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Sample records for junko yokota william

  1. Williams syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams-Beuren syndrome ... Williams syndrome is caused by not having a copy of several genes. Parents may not have any family history of the condition. However, people with Williams syndrome have a 50% chance of passing the ...

  2. Gas-burning air cooling developed by leading gas enterprises (Toho Gas). Nagoyaka Home Yokota, a nursing home; Ote kakusha ni miru gas reibo no saiyo jirei (Toho Gas). Tokubetsu yogo rojin home `Nagoyaka House Yokota`

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    Described herein is the air-conditioning system for Nagoyaka Home Yokota, a nursing home in Nagoya City. It is a 7-story building with a total floor area of 4,444m{sup 2}. The first and second floors are for common purposes (dinning rooms, bathrooms, etc.), and the upper floors are for a total of 39 residents. The air-conditioning system is divided into two lines, one for the residents and the other for offices, where each office is equipped with an individual heat-pump type air conditioner. The residential rooms are air-conditioned by the gas absorption type cool/hot water generating system (capacity: 120 refrigeration tons) installed on the roof, where each room is equipped with a fan coil unit on the ceiling to allow each resident to control temperature independently. The home is also equipped with gas-burning systems for hot water generators, clothes driers and cookers. These city gas burning systems support comfortableness of the home. 5 figs.

  3. Williams Syndrome and Happiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Karen; Wharton, Robert

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of Williams syndrome, a genetic disorder with a variety of medical and developmental features, focuses on frequent outward expression of happiness. Analysis of the unique expression of happiness in individuals with Williams syndrome is followed by discussion of this happiness in the context of other dimensions of the syndrome,…

  4. William Carlos Williams, Literacy, and the Imagination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemak, Francis E.

    1987-01-01

    Argues that the cultivation of the imagination in schools and colleges is largely ignored because of utilitarian biases in the education system, where achievement is determined by quantitative measures of cognitive skills. Discusses Williams' view that acts of the imagination transform reality and applies view to English education. (JG)

  5. William Harvey's epitaph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutton, Vivian

    2003-05-01

    This paper gives the first published English translation of William Harvey's epitaph. The translation is based on a re-examination of the stone itself, and is accompanied by an explanatory commentary.

  6. Appreciating William Wordsworth's poem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨晨; 袁鸿燕

    2007-01-01

    Through a brief introduction to the basic principles of Romanticism and in-depth analysis of Wordsworth' s representative work "I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud" in terms of writing style, the object of this poem, language features as well as the theme behind it, this paper seeks to identify the fundamental characteristics of William Wordsworth's Romantic writing.

  7. William Wilde: Historian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geary, L

    2016-05-01

    This essay attempts to assess William Wilde as a social historian. It examines some of his contributions to the discipline of history and looks particularly at 'The food of the Irish', which was published in the Dublin University Magazine in February 1854.

  8. William Faulkner, 50 Aniversario

    OpenAIRE

    Biblioteca de Filosofía y Letras

    2012-01-01

    Folleto realizado por la Biblioteca Universitaria de Filosofía y Letras, dentro de su programa de “Otoño de premios”, para la muestra bibliográfica sobre William Faulkner en el 50 aniversario de su muerte.

  9. David Owen WILLIAMS

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Lidy Williams-Oonk and her children Mark & Marietta, being unable to thank everybody individually, would like to express their sincere thanks to friends and colleagues at CERN and abroad for their great help and support, their messages and flowers, as well as their donations to the Ligue Genevoise contre le Cancer, on the death of their beloved husband and father.

  10. Prince William Grows Up!

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    <正> 1 At Eton, william breezed (轻而易轻地取得)through his A-level(大学预科)year.He shined at sport and he was elected by his schoolmates to "POP",the college’s elite prefect’s(英国公学中的级长,班长)club,made up form the eleven most

  11. William Gibson's paternity test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malewitz, Raymond

    2011-01-01

    Contemporary culture views DNA through a strange temporal logic: on the one hand, technologies of DNA identification and sequencing testify to fundamental transformations in the way we understand biology, anthropology, law, and medicine—we live in "the DNA age"; and on the other, these technologies have revealed as much about the past as they have about the present or future, gesturing backwards to scenes of conception, crime, and evolutionary branching. The essay shows how this double temporal logic operates within William Gibson's electronic poem Agrippa. It concludes that the poem's stanzas form a metaphorical DNA fingerprint that reveals Gibson's life to be, paradoxically, a novel repetition of his father's and grandfather's lives.

  12. Goody receives William Bowie Medal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, K. N.; Goody, Richard M.

    Richard M. Goody was awarded the William Bowie Medal at the AGU Spring Meeting Honors Ceremony, which was held on May 27, 1998, in Boston, Massachusetts. The William Bowie Medal recognizes outstanding contributions to fundamental geophysics and unselfish cooperation in research.

  13. Entrevista com William Uricchio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uricchio, William

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available William Uricchio é professor e diretor do Programa de Mídias Comparadas do Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT e professor de História das Mídias Comparadas da Universidade de Utrecht. O pesquisador, referência em estudos sobre mídia e cultura, participou como conferencista no XI Seminário Internacional da Comunicação da PUCRS, quando concedeu uma entrevista exclusiva a Sessões do Imaginário. O evento abordava os cem anos de Marshall McLuhan, assim, aproveitamos a ocasião para abordar algumas questões sobre as idéias deste teórico dos meios de comunicação, além de outros temas que são referencia nos estudos do professor Uricchio

  14. The Status of William Carlos Williams in American Modernism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atashi Laleh

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available William Carlos Williams was an American poet who renounced poetic diction in favor of the unpoetic, establishing himself in American Modernism as a powerful voice distinct from such canonical contemporaries as T.S. Eliot and Ezra Pound. His attitude towards literary production was different from many of his contemporaries in that he believed ‘the idea is in the thing’ and therefore the presence of objects rather than abstractions is strongly felt in his poems. A critical survey of Williams’ poems indicates that the poet/physician observes, describes and levels criticism at his society where modernism has transformed the American identity in significant ways. In this article, American icons and popular culture are retraced in the poetry of William Carlos Williams in an effort to explain the seeming opacity of his poems.

  15. [William Harvey revisited ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinke, Hubert

    2015-07-01

    William Harvey's discovery of the circulation of the blood is often described as a product of the Scientific Revolution of the Seventeenth Century. Modern research has, however, shown thatHarvey followed the Aristotelian research tradition and thus tried to reveal the purpose of the organs through examination of various animals. His publication of 1628 has to be read as an argument of natural philosophy, or, more precisely, as a series of linked observations, experiments and philosophical reasonings from which the existence of circulation has to be deduced as a logical consequence. Harvey did not consider experiments as superior to philosophical reasoning nor intended he to create a new system of medicine. He believed in the vitality of the heart and the blood and rejected Francis Bacon's empirism and the mechanistic rationalism of Descartes. Harvey's contribution and originality lied less in his single observations and experiments but in the manner how he linked them with critical reasoning and how he accepted, presented and defended the ensuing radical findings.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: Williams syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2006 Jan 31. Citation on PubMed or Free article on PubMed Central Eckert MA, Galaburda AM, Mills DL, Bellugi U, Korenberg JR, Reiss AL. The neurobiology of Williams syndrome: cascading influences of visual system ...

  17. The demographic work of Sir William Wilde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froggatt, P

    2016-05-01

    This paper argues that Sir William Wilde was indeed a pioneering demographer. It also describes the unveiling of the plaque commemorating Sir William Wilde at his home, 1, Merrion Square, Dublin on the 28 October 1971.

  18. William Harvey, an Aristotelian anatomist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fara, Patricia

    2007-06-01

    William Harvey has long been celebrated as the founding father of physiology for refuting Galen and demonstrating that blood circulates round the body. Yet after his training at Padua, he became a committed Aristotelian: although strongly influencing the new observational sciences of the seventeenth century, Harvey himself looked back towards the classical past.

  19. Spotlight on William D. Revelli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakeslee, Michael

    1993-01-01

    Reports on an interview with William D. Revelli on the occasion of his inclusion in the Music Educators Hall of Fame. Reviews the history of music education and discusses future issues and trends in the field. Argues for more cooperation among public school music education programs, community music efforts, and college-level music education. (CFR)

  20. 76 FR 22363 - Kaibab National Forest, Williams Ranger District; Arizona; Bill Williams Mountain Restoration...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-21

    ... Forest Service Kaibab National Forest, Williams Ranger District; Arizona; Bill Williams Mountain... forested conditions on and surrounding Bill Williams Mountain by reducing hazardous fuels and moving... approximately 4 miles south-southwest of the city of Williams, Arizona. The Proposed Action includes...

  1. Skin Findings in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozel, Beth A.; Bayliss, Susan J.; Berk, David R.; Waxler, Jessica L; Knutsen, Russell H.; Danback, Joshua R.; Pober, Barbara R.

    2014-01-01

    Previous examination in a small number of individuals with Williams syndrome (also referred to as Williams-Beuren syndrome) has shown subtly softer skin and reduced deposition of elastin, an elastic matrix protein important in tissue recoil. No quantitative information about skin elasticity in individuals with Williams syndrome is available; nor has there been a complete report of dermatologic findings in this population. To fill this knowledge gap, 94 patients with Williams syndrome aged 7-50 years were recruited as part of the Skin and Vascular Elasticity (WS-SAVE) study. They underwent either a clinical dermatologic assessment by trained dermatologists (2010 WSA family meeting) or measurement of biomechanical properties of the skin with the DermaLab™ suction cup (2012 WSA family meeting). Clinical assessment confirmed that soft skin is common in this population (83%), as is premature graying of the hair (80% of those 20 years or older), while wrinkles (92%) and abnormal scarring (33%) were detected in larger than expected proportions. Biomechanical studies detected statistically significant differences in dP (the pressure required to lift the skin), dT (the time required to raise the skin through a prescribed gradient), VE (viscoelasticity) and E (Young’s modulus) relative to matched controls. The RT (retraction time) also trended longer but was not significant. The biomechanical differences noted in these patients did not correlate with the presence of vascular defects also attributable to elastin insufficiency (vascular stiffness, hypertension, and arterial stenosis) suggesting the presence of tissue specific modifiers that modulate the impact of elastin insufficiency in each tissue. PMID:24920525

  2. William Wordsworth and The Daffodils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林雅琴

    2014-01-01

    William Wordsworth is best known for his poem, The Daffodils. This paper traces the origin of daffodils in Greek my-thology, the four important facts in Wordsworth’s life and the poetic theories implied in his poem The Daffodils. The most im-portant part shall be the appreciation and analysis of the poem. During this course, readers may find it difficult to understand Wordsworth’s poetic theories of Romanticism. However this is made easier by asking and answering questions and by comparing Chinese and English Romantic poems.

  3. Feminist Motifs in William Faulkner

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhen

    2015-01-01

    As we all know, William Faulkner shows really concern for the Southern people, especially the Southern women who suffer the most. In Faulkner’s works women characters play an important role, which is confirmed. After the theories of feminist literary come to understand Faulkner criticism, critics to Faulkner’s novels drafting an encouraging response detect the author himself either as a pro-feminist or a misogynist. On analyzing the woman characters through Addie and Lena Grove—the wom⁃en images in As I Lay Dying and Light in August, we found out that Faulkner is neither simple a pro-feminist nor a misogynist in the patriarchal society.

  4. Stretching Exercises: Range of Motion and Emotion in Four Poems by William Carlos Williams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenhart, Gary

    1998-01-01

    Discusses four poems by William Carlos Williams used to teach creative writing to college students. Uses "Portrait of a Woman in Red" and "The Last Words of My English Grandmother" because they contain speakers who are clearly not the poet, which gives undergraduate students opportunities to discuss details Williams uses to…

  5. William Wilde: his contribution to otology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, M

    2016-05-01

    Sir William Wilde pioneered the epidemiology of deafness. He set otology on a firm scientific basis by applying the principles established by Robert Graves and William Stokes of the Dublin School of Medicine of correlating clinical observation with post-mortem findings and utilising this information as a framework for therapeutic intervention.

  6. William Russell on Schools in Bulgaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Nikolay; Sabic-El-Rayess, Amra

    2013-01-01

    William Russell became one of the most influential educators in the field of international and comparative education in the first half of the 20th century. In 1914, William Russell obtained his PhD from Teachers College and, within few years, became a prominent figure internationally. He traveled through Europe and taught in Japan and Siberia, as…

  7. A human neurodevelopmental model for Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chailangkarn, Thanathom; Trujillo, Cleber A; Freitas, Beatriz C; Hrvoj-Mihic, Branka; Herai, Roberto H; Yu, Diana X; Brown, Timothy T; Marchetto, Maria C; Bardy, Cedric; McHenry, Lauren; Stefanacci, Lisa; Järvinen, Anna; Searcy, Yvonne M; DeWitt, Michelle; Wong, Wenny; Lai, Philip; Ard, M Colin; Hanson, Kari L; Romero, Sarah; Jacobs, Bob; Dale, Anders M; Dai, Li; Korenberg, Julie R; Gage, Fred H; Bellugi, Ursula; Halgren, Eric; Semendeferi, Katerina; Muotri, Alysson R

    2016-08-18

    Williams syndrome is a genetic neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by an uncommon hypersociability and a mosaic of retained and compromised linguistic and cognitive abilities. Nearly all clinically diagnosed individuals with Williams syndrome lack precisely the same set of genes, with breakpoints in chromosome band 7q11.23 (refs 1-5). The contribution of specific genes to the neuroanatomical and functional alterations, leading to behavioural pathologies in humans, remains largely unexplored. Here we investigate neural progenitor cells and cortical neurons derived from Williams syndrome and typically developing induced pluripotent stem cells. Neural progenitor cells in Williams syndrome have an increased doubling time and apoptosis compared with typically developing neural progenitor cells. Using an individual with atypical Williams syndrome, we narrowed this cellular phenotype to a single gene candidate, frizzled 9 (FZD9). At the neuronal stage, layer V/VI cortical neurons derived from Williams syndrome were characterized by longer total dendrites, increased numbers of spines and synapses, aberrant calcium oscillation and altered network connectivity. Morphometric alterations observed in neurons from Williams syndrome were validated after Golgi staining of post-mortem layer V/VI cortical neurons. This model of human induced pluripotent stem cells fills the current knowledge gap in the cellular biology of Williams syndrome and could lead to further insights into the molecular mechanism underlying the disorder and the human social brain.

  8. William Carlos Williams (1883-1963): physician-writer and "godfather of avant garde poetry".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, R

    1999-05-01

    William Carlos Williams, Pulitzer Prize-winning physician-writer, was born in Rutherford, New Jersey, where he practiced medicine until he was incapacitated by a stroke at age 68. After graduating from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Williams trained in New York City and Leipzig, Germany, settling in Rutherford in 1909. Doctor Williams revolutionized American poetry by rejecting traditional conventions of rhyme and meter, and he masterfully used "American" English-brusque, colloquial, and incisive-in his poetry. Williams is recognized as one of the most original poets of the 20th century. His medical life sometimes trivialized, Williams was a serious student of medicine and considered himself "in the front lines, in the trenches." He regarded art and medicine as "two parts of a whole," and the intimate doctor-patient interface proved a powerful inspiration for his writing. Dr Williams was a physician of immense integrity and dedication; he regarded allegiance to humanism as important as excellence in medical science. Prolific in various genre, Dr William Carlos Williams attained belated recognition in spite of astonishing productivity and originality. His stature and influence has steadily increased since his death in 1963, and Dr Williams is now considered "the most important literary doctor since Chekhov."

  9. Analysis of Ambuscade of William Faulkner

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘冠华; 胡树红

    2012-01-01

      Being an outstanding writer in the history of American literature, William Faulkner had many works in his life, many of them are known by Chinese readers. But Ambuscade, as one of them, was analyzed fewer. This short story is different from other works of William Faulkner .In this essay, writer analyzes William Faulkner’s Ambuscade from four aspects:characters, dialogue style, writing skills and the theme expression so that readers can have a whole new perspective to enjoy Faulkner’s work.

  10. William Harvey, Aristotle and astrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Andrew

    2014-06-01

    In this paper I argue that William Harvey believed in a form of astrology. It has long been known that Harvey employed a macrocosm-microcosm analogy and used alchemical terminology in describing how the two types of blood change into one another. This paper then seeks to examine a further aspect of Harvey in relation to the magical tradition. There is an important corollary to this line of thought, however. This is that while Harvey does have a belief in astrology, it is strongly related to Aristotle's views in this area and is quite restricted and attenuated relative to some contemporary beliefs in astrology. This suggests a more general thesis. While Harvey was amenable to ideas which we associate with the natural magic tradition, those ideas had a very broad range of formulation and there was a limit to how far he would accept them. This limit was largely determined by Harvey's adherence to Aristotle's natural philosophy and his Christian beliefs. I argue that this is also the case in relation to Harvey's use of the macrocosm-microcosm analogy and of alchemical terminology, and, as far as we can rely on the evidence, this informs his attitudes towards witches as well. Understanding Harvey's influences and motives here is important in placing him properly in the context of early seventeenth-century thought.

  11. William Friedman, Geneticist Turned Cryptographer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Irwin L

    2017-05-01

    William Friedman (1891-1969), trained as a plant geneticist at Cornell University, was employed at Riverbank Laboratories by the eccentric millionaire George Fabyan to work on wheat breeding. Friedman, however, soon became intrigued by and started working on a pet project of Fabyan's involving the conjecture that Francis Bacon, a polymath known for the study of ciphers, was the real author of Shakespeare's plays. Thus, beginning in ∼1916, Friedman turned his attention to the so called "Baconian cipher," and developed decryption techniques that bore similarity to approaches for solving problems in population genetics. His most significant, indeed pathbreaking, work used ideas from genetics and statistics, focusing on analysis of the frequencies of letters in language use. Although he had transitioned from being a geneticist to a cryptographer, his earlier work had resonance in his later pursuits. He soon began working directly for the United States government and produced solutions used to solve complex military ciphers, in particular to break the Japanese Purple code during World War II. Another important legacy of his work was the establishment of the Signal Intelligence Service and eventually the National Security Agency. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  12. William Band at Yenching University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Danian

    2008-04-01

    William Band (1906-1993) has been widely remembered by his American colleagues and students as ``a fine physicist and teacher,'' who taught at Washington State University in Pullman between 1949 and 1971 and authored Introduction to Quantum Statistics (1954) and Introduction to Mathematical Physics (1959). Not many, however, knew much about Band's early career, which was very ``uncommon and eventful.'' Born in England, Band graduated from University of Liverpool in 1927 with an MsSc degree in physics. Instead of pursuing his Ph.D. at Cambridge, he chose to teach physics at Yenching University, a prestigious Christian university in Beijing, China. Arriving in 1929, Band established his career at Yenching, where he taught and researched the theory of relativity and quantum mechanics, pioneered the study on low-temperature superconductivity in China, founded the country's first graduate program in physics, and chaired the Physics Department for 10 years until he fled from Yenching upon hearing of the attack on Pearl Harbor. It took him two years to cross Japanese occupied areas under the escort of the Communist force; he left China in early 1945. This presentation will explore Band's motivation to work in China and his contributions to the Chinese physics research and education.

  13. David Owen Williams (1944 - 2006)

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Many people, not only at CERN but also throughout the world, were saddened to learn that their friend and colleague David Williams had passed away in the early hours of Tuesday 24 October. His death came after a year of fighting cancer with all of his usual determination and optimism. Even days before the end he was still welcoming to visitors, and was alert and interested in all their news. Born in 1944, David came to CERN from the University of Cambridge in 1966, with a degree in Physics and Computer Science. Joining what at the time was called the Documents and Data (DD) Division, in the earlier part his career he worked first on software for analysis of bubble chamber photographs, subsequently leading the group that supported experiments with 'hybrids' of bubble chambers and electronic detectors and then the group supporting online computing in experiments. He thus witnessed all of the enormous changes that took place in particle physics as the era of bubble chambers came to an end and the availability ...

  14. AMS DAYs 2015 - Interview William H. Gerstenmaier

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    William H. Gerstenmaier, associate administrator for the Human Exploration and Operations Directorate at NASA, tells about the science aat the International Space Station and the tasks to be performed to make sure the AMS detector, installed on the main

  15. Prince William Sound, Alaska ESI: INDEX

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for Prince William Sound, Alaska. ESI data characterize estuarine environments and wildlife by...

  16. Sir William Wilde: an enlightened editor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Doherty, M

    2016-05-01

    This paper examines Sir William Wilde's peculiar genius as editor, his contribution to the Irish Journal of Medical Science in ensuring its endurance and making it a treasure-house of the history of medicine in Ireland.

  17. Prince William Sound, Alaska ESI: HYDRO (Hydrology)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for Prince William Sound, Alaska. ESI data characterize estuarine environments and wildlife by...

  18. Cognitive heterogeneity in Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Melanie A; Coltheart, Max

    2005-01-01

    This study used the Woodcock-Johnson Tests of Cognitive Ability-Revised to investigate a wide range of cognitive abilities in people with Williams syndrome (WS). It involved a comparatively large sample of 31 people with WS, but took a case-series approach. The study addressed the widespread claims of a characteristic "WS cognitive profile" by looking for heterogeneity rather than homogeneity. People with WS showed a variety of preserved (significantly above mental age [MA]), expected (at MA), and significantly impaired (significantly below MA) levels of functioning. Such results provide clear evidence for heterogeneity in cognitive functions within WS. We found the most homogeneity on a test of phonological processing and a test of phonological short-term memory, with half of the WS sample performing at MA levels on these tests. Interestingly, no WS individual showed a weakness on a test of nonverbal reasoning, and only one WS individual showed a weakness on a test of verbal comprehension. In addition, we found that strengths on analysis-synthesis and verbal analogies occurred only for WS individuals with an MA less than 5.5 years (our sample median MA); people with an MA greater than 5.5 years performed at MA level on these 2 tests. Results also provided preliminary evidence for distinct subgroups of WS people based on their cognitive strengths and weaknesses on a broad range of cognitive functions. On the basis of the findings, caution should be made in declaring a single cognitive profile that is characteristic of all individuals with WS. Just as there is heterogeneity in genetic and physical anomalies within WS, not all WS individuals share the same cognitive strengths and weaknesses. Also, not all WS individuals show the profile of a strength in verbal abilities and a weakness in spatial functions.

  19. Williams-Beuren's Syndrome: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Zamani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Williams-Beuren syndrome is a rare familial multisystem disorder occurring in 1 per 20,000 live births. It is characterized by congenital heart defects (CHD, skeletal and renal anomalies, cognitive disorder, social personality disorder and dysmorphic facies. We present a case of Williams syndrome that presented to us with heart murmur and cognitive problem. A 5-year-old girl referred to pediatric cardiologist because of heart murmurs. She had a systolic murmur (2-3/6 in right upper sternal border with radiation to right cervical region. She also had a bulge forehead. Angiography showed mild supra valvular aortic stenosis and mild multiple peripheral pulmonary stenosis. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH was performed and the result was: 46.XX, ish del (7q11.2 (ELN X1 (7q22 X2 ELN deletion compatible with Williams syndrome. Peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis is associated with Noonan syndrome, Alagille syndrome, Cutis laxa, Ehler-Danlos syndrome, and Silver-Russel syndrome. The patient had peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis, but no other signs of these syndromes were present, and also she had a supravalvular aortic stenosis which was not seen in other syndromes except Williams syndrome. Conclusion. According to primary symptoms, paraclinical and clinical finding such as dysmorphic facies, cognitive disorder and congenital heart defect, Williams syndrome was the first diagnosis. We suggest a more attention for evaluating heart murmur in childhood period, especially when the patient has abnormal facial features or mental problem.

  20. Williams-Beuren's Syndrome: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, Hassan; Babazadeh, Kazem; Fattahi, Saeid; Mokhtari-Esbuie, Farzad

    2012-01-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome is a rare familial multisystem disorder occurring in 1 per 20,000 live births. It is characterized by congenital heart defects (CHD), skeletal and renal anomalies, cognitive disorder, social personality disorder and dysmorphic facies. We present a case of Williams syndrome that presented to us with heart murmur and cognitive problem. A 5-year-old girl referred to pediatric cardiologist because of heart murmurs. She had a systolic murmur (2-3/6) in right upper sternal border with radiation to right cervical region. She also had a bulge forehead. Angiography showed mild supra valvular aortic stenosis and mild multiple peripheral pulmonary stenosis. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was performed and the result was: 46.XX, ish del (7q11.2) (ELN X1) (7q22 X2) ELN deletion compatible with Williams syndrome. Peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis is associated with Noonan syndrome, Alagille syndrome, Cutis laxa, Ehler-Danlos syndrome, and Silver-Russel syndrome. The patient had peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis, but no other signs of these syndromes were present, and also she had a supravalvular aortic stenosis which was not seen in other syndromes except Williams syndrome. Conclusion. According to primary symptoms, paraclinical and clinical finding such as dysmorphic facies, cognitive disorder and congenital heart defect, Williams syndrome was the first diagnosis. We suggest a more attention for evaluating heart murmur in childhood period, especially when the patient has abnormal facial features or mental problem.

  1. Social Cognition in Williams Syndrome: Face Tuning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlova, Marina A; Heiz, Julie; Sokolov, Alexander N; Barisnikov, Koviljka

    2016-01-01

    Many neurological, neurodevelopmental, neuropsychiatric, and psychosomatic disorders are characterized by impairments in visual social cognition, body language reading, and facial assessment of a social counterpart. Yet a wealth of research indicates that individuals with Williams syndrome exhibit remarkable concern for social stimuli and face fascination. Here individuals with Williams syndrome were presented with a set of Face-n-Food images composed of food ingredients and in different degree resembling a face (slightly bordering on the Giuseppe Arcimboldo style). The primary advantage of these images is that single components do not explicitly trigger face-specific processing, whereas in face images commonly used for investigating face perception (such as photographs or depictions), the mere occurrence of typical cues already implicates face presence. In a spontaneous recognition task, participants were shown a set of images in a predetermined order from the least to most resembling a face. Strikingly, individuals with Williams syndrome exhibited profound deficits in recognition of the Face-n-Food images as a face: they did not report seeing a face on the images, which typically developing controls effortlessly recognized as a face, and gave overall fewer face responses. This suggests atypical face tuning in Williams syndrome. The outcome is discussed in the light of a general pattern of social cognition in Williams syndrome and brain mechanisms underpinning face processing.

  2. Social cognition in Williams syndrome: face tuning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina A Pavlova

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Many neurological, neurodevelopmental, neuropsychiatric and psychosomatic disorders are characterized by impairments in visual social cognition, body language reading, and facial assessment of a social counterpart. Yet a wealth of research indicates that individuals with Williams syndrome exhibit remarkable concern for social stimuli and face fascination. Here individuals with Williams syndrome were presented with a set of Face-n-Food images composed of food ingredients and in different degree resembling a face (slightly bordering on the Giuseppe Arcimboldo style. The primary advantage of these images is that single components do not explicitly trigger face-specific processing, whereas in face images commonly used for investigating face perception (such as photographs or depictions, the mere occurrence of typical cues already implicates face presence. In a spontaneous recognition task, participants were shown a set of images in a predetermined order from the least to most resembling a face. Strikingly, individuals with Williams syndrome exhibited profound deficits in recognition of the Face-n-Food images as a face: they did not report seeing a face on the images, which typically developing controls effortlessly recognized as a face, and gave overall fewer face responses. This suggests atypical face tuning in Williams syndrome. The outcome is discussed in the light of a general pattern of social cognition in Williams syndrome and brain mechanisms underpinning face processing.

  3. Language and communicative development in Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mervis, Carolyn B; Becerra, Angela M

    2007-01-01

    Williams syndrome, a genetic disorder caused by a microdeletion of approximately 25 genes on chromosome 7q11.23, is associated with mild to moderate intellectual disability or learning difficulties. Most individuals with Williams syndrome evidence a cognitive profile including relative strengths in verbal short-term memory and language, and considerable weakness in visuospatial construction. The syndrome has often been argued to provide strong evidence for the independence of language from other aspects of cognition. We provide a brief history of early research on the language abilities of individuals with Williams syndrome and then review contemporary studies of language and cognition in Williams syndrome, beginning with a consideration of performance on standardized assessments. In the remainder of the article, we first consider early language acquisition, with a focus on speech production and perception, vocabulary acquisition, and communicative/pragmatic development and then consider the language abilities of school-age children and adolescents, focusing on semantics, grammar, and pragmatics. We argue that rather than being the paradigm case for the independence of language from cognition, Williams syndrome provides strong evidence of the interdependence of many aspects of language and cognition.

  4. A Brief Analysis on William Blake's London

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张莉; 尚彦飞

    2014-01-01

    William Blake (1757-1827) is a renowned British poet in the 18th century. His lyric poems display the characteristics of romantic spirit, and he is regarded as the forefather of the British Romanticism. His London is a well-known lyric poetry, which is thought to be the best vesicle in the West. This paper will analyse this poem in terms of its form, theme, and im-age and then draw a brief conclusion for the characteristics of William Blake's poem.

  5. Tidens Rytmik. Dante Alighieri, William Carlos Williams' Prosodi og Michel Serres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stougaard-Nielsen, Jakob

    2006-01-01

      Artiklen diskuterer William Carlos Williams' poetik og hans lyriske eksperimenter i tilknytning til begreberne 'den variable fod' og 'det triadiske vers'. Den argumenterer for, at Williams' poetik kan opfattes både som et forsøg på at vitalisere et typografisk styret poetisk  sprog og som del a...... et større projekt om at frembringe en poetisk stemme, som korresponderer med modernitetens rytmer og temporalitet. Ezra Pound, George Antheil, Einstein og Michel Serres bliver i denne forbindelse taget med i billedet. ...

  6. Dr. William C. Harris, Director-General, Science Foundation Ireland

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    Photo 01: Dr William C. Harris, Director-General, Science Foundation Ireland (left) with R. Cashmore. Photos 02, 03: Dr William C. Harris, Director-General, Science Foundation Ireland signing the CERN guest book with R. Cashmore.

  7. Who Was the Real William Shakespeare?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Michael Todd

    2009-01-01

    This article highlights a project that encourages students to connect reading and mathematics instruction by using a data analysis approach. Students analyze sonnets from statistical, literary, and historical points of view in an effort to uncover the true identity of William Shakespeare. (Contains 10 figures.)

  8. Attribution of Negative Intention in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godbee, Kali; Porter, Melanie A.

    2013-01-01

    People with Williams syndrome (WS) are said to have sociable and extremely trusting personalities, approaching strangers without hesitation. This study investigated whether people with WS are less likely than controls to attribute negative intent to others when interpreting a series of ambiguous pictures. This may, at least partially, explain…

  9. William James Sidis, The Broken Twig

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montour, Kathleen

    1977-01-01

    By presenting cases of prodigies who entered college as early as William James Bidis but who succeeded, this paper attempts to dissuade the public from its opposition to educational acceleration for precocious children, to which the "Sidis fallacy" has helped give rise. (Author)

  10. Executive Function in Williams and Down Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Daniel P. J.; Brown, Janice H.; Henry, Lucy A.

    2013-01-01

    Williams (WS) and Down (DS) syndromes are characterised by roughly opposing ability profiles. Relative verbal strengths and visuospatial difficulties have been reported in those with WS, while expressive language difficulties have been observed in individuals with DS. Few investigations into the executive function (EF) skills of these groups have…

  11. Syukuro Manabe Receives 2010 William Bowie Medal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broccoli, Anthony J.; Manabe, Syukuro

    2011-01-01

    Syukuro Manabe was awarded the 2010 William Bowie Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, held on 15 December 2010 in San Francisco, Calif. The medal is for “outstanding contributions to fundamental geophysics and for unselfish cooperation in research.”

  12. Aki receives 2004 William Bowie Medal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Thomas H.; Aki, Keiiti

    Keiiti Aki was awarded the 2004 William Bowie Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, which was held on 15 December 2004, in San Francisco, California. The medal recognizes “outstanding contributions to fundamental geophysics and for unselfish cooperation in research”

  13. Allegre receives the William Bowie Medal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Don L.

    The 1995 William Bowie Medal, given by AGU for outstanding contributions to fundamental geophysics and for unselfish cooperation in research, was presented to Claude Allègre at the AGU Spring Meeting Honor Ceremony on May 31 in Baltimore. The award citation is given here.

  14. Solomon Receives 2007 William Bowie Medal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasseur, Guy; Solomon, Susan

    2008-01-01

    Susan Solomon was awarded the 2007 William Bowie Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, which was held on 12 December 2007 in San Francisco, Calif. The medal is for ``outstanding contributions to fundamental geophysics and for unselfish cooperation in research.''

  15. The world in eighteen lessons: Christopher Williams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berrebi, S.

    2011-01-01

    Conceptual photographer Christopher Williams is a real artist's artist. Ever since he moved to Germany, his measured work, which both reveres and examines the art of photography, has more and more easily found its way into European art institutes, such as this spring at Museum Dhondt-Dhaenens in Deu

  16. Denigrating Carl Rogers: William Coulson's Last Crusade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschenbaum, Howard

    1991-01-01

    Reviews William Coulson's assertions that Carl Rogers, Abraham Maslow, and he initiated the humanistic education field, that Rogers repudiated his philosophy late in life, and that they owe the nation's parents an apology. Argues that these charges are groundless and provides examples and quotations from Rogers' later writings to show how Rogers…

  17. Stranger Danger Awareness in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riby, D. M.; Kirk, H.; Hanley, M.; Riby, L. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The developmental disorder Williams syndrome (WS) is characterised by a distinctive cognitive profile and an intriguing social phenotype. Individuals with the disorder are often highly social engaging with familiar and unfamiliar people and once in an interaction they often show subtle abnormalities of social behaviour. Atypically…

  18. WILLIAM GOLDING'S NOVEL--THE BACKWARD LOOK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    PECK, CAROL FAULKNER

    THE "SURPRISE ENDINGS" IN EACH OF WILLIAM GOLDING'S FIRST FOUR NOVELS OCCUR WHEN THE POINT OF VIEW SHIFTS FROM THE LIMITED WORLD OF THE NOVEL TO THE UNLIMITED WORLD OF REALITY. THE BOYS' RESCUE BY THE UNCOMPREHENDING OFFICER IN "LORD OF THE FLIES," REFOCUSES AND REINFORCES ALL THAT PRECEDES IT, AND THE FABLE, SUPERIMPOSED UPON REAL LIFE, BECOMES…

  19. Nature and Nurture: Williams Syndrome across Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zitzer-Comfort, Carol; Doyle, Teresa; Masataka, Nobuo; Korenberg, Julie; Bellugi, Ursula

    2007-01-01

    This study is concerned with ways in which children with Williams syndrome (WS), a rare neurodevelopmental disorder arising from a hemizygous deletion in chromosome band 7q11.23 including the gene for elastin (ELN) and approximately 20 surrounding genes, are affected by social mores of vastly differing cultures: the United States and Japan. WS…

  20. Who Was the Real William Shakespeare?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Michael Todd

    2009-01-01

    This article highlights a project that encourages students to connect reading and mathematics instruction by using a data analysis approach. Students analyze sonnets from statistical, literary, and historical points of view in an effort to uncover the true identity of William Shakespeare. (Contains 10 figures.)

  1. 77 FR 76414 - William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-28

    ... ID ED-2008-OPE-0009] William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program AGENCY: Department of Education... (FFEL) Program; and the William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan (Direct Loan) Program, including the Public... for Postsecondary Education. Accordingly, 34 CFR part 685 is corrected as follows: PART 685--WILLIAM...

  2. 78 FR 28953 - William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-16

    ... May 16, 2013 Part II Department of Education 34 CFR Part 685 William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan... Regulations#0;#0; ] DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 34 CFR Part 685 RIN 1840-AD13 William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan...; request for comments. SUMMARY: The Secretary amends the William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan...

  3. William Harvey, Peter Lauremberg and cardiac output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichmann, G

    1992-11-01

    In 1636, the Rostock professor of medicine and the art of poetry, Peter Lauremberg (1585-1639), was one of the earliest to mention circulation which had been discovered by William Harvey and documented in his anatomical manual. In 1628 William Harvey proved the existence of the blood circulation by calculating the "cardiac output in a half an hour (semihora)". The answer to the question why Harvey chose half an hour as the time range can be found in the way of measuring time usual at that period. The sandglasses were turned half-hourly in maritime navigation and the wheel-clocks on shore had only the hour-hand. Improved chronometry was one of the prerequisites for measuring cardiac output. The minute-hand became usual after 1700 and the second-hand later on. Taking into consideration the alterations of cardiac output made the latter one of the most important circulation parameters in diagnostics, prognostication and therapeutics.

  4. Rorty, Williams, and Davidson: Skepticism and Metaepistemology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Ranalli

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We revisit an important exchange on the problem of radical skepticism between Richard Rorty and Michael Williams. In his contribution to this exchange, Rorty defended the kind of transcendental approach to radical skepticism that is offered by Donald Davidson, in contrast to Williams’s Wittgenstein-inspired view. It is argued that the key to evaluating this debate is to understand the particular conception of the radical skeptical problem that is offered in influential work by Barry Stroud, a conception of the skeptical problem which generates metaepistemological ramifications for anti-skeptical theories. In particular, we argue that, contra Williams, Rorty’s view that Davidson was offering a theoretical diagnosis of radical skepticism can be consistently maintained with his transcendental approach.

  5. William Wilde and 1 Merrion Square.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEntegart, R

    2016-05-01

    William Wilde spent the final third of his life, from 1855 to 1876, in 1 Merrion Square. During the first half of his occupancy of the house his career blossomed to its fullest; the second decade, on the other hand, was marked by scandal, personal tragedy, and an unhappy professional and social decline. This paper considers the background to the development of Merrion Square, the architectural history of 1 Merrion Square from its building in 1762 to the arrival of the Wildes in 1855, the attractions and possibilities which the house offered for William Wilde, the major architectural expansion of the building which he commissioned in 1859, and aspects of his and his family's life in the house.

