-01

    This article begins by considering four traditional definitions of enhancement, then proposes a fifth, the Welfarist definition. It then considers fairness-based objections to enhancement, using the example of performance enhancement in sport. In so doing it defines sport and the values proper to it, surveys alternative theories of justice, considers the natural distribution of capabilities and disabilities, and draws a distinction between social, psychological, and biological enhancement. The article advances a new argument that justice requires enhancement.

  18. Collaborative experiment on intercomparison of regional-scale hydrological models for climate impact assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krysanova, Valentina; Hattermann, Fred

    2015-04-01

    The Inter-Sectoral Impact Model Intercomparison Project (ISI-MIP) is a community-driven modelling effort bringing together impact modellers across sectors and scales to create more consistent and comprehensive projections of the impacts of climate change. This project is aimed in establishing a long-term, systematic, cross-sectoral impact model intercomparison process, including comparison of climate change impacts for multiple sectors using ensemble of climate scenarios and applying global and regional impact models. The project is coordinated by the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research. An overview of this project and collaborative experiment related to the regional-scale water sector model intercomparison in ISI-MIP will be presented. The regional-scale water sector modelling includes eleven models applied to eleven large-scale river basins worldwide (not every model is applied to every of eleven basins). In total, 60-65 model applications will be done by several collaborating groups from different Institutions. The modelling tools include: ECOMAG, HBV, HBV-light, HYPE, LASCAM, LISFLOOD, mHM, SWAT, SWIM, VIC and WaterGAP. Eleven river basins chosen for the model application and intercomparison are: the Rhine and Tagus in Europe, the Niger and Blue Nile in Africa, the Ganges, Lena, Upper Yellow and Upper Yangtze in Asia, the Upper Mississippi and Upper Amazon in America, and the Murray-Darling in Australia. Their drainage areas range between 67,490 km2 (Tagus) to 2,460,000 km2 (Lena). Data from global and regional datasets are used for the model setup and calibration. The model calibration and validation was done using the WATCH climate data for all cases, also checking the representation of high and low percentiles of river discharge. For most of the basins, also intermediate gauge stations were included in the calibration. The calibration and validation results, evaluated with the Nash and Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE) and percent bias (PBIAS), are mostly

  19. A filter-mediated communication model for design collaboration in building construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaewook; Jeong, Yongwook; Oh, Minho; Hong, Seung Wan

    2014-01-01

    Multidisciplinary collaboration is an important aspect of modern engineering activities, arising from the growing complexity of artifacts whose design and construction require knowledge and skills that exceed the capacities of any one professional. However, current collaboration in the architecture, engineering, and construction industries often fails due to lack of shared understanding between different participants and limitations of their supporting tools. To achieve a high level of shared understanding, this study proposes a filter-mediated communication model. In the proposed model, participants retain their own data in the form most appropriate for their needs with domain-specific filters that transform the neutral representations into semantically rich ones, as needed by the participants. Conversely, the filters can translate semantically rich, domain-specific data into a neutral representation that can be accessed by other domain-specific filters. To validate the feasibility of the proposed model, we computationally implement the filter mechanism and apply it to a hypothetical test case. The result acknowledges that the filter mechanism can let the participants know ahead of time what will be the implications of their proposed actions, as seen from other participants' points of view.

  20. Use of XML and Java for collaborative petroleum reservoir modeling on the Internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victorine, J.; Watney, W.L.; Bhattacharya, S.

    2005-01-01

    The GEMINI (Geo-Engineering Modeling through INternet Informatics) is a public-domain, web-based freeware that is made up of an integrated suite of 14 Java-based software tools to accomplish on-line, real-time geologic and engineering reservoir modeling. GEMINI facilitates distant collaborations for small company and academic clients, negotiating analyses of both single and multiple wells. The system operates on a single server and an enterprise database. External data sets must be uploaded into this database. Feedback from GEMINI users provided the impetus to develop Stand Alone Web Start Applications of GEMINI modules that reside in and operate from the user's PC. In this version, the GEMINI modules run as applets, which may reside in local user PCs, on the server, or Java Web Start. In this enhanced version, XML-based data handling procedures are used to access data from remote and local databases and save results for later access and analyses. The XML data handling process also integrates different stand-alone GEMINI modules enabling the user(s) to access multiple databases. It provides flexibility to the user to customize analytical approach, database location, and level of collaboration. An example integrated field-study using GEMINI modules and Stand Alone Web Start Applications is provided to demonstrate the versatile applicability of this freeware for cost-effective reservoir modeling. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Modeling and Optimization of Collaborative Passenger Control in Urban Rail Stations under Mass Passenger Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid development of urban rail transit, the phenomenon of outburst passenger flows flocking to stations is occurring much more frequently. Passenger flow control is one of the main methods used to ensure passengers’ safety. While most previous studies have only focused on control measures inside the target station, ignoring the collaboration between stops, this paper puts emphasis on joint passenger control methods during the occurrence of large passenger flows. To provide a theoretic description for the problem under consideration, an integer programming model is built, based on the analysis of passenger delay and the processes by which passengers alight and board. Taking average passenger delay as the objective, the proposed model aims to disperse the pressure of oversaturated stations into others, achieving the optimal state for the entire line. The model is verified using a case study and the results show that restricted access measures taken collaboratively by stations produce less delay and faster evacuation. Finally, a sensitivity analysis is conducted, from which we find that the departure interval and maximum conveying capacity of the train affect passenger delay markedly in the process of passenger control and infer that control measures should be taken at stations near to the one experiencing an emergency.

  2. Data and Models as Social Objects in the HydroShare System for Collaboration in the Hydrology Community and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarboton, D. G.; Idaszak, R.; Horsburgh, J. S.; Ames, D. P.; Goodall, J. L.; Band, L. E.; Merwade, V.; Couch, A.; Hooper, R. P.; Maidment, D. R.; Dash, P. K.; Stealey, M.; Yi, H.; Gan, T.; Castronova, A. M.; Miles, B.; Li, Z.; Morsy, M. M.; Crawley, S.; Ramirez, M.; Sadler, J.; Xue, Z.; Bandaragoda, C.

    2016-12-01

    How do you share and publish hydrologic data and models for a large collaborative project? HydroShare is a new, web-based system for sharing hydrologic data and models with specific functionality aimed at making collaboration easier. HydroShare has been developed with U.S. National Science Foundation support under the auspices of the Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Science, Inc. (CUAHSI) to support the collaboration and community cyberinfrastructure needs of the hydrology research community. Within HydroShare, we have developed new functionality for creating datasets, describing them with metadata, and sharing them with collaborators. We cast hydrologic datasets and models as "social objects" that can be shared, collaborated around, annotated, published and discovered. In addition to data and model sharing, HydroShare supports web application programs (apps) that can act on data stored in HydroShare, just as software programs on your PC act on your data locally. This can free you from some of the limitations of local computing capacity and challenges in installing and maintaining software on your own PC. HydroShare's web-based cyberinfrastructure can take work off your desk or laptop computer and onto infrastructure or "cloud" based data and processing servers. This presentation will describe HydroShare's collaboration functionality that enables both public and private sharing with individual users and collaborative user groups, and makes it easier for collaborators to iterate on shared datasets and models, creating multiple versions along the way, and publishing them with a permanent landing page, metadata description, and citable Digital Object Identifier (DOI) when the work is complete. This presentation will also describe the web app architecture that supports interoperability with third party servers functioning as application engines for analysis and processing of big hydrologic datasets. While developed to support the

  3. WHY RUSSIAN SOCITE IS NOT JUST? MEANING AND SIGNIFICANCE OF TERM JUSTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Vladimirovna Danilova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article aimed at understanding of justice meaning and significance in the contemporary Russian society. Based on authors' researches and secondary data analyses associative range of justice was defined. It led to conclusion about domination of liberal model of justice. Authors also explored the prevalence degree of such model

  4. COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: CONTINUOUS DYNAMIC GRID ADAPTATION IN A GLOBAL ATMOSPHERIC MODEL: APPLICATION AND REFINEMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutowski, William J.; Prusa, Joseph M.; Smolarkiewicz, Piotr K.

    2012-05-08

    This project had goals of advancing the performance capabilities of the numerical general circulation model EULAG and using it to produce a fully operational atmospheric global climate model (AGCM) that can employ either static or dynamic grid stretching for targeted phenomena. The resulting AGCM combined EULAG's advanced dynamics core with the "physics" of the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model (CAM). Effort discussed below shows how we improved model performance and tested both EULAG and the coupled CAM-EULAG in several ways to demonstrate the grid stretching and ability to simulate very well a wide range of scales, that is, multi-scale capability. We leveraged our effort through interaction with an international EULAG community that has collectively developed new features and applications of EULAG, which we exploited for our own work summarized here. Overall, the work contributed to over 40 peer-reviewed publications and over 70 conference/workshop/seminar presentations, many of them invited. 3a. EULAG Advances EULAG is a non-hydrostatic, parallel computational model for all-scale geophysical flows. EULAG's name derives from its two computational options: EULerian (flux form) or semi-LAGrangian (advective form). The model combines nonoscillatory forward-in-time (NFT) numerical algorithms with a robust elliptic Krylov solver. A signature feature of EULAG is that it is formulated in generalized time-dependent curvilinear coordinates. In particular, this enables grid adaptivity. In total, these features give EULAG novel advantages over many existing dynamical cores. For EULAG itself, numerical advances included refining boundary conditions and filters for optimizing model performance in polar regions. We also added flexibility to the model's underlying formulation, allowing it to work with the pseudo-compressible equation set of Durran in addition to EULAG's standard anelastic formulation. Work in collaboration with others also extended the

  5. Contested collaboration: A descriptive model of intergroup communication in information system design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnenwald, D.H.

    1995-01-01

    support patterns of work activities, social groups, and personal beliefs. In these situations, design is fundamentally an interactive process that requires communication among users, designers, and developers. However, communication among these groups is often difficult although of paramount importance...... to design outcomes. Through a qualitative analysis of a house, expert system, and telecommunications network architecture and management system design situations, a descriptive model of design that characterizes communication among users, designers, and developers as they create an artifact was developed....... The model describes design phases, roles, themes, and intergroup communication networks as they evolve throughout the design process and characterizes design as a process of ''contested collaboration.'' It is a first step towards a predictive design model that suggests strategies which may help participants...

  6. Facilitating Lewin's change model with collaborative evaluation in promoting evidence based practices of health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchester, Julianne; Gray-Miceli, Deanna L; Metcalf, Judith A; Paolini, Charlotte A; Napier, Anne H; Coogle, Constance L; Owens, Myra G

    2014-12-01

    Evidence based practices (EBPs) in clinical settings interact with and adapt to host organizational characteristics. The contextual factors themselves, surrounding health professions' practices, also adapt as practices become sustained. The authors assert the need for better planning models toward these contextual factors, the influence of which undergird a well-documented science to practice gap in literature on EBPs. The mechanism for EBP planners to anticipate contextual effects as programs Unfreeze their host settings, create Movement, and become Refrozen (Lewin, 1951) is present in Lewin's 3-step change model. Planning for contextual change appears equally important as planning for the actual practice outcomes among providers and patients. Two case studies from a Geriatric Education Center network will illustrate the synthesis of Lewin's three steps with collaborative evaluation principles. The use of the model may become an important tool for continuing education evaluators or organizations beginning a journey toward EBP demonstration projects in clinical settings.

  7. THE MODEL OF LAW ENFORCEMENT FOR JUVENILE DELINQUENT IN THE PROCESS OF INVESTIGATION BASED ON LAW NUMBER 11 YEAR 2012 CONCERNING JUVENILE JUSTICE SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidah Abdurrachman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study analyses the application of law enforcement model on juvenille offender before the law. Especially, in investigations according to Act number 11, 2012 about Juvenille Penal Court system in Central Java. Since the act has been formally implemented, the penal court elements have been given two years time to prepare strategies in handling juvenille offender through Diversion with Restorative Justice approach. However, the implementation of Diversion needs several infrastructures such as Juvenille Investigators, Diversion Standard of Operation (SOP, and a proper place for investigating children and mediation process, including children cells. This is an empirical study with primary and secondary sources, including analysis of Acts, literature review, and expert review. The data analysis will be done qualitatively.

  8. Heterogeneity in the Relationship of Substance Use to Risky Sexual Behavior Among Justice-Involved Youth: A Regression Mixture Modeling Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmiege, Sarah J; Bryan, Angela D

    2016-04-01

    Justice-involved adolescents engage in high levels of risky sexual behavior and substance use, and understanding potential relationships among these constructs is important for effective HIV/STI prevention. A regression mixture modeling approach was used to determine whether subgroups could be identified based on the regression of two indicators of sexual risk (condom use and frequency of intercourse) on three measures of substance use (alcohol, marijuana and hard drugs). Three classes were observed among n = 596 adolescents on probation: none of the substances predicted outcomes for approximately 18 % of the sample; alcohol and marijuana use were predictive for approximately 59 % of the sample, and marijuana use and hard drug use were predictive in approximately 23 % of the sample. Demographic, individual difference, and additional sexual and substance use risk variables were examined in relation to class membership. Findings are discussed in terms of understanding profiles of risk behavior among at-risk youth.

  9. Development and implementation of a proactive geriatrics consultation model in collaboration with hospitalists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sennour, Youcef; Counsell, Steven R; Jones, Jerrlyn; Weiner, Michael

    2009-11-01

    Acutely ill hospitalized older adults often experience a decline in function that may be preventable using a proactive, interdisciplinary, patient-centered approach. Hospitalists are treating an increasing number of these patients. A collaborative geriatrics consultation model to prevent functional decline and improve care for older patients with geriatrics syndromes was developed and implemented in partnership with a large hospitalist group in a community teaching hospital. A team of a geriatrician and a geriatrics nurse practitioner led the new consultation service. The team assisted with identifying cases, provided consultation early in the hospital stay, focused its evaluation on functional and psychosocial issues, and assisted in clinical management to optimize implementation of recommendations. In the first 4 years, the consultation service conducted 1,538 consultations in patients with a mean age of 81 (range 56-103). The most frequent geriatrics diagnoses were gait instability, delirium, and depression; recommendations usually included consulting physical therapy, increasing activity, and changing medications. The number of referrals and referring physicians grew steadily each year. Twenty-eight of 34 (82%) of the referring hospitalists completed a Web-based satisfaction questionnaire. All responding hospitalists agreed that proactive geriatrics consultation helped them provide better care; 96% rated the service as excellent. Analysis of hospital administrative data revealed a lower length of stay index and lower hospital costs in patients receiving a geriatrics consultation. The Proactive Geriatrics Consultation Service represents a promising model of collaboration between hospitalists and geriatricians for improving care of hospitalized older adults.

  10. A mental model for successful inter-disciplinary collaboration in curriculum innovation for information literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Detken Scheepers

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The University of Pretoria introduced a compulsory Information Literacy module to address the need for delivering motivated knowledgeable employees that embrace information and have the skills to find, select and use relevant information accurately, efficiently and effectively in an explosive information age. Low class attendance, an indication of unmotivated students, as well as the limited scholarly application of information literacy skills in consecutive academic years of study have been identified as possible barriers to the application of the desired skills. A collaborative action research project based on Whole Brain principles was introduced to motivate learners through innovative learning material in the module. A deeper understanding of the role of thinking preferences and thinking avoidances is essential in selecting a team that is responsible for the planning, design, development and delivery of learning opportunities and material. This article discusses the Whole Brain Model® as a mental model that underpins the successful collaboration of multidisciplinary teams and enhances innovative curriculum design that addresses alternative approaches to the teaching of Information Literacy.

