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Sample records for junctions immunostaining demonstrated

  1. Demonstrated Anomalous Pancreaticobiliary Ductal Junction

    OpenAIRE

    Koçkar, Cem; ?ENOL, Altu?; BA?TÜRK, Abdulkadir; AYDIN, Bünyamin; Cüre, Erkan

    2015-01-01

    Anomalies of the pancreaticobiliary junction are rare. Clinically anomalies of the pancreaticobiliary junction are uncommonly symptomatic but may present themselves with associated conditions ranging from benign acute abdominal pain to carcinomas. A 52 years old man was admitted to gastroenterology service with complaints of fever, nausea, vomiting and recurrent epigastric pain. He was diagnosed with biliary pancreatitis. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreato-graphy was performed. Papilla ...

  2. Demonstration of the Potential of Magnetic Tunnel Junctions for a Universal RAM Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, William J.

    2000-03-01

    Over the past four years, tunnel junctions with magnetic electrodes have emerged as promising devices for future magnetoresistive sensing and for information storage. This talk will review advances in these devices, focusing particularly on the use of magnetic tunnel junctions for magnetic random access memory (MRAM). Exchange-biased versions of magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) in particular will be shown to have useful properties for forming magnetic memory storage elements in a novel cross-point architecture. Exchange-biased MTJ elements have been made with areas as small as 0.1 square microns and have shown magnetoresistance values exceeding 40 The potential of exchange-biased MTJs for MRAM has been most seriously explored in a demonstration experiment involving the integration of 0.25 micron CMOS technology with a special magnetic tunnel junction "back end." The magnetic back end is based upon multi-layer magnetic tunnel junction growth technology which was developed using research-scale equipment and one-inch size substrates. For the demonstration, the CMOS wafers processed through two metal layers were cut into one-inch squares for depositions of bottom-pinned exchange-biased magnetic tunnel junctions. The samples were then processed through four additional lithographic levels to complete the circuits. The demonstration focused attention on a number of processing and device issues that were addressed successfully enough that key performance aspects of MTJ MRAM were demonstrated in 1 K bit arrays, including reads and writes in less than 10 ns and nonvolatility. While other key issues remain to be addressed, these results suggest that MTJ MRAM might simultaneously provide much of the functionality now provided separately by SRAM, DRAM, and NVRAM.

  3. Reticulin immunostaining revisited

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    Kara Melissa T Torres

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Reticulin staining has been suggested as an inexpensive tool in the differential diagnosis of melanoma versus benign nevi. In the present study, reticulin immunostaining patterns in malignant melanomas, benign intradermal nevi, and blue nevi were observed. The concordance in evaluation of the pattern between observers was also done. Materials and Methods: A retrospective search was performed in the computer database of the Ackerman Academy of Dermatopathology for “melanoma,” “melanocytic nevus,” and “blue nevus”. Fifty-six melanomas (30 of nodular subtype and 26 of superficial spreading subtype, 54 benign compound nevi, and 27 blue nevi were selected for the study. Patterns of reticulin staining in the dermis and the basement membrane in these melanocytic lesions were evaluated and the concordance between the two groups of authors was assessed. Statistical evaluation was performed with the Statistica® 10 program, Tulsa, OK. Concordance of the pattern evaluation was evaluated using Cohen's kappa coefficient. Results: Melanomas show a variable basement membrane pattern some of which show flat, thin and smooth pattern. Benign nevi almost never showed this flat pattern at the basement membrane zone. In the dermis, melanomas showed reticulin fibers surrounding groups of melanocytic cells while nevi predominantly had reticulin fibers around individual cells. There was greater agreement in evaluating the dermal component compared to the basement membrane pattern. Conclusion: The dermal reticulin staining pattern may be of some value in the diagnosis of melanocytic lesions, but poor concordance in evaluation of the basement membrane zone pattern limits its usefulness.

  4. Reticulin immunostaining revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Kara Melissa T.; Kazlouskaya, Viktoryia; Parikh, Kruti; Elston, Dirk M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Reticulin staining has been suggested as an inexpensive tool in the differential diagnosis of melanoma versus benign nevi. In the present study, reticulin immunostaining patterns in malignant melanomas, benign intradermal nevi, and blue nevi were observed. The concordance in evaluation of the pattern between observers was also done. Materials and Methods: A retrospective search was performed in the computer database of the Ackerman Academy of Dermatopathology for “melanoma,” “melanocytic nevus,” and “blue nevus”. Fifty-six melanomas (30 of nodular subtype and 26 of superficial spreading subtype), 54 benign compound nevi, and 27 blue nevi were selected for the study. Patterns of reticulin staining in the dermis and the basement membrane in these melanocytic lesions were evaluated and the concordance between the two groups of authors was assessed. Statistical evaluation was performed with the Statistica® 10 program, Tulsa, OK. Concordance of the pattern evaluation was evaluated using Cohen's kappa coefficient. Results: Melanomas show a variable basement membrane pattern some of which show flat, thin and smooth pattern. Benign nevi almost never showed this flat pattern at the basement membrane zone. In the dermis, melanomas showed reticulin fibers surrounding groups of melanocytic cells while nevi predominantly had reticulin fibers around individual cells. There was greater agreement in evaluating the dermal component compared to the basement membrane pattern. Conclusion: The dermal reticulin staining pattern may be of some value in the diagnosis of melanocytic lesions, but poor concordance in evaluation of the basement membrane zone pattern limits its usefulness. PMID:26955582

  5. Experimental demonstration of Aharonov-Casher interference in a Josephson junction circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pop, I. M.; Douçot, B.; Ioffe, L.; Protopopov, I.; Lecocq, F.; Matei, I.; Buisson, O.; Guichard, W.

    2012-03-01

    A neutral quantum particle with magnetic moment encircling a static electric charge acquires a quantum-mechanical phase (Aharonov-Casher effect). In superconducting electronics, the neutral particle becomes a fluxon that moves around superconducting islands connected by Josephson junctions. The full understanding of this effect in systems of many junctions is crucial for the design of novel quantum circuits. Here, we present measurements and quantitative analysis of fluxon interference patterns in a six Josephson junction chain. In this multijunction circuit, the fluxon can encircle any combination of charges on five superconducting islands, resulting in a complex pattern. We compare the experimental results with predictions of a simplified model that treats fluxons as independent excitations and with the results of the full diagonalization of the quantum problem. Our results demonstrate the accuracy of the fluxon interference description and the quantum coherence of these arrays.

  6. Experimental demonstration of single electron transistors featuring SiO{sub 2} plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition in Ni-SiO{sub 2}-Ni tunnel junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karbasian, Golnaz, E-mail: Golnaz.Karbasian.1@nd.edu; McConnell, Michael S.; Orlov, Alexei O.; Rouvimov, Sergei; Snider, Gregory L. [Electrical Engineering Department, University of Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    The authors report the use of plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) to fabricate single-electron transistors (SETs) featuring ultrathin (≈1 nm) tunnel-transparent SiO{sub 2} in Ni-SiO{sub 2}-Ni tunnel junctions. They show that, as a result of the O{sub 2} plasma steps in PEALD of SiO{sub 2}, the top surface of the underlying Ni electrode is oxidized. Additionally, the bottom surface of the upper Ni layer is also oxidized where it is in contact with the deposited SiO{sub 2}, most likely as a result of oxygen-containing species on the surface of the SiO{sub 2}. Due to the presence of these surface parasitic layers of NiO, which exhibit features typical of thermally activated transport, the resistance of Ni-SiO{sub 2}-Ni tunnel junctions is drastically increased. Moreover, the transport mechanism is changed from quantum tunneling through the dielectric barrier to one consistent with thermally activated resistors in series with tunnel junctions. The reduction of NiO to Ni is therefore required to restore the metal-insulator-metal (MIM) structure of the junctions. Rapid thermal annealing in a forming gas ambient at elevated temperatures is presented as a technique to reduce both parasitic oxide layers. This method is of great interest for devices that rely on MIM tunnel junctions with ultrathin barriers. Using this technique, the authors successfully fabricated MIM SETs with minimal trace of parasitic NiO component. They demonstrate that the properties of the tunnel barrier in nanoscale tunnel junctions (with <10{sup −15} m{sup 2} in area) can be evaluated by electrical characterization of SETs.

  7. Reversible Opening of Intercellular Junctions of Intestinal Epithelial and Brain Endothelial Cells With Tight Junction Modulator Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocsik, Alexandra; Walter, Fruzsina R; Gyebrovszki, Andrea; Fülöp, Lívia; Blasig, Ingolf; Dabrowski, Sebastian; Ötvös, Ferenc; Tóth, András; Rákhely, Gábor; Veszelka, Szilvia; Vastag, Monika; Szabó-Révész, Piroska; Deli, Mária A

    2016-02-01

    The intercellular junctions restrict the free passage of hydrophilic compounds through the paracellular clefts. Reversible opening of the tight junctions of biological barriers is investigated as one of the ways to increase drug delivery to the systemic circulation or the central nervous system. Six peptides, ADT-6, HAV-6, C-CPE, 7-mer (FDFWITP, PN-78), AT-1002, and PN-159, acting on different integral membrane and linker junctional proteins were tested on Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cell line and a coculture model of the blood-brain barrier. All peptides tested in nontoxic concentrations showed a reversible tight junctions modulating effect and were effective to open the paracellular pathway for the marker molecules fluorescein and albumin. The change in the structure of cell-cell junctions was verified by immunostaining for occludin, claudin-4,-5, ZO-1, β-catenin, and E-cadherin. Expression levels of occludin and claudins were measured in both models. We could demonstrate a selectivity of C-CPE, ADT-6, and HAV-6 peptides for epithelial cells and 7-mer and AT-1002 peptides for brain endothelial cells. PN-159 was the most effective modulator of junctional permeability in both models possibly acting via claudin-1 and -5. Our results indicate that these peptides can be effectively and selectively used as potential pharmaceutical excipients to improve drug delivery across biological barriers.

  8. Connexin43 mutation causes heterogeneous gap junction loss and sudden infant death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Norstrand, David W; Asimaki, Angeliki; Rubinos, Clio; Dolmatova, Elena; Srinivas, Miduturu; Tester, David J; Saffitz, Jeffrey E; Duffy, Heather S; Ackerman, Michael J

    2012-01-24

    An estimated 10% to 15% of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) cases may stem from channelopathy-mediated lethal arrhythmias. Loss of the GJA1-encoded gap junction channel protein connexin43 is known to underlie formation of lethal arrhythmias. GJA1 mutations have been associated with cardiac diseases, including atrial fibrillation. Therefore, GJA1 is a plausible candidate gene for premature sudden death. GJA1 open reading frame mutational analysis was performed with polymerase chain reaction, denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography, and direct DNA sequencing on DNA from 292 SIDS cases. Immunofluorescence and dual whole-cell patch-clamp studies were performed to determine the functionality of mutant gap junctions. Immunostaining for gap junction proteins was performed on SIDS-associated paraffin-embedded cardiac tissue. Two rare, novel missense mutations, E42K and S272P, were detected in 2 of 292 SIDS cases, a 2-month-old white boy and a 3-month-old white girl, respectively. Analysis of the E42K victim's parental DNA demonstrated a de novo mutation. Both mutations involved highly conserved residues and were absent in >1000 ethnically matched reference alleles. Immunofluorescence demonstrated no trafficking abnormalities for either mutation, and S272P demonstrated wild-type junctional conductance. However, junctional conductance measurements for the E42K mutation demonstrated a loss of function not rescued by wild type. Moreover, the E42K victim's cardiac tissue demonstrated a mosaic immunostaining pattern for connexin43 protein. This study provides the first molecular and functional evidence implicating a GJA1 mutation as a novel pathogenic substrate for SIDS. E42K-connexin43 demonstrated a trafficking-independent reduction in junctional coupling in vitro and a mosaic pattern of mutational DNA distribution in deceased cardiac tissue, suggesting a novel mechanism of connexin43-associated sudden death.

  9. Gap Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Morten Schak; Axelsen, Lene Nygaard; Sorgen, Paul L.; Verma, Vandana; Delmar, Mario; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Gap junctions are essential to the function of multicellular animals, which require a high degree of coordination between cells. In vertebrates, gap junctions comprise connexins and currently 21 connexins are known in humans. The functions of gap junctions are highly diverse and include exchange of metabolites and electrical signals between cells, as well as functions, which are apparently unrelated to intercellular communication. Given the diversity of gap junction physiology, regulation of gap junction activity is complex. The structure of the various connexins is known to some extent; and structural rearrangements and intramolecular interactions are important for regulation of channel function. Intercellular coupling is further regulated by the number and activity of channels present in gap junctional plaques. The number of connexins in cell-cell channels is regulated by controlling transcription, translation, trafficking, and degradation; and all of these processes are under strict control. Once in the membrane, channel activity is determined by the conductive properties of the connexin involved, which can be regulated by voltage and chemical gating, as well as a large number of posttranslational modifications. The aim of the present article is to review our current knowledge on the structure, regulation, function, and pharmacology of gap junctions. This will be supported by examples of how different connexins and their regulation act in concert to achieve appropriate physiological control, and how disturbances of connexin function can lead to disease. © 2012 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 2:1981-2035, 2012. PMID:23723031

  10. Gap junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Morten Schak; Axelsen, Lene Nygaard; Sorgen, Paul L; Verma, Vandana; Delmar, Mario; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2012-07-01

    Gap junctions are essential to the function of multicellular animals, which require a high degree of coordination between cells. In vertebrates, gap junctions comprise connexins and currently 21 connexins are known in humans. The functions of gap junctions are highly diverse and include exchange of metabolites and electrical signals between cells, as well as functions, which are apparently unrelated to intercellular communication. Given the diversity of gap junction physiology, regulation of gap junction activity is complex. The structure of the various connexins is known to some extent; and structural rearrangements and intramolecular interactions are important for regulation of channel function. Intercellular coupling is further regulated by the number and activity of channels present in gap junctional plaques. The number of connexins in cell-cell channels is regulated by controlling transcription, translation, trafficking, and degradation; and all of these processes are under strict control. Once in the membrane, channel activity is determined by the conductive properties of the connexin involved, which can be regulated by voltage and chemical gating, as well as a large number of posttranslational modifications. The aim of the present article is to review our current knowledge on the structure, regulation, function, and pharmacology of gap junctions. This will be supported by examples of how different connexins and their regulation act in concert to achieve appropriate physiological control, and how disturbances of connexin function can lead to disease. © 2012 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 2:1853-1872, 2012.

  11. A Microfluidic Immunostaining System Enables Quality Assured and Standardized Immunohistochemical Biomarker Analysis

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    Kwon, Seyong; Cho, Chang Hyun; Kwon, Youngmee; Lee, Eun Sook; Park, Je-Kyun

    2017-04-01

    Immunohistochemistry (IHC) plays an important role in biomarker-driven cancer therapy. Although there has been a high demand for standardized and quality assured IHC, it has rarely been achieved due to the complexity of IHC testing and the subjective validation-based process flow of IHC quality control. We present here a microfluidic immunostaining system for the standardization of IHC by creating a microfluidic linearly graded antibody (Ab)-staining device and a reference cell microarray. Unlike conventional efforts, our system deals primarily with the screening of biomarker staining conditions for quantitative quality assurance testing in IHC. We characterized the microfluidic matching of Ab staining intensity using three HER2 Abs produced by different manufacturers. The quality of HER2 Ab was also validated using tissues of breast cancer patients, demonstrating that our system is an efficient and powerful tool for the standardization and quality assurance of IHC.

  12. A Microfluidic Immunostaining System Enables Quality Assured and Standardized Immunohistochemical Biomarker Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Seyong; Cho, Chang Hyun; Kwon, Youngmee; Lee, Eun Sook; Park, Je-Kyun

    2017-01-01

    Immunohistochemistry (IHC) plays an important role in biomarker-driven cancer therapy. Although there has been a high demand for standardized and quality assured IHC, it has rarely been achieved due to the complexity of IHC testing and the subjective validation-based process flow of IHC quality control. We present here a microfluidic immunostaining system for the standardization of IHC by creating a microfluidic linearly graded antibody (Ab)-staining device and a reference cell microarray. Unlike conventional efforts, our system deals primarily with the screening of biomarker staining conditions for quantitative quality assurance testing in IHC. We characterized the microfluidic matching of Ab staining intensity using three HER2 Abs produced by different manufacturers. The quality of HER2 Ab was also validated using tissues of breast cancer patients, demonstrating that our system is an efficient and powerful tool for the standardization and quality assurance of IHC. PMID:28378835

  13. Demonstration of a III-nitride vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser with a III-nitride tunnel junction intracavity contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, J. T.; Young, E. C.; Yonkee, B. P.; Cohen, D. A.; Margalith, T.; DenBaars, S. P.; Speck, J. S.; Nakamura, S.

    2015-08-01

    We report on a III-nitride vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) with a III-nitride tunnel junction (TJ) intracavity contact. The violet nonpolar VCSEL employing the TJ is compared to an equivalent VCSEL with a tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) intracavity contact. The TJ VCSEL shows a threshold current density (Jth) of ˜3.5 kA/cm2, compared to the ITO VCSEL Jth of 8 kA/cm2. The differential efficiency of the TJ VCSEL is also observed to be significantly higher than that of the ITO VCSEL, reaching a peak power of ˜550 μW, compared to ˜80 μW for the ITO VCSEL. Both VCSELs display filamentary lasing in the current aperture, which we believe to be predominantly a result of local variations in contact resistance, which may induce local variations in refractive index and free carrier absorption. Beyond the analyses of the lasing characteristics, we discuss the molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) regrowth of the TJ, as well as its unexpected performance based on band-diagram simulations. Furthermore, we investigate the intrinsic advantages of using a TJ intracavity contact in a VCSEL using a 1D mode profile analysis to approximate the threshold modal gain and general loss contributions in the TJ and ITO VCSEL.

  14. Demonstration of a III-nitride vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser with a III-nitride tunnel junction intracavity contact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard, J. T., E-mail: jtleona01@gmail.com; Young, E. C.; Yonkee, B. P.; Cohen, D. A.; Margalith, T.; Speck, J. S. [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); DenBaars, S. P.; Nakamura, S. [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2015-08-31

    We report on a III-nitride vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) with a III-nitride tunnel junction (TJ) intracavity contact. The violet nonpolar VCSEL employing the TJ is compared to an equivalent VCSEL with a tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) intracavity contact. The TJ VCSEL shows a threshold current density (J{sub th}) of ∼3.5 kA/cm{sup 2}, compared to the ITO VCSEL J{sub th} of 8 kA/cm{sup 2}. The differential efficiency of the TJ VCSEL is also observed to be significantly higher than that of the ITO VCSEL, reaching a peak power of ∼550 μW, compared to ∼80 μW for the ITO VCSEL. Both VCSELs display filamentary lasing in the current aperture, which we believe to be predominantly a result of local variations in contact resistance, which may induce local variations in refractive index and free carrier absorption. Beyond the analyses of the lasing characteristics, we discuss the molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) regrowth of the TJ, as well as its unexpected performance based on band-diagram simulations. Furthermore, we investigate the intrinsic advantages of using a TJ intracavity contact in a VCSEL using a 1D mode profile analysis to approximate the threshold modal gain and general loss contributions in the TJ and ITO VCSEL.

  15. In situ protein expression in tumour spheres: development of an immunostaining protocol for confocal microscopy

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    Saubaméa Bruno

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multicellular tumour sphere models have been shown to closely mimic phenotype characteristics of in vivo solid tumours, or to allow in vitro propagation of cancer stem cells (CSCs. CSCs are usually characterized by the expression of specific membrane markers using flow cytometry (FC after enzymatic dissociation. Consequently, the spatial location of positive cells within spheres is not documented. Confocal microscopy is the best technique for the imaging of thick biological specimens after multi-labelling but suffers from poor antibody penetration. Thus, we describe here a new protocol for in situ confocal imaging of protein expression in intact spheroids. Methods Protein expression in whole spheroids (150 μm in diameter from two human colon cancer cell lines, HT29 and CT320X6, has been investigated with confocal immunostaining, then compared with profiles obtained through paraffin immunohistochemistry (pIHC and FC. Target antigens, relevant for colon cancer and with different expression patterns, have been studied. Results We first demonstrate that our procedure overcomes the well-known problem of antibody penetration in compact structures by performing immunostaining of EpCAM, a membrane protein expressed by all cells within our spheroids. EpCAM expression is detected in all cells, even the deepest ones. Likewise, antibody access is confirmed with CK20 and CD44 immunostaining. Confocal imaging shows that 100% of cells express β-catenin, mainly present in the plasma membrane with also cytoplasmic and nuclear staining, in agreement with FC and pIHC data. pIHC and confocal imaging show similar CA 19-9 cytoplasmic and membranar expression profile in a cell subpopulation. CA 19-9+ cell count confirms confocal imaging as a highly sensitive method (75%, 62% and 51%, for FC, confocal imaging and pIHC, respectively. Finally, confocal imaging reveals that the weak expression of CD133, a putative colon CSC marker, is restricted to

  16. One for all--a highly efficient and versatile method for fluorescent immunostaining in fish embryos.

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    Daigo Inoue

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: For the detection and sub-cellular (co-localization of proteins in the context of the tissue or organism immunostaining in whole mount preparations or on sections is still the best approach. So far, each antibody required its own fixation and antigen retrieval protocol so that optimizing immunostaining turned out to be tedious and time consuming. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: Here we present a novel method to efficiently retrieve the antigen in a widely applicable standard protocol, facilitating fluorescent immunostaining of both cryosections and whole mount preparations in zebrafish (Danio rerio and medaka (Oryzias latipes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our method overcomes the loss of sections and damage of tissue and cell morphology, and allows parallel immunostaining in multiple colors, co-immunostaining with fluorescent proteins in transgenic fish lines and in combination with whole mount in situ hybridization.

  17. Evaluation of grading and hormone receptor immunostaining on fine needle aspirates in carcinoma breast

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    Uma Handa

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: The grading along with ER and PR immunostaining of breast carcinoma on smears is advocated because of high concordance between cytology and histology. This allows the patient to be treated with hormonal therapy on the basis of FNAC alone.