  6. Learning by observation: insights from Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foti, Francesca; Menghini, Deny; Mandolesi, Laura; Federico, Francesca; Vicari, Stefano; Petrosini, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Observing another person performing a complex action accelerates the observer's acquisition of the same action and limits the time-consuming process of learning by trial and error. Observational learning makes an interesting and potentially important topic in the developmental domain, especially when disorders are considered. The implications of studies aimed at clarifying whether and how this form of learning is spared by pathology are manifold. We focused on a specific population with learning and intellectual disabilities, the individuals with Williams syndrome. The performance of twenty-eight individuals with Williams syndrome was compared with that of mental age- and gender-matched thirty-two typically developing children on tasks of learning of a visuo-motor sequence by observation or by trial and error. Regardless of the learning modality, acquiring the correct sequence involved three main phases: a detection phase, in which participants discovered the correct sequence and learned how to perform the task; an exercise phase, in which they reproduced the sequence until performance was error-free; an automatization phase, in which by repeating the error-free sequence they became accurate and speedy. Participants with Williams syndrome beneficiated of observational training (in which they observed an actor detecting the visuo-motor sequence) in the detection phase, while they performed worse than typically developing children in the exercise and automatization phases. Thus, by exploiting competencies learned by observation, individuals with Williams syndrome detected the visuo-motor sequence, putting into action the appropriate procedural strategies. Conversely, their impaired performances in the exercise phases appeared linked to impaired spatial working memory, while their deficits in automatization phases to deficits in processes increasing efficiency and speed of the response. Overall, observational experience was advantageous for acquiring competencies

  7. A Williams' Decomposition for Spatially Dependent Superprocesses

    CERN Document Server

    Delmas, Jean-Francois

    2011-01-01

    We present a genealogy for superprocesses with a non-homogeneous quadratic branching mechanism, relying on a weighted version of the superprocess and a Girsanov theorem. We then decompose this genealogy with respect to the last individual alive (William's decomposition). Letting the extinction time tend to infinity, we get the Q-process by looking at the superprocess from the root, and define another process by looking from the top. Examples including the multitype Feller diff usion and the superdiffusion are provided.

  8. Learning by observation: insights from Williams syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Foti

    Full Text Available Observing another person performing a complex action accelerates the observer's acquisition of the same action and limits the time-consuming process of learning by trial and error. Observational learning makes an interesting and potentially important topic in the developmental domain, especially when disorders are considered. The implications of studies aimed at clarifying whether and how this form of learning is spared by pathology are manifold. We focused on a specific population with learning and intellectual disabilities, the individuals with Williams syndrome. The performance of twenty-eight individuals with Williams syndrome was compared with that of mental age- and gender-matched thirty-two typically developing children on tasks of learning of a visuo-motor sequence by observation or by trial and error. Regardless of the learning modality, acquiring the correct sequence involved three main phases: a detection phase, in which participants discovered the correct sequence and learned how to perform the task; an exercise phase, in which they reproduced the sequence until performance was error-free; an automatization phase, in which by repeating the error-free sequence they became accurate and speedy. Participants with Williams syndrome beneficiated of observational training (in which they observed an actor detecting the visuo-motor sequence in the detection phase, while they performed worse than typically developing children in the exercise and automatization phases. Thus, by exploiting competencies learned by observation, individuals with Williams syndrome detected the visuo-motor sequence, putting into action the appropriate procedural strategies. Conversely, their impaired performances in the exercise phases appeared linked to impaired spatial working memory, while their deficits in automatization phases to deficits in processes increasing efficiency and speed of the response. Overall, observational experience was advantageous for

  9. Sydafrikanske William S. Mazwis Lebenslauf (ca. 1928)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, Anne Folke

    2008-01-01

    Gennem teoretiske indsigter lånt fra psykologi, pædagogik, filosofi, lingvistik og litteraturvidenskab reflekteres over de metodologiske udfordringer, der kan møde forskeren i analyser af tekster produceret af den 'Anden'. I artiklen fokuseres på den herrnhutiske missionskirke i Sydafrika i begyn...... begyndelsen af det 20. århundrede, og den sorte herrnhuterpræst William S. Mazwis levnedsbeskrivelse analyseres som et eksempel på autoetnografisk selv-subjektivering. Udgivelsesdato: December...

  10. Learning by Observation: Insights from Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandolesi, Laura; Federico, Francesca; Vicari, Stefano; Petrosini, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Observing another person performing a complex action accelerates the observer’s acquisition of the same action and limits the time-consuming process of learning by trial and error. Observational learning makes an interesting and potentially important topic in the developmental domain, especially when disorders are considered. The implications of studies aimed at clarifying whether and how this form of learning is spared by pathology are manifold. We focused on a specific population with learning and intellectual disabilities, the individuals with Williams syndrome. The performance of twenty-eight individuals with Williams syndrome was compared with that of mental age- and gender-matched thirty-two typically developing children on tasks of learning of a visuo-motor sequence by observation or by trial and error. Regardless of the learning modality, acquiring the correct sequence involved three main phases: a detection phase, in which participants discovered the correct sequence and learned how to perform the task; an exercise phase, in which they reproduced the sequence until performance was error-free; an automatization phase, in which by repeating the error-free sequence they became accurate and speedy. Participants with Williams syndrome beneficiated of observational training (in which they observed an actor detecting the visuo-motor sequence) in the detection phase, while they performed worse than typically developing children in the exercise and automatization phases. Thus, by exploiting competencies learned by observation, individuals with Williams syndrome detected the visuo-motor sequence, putting into action the appropriate procedural strategies. Conversely, their impaired performances in the exercise phases appeared linked to impaired spatial working memory, while their deficits in automatization phases to deficits in processes increasing efficiency and speed of the response. Overall, observational experience was advantageous for acquiring competencies

  11. William Wilde in the West of Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coakley, D

    2016-05-01

    It is widely believed that Sir William Wilde's forebears were in Ireland for just two or three generations. This belief stems from a number of short biographies of Wilde which were published during his lifetime. These biographies gave different versions of the origin of the Wilde family and appear to have been generated by the creative imagination of Lady Jane Wilde or, as she was better known by her nom de plume, Speranza. She was equally imaginative in creating narratives about her own family background and in one she claimed descent from the Italian poet Dante Alighieri. So it was not a great challenge for her to invent biographies of her husband which she deemed suitable for a knight living at the prestigious address of 1 Merrion Square, leading many to believe that William and his son Oscar were more English than Irish. It was also important for Speranza to distance Sir William from any connection which the Wilde family might have had with trade. In this paper published and unpublished material are used, together with a careful examination of family deeds in the Registry of Deeds office, to elucidate the real roots of the Wilde family in Dublin and in the West of Ireland.

  12. William Walker en Centroamérica

    OpenAIRE

    Medaglia Gómez, Marco Aurelio

    2007-01-01

    La campaña Nacional (1856-1857) tuvo su origen en la presencia de los filibusteros en Nicaragua. William Walker fue el mayor representante de la política del “Destino Manifiesto” de los Estados Unidos a mediados del siglo XIX. Esto se manifiesta en sus incursiones en Baja California y Sonora y más tarde en Nicaragua y sus pretensiones sobre Centroamérica. La llamada “falange americana” encarna los intereses de los estados sureños que pretendían mantener su modelo económico basado en la esclav...

  13. Gilbert receives 1999 William Bowie Medal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turekian, Karl K.; Gilbert, J. Freeman

    J. Freeman Gilbert was awarded the William Bowie Medal at the AGU Spring Meeting Honors Ceremony, which was held on June 2, 1999, in Boston, Massachusetts. The medal recognizes outstanding contributions to fundamental geophysics and unselfish cooperation in research.Freeman Gilbert was a geophysical pioneer, even as a student at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he used the Whirlwind computer to apply computational methods to seismic problems. Later at the Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics (IGPP),at the University of California, Los Angeles, where he began his professional university career, he wrote a series of papers on the computation of synthetic seismograms in simple media.

  14. #194050 WILLIAMS-BEUREN SYNDROME; WBS [OMIM

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available social use of language. Many patients sing or play musical instruments with cons...ajority living at home with parents and attending a day center. Lenhoff et al. (1997) described the remarkable music...assorted folktales were often musicians and storytellers. Gosch and Pankau (1994)...s normally in the rostrocaudal direction. Lenhoff et al. (2001) evaluated 5 patients with Williams syndrome for absolute music...al pitch (AP; see 159300), which is the ability to recognize, name, and reproduce the pitch of a music

  15. Walter C. Williams (1919-1995)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1954-01-01

    Walter C. Williams was Chief of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics' and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's flight research organization on Edwards Air Force Base until his appointment as Associate Director of Project Mercury on September 15, 1959. Walt had started his career with NACA at Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory in 1939 as an engineer in the Flight Division. In 1946 he transferred to the Muroc Army Air Field to be in charge of the small group of technicians and engineers who would be doing the flight research on a joint NACA-Army Air Forces program involving the rocket-powered Bell XS-1. See photo DIRECTORS E-49-0170, which addresses the first eight years of Walt's responsibilities with NACA. Williams' achievements as Chief of the NACA/NASA High-Speed Flight Station for the next five years continued to be significant. NACA pilot Joseph A. Walker made the first of 20 NACA research flights in the Douglas X-3 'Flying Stiletto'--on which inertial coupling was first experience--in 1954. The first NACA flight in an Lockheed F-104A aircraft occurred on August 27, 1956. On October 15, 1958, the first of three North American X-15 rocket research aircraft arrived at NASA High Speed Flight Station as preparations moved ahead for the highly successful NASA-Air Force-Navy-North American program that would last 10 years and investigate hypersonic flight. Walt directed a great variety of other flight research programs, including that on the Boeing B-47; investigations using the Century Series fighters, F-100, F-102, F-104, F-105 and F-107; and the ones involving the X-1 #2, which became the X1-E. During Williams' career, he twice received the NASA Distinguished Service Medal and was nominated both to the Meritorious Rank and Distinguished Rank in the Federal Senior Executive Service. In 1963 he was awarded an honorary doctorate of engineering degree by Louisiana State University. He received several awards from the American Institute

  16. George Williams, theoretician and guerilla environmentalist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Bobbi S

    2005-03-01

    George Williams is rightly honored for his contributions to basic biological theory. In addition, however, his thought and contribution paved the way for much needed integration of basic evolutionary theory and modern environmental problems. Specifically, his contributions to the levels of selection" debate, and his application of these contributions to the "Gaia" approach to ecological problems, may help us improve our ability to move past untested prescriptions to a thoughtful matching of the characteristics of the problem and solution, and thus improve our effectiveness.

  17. Enough room for Williams and IMF? / Paul Beckman

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Beckman, Paul

    1999-01-01

    Lõppesid Leedu ja USA energeetikakompanii Williams International läbirääkimised Leedu naftakompleksis osaluse omandamise asjus. IMF uurib Leedu majanduslikku arengut, mida tehing Williamsiga komplitseerib

  18. Enough room for Williams and IMF? / Paul Beckman

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Beckman, Paul

    1999-01-01

    Lõppesid Leedu ja USA energeetikakompanii Williams International läbirääkimised Leedu naftakompleksis osaluse omandamise asjus. IMF uurib Leedu majanduslikku arengut, mida tehing Williamsiga komplitseerib

  19. William Butler Yeats’s ‘The Symbolic System’ of William Blake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arianna Antonielli

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The theosophical systems formulated by great poets, such as William Blake and William Butler Yeats, represent a personal idiosyncratic actualization of an ancient repertoire of magical symbols and occult visions. This study wants to focus the attention on the philosophical, mythical, and esoteric syncretism that W. B. Yeats drew from William Blake’s symbolical system. A fundamental step of Yeats’s deep investigation into the Blakean ‘vision’ was given by his monumental work, written together with Edwin John Ellis, on Blake’s poetic and pictorial production, completed in 1893 with a three-volume edition entitled The Works of William Blake, Poetic, Symbolic, and Critical. This work, published in London by Bernard Quaritch, deeply influenced Yeats’s symbolical and imaginary system, determining its subsequent development up to its codification in the volume of A Vision. With WWB, Yeats was able to systematize for the first time his own thought, giving unity to his Weltanschauung and his poetry. Following this hypothesis, I concentrated on Yeats’s and Ellis’s numerous analyses dedicated to Blake’s mythological and symbolical corpus and, in particular, I examined the last chapter of the first volume of the Quaritch edition. This chapter, entitled “The Symbolic System”, constitutes an unquestionable link between Yeats the reader and scholar of Blake, and Yeats the poet and follower of Blake.

  20. Mailability v. the Crusader: Williams v. O'Brien.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Charles E.

    The issues of prior restraint and press censorship are examined in this paper, which focuses on the 1970 Williams v. O'Brien court case. The paper discusses the litigation, in which Robert F. Williams, as an American citizen living in Peking, China, sued the United States Postmaster General over the banning of the May 1967 issue of "The Crusader,"…

  1. "The Country and the City" by Raymond Williams. Essay Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jerry D.; Howley, Craig B.

    2000-01-01

    Reviews essays by Raymond Williams, which explain how, within the context of a 150-year literary history, rural stereotypes have been constructed and imbedded within a collective consciousness by a form of cultural colonization. Suggests that Williams' insights can help rural education researchers think outside the conventional wisdom that…

  2. 77 FR 72960 - William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 34 CFR Part 685 RIN 1840-AD05 William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program AGENCY: Office of Postsecondary... of William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan (Direct Loan) program regulations that establish a new...

  3. 76 FR 2902 - Williams, Barry Lawson; Notice of Filing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Williams, Barry Lawson; Notice of Filing January 10, 2011. Take notice that on January 10, 2011, Barry Lawson Williams submitted for filing, an application for authority to...

  4. Prince William%威廉姆斯王子

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ The pright future for Britain's Royalty 不列颠皇室的美好未来 Prince William has come of age. After his father, the Prince of Wales, he is next in line to the throne. This is an enormous responsibility for anyone let alone someone in his twenties. As the future King of England, Prince William lives in the public eye.

  5. Discovering Structure in Auditory Input: Evidence from Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsabbagh, Mayada; Cohen, Henri; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette

    2010-01-01

    We examined auditory perception in Williams syndrome by investigating strategies used in organizing sound patterns into coherent units. In Experiment 1, we investigated the streaming of sound sequences into perceptual units, on the basis of pitch cues, in a group of children and adults with Williams syndrome compared to typical controls. We showed…

  6. Pursuing the Panderer: An Analysis of "United States v. Williams"

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrain, Patrick N.; Moore, Jennifer L.

    2010-01-01

    In May 2008, the Supreme Court addressed whether the government can regulate the ownership and distribution of virtual child pornography. "U.S. v. Williams" marked the first time the Court directly addressed the concept of pandering virtual child pornography. This article examines the Court's decision in "U.S. v. Williams" and…

  7. 75 FR 62530 - Williams, Barry Lawson; Notice of Filing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Williams, Barry Lawson; Notice of Filing October 4, 2010. Take notice that on September 24, 2010, Barry Lawson Williams submitted for filing, an application for authority...

  8. William Keit and the Durban Botanic Garden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. P. McCracken

    1986-12-01

    Full Text Available William Keit was born in Saxony in 1841 and in early life travelled across Europe working in many famous nurseries and gardens. In 1872 on the recommendation of the director of Kew Gardens, Keit emigrated to Natal to become curator of the Durban Botanic Garden. So dilapidated was this garden that Keit was faced with the task of virtually re-establishing it.Though he was largely successful in this endeavour, as he was in fortifying the link between Natal and Kew, Keit could not solve the problems of a severe drought,a labour shortage and a scarcity of funds. In 1881 he resigned his position leaving a solid foundation on which the renowned botanist, John Medley Wood was to build. Keit in later Ufe ran a successful nursery in Durban and for 30 years was curator of the Parks and Gardens Department,in which capacity he did more than anyone else to beautify Durban.

  9. [William Harvey, discoverer of the blood circulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    v Mühlendahl, K E

    2007-06-01

    William Harvey (1578-1657), living at the turn to modern times, scientifically speaking, was an eminent physician and scientist. He developed the concept of the circulation of the blood and his findings have proved to be correct in nearly all details to this day. He published his physiological findings and interpretations in a small, albeit epoch-making, volume: Exercitatio anatomica de motu cordis et sanguinis in animalibus, published in Frankfurt in 1628. On the occasion of the 350th anniversary of his death on June 3, 2007, this essay commemorates the work of this important physician, illustrating his brilliant conception of the blood circulation by quoting passages from De motu cordis et sanguinis.

  10. William Pendry Bidelman (1918-2011)

    CERN Document Server

    Bond, Howard E

    2016-01-01

    William P. Bidelman--Editor of Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific from 1956 to 1961--passed away on 2011 May 3, at the age of 92. He was one of the last of the masters of visual stellar spectral classification and the identification of peculiar stars. I review his contributions to these subjects, including the discoveries of barium stars, hydrogen-deficient stars, high-galactic-latitude supergiants, stars with anomalous carbon content, and exotic chemical abundances in peculiar A and B stars. Bidelman was legendary for his encyclopedic knowledge of the stellar literature. He had a profound and inspirational influence on many colleagues and students. Some of the bizarre stellar phenomena he discovered remain unexplained to the present day.

  11. [Vaughan Williams class IV antiarrhythmic drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horie, M; Washizuka, T; Ikeguchi, S; Sasayama, S

    1996-08-01

    Vaughan Williams class IV antiarrhythmic drugs have Ca-channel blocking actions. Since L-type Ca-channels play key roles in regulating pulse conduction in atrioventricular node as well as in pathologically-depolarized myocardium, Ca-channel blockers known to modulate this type of Ca-channel (ICa,L) are used as antiarrhythmic agents. ICa,L channels have relatively high threshold potential (-40 mV) to activate and long-opening properties, and are enhanced by beta-adrenergic stimulation. Among three major ICa,L blockers, dihydropyridines such as nifedipine were found to bind to the channel from extracellular side. In contrast, verapamil and diltiazem interact with the channel from the cytoplasmic side, thereby causing rate-dependent block of ICa,L channels. This sideness of pharmacological action of the Ca-channel blockers determines an important therapeutic modality and their indication for tachyarrhythmias.

  12. William Keit and the Durban Botanic Garden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. P. McCracken

    1986-12-01

    Full Text Available William Keit was born in Saxony in 1841 and in early life travelled across Europe working in many famous nurseries and gardens. In 1872 on the recommendation of the director of Kew Gardens, Keit emigrated to Natal to become curator of the Durban Botanic Garden. So dilapidated was this garden that Keit was faced with the task of virtually re-establishing it.Though he was largely successful in this endeavour, as he was in fortifying the link between Natal and Kew, Keit could not solve the problems of a severe drought,a labour shortage and a scarcity of funds. In 1881 he resigned his position leaving a solid foundation on which the renowned botanist, John Medley Wood was to build. Keit in later Ufe ran a successful nursery in Durban and for 30 years was curator of the Parks and Gardens Department,in which capacity he did more than anyone else to beautify Durban.

  13. A Mystic in English Literature: William Blake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Fahri DOĞAN

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Human beings have never been satisfied with this ephemeral world. Perhaps, yearning and desire of rejoining −stemming from the descent from the heaven to the earth− are the emotions felt by the members of both celestial and non-celestial religions. Mysticism, having started with the zeal of people who weren‘t satisfied with this ephemeral world towards the eternal world, aimed at the love of God in the religions where there is a belief of single God. In this article, glancing at the life of a Christian mystic William Blake, we will try to shed light into his mystic thoughts. While studying Blake‘s mystic thoughts, there will be common points with Sufism. Nevertheless, analysis of these common points has been assigned to other studies.

  14. William Whiston, suur veeuputus ja kohutav spektaakel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roomet Jakapi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available William Whiston (1667-1752 was an English divine, mathematician and astronomer. His works nicely reveal the close relationship between science and religion in the early modern period. The paper aims to characterize Whiston's way of thinking in the light of his Astronomical Principles of Religion, Natural and Reveal'd (1717. In the 17th and early 18th century cosmologies, the location of Hell in the universe was a major issue. This horrible place of punishment could be located beneath the earth or on the sun. Whiston's view on this issue relies on the juxtaposition of biblical descriptions of Hell and scientific evidence regarding comets. Research for this paper was supported by Estonian Science Foundation grant no. 6099.

  15. Geiss Receives 2005 William Bowie Medal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloeckler, George; Geiss, Johannes

    2006-01-01

    Johannes Geiss was awarded the 2005 William Bowie Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, which was held on 7 December 2005 in San Francisco, Calif. The medal recognizes outstanding contributions to fundamental geophysics and unselfish cooperation in research. I am most pleased and honored to present this citation to Johannes Geiss, a truly great space scientist and investigator of the solar system and universe. His pioneering work, spanning over half a century, has paved the way toward understanding the physical world in which we live, its origins, and its destiny. He is a strong and effective advocate of science and ingenious in his ability to influence science policy and foster good science. Space limitations allow me to highlight only a few of Geiss's outstanding scientific accomplishments, service to science and society, and contributions to the conduct of science.

  16. Random Thoughts on William Shakespeare and Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KV Sahasranam

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Medicine and literature have always been connected over the ages. William Shakespeare (1564-1616 is no exception. There are plenty of references to medicine and diseases in the works of Shakespeare. The knowledge which Shakespeare has of medical conditions is much more than is expected of a common man. This is attributed to his association with practitioners of his time and reading of contemporary texts in medicine. Also his son in law Dr. John Hall who married Susanna, Shakespeare's eldest daughter would have contributed substantially to the knowledge of medicine in Shakespeare's compositions. Surgery at the Elizabethan times was well known and is reflected to a large extent in his plays.

  17. Sir William Ramsay and the noble gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Alwyn G

    2012-01-01

    Sir William Ramsay was one of the world's leading scientists at the end of the 19th century, and in a spectacular period of research between 1894 and 1898, he discovered five new elements. These were the noble gases, helium, neon, argon, krypton, and xenon; they added a whole new group to the Periodic Table of the elements, and provided the keystone to our understanding of the electronic structure of atoms, and the way those electrons bind the atoms together into molecules. For this work he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1904, the first such prize to come to a British subject. He was also a man of great charm, a good linguist, and a composer and performer of music, poetry and song. This review will trace his career, describe his character and give and account of the chemistry which led to the award of the Nobel Prize.

  18. A Comparative Study of William Golding'S Four Novels%Comparative Study of William Golding'S Four Novels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔晓强

    2008-01-01

    With his keen insight,William Golding becomes very conscious of the human heart and the necessity that we become aware of this darkness we are to save ourselves.All his novels,attempt to deal with the essential human condition.All Golding 's novels, products of his peculiar literary temperament and habit,are reactive experiments.Each of them represents a response to a specific book by an early writer.

  19. William Eggleston摄影展在巴黎举行

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Holly(译)

    2009-01-01

    以巴黎为基地的卡地亚基金会Fondation Cartier最近邀请国际著名摄影师Wiliam Eggleston举办摄影展.首次将William Eggleston一批摄影精品以及多幅抽象画作一并展出,部分作品是首次公开展览。William Eggleston于1939年出生于美国,这次展出的William Eggleston摄影作品大多是以巴黎当年的时尚生活为主题。

  20. Discoverers of the universe William and Caroline Herschel

    CERN Document Server

    Hoskin, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Discoverers of the Universe tells the gripping story of William Herschel, the brilliant, fiercely ambitious, emotionally complex musician and composer who became court astronomer to Britain's King George III, and of William's sister, Caroline, who assisted him in his observations of the night sky and became an accomplished astronomer in her own right. Together, they transformed our view of the universe from the unchanging, mechanical creation of Newton's clockmaker god to the ever-evolving, incredibly dynamic cosmos that it truly is. William was in his forties when his amateur observations usi

  1. William Blake: escritura y lectura iluminadas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Picón

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Considerando que la fuerza divina es un poder propiamente humano, que permite trascender desde la mera visualización y percepción sensorial del mundo finito y terrenal hacia el reino eterno y verdadero de la imaginación, el poeta, artista y visionario inglés William Blake (1757-1827 identificó a dios con dicha facultad humana. En su lucha contra la ‘religión de la razón’, bajo cuyo poder el hombre se había limitado a la ‘vacía’ percepción exterior, Blake buscará recobrar la ‘religión de la imaginación’. Desde esta perspectiva, este estudio pretende dilucidar el modo en que la materialidad de lo escrito (Roger Chartier y la utilización de un método de escritura particular por parte del visionario -distinto al que su propio tiempo le ofrecía- afecta el circuito de la comunicación visionaria de comienzo a fin, relacionándose directamente con la finalidad que Blake otorgó a sus poemas proféticos iluminados: despertar en los lectores esa capacidad visionaria y verdadera que ‘reside en el pecho de todos los hombres’.Considering the ‘divine force’ as a human power that allows humans to transcend from the mere sensory visualization and perception of the finite and earthly world to the true and eternal realm of imagination, William Blake, the english poet, artist and visionary (1757-1827 identified god with this human faculty. In his struggle against the ‘religion of reason’, under which humans had been reduced to an ‘empty’ outward perception, Blake wants to recover the ‘religion of imagination’. From this perspective, I expect to elucidate the ways in which the material aspects of writing (Roger Chartier and the visionary use of a specific method of writing -different from the methods available to Blake in his own time- affect the visionary circuit of communication. This complete transformation is directly connected with the purpose of Blake’s illuminated prophetic poems: he intends to awake in his

  2. Slovene reactions to William Faulkner's writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataša Intihar Klančar

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with Slovene reactions to William Faulkner's writing: a lot of critical attention was given to the author twice, namely after he won the Nobel Prize for Literature  in 1949 and after his death in 1962. The articles and reviews published  in Slovene magazines  and newspapers focused on themes, characterization, style and structure of his novels. Thus the Slovene reading public got the chance to get to know one of the greatest novelists of 20th century, his troubled, decaying, socially, racially, religiously and historically challenged American South and through it themselves and their attitude toward the world and its problems. Faulkner also had a strong influence on some of the Slovene writers of 1950s and 1960s: they adopted his themes and writing techniques, namely a cyclic structure of the novel and stream-of-consciousness technique,  thus forging the new Slovene modernist fiction that started to emerge from the late 1960s onwards.

  3. William Cheselden: anatomist, surgeon, and medical illustrator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, M A

    1999-11-01

    William Cheselden was Great Britain's foremost surgeon/scientist in the first half of the 18th century. Cheselden directly challenged the Company of Barber-Surgeons' exclusive right to control dissection in London by being the first to conduct a regular series of anatomy lectures and demonstrations outside of the Company's Hall. He incorporated his lecture syllabus into a handbook of anatomy, The Anatomy of the Humane Body, which was used by students for nearly 100 years. Cheselden also wrote the text and drew the illustrations for a majestic atlas of comparative osteology, the Osteographia, or the Anatomy of the Bones. Cheselden used his superior knowledge of anatomy to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with perineal lithotomy, one of the few operations possible in his era. Sagacious and pragmatic, Cheselden recognized that the enlightened practice of surgery beginning to take root in 18th-century London could flourish only under an autonomous body of surgeons. Cheselden used his personal funds and political skills to urge Parliament to pass legislation for the dissolution of the combined Company of Barber-Surgeons and the establishment of separate and distinct Surgeons' and Barbers' Companies. After disjoinder of the two groups on May 2, 1745, Cheselden served as one of the Wardens of the new Company of Surgeons--a predecessor of the Royal College of Surgeons of England. In 1746, Cheselden, who helped design the first Surgeons' Hall, served as the Company's Master.

  4. Space perception and William James's metaphysical presuppositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Martin J

    2011-05-01

    William James's overtly philosophical work may be more continuous with his psychological work than is sometimes thought. His Essays in Radical Empiricism can be understood as an explicit statement of the absolute presupposition that formed the basis of Jamesian psychology: that direct experience is primary and has to be taken at face value. An examination of James's theory of space perception suggests that, even in his early work, he presupposed the primacy of direct experience, and that later changes in his account of space perception can be understood as making his view more consistent with this presupposition. In his earlier view of space perception, James argued that sensations were directly experienced as spatial, though he accepted that spatial relations between sensations may be constructed by higher order thought. In his later view, however, James argued that spatial relations were just as directly experienced as sensations. The work of T. H. Green may have prompted James to recognize the full consequence of his ideas and to realize that taking experience at face value required that spatial relations be thought of as intrinsic to experience rather than the result of intellectual construction.

  5. Memory abilities in children with Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicari, S; Brizzolara, D; Carlesimo, G A; Pezzini, G; Volterra, V

    1996-09-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a rare genetic condition characterised by intellectual disability, typical facial dysmorphology and several medical anomalies. A specific neuropsychological profile with a dissociation between language (relatively preserved) and visuo-spatial abilities (more seriously impaired) has been hypothesised in these children. Memory abilities of these patients have not been adequately investigated, although they may substantially contribute to better understanding their neuropsychological profile. The present study aimed at investigating verbal and spatial memory in patients with WS (N = 16). Their performance was compared with that of normally developing children on tasks of verbal and spatial span and immediate and delayed recall of verbal and visuo-perceptual materials. Memory abilities of WS children appear to be characterised by defective visuo-spatial memory, both in the short-term and long-term domain, and a dissociation between normal short- but deficient long-term verbal learning. Results are interpreted by supporting the thesis that intellectual disability reflects the defective functioning of a complex system in which some cognitive competencies may be disrupted more than others (Detterman, 1987; Vicari, Albertini and Caltagirone, 1992).

  6. Neural Correlates of Amusia in Williams Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam D. Lense

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Congenital amusia is defined by marked deficits in pitch perception and production. Though historically examined only in otherwise typically developing (TD populations, amusia has recently been documented in Williams syndrome (WS, a genetic, neurodevelopmental disorder with a unique auditory phenotype including auditory sensitivities and increased emotional responsiveness to music but variable musical skill. The current study used structural T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging to examine neural correlates of amusia in 17 individuals with WS (4 of whom met criteria for amusia. Consistent with findings from TD amusics, amusia in WS was associated with decreased fractional anisotropy (FA in the right superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF. The relationship between amusia and FA in the inferior component of the SLF was particularly robust, withstanding corrections for cognitive functioning, auditory sensitivities, or musical training. Though the number of individuals with amusia in the study is small, results add to evidence for the role of fronto-temporal disconnectivity in congenital amusia and suggest that novel populations with developmental differences can provide a window into understanding gene-brain-behavior relationships that underlie musical behaviors.

  7. Affective prosody in children with Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setter, Jane; Stojanovik, Vesna; Van Ewijk, Lizet; Moreland, Matthew

    2007-09-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate expressive affect in children with Williams syndrome (WS) in comparison to typically developing children in an experimental task and in spontaneous speech. Fourteen children with WS, 14 typically developing children matched to the WS group for receptive language (LA) and 15 typically developing children matched to the WS groups for chronological age (CA) were recruited. Affect was investigated using an experimental Output Affect task from the Profiling Elements of Prosodic Systems-Child version (PEPS-C) battery, and by measuring pitch range and vowel durations from a spontaneous speech task. The children were also rated for level of emotional involvement by phonetically naïve listeners. The WS group performed similarly to the LA and CA groups on the Output Affect task. With regard to vowel durations, the WS group was no different from the LA group; however both the WS and the LA groups were found to use significantly longer vowels than the CA group. The WS group differed significantly from both control groups on their range of pitch range and was perceived as being significantly more emotionally involved than the two control groups.

  8. Introducing william stern (1871-1938).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamiell, James T

    2012-11-01

    This article discusses the events and considerations, both 'distal' and 'proximal,' behind the production of the author's recent book, William Stern (1871-1938): A Brief Introduction to His Life and Works (Pabst Science Publishers, Germany, March, 2010). The 'distal' roots of the work lie in the advice given to the author by German and other European colleagues in the mid-1980s that examining Stern's writing in some detail would likely prove fruitful. The more proximal roots lie in a series of public lectures that the author prepared and delivered in the capacity of Ernst Cassirer Guest Professor in the Institute for Philosophy at the University of Hamburg in 2004. It is explained that the primary intent of the book is to provide readers with a preliminary sense of the breadth of Stern's contributions to psychology, and to suggest that his works might well deserve closer attention in the 21st century than they ever gained during the 20th. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. William Pendry Bidelman (1918-2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Howard E.

    2017-01-01

    William P. Bidelman—Editor of these Publications from 1956 to 1961—passed away on 2011 May 3, at the age of 92. He was one of the last of the masters of visual stellar spectral classification and the identification of peculiar stars. I review his contributions to these subjects, including the discoveries of barium stars, hydrogen-deficient stars, high-galactic-latitude supergiants, stars with anomalous carbon content, and exotic chemical abundances in peculiar A and B stars. Bidelman was legendary for his encyclopedic knowledge of the stellar literature. He had a profound and inspirational influence on many colleagues and students. Some of the bizarre stellar phenomena he discovered remain unexplained to the present day. Material for this article was contributed by several family members, colleagues, and former students, including: Billie Bidelman Little, Joseph Little, James Caplinger, D. Jack MacConnell, Wayne Osborn, George W. Preston, Nancy G. Roman, and Nolan Walborn. Any opinions stated are those of the author.

  10. Was Sir William Crookes epistemically virtuous?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Ian James

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to use Sir William Crookes' researches into psychical phenomena as a sustained case study of the role of epistemic virtues within scientific enquiry. Despite growing interest in virtues in science, there are few integrated historical and philosophical studies, and even fewer studies focussing on controversial or 'fringe' sciences where, one might suppose, certain epistemic virtues (like open-mindedness and tolerance) may be subjected to sterner tests. Using the virtue of epistemic courage as my focus, it emerges that Crookes' psychical researches were indeed epistemically courageous, but that this judgment must be grounded in sensitivity to the motivational complexity and context-sensitivity of the exercise of epistemic virtues. The paper then considers Crookes' remarks on the relationship between epistemic virtuousness and the intellectual integrity and public duties of scientists, thereby placing epistemic virtues in the context of wider debates about the authority of science in late modern societies. I conclude that Crookes' researches into psychical phenomena offer instructive lessons for historians of science and virtue epistemologists concerning the complexity and contextuality of epistemic virtues, and the profitable forms that future studies of virtues in science could take. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Sir William Mitchell (1925-2002)

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Sir William (Bill) Mitchell, former President of the CERN Council, died on 30th October 2002 at the age of 77. Mitchell was professor of Physics at Oxford University from 1978 to 1989, having previously been Professor of Physics, Dean of Science and Deputy Vice-Chancellor at Reading University. From 1985 to 1990 he was Chairman of the UK's Science and Engineering Research Council (SERC), which at the time was the funding agency for the UK's participation in the CERN programme. As Chairman, Mitchell was one of the UK representatives on the CERN Council, and in 1991 he was elected President, a position he held for three years. This was a difficult period for CERN. Financial problems were being faced in many member states, notably in Germany as a result of unification. This led to calls for reductions in the CERN budget and, more significantly, to requests for delays in consderation of future programmes. On the other hand for the future of CERN and the progress of elementary particle physics, it was necessary...

  12. The epileptology of William Aldren Turner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eadie, M J

    2006-01-01

    William Aldren Turner (1864-1945), in his day Physician to the National Hospital, Queen Square, and to King's College Hospital, London, was one of the major figures in the world of epileptology in the period between Hughlings Jackson in the latter part of the 19th century and the advent of electroencephalography in the 1930s. Although he also made contributions to knowledge in other areas of neurology, and with Grainger Stewart wrote a competent textbook on that subject, Turner's main professional interest throughout his career seems to have been epilepsy. On the basis of a series of earlier, rather heavily statistical, personal publications dealing with various aspects of the disorder, he authored what became a well-accepted monograph entitled Epilepsy - a study of the idiopathic disorder, which appeared in 1907, and he also gave the 1910 Morison lectures in Edinburgh on the topic. His writings on epilepsy over a period of three decades consolidated knowledge rather than led to significant advances, but helped maintain interest in the disorder during a rather long fallow phase in the development of the understanding of its nature.

  13. William D. Stevenson: Atlantic Canada's first neurosurgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhida, Karim; Mendez, Ivar

    2007-12-01

    The origins of neurosurgical services in Atlantic Canada are tied to the individual efforts of William D. Stevenson. Born in Hamilton, Ontario, Stevenson completed his senior matriculation in Dunnville, Ontario, before studying medicine at the University of Toronto. He completed the Gallie surgical course in Toronto and then spent 1 year training with Edward Archibald at McGill University. After working for 2 years with the Canadian Mobile Neurosurgical Unit in Europe during the Second World War, Stevenson undertook formal neurosurgical training with Kenneth G. McKenzie, Canada's first neurosurgeon. Stevenson was thereafter recruited to Halifax to start the neurosurgical service at the Victoria General Hospital in January 1948, and he remained head of the division for the next 26 years. His pioneering work laid the foundations for the establishment of a major academic neurosurgical service at Dalhousie University and was crucial for the establishment of neurosurgery in Atlantic Canada. After his retirement, Stevenson moved back to Ontario and began his second career, transferring his passion for neurosurgery to oil painting. His legacy to neurosurgery in Atlantic Canada will be remembered in perpetuity with the annual Neurosurgery Resident Research Award at Dalhousie University, established and named in his honour. This paper focuses on Stevenson's life and work in neurosurgery as Atlantic Canada's first neurosurgeon.

  14. Salmon stream reconnaissance Prince William Sound and Afognak Island

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In April of 1963, salmon stream improvement projects in Prince William Sound were visited. Objectives of the trip, from a fisheries standpoint, were as follows: (1)...

  15. William L Finley - Slender False-brome Eradication

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — William L. Finley NWR contains some of the largest and best examples of remaining Oregon white oak woodland, oak savanna, and prairie habitats remaining in the...

  16. Coastal Ocean Processes Symposium: A Tribute to William D. Grant

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-05-01

    This report is a compilation of abstracts distributed at the Coastal Ocean Processes Symposium: A Tribute to William D . Grant at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution from September 27-September 30, 1998.

  17. The Trail Inventory of William L. Finley NWR [Cycle 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on William L. Finley National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are...

  18. Anny Cazenave Receives 2012 William Bowie Medal: Citation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltier, W. R.

    2013-01-01

    Anny Cazenave was awarded the 2012 William Bowie Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, held on 5 December 2012 in San Francisco, Calif. The medal is for "outstanding contributions to fundamental geophysics and for unselfish cooperation in research."

