WorldWideScience

Sample records for junior transfer university

  1. University Technology Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike Cox

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the experiences and general observations of the author at Heriot-Watt University and concerns the transfer of university technology for the purposes of commercialisation. Full commercial exploitation of a university invention generally requires transferring that technology into the industrial arena, usually either by formation of a new company or licensing into an existing company. Commercialisation activities need to be carried out in unison with the prime activities of the university of research and teaching. Responsibility for commercialising university inventions generally rests with a specific group within the university, typically referred to as the technology transfer group. Each technology transfer should be considered individually and appropriate arrangements made for that particular invention. In general, this transfer process involves four stages: identification, evaluation, protection and exploitation. Considerations under these general headings are outlined from a university viewpoint. A phased approach is generally preferred where possible for the evaluation, protection and exploitation of an invention to balance risk with potential reward. Evaluation of the potential opportunity for a university invention involves essentially the same considerations as for an industrial invention. However, there are a range of commercial exploitation routes and potential deals so that only general guidelines can be given. Naturally, the final deal achieved is that which can be negotiated. The potential rewards for the university and inventor are both financial (via licensing income and equity realisation and non-financial.

  2. Technology transfer of Cornell university

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Wan Sik

    2010-01-01

    This book introduces technology transfer of Cornell university which deals with introduction of Cornell university, composition of organization and practice of technology transfer : a research contract, research perform, invention report, evaluation and succession of invention, a patent application and management, marketing, negotiation and writing contract, management of contract, compensation, result of technology transfer, cases of success on technical commercialization and daily life of technology transfer center.

  3. Understanding University Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Association of American Universities, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Federal government agencies provide about $33 billion a year to universities to conduct scientific research. That continuing investment expands human knowledge and helps educate the next generation of science and technology leaders. New discoveries from university research also form the basis for many new products and processes that benefit the…

  4. Continuity or Change? Gender, Family, and Academic Work for Junior Faculty in Ontario Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acker, Sandra; Webber, Michelle; Smyth, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 40 or so years, women's share of faculty positions in Canada and elsewhere has increased considerably, if not yet reaching parity. Yet working in the gendered university remains problematic. This article uses data from a qualitative research project in which 38 junior academics were interviewed about their responses to being on the…

  5. "Transfer Shock" or "Transfer Ecstasy?"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickens, John M.

    The alleged characteristic drop in grade point average (GPA) of transfer students and the subsequent rise in GPA was investigated in this study. No statistically significant difference was found in first term junior year GPA between junior college transfers and native Florida State University students after the variance accounted for by the…

  6. A trial map and GIS class on junior high school with university collaboration in Yokohama, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabe, Toshimitsu; Ohnishi, Koji

    2018-05-01

    On the new curriculum of high school in Japan, geography will be compulsory subject in Japan from 2022. The indexes of new high school geography as compulsory subject will be 1. Using of maps and GIS, 2. Understanding of the world and International collaboration: Life and culture, issues of world, 3. Disaster prevention and ESD: natural environment and disaster, and construction of ideal society. The instruction of the GIS will be one of the issues for social studies teachers in the new curriculum. The aim of this study is to make the utilize map and GIS education content through trial class in junior high school. Trial class was done on Tsurugamine junior high school in Yokohama city with university and Yokohama city school board collaboration. In the trial class, the teacher indicated the old and new topographical maps to students and asked them to consider the characteristics of the area and the land use change. Transparent sheets overlaying is useful this activity. Transparent usage indicated the GIS function of overlay. It is good activity for students to understand the function of GIS. After the considering land use changes, they considered the future of their town. The several unused lands are spread in this area. Students present their opinions how to develop them. The important thing to carry out map and GIS class through neighborhood area is preparation of adequate maps. For this preparation, collaboration with university geography stuffs or undergraduate students are effective.

  7. Experiences, attitudes and barriers towards research amongst junior faculty of Pakistani medical universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kauser Samreen

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The developing world has had limited quality research and in Pakistan, research is still in its infancy. We conducted a study to assess the proportion of junior faculty involved in research to highlight their attitude towards research, and identify the factors associated with their research involvement. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in four medical universities/teaching hospitals in Pakistan, representing private and public sectors. A pre-tested, self-administered questionnaire was used to collect information from 176 junior faculty members of studied universities/hospitals. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors related to attitudes and barriers in research among those currently involved in research with those who were not. Results Overall, 41.5% of study subjects were currently involved in research. A highly significant factor associated with current research involvement was research training during the post-graduate period (p Conclusion Less than half of the study participants were currently involved in research. Research output may improve if identified barriers are rectified. Further studies are recommended in this area.

  8. Skynet Junior Scholars- Sharing the Universe with Blind/Low Vision Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Kate K.; Hoette, Vivian; Kron, Richard; Heatherly, Sue Ann; Williamson, Kathryn; Gurton, Suzanne; Haislip, Josh; Reichart, Dan

    2015-08-01

    Skynet Junior Scholars, a project funded by the National Science Foundation, aims to engage middle school youth including youth with visual and hearing impairments in investigating the universe with the same tools professionals use. Project deliverables include: 1) Online access to optical and radio telescopes, data analysis tools, and professional astronomers, 2) An age-appropriate web-based interface for controlling remote telescopes, 3) Inquiry-based standards-aligned instructional modules. From an accessibility perspective, the goal of the Skynet Junior Scholars project is to facilitate independent access to the project deliverables to the greatest extent possible given existing accessibility technologies. In this poster we describe our experience in field-testing SJS activities with 29 blind/low vision youth attending a Lion’s Club summer camp. From our observations and preliminary results from pre and post surveys and interviews, we learned that rather than creating a new interest in STEM, we were instead nourishing pre-existing interest giving students their first direct experience in observational astronomy. Additional accessibility features have been added to the SJS program since the initial pilot testing. Full testing is scheduled for July 2015.

  9. Two-Year Comparison of Transfer and Native Student Academic Performance: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Fall 1986 Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiser, Linda M.; Abbed, Nejla

    In 1989, a two-year study was completed comparing the academic progress of community college transfers, senior college transfers, and continuing juniors (natives) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC). The study samples were comprised of 673 former community college students and 393 senior college transfers who entered UIUC in…

  10. University IPRs and knowledge transfer : is university ownership more efficient?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crespi, G.A.; Geuna, A.; Nomaler, Z.O.; Verspagen, B.

    2010-01-01

    This paper addresses an issue that has been largely ignored so far in the empirical literature on the role of patents in university-industry knowledge transfer: does it matter who owns the patents on university research? We observe that especially in Europe, many patents in which university

  11. PREVALENCE AND CORRELATES OF JOB STRESS AMONG JUNIOR DOCTORS IN THE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE HOSPITAL, IBADAN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeolu, J O; Yussuf, O B; Popoola, O A

    2016-12-01

    Doctors respond differently to their complex work environment, some find it stimulating while others find it stressful. This study aimed to assess the prevalence and correlates of stress among junior doctors in a teaching hospital in Southwest Nigeria. A descriptive cross sectional survey of all junior doctors employed at the University College Hospital, Ibadan was carried out. Information was collected with a structured pretested questionnaire from 253 doctors. Descriptive statistics were generated. T-test, chi square and logistic regression analyses were conducted using SPSS version 16. Statistical significance was set at 5%. Mean age of respondents was 29.9 (±4.1) years, 61.3% were males, 59% had spent less than 5 years in medical practice, and 34.8% were married. Majority (79.4%) were resident doctors. Prevalence of stress, job dissatisfaction and poor mental health were 31.6%, 15.4% and 9.9% respectively. Age, gender, years of medical practice, religion, ethnicity and marital status were not significantly associated with job stress (p>0.05). Doctors who were stressed were more likely to be dissatisfied with their jobs (OR=2.33; CI=1.08-4.04) and to have poor mental health (OR=3.82; CI=1.47-9.95) than those who were not stressed. The prevalence of stress in this study is high, and job dissatisfaction and poor mental health have been implicated as determinants of stress. As such, there should be an improvement in doctors' welfare, health care facilities and delivery.

  12. Junior Enterprise: the process of institutionalization in public universities of Ceará

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuel Dheison dos Santos Penha

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to investigate the process of institutionalization of Junior Enterprises (JEs of the public universities of Ceará, according to the model of institutionalization of Tolbert and Zucker (1999 in its three phases: habituation, objectification and sedimentation. This research is bibliographic, being classified as a descriptive study of qualitative and quantitative nature. The study was conducted in 10 JEs of Ceará. During data collection, questionnaires administered with members, and interviews with the presidents of the JEs were used. The results show that the main reason for the emergence of IOs in public universities of Ceará was the need to combine theory with practice, the main actors in the process of these entities were students. No resistance groups, but there is a threat at the prospect of continuity due to high turnover in JEs. The JEs are among the phases of objectification and sedimentation and isomorphic characteristics, among JEs, are related to the sharing of best management practices.

  13. The evaluation of psycho-emotional state in junior students of medical university

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    Tetiana Pavliuk

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Currently, psychosocial factors, stress and mental exhaustion are considered by WHO experts and the International Labour Organization as an important new factor affecting the health, working capacity, training and career. Young generation, especially students, who are an industrial and intellectual potential of the country can be attributed to the risk group because of the extremely high burden of adaptation. The intensity and tension of modern life at a psychological level preceding the occurrence of negative emotional experiences and stress reactions that, accumulating, cause the formation of depressions. The aim of the study was to examine the level of psycho-emotional stress in the junior students of medical university. The observations of the medical students of the second year of study were performed. To determine the psycho-emotional stress we have used adaptive varint of H.Ayzenko method that include an anxiety, frustration, aggressiveness and rigidity, through questionnaires. According to a survey results of the state of psycho-emotional state low levels of stress resistance were found in students in learning activities, indicating that students are exposed to the negative impact of the environment. It should also be noted that the level of emotional condition of students depends on the personal experience of stressful situations that arise in students’ lives.

  14. Aoyama Gakuin University team winning the second prize in junior class in a solar car race; Aogaku team wa junior nii (solar car race ni sankashite)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Y. [Aoyama Gakuin University, Tokyo (Japan)

    1994-09-20

    This paper introduces how the Aoyama Gakuin University team competed in the World Solar Car Rally race held at Ogata Village in Akita Prefecture, Japan, in the summer of 1994. The race was formed with solar cars mounting a solar panel with the maximum area of 8 m{sup 2} and batteries with a total output of 3 kWh to compete how many rounds the cars can run around a course of 31 km during three days (25 hours in total). The solar car used by the University team had consumed power of about 600 W at a speed of 40 km/h, with the solar panel generating power of 800 Wp. The first day morning was sunny making possible to set the average speed to 45 km/h (power generation of 500 W or more), but the weather worsened in the afternoon compelling the car to change the speed to 30 km/h (power generation of 200 W). The power generated on the second day, which was cloudy all day, stayed at 250 W at the maximum, hence the speed was kept at 30 km/h to suppress the power consumption. On the sunny third day, the team drove the car worrying about the remaining battery capacity, and succeeded the drive of 23 rounds in total, winning the second prize among 30 cars participated in the junior class race.

  15. The prevalence of probable delayed-sleep-phase syndrome in students from junior high school to university in Tottori, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazama, Gen-i; Inoue, Yuichi; Kojima, Kazushige; Ueta, Toshiyuki; Nakagome, Kazuyuki

    2008-09-01

    Delayed sleep phase syndrome (DSPS) is a circadian rhythm sleep disorder with a typical onset in the second decade of life. DSPS is characterized by the sleep-onset insomnia and the difficulty in waking at the desired time in the morning. Although DSPS is associated with inability to attend school, the prevalence has been controversial. To elucidate a change in the prevalence of DSPS among young population, epidemiological survey was conducted on Japanese students. A total of 4,971 students of junior high school, senior high school, and university were enrolled in this cross sectional study in Tottori Prefecture. They answered anonymous screening questionnaire regarding school schedule, sleep hygiene and symptomatic items of sleep disorders. The prevalence of probable DSPS was estimated at 0.48% among the total subject students without gender difference. In university, the prevalence of the last year students showed the highest value (1.66%), while that of the first year students showed the lowest value (0.09%) among all school years from junior high school to university. The prevalence increased with advancing university school years. Thus, a considerable number of Japanese students are affected with DSPS. Senior students of university are more vulnerable to the disorder than younger students. Appropriate school schedule may decrease the mismatch between the individual's sleep-wake cycle and the school schedule. Promotion of a regular sleep habit is necessary to prevent DSPS among this population.

  16. Comparison of Self-Concept of Nonobese and Obese University Junior Female Nursing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Rita F.

    1987-01-01

    Compared self-concept of obese (N=28) and nonobese (N=58) female students in a junior nursing class. Found that obese students and students who considered themselves to be obese had lower self-esteem than did nonobese students. Revealed no relationships with regard to age of onset of obesity, and no significant relationships between social class…

  17. University Knowledge Transfer Offices and Social Responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Martín-Rubio

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies and reviews about University Knowledge Transfer Offices (UKTO have been written, but there are few that focus on Social Responsibility (SR. We present a systematic review of the research on both fields. We consider not only logics from agency theory and resource-based view, but also the dynamic approach from institutional theory, as they aim to generate sustainable economic and social value. The evolution of Knowledge Transfer Offices depends on their role as brokers of collaborations among different stakeholders, according to their mission and capacity to confront the innovation gap. We follow the line of SR viewed as a response to the specific demands of large stakeholders. Building upon recent conceptualizations of different theories, we develop an integrative model for understanding the institutional effects of the UKTO on university social responsibility.

  18. Communication and Cultural Change in University Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, David

    2013-01-01

    Faculty culture and communication networks are pivotal components of technology transfer on university campuses. Universities are focused upon diffusing technology to external clients and upon building structure and support systems to enhance technology transfer. However, engaging faculty members in technology transfer requires an internal…

  19. A Prospective Epidemiological Study of Injuries in Japanese National Tournament-Level Badminton Players From Junior High School to University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Eiji; Yatsunami, Mitsunobu; Kurabayashi, Jun; Teruya, Koji; Sekine, Yasuhiro; Endo, Tatsuaki; Nishida, Ryuichiro; Takano, Nao; Sato, Seiko; Jae Kyung, Han

    2016-03-01

    Injury prevention programs have recently been created for various sports. However, a longitudinal study on badminton injuries, as assessed by a team's dedicated medical staff, at the gymnasium has not been performed. We aimed to perform the first such study to measure the injury incidence, severity and type as the first step in creating a badminton injury prevention program. A prospective, longitudinal survey was conducted between April 2012 and March 2013 with 133 national tournament-level badminton players from junior high school to university in Japan with the teams' physical therapists at the gymnasium. Injury incidence was measured as the injury rate (IR) for every 1,000 hour (1000 hour) and IR for every 1,000 athlete exposures (1000 AE). Severity was classified in 5 levels by the number of days the athlete was absent from practice or matches. Injury types were categorized as trauma or overuse. Practice (IR) (1,000 hour) was significantly higher in female players than in male players; the rates increased with increasing age. IR (1,000 AE) was significantly higher in matches than in practice in both sexes of all ages, except for female junior high school students and injuries were most frequent for high school students in matches. The majority of the injuries were slight (83.8%); overuse injuries occurred approximately 3 times more than trauma. This is the first study in which medical staff assessed injuries in badminton, providing value through benchmark data. Injury prevention programs are particularly necessary for female university students in practice and high school students in matches.

  20. University Technology Transfer Information Processing from the Attention Based View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Clovia

    2015-01-01

    Between 2005 and 2011, there was no substantial growth in licenses executed by university technology transfer offices. Since the passage of the Bayh Dole Act of 1980, universities have owned technological inventions afforded by federal research funding. There are still university technology transfer offices that struggle with increasing their…

  1. A Survey of Learning Motivation among Junior and Senior English Ma?jors in Non-governmental Universities—A Case Study in Ningbo Dahon?gying University

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GU Qian-qian

    2017-01-01

    Motivation is an important factor to English learning, it plays an important role. In this thesis, the instrument used in the study is a questionnaire, and this thesis was conducted on December 5th, 2016 at Ningbo Dahongying University involving 182 students. Based on the questionnaire investigation, this thesis discusses the learning motivation of English major juniors and seniors in Ningbo Dahongying University from the motivation types, factors and strategies...

  2. Essentially Optimal Universally Composable Oblivious Transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgård, Ivan Bjerre; Nielsen, Jesper Buus; Orlandi, Claudio

    2009-01-01

    . Communication complexity: it communicates O(1) group elements to transfer one out of two group elements. The Big-O notation hides 32, meaning that the communication is probably not optimal, but is essentially optimal in that the overhead is at least constant. Our construction is based on pairings, and we assume......Oblivious transfer is one of the most important cryptographic primitives, both for theoretical and practical reasons and several protocols were proposed during the years. We provide the first oblivious transfer protocol which is simultaneously optimal on the following list of parameters: Security...

  3. University Technology Transfer: In Tough Economic Times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Joshua B.; Campbell, Eric G.

    2009-01-01

    In 1907, Frederick Cottrell, professor of chemistry at the University of California-Berkeley and father of the modern academic patent, worried that if universities became too directly involved in patenting and licensing operations, their thirst for profits could lead to the erosion of the openness necessary for academic science to flourish. For…

  4. Contraceptive behavior as risk factor for reproductive health of junior students attending a medical university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.N. Govyazina

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available 1–3 year students attending medical and preventive faculty of a medical university were our research object. Our research had many stages, and at the first one our goal was to examine and to assess basic behavioral risks for reproductive health of students attending medical and preventive faculty of a medical university. We conducted a sociological examination via questioning. 428 students were questioned as per materials collecting program which included 74 parameters; they accounted for 91.6 % out of the overall official number of students, 45.0 % male students and 40.0 % female students combined work and studies. We detected that, as per questioning results, the specific weight of students who took care of their health amounted to 79.2 % boys and 95.2 % girls. However, the students tended to have bad habits, i.e. constant alcohol intake or smoking. And although information on diseases prevention and on how to pursue healthy lifestyle was perfectly available to them, students didn't try to use it and preserve their health. All the respondents said they were against abortion. Girls were likely to adopt a complex approach when choosing a contraceptive, they resorted to hormonal agents, and, with their partners' consent, to condoms. But they often took hormonal agents without any consultations with a gynecologist or an endocrinologist. Contraceptives were rather rarely applied, and students appeared to have no knowledge on risk factors causing reproductive health deterioration. They also tended to be negligent and too self-confident when it came to reproductive health protection. A risk of abortions was very high for girls who didn't use contraceptives, and also all students ran rather high risk of catching sexual diseases. Sexual education is needed to correct contraceptive behavior; medical workers are a main source of information on reproductive health of young people in 7–10 % cases only. We need to create interactive educational programs

  5. Japan acts to speed technology transfer from universities

    CERN Multimedia

    Saegusa, A

    1999-01-01

    A Japanese law will take effect in the autumn to promote technology transfer from universities and laboratories. The new measures aim to encourage collaborations with the commercial sector and allow industrial research partners to retain title to inventions (1 page).

  6. Optimizing Outcome in the University-Industry Technology Transfer Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, Hamed; Hąbek, Patrycja

    2016-06-01

    Transferring inventions of academic scientists to private enterprises for the purpose of commercialization is long known as University-Industry (firm) Technology Transfer While the importance of this phenomenon is simultaneously raising in public and private sector, only a part of patented academic inventions succeed in passing the process of commercialization. Despite the fact that formal Technology Transfer process and licencing of patented innovations to third party is the main legal tool for safeguarding rights of academic inventors in commercialization of their inventions, it is not sufficient for transmitting tacit knowledge which is necessary in exploitation of transferred technology. Existence of reciprocal and complementary relations between formal and informal technology transfer process has resulted in formation of different models for university-industry organizational collaboration or even integration where licensee firms keep contact with academic inventors after gaining legal right for commercialization of their patented invention. Current paper argues that despite necessity for patents to legally pass the right of commercialization of an invention, they are not sufficient for complete knowledge transmission in the process of technology transfer. Lack of efficiency of formal mechanism to end the Technology Transfer loop makes an opportunity to create innovative interpersonal and organizational connections among patentee and licensee company. With emphasize on need for further elaboration of informal mechanisms as critical and underappreciated aspect of technology transfer process, article will try to answer the questions of how to optimize knowledge transmission process in the framework of University-Industry Technology Transfer Projects? What is the theoretical basis for university-industry technology transfer process? What are organization collaborative models which can enhance overall performance by improving transmission of knowledge in

  7. OPTIMIZING OUTCOME IN THE UNIVERSITY-INDUSTRY TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER PROJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed ALAVI

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Transferring inventions of academic scientists to private enterprises for the purpose of commercialization is long known as University-Industry (firm Technology Transfer While the importance of this phenomenon is simultaneously raising in public and private sector, only a part of patented academic inventions succeed in passing the process of commercialization. Despite the fact that formal Technology Transfer process and licencing of patented innovations to third party is the main legal tool for safeguarding rights of academic inventors in commercialization of their inventions, it is not sufficient for transmitting tacit knowledge which is necessary in exploitation of transferred technology. Existence of reciprocal and complementary relations between formal and informal technology transfer process has resulted in formation of different models for university-industry organizational collaboration or even integration where licensee firms keep contact with academic inventors after gaining legal right for commercialization of their patented invention. Current paper argues that despite necessity for patents to legally pass the right of commercialization of an invention, they are not sufficient for complete knowledge transmission in the process of technology transfer. Lack of efficiency of formal mechanism to end the Technology Transfer loop makes an opportunity to create innovative interpersonal and organizational connections among patentee and licensee company. With emphasize on need for further elaboration of informal mechanisms as critical and underappreciated aspect of technology transfer process, article will try to answer the questions of how to optimize knowledge transmission process in the framework of University-Industry Technology Transfer Projects? What is the theoretical basis for university-industry technology transfer process? What are organization collaborative models which can enhance overall performance by improving transmission of

  8. Modelling Graduate Skill Transfer from University to the Workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Denise

    2016-01-01

    This study explores skill transfer in graduates as they transition from university to the workplace. Graduate employability continues to dominate higher education agendas yet the transfer of acquired skills is often assumed. The study is prompted by documented concern with graduate performance in certain employability skills, and prevalent skill…

  9. Institutionalization of Technology Transfer Organizations in Chinese Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yuzhuo; Zhang, Han; Pinheiro, Rómulo

    2015-01-01

    There is a lack of in-depth studies on how technology transfer organizations (TTOs) are organized and developed. This paper examines the evolution/institutionalization of TTOs in Tsinghua University (TU), as a microcosm of the development of TTOs in Chinese universities. It explores two issues in particular: what kinds of TTOs have been developed…

  10. University Technology Transfer Factors as Predictors of Entrepreneurial Orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkman, Dorothy M.

    2011-01-01

    University technology transfer is a collaborative effort between academia and industry involving knowledge sharing and learning. Working closely with their university partners affords biotechnology firms the opportunity to successfully develop licensed inventions and gain access to novel scientific and technological discoveries. These factors may…

  11. University-to-industry advanced technology transfer. A case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldhor, R S; Lung, R T

    1983-06-01

    This case study examines the events in the transfer of an advanced technology (a text-to-speech reading machine) from the university group that developed the technology to an industrial firm seeking to exploit the innovation. After a brief history of the six-year project, the paper discusses the roles of the participants, markets, and time and cost considerations. A model of technology transfer is presented and policy implications derived from the case are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the need for matching technical competence between donor and recipient, and on the function of a transfer agent in facilitating the social process of technology transfer. 42 references, 6 figures, 4 tables.

  12. Building technology transfer within research universities an entrepreneurial approach

    CERN Document Server

    O'Shea, Rory P

    2014-01-01

    For the past number of years, academic entrepreneurship has become one of the most widely studied topics in the entrepreneurship literature. Yet, despite all the research that has been conducted to date, there has not been a systematic attempt to analyze critically the factors which lie behind successful business spin-offs from university research. In this book, a group of academic thought-leaders in the field of technology transfer examine a number of areas critical to the promotion of start-ups on campus. Through a series of case studies, they examine current policies, structures, program initiatives and practices of fourteen international universities to develop a theory of successful academic entrepreneurship, with the aim of helping other universities to enhance the quality of their university transfer programs. This book is a valuable resource for researchers and graduate students working on innovation, entrepreneurship and technology transfer, as well as senior managers and policymakers.

  13. Legislation on university technology transfer and research management 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-02-01

    This book deals with legislation on university technology transfer in 2012, which includes invention promotion act, legislation on technology transfer and promotion of industrialization, legislation on industrial education and industrial cooperation, and special legislation on venture business. It lists the legislation related research and development by government department : fundamental law of scientific technique, law on evaluation and management of domestic research development business, national science and technology council and the patent office.

  14. Techno-Nationalism and the Construction of University Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sá, Creso; Kretz, Andrew; Sigurdson, Kristjan

    2013-01-01

    Our historical study of Canada's main research university illuminates the overlooked influence of national identities and interests as forces shaping the institutionalization of technology transfer. Through the use of archival sources we trace the rise and influence of Canadian technological nationalism--a response to Canada's perceived dependency…

  15. Building Technology Transfer Capacity in Turkish Universities: A Critical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranga, Marina; Temel, Serdal; Ar, Ilker Murat; Yesilay, Rustem Baris; Sukan, Fazilet Vardar

    2016-01-01

    University technology transfer has been receiving significant government funding since 2012. Results of this major investment are now expected by the Turkish government and society, not only in terms of better teaching and research performance, but also of new jobs, new products and services, enhanced regional development and contribution to…

  16. Academic returnees knowledge transfer in Vietnamese public universities

    OpenAIRE

    Truong Thuy, Van

    2017-01-01

    In the trend of international education, many graduates have earned a degree from international education programs and returned to work in their home countries. This study explores the institutional factors affecting the process of transferring knowledge from international education to local workplace, taking the case of Vietnamese academic returnees in public universities. The study employs the qualitative approach and institutional theory to understand this phenomenon. Data from interviews ...

  17. One More Reason to Learn a New Language: Testing Academic Self-Efficacy Transfer at Junior High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryer, Luke K.; Oga-Baldwin, W. L. Quint

    2017-01-01

    Self-efficacy is an essential source of motivation for learning. While considerable research has theorised and examined the how and why of self-efficacy in a single domain of study, longitudinal research has not yet tested how self-efficacy might generalise or transfer between subjects such as mathematics, native and foreign language studies. The…

  18. Technology transfer: federal legislation that helps businesses and universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oaks, Bill G.

    1992-05-01

    In 1980, Congress enacted the Stevenson-Wydler Technology Innovation Act to encourage federal laboratories to `spin off' their technology to industry, universities, and state and local governments. The law reflected Congressional concern for the economic well-being of the nation and the need for the United States to maintain its technological superiority. Almost half the nation's research is conducted in federal laboratories. Other legislation, the Small Business Innovation Development Act of 1982 and the National Cooperative Research Act of 1984, was followed by the Technology Transfer Act of 1986 that strengthened and consolidated policy concerning the technology transfer responsibilities of the federal labs. The law allows the labs to directly license their patents and permits the issuance of exclusive licenses. It allows the labs to enter into cooperative research and development agreements with industry, universities, and state and local governments. It institutionalized the Federal Laboratory consortium which, to that point in time, had been a formal but largely unrecognized body. Under the provisions of the law, the United States Air Force Rome Laboratory located in Rome, New York, as the Air Force lead laboratory in photonics research entered into an agreement with the Governor of the State of New York to collaborate in photonics research and development. Subsequent to that agreement, the state established the not-for-profit New York State Photonics Development Corporation in Rome to facilitate business access to Rome Laboratory's photonics research facilities and technologies. Rome Laboratory's photonics research and development program is described in this paper. The Technology Transfer Act of 1986 is summarized, and the roles and missions of the New York State Photonics Development Corporation is explained.

  19. Expo Junior

    CERN Document Server

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

    Fort de son succès Expo Juniors revient du 22 au 23 novembre 2014 - Papa & Maman Noël seront présents ! Nous avons le plaisir de  proposer à nos membres des billets d'entrées  à un tarif préférentiel, au prix de CHF 10.- l'unité au lieu de CHF 18.- (gratuit pour les enfants de 0 à 4 ans). Des centaines d’ateliers répartis en 3 villages : Sports & Loisirs, Jeux & Jouets, Éducation & Vie pratique. Cet événement propose aux familles aussi d'autres thèmes : tourisme, idées cadeaux, mode, bien-être, beauté, décoration, ainsi que des services destinés aux familles. Parades, attractions, castings, défilés de mode, dédicaces, séances photos avec Papa Noël, ainsi que de nombre...

  20. The Governance of University Knowledge Transfer: A Critical Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geuna, Aldo; Muscio, Alessandro

    2009-01-01

    Universities have long been involved in knowledge transfer activities. Yet the last 30 years have seen major changes in the governance of university-industry interactions. Knowledge transfer has become a strategic issue: as a source of funding for university research and (rightly or wrongly) as a policy tool for economic development. Universities…

  1. Love and Hate in University Technology Transfer: Examining Faculty and Staff Conflicts and Ethical Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Clovia; Schumann, David

    2016-01-01

    With respect to university technology transfer, the purpose of this paper is to examine the literature focused on the relationship between university research faculty and technology transfer office staff. We attempt to provide greater understanding of how research faculty's personal values and research universities' organization values may differ…

  2. Organizational Factors that Affect the University-Industry Technology Transfer Processes of a Private University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisiane Closs

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This case study researched organizational factors that affect the university-industry technology transfer (UITT processes of a private university, chosen by its success and uniqueness in the Brazilian context. Stood out as factors: innovation among pillars of management; valuing of research and intellectual property; qualified students, teachers and managers; multidisciplinary research groups; stability of governing body; performance of the TTO, Technology Management Agency and Technology Park. Difficulties highlighted were: reconciliation of time between activities of professors-researchers, bureaucracy and centralization of administrative and legal support; valuation of research results; approach and negotiation with companies. Among suggestions are: granting greater independence to the structures in charge of UITT and making them self-sustainable; training agents in technology marketing, sale, and negotiation skills.

  3. Evaluation of junior courses students’ level of mobilization of functional backlogs at the dosed physical activities at the pedagogical university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.I. Bosenco

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A study of the functional capacity of the organism lower division students. The study involved 85 students of 1-2 courses, 14 of which were engaged and were part of the team of the University of volleyball. As a student of muscular work performed pedaling on bicycle. The energy level was determined by performing metered loads with changing facilities for closed cycle. The data characterizing the physiological "cost" of adaptation, the level of stress the body of students in different phases of muscular work. Developed and presented model characteristics of the energy level of the body of girls. Reviewed degree of mobilization of functional reserves under load for closed loop five-point scale. Defined physical condition of students during the first year. The recommendations of the evaluation and prediction of the actual state of the physical health of students and improve physical education in high school.

  4. Transfer and access to universal grammar in adult second language acquisition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sauter, Kim

    2002-01-01

    Summary This dissertation focuses on the roles of first language transfer and Universal Grammar in adult second (or foreign) language acquisition. It contributes to the ongoing debate whether second language acquisition is constrained by Universal Grammar. According to generative linguists,

  5. Your idea and your university: issues in academic technology transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Charles D

    2011-06-01

    Research discoveries may lead to products for commercial development. A central consideration for the researcher is how involved she or he will be in the commercialization process. In some cases, a university out-licenses the intellectual property, whereas in other cases, the investigator may want to be involved in the development process and choose to start his or her own company to develop and possibly to manufacture and sell the product. Before undertaking such a challenge, however, the investigator-turned-entrepreneur must consider a variety of issues, including career goals, financial and time commitments, potential conflicts of interest and/or commitment, start-up funding, and his or her ability to run a company or step aside to allow business experts to make necessary decisions. This paper discusses some personal considerations in deciding to start a spinout company and provides information on some of the available government grants to assist you should you decide to undertake your product's commercial development. In particular, the Small Business Innovative Research and Small Business Technology Transfer programs of federal funding agencies often are the source of early funding for new biomedical companies.

  6. R&D Funding Sources and University Technology Transfer: What Is Stimulating Universities to Be More Entrepreneurial?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Joshua B.

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, universities have become increasingly entrepreneurial as evidenced by their rapid escalation into technology transfer, the process by which university-developed technologies are commercialized. Stimulated in part by a favorable policy environment for patenting and licensing as well as increased competition for limited resources,…

  7. Strategic Evaluation of University Knowledge and Technology Transfer Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Thien Anh

    2013-01-01

    Academic knowledge and technology transfer has been growing in importance both in academic research and practice. A critical question in managing this activity is how to evaluate its effectiveness. The literature shows an increasing number of studies done to address this question; however, it also reveals important gaps that need more research.…

  8. International Experience of the Establishing Technology Transfer Centers at the Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lysenko, V.S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of the experience of creation and operation of technology transfer centers on the basis of US universities with the aim of using positive methods for the creation of such centers in Ukraine is presented.

  9. Higher Education System and the "Open" Knowledge Transfer: A View from Perception of Senior Managers at University Knowledge Transfer Offices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi, Hossein; Liu, Weisheng; Ismail, Hossam S.

    2014-01-01

    Higher education institutions (HEIs) have become increasingly entrepreneurial. Such a shift is highly dependent on the managers of university knowledge transfer offices whose perceptions can be critical in this transformation. This study examines such senior managers' perceptions concerning the "open" paradigm in relation with the…

  10. New activities of universities in transfer and extension: multiple requirements and manifold solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Bo Göransson; Rasigan Maharajh; Ulrich Schmoch

    2009-01-01

    The third mission encompasses all activities of universities beyond their first and second missions, education and research. An analysis of various countries with different economic, political and geographic features reveals an increased demand for such activities in particular with regard to technology transfer, but also as to the support of the civil society in more general terms. Therefore the universities have to find a new balance between education, research and transfer/extension. Howev...

  11. A commercial outcome prediction system for university technology transfer using neural networks

    OpenAIRE

    Chu, Ling

    2007-01-01

    This thesis was submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy and awarded by Brunel University, 26/03/2007. This thesis presents a commercial outcome prediction system (CPS) capable of predicting the likely future monetary return that would be generated by an invention. The CPS is designed to be used by university technology transfer offices for invention assessment purposes, and is based on the data from their historical invention cases. It is aimed at improving technology transfer off...

  12. Assessing the Transition of Transfer Students from Community Colleges to a University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Joseph B.; Malaney, Gary D.

    2003-01-01

    Examines how pretransfer experiences and preparation, along with posttransfer experiences, influence the adjustment of community college transfer students to life on a four-year university campus. Results indicate that students who are best informed and who have most actively prepared for transfer are most likely to achieve higher grades and be…

  13. Experience-Oriented Knowledge Organisation for the Transference of Scientific Knowledge from Universities to SMEs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Marianne; Løkkegaard, Sarai; Jantzen, Christian

    2018-01-01

    Transferring scientific knowledge between universities and industry is known to be problematic, specifically for small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) that have limited resources and absorption capacity. A variety of channels is used for knowledge transfer. These include what is commonly refe...

  14. Sustainability of University Technology Transfer: Mediating Effect of Inventor’s Technology Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Li

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on the perspective of knowledge transfer and the technology acceptance model (TAM, this paper constructs a university technology transfer sustainable development model that considers the inventor’s technology service from the perspective of the long-term cooperation of enterprise, and analyzes the mediating effect of the inventor’s technology service on university technology transfer sustainability. By using 270 questionnaires as survey data, it is found that the availability of an inventor’s technology service has a significant positive impact on the attitude tendency and practice tendency of enterprise long-term technological cooperation; enterprise technology absorption capacity and trust between a university and an enterprise also have significant influence on an inventor’s technical service availability. Therefore, the inventor’s technology service acts as a mediator in the relationship between university technology transfer sustainability and influence factors. Universities ought to establish the technology transfer model, which focuses on the inventor’s tacit knowledge transfer service, and promotes the sustainable development of the university.

  15. Transferring Knowledge from Universities to Organizations by Business Students: Findings from a Developing Country

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza, Syed Ali; Najmi, Arsalan; Shah, Nida

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to explore the significance of knowledge transfer (KT) from universities to organizations by employing in-service employees, who are working in organizations and at the same time studying in the universities, as the channel. Design/methodology/approach: By using survey methodology, data were collected from 216 in-service…

  16. Critical Success Factors for Knowledge Transfer Collaborations between University and Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Tatiana

    2013-01-01

    In a fast moving business environment university-industry collaborations play a critical role in contributing to national economies and furthering a competitive advantage. Knowledge transfer from university to industry is supported by national governments as part of their innovation, national growth and competitiveness agenda. A…

  17. UNIVERSITY STUDENTS’ PERCEPTIONS OF TRANSFER OF ACADEMIC WRITING SKILLS ACROSS TIME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tharwat EL-Sakran

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates university students' perceptions towards an English for advanced academic writing purposes (AAW course taught in a private university in the United Arab Emirates. It probes into the relevance of the skills taught to the students' academic disciplines. Data was gathered through a short survey administered to students who successfully completed the course. The transferability of skills was measured in light of some of the learning objectives of the AAW stated in its syllabus. Findings indicated positive students' attitudes towards the AAW course. They also revealed that some learning outcomes did transfer to students' writing tasks in their major courses. However, transfer of these skills was more noticeable in some university disciplines (e.g. English more than others (e.g. Business Administration. Detailed explanations of reasons and contexts for skill transfer are presented. This research concludes with some pedagogical recommendations and suggestions for course improvement and further research.

  18. Tracing Knowledge Transfer from Universities to Industry: A Text Mining Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woltmann, Sabrina; Alkærsig, Lars

    2017-01-01

    This paper identifies transferred knowledge between universities and the industry by proposing the use of a computational linguistic method. Current research on university-industry knowledge exchange relies often on formal databases and indicators such as patents, collaborative publications and l...... is the first step to enable the identification of common knowledge and knowledge transfer via text mining to increase its measurability....... and license agreements, to assess the contribution to the socioeconomic surrounding of universities. We, on the other hand, use the texts from university abstracts to identify university knowledge and compare them with texts from firm webpages. We use these text data to identify common key words and thereby...... identify overlapping contents among the texts. As method we use a well-established word ranking method from the field of information retrieval term frequency–inverse document frequency (TFIDF) to identify commonalities between texts from university. In examining the outcomes of the TFIDF statistic we find...

  19. Addressing the Problem of Negative Lexical Transfer Errors in Chilean University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Anthony Dissington

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies of second language learning have revealed a connection between first language transfer and errors in second language production. This paper describes an action research study carried out among Chilean university students studying English as part of their degree programmes. The study focuses on common lexical errors made by Chilean Spanish-speakers due to negative first language transfer and aims to analyse the effects of systematic instruction and practice of this problematic lexis. It is suggested that raising awareness of lexical transfer through focused attention on common transfer errors is valued by students and seems essential for learners to achieve productive mastery.

  20. A Conceptual Model of Technology Transfer for Public Universities in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Necoechea

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Technology transfer from academic and scientific institutions has been transformed into a strategic variable for companies and nations who wish to cope with the challenges of a global economy. Since the early 1970s, many technology transfer models have tried to introduce key factors in the process. Previous studies have shown that technology transfer is influenced by various elements. This study is based on a review of two recent technology transfer models that we have used as basic concepts for developing our own conceptual model. Researcher–firm networks have been considered as key elements in the technology transfer process between public universities and firms. The conceptual model proposed could be useful to improve the efficiency of existing technology transfer mechanisms.

  1. An Institutional Framework to Explain the University: Industry Technology Transfer in a Public University of Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Puerta Sierra, Lizbeth Magdalena; Marín Vargas, Ma. Enselmina; López Torres, Virginia Guadalupe

    2017-01-01

    In the last years, studies and modifications to the science and technology regulatory framework in Mexico show the increase in the attention to transfer the research results of professors and researchers from higher education institutions, towards the productive sector with the purpose of generating regional, national and international growth and development. This study has conducted to the search of the factors that determine the increase of linkage activities and technology transfer. Based ...

  2. Company-University Collaboration Types As A Determinant For Knowledge Transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woltmann, Sabrina; Alkærsig, Lars

    This paper develops a framework for a novel measurement of outcomes of different types of company-university collaboration. We test whether the level of formalization and the type of interaction influences the outcomes, in particular knowledge transfer. We extend the existing research by applying...... to identify additional forms of knowledge transfer and give companies insights into their potential benefits from different types of relationships. We propose a new perspective that enables companies to shape and adapt their external knowledge search as effective as possible....... novel statistical computational methods form the field of natural language processing to identify the knowledge transfer. We investigate how the level of formalization of collaboration affects the knowledge transfer between universities and companies. Preliminary results indicate that we are able...

  3. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA ESTIMATING THE ECONOMIC IMPACT

    OpenAIRE

    Ruttan, Vernon W.

    2001-01-01

    There is strong synergy among research, education, technology development and technology transfer. Examples of successful public-private technology transfer linkage institutions are provided. But efforts to document the benefits of research conducted at the University of Minnesota to the state have rarely been conducted with the rigor that would be required to meet the test of professional credibility. A program of research to develop more rigorous evidence on economic benefits to the State i...

  4. Technology Transfer From The University of Minas Gerais to a Private Company: Process and Results

    OpenAIRE

    Alves De Oliveira, Maria Do Rosário; Girolleti, Domingos A.; Maccari, Emerson Antonio; Storopoli, José Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Economic growth and technological development are closely related. In this article, the   process of technology transfer developed by the UFMG (a new sole cushioning system for a footwear industry in Nova Serrana city, in Minas Gerais State) is analyzed, using a case study. The data were collected from UFMG document research and through semi-structured interviews with the principal stakeholders. The process of technology transfer from the university to Crômic was a great learning process for ...

  5. Brazilian university technology transfer to rural areas Transferência de tecnologia de universidades brasileiras na área rural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enio Marchesan

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In agriculture, there is a difference between average yield obtained by farmers and crop potential. There is technology available to increase yields, but not all farmers have access to it and/or use this information. This clearly characterizes an extension and technology transference problem. There are several technology transfer systems, but there is no system to fit all conditions. Therefore, it is necessary to create extension solutions according to local conditions. Another rural extension challenge is efficiency, despite continuous funding reductions. One proposal that has resulted from extension reform worldwide has suggested integration between the public and private sectors. The public universities could play the role of training and updating technical assistance of human resources, which is the one of the main aspects that has limited technology transfer. The objective of this study was to identify approaches to promote technology transfer generated in Brazilian public universities to rural areas through literature review. An experimental approach of technology transfer is presented here where a Brazilian university extension Vice-chancellor incorporates professionals from consolidated research groups according to demand. In this way, public universities take part of their social functions, by integrating teaching, research, and extension.Em agricultura, há diferenças entre a produtividade média obtida pelos produtores e o potencial produtivo dos cultivos. Há informação tecnológica disponível para aumentar a produtividade, mas nem todos os produtores têm acesso e/ou usam a informação. Isso caracteriza claramente um problema de extensão e transferência de tecnologia. Há vários sistemas de transferência de tecnologia, mas, como não há sistema que se ajuste a todas as condições, é necessário criar alternativas adequadas às condições de cada local. Outro desafio da extensão rural é ser eficiente, apesar da cont

  6. Determination of effective university-industry joint research for photovoltaic technology transfer (UIJRPTT) in Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugandhavanija, Pornpimol; Sukchai, Sukruedee; Ketjoy, Nipon; Klongboonjit, Sakol

    2011-01-01

    Most of the literatures related to university-industry (U-I) and technology transfer assume that the collaboration particularly the U-I joint research is beneficial to both university and industry which as a result underpins the sustainable development of economics and living standards of developed and developing countries. The U-I joint research for photovoltaic technology transfer in a developing country like Thailand should have been increased considering the fact that (i) the government implemented various strategies to support the renewable energy research and market development, (ii) the university aimed to be ''research-based university and (iii) the Thai photovoltaic industry struggle for competitiveness and survival in the global market. However, evidence revealed that the university and industry conducted little number of U-I joint projects. In this paper, we investigate the factors influencing the effective U-I joint research for photovoltaic technology transfer (UIJRPTT). In an attempt to better understand the influence of the factors, the path model with factors related to characteristics and perspectives of the university and the industry as well as joint research mechanism and their linkages to higher growth and improved economic and quality performance of the U-I joint research is developed and validated. The developed model empirically explains interaction between the factors and the outcome factors and can assist the government, the university and the industry to devise target strategies to improve the growth and performance of UIJRPTT. (author)

  7. An Institutional Framework to Explain the University-Industry Technology Transfer in a Public University of Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizbeth Magdalena Puerta Sierra

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In the last years, studies and modifications to the science and technology regulatory framework in Mexico show the increase in the attention to transfer the research results of professors and researchers from higher education institutions, towards the productive sector with the purpose of generating regional, national and international growth and development. This study has conducted to the search of the factors that determine the increase of linkage activities and technology transfer. Based on the literature review, this study develops a framework integrated with the factors considered that have a significantly impact in the university-industry linkage and technology transfer. The proposed independent variables are the following: Institutional Factors, Academic Profile, and Innovation.

  8. Addressing the Problem of Negative Lexical Transfer Errors in Chilean University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissington, Paul Anthony

    2018-01-01

    Studies of second language learning have revealed a connection between first language transfer and errors in second language production. This paper describes an action research study carried out among Chilean university students studying English as part of their degree programmes. The study focuses on common lexical errors made by Chilean…

  9. Analysing knowledge transfer channels between universities and industry : to what degree do sectors also matter?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekkers, R.N.A.; Bodas de Araújo Freitas, I.M.

    2008-01-01

    There is a wide variety of channels through which knowledge and technology is being transferred between universities and industry. This paper aims to explain the relative importance of these different channels in different contexts. For this purpose, responses from two questionnaires were analysed,

  10. Transferring experience labs for production engineering students to universities in newly industrialized countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiden, A.; Posselt, G.; Bhakar, V.; Singh, R.; Sangwan, K. S.; Herrmann, C.

    2018-01-01

    The Indian economy is one of the fastest growing economies in the world and the demand for the skilled engineers is increasing. Subsequently the Indian education sector is growing to provide the necessary number of skilled engineers. Current Indian engineering graduates have broad theoretical background but lack in methodological, soft and practical skills. To bridge this gap, the experience lab ideas from the engineering education at “Die Lernfabrik” (learning factory) of the Technische Universität Braunschweig (TU Braunschweig) is transferred to the Birla Institute of Technology and Science in Pilani (BITS Pilani), India. This Lernfabrik successfully strengthened the methodological, soft and practical skills of the TU Braunschweig production-engineering graduates. The target group is discrete manufacturing education with focusing on energy and resource efficiency as well as cyber physical production systems. As the requirements of industry and academia in India differs from Germany, the transfer of the experience lab to the Indian education system needs special attention to realize a successful transfer project. This publication provides a unique approach to systematically transfer the educational concept in Learning Factory from a specific university environment to a different environment in a newly industrialized country. The help of a bilateral university driven practice partnership between the two universities creates a lighthouse for the Indian university environment.