  18. Immunostaining for SYT protein discriminates synovial sarcoma from other soft tissue tumors: analysis of 146 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Rui; Patel, Rajiv M; Alkan, Serhan; Hammadeh, Rasheed; Weiss, Sharon W; Goldblum, John R; Venkataraman, Girish; Baila, Horea

    2007-05-01

    Synovial sarcoma in its classic biphasic form can be distinguished readily from other soft tissue lesions; however, monophasic and poorly differentiated forms are diagnostically more problematic. For this reason, we assessed the efficacy of immunostaining for SYT and SSX1 proteins, the gene products resulting from unique synovial sarcoma translocation, to distinguish synovial sarcoma from other soft tissue lesions. A total number of 146 cases were analyzed, including 47 synovial sarcoma cases (all of which were verified by FISH to have t(X; 18) translocation and SYT-SSX fusion gene) and 99 soft tissue tumors of various types. A polyclonal IgG antibody against SYT was used to stain formalin-fixed paraffin embedded tissues. Forty-one out of 47 (87%) synovial sarcoma displayed strong positive nuclear staining (ranging from 80 to 90% of the tumor cells) for SYT antibody. Nineteen of 99 (19%) non-synovial sarcoma cases showed variable nuclear and cytoplasmic staining with SYT, which ranged from 20 to 60% of tumor nuclei, and included malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (5/25), solitary fibrous tumor (2/14), Ewing sarcoma (2/6), low grade fibromyxoid tumor (2/4), extraskeletal mesenchymal chondrosarcoma (2/6), gastrointestinal tumor (4/17), epithelioid sarcoma (2/2). The remaining non-synovial sarcomas were negative. This is the first study demonstrating SYT protein expression in tissue sections of synovial sarcoma. This method could provide an easy, rapid and widely applicable means of assisting in the diagnosis of synovial sarcoma, particularly when material and/or resources are unavailable for PCR or FISH-based testing. However, as variable weak staining for SYT may be encountered in a small percentage of non-synovial sarcoma sarcomas, a positive interpretation should be made only when the staining is strong, nuclear and present in the majority of cells.

  19. Comparison of Different Double Immunostaining Protocols for Paraffin Embedded Liver Tissue

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    Alexander Schütz

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Most of the double immunostaining protocols that have been introduced so far have been developed for application on fresh frozen material or based on different species antibodies. In liver tissue, general problems of double immunostaining techniques are further complicated by tissue‐specific difficulties, such as necrosis or high intracellular protein content. To assess a reliable double immunostaining protocol for archived, paraffin embedded liver tissue, different protocols based on the use of same species primary antibodies were evaluated in terms of sensitivity, specificity and non‐specific background staining in pathological liver specimens. We compared peroxidase–anti‐peroxidase, alkaline phosphatase–anti‐alkaline phosphatase (PAP/APAP, labelled‐avidin–biotin (LAB/LAB and digoxigenin–anti‐digoxigenin (dig–a‐dig/PAP techniques using different cytokeratin antibodies and an antibody against PCNA. Comparison of the double immunostaining techniques revealed a high sensitivity and specificity in all procedures. Sections, which were stained employing PAP/APAP‐technique, displayed a higher background staining compared to sections which were treated with the LAB/LAB or dig–a‐dig/PAP protocol. In contrast to the dig–a‐dig/PAP protocol, the LAB/LAB technique provides a better time/cost relationship. Therefore, we would like to recommend a modified LAB/LAB protocol for simultaneous detection of different antigens in archived liver tissue.

  20. Molecular junctions: can pulling influence optical controllability?

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    Parker, Shane M; Smeu, Manuel; Franco, Ignacio; Ratner, Mark A; Seideman, Tamar

    2014-08-13

    We suggest the combination of single molecule pulling and optical control as a way to enhance control over the electron transport characteristics of a molecular junction. We demonstrate using a model junction consisting of biphenyl-dithiol coupled to gold contacts. The junction is pulled while optically manipulating the dihedral angle between the two rings. Quantum dynamics simulations show that molecular pulling enhances the degree of control over the dihedral angle and hence over the transport properties.

  1. Created-by-current states in long Josephson junctions

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    Boyadjiev, T. L.; Andreeva, O. Yu.; Semerdjieva, E. G.; Shukrinov, Yu. M.

    2008-08-01

    Critical curves "critical current-external magnetic field" of long Josephson junctions with inhomogeneity and variable width are studied. We demonstrate the existence of regions of magnetic field where some fluxon states are stable only if the external current through the junction is different from zero. Position and size of such regions depend on the length of the junction, its geometry, parameters of inhomogeneity and form of the junction. The noncentral (left and right) pure fluxon states appear in the inhomogeneous Josephson junction with the increase in the junction length. We demonstrate new bifurcation points with change in width of the inhomogeneity and amplitude of the Josephson current through the inhomogeneity.

  2. Solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm of the pancreas: A classical presentation with unique paranuclear dot like immunostaining with CD 99.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair Anila, Kunjulekshmi Amma Raveendran; Nayak, Nileena; Muralee, Madhu; Venugopal, Bhaskaran Pillai; Mony, Rari P

    2015-01-01

    A 32-year-old lady presented with a history of abdominal pain and upper abdominal discomfort of 3 months duration. Her imaging studies done at a local hospital showed a solid-cystic mass involving head of the pancreas. The patient was referred to our surgical oncology department. On examination, there was a nontender mass in the epigastrium. An ultrasound scan guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA) was done which was showing classical features of solid-pseudo papillary neoplasm of the pancreas. With this preoperative diagnosis patient was taken up for surgery. Per operatively, there was a solid-cystic mass in the head of the pancreas. Pancreaticoduodenectomy was done. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry (IHC) confirmed the diagnosis of solid-pseudo papillary neoplasm of the pancreas. Apart from the routine IHC panel, CD 99 immunostain was also done which demonstrated the characteristic paranuclear dot-like staining observed in previous studies in the literature.

  3. Josephson junctions with ferromagnetic interlayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wild, Georg Hermann

    2012-03-04

    We report on the fabrication of superconductor/insulator/ferromagnetic metal/superconductor (Nb/AlO{sub x}/Pd{sub 0.82}Ni{sub 0.18}/Nb) Josephson junctions (SIFS JJs) with high critical current densities, large normal resistance times area products, and high quality factors. For these junctions, a transition from 0- to {pi}-coupling is observed for a thickness d{sub F}=6 nm of the ferromagnetic Pd{sub 0.82}Ni{sub 0.18} interlayer. The magnetic field dependence of the critical current of the junctions demonstrates good spatial homogeneity of the tunneling barrier and ferromagnetic interlayer. Magnetic characterization shows that the Pd{sub 0.82}Ni{sub 0.18} has an out-of-plane anisotropy and large saturation magnetization indicating negligible dead layers at the interfaces. A careful analysis of Fiske modes up to about 400 GHz provides valuable information on the junction quality factor and the relevant damping mechanisms. Whereas losses due to quasiparticle tunneling dominate at low frequencies, at high frequencies the damping is explained by the finite surface resistance of the junction electrodes. High quality factors of up to 30 around 200 GHz have been achieved. They allow to study the junction dynamics, in particular the switching probability from the zero-voltage into the voltage state with and without microwave irradiation. The experiments with microwave irradiation are well explained within semi-classical models and numerical simulations. In contrast, at mK temperature the switching dynamics without applied microwaves clearly shows secondary quantum effects. Here, we could observe for the first time macroscopic quantum tunneling in Josephson junctions with a ferromagnetic interlayer. This observation excludes fluctuations of the critical current as a consequence of an unstable magnetic domain structure of the ferromagnetic interlayer and affirms the suitability of SIFS Josephson junctions for quantum information processing.

  4. Chaos induced by coupling between Josephson junctions

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    Shukrinov, Yu. M.; Azemtsa-Donfack, H.; Botha, A. E.

    2015-02-01

    It is found that, in a stack of intrinsic Josephson junctions in layered high temperature superconductors under external electromagnetic radiation, the chaotic features are triggered by interjunction coupling, i.e., the coupling between different junctions in the stack. While the radiation is well known to produce chaotic effects in the single junction, the effect of interjunction coupling is fundamentally different and it can lead to the onset of chaos via a different route to that of the single junction. A precise numerical study of the phase dynamics of intrinsic Josephson junctions, as described by the CCJJ+DC model, is performed. We demonstrate the charging of superconducting layers, in a bias current interval corresponding to a Shapiro step subharmonic, due to the creation of a longitudinal plasma wave along the stack of junctions. With increase in radiation amplitude chaotic behavior sets in. The chaotic features of the coupled Josephson junctions are analyzed by calculations of the Lyapunov exponents. We compare results for a stack of junctions to the case of a single junction and prove that the observed chaos is induced by the coupling between the junctions. The use of Shapiro step subharmonics may allow longitudinal plasma waves to be excited at low radiation power.

  5. Marker of cemento-periodontal ligament junction associated with periodontal regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Ryohko; Wato, Masahiro; Tanaka, Akio

    2005-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify factors promoting formation of the cemento-periodontal ligament junction. Regeneration of the cemento-periodontal ligament junction is an important factor in recovery of the connective tissue attachment to the cementum and it is important to identify all specific substances that promote its formation. To clarify the substances involved in cemento-periodontal ligament junction formation, we produced a monoclonal antibody (mAb) to human cemento-periodontal ligament junction (designated as the anti-TAP mAb) and examined its immunostaining properties and reactive antigen. Hybridomas producing monoclonal antibody against human cemento-periodontal ligament junction antigens were established by fusing P3U1 mouse myeloma cells with spleen cells from BALB/c mice immunized with homogenized human cemento-periodontal ligament junction. The mAb, the anti-TAP mAb for cemento-periodontal ligament junction, was then isolated. The immunoglobulin class and light chain of the mAb were examined using an isotyping kit. Before immunostaining, antigen determination using an enzymatic method or heating was conducted. Human teeth, hard tissue-forming lesions, and animal tissues were immunostained by the anti-TAP mAb. The anti-TAP mAb was positive in human cemento-periodontal ligament junction and predentin but negative in all other human and animal tissues examined. In the cemento-osseous lesions, the anti-TAP mAb was positive in the peripheral area of the cementum and cementum-like hard tissues and not in the bone and bone-like tissues. The anti-TAP mAb showed IgM (kappa) and recognized phosphoprotein. The anti-TAP mAb is potentially useful for developing new agents promoting cementogenesis and periodontal regeneration.

  6. IgG4 immunostaining and its implications in orbital inflammatory disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda J Wong

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: IgG4-related disease is an emerging clinical entity which frequently involves tissue within the orbit. In order to appreciate the implications of IgG4 immunostaining, we analyzed gene expression and the prevalence of IgG4- immunostaining among subjects with orbital inflammatory diseases. METHODS: We organized an international consortium to collect orbital biopsies from 108 subjects including 22 with no known orbital disease, 42 with nonspecific orbital inflammatory disease (NSOI, 26 with thyroid eye disease (TED, 12 with sarcoidosis, and 6 with granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA. Lacrimal gland and orbital adipose tissue biopsies were immunostained for IgG4 or IgG secreting plasma cells. RNA transcripts were quantified by Affymetrix arrays. RESULTS: None of the healthy controls or subjects with TED had substantial IgG4 staining. Among the 63 others, the prevalence of significant IgG4-immunostaining ranged from 11 to 39% depending on the definition for significant. IgG4 staining was detectable in the majority of tissues from subjects with GPA and less commonly in tissue from subjects with sarcoidosis or NSOI. The detection of IgG4+ cells correlated with inflammation in the lacrimal gland based on histology. IgG4 staining tissue expressed an increase in transcripts associated with inflammation, especially B cell-related genes. Functional annotation analysis confirmed this. CONCLUSION: IgG4+ plasma cells are common in orbital tissue from patients with sarcoidosis, GPA, or NSOI. Even using the low threshold of 10 IgG4+ cells/high powered field, IgG4 staining correlates with increased inflammation in the lacrimal gland based on histology and gene expression.

  7. Routine dual-color immunostaining with a 3-antibody cocktail improves the detection of small cancers in prostate needle biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolonen, Teemu T; Kujala, Paula M; Laurila, Marita; Tirkkonen, Mika; Ilvesaro, Joanna; Tuominen, Vilppu J; Tammela, Teuvo L J; Isola, Jorma

    2011-11-01

    We performed dual-color immunostaining with a 3-antibody cocktail (α-methylacyl coenzyme-A racemase, CK34betaE12, and p63) on prostate biopsies from 200 patients. Current practice (hematoxylin and eosin staining followed by dual-color immunostaining on selected cases) was compared with a protocol in which routine dual-color immunostaining was provided in all cases. In the original pathology reports, adenocarcinoma was diagnosed in 87/200 (43%) patients. Small foci interpreted as putative cancers were detected with dual-color immunostaining in 14/113 patients who were originally diagnosed with a nonmalignant lesion. All of the suggested cancerous foci were independently reevaluated by 5 pathologists. A diagnosis of adenocarcinoma was assessed by consensus in 8 cases, and atypical small acinar proliferation was diagnosed in 1 case. Consensus was not reached in 5 cases. Six of the foci reclassified as cancer were of Gleason score 3 + 3 = 6, while 2 were graded as Gleason score 4 + 4 = 8. The feasibility of routine dual-color immunostaining was also tested by analyzing the time spent on microscopic assessment. Because small, atypical lesions expressing α-methylacyl coenzyme-A racemase (blue chromogen) were easy to detect using dual-color immunostaining, the microscopic analysis of dual-color immunostaining and hematoxylin-eosin staining was faster than that of hematoxylin-eosin staining alone that was later followed by dual-color immunostaining in selected cases (median 251 seconds versus 299 seconds, P < .0001). We concluded that routine dual-color immunostaining of all prostate biopsies would produce better diagnostic sensitivity with a smaller microscopy workload for the pathologist. However, minute foci interpreted as cancer with dual-color immunostaining need to be confirmed with hematoxylin-eosin staining, and minimal criteria for a definitive diagnosis of cancer are still lacking. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Photoperiod and testosterone regulate androgen receptor immunostaining in the Siberian hamster brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittman, Eric L; Ehrlich, David A; Ogdahl, Justyne L; Jetton, Amy E

    2003-09-01

    Day length regulates the effects of gonadal steroids on gonadotropin secretion and behavior in seasonal breeders. To determine whether this influence of photoperiod results from changes in androgen receptor expression in Siberian hamster brain regions that regulate neuroendocrine function, androgen receptor immunostaining was examined in castrated animals given either no androgen replacement or one of three doses of testosterone (T) resulting in physiological serum concentrations. Half of the animals were housed under inhibitory photoperiod conditions, and immunostaining was quantified 11 days later. Measurement of serum gonadotropin and prolactin concentrations confirmed that androgen exerted graded effects on pituitary function but that the animals were killed before photoperiodic influences had fully developed. T significantly increased the numbers of androgen receptor-immunoreactive cells in every brain region examined. Photoperiod exerted no significant influence on androgen receptor-immunoreactive cell number in the arcuate nucleus, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST), medial preoptic nucleus, or in medial amygdala. An interaction between T and photoperiod was observed in the BNST and in the rostral and middle portions of the arcuate nucleus. Although increasing concentrations of T resulted in more intense cellular immunostaining in the BNST and arcuate, this effect was not influenced by day length. These results indicate that relatively short-duration (11 days) exposure to inhibitory photoperiod triggers localized and regionally specific changes in androgen receptor expression.

  9. Pretreatment methods to improve nerve immunostaining in corneas from long-term fixed embryonic quail eyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, J. E.; Wells, D. C.; Conrad, G. W.

    1999-01-01

    Pretreatment methods were used to improve neurofilament immunostaining in corneas from embryonic day 16 Japanese quail corneas that had been stored in fixative solution for several months. A sequential combination of the following three pretreatments: brief microwave heating in saline, followed by extraction with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) at 37 degrees C, followed by digestion with hyaluronidase at 37 degrees C, produced significantly increased antibody staining of corneal neurofilament proteins, compared with embryonic corneas subjected to no prior pretreatments or to single or two-step protocols. After applying the sequence of all three pretreatments, darkest nerve staining and increased numbers of fine branches were observed, together with lower background staining. Thus, the result of applying the three-step pretreatment sequence is better than that of applying any of its component single pretreatments or even combinations of any two of them. These findings therefore suggest that each of these three pretreatments causes a unique effect, beneficial to immunostaining of neurofilament proteins, and that their individual effects are independent and additive. In addition to embryonic corneas, the three-step procedure also may be useful for immunostaining of nerves in other very delicate, highly-hydrated tissues containing an abundance of extracellular matrix.

  10. Common features of a vortex structure in long exponentially shaped Josephson junctions and Josephson junctions with inhomogeneities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyadjiev, T. L.; Semerdjieva, E. G.; Shukrinov, Yu. M.

    2007-09-01

    We study the vortex structure in three different models of the long Josephson junction: the exponentially shaped Josephson junction and the Josephson junctions with the resistor and the shunt inhomogeneities in the barrier layer. For these three models the critical curves “critical current-magnetic field” are numerically constructed. We develop the idea of the equivalence of the exponentially shaped Josephson junction and the rectangular junction with the distributed inhomogeneity and demonstrate that at some parameters of the shunt and the resistor inhomogeneities in the ends of the junction the corresponding critical curves are very close to the exponentially shaped one.

  11. Common features of a vortex structure in long exponentially shaped Josephson junctions and Josephson junctions with inhomogeneities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyadjiev, T.L. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Semerdjieva, E.G. [Plovdiv University, 24 Tzar Asen Str., Plovdiv 4000 (Bulgaria); Shukrinov, Yu.M. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation)], E-mail: shukrinv@theor.jinr.ru

    2007-09-01

    We study the vortex structure in three different models of the long Josephson junction: the exponentially shaped Josephson junction and the Josephson junctions with the resistor and the shunt inhomogeneities in the barrier layer. For these three models the critical curves 'critical current-magnetic field' are numerically constructed. We develop the idea of the equivalence of the exponentially shaped Josephson junction and the rectangular junction with the distributed inhomogeneity and demonstrate that at some parameters of the shunt and the resistor inhomogeneities in the ends of the junction the corresponding critical curves are very close to the exponentially shaped one.

  12. Molecular electronic junction transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solomon, Gemma C.; Herrmann, Carmen; Ratner, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Whenasinglemolecule,oracollectionofmolecules,isplacedbetween two electrodes and voltage is applied, one has a molecular transport junction. We discuss such junctions, their properties, their description, and some of their applications. The discussion is qualitative rather than quantitative, and f...

  13. Coordinate transformation in the model of long Josephson junctions: geometrically equivalent Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semerdzhieva, E. G.; Boyadzhiev, T. L.; Shukrinov, Yu. M.

    2005-10-01

    The transition from the model of a long Josephson junction of variable width to the model of a junction with a coordinate-dependent Josephson current amplitude is effected through a coordinate transformation. This establishes the correspondence between the classes of Josephson junctions of variable width and quasi-one-dimensional junctions with a variable thickness of the barrier layer. It is shown that for a junction of exponentially varying width the barrier layer of the equivalent quasi-one-dimensional junction has a distributed resistive inhomogeneity that acts as an attractor for magnetic flux vortices. The curve of the critical current versus magnetic field for a Josephson junction with a resistive microinhomogeneity is constructed with the aid of a numerical simulation, and a comparison is made with the critical curve of a junction of exponentially varying width. The possibility of replacing a distributed inhomogeneity in a Josephson junction by a local inhomogeneity at the end of the junction is thereby demonstrated; this can have certain advantages from a technological point of view.

  14. Junctional adhesion molecule (JAM-C deficient C57BL/6 mice develop a severe hydrocephalus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena Wyss

    Full Text Available The junctional adhesion molecule (JAM-C is a widely expressed adhesion molecule regulating cell adhesion, cell polarity and inflammation. JAM-C expression and function in the central nervous system (CNS has been poorly characterized to date. Here we show that JAM-C(-/- mice backcrossed onto the C57BL/6 genetic background developed a severe hydrocephalus. An in depth immunohistochemical study revealed specific immunostaining for JAM-C in vascular endothelial cells in the CNS parenchyma, the meninges and in the choroid plexus of healthy C57BL/6 mice. Additional JAM-C immunostaining was detected on ependymal cells lining the ventricles and on choroid plexus epithelial cells. Despite the presence of hemorrhages in the brains of JAM-C(-/- mice, our study demonstrates that development of the hydrocephalus was not due to a vascular function of JAM-C as endothelial re-expression of JAM-C failed to rescue the hydrocephalus phenotype of JAM-C(-/- C57BL/6 mice. Evaluation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF circulation within the ventricular system of JAM-C(-/- mice excluded occlusion of the cerebral aqueduct as the cause of hydrocephalus development but showed the acquisition of a block or reduction of CSF drainage from the lateral to the 3(rd ventricle in JAM-C(-/- C57BL/6 mice. Taken together, our study suggests that JAM-C(-/- C57BL/6 mice model the important role for JAM-C in brain development and CSF homeostasis as recently observed in humans with a loss-of-function mutation in JAM-C.

  15. Junctional adhesion molecule (JAM)-C deficient C57BL/6 mice develop a severe hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyss, Lena; Schäfer, Julia; Liebner, Stefan; Mittelbronn, Michel; Deutsch, Urban; Enzmann, Gaby; Adams, Ralf H; Aurrand-Lions, Michel; Plate, Karl H; Imhof, Beat A; Engelhardt, Britta

    2012-01-01

    The junctional adhesion molecule (JAM)-C is a widely expressed adhesion molecule regulating cell adhesion, cell polarity and inflammation. JAM-C expression and function in the central nervous system (CNS) has been poorly characterized to date. Here we show that JAM-C(-/-) mice backcrossed onto the C57BL/6 genetic background developed a severe hydrocephalus. An in depth immunohistochemical study revealed specific immunostaining for JAM-C in vascular endothelial cells in the CNS parenchyma, the meninges and in the choroid plexus of healthy C57BL/6 mice. Additional JAM-C immunostaining was detected on ependymal cells lining the ventricles and on choroid plexus epithelial cells. Despite the presence of hemorrhages in the brains of JAM-C(-/-) mice, our study demonstrates that development of the hydrocephalus was not due to a vascular function of JAM-C as endothelial re-expression of JAM-C failed to rescue the hydrocephalus phenotype of JAM-C(-/-) C57BL/6 mice. Evaluation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) circulation within the ventricular system of JAM-C(-/-) mice excluded occlusion of the cerebral aqueduct as the cause of hydrocephalus development but showed the acquisition of a block or reduction of CSF drainage from the lateral to the 3(rd) ventricle in JAM-C(-/-) C57BL/6 mice. Taken together, our study suggests that JAM-C(-/-) C57BL/6 mice model the important role for JAM-C in brain development and CSF homeostasis as recently observed in humans with a loss-of-function mutation in JAM-C.

