WorldWideScience

Sample records for juniper specialist neotoma

  1. Mammalian species - Neotoma magister

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven B. Castleberry; Michael T. Mengak; W. Mark Ford

    2006-01-01

    External morphology of N. magister (Fig. 1) is similar to that of N. floridana, the only parapatric Neotoma. Although N. magister generally is larger in mass and with longer vibrissae, identification based on single measurements is unreliable because of morphometric overlap (Ray 2000)....

  2. The Neotoma Paleoecology Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, E. C.; Ashworth, A. C.; Barnosky, A. D.; Betancourt, J. L.; Bills, B.; Booth, R.; Blois, J.; Charles, D. F.; Graham, R. W.; Goring, S. J.; Hausmann, S.; Smith, A. J.; Williams, J. W.; Buckland, P.

    2015-12-01

    The Neotoma Paleoecology Database (www.neotomadb.org) is a multiproxy, open-access, relational database that includes fossil data for the past 5 million years (the late Neogene and Quaternary Periods). Modern distributional data for various organisms are also being made available for calibration and paleoecological analyses. The project is a collaborative effort among individuals from more than 20 institutions worldwide, including domain scientists representing a spectrum of Pliocene-Quaternary fossil data types, as well as experts in information technology. Working groups are active for diatoms, insects, ostracodes, pollen and plant macroscopic remains, testate amoebae, rodent middens, vertebrates, age models, geochemistry and taphonomy. Groups are also active in developing online tools for data analyses and for developing modules for teaching at different levels. A key design concept of NeotomaDB is that stewards for various data types are able to remotely upload and manage data. Cooperatives for different kinds of paleo data, or from different regions, can appoint their own stewards. Over the past year, much progress has been made on development of the steward software-interface that will enable this capability. The steward interface uses web services that provide access to the database. More generally, these web services enable remote programmatic access to the database, which both desktop and web applications can use and which provide real-time access to the most current data. Use of these services can alleviate the need to download the entire database, which can be out-of-date as soon as new data are entered. In general, the Neotoma web services deliver data either from an entire table or from the results of a view. Upon request, new web services can be quickly generated. Future developments will likely expand the spatial and temporal dimensions of the database. NeotomaDB is open to receiving new datasets and stewards from the global Quaternary community

  3. The draft genome sequence and annotation of the desert woodrat Neotoma lepida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Campbell

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We present the de novo draft genome sequence for a vertebrate mammalian herbivore, the desert woodrat (Neotoma lepida. This species is of ecological and evolutionary interest with respect to ingestion, microbial detoxification and hepatic metabolism of toxic plant secondary compounds from the highly toxic creosote bush (Larrea tridentata and the juniper shrub (Juniperus monosperma. The draft genome sequence and annotation have been deposited at GenBank under the accession LZPO01000000.

  4. Brucella neotomae Infection in Humans, Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Esquivel, Marcela; Ruiz-Villalobos, Nazareth; Jiménez-Rojas, César; Barquero-Calvo, Elías; Chacón-Díaz, Carlos; Víquez-Ruiz, Eunice; Rojas-Campos, Norman; Baker, Kate S; Oviedo-Sánchez, Gerardo; Amuy, Ernesto; Chaves-Olarte, Esteban; Thomson, Nicholas R; Moreno, Edgardo; Guzmán-Verri, Caterina

    2017-06-01

    Several species of Brucella are known to be zoonotic, but B. neotomae infection has been thought to be limited to wood rats. In 2008 and 2011, however, B. neotomae was isolated from cerebrospinal fluid of 2 men with neurobrucellosis. The nonzoonotic status of B. neotomae should be reassessed.

  5. The Neotoma Paleoecology Database: An International Community-Curated Resource for Paleoecological and Paleoenvironmental Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J. W.; Grimm, E. C.; Ashworth, A. C.; Blois, J.; Charles, D. F.; Crawford, S.; Davis, E.; Goring, S. J.; Graham, R. W.; Miller, D. A.; Smith, A. J.; Stryker, M.; Uhen, M. D.

    2017-12-01

    The Neotoma Paleoecology Database supports global change research at the intersection of geology and ecology by providing a high-quality, community-curated data repository for paleoecological data. These data are widely used to study biological responses and feedbacks to past environmental change at local to global scales. The Neotoma data model is flexible and can store multiple kinds of fossil, biogeochemical, or physical variables measured from sedimentary archives. Data additions to Neotoma are growing and include >3.5 million observations, >16,000 datasets, and >8,500 sites. Dataset types include fossil pollen, vertebrates, diatoms, ostracodes, macroinvertebrates, plant macrofossils, insects, testate amoebae, geochronological data, and the recently added organic biomarkers, stable isotopes, and specimen-level data. Neotoma data can be found and retrieved in multiple ways, including the Explorer map-based interface, a RESTful Application Programming Interface, the neotoma R package, and digital object identifiers. Neotoma has partnered with the Paleobiology Database to produce a common data portal for paleobiological data, called the Earth Life Consortium. A new embargo management is designed to allow investigators to put their data into Neotoma and then make use of Neotoma's value-added services. Neotoma's distributed scientific governance model is flexible and scalable, with many open pathways for welcoming new members, data contributors, stewards, and research communities. As the volume and variety of scientific data grow, community-curated data resources such as Neotoma have become foundational infrastructure for big data science.

  6. Pinyon-juniper woodlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottfried, Gerald J.; Swetnam, Thomas W.; Allen, Craig D.; Betancourt, Julio L.; Chung-MacCoubrey, Alice L.; Finch, Deborah M.; Tainter, Joseph A.

    1995-01-01

    Pinyon-juniper woodlands are one of the largest ecosystems in the Southwest and in the Middle Rio Grande Basin (Fig. 1). The woodlands have been important to the region's inhabitants since prehistoric times for a variety of natural resources and amenities. The ecosystems have not been static; their distributions, stand characteristics, and site conditions have been altered by changes in climatic patterns and human use and, often, abuse. Management of these lands since European settlement has varied from light exploitation and benign neglect, to attempts to remove the trees in favor of forage for livestock, and then to a realization that these lands contain useful resources and should be managed accordingly. Land management agencies are committed to ecosystem management. While there are several definitions of ecosystem management, the goal is to use ecological approaches to create and maintain diverse, productive, and healthy ecosystems (Kaufmann et al. 1994). Ecosystem management recognizes that people are an integral part of the system and that their needs must be considered. Ecological approaches are central to the concept, but our understanding of basic woodland ecology is incomplete, and there are different opinions and interpretations of existing information (Gottfried and Severson 1993). There are many questions concerning proper ecosystem management of the pinyon-juniper woodlands and how managers can achieve these goals (Gottfried and Severson 1993). While the broad concept of ecosystem management generally is accepted, the USDA Forest Service, other public land management agencies, American Indian tribes, and private landowners may have differing definitions of what constitutes desired conditions. Key questions about the pinyon-juniper ecosystems remain unanswered. Some concern the basic dynamics of biological and physical components of the pinyon-juniper ecosystems. Others concern the distribution of woodlands prior to European settlement and changes

  7. Promotion and Rescue of Intracellular Brucella neotomae Replication during Coinfection with Legionella pneumophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yoon-Suk; Kirby, James E

    2017-05-01

    We established a new Brucella neotomae in vitro model system for study of type IV secretion system-dependent (T4SS) pathogenesis in the Brucella genus. Importantly, B. neotomae is a rodent pathogen, and unlike B. abortus , B. melitensis , and B. suis , B. neotomae has not been observed to infect humans. It therefore can be handled more facilely using biosafety level 2 practices. More particularly, using a series of novel fluorescent protein and lux operon reporter systems to differentially label pathogens and track intracellular replication, we confirmed T4SS-dependent intracellular growth of B. neotomae in macrophage cell lines. Furthermore, B. neotomae exhibited early endosomal (LAMP-1) and late endoplasmic reticulum (calreticulin)-associated phagosome maturation. These findings recapitulate prior observations for human-pathogenic Brucella spp. In addition, during coinfection experiments with Legionella pneumophila , we found that defective intracellular replication of a B. neotomae T4SS virB4 mutant was rescued and baseline levels of intracellular replication of wild-type B. neotomae were significantly stimulated by coinfection with wild-type but not T4SS mutant L. pneumophila Using confocal microscopy, it was determined that intracellular colocalization of B. neotomae and L. pneumophila was required for rescue and that colocalization came at a cost to L. pneumophila fitness. These findings were not completely expected based on known temporal and qualitative differences in the intracellular life cycles of these two pathogens. Taken together, we have developed a new system for studying in vitro Brucella pathogenesis and found a remarkable T4SS-dependent interplay between Brucella and Legionella during macrophage coinfection. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  8. Pinyon/juniper woodlands [Chapter 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin J. Tausch; Sharon Hood

    2007-01-01

    Pinyon-juniper woodlands occur in 10 states and cover large areas in many of them. These woodlands can be dominated by several species of pinyon pine (Pinus spp. L.) and juniper (Juniperus spp. L.) (Lanner 1975; Mitchell and Roberts 1999; West 1999a). A considerable amount of information is available on the expansion of the woodlands that has occurred over large parts...

  9. Brucellosis caused by the wood rat pathogen Brucella neotomae: two case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalobos-Vindas, Juan M; Amuy, Ernesto; Barquero-Calvo, Elías; Rojas, Norman; Chacón-Díaz, Carlos; Chaves-Olarte, Esteban; Guzman-Verri, Caterina; Moreno, Edgardo

    2017-12-19

    Brucellosis is a chronic bacterial disease caused by members of the genus Brucella. Among the classical species stands Brucella neotomae, until now, a pathogen limited to wood rats. However, we have identified two brucellosis human cases caused by B. neotomae, demonstrating that this species has zoonotic potential. Within almost 4 years of each other, a 64-year-old Costa Rican white Hispanic man and a 51-year-old Costa Rican white Hispanic man required medical care at public hospitals of Costa Rica. Their hematological and biochemical parameters were within normal limits. No adenopathies or visceral abnormalities were found. Both patients showed intermittent fever, disorientation, and general malaise and a positive Rose Bengal test compatible with Brucella infection. Blood and cerebrospinal fluid cultures rendered Gram-negative coccobacilli identified by genomic analysis as B. neotomae. After antibiotic treatment, the patients recovered with normal mental activities. This is the first report describing in detail the clinical disease caused by B. neotomae in two unrelated patients. In spite of previous claims, this bacterium keeps zoonotic potential. Proposals to generate vaccines by using B. neotomae as an immunogen must be reexamined and countries housing the natural reservoir must consider the zoonotic risk.

  10. TAP Report - Southwest Idaho Juniper Working Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gresham, Garold Linn [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    There is explicit need for characterization of the materials for possible commercialization as little characterization data exists. Pinyon-juniper woodlands are a major ecosystem type found in the Southwest and the Intermountain West regions of the United States including Nevada, Idaho and Oregon. These widespread ecosystems are characterized by the presence of several different species of pinyon and juniper as the dominant plant cover. Since the 1800s, pinyon-juniper woodlands have rapidly expanded their range at the expense of existing ecosystems. Additionally, existing woodlands have become denser, progressively creating potential fire hazards as seen in the Soda Fire, which burned more than 400 sq. miles. Land managers responsible for these areas often desire to reduce pinyon-juniper coverage on their lands for a variety of reasons, as stated in the Working Group objectives. However, the cost of clearing thinning pinyon-juniper stands can be prohibitive. One reason for this is the lack of utilization options for the resulting biomass that could help recover some of the cost of pinyon-juniper stand management. The goal of this TAP effort was to assess the feedstock characteristics of biomass from a juniper harvested from Owyhee County to evaluate possible fuel and conversion utilization options.

  11. Breeding bird response to juniper woodland expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenstock, Steven S.; van Riper, Charles

    2001-01-01

    In recent times, pinyon (Pinus spp.)-juniper (Juniperus spp.) woodlands have expanded into large portions of the Southwest historically occupied by grassland vegetation. From 1997-1998, we studied responses of breeding birds to one-seed juniper (J. monosperma) woodland expansion at 2 grassland study areas in northern Arizona. We sampled breeding birds in 3 successional stages along a grassland-woodland gradient: un-invaded grassland, grassland undergoing early stages of juniper establishment, and developing woodland. Species composition varied greatly among successional stages and was most different between endpoints of the gradient. Ground-nesting grassland species predominated in uninvaded grassland but declined dramatically as tree density increased. Tree- and cavity-nesting species increased with tree density and were most abundant in developing woodland. Restoration of juniper-invaded grasslands will benefit grassland-obligate birds and other wildlife.

  12. Avian community responses to juniper woodland structure and thinning treatments on the Colorado Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Claire; van Riper, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Federal land managers are increasingly implementing fuels-reduction treatments throughout the western United States with objectives of ecological restoration and fire hazard reduction in pinyon-juniper (Pinus spp.-Juniperus spp.) woodlands. The pinyon-juniper woodland ecosystem complex is highly variable across the western landscape, as is bird community composition. We investigated relations between breeding birds and vegetation characteristics in modified pinyon-juniper woodlands at three sites (BLM, USFS, NPS) on the Colorado Plateau. During the breeding seasons of 2005 and 2006, we surveyed birds and measured vegetation in 74 study plots. These plots were each 3.1 hectares (ha; 7.6 acres), located across the range of natural variation, with 41 control sites and 33 plots in areas previously thinned by hand-cutting or chaining. We found that relations of avian pinyon-juniper specialists and priority species to vegetation characteristics were generally in agreement with the findings of previous studies and known nesting and feeding habits of those birds. Relatively high density of pinyon pines was important to species richness and abundance in 6 of 14 species. Abundance of all species was related to treatment method, and we found no difference in bird communities at chaining and hand-cut sites.

  13. Persistence of Allegheny woodrats Neotoma magister across the mid-Atlantic Appalachian Highlands landscape, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. Mark Ford; Steven B. Castleberry; Michael T. Mengak; Jane L. Rodrigue; Daniel J. Feller; Kevin R. Russell

    2006-01-01

    We examined a suite of macro-habitat and landscape variables around active and inactive Allegheny woodrat Neotoma magister colony sites in the Appalachian Mountains of the mid-Atlantic Highlands of Maryland, Virginia, and West Virginia using an information-theoretic modeling approach. Logistic regression analyses suggested that Allegheny woodrat presence was related...

  14. Genetic relatedness and spatial associations of dusky-footed woodrats (Neotoma fuscipes)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin J. Innes; Mary Brooke McEachern; Dirk H. Van Vuren; John M. Eadie; Douglas A. Kelt; Michael L. Johnson

    2012-01-01

    We studied the association between space sharing and kinship in a solitary rodent, the dusky-footed woodrat (Neotoma fuscipes). Genetic relatedness was inversely correlated with geographic distance for female woodrats but not for males, a pattern consistent with female philopatry and male dispersal. However, some female neighbors were unrelated, suggesting the...

  15. Mechanism of cadmium ion removal by base treated juniper fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soo-Hong Min; J.K. Park; James S. Han; Eun Woo Shin

    2003-01-01

    Pinyon juniper, Juniperus Monosperma, is a small-diameter and underutilized (SDU) lignocellulosic material. Evaluated were efficacy of base-treated juniper fiber (BTJF) sample for cadmium (Cd 2+ ) sorption and the viability of juniper fiber as a sorbent for the removal of Cd 2+ from water. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis indicated that...

  16. Prescribed burning in mid and late successional juniper woodlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Western juniper woodlands of the western United States have expanded rapidly since settlement in the late 1800’s. To recover shrub steppe and other plant communities requires that invasive junipers be controlled. We have evaluated recovery of several plant associations after combinations of junipe...

  17. Pediatric Specialists

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Healthy Children > Family Life > Medical Home > Pediatric Specialists Pediatric Specialists Article Body ​Your pediatrician may refer your child to a pediatric specialist for further evaluation and treatment. Pediatric specialists ...

  18. SELECTING ANGORA GOATS TO CONSUME MORE JUNIPER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher John Lupton

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available This research project was initiated in 2003 to develop a more effective tool for biological management of invading juniper species on rangelands through herbivory by Angora goats.  After we had established that juniper consumption in free-ranging goats has a genetic component (heritability = 13%, male and female goats were bred selectively for above- (high and below-average (low juniper consumption that was estimated by fecal near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy. Divergent lines are being produced to facilitate the identification of physiological mechanisms that permit some goats to consume considerably more juniper than others as a regular component of their diet.  Because diet is known to affect growth and fiber production, another objective of the project is to establish the effects of the selection protocol on body weights, fleece weights, and fiber characteristics.  Mature females (age > 1.5 yr and kids were maintained on rangeland and shorn twice a year.  Extreme high- and low-consuming yearling males (10 of each per year were evaluated annually in a central performance test.  The selection protocol resulted in average EBV for percentage juniper consumption of 3.9 and -0.4 (P 0.1 in body weight, mohair production and properties between high and low consumers.  However, the adult data for the extreme males indicated that high consuming males have lower body weights than low consumers (53.8 vs. 57.9 kg, P = 0.01. Differences in body weight and several mohair production and quality traits have also been detected in the mature females but at this early stage of the selection program, no substantial differences have been observed and certainly none that would have an economic impact for producers.  Ultimately, we expect to demonstrate that the high-consuming line controls juniper more effectively than either the low-consuming line or unselected Angora goats.  Subsequently, we plan to release high juniper

  19. Mechanical mastication of Utah juniper encroaching sagebrush steppe increases inorganic soil N

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juniper (Juniperus spp.) has encroached millions of hectares of sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) steppe. Juniper mechanical mastication increases cover of understory species, but could increase resource availability and subsequently invasive plant species. We quantified the effects of juniper mastication ...

  20. Dendrochronology of Utah Juniper (Juniperus osteosperma (Torr.) Little)

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Justin Derose; Matthew F. Bekker; Roger Kjelgren; Brendan M. Buckley; James H. Speer; Eric B. Allen

    2016-01-01

    Utah juniper was a foundational species for the discipline of dendrochronology, having been used in the early 20th Century investigations of Mesa Verde, but has been largely ignored by dendrochronologists since. Here we present dendrochronological investigations of Utah juniper core and cross-sectional samples from four sites in northern Utah. We demonstrate that,...

  1. Plant establishment and soil microenvironments in Utah juniper masticated woodlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kert R. Young

    2012-01-01

    Juniper (Juniperus spp.) encroachment into sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) and bunchgrass communities has reduced understory plant cover and allowed juniper trees to dominate millions of hectares of semiarid rangelands. Trees are mechanically masticated or shredded to decrease wildfire potential and increase desirable understory plant cover. When trees are masticated after...

  2. Silvics and silviculture in the southwestern pinyon-juniper woodlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerald J. Gottfried

    2004-01-01

    Southwestern pinyon-juniper and juniper woodlands cover large areas of the western United States. The woodlands have been viewed as places of beauty and sources of valuable resource products or as weed-dominated landscapes that hinder the production of forage for livestock. They are special places because of the emotions and controversies that encircle their management...

  3. The western juniper resource of eastern Oregon, 1999.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David L. Azuma; Bruce A. Hiserote; Paul A. Dunham

    2005-01-01

    This report summarizes resource statistics for eastern Oregon's juniper forests, which are in Baker, Crook, Deschutes, Gilliam, Grant, Harney, Jefferson, Klamath, Lake, Malheur, Morrow, Sherman, Umatilla, Union, Wallowa, Wasco, and Wheeler Counties. We sampled all ownerships outside of the National Forest System; we report the statistics on juniper forest on...

  4. Juniper Pollen Hotspots in the Southwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunderson, L. D.; VandeWater, P.; Luvall, J.; Levetin, E.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Juniperus pollen is a major allergen in Texas, Oklahoma, and New Mexico. While the bulk of pollen may be released in rural areas, large amounts of pollen can be transported to urban areas. Major juniper species in the region include: Juniperus ashei, J. virginiana, J. pinchotii, and J. monosperma. Pollen release is virtually continuous beginning in late September with J. pinchotii and ending in May with J. monosperma. Urban areas in the region were evaluated for the potential of overlapping seasons in order to inform sensitive individuals. Methods: Burkard volumetric pollen traps were established for two consecutive spring seasons at 6 sites in northern New Mexico and 6 sites for two consecutive winter and fall seasons in Texas and Oklahoma Standard methods were used in the preparation and analysis of slides. Results: The Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex is home to over 6 million people. It is adjacent to populations of J. pinchotii, J. virginiana, and J. ashei. Peak concentration near Dallas for J. ashei in 2011 was 5891 pollen grains/m3 in January 7th. The peak date for J. pinchotii at an upwind sampling location in San Marcos, TX was November 1, 2010 and peak for J. virginiana at a nearby station in Tulsa, OK was November 1, 2010 and peak for J. virginiana at a nearby station in Tulsa, OK was February 20, 2011. Amarillo, TX is adjacent to J. pinchotii, J. ashei, and J. monosperma populations and may be subject to juniper pollen from September through May. Conclusions: Considering the overlapping distributions of juniper trees and the overlapping temporal release of pollen, sensitive patients may benefit from avoiding hotspots.

  5. Vegetation Response to Western Juniper Slash Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Casey; Miller, Rick; Bates, Jonathan D.

    2013-09-01

    The expansion of piñon-juniper woodlands the past 100 years in the western United States has resulted in large scale efforts to kill trees and recover sagebrush steppe rangelands. It is important to evaluate vegetation recovery following woodland control to develop best management practices. In this study, we compared two fuel reduction treatments and a cut-and-leave (CUT) treatment used to control western juniper ( Juniperus occidentalis spp. occidentalis Hook.) of the northwestern United States. Treatments were; CUT, cut-and-broadcast burn (BURN), and cut-pile-and-burn the pile (PILE). A randomized complete block design was used with five replicates of each treatment located in a curl leaf mahogany ( Cercocarpus ledifolius Nutt. ex Torr. & A. Gray)/mountain big sagebrush ( Artemisia tridentata Nutt. spp. vaseyana (Rydb.) Beetle)/Idaho fescue ( Festuca idahoensis Elmer) association. In 2010, 4 years after tree control the cover of perennial grasses (PG) [Sandberg's bluegrass ( Poa secunda J. Pres) and large bunchgrasses] were about 4 and 5 % less, respectively, in the BURN (7.1 ± 0.6 %) than the PILE (11.4 ± 2.3 %) and CUT (12.4 ± 1.7 %) treatments ( P < 0.0015). In 2010, cover of invasive cheatgrass ( Bromus tectorum L.) was greater in the BURN (6.3 ± 1.0 %) and was 50 and 100 % greater than PILE and CUT treatments, respectively. However, the increase in perennial bunchgrass density and cover, despite cheatgrass in the BURN treatment, mean it unlikely that cheatgrass will persist as a major understory component. In the CUT treatment mahogany cover increased 12.5 % and density increased in from 172 ± 25 to 404 ± 123 trees/ha. Burning, killed most or all of the adult mahogany, and mahogany recovery consisted of 100 and 67 % seedlings in the PILE and BURN treatments, respectively. After treatment, juniper presence from untreated small trees (<1 m tall; PILE and CUT treatments) and seedling emergence (all treatments) represented 25-33 % of pre-treatment tree

  6. Evaluation of the seasonal and annual abortifacient risk of western juniper trees on Oregon rangelands: Abortion risk of western juniper trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Western juniper trees can cause late term abortions in cattle, similar to ponderosa pine trees. Analyses of western juniper trees from 35 locations across the state of Oregon suggest that western juniper trees in all areas present an abortion risk in pregnant cattle. Results from this study demonstr...

  7. Temporal and spatial distribution of Leishmania mexicana infections in a population of Neotoma micropus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond Russell W

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A 19-month mark-release-recapture study of Neotoma micropus with sequential screening for Leishmania mexicana was conducted in Bexar County, Texas, USA. The overall prevalence rate was 14.7% and the seasonal prevalence rates ranged from 3.8 to 26.7%. Nine incident cases were detected, giving an incidence rate of 15.5/100 rats/year. Follow-up of 101 individuals captured two or more times ranged from 14 to 462 days. Persistence of L. mexicana infections averaged 190 days and ranged from 104 to 379 days. Data on dispersal, density, dispersion, and weight are presented, and the role of N. micropus as a reservoir host for L. mexicana is discussed.

  8. Off-road transport of pinyon/juniper

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. Klepac; B. Rummer

    2012-01-01

    A 8-wheel forwarder was observed while transporting pinyon pine (P. edulis) and Utah juniper (J. osteosperma) from woods to landing in southern Utah. The forwarder was part of a 2-machine system used to treat pinyon-juniper stands. Trees were felled using a rubber tracked skid steer with a shear head, then transported to a collection point with a Ponsse Buffalo King 20...

  9. Identification of a single-nucleotide insertion in the promoter region affecting the sodC promoter activity in Brucella neotomae.

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    Dina A Moustafa

    Full Text Available Brucella neotomae is not known to be associated with clinical disease in any host species. Previous research suggested that B. neotomae might not express detectable levels of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD, a periplasmic enzyme known to be involved in protecting Brucella from oxidative bactericidal effects of host phagocytes. This study was undertaken to investigate the genetic basis for the disparity in SOD expression in B. neotomae. Our Western blot and SOD enzyme assay analyses indicated that B. neotomae does express SOD, but at a substantially reduced level. Nucleotide sequence analysis of region upstream to the sodC gene identified a single-nucleotide insertion in the potential promoter region. The same single-nucleotide insertion was also detected in the sodC promoter of B. suis strain Thomsen, belonging to biovar 2 in which SOD expression was undetectable previously. Examination of the sodC promoter activities using translational fusion constructs with E. coli β-galactosidase demonstrated that the B. neotomae and B. suis biovar 2 promoters were very weak in driving gene expression. Site-directed mutation studies indicated that the insertion of A in the B. neotomae sodC promoter reduced the promoter activity. Increasing the level of SOD expression in B. neotomae through complementation with B. abortus sodC gene did not alter the bacterial survival in J774A.1 macrophage-like cells and in tissues of BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. These results for the first time demonstrate the occurrence of a single-nucleotide polymorphism affecting promoter function and gene expression in Brucella.

  10. Oral immunization of mice with gamma-irradiated Brucella neotomae induces protection against intraperitoneal and intranasal challenge with virulent B. abortus 2308.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabral, Neha; Martha-Moreno-Lafont; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; Vemulapalli, Ramesh

    2014-01-01

    Brucella spp. are Gram-negative, facultative intracellular coccobacilli that cause one of the most frequently encountered zoonosis worldwide. Humans naturally acquire infection through consumption of contaminated dairy and meat products and through direct exposure to aborted animal tissues and fluids. No vaccine against brucellosis is available for use in humans. In this study, we tested the ability of orally inoculated gamma-irradiated B. neotomae and B. abortus RB51 in a prime-boost immunization approach to induce antigen-specific humoral and cell mediated immunity and protection against challenge with virulent B. abortus 2308. Heterologous prime-boost vaccination with B. abortus RB51 and B. neotomae and homologous prime-boost vaccination of mice with B. neotomae led to the production of serum and mucosal antibodies specific to the smooth LPS. The elicited serum antibodies included the isotypes of IgM, IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b and IgG3. All oral vaccination regimens induced antigen-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells capable of secreting IFN-γ and TNF-α. Upon intra-peritoneal challenge, mice vaccinated with B. neotomae showed the highest level of resistance against virulent B. abortus 2308 colonization in spleen and liver. Experiments with different doses of B. neotomae showed that all tested doses of 10(9), 10(10) and 10(11) CFU-equivalent conferred significant protection against the intra-peritoneal challenge. However, a dose of 10(11) CFU-equivalent of B. neotomae was required for affording protection against intranasal challenge as shown by the reduced bacterial colonization in spleens and lungs. Taken together, these results demonstrate the feasibility of using gamma-irradiated B. neotomae as an effective and safe oral vaccine to induce protection against respiratory and systemic infections with virulent Brucella.

  11. Commercialization of fuels from Pinyon-Juniper biomass in Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, G.P.

    1994-01-01

    This study analyzes and defines energy applications and markets that could stimulate the commercial use of Eastern Nevada's Pinyon-Juniper resources. The commercialization potential for producing energy from Pinyon-Juniper biomass is analyzed by examining the resource base and resource availability for a commercial harvesting and processing operation. The study considered the spectrum of available equipment and technology for carrying out harvesting and processing operations, investigated the markets that might be able to use energy products derived from Pinyon-Juniper biomass, analyzed the costs of harvesting, processing, and transporting Pinyon-Juniper fuels, and set forth a plan for developing the commercial potential of these resources. The emerging residential pellet-fuels market is a promising entry market for the commercialization of an energy from Pinyon-Juniper biomass industry in Eastern Nevada, although there are serious technical issues that may render Pinyon-Juniper biomass an unsuitable feedstock for the manufacture of pellet fuels. These issues could be investigated at a moderate cost in order to determine whether to proceed with development efforts in this direction. In the longer term, one or two biomass-fired power plants in the size range of 5-10 MW could provide a stable and predictable market for the production and utilization of fuels derived from local Pinyon-Juniper biomass resources, and would provide valuable economic and environmental benefits to the region. Municipal utility ownership of such facilities could help to enhance the economic benefits of the investments by qualifying them for federal energy credits and tax-free financing

  12. Do bark beetle sprays prevent Phloeosinus species from attacking cypress and juniper?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chris Hayes; Tom DeGomez; Karen Clancy; Joel McMillin; John Anhold

    2008-01-01

    (Please note, this is an abstract only) Phloeosinus-caused mortality of Arizona cypress, (Cupressus arizonica), oneseed juniper, (Juniperus monosperma) and alligator juniper, (J. deppeana) has been observed at high levels in Arizona during the past 3 years. Currently, there are limited preventative measures to protect high-value cypress and juniper trees against...

  13. Biological soil crust response to late season prescribed fire in a Great Basin juniper woodland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven D. Warren; Larry L. St.Clair; Jeffrey R. Johansen; Paul Kugrens; L. Scott Baggett; Benjamin J. Bird

    2015-01-01

    Expansion of juniper on U.S. rangelands is a significant environmental concern. Prescribed fire is often recommended to control juniper. To that end, a prescribed burn was conducted in a Great Basin juniper woodland. Conditions were suboptimal; fire did not encroach into mid- or late-seral stages and was patchy in the early-seral stage. This study evaluated the effects...

  14. Assessing Pinyon Juniper Feedstock Properties and Utilization Options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gresham, Garold Linn [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kenney, Kevin Louis [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Pinyon-juniper woodlands are a major ecosystem type found in the Southwest and the Intermountain West regions of the United States. These ecosystems are characterized by the presence of several different species of pinyon pine and juniper as the dominant plant cover. Since the 1800s, pinyon-juniper woodlands have rapidly expanded their range at the expense of existing ecosystems. Additionally, existing woodlands have become more dense, potentially increasing fire hazards. Land managers responsible for these areas often desire to reduce pinyonjuniper coverage on their lands for a variety of reasons, including restoration to previous vegetative cover, mitigation of fire risk, and improvement in wildlife habitat. However, the cost of clearing or thinning pinyon-juniper stands can be prohibitive. One reason for this is the lack of utilization options for the resulting biomass that could help recover some of the cost of pinyonjuniper stand management. The goal of this project was to assess the feedstock characteristics of biomass from a pinyon-juniper harvest so that potential applications for the biomass may be evaluated.

  15. Building connected data standards to promote interdisciplinary research in the paleogeosciences- PalEON, Neotoma, THROUGHPUT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goring, S. J.; Richard, S. M.; Williams, J. W.; Dawson, A.

    2017-12-01

    A broad array of data resources, across disciplines, are needed to study Earth system processes operating at multiple spatial or temporal scales. Data friction frequently delays this integrative and interdisciplinary research, while sustainable solutions may be hampered as a result of academic incentives that penalize technical "tool building" at the expense of research publication. The paleogeosciences, in particular, often integrate data drawn from multiple sub-disciplines and from a range of long-tail and big data sources. Data friction can be lowered and the pace of scientific discovery accelerated through the development and adoption of data standards, both within the paleogeosciences and with allied disciplines. Using the PalEON Project (https://sites.nd.edu/paleonproject/) and the Neotoma Paleoecological Database (https://neotomadb.org) as focal case studies, we first illustrate the advances possible through data standardization. We then focus on new efforts in data standardization and building linkages among paleodata resources underway through the EarthCube-funded Throughput project. A first step underway is to analyze existing standards across paleo-data repositories and identify ways in which the adoption of common standards can promote connectivity, reducing barriers to interdisciplinary research, especially for early career researchers. Experience indicates that standards tend to emerge by necessity and from a mixture of bottom-up and top-down processes. A common pathway is when conventions developed to solve specific problems within a community are extended to address challenges that are more general. The Throughput project will identify, document, and promote such solutions to foster wider adoption of standards for data interchange and reduce data friction in the paleogeosciences.

  16. Besnoitia neotomofelis n. sp. (Protozoa: Apicomplexa) from the southern plains woodrat ( Neotoma micropus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, J P; Yabsley, M J

    2010-10-01

    Certain species of the protozoan genus Besnoitia cause clinical disease in livestock and wildlife. In the present paper a new species, Besnoitia neotomofelis is described from the southern planes woodrat (Neotoma micropus). The parasite was detected by bioassay of woodrat tissues in outbred Swiss Webster mice in an attempt to isolate Toxoplasma gondii. Initially, the organism was misdiagnosed as T. gondii because it was highly pathogenic for mice and its tachyzoites resembled T. gondii tachyzoites. Further studies revealed that it differed structurally and biologically from T. gondii. Tachyzoites were successfully cultivated and maintained in vitro in bovine monocytes and African green monkey kidney cells, and in vivo in mice. Non-dividing, uninucleate tachyzoites were approximately 1 x 5 μm in size. Longitudinally-cut bradyzoites in tissue sections measured 1.5-1.6 x 7.7-9.3 μm. Tissue cysts were microscopic, up to 210 μm long, and were infective orally to mice. Cats fed tissue cysts shed unsporulated 13 x 14 μm sized oocysts. All mice inoculated with B. neotomofelis died of acute besnoitiosis, irrespective of the dose, and Norwegian rats became infected but remained asymptomatic. Entero-epithelial stages (schizonts, gamonts) were found in cats fed tissue cysts. Large (up to 40 x 50 μm) first-generation schizonts developed in the lamina propria of the small intestine of cats. A second generation of small sized (8 μm) schizonts containing 4-8 merozoites was detected in enterocytes of the small intestine. Gamonts and oocysts were seen in goblet cells of the small intestinal epithelium. Tachyzoites were present in mesenteric lymph nodes of cats. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that B. neotomofelis was related to other Besnoitia species from rodents, rabbits, and opossums. Besnoitia neotomofelis is distinct from the 3 other species of Besnoitia, B. wallacei, B. darlingi and B. oryctofelisi that utilize cats as a definitive host.

  17. Allegheny woodrat (Neotoma magister) use of rock drainage channels on reclaimed mines in southern West Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamblin, H.D.; Wood, P.B.; Edwards, J.W.

    2004-01-01

    Allegheny woodrats (Neotoma magister) currently receive protected status throughout their range due to population declines. Threats associated with habitat fragmentation (e.g., introduced predators, disease, loss of connectivity among subpopulations and habitat loss) may explain why Allegheny woodrats are no longer found in many areas where they existed just 25 y ago. In southern West Virginia, surface coal mining is a major cause of forest fragmentation. Furthermore, mountaintop mining, the prevalent method in the region, results in a loss of rock outcrops and cliffs within forested areas, typical habitat of the Allegheny woodrat To determine the extent that Allegheny woodrats make use of reclaimed mine land, particularly rock drainages built during reclamation, we sampled 24 drainage channels on reclaimed surface mines in southern West Virginia, collected habitat data at each site and used logistic regression to identify habitat variables related to Allegheny woodrat presence. During 187 trap nights, 13 adult, 2 subadult and 8 juvenile Allegheny woodrats were captured at 13 of the 24 sites. Percent of rock as a groundcover and density of stems >15 cm diameter-at-breast-height (DBH) were related to Allegheny woodrat presence and were significantly greater at sites where Allegheny woodrats were present than absent. Sites where Allegheny woodrats were present differed substantially from other described habitats in West Virginia, though they may simulate boulder piles that occur naturally. Our findings suggest the need for additional research to examine the dynamics between Allegheny woodrat populations inhabiting rock outcrops in forests adjacent to mines and populations inhabiting constructed drainage channels on reclaimed mines. However, if Allegheny woodrats can use human-created habitat, our results will be useful to surface mine reclamation and to other mitigation efforts where rocky habitats are lost or disturbed.

  18. Hydrologic response of mechanical mastication in juniper woodland in Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Various vegetation control methods have been used to reduce juniper (Juniperus ssp.) woodland encroachment. Mechanical mastication (reducing trees to a mulch residue) has recently been used in some western states. We investigated the hydrologic impacts of rubber tire tracks from the masticating vehi...

  19. Proceedings of the western juniper ecology and management workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert E. Martin; J. Edward Dealy; David L. Caraher

    1977-01-01

    Western juniper (Juniperus occidentalis subsp. occidentalis) is an important invader of range lands in central and eastern Oregon. Many people have asked questions about its control, effect on range productivity, and its benefits. The papers in this proceedings resulted from a conference held in Bend, Oregon, January 1977, to...

  20. Parasite prevalence and community diversity in sympatric and allopatric populations of two woodrat species (Sigmodontinae: Neotoma) in central California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechtel, Molly J; Teglas, Michael B; Murphy, Peter J; Matocq, Marjorie D

    2015-04-01

    Patterns of host-parasite association may vary across the landscape in part because of host and parasite diversity, divergence, local ecology, or interactions among these factors. In central coastal California, we quantified parasite prevalence, infection intensity, and diversity in two sister species of woodrats (Neotoma fuscipes and Neotoma macrotis) where the species co-occur (sympatry) and where each species exists alone (allopatry). In feces from 50 adults we identified seven taxa: the protozoans Eimeria, Giardia, and Cryptosporidium, the nematodes Trichuris, Aspicularis, and Eucoleus, and a cestode in the family Anoplocephalidae. Gastrointestinal parasite infection intensity and diversity were higher in males than in females, a difference that was most pronounced in the more aggressive N. fuscipes. Both species had lower infection intensity in sympatry than in allopatry and in sympatry the two species did not differ in infection intensity in total but did maintain distinct parasite communities. Taken together, our findings suggest that host evolutionary differences, including perhaps species-specific patterns of aggressive behavior, as well as local ecology, influence the likelihood of infection by these endoparasite taxa.

  1. Functional characterization of cytochromes P450 2B from the desert woodrat Neotoma lepida

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilderman, P. Ross; Jang, Hyun-Hee; Malenke, Jael R.; Salib, Mariam; Angermeier, Elisabeth; Lamime, Sonia; Dearing, M. Denise; Halpert, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian detoxification processes have been the focus of intense research, but little is known about how wild herbivores process plant secondary compounds, many of which have medicinal value or are drugs. cDNA sequences that code for three enzymes of the cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2B subfamily, here termed 2B35, 2B36, and 2B37 have been recently identified from a wild rodent, the desert woodrat (Malenke et al., 2012). Two variant clones of each enzyme were engineered to increase protein solubility and to facilitate purification, as reported for CYP2B enzymes from multiple species. When expressed in Escherichia coli each of the woodrat proteins gave the characteristic maximum at 450 nm in a reduced carbon monoxide difference spectrum but generally expressed at lower levels than rat CYP2B1. Two enzymes, 2B36 and 2B37, showed dealkylation activity with the model substrates 7-ethoxy-4-(trifluoromethyl)coumarin and 7-benzyloxyresorufin, whereas 2B35 was inactive. Binding of the monoterpene (+)-α-pinene produced a Type I shift in the absorbance spectrum of each enzyme. Mutation of 2B37 at residues 114, 262, or 480, key residues governing ligand interactions with other CYP2B enzymes, did not significantly change expression levels or produce the expected functional changes. In summary, two catalytic and one ligand-binding assay are sufficient to distinguish among CYP2B35, 2B36, and 2B37. Differences in functional profiles between 2B36 and 2B37 are partially explained by changes in substrate recognition site residue 114, but not 480. The results advance our understanding of the mechanisms of detoxification in wild mammalian herbivores and highlight the complexity of this system. - Highlights: • Three CYP2B enzymes from Neotoma lepida were cloned, engineered, and expressed. • A mix of catalytic and binding assays yields unique results for each enzyme. • Mutational analysis indicates CYP 2 B substrate recognition remains to be clarified. • Reported N. lepida gene

  2. Functional characterization of cytochromes P450 2B from the desert woodrat Neotoma lepida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilderman, P. Ross, E-mail: pwilderman@ucsd.edu [Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Jang, Hyun-Hee [Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Malenke, Jael R. [Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Salib, Mariam; Angermeier, Elisabeth; Lamime, Sonia [Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Dearing, M. Denise [Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Halpert, James R. [Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Mammalian detoxification processes have been the focus of intense research, but little is known about how wild herbivores process plant secondary compounds, many of which have medicinal value or are drugs. cDNA sequences that code for three enzymes of the cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2B subfamily, here termed 2B35, 2B36, and 2B37 have been recently identified from a wild rodent, the desert woodrat (Malenke et al., 2012). Two variant clones of each enzyme were engineered to increase protein solubility and to facilitate purification, as reported for CYP2B enzymes from multiple species. When expressed in Escherichia coli each of the woodrat proteins gave the characteristic maximum at 450 nm in a reduced carbon monoxide difference spectrum but generally expressed at lower levels than rat CYP2B1. Two enzymes, 2B36 and 2B37, showed dealkylation activity with the model substrates 7-ethoxy-4-(trifluoromethyl)coumarin and 7-benzyloxyresorufin, whereas 2B35 was inactive. Binding of the monoterpene (+)-α-pinene produced a Type I shift in the absorbance spectrum of each enzyme. Mutation of 2B37 at residues 114, 262, or 480, key residues governing ligand interactions with other CYP2B enzymes, did not significantly change expression levels or produce the expected functional changes. In summary, two catalytic and one ligand-binding assay are sufficient to distinguish among CYP2B35, 2B36, and 2B37. Differences in functional profiles between 2B36 and 2B37 are partially explained by changes in substrate recognition site residue 114, but not 480. The results advance our understanding of the mechanisms of detoxification in wild mammalian herbivores and highlight the complexity of this system. - Highlights: • Three CYP2B enzymes from Neotoma lepida were cloned, engineered, and expressed. • A mix of catalytic and binding assays yields unique results for each enzyme. • Mutational analysis indicates CYP{sub 2}B substrate recognition remains to be clarified. • Reported N. lepida gene

  3. Response of Spectral Reflectances and Vegetation Indices on Varying Juniper Cone Densities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo E. Ponce-Campos

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Juniper trees are widely distributed throughout the world and are common sources of allergies when microscopic pollen grains are transported by wind and inhaled. In this study, we investigated the spectral influences of pollen-discharging male juniper cones within a juniper canopy. This was done through a controlled outdoor experiment involving ASD FieldSpec Pro Spectroradiometer measurements over juniper canopies of varying cone densities. Broadband and narrowband spectral reflectance and vegetation index (VI patterns were evaluated as to their sensitivity and their ability to discriminate the presence of cones. The overall aim of this research was to assess remotely sensed phenological capabilities to detect pollen-bearing juniper trees for public health applications. A general decrease in reflectance values with increasing juniper cone density was found, particularly in the Green (545–565 nm and NIR (750–1,350 nm regions. In contrast, reflectances in the shortwave-infrared (SWIR, 2,000 nm to 2,350 nm region decreased from no cone presence to intermediate amounts (90 g/m2 and then increased from intermediate levels to the highest cone densities (200 g/m2. Reflectance patterns in the Red (620–700 nm were more complex due to shifting contrast patterns in absorptance between cones and juniper foliage, where juniper foliage is more absorbing than cones only within the intense narrowband region of maximum chlorophyll absorption near 680 nm. Overall, narrowband reflectances were more sensitive to cone density changes than the equivalent MODIS broadbands. In all VIs analyzed, there were significant relationships with cone density levels, particularly with the narrowband versions and the two-band vegetation index (TBVI based on Green and Red bands, a promising outcome for the use of phenocams in juniper phenology trait studies. These results indicate that spectral indices are sensitive to certain juniper phenologic traits that can potentially be

  4. Distribution of western juniper seeds across an ecotone and implications for seed dispersal processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Western juniper forests have been the focus of extensive research and management due to range expansion and infilling that began over a century ago. Understanding juniper seed dispersal is vital to identifying processes behind increases in density and range. Dispersal of Juniperus seeds has generall...

  5. 75 FR 27550 - Electrical Interconnection of the Juniper Canyon I Wind Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Bonneville Power Administration Electrical Interconnection of the Juniper Canyon I Wind Project AGENCY: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Department of Energy (DOE). ACTION... would be generated from their proposed Juniper Canyon I Wind Energy Project (Wind Project) in Klickitat...

  6. Rainfall, soil moisture, and runoff dynamics in New Mexico pinon-juniper woodland watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlos Ochoa; Alexander Fernald; Vincent Tidwell

    2008-01-01

    Clearing trees in pinon-juniper woodlands may increase grass cover and infiltration, leading to reduced surface runoff and erosion. This study was conducted to evaluate pinon-juniper hydrology conditions during baseline data collection in a paired watershed study. We instrumented six 1.0 to 1.3 ha experimental watersheds near Santa Fe, NM to collect rainfall, soil...

  7. Variation in herbaceous vegetation and soil moisture under treated and untreated oneseed juniper trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hector Ramirez; Alexander Fernald; Andres Cibils; Michelle Morris; Shad Cox; Michael Rubio

    2008-01-01

    Clearing oneseed juniper (Juniperus monosperma) may make more water available for aquifer recharge or herbaceous vegetation growth, but the effects of tree treatment on soil moisture dynamics are not fully understood. This study investigated juniper treatment effects on understory herbaceous vegetation concurrently with soil moisture dynamics using vegetation sampling...

  8. Spanish juniper gain expansion opportunities by counting on a functionally diverse dispersal assemblage community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escribano-Ávila, Gema; Pías, Beatriz; Sanz-Pérez, Virginia; Virgós, Emilio; Escudero, Adrián; Valladares, Fernando

    2013-10-01

    Seed dispersal is typically performed by a diverse array of species assemblages with different behavioral and morphological traits which determine dispersal quality (DQ, defined as the probability of recruitment of a dispersed seed). Fate of ecosystems to ongoing environmental changes is critically dependent on dispersal and mainly on DQ in novel scenarios. We assess here the DQ, thus the multiplicative effect of germination and survival probability to the first 3 years of life, for seeds dispersed by several bird species (Turdus spp.) and carnivores (Vulpes vulpes, Martes foina) in mature woodland remnants of Spanish juniper (Juniperus thurifera) and old fields which are being colonized by this species. Results showed that DQ was similar in mature woodlands and old fields. Germination rate for seeds dispersed by carnivores (11.5%) and thrushes (9.12%) was similar, however, interacted with microhabitat suitability. Seeds dispersed by carnivores reach the maximum germination rate on shrubs (16%), whereas seeds dispersed by thrushes did on female juniper canopies (15.5) indicating that each group of dispersers performed a directed dispersal. This directional effect was diluted when survival probability was considered: thrushes selected smaller seeds which had higher mortality in the seedling stage (70%) in relation to seedlings dispersed by carnivores (40%). Overall, thrushes resulted low-quality dispersers which provided a probability or recruitment of 2.5%, while a seed dispersed by carnivores had a probability of recruitment of 6.5%. Our findings show that generalist dispersers (i.e., carnivores) can provide a higher probability of recruitment than specialized dispersers (i.e., Turdus spp.). However, generalist species are usually opportunistic dispersers as their role as seed dispersers is dependent on the availability of trophic resources and species feeding preferences. As a result, J. thurifera dispersal community is composed by two functional groups of

  9. Detection of soil erosion within pinyon-juniper woodlands using Thematic Mapper (TM) satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Kevin P.; Ridd, Merrill K.

    1991-01-01

    The sensitivity of Landsat TM data for detecting soil erosion within pinyon-juniper woodlands, and the potential of the spectral data for assigning the universal soil loss equation (USLE) crop managemnent (C) factor to varying cover types within the woodlands are assessed. Results show greatly accelerated rates of soil erosion on pinyon-juniper sites. Percent cover by pinyon-juniper, total soil-loss, and total nonliving ground cover accounted for nearly 70 percent of the variability in TM channels 2, 3, 4, and 5. TM spectral data were consistently better predictors of soil erosion than the biotic and abiotic field variables. Satellite data were more sensitive to vegetation variation than the USLE C factor, and USLE was found to be a poor predictor of soil loss on pinyon-juniper sites. A new string-to-ground soil erosion prediction technique is introduced.

  10. Antimycobacterial potential of the juniper berry essential oil in tap water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peruč, Dolores; Gobin, Ivana; Abram, Maja; Broznić, Dalibor; Svalina, Tomislav; Štifter, Sanja; Staver, Mladenka Malenica; Tićac, Brigita

    2018-03-01

    Mycobacterium avium complex-related diseases are often associated with poorly maintained hot water systems. This calls for the development of new control strategies. The aim of this study was to investigate the activity of essential oils (EOs) from the Mediterranean plants, common juniper, immortelle, sage, lavandin, laurel, and white cedar against Mycobacterium avium ssp. avium, Mycobacterium intracellulare, and Mycobacterium gordonae in culturing broth and freshwater as their most common habitat. To do that, we developed a new method of water microdilution to determine their minimal effective concentrations (MEC). The most active EO was the one from the common juniper with the MEC of 1.6 mg mL-1. Gas chromatography / mass spectrometry the juniper EO identified monoterpenes (70.54 %) and sesquiterpenes (25.9 %) as dominant component groups. The main monoterpene hydrocarbons were α-pinene, sabinene, and β-pinene. The juniper EO significantly reduced the cell viability of M. intracellulare and M. gordonae at MEC, and of M. avium at 2xMEC. Microscopic analysis confirmed its inhibitory effect by revealing significant morphological changes in the cell membrane and cytoplasm of all three bacteria. The mode of action of the juniper EO on the cell membrane was confirmed by a marked leakage of intracellular material. Juniper EO has a great practical potential as a complementary or alternative water disinfectant in hot water systems such as baths, swimming pools, spa pools, hot tubs, or even foot baths/whirlpools.

  11. Detection of soil erosion with Thematic Mapper (TM) satellite data within Pinyon-Juniper woodlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Kevin Paul

    1987-01-01

    Pinyon-Juniper woodlands dominate approximately 24.3 million hectares (60 million acres) in the western United States. The overall objective was to test the sensitivity of the LANDSAT Thematic Mapper (TM) spectral data for detecting varying degrees of soil erosion within the Pinyon-Juniper woodlands. A second objective was to assess the potential of the spectral data for assigning the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) crop management (C) factor values to varying cover types within the woodland. Thematic Mapper digital data for June 2, 1984 on channels 2, 3, 4, and 5 were used. Digital data analysis was performed using the ELAS software package. Best results were achieved using CLUS, an unsupervised clustering algorithm. Fifteen of the 40 Pinyon-Juniper signatures were identified as being relatively pure Pinyon-Juniper woodland. Final analysis resulted in the grouping of the 15 signatures into three major groups. Ten study sites were selected from each of the three groups and located on the ground. At each site the following field measurements were taken: percent tree canopy and percent understory cover, soil texture, total soil loss, and soil erosion rate estimates. A technique for measuring soil erosion within Pinyon-Juniper woodlands was developed. A theoretical model of site degradation after Pinyon-Juniper invasion is presented.

  12. Specialist Bibliographic Databases

    OpenAIRE

    Gasparyan, Armen Yuri; Yessirkepov, Marlen; Voronov, Alexander A.; Trukhachev, Vladimir I.; Kostyukova, Elena I.; Gerasimov, Alexey N.; Kitas, George D.

    2016-01-01

    Specialist bibliographic databases offer essential online tools for researchers and authors who work on specific subjects and perform comprehensive and systematic syntheses of evidence. This article presents examples of the established specialist databases, which may be of interest to those engaged in multidisciplinary science communication. Access to most specialist databases is through subscription schemes and membership in professional associations. Several aggregators of information and d...

  13. Creosote bush (Larrea tridentata) resin increases water demands and reduces energy availability in desert woodrats (Neotoma lepida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangione, Antonio M; Dearing, M Denise; Karasov, William H

    2004-07-01

    Although many plant secondary compounds are known to have serious consequences for herbivores, the costs of processing them are generally unknown. Two potential costs of ingestion and detoxification of secondary compounds are elevation of the minimum drinking water requirement and excretion of energetically expensive metabolites (i.e., glucuronides) in the urine. To address these impacts, we studied the costs of ingestion of resin from creosote bush (Larrea tridentata) on desert woodrats (Neotoma lepida). The following hypotheses were tested: ingestion of creosote resin by woodrats (1) increases minimum water requirement and (2) reduces energy available by increasing fecal and urinary energy losses. We tested the first hypothesis, by measuring the minimum water requirement of woodrats fed a control diet with and without creosote resin. Drinking water was given in decreasing amounts until woodrats could no longer maintain constant body mass. In two separate experiments, the minimum drinking water requirement of woodrats fed resin was higher than that of controls by 18-30% (about 1-1.7 ml/d). We tested several potential mechanisms of increased water loss associated with the increase in water requirement. The rate of fecal water loss was higher in woodrats consuming resin. Neither urinary water nor evaporative water loss was affected by ingestion of resin. Hypothesis 2 was tested by measuring energy fluxes of woodrats consuming control vs. resin-treated diets. Woodrats on a resin diet had higher urinary energy losses and, thus, metabolized a lower proportion of the dietary energy than did woodrats on control diet. Fecal energy excretion was not affected by resin. The excretion of glucuronic acid represented almost half of the energy lost as a consequence of resin ingestion. The increased water requirement and energy losses of woodrats consuming a diet with resin could have notable ecological consequences.

  14. The roles of precipitation regimes on juniper forest encroachment on grasslands in Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.; Xiao, X.; Qin, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Woody plant encroachment into grasslands has been dominantly explained by fire suppression, grazing and CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere. As different root depths of grasses and trees in soils, increased precipitation intensity was expected to facilitate the woody plant abundance, which was demonstrated by the field precipitation test in a sub-tropical savanna ecosystem. However, it is lacking to compressively examine the roles of precipitation regimes on woody plant encroachment at regional scales based on long-term observation data. This study examined the relationships between changes of precipitation regimes (amounts, frequency and intensity) and dynamics of juniper forest coverage using site-based rainfall data and remote sensing-based juniper forest maps in 1994-2010 over Oklahoma State. Our results showed that precipitation amount and intensity played larger roles than frequency on the juniper forest encroachment into the grassland in Oklahoma, and increased precipitation amount and intensity could facilitate the juniper woody encroachment. This practice based on observation data at the regional scale could be used to support precipitation experiments and model simulations and predicting the juniper forest encroachment.

  15. 75 FR 18201 - Juniper Canyon Wind Power, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-09

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. ER10-975-000] Juniper Canyon Wind Power, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing Includes Request for Blanket... of Juniper Canyon Wind Power, LLC's application for market-based rate authority, with an accompanying...

  16. Modeling wind fields and fire propagation following bark beetle outbreaks in spatially-heterogeneous pinyon-juniper woodland fuel complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodman R. Linn; Carolyn H. Sieg; Chad M. Hoffman; Judith L. Winterkamp; Joel D. McMillin

    2013-01-01

    We used a physics-based model, HIGRAD/FIRETEC, to explore changes in within-stand wind behavior and fire propagation associated with three time periods in pinyon-juniper woodlands following a drought-induced bark beetle outbreak and subsequent tree mortality. Pinyon-juniper woodland fuel complexes are highly heterogeneous. Trees often are clumped, with sparse patches...

