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Sample records for juniper specialist neotoma

  1. The draft genome sequence and annotation of the desert woodrat Neotoma lepida

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    Michael Campbell

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We present the de novo draft genome sequence for a vertebrate mammalian herbivore, the desert woodrat (Neotoma lepida. This species is of ecological and evolutionary interest with respect to ingestion, microbial detoxification and hepatic metabolism of toxic plant secondary compounds from the highly toxic creosote bush (Larrea tridentata and the juniper shrub (Juniperus monosperma. The draft genome sequence and annotation have been deposited at GenBank under the accession LZPO01000000.

  2. The draft genome sequence and annotation of the desert woodrat Neotoma lepida.

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    Campbell, Michael; Oakeson, Kelly F; Yandell, Mark; Halpert, James R; Dearing, Denise

    2016-09-01

    We present the de novo draft genome sequence for a vertebrate mammalian herbivore, the desert woodrat (Neotoma lepida). This species is of ecological and evolutionary interest with respect to ingestion, microbial detoxification and hepatic metabolism of toxic plant secondary compounds from the highly toxic creosote bush (Larrea tridentata) and the juniper shrub (Juniperus monosperma). The draft genome sequence and annotation have been deposited at GenBank under the accession LZPO01000000.

  3. Testing the diet-breadth trade-off hypothesis: differential regulation of novel plant secondary compounds by a specialist and a generalist herbivore.

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    Torregrossa, A-M; Azzara, A V; Dearing, M D

    2012-03-01

    Specialist herbivores are predicted to have evolved biotransformation pathways that can process large doses of secondary compounds from the plant species on which they specialize. It is hypothesized that this physiological specialization results in a trade-off such that specialists may be limited in ability to ingest novel plant secondary compounds (PSCs). In contrast, the generalist foraging strategy requires that herbivores alternate consumption of plant species and PSC types to reduce the possibility of over-ingestion of any particular PSC. The ability to behaviorally regulate is a key component of this strategy. These ideas underpin the prediction that in the face of novel PSCs, generalists should be better able to maintain body mass and avoid toxic consequences compared to specialists. We explored these predictions by comparing the feeding behavior of two herbivorous rodents: a juniper specialist, Neotoma stephensi, and a generalist, Neotoma albigula, fed diets with increasing concentrations of phenolic resin extracted from the creosote bush (Larrea tridentata), which produces a suite of PSCs novel to both species. The specialist lost more mass than the generalist during the 15-day trial. In addition, although the specialist and generalist both regulated phenolic resin intake by reducing meal size while on the highest resin concentration (4%), the generalist began to regulate intake on the 2% diet. The ability of the generalist to regulate intake at a lower PSC concentration may be the source of the generalist's performance advantage over the specialist. These data provide evidence for the hypothesis that the specialist's foraging strategy may result in behavioral as well as physiological trade-offs in the ability to consume novel PSCs.

  4. Western juniper in eastern Oregon.

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    Donald R. Gedney; David L. Azuma; Charles L. Bolsinger; Neil. McKay

    1999-01-01

    This report analyzes and summarizes a 1988 inventory of western juniper (Juniperus occidentalis Hook.) in eastern Oregon. This inventory, conducted by the Pacific Northwest Research Station of the USDA Forest Service, was intensified to meet increased need for more information about the juniper resource than was available in previous inventories. A...

  5. Pinyon-juniper woodlands

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    Gottfried, Gerald J.; Swetnam, Thomas W.; Allen, Craig D.; Betancourt, Julio L.; Chung-MacCoubrey, Alice L.; Finch, Deborah M.; Tainter, Joseph A.

    1995-01-01

    Pinyon-juniper woodlands are one of the largest ecosystems in the Southwest and in the Middle Rio Grande Basin (Fig. 1). The woodlands have been important to the region's inhabitants since prehistoric times for a variety of natural resources and amenities. The ecosystems have not been static; their distributions, stand characteristics, and site conditions have been altered by changes in climatic patterns and human use and, often, abuse. Management of these lands since European settlement has varied from light exploitation and benign neglect, to attempts to remove the trees in favor of forage for livestock, and then to a realization that these lands contain useful resources and should be managed accordingly. Land management agencies are committed to ecosystem management. While there are several definitions of ecosystem management, the goal is to use ecological approaches to create and maintain diverse, productive, and healthy ecosystems (Kaufmann et al. 1994). Ecosystem management recognizes that people are an integral part of the system and that their needs must be considered. Ecological approaches are central to the concept, but our understanding of basic woodland ecology is incomplete, and there are different opinions and interpretations of existing information (Gottfried and Severson 1993). There are many questions concerning proper ecosystem management of the pinyon-juniper woodlands and how managers can achieve these goals (Gottfried and Severson 1993). While the broad concept of ecosystem management generally is accepted, the USDA Forest Service, other public land management agencies, American Indian tribes, and private landowners may have differing definitions of what constitutes desired conditions. Key questions about the pinyon-juniper ecosystems remain unanswered. Some concern the basic dynamics of biological and physical components of the pinyon-juniper ecosystems. Others concern the distribution of woodlands prior to European settlement and changes

  6. Juniper tar poisoning.

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    Koruk, Suda Tekin; Ozyilkan, Esin; Kaya, Pinar; Colak, Dilsen; Donderici, Omer; Cesaretli, Yildirim

    2005-01-01

    Juniper tar (cade oil) is distilled from the branches and wood of Juniperus oxycedrus. It contains etheric oils, triterpene and phenols, and is used for many purposes in folk medicine. A case is reported of a previously healthy man who ingested a spoonful of home-made extract of Juniperus oxycedrus. The poisoning caused fever, severe hypotension, renal failure, hepatotoxicity, and severe cutaneous burns on the face. After supportive and symptomatic treatment, the patient improved and was discharged in a good condition on the eleventh day.

  7. An in vivo assay for elucidating the importance of cytochromes P450 for the ability of a wild mammalian herbivore (Neotoma lepida) to consume toxic plants.

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    Skopec, Michele M; Malenke, Jael R; Halpert, James R; Denise Dearing, M

    2013-01-01

    An in vivo assay using the cytochrome P450 (P450) suicide inhibitor 1-aminobenzotriazole (ABT) and 24-h food intake was developed to determine the relative importance of P450s in two populations of Neotoma lepida with respect to biotransformation of plant secondary compounds in the animals' natural diets. The efficacy of ABT as a P450 inhibitor was first validated using hypnotic-state assays with and without pretreatment with ABT. Pretreatment with 100 mg/kg ABT by gavage increased hexobarbital sleep times 3-4-fold in both populations, showing effective inhibition of P450s in woodrats. Next, the Great Basin population was fed a terpene-rich juniper diet, and the Mojave population was fed a phenolic-rich creosote diet, with rabbit chow serving as the control diet in each group. Treatment with ABT inhibited food intake in the Great Basin population fed the juniper diet to a greater extent (35%) than the Great Basin population fed the control diet (19%) or the Mojave population fed the creosote diet (16%). The food intake of the Mojave population fed the control diet was not significantly inhibited by ABT. The findings suggest that the biotransformation of terpenes in juniper relies more heavily on P450s than that of phenolics in creosote. This assay provides an inexpensive and noninvasive method to explore the relative importance of P450s in the biotransformation strategies of wild mammalian herbivores.

  8. Cytochrome P450 2B diversity and dietary novelty in the herbivorous, desert woodrat (Neotoma lepida).

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    Malenke, Jael R; Magnanou, Elodie; Thomas, Kirk; Dearing, M Denise

    2012-01-01

    Detoxification enzymes play a key role in plant-herbivore interactions, contributing to the on-going evolution of ecosystem functional diversity. Mammalian detoxification systems have been well studied by the medical and pharmacological industries to understand human drug metabolism; however, little is known of the mechanisms employed by wild herbivores to metabolize toxic plant secondary compounds. Using a wild rodent herbivore, the desert woodrat (Neotoma lepida), we investigated genomic structural variation, sequence variability, and expression patterns in a multigene subfamily involved in xenobiotic metabolism, cytochrome P450 2B (CYP2B). We hypothesized that differences in CYP2B expression and sequence diversity could explain differential abilities of woodrat populations to consume native plant toxins. Woodrats from two distinct populations were fed diets supplemented with either juniper (Juniperus osteosperma) or creosote bush (Larrea tridentata), plants consumed by woodrats in their respective desert habitats. We used Southern blot and quantitative PCR to determine that the genomic copy number of CYP2B in both populations was equivalent, and similar in number to known rodent copy number. We compared CYP2B expression patterns and sequence diversity using cloned hepatic CYP2B cDNA. The resulting sequences were very diverse, and clustered into four major clades by amino acid similarity. Sequences from the experimental treatments were distributed non-randomly across a CYP2B tree, indicating unique expression patterns from woodrats on different diets and from different habitats. Furthermore, within each major CYP2B clade, sequences shared a unique combination of amino acid residues at 13 sites throughout the protein known to be important for CYP2B enzyme function, implying differences in the function of each major CYP2B variant. This work is the most comprehensive investigation of the genetic diversity of a detoxification enzyme subfamily in a wild mammalian

  9. Cytochrome P450 2B diversity and dietary novelty in the herbivorous, desert woodrat (Neotoma lepida.

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    Jael R Malenke

    Full Text Available Detoxification enzymes play a key role in plant-herbivore interactions, contributing to the on-going evolution of ecosystem functional diversity. Mammalian detoxification systems have been well studied by the medical and pharmacological industries to understand human drug metabolism; however, little is known of the mechanisms employed by wild herbivores to metabolize toxic plant secondary compounds. Using a wild rodent herbivore, the desert woodrat (Neotoma lepida, we investigated genomic structural variation, sequence variability, and expression patterns in a multigene subfamily involved in xenobiotic metabolism, cytochrome P450 2B (CYP2B. We hypothesized that differences in CYP2B expression and sequence diversity could explain differential abilities of woodrat populations to consume native plant toxins. Woodrats from two distinct populations were fed diets supplemented with either juniper (Juniperus osteosperma or creosote bush (Larrea tridentata, plants consumed by woodrats in their respective desert habitats. We used Southern blot and quantitative PCR to determine that the genomic copy number of CYP2B in both populations was equivalent, and similar in number to known rodent copy number. We compared CYP2B expression patterns and sequence diversity using cloned hepatic CYP2B cDNA. The resulting sequences were very diverse, and clustered into four major clades by amino acid similarity. Sequences from the experimental treatments were distributed non-randomly across a CYP2B tree, indicating unique expression patterns from woodrats on different diets and from different habitats. Furthermore, within each major CYP2B clade, sequences shared a unique combination of amino acid residues at 13 sites throughout the protein known to be important for CYP2B enzyme function, implying differences in the function of each major CYP2B variant. This work is the most comprehensive investigation of the genetic diversity of a detoxification enzyme subfamily in a

  10. "Pharm-ecology" of diet shifting: biotransformation of plant secondary compounds in creosote (Larrea tridentata) by a woodrat herbivore, Neotoma lepida.

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    Haley, Shannon L; Lamb, John G; Franklin, Michael R; Constance, Jonathan E; Dearing, M Denise

    2008-01-01

    Diet switching in mammalian herbivores may necessitate a change in the biotransformation enzymes used to process plant secondary compounds (PSCs). We investigated differences in the biotransformation system in the mammalian herbivore, Neotoma lepida, after a radical shift in diet and secondary compound composition. Populations of N. lepida in the Mojave Desert have evolved over the past 10,000 years to feed on creosote (Larrea tridentata) from an ancestral state of consuming juniper (Juniperus osteosperma). This dietary shift represents a marked change in the dietary composition of PSCs in that creosote leaves are coated with phenolic resin, whereas juniper is high in terpenes but lacks phenolic resin. We quantified the enzyme activity of five major groups of biotransformation enzymes (cytochrome P450s, NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase, glutathione conjugation, sulfation, and glucuronidation) recognized for their importance to mammalian biotransformation for the elimination of foreign compounds. Enzyme activities were compared between populations of Mojave and Great Basin woodrats fed control and creosote diets. In response to creosote, the Mojave population had greater levels of cytochrome P450s (CYP2B, CYP1A) and glutathione conjugation liver enzymes compared with the Great Basin population. Our results suggest that elevated levels of cytochrome P450s and glutathione conjugation enzymes in the Mojave population may be the underlying biotransformation mechanisms that facilitate feeding on creosote.

  11. Juniper for Streambank Stabilization in Eastern Oregon

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    Guy R. Sheeter; Errol W. Claire

    1989-01-01

    Cut juniper trees (Juniperous osteosperma Hook.) anchored along eroded streambanks proved beneficial in stabilizing 96 percent of the erosion on eight streams evaluated in eastern Oregon over a 14-year-period. Juniper revetment was a successful substitute for costly rock structures on straight or slightly curved banks, but failed when placed on outside curves or when...

  12. Are western juniper seeds dispersed through diplochory?

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    Seed dispersal of western juniper (Juniperus occidentalis) appears to be convergent on a strategy utilized by fruit-bearing trees in that this conifer produces fleshy female cones (a.k.a., juniper “berries”) that are consumed by frugivorous birds, which then disperse the seeds through endozoochory b...

  13. Pinyon/juniper woodlands [Chapter 4

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    Robin J. Tausch; Sharon Hood

    2007-01-01

    Pinyon-juniper woodlands occur in 10 states and cover large areas in many of them. These woodlands can be dominated by several species of pinyon pine (Pinus spp. L.) and juniper (Juniperus spp. L.) (Lanner 1975; Mitchell and Roberts 1999; West 1999a). A considerable amount of information is available on the expansion of the woodlands that has occurred over large parts...

  14. TAP Report - Southwest Idaho Juniper Working Group

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    Gresham, Garold Linn [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    There is explicit need for characterization of the materials for possible commercialization as little characterization data exists. Pinyon-juniper woodlands are a major ecosystem type found in the Southwest and the Intermountain West regions of the United States including Nevada, Idaho and Oregon. These widespread ecosystems are characterized by the presence of several different species of pinyon and juniper as the dominant plant cover. Since the 1800s, pinyon-juniper woodlands have rapidly expanded their range at the expense of existing ecosystems. Additionally, existing woodlands have become denser, progressively creating potential fire hazards as seen in the Soda Fire, which burned more than 400 sq. miles. Land managers responsible for these areas often desire to reduce pinyon-juniper coverage on their lands for a variety of reasons, as stated in the Working Group objectives. However, the cost of clearing thinning pinyon-juniper stands can be prohibitive. One reason for this is the lack of utilization options for the resulting biomass that could help recover some of the cost of pinyon-juniper stand management. The goal of this TAP effort was to assess the feedstock characteristics of biomass from a juniper harvested from Owyhee County to evaluate possible fuel and conversion utilization options.

  15. Pediatric Specialists

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    ... Healthy Children > Family Life > Medical Home > Pediatric Specialists Pediatric Specialists Article Body ​Your pediatrician may refer your child to a pediatric specialist for further evaluation and treatment. Pediatric specialists ...

  16. Promotion and Rescue of Intracellular Brucella neotomae Replication during Coinfection with Legionella pneumophila.

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    Kang, Yoon-Suk; Kirby, James E

    2017-05-01

    We established a new Brucella neotomaein vitro model system for study of type IV secretion system-dependent (T4SS) pathogenesis in the Brucella genus. Importantly, B. neotomae is a rodent pathogen, and unlike B. abortus, B. melitensis, and B. suis, B. neotomae has not been observed to infect humans. It therefore can be handled more facilely using biosafety level 2 practices. More particularly, using a series of novel fluorescent protein and lux operon reporter systems to differentially label pathogens and track intracellular replication, we confirmed T4SS-dependent intracellular growth of B. neotomae in macrophage cell lines. Furthermore, B. neotomae exhibited early endosomal (LAMP-1) and late endoplasmic reticulum (calreticulin)-associated phagosome maturation. These findings recapitulate prior observations for human-pathogenic Brucella spp. In addition, during coinfection experiments with Legionella pneumophila, we found that defective intracellular replication of a B. neotomae T4SS virB4 mutant was rescued and baseline levels of intracellular replication of wild-type B. neotomae were significantly stimulated by coinfection with wild-type but not T4SS mutant L. pneumophila Using confocal microscopy, it was determined that intracellular colocalization of B. neotomae and L. pneumophila was required for rescue and that colocalization came at a cost to L. pneumophila fitness. These findings were not completely expected based on known temporal and qualitative differences in the intracellular life cycles of these two pathogens. Taken together, we have developed a new system for studying in vitroBrucella pathogenesis and found a remarkable T4SS-dependent interplay between Brucella and Legionella during macrophage coinfection. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  17. Avian community responses to juniper woodland structure and thinning treatments on the Colorado Plateau

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    Crow, Claire; van Riper, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Federal land managers are increasingly implementing fuels-reduction treatments throughout the western United States with objectives of ecological restoration and fire hazard reduction in pinyon-juniper (Pinus spp.-Juniperus spp.) woodlands. The pinyon-juniper woodland ecosystem complex is highly variable across the western landscape, as is bird community composition. We investigated relations between breeding birds and vegetation characteristics in modified pinyon-juniper woodlands at three sites (BLM, USFS, NPS) on the Colorado Plateau. During the breeding seasons of 2005 and 2006, we surveyed birds and measured vegetation in 74 study plots. These plots were each 3.1 hectares (ha; 7.6 acres), located across the range of natural variation, with 41 control sites and 33 plots in areas previously thinned by hand-cutting or chaining. We found that relations of avian pinyon-juniper specialists and priority species to vegetation characteristics were generally in agreement with the findings of previous studies and known nesting and feeding habits of those birds. Relatively high density of pinyon pines was important to species richness and abundance in 6 of 14 species. Abundance of all species was related to treatment method, and we found no difference in bird communities at chaining and hand-cut sites.

  18. Persistence of Allegheny woodrats Neotoma magister across the mid-Atlantic Appalachian Highlands landscape, USA

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    W. Mark Ford; Steven B. Castleberry; Michael T. Mengak; Jane L. Rodrigue; Daniel J. Feller; Kevin R. Russell

    2006-01-01

    We examined a suite of macro-habitat and landscape variables around active and inactive Allegheny woodrat Neotoma magister colony sites in the Appalachian Mountains of the mid-Atlantic Highlands of Maryland, Virginia, and West Virginia using an information-theoretic modeling approach. Logistic regression analyses suggested that Allegheny woodrat presence was related...

  19. Pinyon-juniper woodlands [chapter 6

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    Gerald J. Gottfried; Thomas W. Swetnam; Craig D. Allen; Julio L. Betancourt; Alice L. Chung-MacCoubrey

    1995-01-01

    Pinyon-juniper woodlands are one of the largest ecosystems in the Southwest and in the Middle Rio Grande Basin (Fig. 1). The woodlands have been important to the region's inhabitants since prehistoric times for a variety of natural resources and amenities. The ecosystems have not been static; their distributions, stand characteristics, and site conditions have...

  20. Registro nuevo de Neotoma mexicana vulcani (Rodentia: Muridae para México A new record of Neotoma mexicana vulcani (Rodentia: Muridae in Mexico

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    Roberto Vidal-López

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Se registra la presencia de Neotoma mexicana vulcani en México, subespecie antes considerada como endémica del volcán Tajomulco, Departamento de San Marcos, Guatemala. La identificación se llevó a cabo con base en la revisión de las medidas morfométricas y patrones de coloración de ejemplares recientemente recolectados y registros de bases de datos. Con estos resultados, el área de distribución de la subespecie se amplía hacia México en la Sierra Madre de Chiapas, aproximadamente a 50 km al norte de la localidad anteriormente conocida.We report the presence of Neotoma mexicana vulcani in Mexico; this subspecies has been considered endemic to the Tajomulco volcano, in the Departamento of San Marcos, Guatemala. We identified our specimens using measurements, color patterns of recently colleted specimens, and data base records. Based on our results, the distribution range of this subspecies extends to Mexico, in the Sierra Madre of Chiapas, approximately 50 km north of the previously known locality.

  1. Estimating juniper cover from NAIP imagery and evaluating relationships between potential cover and environmental variables

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    Juniper management is constrained by limited tools to estimate juniper cover and potential cover at stand closure across landscapes. We evaluated if remotely sensed imagery (NAIP) could be used to estimate juniper cover and if environmental characteristic could be used to determine potential junipe...

  2. E - SPECIALIST

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    PETRU ANDEA

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper is about the training, the mission and the condition of the 21th century specialist, who must keep up with the challenges of the informational era, which is rapidly establishing and embracing human society. It analyzes the characteristics of the digital age, information overload, technological impact, communication, which requiring specialists to increasingly leverage their digital techniques, both in training and activity.

  3. Juniper Pollen Hotspots in the Southwest

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    Bunderson, L. D.; VandeWater, P.; Luvall, J.; Levetin, E.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Juniperus pollen is a major allergen in Texas, Oklahoma, and New Mexico. While the bulk of pollen may be released in rural areas, large amounts of pollen can be transported to urban areas. Major juniper species in the region include: Juniperus ashei, J. virginiana, J. pinchotii, and J. monosperma. Pollen release is virtually continuous beginning in late September with J. pinchotii and ending in May with J. monosperma. Urban areas in the region were evaluated for the potential of overlapping seasons in order to inform sensitive individuals. Methods: Burkard volumetric pollen traps were established for two consecutive spring seasons at 6 sites in northern New Mexico and 6 sites for two consecutive winter and fall seasons in Texas and Oklahoma Standard methods were used in the preparation and analysis of slides. Results: The Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex is home to over 6 million people. It is adjacent to populations of J. pinchotii, J. virginiana, and J. ashei. Peak concentration near Dallas for J. ashei in 2011 was 5891 pollen grains/m3 in January 7th. The peak date for J. pinchotii at an upwind sampling location in San Marcos, TX was November 1, 2010 and peak for J. virginiana at a nearby station in Tulsa, OK was November 1, 2010 and peak for J. virginiana at a nearby station in Tulsa, OK was February 20, 2011. Amarillo, TX is adjacent to J. pinchotii, J. ashei, and J. monosperma populations and may be subject to juniper pollen from September through May. Conclusions: Considering the overlapping distributions of juniper trees and the overlapping temporal release of pollen, sensitive patients may benefit from avoiding hotspots.

  4. Evaluation of the seasonal and annual abortifacient risk of western juniper trees on Oregon rangelands: Abortion risk of western juniper trees

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    Western juniper trees can cause late term abortions in cattle, similar to ponderosa pine trees. Analyses of western juniper trees from 35 locations across the state of Oregon suggest that western juniper trees in all areas present an abortion risk in pregnant cattle. Results from this study demonstr...

  5. Restoring mountain big sagebrush communities after prescribed fire in juniper encroached rangelands

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    Western juniper encroachment into sagebrush steppe communities has reduced livestock forage production, increased erosion and runoff risk, and degraded sagebrush-associated wildlife habitat. We evaluated seeding perennial herbaceous vegetation and sagebrush at five sites where juniper was controlle...

  6. Do bark beetle sprays prevent Phloeosinus species from attacking cypress and juniper?

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    Chris Hayes; Tom DeGomez; Karen Clancy; Joel McMillin; John Anhold

    2008-01-01

    (Please note, this is an abstract only) Phloeosinus-caused mortality of Arizona cypress, (Cupressus arizonica), oneseed juniper, (Juniperus monosperma) and alligator juniper, (J. deppeana) has been observed at high levels in Arizona during the past 3 years. Currently, there are limited preventative measures to protect high-value cypress and juniper trees against...

  7. Seed dispersal of two juniper species: Do scatter-hoarding rodents play a role?

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    Knowledge of seed dispersal processes is vital for understanding the ongoing expansion of the range and increase in density of juniper woodlands. Juniper seeds develop within fruit-like female cones often called “berries.” Juniper seed dispersal has largely been attributed to frugivores and endozooc...

  8. Biological soil crust response to late season prescribed fire in a Great Basin juniper woodland

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    Steven D. Warren; Larry L. St.Clair; Jeffrey R. Johansen; Paul Kugrens; L. Scott Baggett; Benjamin J. Bird

    2015-01-01

    Expansion of juniper on U.S. rangelands is a significant environmental concern. Prescribed fire is often recommended to control juniper. To that end, a prescribed burn was conducted in a Great Basin juniper woodland. Conditions were suboptimal; fire did not encroach into mid- or late-seral stages and was patchy in the early-seral stage. This study evaluated the effects...

  9. Assessing Pinyon Juniper Feedstock Properties and Utilization Options

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    Gresham, Garold Linn [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kenney, Kevin Louis [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Pinyon-juniper woodlands are a major ecosystem type found in the Southwest and the Intermountain West regions of the United States. These ecosystems are characterized by the presence of several different species of pinyon pine and juniper as the dominant plant cover. Since the 1800s, pinyon-juniper woodlands have rapidly expanded their range at the expense of existing ecosystems. Additionally, existing woodlands have become more dense, potentially increasing fire hazards. Land managers responsible for these areas often desire to reduce pinyonjuniper coverage on their lands for a variety of reasons, including restoration to previous vegetative cover, mitigation of fire risk, and improvement in wildlife habitat. However, the cost of clearing or thinning pinyon-juniper stands can be prohibitive. One reason for this is the lack of utilization options for the resulting biomass that could help recover some of the cost of pinyonjuniper stand management. The goal of this project was to assess the feedstock characteristics of biomass from a pinyon-juniper harvest so that potential applications for the biomass may be evaluated.

  10. Temporal and spatial distribution of Leishmania mexicana infections in a population of Neotoma micropus

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    Raymond Russell W

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A 19-month mark-release-recapture study of Neotoma micropus with sequential screening for Leishmania mexicana was conducted in Bexar County, Texas, USA. The overall prevalence rate was 14.7% and the seasonal prevalence rates ranged from 3.8 to 26.7%. Nine incident cases were detected, giving an incidence rate of 15.5/100 rats/year. Follow-up of 101 individuals captured two or more times ranged from 14 to 462 days. Persistence of L. mexicana infections averaged 190 days and ranged from 104 to 379 days. Data on dispersal, density, dispersion, and weight are presented, and the role of N. micropus as a reservoir host for L. mexicana is discussed.

  11. Parasites of mammals on the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge, Socorro, New Mexico: Cuterebra austeni and C. neomexicana (Diptera:Oestridae) from Neotoma and Peromyscus (Rodentia:Muridae), 1991-1994.

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    Wilson, W D; Hnida, J A; Duszynski, D W

    1997-05-01

    In total, 6,486 rodents representing 3 families (Muridae, Heteromyidae, and Sciuridae) and 24 species were trapped May through August of 1991 through 1994. Of these, only the white-throated woodrat. Neotoma albigula Hartley; piñon mouse, Peromyscus truei Shufeldt; and white-footed mouse, P. leucopus Rafinesque, were infested with Cuterebra Clark larvae. Of the 594 N. albigula that were captured 103 (17.3%) were infested with 139 Cuterebra larvae with all infestations occurring in the throat region. N. albigula infestations were observed in 4 of 5 habitats sampled. The highest prevalence of infestation occurred during May-June (27.2%) versus July-August (9.1%) and in males (25.2%) versus females (18.3%). Prevalence of infestation was not significantly different between animals from the mark-release webs versus removal webs or adults versus juveniles. Also, there was no correlation between relative density of N. albigula and prevalence of infestation. Fifteen adults were reared from puparia and identified as C. austeni Sabrosky. Of 716 P. truei captured, 22 (3.1%) were infested with a total of 25 Cuterebra larvae with all infestations occurring in the scapular region. Although P. truei were captured in all 5 habitats, they were only infested in the piñon-juniper habitat: the highest prevalence of infestation occurred during July-August (10.9%) versus May-June (3.3%). Prevalence of infestation was not significantly different between animals from mark-release webs versus removal webs, males versus females, or adults versus juveniles. As in the N. albigula, there was no correlation between relative density of P. truei and prevalence of infestation. The adult reared from a puparium was identified as C. neomexicana Sabrosky. Of the 310 P. leucopus captured, only 3 (1%) were infested with Cuterebra larvae.

  12. Oral immunization of mice with gamma-irradiated Brucella neotomae induces protection against intraperitoneal and intranasal challenge with virulent B. abortus 2308.

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    Dabral, Neha; Martha-Moreno-Lafont; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; Vemulapalli, Ramesh

    2014-01-01

    Brucella spp. are Gram-negative, facultative intracellular coccobacilli that cause one of the most frequently encountered zoonosis worldwide. Humans naturally acquire infection through consumption of contaminated dairy and meat products and through direct exposure to aborted animal tissues and fluids. No vaccine against brucellosis is available for use in humans. In this study, we tested the ability of orally inoculated gamma-irradiated B. neotomae and B. abortus RB51 in a prime-boost immunization approach to induce antigen-specific humoral and cell mediated immunity and protection against challenge with virulent B. abortus 2308. Heterologous prime-boost vaccination with B. abortus RB51 and B. neotomae and homologous prime-boost vaccination of mice with B. neotomae led to the production of serum and mucosal antibodies specific to the smooth LPS. The elicited serum antibodies included the isotypes of IgM, IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b and IgG3. All oral vaccination regimens induced antigen-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells capable of secreting IFN-γ and TNF-α. Upon intra-peritoneal challenge, mice vaccinated with B. neotomae showed the highest level of resistance against virulent B. abortus 2308 colonization in spleen and liver. Experiments with different doses of B. neotomae showed that all tested doses of 10(9), 10(10) and 10(11) CFU-equivalent conferred significant protection against the intra-peritoneal challenge. However, a dose of 10(11) CFU-equivalent of B. neotomae was required for affording protection against intranasal challenge as shown by the reduced bacterial colonization in spleens and lungs. Taken together, these results demonstrate the feasibility of using gamma-irradiated B. neotomae as an effective and safe oral vaccine to induce protection against respiratory and systemic infections with virulent Brucella.

  13. Identification of a single-nucleotide insertion in the promoter region affecting the sodC promoter activity in Brucella neotomae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina A Moustafa

    Full Text Available Brucella neotomae is not known to be associated with clinical disease in any host species. Previous research suggested that B. neotomae might not express detectable levels of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD, a periplasmic enzyme known to be involved in protecting Brucella from oxidative bactericidal effects of host phagocytes. This study was undertaken to investigate the genetic basis for the disparity in SOD expression in B. neotomae. Our Western blot and SOD enzyme assay analyses indicated that B. neotomae does express SOD, but at a substantially reduced level. Nucleotide sequence analysis of region upstream to the sodC gene identified a single-nucleotide insertion in the potential promoter region. The same single-nucleotide insertion was also detected in the sodC promoter of B. suis strain Thomsen, belonging to biovar 2 in which SOD expression was undetectable previously. Examination of the sodC promoter activities using translational fusion constructs with E. coli β-galactosidase demonstrated that the B. neotomae and B. suis biovar 2 promoters were very weak in driving gene expression. Site-directed mutation studies indicated that the insertion of A in the B. neotomae sodC promoter reduced the promoter activity. Increasing the level of SOD expression in B. neotomae through complementation with B. abortus sodC gene did not alter the bacterial survival in J774A.1 macrophage-like cells and in tissues of BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. These results for the first time demonstrate the occurrence of a single-nucleotide polymorphism affecting promoter function and gene expression in Brucella.

  14. RESTORATION OF QUAKING ASPEN WOODLANDS INVADED BY WESTERN JUNIPER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaking aspen woodlands are important plant communities in the interior mountains of the western United States, providing essential habitat for many wildlife species and contain a high diversity of understory plants. Western juniper woodlands are rapidly replacing lower elevation (<6800 ft) quaking...

  15. Adsorption mechanism of cadmium on juniper bark and wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eun Woo Shin; K. G. Karthikeyan; Mandla A. Tshabalala

    2007-01-01

    In this study the capacity of sorbents prepared from juniper wood (JW) and bark (JB) to adsorb cadmium (Cd) from aqueous solutions at different pH values was compared. Adsorption behavior was characterized through adsorption kinetics, adsorption isotherms, and adsorption edge experiments. Results from kinetics and isotherm experiments showed that JB (76.3–91.6 lmol Cd...

  16. Ecohydrologic relationships of two juniper woodlands with different precipitation regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, C. G.; Guldan, S. J.; Deboodt, T.; Fernald, A.; Ray, G.

    2015-12-01

    The significant expansion of juniper (Juniperus spp.) woodlands throughout the western U.S. during the last two centuries has disrupted important ecological functions and hydrologic processes. The relationships between water and vegetation distribution are highly impacted by the ongoing shift from shrub steppe and grassland to woodland-dominated landscapes. We investigated vegetation dynamics and hydrologic processes occurring in two distinct juniper landscapes with different precipitation regimes in the Intermountain West region: A winter snow-dominated (Oregon) and a summer rain-dominated with some winter precipitation (New Mexico) landscape. Results from the Oregon site showed marginal differences (1-2%) in soil moisture in treated vs untreated watersheds throughout the dry and wet seasons. In general, soil moisture was greater in the treated watershed in both seasons. Canopy cover affected soil moisture over time. Perennial grass cover was positively correlated with changes in soil moisture, whereas juniper cover was negatively correlated with changes in soil moisture. Shallow groundwater response observed in upland and valley monitoring wells indicate there are temporary hydrologic connections between upland and valley locations during the winter precipitation season. Results from the New Mexico site provided valuable information regarding timing and intensity of monsoon-driven precipitation and the rainfall threshold (5 mm/15 min) that triggers runoff. Long-term vegetation dynamics and hydrologic processes were evaluated based on pre- and post-juniper removal (70%) in three watersheds. In general, less runoff and greater forage response was observed in the treated watersheds. During rainfall events, soil moisture was less under juniper canopy compared with inter-canopy; this difference in soil moisture was intensified during high intensity, short duration rainstorms in the summer months. We found that winter snow precipitation helped recharge soil moisture

  17. Optimum Density and Space Structure of Kyrgyzstan’s Juniper Stands for Identifying Water Protective Properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zayirbek; Toktoraliev; Okke; Batelaan; Pichang; YUE; Heng; ZHANG

    2014-01-01

    Central Asia including Kyrgyzstan is a disaster prone area,suffering from snow avalanches,landslides and flooding.Within the Tyan- Shan region,a mountainous region in Southern Kyrgyzstan,there is an increasing number of natural hazards over the last years.One of the possible causes of the increase in natural disasters in the region is the deterioration of the Juniper forests in the region.Juniper forests have a large economical and ecological importance for Kyrgyzstan.However,the conditions worsened for these juniper forests.Since 1980 approximately 20% of the juniper forests were lost due to intensive deforestation,forest fires and excessive cattle grazing and possibly also climate changes are affecting the juniper trees and their soil properties.The aim of this study is to investigate the impact of the juniper forest on the local hydrology and to characterize the water protective properties.

  18. Besnoitia neotomofelis n. sp. (Protozoa: Apicomplexa) from the southern plains woodrat ( Neotoma micropus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, J P; Yabsley, M J

    2010-10-01

    Certain species of the protozoan genus Besnoitia cause clinical disease in livestock and wildlife. In the present paper a new species, Besnoitia neotomofelis is described from the southern planes woodrat (Neotoma micropus). The parasite was detected by bioassay of woodrat tissues in outbred Swiss Webster mice in an attempt to isolate Toxoplasma gondii. Initially, the organism was misdiagnosed as T. gondii because it was highly pathogenic for mice and its tachyzoites resembled T. gondii tachyzoites. Further studies revealed that it differed structurally and biologically from T. gondii. Tachyzoites were successfully cultivated and maintained in vitro in bovine monocytes and African green monkey kidney cells, and in vivo in mice. Non-dividing, uninucleate tachyzoites were approximately 1 x 5 μm in size. Longitudinally-cut bradyzoites in tissue sections measured 1.5-1.6 x 7.7-9.3 μm. Tissue cysts were microscopic, up to 210 μm long, and were infective orally to mice. Cats fed tissue cysts shed unsporulated 13 x 14 μm sized oocysts. All mice inoculated with B. neotomofelis died of acute besnoitiosis, irrespective of the dose, and Norwegian rats became infected but remained asymptomatic. Entero-epithelial stages (schizonts, gamonts) were found in cats fed tissue cysts. Large (up to 40 x 50 μm) first-generation schizonts developed in the lamina propria of the small intestine of cats. A second generation of small sized (8 μm) schizonts containing 4-8 merozoites was detected in enterocytes of the small intestine. Gamonts and oocysts were seen in goblet cells of the small intestinal epithelium. Tachyzoites were present in mesenteric lymph nodes of cats. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that B. neotomofelis was related to other Besnoitia species from rodents, rabbits, and opossums. Besnoitia neotomofelis is distinct from the 3 other species of Besnoitia, B. wallacei, B. darlingi and B. oryctofelisi that utilize cats as a definitive host.

  19. Allegheny woodrat (Neotoma magister) use of rock drainage channels on reclaimed mines in southern West Virginia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chamblin, H.D.; Wood, P.B.; Edwards, J.W. [West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2004-04-01

    Allegheny woodrats (Neotoma magister) currently receive protected status throughout their range due to population declines. Threats associated with habitat fragmentation (e.g., introduced predators, disease, and habitat loss) may explain why Allegheny woodrats are no longer found in many areas where they existed just 25 y ago. In southern West Virginia, surface coal mining is a major cause of forest fragmentation. Furthermore, mountaintop mining, the prevalent method in the region, results in a loss of rock outcrops and cliffs within forested areas, typical habitat of the Allegheny woodrat. To determine the extent that Allegheny woodrats make use of reclaimed mine land, particularly rock drainages built during reclamation, we sampled 24 drainage channels on reclaimed surface mines in southern West Virginia, collected habitat data at each site and used logistic regression to identify habitat variables related to Allegheny woodrat presence. During 187 trap nights, 13 adult, 2 subadult and 8 juvenile Allegheny woodrats were captured at 13 of the 24 sites. Percent of rock as a groundcover and density of stems {gt} 15 cm diameter-at-breast-height (DBH) were related to Allegheny woodrat presence and were significantly greater at sites where Allegheny woodrats were present than absent. Sites where Allegheny woodrats were present differed substantially from other described habitats in West Virginia, though they may simulate boulder piles that occur naturally. Our findings suggest the need for additional research to examine the dynamics between Allegheny woodrat populations inhabiting rock outcrops in forests adjacent to mines and populations inhabiting constructed drainage channels on reclaimed mines. However, if Allegheny woodrats can use human-created habitat, our results will be useful to surface mine reclamation and to other mitigation efforts where rocky habitats are lost or disturbed.

  20. Lamotheoxyuris ackerti n. gen., n. comb. (Nematoda: Heteroxynematidae parasite of Neotoma spp. (Rodentia: Muridae Lamotheoxyuris ackerti n. gen., n. comb. (Nematoda: Heteroxynematidae parásito de Neotoma spp. (Rodentia: Muridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JORGE FALCÓN-ORDAZ

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of the revision of the type material of Aspiculuris ackerti Kruidenier & Mehra, 1959, and new specimens collected from Neotoma nelsoni Goldman, 1905 (Rodentia: Cricetidae, in Veracruz, Mexico, we herein to which A. ackerti is transferred as Lamotheoxyuris ackerti This new genus differs from all other genera included in 1 mouth surrounded by six lips; 2 extension of lateral alae describe a new genus (Lamotheoxyuris n. gen., (Kruidener & Mehra, 1959 n. gen., n. comb. Heteroxynematinae by the following main traits: reduced; and 3 lack of caudal alae.Con base en la revisión del material tipo de Aspiculuris ackerti Kruidenier y Mehra, 1959 y de nuevos ejemplares recolectados en Neotoma nelsoni Goldman, 1905 (Rodentia: Cricetidae, en Veracruz, México, se describe un nuevo género (Lamotheoxyuris n. gen., al que A. ackerti es transferido como Lamotheoxyuris ackerti (Kruidener y Mehra, 1959 n. gen., n. comb. Este nuevo género se distingue de todos los demás géneros incluidos en Heteroxynematinae por las siguientes características: 1 presencia de seis labios rodeando la boca; 2 extensión reducida del ala lateral; y 3 carencia de ala caudal.

  1. Sage-grouse groceries: forb response to pinon-juniper treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the past 150 years, juniper (Juniperus spp. L.) and piñon (Pinus spp. L.) coniferous woodlands have increased 2 to 10-fold in 9 ecoregions spanning the Intermountain area of the western United States. Control of piñon-juniper woodlands by mechanical treatments and prescribed fire have been appli...

  2. Removal of toxic heavy metal ions in runoffs by modified alfalfa and juniper

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.S. Han; J.K. Park; S.H. Min

    2000-01-01

    A series of batch isotherm tests was performed with alfalfa and juniper fibers to evaluate the effectiveness in filtering toxic heavy metals from stormwater. The adsorption of the heavy metal ions on the alfalfa and juniper fibers was strongly dependent on the equilibrium pH value of the solution. The change in sorption rate over time showed that two different sorption...

  3. Conservation opportunities in Spanish Juniper Juniperus thurifera woodlands: the case of migratory thrushes Turdus spp.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Telleria, J.L.; De la Hera, I.; Ramírez, A.; Santos, T.

    2011-01-01

    Conservation opportunities in Spanish juniper Juniperus thurifera woodlands: the case of migratory thrushes Turdus spp. Spanish juniper Juniperus thurifera woodlands are the core habitat of several sites included in the Nature 2000 Network and the wintering ground of many European thrushes Turdus

  4. Impacts of pinyon and juniper control on ecosystems processes in the Porter Canyon Experimental Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    The opportunistic encroachment of native pinyon and juniper trees into areas formerly dominated by sagebrush has reduced the presence of shrubs and grasses, impacting critical habitat and forage availability. Pinyon and juniper currently occupy 19 million ha in the Intermountain West and prior to 18...

  5. Digging Deeper: Analyzing root traits to characterize juniper expansion into rangelands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juniper expansion into sagebrush communities is a widespread phenomenon occurring across large regions of the western U.S. over the past century. The primary concerns of juniper encroachment are the decrease in forage for wildlife and livestock and potential changes in water quantity. Management of ...

  6. Functional characterization of cytochromes P450 2B from the desert woodrat Neotoma lepida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilderman, P. Ross, E-mail: pwilderman@ucsd.edu [Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Jang, Hyun-Hee [Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Malenke, Jael R. [Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Salib, Mariam; Angermeier, Elisabeth; Lamime, Sonia [Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Dearing, M. Denise [Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Halpert, James R. [Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Mammalian detoxification processes have been the focus of intense research, but little is known about how wild herbivores process plant secondary compounds, many of which have medicinal value or are drugs. cDNA sequences that code for three enzymes of the cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2B subfamily, here termed 2B35, 2B36, and 2B37 have been recently identified from a wild rodent, the desert woodrat (Malenke et al., 2012). Two variant clones of each enzyme were engineered to increase protein solubility and to facilitate purification, as reported for CYP2B enzymes from multiple species. When expressed in Escherichia coli each of the woodrat proteins gave the characteristic maximum at 450 nm in a reduced carbon monoxide difference spectrum but generally expressed at lower levels than rat CYP2B1. Two enzymes, 2B36 and 2B37, showed dealkylation activity with the model substrates 7-ethoxy-4-(trifluoromethyl)coumarin and 7-benzyloxyresorufin, whereas 2B35 was inactive. Binding of the monoterpene (+)-α-pinene produced a Type I shift in the absorbance spectrum of each enzyme. Mutation of 2B37 at residues 114, 262, or 480, key residues governing ligand interactions with other CYP2B enzymes, did not significantly change expression levels or produce the expected functional changes. In summary, two catalytic and one ligand-binding assay are sufficient to distinguish among CYP2B35, 2B36, and 2B37. Differences in functional profiles between 2B36 and 2B37 are partially explained by changes in substrate recognition site residue 114, but not 480. The results advance our understanding of the mechanisms of detoxification in wild mammalian herbivores and highlight the complexity of this system. - Highlights: • Three CYP2B enzymes from Neotoma lepida were cloned, engineered, and expressed. • A mix of catalytic and binding assays yields unique results for each enzyme. • Mutational analysis indicates CYP{sub 2}B substrate recognition remains to be clarified. • Reported N. lepida gene

  7. Specialist Bibliographic Databases

    OpenAIRE

    Gasparyan, Armen Yuri; Yessirkepov, Marlen; Voronov, Alexander A.; Trukhachev, Vladimir I.; Kostyukova, Elena I.; Gerasimov, Alexey N.; Kitas, George D.

    2016-01-01

    Specialist bibliographic databases offer essential online tools for researchers and authors who work on specific subjects and perform comprehensive and systematic syntheses of evidence. This article presents examples of the established specialist databases, which may be of interest to those engaged in multidisciplinary science communication. Access to most specialist databases is through subscription schemes and membership in professional associations. Several aggregators of information and d...

  8. THE EFFECTS OF DIFFERENT SOWING TIMES ON GERMINATION PERCENTAGE OF MOUNTAIN JUNIPER (Juniperus communis L. subsp. nana Syme, SMALL FRUITED JUNIPER (Juniperus oxycedrus L. subsp. oxycedrus, SAVIN JUNIPER (Juniperus sabina L. SEEDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Cemal Gültekin

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Germination is delayed in Junipers because of embriyo dormancy, and also in same cases by an impermable seedcoat, or inhibitors in the cone and seedcoat. There are a lot of non-viable or nongerminating seeds of the species like the other juniper species. Low rates of germination in a number of species are due to a large propartion of non-viable or nongerminating seed. Non-viable seed may be hollow, damaged, or immature. In this study, after the process extraction the seeds from the cones and seperation of the empty, damaged, and immature seeds, the remain full seeds has been sown to find out the effects of different sowing times on germination percent under the nursery conditions. For this reason, ten different sowing times have been applied in thirty days intervals. Germination date on sowing times were analyzed using JMP statistical software. Results of the ANOVA and LSD showed that the most suitable sowing time and greatest germination was July (62.5 % and August (61.3 % for mountain juniper, August (73.0 % for small fruited juniper, July (51.8 % and August (50.8 % for savin juniper.

  9. The dusky-footed woodrat (Neotoma fuscipes) is susceptible to infection by Anaplasma phagocytophilum originating from woodrats, horses, and dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Nathan C; Madigan, John E; Foley, Janet E

    2010-07-01

    The dusky-footed woodrat (Neotoma fuscipes) is the putative reservoir for Anaplasma phagocytophilum in the western United States based on high prevalence of A. phagocytophilum genetic material detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), high antibody prevalence, and infestation with the vector tick Ixodes pacificus. Following inoculation of nine wild-caught woodrats with woodrat-, canine-, or equine-origin A. phagocytophilum, all became PCR-positive and seroconverted. However, when PCR-positive woodrat blood was delivered as inoculum to three horses, the horses never became clinically ill, PCR-positive, or antibody-positive. Each horse was subsequently infected with either the equine- or chipmunk-origin A. phagocytophilum, resulting in clinical anaplasmosis. Our data show that woodrats are permissive to several strains of A. phagocytophilum, but strains originating from woodrats did not cause clinical disease in horses.

  10. Using juniper berry ( Juniperus communis ) as a supplement in Japanese quail diets

    OpenAIRE

    Hakan Inci; Gokce Ozdemir; Ahmet Yusuf Sengul; Bunyamin Sogut; Hüseyin Nursoy; Turgay Sengul

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The present study was conducted to determine the effects of supplemented juniper berry (Juniperus communis) on fattening performance and some carcass traits of quails. A total of 150 one-day-old Japanese quail chicks were randomly divided into five groups (one control and four treated groups) with three replicates. Four different juniper berry levels (0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2%) and a control treatment (0%) were added to the diet. Juniper berry supplementation to the diets initiated at the ...

  11. Predicting woodrat (Neotoma) responses to anthropogenic warming from studies of the palaeomidden record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Felisa A.; Betancourt, Julio L.

    2006-01-01

    Aim The influence of anthropogenic climate change on organisms is an area of great scientific concern. Increasingly there is recognition that abrupt climate transitions have occurred over the late Quaternary; studies of these shifts may yield insights into likely biotic responses to contemporary warming. Here, we review research undertaken over the past decade investigating the response of Neotoma (woodrats) body size and distribution to climate change over the late Quaternary (the last 40,000 years). By integrating information from woodrat palaeomiddens, historical museum specimens and field studies of modern populations, we identify potential evolutionary responses to climate change occurring over a variety of temporal and spatial scales. Specifically, we characterize climatic thresholds in the past that led to local species extirpation and/or range alterations rather than in situ adaptation, and apply them to anticipate potential biotic responses to anthropogenic climate change. Location Middens were collected at about 55 sites scattered across the western United States, ranging from about 34 to 46° N and about 104 to 116° W, respectively. Data for modern populations were drawn from studies conducted in Death Valley, California, Missoula, Montana and the Sevilleta LTER site in central New Mexico. Methods We analysed faecal pellets from midden series collected at numerous cave sites across the western United States. From these we estimated body mass using techniques validated in earlier studies. We compared body size fluctuations at different elevations in different regions and integrated these results with studies investigating temperature–body size tradeoffs in modern animals. We also quantify the rapidity of the size changes over the late Quaternary to estimate the evolutionary capacity of woodrats to deal with predicted rates of anthropogenic climate change over the next century. Results We find remarkable similarities across the geographical range to

  12. Media Specialists Evaluation System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Carol; Marsen, Louise

    Intended to provide a comprehensive system for the evaluation of a media specialist's total job performance, this three-part evaluation form is based on the St. Louis Community College's Faculty Evaluation System: Instructional Resources Faculty, August 1981. Designed for peer evaluation of media specialists, the first form includes a rating scale…

  13. Detection of soil erosion within pinyon-juniper woodlands using Thematic Mapper (TM) satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Kevin P.; Ridd, Merrill K.

    1991-01-01

    The sensitivity of Landsat TM data for detecting soil erosion within pinyon-juniper woodlands, and the potential of the spectral data for assigning the universal soil loss equation (USLE) crop managemnent (C) factor to varying cover types within the woodlands are assessed. Results show greatly accelerated rates of soil erosion on pinyon-juniper sites. Percent cover by pinyon-juniper, total soil-loss, and total nonliving ground cover accounted for nearly 70 percent of the variability in TM channels 2, 3, 4, and 5. TM spectral data were consistently better predictors of soil erosion than the biotic and abiotic field variables. Satellite data were more sensitive to vegetation variation than the USLE C factor, and USLE was found to be a poor predictor of soil loss on pinyon-juniper sites. A new string-to-ground soil erosion prediction technique is introduced.

  14. 75 FR 44281 - Public Land Order No. 7747; Partial Revocation, Juniper Butte Range; Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-28

    ... United States Air Force in Owyhee County, Idaho for the Juniper Butte Range. This order also opens the.... 13, lot 1. The area described contains 5 acres, more or less, in Owyhee County. 2. At 9 a.m.,...

  15. Hart Mountain - Control of Cheatgrass in the Poker Jim Ridge Juniper Removal Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Since 2011 the Sheldon-Hart Mountain NWR Complex (Complex) has removed encroaching western juniper (Juniperus occidentalis) from within approximately 5,470 acres on...

  16. 75 FR 27550 - Electrical Interconnection of the Juniper Canyon I Wind Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Bonneville Power Administration Electrical Interconnection of the Juniper Canyon I Wind Project AGENCY: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Department of Energy (DOE). ACTION: Notice of Availability of...

  17. Geospatial analysis of western juniper (Juniperus occidentalis ) encroachment utilizing remotely sensed data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poznanovic, Aaron James

    Utilizing remote sensing methods to assess landscape-scale ecological change are rapidly becoming a dominant force in the natural sciences. Powerful and robust non-parametric statistical methods are also actively being developed to compliment the unique characteristics of remotely sensed data. The focus of this research is to utilize these powerful, robust remote sensing and statistical approaches to shed light on woody plant encroachment into native grasslands---a troubling ecological phenomenon occurring throughout the world. Specifically, this research investigates western juniper encroachment within the sage-steppe ecosystem of the western USA. Western juniper trees are native to the intermountain west and are ecologically important by means of providing structural diversity and habitat for many species. However, after nearly 150 years of post-European settlement changes to this threatened ecosystem, natural ecological processes such as fire regimes no longer limit the range of western juniper to rocky refugia and other areas protected from short fire return intervals that are historically common to the region. Consequently, sage-steppe communities with high juniper densities exhibit negative impacts, such as reduced structural diversity, degraded wildlife habitat and ultimately the loss of biodiversity. Much of today's sage-steppe ecosystem is transitioning to juniper woodlands. Additionally, the majority of western juniper woodlands have not reached their full potential in both range and density. The first section of this research investigates the biophysical drivers responsible for juniper expansion patterns observed in the sage-steppe ecosystem. The second section is a comprehensive accuracy assessment of classification methods used to identify juniper tree cover from multispectral 1 m spatial resolution aerial imagery.

  18. 安全永续携手共赢-Juniper Solution Day Juniper Networks召开行业用户解决方案分享大会

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗志刚

    2007-01-01

    2007年4月3日Juniper Networks在北京新世纪只航酒店举行盛大的以“安全永续携手共赢--Juniper Solution Day”为主题的行业用户解决方案分享大会.全面展示了Juniper Networks新近推出的产品及各行业的优秀解决方案。来自于国内的政府、教育、电信、金融、石化等各行业用户参加了此次会议,会场座无虚席,气氛热烈。

  19. Prevalence of antibodies to arenaviruses in rodents from the southern and western United States: evidence for an arenavirus associated with the genus Neotoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosoy, M Y; Elliott, L H; Ksiazek, T G; Fulhorst, C F; Rollin, P E; Childs, J E; Mills, J N; Maupin, G O; Peters, C J

    1996-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to extend our knowledge of the geographic distribution and rodent host range of arenaviruses in North America. Sera from wild rodents collected from the southern and western United States were tested for antibody against Tamiami, Pichinde, Junin, and lymphocytic choriomeningitis viruses, using an indirect fluorescent antibody test. Antibody to at least one arenavirus was found in 220 (3.1%) of 7,106 rodents tested. The antibody-positive animals included Mus musculus from Florida and Texas; Neotoma albigula from Arizona, Colorado, and New Mexico; N. fuscipes and N. lepida from California: N. mexicana from Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah; N. stephensi from Arizona and New Mexico; and Oryzomys palustris and Sigmodon hispidus from Florida. Sigmodon hispidus seropositive for Tamiami virus were found only in Florida (156 [27.0%] of 578 tested), although 463 hispid cotton rats from outside that state were examined. High-titered antibodies to Tamiami virus were present in sera from S. hispidus, (geometric mean antibody titer [GMAT] of 1:792), whereas sera from Neotoma spp. reacted at high titer to both Tamiami (GMAT = 1:905) and Pichinde (GMAT = 1:433) viruses. The results suggest that arenaviruses are widely distributed in the southern United States and that one or more indigenous arenaviruses are associated with Neotoma spp. in North America.

  20. Western Juniper Management: Assessing Strategies for Improving Greater Sage-grouse Habitat and Rangeland Productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzan, Shahla; Young, Derek J. N.; Dedrick, Allison G.; Hamilton, Matthew; Porse, Erik C.; Coates, Peter S.; Sampson, Gabriel

    2015-09-01

    Western juniper ( Juniperus occidentalis subsp. occidentalis) range expansion into sagebrush steppe ecosystems has affected both native wildlife and economic livelihoods across western North America. The potential listing of the greater sage-grouse ( Centrocercus urophasianus) under the U.S. Endangered Species Act has spurred a decade of juniper removal efforts, yet limited research has evaluated program effectiveness. We used a multi-objective spatially explicit model to identify optimal juniper removal sites in Northeastern California across weighted goals for ecological (sage-grouse habitat) and economic (cattle forage production) benefits. We also extended the analysis through alternative case scenarios that tested the effects of coordination among federal agencies, budgetary constraints, and the use of fire as a juniper treatment method. We found that sage-grouse conservation and forage production goals are somewhat complementary, but the extent of complementary benefits strongly depends on spatial factors and management approaches. Certain management actions substantially increase achievable benefits, including agency coordination and the use of prescribed burns to remove juniper. Critically, our results indicate that juniper management strategies designed to increase cattle forage do not necessarily achieve measurable sage-grouse benefits, underscoring the need for program evaluation and monitoring.

  1. Mechanical Mastication of Utah Juniper Encroaching Sagebrush Steppe Increases Inorganic Soil N

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kert R. Young

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Juniper (Juniperus spp. has encroached on millions of hectares of sagebrush (Artemisia spp. steppe. Juniper mechanical mastication increases cover of understory species but could increase resource availability and subsequently invasive plant species. We quantified the effects of juniper mastication on soil resource availability by comparing total C, total N, C : N ratio, Olsen extractable P, sulfate S, and pH using soil samples and inorganic N (NO3-+NH4+ using ion exchange membranes. We compared resource availability in paired masticated and untreated areas in three juniper-dominated sagebrush and bunchgrass ecosystems in the Utah portion of the Great Basin. Inorganic N was 4.7 times higher in masticated than in untreated areas across seasons (P<0.001. Within masticated areas, tree mounds of juniper leaf scales and twigs served as resource islands with 1.9 times higher inorganic N and total C, and 2.8 times higher total N than bare interspaces across seasons (P<0.01. Bare interspaces had 3.0–3.4 times higher inorganic N than interspaces covered with masticated trees during late-summer through winter (P<0.01. Soil fertility changes associated with mastication were not considered sufficient to favor establishment of annual over perennial grasses, and we expect both to increase in cover following juniper mastication.

