WorldWideScience

Sample records for jung freud piaget

  1. Another Woman Gets Robbed? What Jung, Freud, Piaget, and Vygotsky Took from Sabina Spielrein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldridge, Jerry

    2009-01-01

    Certainly not as many who have heard the names of Carl Jung, Sigmund Freud, Jean Piaget, and Lev Vygotsky, have heard of Sabina Spielrein. While Spielrein had numerous face-to-face encounters, some personal and some professional, with all four men, and the accounting of her life and the interactions she had with them has been the content of…

  2. Another Woman Gets Robbed? What Jung, Freud, Piaget, and Vygotsky Took from Sabina Spielrein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldridge, Jerry

    2009-01-01

    Certainly not as many who have heard the names of Carl Jung, Sigmund Freud, Jean Piaget, and Lev Vygotsky, have heard of Sabina Spielrein. While Spielrein had numerous face-to-face encounters, some personal and some professional, with all four men, and the accounting of her life and the interactions she had with them has been the content of…

  3. Freud, Adler, Jung: From Womb to Tomb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrini, D. T.; Pedrini, Bonnie C.

    This paper briefly introduces outlines of psychoanalysis (Freud), individual psychology (Adler), and analytical psychology (Jung). Freud focused on problems of adults as they related to childhood; Adler on problems of adults as they related to adulthood; and Jung on problems of adults as they related to middle and later years. Jungian analytical…

  4. Jung's and Freud's contributions to dream interpretation: a comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitz, L J

    1976-04-01

    Carl G. Jung considers dreams as (a) aids to restoring and maintaining mental health, (b) as scientific insights into psychic casuality, (c) as symbolic representations of one's actual subjective state and (d) as expressions of "telepathic visions". In this paper Jung's considerations are contrasted to Freud's.

  5. Sabina Spielrein: out from the shadow of Jung and Freud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skea, Brian R

    2006-09-01

    Since the 1982 publication of Aldo Carotenuto's book, A Secret Symmetry: Sabina Spielrein Between Jung and Freud, there has been renewed interest in the life and work of Sabina Spielrein. She was Jung's first psychoanalytic case at the Burghölzli Hospital in 1904, and was referred to several times in The Freud/Jung Letters. Spielrein recovered, enrolled in medical school, and went on to become a Freudian analyst. Her most famous paper, published in 1912, 'Destruction as a cause of coming into being', was referred to by Freud in 1920 in relation to his Death Instinct theory. In the few Freudian publications on this controversial theory since 1920, Spielrein's contribution is consistently omitted. Jung also neglected to refer to her 'Destruction' paper in his early 1912 version of 'Symbols of transformation', even though he had edited her paper and had promised to acknowledge her contribution. He did refer extensively to Spielrein's first paper, her medical thesis, 'On the psychological content of a case of schizophrenia', published in 1911, as yet unpublished in English. In her paper Spielrein sought to understand the psychotic delusions of Frau M, a patient at the Burghölzli, much in the style of Jung's 'Psychology of dementia praecox' (1907). The purpose of this paper is to explore to what extent Spielrein's Frau M paper, and its companion 'Destruction' paper, make an original contribution to both Jung and Freud's emerging theories on the possible creative versus destructive outcomes of neurotic or psychotic introversion, culminating in Jung's concept of the 'collective unconscious' (1916) and Freud's concept of a 'Death instinct' (1920).

  6. [Salzburg 1908. Karl Abraham caught between Freud and Jung].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schoonheten, Anna Bentinck

    2010-01-01

    The first psychoanalytic congress in Salzburg has often been described as a great success with one blemish: a conflict between Jung and Abraham, mainly caused by the rivalry in Abraham's behaviour. A new study of the material, and taking Abraham's perspective, provides a different view. Abraham, still a beginner in psychoanalysis, got in the way of Freud and Jung who at that time had a deep theoretical disagreement. In the end they both blamed Abraham.

  7. [Freud and Jung. Cooperation--break--mutual stimulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falzeder, Ernst

    2011-01-01

    The article tries to throw new light on the Freud/Jung relationship. First, it studies the nature of the fundamental differences between the two theories. Second, it raises the question of what, and how much, each of them took over from the other, and reaches the conclusion that it was Freud who let himself be inspired to a greater degree than Jung did. Third, the stimulating effect of their conflicts and of their break on the respective development of their theories is underlined.

  8. Tecnologia dos sonhos em Artemidoro, Freud, Jung e nos Warlpiri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abrahão de Oliveira Santos

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Apresentaremos distintas tecnologias dos sonhos: em Artemidoro, Freud, Jung e nos Warlpiri. Artemidoro revela a mensagem onírica imprescindível à condução do cidadão, com os elementos das instituições, da cidade, do cosmo. Com Freud, no moderno mundo europeu, o sonho recebe o sentido da interioridade. Outra leitura é de Carl Jung. O uso dos sonhos tem seu sentido histórico, se relacionando com as práticas de governo, os modos de condução da vida e da cidade. Para além das tradições eurodescendentes e mentalistas vigentes, apresentaremos a tecnologia coletiva dos sonhos dos Warlpiri e uma nova possibilidade de lidarmos com a experiência onírica.

  9. FREUD, JUNG AND BOAS: THE PSYCHOANALYTIC ENGAGEMENT WITH ANTHROPOLOGY REVISITED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Robert

    2015-06-20

    Sigmund Freud's and C. G. Jung's turn to evolutionist anthropological material after 1909 is usually seen as a logical progression of their long-term interest in such material. It is also seen that they used this material ignorant of the significant challenges to the evolutionist paradigm underpinning such material, in particular the challenges led by Franz Boas. This paper argues otherwise: that both psychologists' turnings to such material was a new development, that neither had shown great interest in such material before 1909, and that their turnings to such material, far from being taken in ignorance of the challenges to evolutionist anthropology, were engagements with those challenges, because the evolutionist paradigm lay at the base of psychoanalysis. It argues that it is no coincidence that this engagement occurred after their return from America in 1909, where they had come into first-hand contact with the challenges of Franz Boas.

  10. Freud, Jung and Boas: the psychoanalytic engagement with anthropology revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Sigmund Freud's and C. G. Jung's turn to evolutionist anthropological material after 1909 is usually seen as a logical progression of their long-term interest in such material. It is also seen that they used this material ignorant of the significant challenges to the evolutionist paradigm underpinning such material, in particular the challenges led by Franz Boas. This paper argues otherwise: that both psychologists' turnings to such material was a new development, that neither had shown great interest in such material before 1909, and that their turnings to such material, far from being taken in ignorance of the challenges to evolutionist anthropology, were engagements with those challenges, because the evolutionist paradigm lay at the base of psychoanalysis. It argues that it is no coincidence that this engagement occurred after their return from America in 1909, where they had come into first-hand contact with the challenges of Franz Boas. PMID:26665301

  11. Freud, Jung e o Homem dos Lobos: percalços da psicanálise aplicada Freud, Jung and the Wolfman: benefits of applied psychoanalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Endo

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Pretende-se examinar o papel da analogia no pensamento freudiano, através de um período fértil e tumultuado do movimento psicanalítico, marcado pela intensificação das divergências entre Freud e seu dileto (Jung, e também pelo crescimento do movimento da psicanálise aplicada entre Freud e seus discípulos e pelo trabalho analítico daquele que é, talvez, o mais importante caso clínico escrito por Freud: o caso do Homem dos Lobos. Este período marca um imenso campo de debates clínicos e teóricos, entre os quais se inclui, sem dúvida, o problema da analogia na teoria e na clínica psicanalíticas.This article intends to examine the role of analogy in the Freudian thought. With this in mind we will visit a very hectic and productive period in the psychoanalytical movement. This period was marked by the divergences between Freud and Jung, by the expansion of the applied psychoanalytical movement between Freud and his disciples, and by the analytical work of the Wolfman (which might be considered Freud's most important case. This period marks a huge field of clinical and theoretical debates, among which the problem of analogy in theory and in clinical psychoanalysis is undoubtedly included.

  12. La Psique Latinoamericana: Breve Ensayo Hermenéutico Desde Freud y Jung Latin-American Psyche: Brief Hermeneutic Essay Based on Freud and Jung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Gissi

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available El artículo integra algunas tesis de Freud y de Jung y las aplica a la psique latinoamericana. Según el autor, la conquista española en América, fue y aún es psicoculturalmente, distinta para conquistadores y conquistados. Desde la perspectiva de Freud, el análisis se basa en la segunda tópica, en la teoría de los mecanismos de defensa y en el complejo de Edipo. Se relacionan conflictos represivos, castratorios, proyectivos, etc. en los grupos culturales en pugna, y las derivaciones familiares y psicopolíticas congruentes. Desde Jung, el análisis se realiza a través de mitos y símbolos, lo que refleja una no integración sana de los arquetipos y un fuerte componente patriarcal de dominación. Esto implica la baja individuación, el "yo débil" y las disociaciones descubiertas por Freud.This article joins together some of Freud's and Jung's thesis and applies them into the Latin-American psyche. The author states that Spaniard's conquer period in America was, and still is, very different for conquerors and conquered (from a psychological and cultural point of view. From a Freudian approach, the analysis is based on the "Topica II", on the defense mechanisms theory and the Oedipus complex. In both groups, the author relates repressive conflicts, castration, projection, etc., with its familiar and psycho-political consequences. From Jung, the analysis is made with myths and symbols, which reflects a strong patriarchal component of domination and a unwholesome integration of the archetypes. This implies the low individuation, the "weak self" and the dissociations discovered by Freud.

  13. Piaget e Freud: facetas psicanalíticas da cognição

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Sklar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Apesar de discutida e explorada ao longo do último século, a obra de Piaget continua a ser fonte de inspiração para novos debates teóricos. Um deles se refere às possíveis articulações entre a teoria piagetiana e a psicanálise. Partindo da reflexão elaborada por Piaget em que é vislumbrada uma nova forma de ver o sentido de cognição, este artigo tem como objetivo rever as formulações de Piaget sobre as convergências entre afeto e cognição. A aproximação entre Piaget e Freud é estabelecida, já que na teoria freudiana existe uma dimensão que está além da consciência. Enquanto para Freud o inconsciente é estruturado segundo mudanças afetivas, entre as quais o recalque, para Piaget há uma cognição inconsciente, que não provém unicamente das transformações afetivas.   Palavras-chave: Piaget; Freud; inconsciente afetivo; inconsciente cognitivo; recalque cognitivo. PIAGET AND FREUD: PSYCHOANALYTICAL FACETS OF COGNITION ABSTRACT Although discussed and explored throughout the last century, the work of Piaget remains a source of inspiration for new theoretical debates. One of them concerns the possible connections between Piaget’s theory and psychoanalysis. Based on the reflection developed by Piaget, in which a new way of understanding the sense of cognition is conceived, this article has the purpose to review the formulations of Piaget on the convergences between affect and cognition. The approach between Piaget and Freud is established, as in Freudian theory there is a dimension which is beyond consciousness. While for Freud the unconscious is structured according to affective changes, including repression, for Piaget there is an unconscious cognition, which does not arise solely from affective transformations.   Keywords: Piaget; Freud; affective unconscious; cognitive unconscious; cognitive repression.

  14. Unresolved Questions in the Freud/Jung Debate. On Psychosis, Sexual Identity and Religion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vandermeersch, Patrick

    1991-01-01

    Due to the fact that the phenomenon of religion has been set aside as being something 'different', a number of key problems within psycho¬an¬alysis have been unwittingly lost from sight. This is especially true for the central theme of the Freud Jung debate: the experience of reali¬ty. The experienc

  15. A Comparison of Keywords in the Dynamic Psychology of Jung, Swedenborg and Freud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leon James

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This article provides some comparative data on the frequency of occurrence of key words that can be found in the complete set of collected works of Gustav Jung (1875-1961, Emanuel Swedenborg (1688-1772, and Sigmund Freud (1856-1939. These three historically important writers have each made significant contributions to the formulation and development of dynamic and analytic psychology. These data provide a comparison of the intensity in topical focus in the works of these three writers. There is visible overlap between all three writers in the intensity of focus on certain key concepts. The overlap is greater between Jung and Swedenborg than between Freud and the other two. An interpretation of this finding is presented in terms of the attitude of each author regarding the existence of a psychic “world” that is distinct from the physical world. Freud’s individual unconscious is contrasted with Jung’s collective unconscious and Swedenborg’s collective conscious.

  16. La Reina de las Nieves. La moral y el inconsciente : Leonardo Villalba según Sigmund Freud y Carl Jung

    OpenAIRE

    Nicolás, Maite

    2016-01-01

    Esta tesina trata sobre la moral y el inconsciente a partir del análisis del personaje Leonardo Villalba de la novela La Reina de las Nieves, escrita por Carmen Martín Gaite. El estudio se hace a partir de las siguientes teorías: inconsciente de Sigmund Freud; ello, yo y superyó de Sigmund Freud; inconsciente de Carl Jung. La información almacenada en el inconsciente de una persona es algo que ésta no puede contar ya que ella misma no sabe que tiene tal información. Así, al ser Leonardo narra...

  17. Narcissism, solitude, friendship: notes on the therapeutic alliance in the context of the Freud-Jung relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carta, Stefano

    2012-09-01

    This paper deals with friendship and therapeutic alliance as a transformation of the libidinal love that structures the Oedipal complex. The author considers the relationship between Jung and Freud as a formidable test that may shed light on their personalities and on the relevance of the Oedipal complex for both of them and for their particular theories and practices. The author discusses the possibility that the Oedipal complex may be seen under a finalistic frame of reference and discusses which implicit goals it may express. Such a goal has not been reached by either Freud nor Jung, but might be the key to underline and recognize the fundamental importance of the 'therapeutic alliance' within the analytical situation, seen as a potential relationship between the selves of the patient and of the analyst springing from a transformation of libidinal love into 'friendship' as it was described by Friedrich Nietzsche. © 2012, The Society of Analytical Psychology.

  18. Freud's Therapeutic Mistake with Jung's Disclosure of Childhood Sexual Abuse: Narrative Lessons in the Do's and Don'ts of Validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasker, Janice

    1999-01-01

    Examines the life narratives of over 25 "victims" and "survivors" of sexual victimization, including that of Carl Jung, as revealed in his letters to Sigmund Freud. Looks at the devastating results of Freud's invalidating response. Discusses categories of successful therapeutic validation. (SR)

  19. Freud's Therapeutic Mistake with Jung's Disclosure of Childhood Sexual Abuse: Narrative Lessons in the Do's and Don'ts of Validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasker, Janice

    1999-01-01

    Examines the life narratives of over 25 "victims" and "survivors" of sexual victimization, including that of Carl Jung, as revealed in his letters to Sigmund Freud. Looks at the devastating results of Freud's invalidating response. Discusses categories of successful therapeutic validation. (SR)

  20. Gender Legacies of Jung and Freud as Epistemology in Emergent Feminist Research on Late Motherhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryann Barone-Chapman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available While conducting doctoral research in social science on late motherhood, two analytical engagements with the feminine came to my attention as evidence of a patriarchal bias toward the realm of womanhood. Jung’s mythopoetic tension between symbolism and enactments with the feminine and Freud’s supposition that a denial of the feminine was necessary for psychological and emotional development appeared to be perpetuating a social problem continuing in current times. Across affective behavior and narrative within stories of late procreative desire, dream journals and Word Association Tests of eight participants was the memory of a male sibling who had enjoyed primacy of place in the parental home over the daughter. The female body with a voice was missing in the one-sided perspectives of Analytical Psychology and Psychoanalysis on the subject of the feminine, until a whole view of psyche’s discontents in Feminist inspired Psychoanalytic theories from both schools on the female body were included. Freud and Jung’s views became evidence of patriarchy as background while extension of Feminist inspired psychoanalytical thinking, Queer theories and Creation Myth allowed new meanings of the embodied feminine to emerge through a recapitulation of a union of opposites as a union of epistemology and ethos. The essence of Jung’s mid-life theories, altered by modernity and eclipsed by female advancement, remains replicatable and paradigmatic outside of essentialist gender performance.

  1. 弗洛伊德、荣格与阿德勒的释梦观比较%Comparison on Dream Interpretation Theories from Freud, Jung and Adler

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐凯

    2016-01-01

    Dream interpretation is a classic technique of psychoanalysis. As the pioneers of dream interpretation, Freud, Jung and Adler have fundamentally changed perceptions about dream, furnished a whole new dimension for dream interpretation, and guided the direction of dream theories. Although Freud, Jung and Adler’s dream interpretation theories were all built on the theory of unconscious, and regarded dreams as the fast track to unconscious, they had different understandings on the nature, function, mechanism and analytic methods of dream. We should treat their dream theories differently in order to serve the practice of dream interpretation better.%释梦是精神分析的经典技术。其先驱者弗洛伊德、荣格和阿德勒从根本上改变了人们对梦的看法,开创了―个全新的心理学领域,在梦的元理论思想上一直指导着后世释梦的走向。尽管弗洛伊德、荣格与阿德勒的释梦观都建立在对无意识理解的基础上,都认可梦是通往无意识的捷径,但他们在梦的本质、功能、工作机制和解析方法上却有着不同的理解,在实践应用中也应加以区分对待,以便服务于当下的释梦实践。

  2. Parallels in the Beliefs and Works of Margaret Fuller and Carl Jung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry Aldridge

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Margaret Fuller, the 19th-century feminist and Transcendentalist, has been compared with Louisa May Alcott, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and Henry David Thoreau. The life and theories of Carl Jung, the 20th-century psychiatrist, have been compared with the works of Sigmund Freud, Alfred Adler, Jean Piaget, and Sabina Spielrein among others. However, no comparisons have been published concerning the beliefs and works of Fuller and Jung. The purpose of this research was to compare and contrast the beliefs and written works of Margaret Fuller and Carl Jung. Similarities and differences were reported among their ideologies. Similarities in their childhood and adult dreams, literary references, spiritual beliefs, and explorations of gender were described. Differences were reported, which included the focus of their writings and their ideas about who is to blame when things go wrong, and how to deal with the individual daemon in each person was also explored. Special consideration was given to how closely their writings intersect. Specifically, the authors questioned whether Jung was inspired by the ideas and writings of Fuller. To answer this question, five possibilities were identified.

  3. Jung, vitalism and 'the psychoid': an historical reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addison, Ann

    2009-02-01

    This paper traces the history of Jung's ideas concerning the psychoid unconscious, from their origins in the work of the vitalist, Hans Driesch, and his concept of Das Psychoid, through the subsequent work of Eugen Bleuler, Director of the Burghölzli Asylum, and his concept of Die Psychoide, to the publication of Jung's paper On the Nature of the Psyche in 1947. This involves a review of Jung's early work and of his meeting with Freud, when apparently the two men discussed calling the unconscious 'psychoid', as well as a review of Jung's more mature ideas concerning a psychoid unconscious. I propose to argue that even at the time of their meeting, Jung had already formulated an epistemological approach that was significantly different from that of Freud and that clearly foreshadowed his later ideas as set out in On the Nature of the Psyche.

  4. Jung's very twentieth-century view of myth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Robert A

    2003-11-01

    It is commonly assumed that Jung's view of myth, like his view of everything else, is best understood vis-à-vis Freud's. I argue that Jung in fact positions himself much more broadly, not merely against other psychologists of myth but more fundamentally against non-psychologists altogether. Undeniably, Jung pits his theory against Freud's, but only after pitting both his theory and Freud's against those theories that assume the subject matter of myth to be the external world rather than the human mind and that assume the function of myth to be either the explanation or the description of the external world rather than the expression of the human mind. The theorists whom Jung challenges are called 'nature mythologists', for whom myth is either a literal explanation or a symbolic description of the natural world. Which element of the natural world myth is about varies from nature mythologist to nature mythologist. The two leading nature mythologists, both of whom Jung cites, were Edward Tylor and James Frazer. Their theories epitomize the nineteenth-century approach to myth. For them, myth is the 'primitive' counterpart to science, which is entirely modern. For them, myth and science are incompatible, science is true and myth false, and myth must therefore go when science comes. Jung's rejection of the external world as the referent of myth and of explanation or description of that world as the function of myth epitomizes the twentieth-century response to nineteenth-century theories. For not merely Jung and Freud but also twentieth-century theorists generally, myth is anything but the 'primitive' counterpart to modern science. Consequently, myth and science are not rivals, so that myth need not go when science comes.

  5. Inventing Freud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnytsky, Peter L

    2008-06-01

    Written to commemorate the 150th anniversary of Freud's birth, this paper construes Nina Coltart's statement that "if Freud did not exist it would be necessary to invent him," with its implicit comparison of Freud to God, to refer to (a) the things that Freud taught that are incontrovertibly true; (b) the unavoidable subjectivity in all judgments of Freud; and (c) the resemblances between psychoanalysis and religion. This last comparison is likewise seen to have both positive and negative aspects. Freud's ideas have inspired many people, yet he unscientifically arrogated sovereign authority over psychoanalysis. Freud's admirers are reminded of his extreme difficulty in admitting he was wrong and changing his mind when he should have known better, while his detractors are encouraged to consider the evidence supporting many of Freud's core tenets and to recognize that his discovery of psychoanalysis is indeed one of the supreme achievements in human history.

  6. [Karl Abraham, Freud's scapegoat and, guide to understanding the truth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremerius, J

    1997-01-01

    The history of the relationship between Freud and Abraham is characterized by the presence of third parties. There was always another, more favored one of Freud's disciples between Freud and Abraham. The first of these, from 1907 to 1912, was C.G. Jung. The second, fifteen years later, was Otto Rank. (I will omit Ferenczi, because his relationship with Freud only entered its dramatic final stage after Abraham's death.) Both Jung and Rank eventually showed signs of deviating from Freud's theories, and Abraham, as the guardian of those teachings, called attention to this. As a result, complicated triangles arose between Freud, Abraham and the favored son of the moment. Because of Freud's preference for these psychoanalytic sons, a preference of which he himself was not consciously aware, he resisted Abraham's attacks on them and felt them to be unfounded and destructive. Confusing cause with effect he blamed Abraham for the danger to the psychoanalytic movement which ensued from three conflicts. Freud loved and protected the apostates and made the defender of his theories into a scapegoat. When, however, the apostasy eventually became apparent, Freud renounced whoever was concerned and rehabilitated Abraham. However, until the final separation from the love object, Freud wavered between rejection and affection, hope and disappointment. Then, feeling deceived and betrayed, Freud's love turned to hate.

  7. Tender love and transference: unpublished letters of C. G. Jung and Sabina Spielrein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lothane, Z

    1999-12-01

    The author dissents from the widely accepted interpretation that the relationship between Sabina Spielrein and Carl Jung in the years 1904-1910 included sexual intercourse and constituted an ethical breach of the doctor-patient boundary in the course of a treatment. Spielrein declared that her treatment ended with her discharge from the Burghölzli hospital as Jung's patient in 1904-1905. Jung maintained he 'prolonged the relationship' in order to prevent a relapse and also referred to it as a friendship. Materials published in 1994 (letters, drafts, diaries, hospital chart) and unpublished letters recently found by the author in the Claparède archive in Geneva shed new light on previously published documents and interpretations by Carotenuto that have dominated the secondary literature since 1980. The new materials provide a more nuanced view of the Spielrein-Jung relationship and point to the function of non-erotic love in the therapeutic relationship. A new look at the Freud-Jung correspondence about the Spielrein-Jung relationship shows that Jung's perception that a sex scandal was initiated by Spielrein resulted from Jung's misreading of rumors concerning another woman; the episode had no ill effect on the relationship between Freud and Jung.

  8. Freud uitgeven

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greven, Elisabeth

    2006-01-01

    This dissertation centres on the books by Freud that have been published in Dutch during the twentieth century. It is to a great extent due to his books that Freud has established his name in The Netherlands in cultural, social and scientific respects. Through the publishers activities insight is ga

  9. Freud uitgeven

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greven, Elisabeth

    2006-01-01

    This dissertation centres on the books by Freud that have been published in Dutch during the twentieth century. It is to a great extent due to his books that Freud has established his name in The Netherlands in cultural, social and scientific respects. Through the publishers activities insight is

  10. [Sigmund Freud's ambition and Alfred Adler].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebzeltern, G

    1984-11-09

    Freud never admitted to himself that he possessed a greater-than-average sense of ambition, which manifested itself in dreams, malachievement and priority problems. A completely new picture of Freud arises from such a perspective. Freud experienced childhood trauma in the form of his relationship with his nephew, John, in whom both an intimate friend and hated enemy were incorporated. This experience left a life-long impression which predetermined the neurotic element in Freud's relationship with men. Freud's own interpretation being that he had been betrayed by Breuer, Fliess, Adler and Jung. That is why the sentencing of his Uncle Joseph to a term of imprisonment had such far-reaching consequences for Freud. A further noteworthy observation is the close connection between ambition and death wishes and also between ambition and guilt feelings. Who, after all, likes to admit to harbouring such feelings? It appeared necessary to investigate the extent to which Freud's excessive ambition influenced his relationships with Breuer, Fliess and Adler. Freud was never prepared to recognize that Adler's contribution consisted of revealing the importance of the natural laws governing those layers of the psyche nearer to the conscious. The picture of the whole person emerges only by a combination of psychoanalysis and individual psychology.

  11. Piaget and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelman, Rochel

    1971-01-01

    A review of Science and Education and the Psychology of the Child (Grossman, 1970) by Jean Piaget and Educational Implications of Piaget's Theory (Ginn-Blaisdell, 1970) by Irene J. Athey and Duane O. Rubadeau. (CK)

  12. Piaget and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelman, Rochel

    1971-01-01

    A review of Science and Education and the Psychology of the Child (Grossman, 1970) by Jean Piaget and Educational Implications of Piaget's Theory (Ginn-Blaisdell, 1970) by Irene J. Athey and Duane O. Rubadeau. (CK)

  13. Freuds kvindelige bipersoner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Anm. af Groce Smilevski: "Freuds søster" og Karen Mack og Jennifer Kaufman: "Freuds elskerinde"......Anm. af Groce Smilevski: "Freuds søster" og Karen Mack og Jennifer Kaufman: "Freuds elskerinde"...

  14. Freud, psychoanalysis, and the therapeutic effect of agapic love.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koprowski, Eugene J

    2014-04-01

    Last year, when reading Freud's letters to Jung, I came across a most interesting passage in which Freud claimed that the "talking cure" (i.e., psychoanalysis) was the result of love--not transference, counter-transference, or another neologism of psychiatry. That is, Freud said to Jung, the cure in psychoanalysis is affected by love (McGuire, 1974 ). I meditated on this for a long while: It is interesting that Freud--whose wife was a bat kohen, daughter of a priest/rabbi--and Jung, the son and grandson of Protestant Christian ministers, would have such a soteriological dialog at the beginning of the psychoanalytic era. This remark on love was not just a one-off observation, either. The minutes of the Vienna Psychoanalytic Society affirm this line of thinking: "Our cures are cures of love" (Haynal, 1994, p. 24). Clearly, Freud and his contemporaries were talking about agape, the kind of love God has for humanity, not eros, a physical desire for another person. There is much written in contemporary psychiatric literature about fears of boundary crossing in mental health (Gabbard, 1995 ); Jung's documented erotic relationship with medical student and patient, Sabina Spielrein, may be the causa causans of this concern. But, these fears--correct concerns about untoward involvement in sexual relationships with patients--have obscured the real importance of what Freud and Jung were talking about back in the beginning of their movement. More than 100 years later, it may well be time to revisit the early dialogue of the founders of psychoanalysis and hear them in their own words once again.

  15. [The Isserlin-affaire - a dispute by delegates between Kraepelin and Freud].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, U H

    2002-01-01

    Kraepelin and Freud have indirectly, via Max Isserlin and Carl Gustav Jung, disputed about their completely different blueprints of psychiatric or psychological disturbances. Mainly in the Isserlin-affaire the dispute reached personal and bitter forms. In this affair Bleuler sided with Kraepelin. In the end of the dispute Bleuler just as Jung had separated from Freud, if in different ways and with different motivations. The discussion between Kraepelin-Isserlin on the one side and Freud on the other faded away. The course of the dispute, which mainly the psychoanalytic literature alludes to frequently, is being delineated here for the first time.

  16. Has the Time Come to Emulate Jung? A Response to Piechowski's Most Recent Rethinking of the Theory of Positive Disintegration: I. The Case against Primary Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendaglio, Sal; Tillier, William

    2015-01-01

    Disagreements between theorists and their collaborators are as old as the field of psychology itself. The most well-known example of a professional relationship marked by diverging viewpoints in psychology is that of Sigmund Freud and Carl Jung. Theoretical disagreements between them were resolved by Jung's creation of a new theory. In this…

  17. Has the Time Come to Emulate Jung? A Response to Piechowski's Most Recent Rethinking of the Theory of Positive Disintegration: I. The Case against Primary Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendaglio, Sal; Tillier, William

    2015-01-01

    Disagreements between theorists and their collaborators are as old as the field of psychology itself. The most well-known example of a professional relationship marked by diverging viewpoints in psychology is that of Sigmund Freud and Carl Jung. Theoretical disagreements between them were resolved by Jung's creation of a new theory. In this…

  18. 'A pretty piece of treachery': the strange case of Dr Stekel and Sigmund Freud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, P

    1998-12-01

    Freud claimed he broke with Stekel not because of 'scientific differences' but because of 'exclusively ... personal qualities'. The author offers an alternative version of this significant fragment of psychoanalytic history by suggesting that Freud acted out of revenge for the humiliation that he believed Stekel and Adler inflicted upon him at the 1910 Nuremberg Congress. He suggests that casting the story of the break between Stekel and Freud in the narrative shadow of Robert Louis Stevenson's novella 'Jekyll and Hyde' highlights the extent to which Freud involved himself in the murkier aspects of the politics of the International Psychoanalytical Association and the Vienna Psychoanalytic Society. Ultimately, however, he argues, Freud was cynically prepared to use and then callously sacrifice Stekel, one of his oldest and most loyal followers, in his increasingly bitter struggles against Adler and Jung. He also touches upon the role of the 'Secret Committee' in the 'Stekel Affair' and the wider ramifications of Jung's unexpected return from America at the height of the 'Freud resignation crisis'. He further suggests that Jung's subsequent meeting with Bergmann may have been a significant factor in precipitating Jung's decision to break his personal relationship with Freud.

  19. The cryptomnesic origins of Jung's dream of the multi-storeyed house.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Steve

    2009-09-01

    Jung first recounted his dream of the multi-storeyed house in the 1925 seminars to illustrate the concept of the collective unconscious and explain the influence of phylogeny on his split with Freud. However, his telling the story of the dream belies a cryptomnesic influence of the early writings of psychoanalysis because Josef Breuer used a similar image to illustrate the structure of the psyche which Edouard Claparède associated with a phylogenetic inheritance. When telling the story of the dream, Jung misrepresented Freud's position, creating the impression of there being a bigger difference between their theories than was actually the case, and giving the dream a fictional significance for the breakdown of their relationship. In fact, Jung followed Freud into the fields of mythology and phylogenetics, and their split was due primarily to their different attitudes towards sexuality rather than phylogeny. The dream image has therefore led to a misunderstanding of Freudian theory when viewed from within a Jungian perspective. Freud believed there was a phylogenetic layer in the psyche, though he held a different view to Jung on its nature and importance.

  20. Piaget's Structural Developmental Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broughton, John M.

    1981-01-01

    Piaget's theory is identified as a branch of structuralism concerned with the concept of truth, in distinction from French structuralism, which is focused on meaning. The two branches are compared and contrasted, and relations between logic and language are explored. Similarities and differences in the theories of Piaget, Levi-Strauss, and Chomsky…

  1. Piaget and psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, T L

    1978-04-01

    It is difficult to apply Piaget's theory to psychotherapy because the place of affect in it is ambiguous. When the alternatives are considered, it seems most consistent with Piaget's ideas to regard both cognitive and affective phenomena as problem-solving organizations. Piaget's remarkable discoveries in the cognitive sphere are a consequence of the easy access in that sphere to the kind of problems that need solving, and the phasic development of solutions. But the nature of the problems to be solved or the values to be guarded by a patient in psychotherapy are not knowable independently of the patient's actual behavior. In one respect all that is left from Piaget's approach for psychotherapy generally is the truism that therapy fosters differentiation and integration. However, even if we cannot frame a peculiarly Piagetian paradigm of psychotherapy, Piaget is valuable in posing a subsidiary question, namely, what in therapy fosters problem-solving activity. A reading of Piaget suggests that a patient learns by acting on his therapist and tacitly interpreting the results of his actions, that difficulties in therapy are the material from which therapy proceeds, and that in order to grasp the situation of the patient, the therapist himself may need to act on him and not just think about him. An implied lesson for training would be that supervision should instill a professional identity that is reinforced rather than challenged by therapy difficulties, and does not rely solely on theoretical categorizing.

  2. Jung i Bachelard. Problem wyobraxni i mitu (JUNG AND BACHELARD. THE PROBLEM OF IMAGINATION AND MYTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilona Błocian

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to some specific 'area between' interpretative achievements of Freud, Jung and Bachelard. The imagination and myth problems are involved in more general perspective of philospophical conception of man in their works. Different models of human reason and imagination idealizing forces influenced procedures of an imaginal thinking and image itself interpretations. The basis of comparation is the unconscious (Freudian 'repressed unconscious', Jungian collective unconsciuos, complex and archetype conceptions as some kind of instruments to understand image formating process, phantasies, mythical and poetical image. An example of these differences is their interpretations of Promethean myth. A way of understand dream image, Anima and Animus archetypes refer to their specific theoretical frames.

  3. Piaget's Work and Chemical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Ron; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Presents selected position papers and research papers influenced by the work of Jean Piaget, intended to help science educators understand Piaget's work and how it applies to science education. Emphasis on formal reasoning stage of development. (SA)

  4. Piaget's Work and Chemical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Ron; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Presents selected position papers and research papers influenced by the work of Jean Piaget, intended to help science educators understand Piaget's work and how it applies to science education. Emphasis on formal reasoning stage of development. (SA)

  5. Challenges in Piaget's legacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibace, Roger

    2013-03-01

    The publication of After Piaget (Martí and Rodríguez 2012) hopefully triggers a new effort to understand the richness of the efforts of that major psychologist of the 20th century. Piaget was consistently concerned with part/whole relationships throughout his life. He addressed this issue philosophically, epistemologically, and psychologically. Conceptually Piaget struggled with the issue of continuity/discontinuity in development and changed his mind about how to reconcile the discontinuities of stages with his concept of development. I also attribute his variability to the implications of his important work on perception, and to his willingness to get involved in widespread concrete applications of his approach to education including the education of children with special needs; his center for genetic epistemology, and his interest in psychoanalysis. Benefiting from all the authors of After Piaget, I want to point out that Piaget has identified many major issues that will continue to constitute challenges to psychology in this century. These include specifying terms such as 'development;' methodological issues such as sampling both quantitatively in one culture and across cultures; comprehensive inclusion of the psychological processes covered by introductory textbooks in psychology; and conceptual issues such as the relationships among all these parts within a whole. I make a distinction between an 'issue' and a 'problem'--problems have solutions; while issues refer to controversies in science generally as well as in psychology that have persisted for centuries.

  6. Primary mental expression: freud, klein, and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Michael

    2008-03-01

    Freud formulated the primary process model, describing mental activity that creates the illusion of an actual experience in lieu of reflective thought, at the very start of his career. In this, his initial formulation of unconscious mental activity, he was attempting to account for the nature of dreaming, by inference for the mind of infancy and, more speculatively, for adult psychosis. He never revised the model in light of his later formulations of the structural model and the death instinct, nor did he elaborate on his speculation that it could serve as a model for psychosis, and there has been little subsequent effort to employ the model outside the context of dreaming. A small number of analysts, including Klein, Bion, and Matte-Blanco, have constructed theories of psychosis in idiosyncratic conceptual languages that seem to be describing phenomena similar to those from which Freud constructed his model. Although Klein's model of positions, which has become the most widely accepted theory of psychosis, is generally considered a fundamental departure from Freud, both accounts have remarkable similarity and both tend to confuse primary mental expression with mature thought and normal infancy with psychosis. Contributions by cognitive-developmental psychologists including Werner and Piaget suggest ways to clarify some of the confusion and to supplement and amplify Freud's and Klein's description of some of the salient features of primary mental expression. Findings from neuroimaging studies of dreaming and of schizophrenia support the proposition that primary mental activity is a qualitatively distinctive form of mental expression.

  7. Jung in education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gitz-Johansen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    This article is a review of the influence of analytical psychology within the field of education. The influence of analytical psychology on the mainstream of educational thought and practice has never been great. However, Jung himself gave a number of lectures on education and post-Jungians have...... further explored the relevance of analytical thought in education. The article first outlines Jung’s own thoughts about education and their reception in primarily North-America and England. The second half of the article discusses the post-Jungian contributions. Six different strands of post......-Jungian inspiration are identified: Mytho-historical education, holistic education, archetypal pedagogy, educating imagination, educating different personality types, and transformative education. Finally it is suggested, that while analytical psychology may never occupy a place in the mainstream of educational...

  8. Jung in education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gitz-Johansen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    This article is a review of the influence of analytical psychology within the field of education. The influence of analytical psychology on the mainstream of educational thought and practice has never been great. However, Jung himself gave a number of lectures on education and post-Jungians have......-Jungian inspiration are identified: Mytho-historical education, holistic education, archetypal pedagogy, educating imagination, educating different personality types, and transformative education. Finally it is suggested, that while analytical psychology may never occupy a place in the mainstream of educational...... further explored the relevance of analytical thought in education. The article first outlines Jung’s own thoughts about education and their reception in primarily North-America and England. The second half of the article discusses the post-Jungian contributions. Six different strands of post...

  9. Piaget, Inhelder and "Minecraft"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schifter, Catherine C.; Cipollone, Maria; Moffat, Frederick

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes an exploratory study observing the use of "Minecraft" (a popular sandbox style online video game environment) in a high school English literature classroom. We use Piaget and Inhelder's (1969) constructivist theories about the formal operational stage of development to interpret the concepts of plot and…

  10. Freud and Literary Biography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellman, Richard

    1984-01-01

    Sigmund Freud's attitudes about writing biographies of authors, and the influence of Freud's work on the interpretations of creativity, are discussed in relation to biographies of and by a number of writers. It is proposed that Freud's contributions, used carefully, have served to enlighten biography. (MSE)

  11. Freud and Literary Biography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellman, Richard

    1984-01-01

    Sigmund Freud's attitudes about writing biographies of authors, and the influence of Freud's work on the interpretations of creativity, are discussed in relation to biographies of and by a number of writers. It is proposed that Freud's contributions, used carefully, have served to enlighten biography. (MSE)

  12. Artificial life and Piaget.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Ulrich; Grobman, K H.

    2003-04-01

    Artificial life provides important theoretical and methodological tools for the investigation of Piaget's developmental theory. This new method uses artificial neural networks to simulate living phenomena in a computer. A recent study by Parisi and Schlesinger suggests that artificial life might reinvigorate the Piagetian framework. We contrast artificial life with traditional cognitivist approaches, discuss the role of innateness in development, and examine the relation between physiological and psychological explanations of intelligent behaviour.

  13. Piaget and the Pendulum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Trevor G.

    Piaget's investigations into children's understanding of the laws governing the movement of a simple pendulum were first reported in 1955 as part of a report into how children's knowledge of the physical world changes during development. Chapter 4 of Inhelder & Piaget (1955/1958) entitled `The Oscillation of a Pendulum and the Operations of Exclusion'' demonstrated how adolescents could construct the experimental strategies necessary to isolate each of the variables, exclude the irrelevant factors and conclude concerning the causal role of length. This became one of the most easily replicable tasks from the Genevan school and was used in a number of important investigations to detect the onset of formal operational thinking. While it seems that the pendulum investigation fits nicely into Piaget's sequence of studies of concepts such as time, distance and speed suggested to him by Einstein, more recent research (Bond 2001) shows Inhelder to be directly responsible for the investigations into children's induction of physical laws. The inter-relationship between the pendulum problem, developing thought and scientific method is revealed in a number of Genevan and post-Piagetian investigations.

  14. Is Piaget's epistemic subject dead?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Anton E.

    Niaz (1990) presents arguments in favor of the retention of Piaget's epistemic subject as a theoretical construct to guide research and practice in science education and psychology. The intent of this article is to point out the weaknesses of those arguments and to suggest that the weight of evidence argues against the existence of the logical thinker postulated by Piaget. Therefore, contrary to Niaz's conclusion that the acceptance of Piaget's epistemic subject will facilitate the development of cognitive theories with greater explanatory power, the conclusion is reached that Piaget's epistemic subject is dead and that continued acceptance of this aspect of Piagetian theory would be counterproductive.

  15. Freud's paternity crises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Edward A

    2016-11-14

    This article reexamines the interpretation of the significance of the Aliquis slip and related materials in terms of a family crisis in 1900 involving Freud, Anna Freud Bernays and their youngest sister Paula. It contends that Ernest Jones and Anna Freud later hid this story from history, largely for family reasons. It supports this contention by drawing on Ernest Jones and Anna Freud's archived letters, Anna Freud Bernays' memoirs, the complete Freud-Fliess letters and other historical sources and compares them to The Origins of Psychoanalysis and to Ernest Jones' biography of Freud. It shows how events during the crisis manifested themselves in Freud's On Dreams, the Aliquis slip, and the banking error story. It rejects Peter Swales' hypotheses about Freud and Minna Bernays being part of the Aliquis slip, but accepts Didier Anzieu's idea that Minna Bernays was the subject of the banking error story. It shows that the motive for the historical repression of the story began with Freud, but was over determined and included guilt and pain that developed when Paula and other sisters got caught up in the Nazi takeover of Austria.

  16. Conceptual Development: Piaget's Legacy. Jean Piaget Symposium Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholnick, Ellin K., Ed.; Nelson, Katherine, Ed.; Gelman, Susan A., Ed.; Miller, Patricia H., Ed.

    Based on the papers presented at the 1996 Symposium of the Jean Piaget Society and highlighting the extent to which Piaget's ideas have served to scaffold contemporary thinking about every aspect of conceptual development, this volume examines the nature of conceptual development, its foundations, and the sources of its novelties. The chapters…

  17. Conceptual Development: Piaget's Legacy. Jean Piaget Symposium Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholnick, Ellin K., Ed.; Nelson, Katherine, Ed.; Gelman, Susan A., Ed.; Miller, Patricia H., Ed.

    Based on the papers presented at the 1996 Symposium of the Jean Piaget Society and highlighting the extent to which Piaget's ideas have served to scaffold contemporary thinking about every aspect of conceptual development, this volume examines the nature of conceptual development, its foundations, and the sources of its novelties. The chapters…

  18. The Martin Buber-Carl Jung disputations: protecting the sacred in the battle for the boundaries of analytical psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, B D

    2001-07-01

    The Martin Buber-C.G. Jung disputations rather than the Freud-Jung split or Samuels's post-Jungian categories is considered the more significant paradigm for understanding the conflicts erupting within the Jungian community surrounding clinical practice and candidate training. Looking through the lens of the Freud-Jung split keeps the conflicts focused on the theoretical and technical differences concerning such concepts as object-relations, transference-countertransference, neutrality, clinical boundaries. The Buber-Jung disputations move the discussion into a different and more foundational arena, namely the vertical and horizontal psychological considerations of the experience of the Sacred and how that dimension is supported or thwarted in clinical practice and candidate training by the respective allegiances of the 'warriors' in the 'Holy Wars'. Experiencing the texture of the Buber-Jung disputations as well as grappling with their content suggests that a more dialogical approach to actual clinical material may be a more fruitful way to understand the work of analysis and the business of candidate training.

  19. Jung, the Pentateuch and ethics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eben Scheffler

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available This article reflects on the contribution� that can� be made to the interpretation of the Bible by employing the analytical psychology of Carl Jung. After some relevant biographical considerations on Jung, his view of religion and the Bible is briefly considered, followed by a look into Genesis 1-3 in terms of his distinction of archetypes. It is suggested in the conclusion that Jungian psychological Biblical criticism can lead to a changed, but fresh view on the �authority� or influence of the Bible in the lives of (postmodern human beings and their (ethical behaviour.