  19. Gerald J. Wasserburg Awarded 2008 William Bowie Medal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Stein B.; Wasserburg, Gerald J.

    2009-01-01

    Gerald J. Wasserburg was awarded the 2008 William Bowie Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, held 17 December 2008 in San Francisco, Calif. The medal is for ``outstanding contributions to fundamental geophysics and for unselfish cooperation in research.''

  20. Prince William Sound, Alaska ESI: SOCECON (Socioeconomic Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for Prince William Sound, Alaska. ESI data characterize estuarine environments and wildlife by...

  1. Marine bird populations in Prince William Sound, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Marine bird populations in Prince William Sound, Alaska, were censused in the winter and summer of 1972 and 1973 to assess the potential impact of oil transport...

  2. 34 CFR 685.100 - The William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false The William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program. 685...) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION WILLIAM D. FORD FEDERAL DIRECT LOAN PROGRAM Purpose and Scope § 685.100 The William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program. (a) Under the William D....

  3. Textual Form and Cultural Affect: William Empson's Double-Plot and Raymond Williams's Structure of Feeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pamela McCallum

    2005-01-01

    By insisting on the primacy of double-plot, Empson brackets the sometimes deceptive appearances of a text's content to uncover and disengage the more fundamental double-plot system at work within the defining structure of the text. Empson's thinking about the reception of double-plot structures enables Raymond Williams's early formulations of structure of feeling, in particular the gesturing this perplexing, underdeveloped, but persistent concept makes towards understanding collective response to cultural forms. This article explores the implications of the reception of double-plot structures, drawing out the assumptions inscribed in Empson's claims about processes at work as an audience engages with these dramatic structures.

  4. 77 FR 72413 - William Blair & Company, L.L.C. and William Blair Funds.; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-05

    ... or feasible. 5. The A Share Fund has filed a Certificate of Formation, to be effective as of December... Series will have its own portfolio manager or portfolio management team at William Blair who will...

  5. Uncertainty in Meaning and Possibility of Multi-interpretation--Read-ing Poems Written by William Carlos Williams

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张金娟

    2013-01-01

    William Carlos Williams is noted for the simplicity of his verse form and clear interpretation of its meaning. In this pa-per, the writer tends to unfold that the seemingly simplicity of Williams’poems reveals his deep concern about the modern life. He draws our attention to the particular scene or thing which itself abounds in different meanings. Thus it enables his poems open to different interpretations.

  6. William Byrd: Political and Recusant Composer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel Foshay Bacon

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Amidst the pendulum of political and religious upheaval that pervaded England throughout the sixteenth and seventeenth century, William Byrd stands as one of the best loved and lauded composers. Byrd succeeded in the secular and sacred realms, contributing great works to the Anglican Church, popularizing the English madrigal and producing prolific amounts of sacred music. However, in a time where one’s religious beliefs were often linked with political loyalty, Byrd defied his monarch’s established and enforced Protestant religion, composing politically charged music for recusant use in clandestine Catholic Church services. His themes were aligned with the Jesuit mission and his texts were often drawn from the lips of martyred Catholics at the gallows; their last words forever immortalized by Byrd for the furthering of the Jesuit cause and the Counter-Reformation. The examination of sources by prominent Byrd scholars, an analyses of Byrd’s ‘political’ compositions and a study of the social and historical background are used to place Byrd within the appropriate context, prove his recusant and political leanings, and analyze his precarious relationship with the English monarch, Elizabeth I. It is shown that Byrd could not have proceeded with his recusant practices, personally or musically, had it not been for his status as a composer, as well as Byrd’s shrewdness in procuring diplomatic relationships with high persons at court and with Queen Elizabeth I through the Chapel Royal. Finally, Byrd’s success at writing for the Anglican Church service and popular secular music showcased his ability to take a moderate stance in situations that benefitted his status with the crown

  7. William James, Gustav Fechner, and Early Psychophysics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie L. Hawkins

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available American psychologist and philosopher William James devoted the entirety of his career to exploring the nature of volition, as expressed by such phenomena as will, attention, and belief. As part of that endeavor, James's unorthodox scientific pursuits, from his experiments with nitrous oxide and hallucinogenic drugs to his investigation of spiritualist mediums, represent his attempt to address the "hard problems" of consciousness for which his training in brain physiology and experimental psychology could not entirely account. As a student, James's reading in chemistry and physics had sparked his interest in the concepts of energy and force, terms that he later deployed in his writing about consciousness and in his arguments against philosophical monism and scientific materialism, as he developed his radically empiricist ideas privileging discontinuity and plurality. Despite James's long campaign against scientific materialism, he was, however, convinced of the existence of a naturalistic explanation for the more "wayward and fitful" aspects of mind, including transcendent experiences associated with hysteria, genius, and religious ecstasy. In this paper, I examine aspects of James's thought that are still important for contemporary debates in psychology and neuroscience: his "transmission theory" of consciousness, his ideas on the "knowing of things together," and, finally, the related concept of "the compounding of consciousness," which postulates the theoretical possibility for individual entities within a conscious system of thought to "know" the thoughts of others within the system. Taken together, these ideas suggest that James, in spite of, or perhaps because of, his forays into metaphysics, was working toward a naturalistic understanding of consciousness, what I will term a "distributive model," based on his understanding of consciousness as an "awareness" that interacts dynamically within, and in relation to, its environment.

  8. William james, gustav fechner, and early psychophysics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Stephanie L

    2011-01-01

    American psychologist and philosopher William James devoted the entirety of his career to exploring the nature of volition, as expressed by such phenomena as will, attention, and belief. As part of that endeavor, James's unorthodox scientific pursuits, from his experiments with nitrous oxide and hallucinogenic drugs to his investigation of spiritualist mediums, represent his attempt to address the "hard problems" of consciousness for which his training in brain physiology and experimental psychology could not entirely account. As a student, James's reading in chemistry and physics had sparked his interest in the concepts of energy and force, terms that he later deployed in his writing about consciousness and in his arguments against philosophical monism and scientific materialism, as he developed his "radically empiricist" ideas privileging discontinuity and plurality. Despite James's long campaign against scientific materialism, he was, however, convinced of the existence of a naturalistic explanation for the more "wayward and fitful" aspects of mind, including transcendent experiences associated with hysteria, genius, and religious ecstasy. In this paper, I examine aspects of James's thought that are still important for contemporary debates in psychology and neuroscience: his "transmission theory" of consciousness, his ideas on the "knowing of things together," and, finally, the related concept of "the compounding of consciousness," which postulates the theoretical possibility for individual entities within a conscious system of thought to "know" the thoughts of others within the system. Taken together, these ideas suggest that James, in spite of, or perhaps because of, his forays into metaphysics, was working toward a naturalistic understanding of consciousness, what I will term a "distributive model," based on his understanding of consciousness as an "awareness" that interacts dynamically within, and in relation to, its environment.

  9. Obituary: William A. Rense (1914-2008)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushman, Glen

    2009-12-01

    On March 28, 2008, the space research community lost another of its pioneers. William A. Rense, professor emeritus of physics at the University of Colorado in Boulder, who died in Estes Park, Colorado, following complications from cancer. He was 94. Bill, as he was widely known, was born in 1914 in Massillon, Ohio, the son of German immigrants. His was a large family - five brothers and one sister. His father, Joseph Rense, worked for the city of Cleveland while his mother, Rosalia (Luther) Rense was a housewife. As a child, Bill developed a love of astronomy which led him to earn a bachelor's degree in physics and astronomy from Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, followed by master's and PhD degrees in physics at Ohio State University. He held teaching positions at Rutgers, University of Miami (Florida), Texas A & M, and Louisiana State University before taking his final appointment at CU in 1949. While teaching at LSU, he met and in 1942 married Wanda (Childs) Rense. In addition to teaching physics at CU, Bill did research in CU's Upper Air Laboratory. His early work there included studies of polarized light and its implications for the analysis of zodiacal light. He and his co-workers also began developing instrumentation to be flown above the Earth's atmosphere in sounding rockets. In 1952 he obtained the first photographic spectrogram of the solar Lyman-alpha line of hydrogen (121.6nm). This work was followed in 1956 by the first full disk spectroheliogram in Lyman-alpha. These results could not have been possible without the use of pointing control systems for sounding rockets. These "sun trackers" kept the payloads pointed at the sun long enough for the measurements to be made, and CU was a pioneer in their development. The expanding research venue led the Upper Air Laboratory to be renamed the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP), and Bill Rense was its first director. He continued his research into the properties of the solar

  10. Williams Syndrome and 15q Duplication: Coincidence versus Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokhar, Aditi; Agarwal, Swashti; Perez-Colon, Sheila

    2017-01-01

    Williams syndrome is a multisystem disorder caused by contiguous gene deletion in 7q11.23, commonly associated with distinctive facial features, supravalvular aortic stenosis, short stature, idiopathic hypercalcemia, developmental delay, joint laxity, and a friendly personality. The clinical features of 15q11q13 duplication syndrome include autism, mental retardation, ataxia, seizures, developmental delay, and behavioral problems. We report a rare case of a girl with genetically confirmed Williams syndrome and coexisting 15q duplication syndrome. The patient underwent treatment for central precocious puberty and later presented with primary amenorrhea. The karyotype revealed 47,XX,+mar. FISH analysis for the marker chromosome showed partial trisomy/tetrasomy for proximal chromosome 15q (15p13q13). FISH using an ELN-specific probe demonstrated a deletion in the Williams syndrome critical region in 7q11.23. To our knowledge, a coexistence of Williams syndrome and 15q duplication syndrome has not been reported in the literature. Our patient had early pubertal development, which has been described in some patients with Williams syndrome. However, years later after discontinuing gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogue treatment, she developed primary amenorrhea.

  11. Unity and diversity – the Williams subjects’ message Unity and diversity – the Williams subjects’ message

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans W. Dechert

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Williams subjects, due to a genetically based neuro-developmental disorder from birth, besides various medical problems, demonstrate a dissociation between cognitive and special linguistic processing, and a dissociation within language modules, language domains, and language mini-domains with reference to different languages. This ichotomous profile results from a deletion on one hromosome. What other genes on the same chromosome, not yet identified, or other genes on other chromosomes of the human genome, may be responsible for the same or similar or any other cognitive deficits and/or interactions of cognitive and linguistic deficits, and as such may reveal the specific processes located within specific modules, domains, and/or mini-domains across different languages and cultures, we do not know. What we need, however, is a unified consilient approach engaging the sciences and the humanities to integrate knowledge from various sources of investigation. Williams subjects, due to a genetically based neuro-developmental disorder from birth, besides various medical problems, demonstrate a dissociation between cognitive and special linguistic processing, and a dissociation within language modules, language domains, and language mini-domains with reference to different languages. This ichotomous profile results from a deletion on one hromosome. What other genes on the same chromosome, not yet identified, or other genes on other chromosomes of the human genome, may be responsible for the same or similar or any other cognitive deficits and/or interactions of cognitive and linguistic deficits, and as such may reveal the specific processes located within specific modules, domains, and/or mini-domains across different languages and cultures, we do not know. What we need, however, is a unified consilient approach engaging the sciences and the humanities to integrate knowledge from various sources of investigation.

  12. Obituary: William K. Rose (1935-2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimble, Virginia

    2011-12-01

    Stellar astrophysicist William Kenneth Rose died near his home in Potomac, Maryland, on September 30, 2010, after an extended illness. Rose was the son of pharmacist Kenneth William Rose and Shirley Near Rose and was born in Ossining, New York, on August 10, 1935. He received an AB from Columbia College in 1957 and a PhD in physics from Columbia University in 1963, with a thesis on "measurements of linear polarization in discrete radio sources using a 9.4 cm maser," under the direction of Charles H. Townes. Rose played a major role in designing and constructing the maser and used it at a radio telescope at Maryland Point that belonged to the Naval Research Lab. He observed Jupiter and Saturn and a number of extra-solar-system sources, and also diffuse centimeter emission (see appendix). The thesis was not published in an archival journal, but can be found under Library of Congress code QB 475.R67. While in graduate School, Bill married Sheila Tuchman, whose primary scientific interests were biological. None of their three children chose to be scientists, but two are CPAs. Bill moved successfully through the academic hurdles) from a research position at Princeton (1963-67), where a collaboration with Nick Woolf and Martin Schwarzchild on the infrared spectra of giant stars became one of his most-cited papers, to assistant and associate professorships at MIT (1967-71), and then associate and full professorships at the University of Maryland (1971 to retirement in 2005). His most innovative work was probably that on nova explosions arising from degenerate ignition of hydrogen accreted on white dwarfs in close binary systems, published in 1968. The same idea occurred to others at about the same time, and Bill did not, perhaps, get quite his fair share of the credit. I first met Sheila and Bill in summer 1969 at the Stony Brook summer school on stellar evolution (not published until 1972). He lectured on the nature of nova explosions and on nuclear burning in thin

  13. William Halsted, his family and 'queer business methods'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkow, I M

    1996-02-01

    The life and times of William Stewart Halsted have become a blend of fact and sometimes fiction. Lost in this hagiographic haze are certain true aspects of his upbringing, family life, and professional activities. Whether Halsted remains as monumental a figure in the evolution of American surgery as he is presently perceived, remains a master of historical inquiry. For instance, the important consideration of Halsted's independent wealth and its impact on his ability to accept a "full-time" faculty position at The Johns Hopkins Hospital is a question of interest. Newly available information shows that Halsted's father, William Mills Halsted, Jr, was involved in numerous financial irregularities centered around the family's business, Halsted, Haines & Co. Among the father's alleged misconduct was the apparent embezzlement and fraudulent assignment of company funds. Included in these abuses was, at the time of the firm's bankruptcy, the providing of "preference loans" to William Stewart Halsted, which became the basis for the surgeon's later affluence.

  14. Obituary: William L. Kraushaar, 1920-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, George W.

    2009-01-01

    Professor William L. Kraushaar, a former MIT physics professor and a pioneer in the field of high-energy astronomy, died 21 March 2008 of complications from Parkinson's disease. He was 87. Kraushaar received his bachelor's degree from Lafayette College in 1942. During World War II he worked at the National Bureau of Standards on projects that included development of the proximity fuse for artillery shells. After the war he earned his doctorate at Cornell University. In 1949 Kraushaar was appointed research associate at MIT, where he made the first measurements of the mean life of the pi meson at the MIT electron synchrotron. Over the next fifteen years he rose through the faculty ranks, becoming a full professor before leaving MIT for the University of Wisconsin at Madison in 1965. In 1957 Kraushaar began a decade-long effort to map the sky in the "light" of cosmic gamma rays. Their detection promised to open new ways to investigate high-energy processes in the universe. Initial balloon-borne experiments failed due to background gamma rays generated in the residual atmosphere above the highest attainable altitudes. In 1958, Kraushaar seized a new opportunity for experiments above the atmosphere. Working with Professor George Clark, he directed the development in the MIT Laboratory for Nuclear Science of a gamma-ray detector for a satellite experiment that was launched in April 1961 as Explorer 11. It registered 31 events with the electronic signatures of cosmic gamma rays with energies greater than 50 MeV. Kraushaar then initiated a second and more refined experiment to be carried on OSO 3. In this project Kraushaar and Clark were joined by Gordon Garmire, a former student of Kraushaar. The OSO 3 experiment, launched in March of 1967, registered 621 cosmic gamma-ray events. It yielded the first all-sky map of high-energy cosmic gamma rays showing a concentration of gamma rays from directions in the Milky Way where gamma-ray producing interactions of charged cosmic

  15. Postcardiotomy mechanical circulatory support in two infants with williams' syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contrafouris, Constantinos A; Chatzis, Andrew C; Kanakis, Meletios A; Azariadis, Prodromos A; Mitropoulos, Fotios A

    2014-01-01

    Supravalvar aortic stenosis (SVAS) in patients with Williams' syndrome is often accompanied by coronary, pulmonary, and even myocardial lesions and therefore associated with increased perioperative morbidity and mortality. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) provides reliable short-term mechanical circulatory support to patients, especially young, in acute postoperative cardiac failure when conventional means are ineffective. The incorporation of centrifugal pumps in these systems has made their use more efficient and less traumatic. We describe our experience of using the Levitronix CentriMag pump in two patients with Williams' syndrome who underwent surgical correction of supravalvular aortic stenosis.

  16. William Barlow and the Determination of Atomic Arrangement in Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauskopf, Seymour H

    2015-04-01

    William Barlow (1845-1934) was an important if unconventional scientist, known for having developed the 'closest-packing' atomic models of crystal structure. He resumed an early nineteenth-century tradition of utilizing crystallographical and chemical data to determine atomic arrangements in crystals. This essay recounts Barlow's career and scientific activity in three parts: (a) His place in the tradition of determining atomic arrangement in context of this earlier tradition and of contemporaneous developments of crystallography and chemistry, (b) his unconventional career, and (c) the 'success' of his program to determine atomic arrangements in crystals and its influence on the work of William Lawrence Bragg.

  17. The oil spill in Prince William Sound, Alaska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DeGrange A.R.

    1990-02-01

    Full Text Available Following the Exxon Valdez oil spill in Prince William Sound Alaska, on March 24, 1989, treatment centres for sea otters were set up at Valdez, Seward and Homer. Otter survival rates were lower at Valdez than at Seward, probably because the animals collected were closer to the spill in time and space, and oil toxicity was at a maximum. Otters collected in Prince William Sound were predominantly female and pregnant or lactating. Weathered oil persists in otter habitats throughout the spill zone - long term studies are underway to assess the effects of this.

  18. Relational ethics in the novels of Charles Williams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vande Kemp, H

    1987-06-01

    In the novels of Charles Williams, characters are faced with the mundane but profound choice between "charity and selfishness," the City and Infamy. Williams' "way of exchange" and "doctrine of substitution" have direct parallels in contextual family therapy. In Descent Into Hell, he explores the long-term effects of legacy and the balancing of the relational ledger through the process of "substituted" love. In All Hallows' Eve, the focus is on forgiveness and the opportunity to correct relational mistakes while one is in a purgatorial state. Both novels include parallel processes of relational stagnation/disjunction and rejunction, illustrating the fact that our simple, everyday choices have ultimate significance.

  19. 78 FR 52169 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan (Direct... of Collection: William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan (Direct Loan) Program Federal Direct PLUS...

  20. 78 FR 71022 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Christopher Williams: The...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``Christopher Williams: The Production..., 2003), I hereby determine that the objects to be included in the exhibition ``Christopher Williams:...

  1. The life and legacy of William T. Bovie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Preston L

    2013-05-01

    This Historian's Address, presented at the North Pacific Surgical Association 2012 meeting, held in Spokane, Washington, on November 9, 2012, briefly reviews the life and surgical contributions of the inventor William T. Bovie and his collaboration with Dr Harvey Cushing, which led to the widespread acceptance of surgical electrocautery for dissection and hemostasis.

  2. Wilde's worlds: Sir William Wilde in Victorian Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGeachie, J

    2016-05-01

    Other contributors to this collection have evoked the disparate worlds inhabited by Sir William Wilde. To provide an overall assessment of his career. Looking at the historical conditions that made possible such a career spanning such disparate worlds. Deploying methodologies developed by historians of medicine and sociologists of science, the article brings together Wilde the nineteenth century clinician and Dublin man of science, the Wilde of the Census and of the west of Ireland, William Wilde Victorian medical man and Wilde the Irish medical man-the historian of Irish medical traditions and the biographer of Irish medical men, and William Wilde as an Irish Victorian. A variety of close British Isles parallels can be drawn between Wilde and his cohort in the medical elite of Dublin and their clinical peers in Edinburgh and London both in terms of clinical practice and self-presentation and in terms of the social and political challenges facing their respective ancient regime hegemonies in an age of democratic radicalisation. The shared ideological interests of Wilde and his cohort, however, were also challenged by the socio-political particularities and complexities of Ireland during the first half of the nineteenth century culminating in the catastrophe of the Great Famine. William Wilde saw the practice of scientific medicine as offering a means of deliverance from historical catastrophe for Irish society and invoked a specifically Irish scientific and medical tradition going back to the engagement with the condition of Ireland by enlightened medical men in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.

  3. Characterisation of Sleep Problems in Children with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annaz, Dagmara; Hill, Catherine M.; Ashworth, Anna; Holley, Simone; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette

    2011-01-01

    Sleep is critical to optimal daytime functioning, learning and general health. In children with established developmental disorders sleep difficulties may compound existing learning difficulties. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the prevalence and syndrome specificity of sleep problems in Williams syndrome (WS), a…

  4. Strategies and Biases in Location Memory in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farran, Emily K.

    2008-01-01

    Individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) demonstrate impaired visuo-spatial abilities in comparison to their level of verbal ability. In particular, visuo-spatial construction is an area of relative weakness. It has been hypothesised that poor or atypical location coding abilities contribute strongly to the impaired abilities observed on…

  5. Visually Guided Step Descent in Children with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowie, Dorothy; Braddick, Oliver; Atkinson, Janette

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) have impairments in visuospatial tasks and in manual visuomotor control, consistent with parietal and cerebellar abnormalities. Here we examined whether individuals with WS also have difficulties in visually controlling whole-body movements. We investigated visual control of stepping down at a change of…

  6. Nature, the Source of William Wordsworth’s Inspiration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    和光辉

    2014-01-01

    William Wordsworth has been considered a great Romantic poet in English literature. His thoughts and poems have been researched by literary critics from different aspects. This paper argues that nature is the source of his inspiration by analyzing the background of the poet’s life and his famous poems.

  7. Atypical Sleep Architecture and Altered EEG Spectra in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gombos, F.; Bodizs, R.; Kovacs, I.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental genetic disorder characterised by physical abnormalities and a distinctive cognitive profile with intellectual disabilities (IDs) and learning difficulties. Methods: In our study, nine adolescents and young adults with WS and 9 age- and sex-matched typically developing (TD) participants…

  8. Shepard Award Winners, Part 2: Dr. Tracie Williams

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-07-29

    This podcast highlights the accomplishments of Dr. Tracie Williams, recipient of the prestigious 2009 CDC Charles C. Shepard Award.  Created: 7/29/2009 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 7/29/2009.

  9. Musicality Correlates with Sociability and Emotionality in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Rowena; Lai, Philip; Levitin, Daniel J.; Bellugi, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurogenetic developmental disorder characterized by peaks and valleys of cognitive abilities. One peak that has been understudied is the affinity that many individuals with WS have with music. It remains unknown whether their high levels of musical interest, skill, and expressivity are related to their sociable…

  10. Object Recognition in Williams Syndrome: Uneven Ventral Stream Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hearn, Kirsten; Roth, Jennifer K.; Courtney, Susan M.; Luna, Beatriz; Street, Whitney; Terwillinger, Robert; Landau, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a genetic disorder associated with severe visuospatial deficits, relatively strong language skills, heightened social interest, and increased attention to faces. On the basis of the visuospatial deficits, this disorder has been characterized primarily as a deficit of the dorsal stream, the occipitoparietal brain regions…

  11. Comprehension of Sarcasm, Metaphor and Simile in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godbee, Kali; Porter, Melanie

    2013-01-01

    Background: Although people with Williams syndrome (WS) are often characterized as friendly and sociable with relatively good general language abilities, there is emerging evidence of pragmatic difficulties and trouble comprehending aspects of non-literal language. Aims: The main aim was to investigate the comprehension of sarcasm, metaphor and…

  12. Musicality Correlates with Sociability and Emotionality in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Rowena; Lai, Philip; Levitin, Daniel J.; Bellugi, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurogenetic developmental disorder characterized by peaks and valleys of cognitive abilities. One peak that has been understudied is the affinity that many individuals with WS have with music. It remains unknown whether their high levels of musical interest, skill, and expressivity are related to their sociable…

  13. William Butler Yeats, George Antheil, Ezra Pound Friends and Music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Saddlemyer

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available William Butler Yeats was throughout his life determined to relate his words to music, and involved many writers and musicians in his search for the key. While in Rapallo staying near Ezra Pound, he met the young composer George Antheil, who became one of his converts. Others followed, with Yeats continuing to expound and clarify his ambition.

  14. Repayment Book. William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Education, Washington, DC.

    This booklet is intended to help individuals who received William D. Ford Federal Direct Loans as students manage the repayment process. Following an introduction, explanations are offered for how the principal balance of the loan is determined and how interest rates are applied. The following sections explain the four different repayment plans,…

  15. A salute to William D. Novelli and AARP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    William D. Novelli is the CEO of AARP, the membership organization which represents more than 40 million people over the age of 50. He has made AARP not only the largest, but the most respected association in Washington, D.C. He is known nationwide for his advocacy as well as his philanthropy.

  16. Dziewoński Receives 2002 William Bowie Medal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam Dziewoński was awarded the William Bowie Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, which was held on 8 December 2002, in San Francisco, California. The medal recognizes outstanding contributions to fundamental geophysics and unselfish cooperation in research.

  17. Rodríguez-Iturbe Receives 2009 William Bowie Medal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagleson, Peter S.; Rodríguez-Iturbe, Ignacio

    2010-01-01

    Ignacio Rodríguez-Iturbe was awarded the 2009 William Bowie Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, held on 16 December 2009 in San Francisco, Calif. The medal is for “outstanding contributions to fundamental geophysics and for unselfish cooperation in research.”

  18. Louis J. Lanzerotti receives 2011 William Bowie Medal: Citation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Daniel N.; Kennel, Charles F.

    2012-01-01

    Louis J. Lanzerotti was awarded the 2011 William Bowie Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, held on 7 December 2011 in San Francisco, Calif. The medal is for “outstanding contributions to fundamental geophysics and for unselfish cooperation in research.”

  19. Bowie Medal Citation: Wunsch Receives 2006 William Bowie Medal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Lee-Lueng; Wunsch, Carl

    2007-01-01

    Carl Wunsch was awarded the 2006 William Bowie Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, which was held on 13 December 2006, in San Francisco, Calif. The medal recognizes outstanding contributions to fundamental geophysics and for unselfish cooperation in research.

  20. Louis J. Lanzerotti receives 2011 William Bowie Medal: Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzerotti, Louis J.

    2012-01-01

    Louis J. Lanzerotti was awarded the 2011 William Bowie Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, held on 7 December 2011 in San Francisco, Calif. The medal is for “outstanding contributions to fundamental geophysics and for unselfish cooperation in research.”

  1. Memory Abilities in Williams Syndrome: Dissociation or Developmental Delay Hypothesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, Adriana; Sousa, Nuno; Fernandez, Montse; Henriques, Margarida; Goncalves, Oscar F.

    2008-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental genetic disorder often described as being characterized by a dissociative cognitive architecture, in which profound impairments of visuo-spatial cognition contrast with relative preservation of linguistic, face recognition and auditory short-memory abilities. This asymmetric and dissociative cognition…

  2. William Stern: An Historical Model of a Generalist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Dean; Wesley, Frank

    1988-01-01

    Describes William Stern's professional accomplishments, including pioneering work in educational counseling and contributions to general systems such as Gestalt psychology. Argues that Stern's example supports conclusion that no one scientific method provides single best approach to all questions of psychology, and that interaction between…

  3. I Know! It's Backwards Day! Gender Roles and William's Doll

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Kleut, Geraldine

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a case study of an exploration of gender roles in a second-grade classroom. The author discusses some of the discursive identities in which she and her students are positioned, and then uses the picture book William's Doll to introduce a discussion of discursive gender identities with her students. She then asks students to…

  4. Social Criticism in The Chimney Sweeper by William Blake

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱晓芸

    2008-01-01

    This paper mainly focuses on social criticism in William Blake's poems,both entitled"The Chimnet SWeeper"by analy-zing social background at that time and different Views in these two poems.It also tries to embody a fuller effect in thesc two separate poems.

  5. Characterisation of Sleep Problems in Children with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annaz, Dagmara; Hill, Catherine M.; Ashworth, Anna; Holley, Simone; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette

    2011-01-01

    Sleep is critical to optimal daytime functioning, learning and general health. In children with established developmental disorders sleep difficulties may compound existing learning difficulties. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the prevalence and syndrome specificity of sleep problems in Williams syndrome (WS), a…

  6. William Faulkner: No Friend of Brown v. Board of Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polsgrove, Carol

    2001-01-01

    In the years following the Supreme Court's Brown v. Board of Education decision to integrate America's public schools, William Faulkner, Norman Mailer, Hannah Arendt, Robert Penn Warren, and, to a lesser extent, C. Vann Woodward, provided intellectual sustenance to southern efforts to resist racial integration. Focuses on Faulkner's political…

  7. William Morris and John Dewey: Imagining Utopian Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman-Moir, John

    2012-01-01

    With strikingly resonance William Morris and John Dewey independently imagined what utopian education might plausibly be. Neither remotely thought of utopia as a perfectly ordered society, but rather as a process. Each understood education functionally in terms of how it fits with art, work, and democracy within a holistic conception of utopia.…

  8. William Stern: An Historical Model of a Generalist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Dean; Wesley, Frank

    1988-01-01

    Describes William Stern's professional accomplishments, including pioneering work in educational counseling and contributions to general systems such as Gestalt psychology. Argues that Stern's example supports conclusion that no one scientific method provides single best approach to all questions of psychology, and that interaction between…

  9. The Darwinian Center to the Vision of William James.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredo, Eric

    The essence of William James's vision can sometimes be hard to discover due to emotional volatility and exploratory impulsiveness. On the other hand, beneath James's apparent inconsistency was a constancy of purpose that can be easily underestimated. This paper argues that the center of James's vision lay in an interpretation of Darwinism. By…

  10. Benjamin Franklin, William Hewson and the Craven Street bones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Hillson

    1998-11-01

    Full Text Available Renovation of the house in London where Benjamin Franklin lived has led to the discovery of the remains of a late eighteenth-century anatomy school. Investigations by bioarchaeologists from the Institute are revealing William Hewson's remarkable contribution to the development of anatomical science.

  11. Discourse Analysis of Tennessee Williams' "The Glass Menagerie"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalliveettil, George Mathew; Gadallah, Mahmoud Sobhi Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    "The Glass Menagerie" is one of the Tennessee Williams' most famous plays which won the New York Drama Critics' Circle award. It elevated him to be one of the greatest playwrights of his generation. As a playwright, he is skilful to make the readers conscious of the unconscious habits and attitudes in everyday life. In "The Glass…

  12. William Faulkner's Symbolism in A Rose For Emily

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏英姿

    2008-01-01

    The article discusses William Faulkner's writing style in his short story A Rose for Emily,especially his use of sym-bolism helps readers to stimulate the imagination.Through the analysis of his use ofsymbolism,this article wants to deepen our undemanding of the characters in this story.

  13. In Profound Memory of American Friend WILLIAM H. HINTON

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    <正>William H. Hinton, an old friend of the Chinese people, died of illness in Boston, the United States on May 15, 2004 at the age of 85.I was filled with deep sorrow for losing a good friend of the Chinese people.

  14. Personal Space Regulation in Williams Syndrome: The Effect of Familiarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lough, Emma; Flynn, Emma; Riby, Deborah M.

    2016-01-01

    Personal space refers to a protective barrier that we strive to maintain around our body. We examined personal space regulation in young people with Williams syndrome (WS) and their typically developing, chronological age-matched peers using a parent report questionnaire and a stop-distance paradigm. Individuals with WS were reported by their…

  15. Comprehension of Metaphor and Metonymy in Children with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annaz, Dagmara; Van Herwegen, Jo; Thomas, Michael; Fishman, Roza; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette; Rundblad, Gabriella

    2009-01-01

    Background: Figurative language, such as metaphor and metonymy, is very common in daily language use. Its underlying cognitive processes are sometimes viewed as lying at the interface of language and thought. Williams syndrome, which is a rare genetic developmental disorder, provides an opportunity to study this interface because individuals with…

  16. Williams Syndrome: Daily Challenges and Positive Impact on the Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scallan, Susan; Senior, Joyce; Reilly, Colin

    2011-01-01

    Background: Despite the distinctive physical, cognitive, personality and behavioural characteristics associated with Williams syndrome, few studies to date have examined parental experiences of raising a child with this genetic syndrome. Methods: This explorative pilot study employed predominantly qualitative methodologies via face-to-face…

  17. In Profound Memory of American Friend WILLIAM H. HINTON

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RenZhichang

    2004-01-01

    William H. Hinton, an old friend of the Chinese peopie, died of illness in Boston, the United States on May 15, 2004 at the age of 85. I was filled with deep sorrow for losing a good friend of the Chinese people.

  18. A Stylistic Appreciation of William Wordsworth's The Solitary Reaper

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡园媛

    2009-01-01

    This paper, based on the literary stylistic approach, is about the analysis of William Wordsworth's lyrics The Solitary Reaper. The features in its metrics, lexis and imagery explicitly reveal the poet's love for human, passion for nature and principle of simplicity.

  19. Language and Literacy Development of Children with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mervis, Carolyn B.

    2009-01-01

    Williams syndrome is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder caused by deletion of approximately 25 genes on chromosome 7q11.23. Children with the syndrome evidence large individual differences in both broad language and reading abilities. Nevertheless, as a group, children with this syndrome show a consistent pattern characterized by relative…

  20. William Shakespeare’s“Hamlet”and Oedipus Complex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    迪丽努尔

    2014-01-01

    “Hamlet”is one of the great dramas of William Shakespeare. This paper by describing the relationship between Hamlet and his mother, the Ghost and his uncle, tries to approve that Oedipus complex is the main reason of Hamlet’s kil ing his uncle.

  1. The Poetics of "Pattern Recognition": William Gibson's Shifting Technological Subject

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetmore, Alex

    2007-01-01

    William Gibson's 1984 cyberpunk novel "Neuromancer" continues to be a touchstone in cultural representations of the impact of new information and communication technologies on the self. As critics have noted, the posthumanist, capital-driven, urban landscape of "Neuromancer" resembles a Foucaultian vision of a panoptically engineered social space…

  2. Orientation Perception in Williams Syndrome: Discrimination and Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomares, Melanie; Landau, Barbara; Egeth, Howard

    2009-01-01

    Williams Syndrome (WS) is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder, which stems from a genetic deletion on chromosome 7 and causes a profound weakness in visuospatial cognition. Our current study explores how orientation perception may contribute to the visuospatial deficits in WS. In Experiment 1, we found that WS individuals and normal 3-4 year olds…

  3. The Dog's Children: Anishinaabe Texts Told by Angeline Williams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, Leonard, Ed.; Nichols, John D., Ed.

    In 1941, Angeline Williams, an Anishinaabe elder taught the Ojibwa (Chippewa) language to a class at the Linguistic Institute at the University of North Carolina. Ojibwa is an American Indian language which was spoken as a chain of dialects in numerous communities from Quebec across the Great Lakes and into the plains of Saskatchewan. This text…

  4. The Interplay between Anxiety and Social Functioning in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riby, Deborah M.; Hanley, Mary; Kirk, Hannah; Clark, Fiona; Little, Katie; Fleck, Ruth; Janes, Emily; Kelso, Linzi; O'Kane, Fionnuala; Cole-Fletcher, Rachel; Allday, Marianne Hvistendahl; Hocking, Darren; Cornish, Kim; Rodgers, Jacqui

    2014-01-01

    The developmental disorder Williams syndrome (WS) has been associated with an atypical social profile of hyper-sociability and heightened social sensitivity across the developmental spectrum. In addition, previous research suggests that both children and adults with WS have a predisposition towards anxiety. The current research aimed to explore…

  5. Great Alaska Earthquake, Prince William Sound, March 28, 1964

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Prince William Sound magnitude 8.4 earthquake at 03:36 UT on March 28, 1964, was one of the largest shocks ever recorded on the North American Continent. The...

  6. Experiences of Bullying for Individuals with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Marisa H.; Lough, Emma; Griffin, Megan M.; Lane, Laurel A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Individuals with intellectual disability experience high rates of bullying, but it is not known how people with specific syndromes, such as Williams syndrome (WS), experience and respond to bullying. Given their behavioral profile, including hypersociability and heightened anxiety, and their risk for experiencing other forms of…

  7. Joseph Mallord William Turner: Burning of the Houses of Parliament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solender, Katherine; Buchanan, Penelope D.

    1989-01-01

    Provides a lesson plan that introduces students in grades seven-nine to artistic depiction of a specific time and place. Explores Joseph Mallord William Turner's "Burning of the Houses of Parliament" as both visual record and emotional interpretation. Lists instructional strategies for description, analysis, interpretation, and judgment. Suggests…

  8. Perceptual Speech and Paralinguistic Skills of Adolescents with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargrove, Patricia M.; Pittelko, Stephen; Fillingane, Evan; Rustman, Emily; Lund, Bonnie

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to compare selected speech and paralinguistic skills of speakers with Williams syndrome (WS) and typically developing peers and to demonstrate the feasibility of providing preexisting databases to students to facilitate graduate research. In a series of three studies, conversational samples of 12 adolescents with…

  9. The Dog's Children: Anishinaabe Texts Told by Angeline Williams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, Leonard, Ed.; Nichols, John D., Ed.

    In 1941, Angeline Williams, an Anishinaabe elder taught the Ojibwa (Chippewa) language to a class at the Linguistic Institute at the University of North Carolina. Ojibwa is an American Indian language which was spoken as a chain of dialects in numerous communities from Quebec across the Great Lakes and into the plains of Saskatchewan. This text…

  10. How Executive Functions Are Related to Intelligence in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, Ana; Cruz, Raquel; Sampaio, Adriana; Garayzabal, Elena; Martinez-Regueiro, Rocio; Goncalves, Oscar F.; Carracedo, Angel; Fernandez-Prieto, Montse

    2012-01-01

    Williams syndrome is characterized by impairments in executive functions (EFs). However, it remains unknown how distinct types of EFs relate to intelligence in this syndrome. The present study analyzed performance on working memory, inhibiting and shifting, and its links to IQ in a sample of 17 individuals with WS, and compared them with a group…

  11. Judicial Management: The Achievements of Chief Justice William Howard Taft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Robert

    1998-01-01

    Illuminates the importance of Chief Justice William Howard Taft in creating the modern administrative role of the Chief Justice of the United States. Specifically, the article examines the Act of 14 September 1922 that Taft championed in Congress to give the Chief Justice better tools for managing the judiciary. (DSK)

  12. William Brennan and the Failed "Theory" of Actual Malice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillmor, Donald M.