  11. Toward a Collaborative, Transformative Model of Non-Profit Leadership: Some Conceptual Building Blocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bramwell Osula

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the authors propose extending the construct of non-profit leadership to accommodate collaborative and transformational themes. The suggestion is that the resultant broader definition accords with the modern context within which non-profits now operate and feeds into a more resilient model of non-profit leadership. The paper begins with a review of emergent trends in leadership theory and the changing context of the non-profit sector. The argument is made that the extraordinary challenges facing the sector signal the need for fresh new perspectives in leadership. The authors then proceed to examine the significance of a nascent non-profit culture point to a re-alignment of the sector that is informed by transformational principles and a values-orientation. The result is said to be a new model of non-profit and public sector leadership that raises important methodological questions which the authors maintain can inform future analyses of the structure, role, and responsibilities of non-profit leadership. Finally, a world of new possibilities is envisioned, one in which non-profit organizations are strategically repositioned to take advantage of a new values-based ethic that is rooted in principles of integrity, increased self-awareness, a collaborative agenda, intentionality, emphasis of followership, cultural competence, and orientation toward the future.

  12. Effectiveness of aggressive management of dyslipidemia in a collaborative-care practice model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Michael J; Gibson, Joan; Simmons, Phillip; Stanek, Eric

    2003-06-15

    The Cardiovascular Risk Identification and Treatment Center was established in 1997, adopting a collaborative-care clinic model for the purpose of improving the management of high-risk patients with dyslipidemia. This was a retrospective analysis of 417 high-risk patients with > or =1 year of follow-up laboratory data. Analysis included changes in total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), non-HDL, triglycerides, and total cholesterol to HDL ratio; lipoprotein goal achievement; Framingham risk score; liver function; and cardiovascular events. At baseline, 66% of patients had coronary heart disease (CHD) or equivalent risk, 45% were not receiving dyslipidemia therapy, and 29% were on statin monotherapy. After 3 years in the program, 56% were receiving combination therapy, 41% were on monotherapy, and 2% were not on therapy. The 3 most common treatment regimens were statin plus niacin (36%), statin alone (22%), and niacin alone (14%). All lipoproteins improved from baseline (p achieved combined lipid goals. Patients with Framingham 10-year CHD risk of >20% were reduced from 6% to 3 times normal occurred in 1% of patients. In conclusion, a collaborative-care practice model adopting individualized, aggressive pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatment strategies is highly effective in achieving lipid goals, is sustainable, and is safe. Furthermore, this approach yields reduced projected 10-year CHD risk. A low rate of cardiovascular events was observed.

  13. Community-based senior health promotion program using a collaborative practice model: the Escalante Health Partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuñez, Diane E; Armbruster, Charlotte; Phillips, Wayne T; Gale, Betty J

    2003-01-01

    Recent research demonstrates that, although the risk of disease and disability clearly increases with age, poor health need not be an inevitable consequence of aging. A healthy lifestyle is more influential than genetic factors in assisting older adults avoid the decline and deterioration traditionally associated with aging. Many effective strategies for reducing disease and disability are widely underused. The Escalante Health Partnerships is a community-based, nurse-managed health promotion and chronic disease care management program for community-residing older adults. The program base supports a multidisciplinary, collaborative practice model, which has responded to the health needs of members of a community at high risk of having or developing chronic conditions. Preliminary comparisons of the health status of program participants with national norms demonstrate that these seniors report better general health, performance of roles, and social functioning, with the strongest correlations occurring between general health and vitality and between general health and role-physical. In addition, these participants have 4.2 doctor visits per year, in comparison with 7.1 office visits for a national comparison group and 1.6 hospital days per year, in comparison with 2.1 hospital days in the same referenced population. This collaborative partnership is a model that can be replicated cost-effectively in other communities.

  14. A New Business Model for Problem Solving-Infusing Open Collaboration and Innovation Health and Human Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jeffrey R.; Richard, Eliabeth E.; Fogarty, Jennifer A.; Rando, Cynthia M.

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the Space Life Sciences Directorate (SLSD) new business model for problem solving, with emphasis on open collaboration and innovation. The topics that are discussed are: an overview of the work of the Space Life Sciences Directorate and the strategic initiatives that arrived at the new business model. A new business model was required to infuse open collaboration/innovation tools into existing models for research, development and operations (research announcements, procurements, SBIR/STTR etc). This new model involves use of several open innovation partnerships: InnoCentive, Yet2.com, TopCoder and NASA@work. There is also a new organizational structure developed to facilitate the joint collaboration with other NASA centers, international partners, other U.S. Governmental organizations, Academia, Corporate, and Non-Profit organizations: the NASA Human Health and Performance Center (NHHPC).

  15. A systematic review of collaborative models for health and education professionals working in school settings and implications for training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillier, S L; Civetta, L; Pridham, L

    2010-11-01

    Collaborative engagement between education and health agencies has become requisite since the establishment of school inclusion policies in many developed countries. For the child with healthcare needs in an educational setting, such collaboration is assumed to be necessary to ensure a coordinated and holistic approach. However, it is less clear how this is best achieved. This secondary research aimed to answer the questions: what are the reported models of best practice to support the collaboration between education and health staff and what are the implications for training strategies at an undergraduate and postgraduate level to affect these models? Systematic review of current literature, with narrative summary. Models of interaction and teamwork are well-described, but not necessarily well-evaluated, in the intersection between schools and health agencies. They include a spectrum from consultative to collaborative and interactive teaming. It is suggested that professionals may not be adequately skilled in, or knowledgeable about, teamwork processes or the unique roles each group can play in collaborations around the health needs of school children. There is a need for robust primary research into the questions identified in this paper, as well as a need for educators and health professionals to receive training in interprofessional teamwork and collaboration beyond their traditional domains. It is suggested such training needs to occur at both the undergraduate and postgraduate levels.

  16. Peace talks: A “dialogical ethics” model of faculty–student collaboration in the undergraduate classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey W. Murray

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available At the 2015 CIDER conference on Higher Education Pedagogy, professors Abelson and Nelson discussed their intense and inspiring level of instructor–student collaboration, describing how they collaborate with their first-year students in the design of particular assignments and even overall course design at the unit level. This essay seeks to contribute to both our understanding and appreciation of such collaborative learning-centered strategies by applying a “dialogical ethics” model. The essay begins with an extended investigation of the ways in which the dramatistic philosophy of Kenneth Burke illuminates the grammatical, rhetorical, and dialogical mechanisms by which instructor–student collaboration fosters enhanced levels of student engagement in the process of education—including investment, ownership, and empowerment. In doing so, this essay explores how the notions of (i disparate grammars and recalcitrance, (ii consubstantiality and irony, and (iii dialogue of motives and peace treaty can elucidate the dynamics of instructor–student collaborative learning. Applying the ethical philosophy of Emmanuel Levinas, this essay then argues that instructor–student collaboration is an inherently ethical pedagogy. Finally, consistent with the general topic of collaboration and theoretical framework of dialogue, this essay concludes with a response from those who inspired it, Abelson and Nelson.

  17. Collaboration 'Engineerability'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolfschoten, Gwendolyn L.; de Vreede, Gert-Jan; Briggs, Robert O.; Sol, Henk G.

    2010-01-01

    Collaboration Engineering is an approach to create sustained collaboration support by designing collaborative work practices for high-value recurring tasks, and transferring those designs to practitioners to execute for themselves without ongoing support from collaboration professionals. A key assum

  18. Evaluation of a Danish pharmacist student-physician medication review collaboration model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaae, Susanne; Sørensen, Ellen Westh; Nørgaard, Lotte Stig

    2014-01-01

    Background Interprofessional collaboration between pharmacists and physicians to conduct joint home medication reviews (HMR) is important for optimizing the medical treatment of patients suffering from chronic illnesses. However, collaboration has proved difficult to achieve. The HMR programme...

  19. Environmental justice: a criminological perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Michael J.; Stretesky, Paul B.; Long, Michael A.

    2015-08-01

    This article examines studies related to environmental justice in the criminological literature and from a criminological perspective. Criminologists have long been concerned with injustices in the criminal justice system related to the enforcement of criminal law. In the 1990s, following the emergence of green criminology, a handful of criminologists have drawn attention to environmental justice as an extension of more traditional criminological studies of justice and injustice. Relevant criminological studies of environmental justice are reviewed, and suggestions for future environmental justice research are offered.

  20. Combined effects of uncertainty and organizational justice on employee health : Testing the uncertainty management model of fairness judgments among Finnish public sector employees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elovainio, M.; Bos, K. van den; Linna, A.; Kivimäki, M.; Ala-Mursula, L.; Pentti, J.; Vahtera, J.

    2005-01-01

    We examined whether the combination of uncertainty (lack of work-time control, and negative changes at work) and organizational justice (i.e., justice of decision-making procedures and interpersonal treatment at work) contributes to sickness absence. A total of 7083 male and 24,317 female Finnish pu

  1. Collaborative Computer Graphics Product Development between Academia and Government: A Dynamic Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Deborah R.; Kostis, Helen-Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Collaborations and partnerships between academia and government agencies are common, especially when it comes to research and development in the fields of science, engineering and technology. However, collaboration between a government agency and an art school is rather atypical. This paper presents the Collaborative Student Project, which aims to explore the following challenge: The ideation, development and realization of education and public outreach products for NASAs upcoming ICESat-2 mission in collaboration with art students.

  2. Incorporating learning styles in a computer-supported collaborative learning model

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Shuangyan; Joy, Mike; Griffiths, Nathan

    2008-01-01

    Collaborative learning enables individual learners to combine their own expertise, experience and ability to accomplish a mutual learning goal. The grouping of learners, and learning from social interactions with peer-learners, are two basic characteristics of collaborative learning. For individual learners to benefit from collaborative learning, individual learners with different characteristics must be grouped together. In this paper, we propose a computer-supported collaborative learning m...

  3. Combined Economic and Hydrologic Modeling to Support Collaborative Decision Making Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheer, D. P.

    2008-12-01

    For more than a decade, the core concept of the author's efforts in support of collaborative decision making has been a combination of hydrologic simulation and multi-objective optimization. The modeling has generally been used to support collaborative decision making processes. The OASIS model developed by HydroLogics Inc. solves a multi-objective optimization at each time step using a mixed integer linear program (MILP). The MILP can be configured to include any user defined objective, including but not limited too economic objectives. For example, an estimated marginal value for water for crops and M&I use were included in the objective function to drive trades in a model of the lower Rio Grande. The formulation of the MILP, constraints and objectives, in any time step is conditional: it changes based on the value of state variables and dynamic external forcing functions, such as rainfall, hydrology, market prices, arrival of migratory fish, water temperature, etc. It therefore acts as a dynamic short term multi-objective economic optimization for each time step. MILP is capable of solving a general problem that includes a very realistic representation of the physical system characteristics in addition to the normal multi-objective optimization objectives and constraints included in economic models. In all of these models, the short term objective function is a surrogate for achieving long term multi-objective results. The long term performance for any alternative (especially including operating strategies) is evaluated by simulation. An operating rule is the combination of conditions, parameters, constraints and objectives used to determine the formulation of the short term optimization in each time step. Heuristic wrappers for the simulation program have been developed improve the parameters of an operating rule, and are initiating research on a wrapper that will allow us to employ a genetic algorithm to improve the form of the rule (conditions, constraints

  4. Modeling a Collaborative Answer Negotiation Activity Using IMS-Based Learning Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivia, R.; Nussbaum, M.; Ochoa, S. F.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the design and impact of a face-to-face Computer Supported Collaborative Learning activity named Collaborative Answer Negotiation Activity (CANA). CANA primarily involves face-to-face interactions among students supported by wirelessly interconnected mobile devices to solve collaboratively a set of multiple-choice questions.…

  5. A Collaborative Secure Localization Algorithm Based on Trust Model in Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Guangjie; Liu, Li; Jiang, Jinfang; Shu, Lei; Rodrigues, Joel J P C

    2016-02-16

    Localization is one of the hottest research topics in Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks (UWSNs), since many important applications of UWSNs, e.g., event sensing, target tracking and monitoring, require location information of sensor nodes. Nowadays, a large number of localization algorithms have been proposed for UWSNs. How to improve location accuracy are well studied. However, few of them take location reliability or security into consideration. In this paper, we propose a Collaborative Secure Localization algorithm based on Trust model (CSLT) for UWSNs to ensure location security. Based on the trust model, the secure localization process can be divided into the following five sub-processes: trust evaluation of anchor nodes, initial localization of unknown nodes, trust evaluation of reference nodes, selection of reference node, and secondary localization of unknown node. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed CSLT algorithm performs better than the compared related works in terms of location security, average localization accuracy and localization ratio.

  6. The Association of Expanded Access to a Collaborative Midwifery and Laborist Model With Cesarean Delivery Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenstein, Melissa G; Nijagal, Malini; Nakagawa, Sanae; Gregorich, Steven E; Kuppermann, Miriam

    2015-10-01

    To examine the association between expanded access to collaborative midwifery and laborist services and cesarean delivery rates. This was a prospective cohort study at a community hospital between 2005 and 2014. In 2011, privately insured women changed from a private practice model to one that included 24-hour midwifery and laborist coverage. Primary cesarean delivery rates among nulliparous, term, singleton, vertex women and vaginal birth after cesarean delivery (VBAC) rates among women with prior cesarean delivery were compared before and after the change. Multivariable logistic regression models estimated the effects of the change on the odds of primary cesarean delivery and VBAC; an interrupted time-series analysis estimated the annual rates before and after the expansion. There were 3,560 nulliparous term singleton vertex deliveries and 1,324 deliveries with prior cesarean delivery during the study period; 45% were among privately insured women whose care model changed. The primary cesarean delivery rate among these privately insured women decreased after the change, from 31.7% to 25.0% (P=.005, adjusted odds ratio [OR] 0.56, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.39-0.81). The interrupted time-series analysis estimated a 7% drop in the primary cesarean delivery rate in the year after the expansion and a decrease of 1.7% per year thereafter. The VBAC rate increased from 13.3% before to 22.4% afterward (adjusted OR 2.03, 95% CI 1.08-3.80). The change from a private practice to a collaborative midwifery-laborist model was associated with a decrease in primary cesarean rates and an increase in VBAC rates. II.

  7. Innovations on a shoestring: a study of a collaborative community-based Aboriginal mental health service model in rural Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Douglas

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Collaborative, culturally safe services that integrate clinical approaches with traditional Aboriginal healing have been hailed as promising approaches to ameliorate the high rates of mental health problems in Aboriginal communities in Canada. Overcoming significant financial and human resources barriers, a mental health team in northern Ontario is beginning to realize this ideal. We studied the strategies, strengths and challenges related to collaborative Aboriginal mental health care. Methods A participatory action research approach was employed to evaluate the Knaw Chi Ge Win services and their place in the broader mental health system. Qualitative methods were used as the primary source of data collection and included document review, ethnographic interviews with 15 providers and 23 clients; and 3 focus groups with community workers and managers. Results The Knaw Chi Ge Win model is an innovative, community-based Aboriginal mental health care model that has led to various improvements in care in a challenging rural, high needs environment. Formal opportunities to share information, shared protocols and ongoing education support this model of collaborative care. Positive outcomes associated with this model include improved quality of care, cultural safety, and integration of traditional Aboriginal healing with clinical approaches. Ongoing challenges include chronic lack of resources, health information and the still cursory understanding of Aboriginal healing and outcomes. Conclusions This model can serve to inform collaborative care in other rural and Indigenous mental health systems. Further research into traditional Aboriginal approaches to mental health is needed to continue advances in collaborative practice in a clinical setting.

  8. Spatial Interaction Modelling of Cross-Region R&D Collaborations Empirical Evidence from the EU Framework Programmes

    CERN Document Server

    Scherngell, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this study is on cross-region R&D collaboration networks in the EU Framework Programmes (FP's). In contrast to most other empirical studies in this field, we shift attention to regions as units of analysis, i.e. we use aggregated data on research collaborations at the regional level. The objective is to identify determinants of cross-region collaboration patterns. In particular, we are interested whether geographical and technological distances are significant determinants of interregional cooperation. Further we investigate differences between intra-industry networks and public research networks (i.e. universities and research organisations). The European coverage is achieved by using data on 255 NUTS-2 regions of the 25 pre-2007 EU member-states, as well as Norway and Switzerland. We adopt a Poisson spatial interaction modelling perspective to analyse these questions. The dependent variable is the intensity of collaborative interactions between two regions, the independent variables are reg...