  16. Multiple distinct subtypes of GABAergic neurons in mouse visual cortex identified by triple immunostaining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Gonchar

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The majority of cortical interneurons use GABA (gamma amino butyric acid as inhibitory neurotransmitter. GABAergic neurons are morphologically, connectionally, electrically and chemically heterogeneous. In rat cerebral cortex three distinct groups of GABAergic interneurons have been identifi ed by the expression of parvalbumin (PV, calretinin (CR and somatostatin (SOM. Recent studies in mouse cerebral cortex have revealed a different organization in which the CR and SOM populations are partially overlapping. Because CR and SOM neurons derive from different progenitors located in different embryonic structures, the coexpression of CR + SOM suggests that the chemical differentiation of interneurons is regulated postmitotically. Here, we have taken an important fi rst step towards understanding this process by triple immunostaining mouse visual cortex with a panel of antibodies, which has been used extensively for classifying developing interneurons. We have found at least 13 distinct groups of GABAergic neurons which include PV, CR, SOM, CCK (cholecystokinin, CR + SOM, CR + NPY (neuropeptide Y, CR + VIP (vasointestinal polypeptide, SOM + NPY, SOM + VIP, VIP + ChAT (choline acetyltransferase, CCK + NPY, CR + SOM + NPY and CR + SOM + VIP expressing cells. Triple immunostaining with PV, CR and SOM antibodies during postnatal development further showed that PV is never colocalized with CR and SOM. Importantly, expression of SOM and CR + SOM developed after the percentage of CR cells that do not express SOM has reached the mature level, suggesting that the chemical differentiation of SOM and CR + SOM neurons is a postnatal event, which may be controlled by transcriptional regulation.

  17. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen immunostaining in breast carcinoma and its relationship to clinical and pathological variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, S; Jain, R; Rusia, U; Gupta, R L

    1997-01-01

    Tumour proliferative activity of 74 breast lesions was assessed by determining mitotic index and immunostaining for proliferative cell nuclear antigen using Peroxidase antiperoxidase method. The indices were correlated with histomorphology and clinical stage of the disease. Positively stained nuclei and mitotic figures were counted per 1000 cells to calculate Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA) and mitotic index respectively. Sixty four cases stained positive for PCNA. The index ranged between 0 to 98. PCNA index was significantly low in benign lesions as compared to malignant lesions (p < 0.0002). There was a linear correlation between the mitotic index and PCNA index. PCNA index also showed significant correlation with tumour size and histologic grade; however, it had no correlation with axillary lymph node status.

  18. Pigmented hepatocellular adenoma with complete CD34 immunostaining pattern: A diagnostic dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukul Vij

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available WHO defines hepatocellular adenoma (HCA as a benign tumor composed of cells closely resembling normal hepatocytes, which are arranged in plates separated by sinusoids. It is more common in women. The present concerns a 41 years female who was found to have a mass lesion in liver on ultrasound while undergoing routine evaluation for dyspepsia. Computed tomography scan of abdomen showed 10 × 8 cm lesion in liver. Extended left hepatectomy was performed. Grossly hepatic cut surface showed circumscribed tumor with dark gray or black color. Microscopy revealed hepatocellular adenoma with abundant Dubin Johnson like pigment deposition. CD34 immunostaining showed complete sinusoidal pattern. We labeled the tumor as pigmented hepatic adenoma with complete CD34 staining pattern. To the best of author′s knowledge only eight cases of pigmented hepatocellular adenoma are described in world literature.

  19. Reproducibility of immunostaining quantification and description of a new digital image processing procedure for quantitative evaluation of immunohistochemistry in pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardo, Vagner; Lourenço, Simone Q C; Cruz, Renato; Monteiro-Leal, Luiz H; Silva, Licínio E; Camisasca, Danielle R; Farina, Marcos; Lins, Ulysses

    2009-08-01

    Quantification of immunostaining is a widely used technique in pathology. Nonetheless, techniques that rely on human vision are prone to inter- and intraobserver variability, and they are tedious and time consuming. Digital image analysis (DIA), now available in a variety of platforms, improves quantification performance: however, the stability of these different DIA systems is largely unknown. Here, we describe a method to measure the reproducibility of DIA systems. In addition, we describe a new image-processing strategy for quantitative evaluation of immunostained tissue sections using DAB/hematoxylin-stained slides. This approach is based on image subtraction, using a blue low pass filter in the optical train, followed by digital contrast and brightness enhancement. Results showed that our DIA system yields stable counts, and that this method can be used to evaluate the performance of DIA systems. The new image-processing approach creates an image that aids both human visual observation and DIA systems in assessing immunostained slides, delivers a quantitative performance similar to that of bright field imaging, gives thresholds with smaller ranges, and allows the segmentation of strongly immunostained areas, all resulting in a higher probability of representing specific staining. We believe that our approach offers important advantages to immunostaining quantification in pathology.

  20. Atomically Abrupt Topological p-n Junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Hwan; Jin, Kyung-Hwan; Kho, Byung Woo; Park, Byeong-Gyu; Liu, Feng; Kim, Jun Sung; Yeom, Han Woong

    2017-08-24

    Topological insulators (TI's) are a new class of quantum matter with extraordinary surface electronic states, which bear great potential for spintronics and error-tolerant quantum computing. In order to put a TI into any practical use, these materials need to be fabricated into devices whose basic units are often p-n junctions. Interesting electronic properties of a 'topological' p-n junction were proposed theoretically such as the junction electronic state and the spin rectification. However, the fabrication of a lateral topological p-n junction has been challenging because of materials, process, and fundamental reasons. Here, we demonstrate an innovative approach to realize a p-n junction of topological surface states (TSS's) of a three-dimensional (3D) topological insulator (TI) with an atomically abrupt interface. When a ultrathin Sb film is grown on a 3D TI of Bi2Se3 with a typical n-type TSS, the surface develops a strongly p-type TSS through the substantial hybridization between the 2D Sb film and the Bi2Se3 surface. Thus, the Bi2Se3 surface covered partially with Sb films bifurcates into areas of n- and p-type TSS's as separated by atomic step edges with a lateral electronic junction of as short as 2 nm. This approach opens a different avenue toward various electronic and spintronic devices based on well-defined topological p-n junctions with the scalability down to atomic dimensions.

  1. Magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    We review the giant tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) in ferromagnetic-insulator-ferromagnetic junctions discovered in recent years, which is the magnetoresistance (MR) associated with the spin-dependent tunneling between two ferromagnetic metal films separated by an insulating thin tunnel barrier. The theoretical and experimental results including junction conductance, magnetoresistance and their temperature and bias dependences are described.

  2. Stacked Josephson Junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Søren Find; Pedersen, Niels Falsig; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    2010-01-01

    Long Josephson junctions have for some time been considered as a source of THz radiation. Solitons moving coherently in the junctions is a possible source for this radiation. Analytical computations of the bunched state and bunching-inducing methods are reviewed. Experiments showing THz radiation...

  3. Quantification of Eosinophilic Granule Protein Deposition in Biopsies of Inflammatory Skin Diseases by Automated Image Analysis of Highly Sensitive Immunostaining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Kiehl

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophilic granulocytes are major effector cells in inflammation. Extracellular deposition of toxic eosinophilic granule proteins (EGPs, but not the presence of intact eosinophils, is crucial for their functional effect in situ. As even recent morphometric approaches to quantify the involvement of eosinophils in inflammation have been only based on cell counting, we developed a new method for the cell‐independent quantification of EGPs by image analysis of immunostaining. Highly sensitive, automated immunohistochemistry was done on paraffin sections of inflammatory skin diseases with 4 different primary antibodies against EGPs. Image analysis of immunostaining was performed by colour translation, linear combination and automated thresholding. Using strictly standardized protocols, the assay was proven to be specific and accurate concerning segmentation in 8916 fields of 520 sections, well reproducible in repeated measurements and reliable over 16 weeks observation time. The method may be valuable for the cell‐independent segmentation of immunostaining in other applications as well.

  4. The utility of p16 immunostaining in fine needle aspiration in p16-positive head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bin; Ghossein, Ronald; Lane, Jason; Lin, Oscar; Katabi, Nora

    2016-08-01

    Many patients with human papillomavirus (HPV)-related head and neck squamous cell carcinoma present initially with cervical nodal metastasis. Fine needle aspiration (FNA) of the nodal disease might be the only diagnostic material available for p16 immunohistochemistry (IHC) and HPV testing. The current study aims to evaluate p16 IHC in FNA and establish guidelines for its interpretation. The percentage and intensity of p16 IHC staining were examined in 60 matched FNA and surgical cases. Cytomorphologic features were included in the analysis. p16 IHC staining was correlated with the results seen in the surgical specimens and with HPV in situ hybridization (ISH). Analysis of different thresholds demonstrated that the threshold of 10% p16 tumor cell positivity had the best overall concordance rate with surgical p16 IHC (κ = 0.650) and with FNA HPV-ISH (κ = 0.714). Applying the recommended p16 positivity threshold for surgical specimens (70%) on FNA materials resulted in low sensitivity (39%) and low negative predictive value (26%). In comparison with p16 IHC in surgical specimens, 6/46 FNA cases (13%) were falsely negative for p16. All 6 cases were associated with necrotic background, two (33%) lacked large tumor clusters, and one (17%) had low cellularity. The recommended threshold for p16 IHC on surgical specimens should not be used in cytology materials. The cutoff value for p16 immunostain in FNA specimens showing best results in our series is 10%. When p16 IHC is negative in FNA specimens, a repeat stain on a surgical specimen is recommended to avoid a false-negative diagnosis.

  5. Dysfunction of mitochondria and deformed gap junctions in the heart of IL-18-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen; Jin, Denan; Hata, Masaki; Takai, Shinji; Yamanishi, Kyosuke; Shen, Weili; El-Darawish, Yosif; Yamanishi, Hiromichi; Okamura, Haruki

    2016-08-01

    Interleukin-18 (IL-18) was discovered as an interferon-γ-inducing factor and has been regarded as a proinflammatory cytokine. However, IL-18 is ubiquitously expressed both in immune/inflammatory cells and in nonimmune cells, and its biological roles have not been sufficiently elucidated. Here, we demonstrate that IL-18-deficient [IL-18 knockout (KO)] mice have heart abnormalities that may be related to impaired autophagy. In endurance running tests, IL-18KO mice ran significantly shorter distances compared with wild-type (WT) mice. Echocardiographs indicated disability in the systolic and diastolic functions of the IL-18KO mouse heart. Immunostaining of connexin 43 showed heterogeneous localization of gap junctions in the lateral membranes of the IL-18KO cardiac myocytes. Western blotting analysis revealed decreased phosphorylated connexin 43 in the IL-18KO heart. Electron microscopy revealed unusual localization of intercalated disks, swollen or damaged mitochondria, and broad, indistinct Z-lines in the IL-18KO heart. In accordance with the morphological observation, mitochondrial respiratory function, including that of complexes I and IV, was impaired, and production of reactive oxygen species was augmented in IL-18KO hearts. Notably, levels of LC3-II were markedly lower in the IL-18KO hearts than in WT hearts. In the culture of cardiac myocytes of IL-18KO neonates, exogenous IL-18 upregulated LC3-II and increased the number of intact mitochondria with high mitochondrial membrane potential. These results indicated that IL-18 has roles apart from those as a proinflammatory cytokine in cardiac myocytes and suggested that IL-18 contributes to the homeostatic maintenance of mitochondrial function and gap-junction turnover in cardiac myocytes, possibly by upregulating autophagy.

  6. ADAM10 Is Involved in Cell Junction Assembly in Early Porcine Embryo Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeongwoo Kwon

    Full Text Available ADAM10 (A Disintegrin and Metalloprotease domain-containing protein 10 is a cell surface protein with a unique structure possessing both potential adhesion and protease domains. However, the role of ADAM10 in preimplantation stage embryos is not clear. In this study, we examined the expression patterns and functional roles of ADAM10 in porcine parthenotes during preimplantation development. The transcription level of ADAM10 dramatically increased from the morula stage onward. Immunostaining revealed that ADAM10 was present in both the nucleus and cytoplasm in early cleavage stage embryos, and localized to the apical region of the outer cells in morula and blastocyst embryos. Knockdown (KD of ADAM10 using double strand RNA did not alter preimplantation embryo development until morula stage, but resulted in significantly reduced development to blastocyst stage. Moreover, the KD blastocyst showed a decrease in gene expression of adherens and tight junction (AJ/TJ, and an increase in trophectoderm TJ permeability by disrupting TJ assembly. Treatment with an ADAM10 specific chemical inhibitor, GI254023X, at the morula stage also inhibited blastocyst development and led to disruption of TJ assembly. An in situ proximity ligation assay demonstrated direct interaction of ADAM10 with coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor (CXADR, supporting the involvement of ADAM10 in TJ assembly. In conclusion, our findings strongly suggest that ADADM10 is important for blastocyst formation rather than compaction, particularly for TJ assembly and stabilization in preimplantation porcine parthenogenetic development.

  7. Geometrical theory of triple junctions of CSL boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gertsman, V Y

    2001-07-01

    When three grain boundaries having misorientations generating coincidence site lattices (CSLs) meet at a triple junction, a common (triple-junction) CSL is formed. A theory is developed as a set of theorems establishing the relationships between the geometrical parameters of the grain-boundary and triple-junction CSLs. Application of the theory is demonstrated in detail for the case of the cubic crystal system. It is also shown how the theory can be extended to an arbitrary crystal lattice.

  8. Sublethal doses of fipronil intensify synapsin immunostaining in Atta sexdens rubropilosa (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cintra-Socolowski, Priscila; Roat, Thaisa C; Nocelli, Roberta C F; Nunes, Pablo H; Ferreira, Rafael A C; Malaspina, Osmar; Bueno, Odair C

    2016-05-01

    Although ants are common insects in agricultural ecosystems, few studies have considered how xenobiotics might induce physiological and morphological alterations in these insects. This study aimed to verify the neurotoxic action of sublethal doses of fipronil on the mushroom bodies of brains from the leaf-cutting ant Atta sexdens rubropilosa through immunocytochemistry analysis for the protein synapsin. The LD50 value was established as 1.42 ng ant(-1), and the sublethal doses used were LD50/10 and LD50/100. Synapsin labelling was more evident in the brains extracted from ants exposed to the insecticide, specifically in the regions of glia in the mushroom bodies, compared with the control group. It was possible to measure the intensity of emitted fluorescence in the areas of the mushroom bodies, and a statistical test showed differences between the control group and the treatment group. Thus, it is concluded that sublethal doses of the insecticide fipronil intensified synapsin immunostaining, suggesting an increased release of neurotransmitters, which may be linked to neurotoxicity and overexcitation. These sublethal doses may have two different effects: compromising the operation and maintenance of the colony and leading to the establishment of resistance in insects. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. Collagen immunostains can distinguish capsular fibrous tissue from septal fibrosis and may help stage liver fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Rock, Jonathan B; Yearsley, Martha M; Hanje, A James; Frankel, Wendy L

    2014-01-01

    Core-needle biopsy remains essential for diagnosis of cirrhosis; however, evaluation of fibrosis in such biopsies is often challenging due to the fragmented nature of cirrhotic liver specimens. It is also common to see portions of liver capsules present in the biopsy which adds to the diagnostic challenge. The distinction between capsular/subcapsular fibrous tissue and septal fibrosis is critical to avoid potential overstaging of liver fibrosis. We compared the differential immunostaining in liver capsular and septal areas for collagens III, IV, V, VI, vitronectin, laminin, Orcein, and Trichrome in 15 whole sections of explanted cirrhotic livers and 5 simulated liver biopsies. Collagens III, IV, V, VI, Trichrome, and Orcein show distinct staining patterns in capsular fibrous tissue and septal fibrosis. Collagen IV shows strong diffuse septal staining and consistently weak to negative capsular staining. Collagens III and VI stain similar to IV for septal fibrosis, whereas collagen V, Trichrome, and Orcein show strong staining in both areas. Collagen IV, possibly with III or VI in addition to the routine Trichrome and hematoxylin and eosin stain, is useful in differentiating capsular fibrous tissue from septal fibrosis on challenging and fragmented liver biopsies.

  10. Direct analysis of silica gel extracts from immunostained glycosphingolipids by nanoelectrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisen, Iris; Peter-Katalinić, Jasna; Müthing, Johannes

    2004-04-15

    A combined strategy of preparative high-performance thin-layer chromatography overlay assay and mass spectrometry was established for the structural characterization of immunostained glycosphingolipids (GSLs) in silica gel extracts. Crude chloroform/methanol/water (30/60/8, v/v/v) extracts of immunostained TLC bands were analyzed by nanoelectrospray low-energy CID mass spectrometry without further purification. The GSL species investigated were isomeric monosialogangliosides of the neolacto series from a ganglioside preparation of human granulocytes, the disialoganglioside GD3 from a human melanoma lipid extract, and ganglio series Gg3Cer of a neutral GSL preparation from murine lymphoreticular MDAY-D2 cells. For the specific detection of lipid-bound oligosaccharides, polyclonal chicken IgY, murine monoclonal IgG3, and IgM antibodies were used. The resulting mass spectra show that only analytical quantities of approximately 1 microg of a single GSL within a complex mixture are required for the structure determination of immunostained GSLs by MS and MS/MS. All species investigated were detected as singly charged deprotonated molecular ions, and neither buffer-derived salt adducts nor coextracted contaminants from the immunostaining procedure or the silica gel layer were observed. This effective HPTLC-MS-joined procedure offers a wide range of applications for any carbohydrate binding agents such as bacterial toxins, plant lectins, and others.

  11. Equivalent Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyadjiev, T. L.; Semerdjieva, E. G.; Shukrinov, Yu. M.

    2008-01-01

    The magnetic field dependences of critical current are numerically constructed for a long Josephson junction with a shunt-or resistor-type microscopic inhomogeneities and compared to the critical curve of a junction with exponentially varying width. The numerical results show that it is adequate to replace the distributed inhomogeneity of a long Josephson junction by an inhomogeneity localized at one of its ends, which has certain technological advantages. It is also shown that the critical curves of junctions with exponentially varying width and inhomogeneities localized at the ends are unaffected by the mixed fluxon-antifluxon distributions of the magnetic flow. This fact may explain the improvement of the spectra of microwave radiation noted in the literature.

  12. Quantum Junction Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Tang, Jiang

    2012-09-12

    Colloidal quantum dot solids combine convenient solution-processing with quantum size effect tuning, offering avenues to high-efficiency multijunction cells based on a single materials synthesis and processing platform. The highest-performing colloidal quantum dot rectifying devices reported to date have relied on a junction between a quantum-tuned absorber and a bulk material (e.g., TiO 2); however, quantum tuning of the absorber then requires complete redesign of the bulk acceptor, compromising the benefits of facile quantum tuning. Here we report rectifying junctions constructed entirely using inherently band-aligned quantum-tuned materials. Realizing these quantum junction diodes relied upon the creation of an n-type quantum dot solid having a clean bandgap. We combine stable, chemically compatible, high-performance n-type and p-type materials to create the first quantum junction solar cells. We present a family of photovoltaic devices having widely tuned bandgaps of 0.6-1.6 eV that excel where conventional quantum-to-bulk devices fail to perform. Devices having optimal single-junction bandgaps exhibit certified AM1.5 solar power conversion efficiencies of 5.4%. Control over doping in quantum solids, and the successful integration of these materials to form stable quantum junctions, offers a powerful new degree of freedom to colloidal quantum dot optoelectronics. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  13. Microscopic tunneling theory of long Josephson junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbech-Jensen, N.; Hattel, Søren A.; Samuelsen, Mogens Rugholm

    1992-01-01

    We present a numerical scheme for solving a nonlinear partial integro-differential equation with nonlocal time dependence. The equation describes the dynamics in a long Josephson junction modeled by use of the microscopic theory for tunneling between superconductors. We demonstrate that the detai......We present a numerical scheme for solving a nonlinear partial integro-differential equation with nonlocal time dependence. The equation describes the dynamics in a long Josephson junction modeled by use of the microscopic theory for tunneling between superconductors. We demonstrate...