    This paper contains an analysis of Justice William Brennan's Supreme Court opinions concerning cases on freedom of expression and his interpretations of Alexander Meiklejohn's theory of actual malice in cases of libel. Particular attention is paid to Brennan's landmark contribution to the law of libel, his opinion in "New York Times v.…

  13. Word-Preserving Arts: Material Inscription, Ekphrasis, and Spatial Form in the Later Work of William Wordsworth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Peter

    William Wordsworth, posterity, reading, material inscription, ekphrasis, description, sonnet, portraiture......William Wordsworth, posterity, reading, material inscription, ekphrasis, description, sonnet, portraiture...

  14. Reaching beyond Uncle William: a century of William James in theory and in life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croce, Paul J

    2010-11-01

    During the hundred years since his death, James's works have developed a reputation for literary flair and personal appeal, but also for inconsistency and lack of rigor; this has contributed to more admiration than influence. He had a talent rare among intellectuals for popularization of complex ideas. Meanwhile, his difficult coming of age and his compelling personality have contributed to an iconic status as a kind of uncle figure in philosophy, psychology, religious studies, and more fields that he influenced, and in American intellectual life in general, rather than as a major philosopher and scholar. Often reflecting these ways of depicting James, his biographies have gone through three phases: in the early-to-middle twentieth century, emphasis on his development of theories as solutions to personal problems; since the 1960s, increased scrutiny of deep troubles in his private life; and recently renewed attention to intellectual factors especially as amplified by greater appreciation of James's theories in the last generation. Now, with so much knowledge and insight achieved for understanding his personal life and his contributions to many fields, a next frontier for biographical work will be in synthesis of these strands of the life of William James. Recent and prospective work offers the promise of finding deeper meaning and implications in his work beyond, and even through, his informal style, and with integration of his apparent inconsistencies.

  15. 77 FR 43276 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection Requests; Federal Student Aid; William D. Ford Federal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-24

    ... Notice of Proposed Information Collection Requests; Federal Student Aid; William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program General Forbearance Request SUMMARY: Borrowers who receive loans through the William D... of Collection: William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program General Forbearance Request. OMB...

  16. 77 FR 47374 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection Requests; Federal Student Aid; William D. Ford Federal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-08

    ... Notice of Proposed Information Collection Requests; Federal Student Aid; William D. Ford Federal Direct... William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan (Direct Loan) and Federal Family Education Loan (FFEL) Programs may... of Collection: William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan (Direct Loan) Program/Federal Family Loan...

  17. 78 FR 11857 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-20

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program... of Collection: William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program (DL) Regulations. OMB Control Number: 1845... Annual Burden Hours: 535,998. Abstract: The William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program regulations...

  18. 33 CFR 161.60 - Vessel Traffic Service Prince William Sound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... William Sound. 161.60 Section 161.60 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Movement Reporting System Areas and Reporting Points § 161.60 Vessel Traffic Service Prince William Sound... Cape Hinchinbrook Light to Schooner Rock Light, comprising that portion of Prince William Sound between...

  19. 75 FR 22436 - Michael Williams-Control Exemption-St. Maries River Railroad, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-28

    ... Surface Transportation Board Michael Williams-Control Exemption-St. Maries River Railroad, Inc. Michael Williams (applicant),\\1\\ a noncarrier, has filed a verified notice of exemption to acquire control of St... from STMA's parent, Potlatch Land & Lumber, LLC, by Williams Group, Inc. (WG).\\2\\ Applicant...

  20. 76 FR 13667 - Commercial Furniture Group, Inc., Formerly Known as Falcon Products, Inc., Shelby Williams, Howe...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-14

    ..., Inc., Shelby Williams, Howe and Thonet, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Staffing Solutions... Williams, Howe and Thonet, Chicago, IL; Amended Certification Regarding Eligibility To Apply for Worker... Williams, Howe and Thonet. New information shows that some workers separated from employment at...

  1. Highly toxinogenic but avirulent Park-Williams 8 strain of Corynebacterium diphtheriae does not produce siderophore.

    OpenAIRE

    Russell, L. M.; Holmes, R K

    1985-01-01

    The highly toxinogenic Park-Williams 8 strain of Corynebacterium diphtheriae grows slowly in vitro and is avirulent. C. diphtheriae Park-Williams 8 is defective in iron uptake and does not produce the corynebacterial siderophore corynebactin. Addition of partially purified corynebactin stimulated iron uptake and growth of iron-deprived C. diphtheriae Park-Williams 8 cells.

  2. William and Charles Mayo: their influence on American medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaya-Prado, Roberto; Rubí, Marisol Godínez

    2007-01-01

    In a little-known Midwest town named Rochester, Minnesota, a talented physician grew in fame and respect: Dr. William Worrall Mayo, who was influential in the evolution of medicine. He was a steadfast learner and raised two sons, William and Charles, to follow in his footsteps and further medical knowledge. They were leaders in surgery and in the creation of advanced and sophisticated medical facilities. Their talents, the issues surrounding medical practice, and unexpected opportunity all came into play for the Mayos. Two hospitals, St. Mary's Hospital and later the Methodist Hospital, witnessed and influenced the advancement of medicine through the Mayo Clinic heritage and dynasty in Minnesota and the rest of the world. In this article, we focus on the role of the Mayo brothers and their influence over the increasing acceptance of hospital care in America and abroad.

  3. Ischemic Stroke in Williams-Beuren Syndrome: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Der Lee

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available A 15-year-old girl was admitted because of an acute onset of facial palsy and right hemiparesis. The patient had a history of moderate mental retardation and developmental delay. On admission, her vital signs were stable, except for high blood pressure. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated an infarct involving the left internal capsule and putamen. Because of the patient's young age, an extensive stroke survey was performed. Williams-Beuren syndrome was finally confirmed by fluorescent in situ hybridization. Compared with the previously reported cases, no evidence of cerebral arterial stenosis or cardiac abnormalities was found by noninvasive imaging techniques. Because Williams-Beuren syndrome is a complex, multiple congenital anomaly syndrome with prominent cardiovascular features, regular assessment and antihypertensive treatment are necessary to minimize the lifelong cardiovascular risk in patients with this syndrome.

  4. Williams syndrome and mature B-Leukemia: A random association?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decimi, Valentina; Fazio, Grazia; Dell'Acqua, Fabiola; Maitz, Silvia; Galbiati, Marta; Rizzari, Carmelo; Biondi, Andrea; Cazzaniga, Giovanni; Selicorni, Angelo

    2016-12-01

    Williams syndrome (WBS) is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder with specific phenotypic characteristics and cardiac abnormalities, but is not considered as a cancer predisposing condition. However, in rare cases, malignancies have been described in patients with WBS, with hematologic cancer (mainly Burkitt Lymphoma and Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia) as the most represented. We report here the case of a boy with WS and B-NHL. This is the unique case within the large cohort of patients (n = 117) followed in our institution for long time (mean clinical follow-up, 13 years). We herewith propose that the BCL7B gene, located in the chromosomal region commonly deleted in Williams syndrome, could potentially have a role in this particular association.

  5. Emily Dickinson's ophthalmic consultation with Henry Willard Williams, MD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Donald L

    2012-12-01

    Emily Dickinson is one of America's premier poets of the 19th century. Henry Willard Williams, MD, was one of the very first physicians to limit his practice to ophthalmology and was the established leader in his field in Boston, Massachusetts. They met during the time of the Civil War, when Emily consulted him about her ophthalmic disorder. No records of the diagnosis survive. Photophobia, aching eyes, and a restriction in her ability to work up close were her main symptoms. Iritis, exotropia, or psychiatric problems are the most frequent diagnoses offered to explain her difficulties. Rather than attempt a definitive conclusion, this article will offer an additional possibility that Dr Williams likely considered (ie, hysterical hyperaesthesia of the retina). This was a common diagnosis at that time, although it has currently faded from use.

  6. The sub-peritoneal arterial plexus of Sir William Turner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoja, Mohammadali M; Tubbs, R Shane; Loukas, Marious; Shokouhi, Ghaffar; Ghabili, Kamyar; Agutter, Paul S

    2010-08-20

    Sir William Turner (1832-1916) was Professor of Anatomy at the University of Edinburgh. His classic paper of 1863 on the anastomoses between the parietal and visceral branches of the abdominal aorta, later known as the sub-peritoneal arterial plexus of Turner, has mostly been forgotten. Located in the retroperitoneum and surrounding the kidneys and other adjacent structures, this plexus is an important route of collateral circulation. In the current paper, we discuss the sub-peritoneal arterial plexus as described by Turner in 1863 and review the literature concerning its potential clinical significance in the kidney, emphasizing its probable role in the metastatic spread of various tumors of abdominal organs and in the continuing viability of the kidney after renal artery occlusion. A biographical sketch of Sir William Turner is also presented.

  7. Environmental mutagenesis and radiation biology: The legacy of William Morgan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Jeffrey L

    2017-07-25

    A symposium entitled Environmental Mutagenesis and Radiation Biology was held on September 27, 2016 to honor the memory of Dr. William F. Morgan who passed away unexpectedly on November 13, 2015. The speakers presented the latest reviews on homologous recombination repair, induced genetic instability, bystander effects, and risk estimate development. Their presentations are presented following the introduction. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. William Styron's Sophie's Choice : Choice, Guilt, and Fate

    OpenAIRE

    田中, 久男

    1984-01-01

    Sophie's Choice (1979), William Styron's autobiographical novel, deals, like his other works, with the nature of evil in all mankind: "our proclivity toward hatred and toward massive domination," the grievous proclivity which was embodied on the largest scale in the despotic institutions of slavery and the concentration camps. This paper, though analyzing the obsessions of three main characters, as well as exploring the issue of the form of the first-person narration employed in this book, is...

  9. William H. Sheldon and the culture of the somatotype

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    The burden of this dissertation is to show that William Sheldon's somatotype project should be seen as an integral aspect of modernist culture. Sheldon engaged the same problems with modernity and the "Second Industrial Revolution" (urbanization, overpopulation, industrialization, alienation) that confronted modernist poets, novelists, and philosophers. In this I am elaborating Dorothy Ross's recent metaphor, "modernist impulses in the human sciences" (1994). Both scientists and artists were ...

  10. Clinical usefulness of the Vaughan Williams classification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobbe, S M

    1987-03-01

    The clinical usefulness of the Vaughan Williams classification scheme is limited by the complexity of the mechanisms of arrhythmia formation in man, which offer multiple potential sites for intervention. The properties of antiarrhythmic drugs may be considerably altered in abnormal myocardium. Despite these limitations, however, the classification provides a valuable conceptual framework for the understanding of the clinical electrophysiological properties of antiarrhythmic drugs and for their use.

  11. Sir William Rowan Hamilton: Life, Achievements, Stature in Physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-06-01

    Against the background of the development ofphysics, and in particular of mechanics, over thecenturies since Galileo and Newton, we describethe life and work of William Rowan Hamilton inthe 19th century. The depth of his ideas whichbrought together the understanding of ray opticsand classical mechanics, and the remarkableways in which his work paved the way to theconstruction of quantum mechanics in the 20thcentury, are emphasized.

  12. Eccentric neurosurgical virtuoso: the life and times of William Sharpe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehder, Roberta; Cohen, Alan R

    2015-07-01

    William Sharpe was an intriguing figure in the history of American neurosurgery. He was an extraordinarily bright and gifted man who led a flamboyant, colorful, and unconventional life. He had an international impact on the field of neurosurgery during the first half of the 20th century, yet few practicing neurosurgeons know his name. In this report, the authors discuss Sharpe's contributions to neurosurgery along with the remarkable quirkiness that came to define his professional and personal life.

  13. OBITUARY: Sir William Mitchell Physicist and enthusiast for science

    CERN Multimedia

    Cowley, R

    2002-01-01

    "William Mitchell was successively head of Physics at Reading and Oxford universities, and Chairman of the Science and Engineering Research Council from 1985 to 1990. He is largely responsible for the excellent neutron and X-ray facilities that are available for research by scientists in the UK. He was one of the first to realise that these uniquely powerful facilities would be essential tools not only for physicists but also for chemists, biologists, materials scientists and engineers" (1 page).

  14. William Butler Yeats and High Modernist legacy in Easter 1916

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wit Pietrzak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article proposes to read the poem by William Butler Yeats Easter 1916 in order to trace its relationships with the poetics of High Modernismrepresented by Ezra Pound, Thomas Staerns Eliot and James Joyce.During the analysis not only the historical and literary background ofthe poem is presented but also the relationship between the poet’s imaginationand the realities around him. Easter 1916 is regarded as one ofthe greatest works of modernist poetry.

  15. Fissured and geographic tongue in Williams-Beuren syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeta Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Williams-Beuren Syndrome (WBS is a rare, most often sporadic, genetic disease caused by a chromosomal microdeletion at locus 7q11.23 involving 28 genes. It is characterized by congenital heart defects, neonatal hypercalcemia, skeletal and renal abnormalities, cognitive disorder, social personality disorder, and dysmorphic facies. A number of clinical findings has been reported, but none of the studies evaluated this syndrome considering oral cavity. We here report a fissured and geographic tongue in association with WBS.

  16. Who Invented the Word Asteroid: William Herschel or Stephen Weston?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Clifford J.; Orchiston, Wayne

    2011-11-01

    William Herschel made the first serious study of 1 Ceres and 2 Pallas in the year 1802. He was moved by their dissimilarities to the other planets to coin a new term to distinguish them. For this purpose he enlisted the aid of his good friends William Watson and Sir Joseph Banks. Watson gave him a long list of possible names, which Herschel rejected. With a lifetime of experience classifying and naming newly found objects in nature, Banks became the man both Erasmus Darwin (in 1781) and William Herschel (in 1802) turned to for sage advice in developing a new descriptive language. In the case of Ceres and Pallas, Banks turned the task over to his friend, the noted philologist Stephen Weston, FRS. It has recently been stated by a noted British historian that it was Weston - not Herschel - who coined the term 'asteroid' to collectively describe Ceres and Pallas. This claim is investigated, and parallels are drawn in the use of neologism in astronomy and botany.

  17. Dreamers in dialogue: evolution, sex and gender in the utopian visions of William Morris and William Henry Hudson

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterina Novák

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to explore the parallels between two late-nineteenth-century utopias,William Henry Hudsons A Crystal Age (1882 and William Morriss News from Nowhere (1891. Itaims to explore how these two works respond to the transition from a kinetic to a static conception ofutopia that under pressure from evolutionary and feminist discourses took place during the period.Particular focus lies on the way in which this is negotiated through the depiction of evolution, sexuality,and gender roles in the respective novels, and how the depiction of these disruptive elements may workas a means of ensuring the readers active engagement in political, intellectual and emotional terms.

  18. O espetáculo do crescimento, de William Easterly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Passanezi

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available William Easterly, renomado consultor do Banco Mundial, com coragem e objetividade expõe a verdadeira face  do  fracasso de inúmeras medidas  adotadas (e defendidas por importantes organismos  internacionais  que,  por  muitos  anos, vêm  trabalhando  em  prol  de  um  único  objetivo: promover um crescimento sustentado e real para as economias que vivem em condições precárias.

  19. Dr. William Thornton's views on sleep, dreams, and resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulson, George

    2009-01-01

    William Thornton, MD, was a polymath who designed the Capitol of the U.S. Capital and the Octagon House, present home of the American Institute of Architecture. He was the founding director of the U.S. Patent Office. His collected papers, which are now preserved at the U.S. Library of Congress, though pruned by the wife who lived almost 40 years after him, are extensive and include comments on science, education, slavery, and politics. His views on sleep and dreaming and his concepts of resuscitation are reviewed as the opinions of an educated man early in the nineteenth century.

  20. Differential Equations Related to the Williams-Bjerknes Tumour Model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    F Martinez; A R Villena

    2000-08-01

    We investigate an initial value problem which is closely related to the Williams-Bjerknes tumour model for a cancer which spreads through an epithelial basal layer modeled on ⊂ 2. The solution of this problem is a family =(()), where each () could be considered as an approximation to the probability that the cell situated at is cancerous at time . We prove that this problem has a unique solution, it is defined on [0, + ∞], and, for some relevant situations, lim → ∞ ()=1 for all ∈ . Moreover, we study the expected number of cancerous cells at time .

  1. William Mountfort’s Greenwich Park (1691): a critical edition

    OpenAIRE

    Correa Sánchez, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Falta palabras clave La presente tesis doctoral consta de dos partes. Por un lado, una edición crítica de la obra teatral Greenwich Park, escrita por William Mountfort en 1691 y que desde entonces ha estado inédita. El propósito último de la edición es ofrecer al lector moderno una versión accesible de la obra de Mountfort, modernizando determinados aspectos de la ortografía y la puntuación —en ambos casos, debidamente argumentados en la descripción de la política editorial— que puedan sup...

  2. Marcus Williams 危机与转机

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    近半年来持续"修理"阵容的网队,在今年夏天签下了前魔术队后卫杜林(Keyon Dooling)当作球队第六人。这个动作让上季因为受伤而表现并不怎么理想的M.威廉姆斯(Marcus Williams)在当时备感压力。当时还在网队的M.威廉姆斯说:"我一直认为谁比较强就谁上场,我会努力拿

  3. Detection of a Williams Beuren syndrome case by MLPA.

    OpenAIRE

    Laurito, Sergio Roberto; Branham, Maria Teresita; Herrero, Gustavo; Marsá, Silvana; Garro, Fernanda; Roque Moreno, Maria

    2015-01-01

    El síndrome de Williams-Beuren (WBS) es un trastorno del desarrollo neurológico que incluye diferentes manifestaciones clínicas como estenosis aórtica supravalvular, lesiones cerebrovasculares, retraso en el crecimiento, rasgos faciales "élficos" y retraso mental. Es causado por una microdeleción heterocigótica de genes contiguos en la banda cromosómica 7q11.23, generando un cambio en el número de copias (CNV) de esta región crítica. Los pacientes presentan una amplia manifestación clínica y ...

  4. William James' The Varieties of Religious Experience revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Curtis W

    2008-12-01

    This essay addresses the familial, religious, and cultural context for the writing and presentation of William James' classic work The Varieties of Religious Experience. The essay emphasizes the importance of the impact of Henry James, Senior, upon his son. This relationship along with a severe cardiac condition contributed to James' taking on and carrying through with his exploration of religious experience. The article explores The Varieties and concludes with a discussion of the importance of James' use of narrative to the study of mind-body medicine. This paper was originally presented at the Richardson Research Seminar in the History of Psychiatry at Weill Cornell Medical College.

  5. Inconsistency of Carnot's theorem's proof by William Thomson

    CERN Document Server

    Ihnatovych, V

    2013-01-01

    William Thomson proved Carnot's theorem basing on postulate: "It is impossible, by means of inanimate material agency, to derive mechanical effect from any portion of matter by cooling it below the temperature of the coldest of the surrounding objects". The present paper demonstrates that Carnot's theorem can be proved based on the contrary Thomson's postulate: "It is impossible to use the mechanical effect to the heating the coldest of surrounding objects". A conclusion that Carnot's theorem does not follow from the Thomson's postulate has been drawn.

  6. Seguridad social, empleo y propiedad privada en William Beveridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Llanos Reyes

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to approach the economic and political notions of William Beveridge, which proposed the construction of the British Welfare State immediately after WWII. A form of State which sought to overcome the crisis of capitalism by proposing control over the system. We attempt to demonstrate the relation that should exist, according to Beveridge, the "father" of this model of capitalist State, between the development of a social security system, employment, and the situation of private property, while simultaneously pointing out the specifics and complexity of his ideas in the relation observed between full occupation and private property as basic elements for the construction of a Social Security system.

  7. Stylistic Analysis of William Blake’s Poem London

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈杨波

    2014-01-01

    William Blake utilized ingenious language in his creation of the poem London. Foregrounding and deviation are well practised in this poem. In rhyme pattern, the poem takes end rhyme, consonance, alliteration and internal rhyme. In rhythm pat-tern, the poem mainly uses iambic tetrameter along with the variation of three troches and one single stress at the end of lines which produces a shocking atmosphere. Among syntax features, emphatic pattern and anticipatory structure are used. Among lexi-cal features, the reiteration of specific words makes neat euphonious parallelism while the subtle pun word create a far-reaching artistry.

  8. Applications of computer modeling at Wrightson, Johnson, Haddon & Williams, Inc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, James A.; Seep, Benjamin C.

    2002-05-01

    Computer modeling has become useful as an investigative tool and as a client communication and explanation tool in the field of acoustical consulting. A variety of in-house developed and commercially available applications is in constant use at the firm of Wrightson, Johnson, Haddon & Williams. Examples likely to be demonstrated (depending on time) include use of digital filtering for building exterior noise reduction comparisons, a shell isolation rating (SIR) model, simple sound barrier programs, an HVAC spreadsheet, a visual sightline modeling tool, specular sound reflections in a semicircular arc, and some uses of CATT-acoustic auralizations.

  9. The Gent-McWilliams parameterization: 20/20 hindsight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gent, Peter R.

    It has now been 20 years since the Gent and McWilliams paper on "Isopycnal Mixing in Ocean Circulation Models" was published in January 1990 issue of the Journal of Physical Oceanography. That paper was highlighted at the CLIVAR Working Group on Ocean Model Development "Workshop on Ocean Mesoscale Eddies" which was held at the UK Meteorological Office in April 2009, and this review paper is based on the talk given at that Workshop. It contains some hindsights on how the parameterization of the effect of mesoscale eddies on the mean flow came about; which is a question that I am asked quite often. A few important results from including the parameterization in a non-eddy-resolving ocean model are recalled. Including this parameterization, along with other improvements to all the components, in the first version of the Community Climate System Model resulted in the first non-drifting control simulation in a climate model that did not require flux corrections. Also included are brief comments on how the Gent and McWilliams eddy parameterization has been modified and improved since the original proposal in 1990.

  10. Hydrologic setting of Williams Lake, Hubbard County, Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Donald I.; Winter, Thomas C.

    1980-01-01

    The hydrology and geology of Williams Lake watershed was studied to evaluate the accuracy of various methods used to determine precipitation and evaporation in lake water-balance studies and to define a lake and ground-water system according to approaches suggested by theoretical modeling studies. Regression analysis between estimated and measured precipitation at the lake showed that the accuracy of regionalization techniques is dependent on the closeness of the data network to the lake. For individual storms, the average-value method was found to be better than either the weighted average or isohyetal methods of determining precipitation, but it was least accurate in estimating 14-day average precipitation. The amount of evaporation calculated by the mass-transfer method ranged from 2 to 7 inches per month from July to October 1978, depending on the method used to determine the mass-transfer coefficient. Test drilling indicated that 30 to 150 feet of sand and gravel overlies till in the Williams Lake watershed. A sand lens about 50 feet thick occurs within the till.

  11. William Osler and Seymour Thomas, "the boy artist of Texas".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Charles S

    2016-07-01

    Critics consider the 1908-1909 portrait of William Osler by S. Seymour Thomas the best of six oil-on-canvas portraits of Osler done from life, including those by the more acclaimed US artists John Singer Sargent and William Merritt Chase. Osler called it "the best pictorial diagnosis I have ever seen" and told Thomas "I am at your service." A reappraisal of Seymour Thomas explains why his portrait makes us feel much as the artist did in Osler's presence, which is the original English-language definition of "empathy." Thomas told his subject that "I feel that you can look clear through me and see the wall on the other side." The intensity of Osler's gaze affects us similarly. The portrait satisfied Osler, but his wife, Grace Revere Osler, never warmed to it, perhaps because it depicts so clearly a highly focused, agenda-driven man. Helen Thomas used the portrait to promote her husband's business, and, after a tortuous history, the portrait eventually returned to Oxford University, where it now hangs inconspicuously in the Radcliffe Science Library.

  12. Face processing in Williams syndrome is already atypical in infancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dean eD'Souza

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Face processing is a crucial socio-cognitive ability. Is it acquired progressively or does it constitute an innately-specified, face-processing module? The latter would be supported if some individuals with seriously impaired intelligence nonetheless showed intact face-processing abilities. Some theorists claim that Williams syndrome (WS provides such evidence since, despite IQs in the 50s, adolescents/adults with WS score in the normal range on standardised face-processing tests. Others argue that atypical neural and cognitive processes underlie WS face-processing proficiencies. But what about infants with WS? Do they start with typical face-processing abilities, with atypicality developing later, or are atypicalities already evident in infancy? We used an infant familiarisation/novelty design and compared infants with WS to healthy controls as well as to a group of infants with DS matched on both mental and chronological age. Participants were familiarised with a schematic face, after which they saw a novel face in which either the features (eye shape were changed or just the configuration of the original features. Configural changes were processed successfully by controls, but not by infants with WS who were only sensitive to featural changes and who showed syndrome-specific profiles different from infants with the other neurodevelopmental disorder. Our findings indicate that theorists can no longer use the case of Williams syndrome to support claims that evolution has endowed the human brain with an independent face-processing module.

  13. Sir William Osler's speech at Troy: a Trojan horse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Michael E

    2012-01-01

    Troy, New York, is a city of 55,000 people in upstate New York located along the Hudson River. A city of surprisingly rich cultural heritage, it was the home of New York state's first hospital outside New York City. The 50th anniversary celebration of Troy's hospital brought William Osler to the city as the keynote speaker. This speech, delivered on November 28, 1900, is one of Sir William's less well known addresses. Osler began his comments with Sir Thomas More's Utopia and talked at length about the hospital, its obligations, the influences it has upon the community, and the role of physicians and surgeons. He broached one of his old saws, the salary of attending physicians and their needed role in hospital management. His words were published in the diamond jubilee's records, but the hospital did not outlive its prominent guest professor, and it closed its doors in 1914. Just like the great historical city of Troy, New York's own Troy was on the brink of decline, and its hospital would be the first fatality. Therefore, it is almost prescient that the words of Osler, taken into historical context juxtaposed against the socioeconomic forces at work, are akin to the Greek's offering of a wooden edifice to end the Trojan War.

  14. William Stewart Halsted: letters to a young female admirer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, J L; Gordon, T A; Kehoe, M W; McCall, N

    2001-11-01

    To present the first new information in the past 25 years concerning the life of Dr. William Stewart Halsted. This paper reports on recently discovered personal correspondence of Dr. Halsted, beginning at age 66, to a young lady, Elizabeth Blanchard Randall, 40 years his junior. Dr. William Stewart Halsted is generally considered the most important and influential surgeon that this country has produced. During his Hopkins days in Baltimore (1886-1922) he was rather reclusive, and little is known of his personal life. He was married but had no children. Several biographies written by Halsted's contemporaries constitute the bulk of what is known about Halsted's personal life. All extant letters from Dr. Halsted to Miss Randall were reviewed. Archival materials were consulted to understand the context for this friendship. The correspondence between Halsted and Randall took place during a 3-year period, although their acquaintance was probably long-standing. The letters reveal Dr. Halsted and Miss Randall's great and warm affection for each other, despite their 40-year age difference. The letters have a playful nature absent in Halsted's other correspondence. This relationship has not been previously noted. Late in Halsted's life, he developed a warm and affectionate relationship with a young lady 40 years his junior, as revealed in Halsted's correspondence. Halsted's warm, personal, and playful letters are in stark contrast to his biographers' portrayals of him as a more serious and reclusive person.

  15. Visual search deficits in Williams-Beuren syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montfoort, I; Frens, M A; Hooge, I Th C; Haselen, G C Lagers-van; van der Geest, J N

    2007-03-14

    Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS) is a rare genetic condition characterized by several physical and mental traits, such as a poor visuo-spatial processing and a relative strength in language. In this study we investigated how WBS subjects search and scan their visual environment. We presented 10 search displays on a computer screen to WBS subjects as well as control subjects, with the instruction to find a target out of several stimulus elements. We analyzed the eye movement patterns for fixation characteristics and systematicy of search. Fixations generally lasted longer in WBS subjects than in control subjects. WBS subjects made more fixations at a stimulus element they had already looked at and more fixations that were not aimed at a stimulus element at all, decreasing the efficiency of search. These outcomes lead to the conclusion that visual search of individuals with Williams-Beuren syndrome is less effective than in control subjects. This finding may be related to their motor deficits, an impaired processing of global visual information and/or deficits in working memory and could reflect impairments within the dorsal stream.

  16. Environmental Review for the CV-22 Beddown at Yokota Air Base, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-24

    Development Plan (U) IFR Instrument Flight Rules (U) INRMP Integrated Natural Resources Management Plan (U) ISWMP Integrated Solid Waste Management Plan (U...Control (RAPCON), and have a certain number of instrument flight rules ( IFR ) operations or passenger enplanements. Although the actual configuration of... IFR traffic. ● (U) Alert Areas are established to inform nonparticipating pilots of areas that may contain a high volume of pilot training or other

  17. Diverticulite em adolescente com Síndrome de Williams: relato de caso Diverticulitis in adolescent with Williams Syndrome: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josemberg Marins Campos

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available A Síndrome de Williams é uma doença genética rara, atribuída a deleção do gene da elastina no cromossomo 7. É caracterizada por estenose de aorta, divertículos de bexiga, constipação, retardo mental leve, fácies dismórfica, fraqueza da parede da bexiga e do cólon que levam ao surgimento de divertículos. Relata-se um caso de diverticulite aguda em paciente de 18 anos, o resultado do tratamento clínico durante 5 anos e o diagnóstico diferencial de abdome agudo nesta doença. A indicação de colectomia eletiva é discutida, considerando o pouco conhecimento da história natural da diverticulite nesta síndrome.The Syndrome of Williams is a rare genetic illness, attributed the deletion of the gene of the elastin in chromosome 7. It is characterized by aortic stenosis, bladder diverticula's, constipation, light mental retardation, dysmorphic facies, weakness of the wall of the bladder and colon that they lead to the sprouting of diverticula. A case of acute diverticulitis in patient of 18 years is told, the result of the clinical treatment during 5 years and the differential diagnosis of acute abdomen in this illness. The indication of elective colectomy is argued, considering the unfamiliarity of the natural history of the diverticulitis in the syndrome.

  18. John Dalton and the London atomists: William and Bryan Higgins, William Austin, and new Daltonian doubts about the origin of the atomic theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Mark I.

    2014-01-01

    Most historians have ruled out the possibility that John Dalton was influenced by the theories of atomists William and Bryan Higgins, as well as William Austin, in developing his first table of atomic weights on 6 September 1803. I review and evaluate the case to be made for the influence of each scientist on Dalton. Contrary to prevailing views, I raise new Daltonian doubts, especially for Bryan Higgins.

  19. Buchmann-Williams Authenticated Key Agreement Protocol With Pre-shared Password

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soufiane Mezroui

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Based on Buchmann-Williams key exchange protocol, a Buchmann-Williams Authenticated Key Agreement (BWAKA protocol with pre-shared password is proposed. Its security relies on the Discrete Logarithm Problem over class groups of number fields. It provides identity authentication, perfect forward secrecy and key validation.

  20. Auditory Attraction: Activation of Visual Cortex by Music and Sound in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton-Wells, Tricia A.; Cannistraci, Christopher J.; Anderson, Adam W.; Kim, Chai-Youn; Eapen, Mariam; Gore, John C.; Blake, Randolph; Dykens, Elisabeth M.

    2010-01-01

    Williams syndrome is a genetic neurodevelopmental disorder with a distinctive phenotype, including cognitive-linguistic features, nonsocial anxiety, and a strong attraction to music. We performed functional MRI studies examining brain responses to musical and other types of auditory stimuli in young adults with Williams syndrome and typically…

  1. Brief Report: Developing Spatial Frequency Biases for Face Recognition in Autism and Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Hayley C.; Annaz, Dagmara; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette; Johnson, Mark H.

    2011-01-01

    The current study investigated whether contrasting face recognition abilities in autism and Williams syndrome could be explained by different spatial frequency biases over developmental time. Typically-developing children and groups with Williams syndrome and autism were asked to recognise faces in which low, middle and high spatial frequency…

  2. 34 CFR 662.22 - How does the J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board select fellows?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How does the J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board select fellows? 662.22 Section 662.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of... Foreign Scholarship Board select fellows? (a) The J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board...

  3. 34 CFR 663.22 - How does the J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board select fellows?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How does the J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board select fellows? 663.22 Section 663.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of... Scholarship Board select fellows? The J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board selects fellows on...

  4. Auditory Attraction: Activation of Visual Cortex by Music and Sound in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton-Wells, Tricia A.; Cannistraci, Christopher J.; Anderson, Adam W.; Kim, Chai-Youn; Eapen, Mariam; Gore, John C.; Blake, Randolph; Dykens, Elisabeth M.

    2010-01-01

    Williams syndrome is a genetic neurodevelopmental disorder with a distinctive phenotype, including cognitive-linguistic features, nonsocial anxiety, and a strong attraction to music. We performed functional MRI studies examining brain responses to musical and other types of auditory stimuli in young adults with Williams syndrome and typically…

  5. 77 FR 63308 - J. William Foley Incorporated v. United Illuminating Company; Notice of Complaint

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission J. William Foley Incorporated v. United Illuminating Company; Notice of... Federal Power Act, 16 U.S.C. 824(e) and 825(e), J. William Foley Incorporated (Complainant) filed a...

  6. 77 FR 58818 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection Requests; Federal Student Aid; William D. Ford Federal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Notice of Proposed Information Collection Requests; Federal Student Aid; William D. Ford Federal Direct... notice will be considered public records. Title of Collection: William D. Ford Federal Direct...

  7. 78 FR 45515 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program... to this notice will be considered public records. Title of Collection: William D. Ford Federal...

  8. Valuing Higher Education: An Appreciation of the Work of Gareth Williams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Ronald, Ed.; Temple, Paul, Ed.; Scott, Peter, Ed.

    2016-01-01

    In "Valuing Higher Education," leading international analysts examine Gareth Williams's contribution to shaping our thinking about the economics of higher education in essays that are a testimony to Williams's conception that the field cannot be properly understood unless viewed alongside social policy, changes in knowledge production,…

  9. Anxiety and Repetitive Behaviours in Autism Spectrum Disorders and Williams Syndrome: A Cross-Syndrome Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Jacqui; Riby, Deborah M.; Janes, Emily; Connolly, Brenda; McConachie, Helen

    2012-01-01

    Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder or Williams syndrome are vulnerable to anxiety. The factors that contribute to this risk remain unclear. This study compared anxiety in autism spectrum disorder and Williams Syndrome and examined the relationship between repetitive behaviours and anxiety. Thirty-four children with autism and twenty children…

  10. 77 FR 2241 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Ehrenberg, First Mesa, Kachina Village, Wickenburg, and Williams, AZ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-17

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Ehrenberg, First Mesa, Kachina Village, Wickenburg, and Williams, AZ; and Application of Univision Radio License Corporation, KHOV-FM, Wickenburg, AZ... by Rocket Radio, Inc., proposes the allotment of FM Channel 287C2 at Williams, Arizona, as...

  11. Anxiety and Repetitive Behaviours in Autism Spectrum Disorders and Williams Syndrome: A Cross-Syndrome Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Jacqui; Riby, Deborah M.; Janes, Emily; Connolly, Brenda; McConachie, Helen

    2012-01-01

    Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder or Williams syndrome are vulnerable to anxiety. The factors that contribute to this risk remain unclear. This study compared anxiety in autism spectrum disorder and Williams Syndrome and examined the relationship between repetitive behaviours and anxiety. Thirty-four children with autism and twenty children…

  12. Profiles in drug metabolism and toxicology: Richard Tecwyn Williams (1909-1979).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Alan Wayne

    2015-01-01

    This article pays homage to the life and work of a veritable pioneer in toxicology and drug metabolism, namely a Welshman, Richard Tecwyn Williams, FRS. Professor Williams, or RT as he was known, made major contributions to knowledge about the metabolism and toxicology of drugs and xenobiotics during a scientific career spanning nearly 50 years. Author or coauthor of close to 400 research articles and reviews, including a classic book, entitled Detoxication Mechanisms, Williams and his research school investigated virtually all aspects of drug metabolism, especially conjugations. In particular, the concepts of phase 1 and phase II metabolic pathways were introduced by Williams; the biliary excretion of drugs was extensively studied as were species differences in drug metabolism and detoxication. Besides investigating the metabolism of many pharmaceutical drugs, such as sulfonamides and thalidomide, Williams and his group investigated the disposition and fate in the body of organic pesticides and recreational drugs of abuse, such as amphetamine, methamphetamine and lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD).

  13. William Whewell's philosophy of architecture and the historicization of biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Aleta

    2016-10-01

    William Whewell's work on historical science has received some attention from historians and philosophers of science. Whewell's own work on the history of German Gothic church architecture has been touched on within the context of the history of architecture. To a large extent these discussions have been conducted separately. I argue that Whewell intended his work on Gothic architecture as an attempt to (help) found a science of historical architecture, as an exemplar of historical science. I proceed by analyzing the key features of Whewell's philosophy of historical science. I then show how his architectural history exemplifies this philosophy. Finally, I show how Whewell's philosophy of historical science matches some developments in a science (biological systematics) that, in the mid-to late-nineteenth century, came to be reinterpreted as a historical science. I comment briefly on Whewell as a potential influence on nineteenth century biology and in particular on Darwin.

  14. Lord Byron's physician: John William Polidori on somnambulism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, Stanley; Stiles, Anne

    2013-01-01

    John William Polidori (1795-1821) was the Edinburgh-trained physician hired by Lord Byron to accompany him to Switzerland, where he participated in the story-telling event proposed by Byron that led, with Polidori's help, to Mary Shelley's Frankenstein. Although those interested in English literature might also remember Polidori as the author of The Vampyre, one of the first extended works of fiction about vampires, his earlier interest in somnambulism and trance states is only beginning to be appreciated. Even more than students of Romantic literature, historians of science and medicine seem little aware of what Polidori had written about oneirodynia, a synonym for somnambulism, and how his thoughts from 1815 about such activities reflected the changing medical zeitgeist at this time. This chapter examines Polidori's medical thesis in a neuroscience context and compares what he wrote to the writings of several other physicians who were fascinated by nocturnal wanderings, their causes, their manifestations, and their possible treatments.