  17. Tree regeneration following drought- and insect-induced mortality in piñon-juniper woodlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, Miranda D; Barger, Nichole N

    2013-10-01

    Widespread piñon (Pinus edulis) mortality occurred across the southwestern USA during 2002-2003 in response to drought and bark beetle infestations. Given the recent mortality and changes in regional climate over the past several decades, there is a keen interest in post-mortality regeneration dynamics in piñon-juniper woodlands. Here, we examined piñon and Utah juniper (Juniperus osteosperma) recruitment at 30 sites across southwestern Colorado, USA that spanned a gradient of adult piñon mortality levels (10-100%) to understand current regeneration dynamics. Piñon and juniper recruitment was greater at sites with more tree and shrub cover. Piñon recruitment was more strongly facilitated than juniper recruitment by trees and shrubs. New (post-mortality) piñon recruitment was negatively affected by recent mortality. However, mortality had no effect on piñon advanced regeneration (juveniles established pre-mortality) and did not shift juvenile piñon dominance. Our results highlight the importance of shrubs and juniper trees for the facilitation of piñon establishment and survival. Regardless of adult piñon mortality levels, areas with low tree and shrub cover may become increasingly juniper dominated as a result of the few suitable microsites for piñon establishment and survival. In areas with high piñon mortality and high tree and shrub cover, our results suggest that piñon is regenerating via advanced regeneration. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  18. Impact of grazing abandonment on floristic diversity in the priority habitat type *9562 Grecian Juniper Woods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrahnakis, Michael; Kazoglou, Yannis; Fotiadis, George; Kakouros, Petros; Nasiakou, Stamatia; Soutsas, Konstantinos

    2017-04-01

    The habitat type *9562 Grecian juniper woods (Juniperetum excelsae) includes Greek juniper (Juniperus excelsa M. Bieb.) forests and they are found mainly in the western sector of the Prespa National Park, NW Greece. Greek juniper forests are considered extremely rare for EU-28, recommending a priority habitat type in accordance with Directive 92/43/EEC. In addition, their ecological importance is great given its high plant taxa richness; they harbor most of the 900 plant taxa found in the western sector of the Park, many of them being important for EU or global scale. The accelerated invasion of deciduous hardwoods is the most significant risk for the habitat, since its rich flora is well-adapted to open light conditions produced by the open spaced Greek junipers. Also, the dense vegetated conditions deprive the regeneration of the photophilous Greek juniper. The invasion results from the lack of its natural controller, i.e. the grazing livestock. It is estimated that the total area of juniper forests for the Devas area decreased to 89% of the area of 1945 in favor of invasive hardwoods. The paper presents the analysis of the floristic diversity of the priority habitat type *9562 Grecian Juniper Woods (Juniperetum excelsae) (GJWs). Four (4) types of juniper forest ranges (GJWs) were distinguished in terms of canopy cover: (a) pure GJWs, (b) mixed open GJWs, (c) open GJWs, and (d) mixed dense GJWs. A total of 171 plant taxa were recorded, and distributed within 43 botanical families; the largest one being Leguminosae (26 taxa). The statistically estimated plant taxa richness for pure GJWs was 116.4, for mixed open 152.6, for open 57.9, and for mixed dense 90.2 taxa. The analysis of α-diversity indices did not reveal any specific trend of diversity for the four GJWs. The behavior of the variability of diversity among the four range types of GJWs was depending on the emphasis the used indices place on properties such as taxa richness or abundance. This fact was

  19. Commercialization analysis for fuels from Pinyon-Juniper biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, G.P.

    1993-01-01

    Pinyon-Juniper (P-J) is a predominant forest type in the Southwestern US, and in many areas it is considered a hinderance to optimal land use management. There is only limited commercial demand for the traditional products that are produced from PJ biomass, like Christmas trees, fence poles, and firewood, and their production does not always promote overall land-management goals. This research effort, which is supported by the DOE through the Western Regional Biomass Energy Program, identifies commercially feasible energy markets to promote sustainable land clearing operations for alternative land uses of P-J woodlands in Eastern Nevada. All of the woodlands under consideration are federal lands managed by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, which is supportive of our concept. Three possible markets are available or could reasonably be developed to use fuels derived from PJ biomass in Nevada: (1) The existing market for biomass power-plant fuels in California. (2) The emerging market for fuels for residential pellet-burning stoves. (3) The development of a biomass-fired power plant in the Eastern Nevada Area. The study analyzes the cost of harvesting, processing, transporting, and delivering fuels derived from P-J biomass, and identifies commercialization strategies for bringing these fuels to market. The best opportunity for near term commercial conversion of P-J biomass to fuel lies in the area of entering the pellet-stove fuel market, establishing a 10,000 ton per year pelletizing facility in Lincoln County. Such a facility would have excellent access to markets in Las Vegas, Phoenix, Denver, and Salt Lake City

  20. Estimating pinyon and juniper cover across Utah using NAIP imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darrell B. Roundy

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Expansion of Pinus L. (pinyon and Juniperus L. (juniper (P-J trees into sagebrush (Artemisia L. steppe communities can lead to negative effects on hydrology, loss of wildlife habitat, and a decrease in desirable understory vegetation. Tree reduction treatments are often implemented to mitigate these negative effects. In order to prioritize and effectively plan these treatments, rapid, accurate, and inexpensive methods are needed to estimate tree canopy cover at the landscape scale. We used object based image analysis (OBIA software (Feature AnalystTM for ArcMap 10.1®, ENVI Feature Extraction®, and Trimble eCognition Developer 8.2® to extract tree canopy cover using NAIP (National Agricultural Imagery Program imagery. We then compared our extractions with ground measured tree canopy cover (crown diameter and line point intercept on 309 plots across 44 sites in Utah. Extraction methods did not consistently over- or under-estimate ground measured P-J canopy cover except where tree cover was >45%. Estimates of tree canopy cover using OBIA techniques were strongly correlated with estimates using the crown diameter method (r = 0.93 for ENVI, 0.91 for Feature AnalystTM, and 0.92 for eCognition. Tree cover estimates using OBIA techniques had lower correlations with tree cover measurements using the line-point intercept method (r = 0.85 for ENVI, 0.83 for Feature AnalystTM, and 0.83 for eCognition. All software packages accurately and inexpensively extracted P-J canopy cover from NAIP imagery when the imagery was not blurred, and when P-J cover was not mixed with Amelanchier alnifolia (Utah serviceberry and Quercus gambelii (Gambel’s oak, which had similar spectral values as P-J.

  1. Specialist Bibliographic Databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparyan, Armen Yuri; Yessirkepov, Marlen; Voronov, Alexander A; Trukhachev, Vladimir I; Kostyukova, Elena I; Gerasimov, Alexey N; Kitas, George D

    2016-05-01

    Specialist bibliographic databases offer essential online tools for researchers and authors who work on specific subjects and perform comprehensive and systematic syntheses of evidence. This article presents examples of the established specialist databases, which may be of interest to those engaged in multidisciplinary science communication. Access to most specialist databases is through subscription schemes and membership in professional associations. Several aggregators of information and database vendors, such as EBSCOhost and ProQuest, facilitate advanced searches supported by specialist keyword thesauri. Searches of items through specialist databases are complementary to those through multidisciplinary research platforms, such as PubMed, Web of Science, and Google Scholar. Familiarizing with the functional characteristics of biomedical and nonbiomedical bibliographic search tools is mandatory for researchers, authors, editors, and publishers. The database users are offered updates of the indexed journal lists, abstracts, author profiles, and links to other metadata. Editors and publishers may find particularly useful source selection criteria and apply for coverage of their peer-reviewed journals and grey literature sources. These criteria are aimed at accepting relevant sources with established editorial policies and quality controls.

  2. Specialist Bibliographic Databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Specialist bibliographic databases offer essential online tools for researchers and authors who work on specific subjects and perform comprehensive and systematic syntheses of evidence. This article presents examples of the established specialist databases, which may be of interest to those engaged in multidisciplinary science communication. Access to most specialist databases is through subscription schemes and membership in professional associations. Several aggregators of information and database vendors, such as EBSCOhost and ProQuest, facilitate advanced searches supported by specialist keyword thesauri. Searches of items through specialist databases are complementary to those through multidisciplinary research platforms, such as PubMed, Web of Science, and Google Scholar. Familiarizing with the functional characteristics of biomedical and nonbiomedical bibliographic search tools is mandatory for researchers, authors, editors, and publishers. The database users are offered updates of the indexed journal lists, abstracts, author profiles, and links to other metadata. Editors and publishers may find particularly useful source selection criteria and apply for coverage of their peer-reviewed journals and grey literature sources. These criteria are aimed at accepting relevant sources with established editorial policies and quality controls. PMID:27134485

  3. Reconsidering the process for bow-stave removal from juniper trees in the Great Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constance I. Millar; Kevin T. Smith

    2017-01-01

    We question the growth arrestment hypothesis for bow stave removal used by indigenous people in the western Great Basin. Using modern understanding of tree growth and wound response, we suggest that growth would not be arrested by one or two transverse notches along a juniper stem. Rather these would trigger compartmentalization, which limits cambial death to within 10...

  4. First year soil and runoff response to compaction after mechanical mastication of juniper woodland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utah juniper (Juniperus osteosperma) expansion in the west has resulted in increased wildfires and has led land managers to search for effective fuel control methods. Mechanical mastication using a large, rotating drum with carbide teeth mounted on a tractor allows managers to selectively control tr...

  5. Decreased carbon limitation of litter respiration in a mortality-affected pinon-juniper woodland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erin Berryman; John D. Marshall; Thom Rahn; Marcie Litvak; John Butnor

    2013-01-01

    Microbial respiration depends on microclimatic variables and carbon (C) substrate availability, all of which are altered when ecosystems experience major disturbance. Widespread tree mortality, currently affecting pinon-juniper ecosystems in southwestern North America, may affect C substrate availability in several ways, for example, via litterfall pulses and loss of...

  6. Use of saltcedar and Utah juniper as fillers in wood–plastic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig Clemons; Nicole Stark

    2007-01-01

    Invasive and small-diameter species have become more prevalent, creating numerous environmental and ecological problems. One potential method to control and eliminate invasive species and thereby promote natural rangeland restoration is developing new, value-added uses for them. Saltcedar (Tamarisk ramosissima) and Utah juniper (Juniperus osteosperma) were investigated...

  7. Western Juniper Field Guide: Asking the Right Questions to Select Appropriate Management Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    The rapid expansion of western juniper into neighboring plant communities during the past 130 years has been linked to increased soil erosion; reduced forage production; altered wildlife habitat; changes in plant community composition, structure, and biodiversity. Impacts of post-settlement woodland...

  8. Pinon and juniper field guide: Asking the right questions to select appropriate management actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. J. Tausch; R. F. Miller; B. A. Roundy; J. C. Chambers

    2009-01-01

    Pinon-juniper woodlands are an important vegetation type in the Great Basin. Old-growth and open shrub savanna woodlands have been present over much of the last several hundred years. Strong evidence indicates these woodlands have experienced significant tree infilling and major expansion in their distribution since the late 1800s by encroaching into surrounding...

  9. Pinon-juniper management research at Corona Range and Livestock Research Center in Central New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andres Cibils; Mark Petersen; Shad Cox; Michael Rubio

    2008-01-01

    Description: New Mexico State University's Corona Range and Livestock Research Center (CRLRC) is located in a pinon-juniper (PJ)/grassland ecotone in the southern Basin and Range Province in south central New Mexico. A number of research projects conducted at this facility revolve around soil, plant, livestock, and wildlife responses to PJ woodland management. The...

  10. A demonstration project to test ecological restoration of a pinyon-juniper ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    David W. Huffman; Michael T. Stoddard; Peter Z. Fule; W. Wallace Covington; H. B. Smith

    2008-01-01

    To test an approach for restoring historical stand densities and increasing plant species diversity of a pinyon-juniper ecosystem, we implemented a demonstration project at two sites (CR and GP) on the Grand Canyon-Parashant National Monument in northern Arizona. Historical records indicated that livestock grazing was intensive on the sites beginning in the late 1800s...

  11. Runoff, erosion, and restoration studies in piñon-juniper woodlands of the Pajarito Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Craig D.; Johnson, Peggy S.

    2001-01-01

    Piñon-juniper woodlands are one of the most extensive vegetation types in New Mexico, including large portions of the Pajarito Plateau. The woodland soils on local mesas largely formed under different vegetation during cooler, moister conditions of the late Pleistocene; in other words, they are over 10,000 years old, and many are over 100,000 years old (McFadden et al., 1996). Changes in climate and vegetation in the early Holocene (8,500– 6,000 years ago) led to at least localized episodes of soil erosion on adjoining uplands (Reneau and McDonald, 1996; Reneau et al., 1996). During this time, the dominant climatic and associated vegetation patterns of the modern southwestern United States developed, including grasslands, piñon-juniper woodlands, and ponderosa pine savannas (Allen et al., 1998). On the basis of local fire history, the young ages of most piñon-juniper trees here, and soils data, we believe that many upland mesa areas now occupied by dense piñon-juniper woodlands were formerly more open, with fewer trees and well-developed herbaceous understories that: (1) protected the soil from excessive erosion during intense summer thunderstorm events, and (2) provided a largely continuous fuel matrix, which allowed surface fires to spread and maintain these vegetation types (Fig. 1). In contrast, rocky canyon walls have probably changed relatively little through the centuries, as grazing and fire suppression had fewer effects on such sites.

  12. Evaluation of the seasonal and annual abortifacient risk of western juniper trees on Oregon rangelands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needles from ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) trees are known to cause late term abortions in cattle. Recently, there have been several reports of abortion rates of 10-15% within cattle herds in Oregon after cattle were pastured in areas with abundant western juniper trees (Juniperus occidentalis)....

  13. Ecosystem water availability in juniper versus sagebrush snow-dominated rangelands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Western Juniper (J. occidentalis Hook.) now dominates over 3.6 million ha of rangeland in the Intermountain Western US. Critical ecological relationships among snow distribution, water budgets, plant community transitions, and habitat requirements for wildlife, such as sage grouse, remain poorly und...

  14. Understory cover responses to pinon-juniper treatments across tree dominance gradients in the Great Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñon (Pinus spp.) and juniper (Juniperus spp.) trees are reduced to restore native vegetation and avoid high severity fires where they have invaded sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata Nutt.) communities. To recommend treatment implementation which avoids threshold-crossing to invasive plant dominance w...

  15. Growth and yield of southwest pinyon-juniper woodlands: Modeling growth and drought effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    John D. Shaw

    2008-01-01

    A complex of drought, insects, and disease caused widespread mortality in the pinyon-juniper forest types of the American Southwest in recent years. Most public and scientific attention has been given to the extent of drought-related mortality and causal factors. At the same time, there has been relatively little attention given to non-lethal drought effects. As part...

  16. Restoration of mountain big sagebrush steppe following prescribed burning to control western juniper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, K W; Bates, J D; Madsen, M D; Nafus, A M

    2014-05-01

    Western juniper (Juniperus occidentalis ssp. occidentalis Hook) encroachment into mountain big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata spp. vaseyana (Rydb.) Beetle) steppe has reduced livestock forage production, increased erosion risk, and degraded sagebrush-associated wildlife habitat. Western juniper has been successfully controlled with partial cutting followed by prescribed burning the next fall, but the herbaceous understory and sagebrush may be slow to recover. We evaluated the effectiveness of seeding perennial herbaceous vegetation and sagebrush at five sites where juniper was controlled by partially cutting and prescribed burning. Treatments tested at each site included an unseeded control, herbaceous seed mix (aerially seeded), and the herbaceous seed mix plus sagebrush seed. In the third year post-treatment, perennial grass cover and density were twice as high in plots receiving the herbaceous seed mix compared to the control plots. Sagebrush cover and density in the sagebrush seeded plots were between 74- and 290-fold and 62- and 155-fold greater than the other treatments. By the third year after treatment, sagebrush cover was as high as 12 % in the sagebrush seeded plots and between 0 % and 0.4 % where it was not seeded. These results indicate that aerial seeding perennial herbaceous vegetation can accelerate the recovery of perennial grasses which likely stabilize the site. Our results also suggest that seeding mountain big sagebrush after prescribed burning encroaching juniper can rapidly recover sagebrush cover and density. In areas where sagebrush habitat is limited, seeding sagebrush after juniper control may increase sagebrush habitat and decrease the risks to sagebrush-associated species.

  17. Optometry Specialist (AFSC 91255).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kille, Michael O.

    This four-volume student text is designed for use by Air Force personnel enrolled in a self-study extension course for optometry specialists. Covered in the individual volumes are optometry clinic administration (optometry career and field training, ethical relationships and professionalism, eligibility for optometric care and appointment…

  18. Infectious Disease Specialist: What Is an Infectious Disease Specialist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medical professionals? When do I need an ID specialist? Many common infections can be treated by your ... diseases. Back to Top How was my ID specialist trained? Your ID Physician has 9-10 years ...

  19. Training Nuclear Power Specialists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulikas, V.

    2003-01-01

    Situation of preparation of nuclear energy specialists in Lithuania is presented. Nuclear engineers are being prepared at Kaunas University of Technology. In view with decision to decommission Unit 1, the Ignalina NPP is limiting the number of new personnel to fill in vacancies. The main attention is given to the training courses for improvement skills of existing Ignalina NPP, VATESI personnel. Main topics of the training courses are listed. Comparison with previous years on personnel hired and dismissed in Ignalina NPP is made

  20. Encounters with Pinyon-Juniper influence riskier movements in Greater Sage-Grouse across the Great Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochazka, Brian; Coates, Peter S.; Ricca, Mark; Casazza, Michael L.; Gustafson, K. Ben; Hull, Josh M.

    2016-01-01

    Fine-scale spatiotemporal studies can better identify relationships between individual survival and habitat fragmentation so that mechanistic interpretations can be made at the population level. Recent advances in Global Positioning System (GPS) technology and statistical models capable of deconstructing high-frequency location data have facilitated interpretation of animal movement within a behaviorally mechanistic framework. Habitat fragmentation due to singleleaf pinyon (Pinus monophylla; hereafter pinyon) and Utah juniper (Juniperus osteosperma; hereafter juniper) encroachment into sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) communities is a commonly implicated perturbation that can adversely influence greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus; hereafter sage-grouse) demographic rates. Using an extensive GPS data set (233 birds and 282,954 locations) across 12 study sites within the Great Basin, we conducted a behavioral change point analysis and subsequently constructed Brownian bridge movement models from each behaviorally homogenous section. We found a positive relationship between modeled movement rate and probability of encountering pinyon-juniper with significant variation among age classes. The probability of encountering pinyon-juniper among adults was two and three times greater than that of yearlings and juveniles, respectively. However, the movement rate in response to the probability of encountering pinyon-juniper trees was 1.5 times greater for juveniles. We then assessed the risk of mortality associated with an interaction between movement rate and the probability of encountering pinyon-juniper using shared frailty models. During pinyon-juniper encounters, on average, juvenile, yearling, and adult birds experienced a 10.4%, 0.2%, and 0.3% reduction in annual survival probabilities. Populations that used pinyon-juniper habitats with a frequency ≥ 3.8 times the overall mean experienced decreases in annual survival probabilities of 71.1%, 0.9%, and 0.9%. This

  1. Determine the optimum spectral reflectance of juniper and pistachio in arid and semi-arid region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadaei, Hadi; Suzuki, Rikie

    2012-11-01

    Arid and semi-arid areas of northeast Iran cover about 3.4 million ha are populated by two main tree species, the broadleaf Pistacia vera. L (pistachio) and the conifer Juniperus excelsa ssp. polycarpos (Persian juniper). Natural stands of pistachio in Iran are not only environmentally important but genetically essential as seed sources for pistachio production in orchards. In this study, we estimated the optimum spectral reflectance of juniper forests and natural pistachio stands using remote sensing to help in the sustainable management and production of pistachio in Iran. In this research spectral reflectance are able to specify of multispectral from Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) that provided by JAXA. These data included PRISM is a panchromatic radiometer with a 2.5 m spatial resolution at nadir, has one band with a wavelength of 0.52-0.77 μm and AVNIR-2 is a visible and near infrared radiometer for observing land and coastal zones with a 10 m spatial resolution at nadir, has four multispectral bands: blue (0.42-0.50 μm), green (0.52-0.60 μm), red (0.61-0.69 μm), and near infrared (0.76-0.89 μm). Total ratio vegetation index (TRVI) of optimum spectral reflectance of juniper and pistachio have been evaluated. The result of TRVI for Pistachio and juniper were (R2= 0.71 and 0.55). I hope this research can provide decision of managers to helping sustainable management for arid and semi-arid regions in Iran.

  2. Pinon-juniper reduction increases soil water availability of the resource growth pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce A. Roundy; Kert Young; Nathan Cline; April Hulet; Richard F. Miller; Robin J. Tausch; Jeanne C. Chambers; Ben Rau

    2014-01-01

    Managers reduce piñon (Pinus spp.) and juniper (Juniperus spp.) trees that are encroaching on sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) communities to lower fuel loads and increase cover of desirable understory species. All plant species in these communities depend on soil water held at > −1.5 MPa matric potential in the upper 0.3 m of soil for nutrient...

  3. Viewpoint: Sustainability of piñon-juniper ecosystems - A unifying perspective of soil erosion thresholds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, David W.; Breshears, D.D.; Wilcox, B.P.; Allen, Craig D.

    1998-01-01

    Many pinon-juniper ecosystem in the western U.S. are subject to accelerated erosion while others are undergoing little or no erosion. Controversy has developed over whether invading or encroaching pinon and juniper species are inherently harmful to rangeland ecosystems. We developed a conceptual model of soil erosion in pinon-jumper ecosystems that is consistent with both sides of the controversy and suggests that the diverse perspectives on this issue arise from threshold effects operating under very different site conditions. Soil erosion rate can be viewed as a function of (1) site erosion potential (SEP), determined by climate, geomorphology and soil erodibility; and (2) ground cover. Site erosion potential and cove act synergistically to determine soil erosion rates, as evident even from simple USLE predictions of erosion. In pinon-juniper ecosystem with high SEP, the erosion rate is highly sensitive to ground cover and can cross a threshold so that erosion increases dramatically in response to a small decrease in cover. The sensitivity of erosion rate to SEP and cover can be visualized as a cusp catastrophe surface on which changes may occur rapidly and irreversibly. The mechanisms associated with a rapid shift from low to high erosion rate can be illustrated using percolation theory to incorporate spatial, temporal, and scale-dependent patterns of water storage capacity on a hillslope. Percolation theory demonstrates how hillslope runoff can undergo a threshold response to a minor change in storage capacity. Our conceptual model suggests that pinion and juniper contribute to accelerated erosion only under a limited range of site conditions which, however, may exist over large areas.

  4. Hydraulic limits preceding mortality in a piñon-juniper woodland under experimental drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaut, Jennifer A; Yepez, Enrico A; Hill, Judson; Pangle, Robert; Sperry, John S; Pockman, William T; McDowell, Nate G

    2012-09-01

    Drought-related tree mortality occurs globally and may increase in the future, but we lack sufficient mechanistic understanding to accurately predict it. Here we present the first field assessment of the physiological mechanisms leading to mortality in an ecosystem-scale rainfall manipulation of a piñon-juniper (Pinus edulis-Juniperus monosperma) woodland. We measured transpiration (E) and modelled the transpiration rate initiating hydraulic failure (E(crit) ). We predicted that isohydric piñon would experience mortality after prolonged periods of severely limited gas exchange as required to avoid hydraulic failure; anisohydric juniper would also avoid hydraulic failure, but sustain gas exchange due to its greater cavitation resistance. After 1 year of treatment, 67% of droughted mature piñon died with concomitant infestation by bark beetles (Ips confusus) and bluestain fungus (Ophiostoma spp.); no mortality occurred in juniper or in control piñon. As predicted, both species avoided hydraulic failure, but safety margins from E(crit) were much smaller in piñon, especially droughted piñon, which also experienced chronically low hydraulic conductance. The defining characteristic of trees that died was a 7 month period of near-zero gas exchange, versus 2 months for surviving piñon. Hydraulic limits to gas exchange, not hydraulic failure per se, promoted drought-related mortality in piñon pine. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Drought predisposes piñon-juniper woodlands to insect attacks and mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaylord, Monica L; Kolb, Thomas E; Pockman, William T; Plaut, Jennifer A; Yepez, Enrico A; Macalady, Alison K; Pangle, Robert E; McDowell, Nate G

    2013-04-01

    To test the hypothesis that drought predisposes trees to insect attacks, we quantified the effects of water availability on insect attacks, tree resistance mechanisms, and mortality of mature piñon pine (Pinus edulis) and one-seed juniper (Juniperus monosperma) using an experimental drought study in New Mexico, USA. The study had four replicated treatments (40 × 40 m plot/replicate): removal of 45% of ambient annual precipitation (H2 O-); irrigation to produce 125% of ambient annual precipitation (H2 O+); a drought control (C) to quantify the impact of the drought infrastructure; and ambient precipitation (A). Piñon began dying 1 yr after drought initiation, with higher mortality in the H2 O- treatment relative to other treatments. Beetles (bark/twig) were present in 92% of dead trees. Resin duct density and area were more strongly affected by treatments and more strongly associated with piñon mortality than direct measurements of resin flow. For juniper, treatments had no effect on insect resistance or attacks, but needle browning was highest in the H2 O- treatment. Our results provide strong evidence that ≥ 1 yr of severe drought predisposes piñon to insect attacks and increases mortality, whereas 3 yr of the same drought causes partial canopy loss in juniper. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  6. Resent state and multivariate analysis of a few juniper forests of baluchistan, pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, M.; Siddiqui, M.F.

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative multivariate investigations were carried out to explore various forms of Juniper trees resulting human disturbances and natural phenomenon. Thirty stands were sampled by point centered quarter method and data were analysed using Wards cluster analysis and Bray-Curtis ordination. On the basis of multivariate analysis eight various forms i.e. healthy, unhealthy, over mature, disturbed, dieback, standing dead, logs and cut stem were recognized. Structural attributes were computed. Highest numbers (130-133 stem ha-1) of logs were recorded from Cautair and Khunk forests. Highest density ha-1 (229 ha-1) of healthy plants was estimated from Tangi Top area while lowest number (24 ha-1) of healthy plants was found from Saraghara area. Multivariate analysis showed five groups in cluster and ordination diagrams. These groups are characterized on the basis of healthy, over mature, disturbed and logged trees of Juniper. Higher number (115, 96, 84, 80 ha-1) of disturbed trees were distributed at Speena Sukher, Srag Kazi, Prang Shella and Tangi Top respectively. Overall density does not show any significant relation with basal area m2 ha-1, degree of slopes and the elevation of the sampling stands. Present study show that each and every Juniper stands are highly disturbed mostly due to human influence, therefore prompt conservational steps should be taken to safe these forests. (author)

  7. Defining modeling parameters for juniper trees assuming pleistocene-like conditions at the NTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarbox, S.R.; Cochran, J.R.

    1994-01-01

    This paper addresses part of Sandia National Laboratories' (SNL) efforts to assess the long-term performance of the Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) facility located on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Of issue is whether the GCD site complies with 40 CFR 191 standards set for transuranic (TRU) waste burial. SNL has developed a radionuclide transport model which can be used to assess TRU radionuclide movement away from the GCD facility. An earlier iteration of the model found that radionuclide uptake and release by plants is an important aspect of the system to consider. Currently, the shallow-rooted plants at the NTS do not pose a threat to the integrity of the GCD facility. However, the threat increases substantially it deeper-rooted woodland species migrate to the GCD facility, given a shift to a wetter climate. The model parameters discussed here will be included in the next model iteration which assumes a climate shift will provide for the growth of juniper trees at the GCD facility. Model parameters were developed using published data and wherever possible, data were taken from juniper and pinon-juniper studies that mirrored as many aspects of the GCD facility as possible

  8. Comparison of six commercial DNA extraction kits for detection of Brucella neotomae in Mexican and Central American-style cheese and other milk products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusk, Tina S; Strain, Errol; Kase, Julie A

    2013-05-01

    Raw or inadequately pasteurized milk from infected animals and cheese made with such milk are a frequent vehicle for human brucellosis infection. Also, biological terrorism is a concern with certain Brucella spp. Due to matrix-associated real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) inhibitors, robust sample preparations are crucial. We compared six commercial nucleic acid extraction kits using nine Mexican and Central American-style soft cheeses or creams and three liquid milk products inoculated with Brucella neotomae, a surrogate for pathogenic Brucella spp. Kits were evaluated by purity and quantity of DNA as determined by qPCR Ct values, reproducibility across cheese and milk types, and cost. At 10(7) CFU/g in four different cheeses, Qiagen statistically outperformed all other kits. When two cheese styles were inoculated at dual levels, Qiagen and High Pure kit extracted samples at 1.5 × 10(5) CFU/g produced average Ct values of 34-39, while PrepSEQ and MagMAX kit extracted samples exhibited higher or no Ct values. High Pure and Qiagen kits excelled also with liquid milk products. Considering matrices, inoculation levels, and kits evaluated, High Pure and Qiagen products produced Brucella DNA of high quality and quantity indicated by the lowest Ct values and were the least expensive. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Environmental, genetic, and ecophysiological variation of western and Utah juniper and their hybrids: A model system for vegetation response to climate change. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowak, R.S. [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States). Dept. of Environmental and Resource Sciences; Tausch, R.J. [Forest Service, Reno, NV (United States). Rocky Mountain Research Station

    1998-11-01

    This report focuses on the following two research projects relating to the biological effects of climate change: Hybridization and genetic diversity populations of Utah (Juniperus osteosperma) and western (Juniperus occidentalis) juniper: Evidence from nuclear ribosomal and chloroplast DNA; and Ecophysiological patterns of pinyon and juniper.

  10. Big sagebrush in pinyon-juniper woodlands: Using forest inventory and analysis data as a management tool for quantifying and monitoring mule deer habitat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chris Witt; Paul L. Patterson

    2011-01-01

    We used Interior West Forest Inventory and Analysis (IW-FIA) data to identify conditions where pinyon-juniper woodlands provide security cover, thermal cover, and suitable amounts of big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata spp.) forage to mule deer in Utah. Roughly one quarter of Utah's pinyon-juniper woodlands had a big sagebrush component in their understory....

  11. Historical and modern disturbance regimes, stand structures, and landscape dynamics in pinyon-juniper vegetation of the Western U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    William H. Romme; Craig D. Allen; John D. Bailey; William L. Baker; Brandon T. Bestelmeyer; Peter M. Brown; Karen S. Eisenhart; M. Lisa Floyd; David W. Huffman; Brian F. Jacobs; Richard F. Miller; Esteban H. Muldavin; Thomas W. Swetnam; Robin J. Tausch; Peter J. Weisberg

    2009-01-01

    Pinon-juniper is a major vegetation type in western North America. Effective management of these ecosystems has been hindered by inadequate understanding of 1) the variability in ecosystem structure and ecological processes that exists among the diverse combinations of Pinons, junipers, and associated shrubs, herbs, and soil organisms; 2) the prehistoric and historic...

  12. Tracking juniper berry content in oils and distillates by spectral deconvolution of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbat, Albert; Kowalsick, Amanda; Howell, Jessalin

    2011-08-12

    The complex nature of botanicals and essential oils makes it difficult to identify all of the constituents by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) alone. In this paper, automated sequential, multidimensional gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-GC/MS) was used to obtain a matrix-specific, retention time/mass spectrometry library of 190 juniper berry oil compounds. GC/MS analysis on stationary phases with different polarities confirmed the identities of each compound when spectral deconvolution software was used to analyze the oil. Also analyzed were distillates of juniper berry and its oil as well as gin from four different manufacturers. Findings showed the chemical content of juniper berry can be traced from starting material to final product and can be used to authenticate and differentiate brands. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A comparison of change detection measurements using object-based and pixel-based classification methods on western juniper dominated woodlands in eastern Oregon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan G. Howell

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Encroachment of pinyon (Pinus spp and juniper (Juniperus spp. woodlands in western North America is considered detrimental due to its effects on ecohydrology, plant community structure, and soil stability. Management plans at the federal, state, and private level often include juniper removal for improving habitat of sensitive species and maintaining sustainable ecosystem processes. Remote sensing has become a useful tool in determining changes in juniper woodland structure because of its uses in comparing archived historic imagery with newly available multispectral images to provide information on changes that are no longer detectable by field measurements. Change in western juniper (J. occidentalis cover was detected following juniper removal treatments between 1995 and 2011 using panchromatic 1-meter NAIP and 4-band 1-meter NAIP imagery, respectively. Image classification was conducted using remotely sensed images taken at the Roaring Springs Ranch in southeastern Oregon. Feature Analyst for ArcGIS (object-based extraction and a supervised classification with ENVI 5.2 (pixel-based extraction were used to delineate juniper canopy cover. Image classification accuracy was calculated using an Accuracy Assessment and Kappa Statistic. Both methods showed approximately a 76% decrease in western juniper cover, although differing in total canopy cover area, with object-based classification being more accurate. Classification results for the 2011 imagery were much more accurate (0.99 Kappa statistic because of its low juniper density and the presence of an infrared band. The development of methods for detecting change in juniper cover can lead to more accurate and efficient data acquisition and subsequently improved land management and monitoring practices. These data can subsequently be used to assess and quantify juniper invasion and succession, potential ecological impacts, and plant community resilience.

  14. Education of nuclear energy specialists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulikas, V.

    1999-01-01

    Preparation system of nuclear energy specialists in Lithuania is presented. Nuclear engineers are being prepared at Kaunas University of Technology. Post-graduates students usually continue studies at Obninsk Nuclear Energy Institute in Russia. Many western countries like Sweden, Finland and US is providing assistance in education of Lithuanian specialists. Many of them were trained in these countries

  15. Foliar carbon dynamics of piñon and juniper in response to experimental drought and heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, A.; Ryan, M. G.; Adams, H. D.; Dickman, L. T.; Garcia-Forner, N.; Grossiord, C.; Powers, H. H.; Sevanto, S.; McDowell, N. G.

    2015-12-01

    Plant respiration (R) is generally well-coupled with temperature and in the absence of thermal acclimation, respiration is expected to increase as climate change brings higher temperatures. Increased drought is also predicted for future climate, which could drive respiration higher if the carbon (C) cost to maintain tissues (Rm) or grow increases, or lower if substrate or other factors become limiting. We examined the effects of temperature and drought on R as well as photosynthesis, growth, and carbohydrate storage of mature individuals of two co-dominant tree species. Three mature, in-situ piñon (Pinus edulis) and juniper (Juniperus monosperma) trees were assigned to each of the following treatments: +4.8 °C; 45% reduced precipitation; a combination of both (heat + drought); along with ambient control and treatment controls. Rm measured prior to foliar and twig growth was far more sensitive to drought in piñon, and heat in juniper. Total respiration (Rt, R not partitioned) acclimated to temperature in piñon such that elevated temperature had minimal impacts on Rt; however, juniper exhibited higher Rt with elevated temperature, thus juniper did not display any thermal acclimation. Rt in both species was weakly associated with temperature, but strongly correlated with pre-dawn water potential, photosynthetic assimilation (A) rates, and in piñon, foliar carbohydrates. For both species, heat caused far more days where A-R was negative than did drought. The consequences of drought alone and heat alone in piñon included higher Rt per unit growth, indicating that each abiotic stress forces a greater allocation of Rt to maintenance costs, and both drought + heat in combination results in far fewer days that foliar carbohydrates could sustain R in both species. Notably, the much higher A and R of juniper than piñon is consistent with predicted superior carbon budget regulation of juniper than piñon during drought; however, juniper's lack of temperature acclimation

  16. [Genetical control of the allozymes in juniper (Juniperus excelsa Bieb.) of the Crimea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korshikov, I I; Nikolaeva, A V

    2007-01-01

    Genetical control of nine enzyme systems has been studied in preserved juniper species (Juniperus excelsa Bieb.) of the natural population of the mountain Crimea. Isozymes were extracted from the haploid seed endosperms and separated elecrophoretically. As a result 16 loci have been identified. Fourteen of them were polymorphic (14--Gdh, Got-1, Mdh-1, Mdh-2, Mdh-3, Acp-1, Acp-2, Acp-3, Lap-1, Dia-1, Fdh, Sod-1, Sod-2, Sod-3). Analysis of the allele segragation of the heterozygous trees confirmed their monogenic inheritance.

  17. Modeling dynamics of western juniper under climate change in a semiarid ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, R.; Glenn, N. F.; Flores, A. N.

    2013-12-01

    Modeling future vegetation dynamics in response to climate change and disturbances such as fire relies heavily on model parameterization. Fine-scale field-based measurements can provide the necessary parameters for constraining models at a larger scale. But the time- and labor-intensive nature of field-based data collection leads to sparse sampling and significant spatial uncertainties in retrieved parameters. In this study we quantify the fine-scale carbon dynamics and uncertainty of juniper woodland in the Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed (RCEW) in southern Idaho, which is a proposed critical zone observatory (CZO) site for soil carbon processes. We leverage field-measured vegetation data along with airborne lidar and timeseries Landsat imagery to initialize a state-and-transition model (VDDT) and a process-based fire-model (FlamMap) to examine the vegetation dynamics in response to stochastic fire events and climate change. We utilize recently developed and novel techniques to measure biomass and canopy characteristics of western juniper at the individual tree scale using terrestrial and airborne laser scanning techniques in RCEW. These fine-scale data are upscaled across the watershed for the VDDT and FlamMap models. The results will immediately improve our understanding of fine-scale dynamics and carbon stocks and fluxes of woody vegetation in a semi-arid ecosystem. Moreover, quantification of uncertainty will also provide a basis for generating ensembles of spatially-explicit alternative scenarios to guide future land management decisions in the region.

  18. Detection of soil erosion within pinyon-juniper woodlands using Thematic Mapper (TM) data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Kevin P.

    1993-01-01

    Multispectral measurements collected by Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) were correlated with field measurements, direct soil loss estimates, and Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) estimates to determine the sensitivity of TM data to varying degrees of soil erosion in pinyon-juniper woodland in central Utah. TM data were also evaluated as a predictor of the USLE Crop Management C factor for pinyon-juniper woodlands. TM spectral data were consistently better predictors of soil erosion factors than any combination of field factors. TM data were more sensitive to vegetation variations than the USLE C factor. USLE estimates showed low annual rates of erosion which varied little among the study sites. Direct measurements of rate of soil loss using the SEDIMENT (Soil Erosion DIrect measureMENT) technique, indicated high and varying rates of soil loss among the sites since tree establishment. Erosion estimates from the USLE and SEDIMENT methods suggest that erosion rates have been severe in the past, but because significant amounts of soil have already been eroded, and the surface is now armored by rock debris, present erosion rates are lower. Indicators of accelerated erosion were still present on all sites, however, suggesting that the USLE underestimated erosion within the study area.

  19. Nature's Notebook Provides Phenology Observations for NASA Juniper Phenology and Pollen Transport Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luval, J. C.; Crimmins, T. M.; Sprigg, W. A.; Levetin, E.; Huete, A.; Nickovic, S.; Prasad, A.; Vukovic, A.; VandeWater, P. K.; Budge, A. M.; hide

    2014-01-01

    Phenology Network has been established to provide national wide observations of vegetation phenology. However, as the Network is still in the early phases of establishment and growth, the density of observers is not yet adequate to sufficiently document the phenology variability over large regions. Hence a combination of satellite data and ground observations can provide optimal information regarding juniperus spp. pollen phenology. MODIS data was to observe Juniperus supp. pollen phenology. The MODIS surface reflectance product provided information on the Juniper supp. cone formation and cone density. Ground based observational records of pollen release timing and quantities were used as verification. Approximately 10, 818 records of juniper phenology for male cone formation Juniperus ashei., J. monosperma, J. scopulorum, and J. pinchotti were reported by Nature's Notebook observers in 2013 These observations provided valuable information for the analysis of satellite images for developing the pollen concentration masks for input into the PREAM (Pollen REgional Atmospheric Model) pollen transport model. The combination of satellite data and ground observations allowed us to improve our confidence in predicting pollen release and spread, thereby improving asthma and allergy alerts.

  20. Frijolito Watershed: Integrated investigations of a rapidly eroding pinyon-juniper hillslope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilcox, B.P.; Pitlick, J.

    1995-01-01

    The dramatic acceleration of erosion associated with the expansion of pinyon-juniper woodlands over the past 100 years has been widely recognized, but few process-based studies of this phenomenon have been undertaken. In an attempt to identify the underlying causes, and the factors that affect erosion processes, we have initiated an interdisciplinary study of a rapidly eroding pinyon-juniper woodland in northern New Mexico. Since July 1993, we have collected data on runoff, erosion, and weather conditions from a 1-ha catchment study area and have conducted surveys of topography, soils, and vegetation. Our preliminary results indicate that although runoff makes up less than 10% of the annual water budget, runoff events - which are frequent in the summer - are capable of moving large amounts of sediment. We estimate that between July 1993 and October 1994, between 25,000 and 50,000 kg of sediment has eroded and been transported from the catchment. The information gained from such studies is essential to our ability to formulate effective strategies for managing these rapidly eroding woodlands

  1. Find an Endocrinology - Thyroid Specialist

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... History Resource Center Patients Thyroid Information Find an Endocrinology – Thyroid Specialist Patient Support Links Clinical Thyroidology for ... Access Thyroid Online Access Clinical Thyroidology Online Video Endocrinology Donate Give Online Research Accomplishments Ridgway Legacy Fund ...

  2. Assessing mechanical mastication and thinning-piling-burning treatments on the pinyon-juniper woodlands of southwestern Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerald Gottfried; Steve Overby

    2011-01-01

    New knowledge of fire regimes in the pinyon-juniper woodlands of the interior western United States has altered management views. Once known as being at low wildfire risk, these woodlands are now at a higher risk for severe wildfires because of high tree densities exacerbated by ongoing drought and region-wide bark beetle (Ips confusus) infestation. To help reduce...

  3. Variation in ant populations with elevation, tree cover, and fire in a pinyon-juniper-dominated watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eugenie M. MontBlanc; Jeanne C. Chambers; Peter E. Brussard

    2007-01-01

    Climate change and fire suppression have facilitated expansion of pinyon-juniper woodlands into sagebrush- steppe ecosystems of the Great Basin, USA, resulting in a loss of biological diversity. To assess the effects of using prescribed fire in restoration efforts, ant abundance, species richness, and composition were examined pre- and post-burn along the elevation and...

  4. Effects of a spring prescribed burn on the soil seed bank in sagebrush steppe exhibiting pinyon-juniper expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elizabeth A. Allen; Jeanne C. Chambers; Robert S. Nowak

    2008-01-01

    Pinyon-juniper (Pinus monophylla-Juniperus osteosperma) woodlands are expanding into shrubsteppe ecosystems in western portions of the Great Basin. Often, highly competitive trees displace the understory, and prescribed fire is increasingly used as a restoration tool. To inform management decisions about post-fire recovery, we...

  5. Drought-Related Mortality in Pinyon-Juniper Woodlands: A Test Case for the FIA Annual Inventory System

    Science.gov (United States)

    John D. Shaw

    2006-01-01

    Several years of drought in the Southwest United States are associated with widespread mortality in the pinyon-juniper forest type. A complex of drought, insects, and disease is responsible for pinyon mortality rates approaching 100 percent in some areas, while other areas have experienced little or no mortality. Implementation of the Forest Inventory and Analysis...

  6. What Is a Pediatric Infectious Diseases Specialist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size Email Print Share What is a Pediatric Infectious Diseases Specialist? Page Content Article Body If ... the teen years. What Kind of Training Do Pediatric Infectious Diseases Specialists Have? Pediatric infectious diseases specialists ...

  7. What Is a Pediatric Critical Care Specialist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size Email Print Share What is a Pediatric Critical Care Specialist? Page Content Article Body If ... in the PICU. What Kind of Training Do Pediatric Critical Care Specialists Have? Pediatric critical care specialists ...

  8. Fire patterns in piñon and juniper land cover types in the Semiarid Western United States from 1984 through 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    David I. Board; Jeanne C. Chambers; Richard F. Miller; Peter J. Weisberg

    2018-01-01

    Increases in area burned and fire size have been reported across a wide range of forest and shrubland types in the Western United States in recent decades, but little is known about potential changes in fire regimes of piñon and juniper land cover types. We evaluated spatio-temporal patterns of fire in piñon and juniper land cover types from the National Gap Analysis...

  9. 48 CFR 552.236-72 - Specialist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Specialist. 552.236-72... FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions and Clauses 552.236-72 Specialist. As prescribed in 536.570-3, insert the following clause: Specialist (APR 1984) The term “Specialist...

  10. Pinon and Juniper Field Guide: Asking the Right Questions to Select Appropriate Management Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tausch, R.J.; Miller, R.F.; Roundy, B.A.; Chambers, J.C.

    2009-01-01

    Pinon-juniper woodlands are an important vegetation type in the Great Basin. Old-growth and open shrub savanna woodlands have been present over much of the last several hundred years. Strong evidence indicates these woodlands have experienced significant tree infilling and major expansion in their distribution since the late 1800s by encroaching into surrounding landscapes once dominated by shrubs and herbaceous vegetation. Both infilling and expansion affects soil resources, plant community structure and composition, water and nutrient cycles, forage production, wildlife habitat, biodiversity, and fire patterns across the landscape. Another impact is the shift from historic fire regimes to larger and more intense wildfires that are increasingly determining the future of this landscape. This publication helps biologists and land managers consider how to look at expansion of woodlands and determine what questions to ask to develop a management strategy, including prescribed fire or other practices.

  11. Enantiomeric distribution of major chiral volatile organic compounds in juniper-flavored distillates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pažitná, Alexandra; Spánik, Ivan

    2014-02-01

    The enantiomeric ratios of chiral volatile organic compounds in juniper-flavored spirits produced by various processing technologies in different EU countries were determined by multidimensional GC using solid-phase microextraction and liquid-liquid extraction as a sample pretreatment procedure. In total, more than 260 compounds were detected in studied spirits from which linalool, α-terpineol, 4-terpineol, linalool oxides, α-pinene, and verbenone were selected for enantiomeric separation. The significant differences in enantiomeric ratio of linalool and cis-linalool oxide allowed us to distinguish between samples produced in Slovakia and the United Kingdom from those produced in Germany, Czech Republic, and Belgium. The pure enantiomer of trans-linalool oxide was found only in samples from Germany. It was shown that the enantiomeric ratio is independent of the sample treatment procedure, and only small differences up to 1% were observed. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Pest Management Specialist (AFSC 56650).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Air Univ., Gunter AFS, Ala. Extension Course Inst.

    This eight-volume student text is designed for use by Air Force personnel enrolled in a self-study extension course for pest management specialists. Covered in the individual volumes are civil engineering; pest management (entomology, pest management planning and coordination, and safety and protective equipment); pest management chemicals and…

  13. ISD Designed Medical Specialist Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, Samuel K., Jr.; Chagalis, George P.

    The Basic Medical Specialist course has one of the largest enrollments of the U.S. Army's Academy of Health Sciences; 11,000 soldiers were trained in this course in 1977 and 1978. Training encompasses both emergency first aid (for field medics) and basic nursing skills. A task force working to improve Army training developed this course, in…

  14. Annual increments of juniper dwarf shrubs above the tree line on the central Tibetan Plateau: a useful climatic proxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Eryuan; Lu, Xiaoming; Ren, Ping; Li, Xiaoxia; Zhu, Liping; Eckstein, Dieter

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Dendroclimatology is playing an important role in understanding past climatic changes on the Tibetan Plateau. Forests, however, are mainly confined to the eastern Tibetan Plateau. On the central Tibetan Plateau, in contrast, shrubs and dwarf shrubs need to be studied instead of trees as a source of climate information. The objectives of this study were to check the dendrochronological potential of the dwarf shrub Wilson juniper (Juniperus pingii var. wilsonii) growing from 4740 to 4780 m a.s.l. and to identify the climatic factors controlling its radial growth. Methods Forty-three discs from 33 stems of Wilson juniper were sampled near the north-eastern shore of the Nam Co (Heavenly Lake). Cross-dating was performed along two directions of each stem, avoiding the compression-wood side as far as possible. A ring-width chronology was developed after a negative exponential function or a straight line of any slope had been fit to the raw measurements. Then, correlations were calculated between the standard ring-width chronology and monthly climate data recorded by a weather station around 100 km away. Key Results Our study has shown high dendrochronological potential of Wilson juniper, based on its longevity (one individual was 324 years old), well-defined growth rings, reliable cross-dating between individuals and distinct climatic signals reflected by the ring-width variability. Unlike dwarf shrubs in the circum-arctic tundra ecosystem which positively responded to above-average temperature in the growing season, moisture turned out to be growth limiting for Wilson juniper, particularly the loss of moisture caused by high maximum temperatures in May–June. Conclusions Because of the wide distribution of shrub and dwarf shrub species on the central Tibetan Plateau, an exciting prospect was opened up to extend the presently existing tree-ring networks far up into one of the largest tundra regions of the world. PMID:22210848

  15. Annual increments of juniper dwarf shrubs above the tree line on the central Tibetan Plateau: a useful climatic proxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Eryuan; Lu, Xiaoming; Ren, Ping; Li, Xiaoxia; Zhu, Liping; Eckstein, Dieter

    2012-03-01

    Dendroclimatology is playing an important role in understanding past climatic changes on the Tibetan Plateau. Forests, however, are mainly confined to the eastern Tibetan Plateau. On the central Tibetan Plateau, in contrast, shrubs and dwarf shrubs need to be studied instead of trees as a source of climate information. The objectives of this study were to check the dendrochronological potential of the dwarf shrub Wilson juniper (Juniperus pingii var. wilsonii) growing from 4740 to 4780 m a.s.l. and to identify the climatic factors controlling its radial growth. Forty-three discs from 33 stems of Wilson juniper were sampled near the north-eastern shore of the Nam Co (Heavenly Lake). Cross-dating was performed along two directions of each stem, avoiding the compression-wood side as far as possible. A ring-width chronology was developed after a negative exponential function or a straight line of any slope had been fit to the raw measurements. Then, correlations were calculated between the standard ring-width chronology and monthly climate data recorded by a weather station around 100 km away. Our study has shown high dendrochronological potential of Wilson juniper, based on its longevity (one individual was 324 years old), well-defined growth rings, reliable cross-dating between individuals and distinct climatic signals reflected by the ring-width variability. Unlike dwarf shrubs in the circum-arctic tundra ecosystem which positively responded to above-average temperature in the growing season, moisture turned out to be growth limiting for Wilson juniper, particularly the loss of moisture caused by high maximum temperatures in May-June. Because of the wide distribution of shrub and dwarf shrub species on the central Tibetan Plateau, an exciting prospect was opened up to extend the presently existing tree-ring networks far up into one of the largest tundra regions of the world.

  16. Determination of collected quantities of wild strawbery, bluberry and juniper in Serbia in relation to different scenarios of climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranković Nenad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the influence of some climate elements on the collected quantities of blueberry, wild strawberry and juniper in Serbia. The main objective of the research is to predict the quantity of selected forest fruits depending on the different climate change scenarios (A1Bmin, A1Bmax, A2min and A2max. The general (modeling method, basic (dialectical and specific scientific methods (induction and deduction, analysis and synthesis, abstraction and concretization were used. Regression models were used in data processing, where the focus was on the statistical significance of the correlation coefficient in relation to the statistical significance of the parameters. The research found that, in the coming period, with the increase in temperature and precipitation, an increase in the collected amount of wild strawberries and blueberries could be expected, and the decline of juniper. Longer-term forecasts indicate expected growth with wild strawberries and blueberries with a tendency to slow down after 2040, and expected decline with juniper, with the same slow down tendency after 2040. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. 43007Studies of climate changes and their impact on the environment - monitoring impacts, adaptation and mitigation, sub-project No. 43007/16-III: Socio-economic development, mitigation and adaptation to climate change

  17. Acute aquatic toxicity of western juniper (Juniperus occidentalis) foliage and Port Orford cedar (Chamaecyparis lawsoniana) heartwood oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duringer, Jennifer M; Swan, Laurence R; Walker, Douglas B; Craig, A Morrie

    2010-11-01

    Recently, interest has developed for using essential oils from Western juniper (Juniperus occidentalis) foliage and Port Orford cedar (Chamaecyparis lawsoniana) heartwood in commercial products such as pest repellents and cosmetics. In order to gauge the relative toxicological risk that these oils pose to freshwater and marine organisms, the acute aquatic toxicity of these oils was evaluated using OPPTS guidelines to the cladoceran Daphnia magna, the rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss and the green alga Selenastrum capricornutum. For western juniper foliage oil, no toxicity was exhibited toward D. magna or O. mykiss, even at 5.0 mg/L (the highest concentration tested and limit of solubility). For toxicity to S. capricornutum using algal cell density, the 72 and 96 h EC50 value was 1.7 mg/L and the no observable effect concentration (NOEC) was 0.63 mg/L. For Port Orford cedar heartwood oil, no toxicity was exhibited toward O. mykiss or S. capricornutum, even at 5.0 mg/L (the highest concentration tested and limit of solubility). The 48-h D. magna EC50 value was 1.9 mg/L; the NOEC values for algal cell density were 1.25 mg/L (72 h) and 0.63 mg/L (96 h). In summary, this study shows that western juniper foliage and Port Orford cedar heartwood oils demonstrate little to no risk to aquatic organisms.

  18. Effects of feeding ground redberry juniper (Juniperus pinchotii) to gestating ewes on pre- and postpartum performance, serum metabolites and hormones, milk fatty acid composition, and progeny preweaning performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, W C; Whitney, T R; Scholljegerdes, E J; Hallford, D M; Walker, J W; Adams, R P; Naumann, H D

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this research was to evaluate effects of replacing sorghum × Sudangrass hay with ground juniper in gestating ewe supplements on pre- and postpartum growth performance, serum metabolites and hormonal concentrations, milk fatty acid composition, and progeny preweaning performance. In a completely randomized design, commercial Rambouillet ewes (age = 3 to 5 yr; initial BW = 65.2 ± 1.6 kg) on a base diet of long-stem sorghum × Sudangrass hay were assigned to 1 of 4 dietary supplements in which ground juniper replaced 0% (CNTL), 33% (18JUN), 66% (36JUN), or 100% (54JUN) of the ground sorghum × Sudangrass hay in a pelleted supplement with ground juniper from d 38 ± 4 of gestation to 2 d postpartum. Treatment DM diet intake overall (g/kg BW) in ewes receiving no juniper was similar ( ≥ 0.38) to that of those receiving increasing concentrations of juniper. Changes in ewe BW and BCS were similar ( ≥ 0.24) in ewes throughout gestation. All serum metabolites and hormones were within normal clinical ranges; however, serum IGF-1 decreased linearly ( = 0.003), alanine increased (linear; = 0.003), and serum Na decreased (linear; = 0.049) as the percentage of juniper increased in the diet. Ewe milk fatty acid composition was similar ( > 0.05) for the majority of fatty acids across treatment groups, with the exception of arachidonic acid (C20:4n6) being greater ( hormones measured pre- and postpartum. Lamb birth weight and preweaning performance appeared unaffected by maternal consumption of ground juniper containing supplements. Results also provide novel information regarding the effects of plant secondary compound consumption throughout pregnancy on ewe and progeny performance and health.

  19. American specialists and SAP project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrlova, Z.

    2008-01-01

    Within the past days of November the project teams of SAP Nuclear in Slovenske elektrarne, a. s. incorporated the specialists from PSEG from New Jersey, U.S.A. The goal of their stay here was to pass on the professional experience and good practice from the implementation of quite demanding project in the nuclear power plants. We have learned more about the company and the objectives from an interview with Clay Warren, SAP Nuclear Project Manager in SE. (author)

  20. Specialist training in pediatric anesthesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tom G

    2009-01-01

    There has been a great deal of focus on specialist training in pediatric anesthesia in the last decade or so. Internationally, however, there is still no uniform agreement as to how such a training program should be arranged and organized. Since September 2003, the Scandinavian Society of Anaesth......There has been a great deal of focus on specialist training in pediatric anesthesia in the last decade or so. Internationally, however, there is still no uniform agreement as to how such a training program should be arranged and organized. Since September 2003, the Scandinavian Society...... of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine has coordinated an advanced Inter-Nordic educational program in pediatric anesthesia and intensive care. The training program is managed by a Steering Committee. This program is intended for physicians who recently have received their specialist degree in anesthesiology...... and intensive care. The training period is 12 months of which 9 months are dedicated to pediatric anesthesia and 3 months to pediatric intensive care. During the 1-year training period, the candidates are designated a Scandinavian host clinic (at a tertiary pediatric center in Scandinavia approved...