  11. University, Knowledge and Regional Development: Factors Affecting Knowledge Transfer in a Developing Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fongwa, Neba Samuel; Marais, Lochner

    2016-01-01

    The role of knowledge in the current knowledge economy cannot be overly emphasised. Successful regions are continuously being linked to excellence in the production, accumulation, and application of knowledge. Universities have increasingly been at the centre of such knowledge production, application and transfer. Yet, there is little research and…

  12. Transfer and Articulation Issues between California Community Colleges and California State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The primary purpose of this study was to discover common transfer and articulation practices and to determine what practices aid in the implementation of the STAR Act between California Community Colleges and the California State University. The review of literature revealed a lack of research on the application of practices in transfer…

  13. Research Universities, Technology Transfer, and Job Creation: What Infrastructure, For What Training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodhag, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Technology transfer and innovation are considered major drivers of sustainable development; they place knowledge and its dissemination in society at the heart of the development process. This article considers the role of research universities, and how they can interact with key actors and institutions involved in "innovation…

  14. Describing an Environment for a Self-Sustaining Technology Transfer Service in a Small Research Budget University: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieb, Sharon Lynn

    2014-01-01

    This single-site qualitative study sought to identify the characteristics that contribute to the self sustainability of technology transfer services at universities with small research budgets through a case study analysis of a small research budget university that has been operating a financially self-sustainable technology transfer service for…

  15. Research Results Transfer towards the Productive Sector via Research Collaboration in Four Colombian Public Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Eugenia Morales Rubiano

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article shows the determining factors in the research results transfer towards the productive sector via research collaboration in four Colombian public universities. Thirty heads of units in the aforementioned universities were interviewed, which served to determine eleven cases of study and conduct interviews with thirty-five participants ranging from researchers, participant in formation and business people, in each case, it was found that especially in the last decade universities have turned to creating capacities for research collaboration as well as an openness in participants to create links that not only go in favor of enriching the productive sector but also in strengthening formation and research processes. It was concluded that there is a recent growing interest in the different actors in strengthening the bonds between the universities and the productive sector, though there may be some difficulties in the process of research collaboration due to the lack of an appropriate regulatory framework.

  16. A Study on Coping Patterns of Junior College Students

    OpenAIRE

    Ramya, N.; Parthasarathy, R.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the coping patterns followed by the junior college students. Further, an extensive effort was done to study the gender differences in coping patterns used by the students. This study was conducted in Christ College, Bangalore and on the first and second-year students of pre-university studying in either of the branches (Bachelor of Arts, Science, or Commerce). A total of 120 samples were collected from study population of junior college students usin...

  17. [Survey on public health nursing education-in the comparison of nursing education courses, universities, advanced courses for public health nurse with junior nursing colleges, and public health nursing school].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Kayoko; Ikeda, Nobuko; Kanagawa, Katuko; Shiomi, Sigeki; Suzuki, Akira; Hirayama, Tomoko; Furuya, Akie; Ymazaki, Kyoko; Yasumura, Seiji

    2005-08-01

    Changes in public health nursing education have been consideration. Theses changes include a dramatic increase in the number of public health nurses (PHNs) who have enrolled for nursing courses at university. This study was conducted to assess the current status and future of public health nursing education as perceived by teachers and students at three types of schools: universities offering nursing courses, advanced courses for PHNs with junior nursing colleges, and public health nursing schools. Questionnaires were distributed to teachers and students by mail. The questions that were sent to teachers asked which subjects were required to become a certified PHN, which lecture methods were employed to teach public health-particularly community health assessment methods, and what was the level of awareness of the activities of PHNs. Students were asked about their motivation to be a PHN, their understanding of public health, their views of public health activities and their images of PHNs. Responses were analyzed and differences between questionnaires from different schools were noted. These included the number of subjects and the total number of hours spent doing practical training and field experience in universities and the other types of schools, and the number of teachers. Differences also were noted among students at three types of schools about their age, methods of public health activities, knowledge about activities undertaken by PHNs, and their images of PHNs. No differences were observed among the schools with respect to the students' conceptual understanding of public health. Student age, practical training and field experience were found to contribute to their level of understanding of public health and public health nursing. It is thus necessary to consider the teaching methods employed by universities that administer nursing courses and the effectiveness of courses offered by graduate schools.

  18. Experience-Oriented Knowledge Organisation for the Transference of Scientific Knowledge from Universities to SMEs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Marianne; Løkkegaard, Sarai; Jantzen, Christian

    2018-01-01

    registered in an university research information management system. The analysis focuses on how to meet the characteristics of SMEs in the design and organisation of the subject terms in the navigation and searching system and in the presentation of the scientific knowledge. The design suggestions are based......Transferring scientific knowledge between universities and industry is known to be problematic, specifically for small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) that have limited resources and absorption capacity. A variety of channels is used for knowledge transfer. These include what is commonly...... referred to as generic pathways (e.g. scientific publications) and relational pathways (e.g. faculty consulting). The purpose of this research is to extend our knowledge about the design of knowledge organization for a generic pathway interface providing access to scientific knowledge and publications...

  19. Nine drivers of knowledge transfer between universities and industry R&D partners in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. van Zyl

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available This article presents part of the findings of the Research Marketing and Technology Commercialization Survey conducted in South Africa during 2005 and 2006. Part IV (Q4 of this survey was designed to examine nine drivers of knowledge transfer between South African universities in their research and development (R&D collaborations with industry firms. Respondents from a judgemental sample ranked the knowledge transfer for R&D collaboration between university departments and industry as: (a the need to extract appropriate knowledge at the right time to make critical decisions; (b the perception that knowledge is a valuable resource; (c the emphasis on getting a return on investment in research; (d the need to protect knowledge for competitive advantage; (e the need to close the knowledge gap; (f international trade; (g the need to protect intellectual property such as patents and trademarks; (h geographic proximity between the knowledge source and recipient; and (i war, terrorism and natural disasters.

  20. Transfer and Reception of New Institutional Economics: An Example of Two Universities in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Jovanović

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The research “Transfer and Reception of New Institutional Economics: An Example of Two Universities in Serbia” was conducted in 2005/2006. In order to achieve the goals of the Serbian team of the DIOSCURI project, the main aim of the case study is analysis of the influence of Western institutions in the light of transfer and reception of new institutional economics in two academic institutions in Serbia: The Faculty of Law (The Department of Law and Economics of the University of Belgrade, and The Faculty of Management of BK University. The title of the case study illustrates the focus of the entire research: analysis of Western influence, namely transfer and reception of new institutional economics, on the two institutions and possible obstacles caused by old-fashioned stakeholders and informal institutions. Bearing in mind that the Department of Law and Economics is the leader in the reception of the new institutional economics (NIE in Serbia, the case study will be mostly about it. The Faculty of Management was chosen because of its “greenfield” character and the fact that from its very beginning it followed the experiences of North American universities. The research investigates whether and how the transfer and reception of the Western ideas and economic theory, particularly the NIE, is affected by the difference between an institution with a two-hundred-year tradition and a newly established one. The question is how a traditionalist institution like the Faculty of Law communicated Western economic thought and whether endurance in teaching the exclusively Marxian paradigm up until the 1990s, was an obstacle to the reception of Western economic thought, particularly NIE.

  1. Academic Venturing in Higher Education: Institutional Effects on Performance of University Technology Transfer. ASHE Annual Meeting Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Joshua B.

    This study investigated institutional resource factors that may explain differential performance with university technology transfer--the process by which university research is transformed into marketable products. Using multi-source data on 108 research universities, a set of internal resources (financial, physical, human capital, and…

  2. From university research to innovation: Detecting knowledge transfer via text mining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woltmann, S.; Clemmensen, L.; Alkærsig, L

    2016-07-01

    Knowledge transfer by universities is a top priority in innovation policy and a primary purpose for public research funding, due to being an important driver of technical change and innovation. Current empirical research on the impact of university research relies mainly on formal databases and indicators such as patents, collaborative publications and license agreements, to assess the contribution to the socioeconomic surrounding of universities. In this study, we present an extension of the current empirical framework by applying new computational methods, namely text mining and pattern recognition. Text samples for this purpose can include files containing social media contents, company websites and annual reports. The empirical focus in the present study is on the technical sciences and in particular on the case of the Technical University of Denmark (DTU). We generated two independent text collections (corpora) to identify correlations of university publications and company webpages. One corpus representing the company sites, serving as sample of the private economy and a second corpus, providing the reference to the university research, containing relevant publications. We associated the former with the latter to obtain insights into possible text and semantic relatedness. The text mining methods are extrapolating the correlations, semantic patterns and content comparison of the two corpora to define the document relatedness. We expect the development of a novel tool using contemporary techniques for the measurement of public research impact. The approach aims to be applicable across universities and thus enable a more holistic comparable assessment. This rely less on formal databases, which is certainly beneficial in terms of the data reliability. We seek to provide a supplementary perspective for the detection of the dissemination of university research and hereby enable policy makers to gain additional insights of (informal) contributions of knowledge

  3. Analisis dan Perancangan Sistem Informasi Direktorat Research & Technology Transfer Binus University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahenda Metta Surya

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Rapid growth of information technology development as well as increasing level of competition make every company need to establish an information system to support its business process. Research & Technology Transfer Directorate of Binus University is aware of this matter and makes a goal to improve the existing business process and develop a web-based information system that is able to support the existing business process to be more effective and efficient. This study aims to conduct an analysis and a design of information system for Research & Technology Transfer Directorate Binus University that can enhance the existing business process. Research used two methods, firstly data gathering done by conducting field studies and literature reviews, secondly the analysis and design of the system with object-oriented method. The result achieved from this research is a web-based information system that can support Research & Technology Transfer Directorate business process. The conclusion of this research is a new integrated web-based information system that can support and enhance current business process by connecting all parts of the system with the result to make all process more effective and efficient.

  4. Experience-Oriented Knowledge Organisation for the Transference of Scientific Knowledge from Universities to SMEs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Marianne; Løkkegaard, Sarai; Jantzen, Christian

    2017-01-01

    referred to as generic pathways (e.g. scientific publishing) and relational pathways (e.g. faculty consulting). The purpose of this research is to extend our knowledge about the design of generic pathways. The analysis is concentrated on the knowledge organisation system for a research management system......Transferring scientific knowledge between universities and industry is known to be problematic, specifically for small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) that have limited resources and absorption capacity. A variety of channels is used for knowledge transfer. These include what is commonly...... - how to meet the characteristics of SMEs in the design of subject categories in the navigation system and in the presentation of the scientific knowledge by controlled and uncontrolled keywords and descriptive annotations. The design suggestions are based on findings from a qualitative situation...

  5. Impact evaluation for University-Business Cooperation and Technology Transfer in higher education systems: cluster analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoe Daniela Hamanaka Gusberti

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Higher education systems evolved in recent decades. Universities must not only provide society with capable professionals but also act in the market for technologies, knowledge, and ideas to promote technological development. This paper discusses the motivational performance evaluation system for technology transfer process, specifically the patterns’ evaluation of academic units considering micro-cultures and idiosyncrasies’ analysis, in the academic context of autonomy. Based on action research, the existing performance evaluation system was assessed, and multivariate cluster analysis was proposed and tested as a method to enable micro cultures’ identification and evaluation. The analysis proposed enabled a tool for reflexive discussion regarding the effectiveness of the institutional innovation system in academic units and Engineering Education, and its implications for social and technological development of industry and society enabled action proposals for improvement in the university’s technology transfer management process.

  6. Universally composable oblivious transfer based on a variant of lPN

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    David, Bernardo Machado; Dowsley, Rafael; Nascimento, Anderson C A

    2014-01-01

    Oblivious transfer (OT) is a fundamental two-party cryptographic primitive that implies secure multiparty computation. In this paper, we introduce the first OT based on the Learning Parity with Noise (LPN) problem. More specifically, we use the LPN variant that was introduced by Alekhnovich (FOCS...... 2003). We prove that our protocol is secure against active static adversaries in the Universal Composability framework in the common reference string model. Our constructions are based solely on a LPN style assumption and thus represents a clear next step from current code-based OT protocols, which...

  7. Experiential Interface Design for the Transference of Scientific Publications from University to SMEs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Marianne; Løkkegaard, Sarai; Jantzen, Christian

    2017-01-01

    to develop suggestions for the interface design of a generic knowledge pathway. The interface design is based on principles from experience design with the aim to draw attention to the scientific knowledge and make it desirable and understandable. The study used practice theory as its conceptual framework......Transferring knowledge between universities and industry is known to be problematic. The paper addresses the situation of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in order to understand their use of scientific knowledge. We use our understanding of SME situations and information practices...... to interface design. Generally, the SMEs look for knowledge in two situations: when they have a pressing problem to solve and when they want inspiration for new business opportunities. The SMEs consult many different channels and scientific knowledge from universities is not their first choice. SMEs see...

  8. Knowledge Transfer: A Case Study of a Community Nutrition Education Program at a Land-Grant University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado, Ghaffar Ali

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the process of knowledge transfer. The setting is a health and nutrition educational program at University of Minnesota Extension. The main research question was how is Knowledge Transfer being implemented in Extension, specifically Educational Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program? A case study,…

  9. IS YOUR DISTRICT READY TO START A JUNIOR COLLEGE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    PATTERSON, DOW

    TO DETERMINE IF A DISTRICT IS READY TO ESTABLISH A JUNIOR COLLEGE, CERTAIN QUESTIONS MUST BE ANSWERED--(1) ARE THERE ENOUGH HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES TO WARRANT THE PROGRAM WITHOUT UNDUE TAXATION. (2) WILL THE COLLEGE BE ABLE TO OFFER THE USUAL PROGRAMS OF TRANSFER, VOCATIONAL TRAINING, GUIDANCE, AND GENERAL EDUCATION. (3) SHOULD IT BE AN EXTENSION OF…

  10. First aid and basic life support of junior doctors: A prospective study in Nijmegen, the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, E.C.T.H.; Severien, I.; Metz, J.C.; Berden, H.J.J.M.; Biert, J.

    2006-01-01

    According to the Dutch medical education guidelines junior doctors are expected to be able to perform first aid and basic life support. A prospective study was undertaken to assess the level of first aid and basic life support (BLS) competence of junior doctors at the Radboud University Nijmegen

  11. Study of single- and two-phase fluid transfer between subchannels at Kumamoto University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadatomi, Michio

    2004-01-01

    Firstly, the definitions of turbulent mixing, void drift and diversion cross-flow, which are three components of fluid transfer between subchannels, are given together with the relations of each component with equilibrium or non-equilibrium two-phase subchannel flows. Secondly, measuring techniques of the three components are briefly presented in turn together with typical measurement results. In turbulent mixing measurement, a tracer injection method has been adopted at Kumamoto University, while an isokinetic discharge method for both void drift an diversion cross-flow measurements. In the experiment of hydraulically non-equilibrium flow with both void drift and/or diversion cross-flow, experimental data on flow redistribution process have been obtained. The data include the axial variations of gas and liquid flow rates and void fraction in each subchannel and pressure difference between the subchannels. After analyzing these variations, some correlations on the void drift and the diversion cross-flow are obtained. Finally, a subchannel analysis code used at Kumamoto University is presented together with the results of its validation test against the experimental data on flow redistribution process mentioned above. The code is based on a two-phase two-fluid model, and is applicable to adiabatic two-phase flows under steady state condition. Basic equations in the code are the conservation equations of mass, axial momentum and lateral momentum, while the constitutive equations include the correlations of void diffusion coefficient, both interfacial and wall friction coefficients for the cross-flow, etc. (author)

  12. The Junior Faculty Laboratory: an innovative model of peer mentoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kimberly S; Hastings, S Nicole; Purser, Jama L; Whitson, Heather E

    2011-12-01

    Mentoring in academic medicine has been shown to contribute to the success of junior faculty, resulting in increased productivity, career satisfaction, and opportunities for networking. Although traditional dyadic mentoring, involving one senior faculty member and one junior protégé, is the dominant model for mentoring in the academic environment, there is increasing recognition that the sharing of knowledge, skills, and experiences among peers may also contribute to the career development of junior faculty. The authors describe the structure, activities, and outcomes of the Junior Faculty Laboratory (JFL), a self-organized, flexible, and dynamic peer-mentoring model within the Duke University Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development. As an innovative mentoring model, JFL is entirely peer driven, and its activities are determined by the real-time needs of members. In contrast to some other peer-mentoring models, JFL lacks senior faculty input or a structured curriculum, members are multidisciplinary, meeting times are project driven rather than preset, and participation in collaborative projects is optional based on the interests and needs of group members. Additionally, JFL was not formed as a substitute for, but as a complement to, the dyadic mentoring relationships enjoyed by its members. The model, now in its fifth year, has demonstrated success and sustainability. The authors present the JFL as an innovative, mentoring model that can be reproduced by other junior faculty seeking to foster collegial relationships with peers while simultaneously enhancing their career development.

  13. Transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlgren, Bjarne; Aarkrog, Vibe

    Bogen er den første samlede indføring i transfer på dansk. Transfer kan anvendes som praksis-filosofikum. Den giver en systematisk indsigt til den studerende, der spørger: Hvordan kan teoretisk viden bruges til at reflektere over handlinger i situationer, der passer til min fremtidige arbejdsplads?...

  14. The transferability of information and communication technology skills from university to the workplace: a qualitative descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bembridge, Elizabeth; Levett-Jones, Tracy; Jeong, Sarah Yeun-Sim

    2011-04-01

    This paper presents the findings from a study that explored whether the information and communication technology (ICT) skills nurses acquired at university are relevant and transferable to contemporary practice environments. Whilst universities have attempted to integrate information and communication technology into nursing curricula it is not known whether the skills developed for educational purposes are relevant or transferable to clinical contexts. A qualitative descriptive study was used to explore the perspectives of a small group of new graduate nurses working in a regional/semi-metropolitan healthcare facility in New South Wales, Australia. Semi-structured interviews were used and the data thematically analysed. The themes that emerged from the study are presented in accordance with the conceptual framework and structured under the three headings of pre-transfer, transition and post-transfer. The transferability of information and communication technology skills from university to the workplace is impacted by a range of educational, individual, organisational and contextual factors. Access to adequate ICT and the necessary training opportunities influences new graduates' work satisfaction and their future employment decisions. The ability to effectively use information and communication technology was viewed as essential to the provision of quality patient care. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Teachers’ beliefs about improving transfer of algebraic skills from mathematics into physics in senior pre-university education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tursucu, S.; Spandaw, J.G.; Flipse, S.M.; de Vries, M.J.

    2017-01-01

    Students in senior pre-university education encounter difficulties in the application of mathematics into physics. This paper presents the outcome of an explorative qualitative study of teachers’ beliefs about improving the transfer of algebraic skills from mathematics into physics. We

  16. Knowledge Transfer between SMEs and Higher Education Institutions: Differences between Universities and Colleges of Higher Education in the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delfmann, Heike; Koster, Sierdjan

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge transfer (KT) between higher education institutions (HEIs) and businesses is seen as a key element of innovation in knowledge-driven economies: HEIs generate knowledge that can be adopted in the regional economy. This process of valorization has been studied extensively, mainly with a focus on universities. In the Netherlands, there is a…

  17. Motivation and Self-Regulation in Community College Transfer Students at a Four-Year Online University

    Science.gov (United States)

    List, Alexandra; Nadasen, Denise

    2017-01-01

    Motivation and self-regulation were examined in a sample of community college transfer students enrolled in a 4-year, online university. The relation between motivation and self-regulation and students' performance was examined, as was the association between these learner characteristics (i.e., motivation and self-regulation) and sociodemographic…

  18. Teachers' Beliefs about Improving Transfer of Algebraic Skills from Mathematics into Physics in Senior Pre-University Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tursucu, Süleyman; Spandaw, Jeroen; Flipse, Steven; de Vries, Marc J.

    2017-01-01

    Students in senior pre-university education encounter difficulties in the application of mathematics into physics. This paper presents the outcome of an explorative qualitative study of teachers' beliefs about improving the transfer of algebraic skills from mathematics into physics. We interviewed 10 mathematics and 10 physics teachers using a…

  19. Knowledge transfer through university-industry relations: some aspects of organizational culture. Teadmussiire ülikoolide ja majanduspraktika suhete abil: mõned organisatsioonikultuurilised aspektid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maaja Vadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of national universities and other higher education institutions in knowledge transfer in countries with post-Soviet economies has been studied in very modest extent, especially in the context of small countries. This paper concentrates on the organizational culture aspects playing important role in the commercialization of university research within the university knowledge transfer and knowledge based society framework in Estonia. Knowledge sharing and commercialization depend on nature of organizational culture, as a part of internal environment. Two largest Estonian universities (University of Tartu and Tallinn University of Technology are compared in various factors influencing knowledge transfer using document analysis and interviews. The present study has shown that knowledge transfer faces numerous issues, and in particular soft issues (individual mindsets and organizational values may differ from university to university

  20. Advanced Life Support Research and Technology Transfer at the University of Guelph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dixon M.

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Research and technology developments surrounding Advanced Life-Support (ALS began at the University of Guelph in 1992 as the Space and Advanced Life Support Agriculture (SALSA program, which now represents Canada’s primary contribution to ALS research. The early focus was on recycling hydroponic nutrient solutions, atmospheric gas analysis and carbon balance, sensor research and development, inner/intra-canopy lighting and biological filtration of air in closed systems. With funding from federal, provincial and industry partners, a new generation of technology emerged to address the challenges of deploying biological systems as fundamental components of life-support infrastructure for long-duration human space exploration. Accompanying these advances were a wide range of technology transfer opportunities in the agri-food and health sectors, including air and water remediation, plant and environment sensors, disinfection technologies, recyclable growth substrates and advanced light emitting diode (LED lighting systems. This report traces the evolution of the SALSA program and catalogues the benefits of ALS research for terrestrial and non-terrestrial applications.

  1. Examining Mental Health Differences between Transfer and Nontransfer University Students Seeking Counseling Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehr, Kristin E.; Daltry, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    This article sought to examine the differences between transfer and nontransfer students on mental health factors, social involvement, and academic success. It was found that transfer students had significantly higher scores on several mental health factors as compared to nontransfer students. It was also found that transfer students were less…

  2. Pupil Behavior in Junior Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boydell, D.

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of the exploratory study reported here was to investigate the nature of children's behavior in unstreamed, informal, junior classrooms where the children sit in small groups and the incidence of private teacher talk to small groups and individual children is high. (Author)

  3. 300 Junior Novel Anticipation Guides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polette, Nancy

    2006-01-01

    In this book, the author has created reproducible anticipation guides to 300 popular junior novels (grades 4-8) ranging from classics like Ben and Me and Cricket in Times Square to the current award winner, Kira, Kira. The book consists of 300 reproducible sets of open ended values questions to pique the interest of readers. Librarians and…

  4. Junior College Faculty Job Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, Joanne

    Some of the research done to date concerning job satisfaction of junior college faculty is reviewed in this "Brief." Part I of the "Brief" describes four frameworks that have been applied to the analysis of job satisfaction: the traditional approach, the two-factor approach, the need hierarchy, and the cognitive dissonance approach. Part II…

  5. Junior PC-Kørekort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansbøl, Mikala; Mathiasen, Helle

    udviklingsprojekt med forsøg med DANSK IT's Junior PC-kørekort® som metode og redskab til at evaluere og dokumentere elevernes IT-kompetencer. Projektet blev gennemført i perioden fra 2002-2003 og afsluttet i foråret 2003. Rapporten er baseret på kvalitative case studier af elever og læreres arbejde med Junior PC......-kørekort® prøverne. DANSK IT's Junior PC-kørekort® kan betragtes som et forsøg på at etablere en bestemt fælleskulturel tilgang til elevernes IT-kompetencer i folkeskolen. Ud fra et situeret læringsperspektiv problematiserer rapporten anvendelsen af de standardiserede prøver som metode til at dokumentere og evaluere...... elevernes IT-kompetencer. Rapporten (2MB) fylder 80 sider ekskl. bilag. Bemærk, at forskningsrapporten handler om Dansk IT's Junior PC-kørekort - ikke at forveksle med det IT-bevis for folkeskolens elever, som Undevisningsministeriet har udviklet. Dette IT-bevis koncept skiftede navn i januar 2004, hvor...

  6. Holography in the Junior High.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaszkiewicz, Frank

    1988-01-01

    Examines the use of holography in the art technology program of a junior high school. Characterizing holography as a valuable artistic experience and discovery experience and stressing the importance of student interest and involvement, the author discusses the necessary equipment for the project and includes two diagrams of a holographic setup.…

  7. TRANSFER

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reports on further studies on long range energy transfer between curcumine as donor and another thiazine dye, thionine, which is closely related to methylene blue as energy harvester (Figure 1). Since thionine is known to have a higher quantum yield of singlet oxygen sensitization than methylene blue [8], it is ...

  8. Transfer of radioactive waste disposal knowledge to future generations: A stiff challenge for universities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabet, B.B.; Elorza, F.J.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: In general, effective knowledge management strategies rely on the capacity to perform a full range of allied functions, among which education and research are the key components. However, in most countries and notably in Europe, universities which have to conduct leading-edge research and to supply society with future skilled staffs on radioactive waste disposal, suffer from both the shortage of the institutional national support and the decline of interest among students. This paper gives an overview of the academic educational challenges in geological disposal of radioactive waste. Prior to presenting possible solutions to overcome difficulties encountered in this field, the causes of the present failure that seriously threaten the future provision of human resources are identified and analysed. Some of the main findings are: The poor image of nuclear issues in general and the lack of public confidence in the management and disposal of radioactive waste in particular; The smallness of the radwaste community and the narrowness of the job market at the national level; The organisational structure of most universities that inhibits partnerships with non-academic institutions and impedes collaborative activities; The reticence of most governments to invest public funds in the academic education on radwaste disposal. These particular motives added to the common problems shared by the whole nuclear sector such as the lack of educational programmes, the ageing of teachers, and the decline in academic R and D activities, bring about the need for collaborative actions. The paper gives an example of possible solutions through the development of a European academic initiative. In response to the rising alarm about the future shortage of expertise, EURATOM has launched the ENEN II (European Commission 6th FP project No. FP6-036414 for years 2007-2008) project. The goal of this project is to consolidate the European nuclear education, training and knowledge

  9. Knowledge and Technology Transfer (KTT) Activities Between Universities and Firms in Switzerland: The Main Facts: an empirical analysis based on firm-level data

    OpenAIRE

    Arvanitis, Spyridon; Kubli, Ursina; Sydow, Nora; Wörter, Martin

    2005-01-01

    This study is part of a large project aiming at the investigation of a) extent and b) economic relevance of knowledge and technology transfer (KTT) between science institutions (universities, universities of a pplied science and other public re search institutions) and private corporations. Under knowledge and technology transfer we understand very broadly any activities targeted at transferring knowledge an d technology that may help a company or a research institution – depending on the dir...

  10. SPANISH WRITTEN BY BILINGUAL STUDENTS IN THE INTERCULTURAL UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF MEXICO: SURVEY OF LINGUIST TRANSFER

    OpenAIRE

    Carmen Emilia Mina Viáfara

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARYThis survey results from the evaluation of achievements and academical progress obtain by my students of the subject critical reading and texts production in the Intercultural University of the State of Mexico, in San Felipe del Progreso, during the first year and besides the profit to my teaching labour related to compare the results obtained of my thesis Linguistics transfers from náhuatl to Spanish in Santa Ana Tlacotenco in Mexico City with the characteristic from spanish of bilin...

  11. Assessment of junior doctors? admission notes: do they follow what they learn?

    OpenAIRE

    Barnawi, Rashid A.; Ghurab, Abdulaziz M.; Balubaid, Hassan K.; Alfaer, Sultan S.; Hanbazazah, Kamal A.; Bukhari, Mohammed F.; Hamed, Omayma A.; Bakhsh, Talal M.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To assess the completeness of history-taking and physical-examination notes of junior doctors at King Abdulaziz University Hospital per the approach they learned in medical school. Methods In this retrospective study, we reviewed 860 admission notes written by 269 junior doctors (interns and residents) in an academic tertiary-care medical centre in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, over a two-month period. Notes were evaluated for completeness using a checklist developed with reference to rele...

  12. Exploring the Mechanisms of Knowledge Transfer in University-Industry Collaborations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christian; Cappelen, Katja

    2014-01-01

    respondents have been involved in collaborative projects, such as student-industry cooperation or collaboration projects between scientists and businesses. This research shows that to secure real value adding through knowledge transfer in universityindustry collaboration projects, it is important...

  13. Commercial Transfer--A Business Model Innovation for the Entrepreneurial University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaus, Olaf; Raith, Matthias G.

    2016-01-01

    While knowledge-intensive societies rely heavily on universities for the creation of knowledge, its translation into economic value is typically performed by firms in the market. Since universities increasingly depend on additional funds for new and expensive research, current policies urge them to interact proactively with the market. The authors…

  14. Clark Kerr's Multiversity and Technology Transfer in the Modern American Research University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigurdson, Kristjan T.

    2013-01-01

    In the early 1960s, Clark Kerr, the famed American educationalist and architect of the California public higher education system, took up the task of describing the emergent model of the contemporary American university. Multiversities, as he called them, were the large powerful American universities that packaged the provision of undergraduate,…

  15. Junior empresa: un modelo empresarial diferente = Junior enterprise: a different business model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Jiménez

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Resumen ¿Quién no está harto ya de oír cómo está el mercado laboral? Nos bombardean con un ruido de fondo incesante, como si graduarnos no fuese suficiente reto. Bueno, ¿y qué? Un grupo de estudiantes de la Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingeniería y Diseño Industrial de la Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (ETSIDI-UPM nos hemos unido y hemos creado nuestra propia Junior Empresa, un modelo empresarial diferente, innovador, que nos permite revertir todos los beneficios en aprendizaje. ¿Quién ha dicho que tengamos que dejarnos vencer por un sistema laboral obsoleto? Abstract Are you tired of hearing how difficult it is to get a job? They are filling our minds with a non-stop background noise, as if getting a degree was an insufficient challenge. So what? Well, some students from the Superior Technical School of Engineering and Industrial Design from the Technical University of Madrid (ETSIDIUPM have come together and created our own Junior Enterprise, a different business model, an innovative canvas, which allows us to transform all the benefits into learning. Who said our destiny is being crushed by an obsolete labour market?

  16. Changing the Culture of Science Communication Training for Junior Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankston, Adriana; McDowell, Gary S.

    2018-01-01

    Being successful in an academic environment places many demands on junior scientists. Science communication currently may not be adequately valued and rewarded, and yet communication to multiple audiences is critical for ensuring that it remains a priority in today’s society. Due to the potential for science communication to produce better scientists, facilitate scientific progress, and influence decision-making at multiple levels, training junior scientists in both effective and ethical science communication practices is imperative, and can benefit scientists regardless of their chosen career path. However, many challenges exist in addressing specific aspects of this training. Principally, science communication training and resources should be made readily available to junior scientists at institutions, and there is a need to scale up existing science communication training programs and standardize core aspects of these programs across universities, while also allowing for experimentation with training. We propose a comprehensive core training program be adopted by universities, utilizing a centralized online resource with science communication information from multiple stakeholders. In addition, the culture of science must shift toward greater acceptance of science communication as an essential part of training. For this purpose, the science communication field itself needs to be developed, researched and better understood at multiple levels. Ultimately, this may result in a larger cultural change toward acceptance of professional development activities as valuable for training scientists. PMID:29904538

  17. Changing the Culture of Science Communication Training for Junior Scientists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankston, Adriana; McDowell, Gary S

    2018-01-01

    Being successful in an academic environment places many demands on junior scientists. Science communication currently may not be adequately valued and rewarded, and yet communication to multiple audiences is critical for ensuring that it remains a priority in today's society. Due to the potential for science communication to produce better scientists, facilitate scientific progress, and influence decision-making at multiple levels, training junior scientists in both effective and ethical science communication practices is imperative, and can benefit scientists regardless of their chosen career path. However, many challenges exist in addressing specific aspects of this training. Principally, science communication training and resources should be made readily available to junior scientists at institutions, and there is a need to scale up existing science communication training programs and standardize core aspects of these programs across universities, while also allowing for experimentation with training. We propose a comprehensive core training program be adopted by universities, utilizing a centralized online resource with science communication information from multiple stakeholders. In addition, the culture of science must shift toward greater acceptance of science communication as an essential part of training. For this purpose, the science communication field itself needs to be developed, researched and better understood at multiple levels. Ultimately, this may result in a larger cultural change toward acceptance of professional development activities as valuable for training scientists.

  18. Examining Mental Health Differences among Transfer University Students Seeking Counseling Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daltry, Rachel; Mehr, Kristin E.

    2016-01-01

    This brief report was designed as a follow-up to a study that found that compared to nontransfer students that presented to the counseling center, transfer students who presented to the counseling center endorsed higher levels of symptoms of depression and social anxiety, as well as more academic and family problems. The current study investigated…

  19. Organizational Transformation to Promote Knowledge Transfer at Universities and R&D Institutions in Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balderrama, Jorge Ines Leon; Lopez, Lydia Venecia Gutierrez; Lafarga, Cuitlahuac Valdez

    2013-01-01

    Using the results of an empirical study in the State of Sonora, Mexico, this paper reports on an attempt to identify trends and transformations that have taken place in the way knowledge transfer activities are organized and structured in higher education institutions and research centres. The research was designed to provide a characterization of…

  20. Multidisciplinary Mentoring Programs to Enhance Junior Faculty Research Grant Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freel, Stephanie A; Smith, Paige C; Burns, Ebony N; Downer, Joanna B; Brown, Ann J; Dewhirst, Mark W

    2017-10-01

    Junior faculty face challenges in establishing independent research careers. Declining funding combined with a shift to multidisciplinary, collaborative science necessitates new mentorship models and enhanced institutional support. Two multidisciplinary mentorship programs to promote grant success for junior faculty were established at the Duke University School of Medicine beginning in 2011. These four-month programs-the Path to Independence Program (PtIP) for National Institutes of Health (NIH) R applicants and the K Club for NIH K applicants-use multiple senior faculty mentors and professional grant-writing staff to provide a 20-hour joint curriculum comprising a series of lectures, hands-on workshops, career development counseling, peer groups, and an internal study section. In March 2016, the authors analyzed the success rate for all NIH grants submitted by participants since program enrollment. In a 2015 postprogram survey, participants rated their feelings of support and competency across six skill factors. From October 2011 to March 2016, the programs engaged 265 senior faculty mentors, 145 PtIP participants, and 138 K Club participants. Success rates for NIH grant applications were 28% (61 awards/220 decisions) for PtIP participants-an increase over the 2010 Duke University junior faculty baseline of 11%-and 64% (38/59) for K Club participants. Respondents reported significantly increased feelings of support and self-ratings for each competency post program. The authors plan to expand the breadth of both the mentorship pool and faculty served. Broad implementation of similar programs elsewhere could bolster success, satisfaction, and retention of junior faculty investigators.

  1. Junior High Career Planning: What Students Want

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardick, Angela D.; Bernes, Kerry B.; Magnusson, Kris C.; Witko, Kim D.

    2004-01-01

    This research used "The Comprehensive Career Needs Survey" to assess the career counselling needs of 3,562 junior high students in Southern Alberta. This article examines junior high students' responses regarding their perceptions of (a) the relevance of career planning, (b) who they would approach for help with career planning, and (c)…

  2. Multiple mechanisms generate a universal scaling with dissipation for the air-water gas transfer velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katul, Gabriel; Liu, Heping

    2017-02-01

    A large corpus of field and laboratory experiments support the finding that the water side transfer velocity kL of sparingly soluble gases near air-water interfaces scales as kL˜(νɛ)1/4, where ν is the kinematic water viscosity and ɛ is the mean turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate. Originally predicted from surface renewal theory, this scaling appears to hold for marine and coastal systems and across many environmental conditions. It is shown that multiple approaches to representing the effects of turbulence on kL lead to this expression when the Kolmogorov microscale is assumed to be the most efficient transporting eddy near the interface. The approaches considered range from simplified surface renewal schemes with distinct models for renewal durations, scaling and dimensional considerations, and a new structure function approach derived using analogies between scalar and momentum transfer. The work offers a new perspective as to why the aforementioned 1/4 scaling is robust.

  3. Transfer students in STEM majors at a Midwestern University: Academic and social involvement factors that influence student success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Carlos

    There is soon-to-be a shortage of qualified U.S. workers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). As a result, many science-related jobs are being filled by technically-skilled foreign workers. If the U.S wants to maintain its global economic leadership, then it must ensure a continuous growth of highly-trained individuals in STEM disciplines. Therefore, American institutions of higher education, including community colleges, must identify potential factors that contribute to the lack of interest in STEM majors, as well as the low rate of success of students who enter STEM majors but struggle to finish their degrees. The purpose of this study was to ascertain the perceptions of community college transfer students who are pursuing bachelor degrees in STEM majors at Iowa State University (ISU). What were their transfer experiences and what influenced their academic success in STEM. Participants were encouraged to share their transfer experiences while at the community college as well as their experiences on the ISU campus. They were also asked about their level of academic involvement, their relationships with faculty, and their participation in peer group activities prior to and after transferring. The research design included both quantitative and qualitative components, which provided an in-depth look at the experiences of STEM non-engineering and engineering students. Quantitative data include students' background characteristics, demographic information, and college activities at the community college and ISU. Qualitative data were used to illuminate students' overall transfer experience and their successful journey in STEM fields. The combination of quantitative and qualitative methods allowed a better understanding of the strategies students put into practice once they transfer from a community college to a four-year institution in pursuit of a STEM bachelor's degree. The results of this study suggest that there is an association among the

  4. From university research to innovation Detecting knowledge transfer via text mining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woltmann, Sabrina; Clemmensen, Line Katrine Harder; Alkærsig, Lars

    2016-01-01

    and indicators such as patents, collaborative publications and license agreements, to assess the contribution to the socioeconomic surrounding of universities. In this study, we present an extension of the current empirical framework by applying new computational methods, namely text mining and pattern...... associated the former with the latter to obtain insights into possible text and semantic relatedness. The text mining methods are extrapolating the correlations, semantic patterns and content comparison of the two corpora to define the document relatedness. We expect the development of a novel tool using...... recognition. Text samples for this purpose can include files containing social media contents, company websites and annual reports. The empirical focus in the present study is on the technical sciences and in particular on the case of the Technical University of Denmark (DTU). We generated two independent...

  5. The European credit transfer system (ECTS): Introduction and practical experience at the Technical University of Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Bo Skjold

    2000-01-01

    and teaching after implementation of ECTS at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) is reported. The ratio of guest students attending advanced environmental engineering courses at DTU increased from 7 percent of class to almost 50 percent over a three-year period. The number of DTU students studying abroad...... was also affected by the implementation of ECTS in combination with DTU’s additional internationalisation activities. In 1998 DTU achieved balance between the inflow and outflow of students....

  6. CARIES PREVENTION AMONG JUNIOR SCHOOLCHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.К. Matelo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Biennial program of controlled tooth brushing performed econdary school among junior schoolchildren from Minsk secondary school № 166 proved to be highly effective. Decrease in caries increment has been shown on the average up to 50%. No credible differences between remineralising defluorinated toothpastes or pastes enriched with aminofluoride (F = 500 ppm and sodium fluoride  (F = 1000 ppm efficacy were found in this study. Credibility of the results was determined by comparison with similar study conducted on a bigger population of children. Though anti-caries effect of the same tooth-pastes in a bigger-scale study was lower — within 30%. Such difference can be explained by a different level of motivation and discipline of participants.Key words: schoolchildren, dental caries prevention, toothpastes. (Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. — 2011; 10 (6: 48–51

  7. High pressure study of high temperatures superconductors: Material base, universal Tc-behavior, and charge transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, C.W.; Hor, P.H.; Lin, J.G.; Xiong, Q.; Huang, Z.J.; Meng, R.L.; Xue, Y.Y.; Jean, Y.C.

    1991-01-01

    The superconducting transition temperature (T c ) has been measured in YBa 2 Cu 3 O 6.7 , YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 , Y 2 Ba 4 Cu 7 O 15 , YBa 2 Cu 4 O 8 , Tl 2 Ba 2 Ca n-1 Cu n O n+4-δ , La 2-x Sr x CuO 4 , and La 2-x Ba x CuO 4 under high pressures. The pressure effect on the positron lifetime (τ) has also been determined in the first four compounds. Based on these and other high pressure data, the authors suggest that (1) all known cuprate high temperature superconductors (HTS's) may be no more than mere modifications of either 214-T, 214-T', 123, or a combination of 214-T' and 123, (2) a nonmonotonic T c -behavior may govern the T c -variation of all hole cuprate HTS's and (3) pressure can induce charge transfer leading to a T c -change. The implications of these suggestions will also be discussed

  8. Normative foundations of technology transfer and transnational benefit principles in the UNESCO Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faunce, Thomas Alured; Nasu, Hitoshi

    2009-06-01

    The United Nations Scientific, Education, and Cultural Organization Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights (UDBHR) expresses in its title and substance a controversial linkage of two normative systems: international human rights law and bioethics. The UDBHR has the status of what is known as a "nonbinding" declaration under public international law. The UDBHR's foundation within bioethics (and association, e.g., with virtue-based or principlist bioethical theories) is more problematic. Nonetheless, the UDBHR contains socially important principles of technology transfer and transnational benefit (articles 14, 15, and 21). This paper is one of the first to explore how the disciplines of bioethics and international human rights law may interact in the UDBHR to advance the policy relevance and health impact of such principles. It investigates their normative ancestry in the UDBHR, as well as relevant conceptual differences between bioethics and public international law in this respect, and how these may be relevant to their conceptual evolution and application.

  9. Teacher Pupil Contact in Junior Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boydell, D.

    1974-01-01

    The purpose of the exploratory study reported here was to examine the nature of teacher-pupil contact in informal junior classrooms in terms of the teacher's method of talking to children and the teacher's conversational approach. (Author/RK)

  10. The Community Junior College: An Annotated Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rarig, Emory W., Jr., Ed.

    This annotated bibliography on the junior college is arranged by topic: research tools, history, functions and purposes, organization and administration, students, programs, personnel, facilities, and research. It covers publications through the fall of 1965 and has an author index. (HH)

  11. Junior High School Pupils' Perceptions of Air

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cce

    Abstract. The study examined Junior High School (JHS) pupils' ideas of the concept air. The ... Stavy (1991) reported that students in his physics class had ... Research studies found that even after having been taught the particulate theory and.

  12. Transfer of nuclear engineering knowledge at Hanoi University of Technology: Lessons learned and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan, P. van; Anh, P.V.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Hanoi University of Technology (HUT) has been being the most important polytechnic education centre of the country for half a century. Nuclear Engineering Education Programme (NEEP) was started at HUT since the year 1970, right after establishment of Department of Nuclear Engineering at the University according to the initiative of the first Minister of Ministry of Higher Education of the country. Since the year 2000 the Department changed its education programme to adapt it to the actual circumstances in the country and renamed as Department of Nuclear Engineering and Environmental Physics (DONEEP). The objectives of the HUT's NEEP are as follows: 1. To train up nuclear technical manpower for development of peaceful uses of atomic energy in Vietnam. 2. To prepare initial nuclear technical human resources for introduction of Nuclear Power into the country. Aiming at these objectives, the Programme achieved remarkable results such as inestimable contributions to introducing and then developing the NDT radiography method in Vietnam, to improving and developing the atomic energy applications in the country, to providing important parts of technical human resources for strengthening the nuclear community of the country. The duration of 37 years of implementation of the Programme may be divided by 3 periods: from 1970 to 1989, 1990-2000 and from the year 2001 up to now. During the first period, the Programme was fully supported by the leadership of the University and the Ministry of Higher Education. The second period was full of difficulties. This was the period of searching the ways for preserving and adapting the Programme to the new circumstances in the country. The present period is the one of searching the ways for developing the NEEP at HUT. The lessons learned from 37-year implementation of the HUT's NEEP are as follows: 1. To establish proper objectives aiming to satisfy the urgent short term and/or long term demands of the country is the most

  13. Spatial localization of knowledge-transfer channels and face-to-face contacts: A survey of the Jena university-industry linkages

    OpenAIRE

    Sauer, Thomas; Stoetzer, Matthias-Wolfgang; Gerlach, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we examine the knowledge-Transfer Channels of the universities and public research institutes in Jena. The empirical study is based on a survey of 297 personal interviews with researchers of both types of organisations. Our study focuses on three questions: (a) The importance and multitude of existing transfer channels, (b) their geographic distribution and (c) the importance of face-to-face contacts. With regard to the first question the analysis reveals some shortcomings of th...

  14. Career Calling as a Personal Resource Moderator between Environmental Demands and Burnout in Australian Junior Doctors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creed, Peter A.; Rogers, Mary E.; Praskova, Anna; Searle, Judy

    2014-01-01

    We surveyed 355 junior doctors (first 4 years of post-university training; 69% female, mean age = 28 years) from multiple hospital and practice locations and used an online questionnaire to assess their training-related demands (academic stress, concern about training debt, and hours worked), academic burnout, and personal resources…

  15. The Online Expectations of College-Bound Juniors and Seniors. E-Expectations Report, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel-Levitz, Inc, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Noel-Levitz, OmniUpdate, CollegeWeekLive, and NRCCUA[R] (National Research Center for College & University Admissions) conducted a survey of 2,000 college-bound juniors and seniors about their expectations for college Web sites, mobile usage, e-mail, and social media. Among the findings: (1) More than 50 percent of students said the Web played a…

  16. Barriers to accessing ATLS provider course for junior doctors at a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Barriers to accessing ATLS provider course for junior doctors at a major university hospital in South Africa. ... South African Journal of Surgery ... Subgroup analysis comparing the reasons for PGY1s vs PGY2s demonstrated that not being able to secure a place on course was more common among PGY2s [19% vs 33%, ...