  15. William T. Carpenter Jr: 35 years of clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Robert W

    2014-03-01

    William T. Carpenter Jr has had a major impact on the design and conduct of clinical trials in schizophrenia. His contributions range from the decisive evaluation of the efficacy of hemodialysis to the development of novel approaches to evaluate new treatments for cognitive impairments and negative symptoms. He has developed innovative dosage reduction strategies. He has led efforts to focus drug development on those illness components that are not responsive to antipsychotic treatment. He has emphasized throughout his career the use of translational science to provide the conceptual framework for clinical trial interventions. This article reviews highlights of his many contributions, with an emphasis on 3 areas: (1) dosage reduction studies; (2) the use of the domains of psychopathology to identify drug development targets; and (3) the use of translational science to guide new drug development.

  16. 25 Mo Williams 大帝新配角

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Husky

    2008-01-01

    骑士队·控球后卫·185厘米·25岁上季成绩·17.2分·48.0%投篮·6.3助攻自从詹姆斯(LeBron James)进入NBA以来,骑士队就一直想找个能搭配他的控球后卫,经过这五年无数位球员的实验之后,今年夏天骑士队又找了一个新的试验人选:M.威廉姆斯(Mo Williams)。

  17. Alan Frederick Williams 25 May 1945 - 9 April 1992.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crumpton, Michael J

    2004-01-01

    Alan WIlliams is noted for his seminal contributions to the field of leucocyte membrane glycoproteins (that is, differentiation antigens). He played a leading role in the development of approaches to the purification and structural analysis of cell surface antigens. His comprehensive characterization of the structure of the rat Thy-1 antigen, as well as the application of monoclonal antibodies to the designation and subsequent isolation of multiple new leucocyte antigens, were exemplary. His discovery that Thy-1 is structurally related to immunoglobulin led directly to the concept of the immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily, which embraced a spectrum of cell surface molecules involved in a variety of cell recognition systems. He was a very strong advocate in support of the rat as a model animal in the study of immunological phenomena. He was energetic and courageous, as well as radiating enthusiasm for immunological research, inspiring others, critically analysing accepted dogmas and setting high standards. In short, he was a brilliant research scientist.

  18. William Morris and the critical utopia of high fantasy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matic Večko

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The novels The Wood Beyond the World (1894 and The Weil at the World's End (1896 by William Morris are considered the formative works of the type of literature which has been labelled high fantasy. The latter is one of the commercially most successful genres of fantasy literature. The two novels are analysed from the perspective of critical utopianism as articulated through a distinc­tive type of aesthetic structure which was established in these works and has become characteristic of the high fantasy literature. The author of the article suggests that it is this complex of aesthetic structiire-aiid ifs iiiherent iitopian lmpulse which may be one of the important faciors-in the perennia popularity of high fantasy.

  19. "Aequanimitas" Redux: William Osler on detached concern versus humanistic empathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Charles S

    2006-01-01

    Recent critics make William Osler "the father of cool detachment" in medicine, largely because of his "Aequanimitas" address emphasizing objectivity and imperturbability. Closer analysis suggests that Osler's aequanimitas resembles more nearly the metriopatheia of later Stoic philosophy than the apatheia of the early Stoics. A previously unpublished memoir clarifies at least in part Osler's motive for teaching control of the "medullary centres" to minimize facial expression: he did not want to frighten patients, who typically had serious illnesses for which he lacked effective therapy. Twenty-first century challenges to medicine as a profession differ substantially from those of Osler's era. Physicians and educators must focus more closely on the tension between detached concern ("competence") and humanistic empathy ("caring") if medicine is to thrive as a learned profession as opposed to a technical service, a commodity to be bought and sold like any other.

  20. Asperger's disorder and Williams syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilinçaslan, Ayse; Tanidir, Canan; Tutkunkardaş, Mustafa Deniz; Mukaddes, Nahit Motavalli

    2011-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a genetic disorder caused by the hemizygous microdeletion in chromosome 7q11.23. It is characterized by dysmorphic face, cardiovascular disease, idiopathic hypercalcemia, mental retardation, and an uneven profile of cognitive-linguistic abilities and deficits. The presence of autistic features in individuals with WS is a controversial issue. While there are reports that describe them as overly friendly with excessive sociability and good empathic skills, some recent studies focus more on the qualitative impairment of their social abilities. Here, we report the clinical presentation and follow-up of an eight-year-old boy with WS and clear problems in his social interaction, non-verbal communication and circumscribed interests. To our knowledge, this is the first case report on the coexistence of WS and Asperger's disorder. It also differs from previous papers on the comorbidity of WS and autism spectrum disorders, by depicting a highly verbal, nonretarded child followed for seven years through adolescence.

  1. William E. Adams: Thomas Mann and The Magic Mountain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naef, A P

    1998-01-01

    The lobectomy for carcinoma of the lung performed by William E. Adams in 1946 on Thomas Mann, author of the tuberculosis saga The Magic Mountain, deserves to be added to Harold Ellis's series of "historically famous operations." This lobectomy, by which the surgeon cured his far more famous patient, was only one episode in his 40 eventful years as Chicago's leading pioneer in early thoracic surgery. The historic case is well documented by preoperative, operative, and pathology reports obtained through the courtesy of still-living witnesses and associates, friends of the author. Thomas Mann died 9 years later of an aortoiliac rupture at the University Hospital in Zurich. At autopsy no local recurrence or distal metastasis was found.

  2. The Values of Masculinity in William Shakespeare’s Macbeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mafruha Ferdous

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The theme of gender plays a vital role in William Shakespeare’s famous political play Macbeth. From the very beginning of the play the dramatist focuses on the importance of masculinity in gaining power and authority. Lady Macbeth along with the three witches are as important characters as Macbeth. Because they influence Macbeth profoundly. And Shakespeare very carefully draws the character of Lady Macbeth who being a female sometimes exhibits more masculinity than Macbeth. Similarly is the case of the three witches. Though they look like women they are also bearded which prove the presence of masculinity in their nature. Throughout the play several times the exposition of masculinity is demanded from the character of Macbeth. So the value of masculinity plays an important part in the drama.

  3. William Wilde and the early records of consumption in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breathnach, C S; Moynihan, J B

    2011-01-01

    Absence of documentary or bony evidence before the seventeenth century in Ireland is not conclusive evidence of freedom from tuberculosis. Clear records begin with Bills of Mortality kept in Dublin, the city at the centre of English administration of Ireland, and they show that the basis for an epidemic was firmly established therein before 1700. In the middle of the nineteenth century the cataclysmic Famine opened the floodgates of poverty and urban overcrowding that resulted in an alarming death rate that continued to increase until the early years of the twentieth century. It is to William Wilde (1815-1876) we owe the nuanced investigation of the earliest numerical records of consumption and related disorders in Ireland.

  4. Richard Godden, William Faulkner, An Economy of Complex Words

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédérique Spill

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available En guise de préambule, Richard Godden s’empresse de préciser que le lien entre économie et langage qui est stipulé dans le titre de son dernier ouvrage critique sur l’œuvre de William Faulkner ne doit pas être compris de manière métaphorique : c’est bien en fonction de leur rapport avec un contexte économique et social spécifique que sont analysées les complexités de l’écriture faulknérienne. Sa démonstration repose sur trois présupposés qui sont clairement exposés dans son introduction : les...

  5. William Hewson (1739-74): the father of haematology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Derek

    2006-05-01

    William Hewson has been called the father of haematology. Initially working alongside the Hunter brothers in London in the mid-18th century, he advanced our knowledge of red and white cells (but mistakenly thought some red cells started as white cells and could not recognise different varieties of white corpuscles), showed that it was fibrinogen and not the cells that led to coagulation, greatly advanced our knowledge of the lymphatic system in humans, fishes and amphibians, explored the functions of the thymus and spleen and, investigated pneumothorax and surgical emphysema. His life, cut short at 35 years, was often intertwined with those of the Hunters, Alexander Monro secundus and Benjamin Franklin. This paper reviews his work, his relationships and his impact on a nascent science.

  6. Herbal diuretics revisited: from "wise women" to William Withering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinne-Saffran, Eva; Kinne, Rolf K H

    2002-07-01

    This contribution summarizes the use of herbal diuretics over the period of two thousand years. After describing the role of herbs in the framework of the theory of the balance of humors for well-being, it details the contributions of Pliny the Elder (23-79), Dioscorides (40-90), Hildegard von Bingen (1098-1179), Pietro Andrea Matthioli (1500-1577), and Leonard Fuchs (1501-1566) in providing increasingly more precise descriptions and illustrations of medicinal plants. Then, William Withering's (1741-1799) scientific analysis of the use of foxglove for the treatment of dropsy is presented, taking into account the role peasant "wise women" played in his discoveries and the role of "folklore medicine" before him. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  7. Language abilities in Williams syndrome: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Jon

    2007-01-01

    Williams syndrome is a rare genetic disorder in which, it is claimed, language abilities are relatively strong despite mild to moderate mental retardation. Such claims have, in turn, been interpreted as evidence either for modular preservation of language or for atypical constraints on cognitive development. However, this review demonstrates that there is, in fact, little evidence that syntax, morphology, phonology, or pragmatics are any better than predicted by nonverbal ability, although performance on receptive vocabulary tests is relatively good. Similarly, claims of an imbalance between good phonology and impaired or atypical lexical semantics are without strong support. There is, nevertheless, consistent evidence for specific deficits in spatial language that mirror difficulties in nonverbal spatial cognition, as well as some tentative evidence that early language acquisition proceeds atypically. Implications for modular and neuroconstructivist accounts of language development are discussed.

  8. Sir William Arbuthnot Lane and His Contributions to Plastic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breakey, Richard William F; Mulliken, John B

    2015-07-01

    Surgical subspecialties were just emerging at the turn of the 20th Century, before this time, general surgeons had to adjust their operative skills to address disorders throughout the body. Sir William Arbuthnot Lane was a British surgeon, whose restless mind led him to wander throughout the field of general surgery and beyond. Although controversial, he advanced in the repair of cleft lip and palate, introduced the "no touch" operative technique, internal fixation of fractures, and is credited as the first surgeon to perform open massage of the heart. During The Great War, he established the British Plastic Surgery unit at Sidcup and delegated the care of facial and jaw injuries to young Major Harold Gillies. Lane later founded The New Health Society, an organization that stimulated the natural food movement. Sadly, in his latter years Lane's thinking drifted further away from with the times and his professional credibility waned. Nevertheless, Lane's variegated life is of sufficient interest to deserve reassessment.

  9. William E. Edmonston, Jr.: Editor, 1968-1976.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kihlstrom, John F; Frischholz, Edward J

    2010-10-01

    This article is part of an occasional series profiling editors of the American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis (AJCH). William E. Edmonston was the second editor, succeeding Milton H. Erickson. His research focused on the use of conditioning paradigms and psychophysiological measures to explore a wide variety of hypnotic phenomena, leading to a "neo-Pavlovian" theory of neutral hypnosis as physiological relaxation (anesis). A longtime professor of psychology at Colgate University, he created an interdisciplinary undergraduate major in neuroscience, and was named New York State College Professor of the Year in 1988. He gave the Journal a new look, and a greater balance of clinical and experimental papers. The article also provides background on George Barton Cutten, George H. Estabrooks, and Frank A. Pattie, pioneers of hypnosis who were linked to Edmonston.

  10. Sir William Turner and his studies on the mammalian placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, Reginald

    2003-06-01

    William Turner was appointed Professor of Anatomy at the University of Edinburgh in 1867, and from 1903 until his death in 1916, he was Principal and Vice-Chancellor. He was an outstanding teacher and many of those he taught went on to occupy chairs of anatomy. He published widely on anatomical subjects and one of his interests was comparative anatomy and physiology of the placenta. This paper takes a brief look at Turner's studies on the anatomical structure of the placenta, its comparative anatomy, his thoughts about its physiology and its place in the evolutionary process. At the time, these lectures constituted an anatomical and physiological classic. At the time Turner prepared his lectures, which were delivered in 1875 and 1876, little was known about the gestatory process in marsupials or monotremes. These mammals have a very brief period of intrauterine gestation and placentation and mention is made of studies that have been done in recent times on this subject.

  11. PENGALAMAN BERSUA TUHAN: PERSPEKTIF WILLIAM JAMES DAN AL-GHAZALI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komarudin Komarudin

    2012-12-01

    Pengalaman bersua Tuhan merupakan fenomena yang menarik dan menjadi titik perhatian banyak disiplin ilmu. Psikologi dan tasawuf merupakan dua disiplin ilmu yang memfokuskan kajiannya pada fenomena ini dengan menerapkan pendekatan yang berbeda. Ghazali adalah representasi dari disiplin ilmu tasawuf dan William James adalah representasi disiplin ilmu psikologi. Kedua ahli tersebut menggunakan pendekatan yang berbeda dalam mengkaji pengalaman keagamaan. Basis epistimologi yang digunakan oleh James memiliki akuntabilitas ilmiah namun kurang akurat dalam sumber pengetahuannya. Di sisi lain Ghazali memiliki sumber pengetahuan yang dalam namun kurang dari sisi rasionalitas. Upaya untuk mengkompromikan kedua pendekatan dalam rangka untuk mengkaji pengalaman bersua Tuhan akan menghasilkan penggambaran yang dalam dan obyektif.

  12. Demonstrating the Alaska Ocean Observing System in Prince William Sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoch, G. Carl; McCammon, Molly

    2013-07-01

    The Alaska Ocean Observing System and the Oil Spill Recovery Institute developed a demonstration project over a 5 year period in Prince William Sound. The primary goal was to develop a quasi-operational system that delivers weather and ocean information in near real time to diverse user communities. This observing system now consists of atmospheric and oceanic sensors, and a new generation of computer models to numerically simulate and forecast weather, waves, and ocean circulation. A state of the art data management system provides access to these products from one internet portal at http://www.aoos.org. The project culminated in a 2009 field experiment that evaluated the observing system and performance of the model forecasts. Observations from terrestrial weather stations and weather buoys validated atmospheric circulation forecasts. Observations from wave gages on weather buoys validated forecasts of significant wave heights and periods. There was an emphasis on validation of surface currents forecasted by the ocean circulation model for oil spill response and search and rescue applications. During the 18 day field experiment a radar array mapped surface currents and drifting buoys were deployed. Hydrographic profiles at fixed stations, and by autonomous vehicles along transects, were made to acquire measurements through the water column. Terrestrial weather stations were the most reliable and least costly to operate, and in situ ocean sensors were more costly and considerably less reliable. The radar surface current mappers were the least reliable and most costly but provided the assimilation and validation data that most improved ocean circulation forecasts. We describe the setting of Prince William Sound and the various observational platforms and forecast models of the observing system, and discuss recommendations for future development.

  13. 77 FR 29988 - Notice of Submission for OMB Review; Federal Student Aid; William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-21

    ... Notice of Submission for OMB Review; Federal Student Aid; William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program Deferment Request Forms SUMMARY: These forms serve as the means by which borrowers in the William D. Ford... to this notice will be considered public records. Title of Collection: William D. Ford Federal...

  14. 77 FR 58819 - Notice of Submission for OMB Review; Federal Student Aid; William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-24

    ... Notice of Submission for OMB Review; Federal Student Aid; William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program General Forbearance Request SUMMARY: Borrowers who receive loans through the William D. Ford Federal... to this notice will be considered public records. Title of Collection: William D. Ford Federal...

  15. 77 FR 66841 - The Sherwin-Williams Company; Analysis of Proposed Consent Order To Aid Public Comment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-07

    ... Sherwin-Williams Company; Analysis of Proposed Consent Order To Aid Public Comment AGENCY: Federal Trade.... Write ``Sherwin-Williams, File No. 112 3198'' on your comment and file your comment online at https... consider your comment, we must receive it on or before November 26, 2012. Write ``Sherwin-Williams, File...

  16. 77 FR 17568 - Notice of Receipt of Petition for Decision That Nonconforming 2005 Ifor Williams LM85G Trailers...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-26

    ... Nonconforming 2005 Ifor Williams LM85G Trailers Are Eligible for Importation AGENCY: National Highway Traffic... 2005 Ifor Williams LM85G trailers that were not originally manufactured to comply with all applicable... petitioned NHTSA to decide whether nonconforming 2005 Ifor Williams LM85G trailers are eligible...

  17. Williams-Beuren syndrome associated with single kidney and nephrocalcinosis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidi, Kamel; Jellouli, Manel; Ben Rabeh, Rania; Hammi, Yousra; Gargah, Tahar

    2015-01-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder, characterized by congenital heart defects, abnormal facial features, mental retardation with specific cognitive and behavioral profile, growth hormone deficiency, renal and skeletal anomalies, inguinal hernia, infantile hypercalcaemia. We report a case with Williams-Beuren syndrome associated with a single kidney and nephrocalcinosis complicated by hypercalcaemia. A male infant, aged 20 months presented growth retardation associated with a psychomotor impairment, dysmorphic features and nephrocalcinosis. He had also hypercalciuria and hypercalcemia. Echocardiography was normal. DMSA renal scintigraphy showed a single functioning kidney. The FISH generated one ELN signal in 20 metaphases read and found the presence of ELN deletion, with compatible Williams-Beuren syndrome.

  18. Neurosurgeon as innovator: William V. Cone (1897-1959).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preul, M C; Stratford, J; Bertrand, G; Feindel, W

    1993-10-01

    Neurosurgeons are well known for being productive researchers and innovators. Few, however, have possessed the prolific ingenuity of William Cone. In 1934, he and William Penfield were cofounders of the Montreal Neurological Institute where, until 1959, he filled the twin roles of neurosurgeon-in-chief and neuropathologist. Because he did not find writing easy, many of his technical inventions and refinements remained unpublished. His numerous innovations included the extensive use of twist-drill technique for biopsy, drainage for subdural hematoma and cerebral abscess, and ventriculography. In the mid-1940's, he developed power tools driven by nitrogen that led to the modern, universally used air-driven tool systems. He had a special interest in the treatment of spinal dysfunction, for which he invented the Cone-Barton skull-traction tongs along with the Cone spinal operating table. He also devised operative procedures for vertebral fracture-dislocation and craniospinal anomalies. For the maintenance of muscle tone in the paralyzed bladder, he constructed a tidal drainage system. He introduced and popularized ventriculoperitoneal shunting techniques and carried out some of the earliest experimental trails to treat brain infections with sulphonamide and antibiotic drugs. He designed his own set of surgical suction devices, bone rongeurs, and a personal suction "air-conditioning" system for each surgeon. He had a keen early interest in intracranial tumors, and also demonstrated on monkeys how subdural mass lesions caused pupillary dilation and mesial temporal lobe damage due to cerebral compression. His work for the military during World War II on effects of altitude on brain pressure remained classified for many years. The first clipping and excision of an intracranial aneurysm is attributed to Cone. Although Penfield was known as "the Chief," Cone was referred to as "the Boss." His fervent dedication to provide total care to his patients was expressed in round

  19. A Gaussian-product stochastic Gent-McWilliams parameterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grooms, Ian

    2016-10-01

    The locally-averaged horizontal buoyancy flux by mesoscale eddies is computed from eddy-resolving quasigeostrophic simulations of ocean-mesoscale eddy dynamics. This flux has a very non-Gaussian distribution peaked at zero, not at the mean value. This non-Gaussian flux distribution arises because the flux is a product of zero-mean random variables: the eddy velocity and buoyancy. A framework for stochastic Gent-McWilliams (GM) parameterization is presented. Gaussian random field models for subgrid-scale velocity and buoyancy are developed. The product of these Gaussian random fields is used to construct a non-Gaussian stochastic parameterization of the horizontal subgrid-scale density flux, which leads to a non-Gaussian stochastic GM parameterization. This new non-Gaussian stochastic GM parameterization is tested in an idealized box ocean model, and compared to a Gaussian approach that simply multiplies the deterministic GM parameterization by a Gaussian random field. The non-Gaussian approach has a significant impact on both the mean and variability of the simulations, more so than the Gaussian approach; for example, the non-Gaussian simulation has a much larger net kinetic energy and a stronger overturning circulation than a comparable Gaussian simulation. Future directions for development of the stochastic GM parameterization and extensions of the Gaussian-product approach are discussed.

  20. [William Harvey and the beginnings of modern medical science].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Micheli, Alfredo

    2005-01-01

    Modern medical science was born in the post-Renaissance age and began to consolidate towards the middle of the XVII century thanks to physicists, physiologists, and biologists, most of whom were direct or indirect pupils, of Galilei. The discovery of blood circulation by Harvey is now considered the only progress in physiology at the beginning of the XVII century, comparable to the current advances seen in physical sciences. The history of this achievement could be written from the view point of the progressive advance in knowledge. In his experiments, Harvey referred to the authentic, not the imaginary experiments, and put forward irrefutable quantitative arguments. We can therefore claim that his discovery of blood circulation was the first proper explanation of an organic process and the starting point leading to experimental physiology. Nevertheless, the second monograph of the English researcher, dealing with the generation of animals, published in 1651, has some passages that correspond to modern scientific reasoning yet in others he includes confused, vague and capricious assertions compatible with the prescientific era that the author was not able to escape completely. In conclusion, it seems justified to assert that modern medical science did not all rise suddenly, but was gradually structured starting from the middle of the XVII century following the path traced by William Harvey in light of Galilei's thought.

  1. Discovery of the cardiovascular system: from Galen to William Harvey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aird, W C

    2011-07-01

    The goal of this review is to examine the events that led to discovery of blood circulation. The Ancient Greeks, including Hippocrates and Galen viewed the cardiovascular system as comprising two distinct networks of arteries and veins. Galen claimed that the liver produced blood that was then distributed to the body in a centrifugal manner, whereas air or pneuma was absorbed from the lung into the pulmonary veins and carried by arteries to the various tissues of the body. Arteries also contained blood, which passed from the venous side via invisible pores in the interventricular septum and peripheral anastomoses. This was an open-ended system in which blood and air simply dissipated at the ends of veins and arteries according to the needs of the local tissue. Blood was not seen to circulate but rather to slowly ebb and flow. This view would hold sway for 15 centuries until 1628 when William Harvey published his momentous 72-page book, On the Motion of the Heart and Blood in Animals. Harvey employed experiment and deductive logic to show that arteries and veins are functionally, if not structurally, connected in the lung and the peripheral tissues, and that blood circulates. The mechanical force of the heart replaced Galen's elusive attractive powers. Ultimately, Galenism would collapse under the weight of Harvey's evidence, and a new paradigm of blood circulation would prevail.

  2. In Search of William Gascoigne Seventeenth Century Astronomer

    CERN Document Server

    Sellers, David

    2012-01-01

    William Gascoigne (c.1612-44), the first inventor of the telescopic sight and micrometer—instruments crucial to the advance of astronomy—was killed in the English Civil War. His name is now known to historians of science around the world, but for some considerable time after his tragic death at the age of 32, it seemed as if his achievements would be consigned to oblivion. Most of his papers were lost in the maelstrom of war and the few that seemed to have survived later disappeared. This is the story of how his work was rescued. Woven into that story is an account of the state of astronomy and optics during Gascoigne’s lifetime, so that the reader can appreciate the significance of his discoveries.   A substantial appendix presents selected extracts from Gascoigne's correspondence. This includes much new material that has not been previously published and illustrates his efforts to explain the basis of his pioneering techniques to the satisfaction of his contemporaries.   

  3. THE HISTORY OF DESIGN EDUCATION AND WILLIAM MORRIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oguz DILMAC

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Industrial revolution had an impact on art as well as other fields of society in the years 1760-1860. The machines came to the front in together with bringing out production line to supply growing demand, and so the importance the art had diminished. The machines having some features like standard production, scales based on rules and geometric form having unnatural appearance caused the artists such as William Morris and John Ruskin to believe that the machine harmed the art. The artists such as Morris and Ruskin took a leading role in development of design idea by resisting the form of machine production devoid of art in the light of this ideas. The problem of design keeps as a current issue nowadays. That’s why, we could create a solution by having different perspectives based on previous experience and problems encountered nowadays. The problem of design keeps on up-to-date issue with the technology developing very fast today. So, this study was made with the aim to help us present right approaches towards today’s problems. This research, review of the literature obtained from architecture, history of art and industrial design on books- magazines the subject of the dissertation thesis Higher Education Center was formed with descriptive narratives. Another aim of the research carried out in this context the handmade, machine design is to examine the emerging issues in the transition to production.

  4. Do individuals with Williams syndrome possess absolute pitch?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Castilla, Pastora; Sotillo, María; Campos, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    Although absolute pitch (AP) is a rare skill in typical development, individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) are often referred to as possessing this musical ability. However, there is paucity of research on the topic. In this article, 2 studies were conducted to evaluate AP in WS. In Study 1, seven musically trained individuals with WS, 14 musically trained typically developing controls matched for chronological age, and 2 experienced musicians with AP completed a pitch-identification task. Although the task was a classical assessment of AP, it required participants to have musical knowledge, and the availability and accessibility of musically trained individuals with WS is very low. In Study 2, a paradigm suitable for evaluating AP in individuals without musical training was used, which made it possible to evaluate a larger group of participants with WS. A pitch memory test for isolated tones was presented to 27 individuals with WS, 54 typically developing peers matched for chronological age, and the 2 musicians with AP. Both individuals with WS and their controls obtained low results in the two studies. They showed an arbitrary pattern of response, and their performance was far from that of musicians with AP. Therefore, participants with WS did not appear to possess AP. Unlike what is usually claimed, results suggest that AP is not a remarkable ability in WS and that, as in the typically developing population, this musical ability is also rare in individuals with WS.

  5. Social Reality as Reflected In the Poetry of William Blake

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏林

    2013-01-01

    As one of the most outstanding representatives of the Pre-Romanticism poet in 18th century English literature, Wil⁃liam Blake lived through and witnessed an era of great political and social upheaval and transitional period: the American War of Independence, the French Revolution, the Napoleonic Wars and the Industrial Revolution which brought about significant and essential impact on social and historical progress in England. Coming from the social injustices and the full of the dark-side of the industrial England, Blake caught the pulse of his times through his sharp and deep insight, and employed his symbolism, satiric and allegorical device to condemn and criticize the oppression and exploitation derived from the class inequality, privilege and tyr⁃anny. Through his painting and poetry, Blake lashed the dark and indifferent church and authority, and exposed the hypocrisy and falsehood of the religion and humanity, and also called on the oppressed to shatter mental and physical restriction“The mind-forged manacles”come from the ruling class. In this paper, I want to introduce and interpret the social reality as reflected in the poetry of William Blake through concrete analyzing some of Blake’s poems in terms of main ideas, historical settings, rhe⁃torical device and language character which underlay and concealed in his poetry deeply.

  6. Percevoir Dieu ? Henri Bergson et William P. Alston

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Feneuil

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available William Alston (1921-2009 et Henri Bergson (1859-1941 semblent défendre une même thèse : celle de la valeur de l’expérience mystique pour la connaissance (valeur épistémique. L’étude comparée de la manière dont chacun d’entre eux la formule et la défend constitue un bon angle pour envisager la différence entre tradition « analytique » et tradition « continentale » en philosophie de la religion. Cet article vise à montrer les divergences et les convergences entre les deux auteurs, mais surtout à situer le point d’origine des divergences. Il apparaît que celui-ci n’est pas à chercher dans deux conceptions irréductibles de la philosophie ou de la rationalité, dans une différence de compréhension de la mystique.

  7. Edouard Glissant e o legado de William Faulkner

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    Eurídice Figueiredo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo se propone analizar el intertexto que une al escritor Edouard Glissant con William Faulkner a través de dos obras: el ensayo Faulkner, Mississipi [1996] y la novela Sartorius [1999]. En el primer texto, el autor enfatiza cuestiones presentes en su propia obra novelesca: la genealogía, la relación con el espacio de la plantación, el mestizaje, la [i]legitimidad de derechos con respecto a la posesión de la tierra, la opacidad. En el segundo, traza una línea genealógica de un personaje perteneciente a una etnia africana imaginaria, haciéndolo llegar hasta las plantaciones del sur de los Estados Unidos; paralelamente, presenta la línea genealógica de los Sartoris. En esta dirección, busco mostrar cómo el proyecto literario de Glissant dialoga con la obra de Faulkner, indagando e inventariando las mismas problemáticas con respecto al transplante de poblaciones y su inserción en el espacio de las plantaciones, tanto en el sur de los Estados Unidos como en las islas del Caribe. En las obras de ambos escritores puede percibirse el mismo vértigo trágico que persigue a los personajes, conduciéndolos a la locura, el sufrimiento y la muerte

  8. William Henry Broadbent (1835-1907) as a neurologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eadie, Mervyn

    2015-01-01

    By the end of his career, Sir William Broadbent (1835-1907) had become an eminent London general physician who had been appointed Physician-in-Ordinary to King Edward VII and to the Prince of Wales. Previously he had been Physician-in-Extraordinary to Queen Victoria. At earlier stages in his professional life, he had played a significant role in the development of clinical neurology in Victorian-era Britain. In 1866, he had enunciated a principle (Broadbent's hypothesis) that for the first time satisfactorily accounted for the mechanisms by which the trunk and bulbar muscles and the upper face were spared in hemiplegia. He had also carried out original investigations into the distribution of fiber tracts in the human cerebral hemispheres. At intervals over the years, he published on aspects of aphasia and developed a rather complicated though logical conceptual schema of the presumed anatomical background to the process of speech, based on clinic-pathological correlations. His role in all this neurological research and his other contributions on subjects such as neurosyphilis have largely been forgotten by subsequent generations.

  9. Understanding motor acts and motor intentions in Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparaci, Laura; Stefanini, Silvia; Marotta, Luigi; Vicari, Stefano; Rizzolatti, Giacomo

    2012-06-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a rare genetic disorder associated with unusually hyper-social demeanor and ease with strangers. These personality traits are accompanied by difficulties in social interactions, possibly related, at least in part, to a difficulty in understanding others' mental states. Studies on mentalizing capacities in individuals with WS have often led to contrasting results, some studies revealing specific impairments, others highlighting spared mentalizing capacities. So far, however, no study investigated the performance of individuals with WS in non-inferential understanding of others' motor intentions. In the present study we investigated this capacity by using a computer-based behavioral task using pictures of hand-object interactions. We asked individuals with WS first to describe what the other was doing (i.e. a task implying no kind of intention reading), and secondly, if successful in answering the first question, to describe the motor intention underlying the observed motor acts (i.e. why an act was being done, a task requiring non-inferential motor intention understanding). Results showed that individuals with WS made more errors in understanding what the other was doing (i.e. understanding a motor act) compared to both mental-age matched controls and chronological-age matched peers with typical development, while showing mental-age appropriate performance in understanding why an individual was acting (i.e. understanding a motor intention). These findings suggest novel perspectives for understanding impairments in social behavior in WS.

  10. William Butler Yeats in the Slovene cultural space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janez Gorenc

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available William Butler Yeats, Irish poet, dramatist and essayist, winner of the Nobel prize in 1923, was also widely known for the active  part he played in Irish politics. Even though he was mostly involved culturally - he wro.te about Irish politics in his works, established several literary clubs, founded theatres - he also activated  himself  as a politician when he was a senator during the years 1923-1928. This article focuses on the mention of his political activities in different English and Slovene texts. It makes a presentation of the vast majority of the texts on Yeats that have appeared in Slovene. It also points out that while the majority of English encyclopaedias and literary histories openly write about Yeats's politics, Slovene texts about Yeats focus mostly on his literary opus and less on his involvement in politics. When they do mention it, however, they usually avoid the details. This article tries to determine some reasons for this fact.

  11. Musical learning in children and adults with Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lense, M; Dykens, E

    2013-09-01

    There is recent interest in using music making as an empirically supported intervention for various neurodevelopmental disorders due to music's engagement of perceptual-motor mapping processes. However, little is known about music learning in populations with developmental disabilities. Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental genetic disorder whose characteristic auditory strengths and visual-spatial weaknesses map onto the processes used to learn to play a musical instrument. We identified correlates of novel musical instrument learning in WS by teaching 46 children and adults (7-49 years) with WS to play the Appalachian dulcimer. Obtained dulcimer skill was associated with prior musical abilities (r = 0.634, P musical interest/emotionality. Use of auditory learning strategies, but not visual or instructional strategies, predicted greater dulcimer skill beyond individual musical and visual-motor integration abilities (β = 0.285, sr(2) = 0.06, P = 0.019). These findings map onto behavioural and emerging neural evidence for greater auditory-motor mapping processes in WS. Results suggest that explicit awareness of task-specific learning approaches is important when learning a new skill. Implications for using music with populations with syndrome-specific strengths and weakness will be discussed. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd, MENCAP & IASSID.

  12. Permeable Surface Corrections for Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings Integrals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockard, David P.; Casper, Jay H.

    2005-01-01

    The acoustic prediction methodology discussed herein applies an acoustic analogy to calculate the sound generated by sources in an aerodynamic simulation. Sound is propagated from the computed flow field by integrating the Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings equation on a suitable control surface. Previous research suggests that, for some applications, the integration surface must be placed away from the solid surface to incorporate source contributions from within the flow volume. As such, the fluid mechanisms in the input flow field that contribute to the far-field noise are accounted for by their mathematical projection as a distribution of source terms on a permeable surface. The passage of nonacoustic disturbances through such an integration surface can result in significant error in an acoustic calculation. A correction for the error is derived in the frequency domain using a frozen gust assumption. The correction is found to work reasonably well in several test cases where the error is a small fraction of the actual radiated noise. However, satisfactory agreement has not been obtained between noise predictions using the solution from a three-dimensional, detached-eddy simulation of flow over a cylinder.

  13. Introduction to William Stephenson's quest for a science of subjectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, James M M

    2010-01-01

    In this introduction to the life and work of William Stephenson my aim is to provide a general overview of the development of his thinking and, more specifically, to highlight the importance he attached to the study of single cases. I also attempt to provide a context for an understanding of the significance of his "Tribute to Melanie Klein." Some of the principal reasons for Stephenson's marginal status in the discipline of psychology will also emerge in the course of the article. I begin by outlining some of the central notions in Q-methodology. The early sections of the article trace his roots in the north of England - the setting for his schooling and university training in physics - and then outline his encounters with Charles Spearman and Cyril Burt at University College London. The subsequent section deals with his time at the University of Oxford Institute of Experimental Psychology and the wartime interruption to his career. The next few sections take us across the Atlantic and describe some of the most significant features of his work on Q-methodology. these sections also record the difficulties Stephenson experienced before he eventually secured a tenured position at the University of Missouri School of Journalism in Columbia. In the final section I attempt to situate Q-methodology in relation to some of the principal theoretical orientations in the human sciences.

  14. Romantic morality in Mariano Iberico and William James

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Antonio Orozco

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the author offers an analysis of the evolution in Mariano Iberico’s moral philosophy that would have happened between two of his publications in the decade of the twenties. In the first publication, Iberico defends a morality of a dualistic type, giving birth to an ideal on the basis of overcoming the existential self along with its interests, needs and urgencies. A metaphysical type of morality would have been the result of such a claim. Six years later, on the other hand, the author presents a morality more understanding of the human contradiction, which does not demand the overcoming of the self as moral ideal, but rather recognizes the value of the individual. The hypothesis of this work suggests that the above mentioned evolution in Iberico’s thought would have originated from the reading of William James and of other authors whom Iberico named ‘romantics’. Furthermore, in a later section, the author shows that such an interpretationof James’ morality comes much closer to the interpretations made by Ralph B.Perry and recently by Ramon del Castillo.

  15. Perceptual learning in Williams syndrome: looking beyond averages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Gervan

    Full Text Available Williams Syndrome is a genetically determined neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by an uneven cognitive profile and surprisingly large neurobehavioral differences among individuals. Previous studies have already shown different forms of memory deficiencies and learning difficulties in WS. Here we studied the capacity of WS subjects to improve their performance in a basic visual task. We employed a contour integration paradigm that addresses occipital visual function, and analyzed the initial (i.e. baseline and after-learning performance of WS individuals. Instead of pooling the very inhomogeneous results of WS subjects together, we evaluated individual performance by expressing it in terms of the deviation from the average performance of the group of typically developing subjects of similar age. This approach helped us to reveal information about the possible origins of poor performance of WS subjects in contour integration. Although the majority of WS individuals showed both reduced baseline and reduced learning performance, individual analysis also revealed a dissociation between baseline and learning capacity in several WS subjects. In spite of impaired initial contour integration performance, some WS individuals presented learning capacity comparable to learning in the typically developing population, and vice versa, poor learning was also observed in subjects with high initial performance levels. These data indicate a dissociation between factors determining initial performance and perceptual learning.

  16. William Harvey and the discovery of the circulation of the blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribatti Domenico

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This Commentary emphasizes the fundamental contribution of William Harvey to the discovery of the circulation of the blood and his scientific and experimental approach to this matter.

  17. The Trail Inventory of William L. Finley National Wildlife Refuge [Cycle 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on William L. Finley National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are...

  18. Parcels and Land Ownership, Kent Hanson 701 577 4543, Published in 2007, Williams County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2007. It is described as 'Kent Hanson 701 577 4543'. The extent of these data is generally Williams County, ND. This...

  19. Salmon habitat improvement reconnaissance, Prince William Sound, Cordova and Anchorage districts, September 1985

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report is on the salmon habitat improvement reconnaissance in the Prince William sound, Alaska. The purpose of the trip was to discover new habitat improvement...

  20. Sea otter distribution and abundance in western Prince William Sound, Alaska: Progress report 1984

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Sea otters recently recolonized Prince William sound (PWS), Alaska after being extirpated in the 18th and 19th centuries. Twenty-five years ago a few otters...

  1. Läbi legendide William Shakespeare'i poole / Maris Peters

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Peters, Maris

    2010-01-01

    Tutvustus: Wells, Stanley. Kas on tõsi, et Shakespeare ...? / tõlkinud Maris Peters. Tallinn : Argo, 2010. Raamat William Shakespeare kohta käivatest legendidest, kuuldustest ja teooriatest ning tema teoste autorsusest

  2. Lähtugem ehitistest! / William J. R. Curtis ; interv. Andres Kurg, Karin Hallas, Triin Ojari

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Curtis, William J. R.