  2. Detection of soil erosion with Thematic Mapper (TM) satellite data within Pinyon-Juniper woodlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Kevin Paul

    1987-01-01

    Pinyon-Juniper woodlands dominate approximately 24.3 million hectares (60 million acres) in the western United States. The overall objective was to test the sensitivity of the LANDSAT Thematic Mapper (TM) spectral data for detecting varying degrees of soil erosion within the Pinyon-Juniper woodlands. A second objective was to assess the potential of the spectral data for assigning the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) crop management (C) factor values to varying cover types within the woodland. Thematic Mapper digital data for June 2, 1984 on channels 2, 3, 4, and 5 were used. Digital data analysis was performed using the ELAS software package. Best results were achieved using CLUS, an unsupervised clustering algorithm. Fifteen of the 40 Pinyon-Juniper signatures were identified as being relatively pure Pinyon-Juniper woodland. Final analysis resulted in the grouping of the 15 signatures into three major groups. Ten study sites were selected from each of the three groups and located on the ground. At each site the following field measurements were taken: percent tree canopy and percent understory cover, soil texture, total soil loss, and soil erosion rate estimates. A technique for measuring soil erosion within Pinyon-Juniper woodlands was developed. A theoretical model of site degradation after Pinyon-Juniper invasion is presented.

  3. Using juniper berry ( Juniperus communis as a supplement in Japanese quail diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Inci

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The present study was conducted to determine the effects of supplemented juniper berry (Juniperus communis on fattening performance and some carcass traits of quails. A total of 150 one-day-old Japanese quail chicks were randomly divided into five groups (one control and four treated groups with three replicates. Four different juniper berry levels (0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2% and a control treatment (0% were added to the diet. Juniper berry supplementation to the diets initiated at the end of the 1st week and sustained for seven weeks. Live weight, feed intake, and feed conversion ratio during the trial and some carcass traits after slaughter were determined. Juniper berry supplementation in the diet during seven weeks of growing period significantly increased body weight, cumulative feed intake, and feed conversion ratio of the treated groups. Carcass weight, carcass yield, and breast yield were also significantly increased by supplemented juniper berry. No significant difference was observed between viability of different groups. Supplementation of 0.5-1% juniper berry in quail diets has positive impacts on fattening performance and carcass traits.

  4. Western juniper management: assessing strategies for improving greater sage-grouse habitat and rangeland productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzan, Shahla; Young, Derek J.N.; Dedrick, Allison G.; Hamilton, Mattew; Porse, Erik C.; Coates, Peter S.; Sampson, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Western juniper (Juniperus occidentalis subsp. occidentalis) range expansion into sagebrush steppe ecosystems has affected both native wildlife and economic livelihoods across western North America. The potential listing of the greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) under the U.S. Endangered Species Act has spurred a decade of juniper removal efforts, yet limited research has evaluated program effectiveness. We used a multi-objective spatially explicit model to identify optimal juniper removal sites in Northeastern California across weighted goals for ecological (sage-grouse habitat) and economic (cattle forage production) benefits. We also extended the analysis through alternative case scenarios that tested the effects of coordination among federal agencies, budgetary constraints, and the use of fire as a juniper treatment method. We found that sage-grouse conservation and forage production goals are somewhat complementary, but the extent of complementary benefits strongly depends on spatial factors and management approaches. Certain management actions substantially increase achievable benefits, including agency coordination and the use of prescribed burns to remove juniper. Critically, our results indicate that juniper management strategies designed to increase cattle forage do not necessarily achieve measurable sage-grouse benefits, underscoring the need for program evaluation and monitoring.

  5. Western Juniper Management: Assessing Strategies for Improving Greater Sage-grouse Habitat and Rangeland Productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzan, Shahla; Young, Derek J N; Dedrick, Allison G; Hamilton, Matthew; Porse, Erik C; Coates, Peter S; Sampson, Gabriel

    2015-09-01

    Western juniper (Juniperus occidentalis subsp. occidentalis) range expansion into sagebrush steppe ecosystems has affected both native wildlife and economic livelihoods across western North America. The potential listing of the greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) under the U.S. Endangered Species Act has spurred a decade of juniper removal efforts, yet limited research has evaluated program effectiveness. We used a multi-objective spatially explicit model to identify optimal juniper removal sites in Northeastern California across weighted goals for ecological (sage-grouse habitat) and economic (cattle forage production) benefits. We also extended the analysis through alternative case scenarios that tested the effects of coordination among federal agencies, budgetary constraints, and the use of fire as a juniper treatment method. We found that sage-grouse conservation and forage production goals are somewhat complementary, but the extent of complementary benefits strongly depends on spatial factors and management approaches. Certain management actions substantially increase achievable benefits, including agency coordination and the use of prescribed burns to remove juniper. Critically, our results indicate that juniper management strategies designed to increase cattle forage do not necessarily achieve measurable sage-grouse benefits, underscoring the need for program evaluation and monitoring.

  6. Canopy Interception for a Tallgrass Prairie under Juniper Encroachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Chris B; Caterina, Giulia L; Will, Rodney E; Stebler, Elaine; Turton, Donald

    2015-01-01

    Rainfall partitioning and redistribution by canopies are important ecohydrological processes underlying ecosystem dynamics. We quantified and contrasted spatial and temporal variations of rainfall redistribution for a juniper (Juniperus virginiana, redcedar) woodland and a tallgrass prairie in the south-central Great Plains, USA. Our results showed that redcedar trees had high canopy storage capacity (S) ranging from 2.14 mm for open stands to 3.44 mm for closed stands. The canopy funneling ratios (F) of redcedar trees varied substantially among stand type and tree size. The open stands and smaller trees usually had higher F values and were more efficient in partitioning rainfall into stemflow. Larger trees were more effective in partitioning rainfall into throughfall and no significant changes in the total interception ratios among canopy types and tree size were found. The S values were highly variable for tallgrass prairie, ranging from 0.27 mm at early growing season to 3.86 mm at senescence. As a result, the rainfall interception by tallgrass prairie was characterized by high temporal instability. On an annual basis, our results showed no significant difference in total rainfall loss to canopy interception between redcedar trees and tallgrass prairie. Increasing structural complexity associated with redcedar encroachment into tallgrass prairie changes the rainfall redistribution and partitioning pattern at both the temporal and spatial scales, but does not change the overall canopy interception ratios compared with unburned and ungrazed tallgrass prairie. Our findings support the idea of convergence in interception ratio for different canopy structures under the same precipitation regime. The temporal change in rainfall interception loss from redcedar encroachment is important to understand how juniper encroachment will interact with changing rainfall regime and potentially alter regional streamflow under climate change.

  7. Canopy Interception for a Tallgrass Prairie under Juniper Encroachment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris B Zou

    Full Text Available Rainfall partitioning and redistribution by canopies are important ecohydrological processes underlying ecosystem dynamics. We quantified and contrasted spatial and temporal variations of rainfall redistribution for a juniper (Juniperus virginiana, redcedar woodland and a tallgrass prairie in the south-central Great Plains, USA. Our results showed that redcedar trees had high canopy storage capacity (S ranging from 2.14 mm for open stands to 3.44 mm for closed stands. The canopy funneling ratios (F of redcedar trees varied substantially among stand type and tree size. The open stands and smaller trees usually had higher F values and were more efficient in partitioning rainfall into stemflow. Larger trees were more effective in partitioning rainfall into throughfall and no significant changes in the total interception ratios among canopy types and tree size were found. The S values were highly variable for tallgrass prairie, ranging from 0.27 mm at early growing season to 3.86 mm at senescence. As a result, the rainfall interception by tallgrass prairie was characterized by high temporal instability. On an annual basis, our results showed no significant difference in total rainfall loss to canopy interception between redcedar trees and tallgrass prairie. Increasing structural complexity associated with redcedar encroachment into tallgrass prairie changes the rainfall redistribution and partitioning pattern at both the temporal and spatial scales, but does not change the overall canopy interception ratios compared with unburned and ungrazed tallgrass prairie. Our findings support the idea of convergence in interception ratio for different canopy structures under the same precipitation regime. The temporal change in rainfall interception loss from redcedar encroachment is important to understand how juniper encroachment will interact with changing rainfall regime and potentially alter regional streamflow under climate change.

  8. Specialist Bibliographic Databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparyan, Armen Yuri; Yessirkepov, Marlen; Voronov, Alexander A; Trukhachev, Vladimir I; Kostyukova, Elena I; Gerasimov, Alexey N; Kitas, George D

    2016-05-01

    Specialist bibliographic databases offer essential online tools for researchers and authors who work on specific subjects and perform comprehensive and systematic syntheses of evidence. This article presents examples of the established specialist databases, which may be of interest to those engaged in multidisciplinary science communication. Access to most specialist databases is through subscription schemes and membership in professional associations. Several aggregators of information and database vendors, such as EBSCOhost and ProQuest, facilitate advanced searches supported by specialist keyword thesauri. Searches of items through specialist databases are complementary to those through multidisciplinary research platforms, such as PubMed, Web of Science, and Google Scholar. Familiarizing with the functional characteristics of biomedical and nonbiomedical bibliographic search tools is mandatory for researchers, authors, editors, and publishers. The database users are offered updates of the indexed journal lists, abstracts, author profiles, and links to other metadata. Editors and publishers may find particularly useful source selection criteria and apply for coverage of their peer-reviewed journals and grey literature sources. These criteria are aimed at accepting relevant sources with established editorial policies and quality controls.

  9. Juniper Encroachment and Management in the Intermountain West Relative to Wildfires Utilizing Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J.; Howerton, R.; Ramos, S.; Simpson, Z.; Weber, K.

    2016-12-01

    One of the most pronounced vegetation changes in recent history is the expansion of junipers (Juniperus spp.) throughout the intermountain west United States. These native species have expanded from their traditional fire-safe habitats into fire-dependent communities as a result of climatic fluctuations, grazing patterns, and wildfire suppression efforts. As junipers expand their range, they begin to dominate plant communities resulting in the recession of shrubs, grasses, and forbs. Land management agencies have a strong commitment to find areas that are vulnerable to juniper encroachment, so that these areas can be studied and more effectively managed. Aiding in this effort, this project used remote sensing to develop two tools that determine fire intensity on a per pixel basis and identify different phases of juniper encroachment, respectively. Landsat 8, representing land cover data was combined with topography information (slope and aspect) in a linear regression model that quantified fire intensity on a per pixel basis, identifying areas that would burn hotter and longer based on fuel type. The overall accuracy of the model was 86% with a kappa coefficient of 0.81. Visual validation using NAIP imagery in comparison with the fuel classification result showed good visual correlation of the fuel model with dense juniper stands. The second output of the project was an image/object based classification tool that uses multispectral imagery and supervised point classification to classify different vegetation types according to the spectral detail of the objects. The goal of the model is to improve phase identification of juniper stands. Initial visual verification with NAIP shows the model to be performing very satisfactorily but is dependent on the spatial resolution of the user fed input imagery. Furnishing land managers with these tools will assist in forecasting areas prone to juniper invasion based upon surrounding seedbanks, as well as, predict the ensuing

  10. Soil morphology of canopy and intercanopy sites in a pinon-Juniper woodland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davenport, D.W.; Wilcox, B.P.; Breshear, D.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-11-01

    Pinon-juniper woodlands in the semiarid western USA have expanded as much as fivefold during the last 150 yr, often accompanied by losses of understory vegetation and increasing soil erosion. We conducted this study to determine the differences in soil morphology between canopy and intercanopy locations within a pinon (Pinus edulis Engelm.)-juniper [Juniperus monosperma (Engelm.) Sarg.] woodland with uniform parent material, topography, and climate. The woodland studied, located near Los Alamos, NM, has a mean tree age of 135 yr. We examined soil morphology by augering 135 profiles in a square grid pattern and comparing soils under pinon and juniper canopies with intercanopy soils. Only two of the 17 morphological properties compared showed significant differences. The B horizons make up a slightly greater proportion of total profile thickness in intercanopy soils, and there are higher percentages of coarse fragments in the lower portions of canopy soil profiles. Canopy soils have lower mean pH and higher mean organic C than intercanopy soils. Regression analysis showed that most soil properties did not closely correspond with tree size, but total soil thickness and B horizon thickness are significantly greater under the largest pinon trees, and soil reaction is lower under the largest juniper trees. Our findings suggest that during the period in which pinon-juniper woodlands have been expanding, the trees have had only minor effects on soil morphology. 36 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Modeling wind fields and fire propagation following bark beetle outbreaks in spatially-heterogeneous pinyon-juniper woodland fuel complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodman R. Linn; Carolyn H. Sieg; Chad M. Hoffman; Judith L. Winterkamp; Joel D. McMillin

    2013-01-01

    We used a physics-based model, HIGRAD/FIRETEC, to explore changes in within-stand wind behavior and fire propagation associated with three time periods in pinyon-juniper woodlands following a drought-induced bark beetle outbreak and subsequent tree mortality. Pinyon-juniper woodland fuel complexes are highly heterogeneous. Trees often are clumped, with sparse patches...

  12. Characterizating western juniper expansion via a fusion of Landsat 5 thematic mapper and LiDAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juniper encroachment into shrub steppe and grassland systems is one of the most prominent changes occurring in rangelands of western North America. Most studies on juniper change are conducted over small areas, although encroachment is occurring across large regions. Development of image-based met...

  13. 75 FR 18201 - Juniper Canyon Wind Power, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Juniper Canyon Wind Power, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market... supplemental notice in the above-referenced proceeding of Juniper Canyon Wind Power, LLC's application for...

  14. Anchor chaining’s influence on soil hydrology and seeding success in burned piñon-juniper woodlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadcast seeding is one of the most commonly used rehabilitation treatments for the restoration of burned piñon (Pinus ssp.) and juniper (Juniperus spp.) woodlands, but the success rate of this treatment is notoriously low. In piñon-juniper woodlands, post-fire soil water repellency can impair rese...

  15. Heating Systems Specialist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Air Force Training Command, Sheppard AFB, TX.

    This instructional package is intended for use in training Air Force personnel enrolled in a program for apprentice heating systems specialists. Training includes instruction in fundamentals and pipefitting; basic electricity; controls, troubleshooting, and oil burners; solid and gas fuel burners and warm air distribution systems; hot water…

  16. Pinyon and juniper encroachment into sagebrush ecosystems impacts distribution and survival of greater sage-grouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Peter S.; Prochazka, Brian; Ricca, Mark; Gustafson, K. Ben; Ziegler, Pilar T.; Casazza, Michael L.

    2017-01-01

    In sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) ecosystems, encroachment of pinyon (Pinus spp.) and juniper (Juniperus spp.; hereafter, “pinyon-juniper”) trees has increased dramatically since European settlement. Understanding the impacts of this encroachment on behavioral decisions, distributions, and population dynamics of greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) and other sagebrush obligate species could help benefit sagebrush ecosystem management actions. We employed a novel two-stage Bayesian model that linked avoidance across different levels of pinyon-juniper cover to sage-grouse survival. Our analysis relied on extensive telemetry data collected across 6 yr and seven subpopulations within the Bi-State Distinct Population Segment (DPS), on the border of Nevada and California. The first model stage indicated avoidance behavior for all canopy cover classes on average, but individual grouse exhibited a high degree of heterogeneity in avoidance behavior of the lowest cover class (e.g., scattered isolated trees). The second stage modeled survival as a function of estimated avoidance parameters and indicated increased survival rates for individuals that exhibited avoidance of the lowest cover class. A post hoc frailty analysis revealed the greatest increase in hazard (i.e., mortality risk) occurred in areas with scattered isolated trees consisting of relatively high primary plant productivity. Collectively, these results provide clear evidence that local sage-grouse distributions and demographic rates are influenced by pinyon-juniper, especially in habitats with higher primary productivity but relatively low and seemingly benign tree cover. Such areas may function as ecological traps that convey attractive resources but adversely affect population vital rates. To increase sage-grouse survival, our model predictions support reducing actual pinyon-juniper cover as low as 1.5%, which is lower than the published target of 4.0%. These results may represent effects of pinyon-juniper

  17. Impact of grazing abandonment on floristic diversity in the priority habitat type *9562 Grecian Juniper Woods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrahnakis, Michael; Kazoglou, Yannis; Fotiadis, George; Kakouros, Petros; Nasiakou, Stamatia; Soutsas, Konstantinos

    2017-04-01

    The habitat type *9562 Grecian juniper woods (Juniperetum excelsae) includes Greek juniper (Juniperus excelsa M. Bieb.) forests and they are found mainly in the western sector of the Prespa National Park, NW Greece. Greek juniper forests are considered extremely rare for EU-28, recommending a priority habitat type in accordance with Directive 92/43/EEC. In addition, their ecological importance is great given its high plant taxa richness; they harbor most of the 900 plant taxa found in the western sector of the Park, many of them being important for EU or global scale. The accelerated invasion of deciduous hardwoods is the most significant risk for the habitat, since its rich flora is well-adapted to open light conditions produced by the open spaced Greek junipers. Also, the dense vegetated conditions deprive the regeneration of the photophilous Greek juniper. The invasion results from the lack of its natural controller, i.e. the grazing livestock. It is estimated that the total area of juniper forests for the Devas area decreased to 89% of the area of 1945 in favor of invasive hardwoods. The paper presents the analysis of the floristic diversity of the priority habitat type *9562 Grecian Juniper Woods (Juniperetum excelsae) (GJWs). Four (4) types of juniper forest ranges (GJWs) were distinguished in terms of canopy cover: (a) pure GJWs, (b) mixed open GJWs, (c) open GJWs, and (d) mixed dense GJWs. A total of 171 plant taxa were recorded, and distributed within 43 botanical families; the largest one being Leguminosae (26 taxa). The statistically estimated plant taxa richness for pure GJWs was 116.4, for mixed open 152.6, for open 57.9, and for mixed dense 90.2 taxa. The analysis of α-diversity indices did not reveal any specific trend of diversity for the four GJWs. The behavior of the variability of diversity among the four range types of GJWs was depending on the emphasis the used indices place on properties such as taxa richness or abundance. This fact was

  18. Creosote bush (Larrea tridentata) resin increases water demands and reduces energy availability in desert woodrats (Neotoma lepida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangione, Antonio M; Dearing, M Denise; Karasov, William H

    2004-07-01

    Although many plant secondary compounds are known to have serious consequences for herbivores, the costs of processing them are generally unknown. Two potential costs of ingestion and detoxification of secondary compounds are elevation of the minimum drinking water requirement and excretion of energetically expensive metabolites (i.e., glucuronides) in the urine. To address these impacts, we studied the costs of ingestion of resin from creosote bush (Larrea tridentata) on desert woodrats (Neotoma lepida). The following hypotheses were tested: ingestion of creosote resin by woodrats (1) increases minimum water requirement and (2) reduces energy available by increasing fecal and urinary energy losses. We tested the first hypothesis, by measuring the minimum water requirement of woodrats fed a control diet with and without creosote resin. Drinking water was given in decreasing amounts until woodrats could no longer maintain constant body mass. In two separate experiments, the minimum drinking water requirement of woodrats fed resin was higher than that of controls by 18-30% (about 1-1.7 ml/d). We tested several potential mechanisms of increased water loss associated with the increase in water requirement. The rate of fecal water loss was higher in woodrats consuming resin. Neither urinary water nor evaporative water loss was affected by ingestion of resin. Hypothesis 2 was tested by measuring energy fluxes of woodrats consuming control vs. resin-treated diets. Woodrats on a resin diet had higher urinary energy losses and, thus, metabolized a lower proportion of the dietary energy than did woodrats on control diet. Fecal energy excretion was not affected by resin. The excretion of glucuronic acid represented almost half of the energy lost as a consequence of resin ingestion. The increased water requirement and energy losses of woodrats consuming a diet with resin could have notable ecological consequences.

  19. Estimating pinyon and juniper cover across Utah using NAIP imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darrell B. Roundy

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Expansion of Pinus L. (pinyon and Juniperus L. (juniper (P-J trees into sagebrush (Artemisia L. steppe communities can lead to negative effects on hydrology, loss of wildlife habitat, and a decrease in desirable understory vegetation. Tree reduction treatments are often implemented to mitigate these negative effects. In order to prioritize and effectively plan these treatments, rapid, accurate, and inexpensive methods are needed to estimate tree canopy cover at the landscape scale. We used object based image analysis (OBIA software (Feature AnalystTM for ArcMap 10.1®, ENVI Feature Extraction®, and Trimble eCognition Developer 8.2® to extract tree canopy cover using NAIP (National Agricultural Imagery Program imagery. We then compared our extractions with ground measured tree canopy cover (crown diameter and line point intercept on 309 plots across 44 sites in Utah. Extraction methods did not consistently over- or under-estimate ground measured P-J canopy cover except where tree cover was >45%. Estimates of tree canopy cover using OBIA techniques were strongly correlated with estimates using the crown diameter method (r = 0.93 for ENVI, 0.91 for Feature AnalystTM, and 0.92 for eCognition. Tree cover estimates using OBIA techniques had lower correlations with tree cover measurements using the line-point intercept method (r = 0.85 for ENVI, 0.83 for Feature AnalystTM, and 0.83 for eCognition. All software packages accurately and inexpensively extracted P-J canopy cover from NAIP imagery when the imagery was not blurred, and when P-J cover was not mixed with Amelanchier alnifolia (Utah serviceberry and Quercus gambelii (Gambel’s oak, which had similar spectral values as P-J.

  20. Evaluating mountain meadow groundwater response to pinyon-juniper and temperature in a great basin watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Expansion of deeply-rooted Pinyon-Juniper (PJ) has altered water partitioning and reduced water availability to discharging meadows. Research highlights the development and application of GSFLOW to a semi-arid, snow-dominated watershed in the Great Basin to evaluate PJ and temperature controls on mo...

  1. Hydrology and ecology of pinyon-juniper woodlands: Conceptual framework and field studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilcox, B.P.; Breshears, D.D.

    1994-09-01

    Pinyon-juniper woodlands represent an important ecosystem in the semiarid western United States. Concern over the sustainability of, and management approaches for, these woodlands is increasing. As in other semiarid environments, water dynamics and vegetation patterns in pinyon-juniper woodlands are highly interrelated. An understanding of these relationships can aid in evaluating various management strategies. In this paper we describe a conceptual framework designed to increase our understanding of water and vegetation in pinyon-juniper woodlands. The framework comprises five different scales, at each of which the landscape is divided into {open_quotes}functional units{close_quotes} on the basis of hydrologic characteristics. The hydrologic behavior of each unit and the connections between units are being evaluated using an extensive network of hydrological and ecological field studies on the Pajarito Plateau in northern New Mexico. Data from these studies, coupled with application of the conceptual model, have led to the development of a number of hypotheses concerning the interrelationships of water and vegetation in pinyon-juniper woodlands.

  2. The Effect of Anthropogenic Disturbance in the Ecohydrology of Pinyon Juniper Woodlands with Soil Biocrust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebron, I.; Chandler, D. G.; Robinson, D. A.; Belnap, J.; Madsen, M.

    2005-12-01

    The canopy and intercanopy in pinyon-juniper woodlands are intrinsically related and constitute an ecosystem of great importance in the arid lands in the United States. The integrity of this ecosystem is continually challenged by anthropogenic disturbances as oil exploration and recreation activities in these environments. An important feature in the intercanopy of pinyon juniper drylands is the soil biological crust or biocrust. Biocrust is important to the nutrient cycles and hydrology and sediment production of this system. To quantify the effect of disturbances in the soil physical properties in the interspace of a pinion-juniper woodland we measured soil bulk density, water content, and hydraulic conductivity in undisturbed and disturbed areas of sandy soil. The disturbance had minimal impact on the bulk soil properties in the interspace soils. We also analyzed chlorophyll and other pigments related with bacterial activity in top 4mm of the soil and found chlorophyll activity to be almost zero in the disturbed areas while the undisturbed ones showed several orders of magnitude higher concentrations. Subsequent analysis of the soil surface properties indicates that a drastic change in the surface roughness and structure at the surface due to disturbances can alter the microenvironment characteristics critical for the bacterial survival. Since cyanobacteria colonization is the first step in the formation of biocrust, we conclude that surface properties are critical for the preservation and establishment of biocrust in the intercanopy space of the pinyon-juniper woodlands ecosystems.

  3. Implication of Agathic Acid from Utah Juniper Bark as an Abortifacient Compound in Cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freshly ground Utah juniper (Juniperus osteosperma (Torr.) Little) bark was given via gavage at a dosage of 2.3 kg/cow twice daily to three pregnant cows starting on day 255 of gestation. All three cows aborted the calves after four, five and six days of treatment. A fourth cow was dosed Utah juni...

  4. Soil water repellency within a burned pinon-juniper woodland: spatial distribution, severity, and ecohydrologic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post-fire recovery of juniper-dominated ecosystems is dependent on the extent that ecological processes have been altered. Soil water repellency is a common condition in these ecosystems that may limit site recovery. In this study we examined the extent, severity, and ecohydrologic implications of p...

  5. Influence of Prescribed Fire on Ecosystem Biomass, Carbon, and Nitrogen in a Pinyon Juniper Woodland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinyon and juniper woodland encroachment associated with climate change and land use history in the Great Basin is thought to provide offsets for carbon emissions. However, the largest pools of carbon in arid landscapes are typically found in soils, and aboveground biomass cannot be considered long ...

  6. Decreased carbon limitation of litter respiration in a mortality-affected pinon-juniper woodland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erin Berryman; John D. Marshall; Thom Rahn; Marcie Litvak; John Butnor

    2013-01-01

    Microbial respiration depends on microclimatic variables and carbon (C) substrate availability, all of which are altered when ecosystems experience major disturbance. Widespread tree mortality, currently affecting pinon-juniper ecosystems in southwestern North America, may affect C substrate availability in several ways, for example, via litterfall pulses and loss of...

  7. Wildlife associations in Rocky Mountain juniper in the northern Great Plains, South Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark A. Rumble; John E. Gobeille

    1995-01-01

    Rocky Mountain juniper is an important habitat component in the northern Great Plains. These woodlands provide vertical and horizontal vegetative structure that enhances wildlife use. Ecological approaches to managing habitats require understanding relationships between wildlife species and succession in plant communities. We determined bird, small mammals and large...

  8. Why is cultural resource site density high in the pinon-juniper woodland?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarah Schlanger; Signa Larralde

    2008-01-01

    (Please note, this is an extended abstract only) Hunter gatherers relied on healthy pinon-juniper woodland because it supports a wide variety of small game, large game, and bird species that shelter in the trees and forage on pinon nuts, a rich food source for humans as well as game.

  9. Western Juniper Field Guide: Asking the Right Questions to Select Appropriate Management Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    The rapid expansion of western juniper into neighboring plant communities during the past 130 years has been linked to increased soil erosion; reduced forage production; altered wildlife habitat; changes in plant community composition, structure, and biodiversity. Impacts of post-settlement woodland...

  10. Climate Change Increases Drought Stress of Juniper Trees in the Mountains of Central Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seim, Andrea; Omurova, Gulzar; Azisov, Erlan; Musuraliev, Kanaat; Aliev, Kumar; Tulyaganov, Timur; Nikolyai, Lyutsian; Botman, Evgeniy; Helle, Gerd; Dorado Liñan, Isabel; Jivcov, Sandra; Linderholm, Hans W

    2016-01-01

    Assessments of climate change impacts on forests and their vitality are essential for semi-arid environments such as Central Asia, where the mountain regions belong to the globally important biodiversity hotspots. Alterations in species distribution or drought-induced tree mortality might not only result in a loss of biodiversity but also in a loss of other ecosystem services. Here, we evaluate spatial trends and patterns of the growth-climate relationship in a tree-ring network comprising 33 juniper sites from the northern Pamir-Alay and Tien Shan mountain ranges in eastern Uzbekistan and across Kyrgyzstan for the common period 1935-2011. Junipers growing at lower elevations are sensitive to summer drought, which has increased in intensity during the studied period. At higher elevations, juniper growth, previously favored by warm summer temperatures, has in the recent few decades become negatively affected by increasing summer aridity. Moreover, response shifts are observed during all seasons. Rising temperatures and alterations in precipitation patterns during the past eight decades can account for the observed increase in drought stress of junipers at all altitudes. The implications of our findings are vital for the application of adequate long-term measures of ecosystem conservation, but also for paleo-climatic approaches and coupled climate-vegetation model simulations for Central Asia.

  11. A demonstration project to test ecological restoration of a pinyon-juniper ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    David W. Huffman; Michael T. Stoddard; Peter Z. Fule; W. Wallace Covington; H. B. Smith

    2008-01-01

    To test an approach for restoring historical stand densities and increasing plant species diversity of a pinyon-juniper ecosystem, we implemented a demonstration project at two sites (CR and GP) on the Grand Canyon-Parashant National Monument in northern Arizona. Historical records indicated that livestock grazing was intensive on the sites beginning in the late 1800s...

  12. Conifer encroachment and hydrology: Altered above and below ground hydrologic fluxes in western juniper (Juniperus occidentalis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemeyer, R. J.; Link, T. E.; Heinse, R.; Seyfried, M. S.

    2013-12-01

    Western juniper (Juniperus occidentalis) occupy 9 million acres in Oregon, California, Idaho, and Nevada. In many of these areas juniper has expanded 10-fold since Euro-American settlement into what was mostly sagebrush steppe due to grazing, changes in fire regimes, and climate. Despite the importance of elucidating if juniper encroachment appreciably changes semi-arid hydrology, there have been few process-based studies linking above and below ground hydrologic fluxes or that assess variations across a gradient of shrub to tree-dominated areas. Our objectives are to determine: A) the differences in interception and throughfall at a lower density juniper stand dominated by low sagebrush (Artemisia arbuscula) and a moderate density juniper stand dominated by juniper, B) soil moisture dynamics between lower and moderate density juniper stands, and C) how those above and below ground processes are linked. Our study area was located at the USDA-ARS Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed in the Owyhee Mountains of southwestern Idaho. We used multiple methods to measure and estimate above and below ground hydrologic fluxes. Above ground precipitation was estimated with large (approximately 5.5 m2) precipitation lysimeters; two located under tree canopies and two in the open. Soil moisture was measured continuously at four trees and across both plots once every 1 - 2 months once snow melted. Continuous measurements under the canopy consisted of four soil moisture probes each; two outside and under the canopy at 15 cm and 60 cm. Plot wide soil moisture changes were estimated based on changes in conductivity measured with electromagnetic induction (EMI) at both 0-75 cm and 0-150 cm. Results show some clear patterns in differences in hydrologic fluxes across the two stands. Rain and snow throughfall from mid-October through mid-April under the canopy was 289 mm, compared to 381 mm outside the canopy, therefore interception was 24% of incoming precipitation. Snowmelt rates

  13. Restoration of Mountain Big Sagebrush Steppe Following Prescribed Burning to Control Western Juniper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, K. W.; Bates, J. D.; Madsen, M. D.; Nafus, A. M.

    2014-05-01

    Western juniper ( Juniperus occidentalis ssp. occidentalis Hook) encroachment into mountain big sagebrush ( Artemisia tridentata spp. vaseyana (Rydb.) Beetle) steppe has reduced livestock forage production, increased erosion risk, and degraded sagebrush-associated wildlife habitat. Western juniper has been successfully controlled with partial cutting followed by prescribed burning the next fall, but the herbaceous understory and sagebrush may be slow to recover. We evaluated the effectiveness of seeding perennial herbaceous vegetation and sagebrush at five sites where juniper was controlled by partially cutting and prescribed burning. Treatments tested at each site included an unseeded control, herbaceous seed mix (aerially seeded), and the herbaceous seed mix plus sagebrush seed. In the third year post-treatment, perennial grass cover and density were twice as high in plots receiving the herbaceous seed mix compared to the control plots. Sagebrush cover and density in the sagebrush seeded plots were between 74- and 290-fold and 62- and 155-fold greater than the other treatments. By the third year after treatment, sagebrush cover was as high as 12 % in the sagebrush seeded plots and between 0 % and 0.4 % where it was not seeded. These results indicate that aerial seeding perennial herbaceous vegetation can accelerate the recovery of perennial grasses which likely stabilize the site. Our results also suggest that seeding mountain big sagebrush after prescribed burning encroaching juniper can rapidly recover sagebrush cover and density. In areas where sagebrush habitat is limited, seeding sagebrush after juniper control may increase sagebrush habitat and decrease the risks to sagebrush-associated species.

  14. Palynological evidence for the historic expansion of juniper and desert shrubs in Arizona, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, O.K.; Turner, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    Analysis of the sediment of Pecks Lake, Yavapai County, Arizona, has permitted the first reported palynological evidence for the historic expansion of juniper and desert shrubs in the American Southwest. The palynological evidence is supported by the comparison of modern and historical photographs, which shows the regional expansion of pinyon-juniper woodland, and the local increase of mesquite and creosote bush. A gradual increase in juniper pollen percentages began over 2000 years ago, but the rate of increase abruptly accelerated after the historic introduction of grazing animals. In contrast, juniper percentages did not increase during a prehistoric interval of intense disturbance by humans, about A.D. 1200, and a different weed flora was present. Prehistorically, water depth was greatest at ca. 600 B.C. and was lowest just prior to the arrival of Europeans. Regional climate has gradually cooled since the beginning of the record at 2630 B.P. ?? 1986.

  15. Individualistic Response of Piñon and Juniper Tree Species Distributions to Climate Change in North America's Arid Interior West

    OpenAIRE

    Gibson, Jacob R.

    2011-01-01

    Piñon and juniper tree species have species-specific climatic requirements, resulting in unique distributions and differential responses to climate change. Piñons and junipers co-dominate the arid woodlands of North America as groups with widespread hybridization. Two piñons, Pinus edulis; P. monophylla, and four junipers, Juniperus deppeana var. deppeana; J. monosperma; J. occidentalis; J. osteosperma, are endemic to the midlatitude interior west and form three groups of hybridizing sister s...

  16. Encounters with Pinyon-Juniper influence riskier movements in Greater Sage-Grouse across the Great Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochazka, Brian; Coates, Peter S.; Ricca, Mark; Casazza, Michael L.; Gustafson, K. Ben; Hull, Josh M.

    2016-01-01

    Fine-scale spatiotemporal studies can better identify relationships between individual survival and habitat fragmentation so that mechanistic interpretations can be made at the population level. Recent advances in Global Positioning System (GPS) technology and statistical models capable of deconstructing high-frequency location data have facilitated interpretation of animal movement within a behaviorally mechanistic framework. Habitat fragmentation due to singleleaf pinyon (Pinus monophylla; hereafter pinyon) and Utah juniper (Juniperus osteosperma; hereafter juniper) encroachment into sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) communities is a commonly implicated perturbation that can adversely influence greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus; hereafter sage-grouse) demographic rates. Using an extensive GPS data set (233 birds and 282,954 locations) across 12 study sites within the Great Basin, we conducted a behavioral change point analysis and subsequently constructed Brownian bridge movement models from each behaviorally homogenous section. We found a positive relationship between modeled movement rate and probability of encountering pinyon-juniper with significant variation among age classes. The probability of encountering pinyon-juniper among adults was two and three times greater than that of yearlings and juveniles, respectively. However, the movement rate in response to the probability of encountering pinyon-juniper trees was 1.5 times greater for juveniles. We then assessed the risk of mortality associated with an interaction between movement rate and the probability of encountering pinyon-juniper using shared frailty models. During pinyon-juniper encounters, on average, juvenile, yearling, and adult birds experienced a 10.4%, 0.2%, and 0.3% reduction in annual survival probabilities. Populations that used pinyon-juniper habitats with a frequency ≥ 3.8 times the overall mean experienced decreases in annual survival probabilities of 71.1%, 0.9%, and 0.9%. This

  17. Compatible dominant height - site index model for juniper (Juniperus deppeana Steud.)

    OpenAIRE

    Antonio Rodríguez-Carrillo; Francisco Cruz-Cobos; Benedicto Vargas-Larreta; Francisco J. Hernández

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the site quality of juniper (Juniperus deppeana Steud.) in the San Dimas region of the state of Durango, Mexico, using the site index method. The database comes from stem analysis of 43 trees felled in harvesting activities. The Chapman-Richards and Schumacher models, by means of the algebraic difference and generalized algebraic difference approaches, were tested to determine the site index; in addition, the error structure was modeled with a second-ord...

  18. Determine the optimum spectral reflectance of juniper and pistachio in arid and semi-arid region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadaei, Hadi; Suzuki, Rikie

    2012-11-01

    Arid and semi-arid areas of northeast Iran cover about 3.4 million ha are populated by two main tree species, the broadleaf Pistacia vera. L (pistachio) and the conifer Juniperus excelsa ssp. polycarpos (Persian juniper). Natural stands of pistachio in Iran are not only environmentally important but genetically essential as seed sources for pistachio production in orchards. In this study, we estimated the optimum spectral reflectance of juniper forests and natural pistachio stands using remote sensing to help in the sustainable management and production of pistachio in Iran. In this research spectral reflectance are able to specify of multispectral from Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) that provided by JAXA. These data included PRISM is a panchromatic radiometer with a 2.5 m spatial resolution at nadir, has one band with a wavelength of 0.52-0.77 μm and AVNIR-2 is a visible and near infrared radiometer for observing land and coastal zones with a 10 m spatial resolution at nadir, has four multispectral bands: blue (0.42-0.50 μm), green (0.52-0.60 μm), red (0.61-0.69 μm), and near infrared (0.76-0.89 μm). Total ratio vegetation index (TRVI) of optimum spectral reflectance of juniper and pistachio have been evaluated. The result of TRVI for Pistachio and juniper were (R2= 0.71 and 0.55). I hope this research can provide decision of managers to helping sustainable management for arid and semi-arid regions in Iran.

  19. Functional characterization of fifteen hundred transcripts from Ziarat juniper (Juniperus excelsa M.Bieb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humaira Abdul Wahid

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ziarat juniper (Juniperus excelsa M.Bieb is an evergreen and dominant species of Balochistan juniper forests. This forest is providing many benefits to regional ecosystems and surrounding populations. No functional genomics study is reported for this important juniper plant. This research is aimed to characterize the Ziarat juniper functional genome based on the analyses of 1500 transcripts. Methods: Total RNA from shoot of Juniperus excelsa was extracted and subjected for transcriptome sequencing using Illumina HiSeq 2000 with the service from Macrogen, Inc., South Korea. The Illumina sequenced data was subjected to bioinformatics analysis. Quality assessment and data filtration was performed for the removal of low-quality reads, ambiguous reads and adaptor sequences. The high-quality clean reads data was deposited in the Sequence Read Archive (SRA at NCBI, and used for downstream processes. Fifteen hundred transcripts were randomly chosen and used for functional characterization. Results: As a result of homology search 80.3% transcripts showed significant similarities and were placed in significant similarities category, 19.3% transcripts showed low similarities and assigned to the ‘‘unclassified’’ category while 0.4% transcripts are defined as no hits. The functional characterization results showed that most (18% of the transcripts are involved in metabolism, followed by 11.7% in transcription and 11.5% as structural protein. 8.8% transcripts are engaged in stress response, whereas the transcripts involved in growth and development constituted 6.7%. Transcripts involved in signal transduction represented 5.6%, while 3.5% facilitating transport and 34.1% are involved in hypothetical functions. Conclusion: The functional annotation data produced in this study will be very useful for future functional genome analysis of Juniperus excelsa.

  20. Juniper tar (cade oil) poisoning in new born after a cutaneous application

    OpenAIRE

    Achour, Sanae; Abourazzak, Sana; Mokhtari, Abdelrhani; Soulaymani, Abdelmjid; Soulaymani, Rachida; Hida, Moustapha

    2011-01-01

    Juniper tar (cade oil) is distilled from the branches and wood of Juniperus oxycedrus. It contains etheric oils, triterpene and phenols, used for many purposes in folk medicine. The authors report a case of a previously healthy new born treated with a topical application of Juniperus oxycedrus for atopic dermatosis The poisoning caused convulsions, collapsus, acute pulmonary oedema, renal failure and hepatotoxicity. The newborn survived after supportive and symptomatic treatment, and discharg...

  1. Negative effects of temperature and atmospheric depositions on the seed viability of common juniper (Juniperus communis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruwez, R; De Frenne, P; De Schrijver, A; Leroux, O; Vangansbeke, P; Verheyen, K

    2014-02-01

    Environmental change is increasingly impacting ecosystems worldwide. However, our knowledge about the interacting effects of various drivers of global change on sexual reproduction of plants, one of their key mechanisms to cope with change, is limited. This study examines populations of poorly regenerating and threatened common juniper (Juniperus communis) to determine the influence of four drivers of global change (rising temperatures, nitrogen deposition, potentially acidifying deposition and altering precipitation patterns) on two key developmental phases during sexual reproduction, gametogenesis and fertilization (seed phase two, SP2) and embryo development (seed phase three, SP3), and on the ripening time of seeds. In 42 populations throughout the distribution range of common juniper in Europe, 11,943 seeds of two developmental phases were sampled. Seed viability was determined using seed dissection and related to accumulated temperature (expressed as growing degree-days), nitrogen and potentially acidifying deposition (nitrogen plus sulfur), and precipitation data. Precipitation had no influence on the viability of the seeds or on the ripening time. Increasing temperatures had a negative impact on the viability of SP2 and SP3 seeds and decreased the ripening time. Potentially acidifying depositions negatively influenced SP3 seed viability, while enhanced nitrogen deposition led to lower ripening times. Higher temperatures and atmospheric deposition affected SP3 seeds more than SP2 seeds. However, this is possibly a delayed effect as juniper seeds develop practically independently, due to the absence of vascular communication with the parent plant from shortly after fertilization. It is proposed that the failure of natural regeneration in many European juniper populations might be attributed to climate warming as well as enhanced atmospheric deposition of nitrogen and sulfur.

  2. Viewpoint: Sustainability of pinon-juniper ecosystems - A unifying perspective of soil erosion thresholds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, D.W.; Breshears, D.D.; Wilcox, B.P.; Allen, C.D.

    1998-01-01

    Many pinon-juniper ecosystem in the western U.S. are subject to accelerated erosion while others are undergoing little or no erosion. Controversy has developed over whether invading or encroaching pinon and juniper species are inherently harmful to rangeland ecosystems. We developed a conceptual model of soil erosion in pinon-jumper ecosystems that is consistent with both sides of the controversy and suggests that the diverse perspectives on this issue arise from threshold effects operating under very different site conditions. Soil erosion rate can be viewed as a function of (1) site erosion potential (SEP), determined by climate, geomorphology and soil erodibility; and (2) ground cover. Site erosion potential and cove act synergistically to determine soil erosion rates, as evident even from simple USLE predictions of erosion. In pinon-juniper ecosystem with high SEP, the erosion rate is highly sensitive to ground cover and can cross a threshold so that erosion increases dramatically in response to a small decrease in cover. The sensitivity of erosion rate to SEP and cover can be visualized as a cusp catastrophe surface on which changes may occur rapidly and irreversibly. The mechanisms associated with a rapid shift from low to high erosion rate can be illustrated using percolation theory to incorporate spatial, temporal, and scale-dependent patterns of water storage capacity on a hillslope. Percolation theory demonstrates how hillslope runoff can undergo a threshold response to a minor change in storage capacity. Our conceptual model suggests that pinion and juniper contribute to accelerated erosion only under a limited range of site conditions which, however, may exist over large areas.

  3. Runoff and erosion from a rapidly eroding pinyon-juniper hillslope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilcox, B.P.; Davenport, D. W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Pitlick, J. [Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (United States); Allen, C.D. [National Biological Survey, Los Alamos, NM (United States). Jemez Mountain Field Station

    1996-02-01

    The dramatic acceleration of erosion associated with the expansion of pinyon-juniper woodlands over the past 100 years has been a widely recognized but poorly understood phenomenon. A more complete understanding will come only through long-term observations of erosion and related factors. To this end, we are conducting a study of a small (1-ha) catchment in a rapidly eroding pinyon-juniper woodland. Since July 1993, we have been collecting data on runoff, erosion, and weather conditions in the catchment, as well as on the topography, soils, and vegetation. Our preliminary results suggest that (1) the catchment is currently in a cycle of accelerated erosion that began concomitant with a shift from ponderosa pine forest to pinyon-juniper woodland that was initiated by a prolonged drought; (2) the intercanopy soils cannot be sustained at the current erosion rates and will be mostly stripped away in about a century; (3) large summer thunderstorms are the most important agents of erosion (4) erosion increases dramatically as the scale increases; (5) runoff makes up <10% of the water budget.

  4. Red Mud Catalytic Pyrolysis of Pinyon Juniper and Single-Stage Hydrotreatment of Oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agblevor, Foster A.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Santosa, Daniel M.; Olarte, Mariefel V.; Burton, Sarah D.; Swita, Marie; Beis, Sedat H.; Christian, Kyle; Sargent, Brandon

    2016-10-20

    Pinyon juniper biomass feedstocks, which cover a large acreage of rangeland in the western United States, are being eradicated and, therefore, considered as a convenient biomass feedstock for biofuel production. Pinyon juniper whole biomass (wood, bark, and leaves) were pyrolyzed in a pilot-scale bubbling fluidized-bed reactor at 450 °C, and the noncondensable gases were recycled to fluidize the reactor. Red mud was used as the in situ catalyst for the pyrolysis of the pinyon juniper biomass. The pyrolysis products were condensed in three stages, and products were analyzed for physicochemical properties. The condenser oil formed two phases with the aqueous fraction, whereas the electrostatic precipitator oils formed a single phase. The oil pH was 3.3; the higher heating value (HHV) was 28 MJ/kg; and the viscosity was less than 100 cP. There was a direct correlation between the viscosity of the oils and the alcohol/ether content of the oils, and this was also related to the aging rate of the oils. The catalytic pyrolysis oils were hydrotreated in a continuous single-stage benchtop hydrotreater to produce hydrocarbon fuels with a density of 0.80$-$0.82 cm3/g. The hydrotreater ran continuously for over 300 h with no significant catalyst deactivation or coke formation. This is the first time that such a long single-stage hydrotreatment has been demonstrated on biomass catalytic pyrolysis oils.

  5. The A-V Specialist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulich, John M.

    1969-01-01

    Essay stating that the audiovisual specialist's primary concern should be not with the care of equipment but rather with the "implementation of media in the school's curriculum and in the psychology of learning. (Author/LS)

  6. What Is a Pediatric Critical Care Specialist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size Email Print Share What is a Pediatric Critical Care Specialist? Page Content Article Body If ... in the PICU. What Kind of Training Do Pediatric Critical Care Specialists Have? Pediatric critical care specialists ...

  7. What Is a Pediatric Sports Medicine Specialist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size Email Print Share What is a Pediatric Sports Medicine Specialist? Page Content Article Body If ... children and teens. What Kind of Training Do Pediatric Sports Medicine Specialists Have? Pediatric sports medicine specialists ...

  8. Effect of using redberry juniper (Juniperus pinchotii) to reduce Haemonchus contortus in vitro motility and increase ivermectin efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, S A; Klein, D R; Whitney, T R; Scott, C B; Muir, J P; Lambert, B D; Craig, T M

    2013-10-18

    A modified larval migration inhibition assay was used to determine if redberry juniper (Juniperus pinchotii Sudw.) can reduce Haemonchus contortus in vitro motility and increase ivermectin (IVM) efficacy. Ruminal fluid was mixed with buffer solution and either no material (CNTL) or Tifton 85 Bermudagrass hay (T85), dried juniper (DRY), fresh juniper (FRE), or distilled juniper terpenoid oil (OIL) to make treatment solutions and anaerobically incubated for 16 h. For Trial 1, larvae were incubated in CNTL, T85, DRY, or IVM. During Trial 2, larvae were incubated in CNTL, DRY, FRE, or OIL for 4h. Trials 3 (CNTL or OIL) and 4 (CNTL, DRY or FRE) evaluated larvae after incubation in treatment solution for 2h, then incubated an additional 2h in various IVM doses (0, 0.1, 1, 3, and 6 μg/mL IVM) and placed onto a screen. Larvae that passed through the 20-μm screen within a 96-well plate were considered motile. Larvae incubated in CNTL or T85 had similar (P=0.12) motility, but larvae incubated in DRY were less (PFRE, or OIL reduced (PFRE. Juniper forage material reduced in vitro H. contortus larval motility, but IVM efficacy was increased only by initially incubating larvae in DRY.

  9. Environmental, genetic, and ecophysiological variation of western and Utah juniper and their hybrids: A model system for vegetation response to climate change. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowak, R.S. [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States). Dept. of Environmental and Resource Sciences; Tausch, R.J. [Forest Service, Reno, NV (United States). Rocky Mountain Research Station

    1998-11-01

    This report focuses on the following two research projects relating to the biological effects of climate change: Hybridization and genetic diversity populations of Utah (Juniperus osteosperma) and western (Juniperus occidentalis) juniper: Evidence from nuclear ribosomal and chloroplast DNA; and Ecophysiological patterns of pinyon and juniper.

  10. Historical and modern disturbance regimes, stand structures, and landscape dynamics in pinon-juniper vegetation of the western U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    William H. Romme; Craig D. Allen; John D. Bailey; William L. Baker; Brandon T. Bestelmeyer; Peter M. Brown; Karen S. Eisenhart; Lisa Floyd-Hanna; Dustin W. Huffman; Brian F. Jacobs; Richard F. Miller; Esteban H. Muldavin; Thomas W. Swetnam; Robin J. Tausch; Peter J. Weisberg

    2008-01-01

    Pinon-juniper is one of the major vegetation types in western North America. It covers a huge area, provides many resources and ecosystem services, and is of great management concern. Management of pinon-juniper vegetation has been hindered, especially where ecological restoration is a goal, by inadequate understanding of the variability in historical and modern...

  11. A comparison of change detection measurements using object-based and pixel-based classification methods on western juniper dominated woodlands in eastern Oregon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan G. Howell

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Encroachment of pinyon (Pinus spp and juniper (Juniperus spp. woodlands in western North America is considered detrimental due to its effects on ecohydrology, plant community structure, and soil stability. Management plans at the federal, state, and private level often include juniper removal for improving habitat of sensitive species and maintaining sustainable ecosystem processes. Remote sensing has become a useful tool in determining changes in juniper woodland structure because of its uses in comparing archived historic imagery with newly available multispectral images to provide information on changes that are no longer detectable by field measurements. Change in western juniper (J. occidentalis cover was detected following juniper removal treatments between 1995 and 2011 using panchromatic 1-meter NAIP and 4-band 1-meter NAIP imagery, respectively. Image classification was conducted using remotely sensed images taken at the Roaring Springs Ranch in southeastern Oregon. Feature Analyst for ArcGIS (object-based extraction and a supervised classification with ENVI 5.2 (pixel-based extraction were used to delineate juniper canopy cover. Image classification accuracy was calculated using an Accuracy Assessment and Kappa Statistic. Both methods showed approximately a 76% decrease in western juniper cover, although differing in total canopy cover area, with object-based classification being more accurate. Classification results for the 2011 imagery were much more accurate (0.99 Kappa statistic because of its low juniper density and the presence of an infrared band. The development of methods for detecting change in juniper cover can lead to more accurate and efficient data acquisition and subsequently improved land management and monitoring practices. These data can subsequently be used to assess and quantify juniper invasion and succession, potential ecological impacts, and plant community resilience.

  12. Evaluation of antimicrobial and phytochemical screening of Fennel, Juniper and Kalonji essential oils against multi drug resistant clinical isolates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sharmishtha Purkayastha; Rittee Narain; Praveen Dahiya

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The inhibitory effects of essential oils including fennel, juniper and kalonji from Foeniculum Vulgare, Juniperus Osteosperma and Nigella Sativa on multi drug resistant clinical isolates were investigated. All the oils have been evaluated for phytochemical constituents, antibacterial activity and TLC bioautography assay. Methods: Preliminary phytochemical analysis was performed. The antibacterial potential of essential oils from fennel, juniper and kalonji fennel, juniper and kalonji was evaluated by agar well diffusion method against multi drug resistant clinical isolates. The antibacterial effect was investigated using the TLC-bioautographic method. Results: Preliminary phytochemical analysis demonstrated the presence of most of the phytochemicals including saponins, cardiac glycosides, steroids, terpenoids, flavonoids and tannins. Antibacterial activity of essential oils was assessed on eight multi-drug resistant (MDR) clinical isolates from both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and two standard strains. All the oils tested showed significant to moderate antibacterial activity toward all tested strains except Acinetobacter sp and Staphylococcus aureus MRSA. The maximum zone of inhibition was found to be 25依0.12 mm for juniper oil followed by 21依0.085 mm for kalonji oil againstStaphylococcus aureus 2. Thin layer chromatography and bioautography assay demonstrated well-defined growth inhibition zones against Staphylococcus aureus 2 and E. coli for juniper essential oil in correspondence with tannins observed at Rf values of 0.07 and 0.57. Conclusions: Based on the present study, the essential oils from juniper and kalonji possess antibacterial activity against several multi drug resistant pathogenic bacteria and thus can be used as a base for the development of new potent drugs and phytomedicine.

  13. Tree Removal as a Mechanism to Reverse Ecohydrologic Thresholds in Pinyon- and Juniper-Encroached Shrublands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, C. J.; Pierson, F. B.; Nouwakpo, S.; Weltz, M.

    2016-12-01

    Pinyon and juniper encroachment has altered vegetation structure, ecological condition, hydrologic function, and delivery of ecosystem goods and services on millions of hectares of sagebrush rangelands in the western US. Pinyon and juniper out-compete shrubs and herbaceous vegetation for water and nutrients and facilitate a decline in vigor and cover of understory plants. These cover declines educe a shift from biotic-controlled resource retention to abiotic-driven losses of critical soil resources over time (soil erosion feedback). Our research objective was to evaluate tree removal by mastication, burning, and cutting as a threshold-reversal mechanism for restoration of sagebrush steppe ecohydrologic resilience over a ten year period. We examined vegetation, soils, infiltration, runoff, and erosion from artificial rainfall and concentrated flow experiments across multiple scales in two late succession woodlands before and 1, 2, and 10 yr after tree removal to address two research questions: 1) Can tree removal decrease late-succession woodland ecohydrologic resilience by increasing vegetation and ground cover within the first 10 yr post-treatment?, and 2) Is the soil erosion feedback reversible in the later stages of woodland encroachment? Distributing shredded tree debris into bare areas improved infiltration and reduced soil erosion in the first few years following tree mastication. Cutting and placing downed trees in bare patches had no initial effect on runoff and erosion. Burning initially reduced infiltration and increased runoff and erosion at the sites, but favorable grass and forb cover recruitment 2 yr after burning reduced erosion from the mostly bare intercanopy between tree mounds. Our presentation of the overall study will chronicle these published pre-fire, 1 yr, and 2 yr responses and preliminary results from the 10th yr post-treatment to address the questions outlined above. The collective results advance understanding of pinyon and juniper

  14. Presence and structure of the wart layer in tracheids of some junipers as visualised in the scanning electron micscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Józef Kocoń

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence and structure of the wart layer was investigated in the tracheids of the following juniper species: J. communis L., J. communis var. saxatilis Pall., J. sabina L., J. virginiana L., J. chinensis L. and J. squamata Lamb. The wart layer was found to be present in the tracheids of the stem, roots and branches of spring and summer growths, thus, it is an integral element of their structure. It would seem that this layer is a trait of these juniper species and may be one of the taxonomic features of their wood.

  15. [Genetical control of the allozymes in juniper (Juniperus excelsa Bieb.) of the Crimea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korshikov, I I; Nikolaeva, A V

    2007-01-01

    Genetical control of nine enzyme systems has been studied in preserved juniper species (Juniperus excelsa Bieb.) of the natural population of the mountain Crimea. Isozymes were extracted from the haploid seed endosperms and separated elecrophoretically. As a result 16 loci have been identified. Fourteen of them were polymorphic (14--Gdh, Got-1, Mdh-1, Mdh-2, Mdh-3, Acp-1, Acp-2, Acp-3, Lap-1, Dia-1, Fdh, Sod-1, Sod-2, Sod-3). Analysis of the allele segragation of the heterozygous trees confirmed their monogenic inheritance.

  16. Multi-element determination in medicinal Juniper tree (Juniperus phoenicea by instrumental neutron activation analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouzid Nedjimi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Red Juniper (Juniperus phoenicea, a local medicinal tree was collected and analyzed for 18 essential, non-essential and toxic elements using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA. The GBW 07605 (GSV-4 standard reference material was analyzed simultaneously with the plant samples, the results shown a good recovery and reproducibility of the method. Ca, K and Fe have been detected in good levels in this plant clarifying their possible contribution to curative properties. The data obtained in the present work will be helpful in the synthesis of new synthetic drugs which can be used for medicinal purpose.

  17. Juniper tar (cade oil) poisoning in new born after a cutaneous application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achour, Sanae; Abourazzak, Sana; Mokhtari, Abdelrhani; Soulaymani, Abdelmjid; Soulaymani, Rachida; Hida, Moustapha

    2011-10-28

    Juniper tar (cade oil) is distilled from the branches and wood of Juniperus oxycedrus. It contains etheric oils, triterpene and phenols, used for many purposes in folk medicine. The authors report a case of a previously healthy new born treated with a topical application of Juniperus oxycedrus for atopic dermatosis The poisoning caused convulsions, collapsus, acute pulmonary oedema, renal failure and hepatotoxicity. The newborn survived after supportive and symptomatic treatment, and discharged in a good condition on the eleventh day of hospitalisation in intensive care unit.