  17. The Role of Basic Need Satisfaction for Junior Academics' Goal Conflicts and Teaching Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esdar, Wiebke; Gorges, Julia; Wild, Elke

    2016-01-01

    Junior academics at German universities work and qualify in a highly competitive environment. Most of them have to cope with too little time for too many demands in research and teaching. As previous studies have shown, these work conditions may impair well-being due to goal conflicts and may threaten their teaching motivation. How could this be…

  18. Improving Mathematical Communication Ability and Self Regulation Learning of Junior High Students by Using Reciprocal Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qohar, Abdul; Sumarmo, Utari

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the findings from a posttest experiment control group design by using reciprocal teaching, conducted in Indonesia University of Education to investigate students' ability in mathematical communication and self regulated learning. Subject of the study were 254 of 9th grade students from three junior high schools of high, medium,…

  19. Senior Citizens and Junior Writers--A Center for Exchange: Retired Professionals as Writing Laboratory Tutors for Students Enrolled in Upper-Level Pre-Professional University Writing Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleimann, Susan; Meyers, G. Douglas

    The writing center at a Maryland university prepares third-year students for nonacademic, preprofessional writing by using retired professionals as tutors. These tutors are trained by discussing readings centered around the Aristotelean schema of ethos, logos, and pathos and the more recent conception of writing as a problem-solving process. The…

  20. Collaboration between radiological technologists (radiographers) and junior doctors during image interpretation improves the accuracy of diagnostic decisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, B.S.; Rainford, L.A.; Gray, J.; McEntee, M.F.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives: In Emergency Departments (ED) junior doctors regularly make diagnostic decisions based on radiographic images. This study investigates whether collaboration between junior doctors and radiographers impacts on diagnostic accuracy. Materials and Methods: Research was carried out in the ED of a university teaching hospital and included 10 pairs of participants. Radiographers and junior doctors were shown 42 wrist radiographs and 40 CT Brains and were asked for their level of confidence of the presence or absence of distal radius fractures or fresh intracranial bleeds respectively using ViewDEX software, first working alone and then in pairs. Receiver Operating Characteristic was used to analyze performance. Results were compared using one-way analysis of variance. Results: The results showed statistically significant improvements in the Area Under the Curve (AUC) of the junior doctors when working with the radiographers for both sets of images (wrist and CT) treated as random readers and cases (p ≤ 0.008 and p ≤ 0.0026 respectively). While the radiographers’ results saw no significant changes, their mean Az values did show an increasing trend when working in collaboration. Conclusion: Improvement in performance of junior doctors following collaboration strongly suggests changes in the potential to improve accuracy of patient diagnosis and therefore patient care. Further training for junior doctors in the interpretation of diagnostic images should also be considered. Decision making of junior doctors was positively impacted on after introducing the opinion of a radiographer. Collaboration exceeds the sum of the parts; the two professions are better together.

  1. [Obstetric emergency and non-emergency transfers to the university teaching hospital Yalgado ouedraogo of Ouagadougou: A 3-year study of their epidemiologic, clinical, and prognostic aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouattara, A; Ouedraogo, C M; Ouedraogo, A; Lankoande, J

    2015-01-01

    to describe the epidemiologic, clinical, and prognostic aspects of the emergency and non-emergency transfers of obstetric patients to Yalgado Ouédraogo University Hospital Center (UHC-YO) in Ouagadougou. this retrospective descriptive study looked at the outcomes of women transferred, on an emergency basis or not, to the obstetrics department of the UHC-YO. The study population comprised all women transferred to the department during 2010, 2011, and 2012. during the study period, there were 9,806 admissions for obstetric disorders: 43% were transfers. The patients' mean age was 26.11 years [(13-49]. Women transferred from health care facilities within the city of Ouagadougou accounted for 96% of the sample. The leading reason for these transfers - emergency or not - was preeclampsia and eclampsia (24.57%). We recorded a total of 161 maternal deaths, for a mortality rate of 3.9%. Approximately 26.55% of the newborns received immediate intensive care and were then transferred to the neonatology department. maternal and neonatal prognosis is always poor in cases transferred to UHC-YO, despite increased funding for emergency obstetric and neonatal care. Increased population awareness of the importance of prenatal consultation and adequate funding for health care facilities to provide equipment for emergency transfers and staff training in the management of obstetric and neonatal emergencies would probably improve these mortality and morbidity rates.

  2. Occupational factors for mood and anxiety disorders among junior medical doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pougnet, R; Di Costanzo, Laurence Pougnet; Kerrien, Margaux; Jousset, D; Loddé, B; Dewitte, J D; Garlantézec, R

    2015-09-09

    Junior doctors are exposed to multiple occupational risks. The aim of this study was to assess the risk factors and protective factors for mood and anxiety disorders among junior doctors. We conducted a cross-sectional study via an anonymous online questionnaire between October 2011 and June 2012. All the junior doctors in our faculty were included. The questionnaire inquired about demographic and health data. It contained four validated scales: the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), the Spielberger anxiety questionnaire, the WHO quality of life (WHO - QOL) questionnaire and the Job Content Questionnaire. Finally, it sought to clarify the conditions of professional practice and the interactions between university programmes and junior doctorate students (change of specialty, pregnancy, leave of absence, etc.). 192 juniors doctors participated in the study, 68.2% of whom were women. Out of the group, 13.0% presented a depressive syndrome, while 28.7% presented an anxiety disorder, 32.8% were experiencing Job Strain and 29.7% Iso Strain. The risk factor for anxiety was competition between junior doctors: OR=4.23 (1.06 ‒ 16.82). The protective factors for mood disorders were the help provided by senior physicians and the respect shown by patients: OR=0.21 (0.06-0.74) and 0.20 (0.06-0.75), respectively. This study demonstrated the impact of the relationships with senior physicians and patients on junior doctors' health at work. Consequently, prevention should not be focused uniquely on work organization, but should increase physicians' awareness of the importance of this relationship.

  3. The Effective Contributing Factors in Knowledge Sharing and Knowledge Transfer among Academic Staff at Tehran University of Medical Sciences: A Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narges Ghodsian

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Knowledge transfer is known as a core process in knowledge management. Its decent and influential function in organizations would result in regeneration and innovation of knowledge.Due to this importance, the most recent research in knowledge management has been inclined toward knowledge transfer concept. We aimed to investigate the most influencing contributing factors in knowledge transfer and knowledge sharing within the faculty members at Tehran University of Medical Sciences.Method: This investigation has been conducted with a qualitative approach using grounded theory. Data were collected using semi- structured interview with 17 faculty members of ten distinct departments of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. The data has been transcribed and analyzed.Results: By carefully analyzing the interviews from 272 preliminary open codes after sequential analogies and induction, 54 concepts have been extracted that were categorized into one of eleven classes constituting the effective items and factors in knowledge transfer among faculty members,respectively. These categories could be placed into , non-communication factors and communication factors. The non-communication factors were knowledge actors (professors, organization (university, the knowledge, and surroundings. The communication factors are the factors that are formed in the dual relationships between the relevant factors.Conclusion: A decent knowledge flow in working groups and collaborative societies of faculty members within a department or through different university departments would lead to a better research and education management. This could also bring about some advantages: the research in each department falls in a well-defined, pre-missioned channel, avoiding scattered research works, and enhancing the training and research. The awareness of university senior managers about influencing contributing factors of knowledge transfer and their functions provide a

  4. Barriers facing junior doctors in rural practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Deborah M

    2005-01-01

    Early postgraduate, or junior doctors, are still required to practise in rural and remote communities, and they continue to face numerous issues and difficulties. Within the hospital setting, exposure to rural practice appears to be very limited during internship, and also to some extent, during the second postgraduate year and beyond. This is a major issue for those required to undertake country relieving, rural terms or who will be bonded to rural and remote practice for several years after internship. This research investigated the current issues and difficulties faced by junior doctors, required to undertake rural and remote practice in Queensland, Australia. An exploratory study was undertaken. Primary data were collected through semi-structured interviews held with key stakeholders. Stakeholders included: directors of clinical training; medical educators; junior doctors; rural practitioners; academic rural practitioners; and medical administrators. Of the 23 people approached, a total of 19 agreed to be interviewed. The response rate was 82.6%. Similar to the issues identified in the literature, there are currently a number of barriers influencing the ability of junior doctors to practise competently and confidently when undertaking practice in rural and remote communities. Minimal clinical experience, lack of supervision and on-site support, inadequate orientation and uninformed expectations, limited access to relevant education, and the influence of isolation, results in an overall lack of preparation both professionally and personally. When asked, respondents supported the identification of core skills and knowledge, and integration of these and other issues affecting rural practice, into their hospital-based programs. Current hospital-based education and training programs were not adequately preparing junior doctors for rural and remote practice. It was commented that orientation and education, with a rural emphasis, could assist junior doctors in their

  5. Universe

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    The Universe, is one book in the Britannica Illustrated Science Library Series that is correlated to the science curriculum in grades 5-8. The Britannica Illustrated Science Library is a visually compelling set that covers earth science, life science, and physical science in 16 volumes.  Created for ages 10 and up, each volume provides an overview on a subject and thoroughly explains it through detailed and powerful graphics-more than 1,000 per volume-that turn complex subjects into information that students can grasp.  Each volume contains a glossary with full definitions for vocabulary help and an index.

  6. A study on the accuracy of source position in HDR brachytherapy according to the curvature of universal application transfer tube and applicator type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Hyeon Kyung; Lee, Sang Kyoo; Kim, Joo Ho; Cho, Jeong Hee

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to verify and analyze the source position according to the curvature of the universal applicator and 4 different angle applicators when using RALS(Remote After Loading System). An interval of 1 cm and 15 second dwell times in each source position were applied for plan. To verify the accuracy of source position, we narrowed the distance between MultiSource container and GAFCHROMIC? EBT3 film by 5 cm, 10 cm, 20 cm so that the universal applicator transfer tube had some curvature. Also 4 applicators(Intrauterine tube: 0° , 15°, 30° , Ovoid tube: 65° ) were used in the same condition. The differences between desired and actual source position were measured by using Image J. In case of using 4 different angles of applicator with the straight universal applicator transfer tube, the average error was the lowest for 0°applicator, greatest for 65°applicator. However, All average errors were within ±2 mm recommended in TG-56. When MultiSource container was moved 5 cm, 10 cm, 20 cm towards the EBT3 film, the average errors were beyond ±2 mm. The first dwell position was relatively located in accuracy, while the second and third dwells were displaced by an increasing magnitude with increasing curvature of the transfer tube. Furthermore, with increasing the angle of applicators, the error of all other dwell positioning was increased. The results of this study showed that both the curvature of universal applicator transfer tube and the angle of applicators affect the source dwell position. It is recommended that using straight universal applicator transfer tubes is followed in all cases, in order to avoid deviations in the delivered source dwell position. Also, It is advisable to verify the actual dwell position, using video camera quality control tool prior to all treatments

  7. Design and testing of a compact X-ray diode. 1998 summer research program for high school juniors at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics. Student research reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stern, A.

    1999-03-01

    Omega, the University of Rochester's high powered laser dedicated to fusion research gives off x-rays with different energy levels. Measuring the number of x-rays and the energy of each is important in understanding what happens in the target chamber when Omega is fired. Existing x-ray detectors are expensive, big, and cumbersome. Imaging detectors such as x-ray pinhole cameras which record onto film, x-ray framing cameras which make videos, and most often, x-ray streak cameras which measure time dependences of x-rays. They require a lot of maintenance and are difficult to keep operational. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has developed the Dante Diode. The Dante diode array on Omega functions as a group of 12 diodes which take up a 24 inch port in the target chamber, making it space-consuming and difficult to move for alternate views. In designing a new detector, space was the main issue. The smallest possible functional diode, without losing accuracy was desired. Since the laser pulse only lasts a few nanoseconds it is important that the x-ray detector have a response time of a few tenths of a nanosecond. Other criteria include that it be easy to use for measuring the energy and number of x-ray photons and that cost be kept down. This report discusses the design process and testing of the new diode

  8. Junior Sport and the Evolution of Sport Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siedentop, Daryl

    2002-01-01

    Addresses junior sport and sport culture in New Zealand, recommending that it receive serious consideration for its crucial role in the future of New Zealand's sport culture. The paper presents three goals for junior sport programs (educative, public health, and elite development), describes characteristics of junior sport (e.g., youth want to…

  9. Computer-aided design and modeling of nickel dithiolene near-infrared dyes. 1998 summer research program for high school juniors at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics. Student research reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corsello, S.

    1999-03-01

    Recent advances in computational chemistry have made it feasible to design many types of molecules and predict their properties theoretically. The author applied these techniques to the design of organometallic transition-metal dyes absorbing in the near-infrared region of the spectrum which possess the combination of a large molar extinction coefficient, good chemical and thermal stability, and a high solubility in liquid crystal (LC) hosts. These properties are required for the dye to function as a near-infrared (IR) attenuator in a liquid crystal point diffraction interferometer (LCPDI) device that will be used as a beam diagnostic on the 60-beam OMEGA solid-state Nd:glass laser system at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics. Using commercially available software, both the absorption spectra and solubility characteristics of bis[1,2-di-(p-n alkoxyphenyl)ethane-1,2-dithione] nickel dye complexes were modeled in an isotropic host (cyclohexane) and, in most cases, excellent agreement was found with experimental data. Two additional compounds utilizing the same nickel dithiolene core but with alkylthio and phenylalkylthio terminal groups have been designed and show excellent potential to produce dramatic improvements in both solubility and optical density (absorbance) in liquid crystalline hosts. Based upon my work, a new dye not previously reported, 2(C 4 S)2(C 4 SPh)DTNi, has been proposed to satisfy the LCPDI device requirements. The nickel dithiolene dyes may also find important applications in other technology areas such as near-IR photography and laser-based near-IR communications

  10. Assessment of Turkish junior male physicians’ exposure to mobbing behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Bayram; Cetin, Mehmet; Cimen, Mesut; Yildiran, Nuri

    2012-01-01

    Aim To determine the extent of Turkish junior male physicians’ exposure to mobbing behavior and its correlation with physicians' characteristics. Methods The study included physicians recruited for compulsory military service in April 2009. No sampling method was used, questionnaires were delivered to all physicians, and 278 of 292 (95%) questionnaires were returned. We used Leymann Inventory of Psychological Terror including 45 items for data collection and structural equation model for data analysis. Results A total of 87.7% of physicians experienced mobbing behavior. Physicians who worked more than 40 hours a week, single physicians, physicians working in university hospitals and private hospitals, and physicians who did not have occupational commitment were more exposed to mobbing (P Mobbing was not associated with specialty status, service period, age, and personality variables (P > 0.05). All goodness-of- fit indices of the model were acceptable (χ2 = 1.449, normed fit index = 0.955, Tucker Lewis index = 0.980, comparative fit index = 0.985, and root mean square error of approximation = 0.040). Conclusions Workplace mobbing is a critical problem for junior male physicians in Turkey. We suggest an introduction of a reporting system and education activities for physicians in high-risk groups. PMID:22911529

  11. Assessment of Turkish junior male physicians' exposure to mobbing behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Bayram; Cetin, Mehmet; Cimen, Mesut; Yildiran, Nuri

    2012-08-01

    To determine the extent of Turkish junior male physicians' exposure to mobbing behavior and its correlation with physicians' characteristics. The study included physicians recruited for compulsory military service in April 2009. No sampling method was used, questionnaires were delivered to all physicians, and 278 of 292 (95%) questionnaires were returned. We used Leymann Inventory of Psychological Terror including 45 items for data collection and structural equation model for data analysis. A total of 87.7% of physicians experienced mobbing behavior. Physicians who worked more than 40 hours a week, single physicians, physicians working in university hospitals and private hospitals, and physicians who did not have occupational commitment were more exposed to mobbing (PMobbing was not associated with specialty status, service period, age, and personality variables (P>0.05). All goodness-of- fit indices of the model were acceptable (χ(2)=1.449, normed fit index=0.955, Tucker Lewis index=0.980, comparative fit index=0.985, and root mean square error of approximation=0.040). Workplace mobbing is a critical problem for junior male physicians in Turkey. We suggest an introduction of a reporting system and education activities for physicians in high-risk groups.

  12. Transfer of nurse education to universities under a model of person-centred care: A consequence of changes in Spanish society during the democratic transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo, Olga; Caïs, Jordi; Monforte-Royo, Cristina

    2017-07-01

    In Spain the transfer of nurse education to universities was accompanied by a shift towards a model of person-centred care. To explore whether the change in nurses' professional profile (from physician assistant to providers of person-centred care) was a response to changing needs in Spanish society. Qualitative study. Theoretical sampling and in-depth interviews using an inductive analytical approach. Four categories described the nursing profession in Spain prior to the introduction of university training: the era of medical assistants; technologisation of hospitals; personal care of the patient based on Christian values; professional socialisation differentiated by gender. Further analysis showed that these categories could be subsumed under a broader core category: the transfer of nurse education to universities as part of Spain's transition to democracy. The transfer of nurse education to universities was one of several changes occurring in Spanish society during the country's transition to democratic government. The redefined public health system required a highly skilled workforce, with improved employment rights being given to female health professionals, notably nurses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Characteristics and determinants of knowledge transfer policies at universities and public institutions in medical research--protocol for a systematic review of the qualitative research literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, Rosa; Müller, Olaf; Bozorgmehr, Kayvan

    2015-08-19

    Universities, public institutions, and the transfer of knowledge to the private sector play a major role in the development of medical technologies. The decisions of universities and public institutions regarding the transfer of knowledge impact the accessibility of the final product, making it easier or more difficult for consumers to access these products. In the case of medical research, these products are pharmaceuticals, diagnostics, or medical procedures. The ethical dimension of access to these potentially lifesaving products is apparent and distinguishes the transfer of medical knowledge from the transfer of knowledge in other areas. While the general field of technology transfer from academic and public to private actors is attracting an increasing amount of scholarly attention, the specifications of knowledge transfer in the medical field are not as well explored. This review seeks to provide a systematic overview and analysis of the qualitative literature on the characteristics and determinants of knowledge transfer in medical research and development. The review systematically searches the literature for qualitative studies that focus on knowledge transfer characteristics and determinants at medical academic and public research institutions. It aims at identifying and analyzing the literature on the content and context of knowledge transfer policies, decision-making processes, and actors at academic and public institutions. The search strategy includes the databases PubMed, Web of Science, ProQuest, and DiVa. These databases will be searched based on pre-specified search terms. The studies selected for inclusion in the review will be critically assessed for their quality utilizing the Qualitative Research Checklist developed by the Clinical Appraisal Skills Programme. Data extraction and synthesis will be based on the meta-ethnographic approach. This review seeks to further the understanding of the kinds of transfer pathways that exist in medical

  14. Correlating continuous assessment scores to junior secondary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the relationship between continuous assessment scores and junior secondary school certificate examination(JSCE) final scores in Imo State. A sample of four hundred students were purposively selected from thirty eight thousand students who took the 1997 JSCE in Imo State. The data used were ...

  15. Skills training of junior medical students

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-11-02

    Nov 2, 2013 ... Peer tutors enjoyed and benefited from this teaching method without it negatively affecting their own learning. Discussion. ... addressing the problem of skills training of junior medical students where there is a shortage of trained clinical teachers. AJHPE 2013 ... [1] Informal peer teaching usually takes place.

  16. Reproductive Health Knowledge And Practices Among Junior ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: A cross sectional survey of the reproductive health knowledge and practices of 412 junior secondary school pupils from 12 schools in Enugu State, Nigeria was undertaken using a uniform set of structured self-administered questionnaire. Results: The results revealed that while the pupils demonstrated fair ...

  17. HUMANITIES IN A JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    KNIGHT, BONNIE M.

    A HUMANITIES COURSE HAS BEEN DEVELOPED FOR ACADEMICALLY ABLE SEVENTH-GRADE STUDENTS IN BRANCIFORTE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL IN SANTA CRUZ, CALIFORNIA. IN A TWO-PERIOD DAILY TIME BLOCK, STUDENTS LEARN ENGLISH, LITERATURE, AND LATIN, AND INVESTIGATE TOPICS IN ARCHEOLOGY, CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY, LINGUISTICS, PSYCHOLOGY, PHILOSOPHY, GREEK LITERATURE AND…

  18. Report: Immersion French at Meriden Junior School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Marie-Josee

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author describes the French immersion program at Meriden Junior School, an Anglican school for girls from pre-Kindergarten to Year 12 in Sydney. Four teachers (one of whom is the coordinator) and three assistants are involved in the program. They include six French native speakers and one non-French-born teacher who speaks…

  19. Junior High School Pupils' Perceptions of Air

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cce

    learning of science at the basic level. ... Stavy (1991) reported that students in his physics class had ... In a cross-level study of junior secondary, senior secondary and .... interview guide consisted of the items culled from Section B of the test.

  20. Results of the commercialisation of scientific research in the light of experience gained at the Nicolaus Copernicus University Centre for Technology Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matlakiewicz Paweł

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The statutory mission of a university, in addition to the creation of scientific knowledge and education, lies in the cooperation with the economic sector through the transfer of knowledge and technology. The effectiveness of this process directly affects the affluence of any given State’s economy. Owing to the new amendments to the Act on Higher Education, many barriers that hinder commercialisation of knowledge in Poland have been brought down. Nicolaus Copernicus University in Toruń sets an excellent example in this respect having established a special purpose entity, which has already managed to set up thirteen spin-off companies in just 18 months.

  1. University-industry relationships and the role of the individual : network ties and the diversity of knowledge transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Villanueva-Felez, A; Bekkers, R.N.A.; Molas-Gallart, J

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, considerable attention has been paid to the effectiveness of knowledge transfer processes between academia and industry. Although there is growing evidence that the characteristics of individual researchers are important when explaining cases of successful transfer, few studies have

  2. Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics Institute, Meeting, 25th, University of California, Davis, Calif., June 21-23, 1976, Proceedings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckillop, A. A.; Baughn, J. W.; Dwyer, H. A.

    1976-01-01

    Major research advances in heat transfer and fluid dynamics are outlined, with particular reference to relevant energy problems. Of significant importance are such topics as synthetic fuels in combustion, turbulence models, combustion modeling, numerical methods for interacting boundary layers, and light-scattering diagnostics for gases. The discussion covers thermal convection, two-phase flow and boiling heat transfer, turbulent flows, combustion, and aerospace heat transfer problems. Other areas discussed include compressible flows, fluid mechanics and drag, and heat exchangers. Featured topics comprise heat and salt transfer in double-diffusive systems, limits of boiling heat transfer in a liquid-filled enclosure, investigation of buoyancy-induced flow stratification in a cylindrical plenum, and digital algorithms for dynamic analysis of a heat exchanger. Individual items are announced in this issue.

  3. Psychosocial risks and stress as predictors of burnout in junior doctors performing emergency guards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Prada, María; González-Cabrera, Joaquín; Iribar-Ibabe, Concepción; Peinado, José María

    2017-01-01

    To study the stress, the psychosocial risks associated to the job and the burnout, in a group of junior doctors working at the emergency ward; and to analyze what of those variables could predict and are better related with burnout. Cross-sectional study, with a sample of 42 junior doctors which are on duty in the emergency ward of the University Hospital San Cecilio, Granada (Spain). The Spanish adapted version of the Perceived Stress Scale was used to evaluate stress, the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) to evaluate the professional burnout and the adapted and scaled questionnaire for the self-evaluation of psychosocial risks at work (CopSoQ-ISTAS21). 78% of the junior doctors are in the unfavorable or intermediate range for all CopSoQ-ISTAS21 dimensions, being particularly relevant that 90% of them display unfavorable score in psychological demands. In addition, MBI results show that 45% of our population presents high emotional exhaustion simultaneously to high depersonalization. ISTAS21 psychological demands dimensions (ß = 0.393; p stress scores (ß = 0.451; p burnout. These results indicate the need of psychological and structural interventions in order to improve the professional performance of junior doctors at the emergency ward. Copyright: © 2017 SecretarÍa de Salud

  4. "Peer2Peer" – A university program for knowledge transfer and consultation in dealing with psychosocial crises in med-school and medical career

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vajda, Christian

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Medical students are exposed to various psychosocial problems and challenges. Specific consultations services and programs can support them.“Peer2Peer” is such a consultation program and was implemented at the Medical University of Graz. It focusses on crisis intervention, psychosocial stress management, junior mentoring as well as student education in this field. Besides, it also offers student tutors of the program practical skills trainings. The program was restructured in winter term 2014/15.Methods: On the one hand, “Peer2Peer” gives insights into topics such as the current state of research concerning the students’ psychological strain and psychosocial crises in acutely stressful situations and preventive approaches for coping with these kinds of situations on the other hand. These aspects are taught by means of elective courses, lectures and workshops. Furthermore, “Peer2Peer” provides consultation services by student tutors who give face-to-face advice if required. These tutors receive ongoing training in organizational and professional issues.Results: Since the summer term of 2015, 119 students have been trained (via lectures and elective courses, while 61 contacts (short consultation and 33 contacts (full consultation have been supervisied. In total, two psychotherapeutic and one psychosocial follow ups were recommended. There are seven students who participate as tutors in the program.Conclusions: The “Peer2Peer” program is intended to enable a low-threshold access for medical students facing psychosocial crises situations and to help them in dealing with stress and learning problems. An increase in support contacts from the summer term of 2015 to the winter term of 2015/16 can be considered a success. A first evaluation of the different components of the program started in the winter semester of 2015/16. The student tutors have not only acquired practical skills in dealing with students in crises

  5. "Peer2Peer" - A university program for knowledge transfer and consultation in dealing with psychosocial crises in med-school and medical career.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vajda, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Medical students are exposed to various psychosocial problems and challenges. Specific consultations services and programs can support them. "Peer2Peer" is such a consultation program and was implemented at the Medical University of Graz. It focusses on crisis intervention, psychosocial stress management, junior mentoring as well as student education in this field. Besides, it also offers student tutors of the program practical skills trainings. The program was restructured in winter term 2014/15. On the one hand, "Peer2Peer" gives insights into topics such as the current state of research concerning the students' psychological strain and psychosocial crises in acutely stressful situations and preventive approaches for coping with these kinds of situations on the other hand. These aspects are taught by means of elective courses, lectures and workshops. Furthermore, "Peer2Peer" provides consultation services by student tutors who give face-to-face advice if required. These tutors receive ongoing training in organizational and professional issues. Since the summer term of 2015, 119 students have been trained (via lectures and elective courses), while 61 contacts (short consultation) and 33 contacts (full consultation) have been supervisied. In total, two psychotherapeutic and one psychosocial follow ups were recommended. There are seven students who participate as tutors in the program. The "Peer2Peer" program is intended to enable a low-threshold access for medical students facing psychosocial crises situations and to help them in dealing with stress and learning problems. An increase in support contacts from the summer term of 2015 to the winter term of 2015/16 can be considered a success. A first evaluation of the different components of the program started in the winter semester of 2015/16. The student tutors have not only acquired practical skills in dealing with students in crises situations but also various organizational skills.

  6. LA INVESTIGACIÓN UNIVERSITARIA COMO EJE DE LA TRANSFERENCIA SOCIAL DEL CONOCIMIENTO // THE UNIVERSITY RESEARCH AS HUB SOCIAL TRANSFER OF KNOWLEDGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Gil Domínguez

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article is considered developting through a theoretical framework, the formulation of university research as a guiding priciple of the University, allowing it to be transformed in an intelligent Organization, and yielding the linking of the university areas of knowledge to society. This raises the importance of managing knowledge as an indispensable element in the transformations that require higher education institutions, turning university research into the social hub of knowledge transfer. This involves a review of the theoretical constructs related to the University Management, Social Constructionism, Intelligent Organization and Lines of Action Research, ending with a proposal of linking university research and the productive sector which includes, first, the creation of university spin-offs as a suitable alternative to bridge the information gap and knowledge transfer between universities and traditional companies. Secondly, the development of innovative research management is proposed, which allows systematic channeling of the efforts of researchers, raising funds and the transfer of research results. // RESUMEN: En este articulo se considera desarrollar a través de un marco teórico referencial, la formulación de la investigación universitaria como eje orientador de la Universidad, para que ésta pueda transformarse en una Organización inteligente y permitir la vinculación de las áreas del conocimiento universitario con la sociedad. Para ello se plantea, la importancia de gerenciar el conocimiento como elemento indispensable en las transformaciones que requieren las instituciones de educación superior, convirtiendo a la investigación universitaria en el eje de la transferencia social del conocimiento. Ello supone la revisión de los constructos teóricos relacionados con la Gerencia Universitaria, Construccionismo Social, Organización Inteligente y Ejes de Acción de la Investigación, finalizando con una propuesta de

  7. Teaching and technology transfer as alternative revenue streams: a primer on the potential legal implications for UK universities

    OpenAIRE

    van Hoorebeek, Mark; Marson, James

    2005-01-01

    Abstract: \\ud Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to assess the financial and intellectual issues facing the university sector as many institutions in the United Kingdom (UK) pursue alternative revenue streams. As a consequence to the increasing financial pressures, university departments are increasingly exposed to new forms of potential litigation and also face the risk to the prestige of their university and departmental brand.\\ud Design: A theoretical and analytical approach is adopted ...

  8. Research Resources Survey: Radiology Junior Faculty Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupinski, Elizabeth A; Votaw, John R

    2015-07-01

    To assess resources available to junior faculty in US academic radiology departments for research mentorship and funding opportunities and to determine if certain resources are more common in successful programs. An anonymous survey covering scientific environment and research mentorship and was sent to vice-chairs of research of radiology departments. Results were evaluated to identify practices of research programs with respect to mentorship, resources, and opportunities. Academy of Radiology Research's 2012 National Institutes of Health (NIH) grants and awards list was used to determine if environment and practices correlate with funding. There was a 51% response rate. A greater fraction of clinical faculty gets promoted from assistant to associate professor than research faculty. Research faculty overall submits more funding applications. Most programs support start-up costs and K-awards. Over half of the departments have a vice-chair for faculty development, and most have formal mentorship programs. Faculty members are expected to teach, engage in service, publish, and apply for and get research funding within 3 years of hire. Top-tier programs as judged by NIH awards have a combination of MDs who devote >50% effort to research and PhD faculty. Key factors holding back both clinical and research junior faculty development were motivation, resources, and time, although programs reported high availability of resources and support at the department level. Better marketing of resources for junior faculty, effort devoted to mentoring clinical faculty in research, and explicit milestones/expectations for achievement could enhance junior faculty success, promote interest in the clinician–scientist career path for radiologists, and lead to greater research success.

  9. Junior Leader Training Development in Operational Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    UNITS Successful operational units do not arise without tough, realistic, and challenging training. Field Manual (FM) 7-0, Training Units and D...operations. The manual provides junior leaders with guidance on how to conduct training and training management. Of particular importance is the definition...1 Relation htp between ADDIE and the Anny Training Management Model. The Army Training Management Model and ADDIE process appear in TRADOC PAM 350

  10. A Mentoring Program to Help Junior Faculty Members Achieve Scholarship Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The University of North Carolina Eshelman School of Pharmacy launched the Bill and Karen Campbell Faculty Mentoring Program (CMP) in 2006 to support scholarship-intensive junior faculty members. This report describes the origin, expectations, principles, and best practices that led to the introduction of the program, reviews the operational methods chosen for its implementation, provides information about its successes, and analyzes its strengths and limitations. PMID:24672062

  11. Teaching and Technology Transfer as Alternative Revenue Streams: A Primer on the Potential Legal Implications for UK Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoorebeek, Mark; Marson, James

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to assess the financial and intellectual issues facing the university sector as many institutions in the UK pursue alternative revenue streams. As a consequence to the increasing financial pressures, university departments are increasingly exposed to new forms of potential litigation and also face the risk to…

  12. Contributions of the College of Agriculture, University of Arizona, to education, research, and technology transfer in watershed management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eugene Sander

    2000-01-01

    The College of Agriculture, University of Arizona, has been heavily involved in providing research, education, and outreach concerning the management of watersheds. The Barr Report of 1956, a cooperative effort of the Salt River Project, the State Land Department and the University of Arizona, was a significant beginning that addressed the productivity of watersheds in...

  13. Jordan and Lange: The California Junior College as Protector of Teaching. Working Papers in Education ED-94-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Edward A.

    A group of contemporary historians has recently accused community and junior colleges of not offering the American masses new opportunities of upward social mobility, but instead of serving to divert them away from four-year colleges and universities. In particular, historians have taken issue with the efforts of David Jordan, of Stanford…

  14. Assertiveness, Self-Esteem and Academic Performance in Speech and Oral Communication of Filipino Junior Secondary Teacher Education Students

    OpenAIRE

    Elma S. Pagaduan-Apostol

    2017-01-01

    This study explored the influence of assertiveness and self - esteem on the final grade in English III, Speech and Oral Communication, among the Bachelor of Secondary Education juniors at the Nueva Vizcaya State University, Bambang campus , Philippines. The d escriptive method was employed. A ssertiveness and self - esteem tests were answered by the respondents and their grades in English III were taken from...

  15. Successful ADVANCE Initiatives for Junior Women Faculty in STEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riskin, Eve

    2015-01-01

    The NSF ADVANCE program was designed to transform university policies, procedures, and practices so that women faculty could advance in STEM faculty careers, obtain tenure, and ultimately become academic leaders. The results have been impressive. The most recent data from the American Society of Engineering Education (Fall 2013) show that the average percentage of women faculty in U.S. Colleges of Engineering is now 14.5%; it was just 9% when ADVANCE started in 2001.This talk will describe programs to support and promote junior women faculty that have been successful in recruiting and retaining women in STEM. These programs include mentoring, professional development, and work/life balance initiatives. Suggestions will be made for ways to disseminate low-cost successful ADVANCE programs to other institutions so that they can successfully support their own women faculty in STEM. One effort is the University of Washington's LEAD-it-Yourself! online toolkit that will enable other universities to run their own leadership workshops for department chairs and deans.

  16. Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics Institute, 30th, California State University, Sacramento, May 28, 29, 1987, Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reardon, F.H.; Thinh, N.D.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental and analytical techniques in heat transfer and fluid dynamics and state-of-the-art applications are examined in reviews and reports. Topics discussed include the recirculation characteristics of a vortex pump, simulation of radial-flow impellers using the Navier-Stokes equations, the transient effect in composite-medium conduction or diffusion, flow in a tube with a porous obstruction, the measurement of the physical heat-transfer coefficient, and a penalty FEM for combined forced and free convection in a rectangular enclosure. Consideration is given to heat transfer in the entrance region of multiply connected ducts, working-fluid selection for low-temperature Rankine cycles, a computational-experimental method for monitoring particulate flux in fluid streams, medical applications of a vortex aerosol generator, and the interaction of unlike propellant droplets in various reactive environments

  17. Assessing the Personal Financial Problems of Junior Enlisted Personnel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Buddin, Richard

    2002-01-01

    .... Surveys of military personnel show that, particularly for junior personnel, financial problems constitute a major source of stress, subordinate only to increased workload and family separation...

  18. Evaluating the Quality of Transfer versus Nontransfer Accounting Principles Grades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colley, J. R.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Using 1989-92 student records from three colleges accepting large numbers of transfers from junior schools into accounting, regression analyses compared grades of transfer and nontransfer students. Quality of accounting principle grades of transfer students was not equivalent to that of nontransfer students. (SK)

  19. Disorganized junior doctors fail the MRCP (UK).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Adrian G; Khan, Khalid M; Hussain, Walayat; Tweed, Michael

    2006-02-01

    Career progression during undergraduate and early postgraduate years is currently determined by successfully passing examinations. Both academic factors (secondary school examination results, learning style and training opportunities) and non-academic factors (maturity, ethnic origin, gender and motivation) have been identified as predicting examination outcome. Few studies have examined organization skills. Disorganized medical students are more likely to perform poorly in end-of-year examinations but this observation has not been examined in junior doctors. This study asked whether organization skills relate to examination outcome amongst junior doctors taking the clinical Part II examination for the Membership of the Royal College of Physicians (Practical Assessment of Clinical Examination Skills). The study was conducted prospectively at four consecutive clinical courses that provided clinical teaching and practice to prepare trainees for the examination. Arrival time at registration for the course was the chosen surrogate for organization skills. Trainees were advised that they should arrive promptly at 8.00 a.m. for registration and it was explained that the course would start at 8.30 a.m. Recorded arrival times were compared with the pass lists published by the Royal College of Physicians. The mean arrival time was 8.17 a.m. A total of 81 doctors (53.3%) passed the examination with a mean arrival time of 8.14 a.m. However, 71 doctors failed the exam and arrived, on average, six minutes later than doctors who passed (p?=?0.006). Better-prepared junior doctors were more likely to pass the final examination. Arriving on time represents a composite of several skills involved in the planning of appropriate travel arrangements and is therefore a valid marker of organization skills and preparation. This novel study has shown that good time-keeping skills are positively associated with examination outcome.

  20. Knowledge management aiming to technology transfer: the challenges face by the tic of the state university of Santa Cruz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luan Carlos Santos Silva

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The present article discusses the concept of organizational knowledge, and theory models for the creation and management of organizational knowledge that, in many approaches, do not take into account the specificity of each organization and the relationship. The paper analyses the innovation dynamics and the technology transfer from Technological Innovation Centers (TIC to the productive sector. The methodology employed was qualitative and of descriptive nature. The method used in the research was a case study in a TIC well-structured in respect to the constitution of the TICs from the perspective of the Federal Innovation Law nº 10.973 of the Innovation Law of the Bahia State nº 11.174. Barriers for knowledge creation and management that guarantee the effective technology transfer were identified.

  1. THE GAME TECHNIQUE NTCHNIQUE STIMULATING LEARNING ACTIVITY OF JUNIOR STUDENTS SPECIALIZING IN ECONOMICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juri. S. Ezrokh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The research is aimed at specifying and developing the modern control system of current academic achievements of junior university students; and the main task is to find the adequate ways for stimulating the junior students’ learning activities, and estimating their individual achievements.Methods: The author applies his own assessment method for estimating and stimulating students’ learning outcomes, based on the rating-point system of gradually obtained points building up a student’s integrated learning outcomes.Results: The research findings prove that implementation of the given method can increase the motivational, multiplicative and controlling components of the learning process.Scientific novelty: The method in question is based on the new original game approach to controlling procedures and stimulation of learning motivation of the economic profile students.Practical significance: The recommended technique can intensify the incentivebased training activities both in and outside a classroom, developing thereby students’ professional and personal qualities.

  2. Academic Entrepreneurship and Exchange of Scientific Resources: Material Transfer in Life and Materials Sciences in Japanese Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibayama, Sotaro; Walsh, John P.; Baba, Yasunori

    2012-01-01

    This study uses a sample of Japanese university scientists in life and materials sciences to examine how academic entrepreneurship has affected the norms and behaviors of academic scientists regarding sharing scientific resources. Results indicate that high levels of academic entrepreneurship in a scientific field are associated with less reliance…

  3. To Assess Sleep Quality among Pakistani Junior Physicians (House ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Sleep deprivation among junior physicians (house officers) is of growing concern. In developed countries, duty hours are now mandated, but in developing countries, junior physicians are highly susceptible to develop sleep impairment due to long working hours, on‑call duties and shift work schedule. Aim: We ...

  4. Poor interpretation of chest X-rays by junior doctors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Janus Mølgaard; Gerke, Oke; Karstoft, Jens

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Studies targeting medical students and junior doctors have shown that their radiological skills are insufficient. Despite the widespread use of chest X-ray; however, a study of Danish junior doctors' skills has not previously been performed. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 22...

  5. Multiple Intelligences Profiles of Junior Secondary School Students in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmiyati, Nuri; Rasyid, Muhammad Amin; Rahman, M. Asfah; Arsyad, Azhar; Dirawan, Gufran Darma

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the Multiple Intelligences profiles of the students at junior secondary school in Makassar. The Multiple Intelligences Inventory was used to identify the dominant intelligence among the students. The sample of this research was 302 junior secondary schools students in Makassar Indonesia who willing to participated…

  6. Parental Resources and the Transition to Junior High.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grolnick, Wendy S.; Kurowski, Carolyn O.; Dunlap, Kelly G.; Hevey, Cheryl

    2000-01-01

    This study examined whether maternal resources of involvement and autonomy support might buffer children against the negative effects of the transition to junior high. School, cognitive, and personal involvement were examined. Findings highlight the importance of the home environment in children's coping with the transition to junior high.…

  7. Theorizing Food Sharing Practices in a Junior High Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Mary

    2013-01-01

    This reflective essay analyzes interactions where food was shared between a teacher and her junior high school students. The author describes the official uses of food in junior high school classrooms and in educational contexts in general. The author then theorizes these interactions, suggesting other semiotic, dialogic, and culturally encoded…

  8. Attitude of Junior Secondary School Students towards the Study of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of girls' education in Science subjects, as it exists in Ghana with reference to J.S.S. pupils' attitude to Science. Using a stratified random sample of junior secondary school students from public and private schools, the study investigated the attitudes of junior secondary school students towards the study of science. Data were ...

  9. Potential benefits of student- and junior doctor-led textbooks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Zeshan U; Lattey, Katherine; Bryne, Patrick; Rodrigues, Mark; Ross, Michael; Maxwell, Simon

    2015-06-01

    Medical textbooks are an important teaching supplement. Few have junior doctors or medical students ('juniors') as primary contributors. However, the strengths of junior-led face-to-face teaching are now well-established, and we hypothesized that similar advantages would be transferrable to a textbook setting. Juniors were approached to contribute to an independently published medical textbook, with senior clinicians recruited in parallel to ensure factual accuracy. Juniors directed every aspect of textbook writing and the production process. The published book stressed that it was an open collaboration with readers, inviting them to get in touch to evaluate the text and suggest ideas for new titles. Of 75 respondents, 93 % awarded the first textbook in the series 4 or 5 out of 5 for overall quality. Five other titles have been released, with seven more in development. Over 100 juniors are currently involved, with two students progressing from reviewers to editors after less than a year of mentorship. Juniors can be a motivated, dynamic, innovative group, capable of significant contributions to the medical textbook literature. This initiative has generated a sustainable infrastructure to facilitate junior-led publishing, and has the capacity for expansion to accommodate new initiatives and ideas.

  10. Professional Training of Junior Medical Staff: European Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliasova, Yuliia

    2017-01-01

    The article covers current problems of professional training of junior medical staff. The main disadvantages of Ukrainian system of medical education that impede the intention of improving quality of professional training of junior medical staff have been analyzed. European experience in organizing medical education, namely, in Great Britain,…

  11. Sexuality Education in Junior High Schools in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, N.; Shinohara, H.; Tashiro, M.; Suzuki, S.; Hirose, H.; Ikeya, H.; Ushitora, K.; Komiya, A.; Watanabe, M.; Motegi, T.; Morioka, M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to determine via responses to three questionnaire surveys how sexuality education programs are conducted at junior high schools in Japan. Study 1 examined the practice of sexuality education in schools, Study 2 investigated junior high school students' (age 12-13 and 14-15 years) knowledge of sexuality, and Study 3 examined…

  12. Comparing humans and deep learning performance for grading AMD: A study in using universal deep features and transfer learning for automated AMD analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlina, Philippe; Pacheco, Katia D; Joshi, Neil; Freund, David E; Bressler, Neil M

    2017-03-01

    When left untreated, age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss in people over fifty in the US. Currently it is estimated that about eight million US individuals have the intermediate stage of AMD that is often asymptomatic with regard to visual deficit. These individuals are at high risk for progressing to the advanced stage where the often treatable choroidal neovascular form of AMD can occur. Careful monitoring to detect the onset and prompt treatment of the neovascular form as well as dietary supplementation can reduce the risk of vision loss from AMD, therefore, preferred practice patterns recommend identifying individuals with the intermediate stage in a timely manner. Past automated retinal image analysis (ARIA) methods applied on fundus imagery have relied on engineered and hand-designed visual features. We instead detail the novel application of a machine learning approach using deep learning for the problem of ARIA and AMD analysis. We use transfer learning and universal features derived from deep convolutional neural networks (DCNN). We address clinically relevant 4-class, 3-class, and 2-class AMD severity classification problems. Using 5664 color fundus images from the NIH AREDS dataset and DCNN universal features, we obtain values for accuracy for the (4-, 3-, 2-) class classification problem of (79.4%, 81.5%, 93.4%) for machine vs. (75.8%, 85.0%, 95.2%) for physician grading. This study demonstrates the efficacy of machine grading based on deep universal features/transfer learning when applied to ARIA and is a promising step in providing a pre-screener to identify individuals with intermediate AMD and also as a tool that can facilitate identifying such individuals for clinical studies aimed at developing improved therapies. It also demonstrates comparable performance between computer and physician grading. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Career Progression of Junior Professional Officers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pepper S. E.; Carbonaro J.; Hoffheins, B; Collins, T.

    2015-07-12

    The U.S. Support Program to IAEA Safeguards (USSP) has funded more than 25 Junior Professional Officer (JPO) positions in the IAEA Department of Safeguards since 2005. JPOs are college graduates with zero to two years’ work experience who work alongside experienced IAEA staff members for one to two years and assist with basic, yet essential work while obtaining valuable experience. They contribute to equipment development, testing, integration, open source information collection and analysis, and software and database development. This paper will study the trends in career progression for the JPOs who have completed assignments with the IAEA in the Department of Safeguards. Brookhaven National Laboratory, in its role in managing the USSP, has compiled information that can be analyzed for this purpose.

  14. Pygmalion Effect on Junior English Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurong Wang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Pygmalion Effect, or Robert Rosenthal Effect, was proved by the famous American psychologist Robert Rosenthal and Jacobson in 1968. Pygmalion Effect, as a matter of fact, is a psychological suggestion, which believes that people can accept the influence and suggestion given by the people whom very much they admire, like, believe, and respect. This effect was first applied in the field of management and medication. What’s more, remarkable achievements have been accomplished on human resource management. Robert Rosenthal put it into education through an experiment called Pygmalion in the Classroom, which aroused widely attention in the education sector. This thesis mainly focuses on the application of Pygmalion effect in English teaching, especially junior English teaching in China. If we can make good use of the Pygmalion Effect to conduct teaching and have positive expectations to students, it will improve teaching greatly.

  15. Challenges of Universal Basic Education Programme: The Role of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Toshiba

    Counsellors roles for effective implementation of Universal Basic. Education. Recommendations ... In the Nigerian context, basic education includes primary, junior. Secondary and .... Infrastructural facilities, especially in rural areas. 3.75. 8th. 9.