    1998-01-01

    24. apr. pidas Rotermanni soolalaos loengu arhitektuuriajaloolane William J. R. Curtis. Katkeid jutuajamisest W. Curtisega. Arhitektuurikriitikast, oma raamatust "Modern Architecture since 1900", millest W. Curtis praegu kriitikuna kirjutab, Lille'i projektist jm

  3. Zooplankton Biomass Data from Prince William Sound, Icy Bay and Yakutat Bay, Alaska 2010-2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset includes zooplankton biomass from Prince William Sound, Icy Bay and Yakutat Bay, Alaska. Zooplankton were sampled with a ring net (0.6 m diameter with...

  4. Water Resource Inventory and Assessment - Flow Map Poster: William L. Finley National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This flow map depicts the flow and control of water on William L. Finley National Wildlife Refuge. It was produced as part of the Water Resource Inventory and...

  5. Lähtugem ehitistest! / William J. R. Curtis ; interv. Andres Kurg, Karin Hallas, Triin Ojari

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Curtis, William J. R.

    1998-01-01

    24. apr. pidas Rotermanni soolalaos loengu arhitektuuriajaloolane William J. R. Curtis. Katkeid jutuajamisest W. Curtisega. Arhitektuurikriitikast, oma raamatust "Modern Architecture since 1900", millest W. Curtis praegu kriitikuna kirjutab, Lille'i projektist jm

  6. Läbi legendide William Shakespeare'i poole / Maris Peters

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Peters, Maris

    2010-01-01

    Tutvustus: Wells, Stanley. Kas on tõsi, et Shakespeare ...? / tõlkinud Maris Peters. Tallinn : Argo, 2010. Raamat William Shakespeare kohta käivatest legendidest, kuuldustest ja teooriatest ning tema teoste autorsusest

  7. Leo Piilonen appointed William E. Hassinger, Jr. Senior Faculty Fellow in Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Owczarski, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Leo Piilonen, professor of physics in the College of Science at Virginia Tech, was recently appointed the William E. Hassinger, Jr., Senior Faculty Fellow in Physics by the Virginia Tech Board of Visitors.

  8. Perspectivas Colaborativas das Humanidades Digitais nas Investigações sobre William Blake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palma, Caio Di

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Review of Roger WHITSON & Jason WHITTAKER, William Blake and the Digital Humanities: Collaboration, Participation, and Social Media, London & New York, Routledge, 2013, 200 pp. ISBN 978-0-415-65618-4

  9. Summary of initial reconnaissance of salmon streams in Prince William Sound, Cordova Ranger District

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In August of 1962, nine streams were visited in Prince William Sound. The purpose of this trip was to find out if any of these streams was suitable for improvement...

  10. Prince William Sound, Alaska ESI: M_MAMPT (Marine Mammal Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for Prince William Sound, Alaska. ESI data characterize estuarine environments and wildlife by...

  11. Improving Teacher Practice Utilizing Curriculum Theory: A Conversation with William H. Schubert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Susan C.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    An interview with William Schubert emphasizes how formal study of curriculum can help teachers succeed with diverse learners. In particular, he stresses the use of interests and concerns from students' outside experiences in the curriculum. (SK)

  12. Critical wildlife areas in Port Etches and Constantine Harbor, Hinchinbrook Island, Prince William Sound

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report documents critical wildlife areas in Port Etches and Constantine Harbor, Hinchinbrook Islands, and Prince William Sound during the 1976 and 1977....

  13. Prince William Sound, Alaska ESI: M_MAMMAL (Marine Mammal Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for Prince William Sound, Alaska. ESI data characterize estuarine environments and wildlife by...

  14. Hg and As Minerals in Fluid Inclusions from the Williams Mine, Hemlo, and Their Genetic Implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU HUANZHANG(卢焕章); JAYANTA. GUHA; DON. C. HARRIS

    2002-01-01

    The Hemlo mineralization is enigmatic compared to general Archean lode gold deposits based on the fact that it is characterized by an exotic mineralogy containing elements such as As, Hg, Sb, Ba, V and Mo. The genetic concepts range from syngenetic to epigenetic types of mineralization. This reconnaissance study was designed to examine the relationship of Hg-As minerals with respect to fluid inclusions in the Williams mine (formerly known as the Page Williams mine) covering the A and C ore zones.

  15. On William Walker and his Connections with and Some Secret Societies

    OpenAIRE

    Abarca Hernández, Oriester; Arias Alpízar, Luz Mary

    2016-01-01

    According to various sources, William Walker received the aid of secret societies for his filibustering raids in Central America. Four main sources were selected to examine some aspects of the problem that arises in this article: Did Walker’s projects have a real connection with secret organizations? The emphasis is on criticism of sources and any interest that lies behind the facts stated. Según diversas fuentes, William Walker recibió la ayuda de sociedades secretas para sus incursiones ...

  16. Application of Choi—Williams Reduced Interference Time Frequency Distribution to Machinery Diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard A. Gaberson

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses time frequency analysis of machinery diagnostic vibration signals. The short time Fourier transform, the Wigner, and the Choi–Williams distributions are explained and illustrated with test cases. Examples of Choi—Williams analyses of machinery vibration signals are presented. The analyses detect discontinuities in the signals and their timing, amplitude and frequency modulation, and the presence of different components in a vibration signal.

  17. Oxytocin, Vasopressin and Williams syndrome: Epigenetic effects on Abnormal Social Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian W. Haas

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Williams syndrome is a condition caused by a deletion of ~26-28 genes on chromosome 7q11.23 often characterized by abnormal social behavior and disrupted oxytocin and vasopressin functioning. The observation that individuals with Williams syndrome exhibit oxytocin and vasopressin dysregulation is compelling. There is currently a lack of evidence that any of the genes typically deleted in Williams syndrome have any direct effect on either oxytocin or vasopressin. In this perspective article, we present a novel epigenetic model describing how DNA methylation may impact the expression of key genes within the oxytocin and vasopressin systems, which may ultimately influence the social behavior observed in Williams syndrome. We draw support from data pooled from a prior empirical research study (Henrichsen, et al., 2011, demonstrating that OXTR is overexpressed in Williams syndrome. These preliminary findings may create new opportunities to target the oxytocin and vasopressin systems with the specific goal of improving outcomes in Williams syndrome and other psychiatric conditions.

  18. The rhetorical strategy of William Paley's Natural theology (1802): part 1, William Paley's Natural theology in context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Flaherty, Niall

    2010-03-01

    This article reconstructs the historical and philosophical contexts of William Paley's Natural theology (1802). In the wake of the French Revolution, widely believed to be the embodiment of an atheistic political credo, the refutation of the transmutational biological theories of Buffon and Erasmus Darwin was naturally high on Paley's agenda. But he was also responding to challenges arising from his own moral philosophy, principally the psychological quandary of how men were to be kept in mind of the Creator. It is argued here that Natural theology was the culmination of a complex rhetorical scheme for instilling religious impressions that would increase both the virtue and happiness of mankind. Philosophy formed an integral part of this strategy, but it did not comprise the whole of it. Equally vital were those purely rhetorical aspects of the discourse which, according to Paley, were more concerned with creating 'impression'. This facet of his writing is explored in part one of this two-part article. Turning to the argumentative side of the scheme, part two examines Paley's responses to David Hume and Erasmus Darwin in the light of the wider strategy of inculcation at work throughout all his writings.

  19. Deletions of the elastin gene in Williams Syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenberg, F.; Nickerson, E.; McCaskill, C. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    To investigate deletions in the elastin gene in patients with Williams Syndrome (WS), we screened 37 patients and their parents for deletions in the elastin gene by both fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using cosmid cELN272 containing the 5{prime} end of the elastin gene and by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using a primer pair which amplifies intron 17 in the elastin gene, producing a polymorphic amplification product. Thirty-two patients have been investigated by both the FISH and PCR techniques, one patient was studied only by PCR, and 4 patients were studied only by FISH. Overall, 34 of 37 patients (92%) were deleted for the elastin gene. Using the PCR marker, 14 patients were informative and 12 were shown to be deleted [maternal (n=5) and paternal (n=7)]. Using cosmid cELN272, 33 of 36 patients demonstrated a deletion of chromosome 7q11.23. In one family, both the mother and daughter were deleted due to an apparently de novo deletion arising in the mother. Three patients were not deleted using the elastin cosmid; 2 of these patients have classic WS. Another non-deleted patient has the typical facial features and hypercalcemia but normal intelligence. These three patients will be important in delineating the critical region(s) responsible for the facial features, hypercalcemia, mental retardation and supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS). There was not an absolute correlation between deletions in elastin and SVAS, although these individuals may be at risk for other cardiovascular complications such as hypertention. Since the majority of WS patients are deleted for a portion of the elastin gene, most likely this marker will be an important diagnostic tool, although more patients will need to be studied. Those patients who are not deleted but clinically have WS will be missed using only this one marker. Expansion of the critical region to other loci and identification of additional markers will be essential for identifying all patients with WS.

  20. Internet use and online safety in adults with Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lough, E; Fisher, M H

    2016-10-01

    Individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) increasingly have access to the Internet. Whilst Internet access increases opportunities for social connection for individuals with IDD, it also may increase risk of victimisation. Adults with Williams syndrome (WS), who display an extreme pro-social drive to engage with both familiar and unfamiliar people, might be especially vulnerable to online victimisation. This study first explores how often and why individuals with WS use the Internet and social networking sites. Next, the online vulnerability of individuals with WS is assessed through responses to hypothetical scenarios of potentially dangerous online interactions. Twenty-eight young adults with WS (mean age = 27.7 years) and their parents completed questionnaires about their Internet and social networking use and parental oversight. Participants with WS then responded to hypothetical scenarios assessing their likelihood to take social and non-social risks online. Most participants with WS frequently use the Internet and the majority visit social networking sites every day or almost every day, with little parental supervision or oversight. Individuals with WS interact with both known and unknown individuals through social networking sites. Participants are more likely to agree to engage in socially risky behaviours compared to risky behaviours that are not social in nature when online. For example, participants were more likely to agree to meet an 'online friend' in person than they were to give their bank account information for winning a 'contest'. Individuals with WS, who are a socially vulnerable group in the real world, display behaviours that could also lead to victimisation online as well. As the Internet continues to become more accessible, more research is needed to increase online safety of individuals with WS and other IDDs. Implications for intervention and future research are discussed. © 2016 MENCAP and International

  1. William D. Harper, Jr, MS, DC: anything can cause anything.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Joseph C

    2008-03-01

    Trained as an engineer and a chiropractor, William D. Harper, Jr. made his career in the healing arts as instructor, writer and president of the Texas Chiropractic College (TCC). A native of Texas who grew up in various locales in the Lone Star State, in Mexico and in the Boston area, he took his bachelor's and master's degree in engineering in 1933 and 1934 from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and his chiropractic degree at TCC in 1942. Dissatisfied with the "foot-on-the-hose" concept of subluxation syndrome (D.D. Palmer's second theory), Dr. Harper studied and wrote about aberrant neural irritation as an alternative explanation for disease and for the broad clinical value he perceived in the chiropractic art. In this he paralleled much of D.D. Palmer's third theory of chiropractic. His often reprinted textbook, Anything Can Cause Anything, brought together much of what he had lectured and written about in numerous published articles. He was well prepared for the defense of chiropractic that he offered in 1965 in the trial of the England case in federal district court in Louisiana. The case was lost when the court ruled that the legislature rather than the judiciary should decide whether to permit chiropractors to practice, but Harper's performance was considered excellent. He went on to guide the TCC as president from 1965 through 1976, its first 11 years after relocating from San Antonio to Pasadena, Texas. Harper built the school - its faculty, staff and facilities - from very meager beginnings to a small but financially viable institution when he departed. Along the way he found fault with both chiropractic political camps that vied for federal recognition as the accrediting agency for chiropractic colleges in the United States. Dr. Bill Harper was a maverick determined to do things his way, and in many respects he was successful. He left a mark on the profession that merits critical analysis.

  2. Pragmatic Abilities of Children with Williams Syndrome: A Longitudinal Examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela E. John

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Although prior research has indicated that pragmatics is an area of particular weakness for individuals with Williams syndrome (WS, the relations among different pragmatic abilities and the relations between pragmatic ability and expressive vocabulary ability have yet to be addressed. In addition, analyses of the relations between the same type of pragmatic ability over time have not been reported. The present study was designed to address these questions. We considered the pragmatic language abilities of 14 children with WS at two time points: as 4-year-olds during a 30-minute play-session with their mothers (Time 1 and an average of 5.87 years later during a one-on-one conversation with a familiar researcher (Time 2. Children’s intellectual and expressive vocabulary abilities were assessed at both time points. Results indicated that the ability to verbally contribute information beyond what was required in response to a question was significantly related to the ability to verbally contribute new information in the absence of a question both at age 4 years and during primary school. At age 4, both the ability to pair verbalizations with eye contact (intersubjectivity and expressive vocabulary ability were related to the ability to verbally contribute information beyond what was expected within a social interaction. Finally, the ability to verbally contribute new information to a social interaction beyond what was required to answer a question and the ability to pair verbalizations with eye contact (intersubjectivity at age 4 years predicted the ability to verbally contribute new information beyond what was required to answer a question at age 9 – 12 years. The theoretical implications of our findings and the importance of early pragmatic language intervention for children who have WS are discussed.

  3. Space and language in Williams syndrome: insights from typical development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, Barbara; Ferrara, Katrina

    2013-11-01

    One of the holy grails of cognitive science is to understand the causal chain that links genes and cognition. Genetic syndromes accompanied by cognitive effects offer natural experiments that can uniquely inform our understanding of this chain. In this article, we discuss the case of Williams syndrome (WS), which is characterized by a set of missing genes on chromosome 7q11.23, and presents with a unique cognitive profile that includes severe spatial impairment along with strikingly fluent and well-structured language. An early inference from this profile was the idea that a small group of genes could directly target one cognitive system while leaving others unaffected. Recent evidence shows that this inference fails. First, the profile within the spatial domain is varied, with relative strength in some aspects of spatial representation but severe impairment in others. Second, some aspects of language may fail to develop fully, raising the question of how to compare the resilience and fragility of the two key cognitive domains in this syndrome. Third, much research on the profile fails to place findings in the context of typical developmental trajectories. We explore these points and propose a new hypothesis that explains the unusual WS cognitive profile by considering normal mechanisms of cognitive development that undergo change on an extremely prolonged timetable. This hypothesis places the elements of the WS cognitive profile in a new light, refocuses the discussion of the gene-cognition causal chain for WS and other disorders, and more generally, underlines the importance of understanding cognitive structure in both typical and atypical development. WIREs Cogn Sci 2013, 4:693-703. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1258 Conflict of interest: The authors have declared no conflicts of interest for this article. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Strain accumulation across the Prince William Sound asperity, Southcentral Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, James C.; Svarc, Jerry L.; Lisowski, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The surface velocities predicted by the conventional subduction model are compared to velocities measured in a GPS array (surveyed in 1993, 1995, 1997, 2000, and 2004) spanning the Prince William Sound asperity. The observed velocities in the comparison have been corrected to remove the contributions from postseismic (1964 Alaska earthquake) mantle relaxation. Except at the most seaward monument (located on Middleton Island at the seaward edge of the continental shelf, just 50 km landward of the deformation front in the Aleutian Trench), the corrected velocities qualitatively agree with those predicted by an improved, two-dimensional, back slip, subduction model in which the locked megathrust coincides with the plate interface identified by seismic refraction surveys, and the back slip rate is equal to the plate convergence rate. A better fit to the corrected velocities is furnished by either a back slip rate 20% greater than the plate convergence rate or a 30% shallower megathrust. The shallow megathrust in the latter fit may be an artifact of the uniform half-space Earth model used in the inversion. Backslip at the plate convergence rate on the megathrust mapped by refraction surveys would fit the data as well if the rigidity of the underthrust plate was twice that of the overlying plate, a rigidity contrast higher than expected. The anomalous motion at Middleton Island is attributed to continuous slip at near the plate convergence rate on a postulated, listric fault that splays off the megathrust at depth of about 12 km and outcrops on the continental slope south-southeast of Middleton Island.

  5. William Barstow Mansion of the United States Merchant Marine Academy: Nomination to the National Register of Historic Places

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    ER D C/ CE RL T R- T R- 14 -2 9 William Barstow Mansion of the United States Merchant Marine Academy Nomination to the National...client/default. ERDC/CERL TR-14-29 October 2014 William Barstow Mansion of the United States Merchant Marine Academy Nomination to the National...object. This document contains the nomination form and all supporting docu- mentation for listing the William Barstow Mansion property, located at

  6. Comprehension of sarcasm, metaphor and simile in Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godbee, Kali; Porter, Melanie

    2013-01-01

    Although people with Williams syndrome (WS) are often characterized as friendly and sociable with relatively good general language abilities, there is emerging evidence of pragmatic difficulties and trouble comprehending aspects of non-literal language. The main aim was to investigate the comprehension of sarcasm, metaphor and simile in WS relative to typically developing controls. A secondary aim was to examine the association between non-literal language comprehension and a range of other cognitive abilities, both in WS and in the typically developing population. Twenty-six participants with WS were compared with 26 typically developing chronological age-matched controls (TDCA) and 26 typically developing mental age-matched controls (TDMA). Participants listened to stories in which characters made non-literal comments. They were then asked what each character meant by their comment. In order to investigate the second aim of the study, cognitive abilities were also assessed using the Woodcock-Johnson (Revised) Tests of Cognitive Ability, including expressive vocabulary, verbal working memory, perceptual integration, inferential reasoning and overall cognitive ability. Comprehension of non-literal language in WS was significantly below TDCA levels, but was not significantly different to TDMA levels. For typically developing controls, each of the cognitive measures was strongly correlated with each of the measures of non-literal language comprehension. The same relationships were not always found for participants with WS. In particular, sarcasm comprehension in WS was not significantly correlated with any of the assessed cognitive abilities, and expressive vocabulary was not significantly correlated with any measure of non-literal comprehension. Comprehension of simile in WS is below TDCA levels but seems on par with their mental age level. It appears that comprehension of sarcasm and metaphors is above the cognitive capabilities and mental age level of most

  7. Obituary: William F. M. Buscombe, 1918-2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taam, Ronald Everett; Bahng, John D. R.

    2003-12-01

    William Buscombe, an emeritus professor at Northwestern University, died from a massive stroke on 13 March 2003. He was a stellar spectroscopist and was working on the 16th edition of his catalog, entitled ``MK Spectral Classifications" at the time of his death. Bill was born on 12 February 1918 in Hamilton, Canada to Ethel Minett Buscombe and William Henry Buscombe. His mother was a business woman prior to marriage and his father was an executive secretary to a fire insurance company. His interest in astronomy was stimulated by a mathematics teacher in grade school and this interest carried over to his undergraduate years at the University of Toronto where he worked as a research assistant measuring stellar spectra at the David Dunlop Observatory. He earned a BA degree in Mathematics and Physics in 1940. Upon graduation he entered the graduate program in meteorology under the Department of Transport of the Government of Canada and worked as a meteorologist for the Canadian government until 1945. His studies and service eventually led to a MA degree in Meteorology from the University of Toronto in 1948. From the period 1945 to 1948, Bill was an instructor in the Department of Mathematics at the University of Saskatchewan. During the summer of 1947 Bill resumed his research in astronomy working with Andew McKellar in a study of the intensities of molecular bands in R-type stars at the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory. Subsequently, Bill entered into the graduate program in the Department of Astronomy at Princeton University where he worked with Martin Schwarzschild and Lyman Spitzer, Jr. In 1950, he was awarded a PhD in Astronomy for his thesis entitled, ``Spectrophotometry of Early A-Type Stars." Bill joined the staff at the Mt. Wilson and Palomar Observatories as a Fellow of the Carnegie Institution of Washington from 1950--1952. During this period he spent a significant amount of time observing at Mount Wilson studying the variations of atomic absorption lines

  8. A case of William's syndrome associated peripheral pulmonary arterial stenosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Kyung Hwa; Hwang, Mi Soo; Kim, Sun Yong; Chang, Jae Chun; Park, Bok Hwan [College of Medicine, Yeungam University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1988-06-15

    William's syndrome, in order to more completely delineate the total spectrum of the disorder, indicates that 'infantile hypercalcemia', 'peculiar facies' and 'supravalvular aortic stenosis.' In has other many vascular anomalies, such as peripheral pulmonary arterial stenosis, coronary arterial stenosis, celiac arterial stenosis, and renal aterial stenosis. Only 32% of the patients have evidence of supravalvular aortic stenosis. And it is very rare disease entity that has been reported rarely in Korea. Recently authors experienced a case that was questioned William's syndrome with peripheral pulmonary arterial stenosis, clinically and preliminary radiologically and this case was confirmed by operation. Here we report a case of William's syndrome with peripheral pulmonary arterial stenosis and reviewed literatures.

  9. Williams-Beuren syndrome associated with single kidney and nephrocalcinosis: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidi, Kamel; Jellouli, Manel; Rabeh, Rania Ben; Hammi, Yousra; Gargah, Tahar

    2015-01-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder, characterized by congenital heart defects, abnormal facial features, mental retardation with specific cognitive and behavioral profile, growth hormone deficiency, renal and skeletal anomalies, inguinal hernia, infantile hypercalcaemia. We report a case with Williams-Beuren syndrome associated with a single kidney and nephrocalcinosis complicated by hypercalcaemia. A male infant, aged 20 months presented growth retardation associated with a psychomotor impairment, dysmorphic features and nephrocalcinosis. He had also hypercalciuria and hypercalcemia. Echocardiography was normal. DMSA renal scintigraphy showed a single functioning kidney. The FISH generated one ELN signal in 20 metaphases read and found the presence of ELN deletion, with compatible Williams-Beuren syndrome. PMID:26958139

  10. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by William Floyd High School, New York

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Experiment

    2012-01-01

    This ATLAS Virtual Visit features high school students from Mrs. Brazzelli's and Mrs. Meyer's Physics classes of William Floyd High School in Mastic Beach, NY. This experience will further student involvement in STEM disciplines. Students will be introduced to the Standard Model of particles, the ATLAS Experiment, and the Large Hadron Collider. Students will also have the opportunity to analyze and compare data from the ATLAS experiment and summarize the fundamental facts around the Higgs boson discovery. At the end of this activity students will interact with scientists by asking questions about the experiment. William Floyd High School is also involved in the International Physics Masterclass organized by the European Particle Physics Outreach Group. http://atlas-live-virtual-visit.web.cern.ch/atlas-live-virtual-visit/2012/WilliamFloyd-NY-2012.html

  11. William S. Halsted and Harvey W. Cushing: reflections on their complex association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorhees, Jennifer R; Tubbs, R Shane; Nahed, Brian; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A

    2009-02-01

    William Stewart Halsted, the father of modern surgery, and Harvey Williams Cushing, the father of neurosurgery, are remembered for their countless innovations and contributions to the discipline of surgery. Between 1896 and 1912, they worked together at Johns Hopkins Hospital making many of their respective achievements possible. In the later years, their complex relationship, somewhat strained during Cushing's residency, grew into a mutual respect and deep appreciation for one another. In this offering, the authors attempt to elucidate the evolution of this complex relationship.

  12. The pedagogical thought of William James: tactful teacher and moral education

    OpenAIRE

    Bianca Thoilliez

    2013-01-01

    The article seeks to present the philosophy of education that is at the very heart of William James’s legacy. It is argued that along with the rise of interest in the field of education towards classic American pragmatism, the study of William James has suffered from a lack of attention. After giving an accurate overview of the themes under debate in those few works which have addressed James’s thought from a pedagogical perspective, the article progresses on discussing some other educational...

  13. William and Caroline Herschel pioneers in late 18th-century astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Hoskin, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This beautifully structured book presents the essentials of William and Caroline Herschel's pioneering achievements in late 18th-century astronomy. Michael Hoskin shows that William Herschel was the first observational cosmologist and one of the first observers to attack the sidereal universe beyond the solar system:Herschel built instruments far better than any being used at the royal observatory. Aided by his sister Caroline, he commenced a great systematic survey that led to his discovery of Uranus in 1781.Unlike observers before him, whose telescopes did not reveal them as astronomical obj

  14. Replication of “Experiencing physical warmth promotes interpersonal warmth” by Williams & Bargh (2008)

    OpenAIRE

    Lynott, Dermot; Corker, Katherine; Wortman, Jessica; Connell, Louise; Donnellan, M. Brent; Lucas, Richard; O'Brien, Kerry S.

    2014-01-01

    We report the results of three high-powered, independent replications of Study 2 from Williams and Bargh (2008). Participants evaluated hot or cold instant therapeutic packs before choosing a reward for participation that was framed as a prosocial (i.e., treat for a friend) or self-interested reward (i.e., treat for the self). Williams and Bargh predicted that evaluating the hot pack would lead to a higher probability of making a prosocial choice compared to evaluating the cold pack. We did n...

  15. El miedo en la producción dramática de Tennessee Williams

    OpenAIRE

    Garrido Chamorro, María de las Nieves

    2013-01-01

    Esta Tesis Doctoral pretende demostrar que el miedo es uno de los elementos principales sobre los que se vertebran las distintas obras de Tennessee Williams. A lo largo de su carrera como dramaturgo, Williams creó personajes y situaciones que plasman perfectamente la temática del miedo. Hasta el momento el miedo no ha recibido suficiente atención por parte de la crítica especializada y, aunque se han hecho referencias al mismo, no se ha considerado como factor que englobe la totalidad de su ...

  16. Critical Comparison between Modified Monier-Williams and Electrochemical Methods to Determine Sulfite in Aqueous Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Montes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, known concentration of sulfite aqueous solutions in the presence and absence of gallic acid was measured to corroborate the validity of modified Monier-Williams method. Free and bound-sulfite was estimated by differential pulse voltammetry. To our surprise, the modified Monier-Williams method (also known as aspiration method showed to be very inaccurate for free-sulfite, although suitable for bound-sulfite determination. The differential pulse approach, using the standard addition method and a correction coefficient, proved to be swift, cheap, and very precise and accurate.

  17. 第六十五届William Lowell Putnam数学竞赛

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Leonard F. Klosinski; Gerald L. Alexanderson; Loren C. Larson; 陆柱家

    2006-01-01

    2004年12月4日举行了第65届William Lowell Putnam数学竞赛.竞赛由William Lowell Putnam奖学金奖励基金会资助。该基金会由Putnam夫人为纪念其丈夫而出资设立的。每年一次的竞赛由美国数学协会(the Mathematical Association of America)主办。按照竞赛规则,结果如下。

  18. 第六十六届William Lowell Putnam数学竞赛

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Leonard; F.; Klosinski; Gerald; L.; Alexanderson; Loren; C.; Larson; 陆柱家(译); 陆昱(校)

    2007-01-01

    2005年12月3日举行了第66届William Lowell Putnam数学竞赛.竞赛由William Lowell Putnam奖学金奖励基金会资助.该基金会是由Putnam夫人为纪念其丈夫而出资设立的.每年一次的竞赛由美国数学协会(the Mathematical Association of America)主办.按照竞赛规则,结果如下.

  19. 第六十九届William Lowell Putnam数学竞赛

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Leonard F. Klosinski; Gerald L. Alexanderson; Loren

    2009-01-01

    2008年12月6日举行了第69届William Lowell Putnam数学竞赛.竞赛由William Lowell Putnam奖学金奖励基金会资助.该基金会是由Putnam夫人为纪念其丈夫而出资设立的.每年一次的竞赛由美国数学协会(the Mathematical Association of America)主办.按照竞赛规则,结果如下.

  20. 第六十八届 William Lowell Putnam数学竞赛

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Leonard F. Klosinski; Gerald L. Alexanderson; Loren C. Larson; 陆柱家(译); 陆昱(校)

    2008-01-01

    2007年12月1日举行了第68届William Lowell Putnam数学竞赛.竞赛由William Lowell Putnam奖学金奖励基金会资助.该基金会是由Putnam夫人为纪念其丈夫而出资设立的.每年一次的竞赛由美国数学协会(the Mathematical Association of America)主办.按照竞赛规则,结果如下.

  1. 第七十二届 William Lowell Putnam数学竞赛

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Leonard F. Klosinski; Gerald L. Alexanderson; Mark Krusemeyer; 陆柱家(译); 陆昱(校)

    2012-01-01

    2011年12月3日举行了第72届William Lowell Putnam数学竞赛.竞赛由William Lowell Putnam奖励基金会资助.该基金会是由Putnam夫人为纪念其丈夫而出资设立的.每年一次的竞赛由美国数学协会(the Mathematical Association of America)主办.按照竞赛规则,结果如下.

  2. Infrared astronomy seeing the heat : from William Herschel to the Herschel space observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Clements, David L

    2014-01-01

    Uncover the Secrets of the Universe Hidden at Wavelengths beyond Our Optical GazeWilliam Herschel's discovery of infrared light in 1800 led to the development of astronomy at wavelengths other than the optical. Infrared Astronomy - Seeing the Heat: from William Herschel to the Herschel Space Observatory explores the work in astronomy that relies on observations in the infrared. Author David L. Clements, a distinguished academic and science fiction writer, delves into how the universe works, from the planets in our own Solar System to the universe as a whole. The book first presents the major t

  3. Exploring the Traces of Modern Civilization in William Faulkner's "A Rose for Emily"%Exploring the Traces of Modern Civilization in William Faulkner's"A Rose for Emily"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵阳

    2016-01-01

    As one of the modern American novelists, William Faulkner has enjoyed a high prestige."A Rose for Emily", one of Faulkner's most famous short stories shows a clear picture of the change of Southern society after the American Civil War. As the Civil War came to an end, the modern civilization in the north exerted a powerful influence over the South. It grew rapidly and at the same time affected the South recklessly.

  4. The Pennsylvania Anatomy Act of 1883: Weighing the Roles of Professor William Smith Forbes and Senator William James McKnight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, James R

    2016-10-01

    Effective Anatomical Acts transformed medical education and curtailed grave-robbing. William S. Forbes, Demonstrator of Anatomy at Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia, authored the Pennsylvania Anatomy Act of 1867, but it was ineffective. In December of 1882, Forbes and accomplices were charged with grave-robbing. Forbes was acquitted in early 1883, but his accomplices were all convicted; nevertheless, these events precipitated a strengthened Anatomy Act in 1883. Forbes was crowned the Father of the Pennsylvania Anatomy Act and was revered by the Philadelphia medical community for his personal sacrifices for medical education; they even paid his legal fees. Over the remainder of his life, Forbes received many honors. However, there was a second major player, rural doctor William J. McKnight, a convicted grave-robber and State Senator. The evidence shows that Forbes precipitated the crisis, which was a racial powder keg, and then primarily focused on his trial, while McKnight, creatively working behind the scenes in collaboration with Jefferson, Anatomy Professor William H. Pancoast, used the crisis to draft and pass transformative legislation enabling anatomical dissection at Pennsylvania medical schools. While not minimizing Forbes suffering throughout these events, McKnight should be appropriately recognized for his initiative and contributions, which far exceeded those of Forbes. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. 78 FR 5431 - Annual Notice of Interest Rates of Federal Student Loans Made Under the William D. Ford Federal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Annual Notice of Interest Rates of Federal Student Loans Made Under the William D. Ford Federal Direct..., 2013, for loans made under the William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan (Direct Loan) Program. The...

  6. 78 FR 33395 - Annual Updates to the Income Contingent Repayment (ICR) Plan Formula for 2013-William D. Ford...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Annual Updates to the Income Contingent Repayment (ICR) Plan Formula for 2013--William D. Ford Federal...- 800-877-8339. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Under the William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan (Direct...

  7. 78 FR 53431 - Annual Notice of Interest Rates of Federal Student Loans Made Under the William D. Ford Federal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Annual Notice of Interest Rates of Federal Student Loans Made Under the William D. Ford Federal Direct... June 30, 2014, for loans made under the William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan (Direct Loan) Program...

  8. 77 FR 30266 - Annual Updates to the Income Contingent Repayment (ICR) Plan Formula for 2012; William D. Ford...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Annual Updates to the Income Contingent Repayment (ICR) Plan Formula for 2012; William D. Ford Federal... the ICR plan formula for 2012. Under the William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan (Direct Loan)...

  9. 77 FR 20796 - Annual Updates to the Income Contingent Repayment (ICR) Plan Formula for 2011; William D. Ford...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Annual Updates to the Income Contingent Repayment (ICR) Plan Formula for 2011; William D. Ford Federal... the ICR plan formula for 2011. Under the William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan (Direct Loan)...

  10. 78 FR 59011 - Annual Notice of Interest Rates of Federal Student Loans Made Under the William D. Ford Federal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Annual Notice of Interest Rates of Federal Student Loans Made Under the William D. Ford Federal Direct... rates for loans made under the William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan (Direct Loan) Program on or...

  11. 78 FR 49749 - Williams Olefins Feedstock Pipelines, L.L.C.; Notice of Petition for Declaratory Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Williams Olefins Feedstock Pipelines, L.L.C.; Notice of Petition for... Practices and Procedure, 18 CFR 385.207(a)(2)(2012), Williams Olefins Feedstock Pipelines, L.L.C., filed...

  12. 77 FR 32625 - William J. Stevenson, Estate of Lynn E. Stevenson, Black Canyon Bliss, LLC; Notice of Application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission William J. Stevenson, Estate of Lynn E. Stevenson, Black Canyon Bliss, LLC... 23, 2012, William J. Stevenson, Estate of Lynn E. Stevenson (transferor) and Black Canyon Bliss, LLC (transferee) filed an application for the transfer of license for the Stevenson No. 2 Project (FERC No....

  13. Prosodic Abilities in Spanish and English Children with Williams Syndrome: A Cross-Linguistic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Castilla, Pastora; Stojanovik, Vesna; Setter, Jane; Sotillo, Maria

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the prosodic profiles of English- and Spanish-speaking children with Williams syndrome (WS), examining cross-linguistic differences. Two groups of children with WS, English and Spanish, of similar chronological and nonverbal mental age, were compared on performance in expressive and receptive prosodic tasks…

  14. William Harvey & Capillaries: Can You "Discover" Circulation without Connections between Arteries & Veins?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allchin, Douglas

    2005-01-01

    William Harvey's discovery of the presence of capillaries and the role played by them without actually seeing them highlights his power of observation and logic. However, his perspective could not be considered as new since he had adopted his disposition for ocular demonstration from Aristotle and Galen.

  15. Gaze Aversion during Social Style Interactions in Autism Spectrum Disorder and Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty-Sneddon, Gwyneth; Whittle, Lisa; Riby, Deborah M.

    2013-01-01

    During face-to-face interactions typically developing individuals use gaze aversion (GA), away from their questioner, when thinking. GA is also used when individuals with autism (ASD) and Williams syndrome (WS) are thinking during question-answer interactions. We investigated GA strategies during face-to-face social style interactions with…

  16. Development of Novel Metaphor and Metonymy Comprehension in Typically Developing Children and Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Herwegen, Jo; Dimitriou, Dagmara; Rundblad, Gabriella

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the development of novel metaphor and metonymy comprehension in both typically developing (TD) children and individuals with Williams syndrome (WS). Thirty-one TD children between the ages of 3;09 and 17;01 and thirty-four individuals with WS between the ages of 7;01 and 44 years old were administered a newly developed task…

  17. Caregiver Survey of Pharmacotherapy to Treat Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in Individuals with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Marilee A.; Seyfer, Daisha L.; Andridge, Rebecca R.; Foster, Jessica E. A.; McClure, Kelsey E.; Coury, Daniel L.

    2013-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a genetic condition characterized by a unique neurocognitive and behavioral profile, including increased incidence of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The purpose of the present study was to examine the perceived helpfulness and side effects of medications used to treat ADHD (methylphenidate class,…

  18. Cross Syndrome Comparison of Sleep Problems in Children with Down Syndrome and Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashworth, Anna; Hill, Catherine M.; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette; Dimitriou, Dagmara

    2013-01-01

    Based on previous findings of frequent sleep problems in children with Down syndrome (DS) and Williams syndrome (WS), the present study aimed to expand our knowledge by using parent report and actigraphy to define sleep problems more precisely in these groups. Twenty-two school-aged children with DS, 24 with WS and 52 typically developing (TD)…

  19. William James Sidis'"Tribes and States": An Unpublished Exploration of Native American Contributions to Democracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Bruce E.

    1989-01-01

    Summarizes William Sidis'"Tribes and States," a 50-year-old unpublished manuscript that retells colonial American history from an American Indian viewpoint and traces the contributions of American Indians, particularly the Penacook Federation and the Iroquois Confederacy, to American democracy and constitutional rights. (SV)

  20. William Golding's Iconoclastic Views about the Neanderthal Man in "The Inheritors"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, Sayed Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    William Golding has been identified as a nonconformist whose opinions always go contrary to what is customarily accepted or established. This is shown in all his novels, more specifically "The Inheritors", in which he defies long established opinions held by anthropologists, historians, archaeologists as well as many others about the…

  1. Children's Moral and Ecological Reasoning about the Prince William Sound Oil Spill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Peter H., Jr.; Friedman, Batya

    This study investigated children's moral and ecological conceptions and values about an actual, environmentally destructive accident, the large oil spill that occurred in Prince William Sound, Alaska in 1989. Sixty children from second, fifth, and eighth grades were interviewed on children's reasoning and understandings about the oil spill which…

  2. Music & Minds: Using a Talent Development Approach for Young Adults with Williams Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Sally M.; Schader, Robin; Milne, Harry; Stephens, Robert

    2003-01-01

    The use of a talent development approach with 16 adults with Williams syndrome that focused on strengths, interests, and learning style preferences was found to enhance all participants' understanding of mathematics and to provide opportunities for the further development of their abilities, especially their music potential. (Contains references.)…

  3. Featural versus configural face processing in a rare genetic disorder: Williams syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Isaac, L.; Lincoln, A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Williams syndrome (WMS) is a rare genetic disorder with an estimated prevalence of 1 in 20 000 live births. Among other characteristics, WMS has a distinctive cognitive profile with spared face processing and language skills that contrasts with impairment in the cognitive domains of spat

  4. Absolutism and Natural Law Argument: William O. Douglas on Freedom of Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Raymond S.