  1. Cooperation among medical specialists : "pain" or "gain"?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoffels, Antoinette Marie-Rose Renée

    2008-01-01

    This thesis investigates the cooperation among medical specialists in multidisciplinary teams as well as its antecedents and consequences. During meetings, medical specialists combine their knowledge and expertise, discuss the health problems of patients, weigh possible treatment options and decide

  2. 48 CFR 536.570-3 - Specialist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Specialist. 536.570-3... CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Contract Clauses 536.570-3 Specialist. Insert 552.236-72, Specialist, in solicitations and contracts for construction if the technical sections...

  3. A Comparison of Selected Supervisory Skills of Content Specialist and Non-Content Specialist University Supervisors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Kevin; Mitchell, Murray; Maina, Michael; Griffin, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe and contrast selected approaches to the supervision of student teachers between Content Specialist and Non-Content Specialist university supervisors. Content Specialist supervisors were identified as trained university supervisors with a background in physical education. Non-Content Specialist supervisors…

  4. Developing a Carbon Monitoring System For Pinyon-juniper Forests and Woodlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkowski, M. J.; Hudak, A. T.; Fekety, P.; Filippelli, S.

    2017-12-01

    Pinyon-juniper (PJ) forests and woodlands are the third largest vegetation type in the United States. They cover over 40 million hectares across the western US, representing 40% of the total forest and woodland area in the Intermountain West. Although the density of carbon stored in these ecosystems is relatively low compared to other forest types, the vast area of short stature forests and woodlands (both nationally and globally) make them critical components of regional, national, and global carbon budgets. The overarching goal of this research is to prototype a carbon monitoring, reporting, and verification (MRV) system for characterizing total aboveground biomass stocks and flux across the PJ vegetation gradient in the western United States. We achieve this by combining in situ forest measurements and novel allometric equations with tree measurements derived from high resolution airborne imagery to map aboveground biomass across 500,000 km2 in the Western US. These high-resolution maps of aboveground biomass are then leveraged as training data to predict biomass flux through time from Landsat time-series data. The results from this research highlight the potential in mapping biomass stocks and flux in open forests and woodlands, and could be easily adopted into an MRV framework.

  5. Effects of Feeding Garlic and Juniper Berry Essential Oils on Milk Fatty Acid Composition of Dairy Cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Zhu Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Essential oils (EOs from plant extracts have been reported to have an antibacterial activity against gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria. Several of the gram-positive bacteria are involved in ruminal biohydrogenation of fatty acids (FAs, thus suggesting that feeding EOs could lower biohydrogenation of FA because of a decrease in the number of bacteria involved in that process. As a result, milk FA profiles are expected to be modified. In addition, monensin was approved as an antibiotic to be fed in dairy cattle, and it was reported that dairy cows supplemented with monensin produced milk containing higher concentration of 18:1 t10 and 18:1 t11. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of two EOs (garlic and juniper berry oils and monensin on FA profiles of milk fat. Four ruminally fistulated Holstein dairy cows were used in a 4 x 4 Latin square experiment. Cows were fed for ad libitum intake a total mixed ration without supplementation (control, or supplemented with monensin (330 mg/head per day, garlic oil (5 g/head per day, or juniper berry oil (2 g/head per day. The FA composition of saturated, monounsaturated, or polyunsaturated was not affected by supplementation of EO and monensin. However, proportion of conjugated linoleic acid trans 10, cis 12 (CLA t10, c12 was higher ( P < 0.05 for cows fed EO or monensin than for control cows. Supplementation of monensin increased ( P < 0.05 the proportion of total trans FA compared with the control. These results indicate that supplementation of the dairy cow diet with garlic or juniper berry EO or monensin had the potential to increase the proportion of CLA t10, c12 in milk fat with minimal overall effects on FA of milk fat. The results also confirm the increase of 18:1 t10 in milk fat by feeding monensin to dairy cows.

  6. Response of bird community structure to habitat management in piñon-juniper woodland-sagebrush ecotones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knick, Steven T.; Hanser, Steven E.; Grace, James B.; Hollenbeck, Jeff P.; Leu, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Piñon (Pinus spp.) and juniper (Juniperus spp.) woodlands have been expanding their range across the intermountain western United States into landscapes dominated by sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) shrublands. Management actions using prescribed fire and mechanical cutting to reduce woodland cover and control expansion provided opportunities to understand how environmental structure and changes due to these treatments influence bird communities in piñon-juniper systems. We surveyed 43 species of birds and measured vegetation for 1–3 years prior to treatment and 6–7 years post-treatment at 13 locations across Oregon, California, Idaho, Nevada, and Utah. We used structural equation modeling to develop and statistically test our conceptual model that the current bird assembly at a site is structured primarily by the previous bird community with additional drivers from current and surrounding habitat conditions as well as external regional bird dynamics. Treatment reduced woodland cover by >5% at 80 of 378 survey sites. However, habitat change achieved by treatment was highly variable because actual disturbance differed widely in extent and intensity. Biological inertia in the bird community was the strongest single driver; 72% of the variation in the bird assemblage was explained by the community that existed seven years earlier. Greater net reduction in woodlands resulted in slight shifts in the bird community to one having ecotone or shrubland affinities. However, the overall influence of woodland changes from treatment were relatively small and were buffered by other extrinsic factors. Regional bird dynamics did not significantly influence the structure of local bird communities at our sites. Our results suggest that bird communities in piñon-juniper woodlands can be highly stable when management treatments are conducted in areas with more advanced woodland development and at the level of disturbance measured in our study.

  7. Training of radwaste management specialists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lifanova, S.D.

    2010-01-01

    Highly professional and knowledgeable employees for chemical, and especially radiochemical, technology companies are very much sought after these days. Taking into account the advancement of nuclear power and the associated expansion of radioactive waste management facilities, the demand for staff that possesses all the necessary knowledge is set to increase multi-tenfold. In such circumstances, training of personnel is becoming a key element of the human resource management process. The author says that training of personnel at SUE SIA Radon Moscow is conducted in accordance with the Program of Training, Advanced Training and Personnel Qualification, which prescribes areas of training, categories of trainees, approximate number of trainees for each area, schedule and budget of training sessions. The cooperation of SUE SIA Radon Moscow with higher-education institutions in the field of young specialists training and advanced training of managerial, technical and administrative staff is reported [ru

  8. Dual extraction of essential oil and podophyllotoxin from creeping juniper (Juniperus horizontalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles L Cantrell

    Full Text Available Juniperus horizontalis Moench (Family Cupressaceae, commonly called creeping juniper, is a widely distributed species in the United States and much of Canada. It is potentially a source for two important chemical products, the anticancer drug synthetic precursor, podophyllotoxin and essential oils. The objectives of this study were to ascertain the likelihood of utilizing J. horizontalis needles for the simultaneous production of both (--podophyllotoxin and essential oil components and to determine the optimum distillation time (DT needed for the production of essential oil containing a specific ratio of constituents. Eleven different distillation times were tested in this study: 20, 40, 80, 160, 180, 240, 480, 600, 720, 840, and 960 min. Total essential oil content increased with increasing distillation time from a minimum of 0.023% at 20 min to a maximum of 1.098% at 960 min. The major constituents present in the oil were alpha-pinene, sabinene, and limonene. The percent concentration of sabinene in the essential oil varied from a high of 46.6% at 80 min to a low of 30.2% at 960 min, that of limonene changed very little as a result of distillation time and remained near 30% for all distillation times, whereas the concentration of alpha-pinene was 9.6% at 20 min DT and decreased to 4.2% at 960 min. Post distillation analysis of needles revealed elevated amounts of (--podophyllotoxin remaining in the tissue varied in the amount of podophyllotoxin present, from a low of 0.281% to a high of 0.364% as compared to undistilled needles which gave 0.217% podophyllotoxin. As a result of this study, specific essential oil components can now be targeted in J. horizontalis by varying the distillation time. Furthermore, needles can be successfully utilized as a source of both essential oil and podophyllotoxin, consecutively.

  9. Proposal to endorse the award of a contract for the supply of a juniper T320 network router

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    This document concerns the award of a contract for the supply of a JUNIPER T320 Network Router. The Finance Committee is invited to endorse the CERN Management's decision to negotiate a contract with QWEST COMMUNICATION (USA) for the supply of a JUNIPER T320 Network Router for a total amount not exceeding 265 000 US dollars (350 000 Swiss francs). The Finance Committee is also requested to approve the negotiation of a maintenance contract for a value not exceeding 50 000 US dollars (66 000 Swiss francs) for three years and the option to purchase additional network interfaces for a value not exceeding 100 000 US dollars (132 000 Swiss francs) bringing the total amount to 415 000 US dollars (548 000 Swiss francs), not subject to revision. CERN's contribution will not exceed 90 000 Swiss francs. The amounts in Swiss francs have been calculated using the present rate of exchange. The firm has indicated the following distribution by country of the contract value covered by this adjudication proposal: CA - 100%.

  10. Decreased carbon limitation of litter respiration in a mortality-affected piñon–juniper woodland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Berryman

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Microbial respiration depends on microclimatic variables and carbon (C substrate availability, all of which are altered when ecosystems experience major disturbance. Widespread tree mortality, currently affecting piñon–juniper ecosystems in southwestern North America, may affect C substrate availability in several ways, for example, via litterfall pulses and loss of root exudation. To determine piñon mortality effects on C and water limitation of microbial respiration, we applied field amendments (sucrose and water to two piñon–juniper sites in central New Mexico, USA: one with a recent (2 flux on the girdled site and a non-significant increase on the control. We speculate that the reduction may have been driven by water-induced carbonate dissolution, which serves as a sink for CO2 and would reduce the net flux. Widespread piñon mortality may decrease labile C limitation of litter respiration, at least during the first growing season following mortality.

  11. Both gas chromatography and an electronic nose reflect chemical polymorphism of juniper shrubs browsed or avoided by sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markó, Gábor; Novák, Ildikó; Bernáth, Jeno; Altbäcker, Vilmos

    2011-07-01

    Chemical polymorphism may contribute to variation in browsing damage by mammalian herbivores. Earlier, we demonstrated that essential oil concentration in juniper, Juniperus communis, was negatively associated with herbivore browsing. The aim of the present study was to characterize the volatile chemical composition of browsed and non-browsed J. communis. By using either gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (GC-FID) or an electronic nose device, we could separate sheep-browsed or non-browsed juniper shrubs by their essential oil pattern and complex odor matrix. The main components of the essential oil from J. communis were monoterpenes. We distinguished three chemotypes, dominated either by α-pinene, sabinene, or δ-3-carene. Shrubs belonging to the α-pinene- or sabinene-dominated groups were browsed, whereas all individuals with the δ-3-carene chemotype were unused by the local herbivores. The electronic nose also separated the browsed and non-browsed shrubs indicating that their odor matrix could guide sheep browsing. Responses of sheep could integrate the post-ingestive effects of plant secondary metabolites with sensory experience that stems from odor-phytotoxin interactions. Chemotype diversity could increase the survival rate in the present population of J. communis as certain shrubs could benefit from relatively better chemical protection against the herbivores.

  12. Effects of thinning, burning, seeding, and slash arrangements on understory communities in pinyon-juniper woodlands of northern Arizona

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Irwin

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Pinyon-juniper woodlands are a dominant ecosystem in the American Southwest that have been increasing in density over the last century, generating concerns about the effects on wildlife habitat, livestock forage, and wildfire risk. We tested 16 treatment combinations designed to restore stands to historic conditions by examining the impact on understory plant richness and abundance. We thinned three sites comprised of different parent soil materials: limestone, sandstone, and basalt. Each site had one of four slash arrangements: piled, broadcast, clustered, or no thinning. Each of these arrangements received a different burning/seeding treatment: prescribed fire, seeding, prescribed fire and seeding, or none. This study corresponded with the driest period in the last 55 years, and plant species richness decreased by an average of 40% from the previous year in the control plots. Richness was significantly different due to slash arrangement at the basalt site only. Burning or seeding did not affect richness at any of the sites. Plant species abundance was generally low and not influenced by treatment or site. This study demonstrates that extensive ecosystem manipulation in the pinyon-juniper woodlands of northern Arizona did not affect understory richness or abundance the first year after treatment during a drought.

  13. Effects of thinning, burning, seeding, and slash arrangements on understory communities in pinyon-juniper woodlands of northern Arizona

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria R. Irwin

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Pinyon-juniper woodlands are a dominant ecosystem in the American Southwest that have been increasing in density over the last century, generating concerns about the effects on wildlife habitat, livestock forage, and wildfire risk. We tested 16 treatment combinations designed to restore stands to historic conditions by examining the impact on understory plant richness and abundance. We thinned three sites comprised of different parent soil materials: limestone, sandstone, and basalt. Each site had one of four slash arrangements: piled, broadcast, clustered, or no thinning. Each of these arrangements received a different burning/seeding treatment: prescribed fire, seeding, prescribed fire and seeding, or none. This study corresponded with the driest period in the last 55 years, and plant species richness decreased by an average of 40% from the previous year in the control plots. Richness was significantly different due to slash arrangement at the basalt site only. Burning or seeding did not affect richness at any of the sites. Plant species abundance was generally low and not influenced by treatment or site. This study demonstrates that extensive ecosystem manipulation in the pinyon-juniper woodlands of northern Arizona did not affect understory richness or abundance the first year after treatment during a drought.

  14. Use of Direct and Indirect Estimates of Crown Dimensions to Predict One Seed Juniper Woody Biomass Yield for Alternative Energy Uses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Throughout the western United States there is increased interest in utilizing woodland biomass as an alternative energy source. We conducted a pilot study to predict one seed juniper (Juniperus monosperma) chip yield from tree-crown dimensions measured on the ground or derived from Very Large Scale ...

  15. Detecting mortality induced structural and functional changes in a pinon-juniper woodland using Landsat and RapidEye time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan J. Krofcheck; Jan U. H. Eitel; Lee A. Vierling; Urs Schulthess; Timothy M. Hilton; Eva Dettweiler-Robinson; Rosemary Pendleton; Marcy E. Litvak

    2014-01-01

    Pinon-juniper (PJ) woodlands have recently undergone dramatic drought-induced mortality, triggering broad scale structural changes in this extensive Southwestern US biome. Given that climate projections for the region suggest widespread conifer mortality is likely to continue into the next century, it is critical to better understand how this climate-induced change in...

  16. Impacts of long-term precipitation manipulation on hydraulic architecture and xylem anatomy of piñon and juniper in Southwest USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, P J; Limousin, J M; Krofcheck, D J; Boutz, A L; Pangle, R E; Gehres, N; McDowell, N G; Pockman, W T

    2018-02-01

    Hydraulic architecture imposes a fundamental control on water transport, underpinning plant productivity, and survival. The extent to which hydraulic architecture of mature trees acclimates to chronic drought is poorly understood, limiting accuracy in predictions of forest responses to future droughts. We measured seasonal shoot hydraulic performance for multiple years to assess xylem acclimation in mature piñon (Pinus edulis) and juniper (Juniperus monosperma) after 3+ years of precipitation manipulation. Our treatments consisted of water addition (+20% ambient precipitation), partial precipitation-exclusion (-45% ambient precipitation), and exclusion-structure control. Supplemental watering elevated leaf water potential, sapwood-area specific hydraulic conductivity, and leaf-area specific hydraulic conductivity relative to precipitation exclusion. Shifts in allocation of leaf area to sapwood area enhanced differences between irrigated and droughted K L in piñon but not juniper. Piñon and juniper achieved similar K L under ambient conditions, but juniper matched or outperformed piñon in all physiological measurements under both increased and decreased precipitation treatments. Embolism vulnerability and xylem anatomy were unaffected by treatments in either species. Absence of significant acclimation combined with inferior performance for both hydraulic transport and safety suggests piñon has greater risk of local extirpation if aridity increases as predicted in the southwestern USA. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Analisis Elemen Visual Pada Promosi Busana Muslimah di Instagram (Studi Kasus Merek Hijab Juniper Lane, Zaha, dan Zysku Xena di Bandung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramadita Fetrianggi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of Visual Elements on Muslimah Clothing Promotion in Instagram (Case Study on Brands of Hijab Juniper Lane, Zaha, and Zysku Xena in Bandung. Muslim clothing in the form of hijab has become popular as a religious lifestyle and identity. The popularity of hijab is due to the promotion of marketing through instagram displaying muslim fashion clothing that is designed very interesting, so that consumers become interested and marketing becomes increasing. This study aims to examine muslim clothing photos on instagram hijab with brands of Juniper Lane, Zaha, and Zysku Xena in Bandung seen from the visual elements of photography. The research method used case study with descriptive approach through visual analysis. The research subjects are instagram photos on Juniper Lane hijab brand, Zaha, and Zysku Xena in Bandung. Data collection techniques were collected by observation, instagram photo documentation study, and interviews with local brand owners of hijab and consumers. Data were analyzed by visual analysis, content analysis, and qualitative analysis. The results show that muslim clothing photos on instagram with brands of hijab Juniper Lane, Zaha, and Zysku Xena in Bandung have fulfilled the visual elements of photography, so the photo design becomes attractive, the consumers become interested in them, and the marketing becomes increasing.

  18. Preparing Elementary Mathematics-Science Teaching Specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, L. Diane

    1992-01-01

    Describes a professional development program to train math/science specialists for the upper elementary school grades. Using results from an interest survey, 30 teachers were chosen to participate in a 3-year program to become math/science specialists. Presents the teaching model used and the advantages for teachers and students in having subject…

  19. Mission Specialist Scott Parazynski arrives at KSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    STS-95 Mission Specialist Scott E. Parazynski notes the time on his watch upon his late arrival aboard a T-38 jet at the Shuttle Landing Facility. Parazynski's first plane experienced problems at the stop at Tyndall AFB and he had to wait for another jet and pilot to finish the flight to KSC. He joined other crewmembers Mission Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Steven W. Lindsey, Mission Specialist Stephen K. Robinson, Payload Specialist John H. Glenn Jr., senator from Ohio, Mission Specialist Pedro Duque, with the European Space Agency (ESA), and Payload Specialist Chiaki Mukai, with the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA), for final pre-launch preparations. STS-95 is expected to launch at 2 p.m. EST on Oct. 29, last 8 days, 21 hours and 49 minutes, and land at 11:49 a.m. EST on Nov. 7.

  20. Are peer specialists happy on the job?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Sarah; Chenneville, Tiffany; Salnaitis, Christina

    2018-03-01

    This study was designed to examine the impact of role clarity and job training on job satisfaction among peer specialists. A 3-part survey assessing job training, job satisfaction, and role clarity was administered online to 195 peer specialists who are members of the International Association of Peer Specialists. Data was analyzed using descriptive statistics, correlational analyses to include multiple linear regressions and analysis of variance. Self-study and online training methods were negatively correlated with job satisfaction while job shadowing was positively correlated with job satisfaction. Role clarity was positively correlated with job satisfaction and job training satisfaction as well as job shadowing and one-on-one training. The use of self-study and online training for peer specialists is contraindicated by current findings, which suggest the need to utilize job shadowing or training methods that allow for personal interaction between peer specialists and their colleagues. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Historical fire and multidecadal drought as context for piñon - Juniper woodland restoration in western Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinneman, Douglas J.; Baker, William L.

    2009-01-01

    Fire is known to structure tree populations, but the role of broad-scale climate variability is less clear. For example, the influence of climatic “teleconnections” (the relationship between oceanic–atmospheric fluctuations and anomalous weather patterns across broad scales) on forest age structure is relatively unexplored. We sampled semiarid piñon–juniper (Pinus edulis–Juniperus osteosperma) woodlands in western Colorado, USA, to test the hypothesis that woodland age structures are shaped by climate, including links to oceanic–atmospheric fluctuations, and by past fires and livestock grazing. Low-severity surface fire was lacking, as fire scars were absent, and did not influence woodland densities, but stand-replacing fires served as long-rotation (>400–600 years), stand-initiating events. Old-growth stands (>300 years old) were found in 75% of plots, consistent with a long fire rotation. Juniper and piñon age structures suggest contrasting responses during the past several centuries to dry and wet episodes linked to the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) and Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). Juniper density increased slightly during periods of drought, positive (warm) AMO (after ∼10-year lag), and negative (cool) PDO. In contrast, piñon populations may still be recovering from a long, drought-filled period (AD 1620–1820), with pulses of recovery favored during cool AMO, warm PDO, and above-average moisture periods. Analysis of 20th-century tree establishment and instrumental climate data corroborate the long-term relationships between age structure and climate. After Euro–American settlement (AD 1881), livestock grazing reduced understory grasses and forbs, reducing competition with tree seedlings and facilitating climate-induced increases in piñons. Thus tree populations in these woodlands are in flux, affected by drought and wet periods linked to oceanic–atmospheric variability, Euro–American livestock grazing, and long

  2. Final report: Hydraulic mechanisms of survival and mortality during drought in pinon-juniper woodlands of southwestern USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pockman, William [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-11-23

    The goal of this project was to use rainfall manipulation of an intact pinon-juniper woodland in central New Mexico to understand the mechanisms that control the response of these species to extremes of rainfall. Experimental plots were installed in a pinon-juniper woodland at the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge and treatments were imposed in August 2007. Treatments consisted of 1) a Drought treatment imposed by diverting approximately 45% of precipitation away from the plot, 2) and Irrigation treatment imposed by applying six 19 mm simulated rainfall events at regular intervals during the growing season, 3) a Cover Control treatment designed to assess the impact of the plastic troughs constructed on Drought plots without imposing the rainfall diversion, and 4) an untreated control that received no modification. Extensive pinon mortality was observed beginning one year after the start of drought treatment on hillslope plots, while a third drought plot on deeper soils did not exhibit pinon mortality until the fifth year of drought treatment. Pinon mortality occurred in the context of high levels of bark beetle activity, motivating the installation of two additional plots in 2010: a control plot and a drought plot built to the same standards as the original treatments but with bark beetle control maintained by pesticide application to the bole of target trees from 2010 - 2016. Although the drought treatment created similar conditions to those experienced on hillslope drought plots, the drought plot with bark beetle control exhibited no pinon mortality for 5 years even in the presence of high regional bark beetle activity in 2012/13. One of the goals of the research was to identify the mechanism of drought-induced mortality in pinon and juniper: 1) mortality due to catastrophic failure of water transport through plant tissues (hydraulic failure), 2) mortality due to limitations in carbon uptake (carbon starvation) and 3) either of the first two mechanisms with the

  3. IT Security Specialist | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The IT Security Specialist takes a strategic role in the delivery of Infrastructure ... on IT Security to project managers, business clients and senior management. ... as a team member or a team leader by undertaking research, investigations, ...

  4. Wildlife Private Lands Specialist Support Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This layer represents the areas of Minnesota that MNDNR Wildlife Private Lands Specialists cover. These boundaries are provided for support mapping and to show...

  5. Mountain Warfare: The Need for Specialist Training

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Malik, Muhammad

    2003-01-01

    This study focuses on the need for specialist training for mountain warfare. It analyzes the special characteristics of mountain and high altitude terrain which affect conduct of military operations...

  6. Limits to understory plant restoration following fuel-reduction treatments in a piñon-juniper woodland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, Miranda D; Zelikova, Tamara J; Barger, Nichole N

    2014-11-01

    National fuel-reduction programs aim to reduce the risk of wildland fires to human communities and to restore forest and rangeland ecosystems to resemble their historical structure, function, and diversity. There are a number of factors, such as seed bank dynamics, post-treatment climate, and herbivory, which determine whether this latter goal may be achieved. Here, we examine the short-term (2 years) vegetation response to fuel-reduction treatments (mechanical mastication, broadcast burn, and pile burn) and seeding of native grasses on understory vegetation in an upland piñon-juniper woodland in southeast Utah. We also examine how wildlife herbivory affects the success of fuel-reduction treatments. Herbaceous cover increased in response to fuel-reduction treatments in all seeded treatments, with the broadcast burn and mastication having greater increases (234 and 160 %, respectively) in herbaceous cover than the pile burn (32 %). In the absence of seeding, herbaceous cover only increased in the broadcast burn (32 %). Notably, fuel-reduction treatments, but not seeding, strongly affected herbaceous plant composition. All fuel-reduction treatments increased the relative density of invasive species, especially in the broadcast burn, which shifted the plant community composition from one dominated by perennial graminoids to one dominated by annual forbs. Herbivory by wildlife reduced understory plant cover by over 40 % and altered plant community composition. If the primary management goal is to enhance understory cover while promoting native species abundance, our study suggests that mastication may be the most effective treatment strategy in these upland piñon-juniper woodlands. Seed applications and wildlife exclosures further enhanced herbaceous cover following fuel-reduction treatments.

  7. Ecohydrological Linkages, Multi-scale Processes, Temporal Variability, and Drivers of Change in a Degraded Pinyon-Juniper Watershed: Implications for Erosion Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, C. D.

    2006-12-01

    In 1993 long-term research began on the runoff and erosion dynamics of a pinyon-juniper woodland hillslope at Bandelier National Monument in northern New Mexico (USA). In the 1.09 ha Frijolito watershed, erosion has been continuously studied at 3 spatial scales: 1 square meter, about 1000 square meters, and the entire watershed. This site is currently representative of degraded woodlands of pinyon (Pinus edulis) and one-seed juniper (Juniperus monosperma) in this region, exhibiting marked connectivity of exposed bare soil interspaces between tree canopy patches and obvious geomorphic signs of accelerated soil erosion (e.g., pedestalling, actively expanding rill networks). Ecological and land use histories show that this site has undergone a number of dramatic ecohydrological shifts since ca. C.E. 1850, transitioning from: 1) open ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) overstory with limited pinyon-juniper component and substantial herbaceous understory that supported surface fires and constrained soil erosion, to; 2) ponderosa pine with reduced herbaceous cover due to livestock grazing after ca.1870, resulting in collapse of the surface fire regime and increased establishment of young pinyon and juniper trees, to; 3) mortality of all of the ponderosa pine during the extreme drought of the 1950s, leaving eroding pinyon-juniper woodland, to; 4) mortality of all mature pinyon at or above sapling size during the 2002-2003 drought, with juniper now the only dominant woody species. Detailed measurements since 1993 document high rates of soil erosion (> 2.75 Mg/ha/year on average at the watershed scale) that are rapidly stripping the local soils. Long-term observations are needed to distinguish short-term variability from longer term trends, as measurements of runoff and erosion show extreme variability at multiple time scales since 1993. The multi-scale erosion data from the Frijolito watershed reveal little dropoff in erosion rate (g/meter-squared) between the one meter

  8. Attitudes regarding specialist referrals in periodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, G; Durham, J A; Preshaw, P M

    2007-02-24

    To examine the attitudes of dental practitioners towards specialist periodontal referral in the North East of England. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of 10 practitioners. Interviews continued until data saturation occurred. The data were organised using a framework and analysed by two researchers working independently. Perceptions of periodontal disease and treatment appear to be heavily influenced by the NHS remuneration system. Treatment in general practice was limited to simple scaling and there was an apparent reluctance to treat advanced periodontitis. Such cases were commonly referred to specialists, confirming the demand for a referral service in periodontics. The perceived potential for medico-legal consequences was a strong driver of referrals. Distance to the referral centre and the perceived costs of treatment were significant barriers to referral. Dentists valued the specialist's personal reputation and clinical skills more highly than academic status. Deficiencies in communication between primary and secondary care were highlighted. Increased resources are required to manage periodontal diseases within the NHS. There is a need for a periodontal referral service in the North East of England to improve accessibility to specialist care. This would appear to be most appropriately delivered by increased numbers of specialist practitioners.

  9. Data Report: Meteorological and Evapotranspiration Data from Sagebrush and Pinyon Pine/Juniper Communities at Pahute Mesa, Nevada National Security Site, 2011-2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jasoni, Richard L [DRI; Larsen, Jessica D [DRI; Lyles, Brad F. [DRI; Healey, John M [DRI; Cooper, Clay A [DRI; Hershey, Ronald L [DRI; Lefebre, Karen J [DRI

    2013-04-01

    Pahute Mesa is a groundwater recharge area at the Nevada National Security Site. Because underground nuclear testing was conducted at Pahute Mesa, groundwater recharge may transport radionuclides from underground test sites downward to the water table; the amount of groundwater recharge is also an important component of contaminant transport models. To estimate the amount of groundwater recharge at Pahute Mesa, an INFIL3.0 recharge-runoff model is being developed. Two eddy covariance (EC) stations were installed on Pahute Mesa to estimate evapotranspiration (ET) to support the groundwater recharge modeling project. This data report describes the methods that were used to estimate ET and collect meteorological data. Evapotranspiration was estimated for two predominant plant communities on Pahute Mesa; one site was located in a sagebrush plant community, the other site in a pinyon pine/juniper community. Annual ET was estimated to be 310±13.9 mm for the sagebrush site and 347±15.9 mm for the pinyon pine/juniper site (March 26, 2011 to March 26, 2012). Annual precipitation measured with unheated tipping bucket rain gauges was 179 mm at the sagebrush site and 159 mm at the pinyon pine/juniper site. Annual precipitation measured with bulk precipitation gauges was 222 mm at the sagebrush site and 227 mm at the pinyon pine/juniper site (March 21, 2011 to March 28, 2012). A comparison of tipping bucket versus bulk precipitation data showed that total precipitation measured by the tipping bucket rain gauges was 17 to 20 percent lower than the bulk precipitation gauges. These differences were most likely the result of the unheated tipping bucket precipitation gauges not measuring frozen precipitation as accurately as the bulk precipitation gauges. In this one-year study, ET exceeded precipitation at both study sites because estimates of ET included precipitation that fell during the winter of 2010-2011 prior to EC instrumentation and the precipitation gauges started

  10. Winter precipitation effect in a mid-latitude temperature-limited environment: the case of common juniper at high elevation in the Alps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellizzari, Elena; Pividori, Mario; Carrer, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Common juniper (Juniperus communis L.) is by far the most widespread conifer in the world. However, tree-ring research dealing with this species is still scarce, mainly due to the difficulty in crossdating associated with the irregular stem shape with strip-bark growth form in older individuals and the high number of missing and wedging rings. Given that many different species of the same genus have been successfully used in tree-ring investigations and proved to be reliable climate proxies, this study aims to (i) test the possibility to successfully apply dendrochronological techniques on common juniper growing above the treeline and (ii) verify the climate sensitivity of the species with special regard to winter precipitation, a climatic factor that generally does not affect tree-ring growth in all Alpine high-elevation tree species. Almost 90 samples have been collected in three sites in the central and eastern Alps, all between 2100 and 2400 m in elevation. Despite cross-dating difficulties, we were able to build a reliable chronology for each site, each spanning over 200 years. Climate-growth relationships computed over the last century highlight that juniper growth is mainly controlled by the amount of winter precipitation. The high variability of the climate-growth associations among sites, corresponds well to the low spatial dependence of this meteorological factor. Fairly long chronologies and the presence of a significant precipitation signal open up the possibility to reconstruct past winter precipitation. (letter)

  11. 14 CFR 1214.305 - Payload specialist responsibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Payload specialist responsibilities. 1214... Payload Specialists for Space Transportation System (STS) Missions § 1214.305 Payload specialist... commander has ultimate responsibility and authority for all assigned crew duties. The payload specialist is...

  12. 29 CFR 42.9 - Farm Labor Specialist (ESA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Farm Labor Specialist (ESA). 42.9 Section 42.9 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor COORDINATED ENFORCEMENT § 42.9 Farm Labor Specialist (ESA). (a) The Assistant Secretary for ESA shall designate ESA Compliance Officers as Farm Labor Specialists (Specialists...

  13. IMPROVEMENT OF INNOVATIVE TRAINING OF ROAD SPECIALISTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. I. Leonovich

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Complicated conditions, under which road enterprises of the Republic are forced to operate, put forward and reveal the necessity to innovative way of development. In order to fulfill this task it is necessary to have specialists who are capable and ready to realize this endeavour. The most acceptable variant is to train specialists who will be able to introduce innovations and who are presently involved in the production process. Such training should be carried out within the framework of post-graduate education. Authors have provide a number of reasons in favour of quick development of such education. 

  14. Differences in quality standards when prescribing nutritional support: Differences between specialist and non-specialist physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morán López, Jesús Manuel; Piedra León, María; Enciso Izquierdo, Fidel Jesús; Luengo Pérez, Luis Miguel; Amado Señaris, José Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Adequate nutritional support includes many different aspects, but poor understanding of clinical nutrition by health care professionales often results in an inadequate prescription. A study was conducted to compare enteral and parenteral nutritional support plans prescribed by specialist and non-specialist physicians. Non-specialist physicians recorded anthropometric data from only 13.3% of patients, and none of them performed nutritional assessments. Protein amounts provided by non-specialist physicians were lower than estimated based on ESPEN (10.29g of nitrogen vs 14.62; Pspecialist group (14.88g of nitrogen; P=.072). Calorie and glutamine provision and laboratory controls prescribed by specialists were significantly closer to those recommended by clinical guidelines. Nutritional support prescribed by specialists in endocrinology and nutrition at San Pedro de Alcántara Hospital was closer to clinical practice guideline standards and of higher quality as compared to that prescribed by non-specialists. Copyright © 2015 SEEN. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. 22 CFR 62.26 - Specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Specialists. 62.26 Section 62.26 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE PUBLIC DIPLOMACY AND EXCHANGES EXCHANGE VISITOR PROGRAM Specific Program... such areas, for example, as mass media communication, environmental science, youth leadership...

  16. Professional Training of Marketing Specialists: Foreign Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharchenko, Yuliia

    2017-01-01

    Due to content-based analysis of marketing specialists' professional training and approaches to development of their educational trajectory, it has been revealed that curricula and their content are given much attention by employers whose demands are focused on meeting current labour market conditions. It has been justified that despite the…

  17. Treatment Algorithm of a Hypertension Specialist

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Peleška, Jan; Anger, Z.; Buchtela, David; Tomečková, Marie; Veselý, Arnošt; Zvárová, Jana

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 25, Suppl. 2 (2007), S 383-S 383 ISSN 0952-1178. [European Meeting on Hypertension /17./. 15.06.2007-19.06.2007, Milan] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1ET200300413 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : treatment algorithm for hypertension * hypertension specialist Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery

  18. Preparation, Endorsement, and Employment of Mathematics Specialists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicmanec, Karen B. Mauck

    2008-01-01

    For over 30 years, educators have recommended that mathematics specialists be placed in schools to provide teachers with the resources they need to assist their students. To assess whether these recommendations have been realized, a survey was used to gather data from large school districts, the 50 states, and District of Columbia. The outcome of…

  19. [New business model for medical specialists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houwen, L G H J Louis

    2013-01-01

    The reforms in the field of medical specialist care have important implications for the professional practice of medical specialists and their working relationship with the hospital. This leads to a considerable amount of pressure placed upon the way physicians have traditionally practiced their liberal professions, which is by forming partnerships and practicing from within the hospitals based on an admission agreement. As of 2015, the tax benefits for entrepreneurs will be abolished and the formation of regional partnerships will be discouraged. These developments not only pose threats but also offer opportunities for both the entrepreneurial medical specialist and the innovative hospital. In this article, the prospect of a future business model for specialist medical care will be outlined and explored by proposing three new organizational forms. The central vision of this model is that physicians who wish to retain their status of liberal professional practitioners in the twenty-first century should be more involved in the ownership structure of hospitals. The social importance of responsible patient care remains paramount.

  20. Specialist Teams Needed to Support Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellin, Laurel M.

    1991-01-01

    Presents seven reasons why it is important for health specialist teams to take action supporting the prevention and treatment of childhood obesity. The article offers guidelines to help parents assist their children in maintaining positive eating, exercise, and self-esteem patterns, noting sensitive intervention is preferable to imposed diets. (SM)

  1. Preceptor development. Use a staff development specialist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneller, S; Hoeppner, M

    1994-01-01

    Preceptor orientation is a well identified need. Less often identified is the critical role the staff development specialist plays in the ongoing support and development of preceptors. In this article, the authors explain activities of coaching, facilitating, mentoring, and consulting. These role components are essential in the ongoing development of preceptors. This support also may help retain preceptors.

  2. Brakes Specialist. Teacher Edition. Automotive Service Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This document contains teacher's materials for a course on becoming an automotive brakes specialist, based on the National Institute of Automotive Service Excellence task lists. The course consists of three instructional units: service brake hydraulic system and wheel bearings, service drum brakes, and service disc brakes. Depending on the…

  3. Payload specialist Ronald Parise using SAREX

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    ASTRO-2 payload specialist Ronald A. Parise reminisces on his inspace amateur radio experience of five years ago in the ASTRO-1 mission. Using the Shuttle Amateur Radio Experiment (SAREX), Parise talks to students on Earth from the flight deck of the Earth orbiting Space Shuttle Endeavour.

  4. The changing role of the subject specialist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Cotta-Schønberg

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available As we all know, libraries are these years rapidly undergoing change on unparalleled scale. Evidently, this applies to librarians, too, and not the least to that important category of library staff, the subject specialist. As recruiting and education of library workers differ from country to country it is difficult to give a detailed, generally valid description of the subject librarian in libraries, but I believe that you can describe an ideal model of subject librarianship as follows: Within each of the major subject disciplines covered by the library, the library should have a subject specialist preferably with a master degree or at least a bachelor degree in the particular subject discipline. The role of the subject specialist is to perform four basic functions where extensive subject knowledge is considered to be necessary: selecting and classifying books, assisting users with advanced subject inquiries, giving subject-specific courses in information retrieval, and maintaining liaison with relevant academic departments and centres. Personally, I know this system very well since I got employment in the Royal Library in Copenhagen as a subject specialist in psychology in the very month I finished my degree in psychology from the University of Copenhagen, back in 1973. The subject librarian system at the Royal Library in Copenhagen was patterned on the ideal model, as I just described it, and it was closely paralleled in the other academic libraries in Denmark, also the new university libraries which were founded in the seventies.

  5. 12. national conference of Czechoslovak power specialists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The XIIth national conference of Czechoslovak power specialists was held in Bratislava from October 5 to 7, 1983. Of the total number of 32 papers 12 were incorporated in the INIS system, i.e., such which dealt with the development of the nuclear power complex and the rationalization of sources and the use of heat in the Czechoslovak energy balance. (E.S.)

  6. An Analysis of the Alteration Specialist Occupation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buerkel, Elaine; Rehling, Joseph H.

    The general purpose of the occupational analysis is to provide workable, basic information dealing with the many and varied duties performed in the textile service occupation. The industry needs properly trained alteration specialists, bushelmen and dressmakers, in the repairing, remodeling, altering or renovating of garments. Their personal…

  7. Host specialist clownfishes are environmental niche generalists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litsios, Glenn; Kostikova, Anna; Salamin, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Why generalist and specialist species coexist in nature is a question that has interested evolutionary biologists for a long time. While the coexistence of specialists and generalists exploiting resources on a single ecological dimension has been theoretically and empirically explored, biological systems with multiple resource dimensions (e.g. trophic, ecological) are less well understood. Yet, such systems may provide an alternative to the classical theory of stable evolutionary coexistence of generalist and specialist species on a single resource dimension. We explore such systems and the potential trade-offs between different resource dimensions in clownfishes. All species of this iconic clade are obligate mutualists with sea anemones yet show interspecific variation in anemone host specificity. Moreover, clownfishes developed variable environmental specialization across their distribution. In this study, we test for the existence of a relationship between host-specificity (number of anemones associated with a clownfish species) and environmental-specificity (expressed as the size of the ecological niche breadth across climatic gradients). We find a negative correlation between host range and environmental specificities in temperature, salinity and pH, probably indicating a trade-off between both types of specialization forcing species to specialize only in a single direction. Trade-offs in a multi-dimensional resource space could be a novel way of explaining the coexistence of generalist and specialists. PMID:25274370

  8. The effects of drought-induced mortality on the response of surviving trees in piñon-juniper woodlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, C. W.; Pockman, W.; Litvak, M. E.

    2017-12-01

    lthough it is well-established that land cover change influences water and carbon cycles across different spatiotemporal scales, the impact of climate-driven mortality events on site energy and water balance and subsequently on vegetation dynamics is more variable among studies. In semi-arid ecosystems globally, mortality events following severe drought are increasingly common. We used long-term observations (i.e., from 2009 to present) in two piñon-juniper (i.e., Pinus edulis and Juniperus monosperma) woodlands located at central New Mexico USA to explore the consequence of mortality events in such water-stressed environments. We compared a pinon-juniper woodland site where girdling was used to mimic mortality of adult pinon (PJG) with a nearby untreated woodland site (PJC). Our primary goal is to disentangle the reduction in water loss via biological pathway (i.e., leaf and sapwood area) introduced by girdling manipulation from other effects contributing to the response of surviving trees such as modifications in surface reflectivity (i.e., albedo and emissivity) and surface roughness impacting the partitioning between components in both energy and water balance at canopy level. To achieve this goal, we directly measured sap flux, environmental factors and ecosystem-atmosphere exchange of carbon, water and energy fluxes using eddy-covariance systems at both sites. We found that 1) for each component of the energy balance the difference between PJC and PJG was surprisingly negligible such that the canopy-level surface temperature (i.e., both radiometric and aerodynamic temperature) remains nearly identical for the two sites; 2) the surface reflectivity and roughness are mainly dominated by the soil surface especially when the foliage coverage in semi-arid regions is small; 3) the increase in soil evaporation after girdling manipulation outcompetes the surviving trees for the use of water in the soil. These results suggest that the so-called `water release

  9. Reduced transpiration response to precipitation pulses precedes mortality in a piñon-juniper woodland subject to prolonged drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaut, Jennifer A; Wadsworth, W Duncan; Pangle, Robert; Yepez, Enrico A; McDowell, Nate G; Pockman, William T

    2013-10-01

    Global climate change is predicted to alter the intensity and duration of droughts, but the effects of changing precipitation patterns on vegetation mortality are difficult to predict. Our objective was to determine whether prolonged drought or above-average precipitation altered the capacity to respond to the individual precipitation pulses that drive productivity and survival. We analyzed 5 yr of data from a rainfall manipulation experiment in piñon-juniper (Pinus edulis-Juniperus monosperma) woodland using mixed effects models of transpiration response to event size, antecedent soil moisture, and post-event vapor pressure deficit. Replicated treatments included irrigation, drought, ambient control and infrastructure control. Mortality was highest under drought, and the reduced post-pulse transpiration in the droughted trees that died was attributable to treatment effects beyond drier antecedent conditions and reduced event size. In particular, trees that died were nearly unresponsive to antecedent shallow soil moisture, suggesting reduced shallow absorbing root area. Irrigated trees showed an enhanced response to precipitation pulses. Prolonged drought initiates a downward spiral whereby trees are increasingly unable to utilize pulsed soil moisture. Thus, the additive effects of future, more frequent droughts may increase drought-related mortality. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  10. Difference in tree growth responses to climate at the upper treeline: Qilian Juniper in the Anyemaqen Mountains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jianfeng; Gou, Xiaohua; Chen, Fahu; Li, Jinbao; Liu, Puxing; Zhang, Yong; Fang, Keyan

    2008-08-01

    Three ring-width chronologies were developed from Qilian Juniper (Sabina przewalskii Kom.) at the upper treeline along a west-east gradient in the Anyemaqen Mountains. Most chronological statistics, except for mean sensitivity (MS), decreased from west to east. The first principal component (PC1) loadings indicated that stands in a similar climate condition were most important to the variability of radial growth. PC2 loadings decreased from west to east, suggesting the difference of tree-growth between eastern and western Anyemaqen Mountains. Correlations between standard chronologies and climatic factors revealed different climatic influences on radial growth along a west-east gradient in the study area. Temperature of warm season (July-August) was important to the radial growth at the upper treeline in the whole study area. Precipitation of current May was an important limiting factor of tree growth only in the western (drier) upper treeline, whereas precipitation of current September limited tree growth in the eastern (wetter) upper treeline. Response function analysis results showed that there were regional differences between tree growth and climatic factors in various sampling sites of the whole study area. Temperature and precipitation were the important factors influencing tree growth in western (drier) upper treeline. However, tree growth was greatly limited by temperature at the upper treeline in the middle area, and was more limited by precipitation than temperature in the eastern (wetter) upper treeline.

  11. TRAINING SYSTEM OF FUTURE SPECIALISTS: QUALITY CONTROL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir A. Romanov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation is development of innovative strategy of quality control training of engineers and skilled workers (hereinafter – future specialists in educational professional organizations on the principles of social partnership.Methods. Theoretic: theoretic and methodological analysis, polytheoretic synthesis, modeling. Empirical: research and generalization of the system, process and competence – based approaches experience, experiment, observation, surveys, expert evaluation, SWOT-analysis as a method of strategic planning which is to identify the internal and external factors (socio-cultural of the organization surrounding.Results. The strategy of the development of the process of quality control training in educational professional organizations and a predictive model of the system of quality control training for future engineers and workers have been created on the analysis and synthesis of a quantitative specification of the quality, the obtained experience and success in control training of future specialists in educational professional organizations in recent economic and educational conditions.Scientific novelty. There has been built a predicative model of quality control training of future specialists to meet modern standards and the principles of social partnership; the control algorithm of the learning process, developed in accordance with the standards (international of quality ISO in the implementation of the quality control systems of the process approach (matrix-based responsibility, competence and remit of those responsible for the education process in the educational organization, the «problem» terms and diagnostic tools for assessing the quality of professional training of future specialists. The perspective directions of innovation in the control of the quality of future professionals training have been determined; the parameters of a comprehensive analysis of the state of the system to ensure the

  12. Proceedings of fuel safety research specialists' meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Motoe

    2002-08-01

    Fuel Safety Research Specialists' Meeting, which was organized by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, was held on March 4-5, 2002 at JAERI in Tokai Establishment. Purposes of the Meeting are to exchange information and views on LWR fuel safety topics among the specialist participants from domestic and foreign organizations, and to discuss the recent and future fuel research activities in JAERI. In the Meeting, presentations were given and discussions were made on general report of fuel safety research activities, fuel behaviors in normal operation and accident conditions, FP release behaviors in severe accident conditions, and JAERI's ''Advanced LWR Fuel Performance and Safety Research Program''. A poster exhibition was also carried out. The Meeting significantly contributed to planning future program and cooperation in fuel research. This proceeding integrates all the pictures and papers presented in the Meeting. The 10 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  13. Burnout Syndrome of Leisure Time Activities Specialist.

    OpenAIRE

    REBROVÁ, Iveta

    2012-01-01

    This thesis is dealing with burnout syndrome among leisure time specialists. Theoretical part describes burnout syndrome, its historical basis, symptoms and causes, protective factors and preventive techniques, which prevent from burnout syndrome risk. Next part deals with common stress, its causes and symptoms, and psychosocial stress, which is closely related with burnout syndrome. Ending of the theoretical part is focused on understanding the differences between jobs of common teacher and ...

  14. CAUSES FOR INEFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION BETWEEN MEDICAL SPECIALISTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stayko I. Spiridonov

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In the resent years the healthcare system has moved to inter-professional, cross-disciplinary, multi-person approach where the communications are very important for ensuring patient safety. Communication in health organisations needs to be studied and analysed deeply and comprehensively because the future of an organisation often depends on good communication. The purpose of this study is to investigate and analyse the reasons for ineffective communication between medical specialists in the teams they work in. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire method is used. Through a survey over a period of 12 months (from 01. 12. 2014 to 01. 12. 2015 at the Escullap Hospital in Pazardzhik, DCC 18 - Sofia, St. Mina Hospital in Plovdiv, MHAT – Plovdiv, DCC 1 in Haskovo, UMHAT in Stara Zagora, DCC 3 in Varna and MHAT – Parvomay, was studied and analyzed the opinion of medical specialists on the effectiveness of communication within the team they work in. The survey includes 477 medical specialists. Results and conclusions: According to 41.1% of the respondents, the communication in the team they work in is insufficiently effective. Most of the respondents (39.8% find their colleagues responsible for the ineffective communication, followed by those who seek the cause for poor communication in the management of the health care facility (27.6%. The leading cause of poor communication in the team according to the study participants is the inequality between the characters of the colleagues (41.9%. According to the majority of respondents (28.3%, improvements in facilities and wage increases (27.3% would be essential to improve communication within the team they work in. Recommendations have been formulated to improve communication among medical specialists.

  15. The predictability of phytophagous insect communities: host specialists as habitat specialists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Müller

    Full Text Available The difficulties specialized phytophagous insects face in finding habitats with an appropriate host should constrain their dispersal. Within the concept of metacommunities, this leads to the prediction that host-plant specialists should sort into local assemblages according to the local environmental conditions, i.e. habitat conditions, whereas assemblages of host-plant generalists should depend also on regional processes. Our study aimed at ranking the importance of local environmental factors and species composition of the vegetation for predicting the species composition of phytophagous moth assemblages with either a narrow or a broad host range. Our database consists of 351,506 specimens representing 820 species of nocturnal Macrolepidoptera sampled between 1980 and 2006 using light traps in 96 strict forest reserves in southern Germany. Species were grouped as specialists or generalists according to the food plants of the larvae; specialists use host plants belonging to one genus. We used predictive canonical correspondence and co-correspondence analyses to rank the importance of local environmental factors, the species composition of the vegetation and the role of host plants for predicting the species composition of host-plant specialists and generalists. The cross-validatory fit for predicting the species composition of phytophagous moths was higher for host-plant specialists than for host-plant generalists using environmental factors as well as the composition of the vegetation. As expected for host-plant specialists, the species composition of the vegetation was a better predictor of the composition of these assemblages than the environmental variables. But surprisingly, this difference for specialized insects was not due to the occurrence of their host plants. Overall, our study supports the idea that owing to evolutionary constraints in finding a host, host-plant specialists and host-plant generalists follow two different models of

  16. Payload specialist Reinhard Furrer show evidence of previous blood sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    Payload specialist Reinhard Furrer shows evidence of previous blood sampling while Wubbo J. Ockels, Dutch payload specialist (only partially visible), extends his right arm after a sample has been taken. Both men show bruises on their arms.

  17. ANALYSIS OF DWARF MISTLETOE ARCEUTHOBIUM OXYCEDRI (DC. M. BIEB. AND ITS PRINCIPAL HOST EASTERN PRICKLY JUNIPER JUNIPERUS DELTOIDES R. P. ADAMS DISTRIBUTION IN CRIMEA USING GIS TECHOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Kukushkin

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The current study highlights the distribution pattern of juniper dwarf mistletoe (Arceuthobium oxycedri, a semi-parasite of the Eastern prickly juniper (Juniperus deltoides, in Crimea. A. oxycedri has considerably narrower range in Crimea as compared to its principal host and its ubiquitous distribution is rather sporadic. Nature observations characterize A. oxycedri as a thermophilic and mezo-хerophytic species confined to the low-mountain terrains with mild sub-Mediterranean climate. Significant sites of permanent infection have been discovered at the Crimean coast and in the warmest southwestern part of the Crimean Mountains to the south from the Belbek River valley. Greek juniper (J. excelsa is a codominant species growing side by side with J. deltoids in the majority of localities examined that have the high infection rate. Generally, J. excelsa is an insusceptible species in relation to the parasite; nevertheless, it is affected by A. oxycedri at several sites. Birds feeding habit to consume J. excelsa and J. deltoides fleshy berry-like cones helps to maintain the high infection rate and to disseminate mistletoe seeds at the distance of approximately 4 km. Modeling ecological niche and creating maps of potential range of the parasite and its principal host using MaxEnt 3.3.3k software have demonstrated that A. oxycedri distribution in Crimea at present may be wider than it has been currently observed. It is noteworthy that while modeling such bioclimatic indicators as the minimum winter temperatures and the elevation above sea level were irrelevant for establishing the distribution range of the parasite. Presumably the limited distribution of A. oxycedri can be attributed to the history of forming J. deltoides range in the late Pleistocene – Holocene, alongside with a low speed of the parasite dissemination from Quaternary refugia in the southernmost part of the Crimean Peninsula.

  18. Physico-mechanical properties of Spanish juniper wood considering the effect of heartwood formation and the presence of defects and imperfections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier de la Fuente-Leon

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: Determining the main physical and mechanical properties of Spanish juniper wood from Soria (Spain considering the effects of heartwood formation and the presence of defects and imperfections; and comparing the resulting characteristics with similar existing data for other regional softwood species of commercial interest. Area of study: Berlanga de Duero (Soria, Castilla y León, Spain.Material and Methods: Wood physico-mechanical performance was determined by Spanish UNE standards in order to provide proper comparisons to other regional softwood species. An individual tree representing average plot characteristics was selected in all eight 10 m radius circular plots that were established well-representing the heterogeneity of this woodland. The age of every tree was determined reading the number of growth rings at the base of each sampled tree. Every physico-mechanical property was assessed at least 4 times for every wood sample type (sapwood and heartwood, whether clear or with the presence of defects of each tree. Two-way ANOVA was run to assess significant differences in the results. Post hoc all pairwise comparisons were performed using Tukey's test (p < 0.05.Research highlights: Spanish juniper wood resulted harder than other regional commercial conifers, and showed semi-heavyweight heartwood and lightweight sapwood; whereas shrinkage figures remarked its great dimensional stability. The high presence of knots within heartwood made it even heavier, harder, and more resistant to compression parallel to grain. A commercial use of this rare precious wood may contribute to juniper forests preservation in the frame of forest sustainable management plans. Key words: heartwood effect; Juniperus thurifera L.; physico-mechanical wood properties; wood classification; wood defects.

  19. School Library Media Specialist-Teacher Collaboration: Characteristics, Challenges, Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, O. P.; Bray, Marty

    2011-01-01

    The most successful school library media specialists are those who collaborate with teachers as full partners in the instructional process. Without assertive action by the school library media specialist, however, school administrators and teachers are likely to be more aware of the media specialist's administrative role than the roles of teacher,…

  20. Elder Specialists: Psychosocial Aspects of Medical Education in Geriatric Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann-Stone, Nancy; Robinson, Sherry B.; Rull, Gary; Rosher, Richard B.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes an Elder Specialist Program developed by one school of medicine to sensitize medical students to geriatric psychosocial issues. Elder Specialists participate in panel discussions as part of each geriatric session. As an alternative to traditional senior mentoring programs, the Elder Specialist Program provides all students a…

  1. Effects of juniper essential oil on growth performance, some rumen protozoa, rumen fermentation and antioxidant blood enzyme parameters of growing Saanen kids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesilbag, D; Biricik, H; Cetin, I; Kara, C; Meral, Y; Cengiz, S S; Orman, A; Udum, D

    2017-10-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of juniper essential oil on the growth performance, rumen fermentation parameters, rumen protozoa population, blood antioxidant enzyme parameters and faecal content in growing Saanen kids. Thirty-six male Saanen kids (36 ± 14 days of age) were used in the study. Each group consisted of 9 kids. The control group (G1) was fed with a diet that consisted of the above concentrated feed and oat hay, whereas the experimental groups consumed the same diet but with the concentrated feed uniformly sprayed with juniper essential oil 0.4 ml/kg (G2), 0.8 ml/kg (G3) or 2 ml/kg (G4). There were no differences (p > 0.05) in live weight, live weight gain or feed consumption between the control and experimental groups. There was a significant improvement (p rumen pH, rumen volatile fatty acid (VFA) profile or faecal pH of the control and experimental groups. The rumen NH 3 N values were similar at the middle and end of the experiment, but at the start of the experiment, the rumen NH 3 N values differed between the control and experimental groups (p < 0.05). The faecal score value was significantly (p < 0.05) decreased in the experimental groups. The addition of juniper essential oil supplementation to the rations caused significant effects on the kids' antioxidant blood parameters. Although the superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and catalase values were significantly (p < 0.05) increased in the experimental groups (G2, G3 and G4), especially group G4, the blood glutathione peroxidase (GPX) value significantly decreased in the experimental groups. The results of this study suggest that supplementation of juniper oil is more effective on antioxidant parameters than on performance parameters and may be used as a natural antioxidant product. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  2. Environmental Monitoring Supported by Aerial Photography – a Case Study of the Burnt Down Bugac Juniper Forest, Hungary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szatmári József

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Wildfire poses a serious risk in several regions of the world threatening urban, agricultural areas and natural ecosystems as well. Nature conservation has important role to be prepared for the management of postfire environmental degradation and restoration for protected areas preserving valuable ecosystems. The improving temporal and spatial resolution of remote sensing and GIS methods significantly contributes to map the changes for accelerating management steps of restoration. In this study a severe wildfire and its impacts were assessed in case of a protected area of the Kiskunság National Park in Hungary, which was partly burnt down in 2012. The aim of this research was to efficiently and accurately assess the damages and to plan and execute the restoration works using remote sensing tools. Aerial data collection was performed one month, and one year after the fire. In 2014 the regenerated vegetation was surveyed and mapped in the field. Using the aerial photographs and the field data, the degree and extent of the fire damages, the types and the state of the vegetation and the presence and proportion of the invasive species were determined. Semi-automatic methods were used for the classification of completely, partially damaged and undamaged areas. Based on the results, the reforestation of the burnt area is suggested to prevent the overspreading of white poplar against common junipers and to clean the area from the most frequent invasive species. To monitor the regeneration of the vegetation and the spreading of the invasive species, further aerial photography and field campaigns are planned.