  9. Organizational Justice As a Predictor of Organizational Silence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Çetin

    2014-01-01

    In this study, relation between teachers' perception for organizational justice and their organizational silence was examined. Sample of this study consists of 300 teachers who work at elementary schools in Siirt. Relational Scanning model was utilized in performance of this study. In this study, Organizational Justice Scale and Organizational…

  10. Family and Community Perceptions of Quality in Juvenile Justice Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selber, Katherine; Streeter, Calvin

    2004-01-01

    The conceptualization and empirical assessment of service quality in juvenile justice remains limited. There are few reports on programmatic attempts to assess satisfaction in juvenile justice programs or attempts to include what constitutes quality of service from multiple customer perspectives. This article describes a potential model, the Gap…

  11. Organizational Justice As a Predictor of Organizational Silence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Çetin

    2014-01-01

    In this study, relation between teachers' perception for organizational justice and their organizational silence was examined. Sample of this study consists of 300 teachers who work at elementary schools in Siirt. Relational Scanning model was utilized in performance of this study. In this study, Organizational Justice Scale and Organizational…

  12. Collaborative Development Planning Model of Supporting Product in Platform Innovation Ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the market value of the product, the platform enterprise often participates in the development process of supporting product of emerging industry’s platform innovation ecosystem. This paper puts forward a revenue sharing contract between the platform company and the supporting company by creating a collaborative development model of the supporting product in the ecosystem, and this paper studies the platform enterprise investment resource property's (complementary or substitution impact on the supporting enterprise R&D efforts and the revenue sharing factor and analyzes collaborative development mechanism of supporting product of emerging industry platform innovation ecosystem. The research indicates that when platform enterprise and supporting enterprise's resources are complementary, the supporting enterprise R&D effort level and revenue sharing coefficient increase as the platform company’s investment increases. When platform enterprise and supporting enterprise's resources are substitutive, the supporting enterprise’s R&D effort level and revenue sharing coefficient decrease as the platform company’s investment increases.

  13. Spanish version of Colquitt's Organizational Justice Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Gracia, Liliana; Barbaranelli, Claudio; Moreno-Jiménez, Bernardo

    2014-01-01

    Organizational justice (OJ) is an important predictor of different work attitudes and behaviors. Colquitt's Organizational Justice Scale (COJS) was designed to assess employees' perceptions of fairness. This scale has four dimensions: distributive, procedural, informational, and interpersonal justice. The objective of this study is to validate it in a Spanish sample. The scale was administered to 460 Spanish employees from the service sector. 40.4% were men and 59.6% women. The Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) supported the four dimensions structure for Spanish version of COJS. This model showed a better fit to data that the others models tested. Cronbach's alpha obtained for subscales ranged between .88 and .95. Correlations of the Spanish version of COJS with measures of incivility and job satisfaction were statistically significant and had a moderate to high magnitude, indicating a reasonable degree of construct validity. The Spanish version of COJS has adequate psychometric properties and may be of value in assessing OJ in Spanish setting.

  14. Consequence Based Design. An approach for integrating computational collaborative models (Integrated Dynamic Models) in the building design phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Negendahl, Kristoffer

    affect the design process and collaboration between building designers and simulationists. Within the limits of applying the approach of Consequence based design to five case studies, followed by documentation based on interviews, surveys and project related documentations derived from internal reports...... that secures validity and quality assurance with a simulationist while sustaining autonomous control of building design with the building designer. Consequence based design is defined by the specific use of integrated dynamic models. These models include the parametric capabilities of a visual programming tool...... relies on various advancements in the area of integrated dynamic models. It also relies on the application and test of the approach in practice to evaluate the Consequence based design and the use of integrated dynamic models. As a result, the Consequence based design approach has been applied in five...

  15. e-Justice Implementation at a National Scale: The Ugandan Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitoogo, Fredrick Edward; Bitwayiki, Constantine

    The use of information and communications technologies has been identified as one of the means suitable for supplementing the various reforms in convalescing the performance of the justice sector. The Government of Uganda has made strides in the implementation of e-Government to effectively utilize information and communications technologies in governance. The justice players are manifested in a justice, law and order sector which is based on the the Sector Wide Approach whose basic principle is that communication, cooperation and coordination between institutions can greatly add value to service delivery within a sector. Although a subset of e-Government, e-Justice aims at improving service delivery and collaboration between all justice players through the use of ICTs and needs to be spear-headed at a sector level. This work proposes ways of harnessing the existing opportunities and methods to implement e-Justice in Uganda that will culminate into a generic framework that can be applied in similar countries.

  16. toward a curriculum for justice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    profound justice; i.e. justice that is based on reasonableness and, more ... way to conduct a curriculum enquiry, since it acknowledges the crisis of ..... The principle of having a caring curriculum necessitates that we create learning-teaching.

  17. Empowering Energy Justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finley-Brook, Mary; Holloman, Erica L

    2016-09-21

    The U.S. is experiencing unprecedented movement away from coal and, to a lesser degree, oil. Burdened low-income communities and people of color could experience health benefits from reductions in air and water pollution, yet these same groups could suffer harm if transitions lack broad public input or if policies prioritize elite or corporate interests. This paper highlights how U.S. energy transitions build from, and contribute to, environmental injustices. Energy justice requires not only ending disproportionate harm, it also entails involvement in the design of solutions and fair distribution of benefits, such as green jobs and clean air. To what extent does the confluence of state, civic, and market processes assure "just" transitions to clean, low-carbon energy production involving equitable distribution of costs, benefits, and decision-making power? To explore this question we assess trends with (1) fossil fuel divestment; (2) carbon taxes and social cost of carbon measurements; (3) cap-and-trade; (4) renewable energy; and (5) energy efficiency. Current research demonstrates opportunities and pitfalls in each area with mixed or partial energy justice consequences, leading to our call for greater attention to the specifics of distributive justice, procedural justice, and recognition justice in research, policy, and action. Illustrative energy transition case studies suggest the feasibility and benefit of empowering approaches, but also indicate there can be conflict between "green" and "just", as evident though stark inequities in clean energy initiatives. To identify positive pathways forward, we compile priorities for an energy justice research agenda based on interactive and participatory practices aligning advocacy, activism, and academics.

  18. Empowering Energy Justice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Finley-Brook

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The U.S. is experiencing unprecedented movement away from coal and, to a lesser degree, oil. Burdened low-income communities and people of color could experience health benefits from reductions in air and water pollution, yet these same groups could suffer harm if transitions lack broad public input or if policies prioritize elite or corporate interests. This paper highlights how U.S. energy transitions build from, and contribute to, environmental injustices. Energy justice requires not only ending disproportionate harm, it also entails involvement in the design of solutions and fair distribution of benefits, such as green jobs and clean air. To what extent does the confluence of state, civic, and market processes assure “just” transitions to clean, low-carbon energy production involving equitable distribution of costs, benefits, and decision-making power? To explore this question we assess trends with (1 fossil fuel divestment; (2 carbon taxes and social cost of carbon measurements; (3 cap-and-trade; (4 renewable energy; and (5 energy efficiency. Current research demonstrates opportunities and pitfalls in each area with mixed or partial energy justice consequences, leading to our call for greater attention to the specifics of distributive justice, procedural justice, and recognition justice in research, policy, and action. Illustrative energy transition case studies suggest the feasibility and benefit of empowering approaches, but also indicate there can be conflict between “green” and “just”, as evident though stark inequities in clean energy initiatives. To identify positive pathways forward, we compile priorities for an energy justice research agenda based on interactive and participatory practices aligning advocacy, activism, and academics.

  19. Empowering Energy Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finley-Brook, Mary; Holloman, Erica L.

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. is experiencing unprecedented movement away from coal and, to a lesser degree, oil. Burdened low-income communities and people of color could experience health benefits from reductions in air and water pollution, yet these same groups could suffer harm if transitions lack broad public input or if policies prioritize elite or corporate interests. This paper highlights how U.S. energy transitions build from, and contribute to, environmental injustices. Energy justice requires not only ending disproportionate harm, it also entails involvement in the design of solutions and fair distribution of benefits, such as green jobs and clean air. To what extent does the confluence of state, civic, and market processes assure “just” transitions to clean, low-carbon energy production involving equitable distribution of costs, benefits, and decision-making power? To explore this question we assess trends with (1) fossil fuel divestment; (2) carbon taxes and social cost of carbon measurements; (3) cap-and-trade; (4) renewable energy; and (5) energy efficiency. Current research demonstrates opportunities and pitfalls in each area with mixed or partial energy justice consequences, leading to our call for greater attention to the specifics of distributive justice, procedural justice, and recognition justice in research, policy, and action. Illustrative energy transition case studies suggest the feasibility and benefit of empowering approaches, but also indicate there can be conflict between “green” and “just”, as evident though stark inequities in clean energy initiatives. To identify positive pathways forward, we compile priorities for an energy justice research agenda based on interactive and participatory practices aligning advocacy, activism, and academics. PMID:27657101

  20. The Development of Web-Based Collaborative Training Model for Enhancing Human Performances on ICT for Students in Banditpattanasilpa Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumipuntu, Natawut; Kidrakarn, Pachoen; Chetakarn, Somchock

    2015-01-01

    This research aimed to develop the model of Web-based Collaborative (WBC) Training model for enhancing human performances on ICT for students in Banditpattanasilpa Institute. The research is divided into three phases: 1) investigating students and teachers' training needs on ICT web-based contents and performance, 2) developing a web-based…

  1. Collaborative Workshops and Student Academic Performance in Introductory College Mathematics Courses: A Study of a Treisman Model Math Excel Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Hollis; Dick, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    Describes the Treisman model which involves supplemental workshops in which college students solve problems in collaborative learning groups. Reports on the effectiveness of Math Excel, an implementation of the Treisman model for introductory mathematics courses at Oregon State University over five academic terms. Reveals a significant effect on…

  2. The Development of Web-Based Collaborative Training Model for Enhancing Human Performances on ICT for Students in Banditpattanasilpa Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumipuntu, Natawut; Kidrakarn, Pachoen; Chetakarn, Somchock

    2015-01-01

    This research aimed to develop the model of Web-based Collaborative (WBC) Training model for enhancing human performances on ICT for students in Banditpattanasilpa Institute. The research is divided into three phases: 1) investigating students and teachers' training needs on ICT web-based contents and performance, 2) developing a web-based…

  3. Ten tendencies of criminal justice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Jiahong

    2007-01-01

    A study of the global tendencies of criminal justice will help us design a more scientific and rational pathway for the reformation of existing criminal justice system of China. In the forthcoming several hundred years to come, theworld's criminal justice is to take on ten tendencies, that is, the tendency toward unity, civilization, science, rule of law, human rights, justice, efficiency,specialization, standardization and harmony.

  4. Theorizing Social Justice Ambiguities in an Era of Neoliberalism: The Case of Postapartheid South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subreenduth, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    In this essay, Sharon Subreenduth explores how social justice policies have both global-local and historical dynamics and maintains that, as a result, dominant Western models of social justice limit engagement with alternative modes of understanding social justice in non-Western locations. She uses the South African experience as a case study for…

  5. Moral Virtues, Fairness Heuristics, Social Entities, and Other Denizens of Organizational Justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cropanzano, Russell; Byrne, Zinta S.; Bobocel, D. Ramona; Rupp, Deborah E.

    2001-01-01

    A literature review examined these questions: How do workers make judgments about fairness? Why are workers concerned with organizational justice? and What is organizational justice? The relationship between two paradigms--reaction to events and appraisal of social entities--formed the basis of an integrative model of organizational justice.…

  6. UNIFIED MODELING LANGUAGE TOOLS COLLABORATION FOR USE CASE, CLASS AND ACTIVITY DIAGRAM IMPLEMENTED WITH HTML 5 AND JAVASCRIPT FRAMEWORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya Kurniawan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As a result of the development of web 3.0, web technologies now make it possible for each user to collaborate in performing a task. This technology allows us to draw UML diagrams online and collaborate on a software project. Unified Modeling Language is one of the architectural modeling software that is widely used by software developers. This research aims to develop a modeling tool UML diagrams are class diagrams, use case diagrams and activity diagrams based on pre-existing web using HTML 5 technology combine with JSON Service that allows the software developer to work on the same project UML and collaborate each other with good performance more faster than ordinary web.

  7. Elaborating the assimilation model: Introduction to a special section on case studies of setbacks within sessions and therapeutic collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caro Gabalda, Isabel; Stiles, William B

    2016-11-01

    This article introduces a Special Section of case studies that focus on therapeutic collaboration and setbacks in the process of assimilation with the aim of contributing to the evolution of the assimilation model of therapeutic change. The first study examined setbacks in two depression cases (a good vs. a poor outcome) treated with emotion-focused therapy. The second article traced how therapist activities and positions toward internal voices were associated with setbacks in a case treated with linguistic therapy of evaluation. The third article studied contributions of therapeutic collaboration for both advances and setbacks in assimilation in two contrasting cases treated with emotion-focused therapy. The fourth and final article analyzed the therapeutic collaboration in episodes of ambivalence in two cases of narrative therapy (one good outcome, one poor outcome) reflecting on the implications for the assimilation model's perspective on the therapeutic relationship. This Introduction concludes by offering some suggestions for theory-building within the assimilation model.

  8. Cognition to Collaboration: User-Centric Approach and Information Behaviour Theories/Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alperen M Aydin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim/Purpose: The objective of this paper is to review the vast literature of user-centric in-formation science and inform about the emerging themes in information behaviour science. Background:\tThe paradigmatic shift from system-centric to user-centric approach facilitates research on the cognitive and individual information processing. Various information behaviour theories/models emerged. Methodology: Recent information behaviour theories and models are presented. Features, strengths and weaknesses of the models are discussed through the analysis of the information behaviour literature. Contribution: This paper sheds light onto the weaknesses in earlier information behaviour models and stresses (and advocates the need for research on social information behaviour. Findings: Prominent information behaviour models deal with individual information behaviour. People live in a social world and sort out most of their daily or work problems in groups. However, only seven papers discuss social information behaviour (Scopus search. Recommendations for Practitioners\t: ICT tools used for inter-organisational sharing should be redesigned for effective information-sharing during disaster/emergency times. Recommendation for Researchers: There are scarce sources on social side of the information behaviour, however, most of the work tasks are carried out in groups/teams. Impact on Society: In dynamic work contexts like disaster management and health care settings, collaborative information-sharing may result in decreasing the losses. Future Research: A fieldwork will be conducted in disaster management context investigating the inter-organisational information-sharing.

  9. Final Report Collaborative Project. Improving the Representation of Coastal and Estuarine Processes in Earth System Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryan, Frank [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Dennis, John [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); MacCready, Parker [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Whitney, Michael [Univ. of Connecticut

    2015-11-20

    This project aimed to improve long term global climate simulations by resolving and enhancing the representation of the processes involved in the cycling of freshwater through estuaries and coastal regions. This was a collaborative multi-institution project consisting of physical oceanographers, climate model developers, and computational scientists. It specifically targeted the DOE objectives of advancing simulation and predictive capability of climate models through improvements in resolution and physical process representation. The main computational objectives were: 1. To develop computationally efficient, but physically based, parameterizations of estuary and continental shelf mixing processes for use in an Earth System Model (CESM). 2. To develop a two-way nested regional modeling framework in order to dynamically downscale the climate response of particular coastal ocean regions and to upscale the impact of the regional coastal processes to the global climate in an Earth System Model (CESM). 3. To develop computational infrastructure to enhance the efficiency of data transfer between specific sources and destinations, i.e., a point-to-point communication capability, (used in objective 1) within POP, the ocean component of CESM.