  18. Comparison of six commercial DNA extraction kits for detection of Brucella neotomae in Mexican and Central American-style cheese and other milk products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusk, Tina S; Strain, Errol; Kase, Julie A

    2013-05-01

    Raw or inadequately pasteurized milk from infected animals and cheese made with such milk are a frequent vehicle for human brucellosis infection. Also, biological terrorism is a concern with certain Brucella spp. Due to matrix-associated real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) inhibitors, robust sample preparations are crucial. We compared six commercial nucleic acid extraction kits using nine Mexican and Central American-style soft cheeses or creams and three liquid milk products inoculated with Brucella neotomae, a surrogate for pathogenic Brucella spp. Kits were evaluated by purity and quantity of DNA as determined by qPCR Ct values, reproducibility across cheese and milk types, and cost. At 10(7) CFU/g in four different cheeses, Qiagen statistically outperformed all other kits. When two cheese styles were inoculated at dual levels, Qiagen and High Pure kit extracted samples at 1.5 × 10(5) CFU/g produced average Ct values of 34-39, while PrepSEQ and MagMAX kit extracted samples exhibited higher or no Ct values. High Pure and Qiagen kits excelled also with liquid milk products. Considering matrices, inoculation levels, and kits evaluated, High Pure and Qiagen products produced Brucella DNA of high quality and quantity indicated by the lowest Ct values and were the least expensive.

  19. Pest Management Specialist (AFSC 56650).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Air Univ., Gunter AFS, Ala. Extension Course Inst.

    This eight-volume student text is designed for use by Air Force personnel enrolled in a self-study extension course for pest management specialists. Covered in the individual volumes are civil engineering; pest management (entomology, pest management planning and coordination, and safety and protective equipment); pest management chemicals and…

  20. Frijolito Watershed: Integrated investigations of a rapidly eroding pinyon-juniper hillslope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilcox, B.P. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Pitlick, J. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States). Dept. of Geography; Allen, C.D. [National Biological Survey, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The dramatic acceleration of erosion associated with the expansion of pinyon-juniper woodlands over the past 100 years has been widely recognized, but few process-based studies of this phenomenon have been undertaken. In an attempt to identify the underlying causes, and the factors that affect erosion processes, we have initiated an interdisciplinary study of a rapidly eroding pinyon-juniper woodland in northern New Mexico. Since July 1993, we have collected data on runoff, erosion, and weather conditions from a 1-ha catchment study area and have conducted surveys of topography, soils, and vegetation. Our preliminary results indicate that although runoff makes up less than 10% of the annual water budget, runoff events - which are frequent in the summer - are capable of moving large amounts of sediment. We estimate that between July 1993 and October 1994, between 25,000 and 50,000 kg of sediment has eroded and been transported from the catchment. The information gained from such studies is essential to our ability to formulate effective strategies for managing these rapidly eroding woodlands.

  1. Detection of soil erosion within pinyon-juniper woodlands using Thematic Mapper (TM) data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Kevin P.

    1993-01-01

    Multispectral measurements collected by Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) were correlated with field measurements, direct soil loss estimates, and Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) estimates to determine the sensitivity of TM data to varying degrees of soil erosion in pinyon-juniper woodland in central Utah. TM data were also evaluated as a predictor of the USLE Crop Management C factor for pinyon-juniper woodlands. TM spectral data were consistently better predictors of soil erosion factors than any combination of field factors. TM data were more sensitive to vegetation variations than the USLE C factor. USLE estimates showed low annual rates of erosion which varied little among the study sites. Direct measurements of rate of soil loss using the SEDIMENT (Soil Erosion DIrect measureMENT) technique, indicated high and varying rates of soil loss among the sites since tree establishment. Erosion estimates from the USLE and SEDIMENT methods suggest that erosion rates have been severe in the past, but because significant amounts of soil have already been eroded, and the surface is now armored by rock debris, present erosion rates are lower. Indicators of accelerated erosion were still present on all sites, however, suggesting that the USLE underestimated erosion within the study area.

  2. Soil development mediated by traditional practices shape the stand structure of Spanish juniper woodland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier de la Fuente-Leon

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: Assessing the effect of soil development on the stand structure of a Spanish juniper forest traditionally shaped by livestock browsing and wood extraction. Area of study: Berlanga de Duero (Soria, Castilla y León, Spain.Material and Methods: A stand inventory served to record stand structure. Tree age, height, DBH, basal area, and overbark volume were determined in each plot. Results were pooled considering two well-differentiated degrees of soil evolution. One-way ANOVAs (and Tukey’s test and regressions between growth parameters were performed to assess significant differences between growth performances on both types of soils. Research highlights: Deeper soils yielded significant higher plant density and stand stock figures than stony shallower profiles despite the intense past livestock activity in the area; and single tree-size was also significantly greater. Non-significant differences were found for merchantable junipers age (≈120-160 years. Wood extraction and livestock browsing should be limited on shallower soils to allow soil and forest evolution; as well as to preserve the genetic pool better adapted to hardest growing conditions.Keywords: livestock browsing; forest development; Juniperus thurifera L.; soil evolution; stand stock.

  3. Modeling and mapping potential distribution of Crimean juniper (Juniperus excelsa Bieb.) using correlative approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özkan, Kürşad; Şentürk, Özdemir; Mert, Ahmet; Negiz, Mehmet Güvenç

    2015-01-01

    Modeling and mapping potential distribution of living organisms has become an important component of conservation planning and ecosystem management in recent years. Various correlative and mechanistic methods can be applied to build predictive distributions of living organisms in terrestrial and marine ecosystems. Correlative methods used to predict species' potential distribution have been described as either group discrimination techniques or profile techniques. We attempted to determine whether group discrimination techniques could perform as well as profile techniques for predicting species potential distributions, using elevation (ELVN), parent material (ROCK), slope (SLOP), radiation index (RI) and topographic position index (TPI)) as explanatory variables. We compared potential distribution predictions made for Crimean juniper (Juniperus excelsa Bieb.) in the Yukan Gokdere forest district of the Mediterranean region, Turkey, applying four group discrimination techniques (discriminate analysis (DA), logistic regression analysis (LR), generalized addictive model (GAM) and classification tree technique (CT)) and two profile techniques (a maximum entropy approach to species distribution modeling (MAXENT), the genetic algorithm for rule-set prediction (GARP)). Visual assessments of the potential distribution probability of the applied models for Crimean juniper were performed by using geographical information systems (GIS). Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to objectively assess model performance. The results suggested that group discrimination techniques are better than profile techniques and, among the group discrimination techniques, GAM indicated the best performance.

  4. Critical phases in the seed development of common juniper (Juniperus communis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruwez, R; Leroux, O; De Frenne, P; Tack, W; Viane, R; Verheyen, K

    2013-01-01

    Common juniper (Juniperus communis L.) populations in northwest European lowlands are currently declining in size and number. An important cause of this decline is a lack of natural regeneration. Low seed viability seems to be one of the main bottlenecks in this process. Previous research revealed a negative relation between seed viability and both temperature and nitrogen deposition. Additionally, the seeds of common juniper have a variable ripening time, which possibly influences seed viability. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unresolved. In order to elucidate this puzzle, it is important to understand in which phases of seed production the main defects are situated, together with the influence of ripening time. In this study, we compared seed viability of populations with and without successful recruitment. We examined three seed phases: (i) gamete development; (ii) fertilisation and early-embryo development; and (iii) late-embryo development. After the first two phases, we found no difference in the percentage viable seeds between populations with or without recruitment. After late-embryo development, populations without recruitment showed a significantly lower percentage of viable seeds. These results suggest that late-embryo development is a bottleneck in seed development. However, the complex interaction between seed viability and ripening time suggest that the causes should be in the second seed phase, as the accelerated development of male and female gametophytes may disturb the male-female synchrony for successful mating. © 2012 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  5. Antileishmanial Activities of Greek Juniper (Juniperus excelsa M.Bieb.) Against Leishmania major Promastigotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moein, Mahmoodreza; Hatam, Gholamreza; Taghavi-Moghadam, Razieh; Zarshenas, Mohammad M

    2017-01-01

    Petroleum ether, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and n-butanol fractions of Greek juniper (Juniperus excelsa M.Bieb. from the family Cupressaceae) were evaluated for antileishmanial activities against Leishmania major promastigotes compared to meglumine antimoniate (Glucantime). In vitro toxicity assay was performed using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide and microplate ELISA reader. Extracts were prepared in ethanol/dimethyl sulfoxide (80/20) at 10 to 0.62 mg/mL. The standard was prepared in phosphate-buffered saline at 500 to 15.62 mg/mL. Both leaf and fruit extracts and related fractions showed strong inhibitory effects against promastigotes, significantly different from that of the standard. The leaf extract and the respective petroleum ether fraction showed maximum effectiveness compared to other fractions and also fruit extract and fractions (IC90 = 1.89 ± 0.03 and 0.90 ± 0.03 mg/mL, respectively). Regarding the potent activities of nonpolar fractions of Greek juniper leaf extract, these fractions can be suggested for further investigation. © The Author(s) 2016.

  6. Nature's Notebook Provides Phenology Observations for NASA Juniper Phenology and Pollen Transport Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luval, J. C.; Crimmins, T. M.; Sprigg, W. A.; Levetin, E.; Huete, A.; Nickovic, S.; Prasad, A.; Vukovic, A.; VandeWater, P. K.; Budge, A. M.; hide

    2014-01-01

    Phenology Network has been established to provide national wide observations of vegetation phenology. However, as the Network is still in the early phases of establishment and growth, the density of observers is not yet adequate to sufficiently document the phenology variability over large regions. Hence a combination of satellite data and ground observations can provide optimal information regarding juniperus spp. pollen phenology. MODIS data was to observe Juniperus supp. pollen phenology. The MODIS surface reflectance product provided information on the Juniper supp. cone formation and cone density. Ground based observational records of pollen release timing and quantities were used as verification. Approximately 10, 818 records of juniper phenology for male cone formation Juniperus ashei., J. monosperma, J. scopulorum, and J. pinchotti were reported by Nature's Notebook observers in 2013 These observations provided valuable information for the analysis of satellite images for developing the pollen concentration masks for input into the PREAM (Pollen REgional Atmospheric Model) pollen transport model. The combination of satellite data and ground observations allowed us to improve our confidence in predicting pollen release and spread, thereby improving asthma and allergy alerts.

  7. Utilizing national agriculture imagery program data to estimate tree cover and biomass of pinyon and juniper woodlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    With the encroachment of pinyon (Pinus ssp.) and juniper (Juniperus ssp.) (P-J) woodlands into sagebrush steppe communities, there is an increasing interest in rapid, accurate, and inexpensive quantification methods to estimate tree canopy cover and aboveground biomass over large landscapes. The o...

  8. Specialist training in pediatric anesthesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tom G

    2009-01-01

    There has been a great deal of focus on specialist training in pediatric anesthesia in the last decade or so. Internationally, however, there is still no uniform agreement as to how such a training program should be arranged and organized. Since September 2003, the Scandinavian Society of Anaesth......There has been a great deal of focus on specialist training in pediatric anesthesia in the last decade or so. Internationally, however, there is still no uniform agreement as to how such a training program should be arranged and organized. Since September 2003, the Scandinavian Society...... of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine has coordinated an advanced Inter-Nordic educational program in pediatric anesthesia and intensive care. The training program is managed by a Steering Committee. This program is intended for physicians who recently have received their specialist degree in anesthesiology...... and intensive care. The training period is 12 months of which 9 months are dedicated to pediatric anesthesia and 3 months to pediatric intensive care. During the 1-year training period, the candidates are designated a Scandinavian host clinic (at a tertiary pediatric center in Scandinavia approved...

  9. Landscape dynamics in aspen and western juniper woodlands on the Owyhee Plateau, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Eva K.

    A century of altered fire regimes has affected the landscape vegetation dynamics in the Intermountain West. Suppression of wildfires has resulted in increases in woody plant cover in these semi-arid ecosystems, which has resulted in land cover changes affecting biogeochemical cycling, landscape composition, and habitat diversity. Recent developments in remote sensing technology, computational power, and a rapid development of analysis techniques have enabled us to quantify such changes at the landscape scale. Wavelet analysis is a powerful image analysis technique that is here applied in a novel fashion to fine scale remote sensing imagery to automatically detect the location and crown diameter of individual western juniper plants (Juniperus occidentalis ssp. occidentalis) expanding into sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) steppe at multiple scales. The produced marked point pattern of historical and current spatial juniper distribution was compared regionally and changes in foliar cover and above ground biomass were estimated across a 330,000 ha area on the Owyhee Plateau, Idaho. The above ground carbon accumulation rate from 1946 to 1998 was estimate to be 3.3 gCm-2yr-1 and 10.0 gCm-2yr -1 employing the wavelet and conventional texture analysis methods, respectively, with an additional 25% rise in belowground carbon accumulation in root stock. This research further demonstrates that estimates of carbon accumulation rates as a result of woody encroachment are highly dependent on the spatial and temporal scales of analysis. Conifer species, western juniper and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) on the Owyhee Plateau, have further expanded into the biologically important quaking aspen ( Populus tremuloides) habitats resulting in conifer dominance and occasional loss of aspen clones. Classification of remotely sensed imagery combined with spatially explicit modeling of aspen successional stages indicate that, in the absence of management activity, loss of seral aspen stands

  10. Invisible Roles of Doctoral Program Specialists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachman, Eva Burns; Grady, Marilyn L.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the roles of doctoral program specialists in Big Ten universities. Face-to-face interviews with 20 doctoral program specialists employed in institutions in the Big Ten were conducted. Participants were asked to describe their roles within their work place. The doctoral program specialists reported their…

  11. Pinon and Juniper Field Guide: Asking the Right Questions to Select Appropriate Management Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tausch, R.J.; Miller, R.F.; Roundy, B.A.; Chambers, J.C.

    2009-01-01

    Pinon-juniper woodlands are an important vegetation type in the Great Basin. Old-growth and open shrub savanna woodlands have been present over much of the last several hundred years. Strong evidence indicates these woodlands have experienced significant tree infilling and major expansion in their distribution since the late 1800s by encroaching into surrounding landscapes once dominated by shrubs and herbaceous vegetation. Both infilling and expansion affects soil resources, plant community structure and composition, water and nutrient cycles, forage production, wildlife habitat, biodiversity, and fire patterns across the landscape. Another impact is the shift from historic fire regimes to larger and more intense wildfires that are increasingly determining the future of this landscape. This publication helps biologists and land managers consider how to look at expansion of woodlands and determine what questions to ask to develop a management strategy, including prescribed fire or other practices.

  12. Specialist approaches to managing lipoedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetzer, Amy

    2016-04-01

    While there is no proven cure for lipoedema, early detection is key as specialist treatments, complemented by self-management techniques, can improve symptoms and prevent progression. There is no universal approach as the correct treatment or treatments will depend on each patient's particular circumstances; however, when chosen early and appropriately, interventions can provide huge benefits. The most common treatments in the management of lipoedema include compression, manual lymphatic drainage (MLD), tumescent liposuction, intermittent pneumatic compression therapy (IPC), kinesio taping, deep oscillation therapy, and cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT).

  13. Meteorological, snow, streamflow, topographic, and vegetation height data from four western juniper-dominated experimental catchments in southwestern Idaho, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kormos, Patrick R.; Marks, Danny G.; Pierson, Frederick B.; Williams, C. Jason; Hardegree, Stuart P.; Boehm, Alex R.; Havens, Scott C.; Hedrick, Andrew; Cram, Zane K.; Svejcar, Tony J.

    2017-02-01

    Meteorological, snow, streamflow, topographic, and vegetation height data are presented from the South Mountain experimental catchments. This study site was established in 2007 as a collaborative, long-term research laboratory to address the impacts of western juniper encroachment and woodland treatments in the interior Great Basin region of the western USA. The data provide detailed information on the weather and hydrologic response from four highly instrumented catchments in the late stages of woodland encroachment in a sagebrush steppe landscape. Hourly data from six meteorologic stations and four weirs have been carefully processed, quality-checked, and are serially complete. These data are ideal for hydrologic, ecosystem, and biogeochemical modeling. Data presented are publicly available from the USDA National Agricultural Library administered by the Agricultural Research Service (https://data.nal.usda.gov/dataset/data-weather-snow-and-streamflow-data-four-western-juniper-dominated-experimental-catchments" target="_blank">https://data.nal.usda.gov/dataset/data-weather-snow-and-streamflow-data-four-western-juniper-dominated-experimental-catchments, doi:10.15482/USDA.ADC/1254010).

  14. DETERMINATION OF SEED GERMINATION, OTHER SEED AND SEEDLING CHARACTERISTICS OF SYRIAN JUNIPER (Arceuthosdrupacea (Labill. Ant. et Kotschy. AND SOME RECOMMENDATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Cemal Gültekin

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Syrian Juniper (Arceuthos drupacea (Labill. Antoine et Kotschy, synonym: Juniperus drupacea Labill. seeds have germination barrier due to its fleshy cone, hard seedcoat, and embryo. Germination under natural conditions can be delayed by this barrier for 4-5 years, while cone flesh alone can postpone it for 1 to 2 years. Seeds freed of this flesh (by animals usually germinate in the 3rd or 4th year. Germination can be seen in the same- or the following year if seeds are mechanically scarred by rodents. During the germination, hardened cone scales which cover the seeds fall out and the embryo becomes free to germinate. Combination used for mass production of Syrian Juniper seedling at the Egirdir Forest Nursery is as follows: Seeding in summer “after stratification at room temperature for a month x breaking of seed coats without harming the embryo” results in 53 % germination. Same seed characteristics of Syrian Juniper; time of seed ripening: October, time needed for seed fipening: 18 month,, mean weight of 1000 seeds: 2674 g, one year old seedling diameter: 3.8 mm, one year old seedling length: 16 cm.

  15. [The fiscal position of medical specialists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, S; Moors, M

    2013-01-01

    Independent medical specialists in the Netherlands are treated as entrepreneurs for tax purposes and therefore enjoy tax benefits. A change in the legal relationship between medical specialists and hospitals is foreseen in 2015. Independent medical specialists will then no longer be considered to be entrepreneurs. This could negatively affect their tax position. The Dutch government has adopted a policy aimed at controlling expenses arising from medical specialists' fees. According to this policy, the formation of regional practices or mega-practices of specialists will be discouraged. In contrast, the current fiscal legislation encourages medical specialists to incorporate their practice into regional practices or mega-practices or to become shareholders of their hospitals. It has been proposed that fiscal benefits be linked to certain aspects of entrepreneurship, such as investing in medical equipment or employing medical personnel.

  16. Southern plains woodrats (Neotoma micropus) from southern Texas are important reservoirs of two genotypes of Trypanosoma cruzi and host of a putative novel Trypanosoma species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Roxanne A; Kjos, Sonia; Ellis, Angela E; Barnes, John C; Yabsley, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas' disease, is an important public health and veterinary pathogen. Although human cases are rare in the United States, infections in wildlife, and in some areas domestic dogs, are common. In 2008 and 2010, we investigated T. cruzi prevalence in possible vertebrate reservoirs in southern Texas, with an emphasis on southern plains woodrats (Neotoma micropus). Infection status was determined using a combination of culture isolation, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and serologic testing. Based on PCR and/or culture, T. cruzi was detected in 35 of 104 (34%) woodrats, 3 of 4 (75%) striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis), 12 of 20 (60%) raccoons (Procyon lotor), and 5 of 28 (18%) other rodents including a hispid cotton rat (Sigmodon hispidus), rock squirrel (Otospermophilus variegatus), black rat (Rattus rattus), and two house mice (Mus musculus). Additionally, another Trypanosoma species was detected in 41 woodrats, of which 27 were co-infected with T. cruzi. Genetic characterization of T. cruzi revealed that raccoon, rock squirrel, and cotton rat isolates were genotype TcIV, while woodrats and skunks were infected with TcI and TcIV. Based on the Chagas Stat-Pak assay, antibodies were detected in 27 woodrats (26%), 13 raccoons (65%), 4 skunks (100%), and 5 other rodents (18%) (two white-ankled mice [Peromyscus pectoralis laceianus], two house mice, and a rock squirrel). Seroprevalence based on indirect immunofluorescence antibody testing was higher for both woodrats (37%) and raccoons (90%), compared with the Chagas Stat-Pak. This is the first report of T. cruzi in a hispid cotton rat, black rat, rock squirrel, and white-ankled mouse. These data indicate that based on culture and PCR testing, the prevalence of T. cruzi in woodrats is comparable with other common reservoirs (i.e., raccoons and opossums) in the United States. However, unlike raccoons and opossums, which tend to be infected with a particular genotype, southern

  17. Transpiration and hydraulic strategies in a piñon-juniper woodland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, A G; Hultine, K R; Sperry, J S; Bush, S E; Ehleringer, J R

    2008-06-01

    Anthropogenic climate change is likely to alter the patterns of moisture availability globally. The consequences of these changes on species distributions and ecosystem function are largely unknown, but possibly predictable based on key ecophysiological differences among currently coexisting species. In this study, we examined the environmental and biological controls on transpiration from a piñon-juniper (Pinus edulis-Juniperus osteosperma) woodland in southern Utah, USA. The potential for climate-change-associated shifts in moisture inputs could play a critical role in influencing the relative vulnerabilities of piñons and junipers to drought and affecting management decisions regarding the persistence of this dominant landscape type in the Intermountain West. We aimed to assess the sensitivity of this woodland to seasonal variations in moisture and to mechanistically explain the hydraulic strategies of P. edulis and J. osteosperma through the use of a hydraulic transport model. Transpiration from the woodland was highly sensitive to variations in seasonal moisture inputs. There were two distinct seasonal pulses of transpiration: a reliable spring pulse supplied by winter-derived precipitation, and a highly variable summer pulse supplied by monsoonal precipitation. Transpiration of P. edulis and J. osteosperma was well predicted by a mechanistic hydraulic transport model (R2 = 0.83 and 0.92, respectively). Our hydraulic model indicated that isohydric regulation of water potential in P. edulis minimized xylem cavitation during drought, which facilitated drought recovery (94% of pre-drought water uptake) but came at the cost of cessation of gas exchange for potentially extended periods. In contrast, the anisohydric J. osteosperma was able to maintain gas exchange at lower water potentials than P. edulis but experienced greater cavitation over the drought and showed a lesser degree of post-drought recovery (55% of pre-drought uptake). As a result, these species

  18. Postfire soil water repellency in piñon-juniper woodlands: Extent, severity, and thickness relative to ecological site characteristics and climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zvirzdin, Daniel L; Roundy, Bruce A; Barney, Nicholas S; Petersen, Steven L; Anderson, Val J; Madsen, Matthew D

    2017-07-01

    Wildfires can create or intensify water repellency in soil, limiting the soil's capacity to wet and retain water. The objective of this research was to quantify soil water repellency characteristics within burned piñon-juniper woodlands and relate this information to ecological site characteristics. We sampled soil water repellency across forty-one 1,000 m(2) study plots within three major wildfires that burned in piñon-juniper woodlands. Water repellency was found to be extensive-present at 37% of the total points sampled-and strongly related to piñon-juniper canopy cover. Models developed for predicting SWR extent and severity had R(2)adj values of 0.67 and 0.61, respectively; both models included piñon-juniper canopy cover and relative humidity the month before the fire as coefficient terms. These results are important as they suggest that postfire water repellency will increase in the coming years as infilling processes enhance piñon-juniper canopy cover. Furthermore, reductions in relative humidity brought about by a changing climate have the potential to link additively with infilling processes to increase the frequency and intensity of wildfires and produce stronger water repellency over a greater spatial extent. In working through these challenges, land managers can apply the predictive models developed in this study to prioritize fuel control and postfire restoration treatments.

  19. Content Reading Specialists Evaluate Teaching Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, Thomas C.; Rakow, Steven J.

    1987-01-01

    Presents results of a survey of 37 university-level content reading specialists in which the specialists listed teaching practices that content teachers could incorporate into their teaching to help students learn from texts. Recommends: (1) using multiple texts; (2) using study guides; (3) teaching metacognitive strategies; and (4) direct…

  20. Preparing Elementary Mathematics-Science Teaching Specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, L. Diane

    1992-01-01

    Describes a professional development program to train math/science specialists for the upper elementary school grades. Using results from an interest survey, 30 teachers were chosen to participate in a 3-year program to become math/science specialists. Presents the teaching model used and the advantages for teachers and students in having subject…

  1. Runoff and erosion in a pinon-juniper woodland: Influence of vegetation patches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reid, K.D.; Wilcox, B.P.; Breshears, D.D.; MacDonald, L.

    1999-12-01

    In many semiarid regions, runoff and erosion differ according to vegetation patch type. These differences, although hypothesized to fundamentally affect ecological processes, have been poorly quantified. In a semiarid pinion-juniper woodland [Pinus edulis Engelm. and Juniperus monosperma (Engelm) Sarg.] in northern New Mexico, the authors measured runoff and erosion from the three patch types that compose these woodlands: Canopy patches (those beneath woody plants), vegetated patched in intercanopy areas, and bare patches in intercanopy areas. The bare intercanopy patches exhibited the highest rates, followed by vegetated intercanopy patches and then by canopy patches. Large convective summer storms, though relatively infrequent, generated much of the runoff and most of the sediment; prolonged frontal storms were capable of generating considerable runoff but little sediment. A portion of the runoff and most of the sediment generated from bare intercanopy patches was redistributed down-slope, probably to adjacent vegetated intercanopy patches, demonstrating connectivity between these two patch types. Their results indicate that there are significant and important differences in runoff and sediment production from the three patch types; that bare intercanopy patches act as sources of both water and sediment for the vegetated intercanopy patches; and that the transfer of water and sediment at small scales is both frequent enough and substantial enough to be considered ecologically significant.

  2. Compatible dominant height - site index model for juniper (Juniperus deppeana Steud.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Rodríguez-Carrillo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the site quality of juniper (Juniperus deppeana Steud. in the San Dimas region of the state of Durango, Mexico, using the site index method. The database comes from stem analysis of 43 trees felled in harvesting activities. The Chapman-Richards and Schumacher models, by means of the algebraic difference and generalized algebraic difference approaches, were tested to determine the site index; in addition, the error structure was modeled with a second-order autoregressive model to remedy the dependency of existing longitudinal errors. The results showed that the Chapman-Richards model in generalized algebraic difference form provided the best fit according to the adjusted coefficient of determination (R2 adj = 0.98 and root mean square error (RMSE = 0.46 m. Plotting of the quality curves generated with this model, superimposed on the observed heights, corroborated the goodness of fit of the model selected. The equation obtained with the generalized algebraic difference approach directly estimates the dominant height and site index at any height and base age.

  3. Western juniper and ponderosa pine ecotonal climate-growth relationships across landscape gradients in southern Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutson, K.C.; Pyke, D.A.

    2008-01-01

    Forecasts of climate change for the Pacific northwestern United States predict warmer temperatures, increased winter precipitation, and drier summers. Prediction of forest growth responses to these climate fluctuations requires identification of climatic variables limiting tree growth, particularly at limits of free species distributions. We addressed this problem at the pine-woodland ecotone using tree-ring data for western juniper (Juniperus occidentalis var. occidentalis Hook.) and ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Loud.) from southern Oregon. Annual growth chronologies for 1950-2000 were developed for each species at 17 locations. Correlation and linear regression of climate-growth relationships revealed that radial growth in both species is highly dependent on October-June precipitation events that recharge growing season soil water. Mean annual radial growth for the nine driest years suggests that annual growth in both species is more sensitive to drought at lower elevations and sites with steeper slopes and sandy or rocky soils. Future increases in winter precipitation could increase productivity in both species at the pine-woodland ecotone. Growth responses, however, will also likely vary across landscape features, and our findings suggest that heightened sensitivity to future drought periods and increased temperatures in the two species will predominantly occur at lower elevation sites with poor water-holding capacities. ?? 2008 NRC.

  4. neotoma: A Programmatic Interface to the Neotoma Paleoecological Database

    OpenAIRE

    Goring, Simon; Dawson, Andria; Simpson, Gavin L.; Ram, Karthik; Graham, Russ W; Eric C. Grimm; Williams, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Paleoecological data are integral to ecological and evolutionary analyses. First, they provide an opportunity to study ecological and evolutionary interactions between communities and abiotic environments across time scales. Second, they allow us to study the long-term outcomes of processes that occur infrequently, such as megadroughts, hurricanes, and rapid climate change. Third, the past allows us to study ecological processes in the absence of widespread anthropogenic influence.The R packa...

  5. Response of bird community structure to habitat management in piñon-juniper woodland-sagebrush ecotones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knick, Steven T.; Hanser, Steve; Grace, James B.; Hollenbeck, Jeff P.; Leu, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Piñon (Pinus spp.) and juniper (Juniperus spp.) woodlands have been expanding their range across the intermountain western United States into landscapes dominated by sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) shrublands. Management actions using prescribed fire and mechanical cutting to reduce woodland cover and control expansion provided opportunities to understand how environmental structure and changes due to these treatments influence bird communities in piñon-juniper systems. We surveyed 43 species of birds and measured vegetation for 1–3 years prior to treatment and 6–7 years post-treatment at 13 locations across Oregon, California, Idaho, Nevada, and Utah. We used structural equation modeling to develop and statistically test our conceptual model that the current bird assembly at a site is structured primarily by the previous bird community with additional drivers from current and surrounding habitat conditions as well as external regional bird dynamics. Treatment reduced woodland cover by >5% at 80 of 378 survey sites. However, habitat change achieved by treatment was highly variable because actual disturbance differed widely in extent and intensity. Biological inertia in the bird community was the strongest single driver; 72% of the variation in the bird assemblage was explained by the community that existed seven years earlier. Greater net reduction in woodlands resulted in slight shifts in the bird community to one having ecotone or shrubland affinities. However, the overall influence of woodland changes from treatment were relatively small and were buffered by other extrinsic factors. Regional bird dynamics did not significantly influence the structure of local bird communities at our sites. Our results suggest that bird communities in piñon-juniper woodlands can be highly stable when management treatments are conducted in areas with more advanced woodland development and at the level of disturbance measured in our study.

  6. Decreased carbon limitation of litter respiration in a mortality-affected piñon-juniper woodland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Berryman

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Microbial respiration depends on microclimatic variables and carbon (C substrate availability, all of which are altered when ecosystems experience major disturbance. Widespread tree mortality, currently affecting piñon-juniper ecosystems in Southwestern North America, may affect C substrate availability in several ways; for example, via litterfall pulses and loss of root exudation. To determine piñon mortality effects on C and water limitation of microbial respiration, we applied field amendments (sucrose and water to two piñon-juniper sites in central New Mexico, USA: one with a recent (< 1 yr, experimentally-induced mortality event and a nearby site with live canopy. We monitored the respiration response to water and sucrose applications to the litter surface and to the underlying mineral soil surface, testing the following hypotheses: (1 soil respiration in a piñon-juniper woodland is water- and labile C-limited in both the litter layer and mineral soil; (2 water and sucrose applications increase temperature sensitivity of respiration; (3 the mortality-affected site will show a reduction in C limitation in the litter; (4 the mortality-affected site will show an enhancement of C limitation in the mineral soil. Litter respiration at both sites responded to increased water availability, yet surprisingly, mineral soil respiration was not limited by water. Temperature sensitivity was enhanced by some of the sucrose and water treatments. Consistent with hypothesis 3, C limitation of litter respiration was lower at the recent mortality site compared to the intact canopy site. Results following applications to the mineral soil suggest the presence of abiotic effects of increasing water availability, precluding our ability to measure labile C limitation in soil. Widespread piñon mortality may decrease labile C limitation of litter respiration, at least during the first growing season following mortality.

  7. The use of redberry juniper (Juniperus pinchotii) to reduce Haemonchus contortus fecal egg counts and increase ivermectin efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, T R; Wildeus, S; Zajac, A M

    2013-10-18

    Objectives of this study were to determine if a redberry juniper-based diet can reduce fecal egg counts (FEC) and increase ivermectin (IVM) efficacy in IVM-resistant Haemonchus contortus. Predominant genera present were Haemonchus (range 45-100%) and Trichostrongylus (range 0-47%). The FEC reduction for IVM in the ewe flock was 25% (95% confidence intervals 79% to -162%) and confirmed IVM resistance. After natural infection was established, Barbados Blackbelly and St. Croix lambs (n=64, 6 months old) were randomly assigned to pens and fed a pelleted treatment diet (4 pens/treatment and 8 lambs/pen) consisting of traditional feed ingredients mixed with either 30% hay (CNTL) or 30% ground juniper leaves and stems (JUN). Lambs were fed during two periods: Period 1 (days 0-28) and Period 2 (days 28-42). On day 28, half of the lambs from each treatment and pen were treated with IVM orally (0.2 mg/kg), creating four treatment groups: lambs fed CNTL or JUN and either not treated (CNTLn, JUNn) or treated (CNTLi, JUNi) with IVM. During Period 1, lambs fed CNTL had greater (P0.46) FEC on days 0 and 28, but lambs fed JUN had 69.1% lower (P<0.001) FEC on day 15 as compared to lambs fed CNTL. During Period 2, CNTLi lambs had greater (P<0.05) average daily gain than JUNn and JUNi lambs. Lambs fed JUN and treated with IVM (JUNi) had 66%, 65%, and 61% lower (P<0.05) FEC as compared to CNTLn, CNTLi, and JUNn lambs, respectively. Results suggest that feeding lambs a diet containing 30% redberry juniper reduced FEC and increased IVM efficacy by 65% (JUNi vs. CNTLi). Specific mechanisms involved in increasing IVM efficacy by feeding diets containing bioactive compounds warrants further investigation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Does woodland encroachment impact water?: An ecohydrology study of western juniper (Juniperus occidentalis) and other semi-arid conifers in the western U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemeyer, R. J.; Link, T. E.; Heinse, R.; Seyfried, M. S.; Flerchinger, G. N.; Klos, P. Z.

    2015-12-01

    Semi-arid conifer species including western juniper (Juniperus occidentalis) among other pinyon and juniper (P-J) species have expanded into grass and shrub-dominated landscapes in the western U.S. Despite the importance of land cover changes to hydrological fluxes in these water-limited systems, there have been few process-based ecohydrology studies of western juniper encroachment. Furthermore, many conclusions about the impact of P-J encroachment on streamflow are limited to several studies in the southwestern U.S. Our objectives are to: a) assess how western juniper will impact above-ground hydrological processes, b) assess how western juniper will alter below-ground hydrological processes, c) assess how changes in P-J cover alters deep drainage across diverse climates of the western U.S. To accomplish these objectives we used a combination of continuous lysimeter and soil moisture measurements, periodic snow surveys, electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and electromagnetic induction (EMI) surveys, simulations with the Simultaneous Heat and Water (SHAW) model and broad, spatially-coarse simulations with the atmosphere-vegetation-soil component of the HBV model. Juniper trees by both intercepting snow and increasing below-canopy snow melt caused tree wells to form throughout the winter. These tree wells increased snow redistribution to the base of the trees. Soil moisture in the interspace dominated by sagebrush, forbes, and grasses drops early in the season, but late season soil moisture changes are moderated by juniper. There is evidence that junipers continue to transpire soil moisture both late into the summer and at up to 3 meters deep. HBV simulations revealed that the potential for increases in deep drainage with a change from P-J to grass cover is principally controlled by the timing instead of the total precipitation. Simulations confirm previous empirical studies that landscapes in monsoon-dominated climates of the southwestern U.S. show negligible

  9. [Genetic variability of juniper tall (Juniperus excelsa Bieb.) in the northern and southern limits of the natural distribution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korshikov, I I; Nikolaeva, A V

    2013-01-01

    Genetic structure, subdivision and differentiation of six populations of juniper tall (Juniperus excelsa Bieb.) of the Crimean Mountains and of one population in Lebanon were investigated using 18 polymorphic allozyme loci as genetic markers. The high level of genetic variability of J. excelsa was established in the northern and the southern limits of its natural habitat. The mean values of the main indicators of genetic polymorphism were: P99 = 1,000, A = 3,167, H(E) = 0,370, H(o) = 0,405. Subdivision and differentiation of populations were low (F(ST) = 0,032, D(N) = 0,026) indicating similarity of their gene pools.

  10. Agricultural Chemical Sourcebook for Wildlife Contaminants Specialists

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this handbook is to provide information to contaminant specialists involved in evaluating agricultural chemical impacts on wetlands. The handbook...

  11. Wildlife Private Lands Specialist Support Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This layer represents the areas of Minnesota that MNDNR Wildlife Private Lands Specialists cover. These boundaries are provided for support mapping and to show...

  12. Development status and prospect of rehabilitation clinical nurse specialist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-ping WANG

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Through access to a lot of relevant information on the role of the rehabilitation nurse specialist functions, explore how rehabilitation specialist nurse qualifications provides a basis for our rehabilitation specialist nurse cultivating and development.

  13. Responses of a Federally Endangered Songbird to Understory Thinning in Oak-Juniper Woodlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Ashley M.; Marshall, Mike E.; Morrison, Michael L.; Hays, K. Brian; Farrell, Shannon L.

    2017-04-01

    Wildlife conservation and management on military lands must be accomplished in the context of military readiness, which often includes ground-based training that is perceived to conflict with wildlife needs and environmental regulations. From 2008‒2012, we examined territory density, pairing success, and fledging success of the federally endangered golden-cheeked warbler ( Setophaga chrysoparia; hereafter warbler) in relation to removal of small-diameter trees from the understory of mature oak-juniper ( Quercus-Juniperus) woodland at the 87,890 ha Fort Hood Military Reservation in central Texas. Understory thinning created troop maneuver lanes, but left canopy vegetation intact. Warbler density, pairing success, and fledging success were similar across thinned and control sites. We found that warbler pairing and fledging success were best predicted by Ecological site (hereafter Ecosite), an indicator of hardwood tree species composition. Warbler pairing and fledging success were about 1.5 and 1.6 times higher, respectively, for territories dominated by the Low Stony Hill Ecosite than territories dominated by the Redlands Ecosite. Our results indicate that understory thinning for military training purposes did not have a negative effect on warblers at Fort Hood in the manner tested, and suggest that removal of smaller trees from the understory in a way that replicates historic conditions may elicit neutral responses from this forest-dependent songbird. Quantifying wildlife responses to military activities provides the Department of Defense and US Fish and Wildlife Service with data to guide conservation of threatened and endangered species on Department of Defense facilities while maintaining the military mission, and supports wildlife management efforts on other public and private lands.

  14. Net changes in aboveground woody carbon stock in western juniper woodlands, 1946-1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Eva K.; Vierling, Lee A.; Smith, Alistair M. S.; Bunting, Stephen C.

    2008-03-01

    Although regional increases in woody plant cover in semiarid ecosystems have been identified as a worldwide phenomenon affecting the global carbon budget, quantifying the impact of these vegetation shifts on C pools and fluxes is challenging. Challenges arise because woody encroachment is governed by ecological processes that occur at fine spatial resolutions (1-10 m) and, in many cases, at slow (decadal-scale) temporal rates over large areas. We therefore analyzed time series aerial photography, which exhibits both the necessary spatial precision and temporal extent, to quantify the expansion of western juniper into sagebrush steppe landscapes in southwestern Idaho. We established upper and lower bounds of aboveground woody carbon change across the landscape via two-dimensional spatial wavelet analysis, image texture analysis, and field data collection. Forty-eight 100-ha blocks across a 330,000-ha region were stratified by topography, soil characteristics, and land stewardship for analyses. Across the area we estimate aboveground woody carbon accumulation rates of 3.3 gCm-2yr-1 and 10.0 gCm-2yr-1 using the wavelet and texture method, respectively, during the time period 1946-1998. Carbon accumulation rates were significantly affected by soil properties and were highly dependent on the spatial and temporal scales of analysis. For example, at a 100-ha scale the aboveground carbon accumulation varied from -1.7 to 9.9 gCm-2yr-1, while at the 1-ha scale the range of variability increased to -11 to 22 gCm-2yr-1. These values are an order of magnitude lower than those previously suggested due to woody encroachment, highlighting the need for examining multiple spatial scales when accounting for changes in terrestrial carbon storage.

  15. Dual extraction of essential oil and podophyllotoxin from creeping juniper (Juniperus horizontalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles L Cantrell

    Full Text Available Juniperus horizontalis Moench (Family Cupressaceae, commonly called creeping juniper, is a widely distributed species in the United States and much of Canada. It is potentially a source for two important chemical products, the anticancer drug synthetic precursor, podophyllotoxin and essential oils. The objectives of this study were to ascertain the likelihood of utilizing J. horizontalis needles for the simultaneous production of both (--podophyllotoxin and essential oil components and to determine the optimum distillation time (DT needed for the production of essential oil containing a specific ratio of constituents. Eleven different distillation times were tested in this study: 20, 40, 80, 160, 180, 240, 480, 600, 720, 840, and 960 min. Total essential oil content increased with increasing distillation time from a minimum of 0.023% at 20 min to a maximum of 1.098% at 960 min. The major constituents present in the oil were alpha-pinene, sabinene, and limonene. The percent concentration of sabinene in the essential oil varied from a high of 46.6% at 80 min to a low of 30.2% at 960 min, that of limonene changed very little as a result of distillation time and remained near 30% for all distillation times, whereas the concentration of alpha-pinene was 9.6% at 20 min DT and decreased to 4.2% at 960 min. Post distillation analysis of needles revealed elevated amounts of (--podophyllotoxin remaining in the tissue varied in the amount of podophyllotoxin present, from a low of 0.281% to a high of 0.364% as compared to undistilled needles which gave 0.217% podophyllotoxin. As a result of this study, specific essential oil components can now be targeted in J. horizontalis by varying the distillation time. Furthermore, needles can be successfully utilized as a source of both essential oil and podophyllotoxin, consecutively.

  16. Dual extraction of essential oil and podophyllotoxin from creeping juniper (Juniperus horizontalis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, Charles L; Zheljazkov, Valtcho D; Carvalho, Camila R; Astatkie, Tess; Jeliazkova, Ekaterina A; Rosa, Luiz H

    2014-01-01

    Juniperus horizontalis Moench (Family Cupressaceae), commonly called creeping juniper, is a widely distributed species in the United States and much of Canada. It is potentially a source for two important chemical products, the anticancer drug synthetic precursor, podophyllotoxin and essential oils. The objectives of this study were to ascertain the likelihood of utilizing J. horizontalis needles for the simultaneous production of both (-)-podophyllotoxin and essential oil components and to determine the optimum distillation time (DT) needed for the production of essential oil containing a specific ratio of constituents. Eleven different distillation times were tested in this study: 20, 40, 80, 160, 180, 240, 480, 600, 720, 840, and 960 min. Total essential oil content increased with increasing distillation time from a minimum of 0.023% at 20 min to a maximum of 1.098% at 960 min. The major constituents present in the oil were alpha-pinene, sabinene, and limonene. The percent concentration of sabinene in the essential oil varied from a high of 46.6% at 80 min to a low of 30.2% at 960 min, that of limonene changed very little as a result of distillation time and remained near 30% for all distillation times, whereas the concentration of alpha-pinene was 9.6% at 20 min DT and decreased to 4.2% at 960 min. Post distillation analysis of needles revealed elevated amounts of (-)-podophyllotoxin remaining in the tissue varied in the amount of podophyllotoxin present, from a low of 0.281% to a high of 0.364% as compared to undistilled needles which gave 0.217% podophyllotoxin. As a result of this study, specific essential oil components can now be targeted in J. horizontalis by varying the distillation time. Furthermore, needles can be successfully utilized as a source of both essential oil and podophyllotoxin, consecutively.

  17. Evaluating mountain meadow groundwater response to Pinyon-Juniper and temperature in a great basin watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Rosemary W.H.; Huntington, Justin L.; Snyder, Keirith A.; Niswonger, Richard G.; Morton, Charles; Stringham, Tamzen K.

    2017-01-01

    This research highlights development and application of an integrated hydrologic model (GSFLOW) to a semiarid, snow-dominated watershed in the Great Basin to evaluate Pinyon-Juniper (PJ) and temperature controls on mountain meadow shallow groundwater. The work used Google Earth Engine Landsat satellite and gridded climate archives for model evaluation. Model simulations across three decades indicated that the watershed operates on a threshold response to precipitation (P) >400 mm/y to produce a positive yield (P-ET; 9%) resulting in stream discharge and a rebound in meadow groundwater levels during these wetter years. Observed and simulated meadow groundwater response to large P correlates with above average predicted soil moisture and with a normalized difference vegetation index threshold value >0.3. A return to assumed pre-expansion PJ conditions or an increase in temperature to mid-21st century shifts yielded by only ±1% during the multi-decade simulation period; but changes of approximately ±4% occurred during wet years. Changes in annual yield were largely dampened by the spatial and temporal redistribution of evapotranspiration across the watershed: Yet the influence of this redistribution and vegetation structural controls on snowmelt altered recharge to control water table depth in the meadow. Even a small-scale removal of PJ (0.5 km2) proximal to the meadow will promote a stable, shallow groundwater system resilient to droughts, while modest increases in temperature will produce a meadow susceptible to declining water levels and a community structure likely to move toward dry and degraded conditions.

  18. Proposal to endorse the award of a contract for the supply of a juniper T320 network router

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    This document concerns the award of a contract for the supply of a JUNIPER T320 Network Router. The Finance Committee is invited to endorse the CERN Management's decision to negotiate a contract with QWEST COMMUNICATION (USA) for the supply of a JUNIPER T320 Network Router for a total amount not exceeding 265 000 US dollars (350 000 Swiss francs). The Finance Committee is also requested to approve the negotiation of a maintenance contract for a value not exceeding 50 000 US dollars (66 000 Swiss francs) for three years and the option to purchase additional network interfaces for a value not exceeding 100 000 US dollars (132 000 Swiss francs) bringing the total amount to 415 000 US dollars (548 000 Swiss francs), not subject to revision. CERN's contribution will not exceed 90 000 Swiss francs. The amounts in Swiss francs have been calculated using the present rate of exchange. The firm has indicated the following distribution by country of the contract value covered by this adjudication proposal: CA - 100%.

  19. Decreased carbon limitation of litter respiration in a mortality-affected piñon–juniper woodland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Berryman

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Microbial respiration depends on microclimatic variables and carbon (C substrate availability, all of which are altered when ecosystems experience major disturbance. Widespread tree mortality, currently affecting piñon–juniper ecosystems in southwestern North America, may affect C substrate availability in several ways, for example, via litterfall pulses and loss of root exudation. To determine piñon mortality effects on C and water limitation of microbial respiration, we applied field amendments (sucrose and water to two piñon–juniper sites in central New Mexico, USA: one with a recent (2 flux on the girdled site and a non-significant increase on the control. We speculate that the reduction may have been driven by water-induced carbonate dissolution, which serves as a sink for CO2 and would reduce the net flux. Widespread piñon mortality may decrease labile C limitation of litter respiration, at least during the first growing season following mortality.

  20. Detecting mortality induced structural and functional changes in a pinon-juniper woodland using Landsat and RapidEye time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan J. Krofcheck; Jan U. H. Eitel; Lee A. Vierling; Urs Schulthess; Timothy M. Hilton; Eva Dettweiler-Robinson; Rosemary Pendleton; Marcy E. Litvak

    2014-01-01

    Pinon-juniper (PJ) woodlands have recently undergone dramatic drought-induced mortality, triggering broad scale structural changes in this extensive Southwestern US biome. Given that climate projections for the region suggest widespread conifer mortality is likely to continue into the next century, it is critical to better understand how this climate-induced change in...

  1. Effects of one-seed juniper and polyethylene glycol on intake, rumen fermentation, and plasma amino acids in sheep and goats fed supplemental protein and tannins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    We tested the effect of polyethylene glycol (PEG) on juniper and total intake, rumen fermentation, and plasma amino acids (AA) of 12 does and 12 ewes fed sudangrass and basal diets containing 10% quebracho tannins with no protein supplement (Control; 5% CP) or high rumen degradable (RDP 15% CP) or u...

  2. Effects of adding protein, condensed tannins, and polyethylene glycol to diets of sheep and goats fed one-seed juniper and low quality roughage

    Science.gov (United States)

    The biochemical mechanisms that limit voluntary intake of one-seed juniper by browsing ruminants are not well understood. Twelve Rambouillet ewes (78 ± 2.3 kg BW) and 12 Boer-Spanish does (54 ± 1.4 kg BW) were used in a split-plot sequence design to investigate the effects of adding protein, quebrac...

  3. Analisis Elemen Visual Pada Promosi Busana Muslimah di Instagram (Studi Kasus Merek Hijab Juniper Lane, Zaha, dan Zysku Xena di Bandung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramadita Fetrianggi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of Visual Elements on Muslimah Clothing Promotion in Instagram (Case Study on Brands of Hijab Juniper Lane, Zaha, and Zysku Xena in Bandung. Muslim clothing in the form of hijab has become popular as a religious lifestyle and identity. The popularity of hijab is due to the promotion of marketing through instagram displaying muslim fashion clothing that is designed very interesting, so that consumers become interested and marketing becomes increasing. This study aims to examine muslim clothing photos on instagram hijab with brands of Juniper Lane, Zaha, and Zysku Xena in Bandung seen from the visual elements of photography. The research method used case study with descriptive approach through visual analysis. The research subjects are instagram photos on Juniper Lane hijab brand, Zaha, and Zysku Xena in Bandung. Data collection techniques were collected by observation, instagram photo documentation study, and interviews with local brand owners of hijab and consumers. Data were analyzed by visual analysis, content analysis, and qualitative analysis. The results show that muslim clothing photos on instagram with brands of hijab Juniper Lane, Zaha, and Zysku Xena in Bandung have fulfilled the visual elements of photography, so the photo design becomes attractive, the consumers become interested in them, and the marketing becomes increasing.

  4. Effects of using ground redberry juniper and dried distillers grains with solubles in lamb feedlot diets: growth, blood serum, fecal, and wool characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, T R; Lupton, C J; Muir, J P; Adams, R P; Stewart, W C

    2014-03-01

    Effects of using ground redberry juniper and dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS) in Rambouillet lamb (n = 45) feedlot diets on growth, blood serum, fecal, and wool characteristics were evaluated. In a randomized design study with 2 feeding periods (Period 1 = 64% concentrate diet, 35 d; Period 2 = 85% concentrate diet, 56 d), lambs were individually fed 5 isonitrogenous diets: a control diet (CNTL) that contained oat hay but not DDGS or juniper or DDGS-based diets in which 0 (0JUN), 33 (33JUN), 66 (66JUN), or 100% (100JUN) of the oat hay was replaced by juniper. During Period 1, lambs fed CNTL had greater (P diets. Lamb DMI, ADG, and G:F quadratically increased (P diets. During Period 2, lambs fed CNTL had greater (P diets, but ADG was similar (P > 0.41). Compared to 0JUN, lambs fed CNTL had similar (P = 0.12) G:F and tended to have less G:F (P = 0.07) than lambs fed DDGS-based diets. Among lambs fed DDGS-based diets, DMI was similar (P > 0.19), ADG increased linearly (P = 0.03), and G:F tended to decrease quadratically (P = 0.06) as juniper increased in the diet. Serum IGF-1, serum urea N (SUN), and fecal N were greater (P 0.13) for lambs fed CNTL vs. lambs fed DDGS-based diets (CNTL). Within lambs fed DDGS-based diets, SUN increased quadratically (P = 0.01) and fecal N increased linearly (P = 0.004), which can partially be attributed to increased dietary urea and condensed tannin intake. Most wool characteristics were not affected, but wool growth per kilogram of BW decreased quadratically (P = 0.04) as percentage of juniper increased in the DDGS-based diets. When evaluating the entire 91-d feeding trial, results indicated that replacing all of the ground oat hay with ground juniper leaves and stems in lamb growing and finishing diets is not detrimental to animal performance and that DDGS-based diets can reduce total feedlot costs, as compared to sorghum grain and cottonseed meal-based diets. However, compared to using juniper or oat hay as the sole

  5. A landscape-scale assessment of plant communities, hydrologic processes, and state-and-transition theory in a western juniper dominated ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Steven L.

    Western juniper has rapidly expanded into sagebrush steppe communities in the Intermountain West during the past 120 years. This expansion has occurred across a wide range of soil types and topographic positions. These plant communities, however, are typically treated in current peer-reviewed literature generically. The focus of this research is to investigate watershed level response to Western juniper encroachment at multiple topographic positions. Data collected from plots used to measure vegetation, soil moisture, and infiltration rates show that intercanopy sites within encroached Western juniper communities generally exhibit a significant decrease in intercanopy plant density and cover, decreased infiltration rates, increased water sediment content, and lower soil moisture content. High-resolution remotely sensed imagery and Geographic Information Systems were used with these plot level measurements to characterize and model the landscape-scale response for both biotic and abiotic components of a Western juniper encroached ecosystem. These data and their analyses included an inventory of plant density, plant cover, bare ground, gap distance and cover, a plant community classification of intercanopy patches and juniper canopy cover, soil moisture estimation, solar insulation prediction, slope and aspect. From these data, models were built that accurately predicted shrub density and shrub cover throughout the watershed study area, differentiated by aspect. We propose a new model of process-based plant community dynamics associated with current state-and-transition theory. This model is developed from field measurements and spatially explicit information that characterize the relationship between the matrix mountain big sagebrush plant community and intercanopy plant community patterns occurring within a Western juniper dominated woodland at a landscape scale. Model parameters (states, transitions, and thresholds) are developed based on differences in shrub

  6. Differences in quality standards when prescribing nutritional support: Differences between specialist and non-specialist physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morán López, Jesús Manuel; Piedra León, María; Enciso Izquierdo, Fidel Jesús; Luengo Pérez, Luis Miguel; Amado Señaris, José Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Adequate nutritional support includes many different aspects, but poor understanding of clinical nutrition by health care professionales often results in an inadequate prescription. A study was conducted to compare enteral and parenteral nutritional support plans prescribed by specialist and non-specialist physicians. Non-specialist physicians recorded anthropometric data from only 13.3% of patients, and none of them performed nutritional assessments. Protein amounts provided by non-specialist physicians were lower than estimated based on ESPEN (10.29g of nitrogen vs 14.62; P<.001). Differences were not statistically significant in the specialist group (14.88g of nitrogen; P=.072). Calorie and glutamine provision and laboratory controls prescribed by specialists were significantly closer to those recommended by clinical guidelines. Nutritional support prescribed by specialists in endocrinology and nutrition at San Pedro de Alcántara Hospital was closer to clinical practice guideline standards and of higher quality as compared to that prescribed by non-specialists. Copyright © 2015 SEEN. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Bid-Ask Spreads with Indirect Competition among Specialists

    OpenAIRE

    Gehrig, Thomas; Jackson, Matthew O.

    1997-01-01

    We examine the bid-ask quotes offered by specialists (or dealers) who face indirect competition from other specialists who trade in related assets. In the context of a simple model where investors have mean variance preferences, we characterize the equilibrium bids and asks quoted by K specialists in N assets, where some specialists may control more than one asset. We compare the equilibrium spreads as the number (and factor structure) of the assets each specialist controls is varied. It is s...

  8. Final report: Hydraulic mechanisms of survival and mortality during drought in pinon-juniper woodlands of southwestern USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pockman, William [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-11-23

    The goal of this project was to use rainfall manipulation of an intact pinon-juniper woodland in central New Mexico to understand the mechanisms that control the response of these species to extremes of rainfall. Experimental plots were installed in a pinon-juniper woodland at the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge and treatments were imposed in August 2007. Treatments consisted of 1) a Drought treatment imposed by diverting approximately 45% of precipitation away from the plot, 2) and Irrigation treatment imposed by applying six 19 mm simulated rainfall events at regular intervals during the growing season, 3) a Cover Control treatment designed to assess the impact of the plastic troughs constructed on Drought plots without imposing the rainfall diversion, and 4) an untreated control that received no modification. Extensive pinon mortality was observed beginning one year after the start of drought treatment on hillslope plots, while a third drought plot on deeper soils did not exhibit pinon mortality until the fifth year of drought treatment. Pinon mortality occurred in the context of high levels of bark beetle activity, motivating the installation of two additional plots in 2010: a control plot and a drought plot built to the same standards as the original treatments but with bark beetle control maintained by pesticide application to the bole of target trees from 2010 - 2016. Although the drought treatment created similar conditions to those experienced on hillslope drought plots, the drought plot with bark beetle control exhibited no pinon mortality for 5 years even in the presence of high regional bark beetle activity in 2012/13. One of the goals of the research was to identify the mechanism of drought-induced mortality in pinon and juniper: 1) mortality due to catastrophic failure of water transport through plant tissues (hydraulic failure), 2) mortality due to limitations in carbon uptake (carbon starvation) and 3) either of the first two mechanisms with the

  9. Historical fire and multidecadal drought as context for piñon-juniper woodland restoration in western Colorado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinneman, Douglas J; Baker, William L

    2009-07-01

    Fire is known to structure tree populations, but the role of broad-scale climate variability is less clear. For example, the influence of climatic "teleconnections" (the relationship between oceanic-atmospheric fluctuations and anomalous weather patterns across broad scales) on forest age structure is relatively unexplored. We sampled semiarid piñon-juniper (Pinus edulis-Juniperus osteosperma) woodlands in western Colorado, U.S.A., to test the hypothesis that woodland age structures are shaped by climate, including links to oceanic-atmospheric fluctuations, and by past fires and livestock grazing. Low-severity surface fire was lacking, as fire scars were absent, and did not influence woodland densities, but stand-replacing fires served as long-rotation (>400-600 years), stand-initiating events. Old-growth stands (>300 years old) were found in 75% of plots, consistent with a long fire rotation. Juniper and piñon age structures suggest contrasting responses during the past several centuries to dry and wet episodes linked to the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) and Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). Juniper density increased slightly during periods of drought, positive (warm) AMO (after approximately 10-year lag), and negative (cool) PDO. In contrast, piñon populations may still be recovering from a long, drought-filled period (AD 1620-1820), with pulses of recovery favored during cool AMO, warm PDO, and above-average moisture periods. Analysis of 20th-century tree establishment and instrumental climate data corroborate the long-term relationships between age structure and climate. After Euro-American settlement (AD 1881), livestock grazing reduced understory grasses and forbs, reducing competition with tree seedlings and facilitating climate-induced increases in piñons. Thus tree populations in these woodlands are in flux, affected by drought and wet periods linked to oceanic-atmospheric variability, Euro-American livestock grazing, and long-rotation, high

  10. Auto Mechanics: Auto Mechanic Service Specialist (Lubrication).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Virgil

    The unit of individualized learning activities is designed to provide training in the job skill, lubrication, for the prospective auto mechanic service specialist. The materials in the unit are divided into two sections. The developmental, or preliminary phase, for use by the instructor, includes brief descriptions of the job and of the student…

  11. Generalists and Specialists: Teaming for Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbs, Stephen Mark

    1986-01-01

    Debates the issue of whether generalists or specialists should teach art. Points out the strengths of each, maintaining the decision must consider educational philosophy, instructional approach, and teacher competence, as well as the permissible parameters of budgeting and staffing. Suggests that the two could team for success. (TRS)

  12. [New business model for medical specialists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houwen, L G H J Louis

    2013-01-01

    The reforms in the field of medical specialist care have important implications for the professional practice of medical specialists and their working relationship with the hospital. This leads to a considerable amount of pressure placed upon the way physicians have traditionally practiced their liberal professions, which is by forming partnerships and practicing from within the hospitals based on an admission agreement. As of 2015, the tax benefits for entrepreneurs will be abolished and the formation of regional partnerships will be discouraged. These developments not only pose threats but also offer opportunities for both the entrepreneurial medical specialist and the innovative hospital. In this article, the prospect of a future business model for specialist medical care will be outlined and explored by proposing three new organizational forms. The central vision of this model is that physicians who wish to retain their status of liberal professional practitioners in the twenty-first century should be more involved in the ownership structure of hospitals. The social importance of responsible patient care remains paramount.