    Noting that United States Supreme Court Justice William O. Douglas has often been characterized as an "absolutist" in terms of First Amendment policy, this paper argues that, in fact, Douglas's policy positions provided for less than absolute freedom to communicate. The paper then reveals, through an anlaysis of 18 of Douglas's opinions,…

  5. Understanding the end: Post-object Fandom : Television, Identity and Self-Narrative by Rebecca Williams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.M.R. Driessen (Simone)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractIn the engaging monograph "Post-object Fandom: Television, Identity and Self-narrative" (2015), Rebecca Williams illuminates how fans of TV shows such as The West Wing, Lost, and Doctor Who cope with the endings of the series. Drawing on data analyses from forums, online message bo

  6. William H. Taft High School Project HOLA, 1985-1986. OEA Evaluation Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn. Office of Educational Assessment.

    Project HOLA at William H. Taft High School (Bronx, New York) assists foreign-born and Puerto Rican-born students to quickly assists foreign- and Puerto Rican-born students to quickly acquire English language skills and an American cultural orientation; to maintain or improve their Spanish language skills and cultural knowledge; and to be…

  7. William H. Taft High School Project HOLA 1984-1985. O.E.A. Evaluation Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn. Office of Educational Assessment.

    In 1984-85, Project HOLA was in its second year of funding at William H. Taft High School in the Bronx, New York. HOLA serves Spanish-speaking students of limited English proficiency (LEP). Project goals include speedy acquisition of English skills, orientation to life in America, maintenance and improvement of Spanish skills and cultural…

  8. William H. Taft High School Project HOLA, 1986-1987. OEA Evaluation Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Ana L.; And Others

    In its fourth year of Title VII funding, Project HOLA at William H. Taft High School served 383 Spanish-speaking students of limited English proficiency from low-income families. The program's goals were to develop English language skills for mainstreaming, to develop an understanding and awareness of American culture and society, to develop…

  9. Developmental Trajectories of Structural and Pragmatic Language Skills in School-Aged Children with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Den Heuvel, E.; Manders, E.; Swillen, A.; Zink, I.

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to compare developmental courses of structural and pragmatic language skills in school-aged children with Williams syndrome (WS) and children with idiopathic intellectual disability (IID). Comparison of these language trajectories could highlight syndrome-specific developmental features. Method: Twelve monolingual…

  10. Stress in Families of Young Children with Down Syndrome, Williams Syndrome, and Smith-Magenis Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidler, Deborah J.; Hodapp, Robert M.; Dykens, Elizabeth M.

    2000-01-01

    Compared stress levels in families of children with Down syndrome (DS), Williams syndrome (WS), or Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS). Found that DS families experienced less Pessimism than others and less Parent and Family Problems than SMS families. Strongest predictors of Parent and Family Problems were maladaptive behavior in SMS, younger age in DS,…

  11. Developmental Trajectories of Structural and Pragmatic Language Skills in School-Aged Children with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Den Heuvel, E.; Manders, E.; Swillen, A.; Zink, I.

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to compare developmental courses of structural and pragmatic language skills in school-aged children with Williams syndrome (WS) and children with idiopathic intellectual disability (IID). Comparison of these language trajectories could highlight syndrome-specific developmental features. Method: Twelve monolingual…

  12. Exceptional Rule Learning in a Longitudinal Case Study of Williams Syndrome: Acquisition of Past Tense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Peggy F.; Cairns, Helen Smith

    2010-01-01

    Conflicting reports of language ability in Williams syndrome (WS) are confusing and may hinder accurate clinical decisions with respect to therapeutic services and educational placements for children with WS.This longitudinal case study examined the acquisition of regular and irregular past tense verbs in a child with WS. The development of…

  13. Attention in Williams Syndrome and Down's Syndrome: Performance on the New Early Childhood Attention Battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breckenridge, Kate; Braddick, Oliver; Anker, Shirley; Woodhouse, Margaret; Atkinson, Janette

    2013-01-01

    Attentional problems are commonly reported as a feature of the behavioural profile in both Williams syndrome (WS) and Down's syndrome (DS). Recent studies have begun to investigate these impairments empirically, acknowledging the need for an approach that considers cross-syndrome comparisons and developmental changes across the different component…

  14. Recognition of Emotional and Nonemotional Facial Expressions: A Comparison between Williams Syndrome and Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacroix, Agnes; Guidetti, Michele; Roge, Bernadette; Reilly, Judy

    2009-01-01

    The aim of our study was to compare two neurodevelopmental disorders (Williams syndrome and autism) in terms of the ability to recognize emotional and nonemotional facial expressions. The comparison of these two disorders is particularly relevant to the investigation of face processing and should contribute to a better understanding of social…

  15. Interactions of point vortices in the Zabusky-McWilliams model with a background flow

    CERN Document Server

    Connaughton, Colm

    2011-01-01

    We combine a simple quasi-geostrophic flow model with the Zabusky-McWilliams theory of atmospheric vortex dynamics to address a hurricane-tracking problem of interest to the insurance industry. This enables us to make predictions about the "follow-my-leader" phenomenon.

  16. Why William James Might Be Considered the Founder of the Scientist-Practitioner Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, George S.

    1993-01-01

    Argues that close examination of William James's more philosophically oriented works reveals a set of principles (i.e., pragmatism, pluralism, radical empiricism, strenuosity, and freedom of the will) that form the basis of the scientist-practitioner model in psychology. (Author/NB)

  17. William Blake’s Milton a Poem as a conversion narrative in the Behmenist tradition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Elisabeth Engell

    2014-01-01

    The term ‘conversion narrative’ lacks proper definition and can be understood more broadly than is often the case, underlining its fictive nature. I show this by reading William Blake’s Milton a Poem as a conversion narrative, exploring how Blake weaves a wider discourse of conversion around...

  18. Prevalence of scoliosis in Williams-Beuren syndrome patients treated at a regional reference center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Loquette Damasceno

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE:This study assessed the prevalence of scoliosis and the patterns of scoliotic curves in patients with Williams-Beuren syndrome. Williams-Beuren syndrome is caused by a chromosome 7q11.23 deletion in a region containing 28 genes, with the gene encoding elastin situated approximately at the midpoint of the deletion. Mutation of the elastin gene leads to phenotypic changes in patients, including neurodevelopmental impairment of varying degrees, characteristic facies, cardiovascular abnormalities, hypercalcemia, urological dysfunctions, and bone and joint dysfunctions.METHODS:A total of 41 patients diagnosed with Williams-Beuren syndrome, who were followed up at the genetics ambulatory center of a large referral hospital, were included in the study. There were 25 male subjects. The patients were examined and submitted to radiographic investigation for Cobb angle calculation.RESULTS:It was observed that 14 patients had scoliosis; of these 14 patients, 10 were male. The pattern of deformity in younger patients was that of flexible and simple curves, although adults presented with double and triple curves. Statistical analysis showed no relationships between scoliosis and age or sex.CONCLUSION:This study revealed a prevalence of scoliosis in patients with Williams-Beuren syndrome of 34.1%; however, age and sex were not significantly associated with scoliosis or with the severity of the curves.

  19. William Horsley: Music Master at Miss Black's Boarding-School for Young Ladies, 1828-1840

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodall, Susan

    2009-01-01

    William Horsley (1775-1858) was active in London from the late 1790s. A founder member of the Philharmonic Society, Horsley was at the heart of the musical establishment, working as a composer, organist, commentator and teacher. His teaching career spanned over 50 years, during which time he took private pupils, trained choristers and organists…

  20. Getting Ready to Stay Dead : Rites of Passage in William Faulkner's Novels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Irene

    2012-01-01

    This article uses concepts from anthropology to explore the representation of rites of passage as crucial episodes in William Faulkner's As I Lay Dying (1930), The Sound and the Fury (1929), and Light in August (1932). Rites of passage, as conceptualized by anthropologists, are transformative and in

  1. Pathways to Language: A Naturalistic Study of Children with Williams Syndrome and Children with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Yonata; Eilam, Ariela

    2013-01-01

    This is a naturalistic study of the development of language in Hebrew-speaking children with Williams syndrome (WS) and children with Down syndrome (DS), whose MLU extended from 1[multiplied by]0 to 4[multiplied by]4. Developmental curves over the entire span of data collection revealed minor differences between children with WS, children with DS,…

  2. Periodic Reactions: The Early Works of William C. Bray and Alfred J. Lotka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervellati, Rinaldo; Greco, Emanuela

    2017-01-01

    Oscillating chemical reactions in the homogeneous phase have been studied intensively only since the mid-1960s, but they were known since 1920, having as forerunners the chemist William C. Bray and an "atypical" chemist Alfred J. Lotka. This contribution is the result of a careful reading of their literature and patient research into…

  3. Object Recognition with Severe Spatial Deficits in Williams Syndrome: Sparing and Breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, Barbara; Hoffman, James E.; Kurz, Nicole

    2006-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a rare genetic disorder that results in severe visual-spatial cognitive deficits coupled with relative sparing in language, face recognition, and certain aspects of motion processing. Here, we look for evidence for sparing or impairment in another cognitive system--object recognition. Children with WS, normal mental-age…

  4. The Revolt of the Object : Animated Drawings and the Colonial Archive: William Kentridge's Black Box Theatre

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buikema, R.L.

    2016-01-01

    When South African visual artist William Kentridge accepted the yearly assignment of the German Guggenheim Foundation, he decided for that occasion to thematize the link between Germany and Africa's colonial histories. In particular he decided to highlight the under-researched history of the genocid

  5. Diurnal Cortisol Profile in Williams Syndrome in Novel and Familiar Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lense, Miriam Diane; Tomarken, Andrew J.; Dykens, Elisabeth M.

    2013-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental genetic disorder associated with high rates of anxiety and social issues. We examined diurnal cortisol, a biomarker of the stress response, in adults with WS in novel and familiar settings, and compared these profiles to typically developing (TD) adults. WS and TD participants had similar profiles in…

  6. Cortisol Reactivity and Performance Abilities in Social Situations in Adults with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lense, Miriam D.; Dykens, Elisabeth M.

    2013-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder associated with hypersociability and anxiety. However, little is known about how these salient aspects of the phenotype are related or their underlying physiology. We examined cortisol reactivity in WS because cortisol is responsive to psychosocial stress. Compared to typically developing…

  7. William Kessen and James Mark Baldwin: Lessons from the History of Developmental Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Michel; Runions, Kevin; Fueser, Josephine J.

    2003-01-01

    Considers the work of developmental scholar William Kessen (1925-1999) in light of James Mark Baldwin, one of the founders and principal architects of developmental psychology. Traces Kessen's interest in Baldwin's thought and examines Baldwin's legacy for developmental psychologists. Asserts that Baldwin's theory sought to integrate the role of…

  8. William Bennett on Martin Luther King: Mock-Diversifying the Core Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorn, Jeff

    1992-01-01

    The writings of Martin Luther King Jr. deserve to be read in undergraduate humanities classes but not in the spirit advocated by former Secretary of Education William Bennett. It is argued that Bennett downplays the struggles against racial discrimination and chooses the most conservative King pieces for the literary canon. (SLD)

  9. Direct Loans: A Better Way To Borrow. William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Education, Washington, DC. Student Financial Assistance.

    The Web site http://www.ed.gov/DirectLoan/ provides information on the William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program for both professionals and borrowers. For professionals, it provides information on conferences, promissory notes, regulations, laws, and relevant links, as well as technical assistance, and other publications and guides. For…

  10. Recognition of Emotional and Nonemotional Facial Expressions: A Comparison between Williams Syndrome and Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacroix, Agnes; Guidetti, Michele; Roge, Bernadette; Reilly, Judy

    2009-01-01

    The aim of our study was to compare two neurodevelopmental disorders (Williams syndrome and autism) in terms of the ability to recognize emotional and nonemotional facial expressions. The comparison of these two disorders is particularly relevant to the investigation of face processing and should contribute to a better understanding of social…

  11. Direct PLUS Loan Basics: Parent Loans for Students. William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Education, Washington, DC.

    The Direct PLUS Loan is one of the low-interest loans provided by the William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program. The U.S. Department of Education delivers loan proceeds through the student's school, and parents are responsible for repaying the Department. This booklet answers parents' questions about the loan program, including: (1) Am I…

  12. John Dewey, William Wirt and the Gary Schools Plan: A Centennial Reappraisal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorburn, Malcolm

    2017-01-01

    A century on from the height of John Dewey's educational writings and the reputation of the Gary Schools Plan as a model of progressive education, the paper reappraises two key matters: the relationship between John Dewey and William Wirt, the first superintendent of the Gary Schools in Gary Indiana, and the coherence between John Dewey's…

  13. Atypical Verbal Communication Pattern According to Others' Attention in Children with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asada, Kosuke; Tomiwa, Kiyotaka; Okada, Masako; Itakura, Shoji

    2010-01-01

    Children with Williams syndrome (WS) have been reported to often face problems in daily communication and to have deficits in their pragmatic language abilities. To test this hypothesis, we examined whether children with WS could modify their verbal communication according to others' attention in order to share what they did. The children with WS…

  14. Working Memory Impairment in People with Williams Syndrome: Effects of Delay, Task and Stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hearn, Kirsten; Courtney, Susan; Street, Whitney; Landau, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder associated with impaired visuospatial representations subserved by the dorsal stream and relatively strong object recognition abilities subserved by the ventral stream. There is conflicting evidence on whether this uneven pattern in WS extends to working memory (WM). The present studies…

  15. Theory of Mind in Williams Syndrome Assessed Using a Nonverbal Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Melanie A.; Coltheart, Max; Langdon, Robyn

    2008-01-01

    This study examined Theory of Mind in Williams syndrome (WS) and in normal chronological age-matched and mental age-matched control groups, using a picture sequencing task. This task assesses understanding of pretence, intention and false belief, while controlling for social-script knowledge and physical cause-and-effect reasoning. The task was…

  16. Honing in on the Social Phenotype in Williams Syndrome Using Multiple Measures and Multiple Raters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein-Tasman, Bonita P.; Li-Barber, Kirsten T.; Magargee, Erin T.

    2011-01-01

    The behavioral phenotype of Williams syndrome (WS) is characterized by difficulties with establishment and maintenance of friendships despite high levels of interest in social interaction. Here, parents and teachers rated 84 children with WS ages 4-16 years using two commonly-used measures assessing aspects of social functioning: the Social Skills…

  17. The portrait of Dr William Harvey in the Royal Society since 1683.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keynes, Milo

    2006-09-22

    A portrait of William Harvey in the Royal Society since 1683 is a copy by an unknown artist after a portrait, now lost, painted by Sir Peter Lely ca. 1650. Three other unattributed copies besides a copy bought from Lely's studio on his death by the Earl of Bradford have been located. The present labelling of the Royal Society portrait should be corrected.

  18. David Cronenberg ja William S. Burroughs kutsuvad teid lantshile / Aare Ermel

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ermel, Aare, 1957-2013

    1999-01-01

    Mängufilm "Alasti eine" ("Naked Lunch") William S. Burroughs' teose järgi : režissöör ja stsenarist David Cronenberg : Suurbritannia - Kanada 1991. Lähemalt režissööri kohta. Ka Nädal nr. 35, lk. 29

  19. The Revolt of the Object : Animated Drawings and the Colonial Archive: William Kentridge's Black Box Theatre

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buikema, R.L.

    2016-01-01

    When South African visual artist William Kentridge accepted the yearly assignment of the German Guggenheim Foundation, he decided for that occasion to thematize the link between Germany and Africa's colonial histories. In particular he decided to highlight the under-researched history of the genocid

  20. Alternative Strategies to William Bennett's Plan for a National War on Drugs: A Comprehensive Systems Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Andrea, Michael

    As this country's first appointed "drug czar," William Bennett developed a set of proposals for a national campaign against drug abuse. These included: expanding the national prison capacity by 85 percent; providing additional fiscal support for states and local areas that adopt anti-drug laws; and increasing the availablility of…

  1. William Bennett and the "Good War" against Drugs: Doublespeak and the Bush Administration's Hidden Agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Tom

    This paper contends that former Secretary of Education William Bennett's "war on drugs" (he now directs the government's campaign against drugs) is not being waged against those who sell and use drugs, but against the civil liberties of everyone. The paper maintains that under the guise of ridding society of what President Bush called…

  2. Using Picture Books to Provide Archetypes to Young Boys: Extending the Ideas of William Brozo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambo, Debby

    2007-01-01

    In his book "To Be a Boy, To Be a Reader: Engaging Teen and Preteen Boys in Active Literacy," William Brozo suggested that many adolescent boys have become mentally and academically detached from school. While Brozo acknowledges that a solution to these problems is multifaceted, he asserts that engaging boys in literature that makes use of…

  3. The Revolt of the Object : Animated Drawings and the Colonial Archive: William Kentridge's Black Box Theatre

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buikema, R.L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/072838965

    2016-01-01

    When South African visual artist William Kentridge accepted the yearly assignment of the German Guggenheim Foundation, he decided for that occasion to thematize the link between Germany and Africa's colonial histories. In particular he decided to highlight the under-researched history of the

  4. Lexical-Semantic Reading in a Shallow Orthography: Evidence from a Girl with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barca, Laura; Bello, Arianna; Volterra, Virginia; Burani, Cristina

    2010-01-01

    The reading skills of a girl with Williams Syndrome are assessed by a timed word-naming task. To test the efficiency of lexical and nonlexical reading, we considered four marker effects: Lexicality (better reading of words than nonwords), frequency (better reading of high than low frequency words), length (better reading of short than long words),…

  5. Danish resonances and repercussions in the life and work of William H. Johnson

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent

    William H. Johnson was an outstanding African-American artist, represented with hundreds of works in the Smithsonian Museum of American Art’s collection, but he was also a resident of Denmark for the better part of the 1930s, and again for a brief spell after WWII. While studying art in Paris...

  6. Sleep Patterns and Daytime Sleepiness in Adolescents and Young Adults with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, S. E.; Malow, B. A.; Newman, K. D.; Roof, E.; Dykens, E. M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Sleep disorders are common in individuals with neurodevelopmental disorders and may adversely affect daytime functioning. Children with Williams syndrome have been reported to have disturbed sleep; however, no studies have been performed to determine if these problems continue into adolescence and adulthood. Methods: This study…

  7. Attention in Williams Syndrome and Down's Syndrome: Performance on the New Early Childhood Attention Battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breckenridge, Kate; Braddick, Oliver; Anker, Shirley; Woodhouse, Margaret; Atkinson, Janette

    2013-01-01

    Attentional problems are commonly reported as a feature of the behavioural profile in both Williams syndrome (WS) and Down's syndrome (DS). Recent studies have begun to investigate these impairments empirically, acknowledging the need for an approach that considers cross-syndrome comparisons and developmental changes across the different component…

  8. William Bennett and the "Good War" against Drugs: Doublespeak and the Bush Administration's Hidden Agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Tom

    This paper contends that former Secretary of Education William Bennett's "war on drugs" (he now directs the government's campaign against drugs) is not being waged against those who sell and use drugs, but against the civil liberties of everyone. The paper maintains that under the guise of ridding society of what President Bush called…

  9. Alternative Strategies to William Bennett's Plan for a National War on Drugs: A Comprehensive Systems Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Andrea, Michael

    As this country's first appointed "drug czar," William Bennett developed a set of proposals for a national campaign against drug abuse. These included: expanding the national prison capacity by 85 percent; providing additional fiscal support for states and local areas that adopt anti-drug laws; and increasing the availablility of…

  10. David Cronenberg ja William S. Burroughs kutsuvad teid lantshile / Aare Ermel

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ermel, Aare, 1957-2013

    1999-01-01

    Mängufilm "Alasti eine" ("Naked Lunch") William S. Burroughs' teose järgi : režissöör ja stsenarist David Cronenberg : Suurbritannia - Kanada 1991. Lähemalt režissööri kohta. Ka Nädal nr. 35, lk. 29

  11. Getting Ready to Stay Dead : Rites of Passage in William Faulkner's Novels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Irene

    2012-01-01

    This article uses concepts from anthropology to explore the representation of rites of passage as crucial episodes in William Faulkner's As I Lay Dying (1930), The Sound and the Fury (1929), and Light in August (1932). Rites of passage, as conceptualized by anthropologists, are transformative and

  12. 77 FR 2242 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Ehrenberg, First Mesa, Kachina Village, Wickenburg, and Williams, AZ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-17

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 [MB Docket No. 08-85; RM-11427, RM-11517, RM-11518, RM-11519; DA 11- 2059] Radio Broadcasting Services; Ehrenberg, First Mesa, Kachina Village, Wickenburg, and Williams, AZ, and Needles, CA... Radio, Inc. (RM-11517) and Univision Radio License Corporation (RM-11518), which are mutually...

  13. Sleep EEG Fingerprints Reveal Accelerated Thalamocortical Oscillatory Dynamics in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodizs, Robert; Gombos, Ferenc; Kovacs, Ilona

    2012-01-01

    Sleep EEG alterations are emerging features of several developmental disabilities, but detailed quantitative EEG data on the sleep phenotype of patients with Williams syndrome (WS, 7q11.23 microdeletion) is still lacking. Based on laboratory (Study I) and home sleep records (Study II) here we report WS-related features of the patterns of…

  14. William L. Stern, 1871-1938: A Neglected Founder of Developmental Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreppner, Kurt

    1992-01-01

    Recounts the career of William L. Stern. Stern developed a personalistic psychology emphasizing the individual's role and the importance of context in development. Stern's contributions to developmental psychology concerned: (1) the tension between activity and reactivity in the developing individual; (2) the exchange between a person and the…

  15. Williams Syndrome Hypersociability: A Neuropsychological Study of the Amygdala and Prefrontal Cortex Hypotheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitao, Liliana; Sampaio, Adriana; Fernandez, Montse; Sousa, Nuno; Pinheiro, Ana; Goncalves, Oscar F.

    2011-01-01

    Individuals with Williams syndrome display indiscriminate approach towards strangers. Neuroimaging studies conducted so far have linked this social profile to structural and/or functional abnormalities in WS amygdala and prefrontal cortex. In this study, the neuropsychological hypotheses of amygdala and prefrontal cortex involvement in WS…

  16. Performance on the Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test-2 by Children with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, C. Holley; Mervis, Carolyn B.

    2016-01-01

    We describe the performance of 292 4- to 17-year-olds with Williams syndrome (WS) on the Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test-2 (KBIT-2; Kaufman & Kaufman, 2004). Mean IQ Composite, Verbal standard score (SS), and Nonverbal SS were in the borderline range relative to the general population, with variability similar to the general population.…

  17. Mental Health Concerns in Williams Syndrome: Intervention Considerations and Illustrations from Case Examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Kristin D.; Klein-Tasman, Bonita P.

    2009-01-01

    The refinement of the Williams syndrome phenotype has frequently included the study of behavioral and temperamental features common to individuals with this disorder. Within this line of research, the importance of evaluating incidence of psychopathology has been increasingly recognized, with studies consistently identifying an increased risk for…

  18. The Development of Metaphorical Language Comprehension in Typical Development and in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Michael S. C.; Van Duuren, Mike; Purser, Harry R. M.; Mareschal, Denis; Ansari, Daniel; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette

    2010-01-01

    The domain of figurative language comprehension was used to probe the developmental relation between language and cognition in typically developing individuals and individuals with Williams syndrome. Extending the work of Vosniadou and Ortony, the emergence of nonliteral similarity and category knowledge was investigated in 117 typically…

  19. Adaptive Behavior and Problem Behavior in Young Children with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Laura J.; Fidler, Deborah J.; Hepburn, Susan L.

    2014-01-01

    The present study compares the adaptive behavior profile of 18 young children with Williams syndrome (WS) and a developmentally matched group of 19 children with developmental disabilities and examines the relationship between adaptive behavior and problem behaviors in WS. Parents completed the Vineland Adaptive Behavioral Scales--Interview…

  20. Attention Bias to Emotional Faces Varies by IQ and Anxiety in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Lauren M.; Oates, Joyce M.; Dai, Yael G.; Dodd, Helen F.; Waxler, Jessica; Clements, Caitlin C.; Weill, Sydney; Hoffnagle, Alison; Anderson, Erin; MacRae, Rebecca; Mullett, Jennifer; McDougle, Christopher J.; Pober, Barbara R.; Smoller, Jordan W.

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) often experience significant anxiety. A promising approach to anxiety intervention has emerged from cognitive studies of attention bias to threat. To investigate the utility of this intervention in WS, this study examined attention bias to happy and angry faces in individuals with WS (N = 46). Results showed…

  1. A Glimpse through the Magic Door: Ursula Moray Williams, Gobbolino and the Little Wooden Horse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, Colin

    2012-01-01

    The first full biography of Ursula Moray Williams has been published to mark the centenary of her birth. In this article, its author, Colin Davison, assesses her work in the context of her life, paying particular attention to the way that her extraordinary childhood influenced her writing. He also examines new evidence about where her ideas came…

  2. Spatial-Sequential and Spatial-Simultaneous Working Memory in Individuals with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanfranchi, Silvia; De Mori, Letizia; Mammarella, Irene C.; Carretti, Barbara; Vianello, Renzo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare visuospatial working memory performance in 18 individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) and 18 typically developing (TD) children matched for nonverbal mental age. Two aspects were considered: task presentation format (i.e., spatial-sequential or spatial-simultaneous), and level of attentional control…

  3. The Imprint of Williams James on Gertrude Stein in Three Lives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘莹

    2013-01-01

    Gertrude Stein is regarded as one of the most remarkable writers of the twentieth century. This paper tries to analyze her early work Three Lives under the influence of Williams James from the aspect of Jamesian psychology analysis and the famous prolonged present to conclude that Gertrude Stein is undeniably unorthodox.

  4. Parent and Teacher Perspectives about Problem Behavior in Children with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein-Tasman, Bonita P.; Lira, Ernesto N.; Li-Barber, Kirsten T.; Gallo, Frank J.; Brei, Natalie G.

    2015-01-01

    Problem behavior of 52 children with Williams syndrome ages 6 to 17 years old was examined based on both parent and teacher report. Generally good inter-rater agreement was found. Common areas of problem behavior based both on parent and teacher report included attention problems, anxiety difficulties, repetitive behaviors (e.g., obsessions,…

  5. Heterogeneity of Social Approach Behaviour in Williams Syndrome: The Role of Response Inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Katie; Riby, Deborah M.; Janes, Emily; Clark, Fiona; Fleck, Ruth; Rodgers, Jacqui

    2013-01-01

    The developmental disorder of Williams syndrome (WS) is associated with an overfriendly personality type, including an increased tendency to approach strangers. This atypical social approach behaviour (SAB) has been linked to two potential theories: the amygdala hypothesis and the frontal lobe hypothesis. The current study aimed to investigate…

  6. Renewing the Minds of the Media: An Interview with Cardinal William Keeler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Mary Ann

    1999-01-01

    Presents an interview with Cardinal William Keeler, Archbishop of Baltimore, on the exploitation of sex and violence in communications, and the Church's concern about contemporary media. Discusses specific topics such as violence on television, pornography, and what families and parishes can do to combat media's negative effects on society. (EMH)

  7. Welcome Donald Trump, Baltics! The presidency to endure? / Mark Hertling, William E. Pomeranz ; intervjueeris Linas Jegelevicius

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Hertling, Mark

    2017-01-01

    USA Euroopa vägede endine ülem kindralleitnant Mark Hertlingi ja Kennani Instituudi asedirektor William E. Pomeranz analüüsivad Ameerika Ühendriikide uue presidendi Tonald Trumpi ametisseasumise võimalikku mõju Balti riikide julgeolekule

  8. Crisis Counseling for a Quality School Community: Applying William Glasser's Choice Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmatier, Larry L., Ed.

    This book draws upon William Glasser's choice theory, which categorically rejects external control psychology. Part I, "Seeing Crises in a Context," includes: (1) "Managing for Quality in the Schools" (W. Glasser); (2) "Reality Therapy and Choice Theory: Making Personal Choices for a Change" (L. L. Palmatier); (3)…

  9. Diurnal Cortisol Profile in Williams Syndrome in Novel and Familiar Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lense, Miriam Diane; Tomarken, Andrew J.; Dykens, Elisabeth M.

    2013-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental genetic disorder associated with high rates of anxiety and social issues. We examined diurnal cortisol, a biomarker of the stress response, in adults with WS in novel and familiar settings, and compared these profiles to typically developing (TD) adults. WS and TD participants had similar profiles in…

  10. Cortisol Reactivity and Performance Abilities in Social Situations in Adults with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lense, Miriam D.; Dykens, Elisabeth M.

    2013-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder associated with hypersociability and anxiety. However, little is known about how these salient aspects of the phenotype are related or their underlying physiology. We examined cortisol reactivity in WS because cortisol is responsive to psychosocial stress. Compared to typically developing…

  11. The Impact of Personality on History: An Interview with William L. Shirer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Social Education, 1983

    1983-01-01

    William L. Shirer, author of Rise and Fall of the Third Reich, discusses a wide variety of subjects, including the personalities of Roosevelt and Hitler, why the Germans succumbed to Nazism, McCarthyism in the United States, and the heroic resistance of the Russians to German invasion. (CS)

  12. Item and Error Analysis on Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Herwegen, Jo; Farran, Emily; Annaz, Dagmara

    2011-01-01

    Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices (RCPM) is a standardised test that is commonly used to obtain a non-verbal reasoning score for children. As the RCPM involves the matching of a target to a pattern it is also considered to be a visuo-spatial perception task. RCPM is therefore frequently used in studies in Williams Syndrome (WS), in order to…

  13. Final Environmental Assessment for Wildlife Control Actions at Williams Lake, Buckley Air Force Base, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    biodegradable erosion blanket would minimize sediment movement until the protective vegetation becomes established. Protection measures, similar to or as...polyanthemos), and sunflowers (Helianthus spp.). The shrubby component within the Williams Lake study area includes rubber rabbitbrush (Chrysothamnus...minimize sediment movement until the protective vegetation becomes established. The dam would be excavated to the EA for Wildlife Control Actions at

  14. "Who Killed William Robinson?" Exploring a Nineteenth-Century Murder Online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandwell, Ruth

    2004-01-01

    In 1996, the author and fellow-historian John Lutz set about creating a teaching tool for history that would acquaint students with primary documents and take full advantage of the brand-new technology of the World Wide Web. He launched the website, entitled "Who Killed William Robinson? Race, Justice and Settling the Land,"…

  15. Mathematical Skill in Individuals with Williams Syndrome: Evidence from a Standardized Mathematics Battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hearn, Kirsten; Landau, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a developmental disorder associated with relatively spared verbal skills and severe visuospatial deficits. It has also been reported that individuals with WS are impaired at mathematics. We examined mathematical skills in persons with WS using the second edition of the Test of Early Mathematical Ability (TEMA-2), which…

  16. Pathways to Language: A Naturalistic Study of Children with Williams Syndrome and Children with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Yonata; Eilam, Ariela

    2013-01-01

    This is a naturalistic study of the development of language in Hebrew-speaking children with Williams syndrome (WS) and children with Down syndrome (DS), whose MLU extended from 1[multiplied by]0 to 4[multiplied by]4. Developmental curves over the entire span of data collection revealed minor differences between children with WS, children with DS,…

  17. William Whewell, Galileo, and reconceptualizing the history of science and religion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, David B

    2011-12-20

    This paper advocates a reconceptualization of the history of science and religion. It is an approach to the subject that would aid research by historians of science as well as their message to others, both academic and non-academic. The approach is perfectly illustrated by the life and ideas of William Whewell and Galileo.

  18. Consumerism in Higher Education. A Case Study: Williams College, 1793 to 1993.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, Frederick

    1993-01-01

    Three distinct eras of higher education are seen as characterizing the 200-year history of Williams College (Massachusetts): first as a Christian college, then as a gentleman's school, and, finally, as a consumer-oriented institution as part of a general trend toward consumerism after World War II resulting from social change and decline in the…

  19. Readings on the Tragedies of William Shakespeare. The Greenhaven Press Literary Companion to British Authors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swisher, Clarice, Ed.

    Designed for young adults, this book on William Shakespeare's tragedies is one of an anthology series providing accessible resources for students researching great literary lives and works. Contributing writers' essays in the book are taken from a wide variety of sources and are edited to accommodate the reading and comprehension levels of young…

  20. Good Work and Aesthetic Education: William Morris, the Arts and Crafts Movement, and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petts, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    A notion of "good work," derived from William Morris and the Arts and Crafts Movement but also part of a wider tradition in philosophy (associated with pragmatism and Everyday Aesthetics) understanding the global significance of, and opportunities for, aesthetic experience, grounds both art making and appreciation in the organization of labor…

  1. Brookhaven Lab physicist William Willis wins the 2003 W.K.H. Panofsky prize

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    William Willis, a senior physicist Brookhaven National Laboratory, has won the American Physical Society's 2003 W.K.H. Panofsky Prize in Experimental Particle Physics. He received the prize, which consists of $5,000 and a certificate citing his contributions to physics, at the APS meeting in Philadelphia on April 6 (1 page).

  2. Welcome Donald Trump, Baltics! The presidency to endure? / Mark Hertling, William E. Pomeranz ; intervjueeris Linas Jegelevicius

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Hertling, Mark

    2017-01-01

    USA Euroopa vägede endine ülem kindralleitnant Mark Hertlingi ja Kennani Instituudi asedirektor William E. Pomeranz analüüsivad Ameerika Ühendriikide uue presidendi Tonald Trumpi ametisseasumise võimalikku mõju Balti riikide julgeolekule

  3. William Healy, M.D., Father of the American Child Guidance Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-01

    courts, was another important development, starting in 1899. Meyer, Sigmund Freud , and Healy all contributed to the next step, which coupled the...Dummer Papers lists 454 correspondents. The prominent psychiatrists include: Franz Alexander, Trigant Burrow, Havelock Ellis, Flanders Dunbar, Sigmund ... Freud , Roy Grinker, William Healy, Karen Homey, Marion E. Kenworthy, Lawson Lowrey, Julse Masserman, Karl Menninger, Adolf Meyer, Smith Ely Jelliffe

  4. Psychopathology in Williams Syndrome: The Effect of Individual Differences across the Life Span

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Helen F.; Porter, Melanie A.

    2009-01-01

    This research aimed to comprehensively explore psychopathology in Williams syndrome (WS) across the life span and evaluate the relationship between psychopathology and age category (child or adult), gender, and cognitive ability. The parents of 50 participants with WS, ages 6-50 years, were interviewed using the Schedule for Affective Disorders…

  5. William and Lawrence Bragg father and son the most extraordinary collaboration in science

    CERN Document Server

    Jenkin, John

    2008-01-01

    This joint biography is of William and Lawrence Bragg, who changed all of science in the 20th-century with the development of X-ray crystallography, and by mentoring the mid-century discovery of the structure of DNA. Their stories are vivid examples of science teaching and research in a colonial setting (Australia).

  6. Orientation and Affective Expression Effects on Face Recognition in Williams Syndrome and Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Fredric E.; Lincoln, Alan J.; Lai, Zona; Ene, Michaela; Searcy, Yvonne M.; Bellugi, Ursula

    2007-01-01

    We sought to clarify the nature of the face processing strength commonly observed in individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) by comparing the face recognition ability of persons with WS to that of persons with autism and to healthy controls under three conditions: Upright faces with neutral expressions, upright faces with varying affective…

  7. Dr William Thornton (1759-1828) a savant of colonial America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneeberg, Norman G

    2006-08-01

    Dr William Thornton, an Edinburgh-trained physician, practised medicine sporadically in the British West Indies, the location of his birthplace, and in Philadelphia during post-revolutionary Colonial America. He is not well known to medical historians and 21st century physicians and is remembered principally as the amateur architect who designed the Capitol in Washington, DC and the Library Company of Philadelphia.

  8. Meteor Beliefs Project: some meteoric imagery in the works of William Shakespeare

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBeath, A.; Gheorghe, A. D.

    2003-08-01

    Passages from three of William Shakespeare's plays are presented, illustrating some of the beliefs in meteors in 16th-17th century England. They also reflect earlier beliefs and information which it is known Shakespeare drew on in constructing his works.

  9. WILLIAMS SYNDROME PREDISPOSES TO VASCULAR STIFFNESS MODIFIED BY ANTI-HYPERTENSIVE USE AND COPY NUMBER CHANGES IN NCF1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozel, Beth A.; Danback, Joshua; Waxler, Jessica; Knutsen, Russell H.; Fuentes, Lisa de las; Reusz, Gyorgy S.; Kis, Eva; Bhatt, Ami; Pober, Barbara R

    2014-01-01

    Williams syndrome, is caused by the deletion of 26-28 genes, including elastin, on human chromosome 7. Elastin insufficiency leads to the cardiovascular hallmarks of this condition, namely focal stenosis and hypertension. Extrapolation from the Eln+/− mouse suggests that affected persons may also have stiff vasculature, a risk factor for stroke, myocardial infarction and cardiac death. NCF1, one of the variably deleted Williams genes, is a component of the NAD(P)H oxidase complex and is involved in the generation of oxidative stress, making it an interesting candidate modifier for vascular stiffness. Using a case-control design, vascular stiffness was evaluated by pulse wave velocity in 77 Williams cases and matched controls. Cases had stiffer conducting vessels than controls (p<0.001), with increased stiffness observed in even the youngest Williams children. Pulse wave velocity increased with age at comparable rates in cases and controls and, although the degree of vascular stiffness varied, it was seen in both hypertensive and normotensive Williams participants. Use of anti-hypertension medication and extension of the Williams deletion to include NCF1 were associated with protection from vascular stiffness. These findings demonstrate that vascular stiffness is a primary vascular phenotype in Williams syndrome and that treatment with anti-hypertensives and/or agents inhibiting oxidative stress may be important in managing patients with this condition, potentially even those who are not overtly hypertensive. PMID:24126171

  10. Notas no percurso: linguagem musical e Síndrome de Williams/Notes on the way: musical language and Williams Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Sérgio Souza Junior

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available O presente artigo versa sobre uma síndrome em particular chamada Síndrome de Williams-Beuren. Esta síndrome possui uma relação específica com a música, relação esta que estará no fulcro de nossas preocupações durante as páginas que se seguem. Num primeiro momento faremos uma apresentação da síndrome e de suas singularidades; em seguida nos debruçaremos sobre a especificidade que aqui está em questão, ou seja, a relação da síndrome com o universo sonoro; por fim, traremos um caso com o qual tivemos contato envolvendo a educação musical em contexto da síndrome, e discutiremos a respeito dos elementos que esse contato nos trouxe para pensar essa curiosa e relevante relação entre arte-educação e o desenvolvimento neuropsicológico atípico. The present article is about a particular syndrome, called Williams-Beuren. This syndrome has a very specific relationship with music, which will be at the heart of our concerns over the following pages. Initially we will make a presentation of the syndrome and its singularities. Then we will focus on the uniqueness of the correlation between Williams-Beuren and the musical world. Finally, we will discuss a case which involves musical education in the context of this syndrome, and discuss about the elements, brought by that contact, that are useful to think about this curious and relevant relationship between art education and atypical neuropsychological development.