  3. Academic Information Security Researchers: Hackers or Specialists?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadkhah, Mehdi; Lagzian, Mohammad; Borchardt, Glenn

    2018-04-01

    In this opinion piece, we present a synopsis of our findings from the last 2 years concerning cyber-attacks on web-based academia. We also present some of problems that we have faced and try to resolve any misunderstandings about our work. We are academic information security specialists, not hackers. Finally, we present a brief overview of our methods for detecting cyber fraud in an attempt to present general guidelines for researchers who would like to continue our work. We believe that our work is necessary for protecting the integrity of scholarly publishing against emerging cybercrime.

  4. TEMS: results of a specialist centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flexer, S M; Durham-Hall, A C; Steward, M A; Robinson, J M

    2014-06-01

    Transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEMS) is becoming more widespread due to the increasing body of evidence to support its role. Previous published data has reported recurrence rates in excess of 10% for benign polyps after TEMS. Bradford Royal Infirmary is a tertiary referral centre for TEMS and early rectal cancer in the UK. Data for all TEMS operations were entered into a prospective database over a 7-year period. Demographic data, complications and recurrence rates were recorded. Both benign adenomas and malignant lesions were included. A total of 164 patients (65% male), with a mean age of 68 years were included; 114 (70%) of the lesions resected were benign adenomas, and 50 (30%) were malignant lesions. Median polyp size was 4 (range 0.6-14.5) cm. Mean length of operation was 55 (range 10-120) min. There were no recurrences in any patients with a benign adenoma resected; two patients with malignant lesions developed recurrences. Three intra-operative complications were recorded, two rectal perforations (repaired primarily, one requiring defunctioning stoma), and a further patient suffered a blood loss of >300 ml requiring transfusion. Six patients developed strictures requiring dilation either endoscopically or under anaesthetic in the post-operative period. We have demonstrated that TEMS procedures performed in a specialist centre provide low rates of both recurrence and complication. Within a specialist centre, TEMS surgery should be offered to all patients for rectal lesions, both benign and malignant, that are amenable to TEMS.

  5. Regulation and acclimation of leaf gas exchange in a piñon-juniper woodland exposed to three different precipitation regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limousin, Jean-Marc; Bickford, Christopher P; Dickman, Lee T; Pangle, Robert E; Hudson, Patrick J; Boutz, Amanda L; Gehres, Nathan; Osuna, Jessica L; Pockman, William T; McDowell, Nate G

    2013-10-01

    Leaf gas-exchange regulation plays a central role in the ability of trees to survive drought, but forecasting the future response of gas exchange to prolonged drought is hampered by our lack of knowledge regarding potential acclimation. To investigate whether leaf gas-exchange rates and sensitivity to drought acclimate to precipitation regimes, we measured the seasonal variations of leaf gas exchange in a mature piñon-juniper Pinus edulis-Juniperus monosperma woodland after 3 years of precipitation manipulation. We compared trees receiving ambient precipitation with those in an irrigated treatment (+30% of ambient precipitation) and a partial rainfall exclusion (-45%). Treatments significantly affected leaf water potential, stomatal conductance and photosynthesis for both isohydric piñon and anisohydric juniper. Leaf gas exchange acclimated to the precipitation regimes in both species. Maximum gas-exchange rates under well-watered conditions, leaf-specific hydraulic conductance and leaf water potential at zero photosynthetic assimilation all decreased with decreasing precipitation. Despite their distinct drought resistance and stomatal regulation strategies, both species experienced hydraulic limitation on leaf gas exchange when precipitation decreased, leading to an intraspecific trade-off between maximum photosynthetic assimilation and resistance of photosynthesis to drought. This response will be most detrimental to the carbon balance of piñon under predicted increases in aridity in the southwestern USA. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. The Predictability of Phytophagous Insect Communities: Host Specialists as Habitat Specialists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Müller, J.; Stadler, J.; Jarzabek-Müller, A.; Hacker, H.; Braak, ter C.J.F.; Brandl, R.

    2011-01-01

    The difficulties specialized phytophagous insects face in finding habitats with an appropriate host should constrain their dispersal. Within the concept of metacommunities, this leads to the prediction that host-plant specialists should sort into local assemblages according to the local

  7. E-learning for medical imaging specialists: introducing blended learning in a nuclear medicine specialist course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslerud, Torjan; Tulipan, Andreas Julius; Gray, Robert M; Biermann, Martin

    2017-07-01

    While e-learning has become an important tool in teaching medical students, the training of specialists in medical imaging is still dominated by lecture-based courses. To assess the potential of e-learning in specialist education in medical imaging. An existing lecture-based five-day course in Clinical Nuclear Medicine (NM) was enhanced by e-learning resources and activities, including practical exercises. An anonymized survey was conducted after participants had completed and passed the multiple choice electronic course examination. Twelve out of 15 course participants (80%) responded. Overall satisfaction with the new course format was high, but 25% of the respondents wanted more interactive elements such as discussions and practical exercises. The importance of lecture handouts and supplementary online material such as selected original articles and professional guidelines was affirmed by all the respondents (92% fully, 8% partially), while 75% fully and 25% partially agreed that the lectures had been interesting and relevant. E-learning represents a hitherto unrealized potential in the education of medical specialists. It may expedite training of medical specialists while at the same time containing costs.

  8. Tenth target fabrication specialists` meeting: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foreman, L.R.; Stark, J.C. [comp.

    1995-11-01

    This tenth meeting of specialists in target fabrication for inertial confinement is unique in that it is the first meeting that was completely unclassified. As a result of the new classification, we were able to invite more foreign participation. In addition to participants from the US, UK, and Canada, representatives from France, Japan, and two Russian laboratories attended, about 115 in all. This booklet presents full papers and poster sessions. Indirect and direct drive laser implosions are considered. Typical topics include: polymer or aluminium or resorcinol/formaldehyde shells, laser technology, photon tunneling microscopy as a characterization tool, foams, coatings, hohlraums, and beryllium capsules. Hydrogen, deuterium, tritium, and beryllium are all considered as fuels.

  9. The internal medicine specialist and neurosurgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pizzini

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The neurosurgical patient is often a real challenge for the physicians, because of a frequent multimorbidity and a higher risk for severe complications. Cooperation between internal medicine specialist and neurosurgeon is essential to prevent the fatal effects of cranial and spinal injuries. The topic issues of medical interest in neurosurgery are the disorders of sodium balance, the glycemic control, the thromboembolic risk, the intracerebral bleeding management and the infective problems. The neurosurgeons could be worried by treating these complications that are mostly of internal medicine interest and that could unfortunately rise the risk of death or irreversible insults. AIM OF THE REVIEW This review summarizes the modality of diagnosis and therapy of the foremost concerns in neurosurgical field.

  10. Enhancing assertiveness in district nurse specialist practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Julie

    2016-08-02

    District nurse (DN) care delivery has undergone substantial change in recent years due to changing demographics and service delivery demands that have called for a move of care delivery from secondary to primary care. The title District Nurse is recorded with the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) on completion of the Specialist Practice Qualification in District Nursing (SPQ DN), which purports to be a 'transformational' course that prepares future caseload holders to manage their team and prioritise care delivery effectively. This article explores the need for assertiveness skills in this role in response to Australian research, and outlines the pedagogic interventions implemented during the SPQ DN course to enhance this skill. Assertiveness scores were monitored for the duration of the course and demonstrated a significant increase-a topic that is now the subject of a future, funded study.

  11. Information specialist for a coming age (11)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamio, Tatsuo

    In the business world 'CNN REVOLUTION' is prevailing. 'CNN REVOLUTION' means the information system organized mostly by the Computer and the Communication Network through which they can make a vital business judgment. They try to give customers better service, enjoy a higher share and be more competitive through the information system, which enables them to control various information inside their firm completely and use it most usefully. They are also trying to hard to make the information system effective enough to gather information outside their firm. In making use of information for business, it is vital to get 'intelligence' which analized and processed information and to expand information distribution inside their company freely. As a new field of activity information specialist are expected to take a more important role in developing how to get 'good intelligence' and making useful information accessible through the information system.

  12. Tenth target fabrication specialists' meeting: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foreman, L.R.; Stark, J.C.

    1995-01-01

    This tenth meeting of specialists in target fabrication for inertial confinement is unique in that it is the first meeting that was completely unclassified. As a result of the new classification, we were able to invite more foreign participation. In addition to participants from the US, UK, and Canada, representatives from France, Japan, and two Russian laboratories attended, about 115 in all. This booklet presents full papers and poster sessions. Indirect and direct drive laser implosions are considered. Typical topics include: polymer or aluminium or resorcinol/formaldehyde shells, laser technology, photon tunneling microscopy as a characterization tool, foams, coatings, hohlraums, and beryllium capsules. Hydrogen, deuterium, tritium, and beryllium are all considered as fuels

  13. Modeling the kinetics of essential oil hydrodistillation from juniper berries (Juniperus communis L. using non-linear regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radosavljević Dragana B.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents kinetics modeling of essential oil hydrodistillation from juniper berries (Juniperus communis L. by using a non-linear regression methodology. The proposed model has the polynomial-logarithmic form. The initial equation of the proposed non-linear model is q = q∞•(a•(logt2 + b•logt + c and by substituting a1=q∞•a, b1 = q∞•b and c1 = q∞•c, the final equation is obtained as q = a1•(logt2 + b1•logt + c1. In this equation q is the quantity of the obtained oil at time t, while a1, b1 and c1 are parameters to be determined for each sample. From the final equation it can be seen that the key parameter q∞, which presents the maximal oil quantity obtained after infinite time, is already included in parameters a1, b1 and c1. In this way, experimental determination of this parameter is avoided. Using the proposed model with parameters obtained by regression, the values of oil hydrodistillation in time are calculated for each sample and compared to the experimental values. In addition, two kinetic models previously proposed in literature were applied to the same experimental results. The developed model provided better agreements with the experimental values than the two, generally accepted kinetic models of this process. The average values of error measures (RSS, RSE, AIC and MRPD obtained for our model (0.005; 0.017; –84.33; 1.65 were generally lower than the corresponding values of the other two models (0.025; 0.041; –53.20; 3.89 and (0.0035; 0.015; –86.83; 1.59. Also, parameter estimation for the proposed model was significantly simpler (maximum 2 iterations per sample using the non-linear regression than that for the existing models (maximum 9 iterations per sample. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. TR-35026

  14. Does the specialist nurse enhance or deskill the general nurse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Z; Luffingham, N

    Much conflict and confusion surrounds the title and role of the specialist nurse, leading in some instances to disharmony between general and specialist nurses. It has been suggested that too many highly specialized nurses in a general area may lead to a deskilled workforce and fragmented care. Attempts to define the key concepts of specialist practice as described by the UKCC has resulted in elitism, conflict and abuse of the title. One suggestion to eliminate this conflict is for specialist nurses to achieve key competencies that encompass the role of the clinical expert. These key competencies should be devised by specialist nurses, in the absence of national guidelines, and be agreed by employers. They should incorporate the key roles of: change agent, expert clinician, educator, researcher and coordinator. It is contended that if all concerned have a clearer definition of the title, role and what is expected from the specialist nurse then this will result in reduced conflict and improved quality of care.

  15. Brazilian infectious diseases specialists: who and where are they?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassenote, Alex Jones Flores; Scheffer, Mario César; Segurado, Aluísio Augusto Cotrim

    2016-01-01

    The infectious diseases specialist is a medical doctor dedicated to the management of infectious diseases in their individual and collective dimensions. The aim of this paper was to evaluate the current profile and distribution of infectious diseases specialists in Brazil. This is a cross-sectional study using secondary data obtained from institutions that register medical specialists in Brazil. Variables of interest included gender, age, type of medical school (public or private) the specialist graduated from, time since finishing residency training in infectious diseases, and the interval between M.D. graduation and residency completion. Maps are used to study the geographical distribution of infectious diseases specialists. A total of 3229 infectious diseases specialist registries were counted, with 94.3% (3045) of individual counts (heads) represented by primary registries. The mean age was 43.3 years (SD 10.5), and a higher proportion of females was observed (57%; 95% CI 55.3-58.8). Most Brazilian infectious diseases specialists (58.5%) practice in the Southeastern region. However, when distribution rates were calculated, several states exhibited high concentration of infectious diseases specialists, when compared to the national rate (16.06). Interestingly, among specialists working in the Northeastern region, those trained locally had completed their residency programs more recently (8.7yrs; 95% CI 7.9-9.5) than physicians trained elsewhere in the country (13.6yrs: 95% CI 11.8-15.5). Our study shows that Brazilian infectious diseases specialists are predominantly young and female doctors. Most have concluded a medical residency training program. The absolute majority practice in the Southeastern region. However, some states from the Northern, Northeastern and Southeastern regions exhibit specialist rates above the national average. In these areas, nonetheless, there is a strong concentration of infectious diseases specialists in state capitals and in

  16. Brazilian infectious diseases specialists: who and where are they?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Jones Flores Cassenote

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion: Our study shows that Brazilian infectious diseases specialists are predominantly young and female doctors. Most have concluded a medical residency training program. The absolute majority practice in the Southeastern region. However, some states from the Northern, Northeastern and Southeastern regions exhibit specialist rates above the national average. In these areas, nonetheless, there is a strong concentration of infectious diseases specialists in state capitals and in metropolitan areas.

  17. Educational programme on radiation protection for veterinary medicine specialists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djuric, G.; Popovic, D.

    1992-01-01

    The education of radiation protection for veterinary medicine specialists on the University of Belgrade is integrated both in regular graduate studies and in postgraduate studies. Within the graduate studies, students attend courses in physics and biophysics and in radiation hygiene. During postgraduate or specialistic veterinary medicine studies, veterinary medicine specialists expand their knowledge in radiation protection through a number of courses on radiation biophysics, radioecology, nuclear instrumentation and environmental protection. (author)

  18. FORMATION OF PROFESSIONAL MOBILITY SPECIALIST WITHIN THE COMPETENCE APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Gruzdeva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the article discussed the question of formation of professional mobility specialist through the formation of professional competencies within the educational process in high school.

  19. 'The use of technical specialists in quality assurance audits'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, T.J.; Diaz, M.R.

    1993-01-01

    This paper provides a nontechnical discussion of the use of Technical Specialists in quality assurance audits by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management's Office of Quality Assurance. The purpose is to describe one successful solution to the problem that arises when a quality assurance organization is responsible for conducting audits of many, diverse, highly technical activities. The solution is the conduct of audits that combine both horizontal and vertical sample selection strategies and which employ Technical Specialists in the vertical portion of the audit. The Technical Specialist is paired with a programmatic auditor who perform as a dedicated team in their conduct of the audit. This paper focuses on the Technical Specialist

  20. Methodological bases of innovative training of specialists in nanotechnology field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FIGOVSKY Oleg Lvovich

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The performance of innovative training system aimed at highly intellectual specialists in the area of nanotechnologies for Kazakhstan’s economy demands establishment and development of nanotechnological market in the country, teaching of innovative engineering combined with consistent research, integration of trained specialists with latest technologies and sciences at the international level. Methodological aspects of training competitive specialists for nanotechnological field are specific. The paper presents methodological principles of innovative training of specialists for science-intensive industry that were realized according to grant given by the Ministry of Education and Science of the Republic of Kazakhstan.

  1. An analysis of specialist and non-specialist user requirements for geographic climate change information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Martin C

    2013-11-01

    The EU EuroClim project developed a system to monitor and record climate change indicator data based on satellite observations of snow cover, sea ice and glaciers in Northern Europe and the Arctic. It also contained projection data for temperature, rainfall and average wind speed for Europe. These were all stored as data sets in a GIS database for users to download. The process of gathering requirements for a user population including scientists, researchers, policy makers, educationalists and the general public is described. Using an iterative design methodology, a user survey was administered to obtain initial feedback on the system concept followed by panel sessions where users were presented with the system concept and a demonstrator to interact with it. The requirements of both specialist and non-specialist users is summarised together with strategies for the effective communication of geographic climate change information. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  2. Pharmacy specialists' attitudes toward pharmaceutical service quality at community pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbonas, Gvidas; Jakušovaitė, Irayda; Savickas, Arūnas

    2010-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to analyze pharmacy specialists' attitudes toward the quality of pharmaceutical services at Lithuanian community pharmacies. Between April and June 2009, a total of 471 Lithuanian community pharmacy specialists completed a questionnaire designed to evaluate their attitudes toward the quality of pharmaceutical services at community pharmacies. The main dimensions of pharmaceutical service quality were extracted by principal component analysis. Two main dimensions of pharmaceutical service quality were extracted: pharmacotherapeutic aspects (provision of information about drug therapy, possible side effects, health promotion, the amount of time spent with a patient, and the ascertainment that a patient understood the provided information) and socioeconomic aspects (considering patient's needs and financial capabilities, making a patient confident with the services provided). Pharmacy specialists evaluated the quality of both dimensions positively, but the quality of the first dimension was rated significantly worse than that of the second dimension. The attitudes of pharmacy specialists working at independent pharmacies were more positive toward pharmacotherapeutic aspects as compared to the specialists working at chain or state pharmacies. Pharmacotherapeutic aspects were rated better by pharmacy specialists, aged ≥ 55 years, than those younger than 45 years. Moreover, the attitudes of 45-54-year-old pharmacy specialists toward the socioeconomic aspects were more positive as compared with those of 35-44-year olds. Pharmacists rated the socioeconomic aspects of pharmaceutical service quality worse as compared with pharmacy technicians. The attitudes of pharmacy specialists working at pharmacies with 6-9 specialists were more negative toward pharmacotherapeutic aspects than those of the pharmacies with 1-2 specialists. Pharmacy specialists working at pharmacies with ≥ 10 specialists reported lower scores of socioeconomic

  3. Guideline implementation strategies for specialist mental healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girlanda, Francesca; Fiedler, Ines; Ay, Esra; Barbui, Corrado; Koesters, Markus

    2013-07-01

    Clinical practice guidelines in mental healthcare are viewed as an essential asset if appropriately developed and implemented. The purpose of this article was to review the existing literature on how guidelines should be implemented to optimize their impact on provider performance and patient outcomes in specialist mental healthcare settings. Findings from recent studies suggest a trend toward an improvement in process and patient outcomes following guideline implementation. However, studies are heterogeneous in terms of design, implementation strategies and outcome measures, making it very difficult to draw firm conclusions about which implementation strategy is effective in different healthcare contexts. Current knowledge about how guidelines should be implemented is still sparse and inconclusive in mental healthcare. Future studies should attempt to employ more rigorous designs, including random allocation of patients or clusters of patients, to shed further light on this compelling issue. Research on guideline implementation strategies should additionally take into account potential barriers to knowledge translation, which can heavily influence the implementability of treatment recommendations.

  4. National Target for South Asia Specialists. A Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Council on Foreign Language and International Studies, New York, NY.

    The South Asia Panel of the National Council on Foreign Languages and International Studies reports on the need for specialists in the languages and cultures of Afghanistan, Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Bhutan, and the Maldives. Two categories of specialists are discussed: (1) individuals in government, mission, etc., in…

  5. Becoming a Specialist Nurse in Psychiatric Mental Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Södergren, Ulrika; Benjaminson, Carin; Mattsson, Janet

    2017-01-01

    Background: Specialist nurse students are upon graduation certified to have increased their professional competence to an advanced level. But how do specialist nurse students themselves experience and understand their professional competence and its development upon graduation? This is what this study aims at describing. Method: This study has a…

  6. CSHCN in Texas: meeting the need for specialist care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, M Cherilyn; Drayton, Vonna L C; Menon, Ramdas; Walker, Lesa R; Parker, Colleen M; Cooper, Sam B; Bultman, Linda L

    2005-06-01

    Assuring the sufficiency and suitability of systems of care and services for children with special health care needs (CSHCN) presents a challenge to Texas providers, agencies, and state Title V programs. To meet the need for specialist care, referrals from primary care doctors are often necessary. The objective of this study was to describe the factors associated with the need for specialist care and problems associated with obtaining referrals in Texas. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed using the National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs (NS-CSHCN) weighted sample for Texas (n = 719,014) to identify variables associated with the need for specialist care and problems obtaining referrals for specialist care. Medical need of the CSHCN and sensitivity to family values/customs was associated with greater need for specialist care, and Hispanic ethnicity and lower maternal education were associated with less need. Medical need, amount of time spent with doctors and sensitivity to values/customs, living in a large metropolitan statistical area, and lack of medical information were associated with problems obtaining a specialist care referral. Findings revealed some similarities and differences with meeting the need for specialist care when comparing Texas results to other studies. In Texas, aspects of customer satisfaction variables, especially doctors' sensitivity to family values/customs and parents' not receiving enough information on medical problems, were significantly associated with problems obtaining specialist referrals. Findings indicate a need to further research relationships and communication among doctors, CSHCN, and their families.

  7. The Perception of Teachers and School Library Media Specialist on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Perception of Teachers and School Library Media Specialist on the Role of School Library Media Specialists in Selected Secondary Schools in Ogun State. ... Journal Home > Vol 9, No 1 (2012) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text ...

  8. Management Matters: The Library Media Specialist's Management Toolbox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Marjorie L.

    2004-01-01

    Library media specialists need tools to help them manage the school library media program. The Internet includes a vast array of tools that a library media specialist might find useful. The websites and electronic resources included in this article are only a representative sample and future columns may explore additional tools. All the tools are…

  9. STS-9 payload specialists and backup in training session

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    Two Spacelab 1 payload specialists and a backup for that flight prepare for a training session in the JSC mockup and integration laboratory. Fully decked out in the Shuttle constant wear garments (foreground) are Ulf Merbold, left, and Byron K. Licktenberg, prime crewmembers on the STS-9 team. In civilian clothes is payload specialist backup Michael L. Lampton.

  10. Academic learning for specialist nurses: a grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millberg, Lena German; Berg, Linda; Brämberg, Elisabeth Björk; Nordström, Gun; Ohlén, Joakim

    2014-11-01

    The aim was to explore the major concerns of specialist nurses pertaining to academic learning during their education and initial professional career. Specialist nursing education changed in tandem with the European educational reform in 2007. At the same time, greater demands were made on the healthcare services to provide evidence-based and safe patient-care. These changes have influenced specialist nursing programmes and consequently the profession. Grounded Theory guided the study. Data were collected by means of a questionnaire with open-ended questions distributed at the end of specialist nursing programmes in 2009 and 2010. Five universities were included. Further, individual, pair and group interviews were used to collect data from 12 specialist nurses, 5-14 months after graduation. A major concern for specialist nurses was that academic learning should be "meaningful" for their professional future. The specialist nurses' "meaningful academic learning process" was characterised by an ambivalence of partly believing in and partly being hesitant about the significance of academic learning and partly receiving but also lacking support. Specialist nurses were influenced by factors in two areas: curriculum and healthcare context. They felt that the outcome of contribution to professional confidence was critical in making academic learning meaningful. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Stress, satisfaction and burnout among Dutch medical specialists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Mechteld R. M.; Smets, Ellen M. A.; Oort, Frans J.; de Haes, Hanneke C. J. M.

    2003-01-01

    Background: Stress and stress-related illnesses are increasing among medical specialists. This threatens the quality of patient care. in this study we investigated (a) levels of job stress and job satisfaction among medical specialists, (b) factors contributing to stress and satisfaction and (c) the

  12. The School Librarian as Information Specialist: A Vibrant Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Frances Jacobson

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about the school librarian as information specialist. She stresses that the school librarian's information specialist role is more important than ever. She offers her personal toolkit that consists of four strategies in helping and teaching students to use content responsibly.

  13. The Changing Role of the Reading Specialist: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsburg, Victoria Elaine

    2012-01-01

    This descriptive qualitative case study explored the changing role of the reading specialist through various perceptions of professionals in the Neon Shadow School District. The purpose of the study was to explore what, how, and why the duties and responsibilities of the reading specialist have changed since first employed as an…

  14. Clarifying the role of the mental health peer specialist in Massachusetts, USA: insights from peer specialists, supervisors and clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Linda; Strother, Heather; Muhr, Kathy; Sefton, Laura; Savageau, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Mental health peer specialists develop peer-to-peer relationships of trust with clients to improve their health and well-being, functioning in ways similar to community health workers. Although the number of peer specialists in use has been increasing, their role in care teams is less defined than that of the community health worker. This qualitative study explored how the peer specialist role is defined across different stakeholder groups, the expectations for this role and how the peer specialist is utilised and integrated across different types of mental health services. Data were collected through interviews and focus groups conducted in Massachusetts with peer specialists (N = 44), their supervisors (N = 14) and clients (N = 10) between September 2009 and January 2011. A consensus coding approach was used and all data outputs were reviewed by the entire team to identify themes. Peer specialists reported that their most important role is to develop relationships with clients and that having lived mental health experience is a key element in creating that bond. They also indicated that educating staff about the recovery model and peer role is another important function. However, they often felt a lack of clarity about their role within their organisation and care team. Supervisors valued the unique experience that peer specialists bring to an organisation. However, without a defined set of expectations for this role, they struggled with training, guiding and evaluating their peer specialist staff. Clients reported that the shared lived experience is important for the relationship and that working with a peer specialist has improved their mental health. With increasing support for person-centred integrated healthcare delivery models, the demand for mental health peer specialist services will probably increase. Therefore, clearer role definition, as well as workforce development focused on team orientation, is necessary for peer specialists to be fully integrated

  15. What makes a good neighborhood? Interaction of spatial scale and fruit density in the predator satiation dynamics of a masting juniper tree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezquida, Eduardo T; Olano, José Miguel

    2013-10-01

    Spatio-temporal variability in fruit production (masting) has been regarded as a key mechanism to increase plant fitness by reducing seed predation. However, considerably more effort has been devoted into understanding the consequences of temporal rather than spatial variations in fruit crop for plant fitness. In order to simultaneously evaluate both components, we quantify fruit production and pre-dispersal damage by three arthropod species (mites, chalcid wasps and moths) in the Spanish juniper (Juniperus thurifera) during 3 years in a spatially explicit context. Our aims were to assess (1) the interaction between fruit production and pre-dispersal fruit damage by arthropods, (2) the potential interference or competition between arthropods, and (3) the form of the phenotypic selection exerted by arthropods on fruit traits considering the spatial context. Arthropods damaged a substantial fraction of fruits produced by Spanish juniper with levels of damage showing sharp inter-annual variations. Fruit damage by mites was negatively related to yearly fruit crop and positively correlated at individual trees fruiting in consecutive years. Increased interspecific interference was an additional consequence of reduced fruit availability during small crop years. During a masting year, fruit damage by less mobile species such as mites was negatively affected by tree crop size, and no spatial structure was observed for mite damage. The incidence of chalcid wasps was low, so the spatial pattern of seed predation was unclear, and no preferences for fruit or seed traits were detected. Conversely, moths selected larger fruits and their incidence on trees was spatially aggregated up to 20 m, with predation levels being negatively affected by fruit abundance at the patch level, suggesting a positive density-dependent effect of neighbors on fruit output. These results highlight the importance of including the spatial component to understand complex species interactions at local

  16. Repeat, Low Altitude Measurements of Vegetation Status and Biomass Using Manned Aerial and UAS Imagery in a Piñon-Juniper Woodland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krofcheck, D. J.; Lippitt, C.; Loerch, A.; Litvak, M. E.

    2015-12-01

    Measuring the above ground biomass of vegetation is a critical component of any ecological monitoring campaign. Traditionally, biomass of vegetation was measured with allometric-based approach. However, it is also time-consuming, labor-intensive, and extremely expensive to conduct over large scales and consequently is cost-prohibitive at the landscape scale. Furthermore, in semi-arid ecosystems characterized by vegetation with inconsistent growth morphologies (e.g., piñon-juniper woodlands), even ground-based conventional allometric approaches are often challenging to execute consistently across individuals and through time, increasing the difficulty of the required measurements and consequently the accuracy of the resulting products. To constrain the uncertainty associated with these campaigns, and to expand the extent of our measurement capability, we made repeat measurements of vegetation biomass in a semi-arid piñon-juniper woodland using structure-from-motion (SfM) techniques. We used high-spatial resolution overlapping aerial images and high-accuracy ground control points collected from both manned aircraft and multi-rotor UAS platforms, to generate digital surface model (DSM) for our experimental region. We extracted high-precision canopy volumes from the DSM and compared these to the vegetation allometric data, s to generate high precision canopy volume models. We used these models to predict the drivers of allometric equations for Pinus edulis and Juniperous monosperma (canopy height, diameter at breast height, and root collar diameter). Using this approach, we successfully accounted for the carbon stocks in standing live and standing dead vegetation across a 9 ha region, which contained 12.6 Mg / ha of standing dead biomass, with good agreement to our field plots. Here we present the initial results from an object oriented workflow which aims to automate the biomass estimation process of tree crown delineation and volume calculation, and partition

  17. Mission Specialist Scott Parazynski arrives late at KSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    The T-38 jet aircraft arrives at the Shuttle Landing Facility carrying STS-95 Mission Specialist Scott E. Parazynski (second seat). The pilot is astronaut Kent Rominger. Parazynski's first plane experienced problems at the stop at Tyndall AFB and he had to wait for another jet and pilot to finish the flight to KSC. He joined other crewmembers Mission Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Steven W. Lindsey, Mission Specialist Stephen K. Robinson, Payload Specialist John H. Glenn Jr., senator from Ohio, Mission Specialist Pedro Duque, with the European Space Agency (ESA), and Payload Specialist Chiaki Mukai, with the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA), for final pre-launch preparations. STS-95 is expected to launch at 2 p.m. EST on Oct. 29, last 8 days, 21 hours and 49 minutes, and land at 11:49 a.m. EST on Nov. 7.

  18. The need for PGY2-trained clinical pharmacy specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragucci, Kelly R; O'Bryant, Cindy L; Campbell, Kristin Bova; Buck, Marcia L; Dager, William E; Donovan, Jennifer L; Emerson, Kayleigh; Gubbins, Paul O; Haight, Robert J; Jackevicius, Cynthia; Murphy, John E; Prohaska, Emily

    2014-06-01

    The American College of Clinical Pharmacy and other stakeholder organizations seek to advance clinical pharmacist practitioners, educators, and researchers. Unfortunately, there remains an inadequate supply of residency-trained clinical specialists to meet the needs of our health care system, and nonspecialists often are called on to fill open specialist positions. The impact of clinical pharmacy specialists on pharmacotherapy outcomes in both acute care and primary care settings demonstrates the value of these specialists. This commentary articulates the need for postgraduate year two (PGY2)-trained clinical specialists within the health care system by discussing various clinical and policy rationales, interprofessional support, economic justifications, and their impact on quality of care and drug safety. The integrated practice model that has grown out of the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists Pharmacy Practice Model Initiative (PPMI) could threaten the growth and development of future clinical specialists. Therefore, the ways in which PGY2-trained clinical pharmacist specialists are deployed in the PPMI require further consideration. PGY2 residencies provide education and training opportunities that cannot be achieved in traditional professional degree programs or postgraduate year one residencies. These specialists are needed to provide direct patient care to complex patient populations and to educate and train pharmacy students and postgraduate residents. Limitations to training and hiring PGY2-trained clinical pharmacy specialists include site capacity limitations and lack of funding. A gap analysis is needed to define the extent of the mismatch between the demand for specialists by health care systems and educational institutions versus the capacity to train clinical pharmacists at the specialty level. © 2014 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  19. [Databases for surgical specialists in Cancún, Quintana Roo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contla-Hosking, Jorge Eduardo; Ceballos-Martínez, Zoila Inés; Peralta-Bahena, Mónica Esther

    2004-01-01

    Our aim was to identify the level of knowledge of surgical health-area specialists in Cancún, Quintana Roo, Mexico, from the personal productivity database. We carried out an investigation of 37 surgical specialists: 24 belonged to the Mexican Social Security Institute (IMSS), while 13 belonged to the Mexican Health Secretariat (SSA). In our research, we found that 61% of surgical health-area specialist physicians were familiar with some aspects of the institutional surgical registry, including the following: 54% knew of the existence of a personal registry of surgeries carried out, and 43% keep a record of their personal activities. From the latter percentage, 69% of surgical health-area specialist physicians mentioned keeping their records manually, while 44% used the computer. Results of the research suggest that these physicians would like to have some kind of record of the surgeries carried out by each. An important percentage of these specialists do not keep a personal record on a database; due to this lack of knowledge, we obtain incorrect information in institutional records of the reality of what is actually done. We consider it important to inform surgical specialists concerning the existence of personal institutional records in database form or even of record done manually, as well as correct terminology for the International Codification (CIE-9 & 10). We inform here of the need to encourage a culture in records and databases in the formative stage of surgeon specialists.

  20. Exploring the situational motivation of medical specialists: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Burgt, Stéphanie M E; Kusurkar, Rashmi A; Croiset, Gerda; Peerdeman, Saskia M

    2018-02-26

    The aim was to obtain insight into the factors in the work environment that motivate or demotivate a medical specialist during his/her working day. A qualitative ethnographic design was used, and a constructivist approach was adopted with the Self-Determination theory of motivation as a framework. Six medical specialists from VU University Medical Center in the Netherlands, recruited through convenience, snowball, and purposive sampling, were shadowed for one day each. Data were transcribed and open-coded. Themes were finalized through discussion and consensus. Sixty hours of observation data identified motivating and demotivating factors categorized into four themes that are important for specialists' motivation. Informational technology issues are demotivating factors. Working with colleagues can be both a motivating and demotivating factor, e.g., filling in for each other through feelings of relatedness was motivating. Being in control of one's planning through feelings of autonomy was motivating. Furthermore, patient care and teaching, especially in combination, stimulated specialists' motivation. Regarding the design of the study, we found that situational motivation is indeed observable. The basic psychological needs autonomy, competence, and relatedness are important for specialists' motivation. Investing in a more motivating, open, transparent, and basic-needs- supportive work environment for medical specialists is necessary. Keywords: Continuing professional development, motivation, medical specialists, self-determination theory, qualitative research.

  1. POSTGRADUATE EDUCATION FUNCTIONING PATTERNS OF TOURISM SPHERE SPECIALISTS IN SWITZERLAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Наталія Закордонець

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Functioning patterns of postgraduate education of tourism sphere specialists in Switzerland have been established. The competences of tourism sphere specialist, the formation of which programs of postgraduate education are focused on have been considered. The benefits of educational qualification of Masters in Business Administration with a major specialization in tourism have been outlined. The characteristics of the core curriculum of the Doctor of Management of leading universities in the field of tourism education have been determined. The performance criteria of postgraduate education system functioning of tourism sphere specialists in Switzerland have been revealed.

  2. Elementary School Math Instruction: Can Reading Specialists Assist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrichs, Audrey S.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the contradictions found in recommendations for direction instruction or informal math language development, and some suggestions for practical resolution of disagreements, to enable school reading specialists to provide both background and practical help to classroom instructors teaching math. (HTH)

  3. Training the non-specialist music teacher: insights from a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Training the non-specialist music teacher: insights from a Zimbabwean case study. ... music education in primary schools is taught by general classroom teachers, who ... JOURNAL OF THE MUSICAL ARTS IN AFRICA VOLUME 7 2010, 1–15 ...

  4. Perioperative Clinical Nurse Specialist Role Delineation: A Systematic Review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cole, Lisa M; Walker, Theodore J; Nader, Kelly C; Glover, Dennis E; Newkirk, Laura E

    2006-01-01

    A clearly defined role of the Perioperative Clinical Nurse Specialist (PONS) is not identified. The purpose of this study was to provide recommendations for a delineated role of the PONS that will provide role clarity and practice guidance...

  5. Evaluation of a diabetes nurse specialist prescribing project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Jill; Carryer, Jenny; Adams, Jeffery

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate the diabetes nurse specialist prescribing project with the aim of determining whether diabetes nurse specialist prescribing is safe and effective and to inform the implementation and extension of registered nurse prescribing. Registered nurses in many countries are able to prescribe medicines, but in New Zealand, prior to the diabetes nurse specialist project, nurse practitioners were the only nurses who could prescribe medicines. New regulations allowed the nurses to prescribe a limited number of prescription medicines. The study was a process and outcome clinical programme evaluation. The project took place between April-September 2011 and involved 12 diabetes nurse specialist in four localities. Quantitative data were collected from clinical records maintained by the diabetes nurse specialist for the project (1274 patients and 3402 prescribing events), from surveys with stakeholders (general practitioners, n = 30; team members, n = 19; and patients, n = 89) and audits from patient notes (n = 117) and prescriptions (n = 227), and qualitative data from interviews with project participants (n = 18) and patients (n = 19). All data were analysed descriptively. Diabetes nurse specialist prescribing was determined to be safe, of high quality and appropriate. It brought important benefits to the effectiveness of specialist diabetes services, was acceptable to patients and was supported by the wider healthcare team. These findings are consistent with the findings reported in the international literature about nurse prescribing in a range of different practice areas. Clarification of the education and competence requirements and resourcing for the ongoing supervision of nurses is recommended if the prescribing model is to be extended. Diabetes nurse specialist prescribing improved access to medicines by providing a more timely service. Nurses felt more satisfied with their work because they could independently provide a complete episode of care

  6. Bridging the care continuum: patient information needs for specialist referrals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steltenkamp Carol L

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Information transfer is critical in the primary care to specialist referral process and has been examined extensively in the US and other countries, yet there has been little attention to the patient's perspective of the information transfer process. This cross-sectional study examined the quality of the information received by patients with a chronic condition from the referring and specialist physician in the specialist referral process and the relationship of the quality of information received to trust in the physicians. Methods Structured telephone interviews were conducted with a random sample of 250 patients who had experienced a referral to a specialist for the first visit for a chronic condition within the prior six months. The sample was selected from the patients who visited specialist physicians at any of the 500 hospitals from the National Research Corporation client base. Results Most patients (85% received a good explanation about the reason for the specialist visit from the referring physician yet 26% felt unprepared about what to expect. Trust in the referring physician was highly associated with the preparatory information patients received. Specialists gave good explanations about diagnosis and treatment, but 26% of patients got no information about follow-up. Trust in the specialist correlated highly with good explanations of diagnosis, treatment, and self-management. Conclusion Preparatory information from referring physicians influences the quality of the referral process, the subsequent coordination of care, and trust in the physician. Changes in the health care system can improve the information transfer process and improve coordination of care for patients.

  7. Motivational Profiles and Motivation for Lifelong Learning of Medical Specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Burgt, Stéphanie M E; Kusurkar, Rashmi A; Wilschut, Janneke A; Tjin A Tsoi, Sharon L N M; Croiset, Gerda; Peerdeman, Saskia M

    2018-05-22

    Medical specialists face the challenge of maintaining their knowledge and skills and continuing professional development, that is, lifelong learning. Motivation may play an integral role in many of the challenges facing the physician workforce today including maintenance of a high performance. The aim of this study was to determine whether medical specialists show different motivational profiles and if these profiles predict differences in motivation for lifelong learning. An online questionnaire was sent to every medical specialist working in five hospitals in the Netherlands. The questionnaire included the validated Multidimensional Work Motivation Scale and the Jefferson Scale of Physician Lifelong Learning together with background questions like age, gender, and type of hospital. Respondents were grouped into different motivational profiles by using a two-step clustering approach. Four motivational profiles were identified: (1) HAMC profile (for High Autonomous and Moderate Controlled motivation), (2) MAMC profile (for Moderate Autonomous and Moderate Controlled motivation), (3) MALC profile (for Moderate Autonomous and Low Controlled motivation), and (4) HALC profile (for High Autonomous and Low Controlled motivation). Most of the female specialists that work in an academic hospital and specialists with a surgical specialty were represented in the HALC profile. Four motivational profiles were found among medical specialists, differing in gender, experience and type of specialization. The profiles are based on the combination of autonomous motivation (AM) and controlled motivation (CM) in the specialists. The profiles that have a high score on autonomous motivation have a positive association with lifelong learning.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work

  8. Understanding practice patterns of glaucoma sub-specialists in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhil S. Choudhari

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To obtain information on the prevailing practice patterns of glaucoma specialists in India. METHODS: Glaucoma specialists attending the Annual Conference of the Glaucoma Society of India (GSI were surveyed. This survey, conducted in 2013, was based on an interactive audience response system. RESULTS: The information was obtained from 146 glaucoma specialists. Approximately half (n=83; 57% had ≥10y of experience in managing glaucoma and were in institutional practice (n=74, 51%. Goldmann applanation tonometry was preferred by 103 (72% specialists whilst n=25 (17.4% used non-contact tonometer. Indentation gonioscopy was favoured by two-thirds (n=90, 66% whereas stereoscopic optic disc examination and visual fields using Humphrey perimeter was performed by a majority of the specialists surveyed (n=115, 86% and n=114; 83% respectively. Nearly three quarter specialists (n=96; 72% preferred optical coherence tomography for imaging. The primary choice for treatment of angle closure disease and primary open angle glaucoma was laser (iridotomy, n=117; 93% and medical management (prostaglandin analogue, n=104; 78%, respectively. Approximately only a third of the specialists surveyed (n=37; 28% were performing both trabeculectomy and implantation of a glaucoma drainage device and about half (n=64; 47% were not operating on congenital glaucoma at all. CONCLUSION: This survey has found conformance with preferred practice patterns in several areas of diagnosis and management of glaucoma, but there was diversity in a few areas. The information is a significant step towards improvement of glaucoma care in India, including planning for future strategies.

  9. STS-95 Mission Specialist Duque suits up during TCDT

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    STS-95 Mission Specialist Pedro Duque of Spain, representing the European Space Agency, suits up in the Operations and Checkout Building prior to his trip to Launch Pad 39-B. Duque and the rest of the STS-95 crew are at KSC to participate in the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) which includes mission familiarization activities, emergency egress training, and a simulated main engine cutoff. The other crew members are Payload Specialist Chiaki Mukai (M.D., Ph.D.), representing the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA), Pilot Steven W. Lindsey, Mission Specialist Scott E. Parazynski, Mission Specialist Stephen K. Robinson, Payload Specialist John H. Glenn Jr., senator from Ohio, and Mission Commander Curtis L. Brown. The STS-95 mission, targeted for liftoff on Oct. 29, includes research payloads such as the Spartan solar-observing deployable spacecraft, the Hubble Space Telescope Orbital Systems Test Platform, the International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker, as well as the SPACEHAB single module with experiments on space flight and the aging process. Following the TCDT, the crew will be returning to Houston for final flight preparations.

  10. Impacts of an Extreme Early-Season Freeze Event in the Interior Pacific Northwest (30 October-3 November 2002) on Western Juniper Woodlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Paul A.; Soulé, Peter T.

    2005-07-01

    In mid-autumn 2002, an exceptional 5-day cold spell affected much of the interior Pacific Northwest, with minimum temperatures averaging 13°C below long-term means (1953-2002). On 31 October, minimum temperature records occurred at 98 of the 106 recording stations, with records lowered in some locations by 9°C. Calculation of recurrence intervals of minimum temperatures shows that 50% of the stations experienced a >500-yr event. The synoptic conditions responsible were the development of a pronounced high pressure ridge over western Canada and an intense low pressure area centered in the Intermountain West that promoted strong northeasterly winds. The cold spell occurred near the end of the growing season for an ecologically critical and dominant tree species of the interior Pacific Northwest—western juniper—and followed an extended period of severe drought. In spring 2003, it became apparent that the cold had caused high rates of tree mortality and canopy dieback in a species that is remarkable for its longevity and resistance to climatic stress. The cold event altered western juniper dominance in some areas, and this alteration may have long-term impacts on water budgets, fire intensities and frequencies, animal species interrelationships, and interspecific competition among plant species.

  11. Soils mediate the impact of fine woody debris on invasive and native grasses as whole trees are mechanically shredded into firebreaks in piñon-juniper woodlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aanderud, Zachary T.; Schoolmaster, Donald R.; Rigby, Deborah; Bybee, Jordon; Campbell, Tayte; Roundy, Bruce A.

    2017-01-01

    To stem wildfires, trees are being mechanically shredded into firebreaks with the resulting fine woody debris (FWD) potentially exerting immense control over soil and plants. We linked FWD-induced changes in microbial activity and nutrient availability to the frequency of Bromus tectorum and three native, perennial grasses across 31 piñon-juniper woodlands, UT, USA. Using a series of mixed models, we found that FWD increased the frequency of three of the four grasses by at least 12%. Deep, as opposed to shallow, soils mediated frequencies following FWD additions but only partially explained the variation in Bromus and Pseudoroegneria spicata. Although fertile areas associated with tree-islands elicited no response, FWD-induced increases in nitrogen mineralization in deep soils (15–17 cm) caused the frequency of the exotic and Pseudoroegneria to rise. Higher phosphorus availability in FWD-covered surface soils (0–2 cm) had no impact on grasses. FWD altered deep soil respiration, and deep and shallow microbial biomass structuring Pseudoroegneria frequencies, suggesting that microorganism themselves regulated Pseudoroegneria. The positive effects of FWD on grass frequencies intensified over time for natives but diminished for Bromus. Our results demonstrate that microorganisms in deeper soils helped mediate species-specific responses to disturbance both facilitating exotic invasion and promoting native establishment.

  12. Integrating HCI Specialists into Open Source Software Development Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedberg, Henrik; Iivari, Netta

    Typical open source software (OSS) development projects are organized around technically talented developers, whose communication is based on technical aspects and source code. Decision-making power is gained through proven competence and activity in the project, and non-technical end-user opinions are too many times neglected. In addition, also human-computer interaction (HCI) specialists have encountered difficulties in trying to participate in OSS projects, because there seems to be no clear authority and responsibility for them. In this paper, based on HCI and OSS literature, we introduce an extended OSS development project organization model that adds a new level of communication and roles for attending human aspects of software. The proposed model makes the existence of HCI specialists visible in the projects, and promotes interaction between developers and the HCI specialists in the course of a project.

  13. Orienting and Onboarding Clinical Nurse Specialists: A Process Improvement Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Mayra G; Watt, Jennifer L; Falder-Saeed, Karie; Lewis, Brennan; Patton, Lindsey

    Clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) have a unique advanced practice role. This article describes a process useful in establishing a comprehensive orientation and onboarding program for a newly hired CNS. The project team used the National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists core competencies as a guide to construct a process for effectively onboarding and orienting newly hired CNSs. Standardized documents were created for the orientation process including a competency checklist, needs assessment template, and professional evaluation goals. In addition, other documents were revised to streamline the orientation process. Standardizing the onboarding and orientation process has demonstrated favorable results. As of 2016, 3 CNSs have successfully been oriented and onboarded using the new process. Unique healthcare roles require special focus when onboarding and orienting into a healthcare system. The use of the National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists core competencies guided the project in establishing a successful orientation and onboarding process for newly hired CNSs.

  14. Struggling doctors in specialist training: a case control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Neill, Lotte; Norberg, Karen; Thomsen, Maria

    ), or transferred (i.e. had unplanned changes in place of training/ward due to failure to thrive or due to inadequate development of competences), or dropped out (i.e. were dismissed from, had resigned from, or changed their speciality). Controls were a random sample of doctors in the source population, who were......Abstract summary The aim of this cummulative incidence case-control study was to examine: if struggling trainees in medical specialist training (cases) tended to struggle already in medical school or not compared to non-struggling controls, and which performance indicators during medical school...... seemed to predict struggling in postgraduate education if any. The study design is rooted in epidemiological methodology. Struggling doctors in specialist training: a case-control study. It has been reported in the international literature, that around 3-10% of doctors in post-garduate specialist...

  15. A novel statistical method for classifying habitat generalists and specialists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chazdon, Robin L; Chao, Anne; Colwell, Robert K

    2011-01-01

    in second-growth (SG) and old-growth (OG) rain forests in the Caribbean lowlands of northeastern Costa Rica. We evaluate the multinomial model in detail for the tree data set. Our results for birds were highly concordant with a previous nonstatistical classification, but our method classified a higher......: (1) generalist; (2) habitat A specialist; (3) habitat B specialist; and (4) too rare to classify with confidence. We illustrate our multinomial classification method using two contrasting data sets: (1) bird abundance in woodland and heath habitats in southeastern Australia and (2) tree abundance...... fraction (57.7%) of bird species with statistical confidence. Based on a conservative specialization threshold and adjustment for multiple comparisons, 64.4% of tree species in the full sample were too rare to classify with confidence. Among the species classified, OG specialists constituted the largest...

  16. ICT SPECIALIST SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE – BUSINESS REQUIREMENTS AND EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloš Maryška

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes partial results of surveys realized amongCzech universities and business units which aim has been to analyzecurrent situation in demand and supply side of ICT (Informationand Communication Technologies specialists at the labor marketin the Czech Republic. The demand and supply side are comparedthrough their requirements on knowledge of ICT specialists. Theresults present typical “product” of Czech education system inICT competencies. General conclusions show that majority ofundergraduates do not have appropriate knowledge profile to enterICT corporate business as qualified employees - ICT specialist -without further additional training. The same fact is valid for a littleless than a half of graduates at master level. During quantitativeanalysis, we have identified that at about 60 per cent of ICTspecialists did not pass a formal ICT education. These facts showlacks in ICT oriented study programs and provoke requirementon further development of ICT oriented curricula in accordance tobusiness requirements and needs.

  17. The specialist physician's approach to rheumatoid arthritis in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bester, Frederik C J; Bosch, Fredricka J; van Rensburg, Barend J Jansen

    2016-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is expected to increase in Africa and South Africa. Due to the low numbers of rheumatologists in South Africa, specialist physicians also have to care for patients with RA. Furthermore several new developments have taken place in recent years which improved the management and outcome of RA. Classification criteria were updated, assessment follow-up tools were refined and above all, several new biological disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs were developed. Therefore it is imperative for specialist physicians to update themselves with the newest developments in the management of RA. This article provides an overview of the newest developments in the management of RA in the South African context. This approach may well apply to countries with similar specialist to patient ratios and disease profiles.

  18. Nuclear criticality safety specialist training and qualification programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopper, C.M.

    1993-01-01

    Since the beginning of the Nuclear Criticality Safety Division of the American Nuclear Society (ANS) in 1967, the nuclear criticality safety (NCS) community has sought to provide an exchange of information at a national level to facilitate the education and development of NCS specialists. In addition, individual criticality safety organizations within government contractor and licensed commercial nonreactor facilities have developed training and qualification programs for their NCS specialists. However, there has been substantial variability in the content and quality of these program requirements and personnel qualifications, at least as measured within the government contractor community. The purpose of this paper is to provide a brief, general history of staff training and to describe the current direction and focus of US DOE guidance for the content of training and qualification programs designed to develop NCS specialists

  19. Polish Code of Ethics of a Medical Laboratory Specialist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elżbieta, Puacz; Waldemar, Glusiec; Barbara, Madej-Czerwonka

    2014-09-01

    Along with the development of medicine, increasingly significant role has been played by the laboratory diagnostics. For over ten years the profession of the medical laboratory specialist has been regarded in Poland as the autonomous medical profession and has enjoyed a status of one of public trust. The process of education of medical laboratory specialists consists of a five-year degree in laboratory medicine, offered at Medical Universities, and of a five-year Vocational Specialization in one of the fields of laboratory medicine such as clinical biochemistry, medical microbiology, medical laboratory toxicology, medical laboratory cytomorphology and medical laboratory transfusiology. An important component of medical laboratory specialists' identity is awareness of inherited ethos obtained from bygone generations of workers in this particular profession and the need to continue its further development. An expression of this awareness is among others Polish Code of Ethics of a Medical Laboratory Specialist (CEMLS) containing a set of values and a moral standpoint characteristic of this type of professional environment. Presenting the ethos of the medical laboratory specialist is a purpose of this article. Authors focus on the role CEMLS plays in areas of professional ethics and law. Next, they reconstruct the Polish model of ethos of medical diagnostic laboratory personnel. An overall picture consists of a presentation of the general moral principles concerning execution of this profession and rules of conduct in relations with the patient, own professional environment and the rest of the society. Polish model of ethical conduct, which is rooted in Hippocratic medical tradition, harmonizes with the ethos of medical laboratory specialists of other European countries and the world.

  20. UK HSE Training of HM Radiation Specialist Inspectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nattres, E.; Barrett, J. A.

    2004-01-01

    HSE's mission is to ensure that risks to people's health and safety from work activities are properly controlled. Radiation Specialist Inspectors make an essential contribution to HSE's objectives through the application of their professional skills and knowledge. The role of the Radiation Specialist Inspector includes inspection work in the field to ensure compliance by employers with the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974, Ionising Radiations Regulations 1999 and associated legislation. They also contribute to research, and the development of technical policy, legislation, standards, and guidance on protection against the possible harm from exposure to electromagnetic fields, optical or ionizing radiation. This paper explains how Radiation Specialist Inspectors are trained. It starts with the recruitment process, with an emphasis on recruiting people who have already gained relevant experience from radiation work practices in previous employments. The interview process is explored, which includes both technical and behavioural interviews, making a presentation and completing a personality questionnaire. The initial twelve months training is then discussed in detail, including the six months as a general Health and Safety Inspector where inspector' skills and techniques' are developed by practical involvement in inspection, followed by a challenging six months with a Radiation Specialist group. The programme for this period is designed to broaden and develop skills and knowledge within the radiation protection specialist. After the initial twelve months probationary period, new Inspectors are expected to confirm and establish themselves in their role of Radiation Specialist Inspectors. However, it does not end there, continuing professional development to ensure that Inspectors have cutting edge knowledge of the latest advances within the radiation field and health and safety as a whole is essential and will be discussed in more detail. (Author) 6 refs

  1. Individual prey choices of octopuses: Are they generalist or specialist?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A. MATHER, Tatiana S. LEITE, Allan T. BATISTA

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Prey choice is often evaluated at the species or population level. Here, we analyzed the diet of octopuses of different populations with the aim to assess the importance of individual feeding habits as a factor affecting prey choice. Two methods were used, an assessment of the extent to which an individual octopus made choices of species representative of those population (PSi and IS and 25% cutoff values for number of choices and percentage intake of individual on their prey. In one population of Octopus cf vulgaris in Bermuda individuals were generalist by IS=0.77, but most chose many prey of the same species, and were specialists on it by >75% intake. Another population had a wider prey selection, still generalist with PSi=0.66, but two individuals specialized by choices. In Bonaire, there was a wide range of prey species chosen, and the population was specialists by IS= 0.42. Individual choices revealed seven specialists and four generalists. A population of Octopus cyanea in Hawaii all had similar choices of crustaceans, so the population was generalist by IS with 0.74. But by individual choices, three were considered a specialist. A population of Enteroctopus dofleini from Puget Sound had a wide range of preferences, in which seven were also specialists, IS=0.53. By individual choices, thirteen were also specialists. Given the octopus specialty of learning during foraging, we hypothesize that both localized prey availability and individual personality differences could influence the exploration for prey and this translates into different prey choices across individuals and populations showed in this study [Current Zoology 58 (4: 597-603, 2012].