  20. Jung, the Pentateuch and ethics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eben Scheffler

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available This article reflects on the contribution� that can� be made to the interpretation of the Bible by employing the analytical psychology of Carl Jung. After some relevant biographical considerations on Jung, his view of religion and the Bible is briefly considered, followed by a look into Genesis 1-3 in terms of his distinction of archetypes. It is suggested in the conclusion that Jungian psychological Biblical criticism can lead to a changed, but fresh view on the �authority� or influence of the Bible in the lives of (postmodern human beings and their (ethical behaviour.

  1. Ordem e subversão no movimento psicanalítico: o fantasma de Jung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Plon

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available O autor procura destacar a presença de Jung na correspondência de Freud com os principais discípulos, no contexto histórico da constituição do movimento psicanalítico e no desdobramento mais importante do mesmo. Vale dizer, a figura de Jung como fantasma no discurso psicanalítico se articula com uma série de problemáticas não apenas teóricas, mas também políticas e institucionais, de maneira que as ressonâncias atuais desta polêmica continuam ainda presentes na psicanálise contemporânea.Jung's ghost. The author tries to highlight Jung's presence in the mail exchange with his main disciples, in the historic context of the constitution of the psychoanalytic movement and in its most important unfolding. It should be said that the figure of Jung as a ghost in the psychoanalytic discourse is articulated with a number of problems that are not only theoretical, but also political and institutional, so that the current repercussions of that polemic remain.

  2. Moses: Freud's ultimate project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risto Olavi Nurmela

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Moses and Monotheism was the last work of Sigmund Freud, known as the founder of psychoanalysis. It is not a study of psychoanalytical issues, but mainly a study of the biblical figure Moses, albeit with psychoanalytical applications. Freud attempted to prove that Moses’ original monotheistic religion, which he, an Egyptian, gave to the Israelites, was one without sacrifices and priests, whereas the Israelite religion known from the Bible was not even strictly monotheistic. Moses’ religion, according to Freud, was the religion of Ikhnaton, the similarity of which to Israelite religion Freud was in fact among the first to realize. The religion of Moses, which Freud thought he was able to reconstruct, was in my view actually Judaism, which later developed from Israelite religion. Freud was a stern atheist, but nevertheless also an uncompromising Jew, who never thought atheism would exclude Jewishness. As such he stands as a fine example of Judaism being something more and other than religion and ethnicity. Freud worked on Moses and Monotheism during his five last years. What apparently motivated him was Hitler’s rise to power in Germany, which presented a threat to Freud personally as well as to his life’s work, since the Nazis outlawed psychoanalysis. This threat became a reality when Germany occupied Austria in 1938. Freud fled to London where he finished Moses and Monotheism, published only months before his death in September 1939. In this work Freud’s appreciation of Judaism finds a remarkable expression.

  3. Remembering the evolutionary Freud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Allan

    2006-03-01

    Throughout his career as a writer, Sigmund Freud maintained an interest in the evolutionary origins of the human mind and its neurotic and psychotic disorders. In common with many writers then and now, he believed that the evolutionary past is conserved in the mind and the brain. Today the "evolutionary Freud" is nearly forgotten. Even among Freudians, he is regarded to be a red herring, relevant only to the extent that he diverts attention from the enduring achievements of the authentic Freud. There are three ways to explain these attitudes. First, the evolutionary Freud's key work is the "Overview of the Transference Neurosis" (1915). But it was published at an inopportune moment, forty years after the author's death, during the so-called "Freud wars." Second, Freud eventually lost interest in the "Overview" and the prospect of a comprehensive evolutionary theory of psychopathology. The publication of The Ego and the Id (1923), introducing Freud's structural theory of the psyche, marked the point of no return. Finally, Freud's evolutionary theory is simply not credible. It is based on just-so stories and a thoroughly discredited evolutionary mechanism, Lamarckian use-inheritance. Explanations one and two are probably correct but also uninteresting. Explanation number three assumes that there is a fundamental difference between Freud's evolutionary narratives (not credible) and the evolutionary accounts of psychopathology that currently circulate in psychiatry and mainstream journals (credible). The assumption is mistaken but worth investigating.

  4. Freud and cultural history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Peter

    2007-01-01

    This article is concerned with three questions: Can historians make use of Freud's ideas? Have they done so in the past? Should they do so in the future? It begins with a personal encounter with Freud's ideas and then raises some general questions about the relation between psychoanalysis and history.

  5. "What's New about Freud?".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Ann E

    2015-06-01

    This is a response to a recent Issues in Mental Health Nursing editorial, titled "What's New about Freud?" This response aims to point out the relationship between Freud's psychoanalytic theory; Cowling, Smith, and Watson's (2008) nursing as unitary caring science praxis; and this author's future as a nurse researcher.

  6. Schopenhauer and Freud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, C; Brook, A

    1994-02-01

    A close study of Schopenhauer's central work, 'The World as Will and Representation', reveals that a number of Freud's most characteristic doctrines were first articulated by Schopenhauer. A thinker always expresses something of his culture, of course, but the parallels to be found between Freud and Schopenhauer go well beyond cultural influence. Schopenhauer's concept of the will contains the foundations of what in Freud became the concepts of the unconscious and the id. Schopenhauer's writings on madness anticipate Freud's theory of repression and his first theory of the aetiology of neurosis. Schopenhauer's work contains aspects of what become the theory of free association. And most importantly, Schopenhauer articulates major parts of the Freudian theory of sexuality. These correspondences raise some interesting questions about Freud's denial that he even read Schopenhauer until late in life.

  7. Freud's struggle with misogyny: homosexuality and guilt in the dream of Irma's injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotto, D

    2001-01-01

    The highly condensed dream element trimethylamin is central to the dream of Irma's injection. After a brief review of the medical literature on timethylamine (TMA), it is suggested that two important meanings of this chemical and its properties lie in its disguised reference to disparaging views of women, as well as to Freud's homosexual connection to Wilhelm Fliess. Freud's misogynistic and homosexual impulses were stimulated by Fliess's recent surgical error committed while operating on Freud's patient Emma Eckstein. Evidence is presented that the collaboration between Freud and Fliess in performing an aggressive act toward a woman was for Freud an enactment of a childhood situation in which he and his nephew John had ganged up on John's sister Pauline. The later relationship between Freud, Jung, and Sabina Spielrein is seen as an additional reenactment of this childhood triangle. An examination of Freud's associations to and analysis of the Irma dream, as well as some of his later relationships with women, indicates that guilt and the wish to make reparation were also prominent themes in Freud's inner life.

  8. Freud and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharbert, Gerhard

    2009-01-01

    The essay analyzes the influence of evolutionary thought in the work of Sigmund Freud. Based on Freud's initial occupation as a neuro-anatomist and physiologist certain aspects stemming from the history of nature and developmental biological reasoning that played a role in his endeavours to find a new basis for medical psychology will be pointed out. These considerations are to be regarded as prolegomena of the task to reread Freud once again, and in doing so avoiding the verdict that holds his neuro-anatomic and comparative-morphological works as simply "pre-analytic." In fact, the time seems ripe to reconsider in a new context particularly those evolutionary, medical, and cultural-scientific elements in Freud's work that appear inconsistent at first sight. The substantial thesis is that Freud, given the fact that he was trained in comparative anatomy and physiology in the tradition of Johannes Müller, had the capability of synthesizing elements of this new point of view with the findings and interrogations concerning developmental history and the theory of evolution. More over, this was perceived not merely metaphoric, as he himself stressed it (Freud 1999, XIII, 99), but in the sense of Ubertragung, that inscribed terms and methods deriving from the given field into the realm of psychology. The moving force behind this particular Ubertragung came from a dynamically-neurological perception of the soul that emerged in France since 1800, which Freud came to know trough the late work of Charcot.

  9. Piaget and Levy-Bruhl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahoda, G

    2000-08-01

    Levy-Bruhl exerted a powerful influence, seldom considered, on Piaget. The Levy-Bruhlian thesis of a "pre-logical mentality" characterized by "mystical participation" is outlined, together with its initial reception. The first evidence of Piaget's interest in it dates from 1920, and when he began his studies of children's thinking he compared it with that of 'primitives," also adopting Levy-Bruhl's concept of "participation." By 1928 Piaget had elaborated a theory of the social foundations of different types of thought, which he regarded as also explaining the alleged similarity between the thinking of primitives and children. Both are subject to constraint, primitives by elders and children by parents and teachers. Logical as opposed to pre-logical thought was said to depend on cooperation in free social interaction. Piaget continued to maintain essentially the same views long after Levy-Bruhl himself had renounced the notion of pre-logicality.

  10. Teori Individuasi Carl Gustav Jung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Th.J Weismann

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Masyarakat pada masa kini adalah masyarakat yang telah beralih dari masyarakat tradisional menjadi masyarakat modern. Masyarakat modern punya ciri khas tersendiri begitu pula dengan masyarakat pasca modern. C. G. Jung membahas tentang masyarakat yang berindividuasi. Apakah masyarakat yang berindividuasi itu adalah termasuk dalam salah satu ciri dari masyarakat modern.Individu yang mampu mengatasi persoalan masyarakat moderen ialah individu yang mencapai tahap-tahap proses individuasi ini atau yang disebut pula sebagai individu yang berindividuasi.

  11. Misunderstanding Jung: the afterlife of legends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamdasani, S

    2000-07-01

    F. X. Charet's article, 'Understanding Jung: recent biographies and scholarship', is full of errors and legends. In this article, I demonstrate the tendentiousness of his criticisms of the historical work of Eugene Taylor and myself concerning Jung's linkages with the subliminal psychology of Théodore Flournoy, William James, and F. W. H. Myers, and the fallaciousness of his criticism of my claim that Memories, Dreams, Reflections was not Jung's autobiography.

  12. The story of an ambivalent relationship: Sigmund Freud and Eugen Bleuler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falzeder, Ernst

    2007-06-01

    This paper examines the short-lived flirtation between psychoanalysis and academia and psychiatry in Europe and the reasons for, and consequences of, the fact that their paths diverged. It is argued that Bleuler's break with the psychoanalytic movement is a crucial and, until now, largely underestimated turning point. Bleuler's separation from the psychoanalytic movement was probably more important for the course it has since taken than those of Adler, Stekel, or even Jung. Bleuler's analysis by correspondence by Freud, and its failure, was of paramount importance for the future relationship between Freud and Bleuler, and for Bleuler's assessment of psychoanalysis.

  13. Freud's Mexican readers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Rubén

    2011-01-01

    This essay presents an overview of artists and writers who read Freud's work in Mexico between 1920 and 1968. The focus is on cultural readings of Freud: non-clinical interpretations of psychoanalysis that applied Freud's theory to literary, artistic, philosophical, or religious questions. The essay focuses on Salvador Novo, one of the poets associated with the Contemporáneos group, and his reading of the "Three Essays in the Theory of Sexuality;" Raúl Carrancá y Trujillo, a judge and criminologist who used psychoanalysis in his work, including the trial of Trotky's assassin; Octavio Paz, a poet and intellectual who wrote an essay on Mexican history, "The Labyrinth of Solitude," as a response to "Moses and Monotheism;" and Gregorio Lemercier, a Benedictine monk who placed his monastery in group analysis. These unorthodox readings of Freud opened the door for some of the most daring intellectual experiments in the 20th century.

  14. Freud, Psychodynamics, and Incest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Alvin

    1987-01-01

    Distills the essence of Freud's thinking about incest, placing it within the context of childhood sexuality. Discusses clinical and research implications concerning the relationship between sexual trauma and emotional disturbances. Raises questions requiring further investigation. (NH)

  15. Freud and Historical Thought

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Claire Phelan

    2015-01-01

    .... The application of Freud's psychoanalytic theories seems uniquely placed to assist the historian in developing a richer interpretation of the whole person, as opposed to just one facet of an individual's life...

  16. Freud's early clinical work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, L Z

    1994-01-01

    Freud became a medical practitioner because it was impossible for him to pursue the desired career of a microscopic researcher. His education and training had not prepared him for the task of being a practicing physician. In his private practice he began treating some very intelligent, chaotic, demanding, volatile and disturbed patients. Anna von Lieben was one of these patients whom Freud treated very intensively for a long period of time. Elise Gomperz was another talented and severely pained early patient of Freud. Over a number of years, Freud was her psychiatrist and provided her with attentive care using a variety of treatment methods that were available to him at that time. Emmy von N.'s condition was also fluctuating and very demanding. The dramatic sense and chronic clinical course of these patients is compatible with the contemporary diagnostic category of Borderline Personality Disorder. Freud provided these patients with long-term supportive care while he attempted to cure them. At the same time, Freud committed himself to the theory of radical cure and downplayed the supportive, draining and difficult clinical work that he was doing.

  17. Gnostic inner illumination and Carl Jung's individuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennachio, J

    1992-09-01

    The ancient religious system of Gnosticism argued for the transcendence of the physical world and the divinity of self-knowledge. More recently, a similar argument was made by Carl Jung through his concept of individuation. This paper examines some of the similarities between Gnostic inner illumination and Jung's concept of individuation.

  18. Jung's quest for the "Aurora consurgens"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haaning, Aksel

    2014-01-01

    The paper focuses on the year 1929 when Jung published ‘A European commentary’ to Richard Wilhelm's German translation of the Taoist text The Secret of the Golden Flower. This shows that Jung had already started on the track of European alchemy by following up Conrad Waldkirch's preface in Artis ...

  19. Piaget's Logic of Meanings: Still Relevant Today

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wavering, Michael James

    2011-01-01

    In his last book, "Toward a Logic of Meanings" (Piaget & Garcia, 1991), Jean Piaget describes how thought can be categorized into a form of propositional logic, a logic of meanings. The intent of this article is to offer this analysis by Piaget as a means to understand the language and teaching of science. Using binary propositions, conjunctions,…

  20. Piaget's Logic of Meanings: Still Relevant Today

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wavering, Michael James

    2011-01-01

    In his last book, "Toward a Logic of Meanings" (Piaget & Garcia, 1991), Jean Piaget describes how thought can be categorized into a form of propositional logic, a logic of meanings. The intent of this article is to offer this analysis by Piaget as a means to understand the language and teaching of science. Using binary propositions, conjunctions,…

  1. On the Status of Logic in Piaget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reginensi, Luc

    2004-01-01

    This article analyses the way in which Piaget links the analogy between the child and the primitive with a theory of the history of the sciences, that is, it analyses Piaget's version of Haeckel's principle in which ontogenesis recapitulates phylogenesis. From this analysis, we reconstitute the operations through which Piaget forms and expresses…

  2. Piaget, Pedagogy, and Evolutionary Psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy E. C. Genovese

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Constructivist pedagogy draws on Piaget's developmental theory. Because Piaget depicted the emergence of formal reasoning skills in adolescence as part of the normal developmental pattern, many constructivists have assumed that intrinsic motivation is possible for all academic tasks. This paper argues that Piaget's concept of a formal operational stage has not been empirically verified and that the cognitive skills associated with that stage are in fact “biologically secondary abilities” (Geary and Bjorklund, 2000 culturally determined abilities that are difficult to acquire. Thus, it is unreasonable to expect that intrinsic motivation will suffice for most students for most higher level academic tasks. In addition, a case is made that educational psychology must incorporate the insights of evolutionary psychology.

  3. Freud e a fisiologia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erasmo Garcia Mendes

    1996-08-01

    Full Text Available A experiência de Freud no início de sua carreira em Viena, no campo da ciência empírica, é revista e admitida como ainda relevante nos anos em que a psicanálise foi desenvolvida. Freud foi sucessivamente zoólogo (com Claus, fisiologista (com Brücke e psicólogo (com Meynert antes de criar a psicanálise. Por isso, teria pressentido que o avanço das neurociências e da terapia por drogas poderia conflitar com a sua terapia pela fala. A compatibilidade entre a psicanálise e as neurociências, tal como defendida por Mezan, é reconhecida em termos dos objetivos específicos de cada uma. Exemplos do empenho em explicar mecanicamente a mente são evocados, bem como a recente revalorização da concepção do inconsciente cognitivo. A posição de Freud com relação à filosofia é brevemente abordada, com menção de sua visão quanto ao positivismo. Frustrações de Freud - as chances perdidas de conceber o neurônio e de indicar o uso da cocaina - são recordadas. Em que pese a teorização implicada na psico-análise, Freud teria se mantido residualmente um cientista natural, como se proclamou um dia.Freud's experience in the field of empirical science, at the beginning of his carrer in Vienna, is reviewed and admitted as still relevant in the years in which psychoanalysis was developped. Freud was successively zoologist (with Claus, physiologist (with Brücke and psychologist (with Meynert before creating his talk therapy. This would have enabled him to forecast that the advances in neurosciences and drug therapy might conflict with psychoanalysis. The compatibility between neurosciences and psychoanalysis, as defended by Mezan, is emphasized, in terms of each having its own purpose. Exemples of efforts to explain mechanistically the mind are evoked, as well as the recent revival of the concept of cognitive unconscious. Freud's position in relation to philosophy is briefly approached, as well as his view towards positivism. His

  4. [Carl Gustav Jung's alchemical thinking].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirkiewicz, Jakub

    2004-01-01

    Carl Gustav Jung (1875-1961), Swiss psychologist and philosopher of culture used in his concepts many constructs having their source in philosophy of alchemy. These ideas can be found not only in his books on alchemy but also in his psychological works. Among them we should enumerate: the theory of psychological process, the concepts of opposites coexisting in the psyche, the polar structure of notions in his psychological system and the idea of synchronicity. The author of this article examines these main points of Jungian program within the context of its parallelism with paracelsian alchemical philosophy of nature: the process of nature, alchemical dialectics and the universal analogy of micro- and macrocosmos. At the beginning of his work, creating his psychology Jung assumed similar ideas. Later, when he noticed this similarity, alchemy became very helpful in his research of psyche, because thanks to them he conceptualised the successive aspects of polar structure of dynamical psychical reality, which--like his alchemical predecessors--he used to explain basics of the micro- and macro-world.

  5. Reflections on Piaget. Proceedings of the Jean Piaget Memorial Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broughton, John M., Ed.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Sessions of and presentations given at a memorial conference, held in honor of Jean Piaget, are reported. The conference was sponsored by the Developmental Psychology Program at Teachers College, Columbia University, on November 14, 1980. Sixteen scholars from the fields of psychology, philosophy, and education participated. (CJ)

  6. Reflections on Piaget. Proceedings of the Jean Piaget Memorial Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broughton, John M., Ed.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Sessions of and presentations given at a memorial conference, held in honor of Jean Piaget, are reported. The conference was sponsored by the Developmental Psychology Program at Teachers College, Columbia University, on November 14, 1980. Sixteen scholars from the fields of psychology, philosophy, and education participated. (CJ)

  7. Freud's "On Narcissism: An Introduction"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crockatt, Philip

    2006-01-01

    The author reviews Freud's (1914) seminal paper "On narcissism: an introduction". Freud's paper is briefly set in the historical context of the evolution of psychoanalysis and psychoanalytic theories, and Freud's metapsychology up to the publication of his Narcissism paper is outlined. A detailed and comprehensive description of the content of the…

  8. Freud's "On Narcissism: An Introduction"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crockatt, Philip

    2006-01-01

    The author reviews Freud's (1914) seminal paper "On narcissism: an introduction". Freud's paper is briefly set in the historical context of the evolution of psychoanalysis and psychoanalytic theories, and Freud's metapsychology up to the publication of his Narcissism paper is outlined. A detailed and comprehensive description of the content of the…

  9. Freud: um epidemiologista?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís David Castiel

    1988-09-01

    Full Text Available Apresenta-se uma abordagem do raciocínio causal de Freud para as origens da histeria. Para isto, utilizam-se alguns cânones do "Sistema de Lógica" de John Stuart Mill. Percebe-se que, mesmo sem evidências empíricas, a formulação freudiana pode ser incluída dentro da lógica de Mill para a elaboração de hipóteses causais na pesquisa epidemiológica.An approach to Freud's causal thinking concerning the origins of hysteria is presented. It is used John Stuart Mill's canons from his "Sistem of Logic". Even without empirical evidence, Freud' s thinking can be regarded through Mill's logic to devise causal hypotheses in epidemiologic research.

  10. Piaget's Clay and Descartes' Wax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardine, David W.

    1988-01-01

    Exploration of a coincidental similarity between the work of Rene Descartes and Jean Piaget relating to the contemporary pedagogical conception of understanding as an active construction of reality points out some of the images that coalesce around this conception and reflects upon alternatives to the conception. (CB)

  11. What Does Piaget's Theory Describe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Kieran

    1982-01-01

    Jean Piaget's belief that children's developmental levels largely determine what they can learn is challenged. Research concerning the existence of cognitive structures in children is critiqued, and problems with administering Piagetian tasks are pointed out. Educators should not restrict children's exposure to learning because, according to…

  12. Travelling the path from fantasy to history: the struggle for original history within Freud's early circle, 1908-1913.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotti, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Between 1908 and 1913, Freud and his disciples debated different theories of the origins of mankind, which Freud analysed in the context of his theory of neuroses. Wittels was the first of this group to present, in 1908, what Freud labelled a "fantasy" on the subject. Wittels contemplated various prehistoric scenarios (such as a murder of the father by his children) which he postulated as potential explanations for the origin of man's conception of religion, law and state. Freud (1913) eventually conceived his own human prehistory which differed significantly from the ideas of Wittels and his other disciples (Jung, Tausk) and allowed him to claim he now held a "historical" point of view that his disciples were missing.

  13. Psychoanalyst: Sigmund Freud

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭大任

    2006-01-01

    Sigmund Freud (1856-1939), Austrian psychiatrist, founder of psychoanalysis, is one of the major intellectual figures of the 20th century. He believed that psychological problems could be traced to repressed childhood experiences, particularly to repressed sexual desires. He also argued that dreams provide clues to the nature of psychological problems.

  14. Images of Freud

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent

    2015-01-01

    . This however is undoubtedly the case with the founder of psychoanalysis, Sigmund Freud (1856-1939), whose image is still immediately recognizable to a majority of the population of at least Europe and North America. Freud’s ideas (albeit in popularized form) also travel with ease in current public discourses...

  15. [Sigmund Freud and cocaine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebzeltern, G

    1983-11-11

    The basic tenet proposed by J. V. Scheidt states that the narcotic drug, cocaine played a role in the development of psychoanalysis which has been underestimated up to the present day. It is a fact that Freud himself took cocaine (in small doses) for about two years, and that he began his dream interpretation approximately ten years later. Scheidt believes that a long, unconscious conflict related to the cocaine-induced states of euphoria (ten years later) suddenly led to the beginnings of dream interpretation. The question to be answered now is: Why did this happen precisely in 1895? The foundations of psychoanalysis had already been laid, the application of the new method to the treatment of nervous disorders (heart complaints, train phobias, etc.) was certainly obvious. During this self-analysis it became necessary, first of all, to come to terms with the self-reproaches-which lay on the surface and were more accessible to consciousness-related to Freud's cocaine period (Fleischl-Marxow becomes addicted to cocaine, the most terrible night ever experienced, death of this friend, Freud's warning came too late). It was only when Freud has come to terms with this phase of his life that the road to the deepest part, the discovery of the Oedipus complex in the fall of 1897, was cleared.

  16. Freuds divan vender tilbage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staunæs, Dorthe; Juelskjær, Malou; Ratner, Helene Louise Friis

    2010-01-01

    Det affektive set up, der fulgte med Freuds divan, er i dag eksporteret ind i arbejdsrelationer, og den terapeutiske relation kan nu genfindes som en ledelsesrelation. Hvordan medproducerer en komfortteknologi som en sofa affektiv ledelse? Hvordan rekonstrueres 'de/t der skal ledes', og hvilke im...

  17. Images of Freud

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent

    2015-01-01

    . This however is undoubtedly the case with the founder of psychoanalysis, Sigmund Freud (1856-1939), whose image is still immediately recognizable to a majority of the population of at least Europe and North America. Freud’s ideas (albeit in popularized form) also travel with ease in current public discourses...

  18. Freuds divan vender tilbage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staunæs, Dorthe; Juelskjær, Malou; Ratner, Helene Gad

    2010-01-01

    Det affektive set up, der fulgte med Freuds divan, er i dag eksporteret ind i arbejdsrelationer, og den terapeutiske relation kan nu genfindes som en ledelsesrelation. Hvordan medproducerer en komfortteknologi som en sofa affektiv ledelse? Hvordan rekonstrueres 'de/t der skal ledes', og hvilke...

  19. Dewey and Freud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seckinger, Donald S.; Nel, Johanna

    John Dewey is known as the greatest and the most representative of U.S. philosophers. His philosophy, influenced by and developed during a period of great expansion in U.S. history, and great upheaval in U.S. social life, is characterized by a common sense, extroverted pragmatism. Sigmund Freud, in a ironic twist of fate, has been an important…

  20. Freud's private mini-monograph on his own dreams. A contribution to the celebration of the centenary of The interpretation of dreams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, H P

    2001-10-01

    A virtually unknown brief commentary by Freud on the characteristics of his own dreams is described and discussed. Freud's mini-monograph, discovered after some 80 years, has autobiographical, theoretical and organisational significance in the enigmatic context of the early development of psychoanalysis. Found among papers of Alfred Adler, this extraordinary document adds to our knowledge of psychoanalytic history, including the significance of dreams in the evolution of psychoanalytic thought. Freud's commentary permitted the identification of a particular dream as his own. This dream had been presented in anonymity to the fledgling Vienna Psychoanalytic Society for interpretation. The dream was later inserted, again anonymously, into The Interpretation of Dreams with Freud's own remarkable pre-oedipal interpretation. Freud's conflicted relationships with Adler and Jung are considered in historical context.

  1. Freud with Charcot: Freud's discovery and the question of diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepoutre, Thomas; Villa, François

    2015-04-01

    Although Charcot's seminal role in influencing Freud is widely stated, although Freud's trip to Paris to study with Charcot is well recognized as pivotal in his shift from neurological to psychopathological work, a key fact of the Freudian heuristic remains largely underestimated: namely, that Freud's psychopathological breakthrough, which gave birth to psychoanalysis, cannot be separated from his 'diagnostic preoccupation', which is a crucial and at times the first organizing principle of his earliest writings. The purpose of this article is therefore to reopen the question of diagnosis by following its development along the path leading from Charcot to Freud. The authors demonstrate that Freud's careful attention to diagnostic distinctions follows strictly in the direction of Charcot's 'nosological method'. More importantly, the article intends to identify the precise way in which his ideas operate in Freud's own work, in order to understand how Freud reinvests them to forge his own nosological system. If the authors trace the destiny of Charcot's lessons as they reach Freud's hands, it is the importance granted to mixed neuroses in Freud's psychopathology that allows them to pinpoint the role played by the diagnostic process in the rationality of psychoanalysis. Copyright © 2014 Institute of Psychoanalysis.

  2. Freuds divan @ vender tilbage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staunæs, Dorthe; Juelskjær, Malou

    . Konkret vises der, hvordan sofaers, lænestoles og Fat-boys® intra-aktion med forskellige subjekter og psy-ledelsesformer producerer stemning og følelser af samhørighed og loyalitet, men også foragt og mistro, der så igen skal ledes på. Det diskuteres om, og på hvilke måder Freuds divan, hvis formål det...... var - gennem en særlig intra-aktion med kroppen -  at skabe associationer, refleksioner og emotioner i et privat indelukke, er blevet generaliseret ud i andre møbler i mindre private rum, og endeligt diskuteres det om, og på hvilke måder den tilbagevendte Freuds divan® i dag eksporteres ind i andre...

  3. Jung and Lévy-Bruhl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Robert A

    2007-11-01

    For his knowledge of 'primitive' peoples, C. G. Jung relied on the work of Lucien Lévy-Bruhl (1857-1939), a French philosopher who in mid-career became an armchair anthropologist. In a series of books from 1910 on, Lévy-Bruhl asserted that 'primitive' peoples had been misunderstood by modern Westerners. Rather than thinking like moderns, just less rigorously, 'primitives' harbour a mentality of their own. 'Primitive' thinking is both 'mystical' and 'prelogical'. By 'mystical', Lévy-Bruhl meant that 'primitive' peoples experience the world as identical with themselves. Their relationship to the world, including to fellow human beings, is that of participation mystique. By 'prelogical', Lévy-Bruhl meant that 'primitive' thinking is indifferent to contradictions. 'Primitive' peoples deem all things identical with one another yet somehow still distinct. A human is at once a tree and still a human being. Jung accepted unquestioningly Lévy-Bruhl's depiction of the 'primitive' mind, even when Jung, unlike Lévy-Bruhl, journeyed to the field to see 'primitive' peoples firsthand. But Jung altered Lévy-Bruhl's conception of 'primitive' mentality in three key ways. First, he psychologized it. Whereas for Lévy-Bruhl 'primitive' thinking is to be explained sociologically, for Jung it is to be explained psychologically: 'primitive' peoples think as they do because they live in a state of unconsciousness. Second, Jung universalized 'primitive' mentality. Whereas for Lévy-Bruhl 'primitive' thinking is ever more being replaced by modern thinking, for Jung 'primitive' thinking is the initial psychological state of all human beings. Third, Jung appreciated 'primitive' thinking. Whereas for Lévy-Bruhl 'primitive' thinking is false, for Jung it is true--once it is recognized as an expression not of how the world but of how the unconscious works. I consider, along with the criticisms of Lévy-Bruhl's conception of 'primitive' thinking by his fellow anthropologists and

  4. Individuation:an Analysis of Passing Based on Jung`s Archetypes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Ya-fei

    2013-01-01

    This paper tries to interpreter Passing on the basis of Jungian archetypes. First this paper gives a brief introduction to Jung`s concept of individuation, then it analyses the archetypes:shadow, anima/animus, and persona of the individual respectively so that it shows that the individual has been through the process of individuation and finds her real self at last.

  5. [Freud's narcissism concept].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmowski, B

    1989-01-01

    The conception of narcissism according to Freud involves a number of different issues and hypotheses. Historically, the numerous contradictions and obscurities in the various psychoanalytical theories of narcissism were clear from the beginning. In this study it was attempted to define four central concepts and critically revise their clinical and theoretical relevance. Following a historical survey on the development of the term by Freud, the problems of defining narcissism by means of the theory of drive and libido are described. The corresponding hypothesis concerning developmental psychology will then be examined with regard to the results of recent infant research. Then the first (and for Freud most important) narcissism concept is represented, narcissism as a mode of object relation and a type of object choice. In conclusion, the new theories, which emphasize narcissism in terms of sense of one's self and self-esteem will be dealt with. Thus this study contributes to the differentiation of the various concepts in the clinical theory of narcissism, especially concerning the unravelling of the object relation- and self-theories from energetic-economical models and developmental speculation of primary narcissism.

  6. Was Sigmund Freud's death hastened?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macleod, Alastair D Sandy

    2017-08-01

    The terminal illness of Sigmund Freud has been considered by many authors to be an example of physician-enacted euthanasia. A review and a reconsideration of the published literature by Freud's doctors and biographers cast doubt on this opinion. Over his last 48 h, Freud was administered substantial morphine doses to sedate and relieve his pain. However, from a pharmacological perspective, the timing of his death would not be consistent with that of a fatal dose of opioid. Freud died a natural death. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  7. J. Piaget's theory of intelligence: operational aspect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xenia Naidenova

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available The Piaget's theory of intelligence is considered from the point of view of genesis and gradual development of human thinking operations. Attention is given to operational aspects of cognitive structures and knowledge. The significance of the Piaget's theory of intelligence is revealed for modeling conceptual reasoning in the framework of artificial intelligence.

  8. Jean Piaget's Debt to John Dewey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Jean Piaget became a veritable institution unto himself in education and psychology, largely as the result of his developmental-stage theory advanced over the second quarter of the twentieth century. Not until Piaget was 73 did he make mention of John Dewey's work at Dewey's laboratory school, founded in 1894 at the University of Chicago. But here…

  9. Jean Piaget's Debt to John Dewey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Jean Piaget became a veritable institution unto himself in education and psychology, largely as the result of his developmental-stage theory advanced over the second quarter of the twentieth century. Not until Piaget was 73 did he make mention of John Dewey's work at Dewey's laboratory school, founded in 1894 at the University of Chicago. But here…

  10. Piaget's Enduring Contribution to Developmental Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beilin, Harry

    1992-01-01

    Describes Jean Piaget's transformation of society's conception of childhood thought. Emphasizes the enduring contribution to developmental psychology of Piaget's constructivism, his description of developmental mechanisms, his cognitivism, his explication of structural and functional analysis, and his addressing of epistemological issues and…

  11. Piaget's Enduring Contribution to Developmental Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beilin, Harry

    1992-01-01

    Describes Jean Piaget's transformation of society's conception of childhood thought. Emphasizes the enduring contribution to developmental psychology of Piaget's constructivism, his description of developmental mechanisms, his cognitivism, his explication of structural and functional analysis, and his addressing of epistemological issues and…

  12. Freud in Introductory Psychology Texts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buys, Christian J.

    1976-01-01

    Discussed are presentations and evaluations of Freud found in psychology textbooks from 1908 to 1975 in terms of the empirical versus the nonempirical views about the proper subject matter of psychology. Findings indicate that psychologists remain divided in their attitudes toward Freud. (Author/DB)

  13. [Eugen Bleuler and Carl Gustav Jung's habilitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, H R

    1996-01-01

    Eugen Bleuler's letter of recommendation for Carl Gustav Jung's appointment as a lecturer In January 1905, Eugen Bleuler (1857-1939) wrote a letter of recommendation to the Medical Faculty of the University of Zurich, urging them to accept the application of Carl Gustav Jung (1875-1961) as a lecturer there. Bleuler's letter mentions the contribution to Jung's writing made by Franz Riklin (1878-1938), although he does not define it precisely. It is safe to say that, judging from the way in which Bleuler expresses his opinions in this letter, this may be regarded at the very least as an early sign of his receptiveness to the psychoanalytical ideas of the time.

  14. Child Psychologist:Jean Piaget

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭大任

    2006-01-01

    Jean Piaget(1896-1980),a professor of psychology at theUniversity of Geneva from 1929 to 1954,was a French Swissdevelopmental psychologist who is most well known for organizingcognitive development into a series of stages,including Sensorimotor,Pheoperational,Concrete Operational,and Formal Operational.Piaget’s theory supposes that people develop schemas(conceptualmodels)by either assimilating or accommodating new information.These concepts can be explained as fitting information in to existingschemas,and altering existing schemas in order to accommodate newinformation,respectively.

  15. Ricœur's Freud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J. Bernstein

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Ricoeur’s reading of Freud is one of the most comprehensive, perceptive and judicious explications of Freudianism—one that begins with his early “Project” of 1895 and culminates with the last book that Freud published, Moses and Monotheism. Ricoeur is successful in exposing some of the weaknesses in Freud, and even more importantly, why we need to move beyond Freud. I am deeply sympathetic with his claim that there is a dialectical relationship between a hermeneutics of suspicion and a restorative hermeneutics of meaning—and that they are integral to each other. And I also think he is successful in showing how, if we relentlessly pursue the logic of Freud’s thinking, we are led beyond Freud. But, even though he gives some indications of how such dialectic is to be developed, this remains a task (an Aufgabe that lies before us.

  16. [Wittgenstein and Freud].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabanchik, Samuel Manuel

    2005-01-01

    In this paper I present the most important limits in the reading that Ludwig Wittgenstein made of Sigmund Freud. In particular, starting from certain thematic axes (distinction causes / reasons, conception of the meaning, interpretation concept, the problem of the truth in the therapeutic treatment, the paper of the patient's conviction), I try to show that the position of Wittgenstein in front of the Freudian psychoanalysis was ambiguous: on one hand he conceives it as an example more than "philosophical mythology", but on the other hand, he is identified with the psychoanalyst and he is conceived itself as making something related with that an analyst makes.

  17. Freud: darkness and vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breger, Louis

    2012-06-01

    Freud's creation of psychoanalysis is the starting place for a great many forms of contemporary psychodynamic psychotherapy, despite the fact that his work is very much a mixture of brilliant insights and misconceptions. Here, I will attempt to describe both the valuable contributions and the wrong turns, and to show how both can be understood in terms of the traumas he suffered as a child, as well as his particular adaptations to them. A review of his treatment of a number of patients will illustrate this discussion.

  18. Freud: um epidemiologista?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís David Castiel

    1988-09-01

    Full Text Available Apresenta-se uma abordagem do raciocínio causal de Freud para as origens da histeria. Para isto, utilizam-se alguns cânones do "Sistema de Lógica" de John Stuart Mill. Percebe-se que, mesmo sem evidências empíricas, a formulação freudiana pode ser incluída dentro da lógica de Mill para a elaboração de hipóteses causais na pesquisa epidemiológica.

  19. The Pauli-Jung conjecture and its impact today

    CERN Document Server

    Fuchs, Christopher A

    2014-01-01

    Related to the key areas of Pauli''s and Jung''s joint interests, the book covers overlapping issues from the perspectives of physics, philosophy, and psychology. Of primary significance are epistemological questions connected to issues such as realism, measurement, observation, consciousness, and the unconscious. The contributions assess the extensive material that we have about Pauli''s and Jung''s ideas today, with particular respect to concrete research questions and projects based on and re...

  20. Why did Sigmund Freud refuse to see Pierre Janet? Origins of psychoanalysis: Janet, Freud or both?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Michael

    2017-09-01

    Pierre Janet and Joseph Breuer were the true originators of psychoanalysis. Freud greatly elaborated on their findings. Freud initially admitted these facts but denied them in later life. Janet discovered the concept transference before Freud.

  1. Sonho, memória e o reencontro de Freud com o cérebro

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeiro Sidarta

    2003-01-01

    Para que serve sonhar? A vasta contribuição sobre a função dos sonhos dada por Freud e Jung foi em grande parte ignorada pela ciência, pela falta de um método quantitativo e de hipóteses testáveis. Não obstante, vários resultados experimentais corroboram dois importantes "insights" psicanalíticos: 1) que os sonhos freqüentemente contêm elementos da experiência do dia anterior, denominados de "restos do dia", e 2) que estes "restos" incluem atividades mnemônicas, levando portanto a uma facilit...

  2. Vygotsky and Piaget: Scientific concepts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alves P.F.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Jean Piaget’s so-called biological perspective is often paired with the viewpoint of Lev Vygotsky when we speak of learning in humans. Both authors acknowledged the active role of children in the construction of knowledge. However, they differ in that, unlike Piaget, Vygotsky believed that the assimilation of new information does not have to wait for an appropriate level of development but must, on the contrary, produce that development through instruction; thus, cooperation between teacher and student promotes the development of higher psychological functions. The present research presents proof that school instruction is instrumental in this process. Samples of adults who had acquired distinct levels of schooling (from illiterates to university students are differentiated experimentally through the use of four Piagetian cognitive problem-solving tasks created for adolescents and adults. The present research suggests that instructional level is the distinctive factor in the development of those problem-solving capacities that implicate higher psychological functions.

  3. Jean Piaget' teos mõttestruktuuridest

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2002-01-01

    TPÜ kasvatusteaduste teaduskond esitles 29. okt. 2002.a. Šveitsi psühholoogi Jean Piaget' ja Alina Szeminska teost "Arvumõiste kujunemine lapsel". Kommenteerib TPÜ psühholoogiaprofessor Voldemar Kolga

  4. Gnosticism and psychology. Jung's Septem sermones ad mortuos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, E M

    1990-10-01

    In this paper, I have attempted a historical analysis of what Jung might have been thinking when he wrote the 'Seven sermons'. To this end, I tried to ascertain which Gnostic texts Jung may have consulted before writing it. These documents were then compared with the 'Seven sermons', and numerous affinities noted between it and the Gnostic texts. Jung's contemporaneous academic works were then compared with this treatise, and parallels were established between the 'Seven sermons' and Jung's emerging psychology of the unconscious. In the process, an attempt was made to show how Jung made use of Gnostic themes in his emerging psychology. While there is no way of knowing precisely what Jung was thinking when he wrote the 'Seven sermons', it is clear that he was well acquainted not only with the work of Basilides, but also with the work of other Gnostic thinkers. It is not enough to assume that because Jung chose the pseudonym of Basilides, he was necessarily Jung's primary Gnostic influence. At the same time, it is also evident that Jung was developing his own psychology during the writing of the 'Seven sermons'. We recall Jung's observations regarding the 'Seven sermons', which we quoted on page 17: These conversations with the dead formed a kind of prelude to what I had to communicate to the world about the unconscious . . . All my works, all my creative activity, has come from those initial fantasies and dreams which began in 1912, almost fifty years ago. Everything that I accomplished in later life was already contained in them, although at first only in the form of emotions and images (Jung 21, p. 192). On the basis of what has been published, there are enough affinities between his academic work and this treatise to posit that the 'Seven sermons' played an important role in the emergence of Jung's psychology. Given these numerous parallels, I suspect that Jung's unpublished writings, including the Red Book, would only strengthen the arguments put forth in this

  5. Jung's psychological analysis of Imago Dei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Ryška Vajdová

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available One of the most intricate topics that are still open in connection to a Swiss psychologist Carl Gustav Jung is religion and related issues: What is the relation between religion and psychology? What is Jung’s personal stance? Did Jung reject religion as a relict of primitive way of thinking or did he try to replace religion with psychology? Some speculations drawing primarily from Jung’s imagery and symbolism revealed in Liber Novus put forward the claim that he even aspired to found a new religion. This paper will attempt to square Jung’s attitude to religion, mainly Christianity. I will point out the main ideas of his psychology of religion. I will follow the evolution of particular ideas related to religion starting with his early works right through to his last.

  6. Archetypes and patriarchy: Eliade and Jung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadow, M J

    1992-09-01

    This paper first presents the understandings of the concept of archetype held by Carl Jung and Mircea Eliade. After comparing their use of the term, the paper next presents some major archetypes concerning sex roles that each theorist describes. The problems such notions create for women are analyzed. The paper ends with a discussion of some possible solutions to the difficulties caused by the human proclivity for archetypal imaging.

  7. Dream İnterpretation of Freud's Method

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines Sigmund Freud's views are in line with the dream events. Study entry, composed of six chapters and conclusion, is the title. The first article defined as a dream, interpretation of studies and comments on science are recounted. The second school of psychoanalysis and Sigmund Freud's dream theory as the explanation is. Especially how to create a dream that Freud, and Freud's dream interpretation dream interpretation method based on the criticisms of him by the foundation ar...

  8. Two Jungs. Apropos a paper by Mark Saban.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giegerich, Wolfgang

    2015-06-01

    Jung's idea of the 'personal equation' amounts to the reflection that theoretical differences between the psychologies that people teach are rooted in their personalities, in other words, that they are due to the psychology each one 'has'. This concept also applies to different interpretations of Jung's work. The serious difficulties that Mark Saban has with my psychology are a case in point. Recourse to the concept of the personal equation reveals that Saban has his Jung and I have mine. With his insistence on his Talmudic methodological principle of dream interpretation, that 'the dream is its own interpretation', according to Saban Jung means nothing but a rejection of Freudian free association. My Jung goes far beyond that. Jung understands this methodological principle above all in terms of what he calls 'circumambulation'. The main part of this paper is devoted to an elucidation of what circumambulation involves as a mode of dream interpretation. The paper concludes with the distinction Jung himself introduced between two types of reading of his work, either as 'paper' and 'dead nostrums' or as 'fire and wind', and pleads for a reconstruction of Jung's psychology as a whole in terms of his most advanced, deepest insights, instead of a dogmatic reading mainly based on the early Jung, a reading for which his later revolutionary insights are at best negligible embellishments. © 2015, The Society of Analytical Psychology.