  13. Psychological Measurement for Specialists in Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marley, Scott C.

    2010-01-01

    Recent articles in "The Journal for Specialists in Group Work" have discussed credibility indicators for quantitative and qualitative studies (Asner-Self, 2009; Rubel & Villalba, 2009). This article extends upon these contributions by discussing measurement issues that are relevant to producers and consumers of quantitative group research. This…

  14. How I train specialists in transfusion medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodnough, Lawrence Tim; Murphy, Michael F

    2016-12-01

    The changing focus of transfusion medicine (TM) toward the hospital rather than the blood center and the involvement of TM specialists in a wide range of patient blood management and other specialist activities in the hospital, rather than just blood bank activities, means that the training of the transfusion specialists of the future should be under constant review. We provide overviews of the current training programs of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education in the United States and the Joint Royal Colleges of Physicians Training Board in the United Kingdom, along with specific descriptions of our own training programs at Stanford and Oxford. The numbers of TM fellows in training annually in the United States and of those who attempt to attain board certification have increased substantially over the last 20 years, despite the profound reduction in blood utilization since 2009. These trends reflect increasing job and career opportunities in new activities, such as patient blood management at hospital-based transfusion services. This trend has been seen to a lesser extent in the United Kingdom, although the focus of TM is similarly switching to hospital-based transfusion services. Based on current trends, transfusion medicine is a growing and robust specialty in the United States but perhaps less so in the United Kingdom, increasingly with hospital-centered job opportunities for improving blood utilization and clinical outcomes. Establishing pediatric TM training programs and improving research training are further opportunities for training TM specialists. © 2016 AABB.

  15. Formation of communication skills of aviation specialists

    OpenAIRE

    Коваленко, Ольга Олександрівна

    2013-01-01

    Culture of the professional communication is the basis of the professional activity. It is spoken about the process of formation of the professional communication culture, where communication, professionalism of the communication are foundation of it in personal oriented studying by means of creative technologies; examined about peculiarities, and defined conditions of formation of professional oral skills culture of future aviation specialists.

  16. Integrating Organizational Specialists into School Districts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmuck, Richard A.; Runkel, Philip J.

    In this paper, the authors describe (1) the role of the organizational specialist in trying to establish and maintain vertical and horizontal lines of communication in organizations; (2) two case studies of organizational development (Kent and Eugene); (3) the values of creativity, work, and sharing that guide the authors; (4) the general systems…

  17. One Team: Classroom Teachers and Specialists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Sheila Levine

    2016-01-01

    This View from the Chalkboard article reflects my view of how today's classroom teacher and specialist have joined together to create "One Team" that benefits the student. This was not always the case but the trend, in my view, is clear and the benefits compelling. I highlight the "reading workshop model" as an approach with…

  18. Avionics Instrument Systems Specialist (AFSC 32551).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Lawrence B.; Crowcroft, Robert A.

    This six-volume student text is designed for use by Air Force personnel enrolled in a self-study extension course for avionics instrument systems specialists. Covered in the individual volumes are career field familiarization (career field progression and training, security, occupational safety and health, and career field reference material);…

  19. Preparation, Endorsement, and Employment of Mathematics Specialists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicmanec, Karen B. Mauck

    2008-01-01

    For over 30 years, educators have recommended that mathematics specialists be placed in schools to provide teachers with the resources they need to assist their students. To assess whether these recommendations have been realized, a survey was used to gather data from large school districts, the 50 states, and District of Columbia. The outcome of…

  20. Ecohydrologic Implications and Management of Post-fire Soil Water Repellency in Burned Pinon-Juniper Woodlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Matthew; Zvirzdin, Daniel; Fernelius, Kaitlynn; McMillan, Mica; Kostka, Stanley

    2014-05-01

    Erosion and weed dominance often limit the recovery of piñon-juniper woodlands of western North America after high intensity wildfires. Soil water repellency (SWR) is one factor that may promote overland flow and impede seedling establishment. In spite of these effects, the influence of post-fire SWR on site recovery is poorly understood. Our presentation summarizes data collected within studies on burned piñon-juniper woodlands that provide new insight on: 1) the spatial distribution and severity of SWR, 2) influence of SWR on soil hydrology, nitrogen cycling, and site revegetation, and 3) the suitability of soil surfactants as a post-fire restoration tool. We demonstrate how patterns of SWR are highly correlated to pre-fire woodland canopy structure. At sites where SWR is present, infiltration, soil water content, and plant establishment is significantly less than at non-hydrophobic sites. We show how newly developed soil surfactants can significantly improve ecohydrologic properties required for plant growth by overcoming SWR; thus, increasing the amount and duration of available water for seed germination and plant growth. However, the application of soil surfactants in wildfire-affected ecosystems has been limited due to logistical and economic constraints associated with the standard practice of using large quantities of irrigation water as the surfactant carrier. We have developed a potential solution to this problem by using seed coating technology to use the seed as the carrier for the delivery of soil surfactant. Through this approach, precipitation leaches the surfactant from the seed into the soil where it absorbs onto the soil particles and ameliorates water repellency within the seeds microsite. We present findings from laboratory and field evaluations of surfactant seed coatings, which provide evidence that it may be plausible for the technology to improve post-fire seeding efforts by restoring soil hydrologic function and increasing seedling

  1. The Impact of Ozone Treatment in Dynamic Bed Parameters on Changes in Biologically Active Substances of Juniper Berries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodowska, Agnieszka Joanna; Śmigielski, Krzysztof; Nowak, Agnieszka; Czyżowska, Agata; Otlewska, Anna

    2015-01-01

    The development of the parameters of ozone decontamination method assuring the least possible losses of biologically active substances (essential oils and polyphenols) and their activity in common juniper (Juniperus communis (L.)) berries was studied. Ozone treatment in dynamic bed was conducted 9 times. The process was conducted under different ozone concentrations (100.0; 130.0; 160.0 g O3/m3) and times (30, 60, 90 min). After each decontamination, the microbiological profile of the juniper berries was studied, and the contaminating microflora was identified. Next to the microbiological profile, the phenolic profile, as well as antioxidant activity of extracts and essential oils were determined. The total polyphenol content (TPC), composition of essential oils, free radical-scavenging capacity, total antioxidant capacity, ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), beta-carotene bleaching test (BCB) and LC-MS polyphenol analysis were carried out. The study reveals that during short ozone contact times, higher amounts of TPC, 15.47 and 12.91 mg CE/g of extract, for samples 100/30 and 130/30, respectively, were demonstrated. Whereas samples 100/60, 130/60, 100/90, and 160/90 exhibited the lowest amount of phenolics. The highest antioxidant activity was found in the methanol extract obtained from ozonated berries which exhibited the lowest IC50 in all the antioxidant assays, such as DPPH, FRAP, and BCB assays. Ozone treatment showed noteworthy potential and its usage in food manufacturing and as an alternative decontamination method should be considered.

  2. The Impact of Ozone Treatment in Dynamic Bed Parameters on Changes in Biologically Active Substances of Juniper Berries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Joanna Brodowska

    Full Text Available The development of the parameters of ozone decontamination method assuring the least possible losses of biologically active substances (essential oils and polyphenols and their activity in common juniper (Juniperus communis (L. berries was studied. Ozone treatment in dynamic bed was conducted 9 times. The process was conducted under different ozone concentrations (100.0; 130.0; 160.0 g O3/m3 and times (30, 60, 90 min. After each decontamination, the microbiological profile of the juniper berries was studied, and the contaminating microflora was identified. Next to the microbiological profile, the phenolic profile, as well as antioxidant activity of extracts and essential oils were determined. The total polyphenol content (TPC, composition of essential oils, free radical-scavenging capacity, total antioxidant capacity, ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP, beta-carotene bleaching test (BCB and LC-MS polyphenol analysis were carried out. The study reveals that during short ozone contact times, higher amounts of TPC, 15.47 and 12.91 mg CE/g of extract, for samples 100/30 and 130/30, respectively, were demonstrated. Whereas samples 100/60, 130/60, 100/90, and 160/90 exhibited the lowest amount of phenolics. The highest antioxidant activity was found in the methanol extract obtained from ozonated berries which exhibited the lowest IC50 in all the antioxidant assays, such as DPPH, FRAP, and BCB assays. Ozone treatment showed noteworthy potential and its usage in food manufacturing and as an alternative decontamination method should be considered.

  3. Modeling the shrub and juniper encroachment in the western north America grasslands with a Cellular Automata model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caracciolo, D.; Istanbulluoglu, E.; Noto, L. V.

    2013-12-01

    Arid and semiarid grasslands of western North America have experienced dramatic changes over the last 150 years as a result of woody plant encroachment (WPE). WPE is characterized as increase in density, cover and biomass of indigenous tree or shrubby plants in grasslands. In this study we examine the environmental factors that trigger and further the progress of WPE at two semiarid sites using the CATGraSS ecohydrologic plant coexistence model. CATGraSS is a spatially distributed model driven by spatially explicit irradiance and runs on a fine-resolution gridded domain. In CATGraSS each cell can hold a single plant type or can remain empty. Plant competition is modeled by keeping track of mortality and establishment of plants, both calculated probabilistically based on soil moisture stress. For this study CATGraSS is improved with a stochastic fire and a grazing function, and its plant establishment algorithm is modified. Using CATGraSS shrub encroachment is studied in the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge (SNWR), New Mexico, located in the northern Chihuahuan desert. The area shows a dramatic encroachment front of Larrea tridentata (shrub) into native desert grassland. The model is implemented in a small area (7.3 km2) in SNWR. The second study site is a small catchment (11.8 km2) located within the Ochoco National Forest, Crook County, OR, where Juniper encroachment has been observed since the mid 1800s. The outcome of the changes in observed climate, fire frequency, and grazing intensity are investigated through numerical modeling scenarios. While in the Ochoco National Forest basin, the Western Juniper encroaches all the study area and the shrub disappears. In the SNWR basin, the model is able to reproduce the encroachment, simulating an increasing of the shrub from 2% in 1860 to 42% in 2010 (actual shrub percentage) highlighting as more influent factors the reduced fire frequency and the increased grazing intensity.

  4. Burnout Syndrome of Leisure Time Activities Specialist.

    OpenAIRE

    REBROVÁ, Iveta

    2012-01-01

    This thesis is dealing with burnout syndrome among leisure time specialists. Theoretical part describes burnout syndrome, its historical basis, symptoms and causes, protective factors and preventive techniques, which prevent from burnout syndrome risk. Next part deals with common stress, its causes and symptoms, and psychosocial stress, which is closely related with burnout syndrome. Ending of the theoretical part is focused on understanding the differences between jobs of common teacher and ...

  5. CAUSES FOR INEFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION BETWEEN MEDICAL SPECIALISTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stayko I. Spiridonov

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In the resent years the healthcare system has moved to inter-professional, cross-disciplinary, multi-person approach where the communications are very important for ensuring patient safety. Communication in health organisations needs to be studied and analysed deeply and comprehensively because the future of an organisation often depends on good communication. The purpose of this study is to investigate and analyse the reasons for ineffective communication between medical specialists in the teams they work in. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire method is used. Through a survey over a period of 12 months (from 01. 12. 2014 to 01. 12. 2015 at the Escullap Hospital in Pazardzhik, DCC 18 - Sofia, St. Mina Hospital in Plovdiv, MHAT – Plovdiv, DCC 1 in Haskovo, UMHAT in Stara Zagora, DCC 3 in Varna and MHAT – Parvomay, was studied and analyzed the opinion of medical specialists on the effectiveness of communication within the team they work in. The survey includes 477 medical specialists. Results and conclusions: According to 41.1% of the respondents, the communication in the team they work in is insufficiently effective. Most of the respondents (39.8% find their colleagues responsible for the ineffective communication, followed by those who seek the cause for poor communication in the management of the health care facility (27.6%. The leading cause of poor communication in the team according to the study participants is the inequality between the characters of the colleagues (41.9%. According to the majority of respondents (28.3%, improvements in facilities and wage increases (27.3% would be essential to improve communication within the team they work in. Recommendations have been formulated to improve communication among medical specialists.

  6. Enhancing assertiveness in district nurse specialist practice

    OpenAIRE

    Green, J.

    2016-01-01

    District nurse (DN) care delivery has undergone substantial change in recent years due to changing demographics and service delivery demands that have called for a move of care delivery from secondary to primary care. The title District Nurse is recorded with the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) on completion of the Specialist Practice Qualification in District Nursing (SPQ DN), which purports to be a 'transformational' course that prepares future caseload holders to manage their team and ...

  7. Burnout Syndrome of Leisure Time Activities Specialist.

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    This thesis is dealing with burnout syndrome among leisure time specialists. Theoretical part describes burnout syndrome, its historical basis, symptoms and causes, protective factors and preventive techniques, which prevent from burnout syndrome risk. Next part deals with common stress, its causes and symptoms, and psychosocial stress, which is closely related with burnout syndrome. Ending of the theoretical part is focused on understanding the differences between jobs of common teacher and ...

  8. Sports Medicine: What is a Sports Medicine Specialist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... both the treatment and prevention of illness and injury. The Sports Medicine Specialist helps patients maximize function and minimize ... of these conditions. However, approximately 90% of all sports injuries are non-surgical. The Sports Medicine Specialist can ...

  9. Medical cost of Lassa fever treatment in Irrua Specialist Teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Medical cost of Lassa fever treatment in Irrua Specialist Teaching Hospital, Nigeria. ... Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. ... Of Lassa Fever Research and Control, Irrua Specialist Teaching Hospital (ISTH) Irrua, in Edo State, ...

  10. Data Report: Meteorological and Evapotranspiration Data from Sagebrush and Pinyon Pine/Juniper Communities at Pahute Mesa, Nevada National Security Site, 2011-2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jasoni, Richard L [DRI; Larsen, Jessica D [DRI; Lyles, Brad F. [DRI; Healey, John M [DRI; Cooper, Clay A [DRI; Hershey, Ronald L [DRI; Lefebre, Karen J [DRI

    2013-04-01

    Pahute Mesa is a groundwater recharge area at the Nevada National Security Site. Because underground nuclear testing was conducted at Pahute Mesa, groundwater recharge may transport radionuclides from underground test sites downward to the water table; the amount of groundwater recharge is also an important component of contaminant transport models. To estimate the amount of groundwater recharge at Pahute Mesa, an INFIL3.0 recharge-runoff model is being developed. Two eddy covariance (EC) stations were installed on Pahute Mesa to estimate evapotranspiration (ET) to support the groundwater recharge modeling project. This data report describes the methods that were used to estimate ET and collect meteorological data. Evapotranspiration was estimated for two predominant plant communities on Pahute Mesa; one site was located in a sagebrush plant community, the other site in a pinyon pine/juniper community. Annual ET was estimated to be 310±13.9 mm for the sagebrush site and 347±15.9 mm for the pinyon pine/juniper site (March 26, 2011 to March 26, 2012). Annual precipitation measured with unheated tipping bucket rain gauges was 179 mm at the sagebrush site and 159 mm at the pinyon pine/juniper site. Annual precipitation measured with bulk precipitation gauges was 222 mm at the sagebrush site and 227 mm at the pinyon pine/juniper site (March 21, 2011 to March 28, 2012). A comparison of tipping bucket versus bulk precipitation data showed that total precipitation measured by the tipping bucket rain gauges was 17 to 20 percent lower than the bulk precipitation gauges. These differences were most likely the result of the unheated tipping bucket precipitation gauges not measuring frozen precipitation as accurately as the bulk precipitation gauges. In this one-year study, ET exceeded precipitation at both study sites because estimates of ET included precipitation that fell during the winter of 2010-2011 prior to EC instrumentation and the precipitation gauges started

  11. The predictability of phytophagous insect communities: host specialists as habitat specialists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Müller

    Full Text Available The difficulties specialized phytophagous insects face in finding habitats with an appropriate host should constrain their dispersal. Within the concept of metacommunities, this leads to the prediction that host-plant specialists should sort into local assemblages according to the local environmental conditions, i.e. habitat conditions, whereas assemblages of host-plant generalists should depend also on regional processes. Our study aimed at ranking the importance of local environmental factors and species composition of the vegetation for predicting the species composition of phytophagous moth assemblages with either a narrow or a broad host range. Our database consists of 351,506 specimens representing 820 species of nocturnal Macrolepidoptera sampled between 1980 and 2006 using light traps in 96 strict forest reserves in southern Germany. Species were grouped as specialists or generalists according to the food plants of the larvae; specialists use host plants belonging to one genus. We used predictive canonical correspondence and co-correspondence analyses to rank the importance of local environmental factors, the species composition of the vegetation and the role of host plants for predicting the species composition of host-plant specialists and generalists. The cross-validatory fit for predicting the species composition of phytophagous moths was higher for host-plant specialists than for host-plant generalists using environmental factors as well as the composition of the vegetation. As expected for host-plant specialists, the species composition of the vegetation was a better predictor of the composition of these assemblages than the environmental variables. But surprisingly, this difference for specialized insects was not due to the occurrence of their host plants. Overall, our study supports the idea that owing to evolutionary constraints in finding a host, host-plant specialists and host-plant generalists follow two different models of

  12. Comparing the above-ground component biomass estimates of western junipers using airborne and full-waveform terrestrial laser scanning data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, R.; Glenn, N. F.; Spaete, L.; Hardegree, S. P.

    2012-12-01

    With the rapid expansion into shrub steppe and grassland ecosystems over the last century, western juniper (Juniperus occidentalis var. occidentalis Hook) is becoming a major component of the regional carbon pool in the Intermountain West. Understanding how biomass is allocated across individual tree components is necessary to understand the uncertainties in biomass estimates and more accurately quantify biomass and carbon dynamics in these ecosystems. Estimates of component biomass are also important for canopy fuel load assessment and predicting rangeland fire behavior. Airborne LiDAR can capture vegetation structure over larger scales, but the high crown penetration and sampling density of terrestrial laser scanner (TLS) instruments can better capture tree components. In this study, we assessed the ability of airborne LiDAR to estimate biomass of tree components of western juniper with validation data from field measured tees and a full-waveform TLS. Sixteen juniper trees (height range 1.5-10 m) were randomly selected using a double sampling strategy from different height classes in the Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed in the Owyhee Mountains, southwestern Idaho, USA. Each tree was scanned with a full-waveform TLS, and the dry biomass of each component (foliage, branches and main stem) were measured by destructive harvesting of the trees. We compare the allometric relationships of biomass estimates of the tree components obtained from field-measured trees and TLS-based estimates with the estimates from discrete-return airborne-LiDAR based estimates.

  13. Chemical Composition and Antioxidant Properties of Juniper Berry (Juniperus communis L.) Essential Oil. Action of the Essential Oil on the Antioxidant Protection of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Model Organism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höferl, Martina; Stoilova, Ivanka; Schmidt, Erich; Wanner, Jürgen; Jirovetz, Leopold; Trifonova, Dora; Krastev, Lutsian; Krastanov, Albert

    2014-01-01

    The essential oil of juniper berries (Juniperus communis L., Cupressaceae) is traditionally used for medicinal and flavoring purposes. As elucidated by gas chromatography/flame ionization detector (GC/FID) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS methods), the juniper berry oil from Bulgaria is largely comprised of monoterpene hydrocarbons such as α-pinene (51.4%), myrcene (8.3%), sabinene (5.8%), limonene (5.1%) and β-pinene (5.0%). The antioxidant capacity of the essential oil was evaluated in vitro by 2,2-Diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) scavenging, 2,2-azino-bis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6 sulfonic acid (ABTS) radical cation scavenging, hydroxyl radical (ОН•) scavenging and chelating capacity, superoxide radical (•O2−) scavenging and xanthine oxidase inhibitory effects, hydrogen peroxide scavenging. The antioxidant activity of the oil attributable to electron transfer made juniper berry essential oil a strong antioxidant, whereas the antioxidant activity attributable to hydrogen atom transfer was lower. Lipid peroxidation inhibition by the essential oil in both stages, i.e., hydroperoxide formation and malondialdehyde formation, was less efficient than the inhibition by butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT). In vivo studies confirmed these effects of the oil which created the possibility of blocking the oxidation processes in yeast cells by increasing activity of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx). PMID:26784665

  14. Elder Specialists: Psychosocial Aspects of Medical Education in Geriatric Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann-Stone, Nancy; Robinson, Sherry B.; Rull, Gary; Rosher, Richard B.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes an Elder Specialist Program developed by one school of medicine to sensitize medical students to geriatric psychosocial issues. Elder Specialists participate in panel discussions as part of each geriatric session. As an alternative to traditional senior mentoring programs, the Elder Specialist Program provides all students a…

  15. Is new drug prescribing in primary care specialist induced?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Florentinus, S.R.; Heerdink, R.; Dijk, L. van; Griens, F.A.M.G.; Groenewegen, P.P.; Leufkens, H.G.M

    2009-01-01

    Background: Medical specialists are often seen as the first prescribers of new drugs. However, the extent to which specialists influence new drug prescribing in primary care is largely unknown. Methods: This study estimates the influence of medical specialists on new drug prescribing in primary care

  16. Is new drug prescribing in primary care specialist induced?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Florentinus, S.R.; Heerdink, E.R.; Dijk, L. van; Griens, F.; Groenewegen, P.P.; Leufkens, H.G.M.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Medical specialists are often seen as the first prescribers of new drugs. However, the extent to which specialists influence new drug prescribing in primary care is largely unknown. METHODS: This study estimates the influence of medical specialists on new drug prescribing in primary care

  17. 22 CFR 61.6 - Consultation with subject matter specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Consultation with subject matter specialists... FREE FLOW OF AUDIO-VISUAL MATERIALS § 61.6 Consultation with subject matter specialists. (a) The Department may, in its discretion, solicit the opinion of subject matter specialists for the purpose...

  18. Methodological bases of innovative training of specialists in nanotechnology field

    OpenAIRE

    FIGOVSKY Oleg Lvovich; SHAMELKHANOVA Nelya A.; AIDAROVA Saule B.

    2016-01-01

    The performance of innovative training system aimed at highly intellectual specialists in the area of nanotechnologies for Kazakhstan’s economy demands establishment and development of nanotechnological market in the country, teaching of innovative engineering combined with consistent research, integration of trained specialists with latest technologies and sciences at the international level. Methodological aspects of training competitive specialists for nanotechnological field are spe...

  19. School Library Media Specialist-Teacher Collaboration: Characteristics, Challenges, Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, O. P.; Bray, Marty

    2011-01-01

    The most successful school library media specialists are those who collaborate with teachers as full partners in the instructional process. Without assertive action by the school library media specialist, however, school administrators and teachers are likely to be more aware of the media specialist's administrative role than the roles of teacher,…

  20. Perceptions of Nigerian medical specialists on research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulraheem Olarongbe Mahmoud

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The current research aimed at collating the views of medical specialists on disease priorities, class and outcomes of health research in Nigeria, and draw appropriate policy implications. Structured questionnaires were distributed to consent 90 randomly selected medical specialists practising in six Nigerian tertiary health institutions. Participants' background information, relative disease priority, research types and class, type and class of publication media, frequency of publications, challenges faced in publishing research, impact of their research on health practice or policy, and inventions made were probed. Fifty-one out of the 90 questionnaires distributed were returned giving a response rate of 63.3%. Sixty-four point six percent indicated that the highest priority should be given to non communicable diseases while still recognizing that considerations should be giving to the others. They were largely “always” involved in simple low budget retrospective studies or cross-sectional and medical education studies (67.8% and over a third (37.5% had never been involved in clinical trials. They largely preferred to “always” publish in PubMed indexed journals that are foreign-based (65.0%. They also indicated that their research works very rarely resulted in inventions (4% and change (4% in clinical practice or health policy. Our study respondents indicated that they were largely involved in simple low budget research works that rarely had significant impacts and outcomes. We recommend that adequate resources and research infrastructures particularly funding be made available to medical specialists in Nigeria. Both undergraduate and postgraduate medical education in Nigeria should emphasize research training in their curricula.

  1. Soil moisture, temperature, and carbon substrate influences on soil respiration in a piñon-juniper woodland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryman, E.; Marshall, J. D.; Rahn, T.; Litvak, M. E.

    2010-12-01

    Arid and semi-arid ecosystems may be more vulnerable to climate change than mesic systems, having potentially large consequences for ecosystem carbon balance of the US southwest. Specifically, piñon-juniper woodlands cover much of the land area in the SW US, and they have experienced widespread piñon mortality in the past ten years. The impact of this mortality on carbon cycling in these ecosystems has yet to be fully examined. Of particular current interest is how soil temperature, soil moisture, and substrate availability interact to influence short-term variability of soil respiration rates. In this study, we examined the dependence of soil respiration on recent piñon photosynthate, temperature, and moisture in a piñon-juniper woodland in central New Mexico. We utilized phloem-girdling to study the importance of recently-fixed photosynthate as substrate for respiration, and we treated the stable carbon isotope ratio of soil respiration as indicative of different substrate sources contributing to soil respiration. Due to the presence of C3, C4, and CAM photosynthetic pathways in the ecosystem, we were able to infer changing contribution of different sources to soil respiration. We found that soil-respired δ13C depended on both soil moisture and lagged precipitation, although in dissimilar manners, suggesting different mechanisms are triggered by rainfall events compared to elevated soil moisture. C3-source respiration responded quickly to precipitation events. Over a ten-day period following girdling of piñon trees, soil-respired δ13C did not significantly change compared to a reference plot. There were also distinct differences in carbon isotope signatures and temporal patterns of such signatures of soil respiration collected in open spaces compared to underneath piñon canopies, emphasizing the importance of considering spatial variability when sampling soil-respired CO2 in patchy ecosystems. Overall, we found little evidence that soil respiration in

  2. Professiology and Education of Pharmaceutical Industry Specialists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Starostenkova T.A.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The article investigates the pharmaceutical industry professions. In this field, new professions has emerged, and the functions of the traditional ones has changed. Changed are also the content of activities and the level of responsibility of specialists. All this requires improved employees training. Scientific basis for the professional standards, educational standards and educational programs are different job analysis. The author substantiates the need for job description research for different specializations in pharmacy, as well as the feasibility of combining efforts of professiologists and representatives of educational institutions to address the actual problem of training for pharmaceutical industry professionals.

  3. Academic Information Security Researchers: Hackers or Specialists?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadkhah, Mehdi; Lagzian, Mohammad; Borchardt, Glenn

    2017-04-10

    In this opinion piece, we present a synopsis of our findings from the last 2 years concerning cyber-attacks on web-based academia. We also present some of problems that we have faced and try to resolve any misunderstandings about our work. We are academic information security specialists, not hackers. Finally, we present a brief overview of our methods for detecting cyber fraud in an attempt to present general guidelines for researchers who would like to continue our work. We believe that our work is necessary for protecting the integrity of scholarly publishing against emerging cybercrime.

  4. E-learning for medical imaging specialists: introducing blended learning in a nuclear medicine specialist course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslerud, Torjan; Tulipan, Andreas Julius; Gray, Robert M; Biermann, Martin

    2017-07-01

    While e-learning has become an important tool in teaching medical students, the training of specialists in medical imaging is still dominated by lecture-based courses. To assess the potential of e-learning in specialist education in medical imaging. An existing lecture-based five-day course in Clinical Nuclear Medicine (NM) was enhanced by e-learning resources and activities, including practical exercises. An anonymized survey was conducted after participants had completed and passed the multiple choice electronic course examination. Twelve out of 15 course participants (80%) responded. Overall satisfaction with the new course format was high, but 25% of the respondents wanted more interactive elements such as discussions and practical exercises. The importance of lecture handouts and supplementary online material such as selected original articles and professional guidelines was affirmed by all the respondents (92% fully, 8% partially), while 75% fully and 25% partially agreed that the lectures had been interesting and relevant. E-learning represents a hitherto unrealized potential in the education of medical specialists. It may expedite training of medical specialists while at the same time containing costs.

  5. Annual precipitation since 515 BC reconstructed from living and fossil juniper growth of northeastern Qinghai Province, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheppard, P.R.; Graumlich, L.J. [University of Arizona, Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, AZ (United States); Tarasov, P.E. [Alfred-Wegener-Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Potsdam Department, Potsdam (Germany); Heussner, K.-U.; Wagner, M. [German Archaeological Institute, Department of Eurasian Archaeology, Berlin (Germany); Oesterle, H. [Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Telegrafenberg, P. O. Box 60 12 03, Potsdam (Germany); Thompson, L.G. [Ohio State University, Byrd Polar Research Center, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2004-12-01

    Annual precipitation for the last 2,500 years was reconstructed for northeastern Qinghai from living and archaeological juniper trees. A dominant feature of the precipitation of this area is a high degree of variability in mean rainfall at annual, decadal, and centennial scales, with many wet and dry periods that are corroborated by other paleoclimatic indicators. Reconstructed values of annual precipitation vary mostly from 100 to 300 mm and thus are no different from the modern instrumental record in Dulan. However, relatively dry years with below-average precipitation occurred more frequently in the past than in the present. Periods of relatively dry years occurred during 74-25 BC, AD51-375, 426-500, 526-575, 626-700, 1100-1225, 1251-1325, 1451-1525, 1651-1750 and 1801-1825. Periods with a relatively wet climate occurred during AD376-425, 576-625, 951-1050, 1351-1375, 1551-1600 and the present. This variability is probably related to latitudinal positions of winter frontal storms. Another key feature of precipitation in this area is an apparently direct relationship between interannual variability in rainfall with temperature, whereby increased warming in the future might lead to increased flooding and droughts. Such increased climatic variability might then impact human societies of the area, much as the climate has done for the past 2,500 years. (orig.)

  6. Difference in Tree Growth Responses to Climate at the Upper Treeline: Qilian Juniper in the Anyemaqen Mountains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianfeng Peng; Xiaohua Gou; Fahu Chen; Jinbao Li; Puxing Liu; Yong Zhang; Keyan Fang

    2008-01-01

    Three ring-width chronologies were developed from Qilian Juniper (Sabina przewalskii Kom.) at the upper treeline along a west-east gradient in the Anyemaqen Mountains.Most chronological statistics,except for mean sensitivity (MS),decreased from west to east.The first principal component (PC1) Ioadings indicated that stands in a similar climate condition were most important to the variability of radial growth.PC2 Ioadings decreased from west to east,suggesting the difference of tree-growth between eastern and western Anyemaqen Mountains.Correlations between standard chronologies and climatic factors revealed different climatic influences on radial growth along a west-east gradient in the study area.Temperature of warm season (July-August) was important to the radial growth at the upper treeline in the whole study area.Precipitation of current May was an important limiting factor of tree growth only in the western (drier) upper treeline,whereas precipitation of current September limited tree growth in the eastern (wetter) upper treeline.Response function analysis results showed that there were regional differences between tree growth and climatic factors in various sampling sites of the whole study area.Temperature and precipitation were the important factors influencing tree growth in western (drier) upper treeline.However,tree growth was greatly limited by temperature at the upper treeline in the middle area,and was more limited by precipitation than temperature in the eastern (wetter) upper treeline.

  7. Difference in tree growth responses to climate at the upper treeline: Qilian Juniper in the Anyemaqen Mountains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jianfeng; Gou, Xiaohua; Chen, Fahu; Li, Jinbao; Liu, Puxing; Zhang, Yong; Fang, Keyan

    2008-08-01

    Three ring-width chronologies were developed from Qilian Juniper (Sabina przewalskii Kom.) at the upper treeline along a west-east gradient in the Anyemaqen Mountains. Most chronological statistics, except for mean sensitivity (MS), decreased from west to east. The first principal component (PC1) loadings indicated that stands in a similar climate condition were most important to the variability of radial growth. PC2 loadings decreased from west to east, suggesting the difference of tree-growth between eastern and western Anyemaqen Mountains. Correlations between standard chronologies and climatic factors revealed different climatic influences on radial growth along a west-east gradient in the study area. Temperature of warm season (July-August) was important to the radial growth at the upper treeline in the whole study area. Precipitation of current May was an important limiting factor of tree growth only in the western (drier) upper treeline, whereas precipitation of current September limited tree growth in the eastern (wetter) upper treeline. Response function analysis results showed that there were regional differences between tree growth and climatic factors in various sampling sites of the whole study area. Temperature and precipitation were the important factors influencing tree growth in western (drier) upper treeline. However, tree growth was greatly limited by temperature at the upper treeline in the middle area, and was more limited by precipitation than temperature in the eastern (wetter) upper treeline.

  8. Specialist healthcare law for nurses: an introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tingle, John; McHale, Jean

    Nurses are increasingly concerned with legal and ethical dilemmas in clinical decision-making. The law impacts across a wide range of issues in nursing practice. It is important for healthcare professionals to be aware of the way in which the law regulates their professional practice. In this article John Tingle and Jean McHale introduce a new series of articles on law for nurses. The series will feature contributions by legal academics who are specialists in the area of healthcare law. The series will outline basic issues such as the English legal system. It will then consider a wide range of issues, including nursing negligence, legal issues of expanded role, patient safety, consent to treatment, adults lacking mental capacity, mental health law, end-of-life decision-making, law and nursing research, resource allocation law and human rights.

  9. Enhancing assertiveness in district nurse specialist practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Julie

    2016-08-02

    District nurse (DN) care delivery has undergone substantial change in recent years due to changing demographics and service delivery demands that have called for a move of care delivery from secondary to primary care. The title District Nurse is recorded with the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) on completion of the Specialist Practice Qualification in District Nursing (SPQ DN), which purports to be a 'transformational' course that prepares future caseload holders to manage their team and prioritise care delivery effectively. This article explores the need for assertiveness skills in this role in response to Australian research, and outlines the pedagogic interventions implemented during the SPQ DN course to enhance this skill. Assertiveness scores were monitored for the duration of the course and demonstrated a significant increase-a topic that is now the subject of a future, funded study.

  10. Tenth target fabrication specialists` meeting: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foreman, L.R.; Stark, J.C. [comp.

    1995-11-01

    This tenth meeting of specialists in target fabrication for inertial confinement is unique in that it is the first meeting that was completely unclassified. As a result of the new classification, we were able to invite more foreign participation. In addition to participants from the US, UK, and Canada, representatives from France, Japan, and two Russian laboratories attended, about 115 in all. This booklet presents full papers and poster sessions. Indirect and direct drive laser implosions are considered. Typical topics include: polymer or aluminium or resorcinol/formaldehyde shells, laser technology, photon tunneling microscopy as a characterization tool, foams, coatings, hohlraums, and beryllium capsules. Hydrogen, deuterium, tritium, and beryllium are all considered as fuels.

  11. Managed care and the infectious diseases specialist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tice, A D; Slama, T G; Berman, S; Braun, P; Burke, J P; Cherney, A; Gross, P A; Harris, P; Reid-Hatton, M; Hoffman, R; Joseph, P; Lawton, S; Massanari, R M; Miller, Z I; Osheroff, W J; Poretz, D; Shalowitz, M; Simmons, B; Turner, J P; Wade, B; Nolet, B R

    1996-08-01

    There is growing demand to contain health care costs and to reassess the value of medical services. The traditional hospital, academic, and research roles of the infectious disease (ID) specialist are threatened, yet there is an increasing need for expertise because of growing antimicrobial resistance and emerging pathogens. Opportunities exist to develop and expand services for the care of patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus and in infection control, epidemiology, outcomes research, outpatient intravenous therapy, and resource management. It is important for ID physicians to appreciate the principles involved in managed care and the areas in which ID services can be valuable. To be effective, physicians need to know about tools such as practice guidelines, physician profiling, outcomes monitoring, computerized information management, risk sharing, networking, and marketing, as well as related legal issues. With a positive attitude toward learning, application, and leadership, ID physicians can redefine their role and expand their services through managed care.

  12. The internal medicine specialist and neurosurgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pizzini

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The neurosurgical patient is often a real challenge for the physicians, because of a frequent multimorbidity and a higher risk for severe complications. Cooperation between internal medicine specialist and neurosurgeon is essential to prevent the fatal effects of cranial and spinal injuries. The topic issues of medical interest in neurosurgery are the disorders of sodium balance, the glycemic control, the thromboembolic risk, the intracerebral bleeding management and the infective problems. The neurosurgeons could be worried by treating these complications that are mostly of internal medicine interest and that could unfortunately rise the risk of death or irreversible insults. AIM OF THE REVIEW This review summarizes the modality of diagnosis and therapy of the foremost concerns in neurosurgical field.

  13. Educational programme on radiation protection for veterinary medicine specialists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djuric, G.; Popovic, D. [School of Veterinary Medicine, Dept. of Radiology and Radiation Hygiene and Dept. of Physics, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1992-07-01

    The education of radiation protection for veterinary medicine specialists on the University of Belgrade is integrated both in regular graduate studies and in postgraduate studies. Within the graduate studies, students attend courses in physics and biophysics and in radiation hygiene. During postgraduate or specialistic veterinary medicine studies, veterinary medicine specialists expand their knowledge in radiation protection through a number of courses on radiation biophysics, radioecology, nuclear instrumentation and environmental protection. (author)

  14. What Practicing School Library Media Specialists Say about Collection Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerby, Ramona

    2002-01-01

    Presents thought from school library media specialists regarding collection development. Topics include first-year experiences; the importance of cataloging; selection criteria; selection sources; and weeding. (LRW)

  15. Is new drug prescribing in primary care specialist induced?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Groenewegen Peter P

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medical specialists are often seen as the first prescribers of new drugs. However, the extent to which specialists influence new drug prescribing in primary care is largely unknown. Methods This study estimates the influence of medical specialists on new drug prescribing in primary care shortly after market introduction. The influence of medical specialists on prescribing of five new drugs was measured in a cohort of 103 GPs, working in 59 practices, over the period 1999 until 2003. The influence of medical specialists on new drug prescribing in primary care was assessed using three outcome measures. Firstly, the proportion of patients receiving their first prescription for a new or reference drug from a specialist. Secondly, the proportion of GPs prescribing new drugs before any specialist prescribes to their patients. Thirdly, we compared the time until the GP's first own prescribing between GPs who waited for prescriptions from specialists and those who did not. Results The influence of specialists showed considerable differences among the new drugs studied. The proportion of patients receiving their first prescription from a specialist was greatest for the combination salmeterol/fluticasone (60.2%, and lowest for rofecoxib (23.0%. The proportion of GPs prescribing new drugs before waiting for prescriptions from medical specialists ranged from 21.1% in the case of esomeprazole to 32.9% for rofecoxib. Prescribing new drugs by specialists did not shorten the GP's own time to prescribing. Conclusion This study shows that the influence of medical specialists is clearly visible for all new drugs and often greater than for the existing older drugs, but the rapid uptake of new drugs in primary care does not seem specialist induced in all cases. GPs are responsible for a substantial amount of all early prescriptions for new drugs and for a subpopulation specialist endorsement is not a requisite to initiate in new drug prescribing

  16. Methodological bases of innovative training of specialists in nanotechnology field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FIGOVSKY Oleg Lvovich

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The performance of innovative training system aimed at highly intellectual specialists in the area of nanotechnologies for Kazakhstan’s economy demands establishment and development of nanotechnological market in the country, teaching of innovative engineering combined with consistent research, integration of trained specialists with latest technologies and sciences at the international level. Methodological aspects of training competitive specialists for nanotechnological field are specific. The paper presents methodological principles of innovative training of specialists for science-intensive industry that were realized according to grant given by the Ministry of Education and Science of the Republic of Kazakhstan.

  17. Physico-mechanical properties of Spanish juniper wood considering the effect of heartwood formation and the presence of defects and imperfections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier de la Fuente-Leon

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: Determining the main physical and mechanical properties of Spanish juniper wood from Soria (Spain considering the effects of heartwood formation and the presence of defects and imperfections; and comparing the resulting characteristics with similar existing data for other regional softwood species of commercial interest. Area of study: Berlanga de Duero (Soria, Castilla y León, Spain.Material and Methods: Wood physico-mechanical performance was determined by Spanish UNE standards in order to provide proper comparisons to other regional softwood species. An individual tree representing average plot characteristics was selected in all eight 10 m radius circular plots that were established well-representing the heterogeneity of this woodland. The age of every tree was determined reading the number of growth rings at the base of each sampled tree. Every physico-mechanical property was assessed at least 4 times for every wood sample type (sapwood and heartwood, whether clear or with the presence of defects of each tree. Two-way ANOVA was run to assess significant differences in the results. Post hoc all pairwise comparisons were performed using Tukey's test (p < 0.05.Research highlights: Spanish juniper wood resulted harder than other regional commercial conifers, and showed semi-heavyweight heartwood and lightweight sapwood; whereas shrinkage figures remarked its great dimensional stability. The high presence of knots within heartwood made it even heavier, harder, and more resistant to compression parallel to grain. A commercial use of this rare precious wood may contribute to juniper forests preservation in the frame of forest sustainable management plans. Key words: heartwood effect; Juniperus thurifera L.; physico-mechanical wood properties; wood classification; wood defects.

  18. Investigating uranium distribution in surface sediments and waters: a case study of contamination from the Juniper Uranium Mine, Stanislaus National Forest, CA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayzar, Theresa M; Villa, Adam C; Lobaugh, Megan L; Gaffney, Amy M; Williams, Ross W

    2014-10-01

    The uranium concentrations and isotopic compositions of waters, sediment leachates and sediments from Red Rock Creek in the Stanislaus National Forest of California were measured to investigate the transport of uranium from a point source (the Juniper Uranium Mine) to a natural surface stream environment. The ((234)U)/((238)U) composition of Red Rock Creek is altered downstream of the Juniper Mine. As a result of mine-derived contamination, water ((234)U)/((238)U) ratios are 67% lower than in water upstream of the mine (1.114-1.127 ± 0.009 in the contaminated waters versus 1.676 in the clean branch of the stream), and sediment samples have activity ratios in equilibrium in the clean creek and out of equilibrium in the contaminated creek (1.041-1.102 ± 0.007). Uranium concentrations in water, sediment and sediment leachates are highest downstream of the mine, but decrease rapidly after mixing with the clean branch of the stream. Uranium content and compositions of the contaminated creek headwaters relative to the mine tailings of the Juniper Mine suggest that uranium has been weathered from the mine and deposited in the creek. The distribution of uranium between sediment surfaces (leachable fraction) and bulk sediment suggests that adsorption is a key element of transfer along the creek. In clean creek samples, uranium is concentrated in the sediment residues, whereas in the contaminated creek, uranium is concentrated on the sediment surfaces (∼70-80% of uranium in leachable fraction). Contamination only exceeds the EPA maximum contaminant level (MCL) for drinking water in the sample with the closest proximity to the mine. Isotopic characterization of the uranium in this system coupled with concentration measurements suggest that the current state of contamination in Red Rock Creek is best described by mixing between the clean creek and contaminated upper branch of Red Rock Creek rather than mixing directly with mine sediment.

  19. Consequences of Widespread Piñon Mortality for Water Availability and Water Use Dynamics in Piñon-Juniper Woodlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morillas, L.; Pangle, R. E.; Krofcheck, D. J.; Pockman, W.; Litvak, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    Tree die-off events have showed a rapid increase in the last decade as a result of warmer temperatures and more severe drought. In the southwestern US, where piñon-juniper (PJ) woodlands occupy 24 million ha, the turn of the century drought (1999-2002) triggered 40-95% mortality of piñon pine (Pinus edulis) and 2-25% mortality of juniper (Juniperous monosperma). To determine the consequences of this disturbance on surface water balance we conducted a girdling experiment where all piñon trees above 7 cm of diameter at breast height in an area of 200 m2 were girdled in September 2009. We compared water and energy fluxes in this girdled site (PJG) using open-path eddy covariance (EC) to fluxes measured simultaneously in an intact PJ woodland less than 3 km away (PJC). In addition to evapotranspiration (ET) measurements from EC, canopy transpiration (ETc) was measured using sap flow probes (Granier thermal dissipation method) installed on five juniper and five piñon trees at each site. Soil water content (SWC) was also monitored using TDR probes (CS610, Campbell Scientific) under the three main cover types ( bare soil, under juniper and under piñon) and at three depths (5,10 and 30 cm depths) in both sites. Total ET at PJG decreased slowly, but progressively, relative to PJC following the girdling, with annual ET 5%, 10% and 19% lower in 2010, 2011 and 2012, respectively, in the girdled site. Following the girdling, canopy transpiration was significantly reduced at PJG, with an observed reduction of annual ETc at PJG of 45%, 59% and 71% from 2010 to 2012 compared to the PJC site. Our results suggest that girdling triggered a significant increase of soil evaporation and understory transpiration (not directly measured) as a result of canopy cover loss. This agrees with significant higher establishment of annual forbs seen at PJG relative to PJC and the increase of solar radiation reaching the soil surface as a result of canopy cover loss. Our results suggest pi

  20. Pharmacy specialists' attitudes toward pharmaceutical service quality at community pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbonas, Gvidas; Jakušovaitė, Irayda; Savickas, Arūnas

    2010-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to analyze pharmacy specialists' attitudes toward the quality of pharmaceutical services at Lithuanian community pharmacies. Between April and June 2009, a total of 471 Lithuanian community pharmacy specialists completed a questionnaire designed to evaluate their attitudes toward the quality of pharmaceutical services at community pharmacies. The main dimensions of pharmaceutical service quality were extracted by principal component analysis. Two main dimensions of pharmaceutical service quality were extracted: pharmacotherapeutic aspects (provision of information about drug therapy, possible side effects, health promotion, the amount of time spent with a patient, and the ascertainment that a patient understood the provided information) and socioeconomic aspects (considering patient's needs and financial capabilities, making a patient confident with the services provided). Pharmacy specialists evaluated the quality of both dimensions positively, but the quality of the first dimension was rated significantly worse than that of the second dimension. The attitudes of pharmacy specialists working at independent pharmacies were more positive toward pharmacotherapeutic aspects as compared to the specialists working at chain or state pharmacies. Pharmacotherapeutic aspects were rated better by pharmacy specialists, aged ≥ 55 years, than those younger than 45 years. Moreover, the attitudes of 45-54-year-old pharmacy specialists toward the socioeconomic aspects were more positive as compared with those of 35-44-year olds. Pharmacists rated the socioeconomic aspects of pharmaceutical service quality worse as compared with pharmacy technicians. The attitudes of pharmacy specialists working at pharmacies with 6-9 specialists were more negative toward pharmacotherapeutic aspects than those of the pharmacies with 1-2 specialists. Pharmacy specialists working at pharmacies with ≥ 10 specialists reported lower scores of socioeconomic

  1. Environmental Monitoring Supported by Aerial Photography – a Case Study of the Burnt Down Bugac Juniper Forest, Hungary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szatmári József

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Wildfire poses a serious risk in several regions of the world threatening urban, agricultural areas and natural ecosystems as well. Nature conservation has important role to be prepared for the management of postfire environmental degradation and restoration for protected areas preserving valuable ecosystems. The improving temporal and spatial resolution of remote sensing and GIS methods significantly contributes to map the changes for accelerating management steps of restoration. In this study a severe wildfire and its impacts were assessed in case of a protected area of the Kiskunság National Park in Hungary, which was partly burnt down in 2012. The aim of this research was to efficiently and accurately assess the damages and to plan and execute the restoration works using remote sensing tools. Aerial data collection was performed one month, and one year after the fire. In 2014 the regenerated vegetation was surveyed and mapped in the field. Using the aerial photographs and the field data, the degree and extent of the fire damages, the types and the state of the vegetation and the presence and proportion of the invasive species were determined. Semi-automatic methods were used for the classification of completely, partially damaged and undamaged areas. Based on the results, the reforestation of the burnt area is suggested to prevent the overspreading of white poplar against common junipers and to clean the area from the most frequent invasive species. To monitor the regeneration of the vegetation and the spreading of the invasive species, further aerial photography and field campaigns are planned.

  2. Multidisciplinary training of cancer specialists in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benstead, Kim; Turhal, Nazim Serdar; O'Higgins, Niall

    2017-01-01

    The best care for patients with cancer is most likely to be achieved when decisions about diagnosis, staging and treatment are made at multidisciplinary and multiprofessional meetings, preferably when all the professional expertise relevant to the patient's condition is gathered together. Questio...... surgeons training in cancer surgery) is recommended. This is likely to improve the value of multidisciplinary meetings and may result in improved patient care. The Expert Group on Cancer Control of the European Commission has endorsed this recommendation........ Questionnaires were sent to National Societies of Radiation Oncology and Medical Oncology concerning similarities and differences in training programs and multidisciplinary care in member states in Europe. Results indicated wide variation in training systems and practice. Data were lacking for Surgery because...... Surgical Oncology is not recognised as a speciality in the EU and most specialist training in cancer surgery is organ based. A period of time in cross-disciplinary training in each of the other two disciplines for all trainees in Medical Oncology, Radiation Oncology and Surgical Oncology (including all...

  3. Core curriculum for the heart rhythm specialist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino, Jose L; Arribas, Fernando; Botto, Giovanni Luca; Huikuri, Heikki; Kraemer, Lars I; Linde, Cecilia; Morgan, John M; Schalij, Martin; Simantirakis, Emmanuel; Wolpert, Christian; Villard, Marie-Christine; Poirey, Julie; Karaim-Fanchon, Svya; Deront, Keren

    2009-08-01

    Heart rhythm (HR) management is rapidly developing as a subspecialty within cardiology and it is imperative to promote and ensure sufficient and homogeneous training and qualification among professionals in Europe. This encouraged the European Society of Cardiology, through the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA), to organize a European Core Curriculum for the HR specialist through the following: definition of the scope of the HR speciality (Syllabus), development of minimum standards and objectives for training in HR management (Curriculum), development of a model to certify HR professionals and teaching units (Accreditation), and development of a Registry for European HR accredited professionals and teaching units and their activity (Registries). The duration of the training period should be of a minimum of 2 years following general cardiology training. During this period, the trainee must develop the required knowledge, practical skills, behaviours, and attitudes to manage HR patients. The trainee must be involved in a minimum number of different procedures and achieve specified levels of competence. The training centre should be integrated within a full-service cardiology department. Assessment of the trainee and the training programmes should include reports by the training programme supervisor and the national society HR organizations, a logbook of procedures, written examinations, and assessment of professionalism. The EHRA presently requires the trainee to pass the EHRA accreditation exams (invasive EP and cardiac pacing and ICDs). Continuous learning and practice are required to maintain standards and practice because substantial changes may occur in clinical practice or the health-care environment.

  4. EDUCATION OF AGRICULTURISTS THROUGH SPECIALIST SEMINARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Svržnjak

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available According to the National programme of agriculture and rural areas (2003. it is pointed out that the social-economic development of rural areas is remarkably interfered by their unsuitable educational structure and puts them behind with city inhabitants. It is also pointed out that the offer of programmes for professional development of education and improvement due to specific needs for education of adult rural population (especially farmers is proportionately low. Therefore, general needs for improvement of educational structure of farmers and rural population are extended, especially through the system of permanent professional education and improvement for requirements of family farming and rural population as are specialist seminars at College of Agriculture in Križevci for farmers. Such training colleges have been conducting here since 2004. Until now, 298 trainees have finished such form of education. They were organised in collaboration with 9 agricultural associations. Sex, age and educational structure of trainees as well as average number of people engaged in farming for 213 trainees organized in collaboration with 6 agricultural associations were analysed by this study. They finished training colleges during 2004th and 2005th year. Analysed data was obtained from questionnaire that summaries the most frequent comments and suggestions as the most important guidance for further organisation of such form of education.

  5. Local adaptation in oviposition choice of a specialist herbivore

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wei, Xianqin; Vrieling, Klaas; Mulder, Patrick P.J.; Klinkhamer, Peter G.L.

    2017-01-01

    Specialist herbivores feed on a restricted number of related plant species and may suffer food shortage if overexploitation leads to periodic defoliation of their food plants. The density, size and quality of food plants are important factors that determine the host plant choice of specialist herbiv

  6. Are Specialist Certification Examinations a Reliable Measure of Physician Competence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, V. C.; Norman, G. R.; Schmidt, H. G.; van der Vleuten, C. P. M.

    2008-01-01

    High stakes postgraduate specialist certification examinations have considerable implications for the future careers of examinees. Medical colleges and professional boards have a social and professional responsibility to ensure their fitness for purpose. To date there is a paucity of published data about the reliability of specialist certification…

  7. Academic learning for specialist nurses: a grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millberg, Lena German; Berg, Linda; Brämberg, Elisabeth Björk; Nordström, Gun; Ohlén, Joakim

    2014-11-01

    The aim was to explore the major concerns of specialist nurses pertaining to academic learning during their education and initial professional career. Specialist nursing education changed in tandem with the European educational reform in 2007. At the same time, greater demands were made on the healthcare services to provide evidence-based and safe patient-care. These changes have influenced specialist nursing programmes and consequently the profession. Grounded Theory guided the study. Data were collected by means of a questionnaire with open-ended questions distributed at the end of specialist nursing programmes in 2009 and 2010. Five universities were included. Further, individual, pair and group interviews were used to collect data from 12 specialist nurses, 5-14 months after graduation. A major concern for specialist nurses was that academic learning should be "meaningful" for their professional future. The specialist nurses' "meaningful academic learning process" was characterised by an ambivalence of partly believing in and partly being hesitant about the significance of academic learning and partly receiving but also lacking support. Specialist nurses were influenced by factors in two areas: curriculum and healthcare context. They felt that the outcome of contribution to professional confidence was critical in making academic learning meaningful.

  8. Clarifying the role of the mental health peer specialist in Massachusetts, USA: insights from peer specialists, supervisors and clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Linda; Strother, Heather; Muhr, Kathy; Sefton, Laura; Savageau, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Mental health peer specialists develop peer-to-peer relationships of trust with clients to improve their health and well-being, functioning in ways similar to community health workers. Although the number of peer specialists in use has been increasing, their role in care teams is less defined than that of the community health worker. This qualitative study explored how the peer specialist role is defined across different stakeholder groups, the expectations for this role and how the peer specialist is utilised and integrated across different types of mental health services. Data were collected through interviews and focus groups conducted in Massachusetts with peer specialists (N = 44), their supervisors (N = 14) and clients (N = 10) between September 2009 and January 2011. A consensus coding approach was used and all data outputs were reviewed by the entire team to identify themes. Peer specialists reported that their most important role is to develop relationships with clients and that having lived mental health experience is a key element in creating that bond. They also indicated that educating staff about the recovery model and peer role is another important function. However, they often felt a lack of clarity about their role within their organisation and care team. Supervisors valued the unique experience that peer specialists bring to an organisation. However, without a defined set of expectations for this role, they struggled with training, guiding and evaluating their peer specialist staff. Clients reported that the shared lived experience is important for the relationship and that working with a peer specialist has improved their mental health. With increasing support for person-centred integrated healthcare delivery models, the demand for mental health peer specialist services will probably increase. Therefore, clearer role definition, as well as workforce development focused on team orientation, is necessary for peer specialists to be fully integrated

  9. The Citizen as Issue Specialists in a Changing Media Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Jin Park

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Although recent research suggests that the selective nature of new media helps foster issue specialists, little empirical evidence has been documented, mostly due to theoretical and methodological limitations. Extending the concept of issue publics, the present study proposes a method to estimate the degree to which an individual is a specialist- or a generalist-type citizen. Applying the method to the 2008 American National Election Studies data, the study reveals various characteristics of specialists and generalists. The results indicate that specialist-type citizens are positively associated with online news use, but negatively associated with conventional news media, such as television, newspaper, and radio. The implications of the growth of specialists as well as the validity of the proposed method are discussed.