  14. Automated classification of immunostaining patterns in breast tissue from the human protein Atlas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Issac Niwas Swamidoss

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Human Protein Atlas (HPA is an effort to map the location of all human proteins (http://www.proteinatlas.org/. It contains a large number of histological images of sections from human tissue. Tissue micro arrays (TMA are imaged by a slide scanning microscope, and each image represents a thin slice of a tissue core with a dark brown antibody specific stain and a blue counter stain. When generating antibodies for protein profiling of the human proteome, an important step in the quality control is to compare staining patterns of different antibodies directed towards the same protein. This comparison is an ultimate control that the antibody recognizes the right protein. In this paper, we propose and evaluate different approaches for classifying sub-cellular antibody staining patterns in breast tissue samples. Materials and Methods: The proposed methods include the computation of various features including gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM features, complex wavelet co-occurrence matrix (CWCM features, and weighted neighbor distance using compound hierarchy of algorithms representing morphology (WND-CHARM-inspired features. The extracted features are used into two different multivariate classifiers (support vector machine (SVM and linear discriminant analysis (LDA classifier. Before extracting features, we use color deconvolution to separate different tissue components, such as the brownly stained positive regions and the blue cellular regions, in the immuno-stained TMA images of breast tissue. Results: We present classification results based on combinations of feature measurements. The proposed complex wavelet features and the WND-CHARM features have accuracy similar to that of a human expert. Conclusions: Both human experts and the proposed automated methods have difficulties discriminating between nuclear and cytoplasmic staining patterns. This is to a large extent due to mixed staining of nucleus and cytoplasm. Methods for

  15. CAMTA1 Immunostaining is not Useful in Differentiating Epithelioid Hemangioendothelioma from its Potential Mimickers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarifa YUSİFLİ

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Epithelioid hemangioendothelioma is a rare member of vascular tumors of intermediate malignancy. Recently, presence of t(1;3 translocation and WWTR1/CAMTA1 gene fusion, which enhances CAMTA1 expression, are found to be specific to this tumor. We investigated the CAMTA1 immune expression profile of epithelioid hemangioendothelioma and its potential mimickers using a commercially available CAMTA1 antibody. Material and Method: Standard whole sections from the formalin fixed, paraffin embedded blocks of 12 epithelioid hemangioendotheliomas, 10 angiosarcomas, 9 epithelioid sarcomas, 8 malignant melanomas, 8 signet ring carcinomas, 7 lobular carcinomas of breast, 2 epithelioid mesotheliomas, 2 rhabdoid tumors and 12 miscellaneous hemangiomas were immunostained for anti-CAMTA1 (ab64119, 1:200; Abcam after pretreatment with citrate pH 6.0 for 20 minutes using Leica Bond detection kit with DAB chromogen. Strong nuclear CAMTA1 expression was scored for its extent as ‘negative’ (50% positive. Results: In 60 out of 70 cases (86% either 2+ or 3+ strong nuclear staining was seen. Eighty-three % of epithelioid hemangioendotheliomas, 100% of angiosarcomas, 89% of epithelioid sarcomas, 89% of malignant melanomas, 63% of signet ring carcinomas, 71% of lobular carcinomas of breast, 100% of epithelioid mesotheliomas, 50% of rhabdoid tumors and 100% of hemangiomas were stained. Besides neurons, CAMTA1 expression was also observed in squamous epithelium, skin adnexa, breast lobules, prostate glands, bile ducts, colonic mucosa and gastric pits. Conclusion: Epithelioid hemangioendothelioma, its potential morphological mimickers and other benign or malignant vascular tumors showed strong and diffuse CAMTA1 expression, nullifying the potential use of CAMTA1 immunohistochemistry as an adjunct in the differential diagnosis.

  16. HBME-1 immunostaining in reactive mesothelial versus metastatic adenocarcinoma cells in serous fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Rahmani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The cytological diagnoses of serous effusions are usually made by routine cytomorphology with certainty. However, overlapping cases sometimes exist between reactive mesothelial and adenocarcinoma cells. We tried to evaluate the diagnostic utility of HBME-1 in distinguishing between reactive mesothelial cells and adenocarcinoma in serous effusions. Materials and Methods: Fifty-two cytologic specimens processed by cell-block technique were retrieved from the archive and were assigned to two groups: Group I: 26 effusions containing reactive/benign mesothelial cells; Group II: 26 effusions containing carcinoma cells. Immunostaining with HBME-1 was performed using an Envision technique. The staining intensity of cells, according to proportion of immunoreactive cells, was scored as: 0 (negative, 1+ (<10%, 2+ (10-50%, and 3+ (≥50%; and the predominant staining pattern of positive cells were determined. Statistical analysis and tests of significance were performed using SPSS software. Results: The calculated mean values (in percentile for stained cells in adenocarcinoma and reactive mesothelial cells were 25.57 and 67.88, respectively ( P = 0.001. Thin membranous, thick membranous, thick and thin membranous, cytoplasmic and combined patterns of staining in adenocarcinoma cells were respectively 4 cases (21.1%, 0 case, 0 case, 8 cases (42.1%, and 7 cases (36.8%, and in reactive mesothelial cells, these were 7 cases (26.9%, 1 case (3.8%, 18 cases (69.2%, 0 case, and 0 case, respectively. The intensity of staining in majority (88.5% of reactive mesothelial cells was scored 3+, but the distribution varied in the other group. Conclusions: The staining pattern and intensity for HBME-1 is a useful panel for differentiation of adenocarcinoma and mesothelial cells.

  17. Intercellular junctions of the hen parathyroid gland. A freeze-fracture study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setoguti, T; Inoue, Y; Suematsu, T

    1982-01-01

    The fine structure of the intercellular junctions of the hen parathyroid gland was studied using freeze-fracture replicas and thin sections. In the conventional thin sections, desmosomes, intermediate junctions (maculae adherentes) and gap junctions were observed, and in the lanthanum-fixed sections, tight junctions (maculae occludentes) were demonstrated as well. In the freeze-fracture replicas, desmosomes, gap junctions, tight junctions and combination forms of gap and tight junctions occurred, but intermediate junctions were not identified. Junctional complexes (zonulae occludentes) were not encountered in any preparations. The gap junctions varied in size and shape; they ranged from irregularly shaped, minute assemblages of particles to large aggregations of a round or elliptic outline. Both the tight junctions and the combination forms of gap and tight junctions also exhibited a variety of shape and dimension, and, depending on the form of the tight junctional strands, they were classified into three types: type I consisted of a simple line of strands; type II consisted of a closed network of strands; and type III consisted of an open network of strands. The combination forms were more numerous than the typical tight junctions. The possible significance of these junctions is discussed in relation to the function of the parathyroid parenchymal cell. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 PMID:7174510

  18. Interpretation of p16(INK4a) /Ki-67 dual immunostaining for the triage of human papillomavirus-positive women by experts and nonexperts in cervical cytology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allia, Elena; Ronco, Guglielmo; Coccia, Anna; Luparia, Patrizia; Macrì, Luigia; Fiorito, Corinna; Maletta, Francesca; Deambrogio, Cristina; Tunesi, Sara; De Marco, Laura; Gillio-Tos, Anna; Sapino, Anna; Ghiringhello, Bruno

    2015-04-01

    The triage of human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive women is needed to avoid overreferral to colposcopy. p16(INK4a) immunostaining is an efficient triage method. p16(INK4a) /Ki-67 dual staining was introduced mainly to increase reproducibility and specificity compared with stand-alone p16(INK4a) staining. Within a pilot project, HPV-positive women were referred to colposcopy if cytology was abnormal or unsatisfactory or HPV testing was still positive after 1 year. For 500 consecutive women, a slide obtained during colposcopy was immunostained for p16(INK4a) /Ki-67 and independently interpreted by 7 readers without previous experience with dual staining. Four of these readers were experts in cervical pathology and 3 were not. Kappa values for multiple raters, sensitivity, and specificity for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia type 2-positive histology were computed. Because women with normal cytology were underrepresented, estimates for all HPV-positive women were obtained as weighted means of cytology-specific estimates. The overall kappa for HPV-positive women was 0.70 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.60-0.77). Kappa values were not found to be significantly different between expert and nonexpert readers with regard to cervical cytology but were significantly increased (P =. 0066) after consensus discussion. The overall specificity estimate for HPV-positive women was 64.0% (95% CI, 57.4%-70.2%): 66.7% (95% CI, 59.8%-73.0%) for experts and 60.5% (95% CI, 59.8%-73.0%) for nonexperts. Among women with abnormal cytology, the sensitivity was 85.5% (95% CI, 77.9%-90.8%): 85.8% (95% CI, 77.9%-91.2%) for experts and 85.1% (95% CI, 76.6%-90.9%) for nonexperts. p16(INK4a) /Ki-67 immunostaining demonstrated good reproducibility and specificity when triaging HPV-positive women. Dual-staining interpretation can be performed, after short training, even by staff who are not experts in cervical cytology. This allows HPV-based screening with triage to be performed in settings in

  19. Cooling of suspended nanostructures with tunnel junctions

    OpenAIRE

    Koppinen, P. J.; Maasilta, I. J.

    2009-01-01

    We have investigated electronic cooling of suspended nanowires with SINIS tunnel junction coolers. The suspended samples consist of a free standing nanowire suspended by four narrow ($\\sim$ 200 nm) bridges. We have compared two different cooler designs for cooling the suspended nanowire. We demonstrate that cooling of the nanowire is possible with a proper SINIS cooler design.

  20. Thin-layer chromatography immunostaining in detecting anti-phospholipid antibodies in seronegative anti-phospholipid syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, F; Alessandri, C; Sorice, M; Capozzi, A; Longo, A; Garofalo, T; Misasi, R; Bompane, D; Hughes, G R V; Khamashta, M A; Valesini, G

    2012-01-01

    In clinical practice it is possible to find patients with clinical signs suggestive of anti-phospholipid syndrome (APS) who are persistently negative for the routinely used anti-phospholipid antibodies (aPL). Therefore, the term proposed for these cases was seronegative APS (SN-APS). We investigated the clinical usefulness of thin-layer chromatography (TLC) immunostaining in detecting serum aPL in patients presenting clinical features of SN-APS. Sera from 36 patients with SN-APS, 19 patients with APS, 18 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 20 anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV)-positive subjects and 32 healthy controls were examined for aPL using TLC immunostaining. Anti-β2-glycoprotein-I, anti-annexin II, anti-annexin V and anti-prothrombin antibodies were tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). Eahy926, a human-derived endothelial cell line, was incubated with immunoglobulin (Ig)G fraction from SN-APS patients and analysis of phospho-interleukin (IL)-1 receptor-associated kinase (IRAK) and phospho-nuclear factor (NF)-κB was performed by Western blot, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) expression by cytofluorimetric analysis and supernatants tissue factor (TF) levels by ELISA. TLC immunostaining showed aPL in 58·3% of SN-APS patients: anti-cardiolipin in 47·2%, anti-lyso(bis)phosphatidic acid in 41·7% and anti-phosphatidylethanolamine in 30·5%. Six of 36 patients showed anti-annexin II. Incubation of Eahy926 cells with IgG from SN-APS induced IRAK phosphorylation, NF-κB activation, VCAM-1 surface expression and TF cell release. TLC immunostaining could identify the presence of aPL in patients with SN-APS. Moreover, the results suggest the proinflammatory and procoagulant effects in vitro of these antibodies. PMID:22288586

  1. The Geometric Field at a Josephson Junction

    CERN Document Server

    Atanasov, Victor

    2016-01-01

    A geometric potential from the kinetic term of a constrained to a curved hyper-plane of space-time quantum superconducting condensate is derived. An energy conservation relation involving the geometric field at every material point in the superconductor is demonstrated. At a Josephson junction the energy conservation relation implies the possibility to transform electric energy into geometric field energy, that is curvature of space-time. Experimental procedures to verify that the Josephson junction can act as a voltage-to-curvature converter are discussed.

  2. Silicon fiber with p-n junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homa, D.; Cito, A.; Pickrell, G.; Hill, C.; Scott, B. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 312 Holden Hall, Blacksburg, Virginia 24060 (United States)

    2014-09-22

    In this study, we fabricated a p-n junction in a fiber with a phosphorous doped silicon core and fused silica cladding. The fibers were fabricated via a hybrid process of the core-suction and melt-draw techniques and maintained overall diameters ranging from 200 to 900 μm and core diameters of 20–800 μm. The p-n junction was formed by doping the fiber with boron and confirmed via the current-voltage characteristic. The demonstration of a p-n junction in a melt-drawn silicon core fiber paves the way for the seamless integration of optical and electronic devices in fibers.

  3. Optical trapping of microparticles using silicon nitride waveguide junctions and tapered-waveguide junctions on an optofluidic chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Hong; Poon, Andrew W

    2012-10-01

    We study optical trapping of microparticles on an optofluidic chip using silicon nitride waveguide junctions and tapered-waveguide junctions. We demonstrate the trapping of single 1 μm-sized polystyrene particles using the evanescent field of waveguide junctions connecting a submicrometer-sized input-waveguide and a micrometer-sized output-waveguide. Particle trapping is localized in the vicinity of the junction. We also demonstrate trapping of one and two 1μm-sized polystyrene particles using tapered-waveguide junctions connecting a submicrometer-sized singlemode input-waveguide and a micrometer-sized multimode output-waveguide. Particle trapping occurs near the taper output end, the taper center and the taper input end, depending on the taper aspect ratio.

  4. The human myotendinous junction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, A B; Larsen, M; Mackey, Abigail

    2015-01-01

    The myotendinous junction (MTJ) is a specialized structure in the musculotendinous system, where force is transmitted from muscle to tendon. Animal models have shown that the MTJ takes form of tendon finger-like processes merging with muscle tissue. The human MTJ is largely unknown and has never ...

  5. Doped semiconductor nanocrystal junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borowik, Ł.; Mélin, T., E-mail: thierry.melin@isen.iemn.univ-lille1.fr [Institut d’Electronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie, CNRS-UMR8520, Avenue Poincaré, F-59652 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); Nguyen-Tran, T.; Roca i Cabarrocas, P. [Laboratoire de Physique des Interfaces et des Couches Minces, CNRS-UMR7647, Ecole Polytechnique, F-91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2013-11-28

    Semiconductor junctions are the basis of electronic and photovoltaic devices. Here, we investigate junctions formed from highly doped (N{sub D}≈10{sup 20}−10{sup 21}cm{sup −3}) silicon nanocrystals (NCs) in the 2–50 nm size range, using Kelvin probe force microscopy experiments with single charge sensitivity. We show that the charge transfer from doped NCs towards a two-dimensional layer experimentally follows a simple phenomenological law, corresponding to formation of an interface dipole linearly increasing with the NC diameter. This feature leads to analytically predictable junction properties down to quantum size regimes: NC depletion width independent of the NC size and varying as N{sub D}{sup −1/3}, and depleted charge linearly increasing with the NC diameter and varying as N{sub D}{sup 1/3}. We thus establish a “nanocrystal counterpart” of conventional semiconductor planar junctions, here however valid in regimes of strong electrostatic and quantum confinements.

  6. Junction trees of general graphs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaofei WANG; Jianhua GUO

    2008-01-01

    In this paper,we study the maximal prime subgraphs and their corresponding structure for any undirected graph.We introduce the notion of junction trees and investigate their structural characteristics,including junction properties,induced-subtree properties,running-intersection properties and maximum-weight spanning tree properties.Furthermore,the characters of leaves and edges on junction trees are discussed.

  7. Vacuum Tight Threaded Junctions (VTTJ): A new solution for reliable heterogeneous junctions in ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agostinetti, P., E-mail: piero.agostinetti@igi.cnr.it; Palma, M. Dalla; Agostini, F. Degli; Marcuzzi, D.; Rizzolo, A.; Rossetto, F.; Sonato, P.; Zaccaria, P.

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Heterogeneous junctions represent a critical issue in Nuclear Fusion experiments. • We have developed a new technique for heterogeneous junctions, called VTTJ, whose main advantages are low cost, high reliability and easiness of construction. • The VTTJ junctions have passed all the tests required by ITER for the heterogeneous junctions of the divertor. • Further tests have demonstrated wide margins for operation (up to 700 °C and 500 bar). - Abstract: A new technique, called Vacuum Tight Threaded Junction (VTTJ), has been developed and patented by Consorzio RFX, permitting to obtain low-cost and reliable non-welded junctions, able to maintain vacuum tightness also in heavy loading conditions (high temperature and high mechanical loads). The technique can be applied also if the materials to be joint are not weldable and for heterogeneous junctions (for example, between steel and copper) and has been tested up to 500 bar internal pressure and up to 700 °C, showing excellent leak tightness in vacuum conditions and high mechanical resistance. The main advantages with respect to existing technologies (for example, friction welding and electron beam welding) are an easy construction, a low cost, a precise positioning of the junction and a high repeatability of the process. Due to these advantages, the new technique has been adopted for several components of the SPIDER experiment and it is proposed for ITER, in particular for the ITER Heat and Current Drive Neutral Beam Injector and for its prototype, the MITICA experiment, to be tested at Consorzio RFX. This paper gives a detailed description of the VTTJ technique, of the samples manufactured and of the qualification tests that have been carried out so far.

  8. Parametric resonance in the system of long Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmonov, I. R.; Shukrinov, Yu. M.; Irie, A.

    2014-08-01

    The phase dynamics of the system of long Josephson junctions whose length exceeds the Josephson penetration depth has been studied. The possibility of the appearance of a longitudinal plasma wave and parametric resonance has been demonstrated. Both inductive and capacitive couplings between Josephson junctions have been taken into account in the calculations. The current-voltage characteristics, as well as time evolution of the spatial distribution of the electric charge in superconducting layers and the magnetic field, have been calculated in all Josephson junctions of the system. The coexistence of the longitudinal plasma wave and fluxon states has been observed in the region of parametric resonance beginning with a certain length of the Josephson junction. This indicates the appearance of a new unique collective excitation in the system of coupled Josephson junctions, namely, a composite state of the Josephson current, electric field, and vortex magnetic field.

  9. Design of Steerable Wavelets to Detect Multifold Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Püspöki, Zsuzsanna; Uhlmann, Virginie; Vonesch, Cédric; Unser, Michael

    2016-02-01

    We propose a framework for the detection of junctions in images. Although the detection of edges and key points is a well examined and described area, the multiscale detection of junction centers, especially for odd orders, poses a challenge in pattern analysis. The goal of this paper is to build optimal junction detectors based on 2D steerable wavelets that are polar-separable in the Fourier domain. The approaches we develop are general and can be used for the detection of arbitrary symmetric and asymmetric junctions. The backbone of our construction is a multiscale pyramid with a radial wavelet function where the directional components are represented by circular harmonics and encoded in a shaping matrix. We are able to detect M -fold junctions in different scales and orientations. We provide experimental results on both simulated and real data to demonstrate the effectiveness of the algorithm.

  10. Holliday junction resolvases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Haley D M; West, Stephen C

    2014-09-02

    Four-way DNA intermediates, called Holliday junctions (HJs), can form during meiotic and mitotic recombination, and their removal is crucial for chromosome segregation. A group of ubiquitous and highly specialized structure-selective endonucleases catalyze the cleavage of HJs into two disconnected DNA duplexes in a reaction called HJ resolution. These enzymes, called HJ resolvases, have been identified in bacteria and their bacteriophages, archaea, and eukaryotes. In this review, we discuss fundamental aspects of the HJ structure and their interaction with junction-resolving enzymes. This is followed by a brief discussion of the eubacterial RuvABC enzymes, which provide the paradigm for HJ resolvases in other organisms. Finally, we review the biochemical and structural properties of some well-characterized resolvases from archaea, bacteriophage, and eukaryotes. Copyright © 2014 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  11. Wireless Josephson Junction Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Laura

    2015-03-01

    We report low temperature, microwave transmission measurements on a wireless two- dimensional network of Josephson junction arrays composed of superconductor-insulator -superconductor tunnel junctions. Unlike their biased counterparts, by removing all electrical contacts to the arrays and superfluous microwave components and interconnects in the transmission line, we observe new collective behavior in the transmission spectra. In particular we will show emergent behavior that systematically responds to changes in microwave power at fixed temperature. Likewise we will show the dynamic and collective response of the arrays while tuning the temperature at fixed microwave power. We discuss these spectra in terms of the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition and Shapiro steps. We gratefully acknowledge the support Prof. Steven Anlage at the University of Maryland and Prof. Allen Goldman at the University of Minnesota. Physics and School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

  12. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sands, Robert; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Procedures for two demonstrations are provided. The solubility of ammonia gas in water is demonstrated by introducing water into a closed can filled with the gas, collapsing the can. The second demonstration relates scale of standard reduction potentials to observed behavior of metals in reactions with hydrogen to produce hydrogen gas. (Author/JN)

  13. Two different immunostaining patterns of beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP) may distinguish traumatic from nontraumatic axonal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Takahito; Ago, Kazutoshi; Nakamae, Takuma; Higo, Eri; Ogata, Mamoru

    2015-09-01

    Immunostaining for beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP) is recognized as an effective tool for detecting traumatic axonal injury, but it also detects axonal injury due to ischemic or other metabolic causes. Previously, we reported two different patterns of APP staining: labeled axons oriented along with white matter bundles (pattern 1) and labeled axons scattered irregularly (pattern 2) (Hayashi et al. (Leg Med (Tokyo) 11:S171-173, 2009). In this study, we investigated whether these two patterns are consistent with patterns of trauma and hypoxic brain damage, respectively. Sections of the corpus callosum from 44 cases of blunt head injury and equivalent control tissue were immunostained for APP. APP was detected in injured axons such as axonal bulbs and varicose axons in 24 of the 44 cases of head injuries that also survived for three or more hours after injury. In 21 of the 24 APP-positive cases, pattern 1 alone was observed in 14 cases, pattern 2 alone was not observed in any cases, and both patterns 1 and 2 were detected in 7 cases. APP-labeled injured axons were detected in 3 of the 44 control cases, all of which were pattern 2. These results suggest that pattern 1 indicates traumatic axonal injury, while pattern 2 results from hypoxic insult. These patterns may be useful to differentiate between traumatic and nontraumatic axonal injuries.

  14. Combination of Strong MMP-2 and Weak TIMP-2 Immunostainings Is a Significant Prognostic Factor in Endometrial Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Honkavuori-Toivola

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the combined effects of MMP-2 and TIMP-2 protein immunoreactivities on the prognosis in endometrial carcinoma. Methods. Paraffin-embedded tissue samples from 225 primary endometrioid adenocarcinomas and 13 histologies other than endometrioid adenocarcinoma were immunohistochemically stained for MMP-2 and TIMP-2. Results. In Kaplan-Meier analysis, the 5-year cancer-specific survival rate of the endometrioid adenocarcinoma patients with negative MMP-2 and positive TIMP-2 staining was 100%, whereas only 78% of patients presenting with positive MMP-2 and negative TIMP-2 staining results were alive at that time. In Cox regression analysis, patients with positive MMP-2 and negative TIMP-2 immunostaining had a 4.7-fold relative risk of death from endometrial carcinoma compared to the group of patients with negative MMP-2 and positive or negative TIMP-2 immunoreaction. Conclusions. MMP-2 seems to be the main metalloproteinase determining the prognosis in endometrial carcinoma. Combination of strong MMP-2 and weak TIMP-2 immunostainings was the most potent prognostic marker for poor survival.