  9. Jung's view on myth and post-modern psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Raya A

    2003-11-01

    Post-modern psychology embodies two core themes, the social mind and the narrative self. Whereas the social-mind thesis seems diametrically opposed to Jung's position regarding human nature, the narrative-self thesis is associated with research and theorizing about personal myth and mythmaking in ways that could make contact with Jung's concerns. Jung's view is examined here with particular attention to McAdams' theory of narrative identity. It is suggested that the ostensible differences between Jung and post-modern psychology might reflect divergent interests, rather than necessarily irreconcilable worldviews.

  10. Piaget, Marx and the Political Ideology of Schooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Barry A.

    1978-01-01

    Examines Jean Piaget's developmental theories and evaluates how his psychology of constructivism relates to contemporary behavioral sciences, modern education, and modern monopoly capitalism. Concludes that Piaget's constructivism is inconsistent with capitalist ideology and is widely misunderstood by educators. (DB)

  11. Piaget, Marx and the Political Ideology of Schooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Barry A.

    1978-01-01

    Examines Jean Piaget's developmental theories and evaluates how his psychology of constructivism relates to contemporary behavioral sciences, modern education, and modern monopoly capitalism. Concludes that Piaget's constructivism is inconsistent with capitalist ideology and is widely misunderstood by educators. (DB)

  12. Psychoanalytic ethics: Edoardo Weiss, Freud, and Mussolini.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roazen, P

    1991-10-01

    This paper examines Edoardo Weiss's correspondence with S. Freud regarding Concetta Forzano's analysis and Forzano's efforts to intercede with Mussolini on Freud's behalf after the Nazis invaded Austria in 1938. Freud's reliance on Mussolini can be explained by traditional Viennese attitudes toward Italy, the Duce's protectiveness about Austrian independence, and the relatively benign attitude of the Fascist regime towards Jews.

  13. Jung's views of Nazi Germany: the first year and Jung's transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenl, William; Schoenl, Linda

    2016-09-01

    This article first considers Jung's response to the coming to power of the Nazis in Germany. It brings forth evidence that, besides wanting to preserve psychotherapy in Germany and maintain the international connection between the German and other communities of psychotherapists, he wanted to advance Jungian psychology - his psychology - in Germany. It also presents evidence that, although he occasionally made some anti-Semitic statements during this early period, he was not anti-Semitic in the way the Nazis were. The paper then argues that after Gustav Bally's criticisms in the Neue Zuercher Zeitung in February 1934, Jung entered into a transitional period that spring during which he became warier both of the Nazis and of making any statements that could be construed as being anti-Semitic. Schoenl and Peck (2012) have shown how Jung's views of Nazi Germany changed from 1933 to March 1936. This present article demonstrates very significant changes in Jung's views during the important early part of this period, that is from January 1933 - when Hitler became Chancellor of Germany - through to the spring of 1934. It draws on evidence from archival and other primary sources.

  14. La escuela de Carl G. Jung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Ortiz Osés

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo se presenta la Escuela de C.G.Jung como un movimiento que, siguiendo al psicólogo suizo, trata de coimplicar inconsciente y consciente en un lenguaje simbólico de sentido. Como representante de la Escuela junguiana se ofrece la psicología de Erich Neumann, perteneciente al Círculo Eranos y especializado en el estudio de la correlación entre la urdimbre matriarcal y la estructura patriarcal, cuya síntesis anímica constituye el sentido.

  15. On Freud's theory of law and religion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, David

    This paper is a critical engagement with Freud's anthropological theory of the origins of law and religion, which Freud developed as his representation and development of the Oedipal myth. Freud's mythology, it is argued, is the theoretical result of the essentially narrative nature of psychoanalytical praxis. Freud's myth, especially its treatment of patricide as the original sin, is seen to be a displacement of the biblical myth of fratricide as the original sin. It is argued that the biblical myth is more coherent than Freud's myth, and that it corresponds to the reality of the human condition better than Freud's myth. The paper concludes with the suggestion that the acceptance of the biblical myth in place of Freud's does not necessarily entail a rejection of psychoanalysis as a praxis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Gradiva: freud, fetishism, and Pompeian Fantasy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, John

    2013-10-01

    This paper is a critical reconsideration of Freud's analysis (1907) of Wilhelm Jensen's novella Gradiva: A Pompeian Fantasy (1903). Freud's interest was aroused by the parallels between Jensen's presentation of dreams and Freud's model of dream formation just published in The Interpretation of Dreams (1900). Freud also acclaims Jensen's presentation of the formation and "cure" of his protagonist's delusion about a marble bas-relief of a woman walking. This paper argues for the centrality of the phenomenon of fetishism, briefly considered but excluded from Freud's analysis. The fantasy of Gradiva as "the necessary conditions for loving" (Freud 1910, pp. 165-166) is also a key thesis of the essay, which makes use of the newly translated Freud-Jensen correspondence contained in this article's Appendix. © 2013 The Psychoanalytic Quarterly, Inc.

  17. Jung's Psychology and Deleuze's Philosophy: The Unconscious in Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semetsky, Inna; Delpech-Ramey, Joshua A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper addresses the unconscious dimension as articulated in Carl Jung's depth psychology and in Gilles Deleuze's philosophy. Jung's theory of the archetypes and Deleuze's pedagogy of the concept are two complementary resources that posit individuation as the goal of human development and self-education in practice. The paper asserts that…

  18. Winnicott on Jung: destruction, creativity and the unrepressed unconscious.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith-Owen, William

    2011-02-01

    This paper considers Winnicott's critique of Jung, principally expressed in his review of Memories, Dreams, Reflections, which asserts that Jung's creative contribution to analysis was constrained by his failure to integrate his 'primitive destructive impulses', subsequent to inadequate early containment. It is argued that although Winnicott's diagnosis illuminates Jung's shadow, particularly his constraints vis-à-vis the repressed Freudian unconscious, it fails to appreciate the efficacy of the compensatory containment Jung found in the collective unconscious. This enigmatic relationship between destruction and creativity-so central to late Winnicott-is illuminated by Matte Blanco's bi-logic, and further explored in relation to William Blake. Winnicott's personal resolution through his Jung-inspired 'splitting headache' dream of destruction-previously considered in this Journal by Morey (2005) and Sedgwick (2008)-is given particular attention.

  19. Another serious misunderstanding: Jung, Giegerich and a premature requiem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saban, Mark

    2015-02-01

    Barreto's paper, 'Requiem for analytical psychology' utilized Jung's dreams and visions to argue for the obsolescence of Jungian psychology. Its thesis rested upon the theoretical assumptions of Giegerich's psychology as a Discipline of Interiority, which he and Giegerich claim are themselves based in Jung's psychology. Here I argue that that claim is misplaced because it depends upon a fundamental misunderstanding of the nature of Jung's psychological project. I shall further argue that Giegerich's arguments for a Jungian basis to his psychology rely upon misreadings and decontextualisations of Jung's original texts. Finally, I shall attempt to draw attention to the weaknesses and contradictions involved in Barreto's interpretations of Jung's dreams and visions. © 2015, The Society of Analytical Psychology.

  20. Kohlberg and Piaget: Differences and Similarities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the relationship between Lawrence Kohlberg's cognitive-stage theory as a further development of Piaget's moral theory. Argues Kohlberg describes moral thought and not the formation of the independent moral function. Finds Kohlberg's major interest is in the characteristics of stages of individual moral reasoning and the principle of…

  1. Critical Contributions of Piaget to Humanistic Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassel, Russell N.

    Humanistic psychologists now embrace many of the same principles which served as the basis for Piaget's theory. These same theories were described earlier by John Locke and Immanuel Kant, and were the basis of the new "Humanism" movement in Germany in the 18th century. If one considers humanistic psychology as a kind of culmination of…

  2. Kohlberg and Piaget: Differences and Similarities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the relationship between Lawrence Kohlberg's cognitive-stage theory as a further development of Piaget's moral theory. Argues Kohlberg describes moral thought and not the formation of the independent moral function. Finds Kohlberg's major interest is in the characteristics of stages of individual moral reasoning and the principle of…

  3. [The Freud Museum in London as a research centre].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar, Michael; Tögel, Christfried

    2006-01-01

    The paper presents a compact description of those resources of the Freud Museum most relevant for the Freud scholar: 1. the Archives with its collection of letters, documents, photos, and press cuttings from the 1920s and 1930s, as well as reproductions of paintings and photos of tourist features, compiled by Freud himself; 2. Freud's archaeological collection; 3. Freud's library.

  4. A visit paid to Jung by Alwine von Keller.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardini, Riccardo; Quaglino, Gian Piero; Romano, Augusto

    2011-04-01

    In the winter of 1943-1944, Jung had suffered a coronary thrombosis which almost cost him his life. During his illness, Jung experienced a series of visions, described in his Memories, Dreams, Reflections, which were also to influence significantly the development of his theoretical thinking. On 27(th) September 1944, Alwine von Keller (1878-1965) paid a visit to Jung, while he was still convalescing, in Zurich and documented her meeting with him in a series of notes, recently discovered, which testify to the fact that, at the time of their meeting, Jung was engaged in writing the 'Salt' chapter of Mysterium coniunctionis and investigating the alchemistic symbolism of the 'sea'. This theme seems to testify to a continuity of interests on Jung's part with the seminar he held at Eranos the previous year on the cartographic art of Opicinus de Canistris (1296-c.1352). With its addition of many unpublished details, Alwine von Keller's notes supplement the report which Jung made of his visions experienced during his sickness in MDR. In particular, these attest to the fact that Jung had attributed the terrible experience which he had endured to the problem of the conjunctio, which was confronting him from the theoretical point of view in his writing of Mysterium coniunctionis.

  5. Winnicott's invitation to 'further games of Jung-analysis'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith-Owen, William

    2015-02-01

    Winnicott signs off his celebrated review of Jung's (1963) autobiography Memories, Dreams, Reflections with the warning that translation of 'erreichten' as 'attained' (implying assimilation) rather than as 'reached to', could 'queer the pitch for further games of Jung-analysis'. This subtly underscores his view that Jung--who he described earlier as 'mentally split' and lacking 'a self with which to know'--remained essentially dissociated. However, Winnicott, whilst immersed in this work on Jung, wrote a letter to Michael Fordham describing himself as suffering 'a lifelong malady' of 'dissociation'. But this he now reported repaired through a 'splitting headache' dream of destruction, dreamt 'for Jung, and for some of my patients, as well as for myself' (Winnicott 1989, p. 228). Winnicott's recurrent concern during his last decade was with 'reaching to'--that quintessential Winnicottian term--some reparative experience that could address such difficulties in constellating a 'unit self'. This is correlated with his engagement with Jung and tracked through his contemporaneous clinical work, particularly 'Fear of Breakdown' (1963). Themes first introduced by Sedgwick (2008) and developed by the author's earlier 'Winnicott on Jung; destruction, creativity and the unrepressed unconscious' (2011) are given further consideration.

  6. C. G. Jung: the Man and His Work, Then and Now.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Irving E.

    This paper discusses the life of Carl Jung, analyzing the relationship to his work of selected events in his life. Biographical elements of Jung's life such as his family and childhood experiences are described, and specific incidents that Jung reported to have had a great impact on his emotional health are highlighted. Jung's professional…

  7. Freud on play, games, and sports fanaticism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holowchak, M Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Much has been written in the secondary literature on Freud's aggression-release perspective vis-à-vis competitive sports. Very little has been written, however, on Freud's own explicit contribution to play, games, and sport. That is likely the result of Freud's reluctance to take up them--especially from the gamesman's and sportsman's points of view. One can, however, tease out the development of Freud's thoughts on games, play, and sport through a careful examination of his corpus over time. In doing so, one finds an early view of play and games, where the drives behind those activities are self- and other-preservative, and a later view, where Freud introduces his death drive. The article ends with some notions on what Freud might have said on the fanaticism that accompanies competitive sport, had he expressly taken up the issue.

  8. Jung, weiblich und Journalistin: Endstation Prekariat?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Lettner

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Die Medienbranche ist seit nunmehr vier Jahrzehnten von Wandlungsprozessen gekennzeichnet. Dabei sind die strukturellen Umbrüche im Bereich der Massenmedien bereits Grundlage zahlreicher wissenschaftlicher Arbeiten zum journalistischen Feld; die zunehmende Ungleichheit, die vor allem weibliche Akteure innerhalb des Feldes in Österreich erleben, wurde bisher jedoch nicht eingehend thematisiert. Aufbauend auf den Datensätzen, die 2010 an der Universität Salzburg gewonnen wurden (vgl. Hummel et al. 2010, und der Theorie des französischen Soziologen Pierre Bourdieu werden im folgenden Beitrag Struktur dieser Ungleichheit – derzeit sind junge Frauen im von älteren Männern dominierten journalistischen Feld Österreichs doppelt benachteiligt –, ihre Ursachen, Reproduktionsmechanismen und mögliche Gegenstrategien aufgezeigt.

  9. Freud y la sexualidad femenina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Pereña García

    1981-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuestro propósito es realizar un somero análisis de la cuestión o enigma (de ambas formas suele referirse la tradición psicoanalítica al tema de la sexualidad femenina en la obra de FREUD. Y nos limitamos a los textos que plantean concretamente, y en el seno del despliegue del complejo de Edipo, el problema.

  10. Freud y la sexualidad femenina.

    OpenAIRE

    1981-01-01

    Nuestro propósito es realizar un somero análisis de la cuestión o enigma (de ambas formas suele referirse la tradición psicoanalítica al tema) de la sexualidad femenina en la obra de FREUD. Y nos limitamos a los textos que plantean concretamente, y en el seno del despliegue del complejo de Edipo, el problema.

  11. Analysis and Visualization of Network Data Using JUNG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinaz Sayma

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The JUNG (Java Universal Network/Graph Framework is a free, open-source software library that provides a common and extendible language for the manipulation, analysis, and visualization of data that can be represented as a graph or network. It is written in the Java programming language, allowing JUNG-based applications to make use of the extensive built-in capabilities of the Java Application Programming Interface (API, as well as those of other existing third-party Java libraries. In this paper, the JUNG Framework is described which is used to visualize data.

  12. Sigmund Freud's physicians and "the monster".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tainmont, J

    2007-01-01

    Freud received treatment from several physicians--including rhinologists, oro-facial surgeons or radiotherapists--for a cancer of the palate. Furthermore, as a consequence of his operation, Freud was required to wear a prosthesis that he probably named "the monster". This paper provides some details about the physicians who cured Freud and looks at the prosthesis he was forced to wear until his death.

  13. Eugen Bleuler 150: Bleuler's reception of Freud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalzell, Thomas G

    2007-12-01

    On the 150th anniversary of Eugen Bleuler's birth, this article examines his reception of Sigmund Freud and his use of Freudian theory to understand the symptoms of schizophrenia. In addition, in contrast to earlier interpretations of Bleuler's relationship with Freud in terms of an eventual personal and theoretical incompatibility, the article demonstrates that, although Bleuler did distance himself from the psychoanalytic movement, he remained consistent in his views on Freud's theories.

  14. The Application of Jung's Analytical Psychology to Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaker, Paul

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the application of Jungian analytical psychology to education. The author outlines Jung's concepts which relate to the foundations of education, personality development, cognitive processes, motivation, and curriculum theory. (AM)

  15. Jaan Jung. Muinasaja teadus eestlaste maalt III / Villem Reiman

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Reiman, Villem, 1861-1917

    2015-01-01

    Jaan Jungi elust ja tegevusest ning tema raamatust: Muinasajateadus eestlaste maalt : III, Kohalised muinasaja kirjeldused Tallinnamaalt / Kogunud ja välja annud J. Jung. Tallinn : A. Busch'i rmtkpl., 1910

  16. The Face We Put On: Carl Jung for Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Robert P.

    1994-01-01

    Examines Carl Jung's concept of the "persona" (his term for the masks people wear). Notes how teachers use personae and suggests ways to restore the energy that teachers lose when hiding inside their personae. (SR)

  17. "Decknamen or pseudochemical language"? Eirenaeus Philalethes and Carl Jung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, W R

    1996-01-01

    It is impossible to investigate the historiography of alchemy without encountering the ideas of the "father of analytical psychology", Carl Jung. Jung argued that alchemy, viewed as a diachronic, trans-cultural entity, was concerned more with psychological states occurring in the mind of the practitioner than with real chemical processes. In the course of elucidating this idea, Jung draws on a number of alchemical authors from the early modern period. One of these is Eirenaeus Philalethes, the pen name of George Starkey (1628-1665), a native of Bermuda who was educated at Harvard College, and who later immigrated to London. A careful analysis of Starkey's work shows, however, that Jung was entirely wrong in his assessment of this important representative of seventeenth-century alchemy. This finding casts serious doubt on the Jungian interpretation of alchemy as a whole.

  18. Jaan Jung. Muinasaja teadus eestlaste maalt III / Villem Reiman

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Reiman, Villem, 1861-1917

    2015-01-01

    Jaan Jungi elust ja tegevusest ning tema raamatust: Muinasajateadus eestlaste maalt : III, Kohalised muinasaja kirjeldused Tallinnamaalt / Kogunud ja välja annud J. Jung. Tallinn : A. Busch'i rmtkpl., 1910

  19. From Moscovici to Jung: the feminine archetype and its iconography

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jesús Saiz Galdós; Beatriz Fernández Ruiz; José Luis Álvaro Estramiana

    2007-01-01

    .... Using Jung's concept of archetype to analyse women´s iconographic representations allows us to combine the notion of the collective unconscious with that of social representations. Whereas Moscovici...

  20. Piaget, Super 8mm, and Preschool Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainard, H. Lois

    According to the theory of Piaget, until the age of two the chief developmental factor of a child is the permanence of an object or the ability to retain mental images. Between two and six he begins to use mental images, and as he develops the ability to retain a mental image he begins to imitate things from the past which he has seen or…

  1. Analysis and Visualization of Network Data Using JUNG

    OpenAIRE

    Pinaz Sayma

    2014-01-01

    The JUNG (Java Universal Network/Graph) Framework is a free, open-source software library that provides a common and extendible language for the manipulation, analysis, and visualization of data that can be represented as a graph or network. It is written in the Java programming language, allowing JUNG-based applications to make use of the extensive built-in capabilities of the Java Application Programming Interface (API), as well as those of other existing third-party Java li...

  2. Jung's twin brother. Otto Gross and Carl Gustav Jung. With an hitherto unpublished letter by C. G. Jung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuer, G

    2001-10-01

    This paper is a preliminary communication of several years of research into the life and work of the Austrian psychoanalyst and anarchist Otto Gross (1877-1920). Although he played a pivotal role in the birth of modernity, acting as a significant influence upon psychiatry, psychoanalysis, ethics, sociology and literature, he has remained virtually unknown to this day. Following a biographical sketch and an overview of his main theoretical contributions, the impact of Gross' life and work on the development of analytical theory and practice is described. His relationship with some of the key figures in psychoanalysis is presented, with particular emphasis on his connections to Jung. The paper concludes with an account of relevant contemporary interest in his work: the founding of the International Otto Gross Society, the first edition of The Collected Works of Otto Gross on the Internet, and the 1st and 2nd International Otto Gross Congresses which took place in Berlin in 1999 and at the Burghölzli Clinic, Zürich, in October 2000.

  3. Junge relationships in measurement data for cyclic siloxanes in air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, Matthew; Kierkegaard, Amelie; Genualdi, Susie; Harner, Tom; Scheringer, Martin

    2013-10-01

    In 1974, Junge postulated a relationship between variability of concentrations of gases in air at remote locations and their atmospheric residence time, and this Junge relationship has subsequently been observed empirically for a range of trace gases. Here, we analyze two previously-published datasets of concentrations of cyclic volatile methyl siloxanes (cVMS) in air and find Junge relationships in both. The first dataset is a time series of concentrations of decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5) measured between January and June, 2009 at a rural site in southern Sweden that shows a Junge relationship in the temporal variability of the measurements. The second dataset consists of measurements of hexamethylcyclotrisiloxane (D3), octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4) and D5 made simultaneously at 12 sites in the Global Atmospheric Passive Sampling (GAPS) network that shows a Junge relationship in the spatial variability of the three cVMS congeners. We use the Junge relationship for the GAPS dataset to estimate atmospheric lifetimes of dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane (D6), 8:2-fluorotelomer alcohol and trichlorinated biphenyls that are within a factor of 3 of estimates based on degradation rate constants for reaction with hydroxyl radical determined in laboratory studies.

  4. Teoría del conocimiento según Piaget. Theory of knowledge according to Piaget.

    OpenAIRE

    Castaño, Marta

    2006-01-01

    Theory of knowledge according to Piaget. Resumen Para hacer un acercamiento a las formulaciones piagetianas sobre el sujeto, hay que comenzar aclarando que Piaget no es un psicólogo sino un “epistemólogo genético” como el mismo se autodenomina, con lo que podemos entender que se interesa por conocer e investigar el origen y la naturaleza del conocimiento, y como se da éste a través del desarrollo; lo cual muestra claramente sus prioridades intelectuales como biólogo y filosofo. Para logra...

  5. The influence of Nietzsche on Freud's ideas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, A H; Chapman-Santana, M

    1995-02-01

    The striking analogies between the ideas of Freud and Friedrich Nietzsche, whose works were published from one to three decades before those of Freud, have been commented upon, but no previous systematic correlation of the ideas of Nietzsche and Freud has been made. The major works of Nietzsche were read, and each possible analogy to an idea later broached by Freud was correlated by a systematic review of his works. Any references to Nietzsche in Freud's writings and reported conversation were culled. Concepts of Nietzsche which are similar to those of Freud include (a) the concept of the unconscious mind; (b) the idea that repression pushes unacceptable feelings and thoughts into the unconscious and thus makes the individual emotionally more comfortable and effective; (c) the conception that repressed emotions and instinctual drives later are expressed in disguised ways (for example, hostile feelings and ideas may be expressed as altruistic sentiments and acts); (d) the concept of dreams as complex, symbolic "illusions of illusions" and dreaming itself as a cathartic process which has healthy properties; and (e) the suggestion that the projection of hostile, unconscious feelings onto others, who are then perceived as persecutors of the individual, is the basis of paranoid thinking. Some of Freud's basic terms are identical to those used by Nietzsche. Freud repeatedly stated that he had never read Nietzsche. Evidence contradicting this are his references to Nietzsche and his quotations and paraphrases of him, in causal conversation and his now published personal correspondence, as well as in his early and later writings.

  6. Looking for Skinner and Finding Freud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overskeid, Geir

    2007-01-01

    Sigmund Freud and B. F. Skinner are often seen as psychology's polar opposites. It seems this view is fallacious. Indeed, Freud and Skinner had many things in common, including basic assumptions shaped by positivism and determinism. More important, Skinner took a clear interest in psychoanalysis and wanted to be analyzed but was turned down. His…

  7. We're Assigning the Wrong Freud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shusterman, Noah

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author, a lecturer in Temple University's intellectual-heritage program, explains why colleges are teaching undergraduates the wrong Freud. Though the book "Civilization and Its Discontents" (1930), which most professors use, is Freud's most consistent and most convincing attempt to apply psychoanalytic theory to society as a…

  8. Knowledge, Power, and Freud's Clark Conference Lectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Martha; Makay, John J.

    1988-01-01

    Examines Freud's Clark Conference Lectures in which he offers a case in point of the intersection among knowledge, power, and discourse. Argues that Freud's rhetorical action constituted the "new" knowledge of psychoanalysis, while simultaneously forging relationships between the scientific and medical communities that endowed the…

  9. We're Assigning the Wrong Freud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shusterman, Noah

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author, a lecturer in Temple University's intellectual-heritage program, explains why colleges are teaching undergraduates the wrong Freud. Though the book "Civilization and Its Discontents" (1930), which most professors use, is Freud's most consistent and most convincing attempt to apply psychoanalytic theory to society as a…

  10. Looking for Skinner and Finding Freud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overskeid, Geir

    2007-01-01

    Sigmund Freud and B. F. Skinner are often seen as psychology's polar opposites. It seems this view is fallacious. Indeed, Freud and Skinner had many things in common, including basic assumptions shaped by positivism and determinism. More important, Skinner took a clear interest in psychoanalysis and wanted to be analyzed but was turned down. His…

  11. Jung as psychologist of religion and Jung as philosopher of religion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Robert A

    2010-06-01

    Is it possible to be both a psychologist and a philosopher? Is it possible for a psychologist, or more generally a social scientist, to use social scientific findings to make philosophical claims? Specifically, is it possible for a social scientist to use social scientific findings to determine the existence of God? Did Jung profess to be only a psychologist or also a philosopher? If he professed to be both, did he enlist his psychological findings to make philosophical claims? Specifically, did he enlist his psychological findings to determine the existence of God?

  12. Ideas Fundamentales de Sigmund Freud.

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Plata Mújica

    2006-01-01

    Este tema es en sí mismo muy complejo dado que sugiere la necesidad de transmitir una síntesis de una obra que se desarrolló a través de muchos años y que si bien surgió de la experiencia personal del investigador inicial se continuó a través de todo el siglo pasado a través de sus discípulos y continuadores. Es decir sus investigaciones abrieron un campo prácticamente inexplorado que aun hoy continua siendo enriquecido por sus continuadores. Freud fue un médico humanista que...

  13. La vigencia de Sigmund Freud

    OpenAIRE

    Juan Fernando Pérez

    2010-01-01

    En el artículo se hace un examen de los principales cuestionamientos que ha afrontado la obra de Freud, desde la aparición del psicoanálisis hasta hoy, para mostrar cómo los unos se suceden a los otros, en general, sin que por ello se haya nunca logrado invalidar verdaderamente ni la teoría ni la práctica analítica y, más bien, expresan la dificultad que presenta la época para asumir los hallazgos freudianos. En esa perspectiva se muestra cómo la subvers...

  14. Two in one or one in two? Pushing off from Jung with Wolfgang Giegerich.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saban, Mark

    2015-11-01

    This paper responds to a recent paper by Wolfgang Giegerich entitled 'Two Jungs: apropos a paper by Mark Saban'. Giegerich disputes my assertion that the 'rigorous notion' at the heart of his psychology 'finds no source in Jung's psychology, implicit or explicit'. In order to do this he posits the existence of two Jungs, an exoteric Jung and an esoteric Jung. The implications of Giegerich's binary scission of Jung are explored in this paper, and show that the tendency to exalt one Jung while disparaging the other betrays a comprehensive blindness toward the contradictory complexity of Jung's psychology as a whole. It is suggested that this blindness is the consequence of Giegerich's systematic prioritization of a neo-Hegelian agenda that is in profound conflict with the telos of Jung's psychology.

  15. Jung, Evans-Wentz and various other gurus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, William

    2003-09-01

    How did Jung become deeply concerned with Asian religions and particularly with the Tibetan Buddhism of a Welshman from Trenton, New Jersey? Could that man be considered one of Jung's gurus? This essay begins six years after Jung, at twenty, was admitted to the medical school of Basel University and became a member of the Zofingiaverein, a student society. The next year he gave the first of a series of lectures on the interpretation of Christ as the model of the 'god-man', like the Apostle Paul, Confucius, Zoroaster and the Buddha, who was 'drummed into the Hindu boy'. (Jung's Zofingia Lectures were discovered only after his death, in 1961, and were published in English in 1983). The present essay discusses Jung's early Buddhist interest as displayed in The Psychology of the Unconscious (finally, in a revision, entitled Symbols of Transformation), in Psychological Types and later in his foreword of the Wilhelm translation of the I Ching. Jung was influenced by the gurus Richard Wilhelm and his son Hellmut, the scholar J. W. Hauer (with whom he later broke off relations because of Hauer's Nazi politics), the indologist Heinrich Zimmer, and the Zen master D. T. Suzuki. Walter Yeeling Wentz was born in Trenton in 1878 and brought up in his family's theosophist faith. The Wentzes moved to San Diego in 1900, and Walter added his mother's Celtic surname, Evans, to the German Wentz. He was educated at Stanford University and travelled in Europe, studying Celtic folklore, and widely in the Near East, Tibet, India, and Oxford--studying religions everywhere and editing Tibetan books. He lived his last decades in San Diego and conducted a correspondence with Jung, while living in a cheap hotel, or in an ashram.

  16. A European Teaching Model: From Vygotsky to Socrates via Piaget.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frangos, Christos

    This paper presents a new European teaching model based on ideas and methods of Socrates, Jean Piaget, and Lev S. Vygotsky. The starting point for this new model was the use of Socrates' dialectical method in teaching 906 primary and secondary school students the reduplication of a square. Results of this exercise were compared with Piaget's and…

  17. The Genetic Psychologies of James Mark Baldwin and Jean Piaget.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahan, Emily D.

    1984-01-01

    Describes the ideas proposed by James Mark Baldwin which anticipated much of Jean Piaget's work. The goals, genetic approach, and epistemological assumptions underlying Piaget's inquiry into cognitive development found explicit statement in Baldwin's work. Discusses Baldwin's current importance for psychology. (Author/CB)

  18. The Genetic Psychologies of James Mark Baldwin and Jean Piaget.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahan, Emily D.

    1984-01-01

    Describes the ideas proposed by James Mark Baldwin which anticipated much of Jean Piaget's work. The goals, genetic approach, and epistemological assumptions underlying Piaget's inquiry into cognitive development found explicit statement in Baldwin's work. Discusses Baldwin's current importance for psychology. (Author/CB)

  19. The "Chaos" Pattern in Piaget's Theory of Cognitive Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Jean S.

    Piaget's theory of the cognitive development of the child is related to the recently developed non-linear "chaos" model. The term "chaos" refers to the tendency of dynamical, non-linear systems toward irregular, sometimes unpredictable, deterministic behavior. Piaget identified this same pattern in his model of cognitive development in children.…

  20. Limits of Constructivism: Kant, Piaget and Peirce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otte, M.

    The paradox of mathematical knowledge that mathematics cannot be conceived of as completely separated from empirical experience and yet cannot be explained by empiricist epistemology (for a slightly different and more elaborate formulation cf. Blackwell Companion to Epistemology, 270f), can only be resolved if one accepts that the causal interactions between knower and environment have themselves a generalizing tendency, a sort of continuity, rather than consisting just of singular events. Kant resolves the schism between the continous and the distinct in a constructivist manner. He assumes that all our knowledge-extending cognitions are synthetic. This synthesis does not lie in the matter of experience but springs from the function of cognizant consciousness. Piaget adhered to a Kantianism where the categories are not there at the outset. He conceives of the subject as constructing itself as well as of the emerging subject's structure as the source of the apprehension of the wo rld and believes in a Kantianism which emphasizes man's active being and potential for unlimited self-development. But he has no use for the Kantian idea of space and time as forms of mathematical intuition.Kantian thought is also central to Peirce's philosophy and conception of mathematics. But Peirce emphasizes the role of perception and analysis as its prerequisites. Peirce's and Piaget's origins in Kantianism are exhibited when both try to replace the Aristotelian notion of abstraction and generalization by something more suitable for mathematical epistemology. Peirce proposes that hypostatic abstraction is the chief explanation for the power of mathematical reasoning and explains: This operation is performed when something, that one has thought about any subject, is itself made a subject of thought. Piaget speaks of reflective abstraction in this context, making it the basis of mathematical knowledge; but separating it completely from empirical abstraction.

  1. Sigmund Freud and the countenance of Moses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodnick, B

    1995-01-01

    Sigmund Freud, as is well known, was overwhelmed by the person of Moses. This profound impact is revealed in his "The Moses of Michelangelo," first published in 1914, and "Moses and Monotheism," issued in 1933, the final work of his career. His biographers, in the light of these writings, have sought to discover the sources of this strong influence of Moses. A few claim that Moses arrived late on Freud's life stage. Most recognize that Freud was attracted to Moses early in his personal development. Their explanations to account for Freud's attachment to Moses, however, seem inadequate. The present article explores this issue and attributes the fascination and powerful imprint of Moses as stemming from a frequently viewed frontispiece found in each volume of the Philippson Bible, a lithograph of Moses displaying the Ten Commandments to the people of Israel. From childhood on, Sigmund gazed upon the face of Moses with his piercing eyes as his father related biblical stories to him, particularly the deeds of Moses, during their studies. The role of Jacob Freud with respect to the Freud-Moses relationship is herein discussed. The general conclusion emphasizes, as does Sigmund Freud himself, the enduring power of childhood experiences and their lifelong effect.

  2. Some utilitarian influences in Freud's early writings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govrin, Aner

    2004-01-01

    The author argues that (1) the utilitarian ideas of Jeremy Bentham and John Stuart Mill were an important source for Freud's early metapsychology and (2) the two theories are radically different in many aspects. The facts that link Freud with the British utilitarian school are described in the first part. These include Freud's translation of three of Mill's essays, a course Freud took on utilitarianism as a student and a book written by Mill which Freud cited and held in his library. By stripping Freud's language of its biological connotations the author claims in the second part that utilitarianism ideas are ubiquitous in Freud's early thought especially in his "pleasure principle" and in the hedonistic side of the human psyche. The third part describes how Freudian theory breaks with utilitarianism along three lines: the quality of pleasure, conflict and irrationality. These breaks are demonstrated through concepts such as the quantity-quality dilemma, constancy principle, repression, conflict and hallucination. Although there is a strong basic philosophical affinity (certainly with regard to human motivation) between Freudian thought and utilitarianism the theories should not be compared on the same level.

  3. Jung, spirits and madness: lessons for cultural psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koss-Chioino, Joan D

    2003-06-01

    An understanding of the nature and meaning of 'dissociative,' 'altered' or unusual states ultimately turns on the meaning and definition of consciousness. The view of consciousness from the discipline of psychiatry is largely based on a biomedically endorsed, culturally specific perspective of 'normal' consciousness as an integrated pattern of quotidian relationships with the 'observable' physical world. This perspective underlies the nosology for mental disorders, particularly psychoses, suggesting irreconcilable difference in cognition and affect of persons with these diagnostic labels. This article reviews some theories of Carl Gustav Jung regarding the structure and content of human consciousness and their relationship to aspects of 'dementia praecox' or 'schizophrenia.' It traces the origin and development of these ideas in part to Jung's early contact with, and intense interest in spiritualists and spirits, to later influences comprised of his own altered states (dreams and fantasies) and his involvement with patients diagnosed as schizophrenic. Data on current Spiritist beliefs and healing practices focused on 'madness' (i.e. most often diagnosed as schizophrenia in mental health settings), are described to explore parallels with Jung's ideas on the structure and dynamics of the psyche. These parallels are of special interest because the experience of spirits is ubiquitous, not well explained and often rejected as meaningful by psychiatrists and clinical psychologists. Jung, however, offers a cogent explanation of spirit phenomena as manifestations of the unconscious. A concluding section suggests contributions to cultural psychiatry by Jung.

  4. Sigmund Freud: pioneer in energy healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Stephen D; Edwards, David J

    2010-02-01

    Energy healing is a popular contemporary term for forms of healing that facilitate a natural healing process through harmonizing, rebalancing, and releasing energy flow disturbed or blocked by disease and illness. Biographical evidence indicates that Freud used physical, suggestive, and radiant forms of energy healing, and that his personal life, metapsychology, and psychoanalysis were founded on dynamic, energetic experiences and conceptualizations. Analysis of Freud's life and work leads to the conclusion that in experience, theory, and practice, Freud typified the traditional role of therapist and was a pioneer in modern forms of energy healing.

  5. [Charcot, Freud and the unconscious].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lellouch, Alain

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this work is to assess, on an historical and critical point of view, the new psychological perspective, introduced by Charcot (1825-1893), during the ten last years (1882-1892) of his life to explain hysteria symptomas. From clinical examples (hypnosis and hypnotherapy, "hystero-traumatism", "psychological theory of hysteria", "faith healing"), the paper shows how psychological dimension went back into the Parisian Hospital Medicine. This occurred on the late XIXth century, just one century after Mesmer, when Freud was Charcot's intern, at La Salpêtrière hospital, during years 1885-1886. The return of a non-rational thought into hospital medicine upset the organicist concepts of the Parisian "Ecole anatomo-clinique".

  6. Narcisismo e corporeidade em Freud

    OpenAIRE

    Gaio, Fernando Moysés

    2015-01-01

    A indagação deste estudo parte da constatação de que Freud atribui uma origem narcísica ao eu, e, ao mesmo tempo, refere-se ao eu como um eu corporal. Essa afirmação coloca em questão a relação do narcisismo com a corporeidade, que não é explicitamente tematizada em sua obra, aparecendo sempre de forma dispersa ao longo de seu desenvolvimento. As referências a respeito do tema do narcisismo em suas obras revelam, além disso, uma contínua evolução do seu conceito. Neste estudo, acompanha-se pr...

  7. La teoria letteraria di Freud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Pinto

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A partire dal momento in cui il sintomo nevrotico gli appare come travestimento fantastico del trauma psichico (cfr. il saggio “Le mie opinioni sul ruolo della sessualità nell’etiologia delle nevrosi”, la letteratura diventa per Freud un terreno privilegiato di analisi ai fini della ricostruzione della esperienza inconscia. In quanto entrambi dettati dalla funzione fantastico-immaginativa, tanto il sintomo quanto la letteratura sono descrivibili come elaborazioni simbolico-discorsive della pulsionalità, ma con questa essenziale differenza, che il sintomo (e il sogno, il lapsus, il witz è innanzitutto espressione di un inconscio individuale, mentre la letteratura esprime un inconscio sociale, essendo sempre fluido il passaggio da una dimensione all’altra.

  8. Pauli and Jung the meeting of two great minds

    CERN Document Server

    Lindorff, David

    2004-01-01

    The pioneering work of Nobel prize-winning physicist Wolfgang Pauli led to developing the bombs that decimated Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Desperate over this outcome, Pauli sought help from the eminent depth psychologist, C. G. Jung. Their long correspondence provides the powerful and unique record of a mature scientist's inner journey. It also has had a tremendous impact on scientific and psychological thought ever since. Pauli and Jung is a lucid interpretation of Pauli's ideas and dreams that forcefully validates his belief in the inseparable union of science and spirituality. Far ahead of their time, Wolfgang Pauli and C. G. Jung both knew this union is essential for the future of humanity and the survival of the planet.

  9. Carl Gustav Jung and Granville Stanley Hall on Religious Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chae Young

    2016-08-01

    Granville Stanley Hall (1844-1924) with William James (1842-1910) is the key founder of psychology of religion movement and the first American experimental or genetic psychologist, and Carl Gustav Jung (1875-1961) is the founder of the analytical psychology concerned sympathetically about the religious dimension rooted in the human subject. Their fundamental works are mutually connected. Among other things, both Hall and Jung were deeply interested in how the study of religious experience is indispensable for the depth understanding of human subject. Nevertheless, except for the slight indication, this common interest between them has not yet been examined in academic research paper. So this paper aims to articulate preliminary evidence of affinities focusing on the locus and its function of the inner deep psychic dimension as the religious in the work of Hall and Jung.

  10. Jung, mandala e arquitetura Islâmica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Raffaelli

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo se propõe a refletir sobre as origens do conceito junguiano de mandala. Utiliza-se o relato autobiográfico de Jung, Memórias, Sonhos e Reflexões, e sua obra Psicologia e Alquimia para traçar essa origem. Segundo Barbara Hannah, biógrafa de Jung, uma mesquita no Cairo (Egito foi de importância capital para a formulação desse conceito. Provavelmente esse templo é a Mesquita Ahmad Ibn Tulun. É analisada a relação entre a simbologia arquitetônica islâmica inspirada pelo sufismo e as concepções psicológicas de Jung.

  11. Loss of Innocence: Albert Moll, Sigmund Freud and the Invention of Childhood Sexuality Around 1900

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauerteig, Lutz D.H.

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyses how, prior to the work of Sigmund Freud, an understanding of infant and childhood sexuality emerged during the nineteenth century. Key contributors to the debate were Albert Moll, Max Dessoir and others, as fin-de-siècle artists and writers celebrated a sexualised image of the child. By the beginning of the twentieth century, most paediatricians, sexologists, psychologists, psychiatrists, psychoanalysts and pedagogues agreed that sexuality formed part of a child’s ‘normal’ development. This paper argues that the main disagreements in discourses about childhood sexuality related to different interpretations of children’s sexual experiences. On the one hand stood an explanation that argued for a homology between children’s and adults’ sexual experiences, on the other hand was an understanding that suggested that adults and children had distinct and different experiences. Whereas the homological interpretation was favoured by the majority of commentators, including Moll, Freud, and to some extent also by C.G. Jung, the heterological interpretation was supported by a minority, including childhood psychologist Charlotte Bühler. PMID:23002291

  12. Loss of innocence: Albert Moll, Sigmund Freud and the invention of childhood sexuality around 1900.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauerteig, Lutz D H

    2012-04-01

    This paper analyses how, prior to the work of Sigmund Freud, an understanding of infant and childhood sexuality emerged during the nineteenth century. Key contributors to the debate were Albert Moll, Max Dessoir and others, as fin-de-siècle artists and writers celebrated a sexualised image of the child. By the beginning of the twentieth century, most paediatricians, sexologists, psychologists, psychiatrists, psychoanalysts and pedagogues agreed that sexuality formed part of a child's 'normal' development. This paper argues that the main disagreements in discourses about childhood sexuality related to different interpretations of children's sexual experiences. On the one hand stood an explanation that argued for a homology between children's and adults' sexual experiences, on the other hand was an understanding that suggested that adults and children had distinct and different experiences. Whereas the homological interpretation was favoured by the majority of commentators, including Moll, Freud, and to some extent also by C.G. Jung, the heterological interpretation was supported by a minority, including childhood psychologist Charlotte Bühler.

  13. Freud, Darwin, and the holding environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockman, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Freud's hypothesis of the neonate, derived from the data of adult psychoneurotic patients, was of a supremely narcissistic being who lived in a dreamlike state of hallucinatory satisfaction. A corollary hypothesis was that the neonate's drive to attach was learned and emerged only after the failure of wish fulfillment. These hypotheses provided the ground for Freud's theories of regression, dream, primary process, and pleasure principle. Darwin's data of the neonate, collected from his observations of a variety of mammals, led him to the conclusion that attachment in mammals is innate. Until 1969 and the work of John Bowlby, psychoanalytic thinking faithfully followed Freud. If psychoanalysis is to survive, then it must attach itself to data and discard any theories that are based on unproveable hypotheses, even if those hypotheses are Freud's.

  14. Pychoanalysis and art, Freud and Leonardo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, H P

    2001-01-01

    Freud was the first to apply psychoanalysis to art, choosing for his subject the life and work of Leonardo da Vinci. Observing Leonardo's partly fused image of the Virgin and St. Anne, he inferred that the artist had depicted his two mothers, his biological mother and his stepmother. This very early analytic discourse on parent loss and adoption changed the course of the interpretation of art. Freud explored the psychology of art, the artist, and aesthetic appreciation. Confronting the age-old enigma of the Mona Lisa, he proposed a daring solution to the riddle of the sphinxlike smile of this icon of art. His paper prefigures concepts of narcissism, homosexuality, parenting, and sublimation. Lacking modern methodology and theory, Freud's pioneering insights overshadow his naive errors. In this fledgling inquiry, based on a childhood screen memory and limited knowledge of Leonardo's artistic and scientific contributions, Freud identified with this Renaissance genius in his own self-analytic and creative endeavor.

  15. [Freud in Carinthia. A historical search].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberlerchner, Herwig; Tögel, Christfried

    2015-01-01

    This paper sheds some new light on four visits of Freud to Carinthia between 1898 and 1923. New information from contemporary sources is added to already known facts (patient visit in 1898; encounters with Alban Berg in 1900 and 1907).

  16. [Carl Gustav Jung, the myth of a man].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loza, Julieta

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this article is to get closer to the myth of Jung, this is part of the inner experiences that took place in his first childhood, and in which we can already see the foundation of his work and the development of key concepts as: the unconscious, Self, archetype and individuation process. His life is the display of his unconscious and this is what his work is about. We cannot understand Jung without taking into account the fundamental importance that he gives to the inner world: the dreams and fantasies; and the direct contact that he has had with these aspects since he was a little boy.