  10. The need for PGY2-trained clinical pharmacy specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragucci, Kelly R; O'Bryant, Cindy L; Campbell, Kristin Bova; Buck, Marcia L; Dager, William E; Donovan, Jennifer L; Emerson, Kayleigh; Gubbins, Paul O; Haight, Robert J; Jackevicius, Cynthia; Murphy, John E; Prohaska, Emily

    2014-06-01

    The American College of Clinical Pharmacy and other stakeholder organizations seek to advance clinical pharmacist practitioners, educators, and researchers. Unfortunately, there remains an inadequate supply of residency-trained clinical specialists to meet the needs of our health care system, and nonspecialists often are called on to fill open specialist positions. The impact of clinical pharmacy specialists on pharmacotherapy outcomes in both acute care and primary care settings demonstrates the value of these specialists. This commentary articulates the need for postgraduate year two (PGY2)-trained clinical specialists within the health care system by discussing various clinical and policy rationales, interprofessional support, economic justifications, and their impact on quality of care and drug safety. The integrated practice model that has grown out of the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists Pharmacy Practice Model Initiative (PPMI) could threaten the growth and development of future clinical specialists. Therefore, the ways in which PGY2-trained clinical pharmacist specialists are deployed in the PPMI require further consideration. PGY2 residencies provide education and training opportunities that cannot be achieved in traditional professional degree programs or postgraduate year one residencies. These specialists are needed to provide direct patient care to complex patient populations and to educate and train pharmacy students and postgraduate residents. Limitations to training and hiring PGY2-trained clinical pharmacy specialists include site capacity limitations and lack of funding. A gap analysis is needed to define the extent of the mismatch between the demand for specialists by health care systems and educational institutions versus the capacity to train clinical pharmacists at the specialty level. © 2014 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  11. 提高桧柏成活率关键技术措施%Key Technology for Upgrading Survival Rate of Juniper

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    化荣; 顾跃龙; 张月钦

    2012-01-01

    宁夏气候条件恶劣,春季干旱少雨,风沙大,夏季高温干燥,年降水量少,土壤盐碱化程度高。桧柏苗木在移栽时,往往因移植方法不当导致成活率低,不能达到预期的生态景观效果。结合多年的实践经验及在宁夏发电集团新能源研究所绿化施工中的技术总结,摸索出了一些适合宁夏地区提高桧柏成活率的关键技术措施。%The climate conditions in Ningxia are very bad. It is droughty and sandy with little rain in Spring and dry with high temperature in Summer. The annual average precipitation is little and the soil salinization is severe. The survival rate transplantation methods of juniper seedlings was usually low which couldn't achieve expected ecological landscape effect. Based on years of practical experiences and the technological summarization of the greening works at Ningxia Power Generation Group New Energy Institute, some key technology suitable for upgrading the survival rate of juniper in Ningxia area were found out.

  12. [Smoking among patients of selected specialist clinics of Miedzylesie Specialist Hospital in Warsaw].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pytka, Dorota; Doboszyńska, Anna

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to examine the issue of smoking among patients of selected clinics of the Miedzylesie Specialist Hospital in Warsaw, assessment of nicotine addiction of smokers and motivation to give up smoking. The survey was carried out in June and July 2009 after obtaining the consent of the Director of Miedzylesie Specialist Hospital in Warsaw. The survey was participated in by 100 patients of selected specialist clinics. The survey was carried out on the basis of a questionnaire consisting of 7 questions. Furthermore, the "Test of motivation to give up smoking" (Schneider's test) and the "Assessment of nicotine addiction level" (Fagerström's test), published in the "Consensus regarding recognition and treatment of nicotine addiction", were used. When processing data, the descriptive statistics were applied. Those surveyed included 53 former cigarette smokers 47 active smokers and. In the group of former smokers, 19 people still were exposed to passive smoking. In the past, the problem regarded 41 people. Thirty former smokers smoked cigarettes among non-smokers, including young children (18 people) and when pregnant and breastfeeding (2 people). Also 30 respondents smoked despite medical contraindications and bad conscience. For 27 people, expenditures on cigarettes constituted a considerable burden of their respective household budgets, and 20 said that it was a significant item in their expenditures. Smokers have been smoking cigarettes for 30 years, on average 20 cigarettes a day. Those patients began to smoke at the age of 20. Thirty one active smokers exposed other people to passive smoking and 38 respondents smoked cigarettes despite medical contraindications and with bad conscience. For 22 people, expenditures related to smoking are a considerable burden of the household budget and for 21 people, it is a significant expenditure. Almost one half of the patients smoke cigarettes although they should brake off smoking for medical reasons. Most

  13. Portfolios for assessment of paediatric specialist registrars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melville, C; Rees, M; Brookfield, D; Anderson, J

    2004-10-01

    In 1997 the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health introduced portfolios to guide and monitor the learning of specialist registrars. We studied their value for assessment. Using Bigg's SOLO criteria we devised a marking scheme based on 6 domains of competence: clinical, communication, teaching and learning, ethics and attitudes, management and evaluation, and creation of evidence. We rated portfolios according to quality of evidence presented and expectations by year of training. We similarly assessed trainee performance in the annual record of in-training assessment (RITA) interview. Specific advice based on the results of the first portfolio assessments was circulated to all trainees, instructing them to increase the structure and decrease the bulk of portfolios. A second sample of portfolios was reviewed a year later, using similar evaluations, to determine the effects. A total of 76 portfolios were assessed in year 1 by a single rater; 30 portfolios were assessed in year 2 by 2 independent raters. The quality of documentation improved from year 1 to year 2 but there was no significant increase in portfolio scores. The inter-rater correlation coefficient of the portfolio assessment method was 0.52 (Cohen's kappa 0.35). The inter-rater correlation coefficient of the RITA interview was 0.71 (Cohen's kappa 0.38). There was moderate inter-assessment correlation between portfolios and RITA interviews (kappa 0.26 in year 1 and 0.29 in year 2). Generalisability analysis suggested that 5 successive ratings by a single observer or independent ratings by 4 observers on the same occasion would be needed to yield a generalisability coefficient > 0.8 for overall portfolio rating. This method of portfolio assessment is insufficiently reliable as a sole method for high stakes, single-instance assessment, but has a place as part of a triangulation process. Repeated portfolio assessment by paired observers would increase reliability. Longer term studies are required to

  14. Conjunction of Multizone Infiltration Specialists (COMIS) fundamentals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feustel, H.E.; Rayner-Hooson, A. (eds.)

    1990-05-01

    The COMIS workshop (Conjunction of Multizone Infiltration Specialists) was a joint research effort to develop a multizone infiltration mode. This workshop (October 1988--September 1989) was hosted by the Energy Performance of Buildings Group at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Applied Science Division. The task of the workshop was to develop a detailed multizone infiltration program taking crack flow, HVAC-systems, single-sided ventilation and transport mechanism through large openings into account. This work was accomplished not by investigating into numerical description of physical phenomena but by reviewing the literature for the best suitable algorithm. The numerical description of physical phenomena is clearly a task of IEA-Annex XX Air Flow Patterns in Buildings,'' which will be finished in September 1991. Multigas tracer measurements and wind tunnel data will be used to check the model. The agenda integrated all participants' contributions into a single model containing a large library of modules. The user-friendly program is aimed at researchers and building professionals. From its announcement in December 1986, COMIS was well received by the research community. Due to the internationality of the group, several national and international research programmes were co-ordinated with the COMIS workshop. Colleagues for France, Italy, Japan, The Netherlands, People's Republic of China, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United States of America were working together on the development of the model. Even though this kind of co-operation is well known in other fields of research, e.g., high energy physics; for the field of building physics it is a new approach. This document contains an overview about infiltration modelling as well as the physics and the mathematics behind the COMIS model. 91 refs., 38 figs., 9 tabs.

  15. Comment on: Shukla, M.K. et al., 2006: Physical and chemical properties of soils under some pinon-juniper-oak canopies in a semi-arid ecosystem in New Mexico

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollerup, Mikkel; Jensen, Jens Raunsø

    2008-01-01

    The paper by Shukla et al. [2006. Physical and chemical properties of soils under some pinon-juniper-oak canopies in an semi-arid ecosystem in New Mexico. Journal of Arid Environment 66, 673-685] treats interesting topics of sustainability of different ecosystems and their water availability...

  16. Geriatric oncology in the Netherlands: a survey of medical oncology specialists and oncology nursing specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonker, J M; Smorenburg, C H; Schiphorst, A H; van Rixtel, B; Portielje, J E A; Hamaker, M E

    2014-11-01

    To identify ways to improve cancer care for older patients, we set out to examine how older patients in the Netherlands are currently being evaluated prior to oncological treatment and to explore the potential obstacles in the incorporation of a geriatric evaluation, using a web-based survey sent to Dutch medical oncology specialists and oncology nursing specialists. The response rate was 34% (183 out of 544). Two-thirds of respondents reported that a geriatric evaluation was being used, although primarily on an ad hoc basis only. Most respondents expressed a desire for a routine evaluation or more intensive collaboration with the geriatrician and 86% of respondents who were not using a geriatric evaluation expressed their interest to do so. The most important obstacles were a lack of time or personnel and insufficient availability of a geriatrician to perform the assessment. Thus, over 30% of oncology professionals in the Netherlands express an interest in geriatric oncology. Important obstacles to a routine implementation of a geriatric evaluation are a lack of time, or insufficient availability of geriatricians; this could be overcome with policies that acknowledge that quality cancer care for older patients requires the investment of time and personnel.

  17. Practice management of french retinal specialists in diabetic macular edema

    OpenAIRE

    QU-KNAFO, Mo lise

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the practice management of french vitreoretinal (VR) specialists in the treatment of diabetic macular edema (DME)Methods: A 31-item survey investigating real life practice in diagnosis and treatment of DME was mailed to specialists identified from the Société Française d’Ophtalmologie and the Club Francophone des Spécialistes de la Rétine. Answers were analysed anonymously by an online survey software. Results: 95 specialists answered the survey. 25%, 36% and 32% of respo...

  18. Generalists versus specialists: Toward a typology of batterers in prison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Herrero

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we apply the versatile/specialist offender debate to the research of intimate partner violence. We propose the existence of two types of imprisoned male batterers: the generalist and the specialist batterer. The individual, family, and community characteristics of these types of batterers are further explored in 110 imprisoned males in the Penitentiary of Villabona (Spain. As for the individual characteristics, results indicate that the generalist batterer present higher levels of psychopathology (specially antisocial and borderline personality, sexist attitudes, and substance dependence. Specialist batterers presented higher levels of conflict in their family of origin. Finally, generalist batterers reported coming from more socially disordered communities and showed lower levels of participation and integration in these communities than the specialist batterer. These results suggest that the classical distinctions among batterers based on psychopathology and context of violence (whether general or family only might be of little utility when applied to imprisoned male batterers.

  19. 29 CFR 42.9 - Farm Labor Specialist (ESA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... significant numbers of agricultural worker activity as designated by ESA. These Specialists shall coordinate...-related activities of significant crew leaders and growers in the area to ascertain that those...

  20. A New Health Occupation of the Horizon: Respiratory Exercise Specialist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butts, Karen R.

    1986-01-01

    Describes the role of respiratory exercise specialists and the success of their techniques in treating asthmatic patients, especially children. Calls for research and development leading to an educational program in this field. (CH)

  1. Specialist Gateways through Chaos: A Changing Learning Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan-Brun, Gabrielle; Laux, Holger

    2001-01-01

    Assesses the role of the World Wide Web as a provider of suitable source materials for specialist foreign language learners for whom cultural competence also involves workplace-related skills. (Author/VWL)

  2. Elementary School Math Instruction: Can Reading Specialists Assist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrichs, Audrey S.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the contradictions found in recommendations for direction instruction or informal math language development, and some suggestions for practical resolution of disagreements, to enable school reading specialists to provide both background and practical help to classroom instructors teaching math. (HTH)

  3. Communication Skills Required for Information Specialist in Web Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osman Atti Alsulami, Ph.D

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, there is a tangible attention to communication skills of information specialists which increased in recent years, especially after the emergence of social networks, though studies prepared by specialists in the field of libraries and information on this topic is still very low compared to studies dealing with the rehabilitation of the information specialist to work in a Web environment, which focuses on skills in the field of Computer and its uses. In this paper it will be reviewed previous studies the subject, in addition to reviewing the concept of skill and concept of communication, information specialists, and the concept of Web 2.0 and technologies. Also, this article try to identify the most important specifications and digital skills needed information specialist to adapt to this new environment as prerequisites for the exercise of the profession and office contemporary one hand, and to strengthen its role in the world today is the variable that distinguishes the intense competition between the various markets and organizations, including those working The right of libraries and information as a result of globalization. The research also tries to identify the main difficulties and challenges facing the information specialist in the digital environment

  4. Repeat, Low Altitude Measurements of Vegetation Status and Biomass Using Manned Aerial and UAS Imagery in a Piñon-Juniper Woodland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krofcheck, D. J.; Lippitt, C.; Loerch, A.; Litvak, M. E.

    2015-12-01

    Measuring the above ground biomass of vegetation is a critical component of any ecological monitoring campaign. Traditionally, biomass of vegetation was measured with allometric-based approach. However, it is also time-consuming, labor-intensive, and extremely expensive to conduct over large scales and consequently is cost-prohibitive at the landscape scale. Furthermore, in semi-arid ecosystems characterized by vegetation with inconsistent growth morphologies (e.g., piñon-juniper woodlands), even ground-based conventional allometric approaches are often challenging to execute consistently across individuals and through time, increasing the difficulty of the required measurements and consequently the accuracy of the resulting products. To constrain the uncertainty associated with these campaigns, and to expand the extent of our measurement capability, we made repeat measurements of vegetation biomass in a semi-arid piñon-juniper woodland using structure-from-motion (SfM) techniques. We used high-spatial resolution overlapping aerial images and high-accuracy ground control points collected from both manned aircraft and multi-rotor UAS platforms, to generate digital surface model (DSM) for our experimental region. We extracted high-precision canopy volumes from the DSM and compared these to the vegetation allometric data, s to generate high precision canopy volume models. We used these models to predict the drivers of allometric equations for Pinus edulis and Juniperous monosperma (canopy height, diameter at breast height, and root collar diameter). Using this approach, we successfully accounted for the carbon stocks in standing live and standing dead vegetation across a 9 ha region, which contained 12.6 Mg / ha of standing dead biomass, with good agreement to our field plots. Here we present the initial results from an object oriented workflow which aims to automate the biomass estimation process of tree crown delineation and volume calculation, and partition

  5. A novel statistical method for classifying habitat generalists and specialists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chazdon, Robin L; Chao, Anne; Colwell, Robert K

    2011-01-01

    We develop a novel statistical approach for classifying generalists and specialists in two distinct habitats. Using a multinomial model based on estimated species relative abundance in two habitats, our method minimizes bias due to differences in sampling intensities between two habitat types...... as well as bias due to insufficient sampling within each habitat. The method permits a robust statistical classification of habitat specialists and generalists, without excluding rare species a priori. Based on a user-defined specialization threshold, the model classifies species into one of four groups...... fraction (57.7%) of bird species with statistical confidence. Based on a conservative specialization threshold and adjustment for multiple comparisons, 64.4% of tree species in the full sample were too rare to classify with confidence. Among the species classified, OG specialists constituted the largest...

  6. Addressing cultural diversity: the hepatitis B clinical specialist perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Jack; Smith, Elizabeth; Hajarizadeh, Behzad; Richmond, Jacqueline; Lucke, Jayne

    2017-08-31

    Hepatitis B is a viral infection primarily affecting people from culturally diverse communities in Australia. While vaccination prevents infection, there is increasing mortality resulting from liver damage associated with chronic infection. Deficits in the national policy and clinical response to hepatitis B result in a low diagnosis rate, inadequate testing and diagnosis processes, and poor access to hepatitis B treatment services. While research identifies inadequate hepatitis B knowledge among people with the virus and primary health care workers, this project sought to identify how specialist clinicians in Australia negotiate cultural diversity, and provide often complex clinical information to people with hepatitis B. A vignette was developed and presented to thirteen viral hepatitis specialist clinicians prior to an electronically recorded interview. Recruitment continued until saturation of themes was reached. Data were thematically coded into themes outlined in the interview schedule. Ethical approval for the research was provided by the La Trobe University Human Research Ethics Committee. Key messages provided to patients with hepatitis B by clinical specialists were identified. These messages were not consistently provided to all patients with hepatitis B, but were determined on perceptions of patient knowledge, age and highest educational level. While the vignette stated that English was not an issue for the patient, most specialists identified the need for an interpreter. Combating stigma related to hepatitis B was seen as important by the specialists and this was done through normalising the virus. Having an awareness of different cultural understandings about hepatitis B specifically, and health and well-being generally, was noted as a communication strategy. Key core competencies need to be developed to deliver educational messages to people with hepatitis B within clinical encounters. The provision of adequate resources to specialist clinics will

  7. Individual prey choices of octopuses: Are they generalist or specialist?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jennifer A. MATHER; Tatiana S. LEITE; Allan T. BATISTA

    2012-01-01

    Prey choice is often evaluated at the species or population level.Here,we analyzed the diet of octopuses of different populations with the aim to assess the importance of individual feeding habits as a factor affecting prey choice.Two methods were used,an assessment of the extent to which an individual octopus made choices of species representative of those population (PSi and IS) and 25% cutoff values for number of choices and percentage intake of individual on their prey.In one population of Octopus cf vulgaris in Bermuda individuals were generaiist by IS=0.77,but most chose many prey of the same species,and were specialists on it by >75% intake.Another population had a wider prey selection,still generalist with PSi=0.66,but two individuals specialized by choices.In Bonaire,there was a wide range of prey species chosen,and the population was specialists by IS=0.42.Individual choices revealed seven specialists and four generalists.A population of Octopus cyanea in Hawaii all had similar choices of crustaceans,so the population was generalist by IS with 0.74.But by individual choices,three were considered a specialist.A population of Enteroctopus dofleini from Puget Sound had a wide range of preferences,in which seven were also specialists,IS=0.53.By individual choices,thirteen were also specialists.Given the octopus specialty of learning during foraging,we hypothesize that both localized prey availability and individual personality differences could influence the exploration for prey and this translates into different prey choices across individuals and populations showed in this study.

  8. Individual prey choices of octopuses: Are they generalist or specialist?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A. MATHER, Tatiana S. LEITE, Allan T. BATISTA

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Prey choice is often evaluated at the species or population level. Here, we analyzed the diet of octopuses of different populations with the aim to assess the importance of individual feeding habits as a factor affecting prey choice. Two methods were used, an assessment of the extent to which an individual octopus made choices of species representative of those population (PSi and IS and 25% cutoff values for number of choices and percentage intake of individual on their prey. In one population of Octopus cf vulgaris in Bermuda individuals were generalist by IS=0.77, but most chose many prey of the same species, and were specialists on it by >75% intake. Another population had a wider prey selection, still generalist with PSi=0.66, but two individuals specialized by choices. In Bonaire, there was a wide range of prey species chosen, and the population was specialists by IS= 0.42. Individual choices revealed seven specialists and four generalists. A population of Octopus cyanea in Hawaii all had similar choices of crustaceans, so the population was generalist by IS with 0.74. But by individual choices, three were considered a specialist. A population of Enteroctopus dofleini from Puget Sound had a wide range of preferences, in which seven were also specialists, IS=0.53. By individual choices, thirteen were also specialists. Given the octopus specialty of learning during foraging, we hypothesize that both localized prey availability and individual personality differences could influence the exploration for prey and this translates into different prey choices across individuals and populations showed in this study [Current Zoology 58 (4: 597-603, 2012].

  9. An organization for academic specialists: the time has come.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, L Chesney; Chelmow, David; Hitt, Wilbur; Learman, Lee A; Ogburn, Tony

    2014-07-01

    The Society for Academic Specialists in General Obstetrics and Gynecology was recently formed to meet the professional needs of general obstetrician-gynecologists (ob-gyns) in academic settings. Historically there has been little communication and poor networking among this group, largely as a result of lack of infrastructure. Until the Society for Academic Specialists in General Obstetrics and Gynecology, there has been no common venue to unite academic specialists nor a means to identify colleagues and develop professional relationships. The Society is creating avenues for communication and collaboration among general ob-gyn faculty across institutions. The Society for Academic Specialists in General Obstetrics and Gynecology is hosting national meetings, conducting workshops and webinars, and developing other media to promote research training, share administrative skills, and help members to become more effective educators. One major focus of the new organization is to provide resources to facilitate faculty development. Formation of the Society for Academic Specialists in General Obstetrics and Gynecology is particularly timely given that ob-gyns, without subspecialty fellowship training, have assumed major roles in academic departments. Their contribution to educational, scholarly, and clinical responsibilities is a significant benefit to the well-being of the departments of obstetrics and gynecology. In turn, the role of educator and scholar is of value to the general academic ob-gyn. The Society for Academic Specialists in General Obstetrics and Gynecology will help academic faculty and their institutions by filling current gaps in professional and career development, which should improve scholarship, enhance retention, and improve the ability for academic departments to fulfill their educational and clinical missions.

  10. Do specialists exit the firm outsourcing its R&D?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Wenjing

    employment of R&D specialists decreases with the deepening of R&D outsourcing but increases with the broadening of R&D outsourcing. These relations can be inferred from previous empirical studies as well as our theoretical analysis, and are supported by the empirical evidence from estimations of correlated......Do specialists exit the firm increasingly outsourcing its research and development (R&D) work? Although this question is critical in understanding how R&D outsourcing links to innovation performance, the answer is not yet clear. This paper proposes that the optimal level of firm's internal...

  11. Subject Specialist Mentors in the Lifelong Learning Sector: The Subject Specialist Mentor Model; is it working? A case study approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bailey, Wayne

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This short article explores whether using a mentoring model supports our Subject Specialist Mentors (SSMs with their role of mentoring trainees on Initial Teacher Training (ITT courses. Although there are many mentoring models to choose from, our model is based around mentoring within the Lifelong Learning Sector (LLS where trainees need support for their subject specialism as well as their generic teaching skills. The main focus is the use of coaching and mentoring skills taking into consideration guiding, supporting and challenging the trainee during the lifetime of the mentor/trainee relationship. The SSMs found that using our model as a tool helped to structure meetings and to ensure that the trainee had the necessary support to enable them to become proficient, competent subject specialist teachers. In conclusion, it was found that there is a need for the use of a model or a framework to help the Subject Specialist Mentor (SSM with such an important role.

  12. Accountability of specialist child and adolescent mental health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garralda, Elena M

    2009-05-01

    Outcome auditing of specialist child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS) is now well under way internationally. There is, however, debate about objectives and tools. A case is made for the achievable goal of enhancing service accountability through user satisfaction information and clinician-rated contextualised measures of improvements in symptoms and impairment.

  13. Science Specialists or Classroom Teachers: Who Should Teach Elementary Science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Abigail Jurist; Jia, Yueming; Marco-Bujosa, Lisa; Gess-Newsome, Julie; Pasquale, Marian

    2016-01-01

    This study examined science programs, instruction, and student outcomes at 30 elementary schools in a large, urban district in the northeast United States in an effort to understand whether there were meaningful differences in the quality, quantity and cost of science education when provided by a science specialist or a classroom teacher. Student…

  14. Music without a Music Specialist: A Primary School Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    This case study focuses on generalist primary (elementary) school teachers teaching music in an Australian school. With the onus for teaching music moving away from the specialist music teacher to the generalist classroom teacher, this case study adds to a growing body of literature focusing on generalist primary school teachers and music…

  15. Manual Drivetrain and Axles Specialist. Teacher Edition. Automotive Service Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This instructor's guide contains materials for teaching the manual drive trains and axle specialist component of a competency-based instructional program for students preparing for employment in the automotive service trade. It is based on National Institute of Automotive Service Excellence task lists. Six instructional units contain materials…

  16. Specialisation and specialist education in prosthetic dentistry in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Owall, B.; Welfare, R.; Garefis, P.; Hedzelek, W.; Hobkirk, J.; Isidor, F.; Jerolimov, V.; Jokstad, A.; Kalk, W.; Kronstrom, M.; van der Kuij, P.; Mericske-Stern, R.; Naert, I.; Narhi, T.; Nilner, K.; Polyzois, G.; Setz, J.; User, A.; Zonnenberg, A.

    2006-01-01

    This presentation reports on the results of a meeting of prosthodontists from selected European countries. The aim of the meeting was to analyse and promote specialisation and specialist education in Prosthetic Dentistry in Europe. Representatives for Europe were selected from the European Prosthodo

  17. Export Management Specialist. A Training Program. Instructor's Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This publication provides instructors with materials for an export management specialist (EMS) training program. The objective of the training program is to assist companies in reaching their export goals by educating current and potential managers about the basics of exporting. It provides a foundation for considering international trade and for…

  18. Specialists and the Future of Rural Life in Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirokalova, G. S.; Deriabina, O. N.

    2012-01-01

    The future of Russian agriculture and rural community depends on the willingness of skilled workers to accept conditions of village life and the demands of agricultural work. Surveys of potential rural specialists indicate that they are concerned about the lack of up-to-date technologies, the difficult working conditions and low prestige of…

  19. Green home building workshop offered for homeowners, construction specialists

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Lynn

    2010-01-01

    Virginia Cooperative Extension, the Department of Wood Science and Forest Products in Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service will host an evening workshop entitled "Green Home Building for Homeowners, Construction Specialists, Entrepreneurs, and Educators" on April 8 in Abingdon, Va.

  20. Hospital boards and medical specialists collaborating for quality of care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botje, D.; Plochg, T.; Klazinga, N.; Wagner, C.

    2012-01-01

    Context: In European countries policy briefs are stressing the importance of hospital governance for the quality of care. When governing towards quality it is essential for Hospital Boards to receive the proper information to do so. In the Netherlands, the national association for medical specialist

  1. DOC questionnaire : measuring how GPs and medical specialists rate collaboration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berendsen, A.J.; Benneker, W.H.; Groenier, K.H.; Schuling, J.; Grol, R.P.; Meyboom-de Jong, B.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: This paper aims to assess the validity of a questionnaire aimed at assessing how general practitioners (GPs) and specialists rate collaboration. DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/APPROACH: Primary data were collected in The Netherlands during March to September 2006. A cross-sectional study was conducted

  2. [Assessments during Medical Specialists Training: quantity or quality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamming, J F

    2017-01-01

    Structured assessments form a mandatory part of Dutch Medical Specialist Training, but create administrative workload for both the staff and supervisors. One could argue that the quality of the narrative feedback is more important than the extensive reporting in learning portfolios, and that the focus should be on continuous on-the-job coaching.

  3. Music without a Music Specialist: A Primary School Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    This case study focuses on generalist primary (elementary) school teachers teaching music in an Australian school. With the onus for teaching music moving away from the specialist music teacher to the generalist classroom teacher, this case study adds to a growing body of literature focusing on generalist primary school teachers and music…

  4. Keeping Current: Emotional Intelligence and the School Library Media Specialist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Daniel D.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses emotional intelligence and its importance for school library media specialists, based on a book by Daniel Goleman called "Emotional Intelligence." Highlights include managing emotions and relationships; self-motivation; and how emotional intelligence fits in with Standards for Information Literacy. (LRW)

  5. Professional Training of Specialists in International Marketing in Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zukowski, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    Polish experience in training specialists in international marketing in the context of globalization and integration processes has been studied. A range of theoretical resources, namely Market Entry Strategy for Poland; the articles dedicated to international marketing and economy development (W. Grzegorczyk, M. Viachevskyi, M. Urbanetst); program…

  6. Refrigeration and Cryogenics Specialist. J3ABR54530

    Science.gov (United States)

    Air Force Training Command, Sheppard AFB, TX.

    This document package contains an Air Force course used to train refrigeration and cryogenics specialists. The course is organized in six blocks designed for group instruction. The blocks cover the following topics: electrical principles; fundamentals of tubing and piping; metering devices, motor controls, domestic and commercial refrigeration;…

  7. The Enigma of Graduate Nursing Education: Advanced Generalist? Specialist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Suellen B.; Hoffman, Sharon E.

    1986-01-01

    To pin down the appropriate parameters for graduate nursing education, the authors say we must explore the meanings of advanced generalist and specialist. They discuss the focus, scope, and depth of the community health major, psychiatric mental health nursing, nursing care of children, maternity nursing, medical-surgical nursing, and nursing…

  8. FAMILY DINNER SERVICE SPECIALIST, A SUGGESTED TRAINING PROGRAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office of Education (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    THE PURPOSE OF THIS GUIDE IS TO PROVIDE RESOURCE MATERIAL TO DEVELOP A LOCAL 240-HOUR PROGRAM FOR TRAINING A FAMILY DINNER SERVICE SPECIALIST TO PREPARE AND SERVE DINNERS FOR EMPLOYED PEOPLE, RETIRED PERSONS, OR FAMILIES DESIRING SUCH SERVICE. PROGRAM OBJECTIVES INCLUDE PREPARING TRAINEES TO PLAN MENUS AND DO FAMILY SHOPPING FOR DINNERS, TO PLAN…

  9. Sports Medicine: What is a Sports Medicine Specialist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... injuries (such as ankle sprains, muscle strains, knee & shoulder injuries, and fractures) • Overuse injuries (such as rotator cuff and other forms of tendonitis, stress fractures) • Medical and injection therapies for osteoarthritis Sports Medicine Specialists are uniquely positioned to meet ...

  10. Professional Training of Specialists in International Marketing in Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zukowski, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    Polish experience in training specialists in international marketing in the context of globalization and integration processes has been studied. A range of theoretical resources, namely Market Entry Strategy for Poland; the articles dedicated to international marketing and economy development (W. Grzegorczyk, M. Viachevskyi, M. Urbanetst); program…

  11. 22 CFR 501.6 - Appointment of Overseas Specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) Application procedures. (1) Applications for all specialties except secretarial should include a current SF... equivalent), claimed language proficiency and other background or factors which may be related to the work performed by an Overseas Specialist Officer in the relevant specialty. (3) Oral examination. (i)...

  12. STS 41-D mission specialist Judith Resnik reivews headset interfac

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    STS 41-D mission specialist Judith Resnik and trainer review the headset interface units of the communication kit assemblies to be used during mission. Resnick is wearing the headset interface unit and headset and is examing the documentation attached to the equipment.

  13. View of Mission Specialist Judith Resnik on the middeck

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    View of Mission Specialist Judith Resnik sitting on the floor of the middeck. Beside her on a notebook is a note which says 'Hi Dad'. Above her head on the middeck lockers are various stickers such as 'Beat Army', 'Beat Navy' and 'Air Force: a great way of life'. Beside her is a stickers which reads 'I love Tom Selleck'.

  14. Library Media Specialists: A Valuable Key to School Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstetter, Janet

    1999-01-01

    Administrators are missing access to endless information and support if they disregard library media specialists (LMSs)' expertise. LMSs offer access to research, periodicals, and statistics benefiting the entire school community. They can contribute to public relations, facility planning, curricular tie-ins, technology training, grant-writing…

  15. Computer Cache: ERIC and the Library Media Specialist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodish, Erica K.

    1986-01-01

    Description of how library media specialists can assist teachers and administrators in retrieving useful information by using ERIC highlights its organization, the types of materials available that are especially useful to classroom teachers, and ways that it can be accessed online. A list of ERIC Clearinghouses with addresses is included. (EM)

  16. Ethics and the School Library Media Specialist: Sensitive Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Daniel D.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the role of the school library media specialist in developing and providing programs of prevention and intervention for students experiencing problems with drugs, rape, divorce, suicide, neglect, and other crises. Resources from the ERIC database are listed, and the Child Abuse and Neglect database is described. (LRW)

  17. A Case for Content Specialists as the Elementary Classroom Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerretson, Helen; Bosnick, Janet; Schofield, Kathleen

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify factors associated with the growing use of teacher specialists in the elementary schools, particularly in the area of mathematics. The elementary school principals of a large metropolitan school district located in northeastern Florida responded to an online survey that focused on the type of specialist…

  18. Leading Practice in Space Education: Successful Approaches by Specialist Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schools Network, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the Government's Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) programme is to ensure Britain's future success as a major centre for science, engineering and innovation. Specialist science, technology, engineering and maths & computing colleges help to drive this programme by becoming centres of excellence in STEM…

  19. Seed dispersal by specialist versus generalist foragers: the plant's perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, D.L.

    1996-01-01

    I examined the seed dispersal ecology of the stem parasitic plant, desert mistletoe (Phoradendron californicum, Viscaceae), with the objectives of (1) determining the relative effectiveness of specialist and generalist foragers for seed dispersal, (2) determining the extent to which desert mistletoe fruiting characteristics correspond to those predicted for plants attracting specialist versus generalist foragers, and (3) examining the potential consequences of the observed dispersal strategy for mistletoe reproduction. Three species of birds, phainopepla, Gila woodpecker, and northern mockingbird, fed on desert mistletoe at my study site. The specialist, phainopepla, was the most abundant and the most likely to perch in host species, where defecated seeds had a greater probability of lodging in a site suitable for establishment. Gila woodpeckers, although abundant, spent little time in host plants, thus dooming most of the seeds they consumed. Mockingbirds may disperse a small number of seeds, but were abundant enough to consume only a small portion of the available fruits. As expected for plants attracting specialist frugivores, mistletoes produced fruits throughout the 6-month season in which phainopeplas reside in the Sonoran desert. Contrary to expectation, numbers of fruits produced far exceeded the amount that could be consumed by the frugivores at my study site. Fruit crop size was positively related to absolute fruit removal, but not to proportional removal at the scale of the entire study site. However, crop size was positively related to proportional removal within the neighborhood of mistletoes occupying an individual host tree. Frugivores were attracted to infected hosts, host attractiveness increased, although proportional removal of fruit declined, with number of female mistletoes. The observed dispersal ecology of desert mistletoe suggests the likelihood of increasingly clumped distributions of mistletoe plants, as more and more seeds are deposited

  20. Asthma consultations with specialists: what do the pediatricians seek?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poowuttikul, Pavadee; Kamat, Deepak; Thomas, Ronald; Pansare, Milind

    2011-01-01

    "Expert Panel Report 3 (EPR-3): Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Asthma" includes guidelines for referral to an asthma specialist. Because most cases of asthma are managed by primary care physicians, we intended to explore the referral practices of pediatricians managing childhood asthma. This study was designed to identify important considerations by pediatricians while referring a child to an asthma specialist. An electronic survey was sent to 1200 graduated pediatricians enlisted in the Michigan Chapter, American Academy of Pediatrics directory. The questions explored asthma disease characteristics, physician preferences when referring children with asthma, and reasons and barriers for asthma consultations. All responses were collected anonymously. We received 240/1200 (20%) questionnaires. The majority of pediatricians considered referral to a specialist if a child had severe persistent asthma (201/236 [85.2%]) or had a single life-threatening asthma event (188/229 [82.1%]). The top two likely reasons of referral included poor asthma control (200/224 [89.3%]) and unclear diagnosis (139/224 [62.1%]). We found 74/219 (33.8%) preferred consultation to a pediatric pulmonologist when compared with 93/219 (42.5%) allergists. We found the minority of pediatricians "always" recommended referral to a specialist for the following reasons: allergy skin testing (30/222 [13.5%]), possible allergen immunotherapy (54/223 [24.2%]), and spirometry (26/221 [11.8%]). The major barrier for childhood asthma specialist consultations was issues with medical insurance coverage (137/205 [66.8%]). Allergists have to educate primary care providers about the importance of allergen control, role of allergen immunotherapy, and updating current asthma treatment guidelines when treating a child with allergic asthma.

  1. Establishing a Research Agenda for Understanding the Role and Impact of Mental Health Peer Specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinman, Matthew; McInnes, D Keith; Eisen, Susan; Ellison, Marsha; Farkas, Marianne; Armstrong, Moe; Resnick, Sandra G

    2017-09-01

    Mental health peer specialists are individuals with serious mental illnesses who receive training to use their lived experiences to help others with serious mental illnesses in clinical settings. This Open Forum discusses the state of the research for mental health peer specialists and suggests a research agenda to advance the field. Studies have suggested that peer specialists vary widely in their roles, settings, and theoretical orientations. Theories of action have been proposed, but none have been tested. Outcome studies have shown benefits of peer specialists; however, many studies have methodological shortcomings. Qualitative descriptions of peer specialists are plentiful but lack grounding in implementation science frameworks. A research agenda advancing the field could include empirically testing theoretical mechanisms of peer specialists, developing a measure of peer specialist fidelity, conducting more rigorous outcomes studies, involving peer specialists in executing the research, and assessing various factors that influence implementing peer specialist services and testing strategies that could address those factors.

  2. 蒙药材刺柏叶中槲皮苷的含量测定%Quantification of Quercitrin in Juniper Leaves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔鸿江; 巴德玛; 林燕

    2013-01-01

    A HPLC method was developed and validated for the quantification of quercitrin in a Mongolia herb,namely juniper leaves. Chromatographic separation was carried out using Diamonsil C18 (4.6 mm × 250 mm,5 μm) column and Shim-pack C18(4. 6 mm × 250 mm,5 μm) column with methanol-0. 01 mol/L potassium dihydrogen phosphate solution- acetic acid (40:60:1.5) ,at flow rate of 1.0 mL/ min. The UV detection wavelength was set at 254 nm. The column temperature was 30℃. Good linearity (r =0.9998) of the peak area vs the injection volume (40.2 ng-603.0 ng) was obtained using the developed method. The average recovery was 100.45% with 0.69% of RSD (n = 6). The method was simple,accurate and reproducible. It can be used for the quantification of quercitrin in the juniper leaves.%本实验建立了蒙药材刺柏叶中槲皮苷的HPLC含量测定方法.色谱条件为:Diamonsil C18(4.6 mm ×250 mm,5μm)和Shim-Pack C18(4.6 mm× 250 mm,5μm),流动相:甲醇-0.01 mol/L磷酸二氢钾溶液-冰醋酸(40∶ 60∶ 1.5),检测波长:254 nm,流速:1.0 mL/min,柱温:30℃.槲皮苷进样量在40.2 ng ~603.0 ng范围内线性关系良好(r =0.9998),其平均加样回收率为100.45%,RSD为0.69%(n=6).本方法简便易行,结果准确,重复性好,可用于刺柏叶中槲皮苷的含量测定.

  3. Stars For Citizens With Urban Star Parks and Lighting Specialists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigore, Valentin

    2015-08-01

    General contextOne hundred years ago, almost nobody imagine a life without stars every night even in the urban areas. Now, to see a starry sky is a special event for urban citizens.It is possible to see the stars even inside cities? Yes, but for that we need star parks and lighting specialists as partners.Educational aspectThe citizens must be able to identify the planets, constellations and other celestial objects in their urban residence. This is part of a basic education. The number of the people living in the urban area who never see the main constellations or important stars increase every year. We must do something for our urban community.What is an urban star park?An urban public park where we can see the main constellations can be considered an urban star park. There can be organized a lot of activities as practical lessons of astronomy, star parties, etc.Classification of the urban star parksA proposal for classification of the urban star parks taking in consideration the quality of the sky and the number of the city inhabitants:Two categories:- city star parks for cities with inhabitants- metropolis star parks for cities with > 100.000 inhabitantsFive levels of quality:- 1* level = can see stars of at least 1 magnitude with the naked eyes- 2* level = at least 2 mag- 3* level = at least 3 mag- 4* level= at least 4 mag- 5* level = at least 5 magThe urban star urban park structure and lighting systemA possible structure of a urban star park and sky-friend lighting including non-electric illumination are descripted.The International Commission on IlluminationA description of this structure which has as members national commissions from all over the world.Dark-sky activists - lighting specialistsNational Commissions on Illumination organize courses of lighting specialist. Dark-sky activists can become lighting specialists. The author shows his experience in this aspect as a recent lighting specialist and his cooperation with the Romanian National Commission on

  4. Physical perfection of future specialists to the management.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolinnyj U.A.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The process of leadthrough of practical employments is considered on physical education on an experimental model, which are directed on the increase of reserve possibilities of organism of future specialists of management. In an experiment took part 30 students of 2 and 3 courses. It is set that management specialists for high-quality implementation of work need a high mental capacity, enhanceable psychoemotional firmness, general endurance. Directions of prophylaxis of emotional and physical overstrain are recommended, increases of level of positive motivation to systematic employments by physical exercises. It is marked that an experimental model in combination with the fixed form of leadthrough of employments on a body-conditioning and employments on specialization of the chosen type of sport is one the stages of alteration organizationally of methodical aspects of physical culture.

  5. [Therapy of allergic rhinitis: the preferences of specialists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilova, K V; Razdorskaia, I M

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to study the stereotypes of addressing such a serious medical problem as the treatment of allergic rhinitis by practicing physicians and the development of criteria for the priority choice of pharmaceutical products to be prescribed to the patients presenting with this pathology. This pharmacoepidemiological investigation was designed to elucidate the preferences shown by specialists dealing with this disease. The special questionnaire was developed to collect and analyse the opinions of otorhinolaryngologists and allergologists. The study has demonstrated that both therapy of allergic rhinitis and preferences of specialists conform with the respective international standards. However, the study revealed the lack of the adequate communicative and informational interactions between two basic components of the healthcare system, viz. doctors and pharmacists. The authors emphasize the necessity to optimize professional approaches to the management of allergic rhinitis.

  6. The case for a specialist multidisciplinary valve clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, John B; Lloyd, Guy; Rimington, Helen M; Parkin, Denise; Hayes, Anna M; Baldrock-Apps, Gemma; Topham, Ann

    2012-01-01

    Valve disease is common and is increasing in prevalence as the population ages. The delivery of appropriate management is not always straightforward, and better ways of organizing care are required. Here, the argument is made for a specialist multidisciplinary valve clinic, while a description is provided of the authors' model clinic, which incorporates a specialist cardiologist in addition to sonographers and a nurse who carry out the surveillance services. The clinic is based at a cardiothoracic center and one district hospital, but could be generalized. Previous audits have shown that this model can reduce the number of patients seen by a cardiologist, thus improving the safety and quality of treatment compared to conventional clinics.

  7. Defining the unique role of the specialist district nurse practitioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Anne; Latham, Dinah; Levermore, Joy

    2007-10-01

    Due to the reorganization of primary care trusts across the country, certain trusts proposed a reduction in the specialist district nurse practitioner numbers in favour of less qualified community nurses and health care assistants. Such proposals in one PCT were blocked, partly in response to documentation compiled by practitioners at the sharp end of nursing practice. With the new agenda of practice based commissioning, it is imperative that commissioners and management alike are aware of the scope of specialist district nurse practitioners. This is the first of a series of articles looking at specific case histories where the role of the district nurse is highlighted. It is the intention to stress the importance of the clinical expertise and confidence required by the district nurse to care for patients with complex needs in the community.

  8. Sports-related concussion: the role of the headache specialist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conidi, Francis X

    2012-05-01

    Over the past few years, sports-related concussion has received significant media attention making it one of the most, if not highest profile neurological disorder. Thirty-one states now have passed sports concussion laws, with 14 states pending legislation. Most concussions are managed by primary care physicians, ie, family practice trained sports medicine physicians and pediatricians. Symptoms are usually short lived and do not require treatment. The one exception is headache, which is usually present from onset and is often the last symptom to resolve. Headache is the most common reason for referral to a specialist, and therefore it is imperative that the headache specialist have at least a basic understanding of all aspects of sports concussion as they are likely going to be called upon to evaluate these athletes, especially the more refractory cases.

  9. Soils mediate the impact of fine woody debris on invasive and native grasses as whole trees are mechanically shredded into firebreaks in piñon-juniper woodlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aanderud, Zachary T.; Schoolmaster, Donald R.; Rigby, Deborah; Bybee, Jordon; Campbell, Tayte; Roundy, Bruce A.

    2017-01-01

    To stem wildfires, trees are being mechanically shredded into firebreaks with the resulting fine woody debris (FWD) potentially exerting immense control over soil and plants. We linked FWD-induced changes in microbial activity and nutrient availability to the frequency of Bromus tectorum and three native, perennial grasses across 31 piñon-juniper woodlands, UT, USA. Using a series of mixed models, we found that FWD increased the frequency of three of the four grasses by at least 12%. Deep, as opposed to shallow, soils mediated frequencies following FWD additions but only partially explained the variation in Bromus and Pseudoroegneria spicata. Although fertile areas associated with tree-islands elicited no response, FWD-induced increases in nitrogen mineralization in deep soils (15–17 cm) caused the frequency of the exotic and Pseudoroegneria to rise. Higher phosphorus availability in FWD-covered surface soils (0–2 cm) had no impact on grasses. FWD altered deep soil respiration, and deep and shallow microbial biomass structuring Pseudoroegneria frequencies, suggesting that microorganism themselves regulated Pseudoroegneria. The positive effects of FWD on grass frequencies intensified over time for natives but diminished for Bromus. Our results demonstrate that microorganisms in deeper soils helped mediate species-specific responses to disturbance both facilitating exotic invasion and promoting native establishment.

  10. COMPARISON OF SEED SOURCES OF CRIMEAN JUNIPER (Juniperus excelsa Bieb. IN THE LAKES DISTRICT IN TERMS OF MORPHOLOGICAL SEEDLING QUALITY CRITERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Süleyman Güçlü

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, five seed provenances of Crimean Juniper sampled from Lakes District were compared in terms of some seed quality criterions. For this purpose, seeds were collected from Barla, Sultandağı, Tota, Burdur and Söğüt. The seeds from each provenance were sown in Eğirdir Forest Nursery under the open-air environment and the sowing bed was prepared specially. The experiments were carried out according to “Completely Randomized Design” with three replications. Seedling height, root collar diameter and oven-dry stem/root ratios of ten seedlings were measured from each replication after the seedlings were one-year old. Data were analyzed by using SPSS statistical software program. Analysis of variance (ANOVA and Duncan test results showed that the seed provenances were different from each other in terms of measured characteristics. Until the new and extensive study results are obtained, the seeds should be collected from the provenances of Tota and Barla because those seedlings are better than the others. However, these results are valid only Eğirdir Forest Nursery and its environment should not be generalized for the other nurseries.

  11. Establishment of tree-ring chronology and climatic response of Tibetan juniper(S.tibetica) in south Tibet,western China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dmitry; M.Sonechkin

    2010-01-01

    A tree-ring width chronology of 442 years(1567-2008) was developed from Tibetan junipers(S.tibetica) derived from south Tibet in western China.Three versions of chronology were produced according to standard dendrochronological techniques.The correlation and response analysis displays a high correlation between the standard tree ring-width chronology and observed annual mean precipitation series during the period 1961-2008.Based on a linear regression model,an annual(prior August to current July) precipitation for the past 229 years was reconstructed.This is the first well-calibrated precipitation reconstruction for the Nanggarze region,south Tibet.The results show that relatively wet years with above-average precipitation occurred in 1780-1807,1854-1866,1886-1898,1904-1949,1967-1981 and 2000-2008,whereas relatively dry years with below-average precipitation prevailed during 1808-1853,1867-1885,1899-1903,1950-1966 and 1982-1999.Common dry/wet periods during 1890s,1910s,1940s-1960s and 1980s were also identified from other moisture reconstructions of nearby regions,indicating a synchronous climatic variation in south Tibet.Abrupt change beginning in 1888 was detected,revealing a transition from wet to dry conditions in south Tibet.Power spectrum analysis reveals significant cycles of 28-year,5.5-5.6-year and 3.3-year during the past 200 years.

  12. Pharmacy specialists' attitudes toward pharmaceutical service quality at community pharmacies

    OpenAIRE

    Urbonas, Gvidas; Jakušovaitė, Irayda; Savickas, Arūnas

    2010-01-01

    Objective. The main objective of this study was to analyze pharmacy specialists’ attitudes toward the quality of pharmaceutical services at Lithuanian community pharmacies. Material and methods. Between April and June 2009, a total of 471 Lithuanian community pharmacy specialists completed a questionnaire designed to evaluate their attitudes toward the quality of pharmaceutical services at community pharmacies. The main dimensions of pharmaceutical service quality were extracted by principal ...

  13. Beijing Specialists Give Free Medical Treatment in Yunnan Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    <正>To help improve the physical conditions of the people in the Hui ethnic minority areas of Yunnan Province, from December 6 to 11,2005, a 10-member medical team of specialists from the Capital went to the Weishan Yi and Hui Ethnic Minority Autonomous County of Dali Prefecture and Xundian Hui and Yi Ethnic Minority Autonomous County of Kunming City to give free medical treatment for 6 days. This activity was

  14. Specialists in Multisector Economy: Factors of Social Behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z T Golenkova

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the behaviour and values of «specialists» as a particular quantitatively representative group of modern Russian society. It gives a detailed description of their status and disposition dimensions such as wealth, income, living conditions, labour motivation as well as attitudes to economic and social institutions. The authors base their conclusions on the latest statistics and empiric sociological research.

  15. Clinical nurse specialist prescriber characteristics and challenges in Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Tracy

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess role characteristics of clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) with prescriptive authority in Oregon 10 years after passage of Senate Bill 460. Factors examined included role preparation and mentorship, use and maintenance of authority, prescribing benefits and barriers, and types of drugs/nondrugs prescribed. This study was a descriptive survey using both quantitative and qualitative analysis. The sample was obtained from a list provided on June 13, 2014, by the Oregon State Board of Nursing of all CNSs in Oregon who had ever been granted prescriptive authority (n = 40). Twenty-nine with active authority, 7 with expired authority, and 4 with inactive status were sampled. E-mail distribution with Qualtrics software was released on June 27, 2014. Reminder e-mails were sent at 1 and 2 weeks. Of the 38 e-mails successfully delivered, 23 responses were received for a total response rate of 60%. Clinical nurse specialists successfully maintained their authority in Oregon and felt well prepared for their role. Their prescribing mentorship included nurse and nonnurse prescribers. They were most likely to have ever prescribed psychiatric, noncontrolled analgesics and durable medical equipment. They most frequently prescribed nutrition/electrolytes/fluids, durable medical equipment, and controlled analgesics. Lapse in authority was attributed to constraints regarding certification or credentialing in the role. Clinical nurse specialists uniformly expressed benefits from prescriptive authority. There were no differences in perceptions of preparation based on type of mentorship or educational modality for completion of prescribing requirements. There were systems barriers including lack of employer and colleague support to use of authority. Durable medical equipment authority is important to the CNS role. Clinical nurse specialists valued and maintained their prescriptive authority despite barriers. Further research is recommended to support

  16. Use of professional profiles in applications for specialist training positions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundh, Andreas; Skjelsager, Karen; Wildgaard, Kim

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The seven roles of the CanMEDS system have been implemented in Danish postgraduate medical training. For each medical specialty, a professional profile describes which elements of the seven roles the specialty deems important for applicants for a specialist training position. We inv...... the contents of the profiles should be interpreted. We suggest that specialties seek inspiration for updating their profiles, and that they use the contents from all specialties provided at a website. FUNDING: not relevant. TRIAL REGISTRATION: not relevant....

  17. STS-73 Mission Specialist Catherine Coleman suits up

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    STS-73 Mission Specialist Catherine G. Coleman is assisted by a suit technician as she dons her launch/entry suit in the Operations and Checkout Building. STS-73 will be the first trip into space for Coleman, who will depart shortly for Launch Pad 39B, where the Space Shuttle Columbia awaits lift off during a window opening at 9:41 a.m. EDT, Oct. 7.

  18. The opinions of Finnish specialist physicians on social security system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arttu O Saarinen

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available

    Background: We can argue that opinions are considered to be part of the physician’s professional identity. Professional identity has been considered a result of learning. After graduation physicians usually continue to study to gain a specialisation, and we can assume that this process affects their opinions because every specialty has its own “cultural climate”. Also, specialists have different views towards the welfare state because, for example, of the fact that they work with different types of population groups.

    Aim of the study: In this article we will describe how specialists feel about the current level of social security in Finland.

    Methods: The empirical analysis in our study is based on postal survey. The 2000 working age physicians’ random survey sample was picked from the register of the Finnish Medical Association (n=1092, response rate 54,6 %. The whole questionnaire included questions dealing with social security, health policy and health care system. The data was analysed using means and multinomial logistic regression analysis.

    Results: This study shows that surgeons and radiologists are the most critical of social security. These groups often think that social security is excessive. In contrast, psychiatrists show a stronger tendency to support social security. All in all, Finnish specialists are more critical of the social security system than are nonspecialised physicians.

    Conclusions: There are many similarities between Nordic countries when we look at the historical role of medical profession. We can also assume that specialist physicians' opinions on social security are quite similar compared to those of other Nordic countries.

  19. Management Specialists' Training Social Schemes: World Experience and Russian Specificity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    М А Ignatskaya

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The article offers the analysis of the issues related to the social administration of professional management personnel training which have become particularly complicated over the past two decades. Social schemes, conditions and factors of management are shown to be closely interconnected with the characteristics of human capital as the basis for social, economic and cultural development of the contemporary society. World experience and Russian specificity in the sphere of human resource management specialists' training are analyzed.

  20. Management of liver cirrhosis between primary care and specialists

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ignazio Grattagliano; Enzo Ubaldi; Leonilde Bonfrate; Piero Portincasa

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses a practical, evidence-based approach to the diagnosis and management of liver cirrhosis by focusing on etiology, severity, presence of complications, and potential home-managed treatments. Relevant literature from 1985 to 2010 (PubMed) was reviewed. The search criteria were peer-reviewed full papers published in English using the following MESH headings alone or in combination: "ascites", "liver fibrosis","cirrhosis", "chronic hepatitis", "chronic liver disease","decompensated cirrhosis", "hepatic encephalopathy","hypertransaminasemia", "liver transplantation" and "portal hypertension". Forty-nine papers were selected based on the highest quality of evidence for each section and type (original, randomized controlled trial, guideline, and review article), with respect to specialist setting (Gastroenterology,Hepatology, and Internal Medicine) and primary care. Liver cirrhosis from any cause represents an emerging health issue due to the increasing prevalence of the disease and its complications worldwide. Primary care physicians play a key role in early identification of risk factors, in the management of patients for improving quality and length of life, and for preventing complications.Specialists, by contrast, should guide specific treatments, especially in the case of complications and for selecting patient candidates for liver transplantation. An integrated approach between specialists and primary care physicians is essential for providing better outcomes and appropriate home care for patients with liver cirrhosis.

  1. Caring for cancer patients on non-specialist wards.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gill, Finola

    2012-02-01

    As cancer is the leading cause of death worldwide, every nurse will be required to care for patients with the condition at some point in his\\/her career. However, non-specialized oncology nurses are often ill-prepared to nurse patients suffering from cancer. This literature review aims to provide an overview of current trends and developments in cancer care nursing in an attempt to identify the range of previous research pertaining to caring for patients with cancer on non-specialist wards. The review finds that non-specialized cancer nurses report a lack of education and training with regard to cancer care and cancer treatments, which acts as a barrier to providing quality nursing care. Emotional and communication issues with patients and their families can also cause non-specialist nurses significant distress. International research has shown that specialist oncology nurses make a considerable difference to physical and psychosocial patient care. It is therefore paramount that non-speciality nurses\\' educational needs are met to develop clinical competence and to provide supportive holistic care for both patients and their families.

  2. Applying research to practice: generalist and specialist (visual ergonomics) consultancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jennifer; Long, Airdrie

    2012-01-01

    Ergonomics is a holistic discipline encompassing a wide range of special interest groups. The role of an ergonomics consultant is to provide integrated solutions to improve comfort, safety and productivity. In Australia, there are two types of consultants--generalists and specialists. Both have training in ergonomics but specialist knowledge may be the result of previous education or work experience. This paper presents three projects illustrating generalist and specialist (visual ergonomics) consultancy: development of a vision screening protocol, solving visual discomfort in an office environment and solving postural discomfort in heavy industry. These case studies demonstrate how multiple ergonomics consultants may work together to solve ergonomics problems. It also describes some of the challenges for consultants, for those engaging their services and for the ergonomics profession, e.g. recognizing the boundaries of expertise, sharing information with business competitors, the costs-benefits of engaging multiple consultants and the risk of fragmentation of ergonomics knowledge and solutions. Since ergonomics problems are often multifaceted, ergonomics consultants should have a solid grounding in all domains of ergonomics, even if they ultimately only practice in one specialty or domain. This will benefit the profession and ensure that ergonomics remains a holistic discipline.

  3. What are the roles of clinical nurses and midwife specialists?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickham, Sheelagh

    Research shows the increasing part the Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS) plays in healthcare today. But what does a CNS actually do in their day-to day-work? This study, set in the Republic of Ireland, aimed to explore the CNS and clinical midwife specialist (CMS) roles in practice. Quantitative methodology was used to explore the roles and activities of the CNS and CMS. Following ethics approval, a valid and reliable questionnaire was circulated to the total population of CNS/CMS in Ireland. The data were analysed using SPSS. This study articulates the individual role elements and activity level. The findings show the CNS/CMS to be active in the roles of researcher, educator, communicator, change agent, leader and clinical specialist, but the level of activity varies between different roles and individual role elements. The CNS/CMS is seen as a valuable resource in health care today and has potential to have a positive effect on patient care. The majority of CNS/CMSs are active in varying roles but the analysis shows lesser activity in some areas, such as research. The findings merit further study on role activity and possible variables that influence role activity.

  4. Introducing the National Library for Health Skin Conditions Specialist Library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Hywel C

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper introduces the new National Library for Health Skin Conditions Specialist Library http://www.library.nhs.uk/skin. Description The aims, scope and audience of the new NLH Skin Conditions Specialist Library, and the composition and functions of its core Project Team, Editorial Team and Stakeholders Group are described. The Library's collection building strategy, resource and information types, editorial policies, quality checklist, taxonomy for content indexing, organisation and navigation, and user interface are all presented in detail. The paper also explores the expected impact and utility of the new Library, as well as some possible future directions for further development. Conclusion The Skin Conditions Specialist Library is not just another new Web site that dermatologists might want to add to their Internet favourites then forget about it. It is intended to be a practical, "one-stop shop" dermatology information service for everyday practical use, offering high quality, up-to-date resources, and adopting robust evidence-based and knowledge management approaches.