  15. Thyroid Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsies in Children: Study of Cytological-Histological Correlation and Immunostaining with Thyroid Peroxidase Monoclonal Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bauer Andrew

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Context. There is limited data comparing results of fine needle aspiration biopsies (FNABs to histological diagnosis in children. Design. FNABs were performed in 707 children and cytological results were compared to histology in 165 cases. The usefulness of immunostaining with anti-TPO monoclonal antibodies (MoAb47 on FNAB samples was examined in 54 operated patients. Results. Among unsatisfactory, benign, suspicious, and malignant FNAB, the histological diagnoses were benign in 12/12 (100%, 69/70 (98.5%, 40/50 (80.0%, and 0/33 (0%, respectively. After surgery, malignancy was established in 44/165 (26.6% cases. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were 95.4%, 55.8%, 61.7%, and 95% with standard FNAB; and 100%, 75%, 73.3, and 100% with MoAb47. Among suspicious FNAB, positive MoAb47 staining was a reliable marker for exclusion of malignancy. Conclusion. Benign and malignant FNAB accurately predict histological diagnosis. In suspicious FNAB, MoAb47 immunostaining may be a useful adjunct to standard cytology.

  16. p16 immunostaining as a predictor of anal and cervical dysplasia in women attending a sexually transmitted infection clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepika Pandhi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Carcinogenesis caused by human papillomavirus (HPV leads to over-expression of p16 protein. p16 may act as a marker of HPV integration with host genome and serve as a surrogate marker of HPV oncogenesis. Materials and Methods: A single center study of 75 women (35 HIV-positive and 40 HIV-negative women was conducted. Anal and cervical specimens were obtained for cytology and p16 immunostaining. Results: The sensitivity of p16 to diagnose anal and cervical dysplasia was 50% and 58.8%, respectively, whereas specificity was 98.6% and 100%, respectively. Positive predictive value for anal and cervical was 75% and 100%, whereas negative predictive value was 95.8% and 89.2%, respectively. A strong relationship between the grade of dysplasia and intensity of p16 immunoscore was observed (Pearson correlation r = 0.666, P< 0.0001 and r = 0.496, P< 0.0001 for anal and cervical, respectively. Conclusion: p16 immunostaining with greater specificity for high-grade lesions may improve the diagnostic accuracy, especially for high-grade lesions which have a high risk of progression to malignancy and thereby necessitate treatment.

  17. Simulation of Tunnel Junction in Cascade Solar Cell (GaAs/Ge Using AMPS-1D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benmoussa Dennai

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The development of the tunnel junction interconnect was key the first two-terminal monolithic, multi-junction solar cell development. This paper describes simulation for the tunnel junction (GaAs between top cell (GaAs and bottom cell (Ge. This solar cell cascade was simulated when using one dimensional simulation program called analysis of microelectronic and photonic structures (AMPS-1D. In the simulation, the thickness of the tunnel junction layer was varied from 10 to 50 nm. By varying thickness of tunnel junction layer the simulated device performance was demonstrate in the form of current-voltage(I-V characteristics and quantum efficiency (QE.

  18. Temporal correlations and structural memory effects in break junction measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magyarkuti, A.; Lauritzen, Kasper Primdal; Balogh, Zoltan Imre

    2017-01-01

    that correlations between the opening and subsequent closing traces may indicate structural memory effects in atomic-sized metallic and molecular junctions. Applying these methods on measured and simulated gold metallic contacts as a test system, we show that the surface diffusion induced flattening of the broken......-molecule junctions, we demonstrate pronounced contact memory effects and recovery of the molecule for junctions breaking before atomic chains are formed. However, if chains are pulled the random relaxation of the chain and molecule after rupture prevents opening-closing correlations....

  19. Vortex structure in a long Josephson junction with two inhomogeneities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreeva, O.Yu. [Tumen Thermal Networks OAO ' TRGK' , Tobolsk 626150 (Russian Federation); Boyadjiev, T.L. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Shukrinov, Yu.M. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation)], E-mail: shukrinv@theor.jinr.ru

    2007-09-01

    We study the vortex structure in the long Josephson junctions with one and two rectangular inhomogeneities in the barrier layer. In case of one inhomogeneity we demonstrate the existence of the asymmetric fluxon states. The disappearance of the mixed fluxon-antifluxon states is shown when the position of the inhomogeneity shifted to the end of the junction. In case of two inhomogeneities the change of the amplitude of Josephson current through the inhomogeneity in the end of the junction makes strong effect on the stability of the fluxon states and smoothes the maximums on the dependence 'critical current-magnetic field'.

  20. Vortex structure in a long Josephson junction with two inhomogeneities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreeva, O. Yu.; Boyadjiev, T. L.; Shukrinov, Yu. M.

    2007-09-01

    We study the vortex structure in the long Josephson junctions with one and two rectangular inhomogeneities in the barrier layer. In case of one inhomogeneity we demonstrate the existence of the asymmetric fluxon states. The disappearance of the mixed fluxon-antifluxon states is shown when the position of the inhomogeneity shifted to the end of the junction. In case of two inhomogeneities the change of the amplitude of Josephson current through the inhomogeneity in the end of the junction makes strong effect on the stability of the fluxon states and smoothes the maximums on the dependence “critical current-magnetic field”.

  1. Molecular beam epitaxy growth of germanium junctions for multi-junction solar cell applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, T.; Faucher, J.; Lee, M. L.

    2016-11-01

    We report on the molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth and device characteristics of Ge solar cells. Integrating a Ge bottom cell beneath a lattice-matched triple junction stack grown by MBE could enable ultra-high efficiencies without metamorphic growth or wafer bonding. However, a diffused junction cannot be readily formed in Ge by MBE due to the low sticking coefficient of group-V molecules on Ge surfaces. We therefore realized Ge junctions by growth of homo-epitaxial n-Ge on p-Ge wafers within a standard III-V MBE system. We then fabricated Ge solar cells, finding growth temperature and post-growth annealing to be key factors for achieving high efficiency. Open-circuit voltage and fill factor values of ~0.175 V and ~0.59 without a window layer were obtained, both of which are comparable to diffused Ge junctions formed by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy. We also demonstrate growth of high-quality, single-domain GaAs on the Ge junction, as needed for subsequent growth of III-V subcells, and that the surface passivation afforded by the GaAs layer slightly improves the Ge cell performance.

  2. An induced junction photovoltaic cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Call, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Silicon solar cells operating with induced junctions rather than diffused junctions have been fabricated and tested. Induced junctions were created by forming an inversion layer near the surface of the silicon by supplying a sheet of positive charge above the surface. Measurements of the response of the inversion layer cell to light of different wavelengths indicated it to be more sensitive to the shorter wavelengths of the sun's spectrum than conventional cells. The greater sensitivity occurs because of the shallow junction and the strong electric field at the surface.

  3. Coherent Magnetic Switching in a Permalloy Submicron Junction

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Junlin; Lu, Xianyang; Zhang, Jason; Ling, Hua; Wu, Jing; Zhou, Yan; Xu, Yongbing

    2016-01-01

    This work provides a numerical micromagnetic study of the magnetic switching of a submicron magnetic junction in a Permalloy (Ni80Fe20) cross structure. The simulation results demonstrate that the magnetic domain at the junction can be controlled to switch coherently by the applied magnetic field. This coherent magnetic switching in the cross structure has been found to be reversible and the 2-bit information can be written in the magnetic junction. For information storage, this kind of device can also realize the function of a quaternary arithmetic unit. By varying the direction of the applied magnetic field, we have demonstrated that this magnetic junction could be the building block for a magnetoresistive random access memory (MRAM) or a quaternary magnetic arithmetic unit.

  4. Josephson junction microwave modulators for qubit control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naaman, O.; Strong, J. A.; Ferguson, D. G.; Egan, J.; Bailey, N.; Hinkey, R. T.

    2017-02-01

    We demonstrate Josephson junction based double-balanced mixer and phase shifter circuits operating at 6-10 GHz and integrate these components to implement both a monolithic amplitude/phase vector modulator and an I/Q quadrature mixer. The devices are actuated by flux signals, dissipate no power on chip, exhibit input saturation powers in excess of 1 nW, and provide cryogenic microwave modulation solutions for integrated control of superconducting qubits.

  5. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Free radical chlorination of methane is used in organic chemistry to introduce free radical/chain reactions. In spite of its common occurrence, demonstrations of the reaction are uncommon. Therefore, such a demonstration is provided, including background information, preparation of reactants/reaction vessel, introduction of reactants, irradiation,…

  6. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses a supplement to the "water to rose" demonstration in which a pink color is produced. Also discusses blood buffer demonstrations, including hydrolysis of sodium bicarbonate, simulated blood buffer, metabolic acidosis, natural compensation of metabolic acidosis, metabolic alkalosis, acidosis treatment, and alkalosis treatment. Procedures…

  7. Complete Demonstration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yelon, Stephen; Maddocks, Peg

    1986-01-01

    Describes four-step approach to educational demonstration: tell learners they will have to perform; what they should notice; describe each step before doing it; and require memorization of steps. Examples illustrate use of this process to demonstrate a general mental strategy, and industrial design, supervisory, fine motor, and specific…

  8. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Describes two laboratory demonstrations in chemistry. One uses dry ice, freon, and freezer bags to demonstrate volume changes, vapor-liquid equilibrium, a simulation of a rain forest, and vaporization. The other uses the clock reaction technique to illustrate fast reactions and kinetic problems in releasing carbon dioxide during respiration. (TW)

  9. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Outlines a simple, inexpensive way of demonstrating electroplating using the reaction between nickel ions and copper metal. Explains how to conduct a demonstration of the electrolysis of water by using a colored Na2SO4 solution as the electrolyte so that students can observe the pH changes. (TW)

  10. Antibodies against Pax6 immunostain amacrine and ganglion cells and neuronal progenitors, but not rod precursors, in the normal and regenerating retina of the goldfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitchcock, P F; Macdonald, R E; VanDeRyt, J T; Wilson, S W

    1996-03-01

    Pax6 is a developmental regulatory gene that plays a key role in the development of the embryonic brain, eye, and retina. This gene is also expressed in discrete groups of neurons within the adult brain. In this study, antibodies raised against a fusion protein from a zebra fish pax6 cDNA were used to investigate the expression of the pax6 gene in the mature, growing, and regenerating retina of the goldfish. On western blots of retinal proteins, the pax6 antibodies recognize a single band at the approximate size of the zebra fish pax6 protein. In retinal sections, the antibodies label the nuclei of mature amacrine and some ganglion cells. At the retinal margin, where neurogenesis and cellular differentiation continually occur in goldfish, the antibodies label neuronal progenitors and the newly postmitotic neurons. Following injury and during neuronal regeneration, the antibodies label mitotically active progenitors of regenerating neurons. Rod precursors, proliferating cells that normally give rise solely to rod photoreceptors and are the presumed antecedents of the injury-stimulated neuronal progenitors, are not immunostained by antibodies to the pax6 protein. The results of this study document the identity of pax6-expressing cells in the mature retina and demonstrate that in the goldfish pax6 is expressed in neuronal progenitors during both retinal growth and regeneration.

  11. Raman Scattering at Plasmonic Junctions Shorted by Conductive Molecular Bridges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Hu, Dehong; Apkarian, V. Ara; Hess, Wayne P.

    2013-04-10

    Intensity spikes in Raman scattering, accompanied by switching between line spectra and band spectra, can be assigned to shorting the junction plasmon through molecular conductive bridges. This is demonstrated through Raman trajectories recorded at a plasmonic junction formed by a gold AFM tip in contact with a silver surface coated either with biphenyl-4,4’-dithiol or biphenyl-4-thiol. The fluctuations are absent in the monothiol. In effect, the making and breaking of chemical bonds is tracked.

  12. Development of Junction Elements from Study of the Bionics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wilson Kindlein Junior; Luis Henrique Alves C(a)ndido; André Canal Marques; Sandra Souza dos Santos; Maurício da Silva Viegas

    2007-01-01

    The applications of bionic methodology developed by the Laboratory of Design and Material Selection as basis in the creation of junction elements were demonstrated.These elements favor the application of Ecodesign in reference to the effectiveness of product dismount aiming the reduction of ambient impact in all its phases of use.The creation,the development and the confection of new junction elements were described,and case studies of new products developed specificallv with this purpose were presented.

  13. Graphene junction field-effect transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Tzu-Min; Borsa, Tomoko; van Zeghbroeck, Bart

    2014-03-01

    We have demonstrated for the first time a novel graphene transistor gated by a graphene/semiconductor junction rather than an insulating gate. The transistor operates much like a semiconductor junction Field Effect Transistor (jFET) where the depletion layer charge in the semiconductor modulates the mobile charge in the channel. The channel in our case is the graphene rather than another semiconductor layer. An increased reverse bias of the graphene/n-silicon junction increases the positive charge in the depletion region and thereby reduces the total charge in the graphene. We fabricated individual graphene/silicon junctions as well as graphene jFETs (GjFETs) on n-type (4.5x1015 cm-3) silicon with Cr/Au electrodes and 3 μm gate length. As a control device, we also fabricated back-gated graphene MOSFETs using a 90nm SiO2 on a p-type silicon substrate (1019 cm-3) . The graphene was grown by APCVD on copper foil and transferred with PMMA onto the silicon substrate. The GjFET exhibited an on-off ratio of 3.75, an intrinsic graphene doping of 1.75x1012 cm-2, compared to 1.17x1013 cm-2 in the MOSFET, and reached the Dirac point at 13.5V. Characteristics of the junctions and transistors were measured as a function of temperature and in response to light. Experimental data and a comparison with simulations will be presented.

  14. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L.

    1990-01-01

    Included are three demonstrations that include the phase change of ice when under pressure, viscoelasticity and colloid systems, and flame tests for metal ions. The materials, procedures, probable results, and applications to real life situations are included. (KR)

  15. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Presented is a Corridor Demonstration which can be set up in readily accessible areas such as hallways or lobbies. Equipment is listed for a display of three cells (solar cells, fuel cells, and storage cells) which develop electrical energy. (CS)

  16. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Presents three demonstrations suitable for undergraduate chemistry classes. Focuses on experiments with calcium carbide, the induction by iron of the oxidation of iodide by dichromate, and the classical iodine clock reaction. (ML)

  17. Flicker (1/f) noise in tunnel junction DC SQUIDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, R.H.; Clarke, J.; Goubau, W.M.; Martinis, J.M.; Pegrum, C.M.; Van Harlingen, D.J.

    1983-04-01

    We have measured the spectral density of the 1/f voltage noise in current-biased resistively shunted Josephson tunnel junctions and dc SQUIDs. A theory in which fluctuations in the temperature give rise to fluctuations in the critical current and hence in the voltage predicts the magnitude of the noise quite accurately for junctions with areas of about 2 x 10/sup 4/ ..mu..m/sup 2/, but significantly overestimates the noise for junctions with areas of about 6 ..mu..m/sup 2/. DC SQUIDs fabricated from these two types of junctions exhibit substantially more 1/f voltage noise than would be predicted from a model in which the noise arises from critical current fluctuations in the junctions. This result was confirmed by an experiment involving two different bias current and flux modulation schemes, which demonstrated that the predominant 1/f voltage noise arises not from critical current fluctuations, but from some unknown source that can be regarded as an apparent 1/f flux noise. Measurements on five different configurations of dc SQUIDs fabricated with thin-film tunnel junctions and with widely varying areas, inductances, and junction capacitances show that the spectral density of the 1/f equivalent flux noise is roughtly constant, within a factor of three of (10/sup -10//f)phi/sup 2//sub 0/Hz/sup -1/. It is emphasized that 1/f flux noise may not be the predominant source of 1/f noise in SQUIDS fabricated with other technologies.

  18. Mixing in T-junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, Jacobus B.W.; van der Wal, S.

    1996-01-01

    The transport processes that are involved in the mixing of two gases in a T-junction mixer are investigated. The turbulent flow field is calculated for the T-junction with the k- turbulence model by FLOW3D. In the mathematical model the transport of species is described with a mixture fraction

  19. Selective immunostaining of Mehlis' gland of Opisthorchis viverrini by antibody against rat diacylglycerol kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hipkaeo, Wiphawi; Chaisiwamongkol, Kowit; Kanla, Pipatphong; Maleewong, Wanchai; Intapan, Pewpan M; Sadaow, Lakkhana; Hozumi, Yasukazu; Goto, Kaoru; Kondo, Hisatake

    2014-09-01

    The Mehlis' gland of Opisthorchis viverrini was selectively and intensely immunopositive with an antibody against rat diacylglycerol kinase gamma, and its entire structure with associated radiating processes was clearly demonstrated by immuno-light microscopy. In immuno-electron microscopy, the immunopositive processes were revealed to contain many vesicles and vacuoles and the immunoreactive materials were deposited diffusely in the cytoplasm except for the vesicular interior. The present findings suggest that diacylglycerol kinase is present and plays roles in PKC (protein kinase C)-related signaling in the Mehlis' gland of O. viverrini. This further suggests the possibility of a new way to protect from the infection of O. viverrini in humans by using diacylglycerol kinase as a therapeutic target.

  20. Newly formed skeletal muscle fibers are prone to false positive immunostaining by rabbit antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ditte C; Kliem, Anette; Schrøder, Henrik Daa

    2011-01-01

    Reports on muscle biology and regeneration often implicate immuno(cyto/histo)chemical protein characterization using rabbit polyclonal antibodies. In this study we demonstrate that newly formed myofibers are especially prone to false positive staining by rabbit antibodies and this unwanted staining...... is only recognized (1) by a negative muscle tissue control that does not harbor the protein to be examined (fx. from knockout mouse) or (2) by use of a nonsense rabbit antibody that has been prepared in the same way as the antibody of interest. However, many muscle immuno(cyto/histo)chemical studies only...... rely on controls that reveal non-specific binding by the secondary antibody and neglect that the primary rabbit antibody itself may cause false positive staining of the muscle. We suggest that reliable immuno-based protein detection in newly formed muscle fibers at least requires a nonsense rabbit...

  1. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations to illustrate characteristics of substances. Outlines a method to detect the changes in pH levels during the electrolysis of water. Uses water pistols, one filled with methane gas and the other filled with water, to illustrate the differences in these two substances. (TW)

  2. ICT Demonstration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tine Wirenfeldt; Bay, Gina

    In this demonstration we present and discuss two interrelated on-line learning resources aimed at supporting international students at Danish universities in building study skills (the Study Metro) and avoiding plagiarism (Stopplagiarism). We emphasize the necessity of designing online learning r...

  3. Memory cell operation based on small Josephson junctions arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braiman, Y.; Nair, N.; Rezac, J.; Imam, N.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we analyze a cryogenic memory cell circuit based on a small coupled array of Josephson junctions. All the basic memory operations (e.g., write, read, and reset) are implemented on the same circuit and different junctions in the array can in principle be utilized for these operations. The presented memory operation paradigm is fundamentally different from conventional single quantum flux operation logics (SFQ). As an example, we demonstrate memory operation driven by a SFQ pulse employing an inductively coupled array of three Josephson junctions. We have chosen realistic Josephson junction parameters based on state-of-the-art fabrication capabilities and have calculated access times and access energies for basic memory cell operations. We also implemented an optimization procedure based on the simulated annealing algorithm to calculate the optimized and typical values of access times and access energies.

  4. Metallic Junction Thermoelectric Device Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duzik, Adam J.; Choi, Sang H.

    2017-01-01

    Thermoelectric junctions made of semiconductors have existed in radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG) for deep space missions, but are currently being adapted for terrestrial energy harvesting. Unfortunately, these devices are inefficient, operating at only 7% efficiency. This low efficiency has driven efforts to make high-figure-of-merit thermoelectric devices, which require a high electrical conductivity but a low thermal conductivity, a combination that is difficult to achieve. Lowered thermal conductivity has increased efficiency, but at the cost of power output. An alternative setup is to use metallic junctions rather than semiconductors as thermoelectric devices. Metals have orders of magnitude more electrons and electronic conductivities higher than semiconductors, but thermal conductivity is higher as well. To evaluate the viability of metallic junction thermoelectrics, a two dimensional heat transfer MATLAB simulation was constructed to calculate efficiency and power output. High Seebeck coefficient alloys, Chromel (90%Ni-10%Cr) and Constantan (55%Cu-45%Ni), produced efficiencies of around 20-30%. Parameters such as the number of layers of junctions, lateral junction density, and junction sizes for both series- and parallel-connected junctions were explored.

  5. V-ets erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog (avian)/Trefoil factor 3/high-molecular-weight cytokeratin triple immunostain: a novel tissue-based biomarker in prostate cancer with potential clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyung; Chiu, Ya-Lin; Rubin, Mark A; Demichelis, Francesca; Mosquera, Juan Miguel

    2013-10-01

    Trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) is associated with various cancers and overexpressed in a subset of prostate cancers. Functional studies suggest that v-ets erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog (avian) (ERG) down-regulates TFF3 expression in hormone-naïve prostate cancer. To characterize this inverse relationship, we developed a triple immunostain encompassing ERG, TFF3, and high-molecular-weight cytokeratin. Triple stain was performed on 96 tumors and 52 benign cases represented in tissue microarrays. Distinct ERG and TFF3 protein was expressed in 45% (43/96) and 36% (35/96) of prostate cancers, respectively. Coexpression was observed in 5% (5/96) of tumor cases, and 24% (23/96) did not express ERG or TFF3. The inverse expression of ERG and TFF3 was significant (P tumors demonstrating TFF3 expression. Sensitivity and specificity of combined ERG and TFF3 expression in detecting prostate cancer were 76% and 96%, respectively. The feasibility of triple immunostain protocol was validated in a set of 76 needle biopsies. The application of this multiplex in situ biomarker for molecular characterization of prostate cancer and as a supplemental diagnostic and prognostic tool in prostate needle biopsies should be further explored.

  6. High-speed carrier-depletion silicon Mach-Zehnder optical modulators with lateral PN junctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Trevor Reed

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents new experimental data from a lateral PN junction silicon Mach-Zehnder optical modulator. Efficiencies in the 1.4V.cm to 1.9V.cm range are demonstrated for drive voltages between 0V and 6V. High speed operation up to 52Gbit/s is also presented. The performance of the device which has its PN junction positioned in the centre of the waveguide is then compared to previously reported data from a lateral PN junction device with the junction self-aligned to the edge of the waveguide rib. An improvement in modulation efficiency is demonstrated when the junction is positioned in the centre of the waveguide. Finally we propose schemes for achieving high modulation efficiency whilst retaining self-aligned formation of the PN junction.