  17. The anthropology of Carl Jung: Implications for pastoral care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt-Meeks, S

    1983-09-01

    This article examines the basic tenets of Carl Jung's anthropology, including intrapsychic structure, relationships, society, and the process of individuation. It then turns to his ideas about God and religion. Jung builds his understanding of God from his work in psychology, and because of that method, there are several major problems with his theologizing. Nevertheless, his insights are extremely valuable to the field of pastoral care, and ministers would do very well to appreciate his contribution, though always with a critical eye to its limitation.

  18. The professionalization of Carl G. Jung's analytical psychology clubs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, A

    1994-04-01

    This paper addresses (1) the history of a cluster of unusual institutions-analytical psychology clubs--which started in 1916 and by 1934 had become established in many of the countries in the world in which there was interest in the analytical psychology of Carl G. Jung; (2) the conflicts involved in trying to unite the relatively informal earlier "Jung Clubs" with the more formal societies being established by the increasing numbers of professionally trained analysts; and (3) the wider cultural and social issues included in the professionalization of analytical psychology.

  19. Mind as Medium: Jung, McLuhan and the Archetype

    OpenAIRE

    Braga,Adriana

    2016-01-01

    The Greek notion of archetype was adopted and popularized in the context of the analytical psychology of Carl Gustav Jung. Marshall McLuhan used the concept archetype as a formal perspective rather than the content of an alleged “collective unconscious”. In his book From Cliché to Archetype, the idea of archetype is presented as the ground where individual action is the figure. This article, departing from the notion of archetype, explores some convergences between the thought of Carl Jung an...

  20. The value of confession and forgiveness according to Jung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, E

    1985-03-01

    This article represents a broad survey of the views of C. G. Jung regarding confession and for giveness. Man, a naturally religious being, has a need to confess his wrong and to gain forgiveness of one sanctioned to absolve. The curative effect of confession has been known for centuries. Without confession, man remains in moral isolation. Priests, ministers, and rabbis, as well as psychotherapists, attest to the universality of this human phenomenon. Confession is located in that place where psychology and religion meet-guilt. Jung's views on confession bridge the chasm between psychology and religion.

  1. Ud med Freud, Marx og Lacan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clasen, Mathias

    2009-01-01

    Det er på høje tid, at humanister løsriver sig fra deres forældede teorier. Freud, Marx og Lacan skal erstattes med evolutionspsykologi, biologi og kognitionsvidenskab.......Det er på høje tid, at humanister løsriver sig fra deres forældede teorier. Freud, Marx og Lacan skal erstattes med evolutionspsykologi, biologi og kognitionsvidenskab....

  2. Meditation, the freud family and poets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsburg, Lawrence M

    2008-09-01

    The savoring of yellow Tyrolean laburnum blossoms became a summer vacation rite of the Freud family. It was reminiscent of their paterfamilias's infantile "Dandelion in the Green Meadow" dream-scape. We may ponder whether Freud's adolescent olfactory memories were similarly "re-rooted" in Freiberg as a 17 year-old where many hours were "passed by him in solitary walks through the lovely woods" he had found once more.

  3. Ud med Freud, Marx og Lacan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clasen, Mathias

    2009-01-01

    Det er på høje tid, at humanister løsriver sig fra deres forældede teorier. Freud, Marx og Lacan skal erstattes med evolutionspsykologi, biologi og kognitionsvidenskab.......Det er på høje tid, at humanister løsriver sig fra deres forældede teorier. Freud, Marx og Lacan skal erstattes med evolutionspsykologi, biologi og kognitionsvidenskab....

  4. Some sources for a slip in a translation by Freud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, W I

    1988-01-01

    Among Freud's papers, we find instances in which Freud describes the "psychopathology of everyday life" as he found it in himself and in others. "A Religious Experience" (Freud, 1928) contains examples of both kinds. In addition, this paper contains a slip of which Freud appears to have been unaware. Freud's paper interprets a religious conversion described in a letter written to him in English. In the translation of this letter into German, Freud inserted material that was not present in the original. He mentions another slip he made in speaking about the letter. These slips and some associated details in the paper indicate persisting unconscious conflict. The content of these slips and details points to an association with Freud's childhood anxiety dream reported in The Interpretation of Dreams (Freud, 1900). Freud's associations and discussion of that dream lead to the Philippson Bible of his childhood, which provides additional connections to the paper of 1928.

  5. Freud, evolution, and the tragedy of man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, K R

    1983-01-01

    It is argued that Freud was not, as Sulloway (1979) contends, a "crypto-biologist" of the mind, but rather a cultural anthropologist of the mind. Freud's genetic conception of the psychic apparatus was neither exclusively nor critically derived from biology. Rather, it was based on an anthropogenetic approach to the archaic heritage of mind inspired in part by the moral philosophy of Nietzsche. The idea of tragedy was the unifying theme of Freud's cultural interpretation of evolutionary psychology. The historical search for the primal origins of neurosis led Freud to the unavoidable conclusion that neurosis was in the beginning a prehistoric moral dilemma which, over the course of mental evolution, eventually evolved into guilt, discontent, and neurosis as modern-day phylogenetically endowed facts of life. Freud (1930) made it clear that the source of man's biological and cultural evolutionary progress--self-denial--was also responsible for the tragedy of the human condition, namely, repression, eternal psychic ambivalence, and chronic mental illness. He believed that neurosis began, as Nietzsche (1887) exclaimed, with the "reduction of the beast of prey 'man' to a tame and civilized animal..." (p. 42). For both Freud and Nietzsche, the cause of the human tragedy was not merely the fall from Nature, but the inexorable knowledge that Man's denial of his biological heritage was the very basis for being human.

  6. Freud's baby: beyond autoerotism and narcissism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Dodd W

    2007-08-01

    The prevailing notion in the psychoanalytic literature is that Freud's thinking on neonatal object relations is completely captured in terms of his concepts of autoerotism and primary narcissism. Indeed, for Freud, autoerotism and primary narcissism conceptualize the earliest libido distributions, but these concepts do not exhaust Freud's model of early mental life. In this paper, the author endeavors to show that Freud's hypothetical infant arrives at autoerotism and narcissism at the expense of, and secondary to, primitive object-relatedness. More specifically, an appreciation of Freud's views on primitive object relations in light of the self-preservative instinct demonstrates his view that the infant is born into a state of mutual adaptation with the mother. The author makes detailed use of Freud's writings to show his conception of an infant who, from the inception of neonatal life, has the mental sophistication to maintain complex relations with instinctual objects, the sources of gratification or frustration, part-objects confusedly perceived because of cognitive immaturity and/or fantasy distortion. Such complexity includes the infant's capacity for primitive forms of perception, boundary formation, reality testing, and defensive, splitting-based projections and introjections.

  7. Jean Piaget: Images of a life and his factory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burman, Jeremy Trevelyan

    2012-08-01

    In this article, I use a new book about Jean Piaget to introduce a new historical method: examining "psychological factories." I also discuss some of the ways that "Great Men" are presented in the literature, as well as opportunities for new projects if one approaches the history of the discipline differently and examines the conditions that made that greatness possible. To that end, the article includes many details about Piaget that have never before been discussed in English. Attention is drawn, in particular, to Piaget's collaborators: the hundreds of workers at his factory in Geneva, many of whom were women. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. The application of piaget's theory to physiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, J L

    1977-12-01

    Jean Piaget is a Swiss psychologist who has presented an extensive theory of the growth of the human intellect from birth to maturity. For more than fifty years he has been producing books and articles on human development, conducting research studies on thousands of children, especially those in the schools of Geneva. He is recognized as the world's foremost authority on cognitive development, and his work has led to the publishing of thousands of studies by other research workers around the world, particularly in the U.S.A., Canada, U.K., Australia, France and Scandinavia. He was 80 years of age in 1976, and in retirement has been producing publications at a consistently high rate. Copyright © 1977 Australian Physiotherapy Association. Published by . All rights reserved.

  9. Jung and the Soul of Education (at the "Crunch")

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Susan

    2012-01-01

    C. G. Jung offers education a unique perspective of the dilemma of collective social demands versus individual needs. Indeed, so radical and profound is his vision of the learning psyche as collectively embedded, that it addresses the current crisis over the demand for utilitarian higher education. Hence post-Jungian educationalists can develop…

  10. Different Strokes for Different Folks: Jung's Typology and Structured Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haber, Russell Alan

    1980-01-01

    Examined and compared the evaluations of students differentiated by Carl Jung's psychotypology when they were involved in either a session of nonverbal communication experiences or a session of fantasy experiences. Some of the Jungian psychological types preferred different structured experiences. (Author)

  11. Jung's mediatory science as a psychology beyond objectivism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsch, W E

    2000-04-01

    In this paper, the author argues that Jung's non-objectivist--yet scientific--epistemology and his empirical/hermeneatic methods of inquiry situate him within a psychological tradition that, in many respects, began with William James and, today, is finding expression in the work of many non-Jungian cognitive scientists. In an effort to encourage dialogue between Jungians and scholars within related intellectual traditions, the author presents evidence from the corpus of Jung's work that demonstrates that, like William James, Jung intentionally rejected the absolutist claims of objectivism and the opposite position on 'anything goes' relativism, emotivism, or subjectivism. Instead, Jung forged a path that led to the meta-psychological position similar to internal realism (Putnam 1981) or experientialism (Lakoff 1987) and to a theoretical psychology that gave a central place both to unconscious cognitive structure and to imagination. This he labelled a 'mediatory science'. The psychological theories developed within this mediatory science framework represent an early articulation of key constructs that are currently used by a number of cognitive scientists seeking to understand how we make sense of experience.

  12. Jean Piaget et sa Recherche: Search and Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Elspeth M.

    1981-01-01

    The early influences on and development of Jean Piaget's thinking from which crystallized the ideas forming the foundation of his subsequent work are discussed. The influences noted are personal, intellectual, and professional. (MSE)

  13. The early evolution of Jean Piaget's clinical method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Susan Jean

    2005-11-01

    This article analyzes the early evolution of Jean Piaget's renowned "clinical method" in order to investigate the method's strikingly original and generative character. Throughout his 1st decade in the field, Piaget frequently discussed and justified the many different approaches to data collection he used. Analysis of his methodological progression during this period reveals that Piaget's determination to access the genuine convictions of children eventually led him to combine 3 distinct traditions in which he had been trained-naturalistic observation, psychometrics, and the psychiatric clinical examination. It was in this amalgam, first evident in his 4th text, that Piaget discovered the clinical dynamic that would drive the classic experiments for which he is most well known.

  14. Jean Piaget et sa Recherche: Search and Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Elspeth M.

    1981-01-01

    The early influences on and development of Jean Piaget's thinking from which crystallized the ideas forming the foundation of his subsequent work are discussed. The influences noted are personal, intellectual, and professional. (MSE)

  15. Ideas Fundamentales de Sigmund Freud.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Plata Mújica

    2006-06-01

    Con el deseo de poderles trasmitir su pensamiento debo de ser un tanto impreciso al mostrarles sus principales ideas de acuerdo a cómo las entiendo hoy luego de estudiar su evolución y las aportaciones de sus continuadores. De lo original y complejo de sus ideas siempre tuvo Freud el conocimiento necesario para también postular una síntesis de sus conceptos que además pudieran expresar sus descubrimientos en un nivel teórico para lo cual creo el término de Metapsicología, (1915, con el ambicioso significado general de “más allá de la psicología clásica” y tendió en ese entonces a sintetizarla en tres, digámoslo así, tres vectores simultáneos, insuficientes y complementarios entre sí, denominados: punto de vista dinámico -o de los conflictos-, punto de vista tópico –o de su ubicación en el campo mental-, y punto de vista económico -o cuantitativo-...

  16. Use of Piaget's theory in preschool nutrition education

    OpenAIRE

    Başkale,Hatice; Bahar, Zuhal; Başer,Günsel; Ari,Meziyet

    2009-01-01

    The preschool period is a time when children learn many concepts and develop life-long habits. In that period, children learn about appropriate and balanced nutrition and acquire good eating habits for later years. Piaget determined that children's cognitive development is important for their understanding of and learning about the world around them. Piaget's theory can be used as a guide in nutrition education. In fact, it helps to design effective nutrition education appropriate for the dev...

  17. GERMAN JUNG VON MATT ADVERTISING AGENCY%德国JUNG VON MATT广告公司

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    1991年,Holger Jung和Jean—Remy在德国汉堡成立了他们的广告代理所。今天,15年过去了,当初的代理所已发展成为控股公司,在讲德语国家拥有12个分支机构(8个广告公司,4个专卖店)和600名员工。2005年,其在汉堡、斯图加特、柏林、科隆、苏黎士、维也纳和斯德哥尔摩各地公司的营业总额达到3.99亿欧元,这就是Jung von Matt——德国第二大自主经营的本土广告公司。

  18. Freud and the history of empathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigman, G W

    1995-04-01

    Empathy (Einfühlung) has a long history in aesthetics, psychology and psychoanalysis, and plays a greater role in Freud's thinking than readers of the Standard Edition realise. Coined by Robert Vischer in 1873, Einfühlung originally designates the projection of human feeling on to the natural world. For a quarter of a century the term remains at the centre of psychological aesthetics before Theodor Lipps, a philosopher admired by Freud for 40 years, transfers it to psychology in an attempt to explain how we discover that other people have selves. Freud's conception of Einfühlung, first developed in 'Jokes and their Relation to the Unconscious' (1905), remains heavily intellectual throughout his career; he views it as the process that allows us to understand others by putting ourselves in their place. Although the Standard Edition never translates Einfühlung as 'empathy' in a clinical context, Freud regards it as essential for establishing the rapport between patient and analyst that makes interpretation possible. This paper traces the history of Einfühlung from aesthetics and psychology to Freud and his contemporaries.

  19. Freud on Brothers and Sisters: A Neglected Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwin-White, Susan

    2007-01-01

    This paper explores Freud's developing thought on brothers and sisters, and their importance in his psychoanalytical writings and clinical work. Freud's work on sibling psychology has been seriously undervalued. This paper aims to give due recognition to Freud's work in this area. (Contains 1 note.)

  20. Freud Was Right. . . about the Origins of Abnormal Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muris, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Freud's psychodynamic theory is predominantly based on case histories of patients who displayed abnormal behavior. From a scientific point of view, Freud's analyses of these cases are unacceptable because the key concepts of his theory cannot be tested empirically. However, in one respect, Freud was totally right: most forms of abnormal behavior…

  1. Freud on Brothers and Sisters: A Neglected Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwin-White, Susan

    2007-01-01

    This paper explores Freud's developing thought on brothers and sisters, and their importance in his psychoanalytical writings and clinical work. Freud's work on sibling psychology has been seriously undervalued. This paper aims to give due recognition to Freud's work in this area. (Contains 1 note.)

  2. Freud Was Right. . . about the Origins of Abnormal Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muris, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Freud's psychodynamic theory is predominantly based on case histories of patients who displayed abnormal behavior. From a scientific point of view, Freud's analyses of these cases are unacceptable because the key concepts of his theory cannot be tested empirically. However, in one respect, Freud was totally right: most forms of abnormal behavior…

  3. [Freud in the journals of the German speaking exile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Ulrike

    2006-01-01

    Freud and psychoanalysis figure frequently in exile journals. This paper documents two letters to the editor written by Alexander Freud who denied that his brother Sigmund had been a zionist, and the recollections of the sculptor Königsberger who had made a bust of Freud in 1920.

  4. [An offspring of love. Freud on belief].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, Herbert

    2006-01-01

    This paper elucidates Freud's ideas of belief and believing. By investigating the semantic field, it discusses the place of his theory of religion in the context of his thought. It argues for a consistent model which does not stem from antireligious prejudice but meshes with his whole thinking. For Freud religious belief was a special case of the general attitude of believing. He situated it within a three-stage development of the individual as well as of humanity, starting with a state of magical-animistic thinking in autoerotism and narcissism and leading, via object-dependency and a belief in omnipotent parental figures, to emancipation through rationality and critical judgement. The origin of belief in wishing accounts for the believer's lack of judgement and submission to religious authorities. In the end some of the advantages and disadvantages of Freud's model are highlighted.

  5. Max Graf's "Reminiscences of Professor Sigmund Freud" revisited: new evidence from the Freud archives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, Jerome C

    2007-01-01

    Recently derestricted Freud Archive interviews with Max and Herbert Graf and Herbert's wife shed new light on Max Graf's article, "Reminiscences of Professor Sigmund Freud," published in The Psychoanalytic Quarterly in 1942. To explain discrepancies between the interviews and the earlier article, the author postulates that, in the article, Max Graf purposely distorted or omitted certain details in order not to reveal Herbert's identity as "Little Hans" (Freud 1909). The interviews place incidents reported in the article in a new and more complex light, and also underscore the intensely personal nature of the intellectual development of the psychoanalytic movement.

  6. [Apocryphal Freud: Sigmund Freud' most famous "quotations" and their actual sources].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elms, Alan C

    2005-01-01

    The article traces the sources of the three most widespread quotations attributed to Freud "What does Woman want?", "To love and to work" (summarizing what a psychological healthy person should be able to do well), and "Sometimes a cigar is just a cigar". The first could have been spoken by Freud pretty much as we have it. The second was possibly said by Freud, in some form vaguely resembling the currently cited version. The third most probably did not come from him in any form.

  7. 150 years of Freud-Kraepelin dualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trede, Katharina

    2007-09-01

    The year 2006 marked the 150th Birthday of Emil Kraepelin and Sigmund Freud. Kraepelin and Freud were two very different yet very similar men. The comparison between their biographies shows many parallels in their lives and personalities. They were, in their time, the two most influential individuals in psychiatry. They wrote and thought about similar topics in the field yet came to quite different conclusions. Both did not show public respect for each other but wrote about the importance of integrating their respective approaches into the study of the mind/brain problem. Psychiatry today continues to struggle with the integration of the biological and psychodynamic approach.

  8. Jung on the nature and interpretation of dreams: a developmental delineation with cognitive neuroscientific responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Caifang

    2013-12-01

    Post-Jungians tend to identify Jung's dream theory with the concept of compensation; they tend to believe that Jung's radically open stand constitutes his dream theory in its entirety. However, Jung's theory regarding dreams was a product of an evolving process throughout his whole intellectual and professional life. Unfortunately, the theory has not been understood in such a developmental light. Based on a historical and textual study of all dream articles found throughout The Collected Works of C.G. Jung, this paper maps a concise three-phase trajectory of Jung's changing views on dreams and interpretation. The paper posits that Jung's last essay, "Symbols and the Interpretation of Dreams" (1961), epitomizes his final stand, although such a stand is also reflected in a less explicit and less emphatic way during the latter period of the second phase. The paper also briefly addresses where Jung and Jungians have been enigmatic or negligent. For example, it has not been explicated fully why compensation as slight modifications and compensation as parallels to waking life situations are rare in Jung's cases In addition, contemporary cognitive and neuroscientific approaches to the study of dreams, as represented by Harry Hunt, William Domhoff, and Allan Hobson, among others, are presented in connection with Jung. The juxtaposition of Jungian, cognitive, and neuroscientific approaches showcases how cognitive and scientific findings challenge, enrich, and in some ways confirm Jung's dream theory and praxis.

  9. Existential perspective in the thought of Carl Jung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelburne, W A

    1983-03-01

    It is argued that there is a significant existential perspective in the thought of Carl Jung. Similarities and differences with some of the views of Jean Paul Sartre are explored as a way of developing this perspective and to show how a philosophy of a man might be developed drawing from both sources. Jung is shown to be in disagreement with Sartre in defending an idea of a determinate human nature, describing the self in a developmental way, and in not claiming that human freedom is absolute or unconditioned. Nevertheless, the Jungian concept of individuation is similar to Sartre's ideal of authenticity, in that both focus on the goal of achieving meaningful existence through development of inner resources, creative exercise of freedom, and overcoming self-deception.

  10. From Moscovici to Jung: the feminine archetype and its iconography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Saiz Galdós

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Our representations of women have their origins in the myths of the past. According to Jung, myths are the symbolic expression of the collective unconscious that expresses itself through archetypes. Archetypes are thus images that pass across generations: instruments of collective thought. The main archetypes we deal with in this article are the Mother and the Anima, or men´s feminine principle. Using Jung's concept of archetype to analyse women´s iconographic representations allows us to combine the notion of the collective unconscious with that of social representations. Whereas Moscovici´s theory of social representations offers us the possibility of analysing beliefs about women through history, Jung’s perspective reveals us the possibility of analysing the myths constructed around women as part of the archetypes people use to give sense to reality.

  11. Nous habitons tous dans la maison de Freud: usan Hiller chez Freud à Londres (*)

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Dans un interview Susan Hiller a dit que «nous habitons tous dans le musée Freud» car «le musée Freud est un concept culturel auquel nous ne pouvons pas échapper» . Cette idée a été confirmée par Marina Warner dans sa préface au guide du musée Freud, quand elle a déclaré que «Sigmund Freud a formé l’idée de ce qu’est une personne au cours du vingtième siècle; nous ne nous reconnaîtrions pas sans lui» . Née Etats Unis en 1940, Hiller s’est installée à Londres en 1969 ap...

  12. [Freud as neuropathologist, his reception in France before 1910].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolzinger, A

    1999-08-01

    Even before 1910 Freud in Paris was not unknown. His relation to Charcot first and the reception of his papers by Charcot's followers (mainly Raymond, Marie, Brissaud) later represent a particular chapter of history. This is well documented by Charcot's letters to Freud (hitherto published only in French), by Freud's French articles as well as by many medical theses (Paris, Lyon, Nancy, Bordeaux) discussing the pros and cons. Two topics were focussed. First there was a neurological dispute about Little's disease, its clinical vignette, etiologies, and its spinal and cerebral localisations. Freud argued there to be a nosographic entity. Most of Charcot's disciples, however, pleaded against the idea of an entity for such different pathological forms. This was followed by a discussion about Freuds doctrine of neuroses and their sexual origin, which Freud opposed to the French theories of heredity and degeneration. Both of the discussions were without personal encounter and without a direct exchange of views between the protagonists. Which did not cause it to be less vivid and intense. This proves Freud's standing as an internationally acknowledged expert for neuropathological aspects of the child. However, starting in 1900, Freud retired from the neurological discussion and the Paris scene. The dispute about Little's disease faded away and the discussion about neuroses became occupied by Janet's writings. The neuropathologist Freud eclipsed the psychoanalyst Freud. Hence Freud's repeated complaints not to have been well received by the French.

  13. Piaget's epistemic subject and science education: Epistemological vs. psychological issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchener, Richard F.

    1993-06-01

    Many individuals claim that Piaget's theory of cognitive development is empirically false or substantially disconfirmed by empirical research. Although there is substance to such a claim, any such conclusion must address three increasingly problematic issues about the possibility of providing an empirical test of Piaget's genetic epistemology: (1) the empirical underdetermination of theory by empirical evidence, (2) the empirical difficulty of testing competence-type explanations, and (3) the difficulty of empirically testing epistemic norms. This is especially true of a central epistemic construct in Piaget's theory — the epistemic subject. To illustrate how similar problems of empirical testability arise in the physical sciences, I briefly examine the case of Galileo and the correlative difficulty of empirically testing Galileo's laws. I then point out some important epistemological similarities between Galileo and Piaget together with correlative changes needed in science studies methodology. I conclude that many psychologists and science educators have failed to appreciate the difficulty of falsifying Piaget's theory because they have tacitly adopted a philosophy of science at odds with the paradigm-case of Galileo.

  14. [One hundred years of Freud editions in The Netherlands].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greven, Elsbeth

    2009-01-01

    The history of Dutch editions of Freud is discussed from a publisher's point of view. The author focuses on the main publishers involved in presenting Freud's work to the Dutch public: S. C. van Doesburgh, De Wereldbibliotheek, De Bezige Bij and Uitgeverij Boom. She describes their role, together with their networks of translators, editors and psychoanalysts, in the production, perception and reception of Freud's work--and hence in the development of psychoanalysis in The Netherlands--as well as their approaches to translation, publishing strategies and use of paratextual resources. Three main stages can be identified: 1. 1912 to World War I (Freud was introduced), 2. World War I to 1950 (Freud was popularised), and 3. 1960 to 1990 (Freud was canonised, but also criticised). A fourth stage, the historicisation of Freud, began in 2006 with a new, scholarly edition of his Werken, arranged in chronological order.

  15. Apontamentos sobre a psicologia analítica de Carl Gustav Jung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Marcelo Alves Ramos

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available O texto faz uma introdução à Psicologia Analítica do psicólogo e psiquiatra suíço Carl Gustav Jung: define o conceito de Psicologia Analítica, traz uma biografia resumida de Carl Gustav Jung, indica as principais diferenças entre a Psicologia Analítica e a Psicanálise, descreve a estrutura e o funcionamento da psique e, por fim, apresenta sinteticamente as características dos tipos de personalidades traçadas por Jung. The text makes an introduction to the Analytical Psychology of the psychologist and swiss psychiatrist Carl Gustav Jung: it defines the concept of Analytical Psychology, brings a summarized biography of Carl Gustav Jung, indicates the main differences between Analytical Psychology and the Psychoanalysis, describes the structure and the functioning of psyche and, finally, presents synthetically the characteristics of the types of personalities traced by Jung.

  16. Jung Işığında Heba Heba In The Light Of Jung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra SAZYEK

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Hasan Ali Toptaş, is one of the important authors of Turkishliterature, in his novel called Heba discusses inward looking personalityof Ziya, who lives in the same childish purity during his life consistingof all periods of childhood, military service, marriage and death. Due tothis property, he lives world of dreams and fantasies rather than reeltime. 16 years after he lost his wife and unborn son as casualties inbomb attack, Yazıköy where he breaks away from the crowd of the cityand settle in here, feeds his this side. Thus, the hours passing in thenature, turn into a worship. However, whole peace of Ziya, who hasfound what he seeks in Yazıköy, ends by killing of Kenan. This periodwhen everything has became complicated, is followed by killing of himas being lynched because of the gossips about him.When you reread the novel focusing on a wasted life, of whichtragic events are finished by death in the light of Jungian psychology, itturns into a story of award to reach immortality obtained after thesorrows felt.Experiences of Ziya in Yazıköy resembling Heaven until he isdismissed, realize on the cusp of a magical environment is surroundedby dreams and fantasies. Appearance of unconscious plane by means ofsymbolical contents in dreams indicates that Yazıköy representsunconscious world beyond being a geographic and travelling from thecity to natural follows a way from conscious towards unconscious.Exploring of Ziya moving in unknown darkness of unconsciousthe inner treasure in the deepest, requires passing the each phase fromsurface towards center with a different figure of unconscious named as"archetype" by Jung.In this study, dimensions of period in question will be discussedin terms of Jungian psychology; trails of his thoughts will be examinedin detail by its aspects are reflected on contextual dimension of thenovel. Türk edebiyatının önemli yazarlarından olan Hasan Ali Toptaş, Heba adlı romanında çocukluk, askerlik, evlilik

  17. In Defense of Piaget's Theory: A Reply to 10 Common Criticisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenco, Orlando; Machado, Armando

    1996-01-01

    This study attempts to rebut criticisms of the developmental theories of Jean Piaget by showing that most criticisms derive from misinterpretation and forget the dialectical, constructivist, and developmental nature of Piaget's work. Important aspects of Piaget's theory have not been assimilated by developmental psychologists. (SLD)

  18. In Defense of Piaget's Theory: A Reply to 10 Common Criticisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenco, Orlando; Machado, Armando

    1996-01-01

    This study attempts to rebut criticisms of the developmental theories of Jean Piaget by showing that most criticisms derive from misinterpretation and forget the dialectical, constructivist, and developmental nature of Piaget's work. Important aspects of Piaget's theory have not been assimilated by developmental psychologists. (SLD)

  19. Piaget 奢华艺术

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    <正>Piaget Polo 30周年纪念腕表(上图)18K白金及玫瑰金双色设计,18K白金表框镶嵌圆形美钻,银色表盘搭配18K玫瑰金阿拉伯数字时标及小时刻度,同样备有时、分显示功能,特别选用棕色鳄鱼皮表带,令腕表带有浓厚的马术味道。共有三个款式,分别为男装、男装镶钻及女装镶钻款式。大型男装款式搭载800P自动上链机械机芯;带有镶钻表圈的女装款则搭载690P石英机芯,分别限量发行300枚,每枚均有独立编号。(右图)灵感来自1979年原创款式,18K白金表壳,表框、表盘均镶有圆形美钻,与表链的钻石互相呼应。简单的时、分显示,突显整枚腕表简洁优雅特质。大型男装款式搭载534P自动上链机械机芯:女装款式搭载690P石英机芯,分别限量发行150枚,每枚腕表均有独立编号。

  20. Analytical psychology and the ghost of Lamarck: did Jung believe in the inheritance of acquired characteristics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rensma, Ritske

    2013-04-01

    Whether Jung was a Lamarckian or not has always been a hotly debated topic, both within the post-Jungian community and amongst scholars with an interest in Jung in the wider academic community. Yet surprisingly few substantial pieces of work have been dedicated to it and, to my mind, no one has yet managed to do justice to all the subtleties involved. The scholars who have claimed that Jung is a Lamarckian have, for the most part, oversimplified the debate by failing to discuss the passages in which Jung appears to be defending himself against Lamarckism; the scholars who have defended Jung against Lamarckism, however, have as a rule not adequately dealt with the question of whether these passages actually get Jung off the hook. This paper will attempt to correct this imbalance by putting forward four key passages spanning Jung's career that all represent conclusive evidence that Jung was indeed a Lamarckian. After discussing these, it will then deal in detail with the passages in which Jung appears to be defending himself against Lamarckism, making the case that they do not represent a defence against Lamarckism at all and have therefore generally been misinterpreted by many scholars.

  1. Requiem for analytical psychology: a reflection on Jung's (anti)catastrophic psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreto, Marco Heleno

    2014-02-01

    This article is an interpretation of analytical psychology in the light of the catastrophic vision and dreams that Jung had in 1913 and 1914. It is shown how the guiding spirit of Jung's psychological project is to be found in that psychic material. Then it is proposed that the completion of the symbolic catastrophe displayed in Jung's last vision (1961) points to the end of the psychological foundations upon which analytical psychology is built, and thus to its cultural obsolescence, extensive to any psychology grounded in Jung's notion of 'soul'.

  2. Freud, Piaget, or neither? Beliefs in controlling others by wishful thinking and magical behavior in young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikan, A; Clausen, S E

    1993-09-01

    Tests showed that 4- to 6-year-old children believe that people can be influenced or "controlled" both by thinking (e.g., both wishful thinking and magical behavior) and by realistic means (e.g., positive reinforcement, example, and group pressure). Belief in control by thinking did not vary by the subjects' sex or age, influence type (wishing or magical behavior), or target response (behavior, emotion, or thought). Quantitative measures, however, suggested that magical behavior was seen by subjects as being more efficient than wishing, and that emotion was considered easier to influence than thinking. Beliefs in control by thinking were not related to a measure of fantasy-reality differentiation (realism).

  3. Freud's "bad conscience": The case of Nietzsche's Genealogy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Scott

    2002-01-01

    This article develops the argument that Friedrich Nietzsche influenced several aspects of Freud's later writings by illustrating, in particular, the impact of Nietzsche's On the Genealogy of Morals on Freud's Civilization and its Discontents. The theoretical and conceptual schemes represented in Freud's Discontents are found to bear a remarkable similarity to Nietzsche's Genealogy on a number of highly specific points. It is suggested that "DAS ES," "Uber-ich," and "bad conscience," concepts central to Freud's moral theory of mind, are at least partly derived from Nietzsche. Moreover, Freud's phylogenetic theory of guilt is based upon premises found in Nietzsche, as are specific details relating to ideas on human prehistory and the ancestral family. Based on this evidence, a re-examination of the moral and social dimensions of Freud's "structural" model may be in order. Copyright 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. [Freud and the Hammerschlag family--a formative relationship].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtner, Gerhard

    2008-01-01

    From his obituary on Samuel Hammerschlag we know of Freud's great veneration for his teacher of Jewish religion. However, not only Hammerschlag himself but his whole family had a formative influence on young Freud who was deeply impressed by their humanity. This paper describes Freud's relationship to all family members. In particular it shows how warmly he felt towards the only daughter, Anna Hammerschlag, who was his patient for a while and whom he chose as a godmother of his youngest daughter Anna. By virtue of the crucial role she played in Freud's "specimen dream" of July 1895 ("Irma's injection"), she also became as it were the godmother of Freud's magnum opus, The Interpretation of Dreams.--All known surviving letters of Freud to members of the Hammerschlag family are published here for the first time.

  5. Fathers and sons: Freud's discovery of the Oedipus complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchsman, Kenneth A

    2004-01-01

    Freud's path to the Oedipus complex reveals conceptual inconsistencies. These uncertainties concern fathers, brothers and sons, and the place of the oedipal triad within the family romance. Freud's uncovering of the Oedipus complex emerged, in large part, from his self-analysis of his childhood years in Freiberg. Freud's father was 20 years older than his third wife, and had two adult sons, all of whom lived in Freiberg. In 1897, when Freud announces the Oedipus complex, he stresses his love of his mother and jealousy of his father. Yet in 1924 Freud wrote that his adult brother, Philipp, had taken his father's place as the child's rival. The oedipal complex alters if there are four players rather than three. Freud's concept of an oedipal triangle does not adequately explain the psychological dynamics of his childhood. Fuller conceptual clarity would occur if the dynamics of the Oedipus complex were placed within the family context in which it unfolds.

  6. Freud and the Hammerschlag family: a formative relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtner, Gerhard

    2010-10-01

    From his obituary of Samuel Hammerschlag, we know of Freud's great veneration for his teacher of Jewish religion. However, not only Hammerschlag himself but his whole family had a formative influence on young Freud, who was deeply impressed by their humanity. This paper describes Freud's relationships with all the family members. In particular, it shows how warmly he felt towards the only daughter, Anna Hammerschlag, who was his patient for a while and whom he chose as a godmother for his youngest daughter Anna. By virtue of the crucial role she played in Freud's 'specimen dream' of July 1895 ('Irma's injection'), she also became as it were the godmother of Freud's magnum opus, The Interpretation of Dreams. All the known extant letters from Freud to members of the Hammerschlag family are published here for the first time in English translation. Copyright © 2010 Institute of Psychoanalysis.

  7. On the validity of Freud's dream interpretations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Michael

    2008-03-01

    In this article I defend Freud's method of dream interpretation against those who criticize it as involving a fallacy-namely, the reverse causal fallacy-and those who criticize it as permitting many interpretations, indeed any that the interpreter wants to put on the dream. The first criticism misconstrues the logic of the interpretative process: it does not involve an unjustified reversal of causal relations, but rather a legitimate attempt at an inference to the best explanation. The judgement of whether or not a particular interpretation is the best explanation depends on the details of the case in question. I outline the kinds of probabilities involved in making the judgement. My account also helps to cash out the metaphors of the jigsaw and crossword puzzles that Freudians have used in response to the 'many interpretations' objection. However, in defending Freud's method of dream interpretation, I do not thereby defend his theory of dreams, which cannot be justified by his interpretations alone.

  8. Incest, Freud's seduction theory, and borderline personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, M H

    1992-01-01

    In the early 1890s Freud expressed the belief that many cases of hysteria had a basis in childhood incest. Later he expressed a different view, emphasizing childhood fantasies of sexual intimacies with a parent that never actually took place. Freud never totally repudiated his original seduction theory, however, maintaining to the end of his life that at least some cases of actual incest occurred and that these instances underlay certain types of psychopathology. In our era we have become aware that incest is frequently a forerunner of subsequent borderline disorders, especially in women hospitalized with borderline personality disorder (B.P.D.). All the clinical manifestations of B.P.D. can be related to the prior incest experiences.

  9. The enduring scientific contributions of Sigmund Freud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedo, John E

    2002-01-01

    Through the development of a novel observational method, Sigmund Freud made possible the collection of reliable data about man's inner life. The scientific hypotheses he formulated about these formed the initial version of psychoanalysis. Many of these first thoughts have had to be revised in the light of subsequent scientific findings about the operations of the central nervous system, but even these refuted propositions often had much heuristic value. Despite the passage of a whole century, many Freudian hypotheses have retained their scientific standing. Most important among these was Freud's realization that human thought is usually unconscious. His understanding of the role of the automatic repetition of basic patterns of behavior, of the fateful consequences of early childhood emotional vicissitudes in structuring enduring mental dispositions, and of the distinction between two distinct modes of thinking are the most significant among his many contributions.

  10. Piaget's Nominal Realism from a Linguistic Point of View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ephratt, Michal

    1991-01-01

    A study of children's acquisition of synonymy as a sense-property during the second childhood period (as defined by Piaget) suggests that, contrary to psychologists' claims, nominal realism is a linguistic phenomenon that should be studied as such. (75 references) (Author/CB)

  11. Dialectical Philosophy and Developmental Psychology: Hegel and Piaget on Contradiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawler, James

    1975-01-01

    Suggests that although Piaget's psychological theory is developmental and dialectical in a general way, the lack of a developed philosophical basis leads to the subordination of a dialectical approach to static, anti-dialectical concepts. Hegel's theory of interaction and contradiction is examined to show that dialectical theory has a precise…

  12. Dialectical Philosophy and Developmental Psychology: Hegel and Piaget on Contradiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawler, James

    1975-01-01

    Suggests that although Piaget's psychological theory is developmental and dialectical in a general way, the lack of a developed philosophical basis leads to the subordination of a dialectical approach to static, anti-dialectical concepts. Hegel's theory of interaction and contradiction is examined to show that dialectical theory has a precise…

  13. Karl Popper and Jean Piaget: A Rationale for Constructivism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlow, Steve; Cummings, Rhoda; Aberasturi, Suzanne M.

    2006-01-01

    The current faddish use of the term constructivism has taken on as many different definitions as the number of people attempting to define it. This essay clarifies the meaning of constructivism through an examination of Karl Popper's and Jean Piaget's theories. The authors provide a rationale for the use of Popper's paradigm of "Three Worlds" and…

  14. Jean Piaget: An Introduction and Reader's Guide for Children's Librarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getts, Marilyn; Giacoma, Pete

    1981-01-01

    Introduces children's librarians to the theories of cognitive growth in children formulated by Jean Piaget. An annotated bibliography of three primary and 16 secondary references is provided to promote insight and to reinforce commitment to children's services. Five references are listed. (RAA)

  15. Moral Development: A Guide to Piaget and Kohlberg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duska, Ronald; Whelan, Mariellen

    This book discusses the moral development theories of Piaget and Kohlberg and presents practical applications of these theories for teachers and parents. The author's purpose in writing the book is to present an exposition of the work of these men to the general reading public. Chapter titles are Introduction to Developmental Theories, presenting…

  16. Jean Piaget: An Introduction and Reader's Guide for Children's Librarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getts, Marilyn; Giacoma, Pete

    1981-01-01

    Introduces children's librarians to the theories of cognitive growth in children formulated by Jean Piaget. An annotated bibliography of three primary and 16 secondary references is provided to promote insight and to reinforce commitment to children's services. Five references are listed. (RAA)

  17. Piaget, Kohlberg, and Erikson: Developmental Implications for Secondary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, John P.

    1978-01-01

    Although differences exist between their developmental perspectives, the theories of Erik Erikson, with a psychoanalytic focus, and Piaget and Kohlberg, with a cognitive, structural view, are basically complementary, providing a powerful observation on human growth. Here their theories are used to reexamine the secondary curriculum and the…

  18. Piaget on the Moral Development of Forgiveness: Identity or Reciprocity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enright, Robert D.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Proposes a cognitive mechanism that makes forgiveness possible. Revises Piaget's theory that ideal reciprocity is the underlying cognitive operation that makes understanding and appreciation of forgiveness possible. Draws on modern philosophical inquiry, empirical study, and theory to argue instead that abstract identity provides--philosophically…

  19. Creativity in Gifted Education: Contributions from Vygotsky and Piaget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltz, Tania; Piske, Fernanda Hellen Ribeiro; de Fátima Quintal de Freitas, Maria; D'Aroz, Marlene Schüssler; Machado, Járci Maria

    2015-01-01

    This research aims to highlight the importance of developing creativity in the school environment by promoting quality education to gifted students, with contributions from Vygotsky and Piaget. For Vygotsky creativity is inherent in the human condition, and it is the most important activity because it is the expression of consciousness, thought…

  20. Applying Piaget's Theory of Cognitive Development to Mathematics Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojose, Bobby

    2008-01-01

    This paper is based on a presentation given at National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) in 2005 in Anaheim, California. It explicates the developmental stages of the child as posited by Piaget. The author then ties each of the stages to developmentally appropriate mathematics instruction. The implications in terms of not imposing…

  1. Metacognition and Self-Regulation in James, Piaget, and Vygotsky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Emily; Riconscente, Michelle

    2008-01-01

    This article investigates the intertwined constructs of metacognition and self-regulation as they emerge in the works and theories of James, Piaget, and Vygotsky. To coordinate this exploration, we use an interpretive framework based on the relation of subject and object. In this framework, James's perspective on metacognition and self-regulation…

  2. [Two Dutch sisters in analysis with Freud].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroeken, Harry

    2010-01-01

    The author provides persuasive or at least plausible data for the identity of two patients recorded by Freud in his working season of 1910/11. They were two sisters, living in The Hague/Leiden, who came from a rich banker's family, the van der Lindens. Whereas the treatment does not seem to have led to any decisive improvement for the older of the two, it may have encouraged the younger sister to seek divorce.

  3. Freud's philosophical inheritance: Schopenhauer and Nietzsche in Beyond the Pleasure Principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimwade, Robert

    2012-06-01

    This essay explores the possible significance of Freud's references to Schopenhauer and Nietzsche in Beyond the Pleasure Principle. It attempts to reveal two sides of Freud's philosophical inheritance and explores the structure of Freud's ambivalence toward his intellectual predecessors.

  4. Joseph Campbell, Jung, Anne Tyler, and "The Cards": The Spiritual Journey in "Searching for Caleb."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Karen M.

    Joseph Campbell, Carl Jung, and Anne Tyler have all dealt with spiritual journeys and card reading in their writings. In his book "Tarot Revelations," Joseph Campbell discusses his first association with tarot cards, dating from 1943, when he was introduced to the symoblism of playing cards by his friend and mentor, Heinrich Zimmer. Carl Jung was…

  5. C.G. Jung come precursore di una filosofia per l'anima

    OpenAIRE

    Madera, R.

    2007-01-01

    In una delle accezioni di filosofia per Jung è contenuta una idea della filosofia come modo di vivere: questa intuizione fa di Jung un precursore della riscoperta della filosofia come stile di vita e, insieme, trasforma la psicologia analitica in un primo passo per la riapertura di una via sapienziale propria dell'Occidente

  6. The Ambulatorium: Freud's free clinic in Vienna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danto, E A

    1998-04-01

    At the close of World War I, Freud proposed the creation of clinics providing free treatment, in the first of a series of politically liberal statements promoting the development of a kind of institution that is rarely associated with psychoanalysis today. Using archival and oral history research methods, this study offers a descriptive and statistical history of the Vienna Ambulatorium, the free psychoanalytic clinic and child guidance centre created--we can now surmise--under Freud's direction. Presented within the cultural context of central Europe's inter-war rush of progressivism in 'Red Vienna' and in Germany's Weimar Republic, little-known aspects of the history of psychoanalysis emerge. From 1922 to 1936, the staff of the Ambulatorium treated gratis patients of all ages and social classes, ranging from professional to unemployed. Candidates too were analysed at no cost. Reflecting the urban energy of his era, Freud believed that psychoanalysis could be both productive and free of cost. What emerges is an unexpectedly activist, community-oriented profile of some of the earliest participants in the psychoanalytic movement.