  10. English Only and Social Justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corson, David

    1999-01-01

    Sketches the strengths and weaknesses of the approach to social justice offered by John Rawls, an approach that continues to dominate discussions about social justice and public policy. Contrasts that conception with a critically realistic approach to judging social justice, and argues that the latter is more respectful of minority group…

  11. Understanding Education for Social Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hytten, Kathy; Bettez, Silvia C.

    2011-01-01

    It has become increasingly common for education scholars to claim a social justice orientation in their work. At the same time, education programs seem to be adding statements about the importance of social justice to their mission, and a growing number of teacher education programs are fundamentally oriented around a vision of social justice.…

  12. A New Education Model as a Collaborative Work of Industry, Local Government and College of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himuro, Shozo

    A new educational program was introduced to our college in 2000. This program based on the extensive knowledge in the engineering and high culture, originally intended to foster young engineers with creativity, diversity, interdisciplinarity, internationality and high practical skills. It also aimed to nourish engineers who would be engaged in developing user-friendly technologies that can coexist with nature and who can flexibly cope with current global issues such as environmental problems, food shortages and energy efficiency. Regrettably, great numbers of students don't seem to be interested in studying. We feel that there is an urgent need to improve the educational program to attract students to learn and encourage their motivations. In this paper, We would like to propose a new education model that is the Collaborative Work of Industry, Local Government and College of Technology.

  13. Center for Semiconductor Materials and Device Modeling: expanding collaborative research opportunities between government, academia, and industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perconti, Philip; Bedair, Sarah S.; Bajaj, Jagmohan; Schuster, Jonathan; Reed, Meredith

    2016-09-01

    To increase Soldier readiness and enhance situational understanding in ever-changing and complex environments, there is a need for rapid development and deployment of Army technologies utilizing sensors, photonics, and electronics. Fundamental aspects of these technologies include the research and development of semiconductor materials and devices which are ubiquitous in numerous applications. Since many Army technologies are considered niche, there is a lack of significant industry investment in the fundamental research and understanding of semiconductor technologies relevant to the Army. To address this issue, the US Army Research Laboratory is establishing a Center for Semiconductor Materials and Device Modeling and seeks to leverage expertise and resources across academia, government and industry. Several key research areas—highlighted and addressed in this paper—have been identified by ARL and external partners and will be pursued in a collaborative fashion by this Center. This paper will also address the mechanisms by which the Center is being established and will operate.

  14. Model for collaboration: a rural medicine and academic health center teleradiology project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Slyke, Mark A.; Eggli, Douglas F.; Prior, Fred W.; Salmon, William; Pappas, Gregory; Vanatta, Fred; Goldfetter, Warren; Hashem, Said

    1996-05-01

    A pilot project was developed to explore the role of subspecialty radiology support to rural medicine sites over a long-distance network. A collaborative relationship between 2 rural radiology practices and an academic health was established. Project objectives included: (1) Does the subspecialty consultation significantly change diagnosis patterns at the rural site? (2) Is there value added as measured by improved clinical care or an overall decreased cost of care? (3) Can a collaborative model be economically self-supportive? (4) Does the collaborative model encourage and support education and collegial relationships? Two rural hospitals were selected based on the level of imaging technology and willingness to cooperate. Image capture and network technology was chosen to make the network process transparent to the users. DICOM standard interfaces were incorporated into existing CT and MRI scanners and a film digitizer. Nuclear medicine images were transferred and viewed using a proprietary vendor protocol. Relevant clinical data was managed by a custom designed PC based Lotus Notes application (Patient Study Tracking System: PaSTS) (Pennsylvania Blue Shield Institute). All data was transferred over a Frame Relay network and managed by the Pennsylvania Commonwealth sponsored PA Health Net. Images, other than nuclear medicine, were viewed on a GE Advantage viewing station using a pair of 2 X 2.5 K gray scale monitors. Patient text data was managed by the PaSTS PC and displayed on a separate 15' color monitor. A total of 476 radiology studies were networked into the AHC. Randomly chosen research studies comprised 82% of the case work. Consultative and primary read cases comprised 17% and 1% respectively. The exercise was judged effective by both rural sites. Significant findings and diagnoses were confirmed in 73% of cases with discrepant findings in only 4%. One site benefited by adopting more advanced imaging techniques increasing the sophistication of radiology

  15. Nouveaux instruments de justice sociale en Chine

    OpenAIRE

    Lieber, Marylène

    2015-01-01

    Dans un contexte de mécontentement et de manifestations ouvrières dénonçant les conditions de travail dans l’usine du monde, cet article présente quelques nouvelles mutations de l’espace de la justice sociale en Chine contemporaine, engendrées par la multiplication de collaborations entre entreprises et organisations non gouvernementales, dans le cadre de programmes dits de responsabilité sociale des entreprises (RSE). En s’intéressant en particulier à deux hotlines d’information pour le droi...

  16. Corrective Justice vs. Social Justice in the Aftermath of War

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Kalmanovitz

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available How do we justify the practice of corrective justice for losses suffered during armed conflicts? This article seeks to show the force and relevance of this question, and to argue that, in cases of massively destructive wars, social justice should gain priority over corrective justice. Starting from a liberal Rawlsian conception of the relationship between corrective and social justice, it is argued that, paradoxically, the more destructive a war is, the less normative force corrective rights have and the higher priority policies of social justice, which guarantee basic rights to all citizens, should have.

  17. Perceived Justice in Political Marketing: An Exploratory Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ihwan Susila

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to criticize and develop the construct of equity theory within the framework of perceived justice. Specifically, this study aims to investigate perceived justice construct in political marketing perspective. Sample of the research consist of voters of political parties in Indonesia.Data were collected through interviews and a survey using a structured questionnaire with a purposive sampling method to 150 respondents. The study use exploratory factor analyses and Cronbach Alpha method to test the construct validity. The research also use measurement model of structural equation model (SEM which is the same as confirmatory factor analysis procedure. Qualitative method also used in this research to investigate the new construct of perceived justice in political marketing. Result of the study found that procedural justice has weak construct validity and the definition of the construct is not clear. Findings the new concept of justice in a political marketing perspective discussed in this article.

  18. Interdisciplinary collaboration experiences in creating an everyday rehabilitation model: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moe A

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Aud Moe,1,2 Hildfrid V Brataas1,2 1Faculty of Health Science, Nord University, Steinkjer, Nord-Trøndelag, 2Center of Care Research, Mid-Norway, Steinkjer, Nord-Trøndelag, Norway Background: When functional impairment occurs, assistance to achieve self-help can lead to qualitatively more active everyday life for recipients and better use of community resources. Home-based everyday rehabilitation is a new interdisciplinary service for people living at home. Rehabilitation involves meeting the need for interprofessional services, interdisciplinary collaboration, and coordination of services. Everyday rehabilitation is a service that requires close interdisciplinary cooperation. The purpose of this study was to gain knowledge about employees' experiences with establishing a new multidisciplinary team and developing a team-based work model. Method: The study had a qualitative design using two focus group interviews with a newly established rehabilitation team. The sample consisted of an occupational therapist, two care workers with further education in rehabilitation, a nurse, a physiotherapist, and a project leader. Data were analyzed by thematic content analysis. Results: The data highlight three phases: a planning phase (ten meetings over half a year, a startup phase of trials of interdisciplinary everyday rehabilitation in practice (2 months, and a third period specifying and implementing an everyday rehabilitation model (6 months. During these phases, three themes emerged: 1 team creation and design of the service, 2 targeted practical trials, and 3 equality of team members and combining interdisciplinary methods. Conclusion: The team provided information about three processes: developing work routines and a revised team-based flow chart, developing team cooperation with integrated trans- and interdisciplinary collaboration, and working with external exchange. There is more need for secure network solutions. Keywords: everyday rehabilitation

  19. Better Communication Through Collaboration: Lessons Learned from a New Model of Science Communication Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, T.

    2011-12-01

    Direct, effective communication with the public is an increasingly important part of the earth scientist's professional toolkit. Earth sciences issues, including climate change, ocean acidification, energy extraction and use and geological hazard assessment, are increasingly relevant to public debates, yet recent, dramatic changes in the media business have led to decreased coverage of science. Earth scientists must increasingly shoulder the burden of informing the broad public themselves, and in collaboration with professional communicators. Fortunately, the tools and venues needed to do so have never been more accessible. This presentation will describe a new model of science communication education, based on bringing together collaborating teams of students with diverse backgrounds in the sciences, engineering and journalism. The project-based approach uses group workshopping and multiple rounds of peer- and instructor-guided revision to leverage diverse expertise and facilitate both primary knowledge gain and comprehensive, effective and meaningful training and experience in audience-focused outreach, media interaction, and journalism. Courses build from fundamental communications theory to the end goal of publication in professional outlets. Course goals are regularly enhanced and reinforced with internships and individual study projects. Using examples from a series of courses and projects developed at Stanford University over the past three years, I will describe the theory and strategies underlying this new approach to science communication education, what it has to offer for scientists and journalists alike, and key points to consider for effective implementation. I will also show how combining the knowledge, expertise and experience of STEM and journalism students can inform a new model of science journalism, based on exploring and communicating the process of science, not just the results, that can avoid many of the common pitfalls of science journalism

  20. Sustaining Broader Impacts through Researcher-Teacher Collaboration (A Model Based on Award Abstract #1334935: Collaborative Research: Investigating the Ecological Importance of Iron Storage in Diatoms.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, M.; Marchetti, A.

    2016-02-01

    Broader impacts have become a vital component of scientific research projects. A variety of outreach avenues are available to assist scientists in reaching larger audiences, however, the translation of cutting-edge scientific content and concepts can be challenging. Collaborating with educators is a viable option to assist researchers in fulfilling NSF's broader impact requirements. A broader impacts model based on collaborations between a teacher and 28 researchers from 14 institutions will demonstrate successful science outreach and engagement through interactions between teachers, researchers, students, and general audiences. Communication styles (i.e., blogs, social media) and outreach data incorporated by researchers and the teacher will be shared to illustrate the magnitude of the broader impacts achieved with this partnership. Inquiry-based investigations and activities developed to translate the science into the classroom will also be demonstrated, including the use of real scientific data collected during the research cruise. "Finding Microbe Needles in a Haystack of Oceans" provides an understanding of how remote sensing technology is used to locate specific ocean environments (e.g. High Nutrient Low Chlorophyll - HNLC) that support diverse microbial food webs. A board game ("Diatom Adventures©") designed to explore the physiology of microbial organisms and microscopic food webs will also be demonstrated. The tentative nature of science requires a constant vigil to stay abreast of the latest hypotheses and discoveries. Researcher/Teacher collaborations allow each professional to focus on his/her strengths while meeting broader impact requirements. These partnerships encourage lifelong learning as educators observe and work with scientists first-hand and then follow appropriate scope, sequence, and pedagogy to assist various audiences in understanding the innovative technologies being used to explore new scientific frontiers.

  1. Toward A Buddhist Theory of Justice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Blumenthal

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available For more than twenty years key thinkers of Engaged Buddhism have used terms like “justice” and “social justice” quite freely.  Yet despite more sophisticated discussions of other philosophical topics, Engaged Buddhists have  not clearly defined what they mean by the term justice. Given that the term is one with a rich philosophical history in the West and has no direct parallel in Buddhist thought, it is incumbent upon Engaged Buddhist theorists to define what they mean when they use this term if they are to engage in any sort of meaningful dialog on justice and related issues in the international community. In this paper, to illustrate how Engaged Buddhists might begin this important line of work, I would focus on two cases. First, I will discuss John Rawls' theory of "justice as fairness" and compare that with some traditional Buddhist ideas and explore potential Buddhist thinking, responses, and adaptations. Second, I will discuss a relatively new model known as restorative justice in opposition to the pervasive use of retributive models implemented around the globe and consider the ways that Buddhism seems to lend itself quite well to "restorative" models, particularly with regard to criminal justice.  Both examples are merely beginning points for discussion used to illustrate how and why Engaged Buddhists ought to participate more directly in global philosophical discourse on justice.

  2. A collaborative and trauma-informed practice model for urban Indian child welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucero, Nancy M; Bussey, Marian

    2012-01-01

    Preventing the breakup of the American Indian family is the fundamental goal of the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA). However, few models exist to provide CPS workers and other practitioners with effective and practical strategies to help achieve this goal. This article presents a collaborative and trauma-informed family preservation practice model for Indian Child Welfare services with urban-based American Indian families. The model encompasses both systemic and direct practice efforts that assist families facing multiple challenges in creating a nurturing and more stable family life. System-level interventions improve the cultural responsiveness of providers, encourage partnerships between CPS and community-based providers, and support ICWA compliance. Direct practice interventions, in the form of intensive case management and treatment services, help parents/caregivers become more capable of meeting their own and their children's needs by addressing challenges such as substance abuse, trauma and other mental health challenges, domestic violence, and housing instability. Evaluation of the practice model suggests that it shows promise in preventing out-of-home placement of Native children, while at the same time improving parental capacity, family safety, child well-being, and family environment.

  3. Theoretical and Methodological Aspects of Justice Climate Research in Organizational Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Jakopec

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Fairness is important to people in different roles, especially in the workplace. Scientists have traditionally studied organizational justice at the individual level of analysis, dealing with employees' individual justice evaluations. Although this perspective remains important, justice can be explored at the group level of analysis as well. Justice climate represents team members' shared perception of justice in the workplace. It usually emerges through modeling behavior, or through the social information processing. Shared justice perceptions can originate from the processes that, as the time goes by, make co-workers more similar to one other. Individuals and teams assess three things: outcomes (distributive justice, decision-making processes (procedural justice and interpersonal treatment (interactional justice. Teams, as well as individuals, can attribute (injustice to numerous sources, as long as they hold that source accountable for the treatment they are experiencing. Therefore, employees can evaluate formal authorities' justice (climate, such as supervisor or organization as a whole, but the justice (climate from the ones that do not have the formal authority over each other, their peers or clients. Accordingly, employees can simultaneously perceive one source as entirely fair while the other as completely unfair. Perceptions of justice, both individual and group ones, are associated with numerous organizationally relevant outcomes, expressed in the form of attitudes or behaviors. The interaction of different sources of justice (climate has significant effects on employees (shared reactions as well. Justice climate, as a collective construct, is differentially operationalized at the higher level: additive compositional model, direct consensus model, referent-shift approach model, dispersion model and the process composition model. This paper provides an overview of the up-to-date findings, as well as the guidelines for further justice

  4. CM-DataONE: A Framework for collaborative analysis of climate model output

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hao; Bai, Yuqi; Li, Sha; Dong, Wenhao; Huang, Wenyu; Xu, Shiming; Lin, Yanluan; Wang, Bin

    2015-04-01

    CM-DataONE is a distributed collaborative analysis framework for climate model data which aims to break through the data access barriers of increasing file size and to accelerate research process. As data size involved in project such as the fifth Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) has reached petabytes, conventional methods for analysis and diagnosis of model outputs have been rather time-consuming and redundant. CM-DataONE is developed for data publishers and researchers from relevant areas. It can enable easy access to distributed data and provide extensible analysis functions based on tools such as NCAR Command Language, NetCDF Operators (NCO) and Climate Data Operators (CDO). CM-DataONE can be easily installed, configured, and maintained. The main web application has two separate parts which communicate with each other through APIs based on HTTP protocol. The analytic server is designed to be installed in each data node while a data portal can be configured anywhere and connect to a nearest node. Functions such as data query, analytic task submission, status monitoring, visualization and product downloading are provided to end users by data portal. Data conform to CMIP5 Model Output Format in each peer node can be scanned by the server and mapped to a global information database. A scheduler included in the server is responsible for task decomposition, distribution and consolidation. Analysis functions are always executed where data locate. Analysis function package included in the server has provided commonly used functions such as EOF analysis, trend analysis and time series. Functions are coupled with data by XML descriptions and can be easily extended. Various types of results can be obtained by users for further studies. This framework has significantly decreased the amount of data to be transmitted and improved efficiency in model intercomparison jobs by supporting online analysis and multi-node collaboration. To end users, data query is

  5. Towards a Personalised, Learning Style Based Collaborative Blended Learning Model with Individual Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Ilona BÉRES; Tímea MAGYAR; Turcsányi-Szabó, Márta

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we aim to describe the process by which our personalised web-based collaborative teaching/learning methodology (CECIP - Collaboration - Evaluation - Critical thinking - Individual assessment - learner Profile) evolved originating from Vygotsky's theory and based on the (C) collaborative construction of student's knowledge, (E) developing evaluation and assessment skills, (C) developing critical thinking skills, (I) integrating individual evaluation and (P) generating learner pro...