  5. Differentiating between a consultant nurse and a clinical nurse specialist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maylor, Miles

    With the introduction of nurse consultants, and regulation of the use of the designation 'specialist nurse', experienced practitioners such as clinical nurse specialists have seen their position eroded. Nurse consultants are a new NHS-employment category, and are expected to be at the top rank of the profession both in status and in salary. However, this article argues that nurses at various levels have the same core functions, and that these do not differ for nurse consultants. Distinguishing between practitioners that might have the same job description could be better done by measuring outcomes. More care needs to be taken over the use of words such as 'expert', which is used differently in different contexts, and it is suggested that competencies be developed by which to measure the effects of expertise. Although nurse consultant appointments are often driven by various political directives and they are employed to meet local and national priorities, difficult issues need to be faced. First, if nurse consultant jobs are the top of the clinical career ladder, will clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) need to accept a lower rung on it? Further, perhaps the title CNS should become obsolete or be regulated? Can CNSs claim parity of pay using the 'Agenda for Change' framework?

  6. From Humanizing the Educational Process to Professionally Mobile Specialists Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Fugelova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Training professional mobile specialists capable of responding flexibly to dynamic changes in society is considered to be the most important issue of the modern educational system. The paper justifies the idea that technical universities should take responsibility for solving this problem by means of humanization of technical education, which implies reconsidering its values and general notions. For overcoming the technocratic trends, the author recommends to cultivate the value of professionalism in the humanization context.Professionalism is defined by using the «professional service» idea as a «purpose acknowledgment, supertask, even a mission». The main components of the above attitude lie in finding the harmony with the world and its basic values. Therefore, technical universities face the challenge of training people of intelligence with a high moral and business responsibility. The basic value of such a person is regarded as «dedication to the cause» - the constant desire to improve the world and leave behind them- selves something of value to society. For training such specialists, the educational process should provide teachers dialogue and collaboration with students to facilitate the process of self-determination and self-development of the prospective specialists

  7. Trying To Reduce Your Technostress?: Helpful Activities for Teachers and Library Media Specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Barbara K.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    As pressure increases to integrate technology into instruction, many teachers and library media specialists are having difficulty coping with "technostress." Presents suggestions and activities for teachers and library media specialists designed to reduce "technostress." (PEN)

  8. 78 FR 14359 - Verizon Business Networks Services, Inc., Specialist-Tech Customer Service, Philadelphia, PA...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-05

    ... Employment and Training Administration Verizon Business Networks Services, Inc., Specialist-Tech Customer Service, Philadelphia, PA; Verizon Business Networks Services, Inc., Specialist-Tech Customer Service..., 2012, applicable to workers of Verizon Business Networks Services, Inc., Order Management...

  9. One Point of View: Elementary School Mathematics Specialists: Where Are They?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dossey, John A.

    1984-01-01

    A plea is made for the mathematics education community to support the need for elementary school mathematics specialists. Roles of such specialists in primary as well as intermediate grades are listed. (MNS)

  10. Choosing a Model for eConsult Specialist Remuneration: Factors to Consider

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Electronic consultation (eConsult) is an innovative solution that allows specialists and primary care providers to communicate electronically, improving access to specialist care. Understanding the cost implications of different remuneration models available to pay specialists is of critical importance as adoption of these services continues to increase. We used data collected through the Champlain BASE (Building Access to Specialists through eConsultation) eConsult service to simulate the co...

  11. [Demand and supply of otolaryngology specialists based on evidence: What is the required number of specialists who should be trained?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Gómez, Serafín; Suárez Nieto, Carlos; Cobeta Marco, Ignacio

    2009-01-01

    Several concurrent circumstances have created an impression through the media of a presumed lack of specialists in Spain, which has one of the highest densities of doctors per population in the world: simultaneous creation of jobs in many newly built hospitals; accepting garbage contracts (for months, half/thirds of days, shifts) in relevant hospitals rather than moving to unattractive positions; full dedication to the field of public or private healthcare rather than matching them; bad public healthcare working conditions (low wages, excessive healthcare pressure, lack of respect from the public and from healthcare managers, shifts, scarce professional promotion, difficult family reunification); decreased mobility due to insulation of the markets as a result of decentralization of healthcare by regions. There is no shortage of specialists in otolaryngology, but instead there are sporadic inequalities in their geographical distribution. The current number of positions as training doctors offered annually is higher at the moment than the demand of the Spanish society, for specialists who have adapted smoothly to the requirements of the new medical practice: clinical management, care quality, technology-based efficiency, evidence-based medicine. The modification of working conditions through higher flexibility in the working models and an increase of salaries based on activity and quality will show that the otolaryngology workforce which is generated with the current offer can assume the present and future demand. A high quality of specialized otolaryngology training is the substrate to be improved, so that future otolaryngology specialists will be able to face health challenges without unduly increasing their number.

  12. Inter-observer agreement of canine and feline paroxysmal event semiology and classification by veterinary neurology specialists and non-specialists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Packer, Rowena M A; Berendt, Mette; Bhatti, Sofie;

    2015-01-01

    neurology specialists and non-specialists) on the description and classification of videos depicting paroxysmal events, without knowing any results of diagnostic workup. An online questionnaire study was conducted, where participants watched 100 videos of dogs and cats exhibiting paroxysmal events...... low levels of agreement described here highlight the need for further discussions between neurology experts regarding classifying and describing epileptic seizures, and additional training of non-specialists to facilitate accurate diagnosis. There is a need for diagnostic tools (e...

  13. 14 CFR 1214.306 - Payload specialist relationship with sponsoring institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Payload specialist relationship with sponsoring institutions. 1214.306 Section 1214.306 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE... specialist relationship with sponsoring institutions. Specialists who are not U.S. Government employees must...

  14. Nurse specialists in adult congenital heart disease: The current status in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moons, P.; Scholte op Reimer, W.; De Geest, S.; Fridlund, B.; Heikkila, J.; Jaarsma, Trijntje (Tiny); Martensson, J.; Smith, K; Stewart, S.; Stromberg, A; Thompson, D.R.

    2006-01-01

    Aim: Recommendations for the management of adults with congenital heart disease indicate that specialist referral centres should employ nurse specialists who are trained and educated in the care for these patients. We surveyed the involvement, education and activities of nurse specialists in the car

  15. Perceptions of Information Technology Specialists Regarding Securing Re-Employment after Offshoring Displacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallaway, Ricky A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative exploratory case study was to explore why some IT specialists, after experiencing unemployment because of corporate offshoring, acquired gainful re-employment, whereas other similarly unemployed IT specialists had not. To effectively address this case study, two cases were studied: (a) displaced IT specialists who…

  16. The Composition of Specialist Schools in England: Track Record and Future Prospect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorard, Stephen; Taylor, Chris

    2001-01-01

    Examines the advantages and disadvantages of specialist schools in England. Concludes that specialist schools attain higher levels of student achievement at the cost of socioeconomic diversity, especially when these schools set their own admission criteria. Suggests ways for specialist schools to increase student diversity. (Contains 23…

  17. Formation of DNA adducts in the skin of psoriasis patients, in human skin in organ culture, and in mouse skin and lung following topical application of coal-tar and juniper tar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoket, B; Horkay, I; Kósa, A; Páldeák, L; Hewer, A; Grover, P L; Phillips, D H

    1990-02-01

    Preparations of coal-tar and juniper tar (cade oil) that are used in the treatment of psoriasis are known to contain numerous potentially carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). Evidence of covalent binding to DNA by components of these mixtures was sought in a) human skin biopsy samples from 12 psoriasis patients receiving therapy with these agents, b) human skin explants maintained in organ culture and treated topically with the tars, and c) the skin and lungs of mice treated with repeated doses of the formulations following the regimen used in the clinic. DNA was isolated from the human and mouse tissues and digested enzymically to mononucleotides. 32P-Post-labeling analysis revealed the presence of aromatic DNA adducts in the biopsy samples at levels of up to 0.4 fmol total adducts/microgram DNA. Treatment of human skin in organ culture produced similar levels of adducts, while treatment with dithranol, a non-mutagenic therapeutic agent, resulted in chromatograms indistinguishable from those from untreated controls. In mouse skin, coal-tar ointment and juniper tar gave similar DNA adduct levels, with a similar time-course of removal: maximum levels (0.5 fmol/microgram DNA) at 24 h after the final treatment declined rapidly to 0.05 fmol/microgram at 7 d, thereafter declining slowly over the succeeding 25 d. However, while coal-tar ointment produced only very low levels of adducts in mouse lung (less than 0.03 fmol/microgram DNA), juniper tar produced adducts at a high level (0.7 fmol/microgram DNA) that were persistent in this tissue. These results provide direct evidence for the formation of potentially carcinogenic DNA damage in human and mouse tissue by components of these therapeutic tar preparations.

  18. Transcription, translation, and the evolution of specialists and generalists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Shaobin; Miller, Stephen P; Dykhuizen, Daniel E; Dean, Antony M

    2009-12-01

    We used DNA microarrays to measure transcription and iTRAQ 2D liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (a mass-tag labeling proteomic technique) to measure protein expression in 14 strains of Escherichia coli adapted for hundreds of generations to growth-limiting concentrations of either lactulose, methylgalactoside, or a 72:28 mixture of the two. The two ancestors, TD2 and TD10, differ only in their lac operons and have similar transcription and protein expression profiles. Changes in transcription and protein expression are observed at 30-250 genes depending on the evolved strain. Lactulose specialists carry duplications of the lac operon and show increased transcription and translation at lac. Methylgalactoside specialists are galS(-) and so constitutively transcribe and translate mgl, which encodes a transporter of methylgalactoside. However, there are two strains that carry lac duplications, are galS(-), and show increased transcription and translation at both operons. One is a generalist, the other a lactulose specialist. The generalist fails to sweep to fixation because its lac(+), galS(+) competitor expresses the csg adhesin and sticks to the chemostat wall, thereby preventing complete washout. Transcription and translation are sometimes decoupled. Lactulose-adapted strains show increased protein expression at fru, a fructose transporter, without evidence of increased transcription. This suggests that fructose, produced by the action of beta-galactosidase on lactulose, may leach from cells before being recouped. Reduced expression, at "late" flagella genes and the constitutive gat operon, is an adaptation to starvation. A comparison with two other long-term evolution experiments suggests that certain aspects of adaptation are predictable, some are characteristic of an experimental system, whereas others seem erratic.

  19. STS-84 Mission Specialist Carlos I. Noriega in white room

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-84 Mission Specialist Carlos I. Noriega prepares to enter the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A with help from white room closeout crew members. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. The commander is Charles J. Precourt. The pilot is Eileen Marie Collins. The five mission specialists are C. Michael Foale, Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. The planned nine-day mission will include the exchange of Foale for U.S. astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on Mir since Jan. 15. Linenger transferred to Mir during the last docking mission, STS-81; he will return to Earth on Atlantis. Foale is slated to remain on Mir for about four months until he is replaced in September by STS-86 Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence. During the five days Atlantis is scheduled to be docked with the Mir, the STS-84 crew and the Mir 23 crew, including two Russian cosmonauts, Commander Vasily Tsibliev and Flight Engineer Alexander Lazutkin, will participate in joint experiments. The STS-84 mission also will involve the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science equipment to and from the Mir. Atlantis is carrying a nearly 300-pound oxygen generator to replace one of two Mir units which have experienced malfunctions. The oxygen it generates is used for breathing by the Mir crew.

  20. Predictors of specialist avifaunal decline in coastal marshes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correll, Maureen D; Wiest, Whitney A; Hodgman, Thomas P; Shriver, W Gregory; Elphick, Chris S; McGill, Brian J; O'Brien, Kathleen M; Olsen, Brian J

    2017-02-01

    Coastal marshes are one of the world's most productive ecosystems. Consequently, they have been heavily used by humans for centuries, resulting in ecosystem loss. Direct human modifications such as road crossings and ditches and climatic stressors such as sea-level rise and extreme storm events have the potential to further degrade the quantity and quality of marsh along coastlines. We used an 18-year marsh-bird database to generate population trends for 5 avian species (Rallus crepitans, Tringa semipalmata semipalmata, Ammodramus nelsonii subvirgatus, Ammodramus caudacutus, and Ammodramus maritimus) that breed almost exclusively in tidal marshes, and are potentially vulnerable to marsh degradation and loss as a result of anthropogenic change. We generated community and species trends across 3 spatial scales and explored possible drivers of the changes we observed, including marsh ditching, tidal restriction through road crossings, local rates of sea-level rise, and potential for extreme flooding events. The specialist community showed negative trends in tidally restricted marshes (-2.4% annually from 1998 to 2012) but was stable in unrestricted marshes across the same period. At the species level, we found negative population trends in 3 of the 5 specialist species, ranging from -4.2% to 9.0% annually. We suggest that tidal restriction may accelerate degradation of tidal marsh resilience to sea-level rise by limiting sediment supply necessary for marsh accretion, resulting in specialist habitat loss in tidally restricted marshes. Based on our findings, we predict a collapse of the global population of Saltmarsh Sparrows (A. caudacutus) within the next 50 years and suggest that immediate conservation action is needed to prevent extinction of this species. We also suggest mitigation actions to restore sediment supply to coastal marshes to help sustain this ecosystem into the future.

  1. Development of a prototype specialist shuttle vehicle for chipped woodfuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-06-01

    This report gives details of a project to develop and test a specialist chip shuttle vehicle for conveying woodchips out of the forest with the aim of reducing the cost of woodfuel production. The design objectives are described and include the need to allow easy transfer of the chips from the chipper to the shuttle and on into haulage units, good performance and manoeuvrability on and off roads, and high-tip capacity. Estimates of the improved production and reduced woodfuel production costs are discussed along with the anticipated satisfactory operation of the chipper-shuttle combination in a forestry site.

  2. Scandinavian Nurse Specialist Group/Cystic Fibrosis (SNSG/CF)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnballe, Vibeke; Erwander, Inger

    2006-01-01

    /CF comprises one CF nurse from each of the centers. The board meets twice a year to plan workshops and courses. SNSG/CF is part of the International Nurse Specialist Group/Cystic Fibrosis (INSG/CF). Results: Within the framework of SNSG/CF a 2-day workshop is held every second year for approximately 40......Aims: SNSG/CF was established to stimulate and improve cooperation between CF nurses from Scandinavian CF centers. Methods: SNSG/CF includes all the CF centers in Norway (Oslo and Bergen), Sweden (Stockholm, Gothenburg, Lund and Uppsala) and Denmark (Copenhagen and Aarhus). The board of SNSG...

  3. Column: The Consortium of Digital Forensics Specialists (CDFS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Kelley

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Digital forensic practitioners are faced with an extraordinary opportunity. In fact, we may never again be faced with such an opportunity, and this opportunity will challenge us in ways we may never again be challenged.At this point in the history of the Digital Forensics profession, digital forensic specialists have the unique opportunity to help this profession emerge from its infancy. But for this profession to mature -- and to flourish -- individuals and organizations integral to the practice must assemble and shape its future. This is our opportunity. In fact, this is our mandate.(see PDF for full column

  4. What Proportion of Terminally Ill and Dying People Require Specialist Palliative Care Services?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna M. Wilson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, around 55 million people die each year worldwide. That number is expected to increase rapidly with accelerating population aging. Despite growth in the number of palliative care specialists and specialist services in most countries, the prospect of an increasing number of terminally ill and dying persons is daunting. This paper attempts to answer the question: what proportion of terminally ill and dying persons require specialist palliative care services? To address this question and highlight which persons require specialist palliative care, the current state of access to specialist palliative care services and specialists in Canada and other countries is highlighted, along with available evidence-based information on specialist services utilization and the care needs of terminally ill and dying persons. Current evidence and information gaps reveal that this question cannot be answered now, but it should be answered in advance of a crisis of unmet end-of-life care needs with the rising death toll.

  5. Soil Seed Bank Responses to Postfire Herbicide and Native Seeding Treatments Designed to Control Bromus tectorum in a Pinyon–Juniper Woodland at Zion National Park, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Matthew L.; Hondo Brisbin, graduate student; Andrea Thode, Associate Professor; Karen Weber, graduate student

    2013-01-01

    The continued threat of an invasive, annual brome (Bromus) species in the western United States has created the need for integrated approaches to postfire restoration. Additionally, the high germination rate, high seed production, and seed bank carryover of annual bromes points to the need to assay soil seed banks as part of monitoring programs. We sampled the soil seed bank to help assess the effectiveness of treatments utilizing the herbicide Plateau® (imazapic) and a perennial native seed mix to control annual Bromus species and enhance perennial native plant establishment following a wildfire in Zion National Park, Utah. This study is one of few that have monitored the effects of imazapic and native seeding on a soil seed bank community and the only one that we know of that has done so in a pinyon–juniper woodland. The study made use of untreated, replicated controls, which is not common for seed bank studies. One year posttreatment, Bromus was significantly reduced in plots sprayed with herbicide. By the second year posttreatment, the effects of imazapic were less evident and convergence with the controls was evident. Emergence of seeded species was low for the duration of the study. Dry conditions and possible interactions with imazapic probably contributed to the lack of emergence of seeded native species. The perennial grass sand dropseed outperformed the other species included in the seed mix. We also examined how the treatments affected the soil seed bank community as a whole. We found evidence that the herbicide was reducing several native annual forbs and one nonnative annual forb. However, overall effects on the community were not significant. The results of our study were similar to what others have found in that imazapic is effective in providing a short-term reduction in Bromus density, although it can impact emergence of nontarget species.

  6. Characterization of vegetation properties: Canopy modeling of pinyon-juniper and ponderosa pine woodlands; Final report. Modeling topographic influences on solar radiation: A manual for the SOLARFLUX model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rich, P.M.; Hetrick, W.A.; Saving, S.C.

    1994-12-31

    This report is comprised of two studies. The first study focuses on plant canopies in pinyon-juniper woodland, ponderosa pine woodland, and waste sites at Los Alamos National Laboratory which involved five basic areas of research: (1) application of hemispherical photography and other gap fraction techniques to study solar radiation regimes and canopy architecture, coupled with application of time-domain reflectometry to study soil moisture; (2) detailed characterization of canopy architecture using stand mapping and allometry; (3) development of an integrated geographical information system (GIS) database for relating canopy architecture with ecological, hydrological, and system modeling approaches; (4) development of geometric models that simulate complex sky obstruction, incoming solar radiation for complex topographic surfaces, and the coupling of incoming solar radiation with energy and water balance, with simulations of incoming solar radiation for selected native vegetation and experimental waste cover design sites; and (5) evaluation of the strengths and limitations of the various field sampling techniques. The second study describes an approach to develop software that takes advantage of new generation computers to model insolation on complex topographic surfaces. SOLARFLUX is a GIS-based (ARC/INFO, GRID) computer program that models incoming solar radiation based on surface orientation (slope and aspect), solar angle (azimuth and zenith) as it shifts over time, shadows caused by topographic features, and atmospheric conditions. This manual serves as the comprehensive guide to SOLARFLUX. Included are discussions on modelling insolation on complex surfaces, the theoretical approach, program setup and operation, and a set of applications illustrating characteristics of topographic insolation modelling.

  7. Woody Biomass Estimation in a Southwestern U.S. Juniper Savanna Using LiDAR-Derived Clumped Tree Segmentation and Existing Allometries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan J. Krofcheck

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The rapid and accurate assessment of above ground biomass (AGB of woody vegetation is a critical component of climate mitigation strategies, land management practices and process-based models of ecosystem function. This is especially true of semi-arid ecosystems, where the high variability in precipitation and disturbance regimes can have dramatic impacts on the global carbon budget by rapidly transitioning AGB between live and dead pools. Measuring regional AGB requires scaling ground-based measurements using remote sensing, an inherently challenging task in the sparsely-vegetated, spatially-heterogeneous landscapes characteristic of semi-arid regions. Here, we test the ability of canopy segmentation and statistic generation based on aerial LiDAR (light detection and ranging-derived 3D point clouds to derive AGB in clumps of vegetation in a juniper savanna in central New Mexico. We show that single crown segmentation, often an error-prone and challenging task, is not required to produce accurate estimates of AGB. We leveraged the relationship between the volume of the segmented vegetation clumps and the equivalent stem diameter of the corresponding trees (R2 = 0.83, p < 0.001 to drive the allometry for J. monosperma on a per segment basis. Further, we showed that making use of the full 3D point cloud from LiDAR for the generation of canopy object statistics improved that relationship by including canopy segment point density as a covariate (R2 = 0.91. This work suggests the potential for LiDAR-derived estimates of AGB in spatially-heterogeneous and highly-clumped ecosystems.

  8. Art Appreciation as a Learned Competence: A Museum-Based Qualitative Study of Adult Art Specialist and Art Non-Specialist Visitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracun Sova, Rajka

    2015-01-01

    Since Bourdieu, it has been argued that art appreciation requires "knowledge". The focus of this qualitative study was to examine art appreciation as a learned competence by exploring two different groups of museum visitors: art specialists and art non-specialists. The research was conducted at Moderna galerija in Ljubljana. Twenty-three…

  9. Redefining "Community" through Collaboration and Co-Teaching: A Case Study of an ESOL Specialist, a Literacy Specialist, and a Fifth-Grade Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed Hersi, Afra; Horan, Deborah A.; Lewis, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the development of a professional learning community through a case study of three teachers--an ESOL specialist, a literacy specialist, and a fifth-grade teacher--who engaged in co-teaching and collaboration. The emerging community of practice offered these teachers a space to learn and problem-solve by utilizing their…

  10. Professional standard of specialist of guardianship and custodianship agency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.V. Semya

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We justified the introduction of the professional standard of specialist of guardianship and custodianship agency taking into consideration the psychological characteristics of the target group of customers. We describe the situation in our country with qualification of professionals, the international trends in the field of protection of the rights of minors in the countries – members of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. We analyze the reflection of the theme of labor functions in the Russian legislation. We reveal the need for psychological and pedagogical knowledge for successful professional of guardianship authorities, compile a list of the necessary skills and knowledge. The main focus of the work of specialists is to maintain the child in the biological family at all stages of working with child and family problems. We characterize the trends in professional activities related to the development of the regional legislation in comparison with federal, increased number of international instruments to which Russia joined in the protection of children's rights. It is stressed that a requirement for education is additional retraining for new programs on the basis of higher education in the following professions and fields of study: law, pedagogy and psychology, social pedagogy and social work.

  11. Proceedings of the Specialists' Meeting on High Energy Nuclear Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukahori, Tokio

    1992-03-01

    This report consists of the Proceedings of the Specialists' Meeting on High Energy Nuclear Data. The meeting was held on October 3-4, 1991, at the Tokai Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute with the participation of forty-odd specialists, who were the evaluators, theorists, experimentalists, and users of high energy nuclear data including the members of Japanese Nuclear Data Committee. The need of the nuclear data in the high energy region up to a few GeV was stressed in the meeting for many applications, such as spallation neutron sources for radioactive waste treatment, accelerator shielding design, medical isotope production, radiation therapy, the effects of space radiation on astronauts and their equipment, and the cosmic history of meteorites and other galactic substances. Although the neutron nuclear data below 20 MeV have been well evaluated for fission and fusion reactor applications, the nuclear data in the high energy region have never been prepared in Japan. With the view of producing an evaluated high energy nuclear data file, theoretical models and codes, available and necessary measurements, needs of nuclear data, and various applications were reviewed and discussed. The consensus, that the wide collaboration was necessary to produce the evaluated file and should be established, has been obtained.

  12. The Commonwealth Fund Survey of Long-Term Care Specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Edward Alan; Weissert, William G

    2010-08-01

    The Commonwealth Fund Survey of Long-Term Care of Specialists was administered via the World Wide Web from September 2007 through March 2008. The primary purpose was to characterize the views of those with known or demonstrable experience and expertise with at least one aspect of long-term care. Among 2,577 potential respondents, 1,147 completed the entire survey for an overall response rate of 44.5%. This special supplement of Medical Care Research and Review uses data collected from the survey to explore several issue areas, namely, reforming long-term care financing, improving government oversight, adopting nursing home culture change, and rebalancing long-term care away from institutions toward home- and community-based services. Analyses documenting the opinion networks of long-term care specialists and the relationship between network characteristics and attitudes toward reform are also reported. Two leading experts provide commentary as well. Details of the study's methodology and issue content are described.

  13. 3rd CEAS Specialist Conference on Guidance, Navigation and Control

    CERN Document Server

    Drouin, Antoine; Roos, Clément

    2015-01-01

    The two first CEAS (Council of European Aerospace Societies) Specialist Conferences on Guidance, Navigation and Control (CEAS EuroGNC) were held in Munich, Germany in 2011 and in Delft, The Netherlands in 2013. ONERA The French Aerospace Lab, ISAE (Institut Supérieur de l’Aéronautique et de l’Espace) and ENAC (Ecole Nationale de l’Aviation Civile) accepted the challenge of jointly organizing the 3rd edition. The conference aims at promoting new advances in aerospace GNC theory and technologies for enhancing safety, survivability, efficiency, performance, autonomy and intelligence of aerospace systems. It represents a unique forum for communication and information exchange between specialists in the fields of GNC systems design and operation, including air traffic management. This book contains the forty best papers and gives an interesting snapshot of the latest advances over the following topics: l  Control theory, analysis, and design l  Novel navigation, estimation, and tracking methods l  Aircr...

  14. Opportunity Costs in Paediatric Training: The Specialist Registrars Experience.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O’Neill, MB

    2017-08-01

    In the training process, there is a tension between the work life and home life of trainees. This study explored both the personal impact and the opportunity costs of training from the Specialist Paediatric Registrar (SPR) perspective. The survey explored 1) career progression2) perceived functional effectiveness at work 3) psychological impact of hospital based training and 4) the personal and social cost of training. Fifty-three (71%) SPRs responded of whom 47 (89%)were married or in long term relationships. Seventy-five percent of trainees had a definite career plan with 86% intending to undertake fellowship training. Seventy percent believed they were efficient time managers but 53% had difficulty in making time for academic pursuits and fifty percent experienced negative feelings, which lingered after work and interfered with their relationships at home. Seventy-four percent stated training was undertaken at significant personal cost with only 21% achieving a very satisfactory work\\/life balance. To address these difficulties trainee wellbeing should be addressed at the Basic Specialist Training (BST) level and the career path clearly explained outlining the challenges that are likely to be encountered.

  15. Professional Training Of Specialists In International Marketing In Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Żukowski Wojciech

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Polish experience in training specialists in international marketing in the context of globalization and integration processes has been studied. A range of theoretical resources, namely Market Entry Strategy for Poland; the articles dedicated to international marketing and economy development (W. Grzegorczyk, M. Viachevskyi, M. Urbanetst; program specifications and structures at Polish universities, namely University of Lodz and Collegium Civitas, have been analyzed. It has been defined that marketing is one of the most important activities in all types of organizations since it is a link between customers and companies in the context of global changes in business environment. The need of leading companies for their staff to be highly qualified, open for new opportunities, ready to take an initiative and comprehend the global needs and values has been justified. It has been clarified that both higher education institutions have the same strategic aims, aimed at highly professional specialists’ training, the cultural-based education of youth, stimulating for critical reflection, lifelong learning, and professional development. Positive aspects in Polish experience of training future specialists in international marketing have been defined. Perspectives for further research have been considered.

  16. Contemporary engagement with social media amongst hernia surgery specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, D H; McDonald, J J; de Beaux, A; Tulloh, B; Brady, R R W

    2017-08-01

    Healthcare professional engagement is increasing. This study aims to identify levels of adoption and engagement of several social media platforms by a large international cohort of hernia surgery specialists. Hernia specialists attending the 38th International Congress of the European Hernia Society were identified. A manual search was then performed on Twitter, ResearchGate, and LinkedIn to identify those who had named accounts. Where accounts were identified, data on markers of utilisation were assessed. 759 surgeons (88.5% male) from 57 countries were identified. 334 surgeons (44%) engaged with a social media platform. 39 (5.1%) had Twitter accounts, 189 (24.9%) had ResearchGate accounts and 265 (34.9%) had LinkedIn accounts. 137 surgeons (18.1%) had accounts on 2 or more social media platforms. There was no gender association with social media account ownership (p > 0.05). Engagement in one social media platform was associated with increased engagement and utilisation on other platforms; LinkedIn users were more likely to have Twitter accounts (p social media amongst Hernia surgeons is similar to other surgical specialities. Geographical variation in SM engagement is seen. Engagement with one SM platform is associated with presence on multiple platforms.

  17. Specialist nectar-yeasts decline with urbanization in Berlin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehner, Jeannine; Mittelbach, Moritz; Rillig, Matthias C.; Verbruggen, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Nectar yeasts are common inhabitants of insect-pollinated flowers but factors determining their distribution are not well understood. We studied the influence of host identity, environmental factors related to pollution/urbanization, and the distance to a target beehive on local distribution of nectar yeasts within Robinia pseudoacacia L. and Tilia tomentosa Moench in Berlin, Germany. Nectar samples of six individuals per species were collected at seven sites in a 2 km radius from each target beehive and plated on YM-Agar to visualise the different morphotypes, which were then identified by sequencing a section of the 26S rDNA gene. Multivariate linear models were used to analyze the effects of all investigated factors on yeast occurrence per tree. Yeast distribution was mainly driven by host identity. The influence of the environmental factors (NO2, height of construction, soil sealing) strongly depended on the radius around the tree, similar to the distance of the sampled beehive. Incidence of specialist nectar-borne yeast species decreased with increasing pollution/urbanization index. Given that specialist yeast species gave way to generalist yeasts that have a reduced dependency on pollinators for between-flower dispersal, our results indicate that increased urbanization may restrict the movement of nectar-specialized yeasts, via limitations of pollinator foraging behavior. PMID:28358006

  18. Is seeing a specialist nurse associated with positive experiences of care? The role and value of specialist nurses in prostate cancer care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agarwal Shona

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Specialist nurses may play an important role in helping to improve the experiences of patients with prostate cancer, however there is concern that the specialist nurse role is under threat in the UK due to financial pressures in the NHS. This study explored the role and value of specialist nurses in prostate cancer care via a survey and patient interviews. Methods This paper reports findings from two studies. A survey of patients from three hospitals across the UK (289/481, 60%, investigated whether patients who saw a specialist nurse had different experiences of information provision and involvement in decision-making, to those who did not. Qualitative interviews were also carried out with 35 men recently tested or treated for prostate cancer, recruited from two hospitals in the UK. Interviews explored patients' views on the role and value of the specialist nurse. Results Survey findings indicated that patients who saw a specialist nurse had more positive experiences of receiving written information about tests and treatment, and about sources of advice and support, and were more likely to say they made the treatment decision themselves. In interviews, patients described specialist nurse input in their care in terms of providing information and support immediately post-diagnosis, as well as being involved in ongoing care. Two key aspects of the specialist nurse role were seen as unique: their availability to the patient, and their ability to liaise between the patient and the medical system. Conclusion This study indicates the unique role that specialist nurses play in the experience of patients with prostate cancer, and highlights the importance of maintaining specialist nurse roles in prostate cancer care.

  19. Marketing and the medical specialist in the managed care environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treister, N W

    1997-01-01

    Marketing means more than just communicating or advertising to potential patients; marketing means identifying your customers and working to meet or exceed their expectations. There are five key areas of a marketing plan: (1) Establish the foundation, beginning with your mission statement; (2) Assess your marketing environment by internal and external research; (3) Target your efforts, looking at image and perception; (4) Develop your particular mix of product, price, place of distribution, and promotion; and (5) implement and evaluate your marketing process. This article discusses the importance of a marketing plan for the medical specialist and highlights the features unique to a practice working in a system of capitated reimbursement. Applying these principles will help to demonstrate added value, protect the fundamental role of the patient-physician relationship, ensure that our efforts are aligned with professional missions and goals, and ultimately increase profitability and professional success.

  20. Mission Specialist Coleman and Pilot Ashby in the White Room

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    STS-93 Mission Specialist Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) (left) and Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby (right) are checked out by white room closeout crew members before entering the orbiter Columbia. The white room is an environmental chamber at the end of the orbiter access arm that provides entry to the orbiter crew compartment. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X- ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. After Space Shuttle Columbia's July 20 and 22 launch attempts were scrubbed, the launch was again rescheduled for Friday, July 23, at 12:24 a.m. EDT. The target landing date is July 27 at 11:20 p.m. EDT.

  1. The Injury Profile of an Australian Specialist Policing Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Brianna; Aisbett, Brad; Silk, Aaron

    2016-03-25

    This study investigated the injuries sustained by an Australian specialist police division. Injury records spanning four-years were analyzed. The role being performed when the injury occurred, injury cause, body part injured, and injury-related costs were quantified. The percentage of personnel injured multiple times was documented. One hundred and thirty eight personnel reported injuries, 58 of these on multiple occasions. This resulted in 229 injuries and 76 claims being raised. Half of the injuries occurred during operational policing tasks, however training activities accounted for >30% of injuries. The most common injury was strain/sprain, and upper body injuries were 2.5-times more common than lower-body or torso injuries. 1107 shifts were lost, and injuries cost the organization $487,159 (Australian Dollars) over the four-year period. The injury costs (both financial and in manpower) may prompt policy makers to review the current training and post-injury rehabilitation protocols.

  2. New study program: Interdisciplinary Postgraduate Specialist Study in Medical Informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hercigonja-Szekeres, Mira; Simić, Diana; Božikov, Jadranka; Vondra, Petra

    2014-01-01

    Paper presents an overview of the EU funded Project of Curriculum Development for Interdisciplinary Postgraduate Specialist Study in Medical Informatics named MEDINFO to be introduced in Croatia. The target group for the program is formed by professionals in any of the areas of medicine, IT professionals working on applications of IT for health and researchers and teachers in medical informatics. In addition to Croatian students, the program will also provide opportunity for enrolling students from a wider region of Southeast Europe. Project partners are two faculties of the University of Zagreb - Faculty of Organization and Informatics from Varaždin and School of Medicine, Andrija Štampar School of Public Health from Zagreb with the Croatian Society for Medical Informatics, Croatian Chamber of Economy, and Ericsson Nikola Tesla Company as associates.

  3. [Learning how to learn for specialist further education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuer, G; Lütcke, B; St Pierre, M; Hüttl, S

    2017-02-01

    The world of medicine is becoming from year to year more complex. This necessitates efficient learning processes, which incorporate the principles of adult education but with unchanged periods of further education. The subject matter must be processed, organized, visualized, networked and comprehended. The learning process should be voluntary and self-driven with the aim of learning the profession and becoming an expert in a specialist field. Learning is an individual process. Despite this, the constantly cited learning styles are nowadays more controversial. An important factor is a healthy mixture of blended learning methods, which also use new technical possibilities. These include a multitude of e‑learning options and simulations, which partly enable situative learning in a "shielded" environment. An exemplary role model of the teacher and feedback for the person in training also remain core and sustainable aspects in medical further education.

  4. Professional applied physical training of future specialists of agricultural production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karabanov Y.A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : develop and experimentally prove the contents, methods and forms of physical training of future specialists of agricultural production. This takes into account advanced course of professional applied physical preparation means kettlebell sport. Material : The study involved 141 students. Duration of study is 5 years. Results : It was found that a significant increase in indicators of flexibility, strength, coordination abilities of students promoted the use of exercises using weights of different weights. Confirmed the legitimacy of the use of such means of physical education for the development of muscle strength of the upper body, back, legs, abdominals. These muscles are the most loaded in the performance of professional activities of mechanical engineers. Conclusions : The program meets the basic criteria for the formation of curriculum for physical education. The program promotes the development of professional applications of physical qualities, motor skills and improve physical performance of students.

  5. An approach to mentoring healthcare play specialist students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Rachel; Jubb, Mags

    2016-11-08

    Healthcare play specialists (HPSs) provide therapeutic play programmes for children in healthcare settings. Each HPS student must have a mentor in practice, but most HPSs have received no formal training for their role. This article explores mentoring in the HPS service at Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust. A study day for HPSs was arranged to share best practice and discuss the challenges of mentoring students. Stronger links were built between the higher education institute that delivers the training to HPS students and the trust, and the HPSs were provided with a deeper understanding of what was required of them in their mentoring role. HPSs highlighted the importance of a yearly update on mentoring students.

  6. Can we afford not to have clinical nurse specialists?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollman, K M; Stewart, K H

    1996-05-01

    The clinical nurse specialist (CNS) is in an excellent position to lead and design the necessary changes required in acute, chronic, and home care settings to meet the economic and legislative agendas to reshape health-care delivery. In this article, the authors, through the use of examples, outline key quality characteristics of a successful unit-based, system-focused model of CNS practice. Clearly, the benefits obtained from the outcomes of a traditional CNS role make a significant contribution to the profession of nursing and to the public. Without the CNS role, the opportunity for system change and the development and nurturing of the front-line health-care worker may be lost.

  7. Advance directives: the clinical nurse specialist as a change agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, Karen Anne

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the impact the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) has on the advance directive process within the cardiac surgery patient population. As a change agent, the CNS needs to be able to increase the number of advance directives obtained and increase the provision of dignified, self-directed, quality patient care. With requirements from The Joint Commission and the Patient Self-determination Act, the change in process must take place to ensure that healthcare professionals are doing all they can do to carry out a patient's wishes. The 6-Source Influencer Model is applied to a case study to illustrate the role of the CNS as a change agent. Following this model, the CNS can facilitate lasting institutional change in the advance directive process. Based on the example, it is possible that a CNS can act as a change agent for other patient populations within the healthcare setting.

  8. Learning Abilities and Disabilities: Generalist Genes, Specialist Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovas, Yulia; Plomin, Robert

    2007-10-01

    Twin studies comparing identical and fraternal twins consistently show substantial genetic influence on individual differences in learning abilities such as reading and mathematics, as well as in other cognitive abilities such as spatial ability and memory. Multivariate genetic research has shown that the same set of genes is largely responsible for genetic influence on these diverse cognitive areas. We call these "generalist genes." What differentiates these abilities is largely the environment, especially nonshared environments that make children growing up in the same family different from one another. These multivariate genetic findings of generalist genes and specialist environments have far-reaching implications for diagnosis and treatment of learning disabilities and for understanding the brain mechanisms that mediate these effects.

  9. 2nd CEAS Specialist Conference on Guidance, Navigation and Control

    CERN Document Server

    Mulder, Bob; Choukroun, Daniel; Kampen, Erik-Jan; Visser, Coen; Looye, Gertjan

    2013-01-01

    Following the successful 1st CEAS (Council of European Aerospace Societies) Specialist Conference on Guidance, Navigation and Control (CEAS EuroGNC) held in Munich, Germany in 2011, Delft University of Technology happily accepted the invitation of organizing the 2nd  CEAS EuroGNC in Delft, The Netherlands in 2013. The goal of the conference is to promote new advances in aerospace GNC theory and technologies for enhancing safety, survivability, efficiency, performance, autonomy and intelligence of aerospace systems using on-board sensing, computing and systems. A great push for new developments in GNC are the ever higher safety and sustainability requirements in aviation. Impressive progress was made in new research fields such as sensor and actuator fault detection and diagnosis, reconfigurable and fault tolerant flight control, online safe flight envelop prediction and protection, online global aerodynamic model identification, online global optimization and flight upset recovery. All of these challenges de...

  10. Factors associated with residents' satisfaction with their training as specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala-Morillas, L E; Fuentes-Ferrer, M E; Sánchez-Díaz, J; Rumayor-Zarzuelo, M; Fernández-Pérez, C; Marco-Martínez, F

    2014-05-01

    We do not know what factors influence residents' perceived satisfaction during their training. The aim of this study was to analyze the satisfaction of specialists with their training and its associated factors. This was a cross-sectional study using self-completion surveys of residents in training at the Clinic Hospital San Carlos for the courses conducted in 2006, 2009, 2010 and 2012. The study's dependent variable was overall satisfaction with the training; the independent factors were demographic and occupational characteristics, variables related to healthcare, teaching and research activity. The total participation percentage was 83.7% (1,424/1,701), and the mean age was 28.4 years (SD, 3.2 years). The overall satisfaction percentage was 75.2%. The factors statistically associated with overall satisfaction in the multivariate analysis were the involvement of the teaching staff (tutors and assistants) in the training, greater satisfaction in medical versus surgical specialties, the year of residence, the facilities for completing the thesis, working less than 40 h a week, adequate time to perform daily tasks, appropriate number of department meetings and not having a previous specialty. the activities related to research and teaching are associated with the overall satisfaction of residents. The routine activity factors most closely associated with satisfaction were the time available and the work hours. More studies are necessary to understand the impact of resident satisfaction on care quality and in their activity as future specialists. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  11. National validation of the NACNS clinical nurse specialist core competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Kathleen M; Clark, Angela P; Fulton, Janet; Mayo, Ann

    2009-01-01

    To validate the 75 core National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists' (NACNS) clinical nurse specialist (CNS) competencies among practicing CNSs. Specific aims were to (a) determine the extent to which 75 core CNS competencies were used in current CNS practice, (b) determine the importance of those competencies to practicing CNSs, and (c) identify gaps between CNS core competencies and role expectations in current practice. A survey design was used with both paper-and-pencil and online instruments. The survey included 150 items and three open-ended questions. A convenience sampling method was used, which targeted practicing CNSs. Respondents (N=505) were practicing CNSs who entered the field as RNs between 1956 and 2006. The survey had a high degree of internal consistency reliability (0.967%) between the subscales. The 75 NACNS core competencies were found to be useful and important for CNSs. A few gaps were identified between CNS core competencies and CNS role expectations in current practice. No one method for validating competencies will be satisfactory for all situations; however, the processes and methods used in this study were well suited to accomplish the goal of validating CNS core competencies. The process described here may be instructive to leaders of other national and international professional organizations interested in developing and evaluating competencies. Core competencies are useful and important to currently practicing CNSs. The CNS role is growing internationally. Core CNS competencies can be a framework for CNS role development, education, and practice. As described here, a competency validation survey is one way to assure that CNSs are meeting healthcare needs.

  12. Decision making in specialist forensic psychiatric (the psychological aspect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shmakova E.V.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of a study of psychological factors of decision making amongforensic psychiatric specialists. Given the survey data of10 medical psychologists and 10 psychiatrists carrying out compulsory treatment in the psychiatric hospital №5, Moscow Department of Public Health, in comparison with the control group, consisting of professionals working in the field of education, manufacturing, services and technology. Methodical complex included: 1. The Epstein questionnaire of the intuitive style (adaptation Kornilova T. V., Kornilov S. A.; A new questionnaire of tolerance/intolerance to uncertainty (Kornilova T. V.; Melbourne questionnaire of decision making (adaptation T. V.Kornilova; The questionnaire «Personal factors of decision making»(T.V. Kornilova; TheV. Smecalo and V. M. Kucher method; The Tsvetkova Method; 7. The questionnaire «Styles of thinking» by R. Bramsonand Harrison (adaptation of A. A. Alekseev; 8.The questionnaire «Scale of base convictions» (R.Yanov-Boulemane, adaptation M.A. Padun, A.V. Kotelnikov; 9. The check-list aimed to identify the type of decisions taken by the expert in professional activity, their frequency, importance, subjective evaluation is necessary for decision making qualities and to evaluate the most significant opinions of other persons in the decision-making process. There were defined the characteristics of decision making depending on gender. The relationships between type of activity and frequency of occurrence of different types of decisions in professional activities of specialists were revealed. Analyzed the relationship between consideration of the views of others when making decisions and activity.

  13. Neurophysiology training in the Neurology Specialist Education Program in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Antigüedad, A; Matías-Guiu, J; Hernández-Pérez, M A; Jiménez Hernández, M D; Martín González, M R; Morales Ortiz, A; Delgado, G; Frank, A; López de Silanes, C; Martínez-Vila, E

    2011-06-01

    The training period in neurophysiology is a substantial part of the Neurology Specialist Program in Spain. The National Neurology Committee (La Comisión Nacional de Neurología (CNN), which is the body reporting to the Ministries of Health and Education, must ensure compliance to the Program. During the first trimester of 2008, the CNN sent a questionnaire, in which there was a question asking about this training period, to each of the managers of the 69 teaching units accredited for neurology training in Spain, for them to answer. Of the 69 questionnaires issued, 49 were received completed, which was a response rate of 71%. The neurophysiology training period of the neurology specialist program in Spain was carried out in the same hospital in 44 teaching unit (90%): the remaining 5 sent their neurology trainees to 4 different hospitals. The Unit that carried out the neurophysiology training period was incorporated into the Neurology Department in 27 (55%) cases, and the formula was mixed in 3 (6%). A total of 69% of tutors were satisfied with the training, but was 90% in the hospitals where the unit was integrated into Neurology, and was 65% where this relationship did not exist. The neurologists in training were informed about EEG in 49% of education units, performed EMG/ENG 57%, and informed about evoked potentials in 35% after their training period. Although the level of satisfaction is high, the level of responsibility assumed by the neurologists in training during their rotation into neurophysiology does not appear to comply to the demands laid out in the training program, particularly in these units not integrated into Neurology Departments. Copyright © 2010 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of garlic and juniper berry essential oils on ruminal fermentation and on the site and extent of digestion in lactating cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, W Z; Benchaar, C; Ametaj, B N; Chaves, A V; He, M L; McAllister, T A

    2007-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of feeding essential oils from garlic (GAR) and juniper berry (JUN), or monensin (MO) on feed intake, ruminal fermentation, the site and extent of digestion, microbial protein synthesis, milk production, and immune status in dairy cows. Four midlactating Holstein cows fitted with ruminal and duodenal cannulas were used in a 4 x 4 Latin square design with 21-d periods and 4 treatments: control (no additive), MO (330 mg/cow per d), GAR (5 g/cow per d), and JUN (2 g/cow per d). Cows were fed ad libitum a TMR consisting of 40% forage and 60% barley-based concentrate. Dry matter intake averaged 20.4 kg/d and was not affected by dietary additives. Total tract digestibilities of dry matter, organic matter, fiber, and starch were not affected by experimental treatments. However, ruminal digestibilities of dry matter and organic matter were higher (+13%) for GAR and JUN than for the control diet, mainly because of increased crude protein digestion in the rumen. Feeding GAR and JUN increased ruminal digestion of dietary protein by 11% as compared with the control. In contrast, ruminal digestion of dietary protein was reduced by 11% with MO as compared with the control. Milk fat content was lower for MO (2.68%) than for the GAR (3.46%), JUN (3.40%), and control (3.14%) diets. No effects of GAR, JUN, or MO were observed on milk production, ruminal microbial protein synthesis, ruminal pH, and ruminal concentrations of volatile fatty acids and ammonia N. The total and differential numbers of white blood cells as well as serum amyloid A and haptoglobin were not affected by the treatments, suggesting that additives had no effect on the immune status of cows. Results of this study indicate that supplementing dairy cows with GAR (5 g/d) and JUN (2 g/d) essential oils improved feed digestibility in the rumen, but possibly at the expense of a reduction in the flow of bypass protein to the small intestine. Feeding monensin could

  15. STS-45 payload specialists with crew escape system (CES) mockup at JSC's MAIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    STS-45 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, Payload Specialist Dirk D. Frimout (European Space Agency (ESA) Belgian crewmember) (left), backup Payload Specialist Charles R. Chappell (center), and Payload Specialist Byron K. Lichtenberg (right) listen to technician explain the operation of the crew escape system (CES) pole. Frimout is engaging the handle which extends the CES pole out the side hatch. The payload specialists along with the other STS-45 crewmembers are participating in side hatch emergency egress exercises in JSC's Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9A.

  16. Modeling fraud detection and the incorporation of forensic specialists in the audit process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sakalauskaite, Dominyka

    Financial statement audits are still comparatively poor in fraud detection. Forensic specialists can play a significant role in increasing audit quality. In this paper, based on prior academic research, I develop a model of fraud detection and the incorporation of forensic specialists in the audit...... process. The intention of the model is to identify the reasons why the audit is weak in fraud detection and to provide the analytical framework to assess whether the incorporation of forensic specialists can help to improve it. The results show that such specialists can potentially improve the fraud...

  17. The Snowtweets Project: communicating snow depth measurements from specialists and non-specialists via mobile communication technologies and social networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, J. M.; Cabrera, A. R.; Kelly, R. E.

    2009-12-01

    With the global decline of in situ snow measurements for hydrometeorological applications, there is an evolving need to find alternative ways to collect localized measurements of snow. The Snowtweets Project is an experiment aimed at providing a way for people interested in making snow measurements to quickly broadcast their measurements to the internet. The goal of the project is to encourage specialists and non-specialists alike to share simple snow depth measurements through widely available social networking sites. We are currently using the rapidly growing microblogging site Twitter (www.twitter.com) as a broadcasting vehicle to collect the snow depth measurements. Using 140 characters or less, users "tweet" their snow depth from their location through the Twitter website. This can be done from a computer or smartphone with internet access or through SMS messaging. The project has developed a Snowtweets web application that interrogates Twitter by parsing the 140 character string to obtain a geographic position and snow depth. GeoRSS and KML feeds are available to visualize the tweets in GoogleEarth or they can be viewed in our own visualiser, Snowbird. The emphasis is on achieving wide coverage to increase the number of microblogs. Furthermore, after some quality control filters, the project is able to combine the broadcast snow depths with traditional and objective satellite remote sensing-based observations or hydrologic model estimates. Our site, snowcore.uwaterloo.ca, was launched in July 2009 and is ready for the 2009-2010 northern hemisphere winter. We invite comments from experienced community participation projects to help improve our product.

  18. The clinical nurse specialist as resuscitation process manager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneiderhahn, Mary Elizabeth; Fish, Anne Folta

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to describe the history and leadership dimensions of the role of resuscitation process manager and provide specific examples of how this role is implemented at a Midwest medical center. In 1992, a medical center in the Midwest needed a nurse to manage resuscitation care. This role designation meant that this nurse became central to all quality improvement efforts in resuscitation care. The role expanded as clinical resuscitation guidelines were updated and as the medical center grew. The role became known as the critical care clinical nurse specialist as resuscitation process manager. This clinical care nurse specialist was called a manager, but she had no direct line authority, so she accomplished her objectives by forming a multitude of collaborative networks. Based on a framework by Finkelman, the manager role incorporated specific leadership abilities in quality improvement: (1) coordination of medical center-wide resuscitation, (2) use of interprofessional teams, (3) integration of evidence into practice, and (4) staff coaching to develop leadership. The manager coordinates resuscitation care with the goals of prevention of arrests if possible, efficient and effective implementation of resuscitation protocols, high quality of patient and family support during and after the resuscitation event, and creation or revision of resuscitation policies for in-hospital and for ambulatory care areas. The manager designs a comprehensive set of meaningful and measurable process and outcome indicators with input from interprofessional teams. The manager engages staff in learning, reflecting on care given, and using the evidence base for resuscitation care. Finally, the manager role is a balance between leading quality improvement efforts and coaching staff to implement and sustain these quality improvement initiatives. Revisions to clinical guidelines for resuscitation care since the 1990s have resulted in medical centers developing improved

  19. Enhancing patient education through clinical nurse specialist collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chick, Katherine; Negley, Kristin; Sievers, Beth; Tammel, Karyl

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to describe a collaborative clinical nurse specialist (CNS) project to enhance the patient education provided by registered nurses across 7 medical nursing units in an acute care hospital. Electronic data reviews assisted the medical CNSs with identifying a deficit in using appropriate education plans and documentation of patient education. The interventions implemented included the creation of new patient education brochures, updating the electronic system to enhance nurses' ability to provide patient education materials and to simplify documentation, creating a video-on-demand education channel, and ensuring that patient education materials were easily accessible. Postassessment results showed that nurses' reported use of disease-specific education plan increased 33%. The staff's perception of the importance of documenting patient education provided also increased 9%. This project demonstrates CNSs' ability to design, develop, and implement a systematic and structured process to promote a consistent way for medical nurses to utilize the best disease-specific patient education resources. : With hospital stays being shorter and patients more acutely ill, partnering with the patients in learning how to manage their care as they transition from the hospital to home is key to help prevent hospital readmissions.

  20. Radiological Operations Support Specialist (ROSS) Pilot Course Summary and Recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alai, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Askin, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Buddemeier, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wogan, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Doshi, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Tai, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-09-30

    In support of the Department of Homeland Security / Science and Technology Directorate’s (DHS/S&T) creation of a new position called the Radiological Operations Support Specialist (ROSS), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Sub-task 1.1 and 1.2 has assisted in the development of the ROSS skills, knowledge, and abilities (SKAs); identified potentially relevant training; cross-mapped the training to the SKAs; and identified gaps in the training related to the SKAs, as well as their respective level of training knowledge - current versus desired. In the follow on task, Sub-task 1.3, a 5 day ROSS Pilot Training course was developed to fill the priority gaps identified in Sub-Task 1.2. Additionally, in Sub-Task 1.5, LLNL has performed a gap analysis of electronic tools, handbooks, and job-aides currently available to the ROSS and developed recommendations for additional and next generation tools to ensure the operational effectiveness of the ROSS position. This document summarizes the feedback received from the instructors and pilot course observers on what worked in the course and what could be improved as well as an assessment of the Pre- and Post-Test administered to the students.

  1. Core curriculum for the heart rhythm specialist: executive summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino, Jose L; Arribas, Fernando; Botto, Giovanni Luca; Huikuri, Heikki; Kraemer, Lars I; Linde, Cecilia; Morgan, John M; Schalij, Martin; Simantirakis, Emmanuel; Wolpert, Christian; Villard, Marie-Christine; Poirey, Julie; Karaim-Fanchon, Svya; Deront, Keren

    2009-10-01

    Heart rhythm (HR) management is rapidly developing as a subspecialty within cardiology, and it is imperative to promote and ensure sufficient and homogeneous training and qualification amongst professionals in Europe. This has led the European Society of Cardiology, through the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA), to organize a European Core Curriculum for the HR specialist through the following: definition of the scope of the HR speciality (Syllabus), development of minimum standards and objectives for training in HR management (Curriculum), development of a model to certify HR professionals and teaching units (Accreditation), and development of a Registry for European HR accredited professionals and teaching units and its activity (Registries). The duration of the training period should be of a minimum of 2 years following general cardiology training. During this period, the trainee must develop the required knowledge, practical skills, behaviours, and attitudes to manage HR patients. The trainee must be involved in a minimum number of different procedures and achieve specified levels of competence. The training centre should be integrated within a full-service cardiology department. Assessment of the trainee and the training programmes should include reports by the training programme supervisor and the national society HR organizations, a logbook of procedures, written examinations, and assessment of professionalism. The EHRA presently requires the trainee to pass the EHRA accreditation exams (invasive EP and cardiac pacing and ICDs). Continuous learning and practice are required to maintain standards and practice and because substantial changes may occur in clinical practice or the health-care environment.

  2. [Specialist pharmacist training from the viewpoint of sports pharmacology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasashi, Kumiko

    2012-01-01

    When athletes consult sports outpatient or orthopedic clinics it is possible to undergo drug treatment with the medical staff having prior knowledge of that patient being an athlete. However, if athletes seek any other diagnosis and treatment as an ordinary patient, the possibility of medical staff realizing the potential for imposing a doping issue on the athlete is extremely low. As a result, if the athlete fails to provide medical staff with information regarding anti-doping regulations when receiving clinical treatment, drug treatment administered as part of medical practices could be viewed as doping, resulting in the athlete being disciplined. In order to avoid this, pharmacist should participate in training in order to be able to provide information for anti-doping purposes. It is my personal opinion that knowledge regarding anti-doping is something that should be shared by all pharmacists, as pharmacists are educated in the fields of pharmacology and pharmacokinetics during the pharmacy education process, and sports pharmacology is a part of this. However, in order for pharmacists to understand sports pharmacology, it is necessary to provide education not only on the benefits and adverse effects of pharmaceutical products, but also on the concept of banned substances. It can be considered one of the pharmacist's duties to protect athletes who purchase drugs at a pharmacy or consult medical institutions as patients. With this, I would like to propose considering the potential for introducing sports pharmacology to pharmaceutical education, and specialist pharmacist training in the sports spectrum.

  3. An evaluation of teamwork within a specialist palliative care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaghy, Kevin; Devlin, Breige

    2002-11-01

    This small-scale 10-month study evaluated teamworking within a specialist palliative care team. The study aims were to: collect, analyse and summarize information on how team members perceive teamworking; compare team members' perceptions after a teambuilding workshop; and to evaluate the longer term effect of this training on the team. A group of practitioners from a local Marie Curie Cancer Care Centre was selected and included members from all available disciplines. A piloted questionnaire was used to obtain qualitative and quantitative input. The team as a whole scored themselves above average on almost all counts. Following the teambuilding workshop significant improvement was seen in areas such as role appreciation and communication but not all improvements were long lasting. A perception of understaffing was noted as being one of the largest negative influences on teamwork whereas the setting and maintaining of agreed team objectives and having sufficient education opportunity were positive influences. Although teambuilding sessions appear to have the potential to produce the desired benefits, they should not be initiated at a time when staff already feel anxiety over their workload.

  4. Predictors of Employment Burnout Among VHA Peer Support Specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Stephanie Grace; Chang, Bei-Hung; Mueller, Lisa; Resnick, Sandra G; Eisen, Susan V

    2016-10-01

    This study evaluated three domains of job burnout (emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and personal accomplishment) and factors associated with burnout in a national sample of peer specialists (PSs) employed at 138 Veterans Health Administration (VHA) health care systems in 49 states. Data were drawn from an observational study in which participants (N=152) completed online, self-report surveys about their mental health recovery, quality of life, and employment experiences at baseline, six months, and 12 months. Levels of burnout were analyzed at each time point, and regression analyses that controlled for baseline levels identified potential predictors of burnout (demographic, clinical, and employment characteristics) at six and 12 months. Compared with previously published burnout levels of other mental health workers in the VHA, PSs reported similar levels of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and personal accomplishment. At baseline, increased burnout was correlated with white race, fewer hours providing direct services, greater psychiatric symptoms, and lower self-efficacy. However, analyses did not reveal strong predictors of burnout scores at six or 12 months. In the first study to prospectively examine job burnout among PSs employed by the VHA, results illustrate the nuanced experience of burnout over a 12-month period and suggest the need for replication and further research on employment experiences of this emerging workforce.