  2. Addressing cultural diversity: the hepatitis B clinical specialist perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Jack; Smith, Elizabeth; Hajarizadeh, Behzad; Richmond, Jacqueline; Lucke, Jayne

    2017-08-31

    Hepatitis B is a viral infection primarily affecting people from culturally diverse communities in Australia. While vaccination prevents infection, there is increasing mortality resulting from liver damage associated with chronic infection. Deficits in the national policy and clinical response to hepatitis B result in a low diagnosis rate, inadequate testing and diagnosis processes, and poor access to hepatitis B treatment services. While research identifies inadequate hepatitis B knowledge among people with the virus and primary health care workers, this project sought to identify how specialist clinicians in Australia negotiate cultural diversity, and provide often complex clinical information to people with hepatitis B. A vignette was developed and presented to thirteen viral hepatitis specialist clinicians prior to an electronically recorded interview. Recruitment continued until saturation of themes was reached. Data were thematically coded into themes outlined in the interview schedule. Ethical approval for the research was provided by the La Trobe University Human Research Ethics Committee. Key messages provided to patients with hepatitis B by clinical specialists were identified. These messages were not consistently provided to all patients with hepatitis B, but were determined on perceptions of patient knowledge, age and highest educational level. While the vignette stated that English was not an issue for the patient, most specialists identified the need for an interpreter. Combating stigma related to hepatitis B was seen as important by the specialists and this was done through normalising the virus. Having an awareness of different cultural understandings about hepatitis B specifically, and health and well-being generally, was noted as a communication strategy. Key core competencies need to be developed to deliver educational messages to people with hepatitis B within clinical encounters. The provision of adequate resources to specialist clinics will

  3. Certification of the instructional competence of nuclear training specialists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wollert, T.N.

    1990-01-01

    This study was designed to identify the qualification requirements and the means to assess the unique knowledge and skills necessary to perform the instructional activities needed by nuclear training specialist at Fort Saint Vrain Nuclear Generating Station. A survey questionnaire with 233 task statements categorized into eleven duty areas was distributed to twenty-three nuclear training specialists at Fort Saint Vrain Nuclear Generating Station. On the basis of the data accumulated for this study, the researcher identified the following findings. A list of 158 task statements were identified as being relevant; this list was considered a core knowledge, skills, and abilities needed as a nuclear training specialist. The list consisted of ten duty areas which were relevant to the effective performance of a nuclear training specialist. Thirty-three task statements were identified as being relevant for the duty area Conductive Training. These were considered the core of knowledge, skills, and abilities needed in the development of the initial test instrument and the instructor classroom skills observation checklist. The significant correlation between the results of these two instruments, using a rank-order correlation coefficient, was interpreted by the researcher as indicating that the initial test instrument possessed concurrent validity. The researcher interpreted the reliability value as a positive indicator that the initial test instrument demonstrated internal consistency. It was concluded that it could be determined whether personnel possessed the level of competence needed to perform the instructional duties of a nuclear training specialist by using a written test. Data from this research supported the use of the initial test developed for this study as a valid means to certify nuclear training specialists for the duty area Conducting Training

  4. 14 CFR 1214.306 - Payload specialist relationship with sponsoring institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Payload specialist relationship with... ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT Payload Specialists for Space Transportation System (STS) Missions § 1214.306 Payload specialist relationship with sponsoring institutions. Specialists who are not U.S. Government employees must...

  5. Survey of the labour market for information specialists in Lithuania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Maceviciute

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the results of surveys carried out in Lithuania and Estonia in 1995 and 1996, the main aim of which was to provide a basis for planning the development of information management courses in the Baltic States. In the course of the project it was necessary to resolve certain methodological difficulties in the identification of the concept 'information specialist' and in the process of data collection. The results show the recruitment rates needed over the next three years and the qualities and skills needed by information specialists.

  6. STS-87 Mission Specialist Winston E. Scott suits up

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    STS-87 Mission Specialist Winston Scott dons his launch and entry suit with the assistance of a suit technician in the Operations and Checkout Building. This is Scotts second space flight. He and the five other crew members will depart shortly for Launch Pad 39B, where the Space Shuttle Columbia awaits liftoff on a 16-day mission to perform microgravity and solar research. Scott is scheduled to perform an extravehicular activity spacewalk with Mission Specialist Takao Doi, Ph.D., of the National Space Development Agency of Japan, during STS-87. He also performed a spacewalk on STS-72.

  7. BUSINESS GAMES IN PROFESSIONAL TRAINING OF FUTURE FIRE SAFETY SPECIALISTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Лариса Маладика

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Special features of professional training of future specialists in extraordinary (emergency situations, increasing its quality with the use of interactive technologies have been considered in this article. The paper presents a research of modern interactive educational technologies, most widely used at higher educational institutions, promoting modernization of education as well as training of competitive future specialists. The article grounds possibility of formation and development of the culture of professional communication by interactive methods of learning, and business games, in particular. The research deals with kinds of business games as active methods of learning, their structural levels and features of use.

  8. Do specialists exit the firm outsourcing its R&D?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Wenjing

    Do specialists exit the firm increasingly outsourcing its research and development (R&D) work? Although this question is critical in understanding how R&D outsourcing links to innovation performance, the answer is not yet clear. This paper proposes that the optimal level of firm's internal...... employment of R&D specialists decreases with the deepening of R&D outsourcing but increases with the broadening of R&D outsourcing. These relations can be inferred from previous empirical studies as well as our theoretical analysis, and are supported by the empirical evidence from estimations of correlated...

  9. Entrustable professional activity (EPA) reshapes the practice of specialist training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemi-Murola, Leila

    In addition to medical expertise, competence-based medical training comprises communication and collaboration skills, professionalism, and leadership skills. Continuous feedback is essential for learning and development, and feedback only from the medical specialist examination taken in the end of training does not ensure thorough specialist training. Entrustable professional activity (EPA) is a unit of professional practice, defined as tasks or responsibilities typical of the specialty. EPA translates competence-based training into manageable and meaningful entities and provides tools for the evaluation of medical competence.

  10. Subject Specialist Mentors in the Lifelong Learning Sector: The Subject Specialist Mentor Model; is it working? A case study approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bailey, Wayne

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This short article explores whether using a mentoring model supports our Subject Specialist Mentors (SSMs with their role of mentoring trainees on Initial Teacher Training (ITT courses. Although there are many mentoring models to choose from, our model is based around mentoring within the Lifelong Learning Sector (LLS where trainees need support for their subject specialism as well as their generic teaching skills. The main focus is the use of coaching and mentoring skills taking into consideration guiding, supporting and challenging the trainee during the lifetime of the mentor/trainee relationship. The SSMs found that using our model as a tool helped to structure meetings and to ensure that the trainee had the necessary support to enable them to become proficient, competent subject specialist teachers. In conclusion, it was found that there is a need for the use of a model or a framework to help the Subject Specialist Mentor (SSM with such an important role.

  11. Motorcycle related ocular injuries in Irrua Specialist Teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This is a prospective study of all cases of motorcycle related accidents with involvement of the eyes seen at the Irrua Specialist Teaching Hospital from January 2005 to December 2005. The study was conducted to assess the severity of ocular trauma, ocular structures mostly affected and initial effect on visual acuity in such ...

  12. 22 CFR 61.6 - Consultation with subject matter specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... FREE FLOW OF AUDIO-VISUAL MATERIALS § 61.6 Consultation with subject matter specialists. (a) The... assisting the Department in its determination of whether materials for which export certification or import authentication is sought contain widespread and gross misstatements of fact. (b) As necessary, the Department may...

  13. Diagnostic and Prescriptive Skills of Teachers and Related Specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Karen Vlahos; Nolen, Patricia

    In light of criticisms that teacher preparation programs do not adequately prepare prospective reading teachers and specialists for actual classroom problems, a study was conducted to determine the accuracy of teacher diagnoses and planning for reading difficulties and to examine differences in coursework preparation and classroom experience.…

  14. Supporting smoking cessation in the medical specialist practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schippers, G. M.

    2004-01-01

    Although smoking cessation reduces the cardiovascular risk of smoking, why this is so is still uncertain. Nevertheless, because they are strongly and authoritatively involved in much of the serious health damage caused by smoking, medical specialists should do all they can to support their patients

  15. Keeping Current: Emotional Intelligence and the School Library Media Specialist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Daniel D.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses emotional intelligence and its importance for school library media specialists, based on a book by Daniel Goleman called "Emotional Intelligence." Highlights include managing emotions and relationships; self-motivation; and how emotional intelligence fits in with Standards for Information Literacy. (LRW)

  16. Export Management Specialist. A Training Program. Instructor's Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This publication provides instructors with materials for an export management specialist (EMS) training program. The objective of the training program is to assist companies in reaching their export goals by educating current and potential managers about the basics of exporting. It provides a foundation for considering international trade and for…

  17. Subsistence Specialist Handbook. Pamphlet No. P35101. Fourth Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coast Guard Inst., Oklahoma City, OK.

    This self-paced course is designed to present a basic, general overview of the duties of a Coast Guard Third Class Subsistence Specialist. The course provides basic information necessary to perform food preparation and food service tasks using various types of food service equipment and utensils. The course contains 16 illustrated reading…

  18. The Burden of Specialist Urologic Care in Abuja, Federal Capital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abuja is Nigeria's capital with a population of about 4 million residents. There are a total of fourteen public general and specialist hospitals with 6 consultant Urologists working in only three of these hospital serving the population. It is not known what proportion of the total surgical workload in Abuja is urological. Objective: ...

  19. Foursquare: A Health Education Specialist Checks-In--A Commentary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haithcox-Dennis, Melissa

    2011-01-01

    More and more, health education specialists are integrating technology into their work. Whereas most are familiar with social media sites like Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn, one relatively new form of social media, location based services (LBS), may be less familiar. Developed in 2000, LBS are software applications that are accessible from a…

  20. Maternal Mortality At The State Specialist Hospital Bauchi, Northern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To analyse and document our experiences with maternal mortality with the view of finding the trends over the last seven years, common causes and attributing socio-demographic factors. Design: A prospective analysis of maternal mortality. Setting: State Specialists Hospital Bauchi, Bauchi Northeastern Nigeria.

  1. Elementary Mathematics Specialists: Ensuring the Intersection of Research and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGatha, Maggie B.

    2017-01-01

    This paper provides a historical overview of the role and impact of elementary mathematics specialists as well as current implications and opportunities for the field. Furthermore, suggestions are offered for the mathematics education field for ensuring the intersection of practice and research. [For complete proceedings, see ED581294.

  2. The clinical nurse specialist: leadership in quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelman, Anita

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare delivery is in a crisis, requiring improvement. How to improve and who should assume more leadership are not clear. At the same time, the nursing profession struggles with a weak education system, graduating students who require major support for an extended time. There is also confusion related to nursing roles, particularly with nurses who have a graduate degree. The Institute of Medicine has published a series of reports about the healthcare system and need for improvement and describes a structure for improvement. The clinical nurse specialist is particularly suited to assume a major role in nursing leadership to guide staff and the healthcare system to better ensure improved care. There is great need to communicate that the clinical nurse specialist can and should assume this role. This will require a review and development of more quality improvement content and experiences in clinical nurse specialist educational programs, but much of the content is already in programs. The clinical nurse specialist works in systems, impacts systems, works with staff, and can thus reach more patients with improvement approaches.

  3. Leading Practice in Space Education: Successful Approaches by Specialist Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schools Network, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the Government's Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) programme is to ensure Britain's future success as a major centre for science, engineering and innovation. Specialist science, technology, engineering and maths & computing colleges help to drive this programme by becoming centres of excellence in STEM…

  4. Perceived inequity: Does it explain burnout among medical specialists?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smets, E. M. A.; Visser, M. R. M.; Oort, F. J.; Schaufeli, W. B.; de Haes, H. J. C. J. M.

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated, among medical specialists (N = 2,400), the association between perceived inequity in relationships at work (patients, colleagues, organization) and burn-out, and the moderating role of communal orientation. Intrapersonal inequity, involving an internal standard of reference,

  5. Multicultural Education: An Action Plan for School Library Media Specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeele, Rosemary W.; Schall, Patricia L.

    1994-01-01

    Offers a definition of and a rationale for multicultural education based on changing demographics and suggests ways for school library media specialists to bring a multicultural perspective to collection development, evaluation of multicultural materials, library services, curriculum integration, and curriculum activities. (Contains 21…

  6. Scandinavian Nurse Specialist Group/Cystic Fibrosis (SNSG/CF)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnballe, Vibeke; Erwander, Inger

    2006-01-01

    /CF comprises one CF nurse from each of the centers. The board meets twice a year to plan workshops and courses. SNSG/CF is part of the International Nurse Specialist Group/Cystic Fibrosis (INSG/CF). Results: Within the framework of SNSG/CF a 2-day workshop is held every second year for approximately 40...

  7. Medical cost of Lassa fever treatment in Irrua Specialist Teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This cross-sectional study sought to estimate the direct medical cost of Lassa fever treatment on patients in South-South Nigeria. All the 73 confirmed Lassa fever cases admitted in the isolation ward of the Institute Of Lassa Fever Research and Control, Irrua Specialist Teaching Hospital (ISTH) Irrua, in Edo State, Nigeria, ...

  8. Professional Training of Specialists in International Marketing in Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zukowski, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    Polish experience in training specialists in international marketing in the context of globalization and integration processes has been studied. A range of theoretical resources, namely Market Entry Strategy for Poland; the articles dedicated to international marketing and economy development (W. Grzegorczyk, M. Viachevskyi, M. Urbanetst); program…

  9. Payload specialist Ronald Parise checks on ASTRO-2 payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Payload specialist Ronald A. Parise, a senior scientist in the Space Observatories Department of Computer Sciences Corporation (CSC), checks on the ASTRO-2 payload (out of frame in the cargo bay of the Space Shuttle Endeavour). Parise is on the aft flight deck of the Earth orbiting Endeavour during STS-67.

  10. Perioperative Clinical Nurse Specialist Role Delineation: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    care plans for psychosocial nursing diagnoses. Ostomy Wound Manage, 40(3), 18-22, 24-16. Heath, J., Andrews, J., & Balkstra, C. R. Potential reduction...the clinical nurse specialist. Clin Nurse Spec, 17(2), 83-85. O’Malley, P. (2004). New hope for patients with pulmonary hypertension: endothelin

  11. Science Specialists or Classroom Teachers: Who Should Teach Elementary Science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Abigail Jurist; Jia, Yueming; Marco-Bujosa, Lisa; Gess-Newsome, Julie; Pasquale, Marian

    2016-01-01

    This study examined science programs, instruction, and student outcomes at 30 elementary schools in a large, urban district in the northeast United States in an effort to understand whether there were meaningful differences in the quality, quantity and cost of science education when provided by a science specialist or a classroom teacher. Student…

  12. Safety Specialist Manpower, Manpower Resources. Volumes II and III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booz Allen and Hamilton, Inc., Washington, DC.

    These second and third volumes of a four-volume study of manpower in state highway safety programs over the next decade estimate manpower resources by state and in national aggregate and describe present and planned training programs for safety specialists. For each educational level, both total manpower and manpower actually available for…

  13. Quality Implementation in Transition: A Framework for Specialists and Administrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wald, Judy L.; Repetto, Jeanne B.

    1995-01-01

    Quality Implementation in Transition is a framework designed to guide transition specialists and administrators in the implementation of total quality management. The framework uses the tenets set forth by W. Edwards Deming and is intended to help professionals facilitate change within transition programs. (Author/JOW)

  14. Evaluation of specialist referrals at a rural health care clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggerstaff, Mary Ellen; Short, Nancy

    2017-07-01

    Transition to a value-based care system involves reducing costs improving population health and enhancing the patient experience. Many rural hospitals must rely on specialist referrals because of a lack of an internal system of specialists on staff. This evaluation of the existing specialist referrals from primary care was conducted to better understand and improve the referral process and address costs, population health, and the patient experience. A 6-month retrospective chart review was conducted to evaluate quality and outcomes of specialty referrals submitted by 10 primary care providers. During a 6-month period in 2015, there was a total of 13,601 primary care patient visits and 3814 referrals, a referral rate of approximately 27%. The most striking result of this review was that nearly 50% of referred patients were not making the prescribed specialist appointment. Rather than finding a large number of unnecessary referrals, we found overall referral rates higher than expected, and a large percentage of our patients were not completing their referrals. The data and patterns emerging from this investigation would guide the development of referral protocols for a newly formed accountable care organization and lead to further quality improvement projects: a LEAN effort, dissemination of results to clinical and executive staff, protocols for orthopedic and neurosurgical referrals, and recommendations for future process improvements. ©2017 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  15. Use of professional profiles in applications for specialist training positions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundh, Andreas; Skjelsager, Karen; Wildgaard, Kim

    2013-01-01

    The seven roles of the CanMEDS system have been implemented in Danish postgraduate medical training. For each medical specialty, a professional profile describes which elements of the seven roles the specialty deems important for applicants for a specialist training position. We investigated use...

  16. Music without a Music Specialist: A Primary School Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    This case study focuses on generalist primary (elementary) school teachers teaching music in an Australian school. With the onus for teaching music moving away from the specialist music teacher to the generalist classroom teacher, this case study adds to a growing body of literature focusing on generalist primary school teachers and music…

  17. Glaucoma Medication Preferences among Glaucoma Specialists in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazcano-Gomez, Gabriel; Alvarez-Ascencio, Daniela; Haro-Zuno, Cindy; Turati-Acosta, Mauricio; Garcia-Huerta, Magdalena; Jimenez-Arroyo, Jesus; Castañeda-Diez, Rafael; Castillejos-Chevez, Armando; Gonzalez-Salinas, Roberto; Dominguez-Dueñas, Francisca; Jimenez-Roman, Jesus

    2017-01-01

    To determine the glaucoma specialists' preferences for the different brands of topical glaucoma medications available in Mexico. A web-based survey was sent to 150 board-certified glaucoma specialists in Mexico, with 14 questions related to brand preferences for all glaucoma medications available in Mexico. Participants were asked to select each glaucoma medication class by brand and to state the factors leading to their choice. Data from 111 (74%) glaucoma specialists were collected. Imot (timolol 0.5%; Sophia, Mexico) was the preferred brand for the beta-blockers (BB) class by 71% (n = 79) of the participants. Azopt (brinzolamide 1%; Alcon Lab, US) was the preferred carbonic anhydrase inhibitor (CAI) by 54% (n = 60) of the glaucoma specialists. Lumigan (bimatoprost 0.01% and 0.03%; Allergan Inc., U.S.) was the first choice for the prostaglandin analogues (PGAs) in 62% (n = 70) of the answers. The most frequently prescribed alpha-agonist (AA) was Agglad (brimonidine 0.2%; Sophia Lab, Mexico) in 44% (n = 49) of the answers. Medication accessibility (31%), cost (29%), and recommended dose (23%) were the three main factors influencing the glaucoma specialists' preferences. Medication cost and accessibility, as well as posology, remain the main factors influencing brand preferences among glaucoma doctors. In our professional opinion, the therapeutic effect must be the leading factor when prescribing topical medications in the daily practice, so that patients receive the best treatment option. This survey provides an understanding of the decision-making process when prescribing glaucoma medications by glaucoma specialists in a Latin American developing country. Ideally, patient treatment should be individualized and aimed to achieve the best results possible for their specific condition. How to cite this article: Lazcano-Gomez G, Alvarez-Ascencio D, Haro-Zuno C, Turati-Acosta M, Garcia-Huerta M, Jimenez-Arroyo J, Castañeda-Diez R, Castillejos-Chevez A, Gonzalez

  18. Adult orthodontics in the Republic of Ireland: specialist orthodontists' opinions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMorrow, Siobhán Mary; Millett, Declan T

    2017-12-01

    To report the opinions of specialist orthodontists regarding the profile, characteristics and treatment of adults currently undergoing orthodontic treatment in the Republic of Ireland (ROI) Design/setting: A national cross-sectional questionnaire study in the ROI. A pilot-tested questionnaire was distributed to 122 specialist orthodontists in the ROI. Questions addressed general and treatment information for current adult orthodontic patients. Those whose treatment involved orthognathic surgery were not excluded. A response of 83% was obtained. Ninety-five per cent of specialists reported treating adults, most of whom were self-referred and were typically professional, female and aged 25-35 years. The overall ratio quoted of professionals to non-professionals was almost 3:2. For 50% of specialists, males were estimated to account for 20-40% of their adult cases and for 23%, this increased to an estimated 40-60%. Class II division 1 malocclusion and skeletal II were considered the most common dentofacial characteristics. Occlusal features encountered in decreasing frequency were generalised crowding, increased overjet, deep overbite, late lower incisor crowding, spacing and impacted teeth. Fifteen per cent reported that at least 10% of their adult cases required orthodontics with maxillofacial surgery but 8% reported that this was at least 50%. Treatment challenges commonly acknowledged were overbite reduction, anchorage management, 'black triangles' and overjet reduction. Tooth whitening was reckoned to be used by 19% of specialists. Aesthetic upper and stainless steel lower brackets were indicated to be used most often whereas only 19% used clear aligners and 10% used lingual appliances often. The profile and characteristics of adults currently undergoing orthodontic treatment in the ROI were diverse. Higher estimates were quoted for self- than for general dental practitioner-referral. A high percentage of treatment was reported to be undertaken for non

  19. The impact of specialist trauma service on major trauma mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ting Hway; Lumsdaine, William; Hardy, Benjamin M; Lee, Keegan; Balogh, Zsolt J

    2013-03-01

    Trauma services throughout the world have had positive effects on trauma-related mortality. Australian trauma services are generally more consultative in nature rather than the North American model of full trauma admission service. We hypothesized that the introduction of a consultative specialist trauma service in a Level I Australian trauma center would reduce mortality of the severely injured. A 10-year retrospective study (January 1, 2002-December 31, 2011) was performed on all trauma patients admitted with an Injury Severity Score (ISS) > 15. Patients were identified from the trauma registry, and data for age, sex, mechanism of injury, ISS, survival to discharge, and length of stay were collected. Mortality was examined for patients with severe injury (ISS > 15) and patients with critical injury (ISS > 24) and compared for the three periods: 2002-2004 (without trauma specialist), 2005-2007 (with trauma specialist), and 2008-2011 (with specialist trauma service). A total of 3,869 severely injured (ISS > 15) trauma patients were identified during the 10-year period. Of these, 2,826 (73%) were male, 1,513 (39%) were critically injured (ISS > 24), and more than 97% (3,754) were the victim of blunt trauma. Overall mortality decreased from 12.4% to 9.3% (relative risk, 0.75) from period one to period three and from 25.4% to 20.3% (relative risk, 0.80) for patients with critical injury. A 0.46% per year decrease (p = 0.018) in mortality was detected (odds ratio, 0.63; p 24), the trend was (0.61% per year; odds ratio, 0.68; p = 0.039). The introduction of a specialist trauma service decreased the mortality of patients with severe injury, the model of care should be considered to implement state- and nationwide in Australia. Epidemiologic study, level III.

  20. Soil Seed Bank Responses to Postfire Herbicide and Native Seeding Treatments Designed to Control Bromus tectorum in a Pinyon–Juniper Woodland at Zion National Park, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Matthew L.; Hondo Brisbin, graduate student; Andrea Thode, Associate Professor; Karen Weber, graduate student

    2013-01-01

    The continued threat of an invasive, annual brome (Bromus) species in the western United States has created the need for integrated approaches to postfire restoration. Additionally, the high germination rate, high seed production, and seed bank carryover of annual bromes points to the need to assay soil seed banks as part of monitoring programs. We sampled the soil seed bank to help assess the effectiveness of treatments utilizing the herbicide Plateau® (imazapic) and a perennial native seed mix to control annual Bromus species and enhance perennial native plant establishment following a wildfire in Zion National Park, Utah. This study is one of few that have monitored the effects of imazapic and native seeding on a soil seed bank community and the only one that we know of that has done so in a pinyon–juniper woodland. The study made use of untreated, replicated controls, which is not common for seed bank studies. One year posttreatment, Bromus was significantly reduced in plots sprayed with herbicide. By the second year posttreatment, the effects of imazapic were less evident and convergence with the controls was evident. Emergence of seeded species was low for the duration of the study. Dry conditions and possible interactions with imazapic probably contributed to the lack of emergence of seeded native species. The perennial grass sand dropseed outperformed the other species included in the seed mix. We also examined how the treatments affected the soil seed bank community as a whole. We found evidence that the herbicide was reducing several native annual forbs and one nonnative annual forb. However, overall effects on the community were not significant. The results of our study were similar to what others have found in that imazapic is effective in providing a short-term reduction in Bromus density, although it can impact emergence of nontarget species.

  1. Tree Mortality Decreases Water Availability and Ecosystem Resilience to Drought in Piñon-Juniper Woodlands in the Southwestern U.S.: Tree Mortality in Semiarid Biomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morillas, L. [Department of Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque NM USA; Now at Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver British Columbia Canada; Pangle, R. E. [Department of Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque NM USA; Maurer, G. E. [Department of Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque NM USA; Now at Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, University of California, Berkeley CA USA; Pockman, W. T. [Department of Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque NM USA; McDowell, N. [Earth Systems Analysis and Modeling, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Huang, C. -W. [Department of Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque NM USA; Krofcheck, D. J. [Department of Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque NM USA; Fox, A. M. [School of Natural Resources and the Environment, University of Arizona, Tucson AZ USA; Sinsabaugh, R. L. [Department of Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque NM USA; Rahn, T. A. [Earth and Environmental Sciences Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos NM USA; Litvak, M. E. [Department of Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque NM USA

    2017-12-01

    Climate-driven tree mortality has increased globally in response to warmer temperature and more severe drought. To examine how tree mortality in semi-arid biomes impacts surface water balance, we experimentally manipulated a piñon-juniper (PJ) woodland by girdling all adult piñon trees in a 4 ha area, decreasing piñon basal area by ~65%. Over 3.5 years (2009-2013), we compared water flux measurements from this girdled site with those from a nearby intact PJ woodland. Before and after girdling, the ratio of evapotranspiration (ET) to incoming precipitation was similar between the two sites. Girdling altered the partitioning of ET such that the contribution of canopy transpiration to ET decreased 9-14% over the study period, relative to the intact control, while non-canopy ET increased. We attributed the elevated non-canopy ET in the girdled site each year to winter increases in sublimation, and summer increases in both soil evaporation and below-canopy transpiration. Although we expected that mortality of a canopy dominant would increase the availability of water and other resources to surviving vegetation, we observed a decrease in both soil volumetric water content and sap flow rates in the remaining trees at the girdled site, relative to the control. This post-girdling decrease in the performance of the remaining trees occurred during the severe 2011-2012 drought, suggesting that piñon mortality may trigger feedback mechanisms that leave PJ woodlands drier relative to undisturbed sites, and potentially more vulnerable to drought.

  2. Establishing a Research Agenda for Understanding the Role and Impact of Mental Health Peer Specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinman, Matthew; McInnes, D Keith; Eisen, Susan; Ellison, Marsha; Farkas, Marianne; Armstrong, Moe; Resnick, Sandra G

    2017-09-01

    Mental health peer specialists are individuals with serious mental illnesses who receive training to use their lived experiences to help others with serious mental illnesses in clinical settings. This Open Forum discusses the state of the research for mental health peer specialists and suggests a research agenda to advance the field. Studies have suggested that peer specialists vary widely in their roles, settings, and theoretical orientations. Theories of action have been proposed, but none have been tested. Outcome studies have shown benefits of peer specialists; however, many studies have methodological shortcomings. Qualitative descriptions of peer specialists are plentiful but lack grounding in implementation science frameworks. A research agenda advancing the field could include empirically testing theoretical mechanisms of peer specialists, developing a measure of peer specialist fidelity, conducting more rigorous outcomes studies, involving peer specialists in executing the research, and assessing various factors that influence implementing peer specialist services and testing strategies that could address those factors.

  3. Proceedings of the specialist meeting on severe accident management implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    The Niantic Specialist meeting was structured around three main themes, one for each session. During the first session, papers from regulators, research groups, designers/owners groups and some utilities discussed the critical decisions in Severe Accident Management (SAM), how these decisions were addressed and implemented in generic SAM guidelines, what equipment and instrumentation was used, what are the differences in national approaches, etc. During the second session, papers were presented by utility specialists that described approaches chosen to specific implementation of the generic guidelines, the difficulties encountered in the implementation process and the perceived likelihood of success of their SAM program in dealing with severe accidents. The third session was dedicated to discussing what are the remaining uncertainties and open questions in SAM. Experts from several OECD countries presented significant perspectives on remaining open issues

  4. STS-93 Mission Specialist Cady Coleman suits up for launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    For the third time, during final launch preparations in the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-93 Mission Specialist Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) dons her launch and entry suit. After Space Shuttle Columbia's July 20 and 22 launch attempts were scrubbed, the launch was again rescheduled for Friday, July 23, at 12:24 a.m. EDT. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The STS-93 crew numbers five: Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Stephen A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Coleman, and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a shuttle mission.

  5. STS-93 Mission Specialist Hawley suits up for launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    For the third time, during final launch preparations in the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-93 Mission Specialist Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.) waves after donning his launch and entry suit. After Space Shuttle Columbia's July 20 and 22 launch attempts were scrubbed, the launch was again rescheduled for Friday, July 23, at 12:24 a.m. EDT. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The STS-93 crew numbers five: Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Hawley, Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a shuttle mission.

  6. The clinical nurse specialist in an Irish hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickham, Sheelagh

    2011-01-01

    This study was set in an acute Irish health care setting and aimed to explore the activity of the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) in this setting. Quantitative methodology, using a valid and reliable questionnaire, provided descriptive statistics that gave accurate data on the total population of CNSs in the health care setting. The study was set in an acute-care 750-bed hospital that had 25 CNSs in practice. The sample consisted of all 25 CNSs who are the total population of CNSs working in the acute health care institution. The findings show the CNS to be active in the roles of researcher, educator, communicator, change agent, leader, and clinical specialist, but the level of activity varies between different roles. There is variety in the activity of CNSs in the various roles and to what extent they enact the role. The findings merit further study on CNS role activity and possible variables that influence role activity.

  7. Monitoring stream temperatures—A guide for non-specialists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, Michael P.; Schultz, Luke D.; Hockman-Wert, David; Dinger, Eric C.; Dunham, Jason B.

    2018-04-19

    Executive SummaryWater temperature influences most physical and biological processes in streams, and along with streamflows is a major driver of ecosystem processes. Collecting data to measure water temperature is therefore imperative, and relatively straightforward. Several protocols exist for collecting stream temperature data, but these are frequently directed towards specialists. This document was developed to address the need for a protocol intended for non-specialists (non-aquatic) staff. It provides specific step-by-step procedures on (1) how to launch data loggers, (2) check the factory calibration of data loggers prior to field use, (3) how to install data loggers in streams for year-round monitoring, (4) how to download and retrieve data loggers from the field, and (5) how to input project data into organizational databases.

  8. Effective leadership within hospice and specialist palliative care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, L

    2000-01-01

    In this study the Repertory Grid interview technique was used to investigate constructs of leadership held by a group of male and female senior managers from within hospice and Specialist Palliative Care Units (SPCUs) in the UK. The themes that emerged were compared with those from existing research models of leadership. Men and women in these roles describe different constructs of effective leadership. The women's constructs that emerged were predominantly transformational, whilst the men's were predominantly transactional. Themes were also identified in this study, which differed from previous studied, i.e. those of political and environment awareness and the valuing of others' views regardless of their status. These themes do not feature highly in other research, and may be in response to the environment within which hospice and specialist palliative care functions.

  9. Proceedings of the specialist meeting on severe accident management implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Niantic Specialist meeting was structured around three main themes, one for each session. During the first session, papers from regulators, research groups, designers/owners groups and some utilities discussed the critical decisions in Severe Accident Management (SAM), how these decisions were addressed and implemented in generic SAM guidelines, what equipment and instrumentation was used, what are the differences in national approaches, etc. During the second session, papers were presented by utility specialists that described approaches chosen to specific implementation of the generic guidelines, the difficulties encountered in the implementation process and the perceived likelihood of success of their SAM program in dealing with severe accidents. The third session was dedicated to discussing what are the remaining uncertainties and open questions in SAM. Experts from several OECD countries presented significant perspectives on remaining open issues

  10. Physical perfection of future specialists to the management.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolinnyj U.A.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The process of leadthrough of practical employments is considered on physical education on an experimental model, which are directed on the increase of reserve possibilities of organism of future specialists of management. In an experiment took part 30 students of 2 and 3 courses. It is set that management specialists for high-quality implementation of work need a high mental capacity, enhanceable psychoemotional firmness, general endurance. Directions of prophylaxis of emotional and physical overstrain are recommended, increases of level of positive motivation to systematic employments by physical exercises. It is marked that an experimental model in combination with the fixed form of leadthrough of employments on a body-conditioning and employments on specialization of the chosen type of sport is one the stages of alteration organizationally of methodical aspects of physical culture.

  11. Features of Neonatal Jaundice at Irrua Specialist Hospital, Irrua, in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thirty of the 75 (2-7 day-old) jaundiced neonates delivered at the Irrua Specialist Teaching Hospital, Irrua, in, Edo State were studied. Of the males, 55.6% were kernicteric, compared to 41.7% of the females. Two neonates who had sepsis had mean weight of 2.51 ± 0.86kg, indicating low birth-weight associated with ...

  12. Improving spinal trauma management in non-specialist centres

    OpenAIRE

    Magnussen, Alex; Galloway, Kate; Dinneen, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Fractures of the vertebral column are increasing in incidence. Even though spinal trauma is increasingly being managed in specialist units, these patients often still initially present to district general hospitals. Due to lack of exposure to these patients, the attending Orthopaedic Senior House Officer may not always be aware of current best practice in the acute management of these patients beyond immediate Advance Trauma Life Support measures. There is concern that initiation of managemen...

  13. The balance between generalists and specialists in the Medialogy education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf Nordahl

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we discuss the tradeoff between educating specialists and generalists in the Medialogy Master education at Aalborg University in Copenhagen. The Medialogy education was established in 2002 with the goal to combine technology and creativity in designing, implementing and evaluating media technology applications. The curriculum of the education has been through several revisions, the last of which, discussed in this paper, was performed during the Spring 2011.

  14. Professional Training Of Specialists In International Marketing In Poland

    OpenAIRE

    Żukowski Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    Polish experience in training specialists in international marketing in the context of globalization and integration processes has been studied. A range of theoretical resources, namely Market Entry Strategy for Poland; the articles dedicated to international marketing and economy development (W. Grzegorczyk, M. Viachevskyi, M. Urbanetst); program specifications and structures at Polish universities, namely University of Lodz and Collegium Civitas, have been analyzed. It has been defined that...

  15. Specialists in Multisector Economy: Factors of Social Behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z T Golenkova

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the behaviour and values of «specialists» as a particular quantitatively representative group of modern Russian society. It gives a detailed description of their status and disposition dimensions such as wealth, income, living conditions, labour motivation as well as attitudes to economic and social institutions. The authors base their conclusions on the latest statistics and empiric sociological research.

  16. Commissioning of specialist palliative care services in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, Harriet; Finlay, Ilora; Downman, Maxwell; Dumas, James

    2018-03-01

    Some failures in end-of-life care have been attributed to inconsistent provision of palliative care across England. We aimed to explore the variation in commissioning of services by Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) using a data collection exercise. We sent a Freedom of Information request in the form of an open questionnaire to all 209 CCGs in England to assess their commissioning of palliative and end-of-life care services, mainly focused on the provision of specialist palliative care services. 29 CCGs provided information about the number of patients with some form of palliative care needs in their population. For specialist palliative care services, CCGs allocated budgets ranging from £51.83 to £2329.19 per patient per annum. 163 CCGs (77.90%) currently commission 7-day admission to their specialist palliative care beds. 82.84% of CCGs commission 7-day specialist palliative care services in patients' own homes and out-of-hours services rely heavily on hospice provision. 64 CCGs (31.37%) commission pain control teams, the majority of whom only operate in regular working hours. 68.14% of CCGs reported commissioning palliative care education of any sort for healthcare professionals and 44.85% of CCGs had no plans to update or review their palliative care services. The most important finding from this exercise is that the information CCGs hold about their population and services is not standardised. However, information based on data that are more objective, for example, population and total budget for palliative care, demonstrate wide variations in commissioning. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  17. Glaucoma Medication Preferences among Glaucoma Specialists in Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Lazcano-Gomez, Gabriel; Alvarez-Ascencio, Daniela; Haro-Zuno, Cindy; Turati-Acosta, Mauricio; Garcia-Huerta, Magdalena; Jimenez-Arroyo, Jesus; Castañeda-Diez, Rafael; Castillejos-Chevez, Armando; Gonzalez-Salinas, Roberto; Dominguez-Dueñas, Francisca; Jimenez-Roman, Jesus

    2017-01-01

    Aim To determine the glaucoma specialists’ preferences for the different brands of topical glaucoma medications available in Mexico. Materials and methods A web-based survey was sent to 150 board-certified glaucoma specialists in Mexico, with 14 questions related to brand preferences for all glaucoma medications available in Mexico. Participants were asked to select each glaucoma medication class by brand and to state the factors leading to their choice. Results Data from 111 (74%) glaucoma s...

  18. Contemporary challenges for specialist nursing in interstitial lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Marie Russell

    2018-03-01

    To explain the similarities and differences between clinical nurse specialists (CNSs and advanced nurse practitioners (ANPs in the context of ILD specialism To review contemporary nursing specialism in the UK’s government subsidised healthcare system To stimulate discussion and debate across the European/international respiratory community regarding the clinical and academic development of the ILD CNS To identify key priorities that will support collaboration across the ILD interdisciplinary workforce in clinical practice and research

  19. Directory of Colon and Rectal Cancer Specialist Teams

    OpenAIRE

    Department of Health; Social Services and Public Safety

    2004-01-01

    The Directory of Colon and Rectal Cancer Specialist Teams has been produced under the auspices of the Northern Ireland Regional Advisory Committee on Cancer. It contains details of the full membership of the clinical teams providing care for colon and rectal cancer in each of Health and Social Services Board Area. Lead Clinicians For Colon and Rectal Cancer Services (PDF 74 KB) EHSSB (PDF 198 KB) NHSSB (PDF 107 KB) SHSSB (PDF 130 KB) WHSSB (PDF 131 KB)

  20. Caring for cancer patients on non-specialist wards.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gill, Finola

    2012-02-01

    As cancer is the leading cause of death worldwide, every nurse will be required to care for patients with the condition at some point in his\\/her career. However, non-specialized oncology nurses are often ill-prepared to nurse patients suffering from cancer. This literature review aims to provide an overview of current trends and developments in cancer care nursing in an attempt to identify the range of previous research pertaining to caring for patients with cancer on non-specialist wards. The review finds that non-specialized cancer nurses report a lack of education and training with regard to cancer care and cancer treatments, which acts as a barrier to providing quality nursing care. Emotional and communication issues with patients and their families can also cause non-specialist nurses significant distress. International research has shown that specialist oncology nurses make a considerable difference to physical and psychosocial patient care. It is therefore paramount that non-speciality nurses\\' educational needs are met to develop clinical competence and to provide supportive holistic care for both patients and their families.

  1. A Review of Training Opportunities for Singing Voice Rehabilitation Specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhard, Julia

    2016-05-01

    Training opportunities for singing voice rehabilitation specialists are growing and changing. This is happening despite a lack of agreed-on guidelines or an accredited certification acknowledged by the governing bodies in the fields of speech-language pathology and vocal pedagogy, the American Speech-Language Hearing Association and the National Association of Teachers of Singing, respectively. The roles of the speech-language pathologist, the singing teacher, and the person who bridges this gap, the singing voice rehabilitation specialist, are now becoming better defined and more common among the voice care community. To that end, this article aims to review the current opportunities for training in the field of singing voice rehabilitation. A review of available university training programs, private training programs and mentorships, clinical fellowships, professional organizations, conferences, vocal training across genres, and self-study opportunities was conducted. All institutional listings are with permission from program leaders. Although many avenues are available for training of singing voice rehabilitation specialists, there is no accredited comprehensive training program at this point. This review gathers information on current training opportunities from across various modalities. The listings are not intended to be comprehensive but rather representative of possibilities for interested practitioners. Copyright © 2016 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Neurofibromatosis and the role of the specialist adviser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redman, Carolyn

    2017-09-11

    Neurofibromatosis (NF) is a genetic condition that mainly involves the nervous system. There are two types: NF1 affects about one in 2,500 of the population worldwide and NF2 affects one in 35,000. Both types result in complex health problems for patients and can pose significant challenges for all those involved in their management. Established in 1981, The Neuro Foundation is a patient-focused charity that funds a network of specialist advisers who work in partnership with the NHS to offer support and advice for families affected by NF and the professionals who care for them. With a significant level of autonomy, the specialist adviser role is flexible in matching the needs of those affected while working cooperatively alongside the national specialist services for NF1 and NF2. ©2012 RCN Publishing Company Ltd. All rights reserved. Not to be copied, transmitted or recorded in any way, in whole or part, without prior permission of the publishers.

  3. From Humanizing the Educational Process to Professionally Mobile Specialists Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Fugelova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Training professional mobile specialists capable of responding flexibly to dynamic changes in society is considered to be the most important issue of the modern educational system. The paper justifies the idea that technical universities should take responsibility for solving this problem by means of humanization of technical education, which implies reconsidering its values and general notions. For overcoming the technocratic trends, the author recommends to cultivate the value of professionalism in the humanization context.Professionalism is defined by using the «professional service» idea as a «purpose acknowledgment, supertask, even a mission». The main components of the above attitude lie in finding the harmony with the world and its basic values. Therefore, technical universities face the challenge of training people of intelligence with a high moral and business responsibility. The basic value of such a person is regarded as «dedication to the cause» - the constant desire to improve the world and leave behind them- selves something of value to society. For training such specialists, the educational process should provide teachers dialogue and collaboration with students to facilitate the process of self-determination and self-development of the prospective specialists

  4. What are the roles of clinical nurses and midwife specialists?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickham, Sheelagh

    Research shows the increasing part the Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS) plays in healthcare today. But what does a CNS actually do in their day-to day-work? This study, set in the Republic of Ireland, aimed to explore the CNS and clinical midwife specialist (CMS) roles in practice. Quantitative methodology was used to explore the roles and activities of the CNS and CMS. Following ethics approval, a valid and reliable questionnaire was circulated to the total population of CNS/CMS in Ireland. The data were analysed using SPSS. This study articulates the individual role elements and activity level. The findings show the CNS/CMS to be active in the roles of researcher, educator, communicator, change agent, leader and clinical specialist, but the level of activity varies between different roles and individual role elements. The CNS/CMS is seen as a valuable resource in health care today and has potential to have a positive effect on patient care. The majority of CNS/CMSs are active in varying roles but the analysis shows lesser activity in some areas, such as research. The findings merit further study on role activity and possible variables that influence role activity.

  5. Clinical nurse specialist education: actualizing the systems leadership competency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Cathy J; Nelson-Marten, Paula

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to show how sequenced educational strategies aid in the acquisition of systems leadership and change agent skills, as well as other essential skills for professional clinical nurse specialist (CNS) practice. Clinical nurse specialist education offers the graduate student both didactic and clinical experiences to help the student transition into the CNS role. Clinical nurse specialist faculty have a responsibility to prepare students for the realities of advanced practice. Systems leadership is an integral competency of CNS practice. The contemporary CNS is to be a leader in the translation of evidence into practice. To assist students to acquire this competency, all CNS students are expected to use research and other sources of evidence to identify, design, implement, and evaluate a specific practice change. Anecdotal comments from students completing the projects are offered. Student projects have been focused in acute and critical care, palliative care, and adult/gerontologic health clinical settings; community outreach has been the focus of a few change projects. Examples of student projects related to the systems leadership competency and correlated to the spheres of influence impacted are presented.

  6. Applying research to practice: generalist and specialist (visual ergonomics) consultancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jennifer; Long, Airdrie

    2012-01-01

    Ergonomics is a holistic discipline encompassing a wide range of special interest groups. The role of an ergonomics consultant is to provide integrated solutions to improve comfort, safety and productivity. In Australia, there are two types of consultants--generalists and specialists. Both have training in ergonomics but specialist knowledge may be the result of previous education or work experience. This paper presents three projects illustrating generalist and specialist (visual ergonomics) consultancy: development of a vision screening protocol, solving visual discomfort in an office environment and solving postural discomfort in heavy industry. These case studies demonstrate how multiple ergonomics consultants may work together to solve ergonomics problems. It also describes some of the challenges for consultants, for those engaging their services and for the ergonomics profession, e.g. recognizing the boundaries of expertise, sharing information with business competitors, the costs-benefits of engaging multiple consultants and the risk of fragmentation of ergonomics knowledge and solutions. Since ergonomics problems are often multifaceted, ergonomics consultants should have a solid grounding in all domains of ergonomics, even if they ultimately only practice in one specialty or domain. This will benefit the profession and ensure that ergonomics remains a holistic discipline.

  7. Education of specialists-cartographers in Lviv Polytechnic National University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Наталія Ярема

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the system of future specialists-cartographers education in Lviv polytechnic national university. Main targets of the department of cartography and geospatial modelling are listed. Key research areas of the department, the educational specifics of students at «Bachelor» and «Master‘s» levels are described. At present, the main task of the department is to train specialists with good knowledge of cartographic investigation method, GIS technologies, because digital cartography, web-mapping, web-portal are things of the future. Cartography specialists must know how to create traditional maps (topographic, thematic, tourist using computer technologies and electronic maps that can be used in the creation of GIS systems, informational resources in navigation, military affairs and so on. The main scientific direction of the department is general geographic and thematic mapping, GIS mapping and development of GIS, history of the cartography, mathematic modelling in geodesy, astronomy and geophysics. The department trains bachelors on specialty 103 «Earth sciences», specialization 103.02 «Cartography». The feature of master’s education is maximum approach to education content for future employment. Master degree students are improving their professional knowledge and skills received during their study for the bachelor’s degree. They are deeply studying modern methods of cartographic digital terrain models with GIS technologies, combining their work with development of cartographic databases. They get acquainted with the principles of base sets of geospatial data, conduct thematic evaluation and forecast maps, using GIS. The students also study methods and order of design, edition, and maps development in detail. Modern mapping needs to be more efficient in the use of both natural and human resources, reflect a complex system man - society - environment. Such problem can be solved using various modeling techniques with

  8. 78 FR 14359 - Verizon Business Networks Services, Inc., Specialist-Tech Customer Service, Philadelphia, PA...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-05

    ... Business Networks Services, Inc., Specialist-Tech Customer Service, Philadelphia, PA; Verizon Business Networks Services, Inc., Specialist-Tech Customer Service, Tampa, Florida; Amended Certification Regarding... should [[Page 14360

  9. Trying To Reduce Your Technostress?: Helpful Activities for Teachers and Library Media Specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Barbara K.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    As pressure increases to integrate technology into instruction, many teachers and library media specialists are having difficulty coping with "technostress." Presents suggestions and activities for teachers and library media specialists designed to reduce "technostress." (PEN)

  10. One Point of View: Elementary School Mathematics Specialists: Where Are They?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dossey, John A.

    1984-01-01

    A plea is made for the mathematics education community to support the need for elementary school mathematics specialists. Roles of such specialists in primary as well as intermediate grades are listed. (MNS)

  11. Operative training in otolaryngology in the United Kingdom: a specialist registrar survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Georgalas, Christos; Hadjihannas, Edward; Ghufoor, Khalid; Pracy, Paul; Papesch, Michael

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the current status of operative training for otolaryngology specialist registrars in the United Kingdom. DESIGN: Web-based questionnaire survey. PARTICIPANTS: All otolaryngology specialist registrars in the United Kingdom. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The overall satisfaction with

  12. Sources of satisfaction and dissatisfaction among specialists within the public and private health sectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashton, Toni; Brown, Paul M.; Sopina, Elizaveta (Liza)

    2013-01-01

    and professional development, key sources of dissatisfaction are workload pressures, mentally demanding work and managerial interference. In the private sector specialists value the opportunity to work independently and apply their own ideas in the workplace. Conclusion Sources of job satisfaction...... and dissatisfaction amongst specialists are different for the public and private sectors. Allowing specialists more freedom to work independently and to apply their own ideas in the workplace may enhance recruitment and retention of specialists in the public health system....

  13. Inter-observer agreement of canine and feline paroxysmal event semiology and classification by veterinary neurology specialists and non-specialists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Packer, Rowena M A; Berendt, Mette; Bhatti, Sofie

    2015-01-01

    neurology specialists and non-specialists) on the description and classification of videos depicting paroxysmal events, without knowing any results of diagnostic workup. An online questionnaire study was conducted, where participants watched 100 videos of dogs and cats exhibiting paroxysmal events...... low levels of agreement described here highlight the need for further discussions between neurology experts regarding classifying and describing epileptic seizures, and additional training of non-specialists to facilitate accurate diagnosis. There is a need for diagnostic tools (e...

  14. US Influence on the Education System in Turkey: An Analysis of Reports by American Education Specialists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Yusuf

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to analyse reports prepared by American education specialists visiting Turkey from the Proclamation of the Republic till the end of the 1950's to inspect Turkey's education system. In accordance with this purpose, first, the foreign specialists' reports are briefly introduced chronologically and then American specialist reports…

  15. Nurse specialists in adult congenital heart disease: The current status in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moons, P.; Scholte op Reimer, W.; De Geest, S.; Fridlund, B.; Heikkila, J.; Jaarsma, Trijntje (Tiny); Martensson, J.; Smith, K; Stewart, S.; Stromberg, A; Thompson, D.R.

    2006-01-01

    Aim: Recommendations for the management of adults with congenital heart disease indicate that specialist referral centres should employ nurse specialists who are trained and educated in the care for these patients. We surveyed the involvement, education and activities of nurse specialists in the

  16. Does specialist physician supply affect pediatric asthma health outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filler, Guido; Kovesi, Tom; Bourdon, Erik; Jones, Sarah Ann; Givelichian, Laurentiu; Rockman-Greenberg, Cheryl; Gilliland, Jason; Williams, Marion; Orrbine, Elaine; Piedboeuf, Bruno

    2018-04-05

    Pediatrician and pediatric subspecialist density varies substantially among the various Canadian provinces, as well as among various states in the US. It is unknown whether this variability impacts health outcomes. To study this knowledge gap, we evaluated pediatric asthma admission rates within the 2 Canadian provinces of Manitoba and Saskatchewan, which have similarly sized pediatric populations and substantially different physician densities. This was a retrospective cross-sectional cohort study. Health regions defined by the provincial governments, have, in turn, been classified into "peer groups" by Statistics Canada, on the basis of common socio-economic characteristics and socio-demographic determinants of health. To study the relationship between the distribution of the pediatric workforce and health outcomes in Canadian children, asthma admission rates within comparable peer group regions in both provinces were examined by combining multiple national and provincial health databases. We generated physician density maps for general practitioners, and general pediatricians practicing in Manitoba and Saskatchewan in 2011. At the provincial level, Manitoba had 48.6 pediatricians/100,000 child population, compared to 23.5/100,000 in Saskatchewan. There were 3.1 pediatric asthma specialists/100,000 child population in Manitoba and 1.4/100,000 in Saskatchewan. Among peer-group A, the differences were even more striking. A significantly higher number of patients were admitted in Saskatchewan (590.3/100,000 children) compared to Manitoba (309.3/100,000, p < 0.0001). Saskatchewan, which has a lower pediatrician and pediatric asthma specialist supply, had a higher asthma admission rate than Manitoba. Our data suggest that there is an inverse relationship between asthma admissions and pediatrician and asthma specialist supply.

  17. Mission Specialist Pedro Duque undergoes equipment check prior to launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-95 Mission Specialist Pedro Duque of Spain, with the European Space Agency, gets help with his suit from suit technician Tommy McDonald. The STS-95 crew were conducting flight crew equipment fit checks prior to launch on Oct. 29. STS-95 is expected to launch at 2 p.m. EST on Oct. 29, last 8 days, 21 hours and 49 minutes, and land at 11:49 a.m. EST on Nov. 7.

  18. STS-95 Mission Specialist Pedro Duque in white room

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    In the environmental chamber known as the white room, STS-95 Mission Specialist Pedro Duque of Spain, with the European Space Agency, is prepared by white room crew members Danny Wyatt (left) and Travis Thompson (right) for entry into the Space Shuttle Discovery for his first flight into space. The STS-95 mission, targeted for launch at 2 p.m. EST on Oct. 29, is expected to last 8 days, 21 hours and 49 minutes, and return to KSC at 11:49 a.m. EST on Nov. 7.

  19. Column: The Consortium of Digital Forensics Specialists (CDFS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Kelley

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Digital forensic practitioners are faced with an extraordinary opportunity. In fact, we may never again be faced with such an opportunity, and this opportunity will challenge us in ways we may never again be challenged.At this point in the history of the Digital Forensics profession, digital forensic specialists have the unique opportunity to help this profession emerge from its infancy. But for this profession to mature -- and to flourish -- individuals and organizations integral to the practice must assemble and shape its future. This is our opportunity. In fact, this is our mandate.(see PDF for full column

  20. Specialists' meeting on sodium fires and prevention. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-03-01

    The purpose of the specialists' meeting was to summarize the IWGFR member countries' knowledge of sodium combustion and extinguishment technology, including prevention and detection of sodium fires and protective clothes and to review and discuss critical features of sodium fires contaminated with fission products and fuel, evolution and filtration of aerosols and to determine the critical gaps in our knowledge and what should be done to develop knowledge in this area. The technical parts of the meeting were divided into three major sections, as follows: sodium fires; prevention and extinguishing of sodium fires, and aerosols

  1. A need for play specialists in Japanese children's wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kyoko; Yoshikawa, Naomi; Kudo, Noriko; Negishi, Yoshie; Shimizu, Toshiaki; Hayata, Noriko

    2010-07-01

    The importance of distraction techniques and play therapy for sick children has long been recognised by nurses in the UK and other western countries. Although these techniques are not so well established in Japan there is growing interest in them. The authors conducted a survey and found that children's nurses in Japan appreciated the value of distraction techniques and play therapy. They argue that attitudes to using them on children's wards in Japan are changing, but there is still a lack of training and few play specialists.

  2. Specialists' meeting on sodium fires and prevention. Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1979-03-15

    The purpose of the specialists' meeting was to summarize the IWGFR member countries' knowledge of sodium combustion and extinguishment technology, including prevention and detection of sodium fires and protective clothes and to review and discuss critical features of sodium fires contaminated with fission products and fuel, evolution and filtration of aerosols and to determine the critical gaps in our knowledge and what should be done to develop knowledge in this area. The technical parts of the meeting were divided into three major sections, as follows: sodium fires; prevention and extinguishing of sodium fires, and aerosols.

  3. Requirements for the special examination of isotope diagnostic specialists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csakany, Gyoergy

    1986-01-01

    Isotope diagnostic specialists are required to possess general paraclinical knowledge about nuclear physical principles, basic radiological measuring methods including up-to-date ones such as scintiscanning and tomography, as well as about radiopharmacology, radiation biology, health physics, radiation protection and organizational and economic aspects of the examinations. Clinical isotope diagnostic requirements comprise the proper selection among different radiological methods, the correct application of certain diagnostic procedures in practise, and the evaluation of the results in accordance with the symptoms on various fields of medical science. (V.N.)