  16. Quality and Equality: Basic Skill Requirements at the University Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guskin, Alan E.; Greenebaum, Ben

    1979-01-01

    The University of Wisconsin-Parkside's comprehensive collegiate skills program is described from proposal to implementation. Junior year students must demonstrate competence in: writing, reading, mathematics, research paper writing, and library skills. (MLW)

  17. Beyond knowledge transfer: The social construction of autonomous academic science in university-industry agricultural biotechnology research collaborations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biscotti, Dina Louise

    Autonomy is a social product. Although some might view autonomy as the absence of social interference in individual action, it is in fact produced through social institutions. It enables social actors to act; it is the justification for the allocation of enormous public resources into institutions classified as "public" or "nonprofit;" it can lead to innovation; and, significantly, it is key to the public acceptance of new technologies. In this dissertation, I analyze the social construction of autonomy for academic science in U.S. university-industry agricultural biotechnology research collaborations. University-industry relationships (UIRs) are a site of concern about the influence of commercial interests on academic science. Agricultural biotechnology is a contentious technology that has prompted questions about the ecological and public health implications of genetically-modified plants and animals. It has also spurred awareness of the industrialization of agriculture and accelerating corporate control of the global food system. Through analysis of in-depth interviews with over 200 scientists and administrators from nine U.S. research universities and thirty agricultural biotechnology companies, I find that both the academy and industry have a vested interest in the social construction of the academy as an autonomous space from which claims to objective, disinterested scientific knowledge can be made. These claims influence government regulation, as well as grower and public acceptance of agricultural biotechnology products. I argue that the social production of autonomy for academic science can be observed in narratives and practices related to: (1) the framing of when, how and why academic scientists collaborate with industry, (2) the meanings ascribed to and the uses deemed appropriate for industry monies in academic research, and (3) the dissemination of research results into the public domain through publications and patents. These narratives and practices

  18. How the Use of Remote Sensing is Transferred to Diverse User Communities Through Capacity Building at Columbia University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccato, P.; Bell, M. A.; Mantilla, G.; Thomson, M. C.

    2012-12-01

    This presentation will provide an overview of capacity-building activities developed by the International Research Institute for Climate and Society to help diverse stakeholder communities use remote sensing to monitor climate and environmental factors that influence public health, natural disasters and food security. Teaching at a graduate level at Columbia University, at summer institutes and in counties, we developed training modules and case studies on how to combine remote sensing data to monitor precipitation, temperature, vegetation, and water bodies with climate information and field data (e.g. fires, infectious disease incidence, Desert Locusts) to 1) understand the relationship between climate, environmental factors and specific challenges to development and 2) provide methodologies and tools to forecast and better manage the problems. At Columbia University, we have developed a graduate course that provides the practical and theoretical foundations for the application of remote sensing techniques to the identification and monitoring of environmental change. We use the IRI Data Library, an online tool, to i) manage diverse data, ii) visualize data, iii) analyze remote sensing images and iii) combine data from different sources (e.g., fires, public health, natural disasters, agriculture). The IRI Data Library tool allows the users to analyze on-line climatic and environmental factors in relation to particular problems at various space and time scales. A Summer Institute on Climate Information for Public Health, first developed in 2008, has brought together experts from the public health and climate communities at the IRI to learn how to integrate climate and environmental factors with public health issues. In countries and regions, we also provide training for climate and public health working professionals in Madagascar, Ethiopia, Eritrea, Colombia and the Mercosur Region (including Uruguay, Paraguay, Brazil and Argentina).

  19. How Information Literate Are Junior and Senior Class Biology Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffl, Iris

    2018-03-01

    Information literacy—i.e. obtaining, evaluating and using information—is a key element of scientific literacy. However, students are frequently equipped with poor information literacy skills—even at university level—as information literacy is often not explicitly taught in schools. Little is known about students' information skills in science at junior and senior class level, and about teachers' competences in dealing with information literacy in science class. This study examines the information literacy of Austrian 8th, 10th and 12th grade students. Information literacy is important for science education in Austria, because it is listed as a basic competence in Austria's science standards. Two different aspects of information literacy are examined: obtaining information and extracting information from texts. An additional research focus of this study is teachers' competences in diagnosing information skills. The results reveal that students mostly rely on online sources for obtaining information. However, they also use books and consult with people they trust. The younger the students, the more they rely on personal sources. Students' abilities to evaluate sources are poor, especially among younger students. Although teachers claim to use information research in class, their ability to assess their students' information competences is limited.

  20. Reducing fat and sodium content in pork sausage | Junior | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reducing fat and sodium content in pork sausage. Jonhny De Azevedo Maia Junior, Fábio Da Costa Henry, Felipe Roberto Ferreira Amaral Do Valle, Meire Lelis Leal Martins, Célia Raquel Quirino, Rafael Dos Santos Costa ...

  1. Transforming Junior Leader Development: Developing the Next Generation of Pentathletes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Haynes, Kenneth G

    2007-01-01

    .... The convergence of Full Spectrum Operations, Network Centric Warfare, and Krulak's "Three Block War" have facilitated an urgent need for junior leaders that are more capable, adaptive, and mature...

  2. Gender and Acquisition of Science Process Skills among Junior ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gender and Acquisition of Science Process Skills among Junior Secondary ... for the effective learning of science even at the primary or basic level of education. ... and that activity-based methods of instruction be employed in teaching Basic ...

  3. On Stimulating English Learning Motivation of Junior Middle School Students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱梦萱

    2016-01-01

    Learning motivation plays an important role in students’ English learning process. This thesis first introduces the definition and classification of motivation and then puts forward some measures and strategies that can foster and motivate junior middle school students’ learning motivation.

  4. Personality Dimensions of Gifted and Talented Junior High Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblatt, Howard S.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Compared to a peer group of average abilities, gifted and talented junior high school students appeared more outgoing, participating, insightful, fast-learning, intellectually adaptable, conscientious, persistent, and moralistic, thus indicating significant between-group differences. (SB)

  5. Gordon Ramsay's Politeness Strategies in Masterchef and Masterchef Junior Us

    OpenAIRE

    Safa, Annisa Friska; Kurniawan, Eri

    2015-01-01

    This research aims to investigate the types of politeness strategies that are performed by Gordon Ramsay in judging the Masterchef US and Masterchef Junior US contestants' dishes and to reveal whether Gordon Ramsay performs any different politeness strategies between the Master chef and Masterchef Junior contestants. The data spring from Gordon Ramsay utterances, taken from the elimination test of two episodes of Masterchef season 4 (episode 9 and 12) and the elimination test of two episodes ...

  6. Technical characteristics of elite junior men and women race walkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, B; Bissas, A; Drake, A

    2014-12-01

    Successful coaching in race walking requires a thorough understanding of the biomechanical principles underlying this unique form of gait. The purpose of this study was to analyze elite male and female junior race walkers and identify key kinematic variables. Twenty junior men and 20 junior women were videoed as they competed over 10 km in the 8th European Cup Race Walking. Three-dimensional kinematic data were obtained using motion analysis software (SIMI, Munich). Step length and cadence were correlated with speed in both sexes, and greater step lengths were the kinematic reason for junior men's faster walking speeds. While cadence did not differ between junior men and junior women, there was a difference in proportion of step time spent in contact. There were some differences between genders for upper body joint angles (e.g., elbow) but there were few differences within lower limb joint angles. Although some technical aspects (e.g., pelvic and shoulder girdle rotation) appeared undeveloped, it was noteworthy that most athletes achieved full knee extension at initial contact in accordance with the rules. However, in many athletes flight times were evident that might present problems during the transition to the higher standards of senior competition. There was a large range of ability among both sexes and coaches are advised to ensure that technical development continues during the transition to senior competition.

  7. Has ADVANCE Affected Senior Compared to Junior Women Scientists Differently?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosser, Sue

    2015-01-01

    Substantial evidence exists to demonstrate that the NSF ADVANCE Inititiative has made a positive impact upon institutions. Since it began in 2001, ADVANCE has changed the conversation, policies, and practices in ways to remove obstacles and systemic barriers preventing success for academic women scientists and engineers. Results from ADVANCE projects on campuses have facilitated consensus nationally about policies and practices that institutions may implement to help to alleviate issues, particularly for junior women scientists.Although getting women into senior and leadership positions in STEM constituted an initial impetus for ADVANCE, less emphasis was placed upon the needs of senior women scientists. Surveys of academic women scientists indicate that the issues faced by junior and senior women scientists differ significantly. The focus of ADVANCE on junior women in many ways seemed appropriate--the senior cohort of women scinetists is fed by the junior cohort of scientists; senior women serve as mentors, role models, and leaders for the junior colleagues, while continuing to struggle to achieve full status in the profession. This presentation will center on the differences in issues faced by senior compared to junior women scientists to explore whether a next step for ADVANCE should be to address needs of senior academic women scientists.

  8. Epistaxis management: current understanding amongst junior doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, R; Nash, R; Liu, Z-W; Singh, A

    2016-03-01

    Epistaxis is a common and potentially life-threatening emergency. This survey assesses understanding and confidence in epistaxis management amongst current junior doctors. A cross-sectional study was conducted of foundation year one and two doctors based at three National Health Service trusts within a single region of the UK, assessing basic understanding and procedural confidence. A total of 111 foundation doctors completed this survey. The average duration of undergraduate exposure to otolaryngology was 8.1 days. Forty-one per cent of respondents stated that they would apply pressure to the nasal bones to control epistaxis. Seventy-five per cent lacked confidence in their ability to manage epistaxis. Those with two weeks or more of undergraduate exposure to otolaryngology were more confident than those with one week or less of exposure (p epistaxis management, with patient safety implications. Confidence is associated with the duration of undergraduate exposure to otolaryngology. A minimum emergency safe competency should be a priority during foundation training if not achieved in UK medical schools.

  9. Breakfast Composition in Junior High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Devi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adolescence is a time of rapid development that requires higher nutrient intake levels than in adulthood. However the habit of skipping breakfast has become very popular among adolescents. Skipping breakfast has negative effects such as difficulty in concentrating, growth impairment and decrease academic performance. Therefore, this study was conducted to identify the breakfast composisition of early adolescents in Jatinangor, Sumedang, Indonesia. Methods: A cross sectional study with non-probability sampling method, was conducted in a junior high school Jatinangor during the month of July 2013. Ninety six participants were included in this study. All the participants underwent an interview about the food intake for breakfast in seven days using eating pattern recall guidelines. Results: Overall, 37% of the respondents skipped breakfast. The mean of total calories among the adolescents who consumed breakfast was 286.06 (187.89 kcal. The amount of carbohydrate, fat and protein consumed was 29.23 (19.93 gram, 13.93 (13.29 gram and 8.78 (6.11 gram accordingly. The main reason for adolescent to skip breakfast was lack of time. Conclusions: Majority of the respondents have their breakfast before they go to school. Overall, the total calories comsumed is sufficient however the amount of protein consumed is low.

  10. Bullying and harassment – Are junior doctors always the victims?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyhsen, C.M.; Patel, P.; O'Connell, J.E.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: NHS staff have the right to work in an environment free from bullying, harassment and violence. There should be good team-working with colleagues from all disciplines. Reports of bullying experienced by junior doctors resulted in mandatory annual GMC surveys regarding the quality of training. This led to medical trainees being surveyed more than any other staff. Radiographers informally reported bullying and harassment (B&H) incidents involving trainees. This survey aims to quantify the issue. Methods: Online survey of general and CT radiographers at a large acute hospital in the North East of England addressing incidents involving junior doctors and occurring in the preceding 12 months. Results: The survey was completed by 86% (44/51) general and 5/7 CT radiographers. Overall 45% experienced bullying, 92% had their own/witnessed a colleague's opinion being ignored and 57% were the target of loud verbal abuse/anger or witnessed colleagues being treated in that way. Several radiographers reported 5 or more B&H incidents. 26 radiographers (51%) were shouted at/ridiculed in theatre, 4 feeling unsafe/physically threatened. Junior doctors regularly queried the need to supervise CT contrast injections on call. Free text comments highlighted that doctors rarely introduced themselves to radiology staff. Conclusion: Radiographers report significant incidents of B&H involving junior doctors, who do not always seem to appreciate radiation exposure legislation, patient safety protocols or respect the seniority of highly trained radiographers. Measures introduced subsequently include guidance for radiographers, a dedicated radiology e-learning package for trainees and classroom sessions for foundation doctors and final year undergraduate students. - Highlights: • Bullying and harassment of radiographers is a persistent problem. • Some radiographers reported feeling physically threatened in theatre. • Some junior doctors do not respect radiation exposure

  11. Feasibility study of the university of Utah TRIGA reactor power upgrade - part II: Thermohydraulics and heat transfer study in respect to cooling system requirements and design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babitz Philip

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermodynamic conditions of the University of Utah's TRIGA Reactor were simulated using SolidWorks Flow Simulation, Ansys, Fluent and PARET-ANL. The models are developed for the reactor's currently maximum operating power of 90 kW, and a few higher power levels to analyze thermohydraulics and heat transfer aspects in determining a design basis for higher power including the cost estimate. It was found that the natural convection current becomes much more pronounced at higher power levels with vortex shedding also occurring. A departure from nucleate boiling analysis showed that while nucleate boiling begins near 210 kW it remains in this state and does not approach the critical heat flux at powers up to 500 kW. Based on these studies, two upgrades are proposed for extended operation and possibly higher reactor power level. Together with the findings from Part I studies, we conclude that increase of the reactor power is highly feasible yet dependable on its purpose and associated investments.

  12. Perceived Injury Risk among Junior Cricketers: A Cross Sectional Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasanna J. Gamage

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how junior athletes perceive injury risks when participating in sport and the environment they play in is an important component of injury prevention. This study investigates how Sri Lankan junior cricketers (n = 365, aged 11–14 years, boys perceive injury risks associated with playing cricket. The study used a Sri Lankan modification of an Australian junior cricket injury risk perception survey that considered playing cricket versus other sports, different cricket playing positions and roles, and different ground conditions. The risk of playing cricket was considered to be greater than that for cycling, but lower than that for rugby and soccer. Fast-bowlers, batters facing fast-bowlers, fielding close in the field, and wicket-keeping without a helmet were perceived to pose greater risks of injury than other scenarios. Playing on hard, bumpy and/or wet ground conditions were perceived to have a high risk opposed to playing on a grass field. Fielding in the outfield and wicket-keeping to fast-bowlers whilst wearing a helmet were perceived as low risk actions. The risk perceptions of junior cricketers identified in this study, do not necessarily reflect the true injury risk in some instances. This information will inform the development of injury prevention education interventions to address these risk perceptions in junior cricketers.

  13. Stronger vection in junior high school children than in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirai, Nobu; Imura, Tomoko; Tamura, Rio; Seno, Takeharu

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that even elementary school-aged children (7 and 11 years old) experience visually induced perception of illusory self-motion (vection) (Lepecq et al., 1995, Perception, 24, 435-449) and that children of a similar age (mean age = 9.2 years) experience more rapid and stronger vection than do adults (Shirai et al., 2012, Perception, 41, 1399-1402). These findings imply that although elementary school-aged children experience vection, this ability is subject to further development. To examine the subsequent development of vection, we compared junior high school students' (N = 11, mean age = 14.4 years) and adults' (N = 10, mean age = 22.2 years) experiences of vection. Junior high school students reported significantly stronger vection than did adults, suggesting that the perceptual experience of junior high school students differs from that of adults with regard to vection and that this ability undergoes gradual changes over a relatively long period of development.

  14. Skynet Junior Scholars: Bringing Astronomy to Deaf and Hard of Hearing Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Kate; Williamson, Kathryn; Gartner, Constance; Hoette, Vivian L.; Heatherly, Sue Ann

    2016-01-01

    Skynet Junior Scholars (SJS), funded by the National Science Foundation, aims to engage middle school youth from diverse audiences in investigating the universe with research quality robotic telescopes. SJS project development goals include: 1) Online access to optical and radio telescopes, data analysis tools, and professional astronomers, 2) An age-appropriate web-based interface for controlling remote telescopes, 3) Inquiry-based standards-aligned instructional modules. From an accessibility perspective, the goal of the Skynet Junior Scholars project is to facilitate independent access to the project by all youth including those with blindness or low vision and those who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing.Deaf and Hard of Hearing (DHH) students have long been an underserved population within STEM fields, including astronomy. Two main barriers include: (1) insufficient corpus of American Sign Language (ASL) for astronomy terminology, and (2) DHH education professionals who lack astronomy background. A suite of vocabulary, accessible hands-on activities, and interaction with trained professionals, are critical for enhancing the background experiences of DHH youth, as they may come to an astronomy lesson lacking the basic "incidental learning" that is often taken for granted with hearing peers (for example, from astronomy in the media).A collaboration between the Skynet Junior Scholars (SJS) project and the Wisconsin School for the Deaf is bringing astronomy to the DHH community in an accessible way for the first time. We follow a group of seven DHH youth over one semester as they interact with the SJS tools and curriculum to understand how they assimilate astronomy experiences and benefit from access to telescopes both directly (on school campus and at Yerkes Observatory) and through Skynet's robotic telescope network (optical and radio telescopes, inquiry-based modules, data analysis tools, and professional astronomers). We report on our first findings of resources and

  15. Evaluating Junior Secondary Science Textbook Usage in Australian Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Christine V.

    2016-08-01

    A large body of research has drawn attention to the importance of providing engaging learning experiences in junior secondary science classes, in an attempt to attract more students into post-compulsory science courses. The reality of time and resource constraints, and the high proportion of non-specialist science teachers teaching science, has resulted in an overreliance on more transmissive pedagogical tools, such as textbooks. This study sought to evaluate the usage of junior secondary science textbooks in Australian schools. Data were collected via surveys from 486 schools teaching junior secondary (years 7-10), representing all Australian states and territories. Results indicated that most Australian schools use a science textbook in the junior secondary years, and textbooks are used in the majority of science lessons. The most highly cited reason influencing choice of textbook was layout/colour/illustrations, and electronic technologies were found to be the dominant curricula material utilised, in addition to textbooks, in junior secondary science classes. Interestingly, the majority of respondents expressed high levels of satisfaction with their textbooks, although many were keen to stress the subsidiary role of textbooks in the classroom, emphasising the textbook was `one' component of their teaching repertoire. Importantly, respondents were also keen to stress the benefits of textbooks in supporting substitute teachers, beginning teachers, and non-specialist science teachers; in addition to facilitating continuity of programming and staff support in schools with high staff turnover. Implications from this study highlight the need for high quality textbooks to support teaching and learning in Australian junior secondary science classes.

  16. The roles of games in teaching and learning of mathematics in junior ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The roles of games in teaching and learning of mathematics in junior secondary schools. ... The research seeks to enhance the status of games in teaching mathematics in junior secondary schools curriculum ... AJOL African Journals Online.

  17. Marketing advisors and their role for junior gas producers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maffitt, D.W.

    1997-01-01

    The role of marketing advisors in the new deregulated natural gas industry was discussed. These producer-oriented marketing consultants are specialists in providing affordable marketing services to junior gas producers on an 'as-needed' basis. The most important service provided by marketing advisors is helping the client identify management problems, analyze such problems and recommend solutions. Accordingly, the marketing advisor should be independent and objective, with no conflict of interests. He/she should be prepared to invest a lot of time and effort in providing the junior producer with a customized diagnosis of its marketing problems. 5 refs., 3 figs

  18. Marketing advisors and their role for junior gas producers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maffitt, D.W. [Phoenix Gas Marketing Consultants Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    1997-05-01

    The role of marketing advisors in the new deregulated natural gas industry was discussed. These producer-oriented marketing consultants are specialists in providing affordable marketing services to junior gas producers on an `as-needed` basis. The most important service provided by marketing advisors is helping the client identify management problems, analyze such problems and recommend solutions. Accordingly, the marketing advisor should be independent and objective, with no conflict of interests. He/she should be prepared to invest a lot of time and effort in providing the junior producer with a customized diagnosis of its marketing problems. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Algorithms for computing parsimonious evolutionary scenarios for genome evolution, the last universal common ancestor and dominance of horizontal gene transfer in the evolution of prokaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galperin Michael Y

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparative analysis of sequenced genomes reveals numerous instances of apparent horizontal gene transfer (HGT, at least in prokaryotes, and indicates that lineage-specific gene loss might have been even more common in evolution. This complicates the notion of a species tree, which needs to be re-interpreted as a prevailing evolutionary trend, rather than the full depiction of evolution, and makes reconstruction of ancestral genomes a non-trivial task. Results We addressed the problem of constructing parsimonious scenarios for individual sets of orthologous genes given a species tree. The orthologous sets were taken from the database of Clusters of Orthologous Groups of proteins (COGs. We show that the phyletic patterns (patterns of presence-absence in completely sequenced genomes of almost 90% of the COGs are inconsistent with the hypothetical species tree. Algorithms were developed to reconcile the phyletic patterns with the species tree by postulating gene loss, COG emergence and HGT (the latter two classes of events were collectively treated as gene gains. We prove that each of these algorithms produces a parsimonious evolutionary scenario, which can be represented as mapping of loss and gain events on the species tree. The distribution of the evolutionary events among the tree nodes substantially depends on the underlying assumptions of the reconciliation algorithm, e.g. whether or not independent gene gains (gain after loss after gain are permitted. Biological considerations suggest that, on average, gene loss might be a more likely event than gene gain. Therefore different gain penalties were used and the resulting series of reconstructed gene sets for the last universal common ancestor (LUCA of the extant life forms were analysed. The number of genes in the reconstructed LUCA gene sets grows as the gain penalty increases. However, qualitative examination of the LUCA versions reconstructed with different gain penalties

  20. Ostensiewe illustrasies as mikrostrukturele items in verklarende skoolwoordeboeke gerig op leerders in die junior sekondêre fase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip Louw

    2011-10-01

    School Dictionaries Targeting Learners in the Junior Secondary Phase. An explanatory school dictionary targeting learners in the junior secondary phase must, in the South African context, pursue user-oriented practices in order to add value for both mother-tongue- and non-mother-tongue-speaking learners on a communicative and a pedagogical level. One such practice would be the inclusion of ostensive illustrations as microstructural items in order to en-hance the transfer of pragmatic and semantic data. In this article, the value of ostensive illustrations and their relevance in an explanatory school dictionary targeting learners in the junior secondary phase are evaluated, after which certain reservations regarding their use are addressed. A decision on whether to include ostensive illustrations demands a further discussion of where to position these items in the microstructure, as well as a discussion of different types of illustrations that will be suitable for inclusion in the type of dictionary profiled. Thereafter a critical evaluation of the treatment of ostensive illustrations in a genuinely South African explanatory school dictionary targeting learners in the junior secondary phase is provided and suggestions made for an improved microstructural treatment that meets the demands set by the user perspective. Lastly, the issue of necessary mediostructural support for this data type in the form of precise, comprehensive cross-references will be raised. This article aims to present criteria for the successful lexicographical treatment of ostensive illustrations.


    Keywords: ADJECTIVE, CAPTIONS, COMMUNICATIVE VALUE, CROSS-REFERENCES, EXAMPLE MATERIAL, EXPLANATORY SCHOOL DICTIONARY, GROUP ILLUSTRATION, JUNIOR SECONDARY EDUCATIONAL PHASE, MICROSTRUCTURAL ITEMS, NOUN, OS-TENSIVE ILLUSTRATIONS, PEDAGOGICAL VALUE, STRUCTURAL INDICATOR, VERB

  1. Group Versus Individual Counseling: A Junior College Study. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aughinbaugh, Lorine A.

    Increases in junior college enrollment, coupled with a shortage of qualified guidance personnel, have forced many colleges to rely more heavily on group than on individual counseling for students. In the fall of 1965, students entering American River College were randomly assigned to either group or individual sessions, or not assigned, and these…

  2. Multidimensional Computerized Adaptive Testing for Indonesia Junior High School Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Bor-Chen; Daud, Muslem; Yang, Chih-Wei

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a curriculum-based multidimensional computerized adaptive test that was developed for Indonesia junior high school Biology. In adherence to the Indonesian curriculum of different Biology dimensions, 300 items was constructed, and then tested to 2238 students. A multidimensional random coefficients multinomial logit model was…

  3. Plugging into Pop at the Junior High Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Dick

    1979-01-01

    Describes a junior high music program in Ridgewood, New Jersey, which capitalizes on student interest in popular music through courses in rock music history, pop music choral concerts, and facilities offering modern music production and performance equipment. This article is part of a theme issue on popular music. (SJL)

  4. Empathy, Self-Esteem and Creativity among Junior Ballet Dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalliopuska, Mirja

    This study examined the effect of the active pursuit of ballet as a hobby on personality. The study group consisted of 62 members of the junior ballet of the Finnish National Opera, ranging in age from 9 to 17 with the majority under 14. The dancers were given four self-esteem questionnaires which measured empathy, creativity, and other…

  5. The Effect of Teachers' Emotions on Chinese Junior English Learners

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JiangLiqin

    2004-01-01

    The study intends to investigate the effect of teachers' emotions on Chinese Junior English learners. It is very common to see that in many primary schools, Chinese English teachers tend to play games with children, teach songs and the like,leading the Chinese young English beginners to the door to English world with great enthusiasm. But after children enter

  6. PROCEDURE FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT OF COMMUNITY JUNIOR COLLEGES IN ARKANSAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkansas State Commission on Coordination of Higher Educational Finance, Little Rock.

    CRITERIA FOR ESTABLISHMENT OF JUNIOR COLLEGE DISTRICTS IN ARKANSAS INCLUDE (1) A PROJECTED ENROLLMENT OF AT LEAST 300 FULL TIME EQUIVALENT STUDENTS IN THE THIRD YEAR OF OPERATION, (2) ASSESSED VALUATION ADEQUATE TO PROVIDE FROM LOCAL PROPERTY TAXES ONE-THIRD OF THE ANNUAL OPERATING COST AND THE TOTAL DEBT SERVICE REQUIREMENTS FOR CAPITAL OUTLAY,…

  7. An analysis of the performance of Black African junior provincial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    been investigated. 1. It was found that these processes were effective in increasing participation of senior black provincial players between. 1996 and 2008. There were ... players were performing at junior provincial level but have not been afforded the ..... batsmen have performed consistently well between 2004 and 2010.

  8. Women in Academic Medicine: Measuring Stereotype Threat Among Junior Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassiotto, Magali; Hamel, Elizabeth Otto; Ku, Manwai; Correll, Shelley; Grewal, Daisy; Lavori, Philip; Periyakoil, V J; Reiss, Allan; Sandborg, Christy; Walton, Gregory; Winkleby, Marilyn; Valantine, Hannah

    2016-03-01

    Gender stereotypes in science impede supportive environments for women. Research suggests that women's perceptions of these environments are influenced by stereotype threat (ST): anxiety faced in situations where one may be evaluated using negative stereotypes. This study developed and tested ST metrics for first time use with junior faculty in academic medicine. Under a 2012 National Institutes of Health Pathfinder Award, Stanford School of Medicine's Office of Diversity and Leadership, working with experienced clinicians, social scientists, and epidemiologists, developed and administered ST measures to a representative group of junior faculty. 174 School of Medicine junior faculty were recruited (62% women, 38% men; 75% assistant professors, 25% instructors; 50% white, 40% Asian, 10% underrepresented minority). Women reported greater susceptibility to ST than did men across all items including ST vulnerability (p gender identification (p women reported lower beliefs in advancement (p = 0.021); however, they had similar career interest and identification, felt just as connected to colleagues, and were equally likely to pursue careers outside academia (all p > 0.42). Innovative ST metrics can provide a more complete picture of academic medical center environments. While junior women faculty are susceptible to ST, they may not yet experience all of its consequences in their early careers. As such, ST metrics offer a tool for evaluating institutional initiatives to increase supportive environments for women in academic medicine.

  9. Announcement of the Diagnostics 2016 Junior Scientists Travel Award

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    With the goal of recognizing outstanding contributions to the field of medical diagnostics by early-career investigators, including assistant professors, postdoctoral students and PhD students, and assisting them in attending international conferences in 2016, early this year Diagnostics accepted nominations for the Junior Scientists Travel Award 2016.

  10. Evaluation of English Language Textbooks Used in the Junior ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study sought to establish the readability, comprehensibility, availability and the level of integration of English language and Literature in English in the English language textbooks in use in Lagos State junior secondary schools. Three hundred students and 60 teachers were selected from 20 schools in Lagos State.

  11. An Institutional Autopsy of St. Augustine Junior College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumadue, Richard T.

    2009-01-01

    Institutional autopsies can teach much about why learning centers fail the test of time. St. Augustine Junior College in north Florida, the brainchild of Dr. George Apel, was begun in 1942 and ended seven years later in 1949. The purposes of the short-lived college are identified for discussion in this paper. Also identified are the reasons for…

  12. Effect of Painting Series Package on the Performances of Junior ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated the effect of Painting Series Package on the performance of Junior Secondary School Cultural and Creative Arts in Ogbomoso, Nigeria. Gender influence on the students' performances was also examined. Sample comprised 60 students drawn purposively from two secondary schools.

  13. Self-Esteem of Junior High and High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kimberly E.

    The purpose of this thesis was to investigate the self-esteem of junior high and high school students. The independent variables investigated were quality of family life, birth order, family size, maternal employment, grade level and family structure. The dependent variables were the self-esteem scores from the following sub-scales of the Texas…

  14. Recurrent Respiratory Infections and Psychological Problems in Junior School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelmanson, Igor A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recurrent respiratory infections (RRI) are among most common diseases in school-aged children. Little is known about possible associations between RRI and children psychological well-being. Aim: To study possible associations between RRI in junior school pupils and their emotional/behavioural characteristics. Methods: The RRI group…

  15. [Stop the compulsive PhD trajectory for junior doctors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clevers, J C Hans

    2014-01-01

    It has become the rule rather than the exception that junior doctors in training spend 3-4 years on a research project, culminating in a thesis. Without a PhD, clinical career prospects within and outside academia look rather bleak. Here I argue that PhD degrees should be pursued only by the most talented and motivated young clinicians.

  16. Music and Careers for the Junior High Student.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Bruce

    The curriculum guide describes an exemplary project designed to provide junior high school students with an opportunity to explore careers related to the world of music. The units present objectives, activities, and resources related to the following occupations: pop music artist, professional musician (union), instrumental and vocal music…

  17. Migration intentions among Portuguese junior doctors: Results from a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Pedro; Alves, Hélio

    2017-12-01

    Migration of health personnel during periods of economic crisis represents a challenge for policymakers in origin and destination countries. Portugal is going through a period of economic hardship and much has been speculated about an increase in junior doctors' migration during this period. Using a questionnaire administered to a sample of Portuguese junior doctors who were still in the general residency (1st-year after medical school), we aim at determining the prevalence of migration intentions among Portuguese junior doctors and to identify the most important drivers of career choice for those who are considering emigrating in the near future. In our sample, 55% of Portuguese junior doctors are considering working abroad in the coming 10 years. Several variables were associated with an intention to work abroad: female sex (odds ratio [OR] 0.559; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.488-0.640), the National Medical Exam score (OR 0.978; 95% CI 0.961-0.996;), having studied abroad (OR 1.756; 95% CI 1.086-2.867) and considering income and research opportunities as key factors for future specialty choice (OR 1.356; 95% CI 1.132-1.626; OR 2.626; 95% CI 1.228-4.172). Our study warns of the shortages the country may face due to doctors' migration and the main factors behind migration intentions in Portugal. Developing physician retention strategies is a priority to appropriately address these factors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Teaching mathematics creatively in the junior secondary classes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper tried to emphasize the importance of teaching mathematics with creativity in the Junior Secondary classes (JS1-3) of our education system. It was established that a mathematically creative environment like the mathematics laboratory will enhance the teaching and learning of mathematics in schools. In this study ...

  19. The Influence of Gender on Junior Secondary School Students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper is on the influence of gender on junior secondary school student's attitude towards mathematics in Ovia North East local government area of Edo state. The descriptive survey design was employed for the study. The population of the study comprised of all the JSS3 students, a total of Three Thousand Six Hundred ...

  20. Sex-Differences in Attitudes towards Mathematics of Junior ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated junior secondary school pupils' attitudes towards mathematics. In addition, it investigated gender differences in attitudes towards the subject. The purposive sampling method was used to select nine schools in the Cape Coast Municipality, involving 581 pupils. Questionnaires on attitudes towards ...

  1. The status of basic technology in Cross River State Junior ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of the study was to ascertain the status of basic technology in Cross River State junior secondary schools. Descriptive survey design was adopted for the study. The study was guided by three (3) research questions. The population for the study comprised of one hundred and twelve (112) basic technology ...

  2. CAI and Its Application in Rural Junior English Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaojun

    2015-01-01

    Superiority in developing students' listening, speaking, etc. This thesis explores how to provide a better environment for English teaching in rural junior school with the aid of multimedia and find some ways to improve teaching efficiency. In recent years, using multimedia is the direction of reform and mainstream in English teaching. Compared…

  3. Fitness and body composition profiling of elite junior South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. The aim of this study was to describe the body composition, strength and speed characteristics of elite junior South African rugby players. Design. Cross-sectional. Setting. Field study. Subjects. Rugby players (16 and 18 years old, N = 174) selected for the South African Rugby Union National Green Squad.

  4. readability of comprehension passages in junior high school (jhs)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CHARLES

    ... to enhance readability. Key Words: readability formulas, comprehension passages, Junior High School, .... Index has a manual version but in this study the electronic version was used. The ..... probably the majority of the people heard the news by word of mouth. A critical look ..... The Journal of Tourism Studies 9.2: 49-60.

  5. Fitness profile of elite junior South African badminton players | van ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to establish the fitness profile of the elite junior badminton players in South Africa through the measurement and description of their body composition, aerobic power, muscular characteristics, speed, flexibility and agility. Eight elite male and seven elite female badminton players between the ...

  6. Selection of Learning Media Mathematics for Junior School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widodo, Sri Adi; Wahyudin

    2018-01-01

    One of the factors that determine the success of mathematics learning is the learning media used. Learning media can help students to create mathematical abstract mathematics that is abstract. In addition to media, meaningful learning is a learning that is adapted to the students' cognitive development. According to Piaget, junior high school…

  7. Vertical Integration at Junior and Intermediate Levels. School Research Newsletter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marklund, Inger, Ed.; Hanse, Mona-Britt, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a rapid growth of interest in Sweden in vertically integrated classes in compulsory schools, especially at junior high school and intermediate grade levels. This development is supported in various ways by the curriculum, partly because it puts more emphasis than previous curricula on the occurrence of teaching…

  8. A survey of perceived hindrances to junior secondary school ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated situations which Junior Secondary Schools (JSS) teachers perceived as hindrances to their teaching functions. A 30-item questionnaire with a 5-point scale was used to collect data from 116 science teachers who taught in private and public schools. The schools were based in rural and urban ...

  9. development and validation of an instrument for assessing junior ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. BARTH EKWEME

    school Mathematics classroom environment as it affects teaching and learning of Mathematics in Enugu. State. ... plays a significant role in computer technology. ... classroom. The main purpose of this study was to develop and validate an instrument for assessing junior secondary school Mathematics classroom learning ...

  10. Analysis of Daily Life Time in Women's Junior College Students

    OpenAIRE

    樫村, 修生

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was understand the correlationship between the energy expenditure of living activity and body structure or physical fitness in the students of a women's junior college. The resulut were as follows; It was shown that the physical activites in the daily life was necessary for prevention of obesity in the students.

  11. Head Impact Exposure in Junior and Adult Australian Football Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Hecimovich

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study measured and compared the frequency, magnitude, and distribution of head impacts sustained by junior and adult Australian football players, respectively, and between player positions over a season of games. Twelve junior and twelve adult players were tracked using a skin-mounted impact sensor. Head impact exposure, including frequency, magnitude, and location of impacts, was quantified using previously established methods. Over the collection period, there were no significant differences in the impact frequency between junior and adult players. However, there was a significant increase in the frequency of head impacts for midfielders in both grades once we accounted for player position. A comparable amount of head impacts in both junior and adult players has implications for Australian football regarding player safety and medical coverage as younger players sustained similar impact levels as adult players. The other implication of a higher impact profile within midfielders is that, by targeting education and prevention strategies, a decrease in the incidence of sports-related concussion may result.

  12. Literacy in Community Colleges. Junior College Resource Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarrington, Roger; And Others

    This series of Junior College Resource Reviews focuses on the community college's role in literacy development. After Roger Yarrington's overview of the topic, Robert McCabe and Susan Skidmore consider "The Literacy Crisis and American Education." In light of the changing nature of work and the severe decline in the communication skills of youth,…

  13. Sex-Differences in Attitudes towards Mathematics of Junior ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cce

    The study investigated junior secondary school pupils' attitudes towards mathematics. ... They attributed this to their low interest and confidence in learning ... aspirations performed better in mathematics and science than those who did not .... The questionnaire items were hand delivered to respondents on the days that ...

  14. Sex-Differences in Attitudes towards Mathematics of Junior ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cce

    Abstract. The study investigated junior secondary school pupils' attitudes towards mathematics. In addition, it investigated gender differences in attitudes towards the subject. The purposive sampling method was used to select nine schools in the Cape Coast. Municipality, involving 581 pupils. Questionnaires on attitudes ...

  15. Do "trainee-centered ward rounds" help overcome barriers to learning and improve the learning satisfaction of junior doctors in the workplace?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Vikas; Reyahi, Amir; Amis, Samuel M; Mansour, Sami

    2015-01-01

    Ward rounds are widely considered an underutilized resource with regard to medical education, and therefore, a project was undertaken to assess if the initiation of "trainee-centered ward rounds" would help improve the confidence, knowledge acquisition, and workplace satisfaction of junior doctors in the clinical environment. Data were collated from junior doctors, registrar grade doctors, and consultants working in the delivery suite at Luton and Dunstable University Hospital in Luton over a 4-week period in March-April 2013. A review of the relevant literature was also undertaken. This pilot study found that despite the reservations around time constraints held by both junior and senior clinicians alike, feedback following the intervention was largely positive. The junior doctors enjoyed having a defined role and responsibility during the ward round and felt they benefited from their senior colleagues' feedback. Both seniors and junior colleagues agreed that discussing learning objectives prior to commencing the round was beneficial and made the round more learner-orientated; this enabled maximal learner-focused outcomes to be addressed and met. The juniors were generally encouraged to participate more during the round and the consultants endeavored to narrate their decision-making, both were measures that led to greater satisfaction of both parties. This was in keeping with the concept of "Legitimate peripheral participation" as described by Lave and Wenger. Overall, trainee-centered ward rounds did appear to be effective in overcoming some of the traditional barriers to teaching in the ward environment, although further work to formalize and quantify these findings, as well as using greater sample sizes from different hospital departments and the inclusion of a control group, is needed.

  16. Skynet Junior Scholars: From Idea to Enactment--Tales from the Trenches II Implementation with Blind and Low Vision Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beasley, Jeremiah; Fahlberg, Tim; Hoette, Vivian L.; Mekeel, Tina; Meredith, Kate; Williamson, Kathryn; Hoette, B. Charles; Skynet Robotic Telescope Network, University of North Carolina

    2016-01-01

    Skynet Junior Scholars is an ambitious program that aims to:--Develop online tools that enable middle school and high school aged youth to use robotic optical and radio telescopes to do astronomy--Create an inquiry-based curriculum that promotes critical thinking and scientific habits of mind--Proactively incorporate Principles of Universal Design in all SJS development tasks to ensure access by blind/low vision and deaf/hard of hearing youth--Prepare 180 adult youth leaders from diverse backgrounds including 4-H leaders, museum educators, amateur astronomers and teachers to facilitate SJS activities in a variety of settings.In this paper we describe the work of staff and volunteers at the Wisconsin School for the Blind and Visually Impaired who have implemented SJS activities in school and camp environments, as well as ways in which they have empowered their students to take on leadership roles. Students from the Wisconsin School for the Blind and Visually Impaired planned and co-hosted a Magic of Astronomy (Harry Potter Themed) star party that incorporated topics learned as part of the SJS program; filters, exposure time, locating objects in the sky, as well as, how to make an image request from the Skynet network. Their experiences in successfully doing active astronomy will provide insight into how anyone can engage everyone in programs like Skynet Junior Scholars.Skynet Junior Scholars is supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Numbers 1223687, 1223235 and 1223345.

  17. Skynet Junior Scholars: From Idea to Enactment--Tales from the Trenches I. Implementation in 4-H settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnside, Jason; Feldman, Lynn; Gurton, Suzanne; Heatherly, Sue Ann; Hoette, Vivian L.; Murray, Jenny; Zastrow, Ginger

    2016-01-01

    The creators of Skynet Junior Scholars were ambitious to say the least when they set out to:- Develop online tools that enable middle school and high school aged youth to use robotic optical and radio telescopes to do astronomy- Create an inquiry-based curriculum that promotes critical thinking and scientific habits of mind- Proactively incorporate Principles of Universal Design in all SJS development tasks to ensure access by blind/low vision and deaf/hard of hearing youth- Prepare 180 adult youth leaders from diverse backgrounds including museum educators, amateur astronomers, teachers 4-H leaders to facilitate SJS activities in a variety of settings.After 3 years of development SJS is in full implementation mode. As of August, 2015, 105 youth leaders and leader supervisors from 24 states have completed professional development and many have formed SJS youth groups. In this paper we describe what it takes for a successful implementation of Skynet Junior Scholars in a 4-H setting, from the viewpoint of adult leaders in the trenches who have created novel implementation models to make SJS work in diverse environments from monthly 4-H meetings to immersive residential camps.4-H is the nation's largest positive youth development organization, with a membership of more than six million young people in the U.S. In 2003 the national organization formed a strong commitment to STEM education with the goal to "to engage one million new youth in a dynamic process of discovery and exploration in science, engineering and technology to prepare them to meet the challenges of the 21st century". Skynet Junior Scholars has formed a strong and growing partnership with state 4-H agencies in West Virginia and Wisconsin, with a goal of establishing SJS as a national 4-H curriculum.Skynet Junior Scholars is supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Numbers 1223687, 1223235 and 1223345.

  18. A mixed-methods study of the causes and impact of poor teamwork between junior doctors and nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'connor, Paul; O'dea, Angela; Lydon, Sinéad; Offiah, Gozie; Scott, Jennifer; Flannery, Antoinette; Lang, Bronagh; Hoban, Anthony; Armstrong, Catherine; Byrne, Dara

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to collect and analyse examples of poor teamwork between junior doctors and nurses; identify the teamwork failures contributing to poor team function; and ascertain if particular teamwork failures are associated with higher levels of risk to patients. Critical Incident Technique interviews were carried out with junior doctors and nurses. Two teaching hospitals in the Republic of Ireland. Junior doctors (n = 28) and nurses (n = 8) provided descriptions of scenarios of poor teamwork. The interviews were coded against a theoretical framework of healthcare team function by three psychologists and were also rated for risk to patients by four doctors and three nurses. A total of 33 of the scenarios met the inclusion criteria for analysis. A total of 63.6% (21/33) of the scenarios were attributed to 'poor quality of collaboration', 42.4% (14/33) to 'poor leadership' and 48.5% (16/33) to a 'lack of coordination'. A total of 16 scenarios were classified as high risk and 17 scenarios were classified as medium risk. Significantly more of the high-risk scenarios were associated with a 'lack of a shared mental model' (62.5%, 10/16) and 'poor communication' (50.0%, 8/16) than the medium-risk scenarios (17.6%, 3/17 and 11.8%, 2/17, respectively). Poor teamwork between junior doctors and nurses is common and places patients at considerable risk. Addressing this problem requires a well-designed complex intervention to develop the team skills of doctors and nurses and foster a clinical environment in which teamwork is supported. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care; all rights reserved.

  19. Versatile Desktop Experiment Module (DEMo) on Heat Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minerick, Adrienne R.

    2010-01-01

    This paper outlines a new Desktop Experiment Module (DEMo) engineered for a chemical engineering junior-level Heat Transfer course. This new DEMo learning tool is versatile, fairly inexpensive, and portable such that it can be positioned on student desks throughout a classroom. The DEMo system can illustrate conduction of various materials,…

  20. Impact of the Implementation of the 9- Years Universal Basic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study focuses on the impact of the implementation of the Universal Basic Education 9-3-4 system of education. Its general objective is to identify and access the impact of the implementation of the Universal Basic Education 9- 3-4 programme while the scope covers the public primary and junior secondary schools in Imo ...

  1. Analytical heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Je-Chin

    2012-01-01

    … it will complete my library … [and] complement the existing literature on heat transfer. It will be of value for both graduate students and faculty members.-Bengt Sunden, Lund University, Sweden

  2. TRANSFERENCE BEFORE TRANSFERENCE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaminio, Vincenzo

    2017-10-01

    This paper is predominantly a clinical presentation that describes the transmigration of one patient's transference to another, with the analyst functioning as a sort of transponder. It involves an apparently accidental episode in which there was an unconscious intersection between two patients. The author's aim is to show how transference from one case may affect transference in another, a phenomenon the author calls transference before transference. The author believes that this idea may serve as a tool for understanding the unconscious work that takes place in the clinical situation. In a clinical example, the analyst finds himself caught up in an enactment involving two patients in which he becomes the medium of what happens in session. © 2017 The Psychoanalytic Quarterly, Inc.

  3. The Impact of Trial Stage, Developer Involvement and International Transferability on Universal Social and Emotional Learning Programme Outcomes: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigelsworth, M.; Lendrum, A.; Oldfield, J.; Scott, A.; ten Bokkel, I.; Tate, K.; Emery, C.

    2016-01-01

    This study expands upon the extant prior meta-analytic literature by exploring previously theorised reasons for the failure of school-based, universal social and emotional learning (SEL) programmes to produce expected results. Eighty-nine studies reporting the effects of school-based, universal SEL programmes were examined for differential effects…

  4. Do “trainee-centered ward rounds” help overcome barriers to learning and improve the learning satisfaction of junior doctors in the workplace?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acharya V

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Vikas Acharya,1Amir Reyahi,2 Samuel M Amis,3 Sami Mansour2 1Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire, Coventry, 2Luton and Dunstable University Hospital, Luton, 3Warwick Medical School, University of Warwick, Coventry, UK Abstract: Ward rounds are widely considered an underutilized resource with regard to medical education, and therefore, a project was undertaken to assess if the initiation of “trainee-centered ward rounds” would help improve the confidence, knowledge acquisition, and workplace satisfaction of junior doctors in the clinical environment. Data were collated from junior doctors, registrar grade doctors, and consultants working in the delivery suite at Luton and Dunstable University Hospital in Luton over a 4-week period in March–April 2013. A review of the relevant literature was also undertaken. This pilot study found that despite the reservations around time constraints held by both junior and senior clinicians alike, feedback following the intervention was largely positive. The junior doctors enjoyed having a defined role and responsibility during the ward round and felt they benefited from their senior colleagues’ feedback. Both seniors and junior colleagues agreed that discussing learning objectives prior to commencing the round was beneficial and made the round more learner-orientated; this enabled maximal learner-focused outcomes to be addressed and met. The juniors were generally encouraged to participate more during the round and the consultants endeavored to narrate their decision-making, both were measures that led to greater satisfaction of both parties. This was in keeping with the concept of “Legitimate peripheral participation” as described by Lave and Wenger. Overall, trainee-centered ward rounds did appear to be effective in overcoming some of the traditional barriers to teaching in the ward environment, although further work to formalize and quantify these findings

  5. TOEFL Junior® Design Framework. TOEFL Junior® Research Report. TOEFL JR-02. ETS Research Report No. RR-15-13

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Youngsoon; Wolf, Mikyung Kim; Hauck, Maurice C.; Mollaun, Pamela; Rybinski, Paul; Tumposky, Daniel; Wang, Lin

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the theoretical and empirical foundations of the "TOEFL Junior"® assessment and its development process. The TOEFL Junior test was developed to address the increasing need for objective measures of English language proficiency for young adolescent learners, who are being introduced to English as a second or foreign…

  6. Social skills and loneliness in junior high school students

    OpenAIRE

    Kanayama, Motoharu; Ono, Masahiko; Ohashi, Tsutomu; Tsujimoto, Yuichi; Oi, Shizuyo; Matsui, Kayoko; Tsujimoto, Ikuhiro; Yoshida, Hatsuko

    2003-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to examine the relationship between social skills and loneliness, and to contribute to prevention and intervention of loneliness in junior high school students. Questionnaires were administered to 83 students (45 males and 38 females). Correlation analysis showed that loneliness score was negatively related to the scores of peer reinforcement, social initiation, conflict resolution and assertion skills, and also positively related to the score of withdrawal beh...