  6. Military Justice Study Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-07-01

    Island Paralegal (Student) Command Division N/A TAD from/to until (give date) Naval Justice School, Newport, Rhode Island 3255 Whereabouts for next 30...If a lesser forum is desired, handle according to procedures set out elsewhere in this book. I IV-41 LEGAL OFFICER RELIEVING CHECKLIST A. GEN t . One

  7. Justice under uncertainty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cettolin, E.; Riedl, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    An important element for the public support of policies is their perceived justice. At the same time most policy choices have uncertain outcomes. We report the results of a first experiment investigating just allocations of resources when some recipients are exposed to uncertainty. Although, under c

  8. Reflexivity and social justice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maksimovic, Tijana; Jakobsen, Helle Nordentoft

    2017-01-01

    Career practitioners’ reflexive understanding of their professional role as change agents in career guidance and counselling practices has a major impact on how social justice can be achieved. This entitles an awareness of the way in which guidance and counselling practices are embedded in the co...

  9. Journals and Justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curzer, Howard J.

    1996-01-01

    Addresses the process of journal deselection from the point of view of justice and argues that when journal cuts are necessary, libraries should first, reduce all departments to core holdings; second, ask departments with expensive journals for permission to implement an efficiency principle; third, if refused permission, implement an equal…

  10. Rethinking Restorative Justice: When the Geographies of Crime and of Healing Justice Matter

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jarem Sawatsky

    2007-01-01

    .... Despite the rhetoric that restorative justice is an alternative to the criminal justice system, this article demonstrates that restorative justice does not sufficiently challenge the underlying logic...

  11. Vhub: a knowledge management system to facilitate online collaborative volcano modeling and research

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Palma, Jose L; Courtland, Leah; Charbonnier, Sylvain; Tortini, Riccardo; Valentine, Greg A

    2014-01-01

    ... ) is a community cyberinfrastructure platform designed for collaboration in volcanology research, education, outreach, and discovery that complements existing volcano databases and other cyberinfrastructure projects...

  12. COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: CONTINUOUS DYNAMIC GRID ADAPTATION IN A GLOBAL ATMOSPHERIC MODEL: APPLICATION AND REFINEMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutowski, William J.; Prusa, Joseph M.; Smolarkiewicz, Piotr K.

    2012-05-08

    This project had goals of advancing the performance capabilities of the numerical general circulation model EULAG and using it to produce a fully operational atmospheric global climate model (AGCM) that can employ either static or dynamic grid stretching for targeted phenomena. The resulting AGCM combined EULAG's advanced dynamics core with the "physics" of the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model (CAM). Effort discussed below shows how we improved model performance and tested both EULAG and the coupled CAM-EULAG in several ways to demonstrate the grid stretching and ability to simulate very well a wide range of scales, that is, multi-scale capability. We leveraged our effort through interaction with an international EULAG community that has collectively developed new features and applications of EULAG, which we exploited for our own work summarized here. Overall, the work contributed to over 40 peer-reviewed publications and over 70 conference/workshop/seminar presentations, many of them invited. 3a. EULAG Advances EULAG is a non-hydrostatic, parallel computational model for all-scale geophysical flows. EULAG's name derives from its two computational options: EULerian (flux form) or semi-LAGrangian (advective form). The model combines nonoscillatory forward-in-time (NFT) numerical algorithms with a robust elliptic Krylov solver. A signature feature of EULAG is that it is formulated in generalized time-dependent curvilinear coordinates. In particular, this enables grid adaptivity. In total, these features give EULAG novel advantages over many existing dynamical cores. For EULAG itself, numerical advances included refining boundary conditions and filters for optimizing model performance in polar regions. We also added flexibility to the model's underlying formulation, allowing it to work with the pseudo-compressible equation set of Durran in addition to EULAG's standard anelastic formulation. Work in collaboration with others also extended the

  13. Cloud Service Collaboration Market Transaction Model%云服务组合交易模型研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈冬林; 马明明; 吕秋云

    2011-01-01

    Cloud service of single form cannot meet users' increasingly complex and diverse demand,so the cloud service collaboration,integrating single ones into more powerful and better quality service, becomes an effective solution. Cloud services collaboration market transaction model was proposed from the perspective of multi - level cloud. The model allows collaboration among the different cloud providers from the same and different levels as well. The management way of the cloud service collaboration transaction and the third - party transaction was discussed. This work will offer a good reference to service collaboration in the cloud.%随着用户需求的日益复杂和多样化,单一形式的云服务无法满足其需求,将单个的云服务集成为功能更强大质量更优的服务成为必要的解决途径.从多层次云服务角度出发,提出了云服务组合交易模型,实现了同一层次不同云服务提供商之间、不同层次服务提供商之间的服务组合,并探讨了云服务组合交易和第三方服务组合交易管理方法,为云服务组合的研究提供参考.

  14. Overview of an interlaboratory collaboration on evaluating the effects of model hepatotoxicants on hepatic gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Roger G; Rockett, John C; Gibson, G Gordon; Pettit, Syril D

    2004-03-01

    DNA microarrays and related tools offer promise for identification of pathways involved in toxic responses to xenobiotics. To be useful for risk assessment, experimental data must be challenged for reliability and interlaboratory reproducibility. Toward this goal, the Hepatotoxicity Working Group of the International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI) Health and Environmental Sciences Institute (HESI) Technical Committee on Application of Genomics to Mechanism-Based Risk Assessment evaluated and compared biological and gene expression responses in rats exposed to two model hepatotoxins--clofibrate and methapyrilene. This collaborative effort provided an unprecedented opportunity for the working group to evaluate and compare multiple biological, genomic, and toxicological parameters across different laboratories and microarray platforms. Many of the results from this collaboration are presented in accompanying articles in this mini-monograph, whereas others have been published previously. (Italic)In vivo(/Italic) studies for both compounds were conducted in two laboratories using a standard experimental protocol, and RNA samples were distributed to 16 laboratories for analysis on six microarray platforms. Histopathology, clinical chemistry, and organ weight changes were consistent with reported effects. Gene expression results demonstrated reasonable agreement between laboratories and across platforms. Discrepancies in expression profiles of some individual genes were largely due to platform differences and approaches to data analysis rather than to biological or interlaboratory variability. Despite these discrepancies there was overall agreement in the biological pathways affected by these compounds, demonstrating that transcriptional profiling is reproducible between laboratories and can reliably identify affected pathways necessary to provide mechanistic insight. This effort represents an important first step toward the use of transcriptional profiling in risk

  15. Cyber Enabled Collaborative Environment for Data and Modeling Driven Curriculum Modules for Hydrology and Geoscience Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merwade, V.; Ruddell, B. L.; Manduca, C. A.; Fox, S.; Kirk, K. B.

    2012-12-01

    With the access to emerging datasets and computational tools, there is a need to bring these capabilities into hydrology and geoscience classrooms. However, developing curriculum modules using data and models to augment classroom teaching is hindered by steep technology learning curve, rapid technology turnover, and lack of an organized community cyberinfrastructure (CI) for the dissemination, publication, and sharing of the latest tools and curriculum material for hydrology and geoscience education. The objective of this project is to overcome some of these limitations by developing a cyber enabled collaborative environment for publishing, sharing and adoption of data and modeling driven curriculum modules in hydrology and geoscience classroom. The CI is based on Carleton College's Science Education Resource Center (SERC) Content Management System. Building on its existing community authoring capabilities the system is being extended to allow assembly of new teaching activities by drawing on a collection of interchangeable building blocks; each of which represents a step in the modeling process. This poster presentation will describe the structure of the CI, the type and description of the modules that are under development, and the approach that will be used in assessing students' learning from using modules.

  16. GS3: A Knowledge Management Architecture for Collaborative Geologic Sequestration Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorton, Ian; Black, Gary D.; Schuchardt, Karen L.; Sivaramakrishnan, Chandrika; Wurstner, Signe K.; Hui, Peter SY

    2010-01-10

    Modern scientific enterprises are inherently knowledge-intensive. In general, scientific studies in domains such as groundwater, climate, and other environmental modeling as well as fundamental research in chemistry, physics, and biology require the acquisition and manipulation of large amounts of experimental and field data in order to create inputs for large-scale computational simulations. The results of these simulations must then be analyzed, leading to refinements of inputs and models and further simulations. In this paper we describe our efforts in creating a knowledge management platform to support collaborative, wide-scale studies in the area of geologic sequestration. The platform, known as GS3 (Geologic Sequestration Software Suite), exploits and integrates off-the-shelf software components including semantic wikis, content management systems and open source middleware to create the core architecture. We then extend the wiki environment to support the capture of provenance, the ability to incorporate various analysis tools, and the ability to launch simulations on supercomputers. The paper describes the key components of GS3 and demonstrates its use through illustrative examples. We conclude by assessing the suitability of our approach for geologic sequestration modeling and generalization to other scientific problem domains

  17. Work gets unfair for the depressed: cross-lagged relations between organizational justice perceptions and depressive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Jessica; Bliese, Paul D; Lang, Jonas W B; Adler, Amy B

    2011-05-01

    The organizational justice literature has consistently documented substantial correlations between organizational justice and employee depression. Existing theoretical literature suggests this relationship occurs because perceptions of organizational (in)justice lead to subsequent psychological health problems. Building on recent research on the affective nature of justice perceptions, in the present research we broaden this perspective by arguing there are also theoretical arguments for a reverse effect whereby psychological health problems influence perceptions of organizational justice. To contrast both theoretical perspectives, we test longitudinal lagged effects between organizational justice perceptions (i.e., distributive justice, interactional justice, interpersonal justice, informational justice, and procedural justice) and employee depressive symptoms using structural equation modeling. Analyses of 3 samples from different military contexts (N₁ = 625, N₂ = 134, N₃ = 550) revealed evidence of depressive symptoms leading to subsequent organizational justice perceptions. In contrast, the opposite effects of organizational justice perceptions on depressive symptoms were not significant for any of the justice dimensions. The findings have broad implications for theoretical perspectives on psychological health and organizational justice perceptions.

  18. The BirthPlace collaborative practice model: results from the San Diego Birth Center Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz; Jackson; Lang; Ecker; Ganiats; Dickinson; Nguyen

    1998-07-01

    Objective: The search for quality, cost-effective health care programs in the United States is now a major focus in the era of health care reform. New programs need to be evaluated as alternatives are developed in the health care system. The BirthPlace program provides comprehensive perinatal services with certified nurse-midwives and obstetricians working together in an integrated collaborative practice serving a primarily low-income population. Low-risk women are delivered by nurse-midwives in a freestanding birth center (The BirthPlace), which is one component of a larger integrated health network. All others are delivered by team obstetricians at the affiliated tertiary hospital. Wellness, preventive measures, early intervention, and family involvement are emphasized. The San Diego Birth Center Study is a 4-year research project funded by the U.S. Federal Agency for Health Care Policy and Research (#R01-HS07161) to evaluate this program. The National Birth Center Study (NEJM, 1989; 321(26): 1801-11) described the advantages and safety of freestanding birth centers. However, a prospective cohort study with a concurrent comparison group of comparable risk had not been conducted on a collaborative practice-freestanding birth center model to address questions of safety, cost, and patient satisfaction.Methods: The specific aims of this study are to compare this collaborative practice model to the traditional model of perinatal health care (physician providers and hospital delivery). A prospective cohort study comparing these two health care models was conducted with a final expected sample size of approximately 2,000 birth center and 1,350 traditional care subjects. Women were recruited from both the birth center and traditional care programs (private physicians offices and hospital based clinics) at the beginning of prenatal care and followed through the end of the perinatal period. Prenatal, intrapartum, postpartum and infant morbidity and mortality are being

  19. Linking organizational justice to burnout: are men and women different?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moliner, Carolina; Martínez-Tur, Vicente; Ramos, José; Peiró, José M

    2005-06-01

    This study tested the links from organizational justice with burnout and the moderating role of sex in these relationships. A total of 279 contact employees (149 men and 130 women) were surveyed in 59 hotels. A questionnaire was used to measure distributive, procedural, and interactional justice as well as employees' burnout (exhaustion, cynicism, and efficacy). Hierarchical regression models, calculated to test the hypothesized effects, indicated the predominance of procedural justice over distributive and interpersonal with regard to the direct relationships between organizational justice and burnout. Analysis also showed that links from interactional justice with exhaustion and cynicism were greater for women than for men. In contrast, there were no significant sex differences on the efficacy dimension.

  20. Collaborative e-Business Process Modelling: A Holistic Analysis Framework focused on Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises

    OpenAIRE

    Hoyer, Volker; Christ, Oliver

    2007-01-01

    In this work, we propose a holistic analysis framework for collaborative e-Business process modelling approaches that takes into account the specific challenges small and medium-sized enterprises (SME) are facing with regard to modelling inter-organizational processes. Based on concepts of the management approach Balanced Scorecard (BSC) four different perspectives are derived from empirical studies, conceptual research results and completed with modelling experiences of an EU-funded proje...

  1. 旅游遗产地政府与居民利益冲突处理合作行为意向模型研究%Collaborative Behavior Intention Model of Resident and Government Interest Conflict Management in Natural Heritage Tourism Areas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘焱; 郑焱

    2014-01-01

    Based on the construction of collaborative behavior intention model of resident -government interest conflict management , three different natural heritage tourism areas in Hunan , China were selected and SEM was used to validate the proposed research framework .The findings show that residents′perceived interest distribution justice and procedure justice of local tourism development will not only positively influence the residents ′conflict-handling intention to cooper-ate with government , but also mediate the influence of resident′s pro-social orientation on their conflict -handling in-tention to cooperate with the government .Procedural justice and procedural implementation justice rather than economic means significantly provoked the resident′s conflict-handling intention to cooperate positively with the government .%在构建自然遗产旅游地政府-居民利益冲突处理的合作行为意向模型基础上,本文采用结构方程模型方法,以湖南张家界、崀山和紫鹊界三大自然遗产旅游地为研究对象,对模型进行实证检验。研究发现居民亲社会取向正向影响旅游发展公正感知和冲突处理的合作行为意向;经济手段并不是显著促进居民积极与政府合作的因素;旅游发展的程序公正和符合程序正义的制度执行方式,是促进居民与政府合作行为意向的重要保障。

  2. Equality in the Framework of Justice

    OpenAIRE

    Aşik, Kübra

    2015-01-01

    This thesis assesses the relation between equality and justice by exploring and identifying the relation between equality and justice in Rawls's theory of justice, Sandel's communitarian account of Justice and Sen's capability approach. And these accounts of justice are evaluated from an egalitarian point of view. The main argument defended in the thesis is that justice requires equality. Accordingly, these three accounts of justice are evaluated by taking their understanding of equality into...

  3. A Web 2.0-Based Collaborative Model for Multicultural Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Md. Mokter; Aydin, Hasan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Web 2.0 is a collaborative web development platform that has had tremendous usage in building effective, interactive, and collaborative virtual societies at home and abroad. Multicultural study is another trend that has tremendous possibilities to help people in the fight against racism and enables them to become active members of a…

  4. Nonprofit Organizations and Innovation: A Model of Neighborhood-Based Collaboration to Prevent Child Maltreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulroy, Elizabeth A.; Shay, Sharon

    1997-01-01

    Outlines a theoretical and conceptual framework for neighborhood-based collaboration by nonprofit organizations. Analyzes the main concepts of innovation in the design and implementation of a collaboration to prevent child maltreatment in an undervalued neighborhood and draws implications for social policy, social work practice, and social work…

  5. Adopting Workflow Patterns for Modelling the Allocation of Data in Multi-Organizational Collaborations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kassahun, A.; Tekinerdogan, B.