  4. Development of a prototype specialist shuttle vehicle for chipped woodfuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-06-01

    This report gives details of a project to develop and test a specialist chip shuttle vehicle for conveying woodchips out of the forest with the aim of reducing the cost of woodfuel production. The design objectives are described and include the need to allow easy transfer of the chips from the chipper to the shuttle and on into haulage units, good performance and manoeuvrability on and off roads, and high-tip capacity. Estimates of the improved production and reduced woodfuel production costs are discussed along with the anticipated satisfactory operation of the chipper-shuttle combination in a forestry site.

  5. [Deontology in generalists-specialists relations in domestic emergencies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leemans, P

    2000-09-01

    The deontological rules defining the relations between the general practitioners and specialists about domestic emergencies are clearly exposed in the code edited by the National Medical Council of Belgium. Ethical particularities exist. During an emergency situation, the patient could lose his freedom as well as his autonomy and might become a technical subject rather than an ethical person. The ethical values are in opposition with a medical practice trying to be more and more efficient with as a corollary, the necessity to have a full and permanent access to personal medical data.

  6. The Training and Employment of Area Specialists in the Military

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-06-01

    Unit Acca =o N I1. Title (Include Security Classification) The Training and Employment of Area Specialists in the Military 12 Personal Author(s) Randy P...informally allows FAOs at DLI/FLC to audit courses if they so desire yet there is no obvious effort underway to reverse the Army’s earlier deci- sion...NPS profes- sors. Others cannot even find the time to audit any classes and often turn to magazines at DLI/FLC and/or NPS for their information. Given

  7. [Can the vascular specialist improve patient awareness about advanced directives?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanson, H; Priollet, P

    2016-05-01

    In France, the Leonetti law, adopted on April 22, 2005, stipulates the regulations concerning advanced directives. This is a patient's right that is not well known and rarely applied. In 2015, a new law project was thus presented in which the French National Authority for Health recommended that doctors, including all specialists, bring up the subject, especially during consultation. To evaluate the vascular specialist's possibility to mention the topic of advanced directives during consultations. A single and non-interventional prospective study conducted with the help of patients who consulted a private practitioner vascular specialist: recurrent patients regularly consulting a private practitioner vascular specialist were included. First-time consultants, minors and patients to whom it was not adapted to speak about the subject were not included. Between July 27 and September 23, 2015, 159 consecutive patients were examined. Fifty-five first-time consultants and four patients for whom the interview was unsuitable were excluded. In all, 100 patients were questioned. None of them refused to talk about the subject. Women made up a majority of the population (63 %) with an average age of 67 years (23-97). The principal diagnostics were common to vascular medicine consultations: deep vein thrombosis (20 %), peripheral arterial disease (15 %), varicose veins (11 %), lymphedema (11 %) and leg ulcers (9 %). Thirteen percent of the people had a history of cancer. Half of the patients had had follow-ups for over 10 years. The average time devoted to discussing the topic was 12minutes (5-40). Only 22 % of the patients declared having been familiar with advance directives. Once informed however, 78 % chose to write up an adapted form: 36 % with the help of their doctor and 42 % with a doctor and a relative. Seventy-three percent of the consultants thought that talking about the advance directives would reinforce the confidence link between the doctor and the

  8. Peculiarities of self-regulation of extreme profile specialists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabanova T.N.

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Individually-psychological characteristics were studied and profiles of the styles of self-regulation of the employees engaged in hazardous were determined. The mainly group consisted of 30 men aged 21 to 60 years, who are specialists of dangerous professions. The comparison group included 30 men from 22 to 60 years, whose professional activity was not associated with risk. The following methods were used: questionnaire "Style of self-regulation of behavior" by V. I. Morosanova; questionnaire of self-control (H. Grasmik, 1993, adaptation Bulygina V. G., Abdrazakova A. M., 2009; the questionnaire BIS/BAS, used to study the sensitivity to punishment and reward; the questionnaire formal-dynamic properties of individuality by V. M. Rusalov; the aggression questionnaire by A. Buss and M. Perry (adaptation Enikolopov S. N., Cybulski N. P., 2007; the scale of anxiety Charles D. Spielberger (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory – STAI; personal questionnaire of the G. and S. Eysenck – EPQ. It was found that specialists hazardous professions are distinguished by: a higher level of development of the regulatory flexibility and individual system of conscious self-regulation activity; higher levels of extroversion, communication activity, the total adaptability; a lower level of reactive anxiety, trait anxiety and general emotional. Moreover, impulsiveness, egocentrism, lack of restraint and physical activity in the structure of self-monitoring specialists of dangerous professions associated with high levels of affective component of aggression and incoherence of parts of the process of self-regulation. There were allocated a 3 profile of self-regulation in specialists of dangerous professions: a a high level of self-regulation – coupled with a high intellectual and physical development, the highest level of adaptability and general activity; b medium – rapid response to emerging changes in the situation, the successful production alternatives, greater

  9. The evolution of resource adaptation: how generalist and specialist consumers evolve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Junling; Levin, Simon A

    2006-07-01

    Why and how specialist and generalist strategies evolve are important questions in evolutionary ecology. In this paper, with the method of adaptive dynamics and evolutionary branching, we identify conditions that select for specialist and generalist strategies. Generally, generalist strategies evolve if there is a switching benefit; specialists evolve if there is a switching cost. If the switching cost is large, specialists always evolve. If the switching cost is small, even though the consumer will first evolve toward a generalist strategy, it will eventually branch into two specialists.

  10. Art Appreciation as a Learned Competence: A Museum-Based Qualitative Study of Adult Art Specialist and Art Non-Specialist Visitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracun Sova, Rajka

    2015-01-01

    Since Bourdieu, it has been argued that art appreciation requires "knowledge". The focus of this qualitative study was to examine art appreciation as a learned competence by exploring two different groups of museum visitors: art specialists and art non-specialists. The research was conducted at Moderna galerija in Ljubljana. Twenty-three…

  11. Redefining "Community" through Collaboration and Co-Teaching: A Case Study of an ESOL Specialist, a Literacy Specialist, and a Fifth-Grade Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed Hersi, Afra; Horan, Deborah A.; Lewis, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the development of a professional learning community through a case study of three teachers--an ESOL specialist, a literacy specialist, and a fifth-grade teacher--who engaged in co-teaching and collaboration. The emerging community of practice offered these teachers a space to learn and problem-solve by utilizing their…

  12. Graphite moderator lifecycle behaviour. Proceedings of a specialists meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    The meeting provided the forum for graphite specialists representing operating and research organizations worldwide to exchange information in the following areas: the status of graphite development; operation and safety procedures for existing and future graphite moderated reactors; graphite testing techniques; review of the experiences gained and data acquired on the influence of neutron irradiation and oxidizing conditions on key graphite properties; and to exchange information useful for decommissioning activities. The participants provided twenty-seven papers on behalf of their countries and respective technical organizations. An open discussion followed each of the presentations. A consistently reoccurring theme throughout the specialists meeting was the noticeable reduction in the number of graphite experts remaining the nuclear power industry. Graphite moderated power reactors have provided a significant contribution to the generation of electricity throughout the past forty years and will continue to be a prominent energy source for the future. Yet, many of the renowned experts in the field of nuclear graphites are nearing the end of their careers without apparent replacement. This, coupled with changes in the focus on nuclear power by some industrialized countries, has prompted the IAEA to initiate an evaluation on the feasibility and interest by Member States of establishing a central archive facility for the storage of data on irradiated graphites. Refs, figs, tabs

  13. Current nursing practice by hospital-based stoma specialist nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Jennie

    Nurses frequently care for patients who have stomas. A common complication is sore peristomal skin (skin around the stoma). The study aim was to answer the research question: what is the current nursing practice for peristomal skin problems among UK stoma specialist nurses? The question was explored through investigation of descriptions, treatments and opinions of peristomal skin problems. Results were examined to ascertain if practice reflects the literature and if care was evidence-based. A questionnaire was posted in September 2009 to the stoma care nurses in all UK NHS hospitals (n=596). The proportion of completed or partially completed questionnaires was 15% (89 of 596). Most of the responding nurses held a stoma-related qualification (86%), a degree (55%) and had specialised in stoma care for over 5 years (67%). Respondents used erythema to describe sore skin (80%). Stoma powder (98%) and convex appliances (98%) were the most commonly used treatments. The most common cause of sore skin was appliance leakage (61%). The study population was deemed suitably qualified and experienced to answer the research question. Many responses were reflected in the literature (predominantly opinion articles), reflecting a degree of reliability and validity. It could be concluded that stoma specialist nurses can accurately assess and use stoma accessories to treat sore skin, but due to the paucity of research, the care cannot be defined as evidence-based. More research is needed to determine universally accepted definitions and treatments for sore peristomal skin.

  14. Educational support for specialist international medical graduates in anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Niall S; Taraporewalla, Kersi; Edirippulige, Sisira; Ware, Robert S; Steyn, Michael; Watson, Marcus O

    2013-08-19

    To measure specialist international medical graduates' (SIMGs) level of learning through participation in guided tutorials, face-to-face or through videoconferencing (VC), and the effect of tutorial attendance and quality of participation on success in specialist college examinations. Tutorials were conducted at the Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital between 19 September 2007 and 23 August 2010, and delivered through VC to participants at other locations. Tutorials were recorded and transcribed, and speaker contributions were tagged and ranked using content analysis software. Summary examination results were obtained from the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists. Tutorial participation and attendance, and college examination pass and fail rates. Transcripts were obtained for 116 tutorials. The median participation percentage for those who subsequently failed the college examinations was 1% (interquartile range [IQR], 0%-1%), while for those who passed the exams it was 5% (IQR, 2%-8%; P technology was found to be a feasible method to assist SIMGs to become aware of the requirements of the exam and to prepare more effectively.

  15. Opportunity Costs in Paediatric Training: The Specialist Registrars Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, M B; Nabialek, T; Kandamany, N

    2017-08-08

    In the training process, there is a tension between the work life and home life of trainees. This study explored both the personal impact and the opportunity costs of training from the Specialist Paediatric Registrar (SPR) perspective. The survey explored 1) career progression, 2) perceived functional effectiveness at work, 3) psychological impact of hospital based training, and 4) the personal and social cost of training. Fifty-three (71%) SPRs responded of whom 47 (89%)were married or in long term relationships. Seventy-five percent of trainees had a definite career plan with 86% intending to undertake fellowship training. Seventy percent believed they were efficient time managers but 53% had difficulty in making time for academic pursuits and fifty percent experienced negative feelings, which lingered after work and interfered with their relationships at home. Seventy-four percent stated training was undertaken at significant personal cost with only 21% achieving a very satisfactory work/life balance. To address these difficulties trainee wellbeing should be addressed at the Basic Specialist Training (BST) level and the career path clearly explained outlining the challenges that are likely to be encountered.

  16. Professional standard of specialist of guardianship and custodianship agency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.V. Semya

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We justified the introduction of the professional standard of specialist of guardianship and custodianship agency taking into consideration the psychological characteristics of the target group of customers. We describe the situation in our country with qualification of professionals, the international trends in the field of protection of the rights of minors in the countries – members of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. We analyze the reflection of the theme of labor functions in the Russian legislation. We reveal the need for psychological and pedagogical knowledge for successful professional of guardianship authorities, compile a list of the necessary skills and knowledge. The main focus of the work of specialists is to maintain the child in the biological family at all stages of working with child and family problems. We characterize the trends in professional activities related to the development of the regional legislation in comparison with federal, increased number of international instruments to which Russia joined in the protection of children's rights. It is stressed that a requirement for education is additional retraining for new programs on the basis of higher education in the following professions and fields of study: law, pedagogy and psychology, social pedagogy and social work.

  17. Graphite moderator lifecycle behaviour. Proceedings of a specialists meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    The meeting provided the forum for graphite specialists representing operating and research organizations worldwide to exchange information in the following areas: the status of graphite development; operation and safety procedures for existing and future graphite moderated reactors; graphite testing techniques; review of the experiences gained and data acquired on the influence of neutron irradiation and oxidizing conditions on key graphite properties; and to exchange information useful for decommissioning activities. The participants provided twenty-seven papers on behalf of their countries and respective technical organizations. An open discussion followed each of the presentations. A consistently reoccurring theme throughout the specialists meeting was the noticeable reduction in the number of graphite experts remaining the nuclear power industry. Graphite moderated power reactors have provided a significant contribution to the generation of electricity throughout the past forty years and will continue to be a prominent energy source for the future. Yet, many of the renowned experts in the field of nuclear graphites are nearing the end of their careers without apparent replacement. This, coupled with changes in the focus on nuclear power by some industrialized countries, has prompted the IAEA to initiate an evaluation on the feasibility and interest by Member States of establishing a central archive facility for the storage of data on irradiated graphites. Refs, figs, tabs.

  18. Future career intentions of higher specialist trainees in general Paediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Grainne; Breatnach, Colm; Harty, Sinead; Gavin, Patrick; O'Donnell, Colm; O'Grady, Michael J

    2018-03-27

    A survey of paediatric higher specialist trainees was carried out in 2002 assessing career intentions and perception of training. Fourteen years later, with increased numbers of trainees and a national model of care and a tertiary paediatric hospital on the horizon, we re-evaluated the career intentions of the current trainee workforce. To assess the career intentions of the current paediatric higher specialist trainees. A 28-item questionnaire was developed based on a previously validated instrument and distributed online using the Royal College of Physicians of Ireland trainee database. We distributed the questionnaire to 118 eligible trainees and received responses from 92 (78%). Seventy-nine (86%) respondents desire a consultant post in Ireland. Seventy-five (82%) indicated that their preferred consultant post location was in a tertiary paediatric centre. Sixty-two trainees (67%) intend to become subspecialists with 25 (27%) planning a career in general paediatrics. This contrasts with the 2002 survey when 76% wished to work in urban centres and 61% of trainees planned a career in general paediatrics. There appears to be a mismatch between the career goals of the future paediatric consultant workforce and the requirements for staffing paediatric units nationally. This has the potential to complicate the proposed expansion of general paediatricians in regional centres and result in a significant proportion of current trainees failing to secure a post in their desired location.

  19. Activities of Intellectual Disability Clinical Nurse Specialists in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doody, Owen; Slevin, Eamonn; Taggart, Laurence

    The aim of this study was to identify the contribution of Irish intellectual disability clinical nurse specialists (ID CNSs) to service delivery. A nonexperimental descriptive design was selected to survey ID CNSs presently working in Ireland. The questionnaire was developed based on focus group interviews, available literature, and expert panel views. Ethical approval and access were granted to all ID CNSs in Ireland. Thirty-two responded (33.68% response rate) from all work areas (voluntary organizations or health service executive) practicing within residential, community, or school services. Respondents were surveyed across a range of areas (demographic details and support to client, staff, family, organization, community, other agencies, and professional development). Findings identify that ID CNSs are active in all aspects of their roles as clinical specialist, educator, communicator, researcher, change agent, and leader, thus supporting person-centered care and improving service delivery. To meet changing healthcare demands, promote person-centered care, and improve service delivery, the CNS role in ID should be developed and supported. The findings merit a further study on ID CNS role activity, possible variables influencing role activity, and team members' views.

  20. Specialist nectar-yeasts decline with urbanization in Berlin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehner, Jeannine; Mittelbach, Moritz; Rillig, Matthias C.; Verbruggen, Erik

    2017-03-01

    Nectar yeasts are common inhabitants of insect-pollinated flowers but factors determining their distribution are not well understood. We studied the influence of host identity, environmental factors related to pollution/urbanization, and the distance to a target beehive on local distribution of nectar yeasts within Robinia pseudoacacia L. and Tilia tomentosa Moench in Berlin, Germany. Nectar samples of six individuals per species were collected at seven sites in a 2 km radius from each target beehive and plated on YM-Agar to visualise the different morphotypes, which were then identified by sequencing a section of the 26S rDNA gene. Multivariate linear models were used to analyze the effects of all investigated factors on yeast occurrence per tree. Yeast distribution was mainly driven by host identity. The influence of the environmental factors (NO2, height of construction, soil sealing) strongly depended on the radius around the tree, similar to the distance of the sampled beehive. Incidence of specialist nectar-borne yeast species decreased with increasing pollution/urbanization index. Given that specialist yeast species gave way to generalist yeasts that have a reduced dependency on pollinators for between-flower dispersal, our results indicate that increased urbanization may restrict the movement of nectar-specialized yeasts, via limitations of pollinator foraging behavior.

  1. Opportunity Costs in Paediatric Training: The Specialist Registrars Experience.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O’Neill, MB

    2017-08-01

    In the training process, there is a tension between the work life and home life of trainees. This study explored both the personal impact and the opportunity costs of training from the Specialist Paediatric Registrar (SPR) perspective. The survey explored 1) career progression2) perceived functional effectiveness at work 3) psychological impact of hospital based training and 4) the personal and social cost of training. Fifty-three (71%) SPRs responded of whom 47 (89%)were married or in long term relationships. Seventy-five percent of trainees had a definite career plan with 86% intending to undertake fellowship training. Seventy percent believed they were efficient time managers but 53% had difficulty in making time for academic pursuits and fifty percent experienced negative feelings, which lingered after work and interfered with their relationships at home. Seventy-four percent stated training was undertaken at significant personal cost with only 21% achieving a very satisfactory work\\/life balance. To address these difficulties trainee wellbeing should be addressed at the Basic Specialist Training (BST) level and the career path clearly explained outlining the challenges that are likely to be encountered.

  2. Professional communications of Russian technical and engineering specialists: empirical analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R N Abramov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Sociology of professions focus on the role of interpersonal and intergroup communications in the professional communities as an element of professional culture. The article considers forms and features of professional communications of Russian engineers and technicians in the context of their professional culture defined as the constellation of ideology, values, beliefs, language, and forms of activity typical for the community, which rarely becomes an object of Russian sociologists’ studies. The author shows that interpersonal professional communications on the various aspects of professional activity is an important element of professional culture. The article is based on the results of online survey of Russian engineers and expert interviews with Russian technical specialists - they were questioned on the ways of updating their professional knowledge and on the role of various channels of communication in this process. At the beginning of the article, the author provides an overview of approaches to the study of professional culture in Russia and abroad, and underlines the significant role of the Internet and the declining role of literature as a source of new knowledge for the engineering and technical staff. The results of the study also revealed an important role of informal and direct communications in the transfer of professional knowledge within the engineering community, while organizational environment has a relatively low impact on the updating of professional knowledge, which can be explained by the lack of management attention to the professional development of specialists.

  3. 3rd CEAS Specialist Conference on Guidance, Navigation and Control

    CERN Document Server

    Drouin, Antoine; Roos, Clément

    2015-01-01

    The two first CEAS (Council of European Aerospace Societies) Specialist Conferences on Guidance, Navigation and Control (CEAS EuroGNC) were held in Munich, Germany in 2011 and in Delft, The Netherlands in 2013. ONERA The French Aerospace Lab, ISAE (Institut Supérieur de l’Aéronautique et de l’Espace) and ENAC (Ecole Nationale de l’Aviation Civile) accepted the challenge of jointly organizing the 3rd edition. The conference aims at promoting new advances in aerospace GNC theory and technologies for enhancing safety, survivability, efficiency, performance, autonomy and intelligence of aerospace systems. It represents a unique forum for communication and information exchange between specialists in the fields of GNC systems design and operation, including air traffic management. This book contains the forty best papers and gives an interesting snapshot of the latest advances over the following topics: l  Control theory, analysis, and design l  Novel navigation, estimation, and tracking methods l  Aircr...

  4. Contemporary engagement with social media amongst hernia surgery specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, D H; McDonald, J J; de Beaux, A; Tulloh, B; Brady, R R W

    2017-08-01

    Healthcare professional engagement is increasing. This study aims to identify levels of adoption and engagement of several social media platforms by a large international cohort of hernia surgery specialists. Hernia specialists attending the 38th International Congress of the European Hernia Society were identified. A manual search was then performed on Twitter, ResearchGate, and LinkedIn to identify those who had named accounts. Where accounts were identified, data on markers of utilisation were assessed. 759 surgeons (88.5% male) from 57 countries were identified. 334 surgeons (44%) engaged with a social media platform. 39 (5.1%) had Twitter accounts, 189 (24.9%) had ResearchGate accounts and 265 (34.9%) had LinkedIn accounts. 137 surgeons (18.1%) had accounts on 2 or more social media platforms. There was no gender association with social media account ownership (p > 0.05). Engagement in one social media platform was associated with increased engagement and utilisation on other platforms; LinkedIn users were more likely to have Twitter accounts (p social media amongst Hernia surgeons is similar to other surgical specialities. Geographical variation in SM engagement is seen. Engagement with one SM platform is associated with presence on multiple platforms.

  5. Proceedings of the specialists' meeting on delayed neutron nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katakura, Jun-ichi

    1999-07-01

    This report is the Proceedings of the Specialists' Meeting on Delayed Neutron Nuclear Data. The meeting was held on January 28-29, 1999, at the Tokai Research Establishment of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute with the participation of thirty specialists, who are evaluators, theorist, experimentalists. Although the fraction of the delayed neutron is no more than 1% in the total neutrons emitted in the fission process, it plays an important roll in the control of fission reactor. In the meeting, the following topics were reported: the present status of delayed neutron data in the major evaluated data libraries, measurements of effective delayed neutron fraction using FCA (Fast Critical Assembly) and TCA (Tank-type Critical Assembly) and their analyses, sensitivity analysis for fast reactor, measurements of delayed neutron emission from actinides and so on. As another topics, delayed neutron in transmutation system and fission yield data were also presented. Free discussion was held on the future activity of delayed neutron data evaluation. The discussion was helpful for the future activity of the delayed neutron working group of JNDC aiming to the evaluation of delayed neutron data for JENDL-3.3. The 15 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  6. Genetic analysis of interacting trophic levels in a stressed pinyon-juniper community: A model for examining community responses to a rapid and recent environmental changes. Final report, May 1, 1994--April 30, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keim, P.; Whithmam, T.; Cobb, N.; Gehring, C.

    1998-05-01

    The goals of this project were to examine the genetic component of a pinyon-juniper woodland that had recently experienced a dramatic environmental change. The environmental change was increased temperature and decreased water associated with the volcanic cinder field at Sunset Crater National Monument. In all of these experiments we have used adjacent soil sites as controls for the effects of the stressed locations. We have examined mycorrhizal colonization and diversity in order to understand this important component in community {open_quotes}adaptation{close_quotes} to climate change. We have examined genetic diversity in the pinyon pine populations to determine what level of genetic differentiation has occurred between stressed and nonstressed locations. In addition, we have recently expanded our environmental parameters to include elevated CO{sub 2} on mycorrhizal performance and diversity.

  7. Comment on: Shukla, M.K. et al., 2006: Physical and chemical properties of soils under some pinon-juniper-oak canopies in a semi-arid ecosystem in New Mexico

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollerup, Mikkel; Jensen, Jens Raunsø

    2008-01-01

    The paper by Shukla et al. [2006. Physical and chemical properties of soils under some pinon-juniper-oak canopies in an semi-arid ecosystem in New Mexico. Journal of Arid Environment 66, 673-685] treats interesting topics of sustainability of different ecosystems and their water availability....... However, the physical-based infiltration theories by Green and Ampt [1911. Studies on soil physics, I, flow of air and water through soils. Journal of Agricultural Science 4, 1-24] and Philip [1957. The theory of infiltration: 1. The infiltration equation and its solution. Soil Science 83, 345-357] seems...... to be applied without necessary reflections. The actual analysis can have resulted in coefficients without their original physical significance...

  8. Expected roles and utilization of specialist nurses in Japan: the nurse administrators' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishi, Mami; Kanda, Katsuya

    2010-04-01

    This study explored (1) expected roles for specialist nurses in Japan and (2) nurse administrators' experience-based management strategies for effective implementation of these roles. Background In Japan, specialist nurses have begun to be recognized as valuable human resources. However, managerial issues in utilizing specialist nurses, including unclear roles and lack of reports on effective management strategies, remain. Three focus-group discussions were conducted. Nine nurse administrators participated. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis techniques. The expected roles for specialist nurses were: (1) facilitating general nurses' learning; (2) monitoring and improving the patient care standard; and (3) developing new roles for nursing. Two management strategies were: (1) enhancing specialist nurses' influence, and (2) enhancing specialist nurses' motivation. Specialist nurses are important human resources able to assume responsibility for process improvement in nursing care. Effective ways to enhance specialist nurses' influence and motivation include developing their management and communication skills, and coordinating their workload and relationships with other health care professionals. Process improvement indicators may be useful for evaluating specialist nurses' work. Nurse administrators can contribute to effective implementation of specialist nurses' roles not only by clarifying their roles but also by empowering them to keep up with changing organizational needs.

  9. A qualitative evaluation of the Scottish Staff and Associate Specialist Development Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleland, Jennifer; Burr, Jacqueline; Johnston, Peter

    2016-05-01

    The continued professional development of staff and associate specialist doctors in the UK was ill served prior to the introduction of the new staff and associate specialist doctor's contract in 2008. The aim of this study was to independently evaluate NHS Education for Scotland's approach to improving professional development for staff and associate specialist doctors, the staff and associate specialist Professional Development Fund. Semi-structured telephone interviews with key stakeholders, framed by a realistic approach to evaluate what works, for whom and in how and under what circumstances. An inductive and data-driven thematic analysis was carried out and then the realist framework was applied to the data. We interviewed 22 key stakeholders: staff and associate specialist doctors, staff and associate specialist educational advisors, programme architects and clinical directors, between end February and May 2014. The resultant data indicated five broad themes: organisational barriers to continued professional development for staff and associate specialist doctors, the purpose of funding, gains from funding, the need for better communication about the staff and associate specialist Programme Development Fund, and the interplay between individual and systems factors. The staff and associate specialist Programme Development Fund has changed the opportunities available to staff and associate specialist doctors in Scotland and, in that sense, has changed the context for this group - or at least those who have realised the opportunities. © The Author(s) 2016.

  10. A trust-wide review of clinical nurse specialists' productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsdon, Helen; Wilkinson, Susan

    2014-04-01

    The contribution made by clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) to patient care needs to be understood fully to provide assurance of effective use of resources. However, CNS roles are often poorly understood and not easily articulated. Due to the diversity of these roles, robust reviews of performance and economic benefits can be regarded as time consuming and resource intense, and many organisations enlist external agencies to clarify the contribution to care made by their CNSs. This article gives an overview of a Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust internal review of CNS roles without the support of an external agency. The review provided assurance that this group of nurses is being used effectively and identified opportunities to use the role in different ways to increase effectiveness.

  11. STS-95 Mission Specialist Pedro Duque suits up for launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    STS-95 Mission Specialist Pedro Duque of Spain, with the European Space Agency, is helped with his flight suit by suit tech Tommy McDonald in the Operations and Checkout Building. The final fitting takes place prior to the crew walkout and transport to Launch Pad 39B. Targeted for launch at 2 p.m. EST on Oct. 29, the mission is expected to last 8 days, 21 hours and 49 minutes, and return to KSC at 11:49 a.m. EST on Nov. 7. The STS-95 mission includes research payloads such as the Spartan solar-observing deployable spacecraft, the Hubble Space Telescope Orbital Systems Test Platform, the International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker, as well as the SPACEHAB single module with experiments on space flight and the aging process.

  12. Summary and conclusions: Specialist Meeting on Severe Accident Management Implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    During the first session of this meeting, regulators, research groups, designers/owners' groups and some utilities discussed the critical decisions in SAM (Severe Accident Management), how these decisions were addressed and implemented in generic SAM guidelines, what equipment and instrumentation was used, what are the differences in national approaches, etc. During the second session, papers were presented by utility specialists that described approaches chosen for specific implementation of the generic guidelines, the difficulties encountered in the implementation process and the perceived likelihood of success of their SAM programme in dealing with severe accidents. The third and final sessions was dedicated to discussing what are the remaining uncertainties and open questions in SAM. Experts from several OECD countries presented significant perspectives on remaining open issues

  13. Exploring challenges to telehealth communication by specialists in poison information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothwell, Erin; Ellington, Lee; Planalp, Sally; Crouch, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    The use of the telephone for providing health care is growing. A significant amount of social meaning is derived from visual information, and the absence of visual stimuli provides unique barriers to communication and increases the risks for misunderstandings and distractions. Understanding challenges to telephone communication can provide insight into training opportunities for overcoming these difficulties and improving patient care. The purpose of this research was to explore through focus groups the challenges of phone communication perceived by specialists in poison information. General types of challenges to effective phone communication included developing new communication skills to compensate for lack of visual information, difficulty assessing caller understanding, difficulty managing caller misunderstandings, maintaining distinctive assessments for routine calls, and managing the multifaceted aspects of job stress. The desire for training to enhance telehealth and cultural competency skills was also mentioned, and these findings might provide guidance for the development of training opportunities for telehealth professionals.

  14. Use of professional profiles in applications for specialist training positions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundh, Andreas; Skjelsager, Karen; Wildgaard, Kim

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The seven roles of the CanMEDS system have been implemented in Danish postgraduate medical training. For each medical specialty, a professional profile describes which elements of the seven roles the specialty deems important for applicants for a specialist training position. We...... investigated use of professional profiles among the 38 Danish specialty societies in order to ascertain the use of the seven roles. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We used information from the websites of the Postgraduate Medical Training Secretariats in March 2012. For each profile, we extracted information on how...... the seven roles were described, how the roles were ranked by importance, whether a score sheet was used by the appointment committee and whether the profile had been updated. RESULTS: Twenty-four (63%) of the 38 profiles described the contents for all of the seven roles and four (11%) described the contents...

  15. New study program: Interdisciplinary Postgraduate Specialist Study in Medical Informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hercigonja-Szekeres, Mira; Simić, Diana; Božikov, Jadranka; Vondra, Petra

    2014-01-01

    Paper presents an overview of the EU funded Project of Curriculum Development for Interdisciplinary Postgraduate Specialist Study in Medical Informatics named MEDINFO to be introduced in Croatia. The target group for the program is formed by professionals in any of the areas of medicine, IT professionals working on applications of IT for health and researchers and teachers in medical informatics. In addition to Croatian students, the program will also provide opportunity for enrolling students from a wider region of Southeast Europe. Project partners are two faculties of the University of Zagreb - Faculty of Organization and Informatics from Varaždin and School of Medicine, Andrija Štampar School of Public Health from Zagreb with the Croatian Society for Medical Informatics, Croatian Chamber of Economy, and Ericsson Nikola Tesla Company as associates.

  16. Acoustic outsourcing: New employment possibilities for the specialists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Patricia; Rios, Heriberto; Andrade, Armando; Ramirez, Mario

    2002-11-01

    The need for companies to be more competitive has led them to resort to training, external consultantship, continuous improvement programs, but with the aim of achieving maximum productivity, the big companies go even further: they are opting to focus on their high-priority activities, leaving some nonstrategic functions in the hands of third parties (organizations or individuals). Acoustic outsourcing presents immense business opportunities for the specialists in this area when offering services or completing a production process that the company carries out in an internal way but that is not its main function or activity. Outsourcing contemplates a serious long term commitment between the two parties; a kind of strategic alliance, all with the purpose of increasing efficiency and the quality of the products that the company develops, besides solving acoustic problems related to the production stage. (To be presented in Spanish.)

  17. Marketing and the medical specialist in the managed care environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treister, N W

    1997-01-01

    Marketing means more than just communicating or advertising to potential patients; marketing means identifying your customers and working to meet or exceed their expectations. There are five key areas of a marketing plan: (1) Establish the foundation, beginning with your mission statement; (2) Assess your marketing environment by internal and external research; (3) Target your efforts, looking at image and perception; (4) Develop your particular mix of product, price, place of distribution, and promotion; and (5) implement and evaluate your marketing process. This article discusses the importance of a marketing plan for the medical specialist and highlights the features unique to a practice working in a system of capitated reimbursement. Applying these principles will help to demonstrate added value, protect the fundamental role of the patient-physician relationship, ensure that our efforts are aligned with professional missions and goals, and ultimately increase profitability and professional success.

  18. Job sharing: a viable option for the clinical nurse specialist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haibeck, S V; Howard, J L

    1991-01-01

    NUMEROUS WORK TIME options have been developed to attract, retain and meet the various needs of nurses. Job sharing, a work option little known to nurses, can be a successful alternative for balancing professional and personal lifestyle. The business literature supports job sharing and other innovative work options as successful mechanisms in retaining quality employees in their respective professions. After exploring the literature in this area, a proposal for job sharing the oncology clinical nurse specialist (CNS) position was presented to the Personnel Director and Vice President of Nursing at our institution. The proposal addressed the advantages and disadvantages of the concept. These included: (1) scheduling flexibility, (2) reduced absenteeism and turnover, (3) increased productivity, (4) handling fringe benefits, and (5) job satisfaction. The proposal was accepted, and the job sharing position has been successfully implemented for more than 2 years now. This paper describes issues relevant to designing and implementing job sharing in a CNS position.

  19. Public or private care: where do specialists spend their time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, Gary L; Turbitt, Erin; Allen, Amy

    2017-10-01

    Objectives The aim of the present study was to provide data to help clarify the public-private division of clinical care provision by doctors in Australia. Methods A secondary analysis was performed of data from the workforce survey administered by the Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency. The questionnaire included demographic and employment questions. Analysis included frequency distributions of demographic variables and mean and median calculations of employment data. Data were analysed from those currently employed in eight adult specialities chosen to provide a mix of surgical and medical fields. The specialties were orthopaedic surgery, otolaryngology, ophthalmology, cardiology, neurology, nephrology, gastroenterology and rheumatology. Results For the specialities analysed in the present study, a large majority of the time spent in patient care was provided in the private sector. For the surgical specialties studied, on average less than 30% of clinical time was spent in the public sector. There was considerable variation among specialties in whether a greater proportion of time was spent in out-patient versus in-patient care and how that was divided between the public and private sectors. Conclusions Ensuring Australians have a medical workforce that meets the needs of the population will require assessments of the public and private medical markets, the needs of each market and the adequacy with which current physician clinical time allocation meets those requirements. By appreciating this nuance, Australia can develop policies and strategies for the current and future speciality workforce to meet the nation's needs. What is known about the topic? Australian medical specialists can split their clinical practice time between the public (e.g. public hospitals, public clinics) and private (e.g. private hospitals, private consulting rooms) sectors. For all medical specialists combined, working hours have been reported to be similar in the public and

  20. Specialists' meeting on bellows for sodium systems. Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1980-02-01

    The Specialists' Meeting on Bellows for Sodium Systems was sponsored by the IAEA on the recommendation of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors (IWGFR) was attended by participants and observers from France, the Federal Republic of Germany, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom and the IAEA. The purpose of the meeting was to provide forum for exchanging views on application of bellows for FBR use, problems found in service in sodium systems, design and fabrication of bellows for sodium systems and studies necessary for estimation and improvement of reliability of bellows in long term use under the condition of high temperature sodium. The technical parts of the meeting were divided into five major sessions, as follows: Experience of Bellows Applications for Sodium Systems; Design and Analysis; Fabrication; In-Service Inspection and Repair; Research Work.

  1. Supporting students undertaking the Specialist Practitioner Qualification in District Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginger, Tracey; Ritchie, Georgina

    2017-11-02

    The ever-evolving role of the Specialist Practitioner Qualified District Nurse (SPQDN) presents an increasing number of challenges for Practice Teachers and mentors in preparing SPQDN students for the elevated level clinical and transformational leadership necessary to ensure high-quality patient care. The daily challenges of clinical practice within the community nursing setting in addition to undertaking educational interventions in the clinical arena demand that a structured approach to supervision and mentorship is crucial. Employing learning plans to assess individual students learning needs, prepare plans for educational developments and interventions and evaluate a student's progress can be a helpful tool in aiding the learning journey for both the SPQDN student and Practice Teacher or mentor. This article examines how and why a structured learning plan may be used in supporting learning and competency in achieving the necessary level of practice to meet the requirements of the SPQDN.

  2. Mission Specialist Scott Parazynski checks his flight suit

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    STS-95 Mission Specialist Scott E. Parazynski gets help with his flight suit in the Operations and Checkout Building from a suit technician George Brittingham. The final fitting takes place prior to the crew walkout and transport to Launch Pad 39B. Targeted for launch at 2 p.m. EST on Oct. 29, the mission is expected to last 8 days, 21 hours and 49 minutes, and return to KSC at 11:49 a.m. EST on Nov. 7. The STS-95 mission includes research payloads such as the Spartan solar-observing deployable spacecraft, the Hubble Space Telescope Orbital Systems Test Platform, the International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker, as well as the SPACEHAB single module with experiments on space flight and the aging process.

  3. Advance directives: the clinical nurse specialist as a change agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, Karen Anne

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the impact the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) has on the advance directive process within the cardiac surgery patient population. As a change agent, the CNS needs to be able to increase the number of advance directives obtained and increase the provision of dignified, self-directed, quality patient care. With requirements from The Joint Commission and the Patient Self-determination Act, the change in process must take place to ensure that healthcare professionals are doing all they can do to carry out a patient's wishes. The 6-Source Influencer Model is applied to a case study to illustrate the role of the CNS as a change agent. Following this model, the CNS can facilitate lasting institutional change in the advance directive process. Based on the example, it is possible that a CNS can act as a change agent for other patient populations within the healthcare setting.

  4. The study of informational professional field of pharmacy specialists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. O. Tkachenko

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Today professionalism is important not only for the characteristics of an individual, but also for the manifestation of professional activities. Self-education, self-training and training on the working place are integral elements of the whole continuous professional development. Various components of professionalism form the social responsibility of pharmacist in contemporary conditions. During all professional activities of pharmacists the continuous formation of administrative, economic, legal, communication, social and information competence takes place. Professionally oriented periodical publications, scientific and practical activities act as assistants in it. The aim of this work was to study the sources of the information professional field of pharmaceutical establishments’ staff in the South-eastern region of Ukraine and to determine the frequency of their use and orientation. Gathering of information was carried out using questionnaires. The structure of the developed questionnaire provided conventional separation of questions into two blocks. The first set of questions in the questionnaire provided respondents’ characteristics by demographic and psychological criteria: age, position, length of service, type of enterprise’s ownership. The second set of questions provided the opportunity to identify the main sources of professional information of the specialists in the region, the frequency of their use and the orientation of information for practical activities. Results and discussion. The respondents were proposed the list of periodicals, which today pharmacy specialists are guided by for understanding of modern trends in medicine and pharmacy. The survey results made it possible to determine the most required in practice, sources of information on modern medicine and pharmacy: special edition "Mister blister", "Weekly Drugstore" and "Pharmacist Practical worker". Experts of various levels of pharmacy management use these

  5. [Learning how to learn for specialist further education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuer, G; Lütcke, B; St Pierre, M; Hüttl, S

    2017-02-01

    The world of medicine is becoming from year to year more complex. This necessitates efficient learning processes, which incorporate the principles of adult education but with unchanged periods of further education. The subject matter must be processed, organized, visualized, networked and comprehended. The learning process should be voluntary and self-driven with the aim of learning the profession and becoming an expert in a specialist field. Learning is an individual process. Despite this, the constantly cited learning styles are nowadays more controversial. An important factor is a healthy mixture of blended learning methods, which also use new technical possibilities. These include a multitude of e‑learning options and simulations, which partly enable situative learning in a "shielded" environment. An exemplary role model of the teacher and feedback for the person in training also remain core and sustainable aspects in medical further education.

  6. The Injury Profile of an Australian Specialist Policing Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brianna Larsen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the injuries sustained by an Australian specialist police division. Injury records spanning four-years were analyzed. The role being performed when the injury occurred, injury cause, body part injured, and injury-related costs were quantified. The percentage of personnel injured multiple times was documented. One hundred and thirty eight personnel reported injuries, 58 of these on multiple occasions. This resulted in 229 injuries and 76 claims being raised. Half of the injuries occurred during operational policing tasks, however training activities accounted for >30% of injuries. The most common injury was strain/sprain, and upper body injuries were 2.5-times more common than lower-body or torso injuries. 1107 shifts were lost, and injuries cost the organization $487,159 (Australian Dollars over the four-year period. The injury costs (both financial and in manpower may prompt policy makers to review the current training and post-injury rehabilitation protocols.

  7. Andragogical Model in Language Training of Mining Specialists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondareva, Evgeniya; Chistyakova, Galina; Kleshevskyi, Yury; Sergeev, Sergey; Stepanov, Aleksey

    2017-11-01

    Nowadays foreign language competence is one of the main professional skills of mining engineers. Modern competitive conditions require the ability for meeting production challenges in a foreign language from specialists and managers of mining enterprises. This is the reason of high demand on foreign language training/retraining courses. Language training of adult learners fundamentally differs from children and adolescent education. The article describes the features of andragogical learning model. The authors conclude that distance learning is the most productive education form having a number of obvious advantages over traditional (in-class) one. Interactive learning method that involves active engagement of adult trainees appears to be of the greatest interest due to introduction of modern information and communication technologies for distance learning.

  8. 2nd CEAS Specialist Conference on Guidance, Navigation and Control

    CERN Document Server

    Mulder, Bob; Choukroun, Daniel; Kampen, Erik-Jan; Visser, Coen; Looye, Gertjan

    2013-01-01

    Following the successful 1st CEAS (Council of European Aerospace Societies) Specialist Conference on Guidance, Navigation and Control (CEAS EuroGNC) held in Munich, Germany in 2011, Delft University of Technology happily accepted the invitation of organizing the 2nd  CEAS EuroGNC in Delft, The Netherlands in 2013. The goal of the conference is to promote new advances in aerospace GNC theory and technologies for enhancing safety, survivability, efficiency, performance, autonomy and intelligence of aerospace systems using on-board sensing, computing and systems. A great push for new developments in GNC are the ever higher safety and sustainability requirements in aviation. Impressive progress was made in new research fields such as sensor and actuator fault detection and diagnosis, reconfigurable and fault tolerant flight control, online safe flight envelop prediction and protection, online global aerodynamic model identification, online global optimization and flight upset recovery. All of these challenges de...

  9. Specialists' meeting on bellows for sodium systems. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-02-01

    The Specialists' Meeting on Bellows for Sodium Systems was sponsored by the IAEA on the recommendation of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors (IWGFR) was attended by participants and observers from France, the Federal Republic of Germany, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom and the IAEA. The purpose of the meeting was to provide forum for exchanging views on application of bellows for FBR use, problems found in service in sodium systems, design and fabrication of bellows for sodium systems and studies necessary for estimation and improvement of reliability of bellows in long term use under the condition of high temperature sodium. The technical parts of the meeting were divided into five major sessions, as follows: Experience of Bellows Applications for Sodium Systems; Design and Analysis; Fabrication; In-Service Inspection and Repair; Research Work

  10. Learning Abilities and Disabilities: Generalist Genes, Specialist Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovas, Yulia; Plomin, Robert

    2007-10-01

    Twin studies comparing identical and fraternal twins consistently show substantial genetic influence on individual differences in learning abilities such as reading and mathematics, as well as in other cognitive abilities such as spatial ability and memory. Multivariate genetic research has shown that the same set of genes is largely responsible for genetic influence on these diverse cognitive areas. We call these "generalist genes." What differentiates these abilities is largely the environment, especially nonshared environments that make children growing up in the same family different from one another. These multivariate genetic findings of generalist genes and specialist environments have far-reaching implications for diagnosis and treatment of learning disabilities and for understanding the brain mechanisms that mediate these effects.

  11. Survey of intravitreal injection techniques among retina specialists in Israel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Segal O

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Ori Segal,1,2 Yael Segal-Trivitz,1,3 Arie Y Nemet,1,2 Noa Geffen,1,2 Ronit Nesher,1,2 Michael Mimouni4 1Department of Ophthalmology, Meir Medical Center, Kfar Saba, 2The Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, 3Department of Psychiatry, Geha Psychiatric Hospital, Petah Tikva, 4Department of Ophthalmology, Rambam Health Care Campus, Haifa, Israel Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe antivascular endothelial growth factor intravitreal injection techniques of retinal specialists in order to establish a cornerstone for future practice guidelines. Methods: All members of the Israeli Retina Society were contacted by email to complete an anonymous, 19-question, Internet-based survey regarding their intravitreal injection techniques. Results: Overall, 66% (52/79 completed the survey. Most (98% do not instruct patients to discontinue anticoagulant therapy and 92% prescribe treatment for patients in the waiting room. Three quarters wear sterile gloves and prepare the patient in the supine position. A majority (71% use sterile surgical draping. All respondents apply topical analgesics and a majority (69% measure the distance from the limbus to the injection site. A minority (21% displace the conjunctiva prior to injection. A majority of the survey participants use a 30-gauge needle and the most common quadrant for injection is superotemporal (33%. Less than half routinely assess postinjection optic nerve perfusion (44%. A majority (92% apply prophylactic antibiotics immediately after the injection. Conclusion: The majority of retina specialists perform intravitreal injections similarly. However, a relatively large minority performs this procedure differently. Due to the extremely low percentage of complications, it seems as though such differences do not increase the risk. However, more evidence-based medicine, a cornerstone for practice guidelines, is required in order to identify the intravitreal injection techniques

  12. Training specialists in international relations: rethinking the new paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena V. Voevoda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers new tasks of universities and faculties training students of international relations. The author analyzes the essence of the concept "paradigm" in education because paradigm serves as the basis of the educational process in universities. The content of professional education depends on the aims of professional education of specialists in international relations. The process of globalization, global changes, challenges and threats bring about the necessity to study specific features of international cooperation in ecology, psychology of conflict, psychology of leadership, etc. In the age of globalization, national economies are converging while national cultures are diverging. Representatives of different nations realize the importance of preserving cultural identity. It is of vital importance to instil tolerance in future specialists in international relations and prepare them for cross-cultural communication. At the same time, it is necessary that they should not only enjoy individual freedom and national cultural identity, but realize their own responsibility to the state. In the modern world, the axiological and educational functions of professional training are growing. At the same time, it is crucial to let the students build a number of professionally relevant competences that will make it possible for them to effectively perform their professional functions. It is the competence-based approach that makes the basis of Federal state education standards, including education standards for faculties of international relations. Another direction that needs developing is training and retraining lecturers for universities specializing in international relations. Foreign language training of lecturers in basic subjects will make it possible for the, to give lectures in foreign languages, particularly in English, which, in its turn, will help to make Russia's universities more competitive.

  13. Contemporary challenges for specialist nursing in interstitial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Anne Marie; Olive, Sandra; Lines, Sarah; Murphy, Anna; Hocking, Julie; Newell, Karen; Morris, Helen; Harris, Emma; Dixon, Catherine; Agnew, Sarah; Burge, Geraldine

    2018-03-01

    The role of clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) in interstitial lung disease (ILD) is evolving in response to clinical guidelines and the growth of clinical research. The role is well established in the UK, although more ILD posts are needed to ensure supply meets clinical demand. This phenomenon is also happening across Europe. An appreciation of the similarities and differences between CNS and advanced nurse practitioners is important given the challenges in defining, developing and supporting this nursing specialisation. Globally, different models exist. In some countries charitable organisations take a leading role in supporting patients. Many European centres look to the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidelines and quality standards as a template to develop and evaluate the role of the ILD CNS. We present a UK perspective in the context of a government subsidised healthcare system to promote professional discussion and debate regarding the future of nursing practice in the ILD specialty. ILDs are often complex and associated with significant mortality, morbidity and co-morbid conditions that require a technical healthcare skill setThere is worldwide shortage of nurses, low retention rates and retirement of many skilled nursesCollaboration across the ILD interdisciplinary community is needed to safeguard the future of our professions and high-quality patient careThe ILD interdisciplinary and nurse network has identified key priorities to help secure the future of the ILD clinical and academic nurse specialism. To explain the similarities and differences between clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) and advanced nurse practitioners (ANPs) in the context of ILD specialismTo review contemporary nursing specialism in the UK's government subsidised healthcare systemTo stimulate discussion and debate across the European/international respiratory community regarding the clinical and academic development of the ILD CNSTo identify key priorities that will

  14. Decision making in specialist forensic psychiatric (the psychological aspect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shmakova E.V.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of a study of psychological factors of decision making amongforensic psychiatric specialists. Given the survey data of10 medical psychologists and 10 psychiatrists carrying out compulsory treatment in the psychiatric hospital №5, Moscow Department of Public Health, in comparison with the control group, consisting of professionals working in the field of education, manufacturing, services and technology. Methodical complex included: 1. The Epstein questionnaire of the intuitive style (adaptation Kornilova T. V., Kornilov S. A.; A new questionnaire of tolerance/intolerance to uncertainty (Kornilova T. V.; Melbourne questionnaire of decision making (adaptation T. V.Kornilova; The questionnaire «Personal factors of decision making»(T.V. Kornilova; TheV. Smecalo and V. M. Kucher method; The Tsvetkova Method; 7. The questionnaire «Styles of thinking» by R. Bramsonand Harrison (adaptation of A. A. Alekseev; 8.The questionnaire «Scale of base convictions» (R.Yanov-Boulemane, adaptation M.A. Padun, A.V. Kotelnikov; 9. The check-list aimed to identify the type of decisions taken by the expert in professional activity, their frequency, importance, subjective evaluation is necessary for decision making qualities and to evaluate the most significant opinions of other persons in the decision-making process. There were defined the characteristics of decision making depending on gender. The relationships between type of activity and frequency of occurrence of different types of decisions in professional activities of specialists were revealed. Analyzed the relationship between consideration of the views of others when making decisions and activity.

  15. Late Holocene expansion of Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) in the Central Rocky Mountains, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Jodi R; Betancourt, Julio L.; Jackson, Stephen T.

    2016-01-01

    "Aim: Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) experienced one of the most extensive and rapid post-glacial plant migrations in western North America. We used plant macrofossils from woodrat (Neotoma) middens to reconstruct its spread in the Central Rocky Mountains, identify other vegetation changes coinciding with P. ponderosa expansion at the same sites, and relate P. ponderosa migrational history to both its modern phylogeography and to a parallel expansion by Utah juniper (Juniperus osteosperma).

  16. A qualitative study of work-life balance amongst specialist orthodontists in the United Kingdom

    OpenAIRE

    Cunningham, S. J.; Bateman, L. E.; Collins, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify factors affecting work-life balance amongst male and female orthodontists in the United Kingdom. Design: A qualitative interview-based study with a cross-sectional design. Subjects: Specialist orthodontists working in specialist practice and the hospital service in the United Kingdom were selected by purposive sampling. Methods: In-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with eighteen orthodontic specialists. Interview transcripts were analysed using Framework A...

  17. Work-based assessment within Malta’s specialist training programme in family medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Sammut, Mario R.; Abela, Gunther

    2014-01-01

    The Specialist Training Programme in Family Medicine (STPFM) – Malta was drawn up by the Malta College of Family Doctors in 2006, approved by Malta’s Specialist Accreditation Committee, and launched in 2007 by the Primary Health Care Department and the Malta College of Family Doctors. This article regarding the work-based assessment of specialist training in family medicine in Malta was prepared by consulting various local / international documents and publications tha...

  18. Active methods of teaching in the system of preparation of specialists on physical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pechko O.M.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The uses of simulation games given about directions are resulted in pedagogical practice. Practice is conducted during the increase of professional qualification of specialists. Possibilities of the use of pedagogical situations are considered in the system of preparation of specialist. Pedagogical situations are an aggregate of facilities and methods of becoming of professional specialist. The prospects of the use of simulation games are indicated in an educational process. Acquisition of the proper qualities options are rotined.

  19. Rural specialists: The nature of their work and professional satisfaction by geographical location of work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Belinda; McGrail, Matthew; Russell, Deborah

    2017-12-01

    Systematically describe the characteristics of rural specialists, their work and job satisfaction by geographical location of work. Cross-sectional. Three thousand, four hundred and seventy-nine medical specialists participating in the 2014 Medicine in Australia: Balancing Employment and Life (MABEL) survey of doctors. Location of practice, whether metropolitan, large (>50 000 population) or small regional centres (Rural specialists had more on-call requirements and poorer professional development opportunities. However, satisfaction with work hours, remuneration, variety of work, level of responsibility, opportunities to use abilities and overall satisfaction did not differ. Specialists in general medicine and general surgery were significantly more likely to work rurally compared with anaesthetists, particularly in small regional centres, whereas a range of other relevant specialists had lower than the average rural distribution and paediatricians and endocrinologists were significantly less likely to work in large regional centres. Rural specialists are just as satisfied as metropolitan counterparts reporting equivalent variety and responsibility at work. Better support for on-call demands and access to professional development could attract more specialists to rural practice. Increased rural training opportunities and regional workforce planning is needed to develop and recruit relevant specialties. Specifically, targeted support is warranted for training and development of specialists in general medicine and general surgery and overseas-trained specialists, who provide essential services in smaller regional centres. © 2017 National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  20. CONCEPTUAL BASES OF TRAINING OF TOURISM SPECIALISTS IN UKRAINE (BY THE EXAMPLE OF KRYVYI RIH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Вікторія Пацюк

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Relevance and importance of training of tourism specialists on the regional level have been revealed.  General principles of training of tourism services specialists in Ukraine have been found out. The structure and professional specialization of Ukrainian universities, where the “Tourism” specialists are trained have been analyzed. Pofessional requirements for future employees of tourism industry have been defined. Relevance of training of tourism specialists in Kryvyi Rih in the context of the implementation of the Program of Industrial Tourism Development has been revealed. Potential scope of employment of tourism graduates has been defined. Main tasks  of tourism education in Ukraine have been generalized.

  1. Specialist clinics in remote Australian Aboriginal communities: where rock art meets rocket science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruen, Russell; Bailie, Ross

    2004-10-01

    People in remote Aboriginal communities in the Northern Territory have greater morbidity and mortality than other Australians, but face considerable barriers when accessing hospital-based specialist services. The Specialist Outreach Service, which began in 1997, was a novel policy initiative to improve access by providing a regular multidisciplinary visiting specialist services to remote communities. It led to two interesting juxtapositions: that of 'state of the art' specialist services alongside under-resourced primary care in remote and relatively traditional Aboriginal communities; and that of attempts to develop an evidence base for the effectiveness of outreach, while meeting the short-term evaluative requirements of policy-makers. In this essay, first we describe the development of the service in the Northern Territory and its initial process evaluation. Through a Cochrane systematic review we then summarise the published research on the effectiveness of specialist outreach in improving access to tertiary and hospital-based care. Finally we describe the findings of an observational population-based study of the use of specialist services and the impact of outreach to three remote communities over 11 years. Specialist outreach improves access to specialist care and may lessen the demand for both outpatient and inpatient hospital care. Specialist outreach is, however, dependent on well-functioning primary care. According to the way in which outreach is conducted and the service is organised, it can either support primary care or it can hinder primary care and, as a result, reduce its own effectiveness.

  2. Fostering a "Feeling of Worth" Among Vulnerable HIV Populations: The Role of Linkage to Care Specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broaddus, Michelle R; Owczarzak, Jill; Schumann, Casey; Koester, Kimberly A

    2017-10-01

    To address barriers to adequate engagement in medical care among people living with HIV, Wisconsin's AIDS/HIV Program created a new position, the Linkage to Care (LTC) Specialist. Specialists provide intensive, short-term case management and patient navigation services for small caseloads of individuals at high risk of disengaging with medical care. Clients are eligible if they are newly diagnosed with HIV or new to medical care, recently released from incarceration, recently out of care, nonadherent to scheduled medical care visits, or have detectable viral load while in care. Interviews with 30 clients of Specialists were conducted to understand experiences with the program and medical care. Common themes included the ability of Specialists to navigate complex systems of care and support services, the unique role Specialists played in their clients' lives, and the challenges of transitioning out of the program. Although the primary goal of Specialists is to address barriers to medical care, they often adopted a holistic approach that also included housing, financial assistance, and other social determinants of health. Descriptions of the Specialist's role in implementation manuals focus on their functional roles and the services provided. However, clients often discussed the emotional support they received, especially for clients without strong social support networks. Many clients also desired an ongoing relationship with their Specialists even after discharge, but had been able to establish independence and self-efficacy. The LTC Specialists are resource-intensive considering their small caseloads, but fill an important gap in existing, often overtaxed case management systems.