  11. La haine à l’œuvre dans Carpenter’s Gothic (1999 de William Gaddis Cultivating Hatred in Carpenter’s Gothic (1999 by William Gaddis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Sohier

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In Carpenter’s Gothic, hatred is given pride of place. William Gaddis delineates a society in which hatred proliferates. Characters are caught in the turmoils of their hatred whether it derives from the Vietnam War or from fundamentalist movements, from their individualistic quest for social recognition or from self-aggrandizement. We mean to develop a typology derived from psychoanalysis and anthropology so as to take into account all the different facets hate has in the novel. We shall devote analyses to jealousy caused by hatred, then describe the primary hate that underpins all types of relationships as a preliminary to questioning the excess that fuels Gaddis’s writing. Lastly, by referring to the author’s non-fictional work we shall put forward the thesis that the voluble protagonist is to a large extent the author’s mouthpiece. McCandless’s vindictive disquisitions on the course of the world will be seen as the equivalent of a tragic mask through which William Gaddis gives vent to his melancholia and intense detestation of the ways of the world.

  12. [Citation errors: Uplavici (for Hlava) and William the Silent (for Jules Verne and Mignet)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lienhart, A

    2011-05-01

    A certain 'O Uplavici' was cited for more than fifty years, although he had never existed. This error probably came from a misinterpretation of the Czech language, in which the real author's name--Hlava--can mean 'Title'. It was finally recognized, which was not the case for the author of the sentence: 'I have no need of hope to take action, nor of success to persevere', it is still regularly attributed in France to William I, Prince of Orange, called the Silent. It is a mistake, and no serious reference certifies that an historical figure would have pronounced this sentence. It was written by the historian Mignet in 1841, to describe the character of William III, Prince of Orange and King of England. It was then used in 1875 by Jules Verne, to describe a character in 'The Mysterious Island'. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  13. William Pepper Jr, MD (1843-1898): portrait of a nineteenth-century medical educator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Re, Vincent; Bellini, Lisa M

    2006-08-01

    Dr William Pepper Jr was a prominent Philadelphia physician whose contributions to medicine in the late 19th century are not widely known. As a young physician he rose in stature rapidly due to his abilities as a diagnostician, teacher, writer and researcher. His primary interest, however, was to improve the education of physicians. He orchestrated the creation of America's first university-controlled teaching hospital, the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, enabling substantial improvements in clinical training. Pepper later became Provost of the University of Pennsylvania and ambitiously transformed the curriculum of the medical school, providing greater basic science and clinical training. He also worked to establish several institutes and museums in Philadelphia in order to promote academic pursuits, particularly in medicine. William Pepper Jr was one of the 19th century's foremost medical educators and his accomplishments helped reshape the way medicine was taught throughout the United States.

  14. Reevaluation of Monier-Williams method for determining sulfite in food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, C R; Daniels, D H; Joe, F L; Fazio, T

    1986-01-01

    The Monier-Williams distillation procedure has a long history of successful use for determining sulfite in fruit products and wine; however, a systematic evaluation of its accuracy and precision with other food matrices has not been undertaken. We found that the Monier-Williams distillation yielded greater than 90% recovery of sulfite added to foods such as table grapes, hominy, dried mangoes, and lemon juice. Less than 85% recovery was obtained with broccoli, soda crackers, cheese-peanut butter crackers, mushrooms, and potato chips. These results may, in fact, accurately reflect the residual levels of sulfite if a portion of the sulfite undergoes irreversible reaction with some food components. Analysis of commercial food products gave sulfite levels ranging from 1400 ppm in dried apple slices to 25 ppm in cream sherry.

  15. Affek van toe tot nou: Die erfenis van Herder, Schleiermacher en William James

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Dreyer

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Affect then and now: The heritage of Herder, Schleiermacher and William James. The heritage of Johann Gottfried von Herder (1744�1803, Friedrich Schleiermacher (1768�1834 and William James (1842�1910 is of significance for practical theology. In present-day pastoral care, affect, emotion, feeling and experience are explored by means of, amongst others, narrative theories. In his aesthetics, Herder linked music and literature. Schleiermacher, in his aesthetics, linked his theology of feeling with biography as narrative. Narrativity is central to present-day are theories and praxis in pastoral care. The variety of forms of affect, namely emotion, experience, feeling and mood, has been explored by present-day psychology and psychiatry. These insights can enrich narrative pastoral theories and praxis.

  16. Bringing inorganic chemistry to life with inspiration from R. J. P. Williams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, H Allen O; Sadler, Peter J

    2016-03-01

    Our appreciation of the scholarly ideas and thinking of Bob Williams is illustrated here by a few of the areas in which he inspired us. His journey to bring inorganic chemistry to life began with an early interest in analytical chemistry, rationalising the relative stabilities of metal coordination complexes (The Irving-Williams Series), and elucidating the organometallic redox chemistry of vitamin B12. He (and Vallee) recognised that metal ions are in energised (entatic) states in proteins and enzymes, which themselves are dynamic structures of rods and springs. He played a key role in helping Rosenberg to pave the road toward the clinic for the anticancer drug cisplatin. He believed that evolution is not just dependent on DNA, but also on the metallome. Organisms and the environment are one system: does DNA code directly for all the essential elements of life?

  17. Description of common musculoskeletal findings in Williams Syndrome and implications for therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copes, L E; Pober, B R; Terilli, C A

    2016-07-01

    Williams syndrome (WS), also referred to as Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS), is a relatively rare genetic disorder affecting ∼1/10,000 persons. Since the disorder is caused by a micro-deletion of ∼1.5 Mb, it is not surprising that the manifestations of WS are extremely broad, involving most body systems. In this paper, we primarily focus on the musculoskeletal aspects of WS as these findings have not been the subject of a comprehensive review. We review the MSK features commonly seen in individuals with WS, along with related sensory and neurological issues interacting with and compounding underlying MSK abnormalities. We end by providing perspective, particularly from the vantage point of a physical therapist, on therapeutic interventions to address the most common MSK and related features seen in WS. Clin. Anat. 29:578-589, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. The changing assessments of John Snow's and William Farr's cholera studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyler, J M

    2001-01-01

    This article describes the epidemiological studies of cholera by two major British investigators of the mid-nineteenth century, John Snow and William Farr, and it asks why the assessments of their results by contemporaries was the reverse of our assessment today. In the 1840s and 1850s Farr's work was considered definitive, while Snow's was regarded as ingenious but flawed. Although Snow's conclusions ran contrary to the exceptations of his contemporaries, the major reservations about his cholera studies concerned his bold use of analogy, his thoroughgoing reductionism, and his willingness to ignore what seemed to be contrary evidence. Farr's electric use of current theories, his reliance multiple causation, and his discovery of a mathematical law to describe the outbreak in London in 1849 was much more convincing to his contemporaries. A major change in thinking about disease causation was needed before Snow's work could be widely accepted. William Farr's later studies contributed to that acceptance.

  19. William Ospina y la búsqueda de la franja amarilla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor Valero Bernal

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este artículo es el de analizar el ensayo «Lo que le falta a Colombia» del escritor William Ospina. En este ensayo Ospina profundiza en los principales problemas sociales y políticos que Colombia atravesaba a finales del s. XX así como en las posibles soluciones que podrían adoptarse. Los planteamientos que emplea el escritor colombiano pueden relacionarse con una gran variedad de conceptos propios del ámbito de la política y la sociología. A lo largo de este trabajo mostraremos las analogías existentes entre el análisis de William Ospina y las ideas de pensadores tan alejados en el tiempo como Thomas Hobbes, Rousseau, John Rawls o Charles Tilly.

  20. William P. van Wagenen and the first corpus callosotomies for epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Marlon S; Linskey, Mark E; Binder, Devin K

    2008-03-01

    As a trainee of Dr. Harvey Cushing, cofounder and first president of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons, and founder of a prestigious international academic fellowship, Dr. William P. van Wagenen is an important figure in the history of neurological surgery. Perhaps less well known or appreciated is his seminal role as the first neurosurgeon to attempt, study, and publish results of the corpus callosotomy procedure for patients with epilepsy, and his collaboration with Andrew J. Akelaitis, which led to the description of some features of "split-brain" patients 2 decades before similar work in the 1960s eventually resulted in a Nobel Prize for Roger W. Sperry in 1981. These contributions firmly establish William P. van Wagenen as one of the founding pioneers in the surgical treatment of patients with epilepsy.

  1. Charles Dickens and Barnaby Rudge: The First Description of Williams Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eblovi, Darren; Clardy, Christopher

    2016-02-01

    Williams syndrome, a disorder caused by a genetic deletion and characterized by moderate intellectual disability with relatively strong language skills and a hypersocial personality, was first described in the medical literature in 1961. However, 120 years earlier, Charles Dickens wrote the novel Barnaby Rudge, which follows an "idiot" through London's Gordon Riots of 1780. We propose that Dickens based this character on a person he knew with Williams syndrome. Common features include an "elfin" face, decreased cognitive ability and dependence on a caretaker, strong language skills with emphatic and perseverative speech, anxiety, and an empathetic, overly trusting personality. In the novel, these traits lead the character Barnaby to be duped into actively participating in the riots, which nearly results in his hanging. This example of fiction providing a description of a disorder more detailed than that of medical journals more than a century later should encourage physicians to look to sources beyond traditional scientific articles for valuable clinical information.

  2. The gluon propagator in non-abelian Weizsäcker-Williams fields

    CERN Document Server

    Ayala, A P; McLerran, L; Venugopalan, R; Ayala, Alejandro; Jalilian-Marian, Jamal; McLerran, Larry; Venugopalan, Raju

    1995-01-01

    We carefully compute the gluon propagator in the background of a non--Abelian Weizs\\"{a}cker--Williams field. This background field is generated by the valence quarks in very large nuclei. We find contact terms in the small fluctuation equations of motion which induce corrections to a previously incorrect result for the gluon propagator in such a background field. The well known problem of the Hermiticity of certain operators in Light Cone gauge is resolved for the Weizs\\"{a}cker--Williams background field. This is achieved by working in a gauge where singular terms in the equations of motion are absent and then gauge transforming the small fluctuation fields to Light Cone gauge.

  3. A preliminary study of orbitofrontal activation and hypersociability in Williams Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Mimura, Masaru; Hoeft, Fumiko; Kato, Motoichiro; Kobayashi, Nobuhisa; Sheau, Kristen; Piggot, Judith; Mills, Debra; Galaburda, Albert; Korenberg, Julie R.; Bellugi, Ursula; Reiss, Allan L.

    2010-01-01

    Individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) demonstrate an abnormally positive social bias. However, the neural substrates of this hypersociability, i.e., positive attribution bias and increased drive toward social interaction, have not fully been elucidated. Methods: We performed an event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging study while individuals with WS and typically developing controls (TD) matched positive and negative emotional faces. WS compared to TD showed reduced right amygdal...

  4. Three symmetric positive solutions for Lidstone problems by a generalization of the Leggett-Williams theorem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard I. Avery

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available We study the existence of solutions to the fourth order Lidstone boundary value problem $$displaylines{ y^{(4}(t = f(y(t,-y''(t,cr y(0=y''(0=y''(1=y(1=0,. }$$ By imposing growth conditions on $f$ and using a generalization of the multiple fixed point theorem by Leggett and Williams, we show the existence of at least three symmetric positive solutions. We also prove analogous results for difference equations.

  5. A comparison of William James and Nietzsche on consciousness and will

    OpenAIRE

    Yuen, Vera

    2013-01-01

    I compare William James’ and Friedrich Nietzsche’s construals of consciousness and will, two of the core notions in both philosophy and psychology. I delineate the elements significant in their respective accounts of the two notions, and show that there are significant parallels in their views. An appreciation of the affinities in James’ and Nietzsche’s construals of consciousness and will facilitates an appreciation of their remarkably parallel contributions in both philosophy and psychology...

  6. Annual Research Progress Report (William Beaumont Army Medical Center) FY 1983

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-03-23

    101 Napolitano, P: 92/69 (C) (PR) Pregnancy After Failed Tubal Ligations : A Review of William Beaumont Army Medical Center’s Experience...Failed Tubal Ligation : A Review of WBAMCs Deparbent of Pedi•ics Experience. Armed Forces District Atkinson AW Attention Deficit Meeting of the American...carcinoma, post -venography infarction, etc.; (4) to detect functioning adrenal remnant after adrenalectomy for Cushing’s syndrome ; (5) to aid In

  7. Analysis of an Urban Stormwater Bioretention Management Practice in Prince William County, Virginia

    OpenAIRE

    Angelo, Suzanne

    2005-01-01

    The performance of an urban stormwater bioretention management practice in the Kingsbrooke Subdivision of Prince William County, Virginia was examined over a one-year period. Bioretention is a relatively new urban stormwater best management practice (BMP) intended to mimic the pollutant-removal characteristics of an upland forest habitat. Typical bioretention areas utilize shallow ponding and highly-infiltrative sandy soils to treat the stormwater runoff from small commercial or ...

  8. Early artificial ventilation: the mystery of "Truehead of Galveston"--was he Dr Charles William Trueheart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubuhovich, Ronald V

    2008-12-01

    It seems strange that the medical literature from the United States has only a single original source of reference for a device (from circa 1870) for artificial ventilation in neonatal resuscitation. The invention is attributed to "Dr Truehead of Galveston, Texas". I argue that this mystery arises from two separate misspellings of the inventor's name, and propose that the correct name is Dr Charles William Trueheart (1837-1914), also of Galveston.

  9. Working Memory Impairment in People with Williams Syndrome: Effects of Delay, Task and Stimuli

    OpenAIRE

    O'Hearn, Kirsten; Courtney, Susan; Street, Whitney; Landau, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder associated with impaired visuospatial representations subserved by the dorsal stream and relatively strong object recognition abilities subserved by the ventral stream. There is conflicting evidence on whether this uneven pattern extends to working memory (WM) in WS. The present studies provide a new perspective, testing WM for a single stimulus using a delayed recognition paradigm in individuals with WS and typically developing children...

  10. Code Optimization for the Choi-Williams Distribution for ELINT Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    PAGES 98 14. SUBJECT TERMS Choi-Williams Distribution, Signal Processing, Algorithm Optimization, C programming , Low Probability of Intercept (LPI...not be useful for the C programming language, but was included in this thesis because it could be useful when developing a hardware solution to these...representation. Since there is no such single operation in the C programming language, to utilize this method would involve masking out the eight-bit

  11. Chisholm-Caianiello-Fubini Identities for S=1 Barut-Muzinich-Williams Matrices

    CERN Document Server

    Cabral, M de G Caldera

    2013-01-01

    The formulae of the relativistic products are found S=1 Barut-Muzinich-Williams matrices. They are analogs of the well-known Chisholm-Caianiello-Fubini identities. The obtained results can be useful in the higher-order calculations of the high-energy processes with S=1 particles in the framework of the 2(2S+1) Weinberg formalism, which recently attracted attention again. PACS numbers: 02.90.+p, 11.90.+t, 12.20.Ds

  12. Tectonic controls on large landslide complex: Williams Fork Mountains near Dillon, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, K.S.

    2001-01-01

    An extensive (~ 25 km2) landslide complex covers a large area on the west side of the Williams Fork Mountains in central Colorado. The complex is deeply weathered and incised, and in most places geomorphic evidence of sliding (breakaways, hummocky topography, transverse ridges, and lobate distal zones) are no longer visible, indicating that the main mass of the slide has long been inactive. However, localized Holocene reactivation of the landslide deposits is common above the timberline (at about 3300 m) and locally at lower elevations. Clasts within the complex, as long as several tens of meters, are entirely of crystalline basement (Proterozoic gneiss and granitic rocks) from the hanging wall of the Laramide (Late Cretaceous to Early Tertiary), west-directed Williams Range thrust, which forms the western structural boundary of the Colorado Front Range. Late Cretaceous shale and sandstone compose most footwall rocks. The crystalline hanging-wall rocks are pervasively fractured or shattered, and alteration to clay minerals is locally well developed. Sackung structures (trenches or small-scale grabens and upslope-facing scarps) are common near the rounded crest of the range, suggesting gravitational spreading of the fractured rocks and oversteepening of the mountain flanks. Late Tertiary and Quaternary incision of the Blue River Valley, just west of the Williams Fork Mountains, contributed to the oversteepening. Major landslide movement is suspected during periods of deglaciation when abundant meltwater increased pore-water pressure in bedrock fractures. A fault-flexure model for the development of the widespread fracturing and weakening of the Proterozoic basement proposes that the surface of the Williams Range thrust contains a concave-downward flexure, the axis of which coincides approximately with the contact in the footwall between Proterozoic basement and mostly Cretaceous rocks. Movement of brittle, hanging-wall rocks through the flexure during Laramide

  13. Fuji-Williams Video Conferencing in 2004-2007 Prospects and Applications

    OpenAIRE

    山田, りよ子; 山田 玲子; Riyoko, Yamada; Yamada Reiko; Fuji Women's University Faculty of Human Life Science, Department of Early Childhood Care and Education; Department of Asian Studies, Williams College

    2007-01-01

    This joint project explores the use of video conferencing in two different college courses. One is in the teacher training course in the Department of Early Childhood Care and Education at Fuji Women's University in Japan, and the other is the Japanese language program at Williams College in the United States. The inter-active nature of the video conferencing helps to promote student awareness of different communication styles that are valuable in both teacher training and Japanese language l...

  14. Final Environmental Assessment: Williams Lake Wildlife Control Buckley Air Force Base, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    stocking program. Following the fish kill of summer 2005, Williams Lake was stocked in spring 2006 with bass, bluegill, and catfish . In order to...includes 337 birds, 43 mammals , 20 reptiles, and seven amphibians (USAF 2008). The Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA) protects raptors and other...species. The black-tailed prairie dog is the most abundant small mammal in the grassland habitats at BAFB (USAF 2001a, 2008). The INRMP (USAF 2008) and

  15. Sir William Wilde and provision for the blind in nineteenth-century Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullaney, S

    2016-05-01

    As Assistant Commissioner for the Census of Ireland Sir William Wilde worked as an early epidemiologist, providing information regarding the deaf-and-dumb and the blind in mid-nineteenth-century Ireland. As a social agitator he focussed the attention of the authorities to the plight of the blind and their inability to earn a living and support themselves. This paper highlights his contribution to the provision for the blind in Ireland.

  16. Estrutura e significado em "Uma rosa para Emily", de William Faulkner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Daghlian

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Trata-se de uma análise do consagrado conto "Uma Rosa para Emily", de William Faulkner, voltada para alguns dos principais aspectos de sua estrutura. Após considerarmos o enredo, discutimos a construção das personagens, com destaque para a protagonista, fazendo um levantamento e comentários sobre possíveis fontes de inspiração, destacando, entre outras, aspectos da biografia da poeta Emily Dickinson, a ficção e a poesia de E. A. Poe, romances de Charles Dickens e Henry James, o conto de Sherwood Anderson e a poesia de William Blake, Emily Dickinson, Robert Browning e John Crowe Ransom, acrescentando paralelos com o conto "Bartleby, o escrivão", de Herman Melville. Analisamos, então, o foco narrativo, os símbolos e o significado, ressaltando aqui o desenvolvimento temático da narrativa.This is an analysis of the well-known short story "A Rose for Emily," by William Faulkner, concentrating on some of the main aspects of its structure. A consideration of the plot is followed by a discussion of characterization, with emphasis on the protagonist, by means of a survey and comments on possible sources of inspiration including, among others, aspects of Emily Dickinson's biography, E. A. Poe's fiction and poetry, novels by Charles Dickens and Henry James, Sherwood Anderson's short stories, and the poetry of William Blake, Emily Dickinson, Robert Browning, and John Crowe Ransom, in addition to Herman Melville's short story "Bartleby, the Scrivener." The narrative focus, symbolism and meaning, stressing the thematic development of the narrative, are then analyzed.

  17. Aortic anomalies in an adolescent with the Williams' elfin facies syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, R.L.; Azouz, E.M.

    1984-02-01

    An adolescent with classical Williams' syndrome who presented with hypertensive encephalopathy is described. He had the unusual combination of supravalvular aortic stenosis, long segment coarctation of the aorta, aortic hypoplasia and a high bifurcation of the abdominal aorta. Surgical resection of the coarctation was required; however, the patient has remained moderately hypertensive. The aortic anomalies in this syndrome are reviewed and their frequency and importance examined.

  18. Technology in the work of Jack Kerouac and William S. Burroughs

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    This thesis explores the use and significance of technologies of representation in the work of Jack Kerouac (1922-1969) and William S. Burroughs (1914-1997), particularly in relation to the development of ideas of free and improvisatory expression in the 1950s. More specifically it focuses on the role played by the technologies of the typewriter and tape recorder in the textual production of key works of each writer and how these technologies are also thematically important in their explorat...

  19. Williams' paradox and the role of phenotypic plasticity in sexual systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Janet L

    2013-10-01

    As George Williams pointed out in 1975, although evolutionary explanations, based on selection acting on individuals, have been developed for the advantages of simultaneous hermaphroditism, sequential hermaphroditism and gonochorism, none of these evolutionary explanations adequately explains the current distribution of these sexual systems within the Metazoa (Williams' Paradox). As Williams further pointed out, the current distribution of sexual systems is explained largely by phylogeny. Since 1975, we have made a great deal of empirical and theoretical progress in understanding sexual systems. However, we still lack a theory that explains the current distribution of sexual systems in animals and we do not understand the evolutionary transitions between hermaphroditism and gonochorism. Empirical data, collected over the past 40 years, demonstrate that gender may have more phenotypic plasticity than was previously realized. We know that not only sequential hermaphrodites, but also simultaneous hermaphrodites have phenotypic plasticity that alters sex allocation in response to social and environmental conditions. A focus on phenotypic plasticity suggests that one sees a continuum in animals between genetically determined gonochorism on the one hand and simultaneous hermaphroditism on the other, with various types of sequential hermaphroditism and environmental sex determination as points along the spectrum. Here I suggest that perhaps the reason we have been unable to resolve Williams' Paradox is because the problem was not correctly framed. First, because, for example, simultaneous hermaphroditism provides reproductive assurance or dioecy ensures outcrossing does not mean that there are no other evolutionary paths that can provide adaptive responses to those selective pressures. Second, perhaps the question we need to ask is: What selective forces favor increased versus reduced phenotypic plasticity in gender expression? It is time to begin to look at the question

  20. Reading Consciousness: Analyzing Literature through William James' Stream of Thought Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Casto, Andrew Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Proceeding from the assumption that psychoanalytic theory has yielded insightful literary interpretations, I propose that equally legitimate readings result from analyzing consciousness in literature. William Jamesâ â Stream of Thoughtâ offers a psychological theory of consciousness from which I develop a literary theory that counterbalances the Freudian emphasis on the unconscious. Examining two works by Henry James, I demonstrate how assessing the elements of a character...

  1. Children with Williams Syndrome: Language, Cognitive, and Behavioral Characteristics and their Implications for Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mervis, Carolyn B; Velleman, Shelley L

    2011-10-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a rare genetic disorder characterized by heart disease, failure to thrive, hearing loss, intellectual or learning disability, speech and language delay, gregariousness, and non-social anxiety. The WS psycholinguistic profile is complex, including relative strengths in concrete vocabulary, phonological processing, and verbal short-term memory and relative weaknesses in relational/conceptual language, reading comprehension, and pragmatics. Many children evidence difficulties with finiteness marking and complex grammatical constructions. Speech-language intervention, support, and advocacy are crucial.

  2. Neural correlates of cross-modal affective priming by music in Williams syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Lense, Miriam D.; Gordon, Reyna L.; Key, Alexandra P.F.; Dykens, Elisabeth M.

    2013-01-01

    Emotional connection is the main reason people engage with music, and the emotional features of music can influence processing in other domains. Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental genetic disorder where musicality and sociability are prominent aspects of the phenotype. This study examined oscillatory brain activity during a musical affective priming paradigm. Participants with WS and age-matched typically developing controls heard brief emotional musical excerpts or emotionally ne...

  3. The birth of Kaiser William II (1859-1941) and his birth injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacoby, M G

    2008-08-01

    This paper describes the events leading up to the birth of Kaiser William II in 1859. There is a full description of the clinical aspects of his breech delivery that resulted in an Erb-Duchenne palsy. The later physical and psychological effects of his paralysed left arm are discussed fully, as are the comments about Dr Eduard Arnold Martin (1799-1875), the obstetrician who delivered him.

  4. Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) Atlas: Prince William Sound, Alaska, Volumes 1 and 2, geographic information systems data (NODC Accession 0019218)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for Prince William Sound, Alaska. ESI data characterize estuarine environments and wildlife by...

  5. Two Schemes of Intellectual Development: A Comparison of Development as Defined by William Perry and Jean Piaget.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Bruce; And Others

    1986-01-01

    A comparison of the theories of Jean Piaget and William Perry (using individual interviews with college students) shows that the two theories outline different and independent processes for assessing intellectual development. (JN)

  6. Wilsonian visions of a new world order in concrete terms : the case of William C. Bullitt / Alexander Sedlmaier

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Sedlmaier, Alexander

    2003-01-01

    President Wilsoni internatsionalismi ideede pooldajast, vasakpoolse poliitika kriitikust pärast I maailmasõda Ameerika - Saksamaa suhete taustal, ajakirjanikust ja diplomaadist William C. Bullitt'ist (1891-1967)

  7. Two Schemes of Intellectual Development: A Comparison of Development as Defined by William Perry and Jean Piaget.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Bruce; And Others

    1986-01-01

    A comparison of the theories of Jean Piaget and William Perry (using individual interviews with college students) shows that the two theories outline different and independent processes for assessing intellectual development. (JN)

  8. Wilsonian visions of a new world order in concrete terms : the case of William C. Bullitt / Alexander Sedlmaier

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Sedlmaier, Alexander

    2003-01-01

    President Wilsoni internatsionalismi ideede pooldajast, vasakpoolse poliitika kriitikust pärast I maailmasõda Ameerika - Saksamaa suhete taustal, ajakirjanikust ja diplomaadist William C. Bullitt'ist (1891-1967)

  9. The relationship of pink salmon escapement to returning runs in Prince William Sound and the expected return in 1957

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The long and consistent records of escapement that have been obtained in Prince William Sound show clearly that there is a direct relation between the number of...

  10. 78 FR 77508 - Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC; William States Lee III Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2; Combined...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC; William States Lee III Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2; Combined Licenses Application Review AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Final environmental impact...

  11. Digital image correlation method for calculating coefficients of Williams expansion in compact tension specimen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayatollahi, Majid R.; Moazzami, Mostafa

    2017-03-01

    The digital image correlation (DIC) method is used to obtain the coefficients of higher-order terms in the Williams expansion in a compact tension (CT) specimens made of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA). The displacement field is determined by the correlation between reference image (i.e., before deformation) and deformed image. The part of displacements resulting from rigid body motion and rotation is eliminated from the displacement field. For a large number of points in the vicinity of the crack tip, an over-determined set of simultaneous linear equations is collected, and by using the fundamental concepts of the least-squares method, the coefficients of the Williams expansion are calculated for pure mode I conditions. The experimental results are then compared with the numerical results calculated by finite element method (FEM). Very good agreement is shown to exist between the DIC and FE results confirming the effectiveness of the DIC technique in obtaining the coefficients of higher order terms of Williams series expansion from the displacement field around the crack tip.

  12. The pedagogical thought of William James: tactful teacher and moral education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Thoilliez

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The article seeks to present the philosophy of education that is at the very heart of William James’s legacy. It is argued that along with the rise of interest in the field of education towards classic American pragmatism, the study of William James has suffered from a lack of attention. After giving an accurate overview of the themes under debate in those few works which have addressed James’s thought from a pedagogical perspective, the article progresses on discussing some other educational themes which have gone unnoticed. More precisely, first, the inspiration offered by the image of the «tactful teacher» and, second, the philosophy of moral education that is part of James’s works on psychology. Both themes account for the pedagogical potential that continues to be hidden in the work of this philosopher. Received: 23/06/2013 / Accepted: 21/07/2013How to reference this articleThoilliez, B. (2013. El pensamiento pedagógico de William James: el tactful teacher y la educación moral. Foro de Educación, 11(15, pp. 83-102. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.14516/fde.2013.011.015.004

  13. A paleomagnetic study of the Prince William terrane and Nixon Fork terrane, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumley, P. W.

    1984-12-01

    The mean paleomagnetic inclination of Paleocene volcanics from two regions on Kodiak Island in the Ghost Rocks Formation suggests that the Prince William terrance originated at mid latitudes, about 25 deg south of its expected Alaskan latitude in Paleocene time. The mean declinations of the two regions, however, differ by approximately 120 deg, suggesting they have rotated with respect to each other, perhaps during emplacement. It is suggested that, despite the lack of evidence for a major Tertiary suture zone between the Prince William terrane and central Alaska, the Prince William and perhaps adjacent terranes may have lain substantially south of their present position in the early Tertiary. Paleomagnetic data from early Ordovician to early Tertiary rocks of the Nixon Fork terrane, central Alaska, provide evidence toward a better understanding of the tectonic evolution of the continental margin of northwestern America. The Nixon fork terrane, a Paleozoic continental margin assemblage, is bordered on the south by proven allochthonous terranes and to the North by provinces with oceanic affinities far younger in age. Paleomagnetic analysis of the Ordovician limestone sections (Lower Ordovician Novi Mountain and Middle to Upper Ordovican Telsitna Formation) are interpreted as having three components of magnetization.

  14. Humdrum Tasks of the Salaried Men: Edwin Williams, a London County Council Architect at War

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Beech

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Working at the London County Council Architects’ Department through the 1930s to 1950s, and known (if at all as a member of the design team for the Royal Festival Hall, Edwin Williams is usually presented as a regressive figure, his design work marked by his Beaux Arts training. Using archival evidence and histories of the construction industry, this paper sets out Williams’s role in the organisation of rescue and recovery services in London during the Second World War. The paper argues that through his development of training schools and curricula for Rescue Service personnel, Williams played a key role in the formation of a skilled, mechanised, modern demolition industry. Operating complex emergency projects under extreme conditions, the same contractors and building operatives trained in Williams’s programme were later responsible for the clearance of bomb damaged sites and slums. This paper suggests that certain developments in modern architecture can be considered contingent upon practices of the demolition industry as developed by Williams. By concentrating on the ‘organisation’ and ‘progress’ of production that architects engaged with during the Second World War and after, new configurations of continuity and change emerge in which the ‘humdrum tasks’ of ‘salaried men’ appear crucial.

  15. William Brouncker MD Viscount Castlelyons (c 1620-84) First President of the Royal Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breathnach, Caoimhghín S

    2006-11-01

    William Brouncker was the grandson of Sir Henry Brouncker, President of Munster during the Elizabethan Plantation of Ireland in the 16th century. William's date and place of birth are uncertain; he was born about 1620, most probably at Castlelyons, County Cork, and educated at Oxford where he shone in mathematics and languages. Until his death in 1684 he served the Stuarts as a senior member of the Navy Board from which sprang the Admiralty, and we owe much of what we know about his life to the warts-and-all diary of his younger naval colleague, Samuel Pepys (1633-1703). Although William was granted a doctorate in medicine by Oxford in 1646, music and mathematics were his major interests. He was the first President of the Royal Society and he held that position from 1662 to 1677, when his tenure was brought to a reluctant close by an election, sardonically recorded in the diary of the curator of experiments, Robert Hooke (1635-1703). If Brouncker did not add any empirical facts, he certainly contributed to the promotion and dissemination of natural knowledge.

  16. Bayesian stock assessment of Pacific herring in Prince William Sound, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffitt, Steven D.; Hulson, Peter-John F.

    2017-01-01

    The Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii) population in Prince William Sound, Alaska crashed in 1993 and has yet to recover, affecting food web dynamics in the Sound and impacting Alaskan communities. To help researchers design and implement the most effective monitoring, management, and recovery programs, a Bayesian assessment of Prince William Sound herring was developed by reformulating the current model used by the Alaska Department of Fish and Game. The Bayesian model estimated pre-fishery spawning biomass of herring age-3 and older in 2013 to be a median of 19,410 mt (95% credibility interval 12,150–31,740 mt), with a 54% probability that biomass in 2013 was below the management limit used to regulate fisheries in Prince William Sound. The main advantages of the Bayesian model are that it can more objectively weight different datasets and provide estimates of uncertainty for model parameters and outputs, unlike the weighted sum-of-squares used in the original model. In addition, the revised model could be used to manage herring stocks with a decision rule that considers both stock status and the uncertainty in stock status. PMID:28222151

  17. Therapeutic Considerations and Recovery in Low Back Pain: Williams vs McKenzie

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mircea MOLDOVAN

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Low back pain (LBP is one of the most common muskuloscheletal disorders. It is associated with high costs in medical assistance and indirect losses through temporary work incapacity. Therefore, it represents a challenge for medical practice. There are many types of treatments and recommendations depending on doctors’ knowledge and opinions, but two protocols stand out due to their “popularity”: the Williams and McKenzie protocols. Given the duration of flares and relapses rate, it is important to apply an efficient and lasting treatment. This is why the aim of the present study is to compare these two protocols, McKenzie and Williams, in terms of principles and exercises, in order to reveal wich one is more suitable in LBP recovery. In the end, the McKenzie protocol proved to be superior to the Williams program in terms of pain relief, lumbar mobility and number of sessions needed to recover. Another finding was that the two programs are not totally contradictory, but they are just applied in different stages of the LBP syndrome, depending on several anatomical and pathological factors.

  18. William Herschel's 'Hole in the Sky' and the discovery of dark nebulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinicke, Wolfgang

    2016-12-01

    In 1785 William Herschel published a paper in the Philosophical Transactions containing the remarkable section "An opening or hole". It describes an unusual vacant place in Scorpius. This matter falls into oblivion until Caroline Herschel initiated a correspondence with her nephew John in 1833. It contains Herschel's spectacular words "Hier ist wahrhaftig ein Loch im Himmel" ("Here truly is a hole in the sky"). About a hundred years later, Johann Georg Hagen, Director of the Vatican Observatory, presented a spectacular candidate for the 'hole', discovered in 1857 by Angelo Secchi in Sagittarius and later catalogued by Edward E. Barnard as the dark nebula B 86. Hagen's claim initiated a debate, mainly in the Journal of the British Astronomical Association, about the identity of Herschel's 'object'. Though things could be partly cleared up, unjustified claims still remain. This is mainly due to the fact that original sources were not consulted. A comprehensive study of the curious 'hole' is presented here. It covers major parts of the epochal astronomical work of William, Caroline and John Herschel. This includes a general study of 'vacant places', found by William Herschel and others, and the speculations about their nature, eventually leading to the finding that dark nebulae are due to absorbing interstellar matter. Some of the 'vacant places' could be identified in catalogues of dark nebulae and this leads to a 'Herschel Catalogue of Dark Nebulae' - the first historic catalogue of its kind.

  19. Genes, language, and the nature of scientific explanations: the case of Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musolino, Julien; Landau, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we discuss two experiments of nature and their implications for the sciences of the mind. The first, Williams syndrome, bears on one of cognitive science's holy grails: the possibility of unravelling the causal chain between genes and cognition. We sketch the outline of a general framework to study the relationship between genes and cognition, focusing as our case study on the development of language in individuals with Williams syndrome. Our approach emphasizes the role of three key ingredients: the need to specify a clear level of analysis, the need to provide a theoretical account of the relevant cognitive structure at that level, and the importance of the (typical) developmental process itself. The promise offered by the case of Williams syndrome has also given rise to two strongly conflicting theoretical approaches-modularity and neuroconstructivism-themselves offshoots of a perennial debate between nativism and empiricism. We apply our framework to explore the tension created by these two conflicting perspectives. To this end, we discuss a second experiment of nature, which allows us to compare the two competing perspectives in what comes close to a controlled experimental setting. From this comparison, we conclude that the "meaningful debate assumption", a widespread assumption suggesting that neuroconstructivism and modularity address the same questions and represent genuine theoretical alternatives, rests on a fallacy.

  20. Statistical evaluation of mortality in long-term carcinogenicity bioassays using a Williams-type procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herberich, Esther; Hothorn, Ludwig A

    2012-10-01

    Several doses and a control group can be compared under order restriction using the Williams procedure for normally distributed endpoints assuming variance homogeneity. Comparison of the survival functions represents a secondary endpoint in long-term in vivo bioassays of carcinogenicity. Therefore, a Williams-type procedure for the comparison of survival functions is proposed for the assumption of the Cox proportional hazards model or the general frailty Cox model to allow a joint analysis over sex and strains. Interpretation according to both statistical significance and biological relevance is possible with simultaneous confidence intervals for hazard ratios. Related survival data can be analyzed using the R packages survival, coxme, and multcomp. Together with the R packages MCPAN and nparcomp, Dunnett- or Williams-type procedures are now available for the statistical analysis of the following endpoint types in toxicology: (i) normally distributed, (ii) non-normally distributed, (iii) score (ordered categorical) data, (iv) crude proportions, (v) survival functions, and (vi) time-to-tumor data with and without cause-of-death information.