  5. River Cetaceans and Habitat Change: Generalist Resilience or Specialist Vulnerability?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian D. Smith

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available River dolphins are among the world’s most threatened mammals, and indeed the baiji (Lipotes vexillifer, a species endemic to China's Yangtze River, is likely extinct. Exploitation for products such as meat, oil, and skins has been a lesser feature in the population histories of river dolphins compared to most large mammals. Habitat factors are therefore of particular interest and concern. In this paper we attempt to describe the population-level responses of river dolphins to habitat transformation. We find circumstantial but compelling evidence supporting the view that, at a local scale, river dolphins are opportunists (generalists capable of adapting to a wide range of habitat conditions while, at a river basin scale, they are more appropriately viewed as vulnerable specialists. The same evidence implies that the distributional responses of river dolphins to basinwide ecological change can be informative about their extinction risk, while their local behaviour patterns may provide important insights about critical ecological attributes. Empirical studies are needed on the ecology of river cetaceans, both to inform conservation efforts on behalf of these threatened animals and to help address broader concerns related to biodiversity conservation and the sustainability of human use in several of the world's largest river systems.

  6. A competency-based model for training of specialists in vertebrology at higher medical school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norkin I.A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The field of medicine facing the issues of diagnosis and treatment of spine diseases and injuries requires training of specialists in vertebrology taking into consideration the modern standards of higher professional education and medical care conditions. The article deals with the training of the specialists using a competency-based model

  7. 22 CFR 11.20 - Foreign Service specialist career candidate appointments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... of specialist candidates are found in Volume 3 (Personnel), Foreign Affairs Manual, section 580. (4... (Personnel), Foreign Affairs Manual, section 580, may not be reappointed as a career candidate in the same... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Foreign Service specialist career candidate...

  8. Non-Music Specialist Trainee Primary School Teachers' Confidence in Teaching Music in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddon, Frederick; Biasutti, Michele

    2008-01-01

    Prior research has revealed that non-music specialist trainee primary school teachers lack confidence in teaching music in spite of changes to teacher training and the introduction of music in the National Curriculum in England. The current study investigated the effects on non-music specialist trainee primary teachers' confidence to teach music…

  9. Why are some medical specialists working part-time, while others work full-time?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, Judith D. de; Heiligers, Phil; Groenewegen, Peter P.; Hingstman, Lammert

    2006-01-01

    Although medical specialists primarily work full-time, part-time work is on the increase, a trend that can be found worldwide. This article seeks to answer the question why some medical specialists work part-time, while others do not although they are willing to work part-time. Two approaches are

  10. Building Bridges between Physical and Behavioral Health: The Child Development Specialist in Pediatric Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Claire; Hamburger, Ellie

    2007-01-01

    This article uses the case study of 3-year-old Anna and her parents to illustrate how a child development specialist can be integrated into a private pediatric practice. First, pediatrician Hamburger describes how she and other members of her practice integrated a child development specialist into their pediatric practice. Second, Anna's parents…

  11. CASEI Project (Consultation and Administration Specialists in Early Intervention) Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrosky, Michaelene M.

    This final report describes the activities and accomplishments of the Consultation and Administration Specialists in Early Intervention Project (CASEI). This federally funded project was developed to provide cross-disciplinary preservice training for early intervention (EI) specialists in Illinois. Students were recruited from a broad range of…

  12. Forest specialist and generalist small mammals in forest edges and hedges

    OpenAIRE

    Schlinkert, Hella; Ludwig, Martin; Batáry, Péter; Holzschuh, Andrea; Kovács-Hostyánszki, Anikó; Tscharntke, Teja; Fischer, Christina

    2017-01-01

    GermanyAgricultural intensification often leads to fragmentation of natural habitats, such as forests, and thereby negatively affects forest specialist species. However, human introduced habitats, such as hedges, may counteract negative effects of forest fragmentation and increase dispersal, particularly of forest specialists. We studied effects of habitat type (forest edge versus hedge) and hedge isolation from forests (connected versus isolated hedge) in agricultural landscapes ...

  13. Perception of drug teratogenicity among general practitioners and specialists in obstetrics/gynecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gils, Charlotte; Pottegård, Anton; Ennis, Zandra Nymand

    2016-01-01

    the perception of the teratogenic risk of 9 commonly and 3 rarely prescribed drugs among general practitioners and specialists in obstetrics/gynecology. METHODS: All 811 general practitioners in the Region of Southern Denmark and all 502 specialist obstetricians/gynecologists in Denmark as a whole were invited...

  14. Sources of satisfaction and dissatisfaction among specialists within the public and private health sectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashton, Toni; Brown, Paul M.; Sopina, Elizaveta (Liza)

    2013-01-01

    Aim As in many countries, medical and surgical specialists in New Zealand have the opportunity of working in the public sector, the private sector or both. This study aimed to explore the level and sources of satisfaction and dissatisfaction of specialists in New Zealand with working in the two s...

  15. Professional Insiders/Outsiders? Teacher Professionalism and the Primary School Physical Education Specialist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Caroline; DinanThompson, Maree

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides a context for exploring the positioning of Physical Education specialist teachers (PE specialist teachers) in primary schools in Queensland in the discourses of teacher professionalism. A critical analysis of literature on the history and status of the subject and its practitioners aims to contextualize discourses in and about…

  16. Limit orders, asymmetric information and the formation of asset prices with a computerized specialist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.R. Baye (Michael); A. Gilette (Ann); C.G. de Vries (Casper)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractWe analyze the existence of equilibrium in an asset market under asymmetric information. Price formation is modeled as a bilateral sealed bid auction where uninformed and informed traders submit limit orders to a computerized specialist. The computerized specialist is programmed to sell

  17. An Inside Story: Tracking Experiences, Challenges and Successes in a Joint Specialist Performing Arts College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benn, Tansin; Benn, Barry; Doyle, Brigitte

    2006-01-01

    In England the government's specialist schools initiative is transforming the nature of secondary education. A three-year longitudinal case study tracked the effects of specialist performing arts college status on two schools. The sites were a mainstream school drawing pupils from an area of high social deprivation and disadvantage, and a special…

  18. Collaboration with general practitioners : preferences of medical specialists - a qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berendsen, Annette J.; Benneker, Wim H. G. M.; Schuling, Jan; Rijkers-Koorn, Nienke; Slaets, Joris P. J.; Meyboom-de Jong, Betty

    2006-01-01

    Background: Collaboration between general practitioners (GPs) and specialists has been the focus of many collaborative care projects during the past decade. Unfortunately, quite a number of these projects failed. This raises the question of what motivates medical specialists to initiate and continue

  19. 78 FR 41993 - Transport Handling Specialists, Inc.-Continuance in Control Exemption-RSL Railroad, LLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board Transport Handling Specialists, Inc.--Continuance in Control Exemption--RSL Railroad, LLC Transport Handling Specialists, Inc. (THS), has filed a verified notice of exemption...

  20. Entomology Specialist 1-1. Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jimmie L.

    This individualized, self-paced course for training an entomology specialist was adapted from military curriculum materials for use in vocational and technical education. Completion of the course should provide students with basic information needed to accomplish the following duties of an entomology specialist: perform entomological work, apply…

  1. Administrative Perceptions on the Role of the School Library Media Specialist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Kayla

    2013-01-01

    Despite the efforts of local school library media specialists to promote their programming, many administrators do not understand the roles and responsibilities of the school library media specialist. Using a constructivist theoretical framework, this study was designed to examine the local school administrators' perceptions of the role of the…

  2. The Instructional Role of the Library Media Specialist as Perceived by Elementary School Principals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Audrey P.

    2008-01-01

    This study explores Virginia elementary school principals' perceptions of the instructional role of the library media specialist and the origin of these perceptions. Principals who responded to the study strongly endorse the role of library media specialist as teacher of information literacy skills and as instructional partner. Respondents…

  3. Fair Use Rights in the Digital World: A Phenomenological Study of Instructional Technology Specialists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alakur, Turgay

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to reveal an insight into the awareness and experiences of IT specialists about fair use in Turkey. A phenomenological design was employed and the criterion sampling method was used in this study. A total of nine specialists volunteered to participate. The data were collected through semi-structured interviews. Information…

  4. On attitudes about colorectal cancer screening among gastrointestinal specialists and general practitioners in the Netherlands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JS Terhaar sive Droste; GDN Heine; ME Craanen; H Boot; CJJ Mulder

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To find out whether there are differences in attitudes about colorectal cancer (CRC) screening among gastrointestinal (GI) specialists and general practitioners (GPs) and which method is preferred in a national screening programMETHODS: Four hundred and twenty Dutch GI specialists in the Netherlands and 400 GPs in Amsterdam were questioned in 2004. Questions included demographics, affiliation, attitude towards screening both for the general population and themselves, methods of screening, family history and individual risk.RESULTS: Eighty-four percent of the GI specialists returned the questionnaire in comparison to 32% of the GPs (P < 0.001). Among the GI specialists, 92% favoured population screening whereas 51% of GPs supported population screening (P < 0.001). Of the GI specialists 95% planned to be screened themselves, while 30%of GPs intended to do so (P < 0.001). Regarding the general population, 72% of the GI specialists preferred colonoscopy as the screening method compared to 27% of the GPs (P < 0.001). The method preferred for personal screening was colonoscopy in 97% of the GI specialists, while 29% of the GPs favoured colonoscopy (P < 0.001).CONCLUSION: Screening for CRC is strongly supported by Dutch GI specialists and less by GPs. The major health issue is possibly misjudged by GPs. Since GPs play a crucial role in a successful national screening program, CRC awareness should be realized by increasing knowledge about the incidence and mortality, thus increasing awareness of the need for screening among GPs.

  5. Legal Issues for Orientation and Mobility Specialists: Minimizing the Risks of Liability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Ruth Ann; Hartmeister, Fred; Griffin-Shirley, Nora

    2000-01-01

    This article discusses the potential negligence-based liability risks that orientation and mobility (O&M) specialists often face when assisting students with visual impairments with independent travel in uncontrolled environments. It also presents strategies that may minimize the risks of O&M training for both students and specialists. (Contains…

  6. Characterizing Mathematics Teaching Research Specialists' Mentoring in the Context of Chinese Lesson Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Feishi; Gu, Lingyuan

    2016-01-01

    This study examines how mathematics teaching research specialists mentor practicing teachers during post-lesson debriefs of a lesson study in China. Based on a systematic, fine-grained analysis of 107 h of videotaped mentoring meetings of 20 groups of teachers and teaching research specialists from different elementary schools, this study reveals…

  7. Partnership in Being a Specialist Mathematics and Computing College--Who Gains What, How and Why?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinkinson, Anne J.

    2007-01-01

    The research took place in a mathematics and computing specialist school. The article reports on part of a case study of the mathematics department's experience of being a major contributor to the requirements of being a specialist school. This article aims to explore and describe one model of partnership within the "community" remit of…

  8. Modeling fraud detection and the incorporation of forensic specialists in the audit process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sakalauskaite, Dominyka

    Financial statement audits are still comparatively poor in fraud detection. Forensic specialists can play a significant role in increasing audit quality. In this paper, based on prior academic research, I develop a model of fraud detection and the incorporation of forensic specialists in the audit...... process. The intention of the model is to identify the reasons why the audit is weak in fraud detection and to provide the analytical framework to assess whether the incorporation of forensic specialists can help to improve it. The results show that such specialists can potentially improve the fraud...... detection in the audit, but might also cause some negative implications. Overall, even though fraud detection is one of the main topics in research there are very few studies done on the subject of how auditors co-operate with forensic specialists. Thus, the paper concludes with suggestions for further...

  9. Personal view: randomized controlled trials in epilepsy specialist nursing: the seduction of content by form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Stephen

    2002-04-01

    Research into the effectiveness of epilepsy specialist nursing needs to take into account a number of factors, which have not been adequately addressed in previous studies. Nursing outcome measures are different to medical ones and it is inappropriate to confuse these. Specialist nurses affect the whole culture of a service, and their impact on service quality may go beyond that of their individual patient contacts. Thus randomized studies within a service that already has specialist nurses may not give valid results. Some service users will benefit more from direct contact with a specialist nurse than others, and people who give informed consent to take part in randomized controlled trials might not be representative of those who would benefit most from specialist nurse access. The stampede for level one evidence risks failing to address the issues properly by overvaluing research process (form) against its appropriateness (content), yet there remain great opportunities for good quality research in this area.

  10. Examining the Promotion of Healthy Eating among Exercise Specialists: A Cross-sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Steven T; Cornish, Stephen M; Lytvyak, Ellina; Taylor, Lorian M; Bell, Gordon; Vallance, Jeff; Fraser, Shawn; Murray, Terra

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to survey exercise specialists about nutrition counselling practices, their own dietary practices, and to identify potential relationships. An electronic survey was used to examine characteristics and strategies used for assessing and promoting healthy eating to clients. Exercise specialists (n = 94) were recruited through a public registry and through targeted advertising on 2 professional websites in Alberta, Canada. Eighty-five percent of respondents promoted healthy eating to clients. Confidence in assessing and promoting healthy eating was moderate to low. Those with more than 6 years of professional experience reported higher confidence compared with those with less than 1 year of experience in assessing healthy eating (P healthy eating (P healthy eating by exercise specialists. Promoting collaborative relationships between registered dietitians and exercise specialists would likely benefit exercise specialists when they are assessing and promoting healthy eating among their clients.

  11. Collaboration with general practitioners: preferences of medical specialists – a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slaets Joris PJ

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Collaboration between general practitioners (GPs and specialists has been the focus of many collaborative care projects during the past decade. Unfortunately, quite a number of these projects failed. This raises the question of what motivates medical specialists to initiate and continue participating with GPs in new collaborative care models. The following question is addressed in this study: What motivates medical specialists to initiate and sustain new models for collaborating with GPs? Methods We conducted semi-structured interviews with eighteen medical specialists in the province of Groningen, in the North of The Netherlands. The sampling criteria were age, gender, type of hospital in which they were practicing, and specialty. The interviews were recorded, fully transcribed, and analysed by three researchers working independently. The resulting motivational factors were grouped into categories. Results 'Teaching GPs' and 'regulating patient flow' (referrals appeared to dominate when the motivational factors were considered. In addition, specialists want to develop relationships with the GPs on a more personal level. Most specialists believe that there is not much they can learn from GPs. 'Lack of time', 'no financial compensation', and 'no support from colleagues' were considered to be the main concerns to establishing collaborative care practices. Additionally, projects were often experienced as too complex and time consuming whereas guidelines were experienced as too restrictive. Conclusion Specialists are particularly interested in collaborating because the GP is the gatekeeper for access to secondary health care resources. Specialists feel that they are able to teach the GPs something, but they do not feel that they have anything to learn from the GPs. With respect to professional expertise, therefore, specialists do not consider GPs as equals. Once personal relationships with the GPs have been established, an

  12. Comment on: Shukla, M.K. et al., 2006: Physical and chemical properties of soils under some pinon-juniper-oak canopies in a semi-arid ecosystem in New Mexico

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollerup, Mikkel; Jensen, Jens Raunsø

    2008-01-01

    The paper by Shukla et al. [2006. Physical and chemical properties of soils under some pinon-juniper-oak canopies in an semi-arid ecosystem in New Mexico. Journal of Arid Environment 66, 673-685] treats interesting topics of sustainability of different ecosystems and their water availability....... However, the physical-based infiltration theories by Green and Ampt [1911. Studies on soil physics, I, flow of air and water through soils. Journal of Agricultural Science 4, 1-24] and Philip [1957. The theory of infiltration: 1. The infiltration equation and its solution. Soil Science 83, 345-357] seems...... to be applied without necessary reflections. The actual analysis can have resulted in coefficients without their original physical significance...

  13. Inadequate fine needle aspiration biopsy samples: Pathologists versus other specialists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomez-Macias G

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB is a simple, sensitive, quick and inexpensive method in which operator experience is essential for obtaining the best results. Methods: A descriptive study in which the aspiration biopsy cases of the Pathology and Cytopathology Service of the University Hospital of the UANL (2003-2005 were analyzed. These were divided into three study groups: Group 1, FNAB performed by a pathologist; Group 2, FNAB performed by specialists who are not pathologists, Group 3, FNAB guided by an imaging study with immediate evaluation by a pathologist. The samples were classified as adequate and inadequate for diagnosis, the organ, the size and characteristics of the lesions were taken into consideration. Results: A total of 1905 FNAB were included. In Group 1: 1347 were performed of which 1242 (92.2% were adequate and 105 (7.7% were inadequate. Of the 237 from Group 2, 178 were adequate (75.1% and 59 inadequate (24.8%; in Group 3 there were 321 of which 283 (88.1% were adequate and 38 (11.8% inadequate. A statistically significant difference was found between FNAB performed by Group 1 (p< 0.001 and the other groups. A multivariate analysis was done where the organ punctured, the study groups, the size and characteristics of the lesion by study group were compared, finding that the most important variable was the person who performed the procedure. Conclusion: The experience and training of the person performing the aspiration biopsy, as well as immediate evaluation of the material when it is guided, substantially reduces the number of inadequate samples, improving the sensitivity of the method as well as reducing the need for open biopsies to reach a diagnosis.

  14. Personality types and specialist choices in medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehmood, Syed Imran; Khan, Muhammad Abid; Walsh, Kieran M; Borleffs, Jan C C

    2013-01-01

    Research on the correlation between personality and students' specialty choice is helpful in their career counselling process and in predicting the future distribution of the specialties in a country. This study is the first of its kind in the Arab world. The research questions were: (1) What is the influence of gender on the personality profiles of medical students? (2) What are the personality profiles of students categorized according to their preferred specialist choices? (3) What are the preferred career choices of students categorized according to the stage of their medical education? A cross-sectional study was performed at King Khalid University Medical School including 590 students during the academic year 2010-2011. A long version of the Zuckerman-Kuhlman personality questionnaire measuring five personality factors was used. Students were also asked for their specialty interests. Students were asked by means of a written questionnaire. Study response was 92.5%. Surgery was the single most popular specialty amongst both male and female students. Males had significantly higher scores on the 'impulsive sensation seeking' scale and students preferring a surgery specialty had the highest score on the 'impulsive sensation seeking', 'neuroticism-anxiety', 'aggression-hostility' and 'sociability' scales. Hospital-based, surgical and primary care specialties became more popular as students progressed through their undergraduate years. Different personality types have distinct preferences in medical students' choice of careers. Personality and specialty choice research can enhance career counselling of medical students and fresh graduates. This also has implications for predicting the specialty distribution of the future health careers.

  15. Making robust assessments of specialist trainees' workplace performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, J M; Castanelli, D J; Chen, Y; Jolly, B

    2017-02-01

    Workplace-based assessments should provide a reliable measure of trainee performance, but have met with mixed success. We proposed that using an entrustability scale, where supervisors scored trainees on the level of supervision required for the case would improve the utility of compulsory mini-clinical evaluation exercise (CEX) assessments in a large anaesthesia training program. We analysed mini-CEX scores from all Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists trainees submitted to an online database over a 12-month period. Supervisors' scores were adjusted for the expected supervision requirement for the case for trainees at different stages of training. We used generalisability theory to determine score reliability. 7808 assessments were available for analysis. Supervision requirements decreased significantly (P  0.7) with a feasible number of assessments. Adjusting scores against the expected supervision requirement considerably improved reliability, with G > 0.8 achieved with only nine assessments. Three per cent of trainees generated average mini-CEX scores below the expected standard. Using an entrustment scoring system, where supervisors score trainees on the level of supervision required, mini-CEX scores demonstrated moderate reliability within a feasible number of assessments, and evidence of validity. When scores were adjusted against an expected standard, underperforming trainees could be identified, and reliability much improved. Taken together with other evidence on trainee ability, the mini-CEX is of sufficient reliability for inclusion in high stakes decisions on trainee progression towards independent specialist practice. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Quality of Life in Emergency Medicine Specialists of Teaching Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshin Amini

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Quality of life (QOL of emergency medicine specialists can be effective in providing services to patients. The aim of the present study was evaluating the lifestyle of emergency medicine practitioners, understanding their problems, and addressing the solutions to enhance and improve their lifestyles, in teaching hospitals in Iran. Method: This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on emergency medicine physicians in 10 teaching hospitals of Iran in 2011. Emergency physicians with at least three years of experience who interested in the study, were enrolled in the project. All participants filled out the consent form and QOL questionnaires, then underwent physical examinations and some medical laboratory tests. Categorical variables were reported as percentages, while continuous variables expressed as means and standard deviations. p <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Totally, 100 subjects participated in the study, of whom 48 were male. The mean and standard deviation of the physicians’ age were 38.7±5.1 years. 43% of physicians had an average QOL, while 37% good. 96% of studied physicians had a good condition regarding habitual history, while 93% of them had a poor condition in performing screening tests. Exercise program and personal health in individuals with normal BMI were correlated with higher levels of QOL. BMI was higher in 40-50 years old subjects than youngers. Hypertension was present in five cases (5%, hypercholesterolemia in six (6%, hypertriglyceridemia in six (6%, increased LDL in four (4%, low HDL in four (4%, and impaired FBS in 4 (4%. Conclusion: The findings showed that 63% of studied emergency physicians had an average level of QOL and other ones good. The majority of physicians had undesirable situation regarding the performance of screening tests.

  17. Geographic variation in resource use by specialist versus generalist butterflyfishes

    KAUST Repository

    Lawton, Rebecca J.

    2011-11-14

    Localised patterns of resource use can be constrained by multiple factors. Comparison of resource use at multiple locations with differing resource availability can allow fundamental specialists to be distinguished from species that simply feed predominantly on prey types that are locally abundant. This study investigates geographic variation in the feeding ecology of coral-feeding butterflyfishes to examine whether patterns of resource use and levels of dietary specialisation vary among distinct locations, corresponding with changes in resource availability. Our specific aims were to investigate whether the dietary niche breadth of four butterflyfishes varies among five geographically separated locations and assess whether each species utilises similar resources in each location. Resource availability and dietary composition of four butterflyfishes were quantified at three sites across each of five geographic locations throughout the Pacific. Niche breadth, niche overlap, and resource selection functions were calculated for each species at each site and compared among locations. Availability of dietary resources varied significantly among locations and sites. Chaetodon vagabundus, C. citrinellus and C. lunulatus had low levels of dietary specialisation and used different resources in each location. Chaetodon trifascialis had high levels of dietary specialisation and used the same few resources in each location. Our results indicate that relative levels of dietary specialisation among different butterflyfishes do hold at larger spatial scales, however, geographical variation in the dietary composition of all butterflyfishes indicates that prey availability has a fundamental influence on dietary composition. Highly specialised species such as C. trifascialis will be highly vulnerable to coral loss as they appear to be largely inflexible in their dietary composition. However, the increased feeding plasticity observed here for C. trifascialis suggests this species may

  18. The Specialist Court for Kosovo: continuity or departure from the hybrid courts model?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shkёlzen Selimi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The issue of whether to establish Specialist Chambers within the Kosovo justice system for alleged war crimes committed in Kosovo has been, arguably, one of the most heated debates not only from a political and social point of view, but also from a legal one. While the required amendments in the Constitution and several laws of Kosovo necessary to establish the Specialist Chambers in furtherance of the agreement dated 14 April 2014 between the Republic of Kosovo and the European Union on the Mission of the European Union Rule of Law Mission in Kosovo (“EULEX” will certainly create heated debates in the political level, one may argue that the legal issues that are expected to be encountered when the Specialist Chambers will be operational, may be even more pressing. This is in consideration of the peculiar nature of the Specialist Chambers, which are meant to have their basis within the laws of Kosovo, but at the same time, be independent from them and from control of Kosovo authorities. The purpose of this article is to delineate the possible legal issues that might confront the Specialist Chambers of Kosovo. Its main argument is that, while the Specialist Chambers seem to follow the experience of other hybrid internationalised courts, it still differs from them in some aspects. The challenges that the new Specialist Chambers may need to tackle deal with its jurisdiction and position within the Kosovo Judicial system, and its legitimacy and legal basis.

  19. Factors supporting good partnership working between generalist and specialist palliative care services: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, Clare; Gott, Merryn; Ingleton, Christine

    2012-05-01

    The care that most people receive at the end of their lives is provided not by specialist palliative care professionals but by generalists such as GPs, district nurses and others who have not undertaken specialist training in palliative care. A key focus of recent UK policy is improving partnership working across the spectrum of palliative care provision. However there is little evidence to suggest factors which support collaborative working between specialist and generalist palliative care providers. To explore factors that support partnership working between specialist and generalist palliative care providers. Systematic review. A systematic review of studies relating to partnership working between specialist and generalist palliative care providers was undertaken. Six electronic databases were searched for papers published up until January 2011. Of the 159 articles initially identified, 22 papers met the criteria for inclusion. Factors supporting good partnership working included: good communication between providers; clear definition of roles and responsibilities; opportunities for shared learning and education; appropriate and timely access to specialist palliative care services; and coordinated care. Multiple examples exist of good partnership working between specialist and generalist providers; however, there is little consistency regarding how models of collaborative working are developed, and which models are most effective. Little is known about the direct impact of collaborative working on patient outcomes. Further research is required to gain the direct perspectives of health professionals and patients regarding collaborative working in palliative care, and to develop appropriate and cost-effective models for partnership working.

  20. Using systematic change management to improve emergency patients' access to specialist care: the Big Squeeze.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafman, Heidi; Lim, Siang Ngin; Quek, Swee Chye; Mahadevan, Malcolm; Lim, Chanelle; Lim, Aymeric

    2013-06-01

    Delayed access to specialist care for emergency patients is associated with increased risk of morbidity and mortality, and increased patient anxiety. (1) To provide timelier access to inpatient and urgent outpatient specialist care for emergency patients. (2) To influence multiple stakeholders to modify their traditional practices and sustain changes. National University Hospital of Singapore, an academic medical centre with 997 beds in Singapore and over 34 sub-specialties. A set of six interventions was implemented to meet three goals: (1) provide timely access to urgent outpatient specialist care requested by the emergency department ED; (2) increase early inpatient discharges (in order to better match timing of emergency admissions); and (3) provide earlier defined care by inpatient specialists at the ED. An eight-step organisational change management plan was implemented to ensure all specialties complied with the changes. The goals were achieved. (1) Specialist outpatient appointments given within the timeframe requested by the ED doctor increased from 51.7% to 80.8%. (2) Early discharges increased from 11.9% to 26.6% and were sustained at 27.2%. (3) 84% of eligible patients received earlier defined specialist care at the ED. The change management achieved excellent clinician compliance rates ranging from 84% to 100%. However the median wait for admission remained unchanged. The interventions reduced the time for ED patients to access specialist outpatient and inpatient care. The systematic organisational change management approach resulted in sustained compliance.

  1. Theoretical bases of forming for future physical rehabilitation specialists on readiness to health saving activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bielicova N.O.

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The structure of preparation of future specialist is considered on a physical rehabilitation. An analysis is carried out over 30 literary sources. It is set that readiness of future specialist includes such structural components: motivational, cognitive, operation and personality. It is marked that a specialist owns knowledge about a health, healthy life style, health saving technologies. Also he realizes the value of health and ready to realize the knowledge in professional activity. Emphasized necessity of improvement of indexes of personality qualities and professional culture.

  2. Internal medicine specialists' attitudes towards working part-time: a comparison between 1996 and 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Jong Judith D

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although medical specialists traditionally hold negative views towards working part-time, the practice of medicine has evolved. Given the trend towards more part-time work and that there is no evidence that it compromises the quality of care, attitudes towards part-time work may have changed as well in recent years. The aim of this paper was to examine the possible changes in attitudes towards part-time work among specialists in internal medicine between 1996 and 2004. Moreover, we wanted to determine whether these attitudes were associated with individual characteristics (age, gender, investments in work and whether attitudes of specialists within a partnership showed more resemblance than specialists' attitudes from different partnerships. Methods Two samples were used in this study: data of a survey conducted in 1996 and in 2004. After selecting internal medicine specialists working in general hospitals in The Netherlands, the sample consisted of 219 specialists in 1996 and 363 specialists in 2004. They were sent a questionnaire, including topics on the attitudes towards part-time work. Results Internal medicine specialists' attitudes towards working part-time became slightly more positive between 1996 and 2004. Full-time working specialists in 2004 still expressed concerns regarding the investments of part-timers in overhead tasks, the flexibility of task division, efficiency, communication and continuity of care. In 1996 gender was the only predictor of the attitude, in 2004 being a full- or a part-timer, age and the time invested in work were associated with this attitude. Furthermore, specialists' attitudes were not found to cluster much within partnerships. Conclusion In spite of the increasing number of specialists working or preferring to work part-time, part-time practice among internal medicine specialists seems not to be fully accepted. The results indicate that the attitudes are no longer gender based, but are

  3. ROLE OF EXPERIMENT IN PROFESSIONAL PREPARATION OF FUTURE SPECIALISTS IN THE SYSTEM «COLLEGE-UNIVERSITY»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariia T. Levochko

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available In the article a value and role of experiment in professional preparation of future specialists opens up in the system “college-university”. An experiment plays a considerable role during realization of pedagogical, educational reforms, enables to check up the professional competence of specialists, professional abilities and skills, theoretical purchased knowledgе which are inculcated in practical activity in practicе. During research, by carrying out the experiments, the basic criteria of learning efficiency with use of test tasks and questioning for formation of professional competence and professional skills of the future specialists of economic branch in the system "college-university" have been offered.

  4. Physical rehabilitation specialist, or physical therapist: national and international interpretation of occupational names

    OpenAIRE

    Hertsyk A.M.

    2010-01-01

    The search of modern international accordance specialty is conducted «physical rehabilitation specialist» (physical rehabilitologist). The features of professions are considered «physical rehabilitation specialist», «physician-physiotherapist », «physiotherapist», «physical therapist», «physiatrist», «physiotherapy technician and assistant». In the context of integration processes correctly and expediently in place of the name of profession «physical rehabilitation specialist» to apply the ge...

  5. Art Appreciation as a Learned Competence: A Museum-based Qualitative Study of Adult Art Specialist and Art Non-Specialist Visitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajka Bračun Sova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Since Bourdieu, it has been argued that art appreciation requires “knowledge”. The focus of this qualitative study was to examine art appreciation as a learned competence by exploring two different groups of museum visitors: art specialists and art non-specialists. The research was conducted at Moderna galerija in Ljubljana. Twenty-three adults were recruited and accompanied during their visit to the museum. Participants were requested to “think out loud”, which meant to talk about what they saw, thought, and felt about the artworks. There was a short interview conducted with each participant before entering the museum to gain insight into their art-related and museum-visiting experience. The analysis of the data revealed that some processes of art appreciation were similar within the two groups. Both art specialists and art non-specialists interact with museum objects physically and intellectually; they see contents and formal qualities as a whole; they respond emotionally to artworks; appreciation includes their personal experience; they search museum interpretation/information for their understanding. Some noticeable differences were found. Art specialists respond to artworks with more understanding and are willing to put more effort into art appreciation, whereas art non-specialists respond with less understanding and put less effort into art appreciation. This paper focuses on the differences between the two groups; reflective and spontaneous appreciation of art, objective and subjective appreciation of art and the effort put into art appreciation. The paper ends with a discussion of the implications of the study for the teaching of art and museum education.

  6. Specialist geriatric services: A necessity within the radiotherapy workforce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Abdel-Rahman

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A large proportion of cancer patients receiving outpatient chemotherapy and radiotherapy services are more than 70 years old. For this subgroup of patients, a general clinical evaluation may not be sufficient to determine an individual’s treatment strategy as there are other non-stand¬ard medical issues that concern the elderlies such as polypharmacy, the need for extra social care, and accessibility to information[1]. In addition, these patients also have increased risks of reduced mobility, as well as emotional and financial difficulties.Therefore, it is necessary to incorporate geriatric as-sessment (GA into routine medical practice in order to improve individualized care[2,3]. Geriatric assessment is a comprehensive process that evaluates a senior patient’s medical, emotional, social and functional capacity[4]. In the current issue of AMOR, Louise Hogan and Anita O’Donovan from Trinity College Dublin evaluated the experience of elderly patients who used radiotherapy services in Ireland[5]. This was conducted through a number of questions directed at a focus group of elderly cancer patients, assessing different spheres of social dif-ficulties associated with undergoing radiotherapy in this age group.They found that it is important to focus on providing essential information to patients in a calm setting at an appropriate time. They also recommended establishing proper support groups for elderly patients receiving radiotherapy, as well as encouraging one-to-one discus-sions between patients and members of the healthcare team regarding possible side effects of treatment.In conclusion, it is evident that specialist geriatric services within radiotherapy departments are a necessity, given the large number of elderly patients receiving radi-otherapy and the specificity of their medical and social needs. It is also believed that a treatment strategy based on a personalized GA for elderly patients will improve the overall treatment efficacy

  7. Perceived Life Satisfaction of Workplace Specialist I Faculty and Mentors Participating in a First-Year STEM Teacher Training Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickolich, David; Feldhaus, Charles; Cotton, Sam; Barrett, Andrew, II; Smallwood, Jim

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure perceived professional and personal life satisfaction of Indiana Workplace Specialist I (WS I) faculty and their mentors. Workplace Specialist I teachers are all first-year career and technical education (CTE) faculty who must complete the WS I training program to be eligible for the Workplace Specialist II…

  8. Unbiased Transcriptional Comparisons of Generalist and Specialist Herbivores Feeding on Progressively Defenseless Nicotiana attenuata Plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Govind, G.; Mittapalli, O.; Griebel, T.; Allmann, S.; Böcker, S.; Baldwin, I.T.

    2010-01-01

    Background Herbivore feeding elicits dramatic increases in defenses, most of which require jasmonate (JA) signaling, and against which specialist herbivores are thought to be better adapted than generalist herbivores. Unbiased transcriptional analyses of how neonate larvae cope with these induced

  9. Training medical specialists in communication with patients with medically unexplained physical symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Weiland (Anne)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractIntroduction In secondary care about 50% of newly referred patients to outpatient clinics of Neurology, Gynecology, Rheumatology or Internal Medicine present medically unexplained physical symptoms (MUPS). Medical specialists consider patients with symptoms without underlying pathol

  10. Physical rehabilitation specialist, or physical therapist: national and international interpretation of occupational names

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hertsyk A.M.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The search of modern international accordance specialty is conducted «physical rehabilitation specialist» (physical rehabilitologist. The features of professions are considered «physical rehabilitation specialist», «physician-physiotherapist », «physiotherapist», «physical therapist», «physiatrist», «physiotherapy technician and assistant». In the context of integration processes correctly and expediently in place of the name of profession «physical rehabilitation specialist» to apply the generally accepted international term physical internist». It is indicated on the necessity of account of role of physical rehabilitation specialist with unmedical university education in the modern model of multidisciplinary rehabilitation of persons with motive violations.

  11. E-Everything and the School Library Media Specialist: Grist for the Mill (Part 2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Daniel D.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses electronic books and the need for school library media specialists to merge information literacy and library skills with technology skills. Highlights include advancing technology for electronic books; helpful Web sites, including Project Gutenburg; and reader software. (LRW)

  12. Extension wildlife specialist at Virginia Tech issues salmonella caution to bird feeders

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Lynn

    2009-01-01

    The state's wildlife specialist for the Virginia Cooperative Extension is asking citizens who feed birds to exercise caution in order to help stem a current salmonellosis outbreak in birds from Maryland down through Appalachia.

  13. The role and organisation of community palliative specialist nursing teams in rural England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leadbeater, Maria; Staton, Wendy

    2014-11-01

    This article describes a study that used a qualitative approach, purposive sampling and semi-structured telephone interviews conducted with specialist palliative care nurses from six rural community teams in England. The study investigated how services were organised and the issues of delivering specialist palliative nursing care in a rural area. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse the data. The findings showed many similarities in that the majority of patients in rural areas were not accessing hospice services and there was a greater reliance on care at home. However, the challenges in delivering care ranged from managing patient expectations, geographical distance, lack of technology to support remote working and education for the specialist palliative care teams. The study makes specific recommendations for rural community specialist palliative care teams.

  14. E-Everything and the School Library Media Specialist: Grist for the Mill (Part 2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Daniel D.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses electronic books and the need for school library media specialists to merge information literacy and library skills with technology skills. Highlights include advancing technology for electronic books; helpful Web sites, including Project Gutenburg; and reader software. (LRW)

  15. STS 41-D mission specialist Judith Resnik trains on the RMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    STS 41-D mission specialist Judith Resnik prepares for training on the remote manipulator system (RSM) on board the shuttle mission simulator (SMS). She is on the SMS aft deck facing the RMS translation hand control and overhead starboard window.

  16. Information technologies and software packages for education of specialists in materials science [In Russian

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Krzhizhanovskaya; S. Ryaboshuk

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents methodological materials, interactive text-books and software packages developed and extensively used for education of specialists in materials science. These virtual laboratories for education and research are equipped with tutorials and software environment for modeling complex

  17. Specialist bees collect Asteraceae pollen by distinctive abdominal drumming (Osmia) or brushing (Melissodes, Svastra)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Four species of western US Osmia (Cephalosmia) bees that are Asteraceae specialists (oligoleges) were observed to employ a heretofore unappreciated, stereotypical means of collecting pollen, abdominal drumming, to gather pollen from 19 flowering species representing nine tribes of Asteraceae. Abdom...

  18. COMMON LEVELS OF CO-OPERATION BETWEEN MEDICAL SPECIALISTS, BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERS, AND BIOCYBERNETICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia Mikołajewska

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available There is a dominant opinion that the cooperation of medical personnel and engineers is unappreciated and its significant positive influence on the results of therapy has not been sufficiently investigated. The aim of this paper is an attempt to assess the state of cooperation between medical specialists and biomedical engineers and biocybernetics specialists on the basis of the opinions published up to this point in literature. A survey of the literature in reviewed articles indexed in the main literature databases was carried out using specific keywords and unambiguous criteria for inclusion and omission. Further study is necessary which will determine the state of cooperation between medical specialists and biomedical engineers and biocybernetics specialists, the factors which determine it and any guidelines for clinical practice.

  19. Contracting in specialists for emergency obstetric care- does it work in rural India?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randive, Bharat; Chaturvedi, Sarika; Mistry, Nerges

    2012-12-31

    Contracting in private sector is promoted in developing countries facing human resources shortages as a challenge to reduce maternal mortality. This study explored provision, practice, performance, barriers to execution and views about contracting in specialists for emergency obstetric care (EmOC) in rural India. Facility survey was conducted in all secondary and tertiary public health facilities (44) in three heterogeneous districts in Maharashtra state of India. Interviews (42) were conducted with programme managers and district and block level officials and with public and private EmOC specialists. Locations of private obstetricians in the study districts were identified and mapped. Two schemes, namely Janani Suraksha Yojana and Indian Public Health standards (IPHS) provided for contracting in EmOC specialists. The IPHS provision was chosen for use mainly due to greater sum for contracting in (US $ 30/service episode vs.300 US$/month). The positions of EmOC specialists were vacant in 83% of all facilities that hence had a potential for contracting in EmOC specialists. Private specialists were contracted in at 20% such facilities. The contracting in of specialists did not greatly increase EmOC service outputs at facilities, except in facilities with determined leadership. Contracting in specialists was useful for non emergency conditions, but not for obstetric emergencies. The contracts were more of a relational nature with poor monitoring structures. Inadequate infrastructure, longer distance to private specialists, insufficient financial provision for contracting in, and poor management capacities were barriers to effective implementation of contracting in. Dependency on the private sector was a concern among public partners while the private partners viewed contracting in as an opportunity to gain experience and credibility. Density and geographic distribution of private specialists are important influencing factors in determining feasibility and use of

  20. Part-time and full-time medical specialists, are there differences in allocation of time?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Groenewegen Peter P

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An increasing number of medical specialists prefer to work part-time. This development can be found worldwide. Problems to be faced in the realization of part-time work in medicine include the division of night and weekend shifts, as well as communication between physicians and continuity of care. People tend to think that physicians working part-time are less devoted to their work, implying that full-time physicians complete a greater number of tasks. The central question in this article is whether part-time medical specialists allocate their time differently to their tasks than full-time medical specialists. Methods A questionnaire was sent by mail to all internists (N = 817, surgeons (N = 693 and radiologists (N = 621 working in general hospitals in the Netherlands. Questions were asked about the actual situation, such as hours worked and night and weekend shifts. The response was 53% (n = 411 for internists, 52% (n = 359 for surgeons, and 36% (n = 213 for radiologists. Due to non-response on specific questions there were 367 internists, 316 surgeons, and 71 radiologists included in the analyses. Multilevel analyses were used to analyze the data. Results Part-time medical specialists do not spend proportionally more time on direct patient care. With respect to night and weekend shifts, part-time medical specialists account for proportionally more or an equal share of these shifts. The number of hours worked per FTE is higher for part-time than for full-time medical specialists, although this difference is only significant for surgeons. Conclusion In general, part-time medical specialists do their share of the job. However, we focussed on input only. Besides input, output like the numbers of services provided deserves attention as well. The trend in medicine towards more part-time work has an important consequence: more medical specialists are needed to get the work done. Therefore, a greater number of medical specialists

  1. Contracting in specialists for emergency obstetric care- does it work in rural India?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randive Bharat

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Contracting in private sector is promoted in developing countries facing human resources shortages as a challenge to reduce maternal mortality. This study explored provision, practice, performance, barriers to execution and views about contracting in specialists for emergency obstetric care (EmOC in rural India. Methods Facility survey was conducted in all secondary and tertiary public health facilities (44 in three heterogeneous districts in Maharashtra state of India. Interviews (42 were conducted with programme managers and district and block level officials and with public and private EmOC specialists. Locations of private obstetricians in the study districts were identified and mapped. Results Two schemes, namely Janani Suraksha Yojana and Indian Public Health standards (IPHS provided for contracting in EmOC specialists. The IPHS provision was chosen for use mainly due to greater sum for contracting in (US $ 30/service episode vs.300 US$/month. The positions of EmOC specialists were vacant in 83% of all facilities that hence had a potential for contracting in EmOC specialists. Private specialists were contracted in at 20% such facilities. The contracting in of specialists did not greatly increase EmOC service outputs at facilities, except in facilities with determined leadership. Contracting in specialists was useful for non emergency conditions, but not for obstetric emergencies. The contracts were more of a relational nature with poor monitoring structures. Inadequate infrastructure, longer distance to private specialists, insufficient financial provision for contracting in, and poor management capacities were barriers to effective implementation of contracting in. Dependency on the private sector was a concern among public partners while the private partners viewed contracting in as an opportunity to gain experience and credibility. Conclusions Density and geographic distribution of private specialists are important

  2. Research competence accounting profession as a specialist business process management in processing industries

    OpenAIRE

    Rozhelyuk, Viktoriya

    2015-01-01

    The article is the realization of research competence accountancy profession as a specialist business process management in processing industries.The main base for the study are research scientists to research the accounting profession as a specialist business process management in processing industries. When writing articles used methods: monographic (the study of scientific publications of scientists for the development of basic principles of formation of accounting in the processing indust...

  3. Use of dependency and prioritization tools by clinical nurse specialists in palliative care: an exploratory study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bracken, Mairéad

    2011-12-01

    The principal aim was to assess the utility of three needs assessment\\/dependency tools for use in community-based palliative care services. Specific objectives were to assess a sample of patients receiving specialist palliative care community nursing using these tools, to assess the predictive ability of each tool, and to explore the utility of prioritizing and measuring patient dependency from a clinical nurse specialist (CNS) perspective.

  4. Management of Nonceliac Gluten Sensitivity by Gastroenterology Specialists: Data from an Italian Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Federica Branchi; Francesca Ferretti; Lorenzo Norsa; Leda Roncoroni; Dario Conte; Maria Teresa Bardella; Luca Elli

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim. Nonceliac gluten sensitivity is syndrome characterized by symptoms disappearing after a gluten-free diet. Its existence is still argument of discussion among specialists. Our aim was to evaluate the knowledge about nonceliac gluten sensitivity among gastroenterology specialists. Methods. During October 2013 a questionnaire was sent through a medical newsletter to Italian gastroenterologists. Twelve questions investigated their knowledge on nonceliac gluten sensitivity, inc...

  5. Can plant resistance to specialist herbivores be explained by plant chemistry or resource use strategy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Heather; Vrieling, Klaas; Pelser, Pieter B; Schaffner, Urs

    2012-04-01

    At both a macro- and micro-evolutionary level, selection of and performance on host plants by specialist herbivores are thought to be governed partially by host plant chemistry. Thus far, there is little evidence to suggest that specialists can detect small structural differences in secondary metabolites of their hosts, or that such differences affect host choice or performance of specialists. We tested whether phytochemical differences between closely related plant species are correlated with specialist host choice. We conducted no-choice feeding trials using 17 plant species of three genera of tribe Senecioneae (Jacobaea, Packera, and Senecio; Asteraceae) and a more distantly related species (Cynoglossum officinale; Boraginaceae) containing pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs), and four PA-sequestering specialist herbivores of the genus Longitarsus (Chrysomelidae). We also assessed whether variation in feeding by specialist herbivores is attributable to different resource use strategies of the tested plant species. Plant resource use strategy was quantified by measuring leaf dry matter content, which is related to both plant nutritive value and to plant investment in quantitative defences. We found no evidence that intra-generic differences in PA profiles affect feeding by specialist herbivores. Instead, our results indicate that decisions to begin feeding are related to plant resource use strategy, while decisions to continue feeding are not based on any plant characteristics measured in this study. These findings imply that PA composition does not significantly affect host choice by these specialist herbivores. Leaf dry matter content is somewhat phylogenetically conserved, indicating that plants may have difficulty altering resource use strategy in response to selection pressure by herbivores and other environmental factors on an evolutionary time scale.

  6. Survey of US chiropractors' perceptions about their clinical role as specialist or generalist

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Monica; Carber, Lynne A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to provide new information that describes chiropractors' professional identity relative to their perceived clinical role as specialist or generalist. Methods A pragmatic, descriptive, cross-sectional survey was performed of randomly sampled state-board licensed chiropractors in the United States during the period 2002–2003 to assess the chiropractors' perceptions of how their chiropractic patients see them, and how they see themselves, as specialist or ...

  7. SOLVING THE PROBLEMS OF SUBJECT SPECIALIST KNOWLEDGE FACED IN THE ATTSR PROJECT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    ESP teachers teaching English for mixed subject -specialist groups meet problems such as selecting teach-ing materials,dealing with the subject matter,and teaching methods.The experience in the ATTSR(Advanced Teacher Training in Specialist Reading)project may be a reference point for colleagues whomeet with the same problems.In this paper the author will suggest methods to solve these problems intraining this group:using different subject s

  8. Team meetings in specialist palliative care: Asking questions as a strategy within interprofessional interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Arber, A

    2008-01-01

    In this article, I explore what happens when specialist palliative care staff meet together to discuss patients under their care. Many studies (e.g., Atkinson) have discussed how health care practitioners in various settings use rhetorical strategies when presenting cases in situations such as ward rounds and team meetings. Strategies for arguing and persuading are central to medical practice in the interprofessional context. The context of specialist palliative care is an interesting place...

  9. Does primary medical practitioner involvement with a specialist team improve patient outcomes? A systematic review.

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Geoffrey; Del Mar, Chris; Francis, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    Patients with chronic or complex medical or psychiatric conditions are treated by many practioners, including general practitioners (GPs). Formal liaison between primary and specialist is often assumed to offer benefits to patients. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of formal liaison of GPs with specialist service providers on patient health outcomes, by conducting a systematic review of the published literature in MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsychINFO, CINAHL and Cochrane Library databas...

  10. COMMON LEVELS OF CO-OPERATION BETWEEN MEDICAL SPECIALISTS, BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERS, AND BIOCYBERNETICS

    OpenAIRE

    Emilia Mikołajewska; Dariusz Mikołajewski

    2013-01-01

    There is a dominant opinion that the cooperation of medical personnel and engineers is unappreciated and its significant positive influence on the results of therapy has not been sufficiently investigated. The aim of this paper is an attempt to assess the state of cooperation between medical specialists and biomedical engineers and biocybernetics specialists on the basis of the opinions published up to this point in literature. A survey of the literature in reviewed articles indexed i...

  11. Satisfaction with Family Physicians and Specialists and the use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Israel

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    Amir Shmueli

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Higher utilization of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM is commonly explained by dissatisfaction or disappointment with conventional medical treatment. To explore, at two points in time in Israel, the associations between six domains of satisfaction (attitude, length of visits, availability, information sharing, perceived quality of care and overall with conventional family physicians' and specialists' services and the likelihood of consulting CAM providers. This is a secondary analysis of interviews, which were conducted with 2000 persons in 1993 and 2500 persons in 2000, representing the Israeli Jewish urban population aged 45–75 in those years. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were used in the investigation. In 1993, users of CAM were less satisfied than non-users with both family physicians' and specialists' care. Lower satisfaction with the attitude of, the amount of information sharing by and in general with family physicians, and with the length of visits and perceived quality of care of specialists were significantly associated with CAM use. In 2000, lower satisfaction with specialists' attitude, length of visits, availability and in general was significantly related to the use of CAM. Lower satisfaction with family physicians and specialists is significantly associated with consulting CAM providers. However, with CAM becoming a mainstream medical care specialty in its own, lower satisfaction with conventional medicine specialists becomes the most important factor.

  12. Management of Nonceliac Gluten Sensitivity by Gastroenterology Specialists: Data from an Italian Survey

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    Federica Branchi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim. Nonceliac gluten sensitivity is syndrome characterized by symptoms disappearing after a gluten-free diet. Its existence is still argument of discussion among specialists. Our aim was to evaluate the knowledge about nonceliac gluten sensitivity among gastroenterology specialists. Methods. During October 2013 a questionnaire was sent through a medical newsletter to Italian gastroenterologists. Twelve questions investigated their knowledge on nonceliac gluten sensitivity, including their diagnostic and therapeutic approach. Results. A total of 212 gastroenterologists filled in the questionnaire. The 98.6% were aware of the existence of a syndrome called “nonceliac gluten sensitivity” and 77% believe in its existence. However, only 56% gave a correct definition of the term. The majority of specialists diagnosed gluten sensitive patients and the number of diagnoses was not statistically different from that of celiac disease. Moreover, a gluten-free diet was prescribed by 64% of the specialists and among them the 73% noted an increase of gluten sensitive patients attending their outpatient services. Conclusions. Our study indicated that most of the specialists recognize nonceliac gluten sensitivity and prescribe gluten-free diet, although 44% of the specialists are not able to give its correct definition; underlining the necessity of medical education on this topic is needed.

  13. From Professional Competencies to Capacity: A Study of Education and Training for Subject Specialists

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    Ming-Hsin Phoebe Chiu

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Subject specialists are important assets in academic and research libraries. They possess not only the specialized knowledge of a particular subject field, but also the skills in library and information services. Looming shortage of qualified subject specialists resulting from the retirement of current professionals, most likely the baby-boomer generation, persuasively suggests that education and training are in urgent need of rethinking. This empirical study was conducted within the context of Library and Information Science education and academic librarianship in North America. Survey, content analysis, and focus group were employed as data collection methods. This study aims to analyze the status of LIS education for subject specialists, education needs and personal attributes of subject specialists, and the qualifications and responsibilities of becoming subject specialists. The goal of the study is to understand the knowledge, skills, and attitude of becoming subject specialists. Results of the study may provide insight into planning of formal curriculum and on-the-job training. [Article content in Chinese

  14. Management of Nonceliac Gluten Sensitivity by Gastroenterology Specialists: Data from an Italian Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branchi, Federica; Ferretti, Francesca; Norsa, Lorenzo; Roncoroni, Leda; Conte, Dario; Bardella, Maria Teresa; Elli, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Nonceliac gluten sensitivity is syndrome characterized by symptoms disappearing after a gluten-free diet. Its existence is still argument of discussion among specialists. Our aim was to evaluate the knowledge about nonceliac gluten sensitivity among gastroenterology specialists. During October 2013 a questionnaire was sent through a medical newsletter to Italian gastroenterologists. Twelve questions investigated their knowledge on nonceliac gluten sensitivity, including their diagnostic and therapeutic approach. A total of 212 gastroenterologists filled in the questionnaire. The 98.6% were aware of the existence of a syndrome called "nonceliac gluten sensitivity" and 77% believe in its existence. However, only 56% gave a correct definition of the term. The majority of specialists diagnosed gluten sensitive patients and the number of diagnoses was not statistically different from that of celiac disease. Moreover, a gluten-free diet was prescribed by 64% of the specialists and among them the 73% noted an increase of gluten sensitive patients attending their outpatient services. Our study indicated that most of the specialists recognize nonceliac gluten sensitivity and prescribe gluten-free diet, although 44% of the specialists are not able to give its correct definition; underlining the necessity of medical education on this topic is needed.

  15. Appraisal of the retention of the knowledge for ophthalmology specialists of the Brazilian Ophthalmology Council

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    Limeira-Soares Paulo Henrique

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To determine the retention of knowledge along the years after certification of physicians as ophthalmology specialists. METHODS: The physicians, former ophthalmology residents, were selected at the Department of Ophthalmology, State University of Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil, and randomly allocated to three groups of seven individuals, according to the time as specialists. Group 1 consisted of one-year specialists, group 2 of five-year specialists and group 3 of ten-year specialists. Each participant answered a test with twenty-five multiple choice randomly selected questions, based on the national certificate tests applied by the Brazilian Ophthalmology Council between 1994 and 2003. Each question scored four points. RESULTS: The mean age of groups 1, 2 and 3 was 27, 30 and 36 years, respectively. A preponderance of males was found in all groups. Group 1 achieved the highest score, average of 88, group 2 achieved 77, and group 3 achieved the lowest, average of 64 (p<0,05. CONCLUSION: Loss of knowledge retention amongst specialists of the Brazilian Ophthalmology Council, has been observed along the years after the certification.

  16. Family Doctors Seen through the Eyes of Specialists: A Qualitative Study

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    Anna Probst

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Germany is facing a shortage of young family doctors. In search of possible reasons the aim of this study was to explore the perception of specialists on family doctors. Within a qualitative study 16 medical specialists from different fields in hospital and outpatient care setting were interviewed. Interviews were analysed using qualitative content analysis according to Mayring. Most of the interviewed specialists have a positive view on family doctors although a certain depreciative assumption is resonated in a number of statements. According to the specialists, family doctors enjoy a high status in public, even if social processes of change may have a negative influence on their rather old-fashioned image. Specialists find that family medicine is underrepresented in university education suffering from an upgrading of specialized disciplines. Altogether the majority of the interviewed specialists certify family doctors in Germany a positive image. Lecturer in medical education and training should be aware of their key role in the career choices of young trainees and avoid degradation or upgrading of certain medical disciplines. Interlinked measures on different levels focusing on the improvement of working conditions and representation at the universities would be needed to regain attractiveness for the family doctor's profession as a career choice for young doctors.

  17. How Dutch medical specialists perceive the competencies and training needs of medical residents in healthcare management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkenbosch, L; Bax, M; Scherpbier, A; Heyligers, I; Muijtjens, A M M; Busari, J O

    2013-04-01

    The Dutch postgraduate medical training has been revised to focus on seven competencies. The role as manager is one of these competencies. Recent studies show that this competency receives little attention during the residency training. In an earlier study, we discovered that residents perceived their competency as managers to be moderate. In this study, we investigated how medical specialists perceived the managerial competencies of medical residents and their need for management education. In September 2010, a 46-item questionnaire was designed which examined medical specialists' perceptions of the competency and needs of residents in the field of medical management. Two hundred ninety-eight specialists were invited via email to participate. Hundred twenty-nine specialists (43.3%) responded to our survey. They rated the residents' competencies in contract negotiating skills, knowledge of the healthcare system, and specialist department poorly. They felt that residents were competent in updating their medical knowledge. Ninety-four percent reported a need for training in management among residents. Preferred topics were time management and healthcare organization. The preferred training method was a workshop given during residency by an extramural expert. Dutch medical specialists perceive the management competencies of residents in some areas to be inadequate. They feel that training in medical management during residency is necessary.

  18. An empirical investigation of differences between mathematics specialists and non-specialists at the high school level in Cyprus: A Logistic regression Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanastasiou, Elena C.; Zembylas, Michalinos

    2006-12-01

    AN EMPIRICAL INVESTIGATION OF DIFFERENCES BETWEEN MATHEMATICS SPECIALISTS AND NON-SPECIALISTS AT THE HIGH-SCHOOL LEVEL in Cyprus - The data obtained from high-school seniors for the Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) for the country of Cyprus appear to be contradictory. Although Cypriot students did not perform well in mathematics in elementary school, middle school, and in the non-advanced sectors of high school, students in advanced mathematics courses in high school managed to perform exceptionally well. In seeking to account for this apparent disparity, the present study examines the differences between mathematics specialists and non-specialists at the high-school level and discusses the implications that these have for teaching practice. It shows how students educated in an environment that might not be optimal for producing high-achieving students in mathematics and science in elementary and middle school (according to the TIMSS) might nonetheless manage to excel in these fields at the end of their schooling. In conclusion, the authors address the implications of their study for similar educational systems in other developing countries.