  3. Reasons why specialist doctors undertake rural outreach services: an Australian cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Belinda G; McGrail, Matthew R; Stoelwinder, Johannes U

    2017-01-07

    The purpose of the study is to explore the reasons why specialist doctors travel to provide regular rural outreach services, and whether reasons relate to (1) salaried or private fee-for-service practice and (2) providing rural outreach services in more remote locations. A national cross-sectional study of specialist doctors from the Medicine in Australia: Balancing Employment and Life (MABEL) survey in 2014 was implemented. Specialists providing rural outreach services self-reported on a 5-point scale their level of agreement with five reasons for participating. Chi-squared analysis tested association between agreement and variables of interest. Of 567 specialists undertaking rural outreach services, reasons for participating include to grow the practice (54%), maintain a regional connection (26%), provide complex healthcare (18%), healthcare for disadvantaged people (12%) and support rural staff (6%). Salaried specialists more commonly participated to grow the practice compared with specialists in fee-for-service practice (68 vs 49%). This reason was also related to travelling further and providing outreach services in outer regional/remote locations. Private fee-for-service specialists more commonly undertook outreach services to provide complex healthcare (22 vs 14%). Specialist doctors undertake rural outreach services for a range of reasons, mainly to complement the growth and diversity of their main practice or maintain a regional connection. Structuring rural outreach around the specialist's main practice is likely to support participation and improve service distribution.

  4. Mycorrhizae Alter Toxin Sequestration and Performance of Two Specialist Herbivores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda R. Meier

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Multitrophic species interactions are shaped by both top-down and bottom-up factors. Belowground symbionts of plants, such as arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF, can alter the strength of these forces by altering plant phenotype. For example, AMF-mediated changes in foliar toxin and nutrient concentrations may influence herbivore growth and fecundity. In addition, many specialist herbivores sequester toxins from their host plants to resist natural enemies, and the extent of sequestration varies with host plant secondary chemistry. Therefore, by altering plant phenotype, AMF may affect both herbivore performance and their resistance to natural enemies. We examined how inoculation of plants with AMF influences toxin sequestration and performance of two specialist herbivores feeding upon four milkweed species (Asclepias incarnata, A. curassavica, A. latifolia, A. syriaca. We raised aphids (Aphis nerii and caterpillars (Danaus plexippus on plants for 6 days in a fully factorial manipulation of milkweed species and level of AMF inoculation (zero, medium, and high. We then assessed aphid and caterpillar sequestration of toxins (cardenolides and performance, and measured defensive and nutritive traits of control plants. Aphids and caterpillars sequestered higher concentrations of cardenolides from plants inoculated with AMF across all milkweed species. Aphid per capita growth rates and aphid body mass varied non-linearly with increasing AMF inoculum availability; across all milkweed species, aphids had the lowest performance under medium levels of AMF availability and highest performance under high AMF availability. In contrast, caterpillar survival varied strongly with AMF availability in a plant species-specific manner, and caterpillar growth was unaffected by AMF. Inoculation with AMF increased foliar cardenolide concentrations consistently among milkweed species, but altered aboveground biomasses and foliar phosphorous concentrations in a plant

  5. The clinical nurse specialist as resuscitation process manager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneiderhahn, Mary Elizabeth; Fish, Anne Folta

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to describe the history and leadership dimensions of the role of resuscitation process manager and provide specific examples of how this role is implemented at a Midwest medical center. In 1992, a medical center in the Midwest needed a nurse to manage resuscitation care. This role designation meant that this nurse became central to all quality improvement efforts in resuscitation care. The role expanded as clinical resuscitation guidelines were updated and as the medical center grew. The role became known as the critical care clinical nurse specialist as resuscitation process manager. This clinical care nurse specialist was called a manager, but she had no direct line authority, so she accomplished her objectives by forming a multitude of collaborative networks. Based on a framework by Finkelman, the manager role incorporated specific leadership abilities in quality improvement: (1) coordination of medical center-wide resuscitation, (2) use of interprofessional teams, (3) integration of evidence into practice, and (4) staff coaching to develop leadership. The manager coordinates resuscitation care with the goals of prevention of arrests if possible, efficient and effective implementation of resuscitation protocols, high quality of patient and family support during and after the resuscitation event, and creation or revision of resuscitation policies for in-hospital and for ambulatory care areas. The manager designs a comprehensive set of meaningful and measurable process and outcome indicators with input from interprofessional teams. The manager engages staff in learning, reflecting on care given, and using the evidence base for resuscitation care. Finally, the manager role is a balance between leading quality improvement efforts and coaching staff to implement and sustain these quality improvement initiatives. Revisions to clinical guidelines for resuscitation care since the 1990s have resulted in medical centers developing improved

  6. River Cetaceans and Habitat Change: Generalist Resilience or Specialist Vulnerability?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian D. Smith

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available River dolphins are among the world’s most threatened mammals, and indeed the baiji (Lipotes vexillifer, a species endemic to China's Yangtze River, is likely extinct. Exploitation for products such as meat, oil, and skins has been a lesser feature in the population histories of river dolphins compared to most large mammals. Habitat factors are therefore of particular interest and concern. In this paper we attempt to describe the population-level responses of river dolphins to habitat transformation. We find circumstantial but compelling evidence supporting the view that, at a local scale, river dolphins are opportunists (generalists capable of adapting to a wide range of habitat conditions while, at a river basin scale, they are more appropriately viewed as vulnerable specialists. The same evidence implies that the distributional responses of river dolphins to basinwide ecological change can be informative about their extinction risk, while their local behaviour patterns may provide important insights about critical ecological attributes. Empirical studies are needed on the ecology of river cetaceans, both to inform conservation efforts on behalf of these threatened animals and to help address broader concerns related to biodiversity conservation and the sustainability of human use in several of the world's largest river systems.

  7. Dosimetry in medical specialist in procedures of interventionist radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaona, E.; Vazquez V, J. A.; Rivera M, T.; Izeta G, A. C.; Azorin V, J. C.; Arreola, M.

    2014-08-01

    In this work are presented the experimental results of determining the dose in different body parts, measured by thermoluminescent dosimeters, to medical specialists of implantation procedures of definitive cardiac pacemaker. The medical personnel in ten intervention procedures were controlled according to the procedure type, pathological indication, fluoroscopy time and machine generating estimates of the patient doses. The doses to the extremities of the cardiologist were measured by means of thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). The domains of first level in the hand are in the index finger of the left and the right hand. The medium doses of the skin in the eyes, a report of the dose received during each type of intervention procedure in the glandular thyroid and fingers of the cardiologists is made. The results represent the integrated dose to the cardiologist, received during the implantation procedures of definitive cardiac pacemaker in the same patient. By a half time of detection of 70 minutes for patient, the half dose of the skin, received for the right and left hand, ascended to 1,4 mSv, under the glove. In conclusion, the dose average for the dosimeters of the thyroid gland and forehead was varied from 0,41 up to 1,14 mSv for study. The exposure to the X-rays is a topic to consider, more important every time on the development of systematic procedures little invasive, including the angiography, catheter, worker and patient. (Author)

  8. Pattern of facial palsy in a typical Nigerian specialist hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamina, S; Hanif, S

    2012-12-01

    Data on incidence of facial palsy is generally lacking in Nigeria. To assess six years' incidence of facial palsy in Murtala Muhammed Specialist Hospital (MMSH), Kano, Nigeria. The records of patients diagnosed as facial problems between January 2000 and December 2005 were scrutinized. Data on diagnosis, age, sex, side affected, occupation and causes were obtained. A total number of 698 patients with facial problems were recorded. Five hundred and ninety four (85%) were diagnosed as facial palsy. Out of the diagnosed facial palsy, males (56.2%) had a higher incidence than females; 20-34 years age group (40.3%) had a greater prevalence; the commonest cause of facial palsy was found out to be Idiopathic (39.1%) and was most common among business men (31.6%). Right sided facial palsy (52.2%) was predominant. Incidence of facial palsy was highest in 2003 (25.3%) and decreased from 2004. It was concluded that the incidence of facial palsy was high and Bell's palsy remains the most common causes of facial (nerve) paralysis.

  9. Proceedings of a specialist meeting on boron reactivity transients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    The CSNI Specialist Meeting on Boron Dilution Reactivity Transients was hosted by the Penn State University in collaboration with the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the TRAC Users Group. More than 70 experts from 12 OECD countries, as well as experts from Russia and other non-OECD countries attended the meeting. Thirty papers were presented in five technical sessions. The purpose of the meeting was to bring together experts involved in the different activities related to boron dilution transients. The experts came from all involved parties, including research organizations, regulatory authorities, vendors and utilities. Information was openly shared and discussed on the experimental results, plant and systems analysis, numerical analysis of mixing and probability and consequences of these transients. Regulatory background and licensing implications were also included to provide the proper frame work for the technical discussion. Each of these areas corresponded to a separate session. The meeting focused on the thermal-hydraulic aspects because of the current interest in that subject and the significant amount of new technical information being generated. Three papers of the same conference are already available in INIS as individual reports: Potential for boron dilution during small-break LOCAs in PWRs (Ref. number: 27029412); Analysis of boron dilution in a four-loop PWR (Ref. number: 27051651); Probability and consequences of a rapid boron dilution sequence in a PWR (Ref. number: 27029411)

  10. CSNI specialist meeting on simulators and plant analyzers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miettinen, J.; Holmstroem, H.

    1994-01-01

    The Specialist Meeting on Simulators and Plant Analyzers, held in June 9-12, 1992, in Lappeenranta, Finland, was sponsored by the Committee on the Safety on Nuclear Installations (CSNI) of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA). It was organized in collaboration with the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) and the Lappeenranta Technical University of Technology (LTKK). All the presented papers were invited and devided into four sessions. In the first session the objectives, requirements and consepts of simulators were discussed against present standards and guidelines. The second session focused on the capabilities of current analytical models. The third session focused on the experiences gained so far from the applications. The final fourth session concentrated on simulators, which are currently under development, and future plans with regard to both development and utilization. At the end of the meeting topics of the meeting were discussed at the panel discussion. Summaries of the sessions and shortened version of the panel discussion are included into the proceeding. (orig.)

  11. Radiological Operations Support Specialist (ROSS) Pilot Course Summary and Recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alai, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Askin, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Buddemeier, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wogan, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Doshi, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Tai, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-09-30

    In support of the Department of Homeland Security / Science and Technology Directorate’s (DHS/S&T) creation of a new position called the Radiological Operations Support Specialist (ROSS), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Sub-task 1.1 and 1.2 has assisted in the development of the ROSS skills, knowledge, and abilities (SKAs); identified potentially relevant training; cross-mapped the training to the SKAs; and identified gaps in the training related to the SKAs, as well as their respective level of training knowledge - current versus desired. In the follow on task, Sub-task 1.3, a 5 day ROSS Pilot Training course was developed to fill the priority gaps identified in Sub-Task 1.2. Additionally, in Sub-Task 1.5, LLNL has performed a gap analysis of electronic tools, handbooks, and job-aides currently available to the ROSS and developed recommendations for additional and next generation tools to ensure the operational effectiveness of the ROSS position. This document summarizes the feedback received from the instructors and pilot course observers on what worked in the course and what could be improved as well as an assessment of the Pre- and Post-Test administered to the students.

  12. Mechanical diffraction in a sand-specialist snake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiebel, Perrin E.; Rieser, Jennifer M.; Hubbard, Alex M.; Chen, Lillian; Goldman, Daniel I.

    Limbless locomotors such as snakes move by pressing the trunk against terrain heterogeneities. Our laboratory studies of the desert-dwelling Mojave Shovel-nosed snake (C. occipitalis, 40cm long, N=9) reveal that these animals use a stereotyped sinusoidal traveling wave of curvature. However, this snake also encounters rigid obstacles in its natural environment, and the tradeoff between using a cyclic, shape controlled gait versus one which changes shape in response to the terrain is not well understood. We challenged individuals to move across a model deformable substrate (carpet) through a row of 6.4 mm diameter force-sensitive pegs, a model of obstacles such as grass, oriented perpendicular to the direction of motion. Instead of forward-directed reaction forces, reaction forces generated by the pegs were more often perpendicular to the direction of motion. Distributions of post-peg travel angles displayed preferred directions revealing a diffraction-like pattern with a central peak at zero and symmetric peaks at 193 ° and 415 °. We observed similar dynamics in a robotic snake using shape-based control. This suggests that this sand-specialist snake adheres to its preferred waveform as opposed to changing in response to heterogeneity.

  13. Specialist services: the need for multi-agency partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, J; Gilvarry, E

    1999-07-01

    In the UK the broad trend noted in prevalence surveys is towards increased availability, exposure, and use of illicit drugs across all social strata. There is a developing consensus regarding those groups of young people who are at particular risk. They may be homeless, pregnant, leaving local authority or foster care, engaged in prostitution or involved with the criminal justice system. These young people are likely to require intervention from a variety of agencies and professionals to respond to their multiple needs, yet they are faced with a dearth of specialist substance misuse services. Consequently there is a need to develop a range of partnership approaches amongst both providers and commissioners of services. The importance of partnership has been stressed in a succession of professional guidance documents, but there remain considerable bureaucratic, organisational, and historical barriers that must be overcome. Effective service models that exist in the UK and elsewhere are a source of ideas to stimulate appropriate, child-centred developments. Overall the need for a fresh impetus is emphasised, in which new partnerships are formed, and collaborative services are developed and evaluated. In this way future initiatives can be based upon evidence of clinical and cost effectiveness.

  14. Role clarity and role conflict among Swedish diabetes specialist nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boström, Eva; Hörnsten, Asa; Lundman, Berit; Stenlund, Hans; Isaksson, Ulf

    2013-10-01

    To explore diabetes specialist nurses (DSNs)' perceptions of their role in terms of clarity, conflict and other psychosocial work aspects. A cross-sectional study was conducted among DSNs in a county in northern Sweden. The DSNs answered the Nordic Questionnaire of Psychological and Social Factors at Work (QPS Nordic) about psychosocial aspects of their work. Statistical analysis compared DSNs with a reference group of different health professionals. Correlations between role clarity, role conflict, and other variables were analysed. The DSNs perceived more, and higher, job demands, including quantitative, decision-making and learning demands, but also more positive challenges at work compared with the reference group. Role clarity correlated with experiences of health promotion, perception of mastery, co-worker support, and empowering leadership, while role conflict correlated with quantitative and learning demands. The DSNs perceived high demands but also positive challenges in their work. Their role expectations correlated with several psychosocial work aspects. It is important that DSNs should be presented with positive challenges as meaningful incentives for further role development and enhanced mastery of their work. Copyright © 2013 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The human factors specialist in nuclear control centre design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, R.B.; Beattie, J.D.

    The main focus at Ontario Hydro for man-machine interface design is in the design of control centres. Because the control of a nuclear generating unit is highly centralized there is an increasing need for effective information display and control layout. Control panel design innovations such as the use of CRT displays and the extended use of computerized control in the Darlington station have made it possible for Ontario Hydro to continue to have one first operator for each generating unit. The human factors specialist involved in control panel design must deal with people who know much more about the specific systems being controlled, and must become a generalist in all these systems as well. Designers have to use conceptual techniques such as task analysis, systems design, panel mock-ups, anthropometric data, and personal judgement based on experience as they design panels. They must find a balance between becoming locked into existing technology and methods, slavishly following the latest technological trends, and forgetting that real people will be using what they design

  16. Acanthamoeba Keratitis at the King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Mezaine, H.; Al-Muteb, M.; Al-Motowa, S.; Wagoner, M. D.

    2005-01-01

    To quantify the number of cases and clinical courses of Acanthamoeba keratitis treated at the King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital (KKESH) between December 1982 and May 2005, and to review their clinical course and response to medical and surgical therapy. Retrospective review of medical records of all patients with Acanthamoeba keratitis diagnosed by the KKESH Microbiology or Pathology or Pathology Laboratory since the opening of the hospital. During a period of over 22 years, only six cases of confirmed. Acanthamoeba keratitis were diagnosedand treated at KKESH. In two cases the diagnosis was made by corneal biopsy, while four cases required examination of a histopathology specimen obtained at the time of therapeutic keratoplasty to establish the diagnosis. One eye was cured by medical therapy, while five eyes required one (4eyes) or two (1 eye) therapeutic penetrating keratoplasty (PKP) to achieve a clinical cure. Three eyes achieved good visual acuity (20/40, 20/50, 20/60), one eye achieved fair visual acuity (20/160), and two eyes suffered profound visual loss (hand motions). The incidence of Acanthamoeba keratitis may be less in Saudi Arabia than reported in Western countries although the clinical is similarly complicated, with most cases requiring therapeutic keratoplasty for definitive education of the organism. (author)

  17. Radiological Operations Support Specialist (ROSS) Pilot Course Summary and Recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alai, M.; Askin, A.; Buddemeier, B.; Wogan, L.; Doshi, P.; Tai, L.

    2016-01-01

    In support of the Department of Homeland Security / Science and Technology Directorate's (DHS/S&T) creation of a new position called the Radiological Operations Support Specialist (ROSS), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Sub-task 1.1 and 1.2 has assisted in the development of the ROSS skills, knowledge, and abilities (SKAs); identified potentially relevant training; cross-mapped the training to the SKAs; and identified gaps in the training related to the SKAs, as well as their respective level of training knowledge - current versus desired. In the follow on task, Sub-task 1.3, a 5 day ROSS Pilot Training course was developed to fill the priority gaps identified in Sub-Task 1.2. Additionally, in Sub-Task 1.5, LLNL has performed a gap analysis of electronic tools, handbooks, and job-aides currently available to the ROSS and developed recommendations for additional and next generation tools to ensure the operational effectiveness of the ROSS position. This document summarizes the feedback received from the instructors and pilot course observers on what worked in the course and what could be improved as well as an assessment of the Pre- and Post-Test administered to the students.

  18. Hypopharyngeal carcinoma: King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahasin, Z.; Khan, B.

    1996-01-01

    From 1975 to 1985, 202 patients with hypopharyngeal cancer were seen at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center (KFSHRC). The endoscopic investigation showed that 28.3% of these patients had postcricoid carcinoma; 19.85% had pyriform fossa carcinoma and 52.9% had involvement of both sites. The pathological diagnosis of all cases was squamous cell carcinoma type. The majority of the patients (62.98%) had T4 lesions, which showed a late presentation to KFSHRC. Information related to survival was available for a smaller number of patients to many lost-to-follow-up cases. The overall median survival time was 8.5 months (1-110 months). The survival rate for each site was calculated, as well as the staging of the disease and treatment modality used. It appeared that pyriform fossa (median 21 months) had the best survival rate. In addition the earlier the lesion was detected and the more aggressive the treatment applied, the better the survival rate. Fifty percent of the patients receiving radiation therapy and surgery had a five year survival arte. Factors other than smoking and/on drinking should be looked for in our community as predisposing to this disease in our population. (author)

  19. 22 CFR 11.20 - Foreign Service specialist career candidate appointments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., background investigation, and final review process required of career candidates, but normally they will not... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Foreign Service specialist career candidate... SERVICE OFFICERS § 11.20 Foreign Service specialist career candidate appointments. (a) General...

  20. Administrative Perceptions on the Role of the School Library Media Specialist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Kayla

    2013-01-01

    Despite the efforts of local school library media specialists to promote their programming, many administrators do not understand the roles and responsibilities of the school library media specialist. Using a constructivist theoretical framework, this study was designed to examine the local school administrators' perceptions of the role of the…

  1. Families' perceptions of the contribution of intellectual disability clinical nurse specialists in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doody, Owen; Slevin, Eamonn; Taggart, Laurence

    2018-01-01

    To explore families' perceptions of the contribution of clinical nurse specialists in intellectual disability nursing in Ireland. Clinical nurse specialists roles have developed over the years and are seen as complex and multifaceted, causing confusion, frustration and controversy. 2001 saw the formal introduction of clinical nurse specialists roles in Ireland across nursing including intellectual disability. A exploratory qualitative approach using semistructured one-to-one interviews with 10 family members regarding their perceptions of the clinical nurse specialists in intellectual disability. Data were audio-recorded, transcribed and analysed using Burnard's framework. Ethical approval was gained and access granted by service providers. The study highlights that intellectual disability clinical nurse specialists contribute and support care deliver across a range of areas, including personal caring, supporting and empowering families, liaison, education and leadership. Clinical nurse specialists have an important role and contribution in supporting families and clients, and Ireland is in a unique position to develop knowledge regarding specialist care for people with intellectual disability that can be shared nationally and internationally. Ireland is in a unique position to develop knowledge regarding specialist care for people with intellectual disability that can be shared and adapted by other healthcare professionals in other countries that do not have a specialised intellectual disability nurses. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Entomology Specialist 1-1. Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jimmie L.

    This individualized, self-paced course for training an entomology specialist was adapted from military curriculum materials for use in vocational and technical education. Completion of the course should provide students with basic information needed to accomplish the following duties of an entomology specialist: perform entomological work, apply…

  3. Why are some medical specialists working part-time, while others work full-time?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, Judith D. de; Heiligers, Phil; Groenewegen, Peter P.; Hingstman, Lammert

    2006-01-01

    Although medical specialists primarily work full-time, part-time work is on the increase, a trend that can be found worldwide. This article seeks to answer the question why some medical specialists work part-time, while others do not although they are willing to work part-time. Two approaches are

  4. Non-Music Specialist Trainee Primary School Teachers' Confidence in Teaching Music in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddon, Frederick; Biasutti, Michele

    2008-01-01

    Prior research has revealed that non-music specialist trainee primary school teachers lack confidence in teaching music in spite of changes to teacher training and the introduction of music in the National Curriculum in England. The current study investigated the effects on non-music specialist trainee primary teachers' confidence to teach music…

  5. Learning Mathematics for Teaching Mathematics: Non-Specialist Teachers' Mathematics Teacher Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisan, Cosette; Rodd, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    A non-specialist teacher of mathematics is a school teacher who qualified to teach in a subject other than mathematics yet teaches mathematics to students in secondary school. There is an emerging interest internationally in this population, a brief report of which is given in the paper. Because of concerns about the quality of non-specialists'…

  6. Characterizing Mathematics Teaching Research Specialists' Mentoring in the Context of Chinese Lesson Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Feishi; Gu, Lingyuan

    2016-01-01

    This study examines how mathematics teaching research specialists mentor practicing teachers during post-lesson debriefs of a lesson study in China. Based on a systematic, fine-grained analysis of 107 h of videotaped mentoring meetings of 20 groups of teachers and teaching research specialists from different elementary schools, this study reveals…

  7. Partnership in Being a Specialist Mathematics and Computing College--Who Gains What, How and Why?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinkinson, Anne J.

    2007-01-01

    The research took place in a mathematics and computing specialist school. The article reports on part of a case study of the mathematics department's experience of being a major contributor to the requirements of being a specialist school. This article aims to explore and describe one model of partnership within the "community" remit of…

  8. The Association for Educational Communications and Technology: Division of School Media Specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Mary Mock

    1993-01-01

    Reports on the Division of School Media Specialists of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT). Highlights include the mission statement; publications; board members and committee chairs; activities at the AECT conferences; and future concerns, including public relations and marketing plans for media specialists and…

  9. Collaboration with general practitioners : preferences of medical specialists - a qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berendsen, Annette J.; Benneker, Wim H. G. M.; Schuling, Jan; Rijkers-Koorn, Nienke; Slaets, Joris P. J.; Meyboom-de Jong, Betty

    2006-01-01

    Background: Collaboration between general practitioners (GPs) and specialists has been the focus of many collaborative care projects during the past decade. Unfortunately, quite a number of these projects failed. This raises the question of what motivates medical specialists to initiate and continue

  10. Pharmacovigilance training for specialist oncology nurses-a two way evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutte, T.; Van Eekeren, R.; Richir, M.; Van Staveren, J.; Van Puijenbroek, E.P.; Tichelaar, J.; Van Agtmael, M.A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: In a new prescribing qualifcation course for specialist oncology nurses, we thought it important to emphasize pharma-covigilance and adverse drug reaction (ADR)-reporting. To this end, our aim was to develop and evaluate an ADR reporting assignment for specialist oncology nurses.

  11. 78 FR 41993 - Transport Handling Specialists, Inc.-Continuance in Control Exemption-RSL Railroad, LLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-12

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board [Docket No. FD 35726] Transport Handling Specialists, Inc.--Continuance in Control Exemption--RSL Railroad, LLC Transport Handling Specialists, Inc. (THS), has filed a verified notice of exemption (Notice) under 49 CFR 1180.2(d)(2) to continue in...

  12. The Generalist versus the Specialist: The New Oxford Dictionary Reveals a Gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Martin Lyon

    1981-01-01

    There is a gap, it is suggested, separating the generally cultured person, not just from the scientist, but from specialists in many fields. Dictionary definitions are seen as one means of seeing the extent to which specialists and those in the general culture speak the same language. (MLW)

  13. Insideness and Outsideness: An Autoethnography of a Primary Physical Education Specialist Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Caroline; Thompson, Maree Dinan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide an authentic and legitimate voice to the physical education (PE) specialist teacher in the primary school and to give an insight into professional knowledge. An autoethnographic approach has been used to invite readers to enter my world of the primary PE specialist teacher and observe and respond to its…

  14. Scholarly Productivity of School Psychology Faculty Members in Specialist-Level Programs: 2002-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Jeff; Runia, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    The scholarly productivity of school psychology faculty members in specialist-level only programs was examined. Information was gathered from the School Psychology Program Information portion of the website for the National Association of School Psychologists. A total of 137 specialist-level only school psychology programs were identified.…

  15. Ensemble modeling to predict habitat suitability for a large-scale disturbance specialist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quresh S. Latif; Victoria A. Saab; Jonathan G. Dudley; Jeff P. Hollenbeck

    2013-01-01

    To conserve habitat for disturbance specialist species, ecologists must identify where individuals will likely settle in newly disturbed areas. Habitat suitability models can predict which sites at new disturbances will most likely attract specialists. Without validation data from newly disturbed areas, however, the best approach for maximizing predictive accuracy can...

  16. Professional Insiders/Outsiders? Teacher Professionalism and the Primary School Physical Education Specialist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Caroline; DinanThompson, Maree

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides a context for exploring the positioning of Physical Education specialist teachers (PE specialist teachers) in primary schools in Queensland in the discourses of teacher professionalism. A critical analysis of literature on the history and status of the subject and its practitioners aims to contextualize discourses in and about…

  17. Health Education Specialist Practice Analysis 2015 (HESPA 2015): Process and Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, James F.; Dennis, Dixie; Auld, M. Elaine; Lysoby, Linda; Doyle, Eva; Muenzen, Patricia M.; Caro, Carla M.; Kusorgbor-Narh, Cynthia S.

    2016-01-01

    The Health Education Specialist Practice Analysis 2015 (HESPA 2015) was conducted to update and validate the Areas of Responsibilities, Competencies, and Sub-competencies for Entry- and Advanced-Level Health Education Specialists. Two data collection instruments were developed--one was focused on Sub-competencies and the other on knowledge items…

  18. The Peer Specialist : Opportunities for the Recovery of Suicidal Care Consumers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bergen, Diana; Huisman, Annemiek

    2017-01-01

    The emergence of peer specialists with a history of suicidality who work with suicidal care consumers is a recent phenomenon that increasingly receives attention in the field of suicide prevention. Peer specialists aim at: 1) Establishing a more open discussion of suicidality; 2) Enabling attempt

  19. The Concept of Personological Information-Educational System of Forming Professional Effectiveness of a Specialist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasova, Vera K.; Vakhidova, Luycia V.

    2016-01-01

    Professional self-effectiveness is a key quality of a modern specialist together with cultural, general professional and professional competences, which are realized in his further activity. But in normative documents regulating preparation of a specialist, this quality is not present. The aim of the article is in working out a conception of…

  20. Modeling fraud detection and the incorporation of forensic specialists in the audit process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sakalauskaite, Dominyka

    Financial statement audits are still comparatively poor in fraud detection. Forensic specialists can play a significant role in increasing audit quality. In this paper, based on prior academic research, I develop a model of fraud detection and the incorporation of forensic specialists in the audit...... process. The intention of the model is to identify the reasons why the audit is weak in fraud detection and to provide the analytical framework to assess whether the incorporation of forensic specialists can help to improve it. The results show that such specialists can potentially improve the fraud...... detection in the audit, but might also cause some negative implications. Overall, even though fraud detection is one of the main topics in research there are very few studies done on the subject of how auditors co-operate with forensic specialists. Thus, the paper concludes with suggestions for further...

  1. Doctors applying for Danish postgraduate medical specialist training are getting younger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, N. K.; Clausen, L. W.; Qvesel, D.

    2012-01-01

    was 58 months. 6% of the recruited doctors had a PhD. 61% of the doctors were graduates from the University of Southern Denmark. 14% graduated from the University of Copenhagen and 12% from Aarhus University. Finally, 13% graduated from a foreign university. CONCLUSION: Applicants accepted for specialist......INTRODUCTION: It was previously shown that applicants for postgraduate medical specialist training in Denmark were old. In order to prevent potential shortage of specialists, the Danish health authorities have passed legislation to speed up the output of new specialists. The aim of this study...... was to highlight the present characteristics of young doctors who entered specialist training. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Data include 443 doctors who were enrolled in a formalized postgraduate medical training programme in the Region of Southern Denmark from 2009 to 2011. RESULTS: 41% of the recruited young doctors...

  2. Professional training of future specialists with the use of information technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Виктор Семенович Корнилов

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with implementation of information technologies within different levels of professional training of the future specialists at A. Yassawi International Kazakh-Turkish University. Information technologies enable the future specialists to engage in online exchanges and it gives great good opportunity in learning the subject efficiently; thereby expanding their study and learning community during the classroom activity. The results obtained by the use of the information technologies show improvements in professional training of the future specialists in teaching foreign language. The use of information technology in teaching is increasing, which should lead to a significant improvement of the training quality of future specialists. Improvements also are observed in the experimental groups of higher levels, which indicates the efficiency of the use of information technologies in the professional training of future specialists.

  3. Collaboration with general practitioners: preferences of medical specialists – a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slaets Joris PJ

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Collaboration between general practitioners (GPs and specialists has been the focus of many collaborative care projects during the past decade. Unfortunately, quite a number of these projects failed. This raises the question of what motivates medical specialists to initiate and continue participating with GPs in new collaborative care models. The following question is addressed in this study: What motivates medical specialists to initiate and sustain new models for collaborating with GPs? Methods We conducted semi-structured interviews with eighteen medical specialists in the province of Groningen, in the North of The Netherlands. The sampling criteria were age, gender, type of hospital in which they were practicing, and specialty. The interviews were recorded, fully transcribed, and analysed by three researchers working independently. The resulting motivational factors were grouped into categories. Results 'Teaching GPs' and 'regulating patient flow' (referrals appeared to dominate when the motivational factors were considered. In addition, specialists want to develop relationships with the GPs on a more personal level. Most specialists believe that there is not much they can learn from GPs. 'Lack of time', 'no financial compensation', and 'no support from colleagues' were considered to be the main concerns to establishing collaborative care practices. Additionally, projects were often experienced as too complex and time consuming whereas guidelines were experienced as too restrictive. Conclusion Specialists are particularly interested in collaborating because the GP is the gatekeeper for access to secondary health care resources. Specialists feel that they are able to teach the GPs something, but they do not feel that they have anything to learn from the GPs. With respect to professional expertise, therefore, specialists do not consider GPs as equals. Once personal relationships with the GPs have been established, an

  4. Subsidies to target specialist outreach services into more remote locations: a national cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Belinda G; McGrail, Matthew R; Stoelwinder, Johannes U

    2017-07-01

    Objective Targeting rural outreach services to areas of highest relative need is challenging because of the higher costs it imposes on health workers to travel longer distances. This paper studied whether subsidies have the potential to support the provision of specialist outreach services into more remote locations. Methods National data about subsidies for medical specialist outreach providers as part of the Wave 7 Medicine in Australia: Balancing Employment and Life (MABEL) Survey in 2014. Results Nearly half received subsidies: 19% (n=110) from a formal policy, namely the Australian Government Rural Health Outreach Fund (RHOF), and 27% (n=154) from other sources. Subsidised specialists travelled for longer and visited more remote locations relative to the non-subsidised group. In addition, compared with non-subsidised specialists, RHOF-subsidised specialists worked in priority areas and provided equally regular services they intended to continue, despite visiting more remote locations. Conclusion This suggests the RHOF, although limited to one in five specialist outreach providers, is important to increase targeted and stable outreach services in areas of highest relative need. Other subsidies also play a role in facilitating remote service distribution, but may need to be more structured to promote regular, sustained outreach practice. What is known about this topic? There are no studies describing subsidies for specialist doctors to undertake rural outreach work and whether subsidies, including formal and structured subsidies via the Australian Government RHOF, support targeted outreach services compared with no financial support. What does this paper add? Using national data from Australia, we describe subsidisation among specialist outreach providers and show that specialists subsidised via the RHOF or another source are more likely to provide remote outreach services. What are the implications for practitioners? Subsidised specialist outreach providers are

  5. Specialist participation in healthcare delivery transformation: influence of patient self-referral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliu, Oluseyi; Sun, Gordon; Burke, James; Chung, Kevin C; Davis, Matthew M

    2014-01-01

    Improving coordination of care and containing healthcare costs are prominent goals of healthcare reform. Specialist involvement in healthcare delivery transformation efforts like Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) is necessary to achieve these goals. However, patients’ self-referrals to specialists may undermine care coordination and incur unnecessary costs if patients frequently receive care from specialists not engaged in such healthcare delivery transformation efforts. Additionally, frequent self-referrals may also diminish the incentive for specialist participation in reform endeavors like ACOs to get access to a referral base. To examine recent national trends in self-referred new visits to specialists. A descriptive cross-sectional study of new ambulatory visits to specialists from 2000 to 2009 using data from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey. We calculated nationally representative estimates of the proportion of new specialist visits through self-referrals among Medicare and private insurance beneficiaries. We also estimated the nationally representative absolute number of self-referred new specialist visits among both groups of beneficiaries. Among Medicare and private insurance beneficiaries, self-referred visits declined from 32.2% (95% confidence interval [CI], 24.0%-40.4%) to 19.6% (95% CI, 13.9%-23.3%) and from 32.4% (95% CI, 27.9%-36.8%) to 24.1% (95% CI,18.8%-29.4%), respectively. Hence, at least 1 in 5 and 1 in 4 new visits to specialists among Medicare and private insurance beneficiaries, respectively, are self-referred. The current considerable rate of self-referred new specialist visits among both Medicare and private insurance beneficiaries may have adverse implications for organizations attempting to transform healthcare delivery with improved care coordination.

  6. Geographic variation in resource use by specialist versus generalist butterflyfishes

    KAUST Repository

    Lawton, Rebecca J.; Cole, Andrew J.; Berumen, Michael L.; Pratchett, Morgan S.

    2011-01-01

    Localised patterns of resource use can be constrained by multiple factors. Comparison of resource use at multiple locations with differing resource availability can allow fundamental specialists to be distinguished from species that simply feed predominantly on prey types that are locally abundant. This study investigates geographic variation in the feeding ecology of coral-feeding butterflyfishes to examine whether patterns of resource use and levels of dietary specialisation vary among distinct locations, corresponding with changes in resource availability. Our specific aims were to investigate whether the dietary niche breadth of four butterflyfishes varies among five geographically separated locations and assess whether each species utilises similar resources in each location. Resource availability and dietary composition of four butterflyfishes were quantified at three sites across each of five geographic locations throughout the Pacific. Niche breadth, niche overlap, and resource selection functions were calculated for each species at each site and compared among locations. Availability of dietary resources varied significantly among locations and sites. Chaetodon vagabundus, C. citrinellus and C. lunulatus had low levels of dietary specialisation and used different resources in each location. Chaetodon trifascialis had high levels of dietary specialisation and used the same few resources in each location. Our results indicate that relative levels of dietary specialisation among different butterflyfishes do hold at larger spatial scales, however, geographical variation in the dietary composition of all butterflyfishes indicates that prey availability has a fundamental influence on dietary composition. Highly specialised species such as C. trifascialis will be highly vulnerable to coral loss as they appear to be largely inflexible in their dietary composition. However, the increased feeding plasticity observed here for C. trifascialis suggests this species may

  7. Specialists meeting on LMFBR flow induced vibrations. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-12-01

    A Specialists' Meeting on LMFBR Flow-Induced Vibrations was held at ANL in the United States which was sponsored by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) on the recommendations of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors (IWGFR). It was attended by participants from France, the Federal Republic of Germany, Italy, Japan, Netherlands, the United Kingdom, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, the United States and the IAEA. The purpose of the meeting was to provide, for the first time, a common forum for the exchange of information on flow-induced vibration programs of the member countries. As this was a first meeting, information was sought in the broad areas of: 1. Design Criteria and Problem Areas in LMFBR Design; 2. Current Design Procedures; and 3. Ongoing Research. A session was devoted to each of the above topics wherein papers were presented and discussed followed by open discussions on the session topic. The objective of the open discussions was to identify, from a review of specific reactor designs, (a) flow induced vibration problem areas (expected and observed) and their potential for occurrence; (b) failure modes and associated design criteria; (c) specific components that are susceptible to flow induced vibration; and (d) probable excitation mechanisms. It was aimed to assess the current state-of-the-art in designing to avoid flow induced vibration with consideration of licensing requirements; to evaluate existing methods of analysis, testing, and surveillance, along with their limitations and to identify areas requiring research and review ongoing research programmes relative to these research needs

  8. Specialists meeting on LMFBR flow induced vibrations. Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1977-12-01

    A Specialists' Meeting on LMFBR Flow-Induced Vibrations was held at ANL in the United States which was sponsored by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) on the recommendations of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors (IWGFR). It was attended by participants from France, the Federal Republic of Germany, Italy, Japan, Netherlands, the United Kingdom, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, the United States and the IAEA. The purpose of the meeting was to provide, for the first time, a common forum for the exchange of information on flow-induced vibration programs of the member countries. As this was a first meeting, information was sought in the broad areas of: 1. Design Criteria and Problem Areas in LMFBR Design; 2. Current Design Procedures; and 3. Ongoing Research. A session was devoted to each of the above topics wherein papers were presented and discussed followed by open discussions on the session topic. The objective of the open discussions was to identify, from a review of specific reactor designs, (a) flow induced vibration problem areas (expected and observed) and their potential for occurrence; (b) failure modes and associated design criteria; (c) specific components that are susceptible to flow induced vibration; and (d) probable excitation mechanisms. It was aimed to assess the current state-of-the-art in designing to avoid flow induced vibration with consideration of licensing requirements; to evaluate existing methods of analysis, testing, and surveillance, along with their limitations and to identify areas requiring research and review ongoing research programmes relative to these research needs.

  9. Use of professional profiles in applications for specialist training positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundh, Andreas; Skjelsager, Karen; Wildgaard, Kim

    2013-07-01

    The seven roles of the CanMEDS system have been implemented in Danish postgraduate medical training. For each medical specialty, a professional profile describes which elements of the seven roles the specialty deems important for applicants for a specialist training position. We investigated use of professional profiles among the 38 Danish specialty societies in order to ascertain the use of the seven roles. We used information from the websites of the Postgraduate Medical Training Secretariats in March 2012. For each profile, we extracted information on how the seven roles were described, how the roles were ranked by importance, whether a score sheet was used by the appointment committee and whether the profile had been updated. Twenty-four (63%) of the 38 profiles described the contents for all of the seven roles and four (11%) described the contents only for some of the roles. Nine specialties (24%) described a clear ranking of the seven roles with the medical expert and scholar roles generally ranked as most important. Seven specialties (18%) used standardised score sheets as part of the application process. Four (11%) specialties had updated their professional profiles. The majority of specialties described the seven roles in their professional profiles, but the level of detail varied substantially. Few specialties described whether the roles were ranked by importance or provided specific guidelines for appointment committees on how the contents of the profiles should be interpreted. We suggest that specialties seek inspiration for updating their profiles, and that they use the contents from all specialties provided at a website. not relevant. not relevant.

  10. AIDS: just the facts from specialists at Johns Hopkins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkbeiner, A

    1985-12-01

    This article, based on information from specialists at Johns Hopkins, poses and then answers 3 broad questions about the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). 1st, it is asked, "What is AIDS and how serious is it?" It is noted that AIDS is only 1 of several forms taken by infection with the human T-lymphotropic virus type III/lymphadenopathy-associated virus (HTLV-III/LAV). The earliest form of infection is believed to occur within a few weeks of exposure to the virus, and some patients develop an acute syndrome that resembles infectious mononucleosis. These symptoms disappear after 4-6 weeks, by which time the patient has developed antibodies to the virus. About 2-4%/year of asymptomatic carriers go on to develop AIDS-related complex (ARC), and 15-30% of ARC patients develop AIDS within 5 years. The 2nd question posed is, "How do you catch AIDS?" To cause infection, the virus must go directly into the blood, although the virus alone may not be enough to cause sickness. Previous viral infections such as hepatitis B, herpes, cytomegalovirus, and intestinal parasites have been suggested as co-factors of AIDS. Promiscuity increases the chances of contracting AIDS. Observations of the families of AIDS patients and health care personnel who work with AIDS patients suggest that AIDS cannot be caught by casual contact. Finally, it is asked, "What is being done about AIDS?" 4 strategies are outlined: 1) as a result of donor screening for antibodies to HTLV-III/LAV, AIDS has been completely removed from the blood banks; 2) virologists are attempting to understand the virus so that it can be attacked, and understanding has been advanced by the theory that HTLV-III might be what is called a "slow virus;" 3) education about AIDS is changing the sexual practices that transmit AIDS; and 4) epidemiologists are carefully following those who are at risk, have been exposed, or are already sick.

  11. [Outpatient specialist medical care: what is possible, what will come?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschuschke, C; Uhthoff, H

    2013-08-01

    The guidelines on outpatient specialist medical treatment (ASV) according to § 116b of the Social Act were published by the Federal Joint Committee on 21 March 2013. The guidelines regulate the framework conditions for the new area of healthcare and the requirements for potential participants. The ASV guidelines are designed to ultimately bridge the sectorial borders for the treatment of rare diseases and those with unusual courses. In the past the reforms in § 116b have not fulfilled the criteria expected by the legislation. The reforms have already led to an increase in the costs for medical services by a factor of 50 within 6 years. The spectrum of diseases to be treated has remained practically unchanged. The healthcare providers must now fulfil a catalogue of prerequisites which will be formulated by the Federal Joint Committee for each entity in the still to be provided annexes to the guidelines in order to be approved on notification by the extended National Committee. The guidelines are based on the prototype further education regulations according to the old law. An important detail is the obligatory formation of cooperation and teams for all participants outside the traditional sectorial limits. Each partner must perform the duties at least 1 day in the week at the site of the team leader. Specific and organizational requirements, extent of treatment and lower limits will be regulated by the still to be formulated annexes. Costing and business effectiveness will be tested by the medical services. No patient has yet been treated under the ASV but the winner is already known: bureaucracy.

  12. Distinguishing the Clinical Nurse Specialist From Other Graduate Nursing Roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Lynn D; Coke, Lola A

    Today's healthcare environment poses diverse and complex patient care challenges and requires a highly qualified and experienced nursing workforce. To mitigate these challenges are graduate nursing roles, each with a different set of competencies and expertise. With the availability of many different graduate nursing roles, both patients and healthcare professionals can be confused in understanding the benefit of each role. To gain the maximum benefit from each role, it is important that healthcare providers and administrators are able to distinguish the uniqueness of each role to best use the role and develop strategies for effective collaboration and interprofessional interaction. The purpose of this article was to define the role, educational preparation, role differences, and practice competencies for the clinical nurse specialist (CNS), nurse practitioner, clinical nurse leader, and nurse educator/staff development educator roles. A second purpose was to provide role clarity and demonstrate the unique value the CNS brings to the healthcare environment. Using evidence and reviewing role competencies established by varying organizations, each role is presented with similarities and differences among the roles discussed. In addition, collaboration among the identified roles was reviewed, and recommendations were provided for the new and practicing CNSs. Although there are some similarities among the graduate nursing roles such as in educational, licensing, and certification requirements, each role must be understood to gain the full role scope and benefit and glean the anticipated outcomes. Healthcare providers must be aware of the differences in graduate nursing roles, especially in comparing the CNS with other roles to avoid confusion that may lead to roles being underused with a limited job scope. The CNS provides a unique set of services at all system outcome levels and is an essential part of the healthcare team especially in the acute care setting.

  13. Making robust assessments of specialist trainees' workplace performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, J M; Castanelli, D J; Chen, Y; Jolly, B

    2017-02-01

    Workplace-based assessments should provide a reliable measure of trainee performance, but have met with mixed success. We proposed that using an entrustability scale, where supervisors scored trainees on the level of supervision required for the case would improve the utility of compulsory mini-clinical evaluation exercise (CEX) assessments in a large anaesthesia training program. We analysed mini-CEX scores from all Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists trainees submitted to an online database over a 12-month period. Supervisors' scores were adjusted for the expected supervision requirement for the case for trainees at different stages of training. We used generalisability theory to determine score reliability. 7808 assessments were available for analysis. Supervision requirements decreased significantly (P  0.7) with a feasible number of assessments. Adjusting scores against the expected supervision requirement considerably improved reliability, with G > 0.8 achieved with only nine assessments. Three per cent of trainees generated average mini-CEX scores below the expected standard. Using an entrustment scoring system, where supervisors score trainees on the level of supervision required, mini-CEX scores demonstrated moderate reliability within a feasible number of assessments, and evidence of validity. When scores were adjusted against an expected standard, underperforming trainees could be identified, and reliability much improved. Taken together with other evidence on trainee ability, the mini-CEX is of sufficient reliability for inclusion in high stakes decisions on trainee progression towards independent specialist practice. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Geographic variation in resource use by specialist versus generalist butterflyfishes

    KAUST Repository

    Lawton, Rebecca J.

    2011-11-14

    Localised patterns of resource use can be constrained by multiple factors. Comparison of resource use at multiple locations with differing resource availability can allow fundamental specialists to be distinguished from species that simply feed predominantly on prey types that are locally abundant. This study investigates geographic variation in the feeding ecology of coral-feeding butterflyfishes to examine whether patterns of resource use and levels of dietary specialisation vary among distinct locations, corresponding with changes in resource availability. Our specific aims were to investigate whether the dietary niche breadth of four butterflyfishes varies among five geographically separated locations and assess whether each species utilises similar resources in each location. Resource availability and dietary composition of four butterflyfishes were quantified at three sites across each of five geographic locations throughout the Pacific. Niche breadth, niche overlap, and resource selection functions were calculated for each species at each site and compared among locations. Availability of dietary resources varied significantly among locations and sites. Chaetodon vagabundus, C. citrinellus and C. lunulatus had low levels of dietary specialisation and used different resources in each location. Chaetodon trifascialis had high levels of dietary specialisation and used the same few resources in each location. Our results indicate that relative levels of dietary specialisation among different butterflyfishes do hold at larger spatial scales, however, geographical variation in the dietary composition of all butterflyfishes indicates that prey availability has a fundamental influence on dietary composition. Highly specialised species such as C. trifascialis will be highly vulnerable to coral loss as they appear to be largely inflexible in their dietary composition. However, the increased feeding plasticity observed here for C. trifascialis suggests this species may

  15. Achieving clinical nurse specialist competencies and outcomes through interdisciplinary education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sievers, Beth; Wolf, Sherry

    2006-01-01

    Without formal education, many healthcare professionals fail to develop interdisciplinary team skills; however, when students are socialized to interdisciplinary practice through academic clinical learning experiences, effective collaboration skills can be developed. Increasingly, educational environments are challenged to include clinical experiences for students that teach and model interdisciplinary collaboration. The purpose of this quality improvement initiative was to create an interdisciplinary educational experience for clinical nurse specialist (CNS) students and postgraduate physicians. The interdisciplinary learning experience, supported by an educational grant, provided an interdisciplinary cohort of learners an opportunity to engage in a clinically focused learning experience. The interdisciplinary cohort consisted of CNS students and physicians in various stages of postgraduate training. The clinical experience selected was a quality improvement initiative in which the students were introduced to the concepts and tools of quality improvement. During this 1-month clinical experience, students applied the new skills by implementing a quality improvement project focusing on medication reconciliation in the outpatient setting. The CNS core competencies and outcomes were used to shape the experience for the CNS students. The CNS students exhibited 5 of the 7 essential characteristics of the CNS (leadership, collaboration, consultation skills, ethical conduct, and professional attributes) while demonstrating competencies and fulfilling performance expectations. During this learning experience, the CNS students focused on competencies and outcomes in the organizational sphere of influence. Multiple facilitating factors and barriers were identified. This interdisciplinary clinical experience in a quality improvement initiative provided valuable opportunities for CNS students to develop essential CNS characteristics and to explore practice competencies in the

  16. The Specialist Court for Kosovo: continuity or departure from the hybrid courts model?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shkёlzen Selimi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The issue of whether to establish Specialist Chambers within the Kosovo justice system for alleged war crimes committed in Kosovo has been, arguably, one of the most heated debates not only from a political and social point of view, but also from a legal one. While the required amendments in the Constitution and several laws of Kosovo necessary to establish the Specialist Chambers in furtherance of the agreement dated 14 April 2014 between the Republic of Kosovo and the European Union on the Mission of the European Union Rule of Law Mission in Kosovo (“EULEX” will certainly create heated debates in the political level, one may argue that the legal issues that are expected to be encountered when the Specialist Chambers will be operational, may be even more pressing. This is in consideration of the peculiar nature of the Specialist Chambers, which are meant to have their basis within the laws of Kosovo, but at the same time, be independent from them and from control of Kosovo authorities. The purpose of this article is to delineate the possible legal issues that might confront the Specialist Chambers of Kosovo. Its main argument is that, while the Specialist Chambers seem to follow the experience of other hybrid internationalised courts, it still differs from them in some aspects. The challenges that the new Specialist Chambers may need to tackle deal with its jurisdiction and position within the Kosovo Judicial system, and its legitimacy and legal basis.

  17. Few older people in New Zealand who commit suicide receive specialist psychogeriatric services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Gary; Casey, Jane

    2014-08-01

    Suicide in older people is a growing public health concern in many parts of the world. The literature on this issue is lacking in New Zealand. The aim of this study is to ascertain whether this group is accessing specialist psychogeriatric services. A retrospective case series study of completed suicides in older people (≥65 years) during a three-year period from January 2010 to December 2012 was performed. An online survey detailing demographic and clinical information was completed by psychiatrists in 15 of the 20 District Health Boards in New Zealand. Only about 15% of older people who committed suicide were accessing specialist psychogeriatric services and the group with the highest suicide rate (men≥85 years) did not feature in specialist services. Depression (61%) was the most common diagnosis and nearly half (35%) had had contact with specialist services within three days prior to the suicide. Over half (52%) had a history of past suicide attempt(s). Older people who complete suicide are infrequently accessing specialist services. In those that do, there are questions to be answered regarding suicide prediction and prevention for this high-risk group of vulnerable individuals. More research is required targeting those not accessing specialist services, in particular the high risk group of older men. The role of general practitioner, community care, the assessment and management of depression and whether there is any access issue to specialist psychogeriatric services require elucidation. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2014.

  18. Impact of specialist palliative care on coping with Parkinson's disease: patients and carers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badger, Nathan J; Frizelle, Dorothy; Adams, Debi; Johnson, Miriam J

    2018-01-09

    UK guidelines recommend palliative care access for people with Parkinson's disease; however, this remains sporadic, and it is unknown whether specialist palliative care helps patients and carers cope with this distressing condition. This study aimed to explore whether, and how, access to specialist palliative care services affected patients' and carers' coping with Parkinson's disease. Semistructured interviews were conducted, audio-recorded and verbatim transcribed. Data were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Participants were patients with advanced idiopathic Parkinson's disease (n=3), and carers of people with Parkinson's disease (n=5, however, one diagnosis was reviewed) receiving care from an integrated specialist palliative care and Parkinson's disease service in North East England. Access to specialist palliative care helped participants cope with some aspects of advanced Parkinson's disease. Three superordinate themes were developed:' managing uncertainty', 'impacts on the self' and 'specialist palliative care maintaining a positive outlook'. Specialist palliative care helped patients and carers cope with advanced Parkinson's disease. Specialist palliative care is a complex intervention that acknowledges the complex and holistic nature of Parkinson's disease, enabling health in some domains despite continued presence of pathology. These exploratory findings support the utility of this approach for people living with Parkinson's disease. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  19. Inequalities in utilisation of general practitioner and specialist services in 9 European countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mielck Andreas

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study is to describe the magnitude of educational inequalities in utilisation of general practitioner (GP and specialist services in 9 European countries. In addition to West European countries, we have included 3 Eastern European countries: Hungary, Estonia and Latvia. To cover the gap in knowledge we pay a special attention to the magnitude of inequalities among patients with chronic conditions. Methods Data on the use of GP and specialist services were derived from national health surveys of Belgium, Estonia, France, Germany, Hungary, Ireland, Latvia, the Netherlands and Norway. For each country and education level we calculated the absolute prevalence and relative inequalities in utilisation of GP and specialist services. In order to account for the need for care, the results were adjusted by the measure of self-assessed health. Results People with lower education used GP services equally often in most countries (except Belgium and Germany compared with those with a higher level of education. At the same time people with a higher education used specialist care services significantly more often in all countries, except in the Netherlands. The general pattern of educational inequalities in utilisation of specialist care was similar for both men and women. Inequalities in utilisation of specialist care were equally large in Eastern European and in Western European countries, except for Latvia where the inequalities were somewhat larger. Similarly, large inequalities were found in the utilisation of specialist care among patients with chronic diseases, diabetes, and hypertension. Conclusions We found large inequalities in the utilisation of specialist care. These inequalities were not compensated by utilisation of GP services. Of particular concern is the presence of inequalities among patients with a high need for specialist care, such as those with chronic diseases.

  20. Inequalities in utilisation of general practitioner and specialist services in 9 European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirbu, Irina; Kunst, Anton E; Mielck, Andreas; Mackenbach, Johan P

    2011-10-31

    The aim of this study is to describe the magnitude of educational inequalities in utilisation of general practitioner (GP) and specialist services in 9 European countries. In addition to West European countries, we have included 3 Eastern European countries: Hungary, Estonia and Latvia. To cover the gap in knowledge we pay a special attention to the magnitude of inequalities among patients with chronic conditions. Data on the use of GP and specialist services were derived from national health surveys of Belgium, Estonia, France, Germany, Hungary, Ireland, Latvia, the Netherlands and Norway. For each country and education level we calculated the absolute prevalence and relative inequalities in utilisation of GP and specialist services. In order to account for the need for care, the results were adjusted by the measure of self-assessed health. People with lower education used GP services equally often in most countries (except Belgium and Germany) compared with those with a higher level of education. At the same time people with a higher education used specialist care services significantly more often in all countries, except in the Netherlands. The general pattern of educational inequalities in utilisation of specialist care was similar for both men and women. Inequalities in utilisation of specialist care were equally large in Eastern European and in Western European countries, except for Latvia where the inequalities were somewhat larger. Similarly, large inequalities were found in the utilisation of specialist care among patients with chronic diseases, diabetes, and hypertension. We found large inequalities in the utilisation of specialist care. These inequalities were not compensated by utilisation of GP services. Of particular concern is the presence of inequalities among patients with a high need for specialist care, such as those with chronic diseases. © 2011 Stirbu et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  1. Mixed connective tissue disease: The King Faisal Specialist Hospital experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Rayes, H.; Al-Sheikh, A.; Al-Dalaan, A.; Al-Saleh, S.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the clinical presentation, complications and serological analysis of mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre (KFSHRC), and to determine the long-term clinical and immunologic outcomes. This was a retrospective study with prospective follow-up of 18 patients with MCTD who were followed at KFSHRC between 1982 and 1999. The age at onset of the disease ranged from 6 to 44 years, with mean age of 17.9 years. The female to male ratio was 2.5:1 and the mean follow-up time was 5 years. The most frequent presenting symptoms were arthralgia in all patients, Raynaud's phenomenon in 16 patients (88%) and swollen hands in 11 patients (61%). Arthritis was seen in 12 patients in (67%) and definite myositis in 10 patients (58%). The most common skin rashes encountered included lupus-like rash in 8 patients (44%) and cutaneous vasculitis in 5 patients (28%). Pulmonary hypertension occurred in 4 patients (22%). Other clinical manifestations encountered were esophageal hypomotility in 10 patients (56%), myocarditis in 2 patients (11%) and proteinurea in 2 patients (11%), while various neurological manifestations were present in 7 patients (39%). All patients exhibited higher titer of ANA and anti-nRNP antibodies. Five of the 18 patients (28%) had marked reduction in the anti-nRNP during remission. Following treatment, features of inflammation as well as Raynaud's phenomenon and esophageal hypomotility diminished, while pulmonary hypertension persisted. A favorable outcome was observed in 12 patients (67%), 3 patients (17%) had continued active disease, while 3 patients (17%) died, with death related to pulmonary hypertension occurring in 2 patients (11%). The studied patients demonstrated the typical clinical and serological findings of MCTD, which support the correlation between anti-nRNP antibody specificities and MCTD. Autoantibody reactivity against nRNP polypeptides tends to regress during

  2. The effectiveness of a computer-assisted instruction programme on communication skills of medical specialists in oncology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulsman, Robert L.; Ros, Wynand J. G.; Winnubst, Jacques A. M.; Bensing, Jozien M.