  7. [Sorting role of p16(INK4a)/Ki-67 double immunostaining in the cervical cytology specimens of ASCUS and LSIL cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, J; Zhu, H T; Zhao, J J; Su, J Z; Xia, Y D

    2017-05-08

    Objective: To investigate the sorting effect of p16(INK4a)/Ki-67 double immunostaining method in patients with atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS) or low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL) cytology results. Methods: Four-hundred and twenty cases collected during April 2014 to February 2015 of cervical cytology of ASCUS (n=318) and LSIL (n=102) were selected, and residual liquid-based cytology specimens were used for p16(INK4a)/Ki-67 double immunostaining. The sensitivity and specificity of the detection of cervical precancerous lesions and cervical cancer were calculated, and the results were compared with high risk HPV. Taking histological follow-up as the gold standard, the test was considered positive when at least one cell exhibited p16(INK4a)/Ki-67 co-staining, without requirement of adjunct morphologic interpretation of positive cells. Results: Further screening CIN2+ in cytology ASCUS and LSIL group , the sensitivity of p16(INK4a)/Ki-67 double immunostaining was slightly lower than high risk HPV (84.2% vs. 94.7%), while the specificity was higher (84.0% vs. 53.9%). For ASCUS patients, the sensitivity of p16(INK4a)/Ki-67 double immunostaining and high risk HPV was 82.6% and 91.3%, and the specificity was 88.8% and 63.7%, respectively. For LSIL patients, the sensitivity of p16(INK4a)/Ki-67 double immunostaining and high risk HPV was 86.7% and 100.0%, and the specificity was 67.8% and 20.7%, respectively. For patients younger and older than 30 years, specificity of p16(INK4a)/Ki-67 double immunostaining was both higher than that of high risk HPV (80.8% vs. 42.3%; 84.6% vs. 56.9%). Conclusions: p16(INK4a)/Ki-67 double immunostaining can effectively identify the high risk population in ASCUS or LSIL, with higher specificity than high risk HPV test. p16(INK4a)/Ki-67 double immunostaining may benefit patients younger than 30 years of age as a preliminary or potential cytology-combining screening tool.

  8. Thermal electric effects in Fe|GaAs|Fe tunnel junctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xintao Jia

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We study the spin polarized thermoelectric effects on Fe|GaAs|Fe tunnel junction using a generalized Landauer-Büttiker formalism, where the energy flow is described on the same footing as the electric current. The Seebeck coefficient of tunnel junction will change sign as the GaAs thickness increases. We demonstrate the thermally induced STT on Fe|GaAs|Fe tunnel junction is robust against the interfacial defects and is non-negligible.

  9. Imaging of cervicothoracic junction trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wongwaisayawan S

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sirote Wongwaisayawan,1 Ruedeekorn Suwannanon,2 Rathachai Kaewlai11Department of Radiology, Ramathibodi Hospital and Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand; 2Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, ThailandAbstract: Cervicothoracic junction trauma is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in trauma patients. Imaging has played an important role in identifying injuries and guiding appropriate, timely therapy. Computed tomography is currently a method of choice for diagnosing cervicothoracic junction trauma, in which the pattern of injuries often suggests possible mechanisms and potential injuries. In this article, the authors describe and illustrate common and uncommon injuries that can occur in the cervicothoracic junction.Keywords: cervicothoracic junction, cervical spine, trauma, imaging, radiology

  10. Influence of coupling between junctions on breakpoint current in intrinsic Josephson junctions

    OpenAIRE

    Shukrinov, Yu M.; Mahfouzi, F.

    2006-01-01

    We study theoretically the current-voltage characteristics of intrinsic Josephson junctions in high-$T_c$ superconductors. An oscillation of the breakpoint current on the outermost branch as a function of coupling $\\alpha$ and dissipation $\\beta$ parameters is found. We explain this oscillation as a result of the creation of longitudinal plasma waves at the breakpoint with different wave numbers. We demonstrate the commensurability effect and predict a group behavior of the current-voltage ch...

  11. SAGE2Splice: unmapped SAGE tags reveal novel splice junctions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byron Yu-Lin Kuo

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE not only is a method for profiling the global expression of genes, but also offers the opportunity for the discovery of novel transcripts. SAGE tags are mapped to known transcripts to determine the gene of origin. Tags that map neither to a known transcript nor to the genome were hypothesized to span a splice junction, for which the exon combination or exon(s are unknown. To test this hypothesis, we have developed an algorithm, SAGE2Splice, to efficiently map SAGE tags to potential splice junctions in a genome. The algorithm consists of three search levels. A scoring scheme was designed based on position weight matrices to assess the quality of candidates. Using optimized parameters for SAGE2Splice analysis and two sets of SAGE data, candidate junctions were discovered for 5%-6% of unmapped tags. Candidates were classified into three categories, reflecting the previous annotations of the putative splice junctions. Analysis of predicted tags extracted from EST sequences demonstrated that candidate junctions having the splice junction located closer to the center of the tags are more reliable. Nine of these 12 candidates were validated by RT-PCR and sequencing, and among these, four revealed previously uncharacterized exons. Thus, SAGE2Splice provides a new functionality for the identification of novel transcripts and exons. SAGE2Splice is available online at http://www.cisreg.ca.

  12. Engineering design of artificial vascular junctions for 3D printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiaoxiao; Bibb, Richard; Harris, Russell

    2016-06-20

    Vascular vessels, including arteries, veins and capillaries, are being printed using additive manufacturing technologies, also known as 3D printing. This paper demonstrates that it is important to follow the vascular design by nature as close as possible when 3D printing artificial vascular branches. In previous work, the authors developed an algorithm of computational geometry for constructing smooth junctions for 3D printing. In this work, computational fluid dynamics (CFDs) is used to compare the wall shear stress and blood velocity field for the junctions of different designs. The CFD model can reproduce the expected wall shear stress at locations remote from the junction. For large vessels such as veins, it is shown that ensuring the smoothness of the junction and using smaller joining angles as observed in nature is very important to avoid high wall shear stress and recirculation. The issue is however less significant for capillaries. Large joining angles make no difference to the hemodynamic behavior, which is also consistent with the fact that most capillary junctions have large joining angles. The combination of the CFD analysis and the junction construction method form a complete design method for artificial vascular vessels that can be 3D printed using additive manufacturing technologies.

  13. Renal trauma in occult ureteropelvic junction obstruction: CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sebastia, M.C.; Rodriguez-Dobao, M.; Quiroga, S.; Pallisa, E.; Martinez-Rodriguez, M.; Alvarez-Castells, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Hospital General Universitari Vall d`Hebron, Barcelona (Spain)

    1999-05-01

    The aim of this study was to present CT findings of occult ureteropelvic junction obstruction in patients with renal trauma and to describe the clinical signs and singular CT features that are characteristically observed with trauma and are relevant to management of these patients. We retrospectively reviewed 82 helical CT studies in patients with renal trauma referred to our institution. We found 13 cases of occult preexisting renal pathology, six of which were occult ureteropelvic junction obstructions. The clinical presentation, radiologic findings of trauma according to the Federle classification, and CT findings of obstructed ureteropelvic junction are presented. We found three category-I lesions (one in a horseshoe kidney), two of them treated with nephrostomy because of increased ureteropelvic junction obstruction due to pelvic clots; two category-II lesions (parenchymal and renal pelvis lacerations) that had presented only with microhematuria; and one category-IV lesion (pelvic laceration alone). Pelvic extension was demonstrated in all the cases with perirenal collections. The CT studies in all the cases with suspected ureteropelvic junction obstruction showed decreased parenchymal thickness and enhancement, and dilatation of the renal pelvis and calyx, with a normal ureter. Computed tomography can provide information to confidently diagnose underlying ureteropelvic junction obstruction in renal trauma, categorize the traumatic injury (at times clinically silent) and facilitate proper management according to the singularities observed, such us rupture of the renal pelvis alone (Federle category IV) and increasing ureteropelvic obstruction due to clots which can be decompressed by nephrostomy. (orig.) With 6 figs., 3 tabs., 13 refs.

  14. GASIS demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidas, E.H. [Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

    1995-04-01

    A prototype of the GASIS database and retrieval software has been developed and is the subject of this poster session and computer demonstration. The prototype consists of test or preliminary versions of the GASIS Reservoir Data System and Source Directory datasets and the software for query and retrieval. The prototype reservoir database covers the Rocky Mountain region and contains the full GASIS data matrix (all GASIS data elements) that will eventually be included on the CD-ROM. It is populated for development purposes primarily by the information included in the Rocky Mountain Gas Atlas. The software has been developed specifically for GASIS using Foxpro for Windows. The application is an executable file that does not require Foxpro to run. The reservoir database software includes query and retrieval, screen display, report generation, and data export functions. Basic queries by state, basin, or field name will be assisted by scrolling selection lists. A detailed query screen will allow record selection on the basis of any data field, such as depth, cumulative production, or geological age. Logical operators can be applied to any-numeric data element or combination of elements. Screen display includes a {open_quotes}browse{close_quotes} display with one record per row and a detailed single record display. Datasets can be exported in standard formats for manipulation with other software packages. The Source Directory software will allow record retrieval by database type or subject area.

  15. Electronic thermometry in tunable tunnel junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maksymovych, Petro

    2016-03-15

    A tunable tunnel junction thermometry circuit includes a variable width tunnel junction between a test object and a probe. The junction width is varied and a change in thermovoltage across the junction with respect to the change in distance across the junction is determined. Also, a change in biased current with respect to a change in distance across the junction is determined. A temperature gradient across the junction is determined based on a mathematical relationship between the temperature gradient, the change in thermovoltage with respect to distance and the change in biased current with respect to distance. Thermovoltage may be measured by nullifying a thermoelectric tunneling current with an applied voltage supply level. A piezoelectric actuator may modulate the probe, and thus the junction width, to vary thermovoltage and biased current across the junction. Lock-in amplifiers measure the derivatives of the thermovoltage and biased current modulated by varying junction width.

  16. Confocal Annular Josephson Tunnel Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaco, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    The physics of Josephson tunnel junctions drastically depends on their geometrical configurations and here we show that also tiny geometrical details play a determinant role. More specifically, we develop the theory of short and long annular Josephson tunnel junctions delimited by two confocal ellipses. The behavior of a circular annular Josephson tunnel junction is then seen to be simply a special case of the above result. For junctions having a normalized perimeter less than one, the threshold curves in the presence of an in-plane magnetic field of arbitrary orientations are derived and computed even in the case with trapped Josephson vortices. For longer junctions, a numerical analysis is carried out after the derivation of the appropriate motion equation for the Josephson phase. We found that the system is modeled by a modified and perturbed sine-Gordon equation with a space-dependent effective Josephson penetration length inversely proportional to the local junction width. Both the fluxon statics and dynamics are deeply affected by the non-uniform annulus width. Static zero-field multiple-fluxon solutions exist even in the presence of a large bias current. The tangential velocity of a traveling fluxon is not determined by the balance between the driving and drag forces due to the dissipative losses. Furthermore, the fluxon motion is characterized by a strong radial inward acceleration which causes electromagnetic radiation concentrated at the ellipse equatorial points.

  17. Blockade of Gap Junction Hemichannel Suppresses Disease Progression in Mouse Models of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Alzheimer's Disease: e21108

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hideyuki Takeuchi; Hiroyuki Mizoguchi; Yukiko Doi; Shijie Jin; Mariko Noda; Jianfeng Liang; Hua Li; Yan Zhou; Rarami Mori; Satoko Yasuoka; Endong Li; Bijay Parajuli; Jun Kawanokuchi; Yoshifumi Sonobe; Jun Sato; Koji Yamanaka; Gen Sobue; Tetsuya Mizuno; Akio Suzumura

    2011-01-01

    ... neurotoxic/neuroprotective roles of microglia and hardly affected disease progression. We previously demonstrated that activated microglia release a large amount of glutamate specifically through gap junction hemichannel...

  18. Search for Conditions to Detect Epigenetic Marks and Nuclear Proteins in Immunostaining of the Testis and Cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisashi Ideno

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The localization of nuclear proteins and modified histone tails changes during cell differentiation at the tissue as well as at the cellular level. Immunostaining in paraffin sections is the most powerful approach available to evaluate protein localization. Since nuclear proteins are sensitive to fixation, immunohistochemical conditions should be optimized in light of the particular antibodies and tissues employed. In this study, we searched for optimal conditions to detect histone modification at histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9 and H3K9 methyltransferase G9a in the testis and cartilage in paraffin sections. In the testis, antigen retrieval (AR was indispensable for detecting H3K9me1 and me3, G9a, and nuclear protein proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA. With AR, shorter fixation times yielded better results for the detection of G9a and PCNA. Without AR, H3K9me2 and H3K9ac could be detected at shorter fixation times in primary spermatocytes of the testis. In contrast to the testis, all antibodies tested could detect their epitopes irrespective of AR application in the growth plate cartilage. Thus, conditions for the detection of epigenetic marks and nuclear proteins should be optimized in consideration of fixation time and AR application in different tissues and antibodies.

  19. The Prevalence and pattern of HPV-16 immunostaining in uterine cervical carcinomas in Ethiopian women: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona M Rashed

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Cancer of the cervix uteri is the second most common cancer among women worldwide. The association of human papillomavirus (HPV infection with cervical carcinogenesis is well documented. This is a pilot study aiming to studying the prevalence and the pattern of Human Papilloma Virus Type 16 (HPV16 by immunostaining in the tissues of cervical carcinomas of Ethiopian women. METHODS: 20 specimens of uterine cervical carcinomas were studied histopathologically and immunohistochemically for HPV16. RESULTS: Histologically the specimens were classified as: Ten cases were Non Keratinized Squamous cell carcinoma (NKSCC, six cases were Keratinized Squamous Cell Carcinoma (KSCC and four cases were Adenocarcinoma (ADC. Immunohistochemistry study showed positivity in eleven cases (55%; seven cases (35% were non-keratinized squamous cell carcinoma; three cases (15% were keratinized squamous cell carcinoma and one case (5% belonged to the adenocarcinomas. CONCLUSION: This study reveals a significant detection of HPV in Ethiopian women by the use of advanced techniques such as Immunohistochemistry (IHC. The data of this study suggested that the marked expression of the HPV 16 was in the less differentiated uterine cervix carcinomas

  20. Improved method for immunostaining of mucin separated by supported molecular matrix electrophoresis by optimizing the matrix composition and fixation procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuno, Yu-Ki; Dong, Weijie; Yokoyama, Seiya; Yonezawa, Suguru; Saito, Takuro; Gotoh, Mitsukazu; Narimatsu, Hisashi; Kameyama, Akihiko

    2011-07-01

    Mucins are a family of heavily glycosylated high molecular mass proteins that have great potential as novel clinical biomarkers for the diagnosis of various malignant tumors. Supported molecular matrix electrophoresis (SMME) is a new type of membrane electrophoresis that can be used to characterize mucins. In SMME, mucins migrate in a molecular matrix supported by membrane materials. Here, we have developed an immunostaining method for the identification of SMME-separated mucins. The novel method involves stably fixing the mucins onto the SMME membrane and optimizing the molecular matrix for the fixation process. We applied this technique for the detection of MUC1 produced from three cancer cell lines (T47D, HPAF-II and BxPC3) and also analyzed their O-linked glycans by mass spectrometry. Our results revealed that properties of the MUC1 molecules from the three cell lines are different in terms of migrating position in SMME and glycan profile. The present method allows simple and rapid characterization of mucins in terms of both glycans and core proteins. The method will be a useful tool for the exploration of mucin alterations associated with various diseases such as cancer.

  1. Octagonal Defects at Carbon Nanotube Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaskólski, W.; Pelc, M.; Chico, Leonor; Ayuela, A.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate knee-shaped junctions of semiconductor zigzag carbon nanotubes. Two dissimilar octagons appear at such junctions; one of them can reconstruct into a pair of pentagons. The junction with two octagons presents two degenerate localized states at Fermi energy (EF). The reconstructed junction has only one state near EF, indicating that these localized states are related to the octagonal defects. The inclusion of Coulomb interaction splits the localized states in the junction with two octagons, yielding an antiferromagnetic system. PMID:24089604

  2. Gene Expression Analysis of Immunostained Endothelial Cells Isolated from Formaldehyde-fixated Paraffin Embedded Tumors Using Laser Capture Microdissection – a Technical Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Tomoatsu; Okiji, Takashi; Kaneko, Reika; Suda, Hideaki; Nör, Jacques E.

    2009-01-01

    Laser capture microdissection (LCM) allows microscopic procurement of specific cell types from tissue sections that can then be used for gene expression analysis. In conventional LCM, frozen tissues stained with hematoxylin are normally used to the molecular analysis. Recent studies suggested that it is possible to carry out gene expression analysis of formaldehyde-fixated paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissues that were stained with hematoxylin. However, it is still unclear if quantitative gene expression analyses can be performed from LCM cells from FFPE tissues that were subjected to immunostaining to enhance identification of target cells. In this proof-of-principle study, we analyzed by RT-PCR and real time PCR the expression of genes in factor VIII immunostained human endothelial cells that were dissected from FFPE tissues by LCM. We observed that immunostaining should be performed at 4°C to preserve the mRNA from the cells. The expression of Bcl-2 in the endothelial cells was evaluated by RT-PCR and by real time PCR. GAPDH and 18S were used as house keeping genes for RT-PCR and real time PCR, respectively. This report unveils a method for quantitative gene expression analysis in cells that were identified by immunostaining and retrieved by LCM from FFPE tissues. This method is ideally suited for the analysis of relatively rare cell types within a tissue, and should improve on our ability to perform differential diagnosis of pathologies as compared to conventional LCM. PMID:19425073

  3. Dual color multiplex TTF-1 + Napsin A and p63 + CK5 immunostaining for subcategorizing of poorly differentiated pulmonary non-small carcinomas into adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma in fine needle aspiration specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seema Sethi

    2012-01-01

    stain TTF-1 + Napsin A could be categorized as SCC. Two of the seven (2 / 7 PDC cases were positive for dual stain TTF-1 + Napsin A and negative for dual stain p63 + CK5, consistent with ADC. Conclusions: Simultaneous coordinate or individual immunostaining for Napsin A / TTF-1 in ADC and p63 / CK5 in SCC demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity. The panel with multiplex Napsin A / TTF-1 and p63 / CK5 dual color immunostains could specifically subcategorize PDC into ADC and SCC in lung FNA specimens. Multiplex dual color Napsin A / TTF-1 and p63 / CK5 immunostaining is especially recommended for evaluation of FNA specimens with relatively scant cellularity.

  4. Effect of thermal-annealing on the magnetoresistance of manganite-based junctions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xie Yan-Wu; Shen Bao-Gen; Sun Ji-Rong

    2008-01-01

    Thermal-annealing has been widely used in modulating the oxygen content of manganites. In this work, we have studied the effect of annealing on the transport properties and magnetoresistance of junctions composed of a La0.9Ca0.1MnO3+δ film and a Nb-doped SrTiO3 substrate. We have demonstrated that the magnetoresistance of junctions is strongly dependent on the annealing conditions: From the junction annealed-in-air to the junction annealed-in-vacuum, the magnetoresistance near 0-V bias can vary from ~-60% to~0. A possible mechanism accounting for this phenomenon is discussed.

  5. Turn-on and turn-off voltages of an avalanche p—n junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guoqing, Zhang; Dejun, Han; Changjun, Zhu; Xuejun, Zhai

    2012-09-01

    Characteristics of the turn-on and turn-off voltage of avalanche p—n junctions were demonstrated and studied. As opposed to existing reports, the differences between the turn-on and turn-off voltage cannot be neglected when the size of the p—n junction is in the order of microns. The difference increases inversely with the area of a junction, exerting significant influences on characterizing some parameters of devices composed of small avalanche junctions. Theoretical analyses show that the mechanism for the difference lies in the increase effect of the threshold multiplication factor at the turn-on voltage of a junction when the area of a junction decreases. Moreover, the “breakdown voltage" in the formula of the avalanche asymptotic current is, in essence, the avalanche turn-off voltage, and consequently, the traditional expression of the avalanche asymptotic current and the gain of a Geiger mode avalanche photodiode were modified.

  6. Comparison of the magneto-Peltier and magneto-Seebeck effects in magnetic tunnel junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shan, J.; Dejene, F. K.; Leutenantsmeyer, J. C.; Flipse, J.; Munzenberg, M.; van Wees, B. J.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding heat generation and transport processes in a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) is a significant step towards improving its application in current memory devices. Recent work has experimentally demonstrated the magneto-Seebeck effect in MTJs, where the Seebeck coefficient of the junction v

  7. Modelling of Dual-Junction Solar Cells including Tunnel Junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelaziz Amine

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Monolithically stacked multijunction solar cells based on III–V semiconductors materials are the state-of-art of approach for high efficiency photovoltaic energy conversion, in particular for space applications. The individual subcells of the multi-junction structure are interconnected via tunnel diodes which must be optically transparent and connect the component cells with a minimum electrical resistance. The quality of these diodes determines the output performance of the solar cell. The purpose of this work is to contribute to the investigation of the tunnel electrical resistance of such a multi-junction cell through the analysis of the current-voltage (J-V characteristics under illumination. Our approach is based on an equivalent circuit model of a diode for each subcell. We examine the effect of tunnel resistance on the performance of a multi-junction cell using minimization of the least squares technique.

  8. Oxygen adsorption at noble metal/TiO2 junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossein-Babaei, F.; Alaei-Sheini, Navid; Lajvardi, Mehdi M.

    2016-03-01

    Electric conduction in titanium dioxide is known to be oxygen sensitive and the conductivity of a TiO2 ceramic body is determined mainly by the concentration of its naturally occurring oxygen vacancy. Recently, fabrications and electronic features of a number of noble metal/TiO2-based electronic devices, such as solar cells, UV detectors, gas sensors and memristive devices have been demonstrated. Here, we investigate the effect of oxygen adsorption at the noble metal/TiO2 junction in such devices, and show the potentials of these junctions in chemical sensor fabrication. The polycrystalline, poly-phase TiO2 layers are grown by the selective and controlled oxidation of titanium thin films vacuum deposited on silica substrates. Noble metal thin films are deposited on the oxide layers by physical vapor deposition. Current-voltage (I-V) diagrams of the fabricated devices are studied for Ag/, Au/, and Pt/TiO2 samples. The raw samples show no junction energy barrier. After a thermal annealing in air at 250° C, I-V diagrams change drastically. The annealed samples demonstrate highly non-linear I-V indicating the formation of high Schottky energy barriers at the noble metal/TiO2 junctions. The phenomenon is described based on the effect of the oxygen atoms adsorbed at the junction.