  7. Structuring Naval Special Warfare junior officer professional military education

    OpenAIRE

    Donovan, Thomas A.

    2007-01-01

    Naval Special Warfare does not currently have a designated career path for an officer that requires professional military education (PME) for SEAL junior officers after the rank of Ensign (O-1) and before the rank of Lieutenant Commander (O-4). There currently is interest in this subject matter at the Naval Special Warfare Command and Center. SEAL officers increasingly hold key leadership positions and influence critical decisions in the execution of national strategy. This growing respo...

  8. Junior Officer Competency Model: Research Results and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-03-01

    equal numbers of positive and nega- tive behavioral events, so that variation in this fifty-fifty distribution reflected the information volunteered ...represent effective bahavior . The early piloting of the ALPE produced a number of examples of this phenomena. Second, and more significantly, the junior...deficiencies of experienced NCOs , Get a senior officer to change an inappropriate order 6. Job Involvement Volunteer for new assignments Personally

  9. Logistics Junior Officer Development in a Period of Persistent Conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-23

    JUNIOR OFFICER DEVELOPMENT IN A PERIOD OF PERSISTENT CONFLICT 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S...have less time 38Respondent 10 Email, March 30, 2012. 39Major General Edward C. Cardon , “Thoughts for SAMS Students,”(lecture, Marshall Auditorium...www.amazon.com/John-C.-Maxwell (accessed 18 April 2013). Lectures: Cardon , Edward. “Thoughts for SAMS Students.” Address to School of Advanced Military

  10. Antecedents of Overtime Work: The Case of Junior Academics

    OpenAIRE

    Frei, Irina; Grund, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Despite the ongoing public debate about precarious working conditions in academia, there is only little evidence on working hours and overtime work for the group of (non-tenured) junior academics. By using unique longitudinal survey data on the occupational situation and careers of doctoral students and doctorate holders in STEM fields in Germany, we explore potential antecedents of overtime. We find that overtime hours are less pronounced among firm employees holding a doctorate and among po...

  11. Differences in Physical Capacity Between Junior and Senior Australian Footballers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Stephen J; Watsford, Mark L; Austin, Damien J; Spurrs, Rob W; Pine, Matthew J; Rennie, Michael J

    2017-11-01

    Kelly, SJ, Watsford, ML, Austin, DJ, Spurrs, RW, Pine, MJ, and Rennie, MJ. Differences in physical capacity between junior and senior Australian footballers. J Strength Cond Res 31(11): 3059-3066, 2017-The purpose of this study was to profile and compare anthropometric and physical capacities within elite junior and senior Australian football (AF) players of various chronological ages and stages of athletic development. Seventy-nine players, including junior and senior AF players from one professional club, were profiled using 11 assessments. Junior players were divided into 2 groups based on chronological age (under 16 and 18 years) and senior players according to years since drafted to a professional AF team (1-2 years, 3-7 years, and 8+ years). Parametric data were assessed using a 1-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), whereas nonparametric data were assessed using a Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA. The magnitude difference between players was measured using the Hopkins' effect size (ES). Significant differences were evident between under-16 players and all senior player groups for anthropometric (p = 0.001-0.019/ES = 1.25-2.13), absolute strength (p = 0.001-0.01/ES = 1.82-4.46), and relative strength (p = 0.001-0.027/ES = 0.84-3.55). The under-18 players displayed significantly lower absolute strength (p = 0.001-0.012/ES = 1.82-3.79) and relative strength (p = 0.001-0.027/ES = 0.85-4.00) compared with the 3-7 and 8+ players. Significant differences were evident between the under-16 players and senior player groups for explosive jumping and throwing tests (p = 0.001-0.017/ES = 1.03-2.99). Minimal differences were evident between all player groups for running assessments; however, the under-16 players were significantly slower compared with the 8+ players for the 3-km time trial (p senior AF players.

  12. A Study on the Influence of Home Environment on Autonomous Motivation Toward Study in Junior High School Students : Focus on Father's Home Participation and Marital Relationship

    OpenAIRE

    尾形, 和男

    2015-01-01

    This research aimed at considering the influence which the marital relationship based on a father's home participation has on a child's autonomous motivation toward study. 334 university students(mean age 19.22 years)completed questionnaires designed to investigate the relation among marital relationships, father's and mother's autonomous motivation to their children's study, autonomous support, children's motivational traits, and children's autonomous motivation toward study in their junior ...

  13. Participative leadership practice in junior high schools and actions to improve the practice : a case study of Sekyere south district, Ghana

    OpenAIRE

    Gyasi, Kwame

    2015-01-01

    Gyasi, Kwame. 2015. Participative leadership practice in junior high schools and actions to improve the practice: a case study of Sekyere south district, Ghana Master's Thesis in Education. University of Jyväskylä. Department of Education Participative leadership practice is seen as the kind of school leadership which recognizes parents’ contribution and teachers’ ability and talents in leadership by sharing with them roles and responsibilities in the school administrative process. Th...

  14. IMPLEMENTASI PROGRAM JUNIOR ACHIEVEMENT BE ENTREPRENEURIAL PADA MATA PELAJARAN KEWIRAUSAHAAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arifiyah Arifiyah

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to describe and analyze the implementation of Junior Achievement Be Entrepreneurial program on entrepreneurship subjects in SMA Negeri 3 Semarang. The approach used is qualitative, descriptive methods, and case study research design. The collection of data through observation, interviews and document study. The results showed that the activities of the program before learning that socialization programs, training of trainers and teachers, and planning. Implementation of learning for 8 sessions consist of an introduction to the program, the pre-test, materials, post-test, and questionnaire. Criteria for graduation students follow a program of pre-test and post-test, attendance, student workbook, business plan proposal, and questionnaires with graduation status and succes succes complete and certified. After the implementation of learning there are extra-curricular activities or activities outside class called weekly meetings for the preparation of student company competition. Results graduation are 95.93% and achievements gained from regional, national, and Asia-Pacific. The material taught include the motivation of entrepreneurship, business ideas, who my customers, what is my superiority, business ethics, and business plans. Learning strategy use of small group discussions. Parties directly invol ved, namely students, teachers and trainers, while the other parties involved, namely the Junior Achievement Indonesia, the school, the Department of Education and Citi Bank. Conclusion Junior Achievement Be Entrepreneurial program that is good, decent, and can be disseminated.

  15. [Risk of injury in and adolescent and junior competitive karate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Rath, R; Miltner, O; Mamarvar, M; Mumme, T

    2005-12-01

    Increasing professionalism in competitive karate has led to a specific injury pattern. The aim of our study was to investigate the injury pattern in junior competitive karate and to evaluate the prophylactic effect of fist padding. During the 4 (th) Junior World Championships of the World Karate Confederation (WKC) 2004 235 karate fights were observed and injury-related data were recorded. Fist padding was used in 183 fights, 52 fights were carried out without. In 22 % of all fights we saw an injury. Most of them were mild injuries of the head and face: 32 bruises of the face (13 with epistaxis), 7 facial lacerations and 3 concussions (mild brain injury). 14 fights were stopped due to an injury. Only in the category male 18 - 20 years a higher rate of injuries was seen without fist padding (shobu ippon) compared to shobu sanbon (with fist padding). The injury pattern of junior competitive karate is comparable to senior karate. Fist padding does not generally reduce the incidence or severity of injuries.

  16. Musculoskeletal Injuries and Training Patterns in Junior Elite Orienteering Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian Roos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Findings about the relation between musculoskeletal injuries and training patterns in orienteering athletes are sparse. Therefore, the musculoskeletal injuries and training patterns of 31 Swiss elite orienteering athletes aged 18-19 years were analyzed in a retrospective study. Individual training diaries and medical records were used to assess training data and injury history, respectively. Group comparisons and a multiple linear regression (MLR were performed for statistical analysis. The junior elite orienteering athletes performed 7.38 ± 2.00 training sessions weekly, with a total duration of 455.75 ± 98.22 minutes. An injury incidence rate (IIR of 2.18 ± 2.13 injuries per 1000 hours of training was observed. The lower extremity was affected in 93% of all injuries, and the knee (33% was the most commonly injured location. The MLR revealed that gender and six training variables explained 60% of the variance in the injury severity index in this study. Supported by the low IIR in the observed age group, the training protocol of the junior elite orienteering athletes was generally adequate. In comparison to elite track, marathon, and orienteering athletes, the junior elite athletes performed less high-intensity interval training (HIIT. However, more frequent HIIT seems to be a protective factor against injuries.

  17. NIR tracking assists sports medicine in junior basketball training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paeglis, Roberts; Bluss, Kristaps; Rudzitis, Andris; Spunde, Andris; Brice, Tamara; Nitiss, Edgars

    2011-07-01

    We recorded eye movements of eight elite junior basketball players. We hypothesized that a more stable gaze is correlated to a better shot rate. Upon preliminary testing we invited male juniors whose eyes could be reliably tracked in a game situation. To these ends, we used a head-mounted video-based eye tracker. The participants had no record of ocular or other health issues. No significant differences were found between shots made with and without the tracker cap, Paired samples t-test yielded p= .130 for the far and p=..900 > .050 for the middle range shots. The players made 40 shots from common far and middle range locations, 5 and 4 meters respectively for aged 14 years As expected, a statistical correlation was found between gaze fixation (in milliseconds) for the far and middle range shot rates, r=.782, p=.03. Notably, juniors who fixated longer before a shot had a more stable fixation or a lower gaze dispersion (in tracker's screen pixels), r=-.786, p=.02. This finding was augmented by the observation that the gaze dispersion while aiming at the basket was less (i.e., gaze more stable) in those who were more likely to score. We derived a regression equation linking fixation duration to shot success. We advocate infra-red eye tracking as a means to monitor player selection and training success.

  18. Perspectives on the working hours of Australian junior doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasgow, Nicholas J; Bonning, Michael; Mitchell, Rob

    2014-01-01

    The working hours of junior doctors have been a focus of discussion in Australia since the mid-1990s. Several national organizations, including the Australian Medical Association (AMA), have been prominent in advancing this agenda and have collected data (most of which is self-reported) on the working hours of junior doctors over the last 15 years. Overall, the available data indicate that working hours have fallen in a step-wise fashion, and AMA data suggest that the proportion of doctors at high risk of fatigue may be declining. It is likely that these changes reflect significant growth in the number of medical graduates, more detailed specifications regarding working hours in industrial agreements, and a greater focus on achieving a healthy work-life balance. It is notable that reductions in junior doctors' working hours have occurred despite the absence of a national regulatory framework for working hours. Informed by a growing international literature on working hours and their relation to patient and practitioner safety, accreditation bodies such as the Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care (ACSQHC) and the Australian Medical Council (AMC) are adjusting their standards to encourage improved work and training practices.

  19. State budget transfers to Health Insurance Funds for universal health coverage: institutional design patterns and challenges of covering those outside the formal sector in Eastern European high-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilcu, Ileana; Mathauer, Inke

    2016-01-15

    Many countries from the European region, which moved from a government financed and provided health system to social health insurance, would have had the risk of moving away from universal health coverage if they had followed a "traditional" approach. The Eastern European high-income countries studied in this paper managed to avoid this potential pitfall by using state budget revenues to explicitly pay health insurance contributions on behalf of certain (vulnerable) population groups who have difficulties to pay these contributions themselves. The institutional design aspects of their government revenue transfer arrangements are analysed, as well as their impact on universal health coverage progress. This regional study is based on literature review and review of databases for the performance assessment. The analytical framework focuses on the following institutional design features: rules on eligibility for contribution exemption, financing and pooling arrangements, and purchasing arrangements and benefit package design. More commonalities than differences can be identified across countries: a broad range of groups eligible for exemption from payment of health insurance contributions, full state contributions on behalf of the exempted groups, mostly mandatory participation, integrated pools for both the exempted and contributors, and relatively comprehensive benefit packages. In terms of performance, all countries have high total population coverage rates, but there are still challenges regarding financial protection and access to and utilization of health care services, especially for low income people. Overall, government revenue transfer arrangements to exempt vulnerable groups from contributions are one option to progress towards universal health coverage.

  20. [The transfer from Strasbourg, and the primary ten years (1872-1882) of the "Ecole supérieure de pharmacie" of Nancy. An example of the difficulty of creating an university structure almost from nothing and in urgency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrude, Pierre; Strohl, Stéphanie

    2007-05-01

    The conclusion of the war conducted by France in 1870 was the annexation of Alsace and Moselle to the German Empire. The question of the becoming of the University of Strasbourg was put a long time before the Francfort treaty.... After many discussions, the transfer of the Faculty of medicine and of the School of pharmacy to Nancy was decided on October 1st 1872. First bound to the faculty, the school became independent in 1876. It suffered some difficult years because of the terms of the transfer decree, of the retirement of two of its four professors, of the ministerial decision to keep free the chairs for some time in order to save money, and of the difficulties of the recruitment of new professors. The paper describes successively the difficulties of the choice of Nancy for the transfer, the situation of the schools of Strasbourg and Nancy in the year 1870, the text of the decree, the beginning of the teachings and the difficulties encountered with the chairs of pharmacy and natural history, and finally the pharmacy students come in Nancy during the early years. Some thoughts on this transfer and on the difficulties occured during these years precede the conclusion.

  1. Prediction of Tennis Performance in Junior Elite Tennis Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Kramer, Barbara C.H. Huijgen, Marije T. Elferink-Gemser, Chris Visscher

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Predicting current and future tennis performance can lead to improving the development of junior tennis players. The aim of this study is to investigate whether age, maturation, or physical fitness in junior elite tennis players in U13 can explain current and future tennis performance. The value of current tennis performance for future tennis performance is also investigated. A total of 86 junior elite tennis players (boys, n = 44; girls, n = 42 U13 (aged: 12.5 ± 0.3 years, and followed to U16, took part in this study. All players were top-30 ranked on the Dutch national ranking list at U13, and top-50 at U16. Age, maturation, and physical fitness, were measured at U13. A principal component analysis was used to extract four physical components from eight tests (medicine ball throwing overhead and reverse, ball throwing, SJ, CMJas, Sprint 5 and 10 meter, and the spider test. The possible relationship of age, maturation, and the physical components; “upper body power”, “lower body power”, “speed”, and “agility” with tennis performance at U13 and U16 was analyzed. Tennis performance was measured by using the ranking position on the Dutch national ranking list at U13 and U16. Regression analyses were conducted based on correlations between variables and tennis performance for boys and girls, separately. In boys U13, positive correlations were found between upper body power and tennis performance (R2 is 25%. In girls, positive correlations between maturation and lower body power with tennis performance were found at U13. Early maturing players were associated with a better tennis performance (R2 is 15%. In girls U16, only maturation correlated with tennis performance (R2 is 13%; later-maturing girls at U13 had better tennis performances at U16. Measuring junior elite tennis players at U13 is important for monitoring their development. These measurements did not predict future tennis performance of junior elite tennis players three

  2. Performance and anthropometric characteristics of prospective elite junior Australian footballers: a case study in one junior team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veale, James P; Pearce, Alan J; Koehn, Stefan; Carlson, John S

    2008-04-01

    The aim of the study was to compare anthropometric and physical performance data of players who were selected for a Victorian elite junior U18 Australian rules football squad. Prior to the selection of the final training squad, 54 players were assessed using a battery of standard anthropometric and physical performance tests. Multivariate analysis (MANOVA) showed significant (pcharacteristics can be observed that discriminate between players selected and non-selected, and demonstrates the value of physical fitness testing within the talent identification process of junior (16-18 years) players for squad and/or team selection. Based on MANOVA results, the findings from this study suggest team selection appeared to be related to a generally higher performance across the range of tests. Further, age was not a confounding variable as players selected tended to be younger than those non-selected. These findings reflect the general consensus that, in state-based junior competition, there is evidence of promoting overall player development, selecting those who are generally able to fulfil a range of positions and selecting players on their potential.

  3. RELEVANCE OF USE OF MULTIMEDIA IN ORDER TO PREVENT JUNIOR PUPILS’ AGGRESSIVE BEHAVIOUR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia V. Oleksiuk

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the problem of aggressive behaviour of junior pupils and reasons for its occurrence. There are determined advantages of multimedia use in the prevention of aggressive behaviour of junior pupils and described types of multimedia, which should be used to work with pupils. Problem of aggressive behaviour of junior pupils become one of the main problems of our society. As noted by the most researchers, one of the cause of aggressive behaviour of junior pupils is media, the use of video games, watching movies, cartoons that provoke aggression. One of the important areas of prevention of aggressive behaviour of junior pupils is competence improvement of teachers, social workers and psychologists on the use of multimedia in social and educational classes for junior pupils.

  4. Beyond unidirectional knowledge transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulhøi, John Parm; Neergaard, Helle; Bjerregaard, Toke

    2012-01-01

    Using theory on technology transfer and on trust and an indepth study of nine university departments and nineteen science-based small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), the authors explore the nature and direction of knowledge flows during university-industry R&D collaboration. More specifically......, they examine the nature and direction of R&D technological knowledge transfer in collaborations between universities and science-based SMEs and the primary mechanisms regulating such collaborations. The findings suggest that these collaborations are highly recursive processes of technological knowledge...

  5. Mapping of Junior High School Students’ Social Relation Problem and the Needed Assisting Model

    OpenAIRE

    Arbin Janu Setiyowati; Marthen Pali; Bambang Budi Wiyono; Triyono

    2017-01-01

    This research aims to describe Junior High School students’ social relation problem and the needed assisting model. This research used descriptive design with survey method. The subjects of this research were Junior High School students in the three cities in East Java. This research used purposive sampling as well. The data was collected by using questionnaire. The data analysis was conducted descriptively. This research found that Junior High School students’ social relation problems includ...

  6. Estimativa de erosão pela Equação Universal de Perda de Solo (USLE) e transferência de sedimentos para todo território Brasileiro

    OpenAIRE

    Javier Dario Pulido Gomez

    2012-01-01

    O presente trabalho é uma tentativa de validar uma metodologia para estimar a produção de sedimentos para todo território Brasileiro. Foram utilizadas ferramentas de sistemas de informação geográfi ca (GIS), estatística espacial, modelagem e gerenciamento de bancos de dados aplicados a conservação de solos, permitindo combinar a equação Universal de Perda do Solo (USLE) com diferentes modelos de taxa de transferência de sedimentos (SDR). A metodologia utilizou como base de teste dados da rede...

  7. Factors associated with recognition of the signs of dating violence by Japanese junior high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagamatsu, Miyuki; Hamada, Yukiko; Hara, Kenichi

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated factors associated with the ability of Japanese junior high school students to recognize the signs of dating violence. During a period of 20 months (from June 2011 to January 2013), a survey was distributed to 3340 students aged 13-15 years in the second and third grades at 18 junior high schools in a Japanese prefecture. The survey examined gender, recognition of the signs of dating violence, knowledge of dating violence, self-esteem, attitudes toward sexual activity, attitudes toward an equal dating relationship, and relationships with school teachers. Multiple linear regression analyses were performed to identify predictors of the ability of boys and girls respondents to recognize the signs of physical and psychological dating violence. Binary multiple logistic regression analysis was also performed to identify predictors of the ability of boys and girls respondents to recognize the sign of sexual dating violence. The Ethics Committee of Saga University Medical School approved the study protocol. A total of 3050 (91.3%) students participated in this study (1547 boys and 1503 girls). Gender differences were noted with regard to the scores for some of the variables measured. The results indicated that boys who had more knowledge of dating violence, who focused on an equal dating relationship, and had a positive relationship with their teachers showed a greater ability to recognize the signs of dating violence. In addition, boys with a conservative attitude toward sexual activity showed a greater ability to recognize the signs of physical and sexual violence. Furthermore, girls with more knowledge of dating violence had a conservative attitude toward sexual activity, and girls who focused on an equal dating relationship showed greater ability to recognize the signs of dating violence. These findings suggest that education programs to prevent dating violence should promote understanding about dating violence with consideration of gender

  8. Publishing the pamphlet of radiation education for junior high school students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamezawa, Chika; Kamogawa, Masashi; Kanai, Yuko; Nishiura, Shingo; Banda, Kiyomi; Arakawa, Etsuo

    2014-01-01

    We made supplementary materials of the radiation education as a pamphlet for junior high school students along the government course guidelines for junior high school pressed by Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology. The pamphlet was published as booklet and calendar. For teachers at junior high schools, a pdf file of the booklet was also appended. The pamphlet focused natural phenomenon and latest researches in the radiation science. Many pictures in the booklet could help students to study the radiation science visually. For 100 days since March 2012 published day, 4119 booklets had been distributed to junior high schools and other schools of applicants, free of charge. (author)

  9. Capturing the Policy that Air Force Raters Use When Writing Performance Appraisals on Junior Officers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stephens, Owen

    2001-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between four dimensions of performance leadership, task performance, interpersonal facilitation, and job dedication and overall performance by junior officers in the Air Force...

  10. JS3P: junior staff programme pilot project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pretrel, H.; Tregoures, N.; Bessiron, V.; Dehoyos, A.; Delvallee, I.; Brisson, N.; Debayle, C.; Dubreuil, M.; Nicaise, G.; Perignon, J.P.; Richard, J.; Reinke, N.; Kaulard, J.; Burgener, M.; Keesmann, S.; Schramm, B.; Seubert, A.; Sternkopf, J.; Thuma, G.; Weber, S.; Smidts, O.; Maillet, E.; Bucalossi, A.; Van haesendonck, M.; Uyttenhove, W.; Mertens, J.

    2006-01-01

    Concept: The objective of the project is to allow junior staff members from the European Technical Safety Organisations (TSOs), IRSN, GRS and AVN, to work together with the final goal of creating a junior staff network, based on technical, cultural and personal interests. These projects are to show junior staff members at a very early stage during their career the need for European collaborations. They are also a tool to explore new subjects of co-operation. It is an initiative that should strengthen the links between the organisations and contribute to establishing the future of nuclear safety in Europe. A JS3P (Junior Staff Programme Pilot Project) is a project done jointly by 'junior' staff members from the three TSOs, where experience of 'seniors' is also integrated when needed. Compared to other collaborative activities, it has certain specific features. The JS3P favours staff exchanges, and technical meetings of several days should be planned during a project in order to encourage people to work together. Technical objectives are shared and the work is done jointly (reports, articles). The team involved in the JS3P should be as small as possible to favour its efficiency. The JS3P is short and easy to realize. Its duration is fixed to a maximum of about 12 months with the option to be prolonged. Typical topics are bibliographic work, comparison issues, scientific surveys, benchmark exercises and prospective investigations on innovative ideas. They can be linked to existing joint projects and then form a smaller module integrated into the large project. Topics may concern prospective issues, tentatively investigating new topics that can be seen as exploratory co-operation projects. Subjects may also concern research issues that are not a priority but that deserve to be investigated as new attractive topics. The JS3P is defined and managed by junior staff members. It is approved by a management board committee and supervised by a technical steering committee

  11. Gestão de tecnologia em universidades: uma análise do patenteamento e dos fatores de dificuldade e de apoio à transferência de tecnologia no Estado de São Paulo Technology management in universities: an analysis of patenting and support and difficulty factors in technology transfer in São Paulo State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Augusto Garnica

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A gestão da tecnologia nas universidades públicas brasileiras tem ganhado crescente importância para o sistema de inovação brasileiro. A Lei de Inovação de 2004 forneceu diretrizes legais específicas acerca da propriedade intelectual, cooperação técnica e transferência tecnológica favorecendo a intensificação desses processos. O objetivo deste trabalho foi apreender as políticas institucionais e os desafios para a transferência de tecnologia em universidades públicas do Estado de São Paulo, a saber: USP, Unesp, Unicamp, Unifesp e UFSCar, buscando identificar fatores de dificuldade e de apoio em processos de transferência de tecnologia observados pelos agentes das universidades e empresas parceiras. A pesquisa, de tipo qualitativa, utilizou-se da estratégia de estudo multicaso e por meio da realização de entrevistas a respeito de contratos de transferência de tecnologia foi realizada análise comparativa das universidades. Verificou-se um crescimento do patenteamento e da atividade de comercialização de tecnologia em todos os casos, porém ainda recentes.Technology management in Brazilian public universities has gained increasing importance within the Brazilian innovation system. The Innovation Act of 2004 provides specific legal guidance on intellectual property, technical cooperation and technology transfer, favoring the intensification of these processes. The objective of this work was to understand the institutional policies and challenges for technology transfer in the public universities, as well as to identify forces and obstacles related to technology commercialization. The kind of analyses was qualitative, and for the empirical part of the work, the strategy of case studies was used in institutions such as: USP, Unesp, Unicamp, Unifesp e UFSCar. Using technology transfer contracts from each one of them, this article reveals key aspects, forces and obstacles within that practice. An increase in intellectual

  12. University Knowledge Exchange (KE) Framework: Good Practice in Technology Transfer. Report to the UK Higher Education Sector and HEFCE by the McMillan Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higher Education Funding Council for England, 2016

    2016-01-01

    As part of its commitment to keeping the UK at the leading edge as a global knowledge-based economy, the last Government asked the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) in 2014 to develop a knowledge exchange (KE) performance framework that would secure effective practice in universities on key productive elements in the…

  13. Examining Financial Literacy among Transfer and Nontransfer Students: Predicting Financial Well-Being and Academic Success at a Four-Year University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starobin, Soko S.; Hagedorn, Linda Serra; Purnamasari, Agustina; Chen, Yu

    2013-01-01

    This study analyzes the data collected through the Financial Literacy project conducted in the fall semester of 2010 at a land grant research university in the Midwest. A survey instrument, which includes 43 items that measure constructs such as parental influence, financial knowledge and behaviors, and working experience of students while…

  14. [Stress at work and well-being in junior residents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buddeberg-Fischer, Barbara; Klaghofer, Richard; Buddeberg, Claus

    2005-01-01

    The present study investigated the workplace experiences of junior physicians in their first year of residency, and the impact of these experiences on their physical and psychological well-being. In a prospective longitudinal study 518 junior physicians (54.4% women, 45.6% men) were investigated twice within two years with regard to individual and institutional determinants of career development. Gender-relevant workplace experiences, i. e. effort-reward imbalance, and their relation to physical and psychological well-being, i. e. anxiety and depression, as well as life satisfaction were evaluated. The workplace experiences revealed three significant gender-specific results: Women residents received less mentoring, had more positive social relationships at work, and showed a higher over-commitment than their male colleagues. Both men and women residents reported significantly worse physical and psychological well-being as well as life satisfaction after their first year of residency (T2) compared to the time directly before their graduation from medical school (T1). The junior physicians' life satisfaction scores are significantly lower than those of the normal population. 7-10% of the respondents showed anxiety scores above cut-off, and 1-4% depression scores above cut-off. Personality traits such as a high sense of coherence and low expressiveness are protective factors for well-being and life satisfaction. Insufficient leadership of senior residents and unclear hierarchical structures as well as stress at work and over-commitment are risk factors for the development of symptoms of anxiety and/or depression. The reported results are consistent with the psychosocial stress model by Karasek and Theorell as well as with the model of effort-reward imbalance of Siegrist.

  15. [The comprehensive approach to the rehabilitative treatment of junior athletes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanenko, N P; Levitskaya, T E; Tsekhmeistruk, E A; Tren'kaeva, N A; Tyulyupo, S V; Dostovalova, O V; Kremeno, S V; Shakhova, S S; Chekcheeva, V D

    The objective of the present study was the development of the comprehensive program for the medico-psychological follow-up of the male and female junior athletes (rhythmic gymnastics) with the purpose of stabilizing their hormonal and emotional status, as well as improving sport performances based on the use of modern hardware-software technologies. The comprehensive examination of 72 female athletes at the mean age of 11.5±0.6 years attending R. Kuznetsov specialized school of rhythmic gymnastics of the Olympic reserve in the city of Seversk has been undertaken on the basis of Tomsk Research Institute of Balneology and Physiotherapy, the branch of Siberian Federal Research and Clinical Centre. The program of comprehensive medical psychological rehabilitation for the junior athletes of either sex engaged in sportive activities requiring precise technical actions has been elaborated. The method of the combined therapeutic treatment included physical exercises therapy, manual massage, dry carbonic bathtubs, psychological activities with the application of biological feedback trainings and cognitive trainings; it was intended for the correction of the hormonal status and the improvement of the psycho-emotional conditions of the athletes. The combined treatment based on the use of the modern hardware-software technologies was shown to promote the restoration and development of the psychophysical and psychological qualities of the male and female junior athletes indispensable for the maintenance of their high readiness for the efficient sports activities at the subsequent stages of the training cycle. In addition, such treatment enhances the adaptation resources of the athletes.

  16. Academic achievement of junior high school students with sleep disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fijri Auliyanti

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Sleep disorders are prevalent in adolescents and may influence their academic achievement. To date, no study has been done in Indonesia on academic achievement in students with sleep disorders and its related factors. Objective To assess for relationships between academic achievement and related factors, including gender, motivation and learning strategies, IQ level, maternal educational level, socioeconomic status, family structure, after-hours education program, presence of TV/computer in the bedroom, sleep duration during school days, as well as bedtime and wakeup time difference in junior high school students with sleep disorders. Methods This cross-sectional study was performed from January to March 2013. Subjects were students from five junior high schools in Jakarta who fulfilled the criteria for sleep disorders based on the Sleep Disturbance Scale for Children questionnaire. Results There were 111 study subjects. The prevalence of sleep disorders was 39.7%, mostly in difficulties initiating and maintaining sleep (70.2%. Below-average academic achievement was seen in 47.6% of subjects. Factors significantly related to below-average academic achievement were after-hours education program (prevalence ratio 5.6; 95%CI 1.36 to 23.18; P = 0.017, average IQ level (prevalence ratio 3.26; 95%CI 1.38 to 7.71; P = 0.007, and male gender (prevalence ratio 2.68; 95%CI 1.06 to 6.78; P = 0.037. Conclusion Among junior high school students with sleep disorders, factors related to below-average academic achievement are afterhours education program (more than 2 types, the average IQ level, and male gender.

  17. Technology Transfer and Technology Transfer Intermediaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Stephen M.; Flagg, Jennifer L.

    2010-01-01

    A standard and comprehensive model is needed to evaluate and compare technology transfer systems and the stakeholders within these systems. The principle systems considered include federal laboratories, U.S. universities, the rehabilitation engineering research centers (RERCs), and large small business innovation research programs. An earlier…

  18. Bollasina Receives 2013 James R. Holton Junior Scientist Award: Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollasina, Massimo A.

    2014-08-01

    I am deeply honored to have been selected as this year's recipient of the James R. Holton Junior Scientist Award, and I receive it with heartfelt gratitude and humility. I clearly remember Peter Webster's call announcing the amazing news and how I literally remained speechless and overwhelmed. I would like to express my sincere appreciation to the Atmospheric Sciences section of AGU and the members of the award committee. I am even more appreciative to have been presented this award handed by two outstanding scientists—Peter Webster and Bill Lau—who have remarkably contributed to our understanding of the Asian monsoon and tropical climate, my area of expertise.

  19. A Multifaceted Mentoring Program for Junior Faculty in Academic Pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mary M; Sandborg, Christy I; Hudgins, Louanne; Sanford, Rania; Bachrach, Laura K

    2016-01-01

    The departure of physician-scientists from education and research into clinical practice is a growing challenge for the future of academic medicine. Junior faculty face competing demands for clinical productivity, teaching, research, and work-life integration, which can undermine confidence in the value of an academic career. Mentorship is important to foster career development and satisfaction in junior faculty. The goals of this academic pediatrics department were to develop, implement, and evaluate a multifaceted pediatric mentoring program to promote retention and satisfaction of junior faculty. Program elements included one-on-one mentor-mentee meetings, didactic workshops, grant review assistance, and facilitated peer-group mentoring. Program effectiveness was assessed using annual surveys of mentees and structured mentee exit interviews, as well as retention data for assistant professors. The mentees were instructors and assistant professors in the department of pediatrics. Seventy-nine mentees participated in the program from 2007 through 2014. The response rate from seven annual surveys was 84%. Sixty-nine percent of mentees felt more prepared to advance their careers, 81% had a better understanding of the criteria for advancement, 84% were satisfied with the program, and 95% found mentors accessible. Mentees who exited the program reported they most valued the one-on-one mentoring and viewed the experience positively regardless of promotion. Retention of assistant professors improved after initiation of the program; four of 13 hired from 2002 to 2006 left the institution, whereas 18 of 18 hired from 2007 to 2014 were retained. This multifaceted mentoring program appeared to bolster satisfaction and enhance retention of junior pediatric faculty. Mentees reported increased understanding of the criteria for promotion and viewed the program as a positive experience regardless of career path. Individual mentor-mentee meetings were needed at least twice yearly

  20. The educational value of ward rounds for junior trainees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faidon-Marios Laskaratos

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The ward round (WR is a complex task and medical teachers are often faced with the challenge of finding a balance between service provision and clinical development of learners. The educational value of WRs is an under-researched area. This short communication aims to evaluate the educational role of WRs for junior trainees and provides insight into current practices. It also identifies obstacles to effective teaching/training in this setting and provides suggestions for improving the quality of WR teaching.

  1. CAREER TRANSITION FROM JUNIOR TO SENIOR IN BASKETBALL PLAYERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Lorenzo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to investigate what factors affect basketball players in the transition from junior and amateur to senior and professional sport respectively. The study was a qualitative research which uses a semi-structured interview to get the data. There were interviewed five Spanish basketball players who were starting playing in a team of Basketball Club Association (C.B.A.. The results showed that the participants face several changes both in the sport and in the life outside sport. At the same time, the results indicated the existence of several coping strategies that help the player in his career transition.

  2. Is international junior success a reliable predictor for international senior success in elite combat sports?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pingwei; De Bosscher, Veerle; Pion, Johan; Weissensteiner, Juanita R; Vertonghen, Jikkemien

    2018-05-01

    Currently in the literature, there is a dearth of empirical research that confirms whether international junior success is a reliable predictor for future international senior success. Despite the uncertainty of the junior-senior relationship, federations and coaches still tend to use junior success as a predictor for long-term senior success. A range of former investigations utilising a retrospective lens has merely focused on success that athletes attained at junior level competitions. Success that was achieved at senior-level competitions but at a junior age was relatively ignored. This study explored to what extent international senior success can be predicted based on success that athletes achieved in either international junior level competitions (i.e. junior medalists) or senior competitions at a junior age (i.e. early achievers). The sample contains 4011 international male and female athletes from three combat sports (taekwondo, wrestling and boxing), who were born between 1974 and 1990 and participated in both international junior and senior-level competitions between 1990 and 2016. Gender and sport differences were compared. The results revealed that 61.4% of the junior medalists and 90.4% of the early achievers went on to win international medals at a senior age. Among the early achievers, 92.2% of the taekwondo athletes, 68.4% of the wrestling athletes and 37.9% of the boxing athletes could be reliably "predicted" to win international senior medals. The findings demonstrate that specific to the three combat sports examined, international junior success appears to be an important predictor to long-term international senior success.

  3. Does decision documentation help junior designers rationalize their decisions? A comparative multiple-case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heesch, U. van; Avgeriou, P.; Tang, A.

    Software architecture design is challenging, especially for junior software designers. Lacking practice and experience, junior designers need process support in order to make rational architecture decisions. In this paper, we present the results of a comparative multiple-case study conducted to find

  4. A Longitudinal Study of Physical Fitness in Elite Junior Tennis Players

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramer, Tamara; Huijgen, Barbara C. H.; Elferink-Gemser, Marije T.; Visscher, Chris

    Purpose: To analyze how physical fitness (PF) improves in elite junior tennis players related to age, maturity, and performance level. Methods: Elite junior tennis players (n = 113 boys, n = 83 girls) divided by performance level were monitored longitudinally from U14 to U16. Maturity, upper and

  5. Examination of Turkish Junior High-School Students' Perceptions of the General Problem-Solving Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekici, Didem Inel

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine Turkish junior high-school students' perceptions of the general problem-solving process. The Turkish junior high-school students' perceptions of the general problem-solving process were examined in relation to their gender, grade level, age and their grade point with regards to the science course identified in the…

  6. Collaboration with Sport Psychologists as Viewed by Female Volleyball Junior Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otrebski, Wojciech; Rutkowska, Katarzyna

    2008-01-01

    Study aim: To determine the need of female junior volleyball players to collaborate with a psychologist, considering previous sport career of those players. Material and methods: A group of 78 female volleyball players aged 14-17 years from 7 top Polish junior teams participated in the study. They were requested to fill questionnaires on their…

  7. Emotional Labour, Training Stress, Burnout, and Depressive Symptoms in Junior Doctors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Mary E.; Creed, Peter A.; Searle, Judy

    2014-01-01

    Junior doctors are at risk of work-related burnout and mental health problems due to training workload demands and responsibilities. This study investigated the predictors of work-related burnout and depressive symptoms in junior doctors. Participants were 349 Australian doctors in postgraduate years 1-4, who completed a web-based survey assessing…

  8. Improving Junior High School Students' Mathematical Analogical Ability Using Discovery Learning Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maarif, Samsul

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the influence of discovery learning method towards the mathematical analogical ability of junior high school's students. This is a research using factorial design 2x2 with ANOVA-Two ways. The population of this research included the entire students of SMPN 13 Jakarta (State Junior High School 13 of Jakarta)…

  9. English Cooperative Learning Mode in a Rural Junior High School in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haiyan; Peng, Wen; Sun, Liuhua

    2017-01-01

    Cooperative learning is one of the most recognized and fruitful research areas in modern education practice. It has been widely used in many countries as an effective teaching strategy to improve class efficiency and students' comprehensive language ability since the 1990's. This paper takes JA Junior High School, a rural junior high school in…

  10. Adolescent Views of Time Management: Rethinking the School Day in Junior High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, Paris S.; Strom, Robert D.; Sindel-Arrington, Tricia

    2016-01-01

    Junior high school presents a significant increase in time demands both for study and for social relationships. The students (N = 240) in grades 7 and 8 at a junior high school anonymously completed online the Time Management Poll concerning their own use of time and the way their school managed time. The 20 items in the poll allowed them to…

  11. An Assessment of Campus Police Departments across Mississippi's Public Community and Junior Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggs, Brad D.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to provide an assessment of campus police departments throughout the 15 public community and junior colleges in Mississippi. This research could provide Mississippi community and junior college administrators the opportunity to observe and appraise the overall safety of their respective campuses in comparison to safety…

  12. 75 FR 36659 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Brain Power! The NIDA Junior Scientist Program and the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-28

    ... of the Brain Power! Program's ability to: Increase students' knowledge about the biology of the brain... Request; Brain Power! The NIDA Junior Scientist Program and the Companion Program, Brain Power! Challenge.... Proposed Collection: Title: Brain Power! The NIDA Junior Scientist Program, for grades K-5, and the...

  13. Traditional-Aged College Juniors' Career Planning Self-Efficacy: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Dawn C.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this single-site case study was to explore and describe traditional-age college juniors' reports of self-efficacy (Bandura, 1997) regarding Career Planning (Barker & Kellen, 1998). More specifically, the career planning confidence levels of college juniors enrolled in a required career development course at a private business…

  14. Card Games and Algebra Tic Tacmatics on Achievement of Junior Secondary II Students in Algebraic Expressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okpube, Nnaemeka Michael; Anugwo, M. N.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the Card Games and Algebra tic-Tacmatics on Junior Secondary II Students' Achievement in Algebraic Expressions. Three research questions and three null hypotheses guided the study. The study adopted the pre-test, post-test control group design. A total of two hundred and forty (240) Junior Secondary School II students were…

  15. Effects of Music on Physical Activity Rates of Junior High School Physical Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Lindsey; Barney, David C.; Prusak, Keven A.; Pennington, Todd

    2016-01-01

    Music is an everyday occurrence in a person's life. Music is heard in the workplace, in homes, and in the mall. Music can also be heard as a person exercises. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the effects of music on junior high students (n = 305) step counts and time in activity in junior high school physical education classes.…

  16. The Junior High School Integrated Science: The Actual Teaching Process in the Perspective of an Ethnographer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adu-Gyamfi, Kenneth; Ampiah, Joseph Ghartey

    2016-01-01

    Science education at the Basic School (Primary and Junior High School) serves as the foundation upon which higher levels of science education are pivoted. This ethnographic study sought to investigate the teaching of Integrated Science at the Junior High School (JHS) level in the classrooms of two science teachers in two schools of differing…

  17. The formation of logic thinking of junior schoolchildren during some extracurricular activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efimov Vladimir Fedorovich

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the topical issue of formation of junior schoolchildren's mathematical abilities, discloses the modern scientific concept of General and specific mathematical abilities. The structure of mathematical abilities, analyzed the specificity of extra-curricular activities, which under favorable conditions accompanies the intellectual development of junior schoolchildren.

  18. Business Studies Academic Performance Differences of Secondary School Juniors in Akwa Ibom State of Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udoukpong, Bassey E.; Emah, Ime E.; Umoren, Shirley E.

    2012-01-01

    The research examined the differences in the academic performance in Business Studies of a sampled secondary school junior students in Akwa Ibom State of Nigeria. A sample of 290 (138 male and 152 female) Junior Secondary Three (9th grade) students was surveyed. The students' variables' being examined vis-à-vis academic performance in Business…

  19. Guidelines for Professional Training of Junior Medical Staff in the Context of European Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosnova, Myroslava

    2016-01-01

    The article deals with outlining guidelines for improving professional training of junior medical staff based on European experience. Consequently, guidelines and recommendations on enhancing the efficiency of medical education in general and junior medical specialists' professional training, in particular, published by European Union of Medical…

  20. Will Aesthetics English Comic Books Make Junior High School Students Fall in Love with English Reading?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Mei-Ju; Hsu, Yung-Hung; Chen, Ching-Chi

    2015-01-01

    The present study aims to investigate the effects of Aesthetics English comic books on EFL junior high school students' vocabulary acquisition, reading comprehension, and English learning motivation. The participants in this study were 28 eighth graders from one class in a public junior high school in Pingtung in Taiwan. After ten weeks…

  1. Developing Teaching Materials PISA-Based for Mathematics and Science of Junior High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somakim; Suharman, Andi; Madang, Kodri; Taufiq

    2016-01-01

    This research aims to develop valid and practical teaching materials for mathematics and science lesson PISA-based for junior high school students and to determine potential effects on students in scientific activity. Subjects of this study were students of Junior High School 9 Palembang (SMP Negeri 9 Palembang). The method used in this study is…

  2. A Structural and Functional Model for Forming Management Skills in Junior Schoolchildren

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knissarina, Malika M.; Valikhanov, Sharidyar A.; Medeubayeva, Kenzhekhan T.; Zhazykova, Makpal K.; Rakhmetova, Bazar A.; Seytenova, Salima S.; Abil, Akmaral S.; Mukhangaliyeva, Shnargul Ai.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to analyze theoretically and simulate the formation of management skills in junior schoolchildren. The authors classified junior schoolchildren's management skills, defined psychological and pedagogical principles of their formation. Empirically obtained results of questionnaires for teachers and parents (n=550)…

  3. Using Simulation to Train Junior Psychiatry Residents to Work with Agitated Patients: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zigman, Daniel; Young, Meredith; Chalk, Colin

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This article examines the benefit and feasibility of introducing a new, simulation-based learning intervention for junior psychiatry residents. Method: Junior psychiatry residents were invited to participate in a new simulation-based learning intervention focusing on agitated patients. Questionnaires were used to explore the success of…

  4. Competition Efficiency Analysis of Croatian Junior Wrestlers in European Championship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristijan Slacanac

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Croatian junior wrestler won a bronze medal at the European Championship 2016 year. Considering the potential of our wrestlers there is an obvious need of technical and tactical analysis so our juniors and seniors U23 wrestlers would be able to achieve even better results. Match analysis were conducted by LongoMatch 0.20.1. Seven matches of Croatian wrestlers were analysed. Time parameters, score efficiency, technical efficiency and tactical structure were observed and analysed from the aspect of attack and defence phase and successful/unsuccessful techniques. This paper shows descriptive parameters and competitor efficiency were calculated. The results show a great number of positive score in a standing position in relation to parterre position. The parameters of competitive efficiency (0.49 points per minute show better attacking efficiency (1.32 points per minute in relation to defence efficiency (0.83 points per minute. Croatian wrestlers achieve less score per minute in relation with elite wrestlers, but it is visible a significant progress in technical and tactical efficiency in relation in the past three year. According to place realization of technique, Croatian wrestlers realized more technique in the center, while opponents realized technique in the zone and moving to the zone. Further analysis of efficiency and individualisation training will improve efficiency of Croatian national wrestlers.

  5. Refractive Errors in State Junior High School Students in Bandung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabila Tasyakur Nikmah

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Uncorrected refractive error is one of the avoidable causes of vision impairment in children and adults. Vision problem in children has been shown to affect their psychological and academic performance. This study aims at identifying and gaining more insights on the characteristic of the refractive errors in state junior high school students in Bandung to avoid uncorrected refractive errors. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in September–November 2015 in state junior high schools in Bandung, West Java, Indonesia. Sample was selected using multistage random sampling technique. Children were examined using tumbling E examination; then students with visual acuity worse than 6/12 underwent Snellen Chart test, refractometry without pupil dilatation, correction with trial lens, then was followed by direct ophthalmoscopy. Results: From a total of 435 children who completed all the examination, 80 children (18.39% had refractive errors; consisted of 151 eyes (94.38% with myopia and 9 eyes (5.62% with astigmatism. Refractive errors were found to be more common in female children (73.7% than male children (26.3%. Among those with refractive errors, 45 children (56.3% did not use any corrective glasses before the examination. Conclusions: Routine refractive error test in vision screening examination is needed for students. It is equally important to raise more awareness toward eye disease in community.