    2016-01-01

    Currently, many organizations need to collaborate to achieve their common objectives. An important aspect hereby is the data required for making decisions at anyone organization may be distributed over the different organizations involved in the collaboration. The data objects and the activities in

  6. Motives and preferences of general practitioners for new collaboration models with medical specialists : a qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berendsen, Annette J.; Benneker, Wim H. G. M.; Jong, Betty Meyboom-de; Klazinga, Niek S.; Schuling, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Background: Collaboration between general practitioners (GPs) and specialists has been the focus of many collaborative care projects during the past decade. Unfortunately, quite a number of these projects failed. This raises the question of what motivates GPs to initiate and continue participating w

  7. Promoting Entrepreneurial Culture in the University: The Institutional Collaborative Model at the Universidad Autonoma de Madrid

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pablo, Isidro; Alfaro, Fernando; Rodriguez, Miriam; Valdes, Esperanza

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a case of collaboration between different types of public services and the private sector for the promotion of an entrepreneurial culture. This collaboration is achieved by means of a centre established and developed by the Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, the Centro de Iniciativas Emprendedoras (the Centre for Entrepreneurial…

  8. Towards agent-based modelling and verification of collaborative business processes : An approach centred on interactions and behaviours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stuit, M.; Szirbik, N.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the process-oriented aspects of a formal and visual agent-based business process modeling language. The language is of use for (networks of) organizations that elect or envisage multi-agent systems for the support of collaborative business processes. The paper argues that the

  9. A social marketing approach to implementing evidence-based practice in VHA QUERI: the TIDES depression collaborative care model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Collaborative care models for depression in primary care are effective and cost-effective, but difficult to spread to new sites. Translating Initiatives for Depression into Effective Solutions (TIDES) is an initiative to promote evidence-based collaborative care in the U.S. Veterans Health Administration (VHA). Social marketing applies marketing techniques to promote positive behavior change. Described in this paper, TIDES used a social marketing approach to foster national spread of collaborative care models. TIDES social marketing approach The approach relied on a sequential model of behavior change and explicit attention to audience segmentation. Segments included VHA national leadership, Veterans Integrated Service Network (VISN) regional leadership, facility managers, frontline providers, and veterans. TIDES communications, materials and messages targeted each segment, guided by an overall marketing plan. Results Depression collaborative care based on the TIDES model was adopted by VHA as part of the new Primary Care Mental Health Initiative and associated policies. It is currently in use in more than 50 primary care practices across the United States, and continues to spread, suggesting success for its social marketing-based dissemination strategy. Discussion and conclusion Development, execution and evaluation of the TIDES marketing effort shows that social marketing is a promising approach for promoting implementation of evidence-based interventions in integrated healthcare systems. PMID:19785754

  10. A social marketing approach to implementing evidence-based practice in VHA QUERI: the TIDES depression collaborative care model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parker Louise E

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Collaborative care models for depression in primary care are effective and cost-effective, but difficult to spread to new sites. Translating Initiatives for Depression into Effective Solutions (TIDES is an initiative to promote evidence-based collaborative care in the U.S. Veterans Health Administration (VHA. Social marketing applies marketing techniques to promote positive behavior change. Described in this paper, TIDES used a social marketing approach to foster national spread of collaborative care models. TIDES social marketing approach The approach relied on a sequential model of behavior change and explicit attention to audience segmentation. Segments included VHA national leadership, Veterans Integrated Service Network (VISN regional leadership, facility managers, frontline providers, and veterans. TIDES communications, materials and messages targeted each segment, guided by an overall marketing plan. Results Depression collaborative care based on the TIDES model was adopted by VHA as part of the new Primary Care Mental Health Initiative and associated policies. It is currently in use in more than 50 primary care practices across the United States, and continues to spread, suggesting success for its social marketing-based dissemination strategy. Discussion and conclusion Development, execution and evaluation of the TIDES marketing effort shows that social marketing is a promising approach for promoting implementation of evidence-based interventions in integrated healthcare systems.

  11. A social marketing approach to implementing evidence-based practice in VHA QUERI: the TIDES depression collaborative care model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luck, Jeff; Hagigi, Fred; Parker, Louise E; Yano, Elizabeth M; Rubenstein, Lisa V; Kirchner, JoAnn E

    2009-09-28

    Collaborative care models for depression in primary care are effective and cost-effective, but difficult to spread to new sites. Translating Initiatives for Depression into Effective Solutions (TIDES) is an initiative to promote evidence-based collaborative care in the U.S. Veterans Health Administration (VHA). Social marketing applies marketing techniques to promote positive behavior change. Described in this paper, TIDES used a social marketing approach to foster national spread of collaborative care models. The approach relied on a sequential model of behavior change and explicit attention to audience segmentation. Segments included VHA national leadership, Veterans Integrated Service Network (VISN) regional leadership, facility managers, frontline providers, and veterans. TIDES communications, materials and messages targeted each segment, guided by an overall marketing plan. Depression collaborative care based on the TIDES model was adopted by VHA as part of the new Primary Care Mental Health Initiative and associated policies. It is currently in use in more than 50 primary care practices across the United States, and continues to spread, suggesting success for its social marketing-based dissemination strategy. Development, execution and evaluation of the TIDES marketing effort shows that social marketing is a promising approach for promoting implementation of evidence-based interventions in integrated healthcare systems.

  12. Managing security risks for inter-organisational information systems: a multiagent collaborative model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Nan; Wu, Harris; Li, Minqiang; Wu, Desheng; Chen, Fuzan; Tian, Jin

    2016-09-01

    Information sharing across organisations is critical to effectively managing the security risks of inter-organisational information systems. Nevertheless, few previous studies on information systems security have focused on inter-organisational information sharing, and none have studied the sharing of inferred beliefs versus factual observations. In this article, a multiagent collaborative model (MACM) is proposed as a practical solution to assess the risk level of each allied organisation's information system and support proactive security treatment by sharing beliefs on event probabilities as well as factual observations. In MACM, for each allied organisation's information system, we design four types of agents: inspection agent, analysis agent, control agent, and communication agent. By sharing soft findings (beliefs) in addition to hard findings (factual observations) among the organisations, each organisation's analysis agent is capable of dynamically predicting its security risk level using a Bayesian network. A real-world implementation illustrates how our model can be used to manage security risks in distributed information systems and that sharing soft findings leads to lower expected loss from security risks.

  13. Two-stage collaborative global optimization design model of the CHPG microgrid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Qingfen; Xu, Yeyan; Tang, Fei; Peng, Sicheng; Yang, Zheng

    2017-06-01

    With the continuous developing of technology and reducing of investment costs, renewable energy proportion in the power grid is becoming higher and higher because of the clean and environmental characteristics, which may need more larger-capacity energy storage devices, increasing the cost. A two-stage collaborative global optimization design model of the combined-heat-power-and-gas (abbreviated as CHPG) microgrid is proposed in this paper, to minimize the cost by using virtual storage without extending the existing storage system. P2G technology is used as virtual multi-energy storage in CHPG, which can coordinate the operation of electric energy network and natural gas network at the same time. Demand response is also one kind of good virtual storage, including economic guide for the DGs and heat pumps in demand side and priority scheduling of controllable loads. Two kinds of storage will coordinate to smooth the high-frequency fluctuations and low-frequency fluctuations of renewable energy respectively, and achieve a lower-cost operation scheme simultaneously. Finally, the feasibility and superiority of proposed design model is proved in a simulation of a CHPG microgrid.

  14. CERN’s model for international scientific collaboration to be discussed at UNOG

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2015-01-01

    On 2 November, on the occasion of the 70th anniversary of the United Nations, CERN and UNOG will co-host a one-day symposium, with the support of Switzerland and France. The event will bring together policy-makers, scientists and members of civil society to debate how to construct synergies across communities as a means to drive global objectives. CERN people are invited to the Palais des Nations to take part.   CERN's seat at the General Assembly of the United Nations in New York. How does CERN work? How are goals achieved in such a complex environment where diverse communities work together in the interests of science? CERN’s model for international scientific collaboration is being looked at with growing interest by an increasingly large community of experts in various fields. Scientific advances and accomplishments are testament to the effectiveness of the model and prove that ambitious scientific programmes can be carried out only by communities c...

  15. A distributed, collaborative, structuring model for a clinical-guideline digital-library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahar, Yuval; Shalom, Erez; Mayaffit, Alon; Young, Ohad; Galperin, Maya; Martins, Susana; Goldstein, Mary

    2003-01-01

    The Digital Electronic Guideline Library (DeGeL) is a Web-based framework and a set of distributed tools that facilitate gradual conversion of clinical guidelines from free text, through semi-structured text, to a fully structured, executable representation. Thus, guidelines exist in a hybrid, multiple-format representation The three formats support increasingly sophisticated computational tasks. The tools perform semantic markup, classification, search, and browsing, and support computational modules that we are developing, for run-time application and retrospective quality assessment. We describe the DeGeL architecture and its collaborative-authoring authorization model, which is based on (1) multiple medical-specialty authoring groups, each including a group manager who controls group authorizations, and (2) a hierarchical authorization model based on the different functions involved in the hybrid guideline-specification process. We have implemented the core modules of the DeGeL architecture and demonstrated distributed markup and retrieval using the knowledge roles of two guidelines ontologies (Asbru and GEM). We are currently evaluating several of the DeGeL tools.

  16. Spatial Interaction Modelling of Cross-Region R&D Collaborations: Empirical Evidence from the 5th EU Framework Programme

    CERN Document Server

    Scherngell, Thomas; 10.1111/j.1435-5957.2008.00215.x

    2010-01-01

    The last few years have witnessed an increasing interest in the geography of innovation. As noted by Autant-Bernard et al. (2007a), the geographical dimension of innovation deserves further attention by analysing such phenomena as R&D collaborations. In this study we focus on cross-region R&D collaborations in Europe. The European coverage is achieved by using data on collaborative R&D projects funded by the EU Framework Programmes (FPs) between organisation that are located in 255 NUTS-2 regions of the 25 pre-2007 EU member-states, as well as Norway and Switzerland. The objective is to identify separation effects - such as geographical or technological effects - on the constitution of cross-region collaborative R&D activities. We specify a Poisson spatial interaction model to analyse these questions. The dependent variable is the intensity of cross-region R&D collaborations, the independent variables include origin, destination and separation characteristics of interaction. The results pr...

  17. Modeling cognitive loads for evolving shared mental models in human-agent collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiaocong; Yen, John

    2011-04-01

    Recent research on human-centered teamwork highly demands the design of cognitive agents that can model and exploit human partners' cognitive load to enhance team performance. In this paper, we focus on teams composed of human-agent pairs and develop a system called Shared Mental Models for all--SMMall. SMMall implements a hidden Markov model (HMM)-based cognitive load model for an agent to predict its human partner's instantaneous cognitive load status. It also implements a user interface (UI) concept called shared belief map, which offers a synergic representation of team members' information space and allows them to share beliefs. An experiment was conducted to evaluate the HMM-based load models. The results indicate that the HMM-based load models are effective in helping team members develop a shared mental model (SMM), and the benefit of load-based information sharing becomes more significant as communication capacity increases. It also suggests that multiparty communication plays an important role in forming/evolving team SMMs, and when a group of agents can be partitioned into subteams, splitting messages by their load status can be more effective for developing subteam SMMs.

  18. Application description and policy model in collaborative environment for sharing of information on epidemiological and clinical research data sets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias César Araujo de Carvalho

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sharing of epidemiological and clinical data sets among researchers is poor at best, in detriment of science and community at large. The purpose of this paper is therefore to (1 describe a novel Web application designed to share information on study data sets focusing on epidemiological clinical research in a collaborative environment and (2 create a policy model placing this collaborative environment into the current scientific social context. METHODOLOGY: The Database of Databases application was developed based on feedback from epidemiologists and clinical researchers requiring a Web-based platform that would allow for sharing of information about epidemiological and clinical study data sets in a collaborative environment. This platform should ensure that researchers can modify the information. A Model-based predictions of number of publications and funding resulting from combinations of different policy implementation strategies (for metadata and data sharing were generated using System Dynamics modeling. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The application allows researchers to easily upload information about clinical study data sets, which is searchable and modifiable by other users in a wiki environment. All modifications are filtered by the database principal investigator in order to maintain quality control. The application has been extensively tested and currently contains 130 clinical study data sets from the United States, Australia, China and Singapore. Model results indicated that any policy implementation would be better than the current strategy, that metadata sharing is better than data-sharing, and that combined policies achieve the best results in terms of publications. CONCLUSIONS: Based on our empirical observations and resulting model, the social network environment surrounding the application can assist epidemiologists and clinical researchers contribute and search for metadata in a collaborative environment, thus potentially

  19. What´s the monetary value of distributive justice

    OpenAIRE

    Corneo, Giacomo; Fong, Christina M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper develops a simple theoretical model that can be implemented to estimate the willingness to pay for distributive justice. We derive a formula that allows one to recover the willingness to pay for distributive justice from the estimated coefficients of a probit regression and fiscal data. Using this formula and data from a 1998 Gallup Social Audit, we find that the monetary value of justice in the United States is about one fifth of GDP. We also generalize the model to estimate the v...

  20. Transitional Justice versus Traditional Justice: The Basque Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joxerramon Bengoextea

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Transitional justice is often understood as a field or toolkit that facilitates the establishment of "justice" and rule of law in post-conflict societies. It is also the interdisciplinary understanding and study of that toolkit or field. This article explores to what extent transitional justice is a relevant way of understanding the transformations taking place in the Basque Country in the post-conflict situation created since the final ceasefire was declared by ETA on October 20, 2011. The article analyses different aspects of the field of transitional justice and the experience in Spain and the Basque Country. It underlines the prevalence of truth-seeking processes (over amnesia and of addressing violations and victims' suffering to conclude with the need to enhance the rule of law and traditional-individualised-justice and transitional justice.

  1. Model and experiences of initiating collaboration with traditional healers in validation of ethnomedicines for HIV/AIDS in Namibia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinsembu Kazhila C

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many people with Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS in Namibia have access to antiretroviral drugs but some still use traditional medicines to treat opportunistic infections and offset side-effects from antiretroviral medication. Namibia has a rich biodiversity of indigenous plants that could contain novel anti-HIV agents. However, such medicinal plants have not been identified and properly documented. Various ethnomedicines used to treat HIV/AIDS opportunistic infections have not been scientifically validated for safety and efficacy. These limitations are mostly attributable to the lack of collaboration between biomedical scientists and traditional healers. This paper presents a five-step contextual model for initiating collaboration with Namibian traditional healers in order that candidate plants that may contain novel anti-HIV agents are identified, and traditional medicines used to treat HIV/AIDS opportunistic infections are subjected to scientific validation. The model includes key structures and processes used to initiate collaboration with traditional healers in Namibia; namely, the National Biosciences Forum, a steering committee with the University of Namibia (UNAM as the focal point, a study tour to Zambia and South Africa where other collaborative frameworks were examined, commemorations of the African Traditional Medicine Day (ATMD, and consultations with stakeholders in north-eastern Namibia. Experiences from these structures and processes are discussed. All traditional healers in north-eastern Namibia were willing to collaborate with UNAM in order that their traditional medicines could be subjected to scientific validation. The current study provides a framework for future collaboration with traditional healers and the selection of candidate anti-HIV medicinal plants and ethnomedicines for scientific testing in Namibia.