  19. Late Holocene expansion of Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) in the Central Rocky Mountains, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Jodi R; Betancourt, Julio L.; Jackson, Stephen T.

    2016-01-01

    "Aim: Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) experienced one of the most extensive and rapid post-glacial plant migrations in western North America. We used plant macrofossils from woodrat (Neotoma) middens to reconstruct its spread in the Central Rocky Mountains, identify other vegetation changes coinciding with P. ponderosa expansion at the same sites, and relate P. ponderosa migrational history to both its modern phylogeography and to a parallel expansion by Utah juniper (Juniperus osteosperma).

  20. Inter-observer agreement of canine and feline paroxysmal event semiology and classification by veterinary neurology specialists and non-specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packer, Rowena M A; Berendt, Mette; Bhatti, Sofie; Charalambous, Marios; Cizinauskas, Sigitas; De Risio, Luisa; Farquhar, Robyn; Hampel, Rachel; Hill, Myfanwy; Mandigers, Paul J J; Pakozdy, Akos; Preston, Stephanie M; Rusbridge, Clare; Stein, Veronika M; Taylor-Brown, Fran; Tipold, Andrea; Volk, Holger A

    2015-02-18

    Advances in mobile technology mean vets are now commonly presented with videos of paroxysmal events by clients, but the consistency of the interpretation of these videos has not been investigated. The objective of this study was to investigate the level of agreement between vets (both neurology specialists and non-specialists) on the description and classification of videos depicting paroxysmal events, without knowing any results of diagnostic workup. An online questionnaire study was conducted, where participants watched 100 videos of dogs and cats exhibiting paroxysmal events and answered questions regarding: epileptic seizure presence (yes/no), seizure type, consciousness status, and the presence of motor, autonomic and neurobehavioural signs. Agreement statistics (percentage agreement and kappa) calculated for each variable, with prevalence indices calculated to aid their interpretation. Only a fair level of agreement (κ = 0.40) was found for epileptic seizure presence. Overall agreement of seizure type was moderate (κ = 0.44), with primary generalised seizures showing the highest level of agreement (κ = 0.60), and focal the lowest (κ =0.31). Fair agreement was found for consciousness status and the presence of autonomic signs (κ = 0.21-0.40), but poor agreement for neurobehavioral signs (κ = 0.16). Agreement for motor signs ranged from poor (κ = ≤ 0.20) to moderate (κ = 0.41-0.60). Differences between specialists and non-specialists were identified. The relatively low levels of agreement described here highlight the need for further discussions between neurology experts regarding classifying and describing epileptic seizures, and additional training of non-specialists to facilitate accurate diagnosis. There is a need for diagnostic tools (e.g. electroencephalogram) able to differentiate between epileptic and non-epileptic paroxysms.

  1. Referral and consultation communication between primary care and specialist physicians: finding common ground.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Ann S; Reschovsky, James D

    2011-01-10

    Communication between primary care physicians (PCPs) and specialists regarding referrals and consultations is often inadequate, with negative consequences for patients. We examined PCPs' and specialists' perceptions of communication regarding referrals and consultations. We then identified practice characteristics associated with reported communication. We analyzed the nationally representative 2008 Center for Studying Health System Change Health Tracking Physician Survey of 4720 physicians providing at least 20 hours per week of direct patient care. Outcome measures were physician reports of communication regarding referrals and consultations. Perceptions of communication regarding referrals and consultations differed. For example, 69.3% of PCPs reported "always" or "most of the time" sending notification of a patient's history and reason for consultation to specialists, but only 34.8% of specialists said they "always" or "most of the time" received such notification. Similarly, 80.6% of specialists said they "always" or "most of the time" send consultation results to the referring PCP, but only 62.2% of PCPs said they received such information. Physicians who did not receive timely communication regarding referrals and consultations were more likely to report that their ability to provide high-quality care was threatened. The 3 practice characteristics associated with PCPs and specialists reporting communication regarding referrals and consultations were "adequate" visit time with patients, receipt of quality reports regarding patients with chronic conditions, and nurse support for monitoring patients with chronic conditions. These modifiable practice supports associated with communication between PCPs and specialists can help inform the ways that resources are focused to improve care coordination.

  2. Stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation: The diagnosis and management of hypertension by specialists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healey, Jeff S; Wharton, Sean; Al-Kaabi, Saif; Pai, Menaka; Ravandi, Amir; Nair, Girish; Morillo, Carlos A; Connolly, Stuart J

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hypertension is common in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and is an important cause of stroke. OBJECTIVES To determine how effectively hypertension is managed among specialist-treated outpatients with AF. METHODS Investigators reviewed the charts of patients with a diagnosis of AF cared for by medical specialists to determine the change in blood pressure, patterns of antihypertensive drug use and the role of the specialist in the management of hypertension. RESULTS Of 209 patients with AF, 118 had a history of hypertension or an office blood pressure greater than 140/90 mmHg. Blood pressure was measured at 73% of all visits. Hypertension was identified as an important problem in 57% of patients and antihypertensive therapy was either initiated or suggested in 77%. One year after the initial specialist visit, systolic blood pressure was significantly lower (140±20 mmHg at one year versus 148±23 mmHg initially; P=0.015); however, there was no change in diastolic blood pressure (80±12 mmHg at one year versus 81±16 mmHg initially; P=0.602) and only 50% of patients had a blood pressure less than 140/90 mmHg. In contrast, the percentage of patients receiving warfarin increased from 46% to 78% (P=0.0001). CONCLUSIONS In patients treated by specialists for AF, systolic blood pressure is significantly reduced during follow-up; however, 50% of patients continue to have suboptimal blood pressure control. In many patients, hypertension is not identified as an important comorbid illness and antihypertensive therapy is neither recommended nor initiated by the specialist. Greater specialist involvement in the identification and treatment of hypertension in patients with AF could lead to an important, additional reduction in stroke. PMID:16685312

  3. Long-term climatic variations in the highlands of Western China, as evidenced by a 4650-year-long chronology based on tree-ring cores from Qilian junipers (Juniperus przewalskii Kom)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jingjing; Yang, Bao; Sonechkin, Dmitry; Datsenko, Nina; Qin, Chun

    2017-04-01

    In order to create a reliable chronology of long-term tree-growth variations that may be due to climate variations, we apply eigenanalysis to a large dataset of tree-ring width records (1263 records sampled from Qilian junipers [Juniperus przewalskii Kom]), a species endemic to the highlands of Western China. In order to exclude the so-called growth rate/life span association effect, and to give the possibility of applying the eigenanalysis, tree-ring width records were sorted into six subsets, based on the life spans of the trees sampled: 200-400, 400-600, 600-800, 800-1000, 1000-1500 years old, and trees older than 1500 years. Pairs of partial chronologies were created, pairing the set of all trees (living, dead, archaeological remains) with the living trees belonging to each subset. We compute the contours of tree-growth variations (on both 100-year and longer time scales) for each subset, ending with six pairs of partial subset chronologies. Two sums of all these partial chronologies thus give us a reliable record of tree-growth variations over a period ranging from 2627 BCE up to 2012 CE. These variations are most likely climate-induced. Some of the variations seen over the last two millennia are attributed to effects of the 178-year-long cycle of the Sun rotation around the barycentre of the Solar system, leading to the well-known diminished solar activity events of Oort, Wolf, Spoerer, Maunder, and Dalton. One variation seen early in this long chronology deserves mention: a prolonged (approximately 400 years in length) damping of tree growth, perhaps due to the drought known as the 4.2 kiloyear event (sometimes blamed for the collapse of the Egyptian Old Kingdom, 2500-2100 BCE). The chronology of the only living Qilian junipers also provides a clear picture of the response of these trees to the current period of global climate change. Tree growth seems to have been spurred by rising temperatures until 1998, after which rising global surface air temperatures

  4. Adolescent and young adult medicine in Australia and New Zealand: towards specialist accreditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Susan M; Farrant, Bridget; Hall, Anganette; Kennedy, Andrew; Payne, Donald; Steinbeck, Kate; Vogel, Veronica

    2016-08-01

    In Australia and New Zealand, a critical mass of academic and clinical leadership in Adolescent Medicine has helped advance models of clinical services, drive investments in teaching and training, and strengthen research capacity over the past 30 years. There is growing recognition of the importance of influencing the training of adult physicians as well as paediatricians. The Royal Australasian College of Physicians (RACP) is responsible for overseeing all aspects of specialist physician training across the two countries. Following advocacy from adolescent physicians, the RACP is advancing a three-tier strategy to build greater specialist capacity and sustain leadership in adolescent and young adult medicine (AYAM). The first tier of the strategy supports universal training in adolescent and young adult health and medicine for all basic trainees in paediatric and adult medicine through an online training resource. The second and third tiers support advanced training in AYAM for specialist practice, based on an advanced training curriculum that has been approved by the RACP. The second tier is dual training; advanced trainees can undertake 2 years training in AYAM and 2 years training in another area of specialist practice. The third tier consists of 3 years of advanced training in AYAM. The RACP is currently seeking formal recognition from the Australian Government to have AYAM accredited, a process that will be subsequently undertaken in New Zealand. The RACP is expectant that the accreditation of specialist AYAM physicians will promote sustained academic and clinical leadership in AYAM to the benefit of future generations of young Australasians.

  5. Synergistic effects of amides from two piper species on generalist and specialist herbivores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Lora A; Dyer, Lee A; Smilanich, Angela M; Dodson, Craig D

    2010-10-01

    Plants use a diverse mix of defenses against herbivores, including multiple secondary metabolites, which often affect herbivores synergistically. Chemical defenses also can affect natural enemies of herbivores via limiting herbivore populations or by affecting herbivore resistance to parasitoids. In this study, we performed feeding experiments to examine the synergistic effects of imides and amides (hereafter "amides") from Piper cenocladum and P. imperiale on specialist (Eois nympha, Geometridae) and generalist (Spodoptera frugiperda, Noctuidae) lepidopteran larvae. Each Piper species has three unique amides, and in each experiment, larvae were fed diets containing different concentrations of single amides or combinations of the three. The amides from P. imperiale had negative synergistic effects on generalist survival and specialist pupal mass, but had no effect on specialist survival. Piper cenocladum amides also acted synergistically to increase mortality caused by parasitoids, and the direct negative effects of mixtures on parasitoid resistance and pupal mass were stronger than indirect effects via changes in growth rate and approximate digestibility. Our results are consistent with plant defense theory that predicts different effects of plant chemistry on generalist versus adapted specialist herbivores. The toxicity of Piper amide mixtures to generalist herbivores are standard bottom-up effects, while specialists experienced the top-down mediated effect of mixtures causing reduced parasitoid resistance and associated decreases in pupal mass.

  6. What they think of us: A study of teaching medical specialists' attitude towards psychiatry in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Suravi; Patro, Binod Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Attitudes of teaching medical specialists are important in shaping medical students' attitudes toward psychiatry. Data on attitudes of teaching medical specialists of India toward psychiatry are limited. The aim was to study the attitude of teaching medical specialists of an academic medical center in East India toward psychiatry. This was a cross-sectional descriptive study. We administered attitude toward psychiatry-30 (ATP 30) scale to teaching medical specialists of the All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Bhubaneswar, based on convenience sampling. Of 104 specialists contacted, 88 returned the completed questionnaire. We carried out descriptive statistical analysis and expressed results in mean and standard deviation. We analyzed the association of demographic characteristics, specialization, and duration of professional experience with total ATP scores using Chi-square test. We used subgroup analysis to compare mean ATP scores in different demographic and professional groups. We used independent t-test and ANOVA for between group comparisons. The response rate was 84.62% with a mean ATP score of 88.60. Female gender and having a family member with mental illness was significantly associated with favorable ATP. Notable findings were that 97% of participants were favorable toward patients with psychiatric illness, 90% felt psychiatric interventions as effective whereas 87% found psychiatry unappealing and 52% said that they would not have liked to be a psychiatrist. While favorable attitudes toward patients with psychiatric illness and psychiatric interventions may mean better patient care; unfavorable attitudes toward psychiatry as a career choice may adversely affect postgraduate recruitment rates.

  7. Host plant invests in growth rather than chemical defense when attacked by a specialist herbivore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arab, Alberto; Trigo, José Roberto

    2011-05-01

    Plant defensive compounds may be a cost rather than a benefit when plants are attacked by specialist insects that may overcome chemical barriers by strategies such as sequestering plant compounds. Plants may respond to specialist herbivores by compensatory growth rather than chemical defense. To explore the use of defensive chemistry vs. compensatory growth we studied Brugmansia suaveolens (Solanaceae) and the specialist larvae of the ithomiine butterfly Placidina euryanassa, which sequester defensive tropane alkaloids (TAs) from this host plant. We investigated whether the concentration of TAs in B. suaveolens was changed by P. euryanassa damage, and whether plants invest in growth, when damaged by the specialist. Larvae feeding during 24 hr significantly decreased TAs in damaged plants, but they returned to control levels after 15 days without damage. Damaged and undamaged plants did not differ significantly in leaf area after 15 days, indicating compensatory growth. Our results suggest that B. suaveolens responds to herbivory by the specialist P. euryanassa by investing in growth rather than chemical defense.

  8. Bleeding Hearts, Profiteers, or Both: Specialist Physician Fees in an Unregulated Market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johar, Meliyanni; Mu, Chunzhou; Van Gool, Kees; Wong, Chun Yee

    2017-04-01

    This study shows that, in an unregulated fee-setting environment, specialist physicians practise price discrimination on the basis of their patients' income status. Our results are consistent with profit maximisation behaviour by specialists. These findings are based on a large population survey that is linked to administrative medical claims records. We find that, for an initial consultation, specialist physicians charge their high-income patients AU$26 more than their low-income patients. While this gap equates to a 19% lower fees for the poorest patients (bottom 25% of the household income distribution), it is unlikely to remove the substantial financial barriers they face in accessing specialist care. There are large variations across specialties, with neurologists exhibiting the largest fee gap between the high-income and low-income patients. Several possible channels for deducing the patient's income are examined. We find that patient characteristics such as age, health concession card status and private health insurance status are all used by specialists as proxies for income status. These characteristics are particularly important to further practise price discrimination among the low-income patients but are less relevant for the high-income patients. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Health and homelessness: weaving a net of care as a specialist practitioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fordham, Maria

    2014-06-01

    Reflective practice was used as a process of self-inquiry and transformation in a PhD study of my specialist role in single and family homelessness. New to homelessness when I embarked on the study, there was little to guide my nursing practice and, notably, there was insufficient research evidence to demonstrate the effectiveness of specialist practice with homeless people. Through my reflexive narrative study, that research gap was addressed. The aim of the narrative was to inform the reader of the reflexive journey and my transformation as a specialist practitioner in homeless health care, and to invite readers to reflect on their own perceptions of homelessness along with the health needs of homeless people. Study findings illuminated the key ethical role that mainstream health professionals, including specialist community public health nurses (SCPHNs), have towards effective engagement to reduce suffering and prevent homeless people and families falling through the net of care. As my research progressed I metaphorically understood the specialist practitioner role as a clinical and strategic 'net-weaver' in a net of care between homeless people, multi-agency partnerships, community and acute health services, and in education.

  10. Impact of the Pharmacy Practice Model Initiative on Clinical Pharmacy Specialist Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobi, Judith; Ray, Shaunta'; Danelich, Ilya; Dodds Ashley, Elizabeth; Eckel, Stephen; Guharoy, Roy; Militello, Michael; O'Donnell, Paul; Sam, Teena; Crist, Stephanie M; Smidt, Danielle

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes the goals of the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists' Pharmacy Practice Model Initiative (PPMI) and its recommendations for health-system pharmacy practice transformation to meet future patient care needs and elevate the role of pharmacists as patient care providers. PPMI envisions a future in which pharmacists have greater responsibility for medication-related outcomes and technicians assume greater responsibility for product-related activities. Although the PPMI recommendations have elevated the level of practice in many settings, they also potentially affect existing clinical pharmacists, in general, and clinical pharmacy specialists, in particular. Moreover, although more consistent patient care can be achieved with an expanded team of pharmacist providers, the role of clinical pharmacy specialists must not be diminished, especially in the care of complex patients and populations. Specialist practitioners with advanced training and credentials must be available to model and train pharmacists in generalist positions, residents, and students. Indeed, specialist practitioners are often the innovators and practice leaders. Negotiation between hospitals and pharmacy schools is needed to ensure a continuing role for academic clinical pharmacists and their contributions as educators and researchers. Lessons can be applied from disciplines such as nursing and medicine, which have developed new models of care involving effective collaboration between generalists and specialists. Several different pharmacy practice models have been described to meet the PPMI goals, based on available personnel and local goals. Studies measuring the impact of these new practice models are needed.

  11. Educational clinical supervision: meeting the needs of specialist community practitioner students and professional practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canham, J

    1998-07-01

    In light of the possible demise of the community practice teacher, this paper proposes that a specific system of educationally led clinical supervision would benefit learning, teaching and assessing in the practice elements of specialist community practitioner education. Such a system would be additional to models of clinical supervision currently utilized in practice. An educative supervisory relationship would foster those skills and attributes essential for specialist community practice, enabling students to move toward mature responsible practice. It would provide experience of supportive frameworks that could be later utilized in professional practice. Clinical supervision specifically tailored for specialist community practitioner education would enable equity across branches and could be delivered in a variety of settings without a supervisor having to be 'on-site', thus benefiting comparatively isolated students in practice nursing and occupational health. To work successfully, educationally led clinical supervision necessitates a joint response by educational institutions and those practices where specialist community students undertake assessed placements. Without such a system in place to support specialist community practitioner courses, the standard of education and future practice cannot be assured.

  12. Mistletoe specialist frugivores: latterday "Johnny Appleseeds" or self‑serving market gardeners?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, David M; Rawsthorne, John

    2013-08-01

    Many plants use birds to disperse their propagules, but mistletoes are especially reliant on their services. As aerial parasites, mistletoe seeds need to be deposited upon branches of suitable hosts, and mistletoe specialist frugivores (from eight different avian families) have long been regarded as their coevolved dispersers. Like the pioneer Johnny 'Appleseed' Chapman who established nurseries that helped open up land for settlement, these birds are considered benevolent dispersers of this keystone resource and often invoked as illustrative examples of mutualistic interactions. We have compared recent research on these specialists with studies of other birds with broader diets (generalists) which also disperse mistletoe seed. Rather than mutualists, we suggest that mistletoe specialist frugivores are better considered exploitative, with multiple lineages evolving independently to capitalize on this reliable, nutritious resource. Although mistletoe specialist frugivores are quantitatively important seed dispersers in some regions, their specialized diet restricts them to areas with high mistletoe densities, resulting in contagious dispersal patterns. By intensifying existing infections, mistletoe specialist frugivores increase their own medium-term food security-akin to market gardeners profiting from intensive cultivation. Exploring the ecological and evolutionary implications of this proposition, we evaluate the consequences of different dispersal patterns on mistletoe fitness and highlight the neglected role of dietary generalists in the stabilization of plant-animal interactions.

  13. Standardization of Qilian Juniper ring-width series in the eastern margin of the Qaidam Basin%柴达木盆地东缘祁连圆柏轮宽序列标准化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐岩; 邵雪梅

    2007-01-01

    Standardization is one of the important procedures in dendroclimatology. We used abundant Qilian juniper (Sabina przewalskii Kom.) tree-ring samples from the eastern margin of the Qaidam Basin to develop a new standardization method, I.e. Total growth curve (TGC).The samples that contained the complete pith and reached to the growing culmination around the 40th-60th year were used to fit TGC, and the generalized negative exponential function was used to fit the curve. Usually, most cores cannot reach the arboreal pith for some reasons and it is difficult to determine the arboreal cambial age. The empirical model of initial radial growth (IRG) was employed to estimate the number of rings missing from the pith by the same data and IRG model explained 90.9% of the variance. When developing the chronology,the cambial ages of cores that contained the complete pith were regarded as beginning from the first year and others were determined by the numbers of missing and included rings in the core. Standardization was accomplished by dividing each tree-ring series by corresponding TGC. The chronologies developed by TGC can retain more low-frequency variational information and TGC helps to develop more reliable tree-ring width chronology.

  14. {delta}{sup 13}C in Tibetan juniper trees - climate trends through the past 1600 years; {delta}{sup 13}C in tibetischen Wacholdern - Klimaentwicklung der letzten 1600 Jahre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmermann, B.

    1998-09-01

    A {delta}{sup 13}C{sub Zell}-chronology of juniper tree cellulose from the upper treeline covering the last 1600 years was set up. The tree site is situated close to Qamdo in southeast Tibet at an altitude of 4350 m a.s.l. The southwest slope gets rain during the Indian summer monsoon. Ten trees have been sampled either by coring or by cutting of trunc-sections in pentad sampling interval. Three trees were analysed in two different radial directions. The very positive {delta}{sup 13}C{sub Zell}-data generally varying around -18,75 permille show the typical low fractionation of high mountain plants. Different interpretations are suggested for data before and after 1800 A.D. (orig.) [Deutsch] An Zellulose von Wacholdern der oberen Waldgrenze in Suedost-Tibet wurde eine 1600-jaehrige {delta}{sup 13}C{sub Zell}-Chronologie aufgestellt. Der Standort liegt in 4350 m ue.M. in der Naehe von Qamdo, ist nach Suedwest geneigt und erhaelt Niederschlaege in den Sommermonaten durch den Indischen-Suedwest-Monsun. Zehn Baeume wurden anhand von Kernen und Stammscheiben in Abschnitten von fuenf Jahren beprobt. An drei Baeumen konnten zwei Segmente desselben Baumes untersucht werden. Die im Mittel sehr positiven {delta}{sup 13}C{sub Zell}-Daten um -18,75 permille deuten auf eine fuer Hochgebirgspflanzen typische geringere Fraktionierung hin. Unterschiedliche Interpretationswege werden fuer die Daten vor und nach 1800 verfolgt. (orig.)

  15. Doctors applying for Danish postgraduate medical specialist training are getting younger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, N. K.; Clausen, L. W.; Qvesel, D.

    2012-01-01

    was to highlight the present characteristics of young doctors who entered specialist training. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Data include 443 doctors who were enrolled in a formalized postgraduate medical training programme in the Region of Southern Denmark from 2009 to 2011. RESULTS: 41% of the recruited young doctors...... were men and 59% were women. The average age for doctors recruited for residency training was 35 years and the average time from graduation to initiation of specialist training (candidate age) was 70 months. If foreign graduates were excluded, the average age was 34 years and average candidate age...... was 58 months. 6% of the recruited doctors had a PhD. 61% of the doctors were graduates from the University of Southern Denmark. 14% graduated from the University of Copenhagen and 12% from Aarhus University. Finally, 13% graduated from a foreign university. CONCLUSION: Applicants accepted for specialist...

  16. Excellence in cost-effective inpatient specialist palliative care in the NHS - a new model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grogan, Eleanor; Paes, Paul; Peel, Tim

    2016-02-01

    There is little in the literature describing hospital specialist palliative care units (PCUs) within the NHS. This paper describes how specialist PCUs can be set up within and be entirely funded by the NHS, and outlines some of the challenges and successes of the units. Having PCUs within hospitals has offered patients increased choice over their place of care and death; perhaps not surprisingly leading to a reduced death rate in the acute hospital. However, since the opening of the PCUs there has also been an increased home death rate. The PCUs are well received by patients, families and other staff within the hospital. We believe they offer a model for excellence in cost-effective inpatient specialist palliative care within the NHS.

  17. The level of specialist assessment of adult asthma is influenced by patient age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porsbjerg, C; Sverrild, A; Stensen, L;

    2014-01-01

    is sparse. AIM: To examine the impact of patient age on the type and proportion of diagnostic tests performed in patients undergoing specialist assessment for asthma. METHODS: Data from a clinical population consisting of all patients consecutively referred over a 12 months period to a specialist clinic...... adults, and were more frequently smokers. However, a regression analysis showed that older age was associated with a lower likelihood of diagnostic assessment with a reversibility test, a bronchial challenge test, or measurement of exhaled NO, independently of a known diagnosis of asthma, smoking habits......BACKGROUND: Late onset asthma is associated with more severe disease and higher morbidity than in younger asthma patients. This may in part relate to under recognition of asthma in older adults, but evidence on the impact of patient age on diagnostic assessment of asthma in a specialist setting...

  18. Specialist nursing framework for New Zealand: a missing link in workforce planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Kathy; Baker, Jacqueline; Lumby, Judy

    2009-11-01

    The current global nursing shortage challenges the provision of a well qualified and sustainable health workforce to meet future population health needs. An identified area of concern for New Zealand reaching health policy targets in chronic conditions management and primary health care is an adequate specialist nurse workforce supply. This article explores the New Zealand context underpinning this concern and contends that effective workforce planning would be supported by the development of a single unified framework for specialist nursing practice in New Zealand. A consistent national framework has the potential to support accurate data collection and enable service providers to identify and plan transparent and transferable pathways for specialist nursing service provision and development. Advanced practice nursing frameworks assist in increasing productivity through building an evidence base about advanced practice, enhancing consistency and equity of expertise; supporting a reduction in role duplication; and enabling succession planning and sustainability.

  19. Medical and psychological support and psycho-physiological examination of extreme activities specialists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Starkov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The essence of medical and psychological support is a continuous monitoring of functional and mental state of specialists and the system of mental health interventions aimed at maintaining the optimal level of occupational performance. The scientific basis of this direction is the idea of an integrated system of professional psychological and physiological adaptation in normal conditions, in condition of pre-pathology and pathology. Psychophysiological (professional and psychological examination of specialists is an integral part of medical and psychological support, and presents a set of measures aimed at in-depth study of individual psychological characteristics of personality and evaluation of the specialists' organism functional reserves in the process of their occupational duties implementation to determine the conformity of their professionally important qualities to the requirements of specific occupational activity.

  20. Development of a Model for Planning Specialist Education of Medical Doctors in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relić, Danko

    2016-01-01

    Development of a model for simulation of the needed number of specialists of different specialties in the Republic of Croatia by the year 2035 based on the expected changes in size and age structure of population and experts' estimates of the needs. The model will be implemented in the form of a computer program based on the estimated most potent predictors. The developed model will be used as a tool for the simulation of different scenarios for specialist education combined with other factors like migration flows, changes in retirement age and skill mixing in order to compare different possibilities and options for the renewal of the Croatian healthcare personnel. Results will enable the development of recommendations for decision making and the adoption of a rational plan of referral to specialist training. Indirectly, developed model will be useful for needs assessment and simulation and planning of workforce renewal of other health professionals and for other countries.

  1. Specialists and Generalists: Equilibrium Skill Acquisition Decisions in Problem-solving Populations

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, Katharine A

    2011-01-01

    Many organizations rely on the skills of innovative individuals to create value, including academic and government institutions, think tanks, and knowledge-based firms. Roughly speaking, workers in these fields can be divided into two categories: specialists, who have a deep knowledge of a single area, and generalists, who have knowledge in a wide variety of areas. In this paper, I examine an individual's choice to be a specialist or generalist. My model addresses two questions: first, under what conditions does it make sense for an individual to acquire skills in multiple areas, and second, are the decisions made by individuals optimal from an organizational perspective? I find that when problems are single-dimensional, and disciplinary boundaries are open, all workers will specialize. However, when there are barriers to working on problems in other fields, then there is a tradeoff between the depth of the specialist and the wider scope of problems the generalist has available. When problems are simple, havi...

  2. Sources of satisfaction and dissatisfaction among specialists within the public and private health sectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashton, Toni; Brown, Paul M.; Sopina, Elizaveta (Liza)

    2013-01-01

    and professional development, key sources of dissatisfaction are workload pressures, mentally demanding work and managerial interference. In the private sector specialists value the opportunity to work independently and apply their own ideas in the workplace. Conclusion Sources of job satisfaction......Aim As in many countries, medical and surgical specialists in New Zealand have the opportunity of working in the public sector, the private sector or both. This study aimed to explore the level and sources of satisfaction and dissatisfaction of specialists in New Zealand with working in the two...... of satisfaction and 9 sources of dissatisfaction according to a 5-point Likert scale. Means and standard deviations were calculated for the total sample, and for procedural and non-procedural specialties. Differences between the means of each source of satisfaction and dissatisfaction were also calculated...

  3. School Library Media Specialist Collaboration with Special Education Personnel in Support of Student Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesley S. J. Farmer

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective – The objective of this study was to identify factors for effective collaboration between school library media specialists and special education personnel in support of student learning.Methods – A review method was used to examine illustrative studies of collaboration.Results – The analysis revealed studies that represented a variety of methodologies: survey, observation, interview, action research, and participatory ethnography. The review identified cross-study factors that facilitate collaboration between school library media specialists and special educators: shared knowledge via cross-training and regular professional interaction, effective communication skills, and effective educational team planning and co-teaching of meaningful learning activities.Conclusion – The study concluded that school library media specialists and special education personnel need to share their knowledge and expertise about the effective use of appropriate resources and services for students with special needs.

  4. Specialists of social work as key subjects in the field of social work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. V. Oresheta

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In the presented article an author is analyze social work as type of professional activity and is carried out the sociological analysis of specialists of social work as key subjects in the field of social work. As social work is important direction of activity in any state, it methodological bases, key tasks and main principles though are something alike, however differ depending on legal, organizational, financial possibilities of the state and necessities of clients. Specialists of social work provide realization of social work on national, regional and local levels on enterprises, in establishments, organizations of different pattern of ownership. Professional activity of specialists of social work in Ukraine must correspond the basic requirements and tasks, to certain in Order of Ministry of social policy of Ukraine from 25.05.2012 year «About assertion of new release of qualifying description of profession «Specialist on social work»». In the article is also analyses the short history and features of social work as the type of professional activity in Ukraine, professional requirements to the specialists of social work, their task, role and function are specified. It is set that a necessary condition for a capture this profession is social orientation of personality, presence of the proper social qualities, such as: humanism, goodwill, justice, to responsibility and others. One of entrance terms of efficiency of social work is the presence of skilled shots of the proper level. A considerable value for successful professionalism has an orientation of specialist of social work which plugs the system of values and motivation of him to activity. For a social worker as the professional an important place is occupied by the awareness of itself by the subject of professional activity, that is professional identity.

  5. Managing patients with heart failure: a qualitative study of multidisciplinary teams with specialist heart failure nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glogowska, Margaret; Simmonds, Rosemary; McLachlan, Sarah; Cramer, Helen; Sanders, Tom; Johnson, Rachel; Kadam, Umesh T; Lasserson, Daniel S; Purdy, Sarah

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions and experiences of health care clinicians working in multidisciplinary teams that include specialist heart failure nurses when caring for the management of heart failure patients. We used a qualitative in-depth interview study nested in a broader ethnographic study of unplanned admissions in heart failure patients (HoldFAST). We interviewed 24 clinicians across primary, secondary, and community care in 3 locations in the Midlands, South Central, and South West of England. Within a framework of the role and contribution of the heart failure specialist nurse, our study identified 2 thematic areas that the clinicians agreed still represent particular challenges when working with heart failure patients. The first was communication with patients, in particular explaining the diagnosis and helping patients to understand the condition. The participants recognized that such communication was most effective when they had a long-term relationship with patients and families and that the specialist nurse played an important part in achieving this relationship. The second was communication within the team. Multidisciplinary input was especially needed because of the complexity of many patients and issues around medications, and the participants believed the specialist nurse may facilitate team communication. The study highlights the role of specialist heart failure nurses in delivering education tailored to patients and facilitating better liaison among all clinicians, particularly when dealing with the management of comorbidities and drug regimens. The way in which specialist nurses were able to be caseworkers for their patients was perceived as a method of ensuring coordination and continuity of care. © 2015 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  6. The professional training of future specialists for Industry of hospitality in the United States of America.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vindyk A.V.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of the USA's scientists publications on the professional training of specialists of hospitality is presented. The couteuts of curricula of Conrad Hilton's college, University Johnson and Wales has been analyzed. It is found out that the feature of training future specialists for Industry of hospitality consists in close connection with a society, enterprises. The associations of hotels take part in the discussion, adjustments of curricula, quality determination of training of graduating students, giving grants to higher educational establishments of hospitality.

  7. [Osteoarthritis, disability, travel and recreational activities: comments from physicians and travel specialists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solignac, Marie

    2004-05-22

    IMPACT OF DISABILITY: A survey of general practitioners, rheumatology specialists, and tourism specialists conducted by NEGMA-LERADS Laboratories demonstrated that subjects with osteoarthritis avoid vacation trips more readily than recreational activities. VACATION TRIPS ARE STILL POSSIBLE: Certain tourism organisms have nevertheless developed specialized services for disabled persons. Special emphasis is placed on adequate preparation before the vacation trip. PROBLEMS WITH WALKING: Many persons disabled by osteoarthritis do not require a wheel chair, yet have difficulty walking long distances. It is important to recognize the specific disabilities related to osteoarthritis and their effects on grip force and/or ambulation.

  8. STS-47 Payload Specialist Mohri holds sample syringe during SLJ experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    STS-47 Payload Specialist Mamoru Mohri holds sample syringe while conducting Studies on the Effects of Microgravity on the Ultrastructure and Function of Cultured Mammalian Cells (KIDNEY CELLS). Mohri, wearing a lightweight headset, works inside the Spacelab Japan (SLJ) science module aboard Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105. In the background are the NASDA Material Sciences Rack 10 with field sequential (FS) crew cabin camera attached and the SLJ end cone with a banner from Auburn University and portraits of the backup payload specialists. Mohri represents Japan's National Space Development Agency (NASDA).

  9. Evolution of robotics in surgery and implementing a perioperative robotics nurse specialist role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Paula

    2006-03-01

    Use of robotics is expanding rapidly in the medical arena. Not only are a growing number of facilities purchasing robotic systems, but the number of surgeons using them also is increasing, which creates many challenges (eg, cost, training, safety). The evolution of robotics in surgery is presented within the context of virtual reality, telepresence, telemanipulation, and passive (ie, master-slave) robotic surgical systems. A new perioperative nursing role, the robotics nurse specialist, was developed and implemented at one facility. The need for a robotics nurse specialist and how this role can help the entire surgical team promote positive patient and facility outcomes also is discussed.

  10. The field of competence of the specialist in physical and rehabilitation medicine (PRM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutenbrunner, C; Lemoine, F; Yelnik, A; Joseph, P-A; de Korvin, G; Neumann, V; Delarque, A

    2011-07-01

    The Field of Competence (FOC) of specialists in Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (PRM) in Europe follows uniform basic principles described in the White Book of PRM in Europe. An agreed basis of the field of competence is the European Board curriculum for the PRM-specialist certification. However, due to national traditions, different health systems and other factors, PRM practice varies between regions and countries in Europe. Even within a country the professional practice of the individual doctor may vary because of the specific setting he or she is working in. For that reason this paper aims at a comprehensive description of the FOC in PRM. PRM specialists deal with/intervene in a wide range of diseases and functional deficits. Their interventions include, prevention of diseases and their complications, diagnosis of diseases, functional assessment, information and education of patients, families and professionals, treatments (physical modalities, drugs and other interventions). PRM interventions are often organized within PRM programmes of care. PRM interventions benefit from the involvement of PRM specialists in research. PRM specialists have knowledge of the rehabilitation process, team working, medical and physical treatments, rehabilitation technology, prevention and management of complications and methodology of research in the field. PRM specialists are involved in reducing functional consequences of many health conditions and manage functioning and disability in the respective patients. Diagnostic skills include all dimensions of body functions and structures, activities and participation issues relevant for the rehabilitation process. Additionally relevant contextual factors are assessed. PRM interventions range from medication, physical treatments, psychosocial interventions and rehabilitation technology. As PRM is based on the principles of evidence-based medicine PRM specialist are involved in research too. Quality management programs for PRM

  11. THE ROLE AND PLACE OF INFORMATION PROTECTION IN THE PROGRAM OF TRAINING OF IT-SPECIALISTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey I. Volkov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the importance of issues related to the protection of information in the preparation of modern information technology specialists. Notes the importance of studying IT-specialists of this perspective and the need for an integrated approach to the selection and/or development of information security systems. Define the content of training programs on information security, as well as the amount of knowledge in the field of mathematics and information technologies needed for the development of this program. Formulated requirements to the results of development of the program and noted the need to include the protection of information in coursework and final qualifying work.

  12. Teaching Electronic Literacy A Concepts-Based Approach for School Library Media Specialists

    CERN Document Server

    Craver, Kathleen W

    1997-01-01

    School library media specialists will find this concepts-based approach to teaching electronic literacy an indispensable basic tool for instructing students and teachers. It provides step-by-step instruction on how to find and evaluate needed information from electronic databases and the Internet, how to formulate successful electronic search strategies and retrieve relevant results, and how to interpret and critically analyze search results. The chapters contain a suggested lesson plan and sample assignments for the school library media specialist to use in teaching electronic literacy skills

  13. Topicality of ischemic heart disease prophylaxis in specialists of medical-social expertise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krovyakova Е.А.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Realization of professional duties for specialist of medical-social expertise is accompanied with high intellectual and emotional obligations. Daily extreme and psychogenic situations lead to psychological and occupational maladjustment of physicians, development of anxiety and depression among them, which can be exacerbated by the presence of alexithymia. Negative psycho-emotional factors increase the risk of coronary heart disease. In order to prevent this pathology development in specialists of medical-social expertise, identification of changes in their psycho-emotional sphere and personified correction of revealed disorders are necessary

  14. The experience of specialist inpatient treatment for anorexia nervosa: A qualitative study from adult patients' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Vivien; Chouliara, Zoe; Morris, Paul G; Collin, Paula; Power, Kevin; Yellowlees, Alex; Grierson, David; Papageorgiou, Elena; Cook, Moira

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative study aimed to explore experiences of women currently undergoing specialist inpatient treatment for anorexia nervosa. Interviews were carried out with 21 women with a diagnosis of anorexia nervosa from a specialist adult inpatient eating disorder unit. Five master themes emerged using thematic analysis: (1) shifts in control, (2) experience of transition, (3) importance of supportive staff relationships, (4) sharing with peers and (5) process of recovery and self-discovery. Findings suggest that patients experience a process of change and adjustment in relation to levels of perceived personal control, attachment to the treatment environment and a sense of self-identity.

  15. Exploring the leadership role of the clinical nurse specialist on an inpatient palliative care consulting team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stilos, Kalli; Daines, Pat

    2013-03-01

    Demand for palliative care services in Canada will increase owing to an aging population and the evolving role of palliative care in non-malignant illness. Increasing healthcare demands continue to shape the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) role, especially in the area of palliative care. Clinical nurse specialists bring specialized knowledge, skills and leadership to the clinical setting to enhance patient and family care. This paper highlights the clinical leadership role of the CNS as triage leader for a hospital-based palliative care consulting team. Changes to the team's referral and triage processes are emphasized as key improvements to team efficiency and timely access to care for patients and families.

  16. THE PREPARATION OF A SPECIALIST IN NETWORKING CULTURAL-EDUCATIONAL SPACE OF UNIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zinaida Kekeeva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with specialist preparation problems in networking cultural-educational space of the University. The authors consider the role of networking technologies in quality improvement of educational services in the conditions of the international cooperation. They also substantiate the process of entering the future experts in the working environment, the formation of their professional and personal competencies. The article reveals priority areas of training new generation specialists in the cultural and educational space of the university taking into account modern educational trends in the world.

  17. CONSIDERATIONS CONCERNING THE ROLE OF THE MARKETING SPECIALIST IN THE TOURISM ORGANISATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CLAUDIA-NICOLETA DOBRESCU

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper intends to point out the role and importance of the marketing specialist in tourism organisations, the human resources working in the marketing department/compartment. At the basis of this efficient development tool there are the very activities describing the specific actions, namely the specific occupational standard, by which quality criteria are set in order to reach the qualitative results expected in a professional activity. The development of an accurate job description (based on specific activities, combined with the efficient delivery of activities highlights the special role of the marketing specialist in developing and promoting the tourism organisation.

  18. Transition from specialist to primary diabetes care: A qualitative study of perspectives of primary care physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liddy Clare

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The growing prevalence of diabetes and heightened awareness of the benefits of early and intensive disease management have increased service demands and expectations not only of primary care physicians but also of diabetes specialists. While research has addressed issues related to referral into specialist care, much less has been published about the transition from diabetes specialists back to primary care. Understanding the concerns of family physicians related to discharge of diabetes care from specialist centers can support the development of strategies that facilitate this transition and result in broader access to limited specialist services. This study was undertaken to explore primary care physician (PCP perspectives and concerns related to reassuming responsibility for diabetes care after referral to a specialized diabetes center. Methods Qualitative data were collected through three focus groups. Sessions were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. Data were coded and sorted with themes identified using a constant comparison method. The study was undertaken through the regional academic referral center for adult diabetes care in Ottawa, Canada. Participants included 22 primary care physicians representing a variety of referral frequencies, practice types and settings. Results Participants described facilitators and barriers to successful transition of diabetes care at the provider, patient and systems level. Major facilitators included clear communication of a detailed, structured plan of care, ongoing access to specialist services for advice or re-referral, continuing education and mentoring for PCPs. Identified provider barriers were gaps in PCP knowledge and confidence related to diabetes treatment, excessive workload and competing time demands. Systems deterrents included reimbursement policies for health professionals and inadequate funding for diabetes medications and supplies. At the PCP-patient interface

  19. STS-55 MS3 Harris draws blood sample from Payload Specialist Schlegel

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    STS-55 German Payload Specialist 2 Hans Schlegel (left) serves as a test subject inside the Spacelab Deutsche 2 (SL-D2) science module onboard the Earth-orbiting Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102. Mission Specialist 3 (MS3) Bernard A. Harris, Jr, a physician, performs one of many blood draws designed to help investigate human physiology under microgravity conditions. The two crewmembers use intravehicular activity (IVA) foot restraints (foot loops) in front of Rack 10, a stowage rack, to steady themselves during the procedure. Schlegel represents the German Aerospace Research Establishment (DLR).

  20. The primary care provider (PCP)-cancer specialist relationship: A systematic review and mixed-methods meta-synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dossett, Lesly A; Hudson, Janella N; Morris, Arden M; Lee, M Catherine; Roetzheim, Richard G; Fetters, Michael D; Quinn, Gwendolyn P

    2017-03-01

    Although they are critical to models of coordinated care, the relationship and communication between primary care providers (PCPs) and cancer specialists throughout the cancer continuum are poorly understood. By using predefined search terms, the authors conducted a systematic review of the literature in 3 databases to examine the relationship and communication between PCPs and cancer specialists. Among 301 articles identified, 35 met all inclusion criteria and were reviewed in-depth. Findings from qualitative, quantitative, and disaggregated mixed-methods studies were integrated using meta-synthesis. Six themes were identified and incorporated into a preliminary conceptual model of the PCP-cancer specialist relationship: 1) poor and delayed communication between PCPs and cancer specialists, 2) cancer specialists' endorsement of a specialist-based model of care, 3) PCPs' belief that they play an important role in the cancer continuum, 4) PCPs' willingness to participate in the cancer continuum, 5) cancer specialists' and PCPs' uncertainty regarding the PCP's oncology knowledge/experience, and 6) discrepancies between PCPs and cancer specialists regarding roles. These data indicate a pervasive need for improved communication, delineation, and coordination of responsibilities between PCPs and cancer specialists. Future interventions aimed at these deficiencies may improve patient and physician satisfaction and cancer care coordination. CA Cancer J Clin 2017;67:156-169. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  1. Integration of early specialist palliative care in cancer care and patient related outcomes: A critical review of evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Salins

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: In adult oncology, there is evidence to suggest early specialist palliative care improves HRQOL, mood, treatment decision-making, health care utilization, advanced care planning, patient satisfaction, and end-of-life care. There is moderate evidence to support the role of early specialist palliative care intervention in improvement of symptoms, survival, and health-related communication. There is limited evidence at present to support role of early specialist palliative care interventions in pediatric and geriatric oncology. Qualitative studies on barriers and negative patient outcomes may provide useful insights toward restructuring early specialist palliative care interventions.

  2. A descriptive study of employment patterns and work environment outcomes of specialist nurses in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, Diane; Duffield, Christine; Rizk, Paul; Nahm, Sang; Chu, Charlene H

    2014-01-01

    The purpose was to describe the number, demographic characteristics, work patterns, exit rates, and work perceptions of nurses in Ontario, Canada, in 4 specialty classifications: advanced practice nurse (APN)-clinical nurse specialist (CNS), APN-other, primary healthcare nurse practitioner [RN(extended class [EC])], and registered nurse (RN) with specialty certification. The objectives were to (1) describe how many qualified nurses are available by specialty class; (2) create a demographic profile of specialist nurses; (3) determine the proportions of specialist and nonspecialist nurses who leave (a) direct patient care and (b) nursing practice annually; (4) determine whether specialist and nonspecialist nurses differ in their self-ratings of work environment, job satisfaction, and intention to remain in nursing. Employment patterns refer to nurses' employment status (eg, full-time, part-time, casual), work duration (ie, length of employment in nurses and in current role), and work transitions (ie, movement in and out of the nursing workforce, and movement out of current role). A longitudinal analysis of the Ontario nurses' registration database from 2005 to 2010 and a survey of specialist nurses in Canada was conducted. The setting was Canada. The database sample consisted of 3 specialist groups, consisting of RN(EC), CNS, and APN-other, as well as 1 nonspecialist RN staff nurse group. The survey sample involved 359 nurses who were classified into groups based on self-reported job title and RN specialty-certification status. Data sources included College of Nurses of Ontario registration database and survey data. The study measures were the Nursing Work Index, a 4-item measure of job satisfaction, and 1-item measure of intent to leave current job. Nurses registered with the College of Nurses of Ontario were tracked over the study period to identify changes in their employment status with comparisons made between nurses employed in specialist roles and those

  3. STS-34 Mission Specialist (MS) Chang-Diaz dons EMU during WETF exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    STS-34 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, Mission Specialist (MS) Franklin R. Chang-Diaz dons extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) in preparation for an extravehicular activity (EVA) contingency exercise in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29 pool. This closeup shows Chang-Diaz straightening his EMU sleeve.

  4. Specialist Advocacy Services for Parents with Learning Disabilities Involved in Child Protection Proceedings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarleton, Beth

    2008-01-01

    Parents with learning disabilities frequently become involved with child protection and judicial proceedings. Parents report not understanding and being disempowered by the child protection system. This paper presents fourteen parents' views regarding how two specialist advocacy services supported them during child protection. The parents believed…

  5. International Federation for Emergency Medicine model curriculum for emergency medicine specialists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherri Hobgood

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available To meet a critical and growing need for emergency physicians and emergency medicine resources worldwide, physicians must be trained to deliver time-sensitive interventions and lifesaving emergency care. Currently, there is no globally recognized, standard curriculum that defines the basic minimum standards for specialist trainees in emergency medicine. To address this deficit, the International Federation for Emergency Medicine (IFEM convened a committee of international physicians, health professionals, and other experts in emergency medicine and international emergency medicine development to outline a curriculum for training of specialists in emergency medicine. This curriculum document represents the consensus of recommendations by this committee. The curriculum is designed to provide a framework for educational programs in emergency medicine. The focus is on the basic minimum emergency medicine educational content that any emergency medicine physician specialist should be prepared to deliver on completion of a training program. It is designed not to be prescriptive but to assist educators and emergency medicine leadership to advance physician education in basic emergency medicine no matter the training venue. The content of this curriculum is relevant not just for communities with mature emergency medicine systems but in particular for developing nations or for nations seeking to expand emergency medicine within the current educational structure. We anticipate that there will be wide variability in how this curriculum is implemented and taught. This variability will reflect the existing educational milieu, the resources available, and the goals of the institutions’ educational leadership with regard to the training of emergency medicine specialists.

  6. The consent process in interventional radiology: the role of specialist nurses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, L.; Laasch, H.-U.; Wilbraham, L.; Marriott, A.; England, R.E.; Martin, D.F. E-mail: derrick.martin@smtr.nhs.uk

    2004-03-01

    AIMS: To evaluate the impact of patient education by specialist nurses on patients' understanding of interventional procedures, their anxiety levels and satisfaction with the given information. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sixty patients attending the radiology department for gastrointestinal interventional procedures were interviewed. Patients were assessed using a combination of categorical and visual analogue scales. Parameters were assessed on admission and after additional information had been given by specialist nurses. After the procedure patients were asked to rate the quality of information given and their overall satisfaction. RESULTS: Four of the 60 patients were excluded due to a Mini Mental Test score of <7. Only 35 (62.5%) claimed to have been given information by the referring consultant. Fifty-three patients received additional information before formally giving consent, 50 (96.2%) from the specialist nurses. Patient anxiety before and after information did not significantly change (p=0.52), but there was significant improvement in levels of satisfaction (p=0.001) and perceived understanding (p<0.001). Patients rated overall quality of information at an average of 9.2/10 and overall satisfaction was high (median=9.1/10). CONCLUSION: The use of specialist nurses to educate patients greatly increases patient understanding. The process of informed consent is improved and patient satisfaction is increased.

  7. Apprentice Heating Systems Specialist, 11-1. Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This military-developed text consists of four volumes of materials for use by those studying to become apprentice heating system specialists. Covered in the individual volumes are the following topics: related subjects (basic electricity, electrical controls, pipe and copper tubing, the principles of heating, fuels, and fuel systems); heating…

  8. 22 CFR 41.54 - Intracompany transferees (executives, managers, and specialists).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Intracompany transferees (executives, managers, and specialists). 41.54 Section 41.54 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE VISAS VISAS: DOCUMENTATION OF NONIMMIGRANTS UNDER THE IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT, AS AMENDED Business and Media Visas §...

  9. Maintaining professionalism in today's business environment: ethical challenges for the pain medicine specialist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebovits, Allen

    2012-09-01

    There are many external influences in today's market force that impair the relationship between the pain medicine specialist and the patient, and ultimately prevent optimal quality of care. This article explores the ethical challenges facing the pain medicine specialist in today's increasingly "business" environment and will offer solutions for maintaining the professionalism of pain medicine. Four commonly encountered bioethical principles in the practice of pain medicine are reviewed: beneficence, nonmaleficence, justice, and autonomy. The following ethical challenges of the pain medicine specialist are reviewed: practicing outside ones specialty area, practice characteristics, the consultant role, the economic lure of aggressive intervention, not evaluating for and treating comorbid psychopathology, reimbursement pressures, workers' compensation, and use of unproven methods. Solutions offered include collegial associations, social responsibility, legislative initiatives, pain education, interdisciplinary evaluation and treatment, improved relationships with third-party payers, reduced racial disparities, and ethics education. Ethics is the "roadmap" that enables the pain medicine specialist to navigate the increasingly murky waters of practicing pain management today by maintaining the professionalism necessary to combat today's "business" pressures. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Lubrication Specialist: Task List and Competency Record. Developed for Vocational-Technical Curriculum Articulation in Minnesota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnesota State Dept. of Education, St. Paul. Div. of Vocational and Technical Education.

    Intended for the vocational instructor, the booklet presents a task list and competency record for the occupational program of lubrication specialist. The list was developed by a working committee of auto mechanics instructors and industry representatives throughout the state of Minnesota for use in program articulation between secondary and…

  11. E-consulting in a medical specialist setting: Medicine of the future?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandbelt, Linda C; de Kanter, Froukje E C; Ubbink, Dirk T

    2016-05-01

    Today's technology provides new ways of consulting between patients and medical specialists in health care, such as videoconferencing and web-messaging. In this systematic review we assessed the effects of e-consulting between medical specialists and patients. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Psychlit and Cochrane Library for randomized clinical trials assessing the use of e-consulting methods (videoconferencing (VC) or web-messaging (WM)), as compared to conventional care (face-to-face (FF) or telephone consultations (TC)) in a medical specialist setting. We extracted patient-related, physician-related, cost, time and follow-up outcomes. We included 21 trials, of which 17 addressed VC compared to FF, two compared WM with FF, one VC with TC, and one WM with TC. Physicians appeared to prefer face-to-face consultations over videoconferencing. Patients appeared to be as satisfied with videoconferencing as with face-to-face contacts, but preferred videoconferencing and web-messaging over telephone consultations. Videoconferencing was more expensive regarding equipment, but saved patient-related costs in terms of time, transportation, and missed work. Variable results were found for consult time and follow-up visits. We cautiously conclude that e-consulting seems a feasible alternative to medical specialists' face-to-face follow-up or telephone appointments, but may be less suitable for initial consultations requiring physical examination. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluation, Support and Promotion of Specialists' Competitiveness Development in Modern Enterprise as Learning Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katane, Irena; Kristovska, Ineta; Vjatere, Gita; Katans, Edgars

    2015-01-01

    The process of globalization and the changeability of environment nowadays demand that society ensure sustainability for itself and its lifewide environment. Therefore nowadays the paradigm of personality's and specialist's competitiveness is changing. The old paradigm is substituted by a set of new viewpoints and concepts. The issue of ensuring…

  13. Teaching Online Searching: A Review of Recent Research and Some Recommendations for School Media Specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancall, Jacqueline C.

    1985-01-01

    Reviews findings of formal studies and experiential accounts of teaching online searching and, on basis of past research, recommends guidelines for school media specialists designing curriculum for instruction in online searching. Five types of online training are noted: vendor, database producer, course-based, self-instruction, locally designed…

  14. Evolutionary rescue and the coexistence of generalist and specialist competitors: an experimental test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bono, Lisa M; Gensel, Catharine L; Pfennig, David W; Burch, Christina L

    2015-12-22

    Competition for resources is thought to play a critical role in both the origins and maintenance of biodiversity. Although numerous laboratory evolution experiments have confirmed that competition can be a key driver of adaptive diversification, few have demonstrated its role in the maintenance of the resulting diversity. We investigate the conditions that favour the origin and maintenance of alternative generalist and specialist resource-use phenotypes within the same population. Previously, we confirmed that competition for hosts among φ6 bacteriophage in a mixed novel (non-permissive) and ancestral (permissive) host microcosm triggered the evolution of a generalist phenotype capable of infecting both hosts. However, because the newly evolved generalists tended to competitively exclude the ancestral specialists, coexistence between the two phenotypes was rare. Here, we show that reducing the relative abundance of the novel host slowed the increase in frequency of the generalist phenotype, allowing sufficient time for the specialist to further adapt to the ancestral host. This adaptation resulted in 'evolutionary rescue' of the specialists, preventing their competitive exclusion by the generalists. Thus, our results suggest that competition promotes both the origin and maintenance of biodiversity when it is strong enough to favour a novel resource-use phenotype, but weak enough to allow adaptation of both the novel and ancestral phenotypes to their respective niches.

  15. Media Skills for Middle Schools Strategies for Library Media Specialists and Teachers

    CERN Document Server

    Van Vliet, Lucille W

    1999-01-01

    These practical and useful lesson plans promote teaching information and computer skills as an integral part of the middle school curriculum. Emphasizing the vital role shared by media specialists, teachers, and administrators in connecting students to the Information Superhighway, this new edition contains current goals, terminology, learning strategies, and resources that encompass the Information Age.

  16. Forming Social Partnership Policy in Vocational Training of Service Sector Specialists in Germany and Austria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kredenets Nadiya

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the problem of forming social partnership policy in vocational training of service sector specialists in Germany and Austria. The foreign and domestic pedagogical experience in establishing an effective system of social partnership in vocational education has been analyzed. The author has considered main factors of social partnership development in vocational education that influence the forming of normative and legal support; a multilevel structure of government management, powers of employers and trade unions, regional economic development authorities of local government (industrial, commercial, trade, agricultural units, professional orientation of future specialists vocational education institutions and enterprises where specialists are trained; continuous monitoring of labour market needs and dynamic response to its changes; mechanisms of multivariate and multilevel approach to vocational education funding. Based on the analysis of scientific and reference sources the author has concluded that the main feature of vocational education in Germany and Austria is the participation of social partners who make common decisions and bear responsibility for normative and legal support; a multilevel management structure; monitoring of labour market needs and dynamic response to its changes; an optimal combination of theoretical and practical vocational training of future specialists.

  17. Auditing GPs' prescribing habits : Cardiovascular prescribing frequently continues medication initiated by specialists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, C.S; van Diepen, N.M; de Jong-van den Berg, L T W

    Objective: To determine to what extent general practitioners' (GPs) prescribing behaviour is a result of repeat prescribing of medication which has been initiated by specialists. Method: During a 4-week period, pharmacists identified GPs' prescriptions for a large group of cardiovascular drugs.

  18. Professional Motivation Formation of Future Specialists under the Conditions of Regional Educational Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargina, Elena Mikhaylovna

    2015-01-01

    Motivation plays the leading role in the organization of the personality structure. It is a driving force of the activity. Motivation accounts for the behavior and activity and has a great impact on professional self-determination and person's satisfaction with the work. The problem of professional motivation formation of a future specialist is…

  19. The Life and Professional Prospects of Future Specialists of Agricultural Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khovalyg, N.; Kendivan, O.

    2006-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a survey examining the social and psychological characteristics of future specialists of agriculture who were enrolled as students in Tuva State University. The study was carried out by the Tuva State Institute for Cadre Retraining and Upgrading of Qualifications under the Government of the Republic of Tuva.…

  20. Genetic differentiation across North America in the generalist moth Heliothis virescens and the specialist H. subflexa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, A.T.; Classen, A.; Inglis, O.; Blanco, C.A.; López Jr., J.; Vargas, A.T.; Schal, C.; Heckel, D.G.; Schöfl, G.

    2011-01-01

    The two moth species Heliothis virescens (Hv) and H. subflexa (Hs) are closely related, but have vastly different feeding habits. Hv is a generalist and an important pest in many crops in the USA, while Hs is a specialist feeding only on plants in the genus Physalis. In this study, we conducted a co