  7. The foundation of Piaget's theories: mental and physical action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beilin, H; Fireman, G

    1999-01-01

    Piaget's late theory of action and action implication was the realization of a long history of development. A review of that history shows the central place of action in all of his theoretical assertions, despite the waxing and waning of other important features of his theories. Action was said to be the primary source of knowledge with perception and language in secondary roles. Action is for the most part not only organized but there is logic in action. Action, which is at first physical, becomes internalized and transformed into mental action and mental representation, largely in the development of the symbolic or semiotic function in the sensorimotor period. A number of alternative theories of cognitive development place primary emphasis on mental representation. Piaget provided it with an important place as well, but subordinated it to mental action in the form of operations. In this, as Russell claims, he paralleled Schopenhauer's distinction between representation and will. Piaget's theory of action was intimately related to the gradual development of intentionality in childhood. Intentions were tied to actions by way of the conscious awareness of goals and the means to achieve them. Mental action, following the sensorimotor period, was limited in its logical form to semilogical or one-way functions. These forms were said by Piaget to lack logical reversibility, which was achieved only in the sixth or seventh year, in concrete operations. Mental action was not to be fully realized until the development of formal operations, with hypothetical reasoning, in adolescence, according to the classical Piagetian formulation. This view of the child's logical development, which relied heavily on truth-table (extensional) logic, underwent a number of changes. First from the addition of other logics: category theory and the theory of functions among them. In his last theory, however, an even more radical change occurred. With the collaboration of R. Garcia, he proposed

  8. Sonho, memória e o reencontro de Freud com o cérebro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribeiro Sidarta

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Para que serve sonhar? A vasta contribuição sobre a função dos sonhos dada por Freud e Jung foi em grande parte ignorada pela ciência, pela falta de um método quantitativo e de hipóteses testáveis. Não obstante, vários resultados experimentais corroboram dois importantes "insights" psicanalíticos: 1 que os sonhos freqüentemente contêm elementos da experiência do dia anterior, denominados de "restos do dia", e 2 que estes "restos" incluem atividades mnemônicas, levando portanto a uma facilitação do aprendizado. Em particular, dados recentes sugerem que os sonhos podem desempenhar um papel essencial na consolidação das memórias, levando aquelas recentemente adquiridas a migrar do hipocampo para o neocórtex. Tomados em conjunto, estes resultados indicam a necessidade de reavaliar cientificamente o legado psicanalítico.

  9. On defining words, some scenarios and vectors in the 'autobiography' of C. G. Jung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillard, Christian

    2003-11-01

    Having first considered recent research into the circumstances surrounding the production and publication of the 'autobiography' of Jung, the author concludes that in spite of its being the work of several authors, it nevertheless constitutes a whole. Taken from whichever angle, they all point to Jung's particular inquiry into the unconscious, as it emerges through Jung's own words. The author goes on to suggest both a lateral and a structural reading of MDR (Memories, Dreams, Reflections) which in turn reveals, on the basis of the several dreams reported, the central 'fantasy' which inspired Jung's research and his oeuvre. Finally, he discusses the idea of the collective or impersonal unconscious and highlights the emphasis Jung places on processes which unfold according to rhythms which are associated with distinct scales, depending on whether they are those of the individual, the clan or the culture.

  10. O conceito de religiosidade em C. G. Jung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier, Marlon

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available O artigo procura descrever o conceito de religiosidade na psicologia junguiana, conectando-o aos conceitos que embasam e se relacionam com sua especificidade, contextualizando-o de forma breve no panorama científico atual e relacionando-o à prática psicoterapêutica. Para tanto, utiliza as obras de Jung e de autores relacionados com a temática abordada. O estudo suscitou questionamentos em relação à importância dada à consideração e ao estudo do fator religiosidade em psicologia e na prática clínica. Conclui-se que a religiosidade é fator de suma importância no entendimento do humano e conseqüêntemente na prática clínica, sendo que a teoria de Jung fornece elementos que possibilitam um estudo e uma compreensão em profundidade desse fator

  11. Freud sobre Fausto: sustituciones de la omnipotencia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villacañas Berlanga, José Luis

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available In Freud’s works, literature has an undeniable significance as well as a remarkable “hermeneutical” funtion, specially the great literature of Classicism. Fictional figures such as Goethe’s Faust give expression to general forces inside the subjectivity. This article argues that there is a very influential Faustian-Universe that goes through Freud’s visions and that psychoanalysis is in debt to some extent with Goethe’s masterpiece, for instance, in its reevaluation of the idea of Bildung, that during the “Age of Enlightenment” had to do with an ethical imperative of making one himself. The faustian adventure can be seen like a seek towards that particular kind of “immortality” to be tasted in-this-world that consists of an unending Will of Power (omnipotence followed by an incessant Wish for Pleasure. But Freud has an important point in common with Goethe: Faust, finally, becomes so entranced by one passing moment that he wishes that things will never change, and this means not only that his life is forfeit to de Devil, but something deeper, namely, that both his expectations for pleasure and wish for omnipotence must stop and have to accept the human idea of Death.Freud puso en valor la capacidad hermenéutica de la literatura, en especial la del clasicismo. Las figuras literarias dan expresión a fuerzas subjetivas que operan en cada indivíduo, como formaciones esenciales de la psique. La literatura es la huella de un proceso de humanización y autoconciencia. Este ensayo analiza la deuda de Freud con Goethe, más específicamente, el cosmos fáustico de Freud, a partir de la recuperación de la idea ilustrada de Bildung o formación del sujeto en tanto trabajo de sí mismo. Fausto es para Freud una fuerza ética representativa del desplazamiento de un ideal de omnipotencia hacia la acción intramundana. Esa mefistofélica versión de la inmortalidad que formaban la pulsión de poder y las expectativas ilimitadas de

  12. Freud's "The Uncanny" in Caroline B. Cooney's "Vampire Trilogy."

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarron, Kevin

    This paper compares three supernatural vampire novels geared for adolescents with Freud's discussion of "The Uncanny." Freud's 1919 essay is probably the most important early essay to influence Gothic criticism. To evaluate the adolescent vampire novels, adults must view the books as if they were peer texts, on behalf of a child, and…

  13. [Sigmund Freud and the origin of countertransference's concept].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefana, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to contextualize and analyze historically the birth and early development of the concept of countertransference, introduce by Freud in 1909. In order to do so, will be considered scientific publications, the epistolary and the historical information about the personal relationship between Freud and his students, and among them and some of their patients.

  14. Images of Freud in Popular Culture and Fiction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent

    Historiographic metafiction and postmodern pastiche, both defined by critic Linda Hutcheon as subversive literary and cultural strategies, have put Freud to work both as a clown and a stern cultural critic. My paper will first take a lighthearted look at some of the humorous images we find of Freud...

  15. Freud e a filogenia anímica Freud and the animic phylogeny

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monah Winograd

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Este ensaio investiga a presença, na obra de Freud, da idéia de uma filogenia anímica paralela, concomitante e dependente da filogenia somática descrita pelos teóricos da evolução. Objetivamos mostrar como se forma esta vizinhança da psicanálise com a biologia evolutiva, sublinhando que na filogenia esboçada por Freud, formas psíquicas típicas se sucedem na história da espécie humana, sendo repetidas por cada indivíduo em sua ontogenia singular. Tal como ocorre no plano somático, tempo e forma se associam intimamente na espécie e nos indivíduos. A presença desta idéia no pensamento freudiano abriu um debate sobre sua filiação lamarckista ou darwinista.This essay investigates the presence, in Freud´s work, of the idea of an animic phylogeny parallel, concomitant and dependent of the somatic phylogeny that the theoreticians of evolution describe. Our objective is to show how this neighborhood between psychoanalysis and evolutionary theory is formed. To do so, we stress that, in the phylogeny theory that Freud sketches, typical psychic forms occurs in the history of the human kind in a way that each individual repeats it in its singular ontogeny. As it happens in the somatic level, time and form are intimately associated in the species and in the individuals. The presence of that idea in Freud´s work has opened a debate about his Darwinist or Lamarckist inspiration.

  16. 'Through privation to knowledge': unknown documents from Freud's university years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laible, E

    1993-08-01

    The paper is centred on three hitherto unknown grants, two of them donated by different Jewish Foundations to the medical student Freud shortly before the end of his studies. It furthermore turned out that Freud's salary as a demonstrator in Brücke's Laboratory had been a grant too, donated by the University of Vienna. Aspects of the contemporary background by means of the private foundations and their donors as well as of the aspiring tendencies at the University of Vienna are described. Documentary evidence demonstrates that Brücke promoted Sigmund Freud continuously, more than hitherto known in the biography. The significance of Brücke and Charcot as identification-figures, on the one hand, and for Freud's development as a scientist, on the other, is elaborated. Contemporary quotations shed light on Freud's poverty in his youth as well as the arising anti-Semitism at the University of Vienna.

  17. Remembering and forgetting Freud in early twentieth-century dreams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, John

    2006-03-01

    The paper explores the use of Freud's methods of dream interpretation by four English writers of the early twentieth century: T. H. Pear, W. H. R. Rivers, Ernest Jones, and Alix Strachey. Each employed their own dreams in rather different ways: as part of an assessment of Freud's work as a psychological theory, as illustrative of the cogency of Freud's method and theories as part of the psychoanalytic process. Each adopted different approaches to the question of privacy and decorum. The paper argues that assessment of the impact of Freud's work must take account of the application of the method to the researcher's own dreams and the personal impact this process of analysis had upon them, and must also gauge how the dreamers' deployment of Freud's methods influenced their explicit relationship to him and his theories.

  18. Revolutionizing Cuban Psychiatry: The Freud Wars, 1955-1970.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambe, Jennifer Lynn

    2017-01-01

    This article traces the battle over Freud within Cuban psychiatry from its pre-1959 origins through the "disappearance" of Freud by the early 1970s. It devotes particular attention to the visit of two Soviet psychiatrists to Cuba in the early 1960s as part of a broader campaign to promote Pavlov. The decade-long controversy over Freud responded to both theoretical and political concerns. If for some Freud represented political conservatism and theoretical mystification, Pavlov held out the promise of a dialectical materialist future. Meanwhile, other psychiatrists clung to psychodynamic perspectives, or at least the possibility of heterogeneity. The Freudians would end up on the losing side of this battle, with many departing Cuba over the course of the 1960s. But banishing Freud did not necessarily make for stalwart Pavlovians-or vanguard revolutionaries. Psychiatry would find itself relegated to a handmaiden position in the work of revolutionary mental engineering, with the government itself occupying the vanguard.

  19. [A summer afternoon in Grinzing. Thomas Mann visits Sigmund Freud].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, Gerhard

    2006-01-01

    Focussing on June 14th, 1936 when Mann visited Freud to read him the speech he had delivered in Vienna in celebration of Freud's 80th birthday, the paper investigates the "less than simple" relation between the two men. It shows how they gradually approached each other and then in 1929 entered into direct contact after Mann had publicly underlined Freud's relevance for his project "psychology and myth". Some traces of personal ambivalence contained in the 1936 lecture are highlighted. The author discusses the potential significance for both men of Freud's response to Mann's speech where he interpreted aspects of Napoleon's life as based on his identification with the biblical Joseph in order to surpass his elder brother. Finally it is considered whether Mann's contact with Freud may have helped him to cope with the trauma of the early loss of his father.

  20. Ricœur's reading of Freud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jadranka Brnčić

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article briefly sets out the main points of Ricœur's reflection about Freudian psychoanalysis as a hermeneutics’ language (as a method rather than doctrine that questions the foundation of human consciousness. Hermeneutics of suspicion Ricœur opposes, as dialectical complementary, to hermeneutics of meaning, and on conflict of these hermeneutics is built a narrative identity. While writing about the narrative identity, Ricœur was not expressly returning to Freud, the very concept becomes one of the instruments of psychoanalytic practice.

  1. Piaget Polo不朽的传奇经典

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    为庆祝Piaget Polo系列面世30周年,伯爵在2009年推出五款崭新的纪念腕表。其中两款镶钻的白金Piaget Polo腕表完全忠于1979年的原创设计,并沿用最初的表盘外观,内敛中流露高贵风范。大型男装款式搭载伯爵制534P自动上链机械机芯;女装款式则搭载伯爵690P石英机芯。

  2. Lacan's return to Freud - or turning away from him?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva D. Bahovec

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Freud defined his discovery as “the birth of psychoanalysis”, whereas Lacan defined his relation to Freud as “a return to Freud”. The main characteristic of this return was its orientation into the opposite direction of the American ego-psychology, its positive definition being a return to the “letter of Freud”, or a return through language, and all what Lévi-Strauss and Lacan called “the symbolic”. The paper aims to present a philosophical reading of Freud, and the question whether, in Lacan's “structural” return, something has not been lost, what might have been of crucial importance for the discovery of psychoanalysis as such. In this context, some of the main Freud's concepts, needed for such a re-examination of “Lacanian orientation”, are being discussed, focusing upon Freud's insistence that subjectivity has to be defined by sexual difference and sexuality, and that beyond men and women there is no universal Man or Subject as such. Freud's initial question “What does a woman want?” is contextualized through his other question “How one becomes woman?”, whereas Freud's epistemological hesitations around symmetry and asymmetry of sexual difference are related to philosophical category of the aleatory. The paper concludes with the conclusion that in this perspective Lacan's return to Freud could be characterized as a return to essentialism, or even to implicit antifeminism. In opposition to Lacan, Freud always insisted on the difference between women and men as something that cannot be explained, and that the notion of bisexuality should not be abandoned. Using Beauvoir's critique of Lévi-Strauss, Freud's hesitations and his undecidedness of symmetry or asymmetry is explained as ontological category of a chance without a cause, and as the most repressed part of what later Althusser addressed to as “the repressed current” of aleatory materialism.

  3. Alasdair MacIntyre, joven lector de Freud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramis Barceló, Rafael

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This article tries to show the reading of Freud that MacIntyre made from 1955 to 1970. For this purpose, it summarizes the ideas of MacIntyre in the intellectual context, mainly the use of philosophical ideas of Freud against the Enlightenment project. MacIntyre criticises Marxist interpreters and the mixing between Marx and Freud. MacIntyre uses the philosophical ideas of Freud for answering two problems on determinism: the links between determinism and reasons for action and determinism and Marxism. The main conclusion is that MacIntyre used Freud in his own advantage: as an ally in the criticism of the Enlightenment.

    Este artículo trata de mostrar la lectura que MacIntyre hizo de Freud desde 1955 hasta 1970. Con este fin, se resumen las ideas de MacIntyre en el contexto intelectual, principalmente el uso de las ideas filosóficas de Freud contra el proyecto de la Ilustración. MacIntyre critica a los intérpretes de Marx y a la mezcla entre Marx y Freud. MacIntyre usa las ideas filosóficas de Freud para contestar dos problemas sobre el determinismo: los vínculos entre el determinismo y las razones para la acción y el determinismo y el marxismo. La conclusión principal es que MacIntyre usó a Freud en su propio beneficio: como un aliado en la crítica de la Ilustración.

  4. 'S.W.' and C.G. Jung: mediumship, psychiatry and serial exemplarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamdasani, Sonu

    2015-09-01

    On the basis of unpublished materials, this essay reconstructs Jung's seances with his cousin, Helene Preiswerk, which formed the basis of his 1902 medical dissertation, The Psychology and Pathology of so-called Occult Phenomena. It separates out Jung's contemporaneous approach to the mediumistic phenomena she exhibited from his subsequent sceptical psychological reworking of the case. It traces the reception of the work and its significance for his own self-experimentation from 1913 onwards. Finally, it reconstructs the manner in which Jung continually returned to his first model and reframed it as an exemplar of his developing theories.

  5. Atom and archetype the Pauli/Jung letters, 1932-1958

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    Wolfgang Pauli, world-renowned physicist, turned to Carl Jung for help, setting a standing appointment for Mondays at noon. Thus bloomed an extraordinary intellectual conjunction. Eighty letters, written over twenty-six years, record that friendship, and are published here in English for the first time.Through the association of these two pioneering thinkers, developments in physics profoundly influenced the evolution of Jungian psychology. And many of Jung's abiding themes shaped how Pauli - and, through him, other physicists - understood the physical world. Atom and Archetype will appeal not only to those interested in the life of Pauli or Jung, but also to the educated general reader.

  6. Apontamentos sobre a psicologia analítica de Carl Gustav Jung

    OpenAIRE

    Luís Marcelo Alves Ramos

    2002-01-01

    O texto faz uma introdução à Psicologia Analítica do psicólogo e psiquiatra suíço Carl Gustav Jung: define o conceito de Psicologia Analítica, traz uma biografia resumida de Carl Gustav Jung, indica as principais diferenças entre a Psicologia Analítica e a Psicanálise, descreve a estrutura e o funcionamento da psique e, por fim, apresenta sinteticamente as características dos tipos de personalidades traçadas por Jung. The text makes an introduction to the Analytical Psychology of the psycholo...

  7. INFLUENCE OF VIGOTSKY AND PIAGET TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF DEFECTOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandar KJORDIC

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available Vigotsky's work about the problems in defectology point at social dimension of handicap and the need of multidisciplinary approach towards rehabilitation of the handicap persons. His attitude in defectology more humanistic in meeting with handicapped person.Piaget offers to the defectology completely new and more plentiful approaches in the work with the handicapped children, and in providing defectological help to the children, having dis cognitive problems in regular schools, as well.

  8. Piaget e Vygotsky - um debate possível

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Suzana De Stefano Menin

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Neste artigo sobre Piaget e Vygotsky apresentamos alguns conceitos dos dois autores a respeito de três fatores que atuam no desenvolvimento da cognição o ambiente social, a linguagem e os constituintes biológicos. Comparações sobre o significado desses termos são tecidas e, a partir delas, apresentamos questões que podem sugerir prosseguimentos para o debate entre os autores.

  9. An existential criterion of normal and abnormal personality in the works of Carl Jung and Carl Rogers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapustin, Sergey A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article is the third in a series of four articles scheduled for publication in this journal. In the first article (Kapustin, 2015a I proposed a description of a new so-called existential criterion of normal and abnormal personality that is implicitly present in the works of Erich Fromm. According to this criterion, normal and abnormal personalities are determined, first, by special features of the content of their position regarding existential dichotomies that are natural to human beings and, second, by particular aspects of the formation of this position. Such dichotomies, entitatively existent in all human life, are inherent, two-alternative contradictions. The position of a normal personality in its content orients a person toward a contradictious predetermination of life in the form of existential dichotomies and necessitates a search for compromise in resolving these dichotomies. This position is created on a rational basis with the person’s active participation. The position of an abnormal personality in its content subjectively denies a contradictious predetermination of life in the form of existential dichotomies and orients a person toward a consistent, noncompetitive, and, as a consequence, onesided way of life that doesn’t include self-determination. This position is imposed by other people on an irrational basis. Abnormality of personality interpreted like that is one of the most important factors influencing the development of various kinds of psychological problems and mental disorders — primarily, neurosis. In the second article (Kapustin, 2015b I showed that this criterion is also implicitly present in the personality theories of Sigmund Freud and Alfred Adler, although in more specific cases. In the current work I prove that this criterion is also present in the personality theories of Carl Jung and Carl Rogers, where it is implicitly stated in a more specific way. In the final article I will show that this criterion

  10. Jean Piaget's experiences on the couch: some clues to a mystery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepeler, E M

    1993-04-01

    This paper is an attempt to reconstruct the historical, institutional, and personal circumstances leading to and surrounding Jean Piaget's psychoanalysis with Sabina Spielrein. It appears that the young Piaget's interest in psychoanalysis largely emanated from his long-standing problems with his mother. It is suggested that Piaget's lifelong tendency to intellectualise his own emotional experiences may relate to the near omission of affective factors in his psychological theories.

  11. Adolescent thinking ála Piaget: The formal stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulit, E

    1972-12-01

    Two of the formal-stage experiments of Piaget and Inhelder, selected largely for their closeness to the concepts defining the stage, were replicated with groups of average and gifted adolescents. This report describes the relevant Piagetian concepts (formal stage, concrete stage) in context, gives the methods and findings of this study, and concludes with a section discussing implications and making some reformulations which generally support but significantly qualify some of the central themes of the Piaget-Inhelder work. Fully developed formal-stage thinking emerges as far from commonplace among normal or average adolescents (by marked contrast with the impression created by the Piaget-Inhelder text, which chooses to report no middle or older adolescents who function at less than fully formal levels). In this respect, the formal stage differs appreciably from the earlier Piagetian stages, and early adolescence emerges as the age for which a "single path" model of cognitive development becomes seriously inadequate and a more complex model becomes essential. Formal-stage thinking seems best conceptualized, like most other aspects of psychological maturity, as a potentiality only partially attained by most and fully attained only by some.

  12. Freud e a transferência dos psicóticos Freud and the psychotic’s transference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josiane Bocchi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste artigo é mapear os escritos de Freud sobre a transferência dos pacientes psicóticos demarcando quatro etapas. A particularidade deste trabalho consiste exatamente na divisão da experiência freudiana das psicoses em quatro períodos que salientam a questão da transferência com caráter central na experiência com psicóticos. No primeiro período veremos que Freud utiliza a prática do diagnóstico de maneira bastante flexível, no entanto é a partir deles que a noção de transferência aparece. Num segundo momento, Freud duvida que seja possível o tratamento psicanalítico das psicoses. No momento seguinte, Freud manifesta significativo interesse pela clínica das psicoses. Na quarta e última etapa, Freud analisa as relações entre normalidade e anormalidade e avalia as possibilidades da análise de psicóticos. Apresentamos ainda um caso pouco assinalado de um paciente de Freud, pois acreditamos que compreender o pensamento de Freud a partir da experiência clínica é importante para que se compreenda o conjunto de sua obra.The purpose of this paper is to map the writings of Freud on the transfer of psychotic patients demarcating four steps. The particularity of this work is exactly the Freudian division of experience into four periods of psychosis that emphasize the issue of transfer to the central character in the psychotic experience. In the first period we find that Freud uses the practice of diagnosis quite flexible, however, is from them that the concept of transfer appears. Secondly, Freud doubts it is possible the psychoanalytic treatment of psychosis. The next moment, Freud expressed significant interest in the clinic of psychosis. The fourth and final stage, Freud analyzes the relationship between normality and abnormality and evaluates the possibilities of the analysis of psychotics. We also present a somewhat noted case of a patient of Freud, because we believe they understand the thinking of Freud from

  13. [Carl Gustav Jung's Theatrum Mundi. Can the description of modern alchemy in Jung's Psychologie und Alchemie be really regarded as a historical reconstruction?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Płonka-Syroka, B

    2000-01-01

    In his work, Psychologie und Alchemie, published in 1944, Jung wanted to present a reconstruction of alchemy. In order to do this he used a method of psychology, which he modified and enriched with inspirations drawn from neo-romantically-oriented German medical historiographies of the nineteen thirties. Using historical materials, he intended to demonstrate the empirical character of his Depth Psychology, a widespread concept, ingrained in our supra-personal social unconscious. The present article questions the nature of Jung's reconstruction of alchemy as historical reconstruction. The author presents the methodological bases referred to by Jung derived from his concept of medical practice and compares them with a manner of thinking typical of contemporary historical analysis. The article also presents Jung's inspirations from the medical historiography of his time, as well as the dissimilarity of his concept with the model of historical narrative construction in force in the historiography of the thirties and forties. At the same time, it presents the elements of the "romantic inheritance" in Jung's thought, drawn from the tradition of German non-materialistic medicine of the first half of the nineteenth century.

  14. A comparison between John Dewey's theory of inquiry and Jean Piaget's genetic analysis of intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seltzer, E

    1977-06-01

    This article compares John Dewey's theory of inquiry with Jean Piaget's analysis of the mechanisms implied in the increase of knowledge. The sources for this paper are Dewey's studies on logic and the theory of inquiry and Piaget's historical-critical and psychogenetic investigations. Three major conclusions result from the comparison: first, there are significant convergences between the two theories; second, Piaget's developmental analysis makes explicit what is programmatic in Dewey's investigations; and, finally, Piaget is incorrect in characterizing Dewey's pragmatism as a method that does not meet the criteria of intelligent activity.

  15. O conceito de paranoia em Freud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Calazans

    Full Text Available Neste artigo, refazemos o percurso freudiano a propósito do conceito de paranoia em sua obra. Esse percurso se fará a partir dos textos considerados pré-psicanalíticos, passando por aquele que é considerado o texto maior de Freud sobre as psicoses (o Caso Schereber, culminando com suas análises que levam em consideração sua segunda teoria sobre o funcionamento psíquico e sobre o conflito pulsional. Nosso objetivo é demonstrar como Freud, em sua elaboração das questões relativas à psicose, e à paranoia, mais especificamente, jamais se furtava a encarar os desafios que a clínica impunha. E por não recuar frente a esses desafios é que a sua própria teoria vai se formulando, em uma relação dialética entre os impasses da prática e a necessidade de estabelecer um rigor teórico. O artigo trata, também, da forma como o rigor teórico permite o estabelecimento de um diagnóstico diferencial entre neurose e psicose, além de assentar as bases para que os psicanalistas pós-freudianos pudessem pensar em um direcionamento para tratar a psicose.

  16. Suppose Freud had chosen Orestes instead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Margaret

    2009-04-01

    The paper argues that the story of Oedipus, however understood, conveys psychic truth of no greater or more central importance to human development than do the stories of many other myths. A distinction is made between sophisticated theories developed out of Freud's original concept of the Oedipus complex, and the adherence by some clinicians to his original sexual theory. The meaning of Sophocles' play Oedipus the King is found to lie in the clash between Oedipus' omnipotent narcissism (hubris) and the power of the unconscious psyche, rather than in cross-generational sex. Emphasis is placed on the clinical usefulness of understanding all myths symbolically. The Oresteia by Aeschylus is offered as a story about pre-Oedipal (in the Freudian sense) psychic states. This trilogy shows symbolically the developing of an ego, the establishment of moral judgement and the integration of our shadow (the Furies). It also shows the parallel development of structures of law in society to replace instinctive blood feuds. It is suggested that had Freud chosen Orestes instead of Oedipus, the course of both psychoanalysis and of Western society would have had a different emphasis.

  17. Paediatrics and psychoanalysis--Miss Anna Freud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    Miss Anna Freud died during the winter at the age of 86. She had been a pioneer in the understanding of children through psychoanalysis and a great champion of the rights of children. Her life began in Vienna as the youngest child of Sigmund Freud, and her early work with children was in Austria. In 1938, because of the Nazi régime and even though she was nursing her father during his terminal illness, she had to escape with him to London. Her work with homeless children and with those in residential nurseries in London during the second world war is well known, as is her work on child development and psychopathology in the postwar years. But one less well known aspect of her life that was of immense importance to a few fortunate British paediatricians was the 'paediatric group' that she ran for over a quarter of a century and which Dr Christine Cooper recalled at the memorial meeting in London earlier this year. PMID:6344806

  18. Interlocução entre Rudolf Otto, Carl Gustav Jung e Victor White

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Pereira Ceccon

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In 1917 Rudolf Otto published the book The Sacred and proposing the recognition of the irrational aspect as the foundation and maintainer of religious expression by means of analogies and antonyms that the called the numinous. Later, at a conference in1937, Carl Gustav Jung uses the term numinous to clarify what he meant by religion, recognizing this as an observation on what grabs consciousness, thus extending the idea of the numinous to practice and clinical studies. Victor White, Jung's main collaborator in the field of theology, weaves a critical to Otto and Jung's position front to the understanding of religious phenomena, stating that it presents a unilateralism in recognition that only their irrational sphere supports religion. This article aims to lead to a theoretical discussion as to White's reflections on the idea of numinous, in contrast to the positions of Otto and Jung.

  19. Verification of C. G. Jung's analysis of Rowland Hazard and the history of Alcoholics Anonymous.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluhm, Amy Colwell

    2006-11-01

    Extant historical scholarship in the Jungian literature and the Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) literature does not provide a complete picture of the treatment of Rowland Hazard by C. G. Jung, an analysis that AA co-founder Bill Wilson claimed was integral to the foundation of AA in theory and practice. Wilson's original report resulted in archivists and historians incorrectly calibrating their searches to the wrong date. The current work definitively solves the mystery of the timing of Hazard's treatment with Jung by placing his preliminary analysis with Jung in the year 1926, rather than 1930 or 1931. Previously unexamined correspondence originating from Jung, Hazard, his cousin Leonard Bacon, his uncle Irving Fisher, and his aunt Margaret Hazard Fisher is supplemented by relevant primary and secondary source material.

  20. Sigmund Freud: smoking habit, oral cancer and euthanasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeyemo, W L

    2004-01-01

    Sigmund Freud, the father of modern psychoanalysis had a well-known love of the cigar. The natural progression of this vice was the development of oral cancer for which he underwent a lengthy ordeal. An account is given in this article of Sigmund Freud's illness and care following the diagnosis of his oral cancer. The role of euthanasia and physician assisted suicide is also discussed. A review of relevant literature on Sigmund Freud's illness, risk factors for oral cancer and euthanasia was undertaken. Sigmund Freud was a heavy smoker with a 20-cigar/day habit. In 1923, a diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma of the palate was made, for which he underwent a lengthy ordeal which span a total of 16 years. During this period, he bluntly refused to quit smoking. Freud consulted many specialists (otolaryngologists, oral and maxillofacial surgeons, prosthodontists and general surgeons), during the course of his ordeal with oral cancer. He underwent 34 surgical procedures before his eventual death in 1939 through euthanasia. Continued indulgence in smoking and procrastination on the part of Freud, as well as mediocrity, negligence and incompetence on the part of the first surgeon that operated on Freud, could partly be responsible for his lengthy ordeal.

  1. Finding Freud: a personal tribute on the 150th Anniversary of Sigmund Freud's birthday.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spielman, Ron

    2006-06-01

    To briefly describe my own development from medical student, through junior resident and psychiatry registrar and finally qualified psychiatrist, to feeling the need to undertake psychoanalytic training in order to grapple with the complexities of treatment of personality disorders. My encounter with the concepts developed by the Viennese physician, Sigmund Freud, as represented by a number of significant teachers and clinicians was a formative experience in my early career. My subsequent development as a psychiatrist and psychoanalyst was highly influenced by the understandings of human mental development and function set in train by Freud's clinical findings and ground-breaking thinking in the early 20th century. It is hoped that registrars-in-training and young psychiatrists may be particularly interested in how things 'once were' in NSW Mental Health Services which permitted this course of development.

  2. A histeria em Freud e Flaubert Hysteria in Freud and Flaubert

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Scotti

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo passa em revista o percurso de Freud nos seus textos sobre a histeria e outros correlatos e, seguindo a sugestão do inventor da psicanálise, dirige-se à consideração da personagem de um clássico da literatura, "Madame Bovary", de Flaubert, buscando apontar os traços estruturais da histeria a partir da trajetória tanto da personagem mencionada quanto da consideração de outras obras do mesmo autor.This article reviews Freud's course in his texts about hysteria and others related to it, and, following the suggestion of the inventor of psychoanalysis, intends to consider the character of a literary classic, Flaubert's "Madame Bovary", aiming to point out the structural aspects of hysteria from the course of both, the character already mentioned, and the consideration of other books by the same author.

  3. A psicologia analítica de Carl Gustav Jung: apontamentos de aula/The analytical psychology of Carl Gustav Jung: notes of lesson

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Marcelo Alves Ramos

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available O texto traz o conteúdo de uma aula sobre Teorias da Personalidade com foco nos fundamentos da Psicologia Analítica do psicólogo e psiquiatra suíço Carl Gustav Jung (1875-1961, cuja obra vem apresentando significativas contribuições para a Psicologia Educacional, Organizacional e Clínica. The text brings the content of a lesson on Theories of Personality focused in the fundamentals of the Analytical Psychology of the Swiss psychologist and psychiatrist Carl Gustav Jung (1875-1961, whose work has been presenting significant contributions for Educational, Organizational and Clinical Psychology.

  4. 150 years of Sigmund Freud: What would Freud have said about the obesity epidemic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornstein, S R; Wong, M-L; Licinio, J

    2006-12-01

    The 150th birthday of Sigmund Freud has triggered widespread interest and media coverage on his unique contribution and impact on society. Recent evidence from neuroscience and advanced imaging technology has provided support for some of his major concepts including the unconscious and the key role of early life events. In this perspective, we attempt to write on his behalf an updated version of a Freudian way of thinking focused on the current high rates of obesity and depression.

  5. Freud e Moisés: um contexto social

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    A presente obra é um importante trabalho que visa à apresentação do ambiente judaico em que a Psicanálise se desenvolveu graças aos estudos e as pesquisas de Sigmund Freud, o pai da Psicanálise. Bernstein procura fazer uma leitura do ambiente judaico em que Freud nasceu e que permaneceu durante toda a sua vida, mesmo com o seu declarado ateísmo. Muito além de refletir sobre os aspectos biográficos de Freud, que é considerado um dos maiores nomes do início do século XX, o autor visa constituir...

  6. Images of Freud in Popular Culture and Fiction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent

    Historiographic metafiction and postmodern pastiche, both defined by critic Linda Hutcheon as subversive literary and cultural strategies, have put Freud to work both as a clown and a stern cultural critic. My paper will first take a lighthearted look at some of the humorous images we find of Freud...... in popular culture, where Sigmund has long had iconic status, both in terms of his own physical likeness and in terms of stereotyped versions of his main ideas. To complement this analysis I shall contrast the popular image of Freud with the use of him in recent fiction by E.L. Doctorow and John Irving....

  7. A collective unconscious reconsidered: Jung's archetypal imagination in the light of contemporary psychology and social science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Harry T

    2012-02-01

    A needed rapprochement between Jung and the contemporary human sciences may rest less on the much debated relevance of a biologistic collective unconscious than on a re-inscribing of an archetypal imagination, as the phenomenological and empirical core of Jungian psychology. The most promising approaches in this regard in terms of theory and research in psychology come from combining the cognitive psychology of metaphor and synaesthesia, individual differences in imaginative absorption and openness to numinous experience and spirituality as a form of symbolic intelligence. On the socio-cultural side, this cognitive psychology of archetypal imagination is also congruent with Lévi-Strauss on the metaphoric roots of mythological thinking, and Durkheim on a sociology of collective consciousness. This conjoined perspective, while validating the cross cultural commonality of physical metaphor intuited by Jung and Hillman on alchemy, also shows Jung's Red Book, considered as the expressive source for his more formal psychology, to be far closer in spirit to a socio-cultural collective consciousness, based on metaphoric imagination, than to a phylogenetic or evolutionary unconscious. A mutual re-inscribing of Jung into congruent areas of contemporary psychology, anthropology, sociology, and vice versa, can help to further validate Jung's key observations and is fully consistent with Jung's own early efforts at synthesis within the human sciences. © 2012, The Society of Analytical Psychology.

  8. Beyond synchronicity: the worldview of Carl Gustav Jung and Wolfgang Pauli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donati, Marialuisa

    2004-11-01

    While exploring the phenomena of synchronicity, Carl Gustav Jung became acquainted with the quantum physicist Wolfgang Pauli and eventually began a collaboration with him. During that collaboration Jung's study of synchronistic phenomena underwent a considerable change; prior to the collaboration, Jung had stressed mainly the phenomenological and empirical features of synchronistic phenomena, while in association with Pauli, he focused his attention upon their ontological, archetypal character. Pauli, on the other hand, became increasingly sensitive to the philosophical aspects concerning the unconscious. Jung and Pauli's common reflections went far beyond psychology and physics, entering into the realm where the two areas meet in the philosophy of nature. In fact, as a consequence of their collaboration, synchronicity was transformed from an empirical concept into a fundamental explanatory-interpretative principle, which together with causality could possibly lead to a more complete worldview. Exploring the problematic character of the synchronicity concept has a heuristic value because it leads to the reconsideration of the philosophical issues that drove Jung and Pauli to clear up the conceptual background of their thoughts. Within the philosophical worldview arising from Jung and Pauli's discussions about synchronicity, there are many symbolic aspects that go against mainstream science and that represent a sort of criticism to some of the commonly held views of present day science.

  9. Freud é monista, dualista ou pluralista? Is Freud a monist, a dualist or a pluralist?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monah Winograd

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo trata de uma questão que surge sempre que a problemática do corpo na teoria freudiana é desdobrada. Seria Freud monista, dualista ou pluralista? Nosso primeiro esforço é definir estes termos do léxico filosófico, atentando para a sua generalidade. Em seguida, debruçamo-nos sobre a obra freudiana para mostrar que sua teoria não se encaixa nestas categorias, ou antes, ela aglomera os três termos já que trabalha simultaneamente com monismos, dualismos e pluralismos. Analisamos os conceitos de inconsciente, pulsão, equação etiológica e séries complementares para sustentar esta posição.This article deals with a question that always appears when we investigate the problem of the body in Freud's theory. Is Freud a monist, a dualist or a pluralist? Our first effort is to define these terms of the philosophical lexic, paying attention to its generality. Afterwards, we study the Freudian work in order to show that his theory does not fit into these categories. On the contrary, it puts together the three terms once it works at the same time with monisms, dualisms and pluralisms.

  10. [On the philosophical genealogy of Freud].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, C T

    1975-06-01

    The origins of psycho-analysis, like those of every other medico-psychological study, have their own particular scientific and specific social, historical and philosophical-theoretical presuppositions. Freud's philosophical genealogy is closely linked to classical german philosophy and subsequent philosophical movements. I. Kant, J.-F. Herbart, A. Schopenhauer, F. Nietzsche, E. v. Hartmann, G. T. Fechner, E. Mach, W. Ostwald, L. Feuerbach and others did not only emphasise the significance of drives and the unconscious in human behaviour, they also described many psychological mechanisms from depth psychology, (for example repression, condensation, substitution, sublimation). Some false theoretical trends in psycho-analysis (biologism, psychologism and simplifying psycho-energetics to simplify) can be explained to some extent by the influences mentioned above.

  11. Was Freud, At Heart, A Realistic Romantic?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen O'Dwyer

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The birth of psychoanalysis at the close of the nineteenth centurycoincided with a questioning of philosophical traditions and methodsepitomized by Nietzsche’s assault on current thinking. The Enlightenment had seen the questioning of religion as an explanation and a revelation of reality and of human life within that reality; science had been instigated as a more ‘enlightened’ and a more rational provider of truth and knowledge; but the ongoing nature of philosophical thought continued to encounter new challenges and the re-phrasing of old questions. Attempting to combine the exactness of scientific method with the openness of philosophical inquiry, psychoanalysis broached the terrain of the human mind, and attemptedto explore the perennial questions of meaning, truth and life with anunderstanding enhanced by the discoveries of its founder, Sigmund Freud.

  12. Freud y la escritura. Grafología psicoanalítica y deconstrucción

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez López, Adrián

    2014-01-01

    En el presente trabajo abordaremos una lectura deconstructiva del freudismo. La escritura, en la obra de Freud, será nuestro tema. Freud, nuestro Freud, el Freud de J. Derrida: aquel que escribía en los márgenes de sus obras, ese Freud que no es del to

  13. Freud y la escritura. Grafología psicoanalítica y deconstrucción

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez López, Adrián

    2014-01-01

    En el presente trabajo abordaremos una lectura deconstructiva del freudismo. La escritura, en la obra de Freud, será nuestro tema. Freud, nuestro Freud, el Freud de J. Derrida: aquel que escribía en los márgenes de sus obras, ese Freud que no es del to

  14. Is there still an unknown Freud? A note on the publications of Freud's texts and on unpublished documents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falzeder, Ernst

    2007-01-01

    This article presents an overview of the existing editions of what Freud wrote (works, letters, manuscripts and drafts, diaries and calendar notes, dedications and margin notes in books, case notes, and patient calendars) and what he is recorded as having said (minutes of meetings, interviews, memoirs of and interviews with patients, family members, and followers, and other quotes). There follows a short overview of biographies of Freud and other documentation on his life. It is concluded that a wealth of material is now available to Freud scholars, although more often than not this information is used in a biased and partisan way.

  15. Situating "Egocentric Language" In the Teaching Of Composition: Piaget, Britton, and Merleau-Ponty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunst, Robert C.

    By assigning negative value to egocentric language, Jean Piaget equates depersonalized thought and logic with maturity, and gives disproportionate favor to socialized language. By focusing on the deterministic ends to be gained through the acquisition of socialized language, Piaget misses the value of egocentric language. Maurice Merleau-Ponty,…

  16. Moral Development as the Personal Education of Feeling and Reason: From James to Piaget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Michel; Okamoto, Carol M.

    2003-01-01

    This article traces the connection between William James's writings in "The Varieties of Religious Experience" and Jean Piaget's work on moral development through Piaget's early work on religious experience. James characterises religious experience as unlocking deep personal power that can sustain a "strenuous mood". These ideas impacted the early…

  17. A Biographic Comparison Tracing the Origin of Their Ideas of Jean Piaget and Lev Vygotsky.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pass, Susan

    This paper compares the early life, background, and education of Jean Piaget and Lev Vygotsky. It makes the case that an adaptation of the curve developed by C. Quigley can be used to trace the motivations of both Piaget and Vygotsky in creating their respective theories. The analysis also reveals the adversity that each man faced. Although they…

  18. A Biographic Comparison Tracing the Similarities in the Lives of Jean Piaget and Lev Vygotsky.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pass, Susan

    This paper focuses on similarities in the lives of Jean Piaget and Lev Vygotsky to enlighten study of their pedagogies and to provide some information for current classroom techniques. Neither man had a great deal to say about his early life, although Piaget published an autobiography. A number of primary sources were used to construct the…

  19. Moral Development as the Personal Education of Feeling and Reason: From James to Piaget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Michel; Okamoto, Carol M.

    2003-01-01

    This article traces the connection between William James's writings in "The Varieties of Religious Experience" and Jean Piaget's work on moral development through Piaget's early work on religious experience. James characterises religious experience as unlocking deep personal power that can sustain a "strenuous mood". These ideas impacted the early…

  20. Beyond the Individual-Social Antinomy in Discussions of Piaget and Vygotsky.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Michael; Wertsch, James V.

    1996-01-01

    Examines the role attributed to cultural mediation in Piaget's and Vygotsky's theories. Mediation of human action by cultural artifacts was central to Vygotsky's account of human development, but less important for Piaget. Vygotsky's claims regarding social origins of individual mental processes need to be understood in light of claims regarding…

  1. Piaget and the theories of organic evolution / Piaget e as teorias da evolução orgânica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Argus Vasconcelos de Almeida

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Theories of organic evolution, mainly those proposed by Darwin, have strongly influenced human sciences in general, and psychology in particular. Piaget has brought from biology several theoretical proposals which gave support to his formulations concerning human ontogenetic development. The theoretical link between biological and psychological formulations was based on the proposition of correspondences and partial isomorphism between evolutionary biology and cognitive development. However, Piaget's ideas about phylogenetic evolution of live organisms have had little influence over current biology. Nevertheless, epigenetic contemporary theories of biological evolution make use of Piaget's propositions, in theoretical opposition to the neo-Darwinist views. Because of that, it is proposed in this paper the crucial contribution of Piaget in terms of the proposition of a common theoretical ground for psychogenesis and organic evolution.

  2. Se Faire Voir with Jung and the Ethics of Psychoanalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Gildersleeve

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This article is an important addition to my previous work of integrating Jungian and Lacanian psychoanalysis (see Complexes Tickling the $ubject. A main focus of this article is to use Zizek’s interpretation of Lacan’s writing on desire and drive in relation to my Heideggerian interpretation of Jung. As a result, this article is an important contribution to the literature because it shows the importance of the transcendent function; complexes and the Rosarium Philosophorum to elucidate the ethics of desire and drive. This article shows how Heidegger’s work in Being and Time and his interpretation of Nietzsche is important to detail the process of Lacanian psychoanalysis. Nietzsche’s books; Human All Too Human and The Gay Science will also be discussed as well as Sartre’s Being and Nothingness and Zizek’s writing on the cunning of reason; Kantian ethics; beyond the pleasure principle; Kierkegaard; Sisyphus; anxiety; Hitchcock; Gelassenheit; the Gospel of Matthew and error as a fundamental passage to truth.

  3. Hamlet in Freud's Thoughts: Reinterpretations in the Psychoanalytic Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz de Chumaceiro, Cora L.