  2. Model and experiences of initiating collaboration with traditional healers in validation of ethnomedicines for HIV/AIDS in Namibia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinsembu, Kazhila C

    2009-10-23

    Many people with Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS) in Namibia have access to antiretroviral drugs but some still use traditional medicines to treat opportunistic infections and offset side-effects from antiretroviral medication. Namibia has a rich biodiversity of indigenous plants that could contain novel anti-HIV agents. However, such medicinal plants have not been identified and properly documented. Various ethnomedicines used to treat HIV/AIDS opportunistic infections have not been scientifically validated for safety and efficacy. These limitations are mostly attributable to the lack of collaboration between biomedical scientists and traditional healers. This paper presents a five-step contextual model for initiating collaboration with Namibian traditional healers in order that candidate plants that may contain novel anti-HIV agents are identified, and traditional medicines used to treat HIV/AIDS opportunistic infections are subjected to scientific validation. The model includes key structures and processes used to initiate collaboration with traditional healers in Namibia; namely, the National Biosciences Forum, a steering committee with the University of Namibia (UNAM) as the focal point, a study tour to Zambia and South Africa where other collaborative frameworks were examined, commemorations of the African Traditional Medicine Day (ATMD), and consultations with stakeholders in north-eastern Namibia. Experiences from these structures and processes are discussed. All traditional healers in north-eastern Namibia were willing to collaborate with UNAM in order that their traditional medicines could be subjected to scientific validation. The current study provides a framework for future collaboration with traditional healers and the selection of candidate anti-HIV medicinal plants and ethnomedicines for scientific testing in Namibia.

  3. Analysis and Design Environment for Large Scale System Models and Collaborative Model Development Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — As NASA modeling efforts grow more complex and more distributed among many working groups, new tools and technologies are required to integrate their efforts...

  4. Benefits of multidisciplinary collaboration for earthquake casualty estimation models: recent case studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, E.

    2010-12-01

    Earthquake casualty loss estimation, which depends primarily on building-specific casualty rates, has long suffered from a lack of cross-disciplinary collaboration in post-earthquake data gathering. An increase in our understanding of what contributes to casualties in earthquakes involve coordinated data-gathering efforts amongst disciplines; these are essential for improved global casualty estimation models. It is evident from examining past casualty loss models and reviewing field data collected from recent events, that generalized casualty rates cannot be applied globally for different building types, even within individual countries. For a particular structure type, regional and topographic building design effects, combined with variable material and workmanship quality all contribute to this multi-variant outcome. In addition, social factors affect building-specific casualty rates, including social status and education levels, and human behaviors in general, in that they modify egress and survivability rates. Without considering complex physical pathways, loss models purely based on historic casualty data, or even worse, rates derived from other countries, will be of very limited value. What’s more, as the world’s population, housing stock, and living and cultural environments change, methods of loss modeling must accommodate these variables, especially when considering casualties. To truly take advantage of observed earthquake losses, not only do damage surveys need better coordination of international and national reconnaissance teams, but these teams must integrate difference areas of expertise including engineering, public health and medicine. Research is needed to find methods to achieve consistent and practical ways of collecting and modeling casualties in earthquakes. International collaboration will also be necessary to transfer such expertise and resources to the communities in the cities which most need it. Coupling the theories and findings from

  5. Dentistry and distributive justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharamsi, Shafik; MacEntee, Michael I

    2002-07-01

    There is a growing concern in most countries to address the problem of inequities in health-care within the context of financial restraints on the public purse and the realities of health professions that are influenced strongly by the economic priorities of free-market economies. Dental professionals, like other health professionals, are well aware that the public expects oral health-related services that are effective, accessible, available and affordable. Yet, there is remarkably little reference in the literature to the theories of distributive justice that might offer guidance on how an equitable oral health service could be achieved. This paper considers three prominent theories of distributive justice--libertarianism, egalitarianism and contractarianism--within the controversial context of basic care and quality of life. The discussion leads towards a socially responsible, egalitarian perspective on prevention augmented by a social contract for curative care with the aim of providing maximum benefit to the least advantaged in society.

  6. Motivation and performance within a collaborative computer-based modeling task: Relations between student's achievement goal orientation, self-efficiacy, cognitive processing and achievement.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sins, Patrick H.M.; van Joolingen, Wouter; Savelsbergh, Elwin R.; van Hout-Wolters, Bernadette

    2008-01-01

    Purpose of the present study was to test a conceptual model of relations among achievement goal orientation, self-efficacy, cognitive processing, and achievement of students working within a particular collaborative task context. The task involved a collaborative computer-based modeling task. In ord

  7. Motivation and performance within a collaborative computer-based modeling task: Relations between students' achievement goal orientation, self-efficacy, cognitive processing and achievement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sins, P.H.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/29637119X; van Joolingen, W.R.; Savelsbergh, E.R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/17345853X; van Hout-Wolters, B.H.A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose of the present study was to test a conceptual model of relations among achievement goal orientation, self-efficacy, cognitive processing, and achievement of students working within a particular collaborative task context. The task involved a collaborative computer-based modeling task. In ord

  8. A Development of a Collaborative Blended Learning Model to Enhance Learning Achievement and Thinking Ability of Undergraduate Students at the Institute of Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingpum, Peerasak; Ruangsuwan, Chaiyot; Chaicharoen, Sumalee

    2015-01-01

    This research aimed to develop a model of a collaborative blended learning (CoBl) to develop learning achievement and thinking ability of undergraduate students in the Institute of Physical Education. The research is divided into three phases using the blended learning model via collaborative learning with thinking abilities approach as follows:…

  9. Motivation and performance within a collaborative computer-based modeling task: Relations between students' achievement goal orientation, self-efficacy, cognitive processing and achievement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sins, P.H.M.; van Joolingen, W.R.; Savelsbergh, E.R.; van Hout-Wolters, B.H.A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose of the present study was to test a conceptual model of relations among achievement goal orientation, self-efficacy, cognitive processing, and achievement of students working within a particular collaborative task context. The task involved a collaborative computer-based modeling task. In ord

  10. Motivation and performance within a collaborative computer-based modeling task: relations between students’ achievement goal orientation, self-efficacy, cognitive processing, and achievement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sins, Patrick H.M.; Joolingen, van Wouter R.; Savelsbergh, Elwin R.; Hout-Wolters, van Bernadette

    2008-01-01

    Purpose of the present study was to test a conceptual model of relations among achievement goal orientation, self-efficacy, cognitive processing, and achievement of students working within a particular collaborative task context. The task involved a collaborative computer-based modeling task. In ord

  11. Climate Change Justice

    OpenAIRE

    Sunstein, Cass R.; Posner, Eric A.

    2007-01-01

    Greenhouse gas reductions would cost some nations much more than others and benefit some nations far less than others. Significant reductions would impose especially large costs on the United States, and recent projections suggest that the United States has relatively less to lose from climate change. In these circumstances, what does justice require the United States to do? Many people believe that the United States is required to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions beyond the point that is ...

  12. Promoting employee wellbeing: the relevance of work characteristics and organizational justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Katrina J; Noblet, Andrew J; Rodwell, John J

    2009-09-01

    Research focusing on the relationship between organizational justice and health suggests that perceptions of fairness can make significant contributions to employee wellbeing. However, studies examining the justice-health relationship are only just emerging and there are several areas where further research is required, in particular, the uniqueness of the contributions made by justice and the extent to which the health effects can be explained by linear, non-linear and/or interaction models. The primary aim of the current study was to determine the main, curvilinear and interaction effects of work characteristics and organizational justice perceptions on employee wellbeing (as measured by psychological health and job satisfaction). Work characteristics were measured using the demand-control-support (DCS) model (Karasek and Theorell, 1990) and Colquitt's (2001) four justice dimensions (distributive, procedural, interpersonal and informational) assessed organizational justice (Colquitt, 2001). Hierarchical regression analyses found that in relation to psychological health, perceptions of justice added little to the explanatory power of the DCS model. In contrast, organizational justice did account for unique variance in job satisfaction, the second measure of employee wellbeing. The results supported linear relationships between the psychosocial working conditions and the outcome measures. A significant two-way interaction effect (control x support at work) was found for the psychological health outcome and the procedural justice by distributive justice interaction was significant for the job satisfaction outcome. Notably, the findings indicate that in addition to traditional job stressors, health promotion strategies should also address organizational justice.

  13. Hume's Theory of Justice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horacio Spector

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hume developed an original and revolutionary theoretical paradigm for explaining the spontaneous emergence of the classic conventions of justice - stable possession, transference of property by consent, and the obligation to fulfill promises. In a scenario of scarce external resources, Hume's central idea is that the development of the rules of justice responds to a sense of common interest that progressively tames the destructiveness of natural self-love and expands the action of natural moral sentiments. By handling conceptual tools that anticipated game theory for centuries, Hume was able to break with rationalism, the natural law school, and Hobbes's contractarianism. Unlike natural moral sentiments, the sense of justice is valuable and reaches full strength within a general plan or system of actions. However, unlike game theory, Hume does not assume that people have transparent access to the their own motivations and the inner structure of the social world. In contrast, he blends ideas such as cognitive delusion, learning by experience and coordination to construct a theory that still deserves careful discussion, even though it resists classification under contemporary headings.

  14. Diffusion of a collaborative care model in primary care: a longitudinal qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vedel Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Although collaborative team models (CTM improve care processes and health outcomes, their diffusion poses challenges related to difficulties in securing their adoption by primary care clinicians (PCPs. The objectives of this study are to understand: (1 how the perceived characteristics of a CTM influenced clinicians' decision to adopt -or not- the model; and (2 the model's diffusion process. Methods We conducted a longitudinal case study based on the Diffusion of Innovations Theory. First, diffusion curves were developed for all 175 PCPs and 59 nurses practicing in one borough of Paris. Second, semi-structured interviews were conducted with a representative sample of 40 PCPs and 15 nurses to better understand the implementation dynamics. Results Diffusion curves showed that 3.5 years after the start of the implementation, 100% of nurses and over 80% of PCPs had adopted the CTM. The dynamics of the CTM's diffusion were different between the PCPs and the nurses. The slopes of the two curves are also distinctly different. Among the nurses, the critical mass of adopters was attained faster, since they adopted the CTM earlier and more quickly than the PCPs. Results of the semi-structured interviews showed that these differences in diffusion dynamics were mostly founded in differences between the PCPs' and the nurses' perceptions of the CTM's compatibility with norms, values and practices and its relative advantage (impact on patient management and work practices. Opinion leaders played a key role in the diffusion of the CTM among PCPs. Conclusion CTM diffusion is a social phenomenon that requires a major commitment by clinicians and a willingness to take risks; the role of opinion leaders is key. Paying attention to the notion of a critical mass of adopters is essential to developing implementation strategies that will accelerate the adoption process by clinicians.

  15. Collaborative Project. A Flexible Atmospheric Modeling Framework for the Community Earth System Model (CESM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gettelman, Andrew [University Corporation For Atmospheric Research (UCAR), Boulder, CO (United States)

    2015-10-01

    In this project we have been upgrading the Multiscale Modeling Framework (MMF) in the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM), also known as Super-Parameterized CAM (SP-CAM). This has included a major effort to update the coding standards and interface with CAM so that it can be placed on the main development trunk. It has also included development of a new software structure for CAM to be able to handle sub-grid column information. These efforts have formed the major thrust of the work.

  16. Modeling ductal carcinoma in situ: a HER2-Notch3 collaboration enables luminal filling.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Pradeep, C-R

    2012-02-16

    A large fraction of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), a non-invasive precursor lesion of invasive breast cancer, overexpresses the HER2\\/neu oncogene. The ducts of DCIS are abnormally filled with cells that evade apoptosis, but the underlying mechanisms remain incompletely understood. We overexpressed HER2 in mammary epithelial cells and observed growth factor-independent proliferation. When grown in extracellular matrix as three-dimensional spheroids, control cells developed a hollow lumen, but HER2-overexpressing cells populated the lumen by evading apoptosis. We demonstrate that HER2 overexpression in this cellular model of DCIS drives transcriptional upregulation of multiple components of the Notch survival pathway. Importantly, luminal filling required upregulation of a signaling pathway comprising Notch3, its cleaved intracellular domain and the transcriptional regulator HES1, resulting in elevated levels of c-MYC and cyclin D1. In line with HER2-Notch3 collaboration, drugs intercepting either arm reverted the DCIS-like phenotype. In addition, we report upregulation of Notch3 in hyperplastic lesions of HER2 transgenic animals, as well as an association between HER2 levels and expression levels of components of the Notch pathway in tumor specimens of breast cancer patients. Therefore, it is conceivable that the integration of the Notch and HER2 signaling pathways contributes to the pathophysiology of DCIS.

  17. A collaborative computer auditing system under SOA-based conceptual model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Qiushi; Huang, Zuoming; Hu, Jibing

    2013-03-01

    Some of the current challenges of computer auditing are the obstacles to retrieving, converting and translating data from different database schema. During the last few years, there are many data exchange standards under continuous development such as Extensible Business Reporting Language (XBRL). These XML document standards can be used for data exchange among companies, financial institutions, and audit firms. However, for many companies, it is still expensive and time-consuming to translate and provide XML messages with commercial application packages, because it is complicated and laborious to search and transform data from thousands of tables in the ERP databases. How to transfer transaction documents for supporting continuous auditing or real time auditing between audit firms and their client companies is a important topic. In this paper, a collaborative computer auditing system under SOA-based conceptual model is proposed. By utilizing the widely used XML document standards and existing data transformation applications developed by different companies and software venders, we can wrap these application as commercial web services that will be easy implemented under the forthcoming application environments: service-oriented architecture (SOA). Under the SOA environments, the multiagency mechanism will help the maturity and popularity of data assurance service over the Internet. By the wrapping of data transformation components with heterogeneous databases or platforms, it will create new component markets composed by many software vendors and assurance service companies to provide data assurance services for audit firms, regulators or third parties.

  18. Measuring Validity And Reliability of Perception of Online Collaborative Learning Questionnaire Using Rasch Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharifah Nadiyah Razali

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to generate empirical evidence on the validity and reliability of Perception of Online Collaborative Learning Questionnaire (POCLQ using Rasch model. The questionnaire was distributed to 32 (N=32 Diploma Hotel Catering students from Politeknik Ibrahim Sultan, Johor (PIS. Data obtained was analysed using WINSTEP version 3.68 software. The finding showed that POCLQ had high reliability with five categories of difficulties items. So, it can be concluded that POCLQ is reliable and strongly accepted. Meanwhile, analysis of items fit showed there were six items that are not in the specified range and based on standardised residual correlation measurement value; there were five items found to be overlapped that should be dropped. All the items that needed to be dropped based on the analysis of result had been refined and retained for the purpose of the study and based on expert's view. Therefore, all items remained after Rasch analysis. It is hoped that this study will give emphasis to other researchers about the importance of analysing items to ensure the quality of an instrument being developed.

  19. The Institute for Global Orthopedics and Traumatology: A Model for Academic Collaboration in Orthopedic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Devin James; Coughlin, Richard; Caldwell, Amber; Shearer, David

    2017-01-01

    In 2006, surgeons at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) established the Institute for Global Orthopedics and Traumatology (IGOT), an initiative within the department of orthopedic surgery. The principal aim of IGOT is to create long-term, sustainable solutions to the growing burden of musculoskeletal injury in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) through academic partnership. IGOT currently has relationships with teaching hospitals in Ghana, Malawi, Tanzania, Nicaragua, and Nepal. The organizational structure of IGOT is built on four pillars: Global Surgical Education (GSE), Global Knowledge Exchange (GKE), Global Research Initiative (GRI), and Global Leadership and Advocacy. GSE focuses on increasing surgical knowledge and technical proficiency through hands-on educational courses. The GKE facilitates the mutual exchange of surgeons and trainees among IGOT and its partners. This includes a global resident elective that allows UCSF residents to complete an international rotation at one of IGOT's partner sites. The GRI strives to build research capacity and sponsor high-quality clinical research projects that address questions relevant to local partners. The fourth pillar, Global Leadership and Advocacy aims to increase awareness of the global impact of musculoskeletal injury through national and international courses and events, such as the Bay Area Global Health Film Festival. At the core of each tenet is the collaboration among IGOT and its international partners. Over the last decade, IGOT has experienced tremendous growth and maturation in its partnership model based on cumulative experience and the needs of its partners.