  6. Why are junior doctors deterred from choosing a surgical career?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Mary E; Creed, Peter A; Searle, Judy

    2012-05-01

    To identify the reasons why interns would not choose a surgical career. This qualitative study used semi-structured telephone interviews to explore the future career choices of 41 junior doctors (14 men, 27 women). Doctors were asked to identify specialties they would not take up, and state why this was the case. Thirty (73.2%) of the 41 interns nominated surgery as a specialty they would not choose. Themes relating to reasons for not wanting to pursue a surgical career included the lifestyle associated with surgery (66.7%), the culture within the surgical work environment (53.3%), the lack of interest in performing surgical work (36.7%), and the training requirements associated with surgery (33.3%). Both sexes had similar reasons for not wanting to choose a surgical career; but additionally, women referred to the male domination of surgery, and the difficulty and inflexibility of the training program as deterrents. Efforts are needed to promote interest in surgery as a career especially for women, to improve the surgical work environment so that medical students and junior doctors have exposure to positive role models and surgical placements, and to provide a more flexible approach to surgical training.

  7. The importance of the junior company for an andragogy learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Silva Franco

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Andragogy is a form of teaching and learning initially aimed at the adult public, and its assumptions are directed at providing greater autonomy and participation of this public in their learning. It can be considered as a counterpoint to the traditional pedagogical aspect, which covers a methodological format, essentially applied to children, but has its model present in several higher education institutions, in which the teacher has the central role of decision making on how and what to teach This article aims to analyze, from the perceptions exposed by participants of a Junior Company, how the learning experience of the students in this organization can be related to the principles of andragogic learning. Based on the analysis of the six interviews carried out, it was verified that the experience in the junior company gives its members a greater autonomy regarding their learning, a greater comprehension and applicability of the course, as well as a better use of their baggage of particular experiences. With this study, we intend to contribute with reflections on the possibilities of improvement and development of the learning process in higher education, especially in the teaching field of Administration.

  8. Teaching English through Online Games for Junior High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sastika Seli

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Teaching language is an attractive activity both for the teacher and for the acceptor. They can interact together in this act. Teaching English is a challenge for the teachers to make the students interest in English because as we know English is not the first language for some countries in this world including Indonesia. There are various ways and ideas to teach English so that it can be fun and interest to be taught and to be learnt. But those ways and ideas also should be an up date method and also use a modern technology to be implemented. Along with the development of modern technology, the teachers should involve with it and make it as a part of English teaching tools. Two of the famous and sophisticated tools are computer and the internet. These things have a close relation to be urgent equipment for people. In this article, the writer wants to purpose the use of online games as a way to teach English for junior high school. Te article aims to give another teaching alternative in attracting the junior high school students to learn English in funny and enjoyable way. Through online games they do not only can play the various games but also indirectly they do the exercises of English skills.

  9. Physiological profile of senior and junior England international amateur boxers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Marcus S

    2006-01-01

    Despite worldwide popularity of amateur boxing, research focussed on the physiological demands of the sport is limited. The physiological profile of Senior and Junior England international amateur boxers is presented. A gradual (8 to 21-days) and rapid (0 to 7-days) phase of body weight reduction was evident with 2.2 ± 0.3 % of the 7.0 ± 0. 8 % weight loss occurring over the final 24-hours. An increase in body weight >4% was observed following a recovery period. High urine osmolality values (> 1000 mOsm·kg(-1)) were recorded during training and competition. High post-competition blood lactate values (>13.5 mmol·l(-1)) highlighted the need for a well-developed anaerobic capacity and the importance of not entering the ring in a glycogen depleted state. The aerobic challenge of competition was demonstrated by maximum heart rate values being recorded during 'Open' sparring. Mean body fat values of 9-10% were similar to those reported for other weight classified athletes. Normal resting values were reported for hematocrit (Senior 48 ± 2 % and Junior 45 ± 2 %), haemoglobin (Senior 14.7 ± 1.0 g·dl(-1) and Junior 14.5 ± 0.8 g·dl(-1)), bilirubin (Senior 15.3 ± 6.2 µmol·l-1(-1)) and ferritin (Senior 63.3 ± 45.7 ng·ml(-1)). No symptoms associated with asthma or exercise-induced asthma was evident. A well- developed aerobic capacity was reflected in the Senior VO2max value of 63.8 ± 4.8 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1). Senior lead hand straight punching force (head 1722 ± 700 N and body 1682 ± 636 N) was lower than the straight rear hand (head 2643 ± 1273 N and body 2646 ± 1083 N), lead hook (head 2412 ± 813 N and body 2414 ± 718 N) and rear hook (head 2588 ± 1040 N and body 2555 ± 926 N). It was concluded that amateur boxing performance is dependent on the interplay between anaerobic and aerobic energy systems. Current weight making methods may lead to impaired substrate availability, leading to reduced competitive performance and an increased risk to a boxers

  10. Intergenerational Knowledge Transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, R.B.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Institutions of higher education and universities have been at the forefront of intergenerational knowledge transfer. Their role has gone through evolution and several ideas of the university co-exist. Factors like the squeeze on public funding of higher education across nations, exhortation by governments to value work-based learning as a part of higher education and demand for graduates ready to start working immediately on joining a workplace, are making it necessary to further evolve the classical approach towards intergenerational knowledge transfer. The paper presents a framework that has been evolved in India to meet the requirements of intergenerational knowledge transfer. It essentially integrates a workplace and a university in a single entity similar to the practice in medical education. (author

  11. Advances in heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Hartnett, James P; Cho, Young I; Greene, George A

    2001-01-01

    Heat transfer is the exchange of heat energy between a system and its surrounding environment, which results from a temperature difference and takes place by means of a process of thermal conduction, mechanical convection, or electromagnetic radiation. Advances in Heat Transfer is designed to fill the information gap between regularly scheduled journals and university-level textbooks by providing in-depth review articles over a broader scope than is allowable in either journals or texts.

  12. PHYSIOLOGICAL PROFILE OF SENIOR AND JUNIOR ENGLAND INTERNATIONAL AMATEUR BOXERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus S. Smith

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite worldwide popularity of amateur boxing, research focussed on the physiological demands of the sport is limited. The physiological profile of Senior and Junior England international amateur boxers is presented. A gradual (8 to 21-days and rapid (0 to 7-days phase of body weight reduction was evident with 2.2 ± 0.3 % of the 7.0 ± 0. 8 % weight loss occurring over the final 24-hours. An increase in body weight >4% was observed following a recovery period. High urine osmolality values (> 1000 mOsm·kg-1 were recorded during training and competition. High post-competition blood lactate values (>13.5 mmol·l-1 highlighted the need for a well-developed anaerobic capacity and the importance of not entering the ring in a glycogen depleted state. The aerobic challenge of competition was demonstrated by maximum heart rate values being recorded during 'Open' sparring. Mean body fat values of 9-10% were similar to those reported for other weight classified athletes. Normal resting values were reported for hematocrit (Senior 48 ± 2 % and Junior 45 ± 2 %, haemoglobin (Senior 14.7 ± 1.0 g·dl-1 and Junior 14.5 ± 0.8 g·dl-1, bilirubin (Senior 15.3 ± 6.2 µmol·l-1-1 and ferritin (Senior 63.3 ± 45.7 ng·ml-1. No symptoms associated with asthma or exercise-induced asthma was evident. A well- developed aerobic capacity was reflected in the Senior VO2max value of 63.8 ± 4.8 ml·kg-1·min-1. Senior lead hand straight punching force (head 1722 ± 700 N and body 1682 ± 636 N was lower than the straight rear hand (head 2643 ± 1273 N and body 2646 ± 1083 N, lead hook (head 2412 ± 813 N and body 2414 ± 718 N and rear hook (head 2588 ± 1040 N and body 2555 ± 926 N. It was concluded that amateur boxing performance is dependent on the interplay between anaerobic and aerobic energy systems. Current weight making methods may lead to impaired substrate availability, leading to reduced competitive performance and an increased risk to a boxers health

  13. First systematic plant proteomics workshop in Botany Department, University of Delhi: transferring proteomics knowledge to next-generation researchers and students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deswal, Renu; Abat, Jasmeet Kaur; Sehrawat, Ankita; Gupta, Ravi; Kashyap, Prakriti; Sharma, Shruti; Sharma, Bhavana; Chaurasia, Satya Prakash; Chanu, Sougrakpam Yaiphabi; Masi, Antonio; Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar; Sarkar, Abhijit; Agrawal, Raj; Dunn, Michael J; Renaut, Jenny; Rakwal, Randeep

    2014-07-01

    International Plant Proteomics Organization (INPPO) outlined ten initiatives to promote plant proteomics in each and every country. With greater emphasis in developing countries, one of those was to "organize workshops at national and international levels to train manpower and exchange information". This third INPPO highlights covers the workshop organized for the very first time in a developing country, India, at the Department of Botany in University of Delhi on December 26-30, 2013 titled - "1(st) Plant Proteomics Workshop / Training Program" under the umbrella of INPPO India-Nepal chapter. Selected 20 participants received on-hand training mainly on gel-based proteomics approach along with manual booklet and parallel lectures on this and associated topics. In house, as well as invited experts drawn from other Universities and Institutes (national and international), delivered talks on different aspects of gel-based and gel-free proteomics. Importance of gel-free proteomics approach, translational proteomics, and INPPO roles were presented and interactively discussed by a group of three invited speakers Drs. Ganesh Kumar Agrawal (Nepal), Randeep Rakwal (Japan), and Antonio Masi (Italy). Given the output of this systematic workshop, it was proposed and thereafter decided to be organized every alternate year; the next workshop will be held in 2015. Furthermore, possibilities on providing advanced training to those students / researchers / teachers with basic knowledge in proteomics theory and experiments at national and international levels were discussed. INPPO is committed to generating next-generation trained manpower in proteomics, and it would only happen by the firm determination of scientists to come forward and do it. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Results of distal hypospadias repair after pediatric urology fellowship training: A comparison of junior surgeons with their mentor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, N C; Barber, T D; Dajusta, D; Prieto, J C; Ziada, A; Snodgrass, W

    2016-06-01

    Teaching and learning hypospadias repair is a major component of pediatric urology fellowship training. Educators must transfer skills to fellows, without increasing patient complications. Nevertheless, few studies report results of surgeons during their first years of independent practice. To review outcomes of distal hypospadias repairs performed during the same 2-year period by consecutive, recently matriculated, surgeons in independent practice, and to compare them to results by their mentor (with >20 years of experience). Exposure to hypospadias surgery during fellowship was determined from case logs of five consecutive fellows completing training from 2007-2011. TIP was the only technique used to repair distal hypospadias. No fellow operated independently or performed complete repairs under supervision. Instead, the first 3 months were spent assisting their mentor, observing surgical methodology and decision-making. Then, each performed selected portions under direct supervision, including: degloving, penile straightening, developing glans wings, incising and tubularizing the urethral plate, creating a barrier layer, sewing the glansplasty, and skin closure. Overall fellow participation in each case was mentor, with Fisher's exact contingency test. Training logs indicated fellow participation ranged from 76-134 hypospadias repairs, including distal, proximal and reoperative surgeries. Post-graduation case volumes ranged from 25-68 by junior surgeons versus 136 by the mentor. With similar mean follow-up, urethroplasty complication rates were statistically the same between the former fellows, and between them versus the mentor, ranging from 5-13%. Nearly all were fistulas or glans dehiscence. Junior surgeons reported they performed TIP as learned during fellowship, with one exception who used 7-0 polydioxanone rather than polyglactin for urethroplasty. This is the first study directly comparing hypospadias surgical outcomes by recently graduated fellows in

  15. Junior nursing students' experiences of vertical violence during clinical rotations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Sandra P; Burk, Renee

    2009-01-01

    Horizontal violence is a form of workplace violence, a phenomenon that is prevalent in the nursing profession. Research has revealed a variety of negative peer-to-peer behaviors that lower morale and lead to turnover. However, little research has been conducted on "eating our young" (violence occurring between individuals with unequal power, such as staff nurse and student). We propose "vertical violence" as the appropriate term when abusive registered nurse (RN) behavior is directed towards students. We report a content analysis of stories written by junior nursing students about incidents of injustice perpetrated by staff RNs during their clinical experiences. Four levels of injustice were described. Nursing leadership, both in hospitals and educational institutions, must become engaged in efforts to eradicate vertical violence towards students.

  16. Using Project Portfolio Management in a Junior Enterprise Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RIBEIRO, D. M.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Junior Enterprises have their own particularities in managing of their projects. Scarcity of resources and lack of experience of its members are critics and typical factors in the daily life of these companies. However, these and other variables such as the time for return on investment, project complexity and runtime of the project, must be taken into consideration in the prioritization of the outstanding portfolio projects to maximize desired outcomes. The Portfolio Management aims to provide the company a better allocation of resources in an environment with multiple projects going simultaneously. The model proposed here seeks a link between projects and organizational strategy. In this Paper also are presented the results of applying the model on Upe consultoria JR.

  17. Modern approaches to forming value orientations of junior pupils nowadays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liudmyla Matsuk

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A number of approaches to the formation of value orientations of primary school children today is outlined in the article. One of the most important tasks of the school in terms of national revival of Ukraine appears education of harmonious, spiritually rich and nationally conscious personality. Educating of the current generation needs serious updating of educational content, development of a wide spectrum of problems associated with the formation of ideological orientations of a personality, development and activity, independence, consciousness, self-consciousness. The solution of the abovementioned problem is possible subject to optimize management of process education through the humanization of education that will ensure the establishment of priority of human values in society.Key words: values, value orientations, training and education, junior pupils, patriotism, identity, dignity, courage, duty, responsibility, tolerance.

  18. SWIMMING CLASSES IN JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS’ OPINION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Bielec

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The role of modern physical education is not only to develop motor abilities of the students, but most of all prevent them from epidemic youth diseases such as obesity or postural defects. Positive attitudes to swimming as a long-life physical activity, instilled in adolescence should be beneficial in adult life. The group of 130 boys and 116 girls of 7th grade junior high school (mean age 14.6 was asked in the survey to present their opinion of obligatory swimming lessons at school. Students of both sexes claimed that they liked swimming classes because they could improve their swimming skills (59% of answers and because of health-related character of water exercises (38%. 33% of students regarded swimming lessons as boring and monotonous, and 25% of them complained about poor pool conditions like chlorine smell, crowded lanes, too low temperature. Majority of the surveyed students saw practical role of swimming in saving others life.

  19. [RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN JUNIOR AND SENIOR DOCTORS: A BUBERIAN MODEL].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pougnet, Richard; Pougnet, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    Doctors in training work in services under the supervision of senior doctors. These professional relationships may lead to frustrations, or ill-being at work. Indeed doctors are often very busy with care and can hardly communicate. The purpose of this article is to propose ways to think in its ethical dimension this relationship, by learning from Martin Buber's ideas. He thought a philosophy of relationship in two word pairs: I-Thou and I-It. This thought can be useful in the context of the médical relationship and mentorship. Indeed we can see our colleague as a person or only as a caregiver. We offer a relationship model according to buberian thought, between junior and senior doctor caring about the same patients.

  20. Skynet Junior Scholars: From Idea to Enactment--Tales from the Trenches III. Implementing SJS in Out-of-School Time Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heatherly, Sue Ann; Elyea, Charlene; Goodman, Joel; Gurton, Suzanne; Hoette, Vivian L.; Holt, Geoff; Sanchez, Rick; Skynet Robotic Telescope Network, University of North Carolina

    2016-01-01

    The creators of Skynet Junior Scholars were ambitious to say the least when they set out to:- Develop online tools that enable middle school and high school aged youth to use robotic optical and radio telescopes to do astronomy- Create an inquiry-based curriculum that promotes critical thinking and scientific habits of mind- Proactively incorporate Principles of Universal Design in all SJS development tasks to ensure access by blind/low vision and deaf/hard of hearing youth- Prepare 180 adult youth leaders from diverse backgrounds including 4-H leaders, museum educators, amateur astronomers and teachers to facilitate SJS activities in a variety of settings.So, after three years of development, how is SJS actually working? In this paper we describe what it takes for a successful implementation of Skynet Junior Scholars, from the viewpoint of adult leaders in the trenches who work with youth at schools but in free-choice learning environments. What are the lessons learned in recruiting and engaging youth in observational astronomy projects when academic incentives like grades are no longer part of the equation? Stories and ideas will be presented from classroom teachers, informal educators and amateur astronomers who work with youth in this environment.Skynet Junior Scholars is supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Numbers 1223687, 1223235 and 1223345.

  1. Senior physiotherapy students as standardised patients for junior students enhances self-efficacy and satisfaction in both junior and senior students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandrusiak, Allison M; Isles, Rosemary; Chang, Angela T; Choy, Nancy L Low; Toppenberg, Rowena; McCook, Donna; Smith, Michelle D; O'Leary, Karina; Brauer, Sandra G

    2014-05-23

    Standardised patients are used in medical education to expose students to clinical contexts and facilitate transition to clinical practice, and this approach is gaining momentum in physiotherapy programs. Expense and availability of trained standardised patients are factors limiting widespread adoption, and accessing clinical visits with real patients can be challenging. This study addressed these issues by engaging senior students as standardised patients for junior students. It evaluated how this approach impacted self-reported constructs of both the junior and senior students. Learning activities for undergraduate physiotherapy students were developed in five courses (Neurology, Cardiorespiratory and three Musculoskeletal courses) so that junior students (Year 2 and 3) could develop skills and confidence in patient interview, physical examination and patient management through their interaction with standardised patients played by senior students (Year 4). Surveys were administered before and after the interactions to record junior students' self-reported confidence, communication, preparedness for clinic, and insight into their abilities; and senior students' confidence and insight into what it is like to be a patient. Satisfaction regarding this learning approach was surveyed in both the junior and senior students. A total of 253 students completed the surveys (mean 92.5% response rate). Across all courses, junior students reported a significant (all P Senior students demonstrated a significant improvement in their confidence in providing feedback and insight into their own learning (P senior students as standardised patients resulted in positive experiences for both junior and senior students across a variety of physiotherapy areas, activities, and stages within a physiotherapy program. These findings support the engagement of senior students as standardised patients to enhance learning within physiotherapy programs, and may have application across other

  2. Knowledge transfer from public research organisations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnold, Erik; Knee, Paula; Brown, Neil; Javorka, Zsuzsa; Giarracca, Flora; Sidiqui, Sabeen

    2012-01-01

    This study describes knowledge transfer from European universities and institutes to industry, focusing on the role of the Industrial Liaison / Technology / Knowledge Transfer Office function. It explores practices in European institutions and compares these with international ones, especially from

  3. READINESS PROFILE OF JUNIOR CYCLISTS DETERMINED BY LEIPZIG TEST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovan Zlatković

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to define the readiness profile of junior cyclists determined by the Leipzig test. The second aim was to find out if there were differences in functional performance among cyclists in different disciplines, such as: road cyclists, mountain bikers and sprinters. All cyclists (n=18 were tested with Leipzig test protocol on a bicycle ergometer by increasing the load by 40W per minute, pedalling cadence 90- 100rev/min. The hearth rate was measured at the beginning and at the end of the test, together with the maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max. The results have shown that the maximal oxygen uptake among national junior cyclists in all disciplines was VO2max 56.42±5.82 ml•min-1kg-1, among mountain biking cyclist VO2max was 61.43±4.94, sprinters VO2max 56.78±3.33 and for cross-country cyclists VO2max 53.37±7.82. The statistical analysis of the functional performance results has snown that between subsamples of cyclists there were no significant differences on general level. However, the partial analysis has snown that there is a statistically significant difference between the groups in the hart rate values on an anaerobic threshold (F value 4.547, p=0.032. In conclusion, the tested cyclists were prepared using general training methods even if they had competitions in different disciplines. Therefore, the level of readiness shows that the training process for young cyclists which is used in Serbia is not specific for the competition level and discipline.

  4. Arterial stiffness in junior high school students: Longitudinal observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Hiroshi; Nakajima, Hisakazu; Inoue, Fumio; Kosaka, Kitaro; Asano, Hiroaki; Yoshii, Kengo

    2018-02-01

    Early atherosclerotic change is found even in childhood, and there is an urgent need to clarify the factors causing childhood atherosclerosis and take preventive measures. Early detection of the contributing risk factors is crucial to facilitate preventive measures. Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is a widely used technique for the assessment of atherosclerosis in children. Lifestyle questionnaire, brachio-ankle PWV (baPWV) and anthropometric data were obtained from junior high school students in an urban area of Japan between 2006 and 2008, from seventh to ninth grades. Mean baPWV increased from 867.4 ± 99.5 m/s to 944.5 ± 117.5 m/s in boys, and from 864.0 ± 99.5 m/s to 923.0 ± 101.3 m/s in girls. Obese students had higher baPWV than non-obese students in both genders across each grade. On logistic regression analysis of ninth grade student data, high baPWV was dependent on systolic blood pressure (SBP), time watching television (TV) and symptoms of depression and anxiety, whereas low baPWV was dependent on time playing video games, light exercise, sleep and indoor play, as well as good friendship and motivation. Systolic blood pressure, time watching TV, and symptoms of depression and anxiety may contribute to arterial stiffness and be related to obesity in junior high school students. © 2017 The Authors Pediatrics International published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japan Pediatric Society.

  5. Administrative Governance and Mission of Two Year Colleges within Universities. SACE Research Report #14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlap, William S.

    It is estimated that over 200 two-year colleges exist within universities in the United States. In April 1987, at the annual meeting of the American Association of Community and Junior Colleges, the Council of Two Year Colleges within Universities was formed to better represent the issues and concerns unique to these academic institutions. In…

  6. Cluster randomised controlled trial of a multicomponent intervention to support the implementation of policies and practices that promote healthier environments at junior sports clubs: study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner, Sharin; Sherker, Shauna; Clinton-McHarg, Tara; Dray, Julia; Zukowski, Nadya; Gonzalez, Sharleen; Kingsland, Melanie; Ooi, Jia Ying; Murphy, Allan; Brooke, Daisy; Wiggers, John; Wolfenden, Luke

    2018-01-23

    A large proportion of children and adolescents participate in organised sport, making community sports clubs a promising setting to support healthy behaviours. To date, however, there have been few interventions conducted in junior sports clubs that have targeted health-promoting practices. The primary aim of this pilot study is to assess the potential effectiveness of an intervention to implement health-promoting policies and practices in junior sporting clubs targeting alcohol and tobacco practices, healthy food and beverage availability, and physical activity via participation in sport. A secondary outcome is to assess the impact of such strategies on child exposure to alcohol and tobacco use at the club, purchasing behaviours by/for children at the club canteen and child sports participation opportunities. The study will employ a cluster randomised controlled trial design and be conducted in metropolitan and regional areas of two Australian states. Randomisation will occur at the level of the football league. Community football clubs with over 40 junior players (players under 18 years) within each league will be eligible to participate. The intervention will be developed based on frameworks that consider the social, cultural and environmental factors that influence health behaviours. Intervention clubs will be supported to implement 16 practices targeting alcohol management, tobacco use, nutrition practices, new player recruitment activity, equal participation for players and the development of policies to support these practices. Trained research staff will collect outcome data via telephone interviews at baseline and follow-up. Interviews will be conducted with both club representatives and parents of junior players. The study has been approved by the University of Newcastle Human Research Ethics Committee (H-2013-0429). The results of the study will be disseminated via peer-reviewed publications and presentations at conferences. ACTRN12617001044314; Pre

  7. Cluster randomised controlled trial of a multicomponent intervention to support the implementation of policies and practices that promote healthier environments at junior sports clubs: study protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner, Sharin; Sherker, Shauna; Clinton-McHarg, Tara; Dray, Julia; Zukowski, Nadya; Gonzalez, Sharleen; Kingsland, Melanie; Ooi, Jia Ying; Murphy, Allan; Brooke, Daisy; Wiggers, John

    2018-01-01

    Introduction A large proportion of children and adolescents participate in organised sport, making community sports clubs a promising setting to support healthy behaviours. To date, however, there have been few interventions conducted in junior sports clubs that have targeted health-promoting practices. The primary aim of this pilot study is to assess the potential effectiveness of an intervention to implement health-promoting policies and practices in junior sporting clubs targeting alcohol and tobacco practices, healthy food and beverage availability, and physical activity via participation in sport. A secondary outcome is to assess the impact of such strategies on child exposure to alcohol and tobacco use at the club, purchasing behaviours by/for children at the club canteen and child sports participation opportunities. Methods and analysis The study will employ a cluster randomised controlled trial design and be conducted in metropolitan and regional areas of two Australian states. Randomisation will occur at the level of the football league. Community football clubs with over 40 junior players (players under 18 years) within each league will be eligible to participate. The intervention will be developed based on frameworks that consider the social, cultural and environmental factors that influence health behaviours. Intervention clubs will be supported to implement 16 practices targeting alcohol management, tobacco use, nutrition practices, new player recruitment activity, equal participation for players and the development of policies to support these practices. Trained research staff will collect outcome data via telephone interviews at baseline and follow-up. Interviews will be conducted with both club representatives and parents of junior players. Ethics and dissemination The study has been approved by the University of Newcastle Human Research Ethics Committee (H-2013-0429). The results of the study will be disseminated via peer-reviewed publications and

  8. Uncovering the lived experiences of junior and senior undergraduate female science majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adornato, Philip

    The following dissertation focuses on a case study that uses critical theory, social learning theory, identity theory, liberal feminine theory, and motivation theory to conduct a narrative describing the lived experience of females and their performance in two highly selective private university, where students can cross-register between school, while majoring in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). Through the use of narratives, the research attempts to shed additional light on the informal and formal science learning experiences that motivates young females to major in STEM in order to help increase the number of women entering STEM careers and retaining women in STEM majors. In the addition to the narratives, surveys were performed to encompass a larger audience while looking for themes and phenomena which explore what captivates and motivates young females' interests in science and continues to nurture and facilitate their growth throughout high school and college, and propel them into a major in STEM in college. The purpose of this study was to uncover the lived experiences of junior and senior undergraduate female science majors during their formal and informal education, their science motivation to learn science, their science identities, and any experiences in gender inequity they may have encountered. The findings have implications for young women deciding on future careers and majors through early exposure and guidance, understanding and recognizing what gender discrimination, and the positive effects of mentorships.

  9. A peer mentoring group for junior clinician educators: four years' experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Julie A; Mourtzanos, Emmanuel; McLaren, Kimberly; Murray, Suzanne B; Kimmel, Ryan J; Cowley, Deborah S

    2012-03-01

    To study the effect of a peer mentoring group (PMG). Six junior clinician educator faculty and one senior faculty at the University of Washington Medical Center's Department of Psychiatry formed a PMG in 2006. The PMG had 30 meetings during 2006-2010. Group format, goals, and meeting agendas were determined solely by participants. Feedback about positive and negative outcomes of participation in the PMG was determined by open-ended response to three sets of questions; qualitative analysis was performed by an outside research consultant. Program evaluation revealed benefits and undesirable or unintended outcomes. Reported benefits were increased workplace satisfaction; improved social connection; increased professional productivity and personal growth/development through accountability, collaboration, mutual learning, support, and information sharing; synergy, collaboration, and diversity of thought; increased involvement in professional activities; opportunity for peer discussions in a safe environment; and increased accountability and motivation. Undesirable or unintentional outcomes were exclusivity, lack of hierarchy, scheduling of meetings, absence of an intentional curriculum, diverse and competing interests, personal-professional enmeshment, and occasional loss of focus due to overemphasis on personal matters. Every member of the PMG was retained, and scholarly productivity increased, as did collaboration with other group members. Participants in this PMG experienced qualitative benefits and perceived advantages in career advancement and scholarly productivity. Negative consequences did not deter participation in the PMG or outweigh benefits. The self-sufficient and low-cost structure makes it particularly portable.

  10. Practical examples and discussion in junior high school biological delivery classes

    OpenAIRE

    石井, 照久; ISHII, Teruhisa

    2013-01-01

    Practical examples of the delivery class in junior high school biological education were reported. In 2006-2012, author did 13 times of delivery class in 5 junior high schools in Akita Prefecture. The contents of the delivery classes were‘‘Observation of animals in river’’, ‘‘Marine ecology’’, ‘‘Ecological problems’’ and ‘‘cells and DNA’’. In this report, these contents were discussed in regard to new course of education in Japan. Also, better delivery class in junior high school biological e...

  11. Junior physicians' workplace experiences in clinical fields in German-speaking Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buddeberg-Fischer, Barbara; Klaghofer, Richard; Abel, Thomas; Buddeberg, Claus

    2005-01-08

    To date, there have been several prospective cohort studies investigating the workplace experiences of junior physicians, but with limited focus on gender issues. The objective of the present study is to explore the workplace experiences of first-year residents according to gender, type of training hospital, and clinical field. Data reported are from the second assessment of the longitudinal Swiss physicians' career development study, begun in 2001. In 2003, 497 residents (54.7% females, 45.3% males) assessed their workplace conditions, social support at work, and effort-reward imbalance. There are few, but relevant, gender related differences in workplace experiences, with female physicians experiencing less mentoring and higher over-commitment, yet more positive social relationships at work. In a multivariate model, significant differences in some workplace variables with regard to type of training hospital and/or clinical field are found: workplace conditions are rated worse in type "A" hospitals (university and cantonal hospitals) than in type "B"/"C"/"D" hospitals (regional hospitals and highly specialised units), and in surgical fields than in internal medicine. In "A" hospitals mentoring is assessed as better, but positive social relationships as worse. Both scales are rated worse in surgical fields than in internal medicine. The effort-reward imbalance (ERI) is rated significantly higher (unfavourable) in "A" hospitals than in "B"/"C"/"D" hospitals, regardless of gender and clinical field. Significantly more subjects with an ERI quotient above 1 (which is unfavourable) work in "A" hospitals, and in surgical fields regardless of hospital type. Of the total sample, 81 subjects (16.3%), 41 males and 40 females, show an ERI quotient above 1. The greater the workload, the worse the rating of workplace conditions, effort-reward imbalance, and over-commitment. Institutional determinants are crucial factors for the workplace experiences and first career steps of

  12. Heat transfer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Heat transfer. Heat conduction in solid slab. Convective heat transfer. Non-linear temperature. variation due to flow. HEAT FLUX AT SURFACE. conduction/diffusion.

  13. Heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saad, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    Heat transfer takes place between material systems as a result of a temperature difference. The transmission process involves energy conversions governed by the first and second laws of thermodynamics. The heat transfer proceeds from a high-temperature region to a low-temperature region, and because of the finite thermal potential, there is an increase in entropy. Thermodynamics, however, is concerned with equilibrium states, which includes thermal equilibrium, irrespective of the time necessary to attain these equilibrium states. But heat transfer is a result of thermal nonequilibrium conditions, therefore, the laws of thermodynamics alone cannot describe completely the heat transfer process. In practice, most engineering problems are concerned with the rate of heat transfer rather than the quantity of heat being transferred. Resort then is directed to the particular laws governing the transfer of heat. There are three distinct modes of heat transfer: conduction, convection, and radiation. Although these modes are discussed separately, all three types may occur simultaneously

  14. High Power Orbit Transfer Vehicle

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gulczinski, Frank

    2003-01-01

    ... from Virginia Tech University and Aerophysics, Inc. to examine propulsion requirements for a high-power orbit transfer vehicle using thin-film voltaic solar array technologies under development by the Space Vehicles Directorate (dubbed PowerSail...

  15. A Portrait of School Leadership at Senshu University Matsudo Junior and Senior High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Travis Todd

    2014-01-01

    As an important symbolic figure and embodiment of the traditions and character of the school, the position of principal in Japan is crucial. Yet societal pressures and an undefined job description are serving to increase pressures of the position. The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine school administrative leadership at a private…

  16. Transfer Pricing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren Bo

    2014-01-01

    Against a background of rather mixed evidence about transfer pricing practices in multinational enterprises (MNEs) and varying attitudes on the part of tax authorities, this paper explores how multiple aims in transfer pricing can be pursued across four different transfer pricing regimes. A MNE h...

  17. A transferência de tecnologia universidade-empresa no contexto brasileiro: uma revisão de estudos científicos publicados entre os anos 2005 e 2009 University-industry technology transfer in the brazilian context: a review of scientific studies published from 2005 to 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisiane Quadrado Closs

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available O tema da gestão da inovação e transferência de tecnologia (TT no contexto de interação universidade-empresa é relativamente novo no Brasil e emergente em âmbito internacional (REISMAN, 2005, assim, seus dados e teorias ainda se apresentam de modo fragmentado. Considerando essa fragilidade, este estudo objetivou identificar e analisar pesquisas recentes publicadas no Brasil sobre o tema, buscando contribuir para a consolidação desse corpo teórico. O trabalho, de cunho exploratório, revisou as pesquisas publicadas em periódicos nacionais entre 2005 e 2009, sob uma abordagem qualitativa. Os objetivos, métodos e principais resultados desses estudos foram sintetizados e discutidos. A análise coletiva desses trabalhos sugere que a cooperação universidade-empresa (U-E gera inovações, aprendizados e benefícios mútuos. Esta aponta ainda existir muito espaço para ampliar a transferência de tecnologia U-E. O estudo identificou os métodos usados nas pesquisas; motivadores, facilitadores e obstáculos ao processo; elementos das estruturas universitárias, bem como políticas das IES e do governo intervenientes no processo; características de empresas geradas a partir de spillovers acadêmicos; o papel social exercido pelas IES; diferentes formas de TT na interação U-E; lacunas de pesquisas e sugestões para a realização de estudos futuros.Innovation management and technology transfer (TT in the context of university-industry interaction is a relatively new topic in Brazil and an emerging field internationally (REISMAN, 2005; thus, the data and theories related to it are still presented in a fragmented way. Therefore, the present study aimed to identify and analyze recent studies published in Brazil on the subject seeking to contribute to the consolidation of this theoretical framework. This exploratory study reviewed articles published in national journals between 2005 and 2009 using a qualitative approach. The goals, methods

  18. Accuracy of navigated pedicle screw insertion by a junior spine surgeon without spinal surgery experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Hironori; Kotani, Toshiaki; Motegi, Hiroyuki; Nemoto, Tetsuharu; Koshi, Takana; Nagahara, Ken; Minami, Syohei

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate pedicle screw placement accuracy during navigated surgery by a junior spine surgeon who had no spinal surgery experience. A junior spine surgeon with no spinal surgery experience implanted a total of 137 pedicle screws by using a navigation system. Postoperative computerized tomography was performed to evaluate screw placement, and the pedicle perforation rate was 2.2%. There were no neurologic or vascular complications related to the pedicle screws. The results demonstrated that pedicle screws can be placed safely and effectively by a junior spine surgeon who has no spinal surgery experience when instructed by a senior spine surgeon. The results of this study suggest that navigation can be used as a surgical training tool for junior spine surgeons. (author)

  19. Acculturation, adaptation and multiculturalism among immigrant adolescents in junior vocational education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geel, Mitch van

    2009-01-01

    This thesis deals with the adaptation and acculturation of immigrant adolescents in junior vocational education. The adaptation of immigrant adolescents fits the notion of an 'immigrant paradox'. Maintaining aspects of the ethnic culture was found positively related to immigrant adolescents'

  20. Bringing the Microcomputer into the Junior High: A Success Story from Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Benjamin S.

    1982-01-01

    Describes the introduction of an Apple II microcomputer into Miami Lakes (Florida) Junior High School and its success in generating enthusiasm among teachers, students, parents, and the community. (Author/RW)

  1. Attitude and perception of junior resident doctors' regarding antibiotic resistance – A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sourabh Aggarwal

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Most of the junior residents believe that antibiotic resistance is an emerging problem in their hospital as also nationally. There is a large unmet need of providing education to these residents.

  2. On Strategies of Improving Junior High School Students' Oral English Ability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗茜

    2015-01-01

    With the increasingly frequent international exchanges,English,as an international language,has been attached greater importance.The oral English ability of junior high school students plays an indispensable role in their everyday study and social interaction,and it is the present junior school study that can lay a solid foundation for their future study and life. Therefore,to comprehensively improve their oral English ability is in urgent need and of paramount significance.This paper focuses on analyzing the external and internal factors influencing the cultivation of junior high school students' oral English ability,and put forwards the corresponding cultivating strategies of the oral English ability of junior high school students.

  3. On Strategies of Improving Junior High School Students’ Oral English Ability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗茜

    2015-01-01

    With the increasingly frequent international exchanges,English,as an international language,has been attached greater importance.The oral English ability of junior high school students plays an indispensable role in their everyday study and social interaction,and it is the present junior school study that can lay a solid foundation for their future study and life.Therefore,to comprehensively improve their oral English ability is in urgent need and of paramount significance.This paper focuses on analyzing the external and internal factors influencing the cultivation of junior high school students’oral English ability,and put forwards the corresponding cultivating strategies of the oral English ability of junior high school students.

  4. Earth Science Principles Pertinent to the General Education Programs in Junior High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henson, Kenneth Tyrone

    1970-01-01

    Presents the procedures, and findings of a study designed to identify principles in astronomy, geology, meterology, oceanography and physical geography pertinent to general education programs in junior high schools. (LC)

  5. Does decision documentation help junior designers rationalize their decisions? A comparative multiple-case study

    OpenAIRE

    Heesch, U. van; Avgeriou, P.; Tang, A.

    2013-01-01

    Software architecture design is challenging, especially for junior software designers. Lacking practice and experience, junior designers need process support in order to make rational architecture decisions. In this paper, we present the results of a comparative multiple-case study conducted to find out if decision viewpoints from van Heesch et al. (2012, in press) can provide such a support. The case study was conducted with four teams of software engineering students working in industrial s...

  6. Early diagnosis of junior school age children’s posture disorders

    OpenAIRE

    N.S. Razumeiko

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: to describe specificities of early diagnosis method for junior school age children’s posture disorders. Material: in pedagogic experiment 156 junior school age children (boys and girls of 7-10 years’ age) participated. All children had no experience of training in sport circles. For determination of uniformity of the tested we fulfilled experts’ examination for presence or absence of external signs of posture disorders in frontal plane. The children’s examination was conducted by qua...

  7. MOTIVES OF JUNIOR VOLLEYBALL PLAYERS TO START AND CONTINUE VOLLEYBALL AND THEIR EXPECTATIONS FOR THE FUTURE

    OpenAIRE

    BİNBOĞA, Meltem; KILIÇ, İbrahim; GÖKDEMİR, Kadir

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The goal of this research is to analyze the reasons why junior volleyball players start and continue volleyball and their expectations from future. The study sample includes 359 sportsmen that have participated in the finals of Turkey Junior Volleyball championship in 2010-2011 volleyball seasons in Afyonkarahisar and Isparta cities. Data collection tool of the research is a survey made of three scales and personal features. Reliability analysis, frequency and percenta...

  8. Personality, passion, self-esteem and psychological well-being among junior elite athletes in Norway

    OpenAIRE

    Bauger, Lars

    2011-01-01

    Personality research among athletes seems to have obtained less interest in recent years after much focus until the 1990s. This decline was obviously a result of ill conducted “personology” research, and a greater focus on psychological state versus trait in the sport psychology community. The present study explored personality dimensions, as measured by the Junior Temperament and Character Inventory, passion, self-esteem, and well-being among junior elite athletes. In addition, the athletes ...

  9. Predictive Factors of Exercise Behaviors of Junior High School Students in Chonburi Province

    OpenAIRE

    Tanida Julvanichpong

    2016-01-01

    Exercise has been regarded as a necessary and important aspect to enhance physical performance and psychology health. Body weight statistics of students in junior high school students in Chonburi Province beyond a standard risk of obesity. Promoting exercise among Junior high school students in Chonburi Province, essential knowledge concerning factors influencing exercise is needed. Therefore, this study aims to (1) determine the levels of perceived exercise behavior, exercise behavior in the...

  10. GORDON RAMSAY’S POLITENESS STRATEGIES IN MASTERCHEF AND MASTERCHEF JUNIOR US

    OpenAIRE

    Annisa Friska Safa; Eri Kurniawan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This research aims to investigate the types of politeness strategies that are performed by Gordon Ramsay in judging the Masterchef US and Masterchef Junior US contestants’ dishes and to reveal whether Gordon Ramsay performs any different politeness strategies between the Master chef and Masterchef Junior contestants. The data spring from Gordon Ramsay utterances, taken from the elimination test of two episodes of Masterchef season 4 (episode 9 and 12) and the elimination test of ...

  11. Study of Female Junior Officer Retention and Promotion in the U.S. Navy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    thesis uses multivariate analytical techniques to examine the effects of demographics, pre- commissioning factors, and job performance on the retention ...JUNIOR OFFICER RETENTION AND PROMOTION IN THE U.S. NAVY by David J. Mundell March 2016 Thesis Advisor: Simona Tick Co-Advisor: Steve...3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE STUDY OF FEMALE JUNIOR OFFICER RETENTION AND PROMOTION IN THE U.S. NAVY 5

  12. THE SCORE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN ELITE EUROPEN JUNIOR AND SENIOR WOMEN GYMNASTS

    OpenAIRE

    Erceg, Tina; Delaš Kalinski, Sunčica; Milić, Mirjana

    2014-01-01

    Artistic gymnastics is generally determined by the rules of the gymnastics Code of Points and long-term processes of learning gymnastics skills. Though intensive, the career of women gymnasts is relatively short, so with the goal of prolonging it the International Gymnastics Federation (FIG-a) prescribes junior women gymnasts should apply easier dismounts than senior gymnasts. The aim of this study was to determine the characteristics of junior routines (N=88) and their differences in relatio...

  13. Investigation of junior school student myopia in high-altitude Tibetan areas in Qinghai Province

    OpenAIRE

    Xia Han; Hai-Ling Miao; Dan Huang

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To know the rate of students' myopia in junior school and factors affecting its occurrence in high altitude Tibetan areas in Qinghai, and provide basis for the prevention of myopia. METHODS: Totally 2 209 junior school students were extracted as respondent with stratified cluster sampling method. The gender, age, ethnicity, grade, eye behavior, physical activity and parental visual conditions were collected by self-made questionnaire, and the curvature of the cornea, anterior chamber dep...

  14. Radiation education to the elementary and junior high school students in Aomori prefecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagai, Susumu; Okamura, Yasuharu; Sakata, Misaki; Miyakawa, Toshiharu

    2015-01-01

    In 2006, Japan Nuclear Fuel Limited (JNFL) began 'the delivery lesson on radiation' in order to promote understanding of radiation for the elementary and junior high schools students. Currently, 'the delivery lesson on radiation' is aimed mainly for the junior high school students. About 1800 students per year take the lesson. We will report the effects and tasks of 'the delivery lesson on radiation' based on the results of the questionnaire filled out before and after the lesson. (author)

  15. Comparing Matchplay Characteristics and Physical Demands of Junior and Professional Tennis Athletes in the Era of Big Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie A. Kovalchik, Machar Reid

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Differences in the competitive performance characteristics of junior and professional tennis players are not well understood. The present study provides a comprehensive comparative analysis of junior and professional matchplay. The study utilized multiple large-scale datasets covering match, point, and shot outcomes over multiple years of competition. Regression analysis was used to identify differences between junior and professional matchplay. Top professional men and women were found to play significantly more matches, sets, and games compared to junior players of an equivalent ranking. Professional players had a greater serve advantage, men winning 4 and women winning 2 additional percentage points on serve compared to juniors. Clutch ability in break point conversion was 6 to 8 percentage points greater for junior players. In general, shots were more powerful and more accurate at the professional level with the largest differences observed for male players on serve. Serving to the center of the court was more than two times more common for junior players on first serve. While male professionals performed 50% more total work in a Grand Slam match than juniors, junior girls performed 50% more work than professional women. Understanding how competitiveness, play demands, and the physical characteristics of shots differ between junior and professional tennis players can help set realistic expectations and developmentally appropriate training for transitioning players.

  16. Comparing Matchplay Characteristics and Physical Demands of Junior and Professional Tennis Athletes in the Era of Big Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalchik, Stephanie A; Reid, Machar

    2017-12-01

    Differences in the competitive performance characteristics of junior and professional tennis players are not well understood. The present study provides a comprehensive comparative analysis of junior and professional matchplay. The study utilized multiple large-scale datasets covering match, point, and shot outcomes over multiple years of competition. Regression analysis was used to identify differences between junior and professional matchplay. Top professional men and women were found to play significantly more matches, sets, and games compared to junior players of an equivalent ranking. Professional players had a greater serve advantage, men winning 4 and women winning 2 additional percentage points on serve compared to juniors. Clutch ability in break point conversion was 6 to 8 percentage points greater for junior players. In general, shots were more powerful and more accurate at the professional level with the largest differences observed for male players on serve. Serving to the center of the court was more than two times more common for junior players on first serve. While male professionals performed 50% more total work in a Grand Slam match than juniors, junior girls performed 50% more work than professional women. Understanding how competitiveness, play demands, and the physical characteristics of shots differ between junior and professional tennis players can help set realistic expectations and developmentally appropriate training for transitioning players.

  17. A surgical career for New Zealand junior doctors? Factors influencing this choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jason; Sathanathan, Janarthanan; Naden, Gill; Child, Stephen

    2009-08-07

    To discover the level of interest in a surgical career amongst junior doctors and trainee interns in the Auckland region. Secondary aims are to identify the factors that influence career choice as well as the timing of career choice. An anonymous and structured questionnaire was distributed to all trainee interns and junior doctors in their first to fifth postgraduate years in the Auckland region. Questions were based on basic demographics, level of training, career preference and factors from previous experiences in surgery that may have influenced their career choice. Total of 87 replies with 36% expressed interest in surgery whereas 64% were interested in non-surgical specialties. Top three factors influencing career choice were similar in both groups: Lifestyle, career ambitions and family. Personal interest, practical hands-on and positive previous experiences were the top reasons why junior doctors chose surgery. Poor lifestyle, lacking of interest, limited future part-time work and previous negative experiences were the top reasons why junior doctors did not choose surgery. A significantly (pcareers earlier. Career aspirations of New Zealand junior doctors were similar to findings reported overseas. To promote surgery amongst junior doctors and medical students, attention should be paid to the key factors which may influence career choice. By improving working conditions and have better surgical education with good mentoring, team atmosphere and opportunities for early exposure will hopefully allow better recruitment and training of future surgeons.