  9. Reduced immunostaining for the extracellular Ca{sup 2+} - sensing receptor in primary and uremic secondary hyperparathyroidism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kifor, O.; Moore, F.D. Jr.; Wang, P. [Brigham and Women`s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    Most parathyroid adenomas and some pathological parathyroid glands from patients with primary parathyroid hyperplasia or severe uremic secondary/tertiary hyperparathyroidism show an elevated set-point. In the present study, we investigated whether expression of the Ca{sup 2+}{sub o}-sensing receptor protein recently cloned from bovine parathyroid, a key component in Ca{sup 2+}{sub o}-regulated PTH release, is altered in primary and uremic hyperparathyroidism. Using immunohistochemistry with specific antireceptor antibodies, we compared immunoreactivity of the receptor protein in 14 adenomas, biopsies of 24 normal glands from this same group of patients, and 8 hyperplastic parathyroid glands from 2 individuals with uremic hyparathyroidism. The results show a substantial reduction in the intensity of immunostaining for the receptor protein that averaged nearly 60% for both adenomas and hyperplastic glands, as quantitated by image analysis. There was considerable variation in staining intensity among different pathological parathyroid glands, even in those from the same patient with secondary hyperparathyroidism. In addition, both adenomas and hyperplastic glands had, in some cases, isolated chief cells and groups of cells, sometimes around the periphery of an abnormal gland, with receptor staining equivalent to that of normal parathyroid cells, whereas the bulk of the cells in the same gland showed a marked decrease in staining. Thus, there is a variable, but substantial, reduction in the immunoreactivity of the Ca{sup 2+}{sub o}-sensing receptor protein in both parathyroid adenomas and uremic hyperparathyroidism, as assessed by immunohistochemistry, that probably results from reduced expression of the receptor protein and may contribute to the increase in the set-point often observed in these patients. 49 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Correlation between molecular biomarkers and risk factors for the clinical progression of benign prostatic hyperplasia using tissue microarray immunostaining

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Ding; Yang Bing; Zhou Zhe; Pan Dongliang; Zhang Xianghua

    2014-01-01

    Background The pathogenesis of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) has been widely studied,and several biomarkers are known to play roles in its development.This study aimed to investigate the possible role of cysteine-rich protein 61 (CYR61),vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF),androgen receptor (AR),interleukin-6 (IL-6),cytochrome c,caspase-3,and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in the clinical progression of BPH.Methods Tissue specimens from 96 BPH cases who underwent transurethral resection of the prostate were processed and transferred to tissue microarrays.Patient age,prostate volume,serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level,and International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) of all BPH cases were collected before surgery.The expression of CYR61,VEGF,AR,IL-6,cytochrome c,caspase-3,and PCNA was examined by immunostaining in the BPH specimens,and any possible correlation between the different biomarkers and risk factors for BPH clinical progression was analyzed.Results The expression of CYR61,VEGF,AR,IL-6,cytochrome c,caspase-3,and PCNA in the BPH cases was 68.8% (66/96),77.1% (74/96),43.8% (42/96),31.3% (30/96),35.4% (34/96),56.3% (54/96),and 29.2% (28/96),respectively.The expression of both CYR61 and VEGF was positively correlated with patient age,prostate volume,and serum PSA level (P <0.05).Furthermore,cytochrome c and caspase-3 expression were inversely related to prostate volume (P <0.05),and AR expression was positively related to serum PSA level (P <0.05).Conclusion CYR61 and VEGF expression might serve as biomarkers for predicting the clinical progression of BPH due to effects on stromal cell proliferation and angiogenesis.

  11. Influence of Coupling between Junctions on Breakpoint Current in Intrinsic Josephson Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukrinov, Yu. M.; Mahfouzi, F.

    2007-04-01

    We study theoretically the current-voltage characteristics of intrinsic Josephson junctions in high-Tc superconductors. An oscillation of the breakpoint current on the outermost branch as a function of coupling α and dissipation β parameters is found. We explain this oscillation as a result of the creation of longitudinal plasma waves at the breakpoint with different wave numbers. We demonstrate the commensurability effect and predict a group behavior of the current-voltage characteristics for the stacks with a different number of junctions. A method to determine the wave number of longitudinal plasma waves from α and β dependence of the breakpoint current is suggested. We model the α and β dependence of the breakpoint current and obtain good agreement with the results of the simulation.

  12. Drosophila RSK negatively regulates bouton number at the neuromuscular junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Matthias; Raabe, Thomas; Heisenberg, Martin; Sendtner, Michael

    2009-03-01

    Ribosomal S6 kinases (RSKs) are growth factor-regulated serine-threonine kinases participating in the RAS-ERK signaling pathway. RSKs have been implicated in memory formation in mammals and flies. To characterize the function of RSK at the synapse level, we investigated the effect of mutations in the rsk gene on the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) in Drosophila larvae. Immunostaining revealed transgenic expressed RSK in presynaptic regions. In mutants with a full deletion or an N-terminal partial deletion of rsk, an increased bouton number was found. Restoring the wild-type rsk function in the null mutant with a genomic rescue construct reverted the synaptic phenotype, and overexpression of the rsk-cDNA in motoneurons reduced bouton numbers. Based on previous observations that RSK interacts with the Drosophila ERK homologue Rolled, genetic epistasis experiments were performed with loss- and gain-of-function mutations in Rolled. These experiments provided evidence that RSK mediates its negative effect on bouton formation at the Drosophila NMJ by inhibition of ERK signaling.

  13. Gap junctions - guards of excitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroemlund, Line Waring; Jensen, Christa Funch; Qvortrup, Klaus; Delmar, Mario; Nielsen, Morten Schak

    2015-06-01

    Cardiomyocytes are connected by mechanical and electrical junctions located at the intercalated discs (IDs). Although these structures have long been known, it is becoming increasingly clear that their components interact. This review describes the involvement of the ID in electrical disturbances of the heart and focuses on the role of the gap junctional protein connexin 43 (Cx43). Current evidence shows that Cx43 plays a crucial role in organizing microtubules at the intercalated disc and thereby regulating the trafficking of the cardiac sodium channel NaV1.5 to the membrane.

  14. Manifestation of resonance-related chaos in coupled Josephson junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukrinov, Yu.M. [BLTP, JINR, Dubna, Moscow Region, 141980 (Russian Federation); Hamdipour, M. [BLTP, JINR, Dubna, Moscow Region, 141980 (Russian Federation); Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences, P.O. Box 45195-1159, Zanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kolahchi, M.R. [Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences, P.O. Box 45195-1159, Zanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Botha, A.E., E-mail: bothaae@unisa.ac.za [Department of Physics, University of South Africa, P.O. Box 392, Pretoria 0003 (South Africa); Suzuki, M. [Photonics and Electronics Science and Engineering Center and Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan)

    2012-11-01

    Manifestation of chaos in the temporal dependence of the electric charge is demonstrated through the calculation of the maximal Lyapunov exponent, phase–charge and charge–charge Lissajous diagrams and correlation functions. It is found that the number of junctions in the stack strongly influences the fine structure in the current–voltage characteristics and a strong proximity effect results from the nonperiodic boundary conditions. The observed resonance-related chaos exhibits intermittency. The criteria for a breakpoint region with no chaos are obtained. Such criteria could clarify recent experimental observations of variations in the power output from intrinsic Josephson junctions in high temperature superconductors.

  15. Manifestation of resonance-related chaos in coupled Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukrinov, Yu. M.; Hamdipour, M.; Kolahchi, M. R.; Botha, A. E.; Suzuki, M.

    2012-11-01

    Manifestation of chaos in the temporal dependence of the electric charge is demonstrated through the calculation of the maximal Lyapunov exponent, phase-charge and charge-charge Lissajous diagrams and correlation functions. It is found that the number of junctions in the stack strongly influences the fine structure in the current-voltage characteristics and a strong proximity effect results from the nonperiodic boundary conditions. The observed resonance-related chaos exhibits intermittency. The criteria for a breakpoint region with no chaos are obtained. Such criteria could clarify recent experimental observations of variations in the power output from intrinsic Josephson junctions in high temperature superconductors.

  16. Picosecond time resolved conductance measurements of redox molecular junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arielly, Rani; Nachman, Nirit; Zelinskyy, Yaroslav; May, Volkhard; Selzer, Yoram

    2017-03-01

    Due to bandwidth limitations of state of the art electronics, the transient transport properties of molecular junctions are experimentally a terra incognita, which can only be explored if novel picosecond current-probing techniques are developed. Here we demonstrate one such approach: the laser pulse-pair sequence scheme. The method is used to monitor in picosecond resolution the oxidation state of a redox molecule, 6-ferrocenyl-1-hexanethiol, within a junction and to quantify its redox rate constant, which is found to be (80 ps)-1.

  17. Transistor-like behavior of single metalloprotein junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artés, Juan M; Díez-Pérez, Ismael; Gorostiza, Pau

    2012-06-13

    Single protein junctions consisting of azurin bridged between a gold substrate and the probe of an electrochemical tunneling microscope (ECSTM) have been obtained by two independent methods that allowed statistical analysis over a large number of measured junctions. Conductance measurements yield (7.3 ± 1.5) × 10(-6)G(0) in agreement with reported estimates using other techniques. Redox gating of the protein with an on/off ratio of 20 was demonstrated and constitutes a proof-of-principle of a single redox protein field-effect transistor.

  18. Electrical gating and rectification in graphene three-terminal junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Händel, B. [FG Nanotechnologie, Institut für Mikro- und Nanotechnologien MacroNano and Institut für Mikro- und Nanoelektronik, Postfach 100565, 98684 Ilmenau (Germany); FG Festkörperelektronik, Institut für Mikro- und Nanotechnologien MacroNano and Institut für Mikro- und Nanoelektronik, Technische Universität Ilmenau, Postfach 100565, 98684 Ilmenau (Germany); Hähnlein, B. [FG Nanotechnologie, Institut für Mikro- und Nanotechnologien MacroNano and Institut für Mikro- und Nanoelektronik, Postfach 100565, 98684 Ilmenau (Germany); Göckeritz, R. [FG Nanostrukturierte Materialien, Institut für Physik, Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, Von-Danckelmann-Platz 3, 06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany); Schwierz, F. [FG Festkörperelektronik, Institut für Mikro- und Nanotechnologien MacroNano and Institut für Mikro- und Nanoelektronik, Technische Universität Ilmenau, Postfach 100565, 98684 Ilmenau (Germany); Pezoldt, J., E-mail: joerg.pezoldt@tu-ilmenau.de [FG Nanotechnologie, Institut für Mikro- und Nanotechnologien MacroNano and Institut für Mikro- und Nanoelektronik, Postfach 100565, 98684 Ilmenau (Germany)

    2014-02-01

    Graphene was grown on semiinsulating silicon carbide at 1800 °C and atmospheric argon pressure. The all carbon T- and Y-shape three terminal junction devices were fabricated using electron beam lithography. All devices featured the negative rectification effect. The exact properties of the devices like the curvature of the output voltage response can be tuned by changing the branch width in the T- and Y-shape devices. Beside the rectification a switching behavior is demonstrated with the same three terminal junctions.

  19. Quantitatively accurate calculations of conductance and thermopower of molecular junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Troels; Jin, Chengjun; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2013-01-01

    ) connected to gold electrodes using first‐principles calculations. We find excellent agreement with experiments for both molecules when exchange–correlation effects are described by the many‐body GW approximation. In contrast, results from standard density functional theory (DFT) deviate from experiments......‐interaction errors and image charge effects. Finally, we show that the conductance and thermopower of the considered junctions are relatively insensitive to the metal–molecule bonding geometry. Our results demonstrate that electronic and thermoelectric properties of molecular junctions can be predicted from first‐principles...... calculations when exchange–correlation effects are taken properly into account....

  20. CT assessment of operability in carcinoma of the oesophagogastric junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terier, F.; Schapira, C.; Fuchs, W.A.

    1984-05-01

    25 patients with adenocarcinoma of the oesophagogastric junction were evaluated preoperatively with thoracoabdominal computed tomography (CT). Despite limitations mainly in differentiating intramural from early extramural tumour growth and in predicting peritoneal carcinomatosis, CT was useful in determining local and distant spread of the malignancy and in assessing surgical resectability. CT may identify candidates for palliative procedures such as oesophageal intubation, radiation therapy or chemotherapy by demonstrating inoperability thus avoiding unnecessary surgery. CT should be performed routinely in all patients with carcinoma of the oesophagogastric junction.

  1. Control over Rectification in Supramolecular Tunneling Junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wimbush, K.S.; Wimbush, Kim S.; Reus, William F.; van der Wiel, Wilfred Gerard; Reinhoudt, David; Whitesides, George M.; Nijhuis, C.A.; Velders, Aldrik

    2010-01-01

    In complete control: The magnitude of current rectification in well-defined supramolecular tunneling junctions can be controlled by changing the terminal functionality (red spheres) of dendrimers (gray spheres) immobilized on a supramolecular platform (see picture). Junctions containing biferrocene

  2. Controllable 0-π Josephson junctions containing a ferromagnetic spin valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gingrich, E. C.; Niedzielski, Bethany M.; Glick, Joseph A.; Wang, Yixing; Miller, D. L.; Loloee, Reza; Pratt, W. P., Jr.; Birge, Norman O.

    2016-06-01

    Superconductivity and ferromagnetism are antagonistic forms of order, and rarely coexist. Many interesting new phenomena occur, however, in hybrid superconducting/ferromagnetic systems. For example, a Josephson junction containing a ferromagnetic material can exhibit an intrinsic phase shift of π in its ground state for certain thicknesses of the material. Such `π-junctions' were first realized experimentally in 2001 (refs ,), and have been proposed as circuit elements for both high-speed classical superconducting computing and for quantum computing. Here we demonstrate experimentally that the phase state of a Josephson junction containing two ferromagnetic layers can be toggled between 0 and π by changing the relative orientation of the two magnetizations. These controllable 0-π junctions have immediate applications in cryogenic memory, where they serve as a necessary component to an ultralow power superconducting computer. Such a fully superconducting computer is estimated to be orders of magnitude more energy-efficient than current semiconductor-based supercomputers. Phase-controllable junctions also open up new possibilities for superconducting circuit elements such as superconducting `programmable logic', where they could function in superconducting analogues to field-programmable gate arrays.

  3. Testosterone regulates tight junction proteins and influences prostatic autoimmune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Jing; Mostaghel, Elahe A; Vakar-Lopez, Funda; Montgomery, Bruce; True, Larry; Nelson, Peter S

    2011-06-01

    Testosterone and inflammation have been linked to the development of common age-associated diseases affecting the prostate gland including prostate cancer, prostatitis, and benign prostatic hypertrophy. We hypothesized that testosterone regulates components of prostate tight junctions which serve as a barrier to inflammation, thus providing a connection between age- and treatment-associated testosterone declines and prostatic pathology. We examined the expression and distribution of tight junction proteins in prostate biospecimens from mouse models and a clinical study of chemical castration, using transcript profiling, immunohistochemistry, and electron microscopy. We determined that low serum testosterone is associated with reduced transcript and protein levels of Claudin 4 and Claudin 8, resulting in defective tight junction ultrastructure in benign prostate glands. Expression of Claudin 4 and Claudin 8 was negatively correlated with the mononuclear inflammatory infiltrate caused by testosterone deprivation. Testosterone suppression also induced an autoimmune humoral response directed toward prostatic proteins. Testosterone supplementation in castrate mice resulted in re-expression of tight junction components in prostate epithelium and significantly reduced prostate inflammatory cell numbers. These data demonstrate that tight junction architecture in the prostate is related to changes in serum testosterone levels, and identify an androgen-regulated mechanism that potentially contributes to the development of prostate inflammation and consequent pathology.

  4. Gap junctions in developing thalamic and neocortical neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niculescu, Dragos; Lohmann, Christian

    2014-12-01

    The presence of direct, cytoplasmatic, communication between neurons in the brain of vertebrates has been demonstrated a long time ago. These gap junctions have been characterized in many brain areas in terms of subunit composition, biophysical properties, neuronal connectivity patterns, and developmental regulation. Although interesting findings emerged, showing that different subunits are specifically regulated during development, or that excitatory and inhibitory neuronal networks exhibit various electrical connectivity patterns, gap junctions did not receive much further interest. Originally, it was believed that gap junctions represent simple passageways for electrical and biochemical coordination early in development. Today, we know that gap junction connectivity is tightly regulated, following independent developmental patterns for excitatory and inhibitory networks. Electrical connections are important for many specific functions of neurons, and are, for example, required for the development of neuronal stimulus tuning in the visual system. Here, we integrate the available data on neuronal connectivity and gap junction properties, as well as the most recent findings concerning the functional implications of electrical connections in the developing thalamus and neocortex.

  5. Single Molecule Junctions: Probing Contact Chemistry and Fundamental Circuit Laws

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hybertsen M. S.

    2013-04-11

    By exploiting selective link chemistry, formation of single molecule junctions with reproducible conductance has become established. Systematic studies reveal the structure-conductance relationships for diverse molecules. I will draw on experiments from my collaborators at Columbia University, atomic-scale calculations and theory to describe progress in two areas. First, I will describe a novel route to form single molecule junctions, based on SnMe3 terminated molecules, in which gold directly bonds to carbon in the molecule backbone resulting in near ideal contact resistance [1]. Second, comparison of the conductance of junctions formed with molecular species containing either one backbone or two backbones in parallel allows demonstration of the role of quantum interference in the conductance superposition law at the molecular scale [2].

  6. GaInN-based tunnel junctions with graded layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takasuka, Daiki; Akatsuka, Yasuto; Ino, Masataka; Koide, Norikatsu; Takeuchi, Tetsuya; Iwaya, Motoaki; Kamiyama, Satoshi; Akasaki, Isamu

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrated low-resistivity GaInN-based tunnel junctions using graded GaInN layers. A systematic investigation of the samples grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy revealed that a tunnel junction consisting of a 4 nm both-sides graded GaInN layer (Mg: 1 × 1020 cm-3) and a 2 nm GaN layer (Si: 7 × 1020 cm-3) showed the lowest specific series resistance of 2.3 × 10-4 Ω cm2 at 3 kA/cm2 in our experiment. The InN mole fraction in the 4 nm both-sides graded GaInN layer was changed from 0 through 0.4 to 0. The obtained resistance is comparable to those of standard p-contacts with Ni/Au and MBE-grown tunnel junctions.

  7. Traumatic Tear of the Latissimus Dorsi Myotendinous Junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Michael V.; Stensby, J. Derek; Hillen, Travis J.; Demertzis, Jennifer L.; Keener, Jay D.

    2015-01-01

    A case of a latissimus dorsi myotendinous junction strain in an avid CrossFit athlete is presented. The patient developed acute onset right axillary burning and swelling and subsequent palpable pop with weakness while performing a “muscle up.” Magnetic resonance imaging examination demonstrated a high-grade tear of the right latissimus dorsi myotendinous junction approximately 9 cm proximal to its intact humeral insertion. There were no other injuries to the adjacent shoulder girdle structures. Isolated strain of the latissimus dorsi myotendinous junction is a very rare injury with a scarcity of information available regarding its imaging appearance and preferred treatment. This patient was treated conservatively and was able to resume active CrossFit training within 3 months. At 6 months postinjury, he had only a mild residual functional deficit compared with his preinjury level. PMID:26502450

  8. Josephson ϕ0-junction in nanowire quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szombati, D. B.; Nadj-Perge, S.; Car, D.; Plissard, S. R.; Bakkers, E. P. A. M.; Kouwenhoven, L. P.

    2016-06-01

    The Josephson effect describes supercurrent flowing through a junction connecting two superconducting leads by a thin barrier. This current is driven by a superconducting phase difference ϕ between the leads. In the presence of chiral and time-reversal symmetry of the Cooper pair tunnelling process, the current is strictly zero when ϕ vanishes. Only if these underlying symmetries are broken can the supercurrent for ϕ = 0 be finite. This corresponds to a ground state of the junction being offset by a phase ϕ0, different from 0 or π. Here, we report such a Josephson ϕ0-junction based on a nanowire quantum dot. We use a quantum interferometer device to investigate phase offsets and demonstrate that ϕ0 can be controlled by electrostatic gating. Our results may have far-reaching implications for superconducting flux- and phase-defined quantum bits as well as for exploring topological superconductivity in quantum dot systems.

  9. Charge transport in nanoscale junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Tim; Kornyshev, Alexei; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2008-09-03

    Understanding the fundamentals of nanoscale charge transfer is pivotal for designing future nano-electronic devices. Such devices could be based on individual or groups of molecular bridges, nanotubes, nanoparticles, biomolecules and other 'active' components, mimicking wire, diode and transistor functions. These have operated in various environments including vacuum, air and condensed matter, in two- or three-electrode configurations, at ultra-low and room temperatures. Interest in charge transport in ultra-small device components has a long history and can be dated back to Aviram and Ratner's letter in 1974 (Chem. Phys. Lett. 29 277-83). So why is there a necessity for a special issue on this subject? The area has reached some degree of maturity, and even subtle geometric effects in the nanojunction and noise features can now be resolved and rationalized based on existing theoretical concepts. One purpose of this special issue is thus to showcase various aspects of nanoscale and single-molecule charge transport from experimental and theoretical perspectives. The main principles have 'crystallized' in our minds, but there is still a long way to go before true single-molecule electronics can be implemented. Major obstacles include the stability of electronic nanojunctions, reliable operation at room temperature, speed of operation and, last but not least, integration into large networks. A gradual transition from traditional silicon-based electronics to devices involving a single (or a few) molecule(s) therefore appears to be more viable from technologic and economic perspectives than a 'quantum leap'. As research in this area progresses, new applications emerge, e.g. with a view to characterizing interfacial charge transfer at the single-molecule level in general. For example, electrochemical experiments with individual enzyme molecules demonstrate that catalytic processes can be studied with nanometre resolution, offering a route towards optimizing biosensors at

  10. Nano-Molecular Junctions on STM Tips

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun Huang∗; Jianshu Yang

    2011-01-01

    We present a technique for building metal-organic-metal junctions, which contain ten or fewer conjugated molecules between each of such junction, and the investigations of the I-V response of these junctions. The junctions are made by self assembling thiolated molecules onto gold coated tips for use in scanning tunneling microscopy. We show that this easy technique probes the qualitative properties of the molecules. Current-voltage characteristics of a Tour wire and a new molecular rectifier are presented.