  20. The Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems: a longitudinal database, research, collaboration and knowledge translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, F M; Malec, J F

    2010-12-01

    In 1988, the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR) launched the Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems (TBIMS) program, creating the longest and largest longitudinal database on individuals with moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) available today. In addition to sustaining the longitudinal database, centers that successfully compete to be part of the TBIMS centers are also expected to complete local and collaborative research projects to further scientific knowledge about TBI. The research has focused on areas of the NIDRR Long Range Plan which emphasizes employment, health and function, technology for access and function, independent living and community integration, and other associated disability research areas. Centers compete for funded participation in the TBIMS on a 5-year cycle. Dissemination of scientific knowledge gained through the TBIMS is the responsibility of both individual centers and the TBIMS as a whole. This is accomplished through multiple venues that target a broad audience of those who need to receive the information and learn how to best apply it to practice. The sites produce many useful websites, manuals, publications and other materials to accomplish this translation of knowledge to practice.

  1. The role of attitudes toward White privilege and religious beliefs in predicting social justice interest and commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Nathan R; McConnell, Elizabeth A; Suffrin, Rachael L

    2014-03-01

    The current study examines links among attitudes toward White privilege, religious beliefs, and social justice interest and commitment for White Christian students. Two distinct patterns of results emerged from a path analysis of 500 White Christian students. First, a willingness to confront White privilege was positively associated with the sanctification of social justice (i.e., attributing spiritual significance to working for social justice) and both were positively associated with social justice interest and commitment. Second, awareness of White privilege was negatively associated with religious conservatism, and religious conservatism was negatively associated with social justice interest. These patterns show that White privilege attitudes directly (i.e., willingness to confront White privilege) and indirectly (i.e., awareness of White privilege through religious conservatism) predicted social justice interest and commitment. Moreover, religious beliefs demonstrated opposite patterns of association with social justice interest and commitment such that the sanctification of social justice positively predicted social justice interest and commitment whereas religious conservatism negatively predicted social justice interest. Overall, findings demonstrate direct and indirect links between White privilege attitudes, religious beliefs, and social justice interest and commitment. Limitations and implications for future community psychology research and collaboration also are discussed.

  2. Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration within IEA Wind Annex XXIII: Phase II Results Regarding Monopile Foundation Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonkman, J.; Butterfield, S.; Passon, P.; Larsen, T.; Camp, T.; Nichols, J.; Azcona, J.; Martinez, A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an overview and describes the latest findings of the code-to-code verification activities of the Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration, which operates under Subtask 2 of the International Energy Agency Wind Annex XXIII.

  3. Error-analysis and comparison to analytical models of numerical waveforms produced by the NRAR Collaboration

    CERN Document Server

    Hinder, Ian; Boyle, Michael; Etienne, Zachariah B; Healy, James; Johnson-McDaniel, Nathan K; Nagar, Alessandro; Nakano, Hiroyuki; Pan, Yi; Pfeiffer, Harald P; Pürrer, Michael; Reisswig, Christian; Scheel, Mark A; Sperhake, Ulrich; Szilágyi, Bela; Tichy, Wolfgang; Wardell, Barry; Zenginoglu, Anıl; Alic, Daniela; Bernuzzi, Sebastiano; Bode, Tanja; Brügmann, Bernd; Buchman, Luisa T; Campanelli, Manuela; Chu, Tony; Damour, Thibault; Grigsby, Jason D; Hannam, Mark; Haas, Roland; Hemberger, Daniel A; Husa, Sascha; Kidder, Lawrence E; Laguna, Pablo; London, Lionel; Lovelace, Geoffrey; Lousto, Carlos O; Marronetti, Pedro; Matzner, Richard A; Mösta, Philipp; Mroué, Abdul; Müller, Doreen; Mundim, Bruno C; Nerozzi, Andrea; Paschalidis, Vasileios; Pollney, Denis; Reifenberger, George; Rezzolla, Luciano; Shapiro, Stuart L; Shoemaker, Deirdre; Taracchini, Andrea; Taylor, Nicholas W; Teukolsky, Saul A; Thierfelder, Marcus; Witek, Helvi; Zlochower, Yosef

    2014-01-01

    The Numerical-Relativity-Analytical-Relativity (NRAR) collaboration is a joint effort between members of the numerical relativity, analytical relativity and gravitational-wave data analysis communities. The goal of the NRAR collaboration is to produce numerical-relativity simulations of compact binaries and use them to develop accurate analytical templates for the LIGO/Virgo Collaboration to use in detecting gravitational-wave signals and extracting astrophysical information from them. We describe the results of the first stage of the NRAR project, which focused on producing an initial set of numerical waveforms from binary black holes with moderate mass ratios and spins, as well as one non-spinning binary configuration which has a mass ratio of 10. All of the numerical waveforms are analysed in a uniform and consistent manner, with numerical errors evaluated using an analysis code created by members of the NRAR collaboration. We compare previously-calibrated, non-precessing analytical waveforms, notably the ...

  4. Exploring the black box of quality improvement collaboratives: modelling relations between conditions, applied changes and outcomes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dückers, M.L.A.; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Wagner, C.; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Despite the popularity of quality improvement collaboratives (QICs) in different healthcare settings, relatively little is known about the implementation process. The objective of the current study is to learn more about relations between relevant conditions for successful implementati

  5. Exploring the black box of quality improvement collaboratives : modelling relations between conditions, applied changes and outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dückers, M.L.A.; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Wagner, C.; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Despite the popularity of quality improvement collaboratives (QICs) in different healthcare settings, relatively little is known about the implementation process. The objective of the current study is to learn more about relations between relevant conditions for successful implementati

  6. Collaborative Drug Therapy Management: Case Studies of Three Community-Based Models of Care

    OpenAIRE

    Snyder, Margie E; Earl, Tara R.; Gilchrist, Siobhan; Greenberg, Michael; Heisler, Holly; Revels, Michelle; Matson-Koffman, Dyann

    2015-01-01

    Collaborative drug therapy management agreements are a strategy for expanding the role of pharmacists in team-based care with other providers. However, these agreements have not been widely implemented. This study describes the features of existing provider?pharmacist collaborative drug therapy management practices and identifies the facilitators and barriers to implementing such services in community settings. We conducted in-depth, qualitative interviews in 2012 in a federally qualified hea...

  7. A collaborative knowledge management framework for supply chains: A UML-based model approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Esteban Hernández

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In the most general cases, collaborative activities imply a distributed decision-making process which involves several supply chain nodes. In this paper, by means of a literature review, and by also considering the deficiencies of existing proposals, a collaborative knowledge management UML-based framework supported is proposed. In addition, this proposal synthesizes existing knowledge, and it not only fulfils, but enriches, each component with the modeller’s own knowledge.

  8. On the teaching model of website-based collaborated self-directed study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Zhihua; Zeng, Yingxiong; Wen, Chunyu

    2011-12-01

    Based on the theory of collaborated self-directed study and the strengths of modern education technology, the study explores application of websites for collaborated self-directed college English learning. It introduces the characteristics and functions of the website developed to assist college English teaching in China. It also points out the problems currently existing among teachers and students, and puts forward some suggestions and strategies for the improvement of the application of the website.

  9. Flew on Entitlements and Justice

    OpenAIRE

    Peña, Lorenzo

    1989-01-01

    In «Equality, yes, surely; but Justice?», Antony Flew argues that egalitarianism and collectivism are incompatible with the concept of justice, since the usual concept of justice is that of giving everyone his due (or his own). That concept is intrinsically backward-looking; you cannot assign everyone his own by gratuitously presupposing that nothing is his own and that a fresh start is to be made. As against such a view, I maintain that, in a fairly obvio...

  10. Three Liberal Theories of Justice

    OpenAIRE

    Jiří MACHÁČEK

    2013-01-01

    The mail goal of this thesis is to introduce the modern theory of liberal justice with a focus on distributive justice. In addition, the author addresses the issue of value neutrality in the liberal state and the concept of equality in liberal theory. The author presents the concept of "justice as fairness" described by liberal political philosopher John Rawls. Afterwards his concept is subjected to criticism of other contemporary liberal philosophers Robert Nozick and Ronald Dworkin. The aut...

  11. B2B电子商务协作模型研究%Research on B2B Electronic Business Collaboration Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李双庆; 程代杰; 何玲

    2003-01-01

    B2B is an important application form in electronic business, it provides the methods to do business activities through Internet among companies. But the heterogeneous of the information systems between companies makes it difficult in interoperating between them. In this paper, a B2B electronic business collaboration model is proposed, solving the collaboration between heterogeneous business systems by defining the business irformation ontology and describing the hierarchy in business collaboration process.

  12. Developing a primary care research agenda through collaborative efforts - a proposed "6E" model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Ngiap Chuan; Ng, Chirk Jenn; Rosemary, Mitchell; Wahid, Khan; Goh, Lee Gan

    2014-01-01

    Primary care research is at a crossroad in South Pacific. A steering committee comprising a member of WONCA Asia Pacific Regional (APR) council and the President of Fiji College of General Practitioners garnered sponsorship from Fiji Ministry of Health, WONCA APR and pharmaceutical agencies to organize the event in October 2013. This paper describes the processes needed to set up a national primary research agenda through the collaborative efforts of local stakeholders and external facilitators using a test case in South Pacific. The setting was a 2-day primary care research workshop in Fiji. The steering committee invited a team of three external facilitators from the Asia-Pacific region to organize and operationalize the workshop. The eventual participants were 3 external facilitators, 6 local facilitators, and 29 local primary care physicians, academics, and local medical leaders from Fiji and South Pacific Islands. Pre-workshop and main workshop programs were drawn up by the external facilitators, using participants' input of research topics relating to their local clinical issues of interest. Course notes were prepared and distributed before the workshop. In the workshop, proposed research topics were shortlisted by group discussion and consensus. Study designs were proposed, scrutinized, and adopted for further research development. The facilitators reviewed the processes in setting the research agenda after the workshop and conceived the proposed 6E model. These processes can be grouped for easy reference, comprising the pre-workshop stages of "entreat", "enlist", "engage", and the workshop stages of "educe", "empower", and "encapsulate". The 6E model to establish a research agenda is conceptually logical. Its feasibility can be further tested in its application in other situation where research agenda setting is the critical step to improve the quality of primary care.

  13. Social justice in pandemic preparedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBruin, Debra; Liaschenko, Joan; Marshall, Mary Faith

    2012-04-01

    Pandemic influenza planning in the United States violates the demands of social justice in 2 fundamental respects: it embraces the neutrality of procedural justice at the expense of more substantive concern with health disparities, thus perpetuating a predictable and preventable social injustice, and it fails to move beyond lament to practical planning for alleviating barriers to accessing care. A pragmatic social justice approach, addressing both health disparities and access barriers, should inform pandemic preparedness. Achieving social justice goals in pandemic response is challenging, but strategies are available to overcome the obstacles. The public engagement process of one state's pandemic ethics project influenced the development of these strategies.

  14. Teachers' modeling advantage and their modeling effects on college students' learning styles and occupational stereotypes: a case of collaborative teaching in technical courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou, Wen-Bin; Yang, Chao-Chin

    2006-01-01

    In this study, modeling advantage that depicts the likelihood of a teacher model being imitated by students over other competing models in a particular class was developed to differentiate the rival modeling of two kinds of teachers (the technical teachers vs. the lecturing teachers) between college students' learning styles and occupational stereotypes in the collaborative teaching of technical courses. Results of a one-semester longitudinal study indicated that the students perceived a greater modeling advantage of the technical teachers than that of the lecturing teachers. Both the students' learning styles and occupational stereotypes were in accordance with those teachers as their role models. In general, the impact of the teachers' learning styles and occupational stereotypes on students appeared to be mediated by the teachers' modeling advantage. Administrators and curriculum designers should pay attention to the fact that the technical teachers appeared to exhibit greater modeling effects than the lecturing teachers in collaborative teaching.

  15. "Her illness is a project we can work on together": developing a collaborative family-centered intervention model for newly diagnosed multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rintell, David; Melito, Richard

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a model for intervening with families that are addressing a new diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) in one member. The model is collaborative, integrative, and family-centered. It involves both working with the family collaboratively and providing strategies to promote greater collaboration within the family. The model integrates elements of crisis intervention theory, psycho-education, and family-centered approaches. The model was developed with families addressing MS, and was piloted with three families. The intervention was found to improve family members' ability to collaborate with each other. Such increased collaboration may enhance the family's ability to manage long-term illness more effectively, help the family address the impact of the illness on all family members, and generally improve the family's quality of life.

  16. Sensemaking in collaborative networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peronard, Jean-Paul; Brix, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    be redesigned to strengthen the collaboration between companies. To enable this discussion we delve into the sensemaking literature and theory from loosely coupled systems. Our discussion leads to the development of the Balanced Activity System (BAS) model. The paper’s key contribution is the prescriptive BAS...... model that can be used strategically in collaborative networks to redesign or create new joint activities....

  17. Collaboration and E-collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Razmerita, Liana; Kirchner, Kathrin

    2015-01-01

    Understanding student’s perception of collaboration and how collaboration is supported by ICT is important for its efficient use in the classroom. This article aims to investigate how students perceive collaboration and how they use new technologies in collaborative group work. Furthermore, it tr...

  18. Event justice perceptions and employees' reactions: perceptions of social entity justice as a moderator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jaepil

    2008-05-01

    Building on 2 paradigms in organizational justice research and on fairness heuristic theory, the author argues that employees' perceptions about the fairness of social entities (their supervisor and their organization) moderate the relationship between their perceptions about the fairness of specific events and their reactions. A survey of 265 supervisor-employee pairs in 4 companies was conducted to test this argument. Hierarchical linear modeling analyses showed that when employees perceived their organization to be generally fair, this perception moderated the relationship between the perceived justice of a particular event and their reactions to the organization (organizational commitment and organization-directed citizenship behavior). In addition, employees' perceptions of the fairness of their supervisor were found to moderate the relationship between the perceived justice of a particular event and their supervisor-directed responses (trust in managers and supervisor-directed citizenship behavior) and their organization-directed responses. The results suggest that employee attitudes and behavior can be better understood when both event justice perceptions and social entity justice perceptions are considered together. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved.

  19. Research on New Models of the Collaborative Subject Services in Libraries%图书馆协同化学科服务新模式研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万文娟

    2012-01-01

    当前学科服务供需矛盾日益凸显,在学科服务过程中引入协同机制势在必行。协同化学科服务主要有5种新模式,即学科馆员团队内部协作、学科馆员与其他馆员协作、学科馆员与用户代表协作、学科服务馆际协作、学科馆员与书商和数据商协作。图书馆可通过确立共同目标、识别协同机会、评价协同价值、倡导沟通交流、应用高新技术等策略实现协同化学科服务。%Presently, the cOntradiction between the supply and the demand of subject services has become prominent increasingly, so collaborative mechanisms must be introduced in the process of subject services. There are five new models of collaborative subject services such as collaboration between subject librarians, collaboration between subject librarians and other librarians, collaboration between subject librarians and user representatives, collaboration between libraries, collaboration between subject librarians and data providers or booksellers. Libraries could realize collaborative subject services by establishing common goals, identifying collaborative opportunities, evaluating collaborative values, advocating communication and utilizing high technologies.

  20. Student Perceptions of Social Justice and Social Justice Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Harding, Susan R.; Steele, Cheronda; Schulz, Erica; Taha, Farah; Pico, Chantal

    2014-01-01

    Encouraging students to engage in activities that actively seek to promote social justice is a goal of many educators. This study analyzed college student perceptions around social justice and related activities in a medium-sized, urban university in the United States. Students' open-ended responses to questions assessing their perceptions of…