  18. Computer games to teach hygiene: an evaluation of the e-Bug junior game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, David; Kostkova, Patty; Weinberg, Julius; Lazareck, Lisa; Weerasinghe, Dasun; Lecky, Donna M; McNulty, Cliodna A M

    2011-06-01

    Handwashing, respiratory hygiene and antibiotic resistance remain major public health concerns. In order to facilitate an effective outcome when teaching the basic principles of hand and respiratory hygiene, educational interventions should first target school children. As computer games are ubiquitous in most children's lives, e-Bug developed computer games targeted at teaching children handwashing, respiratory hygiene and antibiotic resistance. The games were designed for two target audiences: junior school children (9-12 year olds); and senior school children (13-15 year olds). Between May and August 2009, the finalized junior game underwent an evaluation in three UK schools (in Glasgow, Gloucester and London), involving 62 children in the schools and ∼ 1700 players accessing the junior game online. The e-Bug junior game consists of a number of levels of play, each of which promotes a set of learning outcomes (LOs). These LOs, complementary to those in the e-Bug packs, are expressed through the game mechanics (the rules of the game) rather than through story or dialogue. Although the junior game's evaluation demonstrated a statistically significant change in the knowledge for only a small number of given LOs, because many children had the required knowledge already before playing the game, this is e-Bug's first statistical study on the junior game and the first comprehensive evaluation of its kind. Future work includes a re-examination of the quiz-style questionnaires utilized in this study and an exploration of the potential knowledge change acquired strictly through engagement.

  19. [An investigation of occupational stress, social support, and happiness of junior civil servants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lingfeng

    2015-10-01

    To investigate the current status of occupational stress, social support, and happiness in junior civil servants in northern Zhejiang Province, China, and to investigate the relationship between occupational stress, social support and happiness. A total of 360 junior civil servants from below-county-level administrative organizations in Huzhou, Jiaxing, and Hangzhou were surveyed using the job stress questionnaire and social support rating scale for civil servants. The total average score of occupational stress in junior civil servants was 2.52 ± 0.48, indicating a moderate level of occupational stress; career prospects topped the rank list of sources of occupational stress with a score of 2.90 ± 0.60; different generations showed significant differences in the sources and total average scores of occupational stress, with the scores of the 1980s, 1990s, 1970s, 1950s, and 1960s groups decreasing in the same order (Phappiness among the junior civil servants were relatively low, with scores of 38.43 ± 8.38 and 76.88 ± 12.77, respectively; different generations also showed significant differences, with the scores of 1980s, 1990s, 1970s, 1950s, and 1960s groups increasing in the same order (Phappiness than males (Phappiness of junior civil servants (r=0.405~0.571, Phappiness of junior civil servants.

  20. Artictis and creative development of junior schoolchildren during the labor education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Леся Василівна Старовойт

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with a topical problem of artistic and creative development of junior schoolchildren during labor process. There were considered the diverse aspects of problem of personal creative activity. The special attention was paid to importance of combining labor, creation and artistic activity in educational process. On the base of experimental research there was considered the modern state of artistic and creative development of pupils in elementary school. By analysis of the theory and practice of artistic and creative development of junior schoolchildren during labor education there was determined inexpediency of excessive reproductive approach to the labor activity of children that impedes emotional, spiritual and esthetic development transforming the work of children into the boring and ineffective one. There was determined the criteria of artistic and creative development of junior schoolchildren during the labor education. During the study there were defined principles that reveal content, essence and nature of creation. There were defined peculiarities of artistic and creative development of junior schoolchildren at the lessons of labor education and distinguished the main sings that characterize mechanism of creative activity of junior schoolchildren. There was grounded pedagogical expediency of artistic and creative approach to the work with junior schoolchildren

  1. Interprofessional collaboration between junior doctors and nurses in the general ward setting: A qualitative exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Charmaine J; Zhou, Wen T; Chan, Sally W-C; Liaw, Sok Y

    2018-01-01

    To explore the collaboration experiences of junior physicians and nurses in the general ward setting. Junior physicians and nurses do not always work collaboratively and this could affect the quality of patient care. The understanding of the issues affecting junior physicians and nurses working together is needed to inform strategies to improve interprofessional collaboration. Nineteen junior physicians and nurses were interviewed in 2012 and 2013. Interviews were transcribed and analysed using thematic analysis. Junior physicians and nurses acknowledged the importance of working collaboratively to achieve better patient care, but they are struggling to cope due to heavy clinical workload, organisational constraints and differing power relationships. Nurses have to take on more responsibilities in the decision-making process of patients' care to foster effective interprofessional collaboration. The study calls for educational and organisational strategies to improve interprofessional collaboration between junior physicians and nurses. Nurse leaders should ensure that ward nurses are given a designated time to participate in ward rounds with physicians and have access to a communication tool that assists them in contributing proactively in the decision-making process of patient care. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Relationships between academic performance of medical students and their workplace performance as junior doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Sandra E; Celenza, Antonio; Puddey, Ian B; Lake, Fiona

    2014-07-30

    Little recent published evidence explores the relationship between academic performance in medical school and performance as a junior doctor. Although many forms of assessment are used to demonstrate a medical student's knowledge or competence, these measures may not reliably predict performance in clinical practice following graduation. This descriptive cohort study explores the relationship between academic performance of medical students and workplace performance as junior doctors, including the influence of age, gender, ethnicity, clinical attachment, assessment type and summary score measures (grade point average) on performance in the workplace as measured by the Junior Doctor Assessment Tool. There were two hundred participants. There were significant correlations between performance as a Junior Doctor (combined overall score) and the grade point average (r = 0.229, P = 0.002), the score from the Year 6 Emergency Medicine attachment (r = 0.361, P gender or ethnicity on the overall combined score of performance of the junior doctor. Performance on integrated assessments from medical school is correlated to performance as a practicing physician as measured by the Junior Doctor Assessment Tool. These findings support the value of combining undergraduate assessment scores to assess competence and predict future performance.

  3. Autopercepção de competências transversais de trabalho em universitários: construção de um instrumento Self-perception of work transferable skills among university students: construction of an instrument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara Maria Barbosa Silva

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available O sucesso e a permanência no mercado de trabalho não estão ligados somente às competências técnicas e específicas de cada profissão. Competências transversais, ou seja, que podem ser transferidas de um contexto a outro de trabalho, são cada vez mais importantes. O objetivo principal desta pesquisa foi a construção de um instrumento para avaliar a autopercepção de competências transversais de trabalho em universitários. A amostra foi composta por 777 universitários de 34 cursos diferentes com idades entre 18 e 33 anos. Resultados de análises de componentes principais indicaram sete dimensões no instrumento: resolução de problemas e criatividade, organização e responsabilidade, relacionamento interpessoal, trabalho em equipe, comunicação escrita, comunicação oral e raciocínio numérico. Os índices de fidedignidade obtidos foram todos satisfatórios (entre 0,74 e 0,91. Estes resultados sugerem que o instrumento proposto apresenta boas qualidades psicométricas, embora novos estudos de validade sejam necessários.Success and permanence in the labor market do not depend only on individuals' possession of specific and technical skills of her or his occupation. Transferable skills, which can be transferred from one context of work to another, are increasingly important. The main objective of this research was the construction of an instrument to assess self-perceptions of work transferable skills among university students. The sample was composed of 777 students from 34 different courses, aged between 18 and 33 years. Principal components analysis results revealed seven dimensions in the instrument: problem-solving and creativity, organization and responsibility, interpersonal relationship, teamwork, written communication, oral communication and numeric reasoning. All reliability indexes obtained were satisfactory (between 0.74 and 0.91. These results suggest that the proposed instrument shows good psychometric properties

  4. Introducing Nine-Point Circle to Junior High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiangga, S.; Azizah, M. A. N.; Rini, R. N. K.; Hidayanti, A. N.

    2018-01-01

    The concept of circles is an ancient concept that has appeared since Ancient Egypt from which this concept gives many significant contributions in mathematics’ development until now. Nevertheless, the concept of circles hides many uncover mysterious features that are of applications in mathematics. One of the mysterious features is the Nine-Point Circle. This Nine-point circle is also known as Euler’s circle, six-point circle, Feuerbach’s circle, the twelve-point circle, and many others. Because of these different names, there have been misunderstand among mathematicians about the Nine-Point Circle’s history. Besides, the discussion of Nine-Point Circle can be used to be an initial material to explain elementary geometry topic in junior high school’s level curriculum of 2013. Therefore, this concept needs to be delivered to the students as a geometry introduction. A possible form of the integration historical aspect of Nine-point circle is suggested in this paper as well as its importance in the curriculum of 2013.

  5. Is there a risk profile for the vulnerable junior doctor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, D; Buttrey, S; Carberry, C; Lydon, S; O'Connor, P

    2016-08-01

    Mental ill health is prevalent among doctors, especially those in the early stages of postgraduate training. However, a paucity of research has examined factors predictive of psychological distress in this population. To report the findings from a multi-centre survey of mental health among junior doctors in Ireland, and assess the extent to which moderator variables (e.g., age, academic performance, nationality, etc.) alter the levels of psychological distress caused by internship. An online, anonymous, questionnaire was distributed to all interns in the Republic of Ireland in January 2012. A total of 270 interns responded to the survey (45.0 % response rate), with 48.5 % of the respondents having a score indicative of psychological distress. A regression model found that nationality, academic performance, intern training network, rating of work stressors, home stressors, and work-life balance were associated with differing levels of mental health as measured by the General Health Questionnaire-12. There is a need to consider moderator variables when examining mental health in healthcare populations to avoid drawing overly simplistic conclusions. Interns in Ireland reported particularly high levels of psychological distress compared to other studies of mental health among healthcare populations.

  6. Nutrition status of junior elite Canadian female soccer athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Jennifer C; Stuart-Hill, Lynneth; Martin, Steven; Gaul, Catherine

    2011-12-01

    Adolescent female team-sport athletes are faced with the challenge of meeting nutrition requirements for growth and development, as well as sport performance. There is a paucity of evidence describing the dietary adequacy of this population in respect to these physiological demands. Therefore, the aim of this study was to comprehensively evaluate the nutrition status of junior elite female soccer athletes. A total of 33 athletes (15.7 ± 0.7 yr) completed anthropometric assessment, 4-day food records analyzed for macro- and micronutrient intake, and hematological analysis. Energy expenditure was estimated using predictive equations. Mean sum of 7 skinfolds was 103.1 ± 35.2 mm, and body-mass index was 22.7 ± 2.7. Mean energy intake was 2,079 ± 460 kcal/day, and estimated energy expenditure was 2,546 ± 190 kcal/day. Of the athletes, 51.5% consumed nutrition status may affect soccer performance and physiological growth and development. More research is needed to understand the unique nutrition needs of this population and inform sport nutrition practice and research.

  7. Does the Beach-Spawning Grunion Eat Its Own Eggs? Eighth Graders Use Inquiry-Based Investigation to Collect Real Data in a University Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, J. William; Martinez, Kimberly M.; Higgins, Benjamin A.; Horn, Michael H.

    2014-01-01

    A collaborative effort between a junior high school and a nearby university allowed 40 eighth-grade honors students to engage in a scientific investigation within a university laboratory. These students, with their science teachers and university researchers, gathered data on egg cannibalism in a beach-spawning fish and thereby contributed to an…

  8. Transfer Pricing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Carsten; Rossing, Christian Plesner

    trade internally as the units have to decide what prices should be paid for such inter-unit transfers. One important challenge is to uncover the consequences that different transfer prices have on the willingness in the organizational units to coordinate activities and trade internally. At the same time...... the determination of transfer price will affect the size of the profit or loss in the organizational units and thus have an impact on the evaluation of managers‟ performance. In some instances the determination of transfer prices may lead to a disagreement between coordination of the organizational units...

  9. What is the effect of a shoulder-strengthening program to prevent shoulder pain among junior female team handball players?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sommervold M

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Maria Sommervold, Håvard Østerås Department of Neuromedicine and Movement Science, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU, Trondheim, Norway Background: Excessively high stresses are applied to the shoulder joint of handball players, mainly caused by overhead throwing. Shoulder pain is a significant problem among junior female team handball players and both male and female top-level team handball players in Norway.Method: A randomized selection was performed among the best female junior teams (J 16 in the Trøndelag region of Norway in the 2014–2015 season. Three teams were randomized to the intervention group and three teams to the control group. Players in the intervention group (n=53 participated in a seven-month, three-times-a-week shoulder-muscle strength-training program, while those in the control group (n=53 participated in a comparable handball training, but did not conduct any specific strength training during the season. Results: A strength-training program had no effect on the prevention of shoulder pain. Overall, the players reported shoulder pain, but graded the pain low on visual analog scale (VAS. Both the intervention group and the control group reported pain under 1 on VAS at baseline and posttest, and there was no significant difference within or between the groups when it came to the intensity of pain reported on VAS. A significant difference (p<0.048 was found between the groups on the sport-specific part of the quick-Disability of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH form, but it did not fulfill the minimal demand to change and the players scored it low, something that indicates little functional problems when it comes to team handball. The intervention group was significantly stronger (p<0.008 on the push-ups test compared to the control group on the posttest. The intervention group increased the number of push-ups from 3.1 to 6.4, while the control group went from 2.3 to 3.6. Aside from this, there were no

  10. Immunization Status Against Hepatitis B Among Iranian Junior Medical, Nursing, and Obstetrics Students With Different Vaccination Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allami

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Since the protection time by hepatitis B (HB vaccination is unclear, the strategy of immunization of junior students who previously received hepatitis vaccine is controversial. Objectives This study aimed to determine the status of immunity to hepatitis B in junior medical, nursing and obstetrics students with different hepatitis B virus (HBV vaccination patterns. Patients and Methods In an analytical cross-sectional study, 255 junior medical sciences students were tested for quantitative antibodies to hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBs. The proportion of protective immunity was compared in different vaccination patterns. Results Vaccination coverage rates were 74.1%. About half the participants didn’t show serological evidence of protective immunity; 68.9% had their last shot more than 10 years ago and 30.4% had a vaccination history of five years or less (P < 0.001. Geometric mean level of anti-HBs titer among students, who had received a primary series vaccine at birth, was significantly lower than students who had started vaccination at an older age (P < 0.001. Also, analysis of variance for geometric mean of anti-HBs titer showed significant differences between groups based on injection time from the last shot (P < 0.001 (post hoc comparisons resulted in a P value of < 0.001 for birth versus < 5 year group, and P < 0.001 for the 5 to 10 year group. The lowest rate of non-protective level belonged to participants with complete three doses and a booster additional shot (27.1%. The final model for independent predictors of anti-HBs positive status was made by a binary logistic regression analysis. The model included presence of a booster dose, injection time from last shot, and discipline of study. Conclusions This study shows lower anti-HBs among students who were vaccinated at infancy compared to those vaccinated at older childhood or adolescence. Also, subsequent measurement of anti-HBs level at the time of entrance to

  11. Innovation through Knowledge Transfer 2012

    CERN Document Server

    Gabrys, Bogdan; Musial-Gabrys, Katarzyna; Roach, Jim; Innovation through Knowledge Transfer InnovationKT-2012

    2013-01-01

    Across the world there is growing awareness of the importance of innovation and knowledge transfer.  Innovation in the sense of generating new knowledge and making better use of existing knowledge, coupled with knowledge transfer and sharing paradigms, have never been more relevant to the universities, industry, commerce and the third sector.  This volume represents the proceedings of the Innovation through Knowledge Transfer 2012 Conference which formed an excellent opportunity to disseminate, share and discuss the impact of innovation, knowledge sharing, enterprise and entrepreneurship.  The volume contains papers presented at a Workshop on ‘The Meta Transfer of Knowledge: Challenges in the Transfer of Knowledge in Industry’, others from thematic sessions on ‘Next-Practice in University Based Open Innovation’,  ‘Social Innovation and Related Paradigms’, ‘Engagement with Industry and Commerce’ and ‘Knowledge Exchange’.  All papers were thoroughly reviewed by referees knowledgeable in...

  12. A Survey of Perceived Hindrances to Junior Secondary School ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kofimereku

    had been transferred from the then Middle Schools to Primary Schools. The aim of this ... He found that the school lacked science teaching and learning materials ..... other hand, highly intensive broad-based remediation interventions (Conley,.

  13. Evaluation and Report on Consumer and Homemaking Program in Depressed Areas. Utterback Junior High School Program. Wakefield Junior High School Program. June and July, 1972.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noon, Madeline Estella; Hanson, Connie

    The document describes the consumer and home economics summer programs for grade 7 and grade 8 girls in two junior high schools. The programs provided opportunities to learn basic sewing and cooking skills, as well as personal improvement such as grooming, hygiene, posture, and modeling. A number of field trips to supplement the class instruction…

  14. The development of mini project interactive media on junior statistical materials (developmental research in junior high school)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauziah, D.; Mardiyana; Saputro, D. R. S.

    2018-05-01

    Assessment is an integral part in the learning process. The process and the result should be in line, regarding to measure the ability of learners. Authentic assessment refers to a form of assessment that measures the competence of attitudes, knowledge, and skills. In fact, many teachers including mathematics teachers who have implemented curriculum based teaching 2013 feel confuse and difficult in mastering the use of authentic assessment instruments. Therefore, it is necessary to design an authentic assessment instrument with an interactive mini media project where teacher can adopt it in the assessment. The type of this research is developmental research. The developmental research refers to the 4D models development, which consist of four stages: define, design, develop and disseminate. The research purpose is to create a valid mini project interactive media on statistical materials in junior high school. The retrieved valid instrument based on expert judgment are 3,1 for eligibility constructions aspect, and 3,2 for eligibility presentation aspect, 3,25 for eligibility contents aspect, and 2,9 for eligibility didactic aspect. The research results obtained interactive mini media projects on statistical materials using Adobe Flash so it can help teachers and students in achieving learning objectives.

  15. What basic clinical procedures should be mastered by junior clerkship students? Experience at a single medical school in Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konje ET

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Eveline T Konje,1,2 Rodrick Kabangila,2,3 Mange Manyama,2,4 Jacqueline M van Wyk2,5 1Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Catholic University of Health and Allied Sciences, Mwanza, Tanzania; 2Medical Education Fellowship, Southern Africa FAIMER Regional Institute – SAFRI, Cape Town, South Africa; 3Department of Internal Medicine, 4Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, School of Medicine, Catholic University of Health and Allied Sciences, Mwanza, Tanzania; 5Department of Clinical and Professional Education, Nelson R Mandela School of Medicine, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa Background: Clinical training in most medical schools, including the Catholic University of Health and Allied Sciences (CUHAS, is offered in the form of junior and senior rotations. During these clinical rotations, students are expected to acquire and master the basic procedural skills. However, students’ learning process should be evaluated for quality improvement. Objectives: This study was conducted to identify the basic medical procedural skills that third-year medical students should acquire and master and determine the level of students’ exposure on these procedures at the end of junior rotation in internal medicine. Identification of the gap between clinicians’ opinions, skills practiced by students, and third-year students’ curriculum in the medical department at CUHAS was also done. Methods: The descriptive cross-sectional study was used to collect data through a self-administered, structured questionnaire from clinicians in medicine. A review of logbooks was considered to determine level of students’ exposure, and a document analysis was done using existing medical curriculum. Results: The response of 71% (n=22 was obtained. Clinicians agreed on basic procedures that students should perform independently (ie, Foley catheter insertion, venipuncture, and intravenous drip insertion. Clinicians thought

  16. Junior doctor psychiatry placements in hospital and community settings: a phenomenological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beattie, Sharon; Crampton, Paul E S; Schwarzlose, Cathleen; Kumar, Namita; Cornwall, Peter L

    2017-09-27

    The proportion of junior doctors required to complete psychiatry placements in the UK has increased, due in part to vacant training posts and psychiatry career workforce shortages, as can be seen across the world. The aim of this study was to understand the lived experience of a Foundation Year 1 junior doctor psychiatry placement and to understand how job components influence attitudes. The study was conducted using a cross-sectional qualitative phenomenological approach. Hospital and community psychiatry department settings in the North East of England, UK. In total, 14 Foundation Year 1 junior doctors were interviewed including seven men and seven women aged between 23 and 34 years. The majority had completed their medical degree in the UK and were White British. The lived experience of a junior doctor psychiatry placement was understood by three core themes: exposure to patient recovery, connectedness with others in the healthcare team and subjective interpretations of psychiatry. The experiences were moderated by instances of role definition, reaction to the specialty and the organisational fit of the junior doctor capacity in the specialty. The study reinforces and adds to the literature by identifying connectedness as being important for both job satisfaction and morale, which is currently damaged within the junior doctor population. The study provides in-depth insights into the lived experience of psychiatry placements and can be taken forward by educationalists to ensure the placements are meaningful experiences for junior doctors by developing role definition, belonging, structure and psychiatric care responsibility. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  17. Geological field study for science education on Elementary and Junior high school student, in Shimane prefecture, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, I.

    2011-12-01

    The importance of learning at field has been increasing in the elementary and the junior high school in Japan. And, an environmental education is one of the important subjects even in the school education, too. It was important, as for science education, understanding with actual feeling and learning were specified as for the Teaching outlines (the Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology) of the new science textbook of the elementary and the junior high school as well. However, It is a little actual situation that there is in an opportunity for the field learning enforced in the school lesson by the investigation of JST (Japan Science and Tecnology Agency). This tendency is strong as much as school of the city and that circumference. I have this cause think that there are a few suitable places for learning to observe geological and biological field near school. In addition, below two is pointed out as a big problem to obstruct the execution of field learning. 1) A natural experience isn't being done sufficient as much as a teacher can teach to the student. 2) It doesn't have the confidence that a teacher teaches a student geology and biology at the field. I introduce the practical example of geological field learning at the public elementary school of the Shimane prefecture by this research. Though it is the place where nature is comparatively rich even in Japan, it can't be said that field learning is popular in Shimane prefecture. A school teacher has to learning experience at field, and he must settle confidence to guide a student at the field. A specialist in the university and the museum must support continuous learning for that to the school teacher.

  18. The Spanish technology transfer. Diagnostic and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Pomeda, J.; Casani Fernandez de Navarrete, F.

    2007-01-01

    After a non exhaustive literature review of technology transfer in Spain, the authors offer a synthetic view of it. The main aspects reviewed are as follows: general ideas on technology transfer and their links with universities third mission; obstacles and success factors, and, lastly, support structures and transfer tools. (Author) 58 refs

  19. Psychophysiological responses of junior orienteers under competitive pressure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Robazza

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to examine psychobiosocial states, cognitive functions, endocrine responses (i.e., salivary cortisol and chromogranin A, and performance under competitive pressure in orienteering athletes. The study was grounded in the individual zones of optimal functioning (IZOF and biopsychosocial models. Fourteen junior orienteering athletes (7 girls and 7 boys, ranging in age from 15 to 20 years (M = 16.93, SD = 1.77 took part in a two-day competitive event. To enhance competitive pressure, emphasis was placed on the importance of the competition and race outcome. Psychophysiological and performance data were collected at several points before, during, and after the races. Results showed that an increase in cortisol levels was associated with competitive pressure and reflected in higher perceived exertion (day 1, r = .32; day 2, r = .46, higher intensity of dysfunctional states (day 1, r = .59; day 2, r = .55, lower intensity of functional states (day 1, r = -.36; day 2, r = -.33, and decay in memory (day 1, r = -.27; day 2, r = -.35, visual attention (day 1, r = -.56; day 2, r = -.35, and attention/mental flexibility (day 1, r = .16; day 2, r = .26 tasks. The second day we observed better performance times, lower intensity of dysfunctional states, lower cortisol levels, improved visual attention and attention/mental flexibility (p < .050. Across the two competition days, chromogranin A levels were higher (p < .050 on the most difficult loops of the race in terms of both physical and psychological demands. Findings suggest emotional, cognitive, psychophysiological, and performance variables to be related and to jointly change across different levels of cognitive and physical load. Overall results are discussed in light of the IZOF and biopsychosocial models. The procedure adopted in the study also supports the feasibility of including additional cognitive load for possible practical applications.

  20. Harmonization of European neurology education: the junior doctor's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macerollo, Antonella; Struhal, Walter; Sellner, Johann

    2013-10-29

    The objective of this article, written by executives of the European Association of Young Neurologists and Trainees (EAYNT), is to illustrate the status quo of neurology training in Europe and give an outlook on ongoing efforts and prospects for junior neurologists. The European Union is an economic and political union that currently encompasses 27 member states with more than 500 million inhabitants (or 7.3% of the world population) (interested readers are referred to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/European_Union). Countries of the European Union act as a single market with free movement of citizens, goods, services, and finances. As a consequence, a diploma and postgraduate training obtained in one EU country will be automatically recognized by all other EU member states. At the Lisbon European Council in March 2000, the Heads of State or Government signed a treaty that expresses their ambition of making Europe "the most competitive and dynamic knowledge-based economy in the world, capable of sustainable economic growth with more and better jobs and greater social cohesion" (www.en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lisbon_Strategy). More than 1.6 million physicians in all the different medical specialties are represented by the European Union of Medical Specialists (UEMS). The UEMS was founded in 1958 and the objectives include the study, promotion, and harmonization of the highest level of training of medical specialists, medical practice, and health care within the European Union. The European Board of Neurology (UEMS-EBN; www.uems-neuroboard.org) is in charge of the implementation of the UEMS policy regarding neurology.

  1. Psychophysiological responses of junior orienteers under competitive pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robazza, Claudio; Izzicupo, Pascal; D'Amico, Maria Angela; Ghinassi, Barbara; Crippa, Maria Chiara; Di Cecco, Vincenzo; Ruiz, Montse C; Bortoli, Laura; Di Baldassarre, Angela

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine psychobiosocial states, cognitive functions, endocrine responses (i.e., salivary cortisol and chromogranin A), and performance under competitive pressure in orienteering athletes. The study was grounded in the individual zones of optimal functioning (IZOF) and biopsychosocial models. Fourteen junior orienteering athletes (7 girls and 7 boys), ranging in age from 15 to 20 years (M = 16.93, SD = 1.77) took part in a two-day competitive event. To enhance competitive pressure, emphasis was placed on the importance of the competition and race outcome. Psychophysiological and performance data were collected at several points before, during, and after the races. Results showed that an increase in cortisol levels was associated with competitive pressure and reflected in higher perceived exertion (day 1, r = .32; day 2, r = .46), higher intensity of dysfunctional states (day 1, r = .59; day 2, r = .55), lower intensity of functional states (day 1, r = -.36; day 2, r = -.33), and decay in memory (day 1, r = -.27; day 2, r = -.35), visual attention (day 1, r = -.56; day 2, r = -.35), and attention/mental flexibility (day 1, r = .16; day 2, r = .26) tasks. The second day we observed better performance times, lower intensity of dysfunctional states, lower cortisol levels, improved visual attention and attention/mental flexibility (p competition days, chromogranin A levels were higher (p < .050) on the most difficult loops of the race in terms of both physical and psychological demands. Findings suggest emotional, cognitive, psychophysiological, and performance variables to be related and to jointly change across different levels of cognitive and physical load. Overall results are discussed in light of the IZOF and biopsychosocial models. The procedure adopted in the study also supports the feasibility of including additional cognitive load for possible practical applications.

  2. Traditional versus internet bullying in junior high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gofin, Rosa; Avitzour, Malka

    2012-11-01

    To examine the prevalence of traditional and Internet bullying and the personal, family, and school environment characteristics of perpetrators and victims. Students (12-14 years old) in 35 junior high schools were randomly selected from the Jerusalem Hebrew (secular and religious) and Arab educational system (n = 2,610). Students answered an anonymous questionnaire, addressing personal, family, and school characteristics. Traditional bullying and Internet bullying for perpetrators and victims were categorized as either occurring at least sometimes during the school year or not occurring. Twenty-eight percent and 8.9 % of students were perpetrators of traditional and Internet bullying, respectively. The respective proportions of victims were 44.9 and 14.4 %. Traditional bullies presented higher Odds Ratios (ORs) for boys, for students with poor social skills (those who had difficulty in making friends, were influenced by peers in their behavior, or were bored), and for those who had poor communication with their parents. Boys and girls were equally likely to be Internet bullies and to use the Internet for communication and making friends. The OR for Internet bullying victims to be Internet bullying perpetrators was 3.70 (95 % confidence interval 2.47-5.55). Victims of traditional bullying felt helpless, and victims of traditional and Internet bullying find school to be a frightening place. There was a higher OR of Internet victimization with reports of loneliness. Traditional bully perpetrators present distinctive characteristics, while Internet perpetrators do not. Victims of traditional and Internet bullying feel fear in school. Tailored interventions are needed to address both types of bullying.

  3. Technology Transfer Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Since its inception, Goddard has pursued a commitment to technology transfer and commercialization. For every space technology developed, Goddard strives to identify secondary applications. Goddard then provides the technologies, as well as NASA expertise and facilities, to U.S. companies, universities, and government agencies. These efforts are based in Goddard's Technology Commercialization Office. This report presents new technologies, commercialization success stories, and other Technology Commercialization Office activities in 1999.

  4. Computer-aided detection (CAD) in mammography: Does it help the junior or the senior radiologist?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balleyguier, Corinne; Kinkel, Karen; Fermanian, Jacques; Malan, Sebastien; Djen, Germaine; Taourel, Patrice; Helenon, Olivier

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the impact of a computer-aided detection (CAD) system on the ability of a junior and senior radiologist to detect breast cancers on mammograms, and to determine the potential of CAD as a teaching tool in mammography. Methods: Hundred biopsy-proven cancers and 100 normal mammograms were randomly analyzed by a CAD system. The sensitivity (Se) and specificity (Sp) of the CAD system were calculated. In the second phase, to simulate daily practice, 110 mammograms (97 normal or with benign lesions, and 13 cancers) were examined independently by a junior and a senior radiologist, with and without CAD. Interpretations were standardized according to BI-RADS classification. Sensitivity, Specificity, positive and negative predictive values (PPV, NPV) were calculated for each session. Results: For the senior radiologist, Se slightly improved from 76.9 to 84.6% after CAD analysis (NS) (one case of clustered microcalcifications case overlooked by the senior radiologist was detected by CAD). Sp, PPV and PNV did not change significantly. For the junior radiologist, Se improved from 61.9 to 84.6% (significant change). Three cancers overlooked by the junior radiologist were detected by CAD. Sp was unchanged. Conclusion: CAD mammography proved more useful for the junior than for the senior radiologist, improving sensitivity. The CAD system may represent a useful educational tool for mammography

  5. Which non-technical skills do junior doctors require to prescribe safely? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dearden, Effie; Mellanby, Edward; Cameron, Helen; Harden, Jeni

    2015-12-01

    Prescribing errors are a major source of avoidable morbidity and mortality. Junior doctors write most in-hospital prescriptions and are the least experienced members of the healthcare team. This puts them at high risk of error and makes them attractive targets for interventions to improve prescription safety. Error analysis has shown a background of complex environments with multiple contributory conditions. Similar conditions in other high risk industries, such as aviation, have led to an increased understanding of so-called human factors and the use of non-technical skills (NTS) training to try to reduce error. To date no research has examined the NTS required for safe prescribing. The aim of this review was to develop a prototype NTS taxonomy for safe prescribing, by junior doctors, in hospital settings. A systematic search identified 14 studies analyzing prescribing behaviours and errors by junior doctors. Framework analysis was used to extract data from the studies and identify behaviours related to categories of NTS that might be relevant to safe and effective prescribing performance by junior doctors. Categories were derived from existing literature and inductively from the data. A prototype taxonomy of relevant categories (situational awareness, decision making, communication and team working, and task management) and elements was constructed. This prototype will form the basis of future work to create a tool that can be used for training and assessment of medical students and junior doctors to reduce prescribing error in the future. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  6. Using medical knowledge sources on handheld computers--a qualitative study among junior doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelson, Christian; Wårdh, Inger; Strender, Lars-Erik; Nilsson, Gunnar

    2007-09-01

    The emergence of mobile computing could have an impact on how junior doctors learn. To exploit this opportunity it is essential to understand their information seeking process. To explore junior doctors' experiences of using medical knowledge sources on handheld computers. Interviews with five Swedish junior doctors. A qualitative manifest content analysis of a focus group interview followed by a qualitative latent content analysis of two individual interviews. A focus group interview showed that users were satisfied with access to handheld medical knowledge sources, but there was concern about contents, reliability and device dependency. Four categories emerged from individual interviews: (1) A feeling of uncertainty about using handheld technology in medical care; (2) A sense of security that handhelds can provide; (3) A need for contents to be personalized; (4) A degree of adaptability to make the handheld a versatile information tool. A theme was established to link the four categories together, as expressed in the Conclusion section. Junior doctors' experiences of using medical knowledge sources on handheld computers shed light on the need to decrease uncertainty about clinical decisions during medical internship, and to find ways to influence the level of self-confidence in the junior doctor's process of decision-making.

  7. The Physiological Profile of Junior Soccer Players at SSBB Surabaya Bhakti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nashirudin, M.; Kusnanik, N. W.

    2018-01-01

    Soccer players are required to have good physical fitness in order to achieve optimum accomplishment; physical fitness stands as the foundation of technical and tactical proficiency as well as the mental maturity during the matches. The purpose of this study was to identify the physiological profile of junior soccer players of SSB Surabaya Bhakti age 16-17. The research was conducted at 20 junior soccer players. This research was quantitative with descriptive analysis. Data were collected by testing of physiological (anaerobic power and capacity including explosive leg power, speed, agility; aerobic capacity: cardiovascular endurance). Data was analyzed using percentage. The result showed that the percentage of explosive leg power of junior soccer players were 30% (good category), speed was 85% (average category), right agility was 90% (average category), left agility was 75% (average category). On the other hand, the aerobic power and capacity of the junior soccer players in this study was 50% (average category). The conclusion of this research is that the physiological profile of junior soccer players at SSB Surabaya Bhakti age 16-17 was majority in average category.

  8. Junior High School Students’ Perception about Simple Environmental Problem as an Impact of Problem based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapilouw, M. C.; Firman, H.; Redjeki, S.; Chandra, D. T.

    2017-09-01

    Environmental problem is a real problem that occur in student’s daily life. Junior high school students’ perception about environmental problem is interesting to be investigated. The major aim of this study is to explore junior high school students’ perception about environmental problems around them and ways to solve the problem. The subject of this study is 69 Junior High School Students from two Junior High School in Bandung. This study use two open ended question. The core of first question is environmental problem around them (near school or house). The core of second question is the way to prevent or to solve the problem. These two question are as an impact of problem based learning in science learning. There are two major findings in this study. The first finding, based on most students’ perception, plastic waste cause an environmental problem. The second finding, environmental awareness can be a solution to prevent environmental pollution. The third finding, most student can classify environmental pollution into land, water and air pollution. We can conclude that Junior High School Students see the environmental problem as a phenomenon and teacher can explore environmental problem to guide the way of preventing and resolving environmental problem.

  9. Station Transfers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — ixed rail transit external system transfers for systems within the Continental United States, Alaska, Hawaii, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. The modes of...

  10. Technology transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    On the base of technological opportunities and of the environmental target of the various sectors of energy system this paper intend to conjugate the opportunity/objective with economic and social development through technology transfer and information dissemination [it

  11. The effect of westward travel across five time zones on sleep and subjective jet-lag ratings in athletes before and during the 2015's World Rowing Junior Championships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kölling, Sarah; Treff, Gunnar; Winkert, Kay; Ferrauti, Alexander; Meyer, Tim; Pfeiffer, Mark; Kellmann, Michael

    2017-11-01

    This study examined sleep-wake habits and subjective jet-lag ratings of 55 German junior rowers (n = 30 male, 17.8 ± 0.5 years) before and during the World Rowing Junior Championships 2015 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Athletes answered sleep logs every morning, and Liverpool John Moore's University Jet-Lag Questionnaires each evening and morning. Following an 11-h westward flight with 5-h time shift, advanced bedtimes (-1 h, P travel fatigue probably had a major effect on perceptual decrements, sleep during travel and time to recover upon arrival should be emphasised. Coaches and practitioners should consider higher sleep propensity in the early evening by scheduling training sessions and meetings until the late afternoon.

  12. Junior Secondary School Students' Ideas of Chemical Change

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cce

    Items 1 - 10 ... Department of Science Education, University of Education, Winneba, Ghana. ... Abraham, Williamson & Westbrook (1994) conducted research on children's ... substances interact; or how new substances were formed as a result of ...

  13. Junior medical officer recruitment: challenges and lessons from the Northern Territory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Robert; Sathianathan, Vino

    2007-06-01

    To examine the influence of newspaper and Internet advertising, word-of-mouth endorsement and student experience in attracting applicants for junior medical officer positions in the Northern Territory. A retrospective study. Fifty-four applicants for junior medical officer positions. Proportion of applicants who reported newspaper advertising, Internet advertising, word of mouth or personal experience in attracting their application for an intern or resident medical officer position. Nineteen per cent of applicants saw the newspaper advertisement and 52% of the Internet advertisement. Eighty-seven per cent of applicants were influenced by word-of-mouth endorsement and 52% by student experience in the Northern Territory or Indigenous health. These results suggest that word-of-mouth endorsement has the greatest influence in attracting applicants for junior medical officer positions in Northern Territory hospitals.

  14. Scientific reasoning profile of junior secondary school students on the concept of static fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariana, N.; Siahaan, P.; Utari, S.

    2018-05-01

    Scientific reasoning is one of the most important ability. This study aims to determine the profile of scientific reasoning of junior high school students about the concept of static fluid. This research uses a descriptive method with a quantitative approach to get an idea about the scientific reasoning of One Roof Junior Secondary School Student Kotabaru Reteh in Riau. The technique of collecting data is done by test of scientific reasoning. Scientific reasoning capability refers to Furtak’s EBR (Evidence Based Reasoning) scientific reasoning indicator that contains the components of claims, data, evidence, and rules. The result obtained on each element of scientific reasoning is 35% claim, 23% data, 21% evidence and 17% rule. The conclusions of this research that scientific reasoning of Satu Atap Junior Secondary School student Kotabaru Reteh, Riau Province still in the low category.

  15. [Changes in academic motivation among elementary and junior high school students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Takuma; Sakurai, Shigeo

    2013-02-01

    This study examined changes in academic motivation among elementary and junior high school students. Based on self-determination theory (Ryan & Deci, 2000a), we focused on changes in autonomous and controlled motivation. In Study 1, we examined inter-individual changes in academic motivation among 5th to 9th grade students (N = 1 572) through a cross-sectional study. In Study 2, we examined intra-individual changes in academic motivation among students (N = 128) who were in transition from elementary to junior high school through a longitudinal study. All participants completed the Academic Motivation Scale (Nishimura, Kawamura, & Sakurai, 2011) that measured autonomous and controlled motivation. The results revealed that autonomous motivation decreased in the students from elementary to junior high school, while controlled motivation increased during the same period. This is a unique finding because a prior study conducted in a Western culture suggested that both motivations decrease gradually in school.

  16. Identification of the benefits, enablers and barriers to integrating junior pharmacists into the ward team within one UK-based hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Man Yui; Wright, David John; Blacklock, Jeanette; Needle, Richard John

    2017-01-01

    A high nurse-vacancy rate combined with high numbers of applications for junior pharmacist roles resulted in Colchester Hospital University National Health System Foundation Trust trial employing junior pharmacists into traditional nursing posts with the aim of integrating pharmacists into the ward team and enhancing local medicines optimization. The aim of the evaluation was to describe the implementation process and practice of the integrated care pharmacists (ICPs) in order to inform future innovations of a similar nature. Four band 6 ward-based ICPs were employed on two wards funded within current ward staffing expenditure. With ethical committee approval, interviews were undertaken with the ICPs and focus groups with ward nurses, senior ward nurses and members of the medical team. Data were analyzed thematically to identify service benefits, barriers and enablers. Routine ward performance data were obtained from the two ICP wards and two wards selected as comparators. Appropriate statistical tests were performed to identify differences in performance. Four ICPs were interviewed, and focus groups were undertaken with three junior nurses, four senior nurses and three medical practitioners. Service enablers were continuous ward time, undertaking drug administration, positive feedback and use of effective communication methods. Barriers were planning, funding model, career development, and interprofessional working and social isolation. ICPs were believed to save nurse time and improve medicines safety. The proportion of patients receiving medicine reconciliation within 24 hours increased significantly in the ICP wards. All ICPs had resigned from their role within 12 months. It was believed that by locating pharmacists on the ward full time and allowing them to undertake medicines administration and medicines reconciliation, the nursing time would be saved and medicines safety improved. There was however significant learning to be derived from the implementation

  17. MEANS OF ORIENTEERING IN EDUCATION OF JUNIOR SCHOOLCHILDREN WITH INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina V. Mayorkina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of the adapted methods of basic training in orienteering (BTIO on the correction of physical fitness and mental development of junior schoolchildren with intellectual disability (ID.Methods. The following methods were used: theoretical analysis of literature, generalization, «forming» experiment, mathematical statistics, testing of physical qualities, psychological testing and pedagogical observation.Results and scientific novelty. The conditions of basic training in orienteering for junior schoolchildren with intellectual disability are determined wherein the correction of physical fitness and mental functions through the means of orienteering will be the most effective. Methods of basic training were substantiated and adapted for the capabilities of junior schoolchildren with ID. The author has defined the effect of orienteering exercises on the development of speed-andstrength qualities, overall endurance, movement speed, coordination; fine motor skills; stability, volume and switching of attention, volume of picturesque and verbal memory, representational thought and verbal-logical thinking; volitional qualities.The study has revealed wholesome influence of orienteering on correction of physical fitness and mental functions of schoolchildren of 9–10 years with intellectual disability.Practical significance. The results could be used for education of junior schoolchildren with ID during extra classes in special (correctional schools of Type-7 and during remedial classes (remedial and developing teaching in schools of general education. The results could also be applied for training of teachers of additional education. The adapted methods of BTIO for junior schoolchildren with ID could be used for normally developing children of younger age. Practical recommendations on the organization and conditions of orienteering exercises for junior schoolchildren with ID, games and intellectual

  18. The TROJAN Project: Creating a Customized International Orthopedic Training Program for Junior Doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalraiya, Ashish; Buddhdev, Pranai

    2015-03-03

    Musculoskeletal problems account for a vast proportion of presentations encountered by doctors globally, with figures ranging from 15-36%. However, the time medical schools allocate to learning orthopedics is by no means proportional to this. This study aims to bridge this gap by developing an international orthopedic teaching program tailored to the specific knowledge and skills required by junior doctors in different countries. This prospective study asked fifty junior doctors, who had recently completed an orthopedics job, what three orthopedic teaching topics taught retrospectively would have benefitted their clinical practice. The most requested topics were used to design educational workshops for junior doctors and these consequently comprised the TROJAN (Teaching Requested by Orthopaedic Juniors And Novices) training program. Data was collected from twenty-five junior doctors in KwaZulu-Natale State, South Africa, and twenty-five in London, UK. It is therefore in these two countries that the TROJAN program was subsequently made available. Participants who selected topics were within two years of graduating medical school and had worked an orthopedic or Accident and Emergency job within the last year. 49% of topics chosen by SA doctors were practical skills such as wrist and ankle fracture reduction techniques, and management of open fractures. The most requested topic by UK doctors (11 out of 25) was management of neck of femur fractures. This is rationalized by the fact South African doctors require more hands-on responsibility in their daily practice whereas in the UK greater emphasis is placed on optimizing patients for theatre and making sound management plans. TROJAN currently develops orthopedic skills and knowledge in junior doctors in South Africa and United Kingdom with teaching customized based upon location. Feedback has been exceptionally positive with every candidate thus far rating the usefulness of TROJAN as the highest option, very useful.

  19. Contrasting Perspectives Of Junior versus Senior NASA ISS Flight Controllers On Leadership And Cultural Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, James L.; Boyd, J. E.; Saylor, S.; Kanas, N.

    2007-01-01

    NASA flight controllers have always worked in a very demanding environment, but the International Space Station (ISS) poses even more challenges than prior missions. A recent NASA/Ames survey by Parke and Orasanu of NASA/Johnson flight controllers uncovered concerns about communications problems between American personnel and their international counterparts. To better understand these problems, we interviewed 14 senior and 12 junior ISS flight controllers at NASA/Johnson about leadership and cultural challenges they face and strategies for addressing these challenges. The qualitative interview data were coded and tabulated. Here we present quantitative analyses testing for differences between junior and senior controllers. Based on nonparametric statistical tests comparing responses across groups, the senior controllers were significantly more aware of the impact of working in dispersed teams, the context of constant change, and the upcoming multilateral challenges, while junior controllers were more aware of language and cultural issues. We consider our findings in light of other studies of controllers and other known differences between senior and junior controllers. For example, the fact that senior controllers had their formative early experience controlling pre-ISS short-duration Shuttle missions seems to have both positive and negative aspects, which are supported by our data. Our findings may also reflect gender differences, but we cannot unconfound this effect in our data because all the senior respondents were males. Many of the junior-senior differences are not only due to elapsed time on the job, but also due to a cohort effect. The findings of this study should be used for training curricula tailored differently for junior and senior controllers.