    2002-01-01

    Background Although doctor-patient communication is important in health care, medical specialists are generally not well trained in communication skills. Conventional training programmes are generally time consuming and hard to fit into busy working schedules of medical specialists. A

  3. The management of chronic pain in Switzerland: a comparative survey of Swiss medical specialists treating chronic pain.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilder-Smith, O.H.G.; Mohrle, J.J.; Dolin, P.J.; Martin, N.C.

    2001-01-01

    Chronic pain management by Swiss specialist physicians with the primary hypothesis that pain clinic practitioners conform better to good practice (interdisciplinarity, diagnostic/therapeutic routines, quality control, education) than other specialists treating chronic pain was surveyed. Management

  4. 'On the doctor's orders': A pilot study of the effects of website marketing for medical specialist providers under gatekeeping arrangements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwier, S.

    2017-01-01

    Websites from medical specialist providers are becoming increasingly marketing oriented, but there exists a paucity of empirical research on the effects. This experimental study explored effects of exposure to real websites from medical specialist providers among Dutch adults under physician

  5. Think Stoma Nurse: a tool to trigger referral to specialist care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Judy; Adams, Jane

    This article describes the initial development and subsequent evolution of a simple referral assessment tool for stoma care. The first author's personal experience identified that there was widespread inconsistency in perceptions of local multidisciplinary teams as to when it was appropriate to refer to specific specialist nursing teams. This resulted in both inappropriate and delayed referrals. A 'Think Specialist Nurse' initiative was developed across the author's trust, building on the traffic light template from the 'ThinkGlucose' tool, to facilitate referrals to clinical nurse specialists. The stoma-care specific tool, 'Think Stoma Nurse', has subsequently evolved beyond its initial audience, and has been adapted into materials aimed at patients and carers.

  6. Art Appreciation as a Learned Competence: A Museum-based Qualitative Study of Adult Art Specialist and Art Non-Specialist Visitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajka Bračun Sova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Since Bourdieu, it has been argued that art appreciation requires “knowledge”. The focus of this qualitative study was to examine art appreciation as a learned competence by exploring two different groups of museum visitors: art specialists and art non-specialists. The research was conducted at Moderna galerija in Ljubljana. Twenty-three adults were recruited and accompanied during their visit to the museum. Participants were requested to “think out loud”, which meant to talk about what they saw, thought, and felt about the artworks. There was a short interview conducted with each participant before entering the museum to gain insight into their art-related and museum-visiting experience. The analysis of the data revealed that some processes of art appreciation were similar within the two groups. Both art specialists and art non-specialists interact with museum objects physically and intellectually; they see contents and formal qualities as a whole; they respond emotionally to artworks; appreciation includes their personal experience; they search museum interpretation/information for their understanding. Some noticeable differences were found. Art specialists respond to artworks with more understanding and are willing to put more effort into art appreciation, whereas art non-specialists respond with less understanding and put less effort into art appreciation. This paper focuses on the differences between the two groups; reflective and spontaneous appreciation of art, objective and subjective appreciation of art and the effort put into art appreciation. The paper ends with a discussion of the implications of the study for the teaching of art and museum education.

  7. {delta}{sup 13}C in Tibetan juniper trees - climate trends through the past 1600 years; {delta}{sup 13}C in tibetischen Wacholdern - Klimaentwicklung der letzten 1600 Jahre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmermann, B.

    1998-09-01

    A {delta}{sup 13}C{sub Zell}-chronology of juniper tree cellulose from the upper treeline covering the last 1600 years was set up. The tree site is situated close to Qamdo in southeast Tibet at an altitude of 4350 m a.s.l. The southwest slope gets rain during the Indian summer monsoon. Ten trees have been sampled either by coring or by cutting of trunc-sections in pentad sampling interval. Three trees were analysed in two different radial directions. The very positive {delta}{sup 13}C{sub Zell}-data generally varying around -18,75 permille show the typical low fractionation of high mountain plants. Different interpretations are suggested for data before and after 1800 A.D. (orig.) [Deutsch] An Zellulose von Wacholdern der oberen Waldgrenze in Suedost-Tibet wurde eine 1600-jaehrige {delta}{sup 13}C{sub Zell}-Chronologie aufgestellt. Der Standort liegt in 4350 m ue.M. in der Naehe von Qamdo, ist nach Suedwest geneigt und erhaelt Niederschlaege in den Sommermonaten durch den Indischen-Suedwest-Monsun. Zehn Baeume wurden anhand von Kernen und Stammscheiben in Abschnitten von fuenf Jahren beprobt. An drei Baeumen konnten zwei Segmente desselben Baumes untersucht werden. Die im Mittel sehr positiven {delta}{sup 13}C{sub Zell}-Daten um -18,75 permille deuten auf eine fuer Hochgebirgspflanzen typische geringere Fraktionierung hin. Unterschiedliche Interpretationswege werden fuer die Daten vor und nach 1800 verfolgt. (orig.)

  8. Improving School Improvement: Development and Validation of the CSIS-360, a 360-Degree Feedback Assessment for School Improvement Specialists

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougall, Christie M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the mixed methods study was to develop and validate the CSIS-360, a 360-degree feedback assessment to measure competencies of school improvement specialists from multiple perspectives. The study consisted of eight practicing school improvement specialists from a variety of settings. The specialists nominated 23 constituents to…

  9. 38 CFR 17.142 - Authority to approve sharing agreements, contracts for scarce medical specialist services and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... sharing agreements, contracts for scarce medical specialist services and contracts for other medical... medical specialist services and contracts for other medical services. The Under Secretary for Health is... specialist services at Department of Veterans Affairs health care facilities (including, but not limited to...

  10. Information technologies and software packages for education of specialists in materials science [In Russian

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krzhizhanovskaya, V.; Ryaboshuk, S.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents methodological materials, interactive text-books and software packages developed and extensively used for education of specialists in materials science. These virtual laboratories for education and research are equipped with tutorials and software environment for modeling complex

  11. About a competence and professional trade of specialists in the field of physical culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.I. Sobyanin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Correlation of concepts «competence» and «professional trade» is examined. More than 200 sources are studied. The necessity of account for training of athletic personnels of professional fitness and value of professional trade becomes firmly established as to the ultimate goal of forming of specialist in the field of physical culture. Negative tendencies are exposed in maintenance of preparation of specialists and higher professional athletic education in the higher institutes. Culturological and acmeological approach is offered for further strategy of perfection of professional pedagogical preparation of specialists. The stages of forming of specialist are presented on the basis of application of this approach. A necessity is marked at training of personnels oriented on the exposure of features of professional fitness of young people to the professions in the field of physical culture, its initial state and dynamics.

  12. [What is parents' and medical health care specialists knowledge about vaccinations?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarczoń, Izabela; Domaradzka, Ewa; Czajka, Hanna

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to become familiar with parents' and Medical Health Care specialists knowledge and attitude towards vaccinations. The influence of information, provided to patients from various sources, on general opinion about immunization and its coverage within the last year were evaluated. Analysis of questionnaires about vaccinations performed among 151 parents and 180 Medical Health Care specialists. Medical Health Care specialists knowledge was considerably higher in comparison to questioned parents. Surprisingly enough, only approximately 90% of Medical Health Care workers knew about prophylaxis of Hib infections. A doctor is the main and the most reliable source of information for parents. Significant impact on parents' attitude to vaccinations is made not only by campaigns promoting vaccinations, but also by widespread opinions about their harmfulness. The doctor is the major source of reliable information about vaccinations for parents. Therefore, there is the need of continuous improvement of Medical Health Care specialists knowledge, but also the ability of successfully communicating it to parents.

  13. Specialist bees collect Asteraceae pollen by distinctive abdominal drumming (Osmia) or tapping (Melissodes, Svastra)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Four species of western US Osmia (Cephalosmia) bees that are Asteraceae specialists (oligoleges) were observed to employ a heretofore unappreciated, stereotypical means of collecting pollen, abdominal drumming, to gather pollen from 19 flowering species representing nine tribes of Asteraceae. Abdom...

  14. Survey of medical specialists on their attitudes to and resources for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-06-15

    Jun 15, 2011 ... protected research time for Nigerian medical specialists in order to boost their research function. Keywords: .... to assess comprehension and feasibility. As a part of a ..... Bridging the gap between outputs of clinical research ...

  15. E-Everything and the School Library Media Specialist: Grist for the Mill (Part 2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Daniel D.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses electronic books and the need for school library media specialists to merge information literacy and library skills with technology skills. Highlights include advancing technology for electronic books; helpful Web sites, including Project Gutenburg; and reader software. (LRW)

  16. EPA's Review of DOE's Inventory Tracking for TRU Wastes at Waste Control Specialists

    Science.gov (United States)

    On April 9, 2014, EPA's Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) waste characterization team visited Waste Control Specialists (WCS) to determine whether DOE was meeting EPA's waste inventory tracking requirements at 40 CFR 194.24(c)(4).

  17. Agreement of glaucoma specialists and experienced optometrists in gonioscopy and optic disc evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Addepalli U. Kumar

    2013-10-01

    Conclusion: Agreement between optometrists and glaucoma specialists, in diagnostic performance of gonioscopy and optic assessment was excellent with high sensitivity and specificity. Hence, we conclude that the experienced optometrists can detect glaucoma accurately in the LVPEI-GLEAMS.

  18. Making Self-Confidence and Communication Skills Work for the Media Specialist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Roberta M.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the importance of incorporating technical and human relation skills to be a successful and productive media specialist, and offers guidelines for developing communication skills and self-esteem. (CLB)

  19. Articulating the Role of the Development Specialist in Large Organisational Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Dell

    1997-01-01

    Workplace educators play a more holistic role of development specialists who plan, implement, and manage human resource development. This role requires skills in communication, employee relations, program development, change agency, and budget management. (SK)

  20. Proceedings of a specialists' meeting on neutron activation cross sections for fission and fusion energy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, M.; Vonach, H.

    1990-01-01

    These proceedings of a specialists' meeting on neutron activation cross sections for fission and fusion energy applications are divided into 4 sessions bearing on: - data needs: 4 conferences - experimental work: 11 conferences - theoretical work: 4 conferences - evaluation work: 5 conferences

  1. The role and organisation of community palliative specialist nursing teams in rural England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leadbeater, Maria; Staton, Wendy

    2014-11-01

    This article describes a study that used a qualitative approach, purposive sampling and semi-structured telephone interviews conducted with specialist palliative care nurses from six rural community teams in England. The study investigated how services were organised and the issues of delivering specialist palliative nursing care in a rural area. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse the data. The findings showed many similarities in that the majority of patients in rural areas were not accessing hospice services and there was a greater reliance on care at home. However, the challenges in delivering care ranged from managing patient expectations, geographical distance, lack of technology to support remote working and education for the specialist palliative care teams. The study makes specific recommendations for rural community specialist palliative care teams.

  2. Screening Air Traffic Control Specialists for Psychopathology Using the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    King, Raymond E; Schroeder, David J; Manning, Carol A; Retzlaff, Paul D; Williams, Clara A

    2008-01-01

    ...) as a psychological screening tool for conditionally selected FAA Air Traffic Control Specialists (ATCSs). A sample of 1,014 ATCSs in training voluntarily completed the MMPI-2 as part of a research program...

  3. Self-perceived readiness to perform at the attending level following surgical specialist training in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Rasmus; Sillesen, Martin; Hansen, Morten Sejer

    2017-01-01

    not previously been studied. In the present study, we aim to investigate the role of supervision in the national surgical residency programme and the self-perceived readiness to undertake the role of a specialist doctor in gastrointestinal surgery in a cohort of gastrointestinal surgeons graduating in 2012......: A total of 30 graduated residents (55%) responded to the Danish survey. Among those, 14 (47%) felt ready to be a specialist in surgery. A total of 25 (83%) answered that increased supervision would have increased their selfperceived competencies to serve as a surgical specialist. Self -perceived readiness...... was significantly associated with level of supervision during surgical training (p = 0.02), whereas no association with operative volume could be established. CONCLUSIONS: A worryingly high number of graduates did not feel ready to undertake their role as a gastrointestinal surgical specialist. Adequate supervision...

  4. According to Lenin's Design: Socialist Reforms in Agriculture and the Training of Specialists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagaidachnaia, Z. A.

    1971-01-01

    The use of agricultural specialists with leadership training from the social sciences was a key program in the socialization of the rural population in communist ideology and in the advancement of agricultural production. (MB)

  5. Contracting in specialists for emergency obstetric care- does it work in rural India?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randive Bharat

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Contracting in private sector is promoted in developing countries facing human resources shortages as a challenge to reduce maternal mortality. This study explored provision, practice, performance, barriers to execution and views about contracting in specialists for emergency obstetric care (EmOC in rural India. Methods Facility survey was conducted in all secondary and tertiary public health facilities (44 in three heterogeneous districts in Maharashtra state of India. Interviews (42 were conducted with programme managers and district and block level officials and with public and private EmOC specialists. Locations of private obstetricians in the study districts were identified and mapped. Results Two schemes, namely Janani Suraksha Yojana and Indian Public Health standards (IPHS provided for contracting in EmOC specialists. The IPHS provision was chosen for use mainly due to greater sum for contracting in (US $ 30/service episode vs.300 US$/month. The positions of EmOC specialists were vacant in 83% of all facilities that hence had a potential for contracting in EmOC specialists. Private specialists were contracted in at 20% such facilities. The contracting in of specialists did not greatly increase EmOC service outputs at facilities, except in facilities with determined leadership. Contracting in specialists was useful for non emergency conditions, but not for obstetric emergencies. The contracts were more of a relational nature with poor monitoring structures. Inadequate infrastructure, longer distance to private specialists, insufficient financial provision for contracting in, and poor management capacities were barriers to effective implementation of contracting in. Dependency on the private sector was a concern among public partners while the private partners viewed contracting in as an opportunity to gain experience and credibility. Conclusions Density and geographic distribution of private specialists are important

  6. Contracting in specialists for emergency obstetric care- does it work in rural India?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randive, Bharat; Chaturvedi, Sarika; Mistry, Nerges

    2012-12-31

    Contracting in private sector is promoted in developing countries facing human resources shortages as a challenge to reduce maternal mortality. This study explored provision, practice, performance, barriers to execution and views about contracting in specialists for emergency obstetric care (EmOC) in rural India. Facility survey was conducted in all secondary and tertiary public health facilities (44) in three heterogeneous districts in Maharashtra state of India. Interviews (42) were conducted with programme managers and district and block level officials and with public and private EmOC specialists. Locations of private obstetricians in the study districts were identified and mapped. Two schemes, namely Janani Suraksha Yojana and Indian Public Health standards (IPHS) provided for contracting in EmOC specialists. The IPHS provision was chosen for use mainly due to greater sum for contracting in (US $ 30/service episode vs.300 US$/month). The positions of EmOC specialists were vacant in 83% of all facilities that hence had a potential for contracting in EmOC specialists. Private specialists were contracted in at 20% such facilities. The contracting in of specialists did not greatly increase EmOC service outputs at facilities, except in facilities with determined leadership. Contracting in specialists was useful for non emergency conditions, but not for obstetric emergencies. The contracts were more of a relational nature with poor monitoring structures. Inadequate infrastructure, longer distance to private specialists, insufficient financial provision for contracting in, and poor management capacities were barriers to effective implementation of contracting in. Dependency on the private sector was a concern among public partners while the private partners viewed contracting in as an opportunity to gain experience and credibility. Density and geographic distribution of private specialists are important influencing factors in determining feasibility and use of

  7. The role of specialist nurses in multiple sclerosis: a rapid and systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Broe, S; Christopher, F; Waugh, N

    2001-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease of the central nervous system. The cause is unknown. There are about 80-160 people with MS per 100,000 population, with twice as many women affected as men. The management of individuals with MS includes treatment of acute relapses and chronic symptoms. The care of MS patients is provided by various healthcare professionals, such as general practitioners (GPs), neurologists, physiotherapists, occupational therapists and nurses. Some MS patients have access to an MS specialist nurse, although this provision varies geographically. The aim of this report is to assess the effectiveness and relative cost-effectiveness of MS specialist nurses in improving care and outcomes for patients with MS. A systematic review of the literature, involving a range of databases, was performed. Full details are described in the main report. Only one study was identified that tried to evaluate the benefit of MS specialist nurses. The study concluded that MS patients and their carers found the MS specialist nurse to be helpful, particularly in improving their knowledge of MS, ability to cope, mood and confidence about the future. GPs also reported finding the nurse to be helpful with their MS patients, and 40% of the GPs stated they would purchase the services of an MS specialist nurse if their practices became fundholding. However, there were considerable methodological weaknesses inherent in the study design, and it was unclear whether the results of the study could be extrapolated to other settings or to other MS patient groups. RESULTS - ONGOING RESEARCH: There are two ongoing research studies regarding MS specialist nurses. One of these studies involves the provision of MS nurses to several areas, but also has two control populations to allow evaluation of the health benefits of the nurses to MS patients and their carers. This study will help to fill the evidence gap. RESULTS - COSTS: The costs of providing MS specialist nurses consist of their

  8. Part-time and full-time medical specialists, are there differences in allocation of time?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Groenewegen Peter P

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An increasing number of medical specialists prefer to work part-time. This development can be found worldwide. Problems to be faced in the realization of part-time work in medicine include the division of night and weekend shifts, as well as communication between physicians and continuity of care. People tend to think that physicians working part-time are less devoted to their work, implying that full-time physicians complete a greater number of tasks. The central question in this article is whether part-time medical specialists allocate their time differently to their tasks than full-time medical specialists. Methods A questionnaire was sent by mail to all internists (N = 817, surgeons (N = 693 and radiologists (N = 621 working in general hospitals in the Netherlands. Questions were asked about the actual situation, such as hours worked and night and weekend shifts. The response was 53% (n = 411 for internists, 52% (n = 359 for surgeons, and 36% (n = 213 for radiologists. Due to non-response on specific questions there were 367 internists, 316 surgeons, and 71 radiologists included in the analyses. Multilevel analyses were used to analyze the data. Results Part-time medical specialists do not spend proportionally more time on direct patient care. With respect to night and weekend shifts, part-time medical specialists account for proportionally more or an equal share of these shifts. The number of hours worked per FTE is higher for part-time than for full-time medical specialists, although this difference is only significant for surgeons. Conclusion In general, part-time medical specialists do their share of the job. However, we focussed on input only. Besides input, output like the numbers of services provided deserves attention as well. The trend in medicine towards more part-time work has an important consequence: more medical specialists are needed to get the work done. Therefore, a greater number of medical specialists

  9. IAEA specialists' meeting on seismic isolation technology. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the Meeting on Seismic Isolation Technology was to provide a forum for review and discussion of seismic isolation technology applicable to thermal and fast reactors. The meeting was conducted consistent with the recommendations of the IAEA Working Group Meeting on Fast Breeder Reactor-Block Antiseismic Design and Verification in October 1987, to augment a coordinated research program with specific recommendations and an assessment of technology in the area of seismic isolation. Seismic isolation has become an attractive means for mitigating the consequences of severe earthquakes. Although the general idea of seismic isolation has been considered since the turn of the century, real practical applications have evolved, at an accelerating pace, over the last fifteen years aided by several key developments: (1) recent advances in hardware developments in the form of reliable elastomer bearings, (2) development of reliable analytical methods for the prediction of dynamic responses of structures (3) construction of large bearing test machines and large shake tables to simulate earthquake effects on structures for validation analytical models and demonstration of performance characteristics, and (4) advances in seismological engineering. Although the applications and developments of seismic isolation technology have mainly benefited commercial facilities and structures, including office buildings, research laboratories, hospitals, museums, bridges, ship loaders, etc., several seismically isolated nuclear facilities were implemented: the four 900 MWe pressurized water reactor units of the Cruas plant in France, the two Framatome units in Koeberg, South Africa, a nuclear waste storage facility in France and a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant in England. The scope of this specialists' meeting was to review the state-of-the-art technology related to the performance of seismic isolator elements and systems, performance limits and margins, criteria for the

  10. IAEA specialists' meeting on seismic isolation technology. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-07-01

    The objective of the Meeting on Seismic Isolation Technology was to provide a forum for review and discussion of seismic isolation technology applicable to thermal and fast reactors. The meeting was conducted consistent with the recommendations of the IAEA Working Group Meeting on Fast Breeder Reactor-Block Antiseismic Design and Verification in October 1987, to augment a coordinated research program with specific recommendations and an assessment of technology in the area of seismic isolation. Seismic isolation has become an attractive means for mitigating the consequences of severe earthquakes. Although the general idea of seismic isolation has been considered since the turn of the century, real practical applications have evolved, at an accelerating pace, over the last fifteen years aided by several key developments: (1) recent advances in hardware developments in the form of reliable elastomer bearings, (2) development of reliable analytical methods for the prediction of dynamic responses of structures (3) construction of large bearing test machines and large shake tables to simulate earthquake effects on structures for validation analytical models and demonstration of performance characteristics, and (4) advances in seismological engineering. Although the applications and developments of seismic isolation technology have mainly benefited commercial facilities and structures, including office buildings, research laboratories, hospitals, museums, bridges, ship loaders, etc., several seismically isolated nuclear facilities were implemented: the four 900 MWe pressurized water reactor units of the Cruas plant in France, the two Framatome units in Koeberg, South Africa, a nuclear waste storage facility in France and a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant in England. The scope of this specialists' meeting was to review the state-of-the-art technology related to the performance of seismic isolator elements and systems, performance limits and margins, criteria for the

  11. Impact of a Clinical Pharmacy Specialist in an Emergency Department for Seniors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Paul B; Delate, Thomas; Lyman, Alfred; Adams, Jody; Kreutz, Heather; Sanchez, Julia K; Dowd, Mary Beth; Gozansky, Wendolyn

    2016-02-01

    This study assesses outcomes associated with the implementation of an emergency department (ED) for seniors in which a clinical pharmacy specialist, with specialized geriatric training that included medication management training, is a key member of the ED care team. This was a retrospective cohort analysis of patients aged 65 years or older who presented at an ED between November 1, 2012, and May 31, 2013. Three groups of seniors were assessed: treated by the clinical pharmacy specialist in the ED for seniors, treated in the ED for seniors but not by the clinical pharmacy specialist, and not treated in the ED for seniors. Outcomes included rates of an ED return visit, mortality and hospital admissions, and follow-up total health care costs. Multivariable regression modeling was used to adjust for any potential confounders in the associations between groups and outcomes. A total of 4,103 patients were included, with 872 (21%) treated in the ED for seniors and 342 (39%) of these treated by the clinical pharmacy specialist. Groups were well matched overall in patient characteristics. Patients who received medication review and management by the clinical pharmacy specialist did not experience a reduction in ED return visits, mortality, cost of follow-up care, or hospital admissions compared with the other groups. Of the patients treated by the clinical pharmacy specialist, 154 (45.0%) were identified as having at least 1 medication-related problem. Although at least 1 medication-related problem was identified in almost half of patients treated by the clinical pharmacy specialist in the ED for seniors, incorporation of a clinical pharmacy specialist into the ED staff did not improve clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2015 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Use of dependency and prioritization tools by clinical nurse specialists in palliative care: an exploratory study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bracken, Mairéad

    2011-12-01

    The principal aim was to assess the utility of three needs assessment\\/dependency tools for use in community-based palliative care services. Specific objectives were to assess a sample of patients receiving specialist palliative care community nursing using these tools, to assess the predictive ability of each tool, and to explore the utility of prioritizing and measuring patient dependency from a clinical nurse specialist (CNS) perspective.

  13. Specialist services for older people : issues of negative and positive ageism

    OpenAIRE

    Reed, Jan; Cook, Glenda; Cook, Margaret; Inglis, Pamela; Clarke, Charlotte

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports findings of a study in 2004 of the development of specialist services for older people in the National Health Service (NHS) in England, as recommended in the Department of Health's National Service Framework for Older People (NSF-OP). The study was funded by the Department of Health as part of a programme of research to explore the Framework's implementation. Information was collected through a questionnaire survey about the nature of specialist developments at three levels...

  14. The marketer-a complex specialist, a man of concept, decision and action

    OpenAIRE

    Pop, Nicolae Al.; Vlădoi, Anca-Daniela

    2009-01-01

    Over the last fifty years, the theory and practice of contemporary marketing have been influenced by the focus of its applicative approach over a major landmark of the business world. A short characterization of its different orientations, from consumer oriented marketing to holistic marketing, can only lead to the conclusion regarding the formative complexity of the specialist working in this field. The profile of this specialist is to be understood in such a manner as to have a competitive ...

  15. Data organisation & description - presentation. RDM Support basic training course for information specialists session 4

    OpenAIRE

    Selm, Mariette van

    2015-01-01

    Presentation for session 4 of RDM Support. RDM Support is a basic training course in research data management (support) for information specialists. The training course was developed by Mariëtte van Selm for the information specialists of the Library of the University of Amsterdam (UvA), within the framework of the RDM Support project (2013-2015). The training course was held from January to April 2014.

  16. Theoretical Aspects of the Building Professional Competences of the Hospitality Industry Specialists

    OpenAIRE

    Silicka, Inese; Ļubkina, Velta

    2015-01-01

    The theoretical aspects of the concept of the professional competences of future hospitality industry specialists are examined and analysed in the paper. The study is carried out within the framework of development of the doctoral thesis “Interrelation of the professional competence theories and the practice in the hospitality industry”. The components and constituent elements of the professional competences of the hospitality industry specialists are defined in the research; the concepts “pr...

  17. STS-35 payload specialists perform balancing act on OV-102's middeck

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Aided by the microgravity environment aboard Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, STS-35 Payload Specialist Ronald A. Parise balances Payload Specialist Samuel T. Durrance on his index finger in front of the middeck starboard wall. Durrance is wearing a blood pressure cuff and is holding a beverage container and food package during the microgravity performance. The waste management compartment (WMC), side hatch, and orbiter galley are seen behind the two crewmembers. Durrance's feet are at the forward lockers.

  18. Development of the Role Scenario of the Personnel Management Specialist Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Stolyaruk Khrystyna S.

    2013-01-01

    The article is devoted of the issues of development of classification and content of role, which are performed by personnel management specialists in their professional activity. It proves a necessity of development of role scenarios under conditions of application of the competence approach in training and practical activity. Thus, the author offers five key roles in activity of a personnel management specialist, which reflect different vectors of directions of the scenario of professional a...

  19. Motives that head and neck cancer patients have for contacting a specialist nurse - an empirical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salander, Pär; Isaksson, Joakim; Granström, Brith; Laurell, Göran

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to systematically explore the motives for patients with head and neck cancer to contact a specialist nurse during two years postdiagnosis. Research focusing on the role of specialist nurses in cancer care almost exclusively concern cancers other than head and neck cancer. Qualitative, descriptive study based on the contacts between patients with head and neck cancer and a specialist nurse. Patients were invited to contact a specialist nurse by telephone. The specialist nurse took systematic field notes, that is, she registered who contacted her, the nature of the call and the outcome. Sixty patients were included. In descending order, the motives for contact were questions about practical and uncomplicated matters, consultations about medical troubles/worries, presenting a report of the patient's situation, requests for additional information about the treatment plan and requests for medical information. The pattern of the patients' motivations for calling was not related to medical or social factors, suggesting that the initiative to make contact is very much a question of the complexity of individual life circumstances. Very few referrals were sent from the specialist nurse to other professionals. The specialist nurse turned out to be more than just a coordinator of health-care resources. The findings bring up questions about the potential of the nurse's function as a coordinator, but also as a potential attachment figure, and questions about the nurse's relationships to other professionals. When implementing a specialist nurse function, it is important to decide whether the function should be inspired by a broader relational perspective. In addition to the indispensible competence and experience in the clinical field of head and neck cancer, training in counselling and acquaintance with object-relational psychology will then be desirable. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Sources of satisfaction and dissatisfaction among specialists within the public and private health sectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Toni; Brown, Paul; Sopina, Elizaveta; Cameron, Linda; Tenbensel, Timothy; Windsor, John

    2013-09-27

    As in many countries, medical and surgical specialists in New Zealand have the opportunity of working in the public sector, the private sector or both. This study aimed to explore the level and sources of satisfaction and dissatisfaction of specialists in New Zealand with working in the two sectors. Such information can assist workforce planning, management and policy and may inform the wider debate about the relationship between the two sectors. A postal survey was conducted of 1983 registered specialists throughout New Zealand. Respondents were asked to assess 14 sources of satisfaction and 9 sources of dissatisfaction according to a 5-point Likert scale. Means and standard deviations were calculated for the total sample, and for procedural and non-procedural specialties. Differences between the means of each source of satisfaction and dissatisfaction were also calculated. Completed surveys were received from 943 specialists (47% response rate). Overall mean levels of satisfaction were higher in the private sector than the public sector while levels of dissatisfaction were lower. While the public system is valued for its opportunities for further education and professional development, key sources of dissatisfaction are workload pressures, mentally demanding work and managerial interference. In the private sector specialists value the opportunity to work independently and apply their own ideas in the workplace. Sources of job satisfaction and dissatisfaction amongst specialists are different for the public and private sectors. Allowing specialists more freedom to work independently and to apply their own ideas in the workplace may enhance recruitment and retention of specialists in the public health system.

  1. Asthma management in a specialist setting: Results of an Italian Respiratory Society survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braido, Fulvio; Baiardini, Ilaria; Alleri, Pietro; Bacci, Elena; Barbetta, Carlo; Bellocchia, Michela; Benfante, Alida; Blasi, Francesco; Bucca, Caterina; Busceti, Maria Teresa; Centanni, Stefano; Colanardi, Maria Cristina; Contoli, Marco; Corsico, Angelo; D'Amato, Maria; Di Marco, Fabiano; Marco, Dottorini; Ferrari, Marta; Florio, Giovanni; Fois, Alessandro Giuseppe; Foschino Barbaro, Maria Pia; Silvia, Garuti; Girbino, Giuseppe; Grosso, Amelia; Latorre, Manuela; Maniscalco, Sara; Mazza, Francesco; Mereu, Carlo; Molinengo, Giorgia; Ora, Josuel; Paggiaro, Pierluigi; Patella, Vincenzo; Pelaia, Girolamo; Pirina, Pietro; Proietto, Alfio; Rogliani, Paola; Santus, Pierachille; Scichilone, Nicola; Simioli, Francesca; Solidoro, Paolo; Terraneo, Silvia; Zuccon, Umberto; Canonica, Giorgio Walter

    2017-06-01

    Asthma considerably impairs patients' quality of life and increases healthcare costs. Severity, morbidity, and degree of disease control are the major drivers of its clinical and economic impact. National scientific societies are required to monitor the application of international guidelines and to adopt strategies to improve disease control and better allocate resources. to provide a detailed picture of the characteristics of asthma patients and modalities of asthma management by specialists in Italy and to develop recommendations for the daily management of asthma in a specialist setting. A quantitative research program was implemented. Data were collected using an ad hoc questionnaire developed by a group of specialists selected by the Italian Pneumology Society/Italian Respiratory Society. The records of 557 patients were analyzed. In the next few years, specialists are expected to focus their activity patients with more severe disease and will be responsible for selection of patients for personalized biological therapy; however, only 20% of patients attending Italian specialist surgery can be considered severe. In 84.4% of cases, the visit was a follow-up visit requested in 82.2% of cases by the specialist him/herself. The Asthma Control Test is used only in 65% of patients. When available, a significant association has been observed between the test score and asthma control as judged by the physician, although concordance was only moderate (κ = 0.68). Asthma was considered uncontrolled by the specialist managing the case in 29.1% of patients; nevertheless, treatment was not stepped up in uncontrolled or partly controlled patients (modified in only 37.2% of patients). The results of this survey support re-evaluation of asthma management by Italian specialists. More resources should be made available for the initial visit and for more severely ill patients. In addition, more extensive use should be made of validated tools, and available drugs should be used

  2. Leadership capabilities of physiotherapy leaders in Ireland: Part 2. Clinical specialists and advanced physiotherapy practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, E; Elliott, N; Stokes, E

    2018-05-07

    Investigation of the leadership capabilities of physiotherapy managers found that they report predominantly demonstrating capabilities associated with the human resource and structural frames. However, little is known about the leadership capabilities of clinical specialists and advanced physiotherapy practitioners (APPs) who also are identified as having responsibility for leadership. To explore clinical specialists´ and APPs' perceptions of their leadership capabilities and compare them with the reported leadership capabilities of physiotherapy managers. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of 17 physiotherapy clinical specialists and APPs from a range of practice settings across Ireland. The interviews were analyzed using template analysis and the coding template was based on the Bolman and Deal Leadership framework. The participants described demonstrating leadership capabilities associated with each of the four leadership frames. However, the language used by the clinical specialists/APPs suggested that they work predominantly through the human resource frame. Structural frame capabilities were reported by the clinical specialists/APPs and there were some differences to those reported by the managers. In keeping with the reported leadership capabilities of the physiotherapy managers, the employment of capabilities associated with the political frame varied between participants and symbolic frame capabilities were underused. There are many similarities in the self-reported leadership capabilities of managers and clinical specialists/APPs. However, differences were also noted. Both cohorts of physiotherapy leaders may benefit from specific development programs to develop leadership capabilities associated with the political and symbolic frames.

  3. Clinical Nurse Specialists Guide Staff Nurses to Promote Practice Accountability Through Peer Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semper, Julie; Halvorson, Betty; Hersh, Mary; Torres, Clare; Lillington, Linda

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to describe the clinical nurse specialist role in developing and implementing a staff nurse education program to promote practice accountability using peer review principles. Peer review is essential for professional nursing practice demanding a significant culture change. Clinical nurse specialists in a Magnet-designated community hospital were charged with developing a staff nurse peer review education program. Peer review is a recognized mechanism of professional self-regulation to ensure delivery of quality care. The American Nurses Association strongly urges incorporating peer review in professional nursing practice models. Clinical nurse specialists play a critical role in educating staff nurses about practice accountability. Clinical nurse specialists developed an education program guided by the American Nurses Association's principles of peer review. A baseline needs assessment identified potential barriers and learning needs. Content incorporated tools and strategies to build communication skills, collaboration, practice change, and peer accountability. The education program resulted in increased staff nurse knowledge about peer review and application of peer review principles in practice. Clinical nurse specialists played a critical role in helping staff nurses understand peer review and its application to practice. The clinical nurse specialist role will continue to be important in sustaining the application of peer review principles in practice.

  4. The Path to Advanced Practice Licensure for Clinical Nurse Specialists in Washington State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoonover, Heather

    The aim of this study was to provide a review of the history and process to obtaining advanced practice licensure for clinical nurse specialists in Washington State. Before 2016, Washington State licensed certified nurse practitioners, certified nurse midwives, and certified nurse anesthetists under the designation of an advanced registered nurse practitioner; however, the state did not recognize clinical nurse specialists as advanced practice nurses. The work to drive the rule change began in 2007. The Washington Affiliate of the National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists used the Power Elite Theory to guide advocacy activities, building coalitions and support for the desired rule changes. On January 8, 2016, the Washington State Nursing Care Quality Assurance Commission voted to amend the state's advanced practice rules, including clinical nurse specialists in the designation of an advanced practice nurse. Since the rule revision, clinical nurse specialists in Washington State have been granted advanced registered nurse practitioner licenses. Driving changes in state regulatory rules requires diligent advocacy, partnership, and a deep understanding of the state's rule-making processes. To be successful in changing rules, clinical nurse specialists must build strong partnerships with key influencers and understand the steps in practice required to make the desired changes.

  5. Management of Nonceliac Gluten Sensitivity by Gastroenterology Specialists: Data from an Italian Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Branchi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim. Nonceliac gluten sensitivity is syndrome characterized by symptoms disappearing after a gluten-free diet. Its existence is still argument of discussion among specialists. Our aim was to evaluate the knowledge about nonceliac gluten sensitivity among gastroenterology specialists. Methods. During October 2013 a questionnaire was sent through a medical newsletter to Italian gastroenterologists. Twelve questions investigated their knowledge on nonceliac gluten sensitivity, including their diagnostic and therapeutic approach. Results. A total of 212 gastroenterologists filled in the questionnaire. The 98.6% were aware of the existence of a syndrome called “nonceliac gluten sensitivity” and 77% believe in its existence. However, only 56% gave a correct definition of the term. The majority of specialists diagnosed gluten sensitive patients and the number of diagnoses was not statistically different from that of celiac disease. Moreover, a gluten-free diet was prescribed by 64% of the specialists and among them the 73% noted an increase of gluten sensitive patients attending their outpatient services. Conclusions. Our study indicated that most of the specialists recognize nonceliac gluten sensitivity and prescribe gluten-free diet, although 44% of the specialists are not able to give its correct definition; underlining the necessity of medical education on this topic is needed.

  6. [Beginners' operations and medical specialist standards : Avoidance of criminal liability and civil liability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, H

    2018-05-16

    In all phases, patients are entitled to receive medical treatment according to medical specialist standards. This does not mean that patients necessarily have to be treated by a medical specialist. Operations performed by "beginners", e. g. assistant physicians, are permitted. However, there are increased liability risks, both for the specialist and the assistant physician. Furthermore, there are risks of criminal responsibility for causing bodily harm by negligence or negligent manslaughter. This article portrays the requirements of civil liability and criminal responsibility concerning beginners' operations on the basis of cases and judgments of the Federal Court and the Higher Regional Courts in Germany. Additionally, the reception of the jurisprudence by the relevant legal literature will be discussed. Jurisprudence and legal literature categorize breaches of duty of care. Assistant physicians can be subject to contributory negligence liabilities, while specialists can bear liabilities for negligent selection, organization or supervision. Responsible specialist and assistant physicians can protect themselves (and the patient) and avoid legal risks by only performing operations adequate to their educational level or by delegating operations to beginners and ensuring intervention by a specialist by supervision of the operation which is suitable to the assistant physician's level of education.

  7. From Professional Competencies to Capacity: A Study of Education and Training for Subject Specialists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Hsin Phoebe Chiu

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Subject specialists are important assets in academic and research libraries. They possess not only the specialized knowledge of a particular subject field, but also the skills in library and information services. Looming shortage of qualified subject specialists resulting from the retirement of current professionals, most likely the baby-boomer generation, persuasively suggests that education and training are in urgent need of rethinking. This empirical study was conducted within the context of Library and Information Science education and academic librarianship in North America. Survey, content analysis, and focus group were employed as data collection methods. This study aims to analyze the status of LIS education for subject specialists, education needs and personal attributes of subject specialists, and the qualifications and responsibilities of becoming subject specialists. The goal of the study is to understand the knowledge, skills, and attitude of becoming subject specialists. Results of the study may provide insight into planning of formal curriculum and on-the-job training. [Article content in Chinese

  8. Variation of fee-for-service specialist direct care work effort with patient overall illness burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Robert

    2011-08-01

    To explore whether a common industry measure of overall patient illness burden, used to assess the total costs of members in a health plan, would be suitable to describe variation in a summary metric of utilization that assesses specialist physician direct patient care services not grouped into clinical episodes, but with exclusion criteria applied to reduce any bias in the data. Data sources/study setting Calendar year 2006 administrative data on 153,557 commercial members enrolled in a non-profit single-state statewide Health Maintenance Organization (HMO) and treated by 4356 specialists in 11 specialties. The health plan's global referral process and specialist fee-for-service reimbursement likely makes these results applicable to the non-managed care setting, as once a global referral was authorized there was no required intervention by the HMO or referring primary care provider for the majority of any subsequent specialist direct clinical care. Study design Specialty-specific correlations and ordinary least-squares regression models to assess variations in specialist direct patient care work effort with patient overall illness burden, after the application of exclusion criteria to reduce potential bias in the data. Principle findings Statistically significant positive correlations exist between specialist direct patient care work effort and patient overall illness burden for all studied specialties. Regression models revealed a generally monotonic increasing relationship between illness burden categories and aggregate specialist direct patient care work effort. Almost all regression model differences from the reference category across specialties are statistically significant (P ≤ 0.012). Assessment of additional results demonstrates the relationship has more substantive significance in some specialties and less in others. The most substantive relationships in this study were found in the specialties of orthopaedic surgery, general surgery and interventional

  9. Focus group interviews examining the contribution of intellectual disability clinical nurse specialists in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doody, Owen; Slevin, Eamonn; Taggart, Laurence

    2017-10-01

    To explore the contribution of clinical nurse specialists in intellectual disability nursing in Ireland. While clinical nurse specialists exist since the 1940s, they have only been a reality in Ireland since 2001. While the role of clinical nurse specialist has developed over the years, it still however is often seen as a complex multifaceted role that causes confusion, frustration and controversy. A exploratory qualitative approach using focus groups with Irish intellectual disability clinical nurse specialists (n = 31). Five focus group interviews were conducted to gather qualitative data to gain insight into the attitudes, perceptions and opinions of the participants. Data were audio-recorded, transcribed and analysed using Burnard's (Vital Notes for Nurses: Research for Evidence-Based Practice in Healthcare, 2011, Blackwell Publishing, Oxford) framework. Ethical approval was gained from the researcher's university and access granted by the national council for the professional development of nursing/midwifery in Ireland. The study highlights that intellectual disability clinical nurse specialists contribute to and support care delivery across a range of areas including client-focused and family-centred care, staff support, organisation support, community support and supporting other agencies. Overall, the study shows the importance of intellectual disability clinical nurse specialists and their contribution across a range of services, care environments and the support they offer to clients/families/staff/multidisciplinary team members and outside agencies. Ireland is in a unique position to develop knowledge regarding specialist care for people with intellectual disability that can be shared and adapted by other healthcare professionals in other countries that do not have specialised intellectual disability nurses. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Freedom of choice of specialist physicians is important to Swiss resident: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peytremann-Bridevaux, Isabelle; Ruffieux, Christiane; Burnand, Bernard

    2011-12-19

    To assess how important the possibility to choose specialist physicians is for Swiss residents and to determine which variables are associated with this opinion. This cross-sectional study used data from the 2007 Swiss population-based health survey and included 13,642 non-institutionalised adults who responded to the telephone and paper questionnaires. The dependent variable included answers to the question "How important is it for you to be able to choose the specialist you would like to visit?" Independent variables included socio-demographics, health and past year healthcare use measures. Crude and adjusted logistic regressions for the importance of being able to choose specialist physicians were performed, accounting for the survey design. 45% of participants found it very important to be able to choose the specialist physician they wanted to visit. The answers "rather important", "rather not important" and "not important" were reported by 28%, 20% and 7% of respondents. Women, individuals in middle/high executive position, those with an ordinary insurance scheme, those reporting ≥2 chronic conditions or poorer subjective health, or those who had had ≥2 outpatient visits in the preceding year were more likely to find this choice very important. In 2007, almost half of all Swiss residents found it very important to be able to choose his/her specialist physician. The further development of physician networks or other chronic disease management initiatives in Switzerland, towards integrated care, need to pay attention to the freedom of choice of specialist physicians that Swiss residents value. Future surveys should provide information on access and consultations with specialist physicians.

  11. STS-95 Payload Specialist Glenn participates in a media briefing before returning to JSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    STS-95 Payload Specialist John H. Glenn Jr., a senator from Ohio and one of the original seven Project Mercury astronauts, participates in a media briefing at the Kennedy Space Center Press Site Auditorium before returning to the Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. The STS-95 mission ended with landing at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility at 12:04 p.m. EST on Nov. 7. Also participating in the briefing were the other STS-95 crew members: Mission Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr.; Pilot Steven W. Lindsey; Mission Specialist and Payload Commander Stephen K. Robinson; Mission Specialist Scott E. Parazynski; Mission Specialist Pedro Duque, with the European Space Agency (ESA); and Payload Specialist Chiaki Mukai, with the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA). The mission included research payloads such as the Spartan-201 solar-observing deployable spacecraft, the Hubble Space Telescope Orbital Systems Test Platform, the International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker, as well as a SPACEHAB single module with experiments on space flight and the aging process.

  12. STS-95 Payload Specialist Glenn and his wife pose before their return flight to JSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    At the Skid Strip at Cape Canaveral Air Station, STS-95 Payload Specialist John H. Glenn Jr., a senator from Ohio and one of the original seven Project Mercury astronauts, poses with his wife Annie before their return flight to the Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. The STS-95 mission ended with landing at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility at 12:04 p.m. EST on Nov. 7. The STS-95 crew also includes Mission Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr.; Pilot Steven W. Lindsey; Mission Specialist Scott E. Parazynski; Mission Specialist Stephen K. Robinson; Mission Specialist Pedro Duque, with the European Space Agency (ESA); and Payload Specialist Chiaki Mukai, with the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA). The mission included research payloads such as the Spartan-201 solar-observing deployable spacecraft, the Hubble Space Telescope Orbital Systems Test Platform, the International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker, as well as a SPACEHAB single module with experiments on space flight and the aging process.

  13. Personalizing protocol-driven care: the case of specialist heart failure nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Tom; Harrison, Stephen; Checkland, Katherine

    2010-09-01

    This paper is a report of a study conducted to explore how specialist heart failure nurses negotiate treatment advice with patients, in the context of an increasing expectation that clinical staff in the National Health Services will follow guidelines in their daily work. The development of specialist nurse roles has given rise to questions about their compatibility with patient-centred care. However, research has revealed little about how specialist nurses balance clinical guidelines with traditional caring tasks. Semi-structured interviews (n = 10) were conducted with specialist heart failure nurses in northern England recruited from a heart failure specialist nursing contact list. In addition, non-participant observations were carried out on nurse-patient consultations (n = 16) in one regional nurse-led heart failure clinic. Data were collected between 2003 and 2005, and analysed using a variation of grounded theory. Heart failure nurses sought to combine traditional caring work with the wider goal of improving patient outcomes by 'personalizing' their advice to patients and presenting their heart failure as 'typical'. They accommodated protocol-driven care into their daily routines, and perceived no disjuncture between evidence-based practice and patient-centredness. However, their approach allowed little space for the exploration of each patient's own priorities about their illness. There is a need both to re-examine the appropriateness of traditional caring concepts, and to reflect on the need to incorporate patients' own values into the consultation process.

  14. The Role of the Technical Specialist in Disaster Response and Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, J. C.

    2017-12-01

    Technical Specialists provide scientific expertise for making operational decisions during natural hazards emergencies. Technical Specialists are important members of any Incident Management Team (IMT) as is described in in the National Incident Management System (NIMS) that has been designed to respond to emergencies. Safety for the responders and the threatened population is the foremost consideration in command decisions and objectives, and the Technical Specialist is on scene and in the command post to support and promote safety while aiding decisions for incident objectives. The Technical Specialist's expertise can also support plans, logistics, and even finance as well as operations. This presentation will provide actual examples of the value of on-scene Technical Specialists, using National Weather Service "Decision Support Meteorologists" and "Incident Meteorologists". These examples will demonstrate the critical role of scientists that are trained in advising and presenting life-critical analysis and forecasts during emergencies. A case will be made for local, state, and/or a national registry of trained and deployment-ready scientists that can support emergency response.

  15. What influences the job satisfaction of staff and associate specialist hospital doctors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Fiona; Ikenwilo, Divine; Scott, Anthony

    2007-08-01

    Despite their rising numbers in the National Health Service (NHS), the recruitment, retention, morale and educational needs of staff and associate specialist hospital doctors have traditionally not been the focus of attention. A postal survey of all staff grades and associate specialists in NHS Scotland was conducted to investigate the determinants of their job satisfaction. Doctors in both grades were least satisfied with their pay. They were more satisfied if they were treated as equal members of the clinical team, but less satisfied if their workload adversely affected the quality of patient care. With the exception of female associate specialists, respondents who wished to become a consultant were less satisfied with all aspects of their jobs. Associate specialists who worked more sessions also had lower job satisfaction. Non-white staff grades were less satisfied with their job compared with their white counterparts. It is important that associate specialists and staff grades are promoted to consultant posts, where this is desired. It is also important that job satisfaction is enhanced for doctors who do not desire promotion, thereby improving retention. This could be achieved through improved pay, additional clinical training, more flexible working hours and improved status.

  16. Tests and measures used by specialist physical therapists when examining patients with stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, A Williams; Folger, Stephen E; Norbet, Shannon E; Swift, Lindsay C

    2008-09-01

    Examination procedures preferred by physical therapists have not been documented either specifically or comprehensively. The purpose of this study was to determine which tests and measures are used most frequently by specialists in the examination of adults with stroke. Physical therapy specialists were identified as having geriatric or neurologic certification through the American Board of Physical Therapy Specialties. A request to participate in a Web-based survey was sent to 471 individuals in the American Physical Therapy Association's Directory of Certified Specialists. A comprehensive list of tests and measures was first derived from the Interactive Guide to Physical Therapist Practice. The list was finalized based on several exclusion criteria and the results of a pilot study. Subjects rated the frequency of use of 294 tests and measures with patients post-stroke on a Likert scale. The survey response rate was 31.7% (n = 128). The 50 most frequently used tests and measures were identified. The results of this study do not identify the tests and measures that clinicians should use, only those that the specialists use. Nevertheless, clinicians may want to consider tests and measurements frequently used by specialists when examining adults with stroke.

  17. Contrasting effects of specialist and generalist herbivores on resistance evolution in invasive plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhijie; Pan, Xiaoyun; Blumenthal, Dana; van Kleunen, Mark; Liu, Mu; Li, Bo

    2018-04-01

    Invasive alien plants are likely to be released from specialist herbivores and at the same time encounter biotic resistance from resident generalist herbivores in their new ranges. The Shifting Defense hypothesis predicts that this will result in evolution of decreased defense against specialist herbivores and increased defense against generalist herbivores. To test this, we performed a comprehensive meta-analysis of 61 common garden studies that provide data on resistance and/or tolerance for both introduced and native populations of 32 invasive plant species. We demonstrate that introduced populations, relative to native populations, decreased their resistance against specialists, and increased their resistance against generalists. These differences were significant when resistance was measured in terms of damage caused by the herbivore, but not in terms of performance of the herbivore. Furthermore, we found the first evidence that the magnitude of resistance differences between introduced and native populations depended significantly on herbivore origin (i.e., whether the test herbivore was collected from the native or non-native range of the invasive plant). Finally, tolerance to generalists was found to be higher in introduced populations, while neither tolerance to specialists nor that to simulated herbivory differed between introduced and native plant populations. We conclude that enemy release from specialist herbivores and biotic resistance from generalist herbivores have contrasting effects on resistance evolution in invasive plants. Our results thus provide strong support for the Shifting Defense hypothesis. © 2018 by the Ecological Society of America.

  18. Host plant invests in growth rather than chemical defense when attacked by a specialist herbivore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arab, Alberto; Trigo, José Roberto

    2011-05-01

    Plant defensive compounds may be a cost rather than a benefit when plants are attacked by specialist insects that may overcome chemical barriers by strategies such as sequestering plant compounds. Plants may respond to specialist herbivores by compensatory growth rather than chemical defense. To explore the use of defensive chemistry vs. compensatory growth we studied Brugmansia suaveolens (Solanaceae) and the specialist larvae of the ithomiine butterfly Placidina euryanassa, which sequester defensive tropane alkaloids (TAs) from this host plant. We investigated whether the concentration of TAs in B. suaveolens was changed by P. euryanassa damage, and whether plants invest in growth, when damaged by the specialist. Larvae feeding during 24 hr significantly decreased TAs in damaged plants, but they returned to control levels after 15 days without damage. Damaged and undamaged plants did not differ significantly in leaf area after 15 days, indicating compensatory growth. Our results suggest that B. suaveolens responds to herbivory by the specialist P. euryanassa by investing in growth rather than chemical defense.

  19. Provision and practice of specialist preterm labour clinics: a UK survey of practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, A N; Alfirevic, Z

    2014-03-01

    To identify the current status of specialist preterm labour (PTL) clinic provision and management within the UK. Postal survey of clinical practice. All consultant-led obstetric units within the UK. A questionnaire was sent by post to all 210 NHS consultant-led obstetric units within the UK. Units that had a specialist PTL clinic were asked to complete a further 20 questions defining their protocol for risk stratification and management. Current practice in specialist preterm labour clinics. We have identified 23 specialist clinics; the most common indications for attendance were previous PTL (100%), preterm prelabour rupture of membranes (95%), two large loop excisions of the transformation zone (95%) or cone biopsy (95%). There was significant heterogeneity in the indications for and method of primary treatment for short cervix, with cervical cerclage used in 45% of units, progesterone in 18% of units and Arabin cervical pessary in 5%. A further 23% used multiple treatment modalities in combination. A significant heterogeneity in all topics surveyed suggests an urgent need for networking, more evidence-based guidelines and prospective comparative audits to ascertain the real impact of specialist PTL clinics on the reduction in preterm birth and its sequelae. © 2013 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  20. Impact of the Pharmacy Practice Model Initiative on Clinical Pharmacy Specialist Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobi, Judith; Ray, Shaunta'; Danelich, Ilya; Dodds Ashley, Elizabeth; Eckel, Stephen; Guharoy, Roy; Militello, Michael; O'Donnell, Paul; Sam, Teena; Crist, Stephanie M; Smidt, Danielle

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes the goals of the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists' Pharmacy Practice Model Initiative (PPMI) and its recommendations for health-system pharmacy practice transformation to meet future patient care needs and elevate the role of pharmacists as patient care providers. PPMI envisions a future in which pharmacists have greater responsibility for medication-related outcomes and technicians assume greater responsibility for product-related activities. Although the PPMI recommendations have elevated the level of practice in many settings, they also potentially affect existing clinical pharmacists, in general, and clinical pharmacy specialists, in particular. Moreover, although more consistent patient care can be achieved with an expanded team of pharmacist providers, the role of clinical pharmacy specialists must not be diminished, especially in the care of complex patients and populations. Specialist practitioners with advanced training and credentials must be available to model and train pharmacists in generalist positions, residents, and students. Indeed, specialist practitioners are often the innovators and practice leaders. Negotiation between hospitals and pharmacy schools is needed to ensure a continuing role for academic clinical pharmacists and their contributions as educators and researchers. Lessons can be applied from disciplines such as nursing and medicine, which have developed new models of care involving effective collaboration between generalists and specialists. Several different pharmacy practice models have been described to meet the PPMI goals, based on available personnel and local goals. Studies measuring the impact of these new practice models are needed. © 2016 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.