    1998-01-01

    Presents a selection of interpretations in the psychoanalytic literature of "Hamlet," by William Shakespeare, beginning with an extensive look at the role this literature played in Sigmund Freud's mind at the origins of psychoanalysis. Also examines later interpretations. (SR)

  4. [The infantile sexual seduction: revolution and aftermath of Freud's theory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Gustavo C

    2014-01-01

    There is no question about the negative effects of child sexual abuse. Freud's seduction theory asserts that psychoneuroses in adults are caused by reactivation of forgotten recollections of gross sexual abuse (involving the genitals) that had taken place prior to the age of 8 to 10 years. His contribution consisted in the discovery of specific events, prior to puberty, which were indispensable to the formation of psychoneuroses. If an adult patient recalled an infantile sexual experience, Freud assumed the interference of a pervert: a child was sexually innocent unless it had been traumatized. But Freud's technique of clinical exploration had not attained adequate reliability and was not immune to prejudices. Freud himself dropped his mechanical, static theory that presupposed a single type of accidentally occurring trauma prior to puberty, allowing him to develop his new drive and fantasy theory.

  5. Hamlet in Freud's Thoughts: Reinterpretations in the Psychoanalytic Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz de Chumaceiro, Cora L.

    1998-01-01

    Presents a selection of interpretations in the psychoanalytic literature of "Hamlet," by William Shakespeare, beginning with an extensive look at the role this literature played in Sigmund Freud's mind at the origins of psychoanalysis. Also examines later interpretations. (SR)

  6. Mentaliseringsbegrebet og dets arv fra Freuds begreb om binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Signe Holm

    2011-01-01

    Artiklen undersøger og diskuterer forskelle og ligheder mellem mentaliseringsbegrebet og Freuds bindingsbegreb. Begrebet mentalisering, som betegner en evne til at forholde sig refleksivt til egne og andres mentale tilstande, har indenfor de sidste fem- ti år vundet en central placering i klinisk...... psykologiske teoridannelser. Dets ophavsmænd Fonagy et al. forsøger imidlertid ikke at tage patent på begrebet, men peger på, at en række teoretikere har understreget betydningen af en refleksiv funktion. Alle disse begreber kan ifølge Fonagygruppen føres tilbage til Freuds begreb om binding. På baggrund af en...... udlægning af det oprindelige bindingsbegreb hos Freud, ønskes det i denne artikel at tydeliggøre den grundlæggende forskel på Freuds – og Fonagys subjektopfattelse....

  7. Before babel: reflections on reading and translating freud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolnik, Eran J

    2015-04-01

    The author offers some thoughts on reading and teaching Freud, on translating Freud, on translation in general, and on a possible kinship between translation and the psychoanalytic process. His reading of Freud's works, and the years he spent translating them into Hebrew and editing Hebrew editions of his writings, have made a deep and salient impression on his personal psychoanalytic palimpsest. The author began this labor prior to his psychoanalytic training and has no doubt that, to this day, the experience greatly shapes not only his attitude toward Freud himself, but also the nature of how he listens to patients and the way he thinks and writes about psychoanalysis. © 2015 The Psychoanalytic Quarterly, Inc.

  8. Thomas Hobbes y Sigmund Freud: pensadores del orden

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reano, Ariana

    2009-01-01

    .... Para ilustrar esto nos referiremos al modo en que Thomas Hobbes y Sigmund Freud indagan el caracter contingente de lo humano en las respectivas representaciones del estado de naturaleza y de la horda primitiva...

  9. The Hawthorne experiments and the introduction of Jean Piaget in American industrial psychology, 1929-1932.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsueh, Yeh

    2002-05-01

    The Hawthorne interview program between 1929 and 1932 was one of the most significant industrial studies in the United States. The Hawthorne researchers applied Jean Piaget's clinical method in their extensive interviews with tens of thousands of workers. Chiefly responsible for the program's methodology was Elton Mayo, an Australian who saw interviewing as a means to promote social cooperation. Previous discussions of the Hawthorne experiments have ignored the influence of Piaget in the social sciences. This article provides an account of Mayo's and the Hawthorne researchers' efforts to fuse Piaget's innovation with burgeoning American industrial psychology. The endeavor was not an isolated event but rather drew on the theories and practice of Janet-Piaget psychology, on the support of the Laura Spelman Rockefeller Memorial Foundation, and on the discourse among social scientists about Piaget's work.

  10. Use of Piaget's theory in preschool nutrition education Uso da teoria de Piaget na educação nutricional de pré-escolares

    OpenAIRE

    Hatice Başkale; Zuhal Bahar; Günsel Başer; Meziyet Ari

    2009-01-01

    The preschool period is a time when children learn many concepts and develop life-long habits. In that period, children learn about appropriate and balanced nutrition and acquire good eating habits for later years. Piaget determined that children's cognitive development is important for their understanding of and learning about the world around them. Piaget's theory can be used as a guide in nutrition education. In fact, it helps to design effective nutrition education appropriate for the dev...

  11. Aprendizagem e Desenvolvimento na Teoria de Jean Piaget

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Suzana de Stefano Menin

    2009-01-01

    Neste artigo são apresentadas, segundo indicay6es de Castorina (1988), e desenvolvidas três etapas em que a teoria Psicogenetica de Jean Piaget debruçou-se sobre as relações entre aprendizagem e desenvolvimento buscando esclarece-las. Na primeira etapa, a teoria buscou diferenciar-se das posi96es empiristas e aprioristas afirmando todo o desenvolvimento cognitivo como construção gradual de estruturas. Na segunda, negou-se a possibilidade de apressar a construção de operações 16gicas atraves d...

  12. [Concept formation in children with schizophrenia (from Piaget test material)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedinskiĭ, V V; Novikova, E Iu

    1975-01-01

    The authors studied reasons of a domineering perceptive generalizations in the Piaget test by children with schizophrenia. In teaching the children to distinguish and measure different properties of objects, the most typical appeared to be the following actions: a complete or partial refusal to accomplish them, a substitution of measurements by a perceptive comparison, difficulties in the narration of personal activity in well developed speech. Better results were attained in those who were emotionally positive. On these grounds the authors presumed an autistical genesis of these disturbances.

  13. Active Learning: The Dewey, Piaget, Vygotsky, and Constructivist Theory Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pardjono Pardjono

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Active Learning Approach has long been implemented in Indonesian schools, and until now the implementation of Active Learning Approach remains to be suggested to improve the quality of learning process in Indonesian classrooms. However, the constraint is still on the definition of active learning itself. This article discusses the nature of Active Learning from the perspectives of four theories: Dewey's theory of progressive education, Piaget's theory of assimilation and accommodation, Vygotsky's theory of social context and zone of proximal development, and theory of constructivism. The discussion involves the nature of knowledge, learning, and teaching including the roles of teachers in active learning based on the four theories

  14. Sigmund Freud's practice: visits and consultation, psychoanalyses, remuneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tögel, Christfried

    2009-10-01

    This paper provides an overview of the quantitative side of the systematic records kept by Freud on his practice. He left precise records of the duration, frequency, and fees of psychoanalytic treatments. These statistics are compared with the treatment duration and frequency customary in present-day psychoanalytic practice in German-speaking countries. The results suggest that, regarding frequency and duration and their relationship, there is little difference between Freud's psychoanalytic practice and that of the present day.

  15. Muusikamaailm : "Represseeritud muusika" Moskvas. György Kurtagi festival Londonis. Junge Deutshe Philarmonie kevad. Herbert Wernicke lahkunud / Priit Kuusk

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kuusk, Priit, 1938-

    2002-01-01

    Moskvas toimuvast festivalist "Represseeritud muusika". Londonis toimuvast György Kurtagi festivalist. Saksa orkestri Junge Deutshe Philarmonie kevadesinemistest. Suri saksa ooperilavastaja Herbert Wernicke

  16. Muusikamaailm : "Represseeritud muusika" Moskvas. György Kurtagi festival Londonis. Junge Deutshe Philarmonie kevad. Herbert Wernicke lahkunud / Priit Kuusk

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kuusk, Priit, 1938-

    2002-01-01

    Moskvas toimuvast festivalist "Represseeritud muusika". Londonis toimuvast György Kurtagi festivalist. Saksa orkestri Junge Deutshe Philarmonie kevadesinemistest. Suri saksa ooperilavastaja Herbert Wernicke

  17. PENERAPAN TEORI PERKEMBANGAN MENTAL PIAGET PADA KONSEP KEKEKALAN PANJANG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idrus Alhaddad

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available According to the mental development of Piaget's theory, there are four stages of cognitive development in children, namely: 1 sensory phase motors, from birth until the age of about 2 years; 2 Phase pre operations, from the age of about 2 years to about 7 years; 3 stage of concrete operations, from the age of about 7 years to about 11-12 years; and 4 the stage of formal operations, from the age of about 11 years to mature. Each stage of mental development have a nature or characteristic of each. One of the characteristics that appear in the stage of concrete operations among which at this stage that children are beginning to understand the concept of eternity. Among the concept of eternity long (7-8 years. Of course it is aimed at children abroad where Jean Piaget did research, namely in the State Switzerland. The question is whether the stages of child development applies also to the children in our country. The results of our study showed that, there are children according to age are at the stage of concrete operations is not yet understand the concept of eternity long.

  18. Piaget segundo seus próprios argumentos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zélia Ramozzi-Chiarottino

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Neste artigo tivemos a intenção de oferecer ao leitor o resumo de um dos aspectos mais importantes da análise estrutural que realizamos, durante décadas, do texto de Jean Piaget, sobretudo as estreitas relações entre a Biologia e a Lógica na construção e na explicação do conhecimento científico. Nesse sentido, procuramos demonstrar que, a partir dos conceitos de implicação significante e de imagem mental criados por Piaget, um novo campo de investigações se abre, a saber, aquele que denominamos como o dos sistemas de significação não lógica, campo de suma relevância e que vem preencher uma secular lacuna entre a razão e a emoção até hoje presente nas pesquisas sobre os fenômenos normais e patológicos do psiquismo.

  19. The dual impact of Freud's death and Freud's death instinct theory on the history of psychoanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Martin S

    2011-10-01

    Since I have ranged over a rather large territory in this presentation I will summarize my main points. I claim that the very way Freud created psychoanalysis made it impossible for it to continue to grow and develop as a unified movement after his death. Unlike other sciences, psychoanalysis had no way of differentiating its basic findings from what is yet to be discovered. I then reintroduced my differentiation between heretics, modifiers, and extenders, claiming that after Freud’s death there was less opportunity for heretics and more space for modifiers. I assigned a crucial role to the fact that Anna Freud did not succeed in expelling the Kleinians. In the second part of the paper I presented the view of those who made use of Freud’s death instinct theory and those who opposed it. Many analysts preferred to ignore dealing with it rather than state their opposition. My presentation was biased in favor of those who chose to work with the death instinct as a clinical reality,highlighting Ferenczi’s construction. I made the claim, so far as I know never made before, that Freud’s death instinct theory had a traumatic impact on the psychoanalytic movement because it greatly limited the belief in the curative power of our therapeutic work. After his announcement of the dual-instinct theory Freud withdrew his interest in psychoanalysis as a method of cure. By doing so he inflicted a narcissistic wound on psychoanalysis. I believe that the creativity of psychoanalysis will improve if we face this difficult chapter in our history.

  20. Triniti daripada Perspektif Taoisme: Analisis Pemikiran Jung Young Lee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZURAIZA HUSIN

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Jung Young Lee is a Korean-born theologian who employs creatively the doctrine of the Trinity from an Asian worldview. This article aims to analyze Lee’s approaches of the Trinity with the Yin-Yang symbolism. The main reference is based on the book written by him entitled ‘The Trinity in Asian Perspective (1996’. Lee has turned his attention to the topic of Trinity through the lens of the culture and thought patterns of his own milieu. One of the leading point in presenting Yin-Yang principle as Trinitarian thinking, Lee examines the interpretation of the term “in” in the Bible, "Believe me that I am in the Father and the Father is in me" (John 14:11. The statement leads to the point that Yin and Yang cannot exist without each other because relationality is given priority than individuality. The idea is based on the terminology of ‘both/and’. So, ‘and’ indicates a Trinitarian statement, there is interdependence and unification. With reference to Trinity, the Father and the Son are One because of ‘and’. In addition, the same concept implements to the Holy Spirit. Lee views ‘and’ is not only a linking principle in both-and thinking but also the principle that is ‘between’ two. When ‘two’ exists, the third also exist between them. Based on the idea of ‘middle’, represents the connecting element between two, which contributes for the existence of the Third. Accordingly, the Spirit is the third element in the Trinity relationship.

  1. Jung's evolving views of Nazi Germany: from 1936 to the end of World War II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenl, William

    2014-04-01

    This article first shows Jung's evolving views of Nazi Germany from 1936 to the beginning of World War II. In a lecture at the Tavistock Clinic, London, in October 1936, he made his strongest and most negative statements to that date about Nazi Germany. While in Berlin in September 1937 for lectures to the Jung Gesellschaft, his observations of Hitler at a military parade led him to conclude that should the catastrophe of war come it would be far more and bloodier than he had previously supposed. After the Sudetenland Crisis in Fall 1938, Jung in interviews made stronger comments on Hitler and Nazi Germany. The article shows how strongly anti-Nazi Jung's views were in relation to events during World War II such as Nazi Germany's invasion of Poland, the fall of France, the bombings of Britain, the U.S. entry into the War, and Allied troops advancing into Germany. Schoenl and Peck, 'An Answer to the Question: Was Jung, for a Time, a "Nazi Sympathizer" or Not?' (2012) demonstrated how his views of Nazi Germany changed from 1933 to March 1936. The present article shows how his views evolved from 1936 to the War's end in 1945.

  2. Some reflections on the influence of Chinese thought on Jung and his psychological theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Murray

    2005-04-01

    Jung claimed that Richard Wilhelm, whose masterful translations of Chinese wisdom literature into a European language (German) and thence into Western consciousness have brought Chinese modes of thinking to so many, was one of the most important influences on his own life and work. The contacts between the two men, which took place from the early 1920's until Wilhelm's death in 1930, were few but intense and for Jung decisive in several ways. Wilhelm's translations of the I Ching and The Secret of the Golden Flower opened new avenues for Jung that had far-reaching consequences on his research and writing after 1930. The latter opened the door to the study of alchemy as a key to the archetypal process of individuation as rooted in the collective unconscious. 'Synchronicity' is a term that grew out of his contact with Chinese thought, in particular with the I Ching. From his contact with Chinese thought, additionally, he received confirmation of the view, independently arrived at, that adult psychological development is not linear but rather circular and spiral-like. The letters between Jung and Wilhelm illuminate the great importance Jung ascribed to Wilhelm's contribution toward bridging East and West and the potential value of Chinese philosophy for psychotherapy.

  3. The place of the 17th century in Jung's encounter with China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambray, Joe

    2005-04-01

    After recounting several dreams and related alchemical interests of Jung's tied to the 17(th) century, a contextualizing look at select scientific and philosophical developments of that century is presented. Several precursors of the contemporary debates on the mind/body relation are noted, with special reference to the work of Antonio Damasio. This in turn leads to a reconsideration of the work of the 17(th) century polymath Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, which Jung read as a major precursor to his formulation of synchronicity (via Leibniz's concept of 'pre-established harmony'). Leibniz was the first philosopher to articulate the mind/body relationship in terms of supervenience, sharing an accord with those contemporary philosophers and scientists who see the mind as being an emergent property of the body-brain. Similarly, these ideas are also consistent with a reformulation of synchronicity in terms of emergence. Tracing Leibniz's interest in China reveals another set of links to Jung and to emergentism. Jung's use of Taoist concepts in developing the synchronicity principle is well known. According to scholars, Leibniz was the first major Western intellect to study the I-Ching, through the assistance of a Jesuit missionary in Beijing, Fr. Joachim Bouvet. Some details of the Leibniz-Bouvet correspondence are discussed here. Despite Helmut Wilhelm's presenting aspects of this correspondence at an Eranos conference, Jung does not appear to have integrated it into his writing on synchronicity--a possible reason for this omission is suggested.

  4. Piaget e a consciência moral: um kantismo evolutivo? Piaget and the moral conscience: an evolving kantism?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lia Beatriz de Lucca Freitas

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo apresenta os principais resultados de uma pesquisa sobre a teoria da moral de Jean Piaget. No estudo de seus textos sobre a moral, utilizamos o método da análise estrutural. Essa análise possibilitou-nos descobrir em Recherche o seu plano inicial de pesquisa e propor uma interpretação original do significado de seu livro O julgamento moral na criança. Além disso, constatamos que ele buscou traçar o caminho que conduz o ser humano da anomia à autonomia moral. Esses resultados permitiram explicar por que a sua teoria da moral, assim como a sua teoria do conhecimento, pode ser compreendida como um kantismo evolutivo.This paper gives the main results of a research on Piaget's theory of morality. In the study of his texts on morality, the method of structural analysis was used. This analysis made it possible to discover in Recherche his initial research project and to propose an original interpretation of his book The moral judgment of the child. Besides, it became evident that he tried to outline the way which leads the human being from a non-moral world to moral autonomy. These results show that his theory of morality, as well as his theory of knowledge, may be understood as an evolving kantism.

  5. Transference and katharsis, Freud to Aristotle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turri, Maria Grazia

    2015-04-01

    Aristotle's theory of tragic katharsis is the most ancient and debated theory of the effect of the theatrical experience on the audience. It affirms that tragedy effects the katharsis of fear and pity, engaging readers with the controversy whether by katharsis Aristotle meant purification of the emotions (i.e. their perfection within the mind) or purification of the mind from the emotions (i.e. their abreaction from the mind). In this paper I will explore how Freud's theory of transference can suggest a new interpretation of Aristotle's tragic katharsis. Transference allows for the representation and expression of repressed emotions through the re-enactment of past relational dynamics. Although this process is essential to the psychoanalytic method, it is the subsequent analytic endeavour which allows for the "working through" of repressed emotions, bringing into effect the transference cure. I argue that the dynamic between emotional arousal in re-enactment and emotional distancing in analysis offers an effective parallel of the dynamic between katharsis of fear and katharsis of pity in Aristotle's theory. Such interpretation of tragic katharsis suggests that the theatrical effect in audiences may be an opportunity for self-analysis and the 'working through' of unconscious psychic dynamics. Copyright © 2014 Institute of Psychoanalysis.

  6. Standing in the gap: ref lections on translating the Jung-Neumann correspondence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCartney, Heather

    2016-04-01

    This paper considers the experience of translating the correspondence between C.G. Jung and Erich Neumann as part of the Philemon series. The translator explores the similarities between analytical work and the task of translation by means of the concepts of the dialectical third and the interactional field. The history and politics of the translation of analytic writing and their consequences for the lingua franca of analysis are discussed. Key themes within the correspondence are outlined, including Jung and Neumann's pre-war exploration of Judaism and the unconscious, the post-war difficulties around the publication of Neumann's Depth Psychology and a New Ethic set against the early years of the C.G. Jung Institute in Zurich, and the development of the correspondents' relationship over time.

  7. Coincidence, historical repetition, and self-knowledge: Jung, Vico, and Joyce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verene, Donald Phillip

    2002-07-01

    Jung develops synchronicity as an a causal principle of connection by recounting various examples of meaningful coincidence from experience and by analysing various systems of divination, notably the I Ching. Philosophical theory of causality has given no significant attention to synchronicity; the events of synchronicity are regarded as chance. The Neapolitan philosopher Giambattista Vico (1668-1744) developed a doctrine of historical experience and of self-knowledge that grounds the phenomenon of synchronicity in a metaphysics. James Joyce employed Vico's conception of language and historical cycles as the basis of Joyce's final literary work, Finnegans Wake. Vico's metaphysical sense of synchronicity and Joyce's literary formulation offer a grounding of this principle in non-divinatory sources in modern Western thought, something which Jung's discussion does not provide. These philosophical and literary perspectives complement Jung's to offer an expanded context in which to recognize synchronicity and to make sense of it.

  8. From Copenhagen to the consulting room: Pauli and Jung in Copenhagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gieser, Suzanne

    2014-04-01

    In this paper the city of Copenhagen is used as a starting point to highlight some critical historical events, both concerning the exchange of ideas between the physicist Wolfgang Pauli and C.G. Jung and the history of psychotherapy in Scandinavia. Pauli's years in Copenhagen under the influence of Niels Bohr and his philosophy prepared him mentally to receiveC.G. Jung's ideas. The paper also recounts the one occasion that Jung was in Scandinavia, attending the 9th conference of the General Medical Society for Psychotherapy in Copenhagen, just before going to New York in 1937 to give his final seminars on Pauli's dreams. The reason for focusing on these particular events is that they also constitute part of the history of the reception of psychodynamic psychology in Sweden and Scandinavia. © 2014, The Society of Analytical Psychology.

  9. Incorporating Piaget's theories into behavior management techniques for the child dental patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delitala, G

    2000-01-01

    This presentation reviews psychologist Jean Piaget's contributions to knowledge of cognitive development in children, relating it to behavior management techniques. Piaget theorized that children's knowledge about reality is realized by touching and observing; he termed this constructivism. He recognized that there are stages of development in knowledge acquisition. Practitioners should try to stimulate these needs to develop a positive dental experience. Another Piaget model is egocentrism, wherein a child views the world subjectively. The dentist should let the child patient know what's going on and have an active part in treatment.

  10. The Unifying Function of Affect: Founding a Theory of Psychocultural Development in the Epistemology of John Dewey and Carl Jung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlap, Peter T.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper I explore the shared interest of John Dewey and Carl Jung in the developmental continuity between biological, psychological, and cultural phenomena. Like other first generation psychological theorists, Dewey and Jung thought that psychology could be used to deepen our understanding of this continuity and thus gain a degree of control…

  11. The Unifying Function of Affect: Founding a Theory of Psychocultural Development in the Epistemology of John Dewey and Carl Jung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlap, Peter T.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper I explore the shared interest of John Dewey and Carl Jung in the developmental continuity between biological, psychological, and cultural phenomena. Like other first generation psychological theorists, Dewey and Jung thought that psychology could be used to deepen our understanding of this continuity and thus gain a degree of control…

  12. 77 FR 34121 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Lucian Freud: Portraits”

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``Lucian Freud: Portraits'' SUMMARY... object to be included in the exhibition ``Lucian Freud: Portraits,'' imported from abroad by The Modern...

  13. Freud and the diagnosis of Gilles de la Tourette's illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushner, H I

    1998-03-01

    A number of observers recently have taken Freud to task for failing to have diagnosed both Frau Emmy von N.'s (1888-9) involuntary ticcing and vocalizations and Daniel Paul Schreber's (1911) coprolalia and convulsive tics as Tourette's syndrome. None of Freud's critics, however, has placed Freud's understanding of motor and vocal tics in historical context. None seems aware of the contests over the classification of tic symptoms in the 1880's and 1890's, nor do they appreciate the extent to which Charcot and Gilles de la Tourette had conceded that motor and vocal tics, as well as coprolalia, could also appear as symptoms of hysteria. By 1893 (when Freud first wrote out his case of Frau Emmy von N.), both Gilles de la Tourette and Charcot had defended themselves against Guinon's claim that conculsive tics were always a symptom of hysteria by distinguishing those tic symptoms that should be classified as "maladie des tics" from those that accompanied hysteria. Yet Charcot and Gilles de la Tourette had agreed by 1890 that tic symptoms were possible outcomes of either maladie des tics or of hysteria. What separated those afflicted with "hysteria", were particular inherited factors and whether or not the patient could be cured of tics and vocalizations. Thus, within Charcotian terms, Freud was hardly obligated to conclude that his ticcing and cursing patients should have been diagnosed with maladie des tics de Gilles de la Tourette.

  14. no Freud pré-psicanalítico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Eduardo Silva Bento

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This article developed a psychoanalytical semiology of toxicomania’s and addiction’s notions in pre-psychoanalytical Freud to compose the “toxic passion” notion from this Freudian period. The examined articles and conclusions were the following: 1st- “Psychical treatment”: From the toxicomania without drug and the addiction to hypnosis in Freud (1890/1991a e 1905/1972d, we reached the “toxic passion in love”; 2nd- “Letter to Fliess – 11/01/1897”: From dipsomania and game passion in Freud (1950/1977a e 1950/1991b, we reached the addicting basis human sexuality and the notion of “toxic passion”; 3rd- “Letter to Fliess – 22/12/1897”: From the masturbation as toxicomania prototype in Freud (1950/1977b e 1950/1991c, we reached the auto-erotical narcissism as a common function in the basis of toxic passions and addicting sexualities; and 4th- “Sexuality in the aetiology of the neurosis”: From the toxicomania and masturbation as defence against depression in Freud (1898/1976a e 1898/1989, we reached the psychoanalytical psychopathology of toxic passions and addictions associated to a melancholy.

  15. Psychoanalysis and the brain - why did freud abandon neuroscience?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northoff, Georg

    2012-01-01

    Sigmund Freud, the founder of psychoanalysis, was initially a neuroscientist but abandoned neuroscience completely after he made a last attempt to link both in his writing, "Project of a Scientific Psychology," in 1895. The reasons for his subsequent disregard of the brain remain unclear though. I here argue that one central reason may be that the approach to the brain during his time was simply not appealing to Freud. More specifically, Freud was interested in revealing the psychological predispositions of psychodynamic processes. However, he was not so much focused on the actual psychological functions themselves which though were the prime focus of the neuroscience at his time and also in current Cognitive Neuroscience. Instead, he probably would have been more interested in the brain's resting state and its constitution of a spatiotemporal structure. I here assume that the resting state activity constitutes a statistically based virtual structure extending and linking the different discrete points in time and space within the brain. That in turn may serve as template, schemata, or grid for all subsequent neural processing during stimulus-induced activity. As such the resting state' spatiotemporal structure may serve as the neural predisposition of what Freud described as "psychological structure." Hence, Freud and also current neuropsychoanalysis may want to focus more on neural predispositions, the necessary non-sufficient conditions, rather than the neural correlates, i.e., sufficient, conditions of psychodynamic processes.

  16. Trauma and the state with Sigmund Freud as witness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danto, Elizabeth Ann

    Just before and after the end of World War I, Sigmund Freud took on an activist role and in his writings and speeches, redirected the concept of war trauma from individual failure to a larger issue of community responsibility. Testifying in Vienna as an expert witness for the state, Freud said that the military psychiatrists-not the soldiers-had "acted like machine guns behind the front" and were the "immediate cause of all war neurosis." Freud was called on by the legal community when Julius Wagner-Jauregg, a future Nobel Prize winner (and also future Nazi Party adherent), head of the municipal Clinic for Psychiatry and Nervous Diseases, was accused of the lethal use of electrotherapy on shell-shocked soldiers. As sociological as psychoanalytic in his responses, Freud's withering critique came just 2years after he avowed that "it is possible to foresee that the conscience of society will awake." That speech on the human right to mental health care affirmed Freud's alliance to the social democratic position and inspired the second generation of psychoanalysts to develop community-based clinics throughout Europe where treatment was free of cost, for war neurosis and beyond. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Psychoanalysis and the Brain – Why Did Freud Abandon Neuroscience?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northoff, Georg

    2012-01-01

    Sigmund Freud, the founder of psychoanalysis, was initially a neuroscientist but abandoned neuroscience completely after he made a last attempt to link both in his writing, “Project of a Scientific Psychology,” in 1895. The reasons for his subsequent disregard of the brain remain unclear though. I here argue that one central reason may be that the approach to the brain during his time was simply not appealing to Freud. More specifically, Freud was interested in revealing the psychological predispositions of psychodynamic processes. However, he was not so much focused on the actual psychological functions themselves which though were the prime focus of the neuroscience at his time and also in current Cognitive Neuroscience. Instead, he probably would have been more interested in the brain’s resting state and its constitution of a spatiotemporal structure. I here assume that the resting state activity constitutes a statistically based virtual structure extending and linking the different discrete points in time and space within the brain. That in turn may serve as template, schemata, or grid for all subsequent neural processing during stimulus-induced activity. As such the resting state’ spatiotemporal structure may serve as the neural predisposition of what Freud described as “psychological structure.” Hence, Freud and also current neuropsychoanalysis may want to focus more on neural predispositions, the necessary non-sufficient conditions, rather than the neural correlates, i.e., sufficient, conditions of psychodynamic processes. PMID:22485098

  18. Piaget: Notas para uma Teoria Construtivista da Inteligência

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lajonquière Leandro de

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Constata-se que boa parte dos comentadores da obra de Piaget afirma que a inteligência é originariamente de natureza individual e que, portanto, a socialização seria o efeito de um processo de evolução cognitiva. Essa interpretação substancializa a inteligência, recorre a explicações redu-cionistas e considera o processo de construção epistêmica como uma simples atualização de possíveis cognitivos pré-formados. Uma série de investigações tem sugerido a existência de uma interdependência causal entre as dinâmicas sociais e o desenvolvimento cognitivo, que nos alerta da necessidade de rediscutir o estatuto da interação.

  19. Practicalizing piaget at the asep guidelines conference 1970

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawns, Rod

    1990-01-01

    ‘To understand is to invent’ (Piaget, 1968). This paper examines the attempt of Les Dale, the Assistant Director of the Australian Science Education Project, to apply Piagetian theory to describing a theory of instruction for the Project. The historiographical method consists in examining and comparing instances of curriculum invention in science education in Australia starting with contemporary and retrospective accounts of the key figures (Fawns 1988a). This paper is a case record (Stenhouse, 1978) which synthesises public and personal material in the files collected by the author. It has been subjected to review by Dale and others including those to whom it was presented at A.S.E.R.A. It accompanies an earlier paper (Fawns, 1989) which assessed the social context of the Debate at the Guidelines Conference 20 years on.

  20. Sigmund Freud's Discovery of the Etiological Significance of Childhood Sexual Traumas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Philip

    1997-01-01

    Reconstructs Freud's early treatment of Emma Eckstein so as to challenge assumptions that Freud's early writings have no place in the current discourse on child sexual abuse. Reveals how Freud first formulated the radical theory that his patients' psycho-neuroses were due to their having been sexually traumatized as children. (RJM)

  1. Sigmund Freud's Discovery of the Etiological Significance of Childhood Sexual Traumas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Philip

    1997-01-01

    Reconstructs Freud's early treatment of Emma Eckstein so as to challenge assumptions that Freud's early writings have no place in the current discourse on child sexual abuse. Reveals how Freud first formulated the radical theory that his patients' psycho-neuroses were due to their having been sexually traumatized as children. (RJM)

  2. Sartre's Freud and the future of Sartrean psychoanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, S C

    1998-01-01

    I describe Sartre's analysis of Freud as an exemplary case study in existential psychoanalysis, a kind of anti-psychiatric analysis; in addition Sartre's analysis of Freud is a practical critique of the latter's theory. Sartre's overall aim is revolutionary, not primarily concerned with healing people; his method transcends the traditional aims of psychoanalysis and psychotherapy. The paper is divided into four sections: 1) Sartrean Existential Psychoanalysis: An explanation of the basic understandings of Sartre's Existentialism and Psychoanalysis. 2) Sartre and Anti-psychiatry: An analysis of the relation and influence of Sartre's philosophy on R.D. Laing's anti-psychiatry, and a review of the contemporary anti-psychiatric practice of the Philadelphia Association. 3) Sartre's Case-study of Freud: An exemplary application of Sartrean psychoanalysis and a critique of traditional psychoanalysis. 4) Transcending the Boundaries of Therapy: A proposal for a radical application of Sartre's philosophy that extends beyond the aims of clinical approaches.

  3. A psicologia social nos tempos de S. Freud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mello Neto Gustavo Adolfo Ramos

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Trata-se de uma revisão dos textos psicossociais citados por Freud em Psicologia de massas e análise do eu. O objetivo é propor ao leitor algum conhecimento desses textos que já se perdem no tempo. São referidos textos de Wilfred Trotter, William MacDougall, Gustave Le Bon e Gabriel Tarde. Alude-se também a Durkheim, autor não citado por Freud, mas cuja referência permite contrastar uma visão psicologizante do fenômeno social, que é a de Freud e dos autores que ele cita, com um aporte em que o social é visto como independente do psicológico.

  4. A psicologia social nos tempos de S. Freud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Adolfo Ramos Mello Neto

    Full Text Available Trata-se de uma revisão dos textos psicossociais citados por Freud em Psicologia de massas e análise do eu. O objetivo é propor ao leitor algum conhecimento desses textos que já se perdem no tempo. São referidos textos de Wilfred Trotter, William MacDougall, Gustave Le Bon e Gabriel Tarde. Alude-se também a Durkheim, autor não citado por Freud, mas cuja referência permite contrastar uma visão psicologizante do fenômeno social, que é a de Freud e dos autores que ele cita, com um aporte em que o social é visto como independente do psicológico.

  5. Between the quills: Schopenhauer and Freud on sadism and masochism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimwade, Robert

    2011-02-01

    It is a matter of common knowledge that Sigmund Freud (1856-1939) and Arthur Schopenhauer (1788-1860) shared a common worldview. Everyone familiar with the works of these two thinkers should recognize their general philosophical affinities. Both men were pessimistic about the power of human reason and attributed human behavior to powerful unconscious forces and, as a result, both were deeply skeptical about the future of human society. Drawing from previous literature, this essay compares the philosophical theory of Schopenhauer with the psychoanalytic theory of Freud. We find that, while Schopenhauer and Freud share a common philosophical orientation and diagnosed the same fundamental problems with life in civilization, they proposed some ostensibly similar, yet ultimately very different solutions. Focusing on each thinker's respective notion of sadism and masochism, this paper tries to understand and come to terms with the dimensions of this radical pessimism. Copyright © 2011 Institute of Psychoanalysis.

  6. Sexuality and meaning in Freud and Merleau-Ponty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moya, Patricia; Larrain, Maria Elena

    2016-06-01

    This article analyzes the links between the conception of the body and of sexuality found in Freud and Merleau-Ponty. The French philosopher refers to Freud in various of his works, and performs a reading of Freud through which he rescues the meaning that the latter gives to sexuality as he integrates it into the totality of the person, without making it into a blind or merely instinctive force. As a consequence of this integration, the notions of the unconscious and of instinct or drive are interpreted in the light of the meaning or signification that they have in the person's behavior. Merleau-Ponty's notion of pre-reflective knowledge plays a decisive role in this understanding of meaning. In the same way, it allows important contemporary analysts to use these studies in their therapeutic work and also in psychological studies. Copyright © 2016 Institute of Psychoanalysis.

  7. Persuasion from an Eighteen-Year-Old's Perspective: Perry and Piaget.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinitz, Sue; Kiedaisch, Jean

    1990-01-01

    Looks at how the theories of William Perry and Jean Piaget explain choices students made in writing persuasive essays. Examines the implications of their theories for teaching persuasion to eighteen-year olds. (SR)

  8. Persuasion from an Eighteen-Year-Old's Perspective: Perry and Piaget.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinitz, Sue; Kiedaisch, Jean

    1990-01-01

    Looks at how the theories of William Perry and Jean Piaget explain choices students made in writing persuasive essays. Examines the implications of their theories for teaching persuasion to eighteen-year olds. (SR)

  9. Piaget's Structural Developmental Psychology. v. Ideology-Critique and the Possibility of a Critical Developmental Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broughton, John M.

    1981-01-01

    This final essay in a five-part series examining Piaget's structural developmental psychology suggests that a psychological theory which integrates aspects of developmental structuralism within a critical social framework can be developed. (Author/RH)

  10. Sigmund Freud and hysteria: the etiology of psychoanalysis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogousslavsky, Julien; Dieguez, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Sigmund Freud developed a specific interest in hysteria after his stay with Professor Jean-Martin Charcot during the winter of 1885-1886, although his previous activity mainly consisted of neuropathology and general medical practice. Most of his initial studies on hysteria (hysteria in men, influence of subconscious ideas, role of traumas, and psychological and sexual factors) were indeed 'borrowed' from Charcot and his immediate followers, such as Pierre Janet and Paul Richer. Subsequently, Freud developed with Breuer a theory of hysteria which encompassed a mixture of Janet's 'fixed subconscious ideas' with the 'pathological secret' concept of Moriz Benedikt. After their book Studies on Hysteria (1895), Freud interrupted his collaboration with Breuer and developed the concept of conversion of psychological problems into somatic manifestations, with a strong 'sexualization' of hysteria. Firstly, he believed that actual abuses had occurred in these patients (the 'seduction' theory), but then blamed them for having deceived him on that issue, so that he subsequently launched a 'fantasy' theory to explain the development of hysterical symptoms without the necessity of actual abuses. Like many of his contemporaries, and contrary to his claims, Freud did not follow a scientific process of verified experiments, but rather adapted his theories to the evolution of his own beliefs on psychological conditions, selectively emphasizing the aspects of his 'therapies' with patients which supported his emerging ideas, with often abrupt changes in theoretical interpretations. While it remains difficult to get a clear, synthetic vision of what was Freud's definite theory of hysteria, it is obvious that hysteria really was the origin of what would become Freud's psychoanalytical theory. Indeed, psychoanalysis appears to have been initially developed by him largely in order to absorb and explain his many changes in the interpretation of hysterical manifestations.

  11. Profiles of international archives: Les archives Jean Piaget, University of Geneva, Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burman, Jeremy Trevelyan

    2013-05-01

    This research report provides a look behind closed doors at the Jean Piaget Archives in Geneva, Switzerland. It situates the potential visitor, contextualizes the Archives in its own history, and then describes what scholars can expect to find. New details about Piaget's views on Equal Rights and Equal Pay are also provided, including a look at how they affected the women who worked his factory (esp. Bärbel Inhelder). (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Piaget: Only the Galileo of cognitive development? Comment on Niaz and Lawson on genetic epistemology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shayer, Michael

    Niaz argued for the epistemic subject as an ideal knower, with never a mention of logic - only of science understanding. Lawson identifies the epistemic subject as pure logical reasoner - a straw man. Net result: no meeting of minds, and little light shown on Piaget. Both fail to present the constructivist Piaget who, as far as he went, did resolve the contextual knowledge/abstract reasoning dilemma.

  13. Generalized Freud's equation and level densities with polynomial potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boobna, Akshat; Ghosh, Saugata

    2013-08-01

    We study orthogonal polynomials with weight $\\exp[-NV(x)]$, where $V(x)=\\sum_{k=1}^{d}a_{2k}x^{2k}/2k$ is a polynomial of order 2d. We derive the generalised Freud's equations for $d=3$, 4 and 5 and using this obtain $R_{\\mu}=h_{\\mu}/h_{\\mu -1}$, where $h_{\\mu}$ is the normalization constant for the corresponding orthogonal polynomials. Moments of the density functions, expressed in terms of $R_{\\mu}$, are obtained using Freud's equation and using this, explicit results of level densities as $N\\rightarrow\\infty$ are derived.

  14. The talking cure as action: Freud's theory of ritual revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janowitz, Naomi

    2011-09-01

    Freud made creative use of late Victorian theories of ritual as empty modes of behavior, using the idea of "seemingly meaningless" ritual to offer a compelling comparison with obsessive behavior. However, analytic hours, with their repetitive frame and repetition of unconscious conflicts, have stronger links with rituals than Freud admitted. Recent theories highlight the extensive power of rituals to organize and instantiate models of effective action, especially in terms of the multifunctionality of language. These new theories of ritual offer in turn new tools for understanding the therapeutic action of analytic hours.

  15. A Special Sort of Forgetting: Negation in Freud and Augustine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosengart, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    The development from a positive, dualistic theory of memory and forgetting to a concept of memory that includes forgetting as a variety of remembering is traced in two thinkers. Freud's concept of repression is discussed as a complex negation of both remembering and forgetting, and the development of this construct is shown in his letters to Wilhelm Fliess. A close reading of Augustine of Hippo's Confessions shows a similar concept of a special sort of forgetting, in which what is forgotten is remembered nonetheless. Finally, the limits of the comparison are discussed, and a reading of Freud's "Negation" reveals ways in which the unconscious is fundamentally unlike Augustine's interiority.

  16. Freud in China: An Interview with Wang Ning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Evan Osnos

    2011-01-01

    0 (Abbreviation of Osnos) : How did you become focused on Freud? W (Abbreviation of Wang Ning) : I found that many of the American writers were greatly influenced by psychoanalysis, especially by Freud. So I took some time reading some of the books written by Freud, such as Introductory Lectures on Psychoanalysis, New Introductory Lectures on Psychoanalysis, Beyond the Pleasure Principles and An Autobiographi- cal Study. And in 1983, I attended a conference, a national conference on psychoanalysis in Nanjing and submitted a paper on Freudian influence on modern and contemporary Western literature.

  17. Freud's "narcissism of minor differences": a review and reassessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werman, D S

    1988-10-01

    Freud coined the name and briefly described the narcissism of minor differences. Although he initially regarded it as a form of individual behavior, he later came to see its implications for groups. This paper explores the manifestations of the narcissism of minor differences in psychoanalytic organizations and treatment. In contrast to Freud's observation that the narcissism of minor differences is relatively harmless, I suggest that in the social sphere it harbors the potential for a pernicious escalation into hostile and destructive actions on a widespread scale.

  18. Kierkegaard y Freud: enfermedad, terapéutica y cura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Uriel Rodríguez

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available La filosofía de Kierkegaard y la psicología de Freud definen al hombre como un ser que dialoga consigo mismo. En este artículo desarrollamos esta idea. Kierkegaard y Freud piensan que el sujeto moderno es incapaz de comprenderse correctamente a sí mismo. El hombre es una auto-relación y esta auto-relación está rota. El psicólogo kierkegaardeano y el psicólogo freudiano intentan recomponer esta auto-relación.

  19. The analysis of Rostam’s personality in “Seven Khan” story based on the views of Jung and Freud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjalaladin Kazazi

    2016-12-01

    Rostam enters subconscious arena with the entry into every Khan. But before entering the subconscious, he must gradually come out of consciousness (from the external entity and take steps toward the super-ego. Rostam is, first, in the

  20. Western psychology and Muslim psychology in dialogue: comparisons between a Qura'nic theory of personality and Freud's and Jung's ideas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Raiya, Hisham

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, comparisons are made between a newly developed Qura'nic theory of personality and the Freudian and Jungian theories of the mind. Notable similarities were found between the Freudian id, ego, superego and neurosis and the Qura'nic nafs ammarah besoa' (evil-commanding psyche), a'ql (intellect), al-nafs al-lawammah (the reproachful psyche) and al-nafs al-marid'a (the sick psyche), respectively. Noteworthy resemblances were detected also between the Jungian concepts collective unconscious, archetypes, Self and individuation and the Qura'nic constructs roh (spirit), al-asmaa' (the names), qalb (heart), and al-nafs al-mutmainnah (the serene psyche), respectively. These parallels, as well as the departure points, between the models are thoroughly discussed and analyzed. The comparisons performed in this paper open new avenues for dialogue between western models of the psyche and their Muslim counterparts, a dialogue that can enrich both perspectives and advance the field of psychology.

  1. 弗洛伊德与荣格宗教思想比较%Comparison of Freud's Religious Thoughts with Carl G. Jung's

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙恪廉

    2010-01-01

    本文通过分析弗洛伊德和荣格对无意识以及无意识与意识之间关系的不同主张,论述了两位精神分析大师在以下问题上的不同观点:里比多是只具有生物学意义还是另具精神上的意义?走出俄底甫斯情节面后向宗教的殿堂,能否在无意识领域里获得更多的发现?心理分析是否应当投射到外部的精神世界?宗教信仰与心理治疗存在着一种怎样的联系?