  20. Use of multimedia messaging system (MMS) by junior doctors for scan image transmission in neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Ji Min; Lim, Kim Zhuan; Ng, Wai Hoe

    2012-02-01

    Multimedia Messaging Service (MMS) is used by neurosurgical residents to transmit scan images to the attending neurosurgeon in conjunction with telephone consultation. This service has been well received by the attending neurosurgeons, who felt that after viewing scan images on their phones, they felt increased confidence in clinical decision making and that it reduced the need for recall to the hospital. The use of MMS can be extended to junior doctors making referrals from regional hospitals with no neurosurgical cover. This study aims to validate the competency of non-neurosurgically trained junior doctors in selecting optimal images to transmit via MMS to the attending neurosurgeon on call. Ten junior doctors with no formal neurosurgical training and five neurosurgical residents were interviewed. They were shown the full complement of images together with relevant clinical history and assessment. They were then asked to make the radiological diagnosis and then select two images for MMS transmission to the attending neurosurgeon that they thought would best aid the neurosurgeon in clinical decision making. The attending neurosurgeon was asked to comment, on each image, whether his management plan would differ if he was shown the entire series of the images. All the images chosen are deemed appropriate, and the decision made based on the MMS images would be similar if the entire series of images were available to the neurosurgeon. However, 7 of 10 junior doctors were unable to read magnetic resonance images of lumbar spine. There was no significant difference in the images chosen by the neurosurgical residents and the junior doctors. It is feasible and safe for junior doctors to utilize MMS to transmit computed tomographic images to a neurosurgeon while making an urgent referral. The images selected are representative of the disease pathology and facilitate clinical decision making. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Online video-based resistance training improves the physical capacity of junior basketball athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klusemann, Markus J; Pyne, David B; Fay, Tristan S; Drinkwater, Eric J

    2012-10-01

    Junior basketball athletes require a well-designed resistance training program to improve their physical development. Lack of expert supervision and resistance training in junior development pathways may be overcome by implementing an online video-based program. The aim of this study was to compare the magnitude of improvement (change) in physical performance and strength and functional movement patterns of junior basketball athletes using either a fully supervised or an online video-based resistance training program. Thirty-eight junior basketball athletes (males, n = 17; age, 14 ± 1 year; height, 1.79 ± 0.10 m; mass, 67 ± 12 kg; females, n = 21; age, 15 ± 1 year; height, 1.70 ± 0.07 m; mass, 62 ± 8 kg) were randomly assigned into a supervised resistance training group (SG, n = 13), video training group (VG, n = 13) or control group (CG, n = 12) and participated in a 6-week controlled experimental trial. Pre- and posttesting included measures of physical performance (20-m sprint, step-in vertical jump, agility, sit and reach, line drill, and Yo-Yo intermittent recovery level 1), strength (15 s push-up and pull-up), and functional movement screening (FMS). Both SG and VG achieved 3-5% ± 2-4% (mean ± 90% confidence limits) greater improvements in several physical performance measures (vertical jump height, 20-m sprint time, and Yo-Yo endurance performance) and a 28 ± 21% greater improvement in push-up strength compared with the CG. The SG attained substantially larger gains in FMS scores over both the VG (12 ± 10%) and CG (13 ± 8%). Video-based training appears to be a viable option to improve physical performance and strength in junior basketball athletes. Qualified supervision is recommended to improve functional movement patterns in junior athletes.

  2. Single-site robotic cholecystectomy and robotics training: should we start in the junior years?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayabe, Reed I; Parrish, Aaron B; Dauphine, Christine E; Hari, Danielle M; Ozao-Choy, Junko J

    2018-04-01

    It has become increasingly important to expose surgical residents to robotic surgery as its applications continue to expand. Single-site robotic cholecystectomy (SSRC) is an excellent introductory case to robotics. Resident involvement in SSRC is known to be feasible. Here, we sought to determine whether it is safe to introduce SSRC to junior residents. A total of 98 SSRC cases were performed by general surgery residents between August 2015 and August 2016. Cases were divided into groups based on resident level: second- and third-years (juniors) versus fourth- and fifth-years (seniors). Patient age, gender, race, body mass index, and comorbidities were recorded. The number of prior laparoscopic cholecystectomies completed by participating residents was noted. Outcomes including operative time, console time, rate of conversion to open cholecystectomy, and complication rate were compared between groups. Juniors performed 54 SSRC cases, whereas seniors performed 44. There were no significant differences in patient age, gender, race, body mass index, or comorbidities between the two groups. Juniors had less experience with laparoscopic cholecystectomy. There was no significant difference in mean operative time (92.7 min versus 98.0 min, P = 0.254), console time (48.7 min versus 50.8 min, P = 0.639), or complication rate (3.7% versus 2.3%, P = 0.68) between juniors and seniors. SSRC is an excellent way to introduce general surgery residents to robotics. This study shows that with attending supervision, SSRC is feasible and safe for both junior and senior residents with very low complication rates and no adverse effect on operative time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Aspectos ergonômicos na transferência de pacientes: um estudo realizado com trabalhadores de uma central de transportes de um hospital universitário Aspectos ergonómicos en la transferencia de enfermos: un estudio hecho com trabajadores de una central de transportes de un hospital universitário The transfer of patients and its ergonomic aspects: a study conducted at a university hospital lifting center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Gonzales Rossi

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de avaliar aspectos ergonômicos na transferência de pacientes com a utilização de maca e cadeira de rodas, observou-se 249 transferências realizadas por trabalhadores da Seção de Escolta de um Hospital Universitário. Os resultados sugerem que a existência dessa equipe é uma iniciativa que deve ser estimulada mas que esses trabalhadores precisam de treinamento específico sobre movimentação e transporte de pacientes e de terem à disposição materiais auxiliares e equipamentos mecânicos.Com el objetivo de avaliar aspectos ergonómicos de transferencia de enfermos com utilización de maca y silla de ruedas, observarán se 249 transferencias realizadas por trabajadores de la Sección de Escolta (Acompañamiento de un Hospital Universitário. Los resultados sugerem que la existencia desse equipo es una iniciativa que debrá ser estimulada. Pero esos trabajadores necessitan entrenamiento especifico sobre mobilizacion y transporte de enfermos e necessitam tener a disposicion materiales auxiliares y equipamentos mecânicos.The purpose of this study was to evaluate ergonomic aspects involved in using a stretcher and a wheel chair to transfer patients. 249 transfers carried out by the workers of a university hospital lifting sector were observed. The observations showed that the idea of having a team to transfer patients has to be stimulated but the members of the team require specific training in handling and transferring patients. Mechanical equipment and other devices should also be available.

  4. Assessing Factors That Influence the Recruitment of Majors from Introductory Geology Classes at Northern Arizona University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoisch, Thomas D.; Bowie, James I.

    2010-01-01

    In order to guide the formulation of strategies for recruiting undergraduates into the geology program at Northern Arizona University, we surveyed 783 students in introductory geology classes and 23 geology majors in their junior and senior years. Our analysis shows that ~7% of students in the introductory classes are possible candidates for…

  5. Motivation and Productivity in Academic Libraries: A Case Study of Balme Library, University of Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemna, Anaba

    1992-01-01

    Reports results of a survey of junior staff (i.e., clerical and service personnel) at the University of Ghana library that collected data on background, experience, salaries, recreational facilities, job satisfaction, attitudes of colleagues and supervisors, committees, staff meetings, discipline, appraisal methods, and communication. Suggestions…

  6. 77 FR 68679 - Hispanic-Serving Agricultural Colleges and Universities (HSACU)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-16

    ... changes to the existing list of institutions in Appendix B of 7 CFR part 3434. The list of institutions is.... Institutions are listed alphabetically under the state of the school's location, with the campus indicated...) Trinidad State Junior College Florida (4) Florida International University Miami Dade College Nova...

  7. Teachers' Continuing Professional Development as Correlates of Sustainable Universal Basic Education in Bayelsa State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyunade, Olufunmilayo T.

    2017-01-01

    The study examined the correlates of teachers' continuing professional development on universal basic education in Bayelsa State, Nigeria. Using descriptive survey, a sample of 500 teachers was randomly selected from twenty (20) Basic Junior Secondary Schools and Primary Schools used for the study. The instrument used for data collection was a…

  8. Leadership Skills of Faculty Members at Al-Istiqlal University: Cadets' Point of Views

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samra, Mahmoud A. Abu

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the availability of leadership skills of faculty members (civilian and military personnel) at Al- Istiqlal university (AIU). The population of the study was composed of AIU students, including juniors and sophomores. A random sample, consisting of 137 cadets, was chosen. The researcher developed a…

  9. How to make university students solve physics problems requiring mathematical skills: The "Adventurous Problem Solving" approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Mul, F.F.M.; Martin Batlle, C.; Martin i Batlle, Cristina; de Bruijn, Imme; Rinzema, K.; Rinzema, Kees

    2003-01-01

    Teaching physics to first-year university students (in the USA: junior/senior level) is often hampered by their lack of skills in the underlying mathematics, and that in turn may block their understanding of the physics and their ability to solve problems. Examples are vector algebra, differential

  10. Using a general problem-solving strategy to promote transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef-Shalala, Amina; Ayres, Paul; Schubert, Carina; Sweller, John

    2014-09-01

    Cognitive load theory was used to hypothesize that a general problem-solving strategy based on a make-as-many-moves-as-possible heuristic could facilitate problem solutions for transfer problems. In four experiments, school students were required to learn about a topic through practice with a general problem-solving strategy, through a conventional problem solving strategy or by studying worked examples. In Experiments 1 and 2 using junior high school students learning geometry, low knowledge students in the general problem-solving group scored significantly higher on near or far transfer tests than the conventional problem-solving group. In Experiment 3, an advantage for a general problem-solving group over a group presented worked examples was obtained on far transfer tests using the same curriculum materials, again presented to junior high school students. No differences between conditions were found in Experiments 1, 2, or 3 using test problems similar to the acquisition problems. Experiment 4 used senior high school students studying economics and found the general problem-solving group scored significantly higher than the conventional problem-solving group on both similar and transfer tests. It was concluded that the general problem-solving strategy was helpful for novices, but not for students that had access to domain-specific knowledge. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  11. Educational Progression in Ghana: Gender and Spatial Variations in Longitudinal Trajectories of Junior High School Completion Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansong, David; Alhassan, Mustapha

    2016-01-01

    Completion of junior high school is a critical milestone in every Ghanaian child's educational trajectory and a critical step toward the transition to higher education. However, the rate of children completing junior high school still lags behind most educational indicators in Ghana. Far more attention is paid to ensuring that students enroll in…

  12. Integrating Information and Communication Technology in English Language Teaching: A Case Study of Selected Junior Secondary Schools in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafuraga, Mbizo; Moremi, Mbiganyi

    2017-01-01

    The paper discusses how Information and Communication Technology (ICT) could be integrated in the teaching of English Language in Botswana Junior Secondary Schools. It does so by exploring opportunities and challenges faced by teachers of English Language and the students they teach. Fifty five (55) teachers in eleven (11) Junior Secondary Schools…

  13. A Comparative Study of Recent Trends and Characteristics of Students Entering American Junior Colleges, 1968-72.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenske, Robert H.; Scott, Craig S.

    Recent changes in the background characteristics and attributes of students entering American junior colleges are compared with those of students entering colleges offering baccalaureate and graduate degrees. Comparisons are also made between students entering private and public junior colleges. The characteristics and attributes are: Level of…

  14. Adaptability of the In-Use Textbooks to Students in Rural Junior Middle School in Henan, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Daohuan

    2013-01-01

    In Henan province, and through out China, both students in cities and countrysides are using the same textbooks for junior high schools. This phenomenon unavoidably resulted in the fact that it is difficult for students in rural junior high school to understand the contents in textbooks. In order to investigate whether the learning difficulty…

  15. Evaluation of Some Approved Basic Science and Technology Textbooks in Use in Junior Secondary Schools in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwafor, C. E.; Umoke, C. C.

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the content adequacy and readability of approved basic science and technology textbooks in use in junior secondary schools in Nigeria. Eight research questions guided the study. The sample of the study consisted of six (6) approved basic science and technology textbooks, 30 Junior Secondary Schools randomly…

  16. Professional approaches in clinical judgements among senior and junior doctors: implications for medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilhammar Ewa

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical experience has traditionally been highly valued in medical education and clinical healthcare. On account of its multi-faceted nature, clinical experience is mostly difficult to articulate, and is mainly expressed in clinical situations as professional approaches. Due to retirement, hospitals in Scandinavia will soon face a substantial decrease in the number of senior specialist doctors, and it has been discussed whether healthcare will suffer an immense loss of experienced-based knowledge when this senior group leaves the organization. Both senior specialists and junior colleagues are often involved in clinical education, but the way in which these two groups vary in professional approaches and contributions to clinical education has not been so well described. Cognitive psychology has contributed to the understanding of how experience may influence professional approaches, but such studies have not included the effect of differences in position and responsibilities that junior and senior doctors hold in clinical healthcare. In the light of the discussion above, it is essential to describe the professional approaches of senior doctors in relation to those of their junior colleagues. This study therefore aims to describe and compare the professional approaches of junior and senior doctors when making clinical judgements. Methods Critical incident technique was used in interviews with nine senior doctors and nine junior doctors in internal medicine. The interviews were subjected to qualitative content analysis. Result Senior and junior doctors expressed a variety of professional approaches in clinical judgement as follows: use of theoretical knowledge, use of prior experience of cases and courses of events, use of ethical and moral values, meeting and communicating with the patient, focusing on available information, relying on their own ability, getting support and guidance from others and being directed by the

  17. A pilot survey of junior doctors' confidence in tasks related to broad aspects of competence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Deborah J; Skaarup, Anne Marie; Ringsted, Charlotte

    2005-01-01

    Medical authorities and society are recommending that postgraduate medical education prepare physicians for broad aspects of competence. The most effective ways to prepare physicians for these are not known. The aim of this pilot study was to survey junior doctors' growth in confidence in different...... useful in facilitating learning of the tasks. These results suggest that growth of confidence in the physician roles proceeds at different rates during postgraduate training. Additional research is needed to identify effective ways for junior doctors to learn broad aspects of competence. Longitudinal...

  18. Preparing prospective physics teachers to teach integrated science in junior high school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiyanto; Hartono; Nugroho, S. E.

    2018-03-01

    The physics education study program especially prepares its students to teach physics in senior high school, however in reality many its graduates have become science teachers in junior high school. Therefore introducing integrated science to prospective physics teachers is important, because based on the curriculum, science in the junior high school should be taught integratedly. This study analyzed integrated science teaching materials that developed by prospective physics teachers. Results from this study showed that majority of the integration materials that developed by the prospective physics teachers focused on topic with an overlapping concept or theme as connecting between two or three subjects.

  19. Discriminating Talent Identified Junior Australian Footballers Using a Fundamental Gross Athletic Movement Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Carl T.; Banyard, Harry G.; McKeown, Ian; Fransen, Job; Robertson, Sam

    2016-01-01

    Talent identification (TID) is a pertinent component of the sports sciences, affording practitioners the opportunity to target developmental interventions to a select few; optimising financial investments. However, TID is multi-componential, requiring the recognition of immediate and prospective performance. The measurement of athletic movement skill may afford practitioners insight into the latter component given its augmented relationship with functional sport specific qualities. It is currently unknown whether athletic movement skill is a discriminant quality in junior Australian football (AF). This study aimed to discriminate talent identified junior AF players from their non-talent identified counterparts using a fundamental gross athletic movement assessment. From a total of 50 under 18 (U18) AF players; two groups were classified a priori based on selection level; talent identified (n = 25; state academy representatives) and non-talent identified (n = 25; state-based competition representatives). Players performed a fundamental gross athletic movement assessment based on the Athletic Ability Assessment (AAA), consisting of an overhead squat, double lunge (left and right legs), single leg Romanian deadlift (left and right legs), and a push up (six movement criterions). Movements were scored across three assessment points using a three-point scale (resulting in a possible score of nine for each movement). A multivariate analysis of variance revealed significant between group effects on four of the six movement criterions (d = 0.56 – 0.87; p = 0.01 – 0.02). Binary logistic regression models and a receiver operating characteristic curve inspection revealed that the overhead squat score provided the greatest group discrimination (β(SE) = -0.89(0.44); p talent identified and non-talent identified groups, respectively. Results support the integration of this assessment into contemporary talent identification approaches in junior AF, as it may provide coaches

  20. Mbarara University Research Training Initiative: a spin-off of the Medical Education Partnership Initiative in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wakida E

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Edith Wakida,1 Samuel Maling,2 Celestino Obua3 1Office of Research Administration, 2Department of Psychiatry, Office of the Dean, Faculty of Medicine, 3Department of Pharmacomology and Therapeutics, Office of the Vice Chancellor, Mbarara University of Science and Technology, Mbarara, Uganda Abstract: Scientific productivity in Africa is insignificant compared to that in the rest of the world. This has been attributed to the fact that, in spite of academic qualifications, junior ­faculty, who form the majority of academics in low- and middle-income countries lack experience in research. This calls for a need to put in place programs that provide hands-on training in research so that junior faculty can conduct relevant research. The Mbarara University Research ­Training Initiative, a Fogarty International Center-funded program, is one such program that was developed to provide research capacity training for junior faculty at the Mbarara University of Science and Technology. The program utilizes health priority areas to provide research training to junior faculty. During the training, they are given short-term-focused research training on particular knowledge and skills, which they apply while conducting the mentored research. Keywords: junior faculty, MURTI, short training, mentored research

  1. Pilot internship program on radioactive waste at Vanderbilt University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The fourth year of the program began with the selection of the new interns. Mailings were sent to prospective graduate students and rising juniors at Vanderbilt University with grade point averages of 3.0 or better (out of 4.0) advertising the availability of internships in radioactive waste disposal. New interns were selected. All of the interns selected in the fourth year chose to return to Vanderbilt after their field assignment

  2. As contradições entre o SUS universal e as transferências de recursos públicos para os planos e seguros privados de saúde The contradictions between the universal Unified Health System and the transfer of public funds to private health plans and insurances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ligia Bahia

    2008-10-01

    , taking into consideration the contradictions between the political and economical circuit in which the health plan and insurance companies are operating and the universality of the Brazilian Health System.

  3. The University Entrance Exam that Diversified and the Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Osamu

    The percentage of students who go on to universities or junior colleges is over fifty percent which is more than half of high school students. However the nation's birthrate is in decline and the total number of university-age children shows a declining tendency. Hence we cannot expect an increase in the number of applicants in the future. On the other hand, the number of universities has been increasing year by year. The competition among universities to survive is very fierce. The diversification of entrance examination is a symbol of this competition. By diversifying entrance exams, universities aimed at the quality of excellent students in the beginning. However, they have changed their direction to pursue the quantity of students. As of Today the entrance examination is losing its original starting function which means most or all applicants can enter universities. It is time all of the universities return to its starting line.

  4. Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nanette R.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this summer's work was to attempt to enhance Technology Application Group (TAG) ability to measure the outcomes of its efforts to transfer NASA technology. By reviewing existing literature, by explaining the economic principles involved in evaluating the economic impact of technology transfer, and by investigating the LaRC processes our William & Mary team has been able to lead this important discussion. In reviewing the existing literature, we identified many of the metrics that are currently being used in the area of technology transfer. Learning about the LaRC technology transfer processes and the metrics currently used to track the transfer process enabled us to compare other R&D facilities to LaRC. We discuss and diagram impacts of technology transfer in the short run and the long run. Significantly, it serves as the basis for analysis and provides guidance in thinking about what the measurement objectives ought to be. By focusing on the SBIR Program, valuable information regarding the strengths and weaknesses of this LaRC program are to be gained. A survey was developed to ask probing questions regarding SBIR contractors' experience with the program. Specifically we are interested in finding out whether the SBIR Program is accomplishing its mission, if the SBIR companies are providing the needed innovations specified by NASA and to what extent those innovations have led to commercial success. We also developed a survey to ask COTR's, who are NASA employees acting as technical advisors to the SBIR contractors, the same type of questions, evaluating the successes and problems with the SBIR Program as they see it. This survey was developed to be implemented interactively on computer. It is our hope that the statistical and econometric studies that can be done on the data collected from all of these sources will provide insight regarding the direction to take in developing systematic evaluations of programs like the SBIR Program so that they can

  5. Empresa Júnior e a reprodução da ideologia da Administração Junior Enterprise and the reproduction of Administration ideology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata de Almeida Bicalho

    2012-12-01

    through life history and using the hermeneutic-dialectic methodology for data analysis. Then, there's a discussion on the violence experienced in the academic-professional environment of junior enterprises; the naturalization of this violence; the actual purpose of these organizations, that is, fixation of administration ideology in the students; and the role of University - which is aimed at the critical training of the subjects or their training in accordance with the socioeconomic context. Finally, brief additional remarks are made.

  6. Anabolic-Androgenic Steroids: Prevalence, Knowledge, and Attitudes in Junior and Senior High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luetkemeier, Maurie J.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Reports a survey of junior and senior high school students that investigated the prevalence of anabolic-androgenic steroid use and examined gender, sports participation, and illicit drug use. Results indicated the prevalence of steroid use was 3.3%. Steroid use was greater for males, users of other drugs, and strength trainers. (SM)

  7. Structural Equation Modeling for Studying Adaptation of the Students with Disabilities in Inclusive Junior High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li Ju

    2014-01-01

    This research explored the factors of the adaptation for the children with disabilities studying in inclusive junior high schools. The subjects were recruited from the Special Needs Education Longitudinal Study of Taiwan. The result of the Confirmatory Factor Analyses reflects that there are two, three and five observed variables included in the…

  8. Evaluation of West-Austrian junior athletes' knowledge regarding doping in sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fürhapter, Christina; Blank, Cornelia; Leichtfried, Veronika; Mair-Raggautz, Maria; Müller, David; Schobersberger, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    An important factor while developing efficient doping prevention strategies is to identify relevant target groups, to evaluate the state of knowledge about this topic as well as to evaluate motivations behind using prohibited substances. Measures to prevent doping substances abuse have to be supported in early stages of childhood. The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the knowledge of Tyrolean junior athletes about doping in sport. Next to the knowledge, their attitudes in regard to doping practices have also been a focus of this project. Within a prospective cross-sectional study, Tyrolean junior athletes aged between 14 and 19 years (n = 408) were anonymously questioned by distributing questionnaires in three Tyrolean sport schools as well as two Tyrolean sport-training centers. To collect the data, an anonymous questionnaire with close-ended questions was used. Next to sociodemographic data, questions also evaluated the knowledge about prohibited substances as well as attitudes and behaviors towards doping. The concept was set up based on contents of comparable studies and publications. The knowledge about doping among junior athletes was moderate. The consumer behavior of the young athletes on the other hand has turned out to be satisfactory. Nevertheless, the overall knowledge especially regarding potential negative side effects of doping agents is poor. To incorporate an effective doping-prevention strategy, improved education, particularly in terms of side effects, is clearly needed. To achieve sustainable doping-prevention effects, focus has to be generally set on education within the frame of junior competitive sport.

  9. Chinese Junior High School Students' Perceptions of Geographic Fieldwork: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Daihu; Wang, Ziying; Xu, Di; Wang, Chuanbing; Deng, Zhengzheng

    2013-01-01

    After nearly ten years of implementation of the first junior high school geography standards, Chinese geography educators have been increasingly incorporating fieldwork into their geography teaching. This study examined student perceptions of fieldwork from an international perspective by reviewing student fieldwork reports and administering a…

  10. To Work or Play? Junior Age Non-Fiction as Objects of Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Gemma

    2001-01-01

    Examines change and variation in the design of non-fiction texts which have a junior-age readership. Argues that different forms of presentation of non-fiction offer different ways of reading non-fiction texts, which as yet are neither fully described nor recognized. Suggests that non-fiction texts can be more or less firmly orientated towards…

  11. Junior staffing changes and the temporal ecology of adverse incidents in acute psychiatric wards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bowers, L.; Jeffery, D.; Simpson, A.; Daly, C.; Warren, J.; Nijman, H.L.I.

    2007-01-01

    Aim. This paper reports in examination of the relationship between adverse incident rates, the arrival of new junior staff on wards, and days of the week oil acute Psychiatric wards. Background. Incidents of violence, absconding and self-harm in acute inpatient services pose risks to patients and

  12. A Rasch Analysis of the Junior Metacognitive Awareness Inventory with Singapore Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Hoi Kwan

    2018-01-01

    The psychometric properties of the 2 versions of the Junior Metacognitive Awareness Inventory were examined with Singapore student samples. Other than 2 misfitting items and an underutilized response scale, Rasch analysis demonstrated that the instruments have good measurement precision, and no differential item functioning was detected across…

  13. The Impact of a Junior Faculty Fellowship Award on Academic Advancement and Retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connelly, Maureen T; Sullivan, Amy M; Chinchilla, Manuel; Dale, Margaret L; Emans, S Jean; Nadelson, Carol Cooperman; Notman, Malkah Tolpin; Tarbell, Nancy J; Zigler, Corwin M; Shore, Eleanor G

    2017-08-01

    Academic faculty experience barriers to career development and promotion. In 1996, Harvard Medical School (HMS) initiated an intramural junior faculty fellowship to address these obstacles. The authors sought to understand whether receiving a fellowship was associated with more rapid academic promotion and retention. Junior faculty fellowship recipients and all other instructor and assistant professors at HMS between 1996 and 2011 were identified. Using propensity score modeling, the authors created a matched comparison group for the fellowship recipients based on educational background, training, academic rank, department, hospital affiliation, and demographics. Time to promotion and time to leaving were assessed by Kaplan-Meier curves. A total of 622 junior faculty received fellowships. Faculty who received fellowships while instructors (n = 480) had shorter times to promotion to assistant professor (P Women instructors advanced more quickly than matched controls, while male instructors' rates of promotions did not differ. Fellowships to support junior faculty were associated with shorter times to promotion for instructors and more sustained faculty retention for both instructors and assistant professors. This suggests that relatively small amounts of funding early in faculty careers can play a critical role in supporting academic advancement and retention.

  14. Teaching of Cultural Concepts in Botswana Junior Secondary Schools Design and Technology Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moalosi, Richie

    2011-01-01

    This research explored the extent to which cultural concepts stipulated in Botswana Design and Technology curriculum are taught by teachers at junior secondary schools, a topic on which there is little previous research. The pinnacle of good product innovation is when it is grounded on sensitive cultural analysis of the society's culture. However,…

  15. Evaluation of a Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation Curriculum for Junior and Senior High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderschmidt, Hannelore Falk

    An adaptation of the standard American Heart Association training program was utilized to teach secondary school students cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) procedures. Students, at both junior and senior high levels, were randomly assigned to practice and no-practice groups, of ten students each. All were taught CPR procedures didactically, but…

  16. Key Elements of a Good Mathematics Lesson as Seen by Japanese Junior High School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebaeguin, Marlon; Stephens, Max

    2016-01-01

    This study makes a comparison between what literature on Japanese Lesson Study suggests are key elements of a good mathematics lesson and what junior high school mathematics teachers in Japan value in planning their lessons. The teachers' strong consensus in their endorsements of these key elements explains why Japanese teachers strongly support…

  17. Prevalence and correlates of job stress among junior doctors in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prevalence and correlates of job stress among junior doctors in the ... Journal Home > Vol 14, No 2 (2016) > ... Descriptive statistics were generated. ... 61.3% were males, 59% had spent less than 5 years in medical practice, and 34.8% were ...

  18. Sex Differences in Emergent Literacy and Reading Behaviour in Junior Kindergarten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deasley, Shanna; Evans, Mary Ann; Nowak, Sarah; Willoughby, David

    2018-01-01

    In a sample of 128 Canadian junior kindergarten children (66 boys), we examined sex differences in emergent literacy and behaviour when listening to and interacting with books of four types: alphabet books with simple text and illustrations, traditional alphabet books with complex text and illustrations, alphabet eBooks, and illustrated…

  19. Development and Validation of a Project Package for Junior Secondary School Basic Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udofia, Nsikak-Abasi

    2014-01-01

    This was a Research and Developmental study designed to develop and validate projects for Junior Secondary School Basic Science instruction and evaluation. The projects were developed using the project blueprint and sent for validation by experts in science education and measurement and evaluation; using a project validation scale. They were to…

  20. Improving Study Habits of Junior High School Students Through Self-Management versus Group Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Mary B.; Trujillo, Amaryllis E.

    1975-01-01

    Both a self-management approach, teaching the principles of behavior modification and self-control (n=36), and a group-discussion technique, involving discussion of study habits and problems (n=41), led to improvements in grade point averages compared with a no-treatment control group (n=36) for low-achieving junior high school students. (Author)

  1. Calling Orientations of Junior Doctors and Medical Interns in India: Cultural, Occupational and Relational Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Vandana

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the factors that shape calling orientations within the Indian context. Based on the narratives of 72 junior doctors and medical interns, it is found that participants identify with harbouring a calling both prior and subsequent to occupational entry. Although factors such as self-recognition of talent and sensemaking of work as…

  2. Personality Adjustment and Job Satisfaction among the Lecturers Working in Junior Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, T. J. M. S.

    2011-01-01

    The present study focused on the relationship between personality adjustment and job satisfaction among junior college Lecturers in Vizianagaram District of Andhra Pradesh, India. The successfulness of any educational program basically depends on the right performance and acceptance of teacher community. This mainly depends on their satisfaction…

  3. Analysis of the Junior Secondary School One (J.S.S. 1) Science Textbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otuka, J. O. E.; Nkrumah, Clifford N.

    2001-01-01

    Investigates whether the junior high school textbook 1 meets the requirements of a standards textbook that identifies with 12 criteria set by the Science Teachers Association of Nigeria (STAN). Includes the criteria of coverage of topics in the syllabus, currency suitability of language, and coherency. (Contains 18 references.) (Author/YDS)

  4. Mentoring and role models in recruitment and retention: a study of junior medical faculty perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Margaret M; Fisman, Sandra; Davidson, Brenda

    2013-05-01

    This study explored the views of junior faculty toward informing mentorship program development. Mixed sampling methodologies including questionnaires (n = 175), focus groups (female, n = 4; male, n = 4), and individual interviews (female n = 10; male, n = 9) of junior faculty were conducted in clinical departments at one academic health sciences center. Questionnaire results indicated that having role models increased commitment to an academic career; mentorship experience during residency training was a high incentive to pursue an academic career; and junior faculty did have identifiable mentorship experiences. Focus group results revealed that mentoring as well as the presence of role models a few years ahead of the junior faculty would promote career development. Females preferred similar age role models who spoke the same language, particularly in the area of promotion. Females identified several challenges and issues including a lack of researcher role models, a range of perceptions regarding the merits of formal versus informal mentoring, and the idea that mentors should provide advice on promotion and grants. Males valued advice on finances while females wanted advice on work-life balance. Mentorship emerged as an important factor in academic faculty recruitment and retention, with varying perceptions of how it should be institutionalized. Role models were viewed as important for retention, and a paucity of mid-career, female researcher role models suggests a gap to be filled in future programmatic efforts.

  5. Safari Adventures: A Bibliography for Young Readers Preschool through Junior High.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumner, Mary Ann, Comp.

    This annotated bibliography contains books for blind or physically handicapped youngsters from preschool through junior high. The books are available in braille, on audiocassette, or recorded discs. The approximately 400 titles listed were produced in Florida or obtained from the National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped.…

  6. 7 CFR 3560.409 - Subordinations or junior liens against security property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... program requirements or to operate and manage the housing project in a manner consistent with program... specific amount. (4) The subordination or junior lien must not adversely impact the Agency's ability to... condition and the borrower's ability to repay the Agency loan being secured by the property. (3) The action...

  7. Physical characteristics of experienced and junior open-wheel car drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raschner, Christian; Platzer, Hans-Peter; Patterson, Carson

    2013-01-01

    Despite the popularity of open-wheel car racing, scientific literature about the physical characteristics of competitive race car drivers is scarce. The purpose of this study was to compare selected fitness parameters of experienced and junior open-wheel race car drivers. The experienced drivers consisted of five Formula One, two GP2 and two Formula 3 drivers, and the nine junior drivers drove in the Formula Master, Koenig, BMW and Renault series. The following fitness parameters were tested: multiple reactions, multiple anticipation, postural stability, isometric upper body strength, isometric leg extension strength, isometric grip strength, cyclic foot speed and jump height. The group differences were calculated using the Mann-Whitney U-test. Because of the multiple testing strategy used, the statistical significance was Bonferroni corrected and set at P < 0.004. Significant differences between the experienced and junior drivers were found only for the jump height parameter (P = 0.002). The experienced drivers tended to perform better in leg strength (P = 0.009), cyclic foot speed (P = 0.024) and grip strength (P = 0.058). None of the other variables differed between the groups. The results suggested that the experienced drivers were significantly more powerful than the junior drivers: they tended to be quicker and stronger (18% to 25%) but without statistical significance. The experienced drivers demonstrated excellent strength and power compared with other high-performance athletes.

  8. Topic Outlines in Microbiology: An Instructor's Guide for Junior and Community Colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Society for Microbiology, Washington, DC.

    This resource guide presents subject matter organized in outline form for four topical areas: introductory microbiology; medical microbiology; microbial genetics; and microbial physiology. The first two units comprise the two most frequently taught microbiology courses in community and junior colleges. The outlines for microbial genetics and…

  9. Solar Energy Education. Renewable energy activities for junior high/middle school science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-01

    Some basic topics on the subject of solar energy are outlined in the form of a teaching manual. The manual is geared toward junior high or middle school science students. Topics include solar collectors, solar water heating, solar radiation, insulation, heat storage, and desalination. Instructions for the construction of apparatus to demonstrate the solar energy topics are provided. (BCS)

  10. Relationship among Family Support, Love Attitude, and Well-Being of Junior High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ho-tang; Chou, Mei-ju; Chen, Wei-hung; Tu, Chin-Tang

    2016-01-01

    This research aims to analyze the correlation between family support, love attitude, and well-being of junior high school students. After analyzing related literature, it is found that demographic variables like gender, grade, family structure, socioeconomic position have difference in perception of well-being. In addition, family support and love…

  11. Mathematical Modelling in the Junior Secondary Years: An Approach Incorporating Mathematical Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, James; Carter, Merilyn; Cooper, Tom

    2018-01-01

    Mathematical models are conceptual processes that use mathematics to describe, explain, and/or predict the behaviour of complex systems. This article is written for teachers of mathematics in the junior secondary years (including out-of-field teachers of mathematics) who may be unfamiliar with mathematical modelling, to explain the steps involved…

  12. Junior High School Physics: Using a Qualitative Strategy for Successful Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mualem, Roni; Eylon, Bat Sheva

    2010-01-01

    Students at the junior high school (JHS) level often cannot use their knowledge of physics for explaining and predicting phenomena. We claim that this difficulty stems from the fact that explanations are multi-step reasoning tasks, and students often lack the qualitative problem-solving strategies needed to guide them. This article describes a new…

  13. Colorado Upper-Division Electrostatics Diagnostic: A Conceptual Assessment for the Junior Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasteen, Stephanie V.; Pepper, Rachel E.; Caballero, Marcos D.; Pollock, Steven J.; Perkins, Katherine K.

    2012-01-01

    As part of an effort to systematically improve our junior-level E&M I course, we have developed a tool to assess student conceptual learning of electrostatics at the upper division. Together with a group of physics faculty, we established a list of learning goals for the course that, with results from student observations and interviews,…

  14. The Relationships among Imagination, Future Imagination Tendency, and Future Time Perspective of Junior High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Min-Ying

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of the study were to investigate the relationships among imagination, future imagination tendency, and future time perspective of junior high school students, then to explore the future time perspective which is predicted by background variables, imaginative qualities, and future imagination tendency. The subjects were 331 from…

  15. A Review of Literature Published in 1973 on Mathematics Education in the Community Junior College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimmestad, Beverly, Swadener, Marc

    Twenty-eight reports, articles, and papers published in 1973 which concern mathematics education in the community junior college are reviewed. Much of this literature was found in "The Two-Year College Mathematics Journal,""The American Mathematical Monthly," or among Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC) reports. The references are…

  16. The Design of Management Practices To Improve the Physical Plant Maintenance of Southwest Texas Junior College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Box, Wilford Winston

    A study was conducted of the physical plant maintenance department (PPMD) of Southwest Texas Junior College (SWTJC), in order to determine if the department was structured as a functional organization, if maintenance control procedures were in place, and if efficient management practices were being used. Consultations with the director of the PPMD…

  17. Student Dropout from the Perspectives of Junior High Counselors in Northeast Mississippi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Kelly Ann

    2013-01-01

    I investigated fifteen junior high counselors' understandings about student dropout, particularly about identification of and interventions for students at risk for dropping out of school. As an educator, I desired to research the phenomenon of student dropout to understand how to better reach these types of students. Research is available…

  18. Instructional Objectives for Junior College Courses in Economics: Principles of Macroeconomics and Principles of Microeconomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Fred A.

    These sets of behavioral objectives for junior college economics courses were written to serve as a guide to instruction, a student guide to learning, and a basis for evaluation. The objectives are offered as samples that may be used where they correspond to the skills, abilities, and attitudes other instructors want their students to acquire.…

  19. A PARTIAL ASSESSMENT OF THE WILL C. WOOD JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL NONGRADED PLAN OF ORGANIZATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DELAVAN, FRANK E.; HARTWIG, KEITH E.

    THE NONGRADED PLAN OF SCHOOL ORGANIZATION PUT INTO EFFECT AT SACRAMENTO'S WILL C. WOOD JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL IN 1964 WAS EVALUATED AND COMPARED WITH GRADED PROGRAMS AT OTHER SCHOOLS BY MEANS OF STANDARDIZED TESTS AND TEACHER OPINIONS. THE POPULATION OF THE STUDY CONSISTED OF THREE PUPIL GROUPS--(1) 212 PUPILS WHO WERE IN THE SEVENTH GRADE DURING THE…

  20. Junior High School Students' Ideas about the Shape and Size of the Atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cokelez, Aytekin

    2012-01-01

    The concept of the atom is one of the building blocks of science education. Although the concept is a foundation for students' subsequent learning experiences, it is difficult for students to comprehend because of common misconceptions and its abstractness. The purpose of this study is to examine junior high school students' (ages 12-13) ideas…

  1. Junior / Community College Students with Learning Disabilities and Their Use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Mai Nhu; Fichten, Catherine; King, Laura; Barile, Maria; Mimouni, Zohra; Havel, Alice; Raymond, Odette; Juhel, Jean-Charles; Jorgensen, Shirley; Chauvin, Alexandre; Gutberg, Jennifer; Budd, Jillian; Hewlett, Maureen; Heiman, Tali; Gaulin, Chris; Asuncion, Jennison

    2013-01-01

    Junior / community college students who have learning disabilities (LD), such as dyslexia, often do not maximize their use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) for school work. They do not use many of these technologies nor do they know as much about them as other students. These are the results of an Adaptech Research Network…

  2. Profiling of Junior College Football Players and Differences between Position Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert G. Lockie

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study profiled junior college football players. Sixty-two subjects completed vertical jump (VJ; height and peak power, standing broad jump (SBJ, 36.58 m sprint, pro-agility shuttle, three-cone drill, and maximal-repetition bench press and front squat. The sample included 2 quarterbacks (QB, 7 running backs (RB, 13 wide receivers (WR, 1 tight end (TE, 18 defensive backs (DB, 8 linebackers (LB, and 13 offensive and defensive linemen (LM. To investigate positional differences, subjects were split into skill (SK; WR, DB, big skill (BSK; QB, RB, TE, LB, and LM groups. A one-way ANOVA determined between-group differences. LM were taller and heavier than SK and BSK players. The SK and BSK groups were faster than LM in the 0–36.58 m sprint, pro-agility shuttle, and three-cone drill (p ≤ 0.009. The SK group had greater VJ height and SBJ distance; LM generated greater VJ peak power (p ≤ 0.022. There were no between-group differences in the strength endurance tests. Compared to Division I data, junior college players were smaller, slower, and performed worse in jump tests. Positional differences in junior college football are typical to that of established research. Junior college players should attempt to increase body mass, and improve speed and lower-body power.

  3. One Step beyond What the Literature Says on Institutional Effectiveness of Community, Junior, and Technical Colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welker, William F.; Morgan, Samuel D.

    1991-01-01

    Analyzes the content of the literature on community, junior, and technical colleges, utilizing a matrix with seven major classifications (i.e., governance, organization, staffing, clientele, curriculum, finance, and evaluation) and three dimensions (i.e., structure/form, function/role, and process/operations). Offers observations on effectiveness…

  4. Some Factors That Affecting the Performance of Mathematics Teachers in Junior High School in Medan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manullang, Martua; Rajagukguk, Waminton

    2016-01-01

    Some Factor's That Affecting The Mathematic Teacher Performance For Junior High School In Medan. This research will examine the effect of direct and indirect of the Organizational Knowledge towards the achievement motivation, decision making, organizational commitment, the performance of mathematics teacher. The research method is a method of…

  5. The Queen Bee Phenomenon: Why Women Leaders Distance Themselves from Junior Women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derks, B.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/299622673; Van Laar, C.; Ellemers, Naomi|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/086631276

    2016-01-01

    This contribution reviews work on the Queen Bee phenomenon whereby women leaders assimilate into masculine organizations, distance themselves from junior women and legitimize gender inequality in their organization. We propose that rather than being a source of gender inequality, the Queen Bee

  6. RECOGNIZE: A Social Norms Campaign to Reduce Rumor Spreading in a Junior High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Jennifer E.; Peisner, William

    2009-01-01

    This article studied changes in rumor spreading and perceptions of peers' rumor spreading among students at one public junior high school following a social norms marketing campaign. Results of the study show that perceptions of peer rumor spreading fell following the campaign, but self-reports of rumor spreading did not decrease. Results suggest…

  7. Training and Confidence Level of Junior Anaesthetists in CPR- Experience in A Developing Country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desalu Ibironke

    2008-01-01

    There is low confidence among junior anaesthetists in Nigeria in performance of CPR, poor knowledge of ECG interpretation of cardiac arrest rhythm and little practice in defibrillation. The establishment of a Resuscitation council would ensure adequate and frequent training which would improve knowledge, boost confidence and result in better patient care.

  8. Relationship between cognitive functions and prevalence of fatigue in elementary and junior high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Kei; Tanaka, Masaaki; Fukuda, Sanae; Imai-Matsumura, Kyoko; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi

    2011-06-01

    Fatigue is a common complaint among elementary and junior high school students, and is related to poor academic performance. Since grade-dependent development of cognitive functions also influences academic performance, we attempted to determine whether cognitive functions were associated with the prevalence of fatigue. Participants were 148 elementary school students from 4th- to 6th-grades and 152 junior high school students from 7th- to 9th-grades. Participants completed a questionnaire about fatigue (Japanese version of the Chalder Fatigue Scale) and paper-and-pencil and computerized cognitive tests which could evaluate the abilities of motor processing, immediate, delayed and working memory, selective, divided and alternative attention, retrieve learned material, and spatial construction. We found that in multivariate logistic regression analyses adjusted for grade and gender, slow motor processing was positively correlated with the prevalence of fatigue in the elementary school students and decreases in working memory and divided and alternative attention processing were positively correlated with the prevalence of fatigue in the junior high school students. The grade-dependent development of cognitive function influences the severity of fatigue in elementary and junior high school students. Copyright © 2010 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. School Violence, Social Support and Psychological Health among Taiwanese Junior High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ji-Kang; Wei, Hsi-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This paper examines how peer social support mediates the association between school victimization and student psychological health among junior-high students in an Asian context (Taiwan), and further examines how gender and ethnicity differ in the interrelationships of school violence, peer social support and psychological health.…

  10. Student Government and Student Participation in Junior College Governance--Models for the 1970's.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deegan, William L.

    It is the author's contention that student government revitalization will come only when student government begins to play a substantive role in policy making and implementation. The purpose of this paper is to consider, criticize, and propose a number of models for student participation in junior college governance. The first, a traditional…

  11. Promoting of Thematic-Based Integrated Science Learning on the Junior High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pursitasari, Indarini Dwi; Nuryanti, Siti; Rede, Amran

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to explain the effect of thematic based integrated science learning to the student's critical thinking skills and character. One group pretest-posttest design is involving thirty students in one of the junior high school in the Palu city. A sample was taken using purposive sampling. Data of critical thinking skills…

  12. An Investigation of Three Methods of Teaching Vocabulary at the Junior High Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, Evangeline Drury

    This study of methods of teaching vocabulary in the junior high school investigated three approaches: use of a programed text in vocabulary development that emphasized context clues, use of the programed text augmented by listening assistance, and use of the programed text augmented by a word-analysis supplement. Over 300 students with I.Q.'s…

  13. The Construction of an Online Competitive Game-Based Learning System for Junior High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yuh-Ming; Kuo, Sheng-Huang; Lou, Shi-Jer; Shih, Ru-Chu

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study aimed to construct an online competitive game-based learning system by using freeware for junior high school students and to assess its effectiveness. From the learning standpoints, game mechanisms including learning points, competition mechanism, training room mechanism, questioning & answering mechanism, tips, and…

  14. ENRICHMENT PROGRAM FOR ACADEMICALLY TALENTED JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS FROM LOW INCOME FAMILIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    PRESSMAN, HARVEY

    A PROPOSAL FOR AN ENRICHMENT PROGRAM FOR ACADEMICALLY TALENTED JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS FROM LOW-INCOME FAMILIES IN CERTAIN AREAS OF BOSTON IS PRESENTED. BASIC ASSUMPTIONS ARE THAT THERE IS AND OBVIOUS AND PRESSING NEED TO GIVE EXTRA HELP TO THE ABLE STUDENT FROM A DISADVANTAGED BACKGROUND, AND THAT A RELATIVELY BRIEF ENRICHMENT EXPERIENCE FOR…

  15. Junior-headed households as a possible strategy for coping with the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Junior-headed households as a possible strategy for coping with the growing orphan crisis in northern Namibia. ... Keywords: child-headed households, coping, extended families, HIV/AIDS, Oshiwambo, socio-economic aspects, southern Africa African Journal of AIDS Research 2008, 7(1): 123–132 ...

  16. Supplying Community College Needs in Basic Speech Courses at Florida Junior College at Jacksonville, Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, Dorothy Feldbinder; Shannon, Mary Louise

    At Florida Junior College at Jacksonville, public speaking instructors employ Jerome S. Bruner's four factors of learning--predisposition to learn, structure of knowledge, sequence, and reinforcement--to plan an effective learning program for students with diverse academic backgrounds and goals. Specifically, six learning units, tailored to both…

  17. The Academic Procrastination in Junior High School Students' Mathematics Learning: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asri, Dahlia Novarianing; Setyosari, Punaji; Hitipeuw, Imanuel; Chusniyah, Tutut

    2017-01-01

    Among the main causes of low learning achievement in mathematics learning is a delayed behavior to do tasks, commonly called academic procrastination. The objectives of this research are to describe and to explain the causal factors and consequences of academic procrastination in learning mathematics for junior high school students. This research…

  18. A Program to Enhance Self-Concept of Junior High Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, James H.

    This research analyzes the results of a program to enhance the self concepts of junior high students. Subjects were 80 students identified as having low self concepts. They participated in an eight-week program to develop skills in personal and social awareness. Pretest posttest scores on the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory indicated that…

  19. Self-Esteem Comparisons among Intellectually Gifted Minority/Non-Minority Junior High Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legin-Bucell, Cynthia; And Others

    Differences in self-esteem between 48 minority and 62 non-minority intellectually gifted and 75 intellectually average junior-high students were assessed using the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory. Results indicated a higher level of self-esteem for the gifted students than for the control group. Significant differences were also found to exist…

  20. The Implications of Selective Learning Models on Teaching Junior High School Mathematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Roosevelt L.

    1978-01-01

    Providing practitioners with synopses, illustrations based on classroom experiences, and research findings, this article analyzes the learning models of Jean Piaget, Robert Gagne, Robert Karplus, David Ausubel, and Jerome Bruner in terms of the implications for teaching junior high school mathematics. (JC)