  2. Use of Piaget's theory in preschool nutrition education Uso da teoria de Piaget na educação nutricional de pré-escolares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatice Başkale

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The preschool period is a time when children learn many concepts and develop life-long habits. In that period, children learn about appropriate and balanced nutrition and acquire good eating habits for later years. Piaget determined that children's cognitive development is important for their understanding of and learning about the world around them. Piaget's theory can be used as a guide in nutrition education. In fact, it helps to design effective nutrition education appropriate for the developmental stages of childhood. The purpose of this article is to describe Piaget's theory and nutrition education based on this theory. This article will discuss how Piaget's theory is to be used in the development of nutritional habits of preschool children and will make an attempt to provide a viewpoint for those who provide nutrition education.O período pré-escolar é uma época na qual a criança aprende muitos conceitos e desenvolve hábitos que persistem a vida toda. Nesta época, a criança aprende sobre nutrição adequada e balanceada e adquire bons hábitos alimentares para os anos seguintes. Piaget estabeleceu que o desenvolvimento cognitivo de uma criança é importante para a compreensão e o aprendizado do mundo que a cerca. A teoria de Piaget pode ser usada como um guia na educação nutricional. De fato, a teoria ajuda a elaborar uma educação nutricional apropriada para os estágios de desenvolvimento infantis. O objetivo deste artigo é descrever a teoria de Piaget e a educação nutricional com base nesta teoria. Este artigo discutirá como a teoria de Piaget pode ser usada no desenvolvimento dos hábitos nutricionais de pré-escolares na tentativa de apresentar um panorama aos profissionais envolvidos com a educação nutricional.

  3. Updating the debate between Piaget and Chomsky in a neurobiological perspective / Atualizando o debate entre Piaget e Chomsky em uma perspectiva neurobiológica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Leandro Eichler

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The understandings of language acquisition and of cognitive structures are in debate in the center of the cognitive sciences. It happens despite of a group of academics who, in a rhetorical way, insists on despising Piaget's constructivist model, keeping a connection to Chomsky's innatist theory. This paper recalls the classical debate between these two knowledge systems, rethinking it in a psychobiological perspective and presenting recent neurobiological studies that suggest a correction of commitment between innate and acquired as pointed by Piaget.

  4. Joseph Campbell, Jung, Anne Tyler, and "The Cards": The Spiritual Journey in "Searching for Caleb."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Karen M.

    Joseph Campbell, Carl Jung, and Anne Tyler have all dealt with spiritual journeys and card reading in their writings. In his book "Tarot Revelations," Joseph Campbell discusses his first association with tarot cards, dating from 1943, when he was introduced to the symoblism of playing cards by his friend and mentor, Heinrich Zimmer. Carl…

  5. Jung's Red Book and its relation to aspects of German idealism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Paul

    2012-06-01

    The late nineteenth century saw a renaissance of interest in the thought of the German Romantic philosopher, F.W.J. Schelling. This paper takes Jung's engagement with Schelling and his awareness of Schellingian ideas and interests (notably, the mysterious Kabeiroi worshipped at Samothrace) as its starting-point. It goes on to argue that a key set of problematics in German Idealism - the relation between freedom and necessity, between science and art, and ultimately between realism and idealism - offers a useful conceptual framework within which to approach Jung's Red Book. For the problem of the ideal is central to this work, which can be read as a journey from eternal ideals to the ideal of eternity. (Although the term 'idealism' has at least four distinct meanings, their distinct senses can be related in different ways to Jung's thinking.) The eloquent embrace of idealism by F.T. Vischer in a novel, Auch Einer, for which Jung had the highest praise, reminds us of the persistence of this tradition, which is still contested and debated in the present day. © 2012, The Society of Analytical Psychology.

  6. Ghost and self: Jung's paradigm shift and a response to Zinkin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Susan

    2009-11-01

    Zinkin's lucid challenge to Jung makes perfect sense. Indeed, it is the implications of this 'making sense' that this paper addresses. For Zinkin's characterization of the 'self' takes it as a 'concept' requiring coherence; a variety of abstract non-contextual knowledge that itself has a mythical heritage. Moreover, Zinkin's refinement of Jung seeks to make his work fit for the scientific paradigm of modernity. In turn, modernity's paradigm owes much to Newton's notion of knowledge via reductionism. Here knowledge or investigation is divided up into the smallest possible units with the aim of eventually putting it all together into 'one' picture of scientific truth. Unfortunately, 'reductionism' does not do justice to the resonant possibilities of Jung's writing. These look forward to a new scientific paradigm of the twenty-first century, of the interactive 'field', emergence and complexity theory. The paper works paradoxically by discovering Zinkin's 'intersubjective self' after all, in two undervalued narratives by Jung, his doctoral thesis and a short late ghost story. However, in the ambivalences and radical fictional experimentation of these fascinating texts can be discerned an-Other self, one both created and found.

  7. The Prayer-Poem and Jung's Use of Active-Imagination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molton, Warren L.

    1996-01-01

    Develops the concept of the prayer-poem as a method for spiritual search. Relates the process of the prayer-poem to Carl Jung's use of "active imagination" as a way of pushing the poetic image to a deeper level of meaning and usefulness: a window into the psyche (soul). (SR)

  8. The Jung Curriculum. An Interdisciplinary Curriculum and Resource Packet Designed for Secondary Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Patricia E.; Fuller, Roger J.

    The ideas and concepts of Carl Jung are the basis for the materials of this curriculum guide for teaching gifted students at the secondary level. Entitled "Man and His Symbols," the guide is organized in five parts: (1) Approaching the Unconscious; (2) Ancient Myths and Modern Man; (3) The Process of Individuation; (4) Symbolism in the Visual…

  9. Synchronicity - The Link Between Physics and Psyche, from Pauli and Jung to Chopra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teodorani, M.

    2006-07-01

    This book, which is entirely dedicated to the mystery of "synchronicity", is divided into three parts: a) the joint research between analytic psychologist Carl Gustav Jung and quantum physicist Wolfgang Pauli; b) synchronicity mechanisms occurring in the microscopic (canonical quantum entanglement), mesoscopic and macroscopic scales; c) research and philosophy concerning synchronicity by MD Deepak Chopra.

  10. Interlocução entre Rudolf Otto, Carl Gustav Jung e Victor White

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Pereira Ceccon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available En 1917, Rudolf Otto publicó el libro Lo Sagrado que propone el reconocimiento del aspecto irracional como el fundamento y sostén de la expresión religiosa a través de analogías y antinomias que llamó lo numinoso. Más tarde, en una conferencia en1937, Carl Gustav Jung utiliza el término numinoso para aclararlo dilucidar qué entiende por religión, reconociéndola como una observación sobre lo que arrebata la conciencia, ampliando de esta manera la idea de numinoso a la práctica y el estudio clínico. Víctor White, principal colaborador de Jung en el campo de la teología, teje una crítica sobre las posiciones de Otto y Jung de comprender el fenómeno religioso, afirmando que tienen una actitud unilateral en el reconocimiento de que sólo la esfera irracional fundamenta la religión. Este artículo propone una discusión teórica alrededor de las reflexiones de White en la idea de lo numinoso, contra las posiciones de Otto y Jung.

  11. Jung's psychoid concept and Bion's proto-mental concept: a comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addison, Ann

    2016-11-01

    Jung and Bion both developed theoretical concepts propounding a deeply unknowable area of the psyche in which body and mind are undifferentiated and the individual has no distinct identity, from which a differentiated consciousness arises. In Jung's case, this is enshrined in his psychoid concept and the associated notion of synchronicity and, in Bion's case, in his proto-mental concept and his ideas on group dynamics. It is by means of these two concepts that Jung and Bion approach and locate a combined body-mind, a monism, in which body and mind are seen as different aspects of the same thing. This paper reviews the claim that although the two concepts are associated clinically with very different situations, their commonality may arise from a similar intellectual basis: both men appear to have been influenced by the same source of vitalist ideas in philosophy including Henri Bergson, and Jung's ideas also exerted a direct influence on Bion. © 2016, The Society of Analytical Psychology.

  12. ["A shot at the father: a student's assault". Sigmund Freud and the case of Ernst Haberl].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aichhorn, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    In the fall of 1922, the Freud family was involved in a criminal case: The son of Mathilde Freud's nursing sister, Ernst Haberl, had shot at his father. With the help of August Aichhorn the Viennese Juvenile Court's social assistance department was engaged on behalf of the young man. Freud commissioned the lawyer Valentin Teirich to defend him in court. The Viennese dailies reported the deed and the trial extensively (Haberl was acquitted). That a comment published in the Neue Freie Presse was written by Freud himself, as Teirich believed, is, according to Anna Freud, highly improbable.

  13. Psyche=singularity: A comparison of Carl Jung's transpersonal psychology and Leonard Susskind's holographic string theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmond, Timothy

    In this dissertation I discern what Carl Jung calls the mandala image of the ultimate archetype of unity underlying and structuring cosmos and psyche by pointing out parallels between his transpersonal psychology and Stanford physicist Leonard Susskind's string theory. Despite his atheistic, materialistically reductionist interpretation of it, I demonstrate how Susskind's string theory of holographic information conservation at the event horizons of black holes, and the cosmic horizon of the universe, corroborates the following four topics about which Jung wrote: (1) his near-death experience of the cosmic horizon after a heart attack in 1944; ( 2) his equation relating psychic energy to mass, "Psyche=highest intensity in the smallest space" (1997, 162), which I translate into the equation, Psyche=Singularity; (3) his theory that the mandala, a circle or sphere with a central point, is the symbolic image of the ultimate archetype of unity through the union of opposites, which structures both cosmos and psyche, and which rises spontaneously from the collective unconscious to compensate a conscious mind torn by irreconcilable demands (1989, 334-335, 396-397); and (4) his theory of synchronicity. I argue that Susskind's inside-out black hole model of our Big Bang universe forms a geometrically perfect mandala: a central Singularity encompassed by a two-dimensional sphere which serves as a universal memory bank. Moreover, in precise fulfillment of Jung's theory, Susskind used that mandala to reconcile the notoriously incommensurable paradigms of general relativity and quantum mechanics, providing in the process a mathematically plausible explanation for Jung's near-death experience of his past, present, and future life simultaneously at the cosmic horizon. Finally, Susskind's theory also provides a plausible cosmological model to explain Jung's theory of synchronicity--meaningful coincidences may be tied together by strings at the cosmic horizon, from which they

  14. Jung, the trickster writer, or what literary research can do for the clinician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Susan

    2006-04-01

    This paper aims to show how literary scholarship can contribute to clinical debates by offering different methods of reading and interpreting works by Jung. Firstly, as texts form much of the means by which Jungian ideas are transmitted and worked upon, literary research offers methods of examining the way we read for authority and orthodoxy. Secondly, it is invaluable to look at the way in which Jung actually wrote. Jung portrays a dynamic psyche in action in his writings. His works are not only about a creative archetypal psyche, they enact and perform this creativity in the way in which he uses words. The rich playfulness demonstrated in The Collected Works is an example of a writer as a mythmaker of the psyche, one who absorbs unconscious creative energies into his writing in ways that dissolve modernity's cultural boundaries of science and art. In addition, the aesthetic component in Jung's writing is not a decoration of his ideas. Rather, his 'literary' qualities are themselves forms of argument about the fragile state of modern subjectivity. Using his essays on 'Synchronicity', and the 'Trickster', the paper will show these works to be responses to three related crises that still face clinicians and scholars today: the problematic role of the hero myth as an individuation narrative, the nature of 'science', and the crisis of western modernity itself in desperate need of psychic healing. The paper will show that where writing on synchronicity aims to individuate science by adding a 'feminine' Eros to its Logos biases, the Trickster essay is designed to ameliorate modernity by providing frameworks to make visible marginal or excluded material. In these works Jung tries to rejuvenate the modern world by re-connecting traditional symbolic systems with the psyche through myth as a language of psychic relating.

  15. Carl Jung's interpretation of Wolfgang Pauli's dreams: The Bailey Island, Maine, and New York City seminars of 1936 and 1937

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Richard Paul

    This dissertation reviewed the development of Jung's dream theory and addresses the question as to whether or not Jung was influenced by the dreams of the Nobel Prize winning physicist, Wolfgang Pauli. Jung provided an extensive analysis of Pauli's dreams, which are contained in the lightly edited, unpublished transcripts of lectures delivered in 1936 and 1937. An archival and hermeneutic analysis of the texts reveals a staged process of individuation that Jung related to in many ways because of the parallels to his own personal journey toward individuation. A chronological history of the development of Jung's dream theory is presented, followed by a picture of the relationship between Jung and Pauli. Thereafter, a detailed summary of the seminar transcripts, one given on Bailey Island, Maine, and the other in New York City the following year, is offered with hermeneutic commentary. An analysis of the seminars found that Pauli's dreams did, in part, support Jung's theory. Specifically, while Jung was unable to meet the scientific demands for clear empirical evidence of his dream theory, he did offer his professional and non-professional audiences with a slightly less rigorous example of his dream theory in action, demonstrating that the process shared similarities across peoples, time, and cultures. Additionally, in Pauli he found a superior mind that had gone through the process of individuation in accordance with his theory and his own experience. During the course of research, reference to a document was found in the correspondence in the Jungian Archives in Zurich. This document entitled, "FAREWELL SPEECH, Given by Dr. C. G. Jung on the Occasion of a Dinner Given in His Honor by the Analytical Psychology Club of New York City October 26, 1937" and other related documents were subsequently uncovered in the sub-basement of the Kristine Mann Library in New York City. A synopsis of the discovery and description of the papers contained in the file are discussed in

  16. Learning from the patient: the East, synchronicity and transference in the history of an unknown case of C.G. Jung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moura, Vicente

    2014-06-01

    This article presents the history of one until now unknown case of C.G. Jung: Maggy Reichstein. Born in Indonesia in 1894 in a very aristocratic family, she brought her sister to Zurich to be treated by Jung in 1919, and later she herself was in analysis with him. Jung used her case as example in his lecture in 1937 on the realities of practical psychotherapy, relating it to the process of transference and countertransference. Jung deepened his studies in Eastern psychology after a series of dreams she had, which culminated in the Yoga Kundalini Seminars. She was also the case presented in his article of 1951 on the concept of synchronicity. Jung wrote that her case, concerning synchronicity, remained unique in his experience. Jung also published some of her mandalas. He considered her able to understand his ideas in depth. Reichstein was for Jung an important case, which challenged and triggered his interests in different subjects.

  17. On Stories and Theories: In Appreciation of Miss Freud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottle, Thomas J.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author reflects on Bert Cohler's essay "Desire, Teaching and Learning" and relates it to his teacher, Miss Anna Freud's story. The author asks whether it is possible that what one sees and hears, and encounters as teacher is only partially what is really out there in one's classroom and in the heads of one's students and…

  18. Freud, Adler, and Women: Powers of the "Weak" and "Strong."

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVitis, Joseph L.

    1985-01-01

    This article discusses Freud's original psychoanalytic notions on women and morality and their influence on constructions of personality, power, culture, and socioeducational change. Also discussed is Freudian critic Alfred Adler's use of a larger external lens to focus women's lives in a wider context of "social interest" and social…

  19. ¿Qué tanto le debe Freud a Brentano?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Bustamante Zamudio

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sigmund Freud tomó clases con el filósofo Franz Brentano. ¿Implica que los conceptos del psicoanalista tengan una deuda con los del filósofo? Freud tenía un anclaje en la clínica y temía al pensamiento sin ataduras. Brentano tenía por anclaje la lógica de los argumentos. Las decisiones de Freud se alejan de los criterios de Brentano; de manera que si hemos de tomar el paquete de la clínica y de la teoría que intenta estar a su altura, el psicoanálisis poco tiene que ver con la psicología empírica brentaniana. Se analiza el texto La negación de Freud, contrastándolo con el intento de Agustín Kripper para ubicar en ese texto la presencia de Brentano.

  20. Freud on the Death Drive as Existence Without Tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Brian

    2016-06-01

    Freud's notion of the death drive is complex and arguably ambiguous. This paper, however, proposes that Freud's thoughts on our organic dynamic towards tensionlessness provide us with a cohesive path through the diverse characteristics that are attributed to the death drive. The paper shows that Freud is interested in giving expression to a kind of disavowal of personhood that may present itself symptomatically. A tensionless state can be gained by a dynamic release of the individual from the pressures of the ego. This study critically sets out the line of analysis that brought Freud, in Beyond the Pleasure Principle, to introduce the notion of the death drive. The main work of the paper is to examine the meaning of the very idea of death as tensionlessness. A central contention will be that death has a figurative meaning when it is discussed in that context: it is the death of the ego. The idea of death as tensionlessness will be employed to explore a number of clinical interpretations of the relationship between the death drive and neurotic guilt and envy.

  1. Scholars Prescribe Freud's "Talking Cure" for Problems of Interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Karen J.

    1986-01-01

    While Freud's reputation is in decline among psychiatrists and psychologists, it is on the rise among literary and film critics, historians, anthropologists, and political scientists, where it is being adopted as a tool to help analyze historical movements, literary works and films, cultural patterns, and political theories. (MSE)

  2. "Behind the poetic fiction": Freud, Schnitzler and feminine subjectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodstein, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    In 1922 Sigmund Freud wrote to fellow Viennese author and dramatist Arthur Schnitzler: "I believe I have avoided you out of a sort of fear of my double." Through a series of reflections on this imagined doubling and its reception, this paper demonstrates that the ambivalent desire for his literary other attested by Freud's confession goes to the heart of both theoretical and historical questions regarding the nature of psychoanalysis. Bringing Schnitzler's resistance to Freud into conversation with attempts by psychoanalytically oriented literary scholars to affirm the "Doppengängertum" of the two men, it argues that not only psychoanalytic theories and modernist literature but also the tendency to identify the two must be treated as historical phenomena. Furthermore, the paper contends, Schnitzler's work stands in a more critical relationship to its Viennese milieu than Freud's: his examination of the vicissitudes of feminine desire in "Fräulein Else" underlines the importance of what lies outside the oedipal narrative through which the case study of "Dora" comes to be centered on the uncanny nexus of identification with and anxious flight from the other.

  3. Freud, Adler, and Women: Powers of the "Weak" and "Strong."

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVitis, Joseph L.

    1985-01-01

    This article discusses Freud's original psychoanalytic notions on women and morality and their influence on constructions of personality, power, culture, and socioeducational change. Also discussed is Freudian critic Alfred Adler's use of a larger external lens to focus women's lives in a wider context of "social interest" and social…

  4. Comments on erroneous interpretations of Freud's seduction theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eissler, K R

    1993-01-01

    The seduction theory, as formulated by Freud in 1896, has been erroneously understood by many to be a statement about the frequency of sexual abuse of children, but in reality it postulates a specific etiology of adult psychopathology. Freud stated two conditions that would falsify the theory. When he discovered their existence, he was forced, very much against his preference, to abandon the theory. Later, this sequence was denied and Freud's change of theory was referred to opprobrious subjective traits, assertions made without documentation except by Masson. He maintained that he had come across a document from the pen of Ruth Mack Brunswick the alleged content of which implied grave deficits in Freud's scholarship. When it became possible to examine the original document, it was found that it does not contain anything corresponding to what Masson reported. The discrepancies between his account and Mack Brunswick's draft are presented. In the document, Mack Brunswick set forth some of the observations she had made when treating the Wolf Man in the years subsequent to the patient's first analysis, which she had reported in 1928. Her enlargement of the role of seduction in the etiology of the Wolf Man's psychopathology is discussed.

  5. Freud, Adler, and Women: Powers of the "Weak" and "Strong."

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVitis, Joseph L.

    1985-01-01

    This article discusses Freud's original psychoanalytic notions on women and morality and their influence on constructions of personality, power, culture, and socioeducational change. Also discussed is Freudian critic Alfred Adler's use of a larger external lens to focus women's lives in a wider context of "social interest" and social relationship.…

  6. On Stories and Theories: In Appreciation of Miss Freud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottle, Thomas J.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author reflects on Bert Cohler's essay "Desire, Teaching and Learning" and relates it to his teacher, Miss Anna Freud's story. The author asks whether it is possible that what one sees and hears, and encounters as teacher is only partially what is really out there in one's classroom and in the heads of one's students and…

  7. [Sigmund Freud and the "Zeitschrift für Hypnotismus"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Terence A

    2005-01-01

    While Freud was always ready to acknowledge the debt that psychoanalysis owed to hypnotism, his engagement in its study and medical application is often seen by historians as little more than a passing phase on the way to psychoanalysis proper. This paper attempts to redress the balance by exploring Freud's association with the most influential German-language journal devoted to hypnotism, the Zeitschrift für Hypnotismus. Freud not only contributed a paper to this periodical but also served on its editorial board for the first three years of its existence. There also appeared in the journal one review and six abstracts of his work. After a condensed bibliographical account of the journal, a summary is given of Freud's intellectual and professional contacts and exchanges with three of the key individuals associated with it: August Forel, Jonas Grossmann and Oskar Vogt. Finally clarification is given of the publication history of the "Dora" case history and the chronology of its rejection for publication by Korbinian Brodmann, editor of the journal when it became the Journal für Psychologie und Neurologie.

  8. Learning by doing - Piagets Konstruktivistische Lerntheorie und Ihre Konsequenzen FÜR Die PÄDAGOGISCHE Praxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmers, Burkhard

    1997-01-01

    Piaget's theory of genetic recognition has a number of pedagogical implications. With the swing from structuralism to constructivism, Piaget created one of the first constructivist learning theories around the middle of this century. After this has been briefly presented, its relationship to present-day teaching and learning research, pedagogical practice and other forms of constructivism is examined critically. Although Piaget's theory does not embrace all forms of human learning, it does contain some significant pointers for pedagogical practice. An appropriate practical application of Piaget's learning theory would be to teach by encouraging spontaneous activity and the interests of the pupils.

  9. Freud e Brentano: mais que um flerte filosófico = Freud and Brentano: more than a philosophical flirt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cataldo-Maria, Thiago Marcellus de S.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Não seria exagerado afirmar que a importância da relação entre Freud e Brentano tem sido negligenciada. Embora o tema não tenha sido ignorado, dentre os nomes que compõem a fileira dos que influenciaram Freud, o de Brentano certamente é um dos mais apagados. Este ensaio pretende sublinhar algumas marcas do filósofo nas formulações do metapsicólogo. Para tanto, começamos destacando as evidências históricas da estreiteza da relação Freud- Brentanto. Em seguida, investigamos o conceito de intencionalidade tendo em vista a proximidade das concepções de Freud e Brentano a respeito da representação em dois pontos principais: o primeiro é a impossibilidade de um ato de representação ocorrer na ausência de objeto representado e o segundo é o fato de o objeto representado não necessariamente existir enquanto coisa real. Após estes desenvolvimentos, finalizamos, apontando para outras marcas das concepções brentanianas na teoria freudiano e, portanto, para a riqueza desta linha de pesquisa

  10. Aprendizagem e Desenvolvimento na Teoria de Jean Piaget

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Suzana De Stefano Menin

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Neste artigo são apresentadas, segundo indicay6es de Castorina (1988, e desenvolvidas três etapas em que a teoria Psicogenetica de Jean Piaget debruçou-se sobre as relações entre aprendizagem e desenvolvimento buscando esclarece-las. Na primeira etapa, a teoria buscou diferenciar-se das posi96es empiristas e aprioristas afirmando todo o desenvolvimento cognitivo como construção gradual de estruturas. Na segunda, negou-se a possibilidade de apressar a construção de operações 16gicas atraves de treinos baseados em aprendizagens estritas, por associação e reforço, de respostas corretas. Na terceira etapa a teoria Psicogenetica buscou responder às indagações sobre as possibilidades de se promover o desenvolvimento através da apresentação de situações de desequilíbriocognitivo.

  11. 华丽计时艺术piaget

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    <正>由个人兴趣发展成为家族事业,凭着创意与胆识,不但在技术上推陈出新作出重大突破,腕表.外形上亦屡创新猷,甚至将名贵的珠宝融入设计之中。今时今日,它在国际表坛享有崇高地位,并获‘制表与珠宝工艺大师’的雅号,这就是Piaget伯爵。掩不住的制表热情1874年,年仅19岁的乔治·伯爵(GeorgesEdouard Piaget)创立伯爵。在瑞士侏罗山区上的宁静小村庄La Cote-aux-Fees,每年十一月到翌年四月这个漫长严寒冬季,都是研修第二职业的好时机,乔治·伯爵就在这情况下展开了对杠干擒纵结构的研究热情。他对制表的热忱渐渐感染家族成员,不久大家都投入了制作高度精准机芯的行列。

  12. A psicologia analítica de Carl Gustav Jung: apontamentos de aula/The analytical psychology of Carl Gustav Jung: notes of lesson

    OpenAIRE

    Luís Marcelo Alves Ramos

    2005-01-01

    O texto traz o conteúdo de uma aula sobre Teorias da Personalidade com foco nos fundamentos da Psicologia Analítica do psicólogo e psiquiatra suíço Carl Gustav Jung (1875-1961), cuja obra vem apresentando significativas contribuições para a Psicologia Educacional, Organizacional e Clínica. Palavras-chave Psicologia analítica; Teorias da personalidade Abstract The text brings the content of a lesson on Theories of Personality focused in the fundamentals of the Analytical Psychology of...

  13. The early relationship between Sigmund Freud and Isidor Sadger: a dream (1897) and a letter (1902).

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Ulrike

    2003-01-01

    Proceeding from Wittels' comment that Isidor Sadger's essay "The miracle of the thinking protein" (1897a) was the day residue for Freud's dream of the norekdal style, I suggest that the dream was dreamt between February/April 1897 and autumn 1897. I go on to consider which of Sadger's publications on Ibsen could have been the second day residue for Freud's dream. Against the background of Freud and Sadger's relationship in the 1890s, I examine what it was about Sadger's essay that could have precipitated the dream. Flechsig's basic conception of the connection between brain and mind and Sadger's pre-analytical view of psychic phenomena are outlined. Furthermore, a previously unpublished letter from Freud to Sadger in 1902 is presented and its possible context discussed. I show that Sadger probably already began carrying out analyses in 1898 and that, of Freud's immediate circle in Vienna, he was either the first or the second doctor to begin analytical work. In addition Sadger already made references to Freud in his publications in 1897. In summary, Isidor Sadger was probably the only one of Freud's disciples for whom the following combination was true: he became interested in Freud's approach before 1900, carried out analyses before 1900, publicly spoke out for Freud before 1900, became a member of the Wednesday group and stayed in Freud's vicinity for a long time (until 1933).

  14. The relationship between Piaget and cognitive levels in persons with Alzheimer's disease and related disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteson, M A; Linton, A D; Barnes, S J; Cleary, B L; Lichtenstein, M J

    1996-02-01

    Clinical observations and research studies have documented that people with Alzheimer's disease and related disorders (ADRD) appear to regress developmentally during the course of the disease. The purpose of this study was to prospectively determine the association between changes in Piaget levels of cognitive development and cognitive decline in nursing home residents in various stages of ADRD. Fifty-seven people were tested three times at yearly intervals, using the Folstein Mini-Mental State Exam to determine cognitive levels and a set of 14 Piaget tasks to determine cognitive developmental levels: 1) Formal Operations; 2) Concrete Operations; 3) Preoperational; and 4) Sensorimotor. Mean MMSE scores declined from 12.7 to 9.4, and there was a downward trend in Piaget levels over the study period. ANOVA showed significant differences (p Piaget levels, and Spearman rho analysis showed significant correlations between Piaget levels and MMSE for each year (p < 0.0005, Years 1, 2, 3). The results suggest that there is a concurrent decline in cognitive developmental levels and cognition in people in various stages of Alzheimer's disease and related disorders.

  15. Synchronicity and the I Ching: Jung, Pauli, and the Chinese woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabriskie, Beverley

    2005-04-01

    The capacity of the human mind to discover and invent both imagistic analogies and mathematical structures to represent reality is strikingly juxtaposed in the ancient Chinese text of the I Ching. Its emphasis on containing all sorts of opposites and its plastic appeal to multi-valenced experience has kept it alive through millennia and across cultures. Jung was introduced to its Taoist wisdom by the Sinologist Richard Wilhelm. The Nobel Laureate quantum physicist Wolfgang Pauli became familiar with its philosophy and mathematics through his reading of Schopenhauer and Leibniz. In their correspondence about the nature of the unconscious and synchronicity, Pauli and Jung also exchanged their musings on Pauli's dreams of a Chinese woman, her role in his psyche and his scientific theories(1).

  16. Saying goodbye to the hero: Jung, Liber Novus and conversion from addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addenbrooke, Mary

    2015-06-01

    Two chapters in Liber Novus throw fresh light on Jung's epistemology of addiction. Taking these as a starting point, the nature of the challenges that patients confront in leaving addiction behind are explored. It is suggested that an archetypal process of separation is constellated at the point of quitting as the precursor to a life without the object of the addiction. A short account is given of Jung's part in the inception of Alcoholics Anonymous and the potential role of a 'conversion experience' as an initiation into psychological reorientation away from the negative individuation experienced by the hero. The case of a patient addicted to heroin illustrates the contribution of an analytic approach in an NHS setting, along with other workers in a rehabilitation centre. Certain challenges of working with addicted people are outlined, including arousal of the psychotherapist's rescue fantasies.

  17. The correspondence between Erich Neumann and C.G. Jung on the occasion of the November, progroms 1938 [corrected].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löwe, Angelica

    2015-06-01

    In the light of recently-published correspondence between Jung and Neumann, this paper considers and connects two aspects of their relationship: Jung's theory of an ethno-specific differentiation of the unconscious as formulated in 1934, and the relationship between Jung and Neumann at the beginning of the Holocaust in 1938-with Jung as the wise old man and a father figure on one hand, and Neumann as the apprentice and dependent son on the other. In examining these two issues, a detailed interpretation of four letters, two by Neumann and two by Jung, written in 1938 and 1939, is given. Neumann's reflections on the collective Jewish determination in the face of the November pogroms in 1938 led Jung to modify his view, with relativization and secularization of his former position. This shift precipitated a deep crisis with feelings of disorientation and desertion in Neumann; the paper discusses how a negative father complex was then constellated and imaged in a dream. After years of silence, the two men were able to renew the deep bonds that characterized their lifelong friendship.

  18. An existential criterion for normal and abnormal personality in the works of Sigmund Freud and Alfred Adler.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapustin S.A.

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This is the second in a series of four articles scheduled for publication in this journal. In the previous article I proposed a description of a new so-called existential criterion of normal and abnormal personality that is implicitly present in the works of Erich Fromm. According to this criterion, normal and abnormal personalities are determined, first, by special features of the content of their position regarding existential dichotomies that are natural to human beings and, second, by particular aspects of the formation of this position. Such dichotomies, entitatively existent in all human life, are inherent, two-alternative contradictions. The position of a normal personality in its content orients one toward a contradictious predetermination of life in the form of existential dichotomies and the necessity of searching for compromise in resolving these dichotomies. This position is created on a rational basis with the person’s active participation. The position of an abnormal personality in its content subjectively denies a contradictious predetermination of life in the form of existential dichotomies and orients one toward a consistent, noncompetitive, and, as a consequence, one-sided way of life that doesn’t include self-determination. This position is imposed by other people on an irrational basis. Abnormality of personality interpreted like that is one of the most important factors influencing the development of various kinds of psychological problems and mental disorders — primarily, neurosis. In this article I show that this criterion is implicitly present in the personality theories of Sigmund Freud and Alfred Adler, although in more special cases. In the following articles I will show that this criterion is also implicitly present in the personality theories of Carl Jung, Carl Rogers, and Viktor Frankl.

  19. Elementary Teachers' Application of Jean Piaget's Theories of Cognitive Development during Social Studies Curriculum Debates in Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinde, Elizabeth R.; Perry, Nancy

    2007-01-01

    In this article we explore educators' use of Jean Piaget's theories concerning cognitive development to refute proposed social studies standards in Arizona. We describe the work of Piaget as well as the National Association for the Education of Young Children's developmentally appropriate practices as they apply to primary-grade children's…

  20. Elementary Teachers' Application of Jean Piaget's Theories of Cognitive Development during Social Studies Curriculum Debates in Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinde, Elizabeth R.; Perry, Nancy

    2007-01-01

    In this article we explore educators' use of Jean Piaget's theories concerning cognitive development to refute proposed social studies standards in Arizona. We describe the work of Piaget as well as the National Association for the Education of Young Children's developmentally appropriate practices as they apply to primary-grade children's…

  1. Old Age and Spirituality - Metanoia, "The second half of life" according to Carl Gustav Jung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Pereira Gaeta Arcuri

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This study shows the possibility of old age as human development, since the second half of life is the period of spiritual growth. Jung is a classic illustration of metanoia showing what connects and what distinguishes the second half of life. It is as if the focus change and a shift occurred. The focus may be because the ego does not find this place the foundation that once experienced as a solid foundation, and is directed to the Self.

  2. Relationship Between Personality Types Conceptualized by C. G. Jung and Emotional Intelligence

    OpenAIRE

    Natasha Virmozelova; Mariana Dimitrova

    2013-01-01

    The main aim of this study is to present the results from a study of the relationship between personality types described by C. G. Jung and emotional intelligence. The investigated subjects were 150 at the age of 18 – 50. The methods of research were MBTI (Myers-Briggs Type Indicator) - Bulgarian adaptation (Rusinova, 1992) and one psychological questionnaire measuring emotional intelligence -Bulgarian adaptation (Stoyanova, 2008). The received data indicated that the functions of thinking an...

  3. Faint voices from Greenwich Village: Jung's impact on the first American avant-garde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherry, Jay

    2011-11-01

    In 1913 Jung made a trip to New York which was to have an important impact on the creation of modern American culture. At the invitation of Beatrice Hinkle, the first Jungian analyst in the country, he spoke to the Liberal Club, a forum for discussing progressive topics. Jung was the leading spokesman for psychoanalysis and his ideas about creative fantasy resonated with popular interest in the ideas of William James and Henri Bergson. This paper will document that visit and the influence that Hinkle had on the young people who had gravitated to Greenwich Village. She promoted Jungian psychology through her analytical practice and her translation of Jung's Wandlungen und Symbole der Libido as Psychology of the Unconscious. Her influence is evident in four key neighbourhood institutions: The Masses, a socialist magazine, The Seven Arts, an avant-garde literary magazine, the Provincetown Players theatre ensemble, and the Heterodoxy Club, America's first feminist group. Her influence is also evident at The New School where several pioneering anthropologists employed the theory of psychological types as a tool for understanding social behaviour. This paper will demonstrate that a cultural moment usually seen through a Freudian lens had, in fact, a remarkably Jungian character.

  4. The Fibonacci Life-Chart Method (FLCM) as a foundation for Carl Jung's theory of synchronicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacco, Robert G

    2016-04-01

    Since the scientific method requires events to be subject to controlled examination it would seem that synchronicities are not scientifically investigable. Jung speculated that because these incredible events are like the random sparks of a firefly they cannot be pinned down. However, doubting Jung's doubts, the author provides a possible method of elucidating these seemingly random and elusive events. The author draws on a new method, designated the Fibonacci Life-Chart Method (FLCM), which categorizes phase transitions and Phi fractal scaling in human development based on the occurrence of Fibonacci numbers in biological cell division and self-organizing systems. The FLCM offers an orientation towards psychological experience that may have relevance to Jung's theory of synchronicity in which connections are deemed to be intrinsically meaningful rather than demonstrable consequences of cause and effect. In such a model synchronistic events can be seen to be, as the self-organizing system enlarges, manifestations of self-organized critical moments and Phi fractal scaling. Recommendations for future studies include testing the results of the FLCM using case reports of synchronistic and spiritual experiences. © 2016, The Society of Analytical Psychology.

  5. Jung on the Nature and Interpretation of Dreams: A Developmental Delineation with Cognitive Neuroscientific Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Caifang

    2013-01-01

    Post-Jungians tend to identify Jung’s dream theory with the concept of compensation; they tend to believe that Jung’s radically open stand constitutes his dream theory in its entirety. However, Jung’s theory regarding dreams was a product of an evolving process throughout his whole intellectual and professional life. Unfortunately, the theory has not been understood in such a developmental light. Based on a historical and textual study of all dream articles found throughout The Collected Works of C.G. Jung, this paper maps a concise three-phase trajectory of Jung’s changing views on dreams and interpretation. The paper posits that Jung’s last essay, “Symbols and the Interpretation of Dreams” (1961), epitomizes his final stand, although such a stand is also reflected in a less explicit and less emphatic way during the latter period of the second phase. The paper also briefly addresses where Jung and Jungians have been enigmatic or negligent. For example, it has not been explicated fully why compensation as slight modifications and compensation as parallels to waking life situations are rare in Jung’s cases In addition, contemporary cognitive and neuroscientific approaches to the study of dreams, as represented by Harry Hunt, William Domhoff, and Allan Hobson, among others, are presented in connection with Jung. The juxtaposition of Jungian, cognitive, and neuroscientific approaches showcases how cognitive and scientific findings challenge, enrich, and in some ways confirm Jung’s dream theory and praxis. PMID:25379263

  6. Jung on the Nature and Interpretation of Dreams: A Developmental Delineation with Cognitive Neuroscientific Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caifang Zhu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Post-Jungians tend to identify Jung’s dream theory with the concept of compensation; they tend to believe that Jung’s radically open stand constitutes his dream theory in its entirety. However, Jung’s theory regarding dreams was a product of an evolving process throughout his whole intellectual and professional life. Unfortunately, the theory has not been understood in such a developmental light. Based on a historical and textual study of all dream articles found throughout The Collected Works of C.G. Jung, this paper maps a concise three-phase trajectory of Jung’s changing views on dreams and interpretation. The paper posits that Jung’s last essay, “Symbols and the Interpretation of Dreams” (1961, epitomizes his final stand, although such a stand is also reflected in a less explicit and less emphatic way during the latter period of the second phase. The paper also briefly addresses where Jung and Jungians have been enigmatic or negligent. For example, it has not been explicated fully why compensation as slight modifications and compensation as parallels to waking life situations are rare in Jung’s cases In addition, contemporary cognitive and neuroscientific approaches to the study of dreams, as represented by Harry Hunt, William Domhoff, and Allan Hobson, among others, are presented in connection with Jung. The juxtaposition of Jungian, cognitive, and neuroscientific approaches showcases how cognitive and scientific findings challenge, enrich, and in some ways confirm Jung’s dream theory and praxis.

  7. [Freud's identification with men who had 2 mothers: Oedipus, Leonardo da Vinci, Michealangelo and Moses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harsch, H E

    1994-02-01

    In view of the fact that as a child Sigmund Freud was looked after by two mothers--his actual mother and a nursemaid--it is hardly surprising that traces of this pre-oedipal situation, fraught as it was with traumatisation and loss, should be discernible in the works of the creator of psychoanalysis. Freud's continued preoccupation with the Oedipus myth, his interest in "great men" like da Vinci and Michelangelo, and finally his identification with the figure of Moses are pointers not only to the paternal dimension (as long suggested by Freud's biographers) but also to the maternal dimension and its significance for Freud's life and work. The author demonstrates that those mythical and historical figures which Freud identified with--Oedipus, da Vinci, Michelangelo, Moses--themselves all had two mothers and sublimated this traumatic experience into outstanding achievements, the same being true of Freud himself "who solved the famous riddle and was a most powerful man".

  8. Father and son: Freud revisits his Oedipus complex in Moses and Monotheism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelbaum, Jerome

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, I propose to understand Freud on his own terms and within his social, intellectual and psychological context. It is my hope that such an understanding will contribute in turn to our understanding of some of the sources of the creative process. Were it not for his fame, Freud's views on religion, history and art, would at best be but a footnote to these subjects. My contention is that Freud's writings on these subjects can contribute more to our understanding of Freud, the person, than they do to some of the subjects he is writing about. Toward this end I will focus on two of Freud's works, written more than 30 years apart, his early Moses of Michelangelo and his late-life work Moses and Monotheism, which reflect the considerable changes in Freud's thinking.

  9. Dreaming scientists and scientific dreamers: Freud as a reader of French dream literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroy, Jacqueline

    2006-03-01

    The argument of this paper is to situate The Interpretation of Dreams within an historical context. It is, therefore, impossible to believe Freud entirely when he staged himself in his letters to Fliess as a mere discoverer. In reality Freud also felt he belonged to a learned community of dream specialists, whom I call "dreaming scientists" and "scientific dreamers." Instead of speaking, as Ellenberger does, in terms of influence, I will be offering as an example a portrait of Freud as a reader of two French authors, Maury, and indirectly, Hervey de Saint-Denys. I will analyze how Freud staged himself as replacing Maury and dreaming sometimes like Hervey de Saint-Denys. My premise in this work is that we must forget Freud, in order to adventure into a learned dream culture peculiar to the nineteenth century. Only afterwards can we come back to Freud and place him in this context as a creative heir.

  10. Sexuality and psychoanalytic aggrandisement: Freud's 1908 theory of cultural history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotti, Patricia

    2011-03-01

    In 1908, in his article "'Civilized" sexual morality and modern nervous illness', Freud presented neuroses as the consequence of a restrictive state of cultural development and its 'civilized morality'. He found the inspiration for this idea by expanding upon previous formulations in this area by his predecessors (notably Christian von Ehrenfels) that focused on a cultural process earlier introduced by Kant, while also integrating in his analysis the principles of Haeckel's evolutionism (history of development, recapitulation) which eventually re-defined the psychoanalytic theory of neuroses. These new theoretical elements became the basis of psychoanalytic theory and thereby influenced subsequent thinking in the cultural process itself and in human sciences. This transformation of underlying theory provided a unique historical and analytical framework for psychoanalysis which allowed Freud to claim for it a pre-eminent position among the human sciences.

  11. Freud's Jewish identity and psychoanalysis as a science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Arnold D

    2014-12-01

    Ludwik Fleck, the Polish philosopher of science, maintained that scientific discovery is influenced by social, political, historical, psychological, and personal factors. The determinants of Freud's Jewish identity are examined from this Fleckian perspective, as is the impact of that complex identity on his creation of psychoanalysis as a science. Three strands contributing to his Jewish identity are identified and explored: his commitment to the ideal of Bildung, the anti-Semitism of the times, and his "godlessness." Finally, the question is addressed of what it means that psychoanalysis was founded by a Jew. For Freud, psychoanalysis was a kind of liberation philosophy, an attempt to break free of his ethnic and religious inheritance. Yet it represented at the same time his ineradicable relationship with that inheritance. It encapsulated both the ambivalence of his Jewish identity and the creativity of his efforts to resolve it.

  12. On the subject of homosexuality: What Freud said.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanders, Sara; Ladame, Francois; Carlsberg, Anders; Heymanns, Petra; Naziri, Despina; Panitz, Denny

    2016-06-01

    The article explores Freud's writing on homosexuality, from his early hypotheses, expressed in his letters to Fleiss to his last observations in The Outline of Psychoanalysis, published in 1940 after his death. We trace the continuities as well as changes in his thinking, and have organized the paper conceptually, under the headings: 1) Bisexuality 2) Narcissism and Object choice, 3) On Normality and Pathology, and 4) The Quantitative factor and Aggression. We show that Freud was the first to confirm the existence of homosexualities, that he offers no black and white solution to the question of normality and pathology, although he contributes to the understanding of the vehemence that surrounds the subject, and that, in the considerable body of work, he has offered a rich and varied foundation for further thinking on the subject.

  13. Defenses and morality: Adam Smith, Sigmund Freud, and contemporary psychoanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrinetti, Paul A; Özler, Sule

    2014-10-01

    In this paper we follow the development and transmission of moral learning from Adam Smith's impartial spectator to Sigmund Freud's superego and then to contemporary psychoanalysis. We argue that defenses are an integral component in the acquisition of any moral system. Elaborating on this argument, we assert that there is a progression from defensive systems that are "closed" to defensive systems that are "open," as defined in a recent work by Novick and Novick. The former system is "static, avoids reality, and is characterized by power dynamics, sadomasochism, and omnipotent defense." The latter, on the other hand, is a system that allows for "joy, creativity, spontaneity, love and it is attuned to reality." Furthermore, while Smith and Freud's systems are more one-person systems of defense, contemporary psychoanalysis has moved to more of a two-person system.

  14. Deepening psychoanalytic listening: the marriage of Buddha and Freud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Jeffrey B

    2009-06-01

    Freud (1912) delineated the ideal state of mind for therapists to listen, what he called "evenly hovering" or "evenly suspended attention." No one has ever offered positive recommendations for how to cultivate this elusive yet eminently trainable state of mind. This leaves an important gap in training and technique. What Buddhism terms meditation-non-judgmental attention to what is happening moment-to-moment-cultivates exactly the extraordinary, yet accessible, state of mind Freud was depicting. But genuine analytic listening requires one other quality: the capacity to decode or translate what we hear on the latent and metaphoric level-which meditation does not do. This is a crucial weakness of meditation. In this chapter I will draw on the best of the Western psychoanalytic and Eastern meditative traditions to illuminate how therapists could use meditation to cultivate "evenly hovering attention" and how a psychoanalytic understanding of the language and logic of the unconscious complements and enriches meditative attention.

  15. Piaget e as teorias da evolução orgânica Piaget and the theories of organic evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Argus Vasconcelos de Almeida

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available As teorias da evolução orgânica, principalmente a de Darwin, tiveram enorme impacto nas ciências humanas, notadamente na psicologia. Piaget importou da biologia diversas formulações teóricas que fundamentaram as suas teorias sobre o desenvolvimento ontogenético humano. A sua tese central estabelece a existência de uma correspondência de funções e isomorfismos parciais de estruturas entre a biologia evolutiva e as funções cognitivas dos sujeitos. Entretanto, suas idéias sobre a evolução dos seres vivos, com ênfase no papel do comportamento na evolução, pouca influência tiveram na biologia dominante de sua época. Não obstante, as teorias epigenéticas contemporâneas da evolução, em confronto teórico com o paradigma neodarwinista, reproduzem e atualizam as idéias piagetianas sobre a evolução e desenvolvimento dos seres vivos. Nesse sentido, defende-se aqui a idéia segundo a qual Piaget formula plataforma teórica que estabelece bases comuns para a psicogênese e a evolução orgânica.Theories of organic evolution, mainly those proposed by Darwin, have strongly influenced human sciences in general, and psychology in particular. Piaget has brought from biology several theoretical proposals which gave support to his formulations concerning human ontogenetic development. The theoretical link between biological and psychological formulations was based on the proposition of correspondences and partial isomorphism between evolutionary biology and cognitive development. However, Piaget's ideas about phylogenetic evolution of live organisms have had little influence over current biology. Nevertheless, epigenetic contemporary theories of biological evolution make use of Piaget's propositions, in theoretical opposition to the neo-Darwinist views. Because of that, it is proposed in this paper the crucial contribution of Piaget in terms of the proposition of a common theoretical ground for psychogenesis and organic evolution.

  16. Freud's Psychoanalysis of The Tell-Tale Heart

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜红云; 梁静

    2014-01-01

    Edgar Allan Poe is a famous American poet, short fiction writer and critic. He is good at writing horror tale and detective story. Many of his short stories show the narrator's abnormal mind. The Tell-Tale Heart is one of his famous short stories. This paper will analyze Poe's The Tell-Tale Heart by using Freud's psychoanalysis theory:the three-level personality.

  17. Letter to Freud: on the plight of psychoanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Dinah M

    2011-12-01

    In the form of a letter, the writer communicates to Freud her appreciation for the incomparable richness and complexity of the psychoanalytic enterprise in its century-long evolution from classical, Freudian origins to new developments in theory and technique. At the same time, concern is expressed about the continuity and survival of psychoanalysis in a cultural milieu that has absorbed its once radical ideas about sexuality and unconscious motivation while resisting its viability as a method of treatment.

  18. Freud and history before 1905: from defending to questioning the theory of a glorious past.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotti, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    By sticking closely to Freud's use of the German term Geschichte (history, story) between 1894 and 1905, I will reveal two conceptions of history. The first one, the theory of the glorious past and its archaeological metaphor, which accompanied and sustained the seduction theory of cultural history. I will define how this change was determined by an evolution in Freud's conceptions of childhood prehistory and original history. I will also question how the history problem interfered with Freud's auto-analysis.

  19. Il dottor Freud a proposito dell'arte (1925

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clive Bell

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Clive Bell (1881-1964, critico d’arte inglese appartenente al Gruppo di Bloomsbury, fu tra i fautori più decisi del formalismo in estetica. In questo articolo critica qui con ironica asprezza, la concezione dell’arte espressa da Freud in un noto passo dell’Introduzione alla Psicoanalisi, in cui l’artista viene descritto come una persona insoddisfatta che compensa attraverso l’arte i suoi bisogni pulsionali. Secondo Clive Bell il piacere dell’arte non nasce dall’appagamento di desiderio ma da una speciale emozione che riguarda solo la “Forma Significante”. “L’artista– scrive – non è alle prese… con la “sublimazione” delle sue normali brame, perché è alle prese con un problema totalmente al di fuori dell’esperienza normale. Il suo obbiettivo è creare una forma che debba corrispondere a un’idea estetica, non creare una forma che debba soddisfare le voglie inappagate del dottor Freud.” Conclude poi dicendo: “A me pare che il dottor Freud possa essere un eccellente psicoanalista; ma l’arte, sono certo, farebbe meglio a lasciarla stare.”

  20. The historical character of human nature in Freud's theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilbersheid, Uri

    2013-06-01

    In Freud' theories of human development, human nature is described and analyzed as essentially historical. At the core of human history is the restructuring of the sexual instinct and the death instinct (or its unique form as destructive impulses). The conscious, asked-for shaping of these two instincts, under the rule of the "reality principle", forms the basis of human society at all stages. This conscious restructuring has also unintended, unasked-for results, which are part of the historically developing human nature. The historical choice has been the building of human society as a social complex based on the de-eroticization of both the individual and society. Freud suggested that the historical process of changing human nature and maintaining the achieved new structure has mainly been an enterprise of enlightened political elite, which has imposed (in all societies) the various elements of the new nature upon the ordinary people. Human history is essentially a deed of the political sphere. In viewing human nature as consisting of both asked-for and unasked-for results of human conscious purposeful activity Freud belongs to the same historical school as Marx.

  1. German philosophy, Freud, and the riddle of the woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makari, G J

    1991-01-01

    After Kant's critique of empiricism, subjectivist epistemologies cropped up in 19th-century German philosophy. Schopenhauer argued that the true essence of every object was an irrational and sexual will. This underlying will distorted a subject's knowledge of the world. Schopenhauer's notion of this true essence was analogous to his portrayal of women; they too were natural, irrational, and instinctual. Nietzsche postulated a will-to-power that structured and hence distorted a chaotic world. That structureless "real" world Nietzsche symbolized as the essential "truth of a woman," a truth which for Nietzsche was unknowable to the desirous male philosopher. Freud, while maintaining belief in empirical truth, developed a psychology of mis-knowledge which had much in common with Schopenhauer's epistemology. His theory of transference grew from a need to explain how female patients libidinally distorted the reality of their male analysts. Conversely, Freud's later writings on women are hampered by the author's realization of his own precarious and subjective position as man trying to know woman. These counter-transferential concerns ultimately made the woman's psychological essence an unknowable riddle for Freud.

  2. Wittgenstein's personality and his relations with Freud's thought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancia, Mauro

    2002-02-01

    In this contribution the author examines the connections between Wittgenstein's personality and his attitude to Freud's psychoanalytic theories in the light of biographies of the philosopher, published exchanges of letters between him and his sisters, his 'secret' diaries from the time of the First World War, his diaries from the nineteen-thirties and the writings in which he discusses Freud and psychoanalysis. The paper quotes liberally from all these sources. Following an account of Wittgenstein's cultural and family background in Vienna and his subsequent peripatetic life, hypotheses are presented concerning his personality, sexuality and 'internal' theology, together with some ideas about his relationship with his family (in particular, his parents and sisters) and his critique of Freud's theories, with particular reference to dreams and their interpretation. Wittgenstein emerges as a highly original philosopher who is, however, emotionally disturbed and restless. His personality is found to have narcissistic aspects that moulded his behaviour and thought, and the author contends that his mental suffering caused him to apply psychological and psychoanalytic categories to his philosophy.

  3. "I no longer believe": did Freud abandon the seduction theory?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahbel-Rappe, Karin

    2006-01-01

    Recent accounts of the seduction theory and the question of its abandonment have emphasized the continuity of Freud's work before and after the seduction theory, claiming that Freud did not abandon his concern with the event of seduction but rather came to appreciate that an understanding of fantasy was also essential. This claim is challenged. It is shown that Freud did abandon the passionate concerns of his seduction theory for the most part; that he left behind his early interest in reconstructing unconscious infantile incest and focused instead on later, conscious seduction; that he at times clearly reduced apparent paternal incest to fantasy; that he turned away from the phenomenology of incest he had begun to develop; and that he theoretically nullified the value of the difference between real and fantasied seduction. It is also shown that, contrary to a persistent concern in psychoanalytic history, attention to actual seduction need not detract from the essential psychoanalytic concern with fantasy and infantile sexuality. Thinking about incest specifically illuminates the capacity for fantasizing, the core of the Freudian psyche. In this way the intuition of the seduction theory that there is something of distinctive psychoanalytic significance about incest finds support.

  4. Weltanschauung e Wissenschaft in Edmund Husserl e Sigmund Freud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Saverio Trincia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Weltanschauung and Wissenschaft between Edmund Husserl and Sigmund Freud - Comparing Edmund Husserl’s and Sigmund Freud’s approach to the conflict between the philosophy of “Weltanschauung” and the scientific method is not only possible but also useful for epistemological reasons. Two main texts will be considered in this paper: Husserl’s Philosophie als strenge Wissenschaft (1911 and Freud’s last lessons on Einleitung in die Psychoanalyse (1932. Both Husserl and Freud have a radically negative approach to “Weltanschauung" Freud objecting primarily to religious ideology and Husserl to any kind of relativism, skepticism or historicism. But a very deep difference is also apparent in their common critical approach. While Husserl points to the philosophical science of phenomenology with its eidetic intuition, Freud’s idea of science is based on the intellectual elaboration of those facts which are made objects of observation. This also means that Husserl’s science aims for a supra-temporal level, while Freud’s proposes a pattern of ongoing research continuously extending into the future.

  5. Freud's dreams of reason: the Kantian structure of psychoanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauber, Alfred I

    2009-10-01

    Freud (and later commentators) have failed to explain how the origins of psychoanalytical theory began with a positivist investment without recognizing a dual epistemological commitment: simply, Freud engaged positivism because he believed it generally equated with empiricism, which he valued, and he rejected "philosophy," and, more specifically, Kantianism, because of the associated transcendental qualities of its epistemology. But this simple dismissal belies a deep investment in Kant's formulation of human reason, in which rationality escapes natural cause and thereby bestows humans with cognitive and moral autonomy. Freud also segregated human rationality: he divided the mind between (1) an unconscious grounded in the biological and thus subject to its own laws, and (2) a faculty of autonomous reason, lodged in consciousness and free of natural forces to become the repository of interpretation and free will. Psychoanalysis thus rests upon a basic Kantian construction, whereby reason, through the aid of analytic techniques, provides a detached scrutiny of the natural world, i.e. the unconscious mental domain. Further, sovereign reason becomes the instrument of self-knowing in the pursuit of human perfection. Herein lies the philosophical foundation of psychoanalytic theory, a beguiling paradox in which natural cause and autonomous reason - determinism and freedom - are conjoined despite their apparent logical exclusion.

  6. The ego according to Klein: return to Freud and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blass, Rachel B

    2012-02-01

    This paper explores fundamental dimensions of Melanie Klein's concept of the ego through a detailed study of the writings of Klein and her early colleagues (Paula Heimann, Susan Isaacs and Joan Riviere). The study examines three central issues: (a) the basic theoretical framework for Klein's conceptualization of the ego, and specifically how her conceptualization builds on Freud's structural and dual instinct models; (b) the processes involved in the development of the ego and its capacities (including the development from id to ego and from ego to superego); and (c) the view of the ego as an object of phantasy. Through this examination, the study demonstrates that Klein's conceptualization of the ego is firmly grounded both in Freud's formulations about the ego and in his theoretical and metapsychological approach to thinking about the ego. This counters the prevalent view that Klein was only focused on clinical understandings, unconcerned with theory and fuzzy in her abstract thinking. More specifically, it counters the view that Klein did not really have a concept of the ego in any well-structured sense of the term (Britton, 2003; Hinshelwood, 1994; Segal, 2001). The study considers the sources of these misconceived views. Finally, it argues that discarding such views allows us to appreciate better the richness of Klein's thinking, her theoretical affinities to Freud, and the role of theory in the development and justification of psychoanalysis.

  7. PIAGET ALTIPLANO 38MM 900P打破纤薄纪录的奥秘

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    3.65毫米,略大于一个一元硬币的厚度,也是Piaget Altiplano 38 mm 900P打破机械腕表纤薄纪录的厚度。同时,它还有令人惊艳的高级珠宝表款式,厚度仅5.65毫米的Piaget Altiplano 38 mm 900P珠宝腕表,镶嵌共计4.71克拉美钻,创下全球珠宝腕表的纤薄纪录。

  8. The variable "Jung" as a predictor of mortality in patients with pulmonary edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Robert

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. In our Intensive Coronary Care Unit (CCU a specific scoring system named the AMIS_NS was developed both for prediction of mortality in patients with acute myocardial infarction and for evaluation of the quality of work. One of the most important variables of the AMIS_NS system is the variable Jung which stands for the interrelationship unified mortality predictors. The variable includes all the values of systolic blood pressure, heart rate and age, without limiting values for any of these. The cutoff value is 2.08. The patients with the lower variable value account for a significantly higher mortality. Data on the actual infarction are not necessitated now for this variable. The aim of this study was to assess the significance of the variable Jung in non-infarction patients with acute pulmonary edema. Methods. In a 24-month period out of 2,223 patients there were 1,087 and 1,136 patients with and without acute myocardial infarction, respectively. There was the subgroup without myocardial infarction of 312 (84.1% patients admitted with the diagnosis of pulmonary edema. The subgroup with myocardial infarction consisted of 59 (15.9% patients who were admitted for acute myocardial infarction and pulmonary edema which developed immediately after admission or during hospitalization in the CCU. For all the patients a uniform questionnaire was fulfilled on admission. Data were put into the personal computer. The variable “Jung” was used: (systolic bloog pressure/heart rate × age × 100. Results. Regarding sex, there was no difference in mortality, so that males and females were regarded as a whole. Previous myocardial infarction was equally registered in both groups. The investigated persons had less percent of mortality and a significantly higher systemic pressure as well as higher value of the variable Jung. There was no statistically significant difference in the heart rate between the two groups. In both groups of deceased

  9. [Doctor and poet as rivals. Sigmund Freud, Alfred von Berger and the narrative of female homosexuality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldmann, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Starting from a passage in the Dora case history where Freud suggests some differences between a literary and a clinical narrative of female homosexuality, this paper presents examples which he might have had in mind. Besides Balzac's "La fille aux yeux d'or" (1834/35) it is in particular Alfred v. Berger's novella "Die Italienerin [The Italian woman]" (1904) which may have served as a model and counterpoint to the literary strategies used in Freud's case history. Freud had a relationship of long standing with Berger. This newly discovered source may provide a clue for the date at which Freud finalized the Dora manscript which he had held back for years.

  10. El actor y el espectador. De Freud a Lacan // The author and the audience. From Freud to Lacan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Roldán

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Teniendo en cuenta los aportes de Freud y Lacan, en este texto se trata, por una parte, de mirar cuál es la función del actor en la representación teatral o parafraseando al segundo de estos autores ¿Qué añade el actor a la obra escrita? de otro lado, profundizar en los mecanismos que en el espectador ponen en juego para conectarse con la obra y el actor, suscitando las vivencias y emociones propias de la experiencia teatral. // Taking in account Freud and Lacan works, this paper questions about what is the actor function in a theatrical performance; paraphrasing Lacan: What does the actor add to the written work? On the other hand, deeping into the mechanisms that the member of the audience uses to put in contact with the play and the actor, arousing his/her own life experiences and emotions through the theatrical experience.

  11. Atualizando o debate entre Piaget e Chomsky em uma perspectiva neurobiológica Updating the debate between Piaget and Chomsky in a neurobiological perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Leandro Eichler

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Os entendimentos sobre a aquisição da linguagem e sobre as estruturas cognitivas estão em debate no seio das ciências cognitivas. Isso se dá apesar de um grupo de acadêmicos, de forma retórica, insistir em desmerecer o modelo construtivista piagetiano, mantendo uma adesão ao inatista ponto de vista chomskyano. Nesse artigo, retoma-se o clássico debate entre esses dois sistemas de conhecimento, repensando-o em uma perspectiva psicobiológica e apresentando recentes estudos neurobiológicos que sugerem a correção do compromisso, apontado por Piaget, entre o inato e o adquirido.The understandings of language acquisition and of cognitive structures are in debate in the center of the cognitive sciences. It happens despite of a group of academics who, in a rhetorical way, insists on despising Piaget's constructivist model, keeping a connection to Chomsky's innatist theory. This paper recalls the classical debate between these two knowledge systems, rethinking it in a psychobiological perspective and presenting recent neurobiological studies that suggest a correction of commitment between innate and acquired as pointed by Piaget.

  12. Matrizes clínicas e ética em Freud Clinical matrices and ethics in Freud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina de Andrade Vahle

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available O presente estudo hipotetiza que as diferentes matrizes clínicas que Freud encontrava em sua prática, e que lhe possibilitavam acréscimos teóricos, direcionaram seus distintos olhares sobre a cultura, fazendo-o privilegiar alguns elementos éticos em detrimento de outros. Desse modo, indicaremos: (1 como a histeria gerou a questão do conflito entre sexualidade e moral na civilização; (2 como a neurose obsessiva possibilitou a entrada dos temas da agressividade e do ódio como entraves contra os quais a cultura se esforça por lutar, assim como a presença marcante no psiquismo da consciência moral e do sentimento de culpa; (3 por fim, como as ditas afecções narcísicas trouxeram a Freud o papel do egoísmo e da destrutividade como inimigos da cultura. Nesse percurso nos aproximaremos das questões ligadas à problematização ética na "psicologia" freudiana e, a partir daí, do destaque que terá a dimensão moral na concepção freudiana do sujeito.The present study is guided by the hypothesis that the different clinical matrices found by Freud in his practice, which provided him theoretical additions, directed his different perspectives about culture, making him privilege some ethical elements over others. Therefore, we will indicate: (1 how hysteria was responsible for bringing Freud the issue of conflict between sexuality and morality in civilization; (2 the obsessive neurosis enabled the entering of the aggressiveness and hate themes as obstacles against which the culture strives to fight, as well as the outstanding presence in the psyche of the moral conscience and the sentiment of guilt; (3 at last, the so called narcissistic conditions brought to Freud the role of selfishness and destructiveness as enemies of culture. In this way we will approach the issues related to the ethical problematization in Freudian "psychology" and, thereafter, the prominence that the moral dimension will have in Freudian conception of the subject.

  13. Rules constitution and the moral development in the theory of piaget: a Kantian keflection / Constituição das regras e o desenvolvimento moral na teoria de piaget: uma reflexão Kantiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sávio Silveira de Queiroz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The games of rules have complex systems of rules expressed in socio-cultural relations favoring, according to Piaget, the study of autonomy versus heteronomy - a dimension of the moral development. Our aim was to analyze the importance of the rules' constitution for Piaget, examining his appropriations of Kantian terms, providing a reflection on terms that have been differently used from their original philosophical meanings. We observed that the differentiation between the two moral systems and the conception of respect are Kantian presuppositions used by Piaget. We concluded that the understanding of the moral development in the Piagetian theory became evident when terms in the Kantian writings are specified.

  14. A dynamic systems model of basic developmental mechanisms : Piaget, Vygotsky, and beyond

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Geert, P

    1998-01-01

    A dynamic systems model is proposed on the basis of a general developmental mechanism adopted from the theories of J. Piaget and L. S. Vygotsky, more particularly a mechanism based on the concepts assimilation versus accommodation and actual development versus zone of proximal development. In the

  15. Tests Built from Piaget's and Gesell's Tasks as Predictors of First-Grade Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Alan S.; Kaufman, Nadeen L.

    1972-01-01

    Results offer empirical support to Ilg and Ames's claim that the Gesell battery is an excellent predictor of school readiness. The close similarity of the Piaget and Gesell tests accords well with previous findings that the two tests have much in common. (Authors/MB)

  16. Mathematical Analysis of Piaget's Grouping Concept. Papy's Minicomputer as a Grouping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, H. G.

    1974-01-01

    Through a mathematical analysis, Piaget's grouping concept can be formally interpreted as being a hybrid between the mathematical concepts of a group and a lattice. Some relevant pedagogical models are presented. Activities with Cuisenaire Rods, Dienes Blocks, and Papy's Minicomputer are shown to take place in groupings. (LS)

  17. Theories of Childhood: An Introduction to Dewey, Montessori, Erikson, Piaget & Vygotsky, Second Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, Carol Garhart

    2013-01-01

    This best-selling resource provides clear, straightforward introductions to the foundational theories of John Dewey, Maria Montessori, Erik Erikson, Jean Piaget, and Lev Vygotsky. Each chapter highlights a theorist's work and includes insight on how the theory impacts teaching young children today. Discussion questions and suggested readings are…

  18. Age, Gender, and Training in Children's Performance of Piaget's Horizontality Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parameswaran, Gowri

    2003-01-01

    Presents a study in which children (n=600), ages five to nine, completed Jean Piaget's horizontality task using a square water bottle. Finds a significant sex difference in the pretest performance of the horizontality task beginning with eight year olds. Includes references. (CMK)

  19. Manufactured Memory, Altered Belief and Self Report Mirage: The Alleged False Memory of Jean Piaget Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavitt, Frank

    1999-01-01

    It is argued that a Jean Piaget anecdote about an alleged memory implanted in a young child leading to both a visual and semantic memory that persists despite disconfirming evidence is entirely different than the recovered memory debate, which is about the alleged introduction of memories to grown adults. (CR)

  20. Manufactured Memory, Altered Belief and Self Report Mirage: The Alleged False Memory of Jean Piaget Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavitt, Frank

    1999-01-01

    It is argued that a Jean Piaget anecdote about an alleged memory implanted in a young child leading to both a visual and semantic memory that persists despite disconfirming evidence is entirely different than the recovered memory debate, which is about the alleged introduction of memories to grown adults. (CR)

  1. Theories of Childhood: An Introduction to Dewey, Montessori, Erikson, Piaget & Vygotsky, Second Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, Carol Garhart

    2013-01-01

    This best-selling resource provides clear, straightforward introductions to the foundational theories of John Dewey, Maria Montessori, Erik Erikson, Jean Piaget, and Lev Vygotsky. Each chapter highlights a theorist's work and includes insight on how the theory impacts teaching young children today. Discussion questions and suggested readings are…

  2. Age, Gender, and Training in Children's Performance of Piaget's Horizontality Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parameswaran, Gowri

    2003-01-01

    Presents a study in which children (n=600), ages five to nine, completed Jean Piaget's horizontality task using a square water bottle. Finds a significant sex difference in the pretest performance of the horizontality task beginning with eight year olds. Includes references. (CMK)

  3. Jean Piaget and Rudolf Steiner: Stages of Child Development and Implications for Pedagogy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsburg, Iona H.

    1982-01-01

    The views of Jean Piaget and Rudolf Steiner concerning children's stages of development are compared and related to present-day instructional practices used in the Waldorf schools, which employ Steiner's ideas. Educational principles and practices used at the elementary school level are discussed. (PP)

  4. Young Children Reinvent Arithmetic: Implications of Piaget's Theory. Second Edition. Early Childhood Education Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamii, Constance

    This book describes and develops an innovative program of teaching arithmetic in the early elementary grades. The educational strategies employed are based on Jean Piaget's constructivist scientific ideas of how children develop logico-mathematical thinking. The book is written in collaboration with a classroom teacher and premised on the…

  5. An Analysis of Erikson's and Piaget's Theories of Human Growth. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light, Donald W., Jr.

    Similarities and differences between Erik H. Erikson's and Jean Piaget's theories concerning social development and the process of identification are explored in this report. The first part of the report is a synthesis of Erikson's concept of the developmental processes of personal growth and societal development. The second part integrates…

  6. Another Look at Piaget: Some Thoughts for Curriculum Workers and Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Dennis M.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews the stages of children's thinking according to Piaget's Theory. Illustrates how a curriculum writer might consider the complexities of a topic and match these to a level of thinking as represented by a school grade level. Outlines the implications of Piagetian levels in the construction of examinations. (GS)

  7. Young Children Reinvent Arithmetic: Implications of Piaget's Theory. Second Edition. Early Childhood Education Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamii, Constance

    This book describes and develops an innovative program of teaching arithmetic in the early elementary grades. The educational strategies employed are based on Jean Piaget's constructivist scientific ideas of how children develop logico-mathematical thinking. The book is written in collaboration with a classroom teacher and premised on the…

  8. Jean Piaget and Rudolf Steiner: Stages of Child Development and Implications for Pedagogy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsburg, Iona H.

    1982-01-01

    The views of Jean Piaget and Rudolf Steiner concerning children's stages of development are compared and related to present-day instructional practices used in the Waldorf schools, which employ Steiner's ideas. Educational principles and practices used at the elementary school level are discussed. (PP)

  9. Negative Priming Effect after Inhibition of Weight/Number Interference in a Piaget-Like Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirlin, Olivier; Houde, Olivier

    2007-01-01

    Piagetian tasks have more to do with the child's ability to inhibit interference than they do with the ability to grasp their underlying logic. Here we used a chronometric paradigm with 11-year-olds, who succeed in Piaget's conservation-of-weight task, to test the role of cognitive inhibition in a priming version of this classical task. The…

  10. A Study of Vocational College English Teaching Based on Piaget's Theory of Cognitive Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈映丹; 江晶鑫

    2015-01-01

    Piaget has taught us that we learn a great deal about how students think by listening carefully during the class,by paying attention to their own ways of solving problems. If English teachers understand the Vocational College students' thinking,they will be better able to match teaching methods to students' abilities.

  11. The Failure to Construct Proof Based on Assimilation and Accommodation Framework from Piaget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netti, Syukma; Nusantara, Toto; Subanji; Abadyo; Anwar, Lathiful

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the process of a proof construction. It is more specific on the failure of the process. Piaget's frameworks, assimilation and accommodation, were used to analyze it. Method of this research was qualitative method. Data were collected by asking five students working on problems of proof using think aloud…

  12. A dynamic systems model of basic developmental mechanisms : Piaget, Vygotsky, and beyond

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Geert, P

    1998-01-01

    A dynamic systems model is proposed on the basis of a general developmental mechanism adopted from the theories of J. Piaget and L. S. Vygotsky, more particularly a mechanism based on the concepts assimilation versus accommodation and actual development versus zone of proximal development. In the mo

  13. Contributions to the history of psychology: LXXXV. Jean Piaget, student of Pierre Janet (Paris 1919-1921).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amann-Gainotti, M

    1992-06-01

    This article provides information about an important period of Piaget's formative years, those he spent in Paris from 1919 to 1921, during which he came into contact with eminent members of the French scientific and philosophical community of the time. Among these was the psychiatrist and psychologist Pierre Janet, whose genetic approach to the psychology of behaviour and ideas about the hierarchical organization of psychological functions converged with Piaget's early scientific interests and provided Piaget a conceptual framework within which to work and develop his own project of studying the genesis of knowledge.

  14. Silencing the Patient: Freud, Sexual Abuse, and "The Etiology of Hysteria."

    Science.gov (United States)

    McOmber, James B.

    1996-01-01

    States that, in "The Etiology of Hysteria," Sigmund Freud's "seduction theory" asserted that child sexual abuse was the single cause of adult hysteria. Argues that Freud's failure to persuade his audience can be attributed not only to their denial of sexual abuse but also to his failure to clarify how pschyoanalysis could comport with traditional…

  15. Wittgenstein, Freud, Dreaming and Education: Psychoanalytic Explanation as "Une Facon de Parler"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, James D.

    2008-01-01

    Freud saw the dream as occupying a very important position in his theoretical model. If there were to be problems with his theoretical account of the dream then this would impinge upon proposed therapy and, of course, education as the right balance between the instincts and the institution of culture. Wittgenstein, whilst stating that Freud was…

  16. Freud on Sexual Trauma: An Historical Review of Seduction and Betrayal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerlund, Elaine

    1986-01-01

    An historical review of the development and rejection of Freud's seduction theory. Freud's interpretation of seduction as real sexual acts gave way to his conclusion that his patients' reports derived from fantasy, though his view of the significance of childhood sexual trauma in the etiology of neurosis remained steady. Examines the relationship…

  17. A note on the zeros of Freud-Sobolev orthogonal polynomials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Balcazar, Juan J.

    2007-10-01

    We prove that the zeros of a certain family of Sobolev orthogonal polynomials involving the Freud weight function e-x4 on are real, simple, and interlace with the zeros of the Freud polynomials, i.e., those polynomials orthogonal with respect to the weight function e-x4. Some numerical examples are shown.

  18. "More Than Lessons in How To Read": Burke, Freud, and the Resources of Symbolic Transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quandahl, Ellen

    2001-01-01

    Argues that Kenneth Burke used "The Interpretation of Dreams," as well as other works by Sigmund Freud, as a lesson on reading, taking over the central tropes of dreamwork and making them broadly dialectical rather than strictly psychoanalytic terms. Suggests that Freud's "tropology" of dreaming is crucial for reading Burke.…

  19. "More Than Lessons in How To Read": Burke, Freud, and the Resources of Symbolic Transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quandahl, Ellen

    2001-01-01

    Argues that Kenneth Burke used "The Interpretation of Dreams," as well as other works by Sigmund Freud, as a lesson on reading, taking over the central tropes of dreamwork and making them broadly dialectical rather than strictly psychoanalytic terms. Suggests that Freud's "tropology" of dreaming is crucial for reading Burke. (SG)

  20. Individual Meaning and Increasing Complexity: Contributions of Sigmund Freud and Rene Spitz to Developmental Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emde, Robert N.

    1992-01-01

    Considers contributions of Sigmund Freud and Rene Spitz to developmental psychology. Freud's contributions include his observations about play, perspectives on developmental processes, and ideas about unconscious mental activity. Spitz's contributions include his assessments of infants, perspectives on developmental processes, and his concept of…

  1. Entre Viena e Londres: uma visita à casa de Sigmund Freud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Andrés Villari

    Full Text Available O texto pretende - pela via da crônica-homenagem - retratar o contexto cultural e social de Viena e Londres - através da visão de Sigmund Freud - nos momentos que antecederam a Segunda Guerra Mundial para, a seguir, relatar os efeitos de uma visita ao - agora - Freud Museum.

  2. Freud on Sexual Trauma: An Historical Review of Seduction and Betrayal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerlund, Elaine

    1986-01-01

    An historical review of the development and rejection of Freud's seduction theory. Freud's interpretation of seduction as real sexual acts gave way to his conclusion that his patients' reports derived from fantasy, though his view of the significance of childhood sexual trauma in the etiology of neurosis remained steady. Examines the relationship…

  3. "More Than Lessons in How To Read": Burke, Freud, and the Resources of Symbolic Transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quandahl, Ellen

    2001-01-01

    Argues that Kenneth Burke used "The Interpretation of Dreams," as well as other works by Sigmund Freud, as a lesson on reading, taking over the central tropes of dreamwork and making them broadly dialectical rather than strictly psychoanalytic terms. Suggests that Freud's "tropology" of dreaming is crucial for reading Burke.…

  4. Wittgenstein, Freud, Dreaming and Education: Psychoanalytic Explanation as "Une Facon de Parler"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, James D.

    2008-01-01

    Freud saw the dream as occupying a very important position in his theoretical model. If there were to be problems with his theoretical account of the dream then this would impinge upon proposed therapy and, of course, education as the right balance between the instincts and the institution of culture. Wittgenstein, whilst stating that Freud was…

  5. Individual Meaning and Increasing Complexity: Contributions of Sigmund Freud and Rene Spitz to Developmental Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emde, Robert N.

    1992-01-01

    Considers contributions of Sigmund Freud and Rene Spitz to developmental psychology. Freud's contributions include his observations about play, perspectives on developmental processes, and ideas about unconscious mental activity. Spitz's contributions include his assessments of infants, perspectives on developmental processes, and his concept of…

  6. [Observations on the origins of the core thesis in Freud's "comparative study" of organic and hysterical paralyses (1893)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menninger, Anneliese

    2011-01-01

    Proceeding from two discrepant published transcriptions of a letter of Charcot to Freud, the author discusses the historical and theoretical background of Freud's paper. She emphasizes the influence of Charcot on Freud's early theory formation, as opposed to that of Janet.

  7. 'A cure with a defect': a previously unpublished letter by Freud concerning 'Anna O.'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, J; Cameron, L

    1999-10-01

    The authors make available in this paper the text of a previously unpublished letter by Freud, probably addressed to the founder of British ecology and his former patient, Sir Arthur Tansley, F.R.S., dating from 1932, concerning the treatment and later life of 'Anna O.', the first psychoanalytic patient. They give the full text of Freud's letter as discovered, and offer a brief commentary on its significance as evidence of Freud's view or views of Anna O.'s treatment, case-history and later life. The authors compare the view of Anna O.'s treatment and later life with other sources, in particular Freud's roughly contemporaneous letter to Stefan Zweig. The letter's principal novel formulation is to be found in the phrase 'a cure with a defect', with which Freud characterised Anna O.'s experience of her treatment with Breuer.

  8. Sigmund Freud and the Crick-Koch hypothesis. A footnote to the history of consciousness studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D L

    1999-06-01

    The author describes Crick and Koch's recently developed theory of the neurophysiological basis of consciousness as synchronised neural oscillations. The thesis that neural oscillations provide the neurophysiological basis for consciousness was anticipated by Sigmund Freud in his 1895 'Project for a scientific psychology'. Freud attempted to solve his neuropsychological 'problem of quality' by means of the hypothesis that information concerning conscious sensory qualities is transmitted through the mental apparatus by means of neural 'periods'. Freud believed that information carried by neural oscillations would proliferate across 'contact-barriers' (synapses) without inhibition. Freud's theory thus appears to imply that synchronised neural oscillations are an important component of the neurophysiological basis of consciousness. It is possible that Freud's thesis was developed in response to the experimental research of the American neuroscientist M. M. Garver.

  9. Para que serve a escrita? Freud escreve(-se

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Cordeiro Andrade

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Este texto é um estudo inicial das relações internas entre as circunstâncias do nascimento da Psicanálise, da vida de seu fundador, e de sua experiência de escrita. Aponta, particularmente, para a hipótese de um movimento comum da letra entre escrita, nascimento da Psicanálise, amor, sonho, morte, desaparecimento, desastre. Suas fontes são cartas e textos de Freud – e alguns estudos sobre estas mesmas fontes –, e o pensamento de Maurice Blanchot.

  10. Constituição das regras e o desenvolvimento moral na teoria de piaget: uma reflexão Kantiana Rules constitution and the moral development in the theory of piaget: a Kantian keflection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sávio Silveira de Queiroz; Juliana Peterle Ronchi; Rosana Suemi Tokumaru

    2009-01-01

    ... kantianos.The games of rules have complex systems of rules expressed in socio-cultural relations favoring, according to Piaget, the study of autonomy versus heteronomy - a dimension of the moral development...

  11. Freud-2/CC2D1B mediates dual repression of the serotonin-1A receptor gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjighassem, Mahmoud R; Galaraga, Kimberly; Albert, Paul R

    2011-01-01

    The serotonin-1A (5-HT1A) receptor functions as a pre-synaptic autoreceptor in serotonin neurons that regulates their activity, and is also widely expressed on non-serotonergic neurons as a post-synaptic heteroreceptor to mediate serotonin action. The 5-HT1A receptor gene is strongly repressed by a dual repressor element (DRE), which is recognized by two proteins: Freud-1/CC2D1A and another unknown protein. Here we identify mouse Freud-2/CC2D1B as the second repressor of the 5-HT1A-DRE. Freud-2 shares 50% amino acid identity with Freud-1, and contains conserved structural domains. Mouse Freud-2 bound specifically to the rat 5-HT1A-DRE adjacent to, and partially overlapping, the Freud-1 binding site. By supershift assay using nuclear extracts from L6 myoblasts, Freud-2-DRE complexes were distinguished from Freud-1-DRE complexes. Freud-2 mRNA and protein were detected throughout mouse brain and peripheral tissues. Freud-2 repressed 5-HT1A promoter-reporter constructs in a DRE-dependent manner in non-neuronal (L6) or 5-HT1A-expressing neuronal (NG108-15, RN46A) cell models. In NG108-15 cells, knockdown of Freud-2 using a specific short-interfering RNA reduced endogenous Freud-2 protein levels and decreased Freud-2 bound to the 5-HT1A-DRE as detected by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, but increased 5-HT1A promoter activity and 5-HT1A protein levels. Taken together, these data show that Freud-2 is the second component that, with Freud-1, mediates dual repression of the 5-HT1A receptor gene at the DRE. © 2010 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience © 2010 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Under a Starry Vault. Warburg, Jung and the Renaissance of Ancient Paganisms at the Beginning of the 20th Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Pallotto Strickland

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper tackles the controversial question of the affinities between the work of Aby Warburg and Carl Gustav Jung. Instead of focussing her interest exclusively on the concepts of collective memory and primordial images, though, the author critically compares the different ways Warburg and Jung looked at the renaissance of ancient practices of Paganism at the beginning of the Twentieth century, and questions the extent to which the cultural crisis heralded by Modernity, and the challenges brought about by secularisation influenced their reading of the revivals.

  13. Concordâncias e discordâncias de Dewey com Freud Dewey's agreements and disagreements with Freud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Natacha Fernandes de Andrade

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo expõe ideias de Sigmund Freud sobre temas que são fundamentais para compreender o homem contemporâneo: a constituição do psiquismo; a formação e a resolução das patologias mentais; a cultura em sentido amplo e a educação como elemento mediador entre o indivíduo e a sociedade. O objetivo é apresentar e comparar as análises feitas por John Dewey sobre esses mesmos temas, tomando por base o livro Human nature and conduct. As comparações entre os discursos freudiano e deweyano são feitas por meio da metodologia proposta por Chaïm Perelman no livro Tratado da argumentação (elaborado em coautoria com Olbrechts-Tyteca, que busca esclarecer as estratégias argumentativas usadas por um autor para obter ou aumentar a adesão às teses propostas e, com isso, despertar ações concretas. As conclusões sugerem que, embora Dewey discorde de Freud, existem pontos de concordância entre ambos, especialmente no que diz respeito ao significado dos impulsos e da sublimação e à concepção de que o conhecimento é mutável e impreciso, o que rejeita a crença em certezas absolutas e insere as decisões e ações humanas no âmbito da probabilidade.This article exposes Sigmund Freud's ideas about themes which are fundamental to the comprehension of the contemporary man: the psychic constitution; the formation and resolution of mental pathologies; the broad meaning of culture and the education as a mediating element between individual and society. This paper aims to present and compare the analysis made by John Dewey regarding these same themes based on the book Human nature and conduct. The comparisons between Freudian and Deweyan discourses are made through the methodology proposed by Chaïm Perelman in the book Treatise on argumentation (co-authored by Olbrechts-Tyteca, which aims to clarify the argumentative strategies used by an author to obtain or increase adhesion to the proposed theses and, with that, to awaken concrete

  14. Two Schemes of Intellectual Development: A Comparison of Development as Defined by William Perry and Jean Piaget.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Bruce; And Others

    1986-01-01

    A comparison of the theories of Jean Piaget and William Perry (using individual interviews with college students) shows that the two theories outline different and independent processes for assessing intellectual development. (JN)

  15. Two Schemes of Intellectual Development: A Comparison of Development as Defined by William Perry and Jean Piaget.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Bruce; And Others

    1986-01-01

    A comparison of the theories of Jean Piaget and William Perry (using individual interviews with college students) shows that the two theories outline different and independent processes for assessing intellectual development. (JN)

  16. 李连杰为伯爵经典Piaget Polo系列殿堂级时尚演绎

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    PiagetPolo系列自推出以来,广受上流社会人仕喜爱,至今仍是品牌极受欢迎系列之一,红星李连杰先生亦是Piaget Polo系列的拥戴者。固此促成伯爵与国际巨星李连杰先生于2007年首度合作,为大家演绎多个Piaget Polo腕表的配戴风格,示范了多款造型。让太家以不同角度欣赏Piaget Polo经典创作。

  17. [Freud, the biography, his autobiography and his biographers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mijolla, A

    1993-01-01

    Freud has a dual attitude to the biographical genre. When he places himself in the position of psychoanalyst-biographer of others, he is enthusiastic, speaking of ground to be conquered for psychoanalysis, and his works, as well as his correspondence, show that he continued to devote himself to investigations which resulted in interpretations of a number of personalities, the most detailed of which dealt with Leonardo de Vinci, Goethe, Dostoyevsky, President Wilson, and Moses. On the other hand, even though during the first years of the discovery of psychoanalysis he allowed himself, in a more or less veiled manner, confidences of an autobiographical nature, Freud remained very secretive about himself. He limited himself to making public only the routine information found on his university resume or the details of his life directly related to the discovery and the development of psychoanalysis. Hidden behind die Sache, the Cause, the man always vigorously defended himself against those who, braving the periodical destruction to which he subjected his archives, claimed to apply to him this "investigative drive" whose heuristic richness he otherwise celebrated. It is by means of fantasies of identification to the work, present in every biographical attempt, that we attempt to address here the contradictions of this dual attitude.

  18. Nietzsche y Freud ante el problema de la verdad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Drivet

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo se propone reflexionar acerca del problema de la verdad en las obras de Friedrich Nietzsche y Sigmund Freud, a las que se considera estrechamente vinculadas. Esta perspectiva permitirá identificar el carácter específico de la “verdad”, cuyos vestigios detectaron ambos “psicólogos” transvaloradores; apreciar la doble valoración nietzscheana de la verdad, usualmente reducida a un rechazo unilateral; y repensar la pretensión de cientificidad del psicoanálisis, actualmente despreciada en nombre de una sospechosa reivindicación anticientífica. Se concluye con el postulado de que Nietzsche y Freud conciben a la verdad como una lucha contra las resistencias, lo que les conduce a fundar una nueva escucha.

  19. Theoretical trajectories: Dreams and dreaming from Freud to Bion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinocur Fischbein, Susana; Miramón, Beatriz

    2015-08-01

    This paper aims at comparing Freud's and Bion's conceptual models on dreams and dreaming. Beyond both authors' shared disposition vis-à-vis problems posed by knowledge, a critical gap opens regarding their differing clinical practices. It is hypothesized that their ideas do not belong to irreconcilable paradigms, but that there are continuities besides discontinuities more frequently highlighted between Freudian statements on psychic functioning--described in his theory on dreams--and Bion's findings in his development of both the original theory and the connections between dreaming and thinking. Firstly, Freud's and Bion's epistemological sources are examined as well as their creative use and historical environment. Then certain general theoretical and clinical issues are considered concerning their theories on dreams, the evolution of their ideas and corresponding clinical contexts. In a third section, their confluences and dissimilarities are dealt with, including clinical vignettes belonging to the authors to illustrate their interpretative modes of working. This is meant to show both an implicit theoretical-clinical complementarity and the fact that, though their routes bifurcate about the function of dreams, there remain connecting paths. Lastly, the final remarks review certain issues that have frequently been controversial between these lines of thought.

  20. The Critical Import of the Image: From Freud to Magritte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaetano Chiurazzi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the Interpretation of Dreams Freud asks how and if the dream, which is made of images, can express its connective structure, and in particular the negation. This can be made only by interpretation. This question represents the thread to examine the problem of the critical import of figurative arts, by comparing Adorno’s and Heidegger’s theories. According to Adorno, the artwork is mimesis: the capability to express negativity coincides with its autonegation, with its disappearing. For Heidegger, on the contrary, the artwork is first of all a work, and interpretation is the reconstruction of its genesis, or better, the understanding of it as temporal. In the last part of the text the problem of the relationship between negation and image is tackled discussing Magritte’s painting «Ceci n’est pas une pipe» : the structure of this painting (it is formed by images and words makes it a rebus (like the dream, according to Freud, the deciphering of which carries a conceptual and interpretative work. Only this interpretation can account for the negation that it, as image, could otherwise not express.