  11. Nano-Molecular Junctions on STM Tips

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun Huang; Jianshu Yang

    2011-01-01

    We present a technique for building metal-organic-metal junctions, which contain ten or fewer conjugated molecules between each of such junction, and the investigations of the I-V response of these junctions.The junctions are made by self assembling thiolated molecules onto gold coated tips for use in scanning tunneling microscopy. We show that this easy technique probes the qualitative properties of the molecules. Currentvoltage characteristics of a Tour wire and a new molecular rectifier are presented.

  12. Current noise in tunnel junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frey, Moritz; Grabert, Hermann [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Strasse 3, 79104, Freiburg (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    We study current fluctuations in tunnel junctions driven by a voltage source. The voltage is applied to the tunneling element via an impedance providing an electromagnetic environment of the junction. We use circuit theory to relate the fluctuations of the current flowing in the leads of the junction with the voltage fluctuations generated by the environmental impedance and the fluctuations of the tunneling current. The spectrum of current fluctuations is found to consist of three parts: a term arising from the environmental Johnson-Nyquist noise, a term due to the shot noise of the tunneling current and a third term describing the cross-correlation between these two noise sources. Our phenomenological theory reproduces previous results based on the Hamiltonian model for the dynamical Coulomb blockade and provides a simple understanding of the current fluctuation spectrum in terms of circuit theory and properties of the average current. Specific results are given for a tunnel junction driven through a resonator. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Josephson tunnel junction microwave attenuator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koshelets, V. P.; Shitov, S. V.; Shchukin, A. V.

    1993-01-01

    A new element for superconducting electronic circuitry-a variable attenuator-has been proposed, designed, and successfully tested. The principle of operation is based on the change in the microwave impedance of a superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) Josephson tunnel junction when dc bias...

  14. Stability of large-area molecular junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkerman, Hylke B.; Kronemeijer, Auke J.; Harkema, Jan; van Hal, Paul A.; Smits, Edsger C. P.; de Leeuw, Dago M.; Blom, Paul W. M.

    The stability of molecular junctions is crucial for any application of molecular electronics. Degradation of molecular junctions when exposed to ambient conditions is regularly observed. In this report the stability of large-area molecular junctions under ambient conditions for more than two years

  15. Soliton bunching in annular Josephson junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vernik, I.V; Lazarides, Nickos; Sørensen, Mads Peter

    1996-01-01

    By studying soliton (fluxon) motion in long annular Josephson junctions it is possible to avoid the influence of the boundaries and soliton-soliton collisions present in linear junctions. A new experimental design consisting of a niobium coil placed on top of an annular junction has been used...

  16. Long Range Magnetic Interaction between Josephson Junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbech-Jensen, Niels; Samuelsen, Mogens Rugholm

    1995-01-01

    A new model for magnetic coupling between long Josephson junctions is proposed. The coupling mechanism is a result of the magnetic fields outside the junctions and is consequently effective over long distances between junctions. We give specific expressions for the form and magnitude of the inter...

  17. Dynamics of pi-junction interferometer circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornkev, V.K.; Mozhaev, P.B.; Borisenko, I.V.;

    2002-01-01

    The pi-junction superconducting circuit dynamics was studied by means of numerical simulation technique. Parallel arrays consisting of Josephson junctions of both 0- and pi-type were studied as a model of high-T-c grain-boundary Josephson junction. The array dynamics and the critical current...

  18. Dynamics of pi-junction interferometer circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornkev, V.K.; Mozhaev, P.B.; Borisenko, I.V.

    2002-01-01

    The pi-junction superconducting circuit dynamics was studied by means of numerical simulation technique. Parallel arrays consisting of Josephson junctions of both 0- and pi-type were studied as a model of high-T-c grain-boundary Josephson junction. The array dynamics and the critical current...

  19. Development, characterization, and applications of high temperature superconductor nanobridge Josephson junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendt, J.R.; Tigges, C.P.; Hietala, V.M.; Plut, T.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Martens, J.S.; Char, K.; Johansson, M.E. [Conductus, Inc., Sunnyvale, CA (United States)

    1994-03-01

    A well-controlled, high-yield Josephson junction process in high temperature superconductors (HTS) is necessary for the demonstration of ultra-high-speed devices and circuits which exceed the capabilities of conventional electronics. The authors developed nanobridge Josephson junctions in high quality thin-film YBaCuO with dimensions below 100 nm fabricated using electron-beam nanolithography. They characterized this Josephson junction technology for process yield, junction parameter uniformity, and overall applicability for use in high-performance circuits. To facilitate the determination of junction parameters, they developed a measurement technique based on spectral analysis in the range of 90--160 GHz of phase-locked, oscillating arrays of up to 2,450 Josephson junctions. Because of the excellent yield and uniformity of the nanobridge junctions, they successfully applied the junction technology to a wide variety of circuits. These circuits included transmission-line pulse formers and 32 and 64-bit shift registers. The 32-bit shift register was shown to operate at clock speeds near 100 GHz and is believed to be one of the faster and more complex digital circuit demonstrated to date using high temperature superconductor technology.

  20. Gap junctions in the nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozental, R; Giaume, C; Spray, D C

    2000-04-01

    Synapses are classically defined as close connections between two nerve cells or between a neuronal cell and a muscle or gland cell across which a chemical signal (i.e., a neurotransmitter) and/or an electrical signal (i.e., current-carrying ions) can pass. The definition of synapse was developed by Charles Sherrington and by Ramon y Cajal at the beginning of this century and refined by John Eccles and Bernard Katz 50 years later; in this collection of papers, the definition of synapses is discussed further in the chapter by Mike Bennett. who provided the first functional demonstration of electrical transmission via gap junction channels between vertebrate neurons. As is evidenced by the range of topics covered in this issue, research dealing with gap junctions in the nervous system has expanded enormously in the past decade, major findings being that specific cell types in the brain expresses specific types of connexins and that expression patterns coincide with tissue compartmentalization and function and that these compartments change during development.

  1. Annealing free magnetic tunnel junction sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudde, S.; Leitao, D. C.; Cardoso, S.; Freitas, P. P.

    2017-04-01

    Annealing is a major step in the fabrication of magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs). It sets the exchange bias between the pinned and antiferromagnetic layers, and helps to increase the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) in both amorphous and crystalline junctions. Recent research on MTJs has focused on MgO-based structures due to their high TMR. However, the strict process control and mandatory annealing step can limit the scope of the application of these structures as sensors. In this paper, we present AlOx-based MTJs that are produced by ion beam sputtering and remote plasma oxidation and show optimum transport properties with no annealing. The microfabricated devices show TMR values of up to 35% and using NiFe/CoFeB free layers provides tunable linear ranges, leading to coercivity-free linear responses with sensitivities of up to 5.5%/mT. The top-pinned synthetic antiferromagnetic reference shows a stability of about 30 mT in the microfabricated devices. Sensors with linear ranges of up to 60 mT are demonstrated. This paves the way for the integration of MTJ sensors in heat-sensitive applications such as flexible substrates, or for the design of low-footprint on-chip multiaxial sensing devices.

  2. Breathing Charge Density Waves in Intrinsic Josephson Junctions

    OpenAIRE

    Shukrinov, Yu M.; Abdelhafiz, H.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the creation of a charge density wave (CDW) along a stack of coupled Josephson junctions in layered superconductors. Electric charge in each superconducting layer oscillates around some average value, forming a breathing CDW. We show the transformation of a longitudinal plasma wave to CDW in the state corresponding to the outermost branch. Transitions between different types of CDW's related to the inner branches of current voltage characteristics are demonstrated. The effect o...

  3. Octagonal Defects at Carbon Nanotube Junctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Jaskólski

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate knee-shaped junctions of semiconductor zigzag carbon nanotubes. Two dissimilar octagons appear at such junctions; one of them can reconstruct into a pair of pentagons. The junction with two octagons presents two degenerate localized states at Fermi energy (EF. The reconstructed junction has only one state near EF, indicating that these localized states are related to the octagonal defects. The inclusion of Coulomb interaction splits the localized states in the junction with two octagons, yielding an antiferromagnetic system.

  4. Fabrication of high quality ferromagnetic Josephson junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weides, M. [Institute for Solid State Research, Research Centre Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany) and CNI-Center of Nanoelectronic Systems for Information Technology, Research Centre Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany)]. E-mail: m.weides@fz-juelich.de; Tillmann, K. [Institute for Solid State Research, Research Centre Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Research Centre Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Kohlstedt, H. [Institute for Solid State Research, Research Centre Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); CNI-Center of Nanoelectronic Systems for Information Technology, Research Centre Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Department of Material Science and Engineering and Department of Physics, University of Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2006-05-15

    We present ferromagnetic Nb/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Ni{sub 60}Cu{sub 40}/Nb Josephson junctions (SIFS) with an ultrathin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} tunnel barrier. The junction fabrication was optimized regarding junction insulation and homogeneity of current transport. Using ion-beam-etching and anodic oxidation we defined and insulated the junction mesas. The additional 2 nm thin Cu-layer below the ferromagnetic NiCu (SINFS) lowered interface roughness and ensured very homogeneous current transport. A high yield of junctional devices with j {sub c} spreads less than 2% was obtained.

  5. Suprabasal spread of melanocytes in dysplastic nevi and melanoma in situ: Ki-67-labeling rate of junctional melanocytes and suprabasal cells may be a helpful clue to the diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Brian J; LeBoit, Philip E

    2014-08-01

    Multiple criteria on routinely stained sections allow one to make a diagnosis of a dysplastic or "Clark" nevus (CN) versus melanoma in situ (MIS), and one of these is suprabasal spread of melanocytes. The extent of suprabasal spread of melanocytes in otherwise conventional CN and the combination of a sensitive marker of melanocytes combined with Ki-67 to assess the differences between the proliferation of melanocytes at the junction and those above it have not yet been studied. Fifty classic examples of CN and 27 cases of MIS were culled from the files of a university-based dermatopathology practice. All cases were stained with a 2-color method (MART-1/tyrosinase red, Ki-67 brown) to evaluate morphologic and immunohistochemical differences in these lesions. Fifteen of 50 cases of benign CN demonstrated suprabasal spread compared with 27 of 27 cases of MIS. The majority of CNs with suprabasal spread (13 of 15) showed a 0% Ki-67-labeling rate among the suprabasal melanocytes, and the majority of MISs (23 of 27) showed a 20% or greater Ki-67-labeling rate in suprabasal cells. Suprabasal melanocytes can be seen by immunostaining in otherwise unremarkable CN, wherein they are not notable in routinely stained sections, but their proliferation rate is much less than in MIS.

  6. Selective permeability of gap junction channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Gary S; Valiunas, Virginijus; Brink, Peter R

    2004-03-23

    Gap junctions mediate the transfer of small cytoplasmic molecules between adjacent cells. A family of gap junction proteins exist that form channels with unique properties, and differ in their ability to mediate the transfer of specific molecules. Mutations in a number of individual gap junction proteins, called connexins, cause specific human diseases. Therefore, it is important to understand how gap junctions selectively move molecules between cells. Rules that dictate the ability of a molecule to travel through gap junction channels are complex. In addition to molecular weight and size, the ability of a solute to transverse these channels depends on its net charge, shape, and interactions with specific connexins that constitute gap junctions in particular cells. This review presents some data and interpretations pertaining to mechanisms that govern the differential transfer of signals through gap junction channels.

  7. Photoelectric polarization-sensitive broadband photoresponse from interface junction states in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalugin, Nikolai G.; Jing, Lei; Suarez Morell, Eric; Dyer, Gregory C.; Wickey, Lee; Ovezmyradov, Mekan; Grine, Albert D.; Wanke, Michael C.; Shaner, Eric A.; Lau, Chun Ning; Foa Torres, Luis E. F.; Fistul, Mikhail V.; Efetov, Konstantin B.

    2017-03-01

    Graphene has established itself as a promising optoelectronic material. Many details of the photoresponse (PR) mechanisms in graphene in the THz-to-visible range have been revealed, however, new intricacies continue to emerge. Interface junctions, formed at the boundaries between parts of graphene with different number of layers or different stacking orders, and making connection between electrical contacts, provide another peculiar setup to establish PR. Here, we experimentally demonstrate an enhanced polarization sensitive photoelectric PR in graphene sheets containing interface junctions as compared to homogenous graphene sheets in the visible, infrared, and THz spectral regions. Our numerical simulations show that highly localized electronic states are created at the interface junctions, and these states exhibit a unique energy spectrum and enhanced probabilities for optical transitions. The interaction of electrons from interface junction states with electromagnetic fields generates a polarization-sensitive PR that is maximal for the polarization direction perpendicular to the junction interface.

  8. Chemical control over the energy-level alignment in a two-terminal junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Li; Franco, Carlos; Crivillers, Núria; Mas-Torrent, Marta; Cao, Liang; Sangeeth, C. S. Suchand; Rovira, Concepció; Veciana, Jaume; Nijhuis, Christian A.

    2016-07-01

    The energy-level alignment of molecular transistors can be controlled by external gating to move molecular orbitals with respect to the Fermi levels of the source and drain electrodes. Two-terminal molecular tunnelling junctions, however, lack a gate electrode and suffer from Fermi-level pinning, making it difficult to control the energy-level alignment of the system. Here we report an enhancement of 2 orders of magnitude of the tunnelling current in a two-terminal junction via chemical molecular orbital control, changing chemically the molecular component between a stable radical and its non-radical form without altering the supramolecular structure of the junction. Our findings demonstrate that the energy-level alignment in self-assembled monolayer-based junctions can be regulated by purely chemical modifications, which seems an attractive alternative to control the electrical properties of two-terminal junctions.

  9. Functional consequences of heterogeneous gap junction channel formation and its influence in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottrell, G Trevor; Burt, Janis M

    2005-06-10

    The capacity of multiple connexins to hetero-oligomerize into functional heterogeneous gap junction channels has been demonstrated in vivo, in vitro, and in nonmammalian expression systems. These heterogeneous channels display gating activity, channel conductances, selectivity and regulatory behaviors that are sometimes not predicted by the behaviors of the corresponding homogeneous channels. Such observations suggest that heteromerization of gap junction proteins offers an efficient cellular strategy for finely regulating cell-to-cell communication. The available evidence strongly indicates that heterogeneous gap junction assembly is important to normal growth and differentiation, and may influence the appearance of several disease states. Definitive evidence that heterogeneous gap junction channels differentially regulate electrical conduction in excitable cells is absent. This review examines the prevalence, regulation, and implications of gap junction channel hetero-oligomerization.

  10. Emergent Central Pattern Generator Behavior in Gap-Junction-Coupled Hodgkin-Huxley Style Neuron Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle G. Horn

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Most models of central pattern generators (CPGs involve two distinct nuclei mutually inhibiting one another via synapses. Here, we present a single-nucleus model of biologically realistic Hodgkin-Huxley neurons with random gap junction coupling. Despite no explicit division of neurons into two groups, we observe a spontaneous division of neurons into two distinct firing groups. In addition, we also demonstrate this phenomenon in a simplified version of the model, highlighting the importance of afterhyperpolarization currents ( to CPGs utilizing gap junction coupling. The properties of these CPGs also appear sensitive to gap junction conductance, probability of gap junction coupling between cells, topology of gap junction coupling, and, to a lesser extent, input current into our simulated nucleus.

  11. Analyzing the Effects of Gap Junction Blockade on Neural Synchrony via a Motoneuron Network Computational Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heraldo Memelli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In specific regions of the central nervous system (CNS, gap junctions have been shown to participate in neuronal synchrony. Amongst the CNS regions identified, some populations of brainstem motoneurons are known to be coupled by gap junctions. The application of various gap junction blockers to these motoneuron populations, however, has led to mixed results regarding their synchronous firing behavior, with some studies reporting a decrease in synchrony while others surprisingly find an increase in synchrony. To address this discrepancy, we employ a neuronal network model of Hodgkin-Huxley-style motoneurons connected by gap junctions. Using this model, we implement a series of simulations and rigorously analyze their outcome, including the calculation of a measure of neuronal synchrony. Our simulations demonstrate that under specific conditions, uncoupling of gap junctions is capable of producing either a decrease or an increase in neuronal synchrony. Subsequently, these simulations provide mechanistic insight into these different outcomes.

  12. Seebeck effect in molecular junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimbovskaya, Natalya A.

    2016-05-01

    Advances in the fabrication and characterization of nanoscale systems presently allow for a better understanding of their thermoelectric properties. As is known, the building blocks of thermoelectricity are the Peltier and Seebeck effects. In the present work we review results of theoretical studies of the Seebeck effect in single-molecule junctions and similar systems. The behavior of thermovoltage and thermopower in these systems is controlled by several factors including the geometry of molecular bridges, the characteristics of contacts between the bridge and the electrodes, the strength of the Coulomb interactions between electrons on the bridge, and of electron-phonon interactions. We describe the impact of these factors on the thermopower. Also, we discuss a nonlinear Seebeck effect in molecular junctions.

  13. Electron transport in molecular junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Chengjun

    This thesis addresses the electron transport in molecular junctions, focusing on the energy level alignment and correlation effects. Various levels of theory have been applied to study the structural and electronic effects in different molecular junctions, starting from the single particle density...... charge position are in quantitative agreement with the experiments, while pure DFT is not. This is the consequence of the accurate energy level alignment, where the DFT+∑ method corrects the self-interaction error in the standard DFT functional and uses a static image charge model to include the image...... charge effect on the energy level renormalization. Additionally, the gating of the 4,4’-bipyridine (44BP) molecule contacted to either Ni or Au electrodes has been investigated. Here it is found that the gating mechanism is conceptually different between two cases. In the case of Ni contacts where...

  14. How coherent are Josephson junctions?

    CERN Document Server

    Paik, Hanhee; Bishop, Lev S; Kirchmair, G; Catelani, G; Sears, A P; Johnson, B R; Reagor, M J; Frunzio, L; Glazman, L; Schoelkopf, R J

    2011-01-01

    Attaining sufficient coherence is a requirement for realizing a large-scale quantum computer. We present a new implementation of a superconducting transmon qubit that is strongly coupled to a three-dimensional superconducting cavity. We observe a reproducible increase in the coherence times of qubit (both $T_1$ and $T_2$ > 10 microseconds) and cavity ($T_{cav}$ ~ 50 microseconds) by more than an order of magnitude compared to the current state-of-art superconducting qubits. This enables the study of the stability and quality of Josephson junctions at precisions exceeding one part per million. Surprisingly, we see no evidence for $1/f$ critical current noise. At elevated temperatures, we observe the dissipation due to a small density (< 1 - 10 ppm) of thermally-excited quasiparticles. The results suggest that the overall quality of Josephson junctions will allow error rates of a few $10^{-4}$, approaching the error correction threshold.

  15. Morphogenesis of rat myotendinous junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curzi, Davide; Ambrogini, Patrizia; Falcieri, Elisabetta; Burattini, Sabrina

    2013-10-01

    Myotendinous junction (MTJ) is the highly specialized complex which connects the skeletal muscle to the tendon for transmitting the contractile force between the two tissues. The purpose of this study was to investigate the MTJ development and rat EDL was chosen as a model. 1, 15, 30 day animals were considered and the junctions were analyzed by light and electron microscopy. The MTJ interface architecture increased during the development, extending the interaction between muscle and tendon. 1-day-old rats showed disorganized myofibril bundles, spread cytosol and incomplete rough endoplasmic reticulum, features partially improved in 15-day-old rats, and completely developed in 30-day-old animals. These findings indicate that muscle-tendon interface displays, during rat lifetime, numerically increased and longer tendon interdigitations, correlated with an improved organization of both tissues and with a progressive acquirement of full functionality.

  16. Thermoelectric efficiency of molecular junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perroni, C. A.; Ninno, D.; Cataudella, V.

    2016-09-01

    Focus of the review is on experimental set-ups and theoretical proposals aimed to enhance thermoelectric performances of molecular junctions. In addition to charge conductance, the thermoelectric parameter commonly measured in these systems is the thermopower, which is typically rather low. We review recent experimental outcomes relative to several junction configurations used to optimize the thermopower. On the other hand, theoretical calculations provide estimations of all the thermoelectric parameters in the linear and non-linear regime, in particular of the thermoelectric figure of merit and efficiency, completing our knowledge of molecular thermoelectricity. For this reason, the review will mainly focus on theoretical studies analyzing the role of not only electronic, but also of the vibrational degrees of freedom. Theoretical results about thermoelectric phenomena in the coherent regime are reviewed focusing on interference effects which play a significant role in enhancing the figure of merit. Moreover, we review theoretical studies including the effects of molecular many-body interactions, such as electron-vibration couplings, which typically tend to reduce the efficiency. Since a fine tuning of many parameters and coupling strengths is required to optimize the thermoelectric conversion in molecular junctions, new theoretically proposed set-ups are discussed in the conclusions.

  17. Three-dimensional modeling and quantitative analysis of gap junction distributions in cardiac tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackey, Daniel P; Carruth, Eric D; Lasher, Richard A; Boenisch, Jan; Sachse, Frank B; Hitchcock, Robert W

    2011-11-01

    Gap junctions play a fundamental role in intercellular communication in cardiac tissue. Various types of heart disease including hypertrophy and ischemia are associated with alterations of the spatial arrangement of gap junctions. Previous studies applied two-dimensional optical and electron-microscopy to visualize gap junction arrangements. In normal cardiomyocytes, gap junctions were primarily found at cell ends, but can be found also in more central regions. In this study, we extended these approaches toward three-dimensional reconstruction of gap junction distributions based on high-resolution scanning confocal microscopy and image processing. We developed methods for quantitative characterization of gap junction distributions based on analysis of intensity profiles along the principal axes of myocytes. The analyses characterized gap junction polarization at cell ends and higher-order statistical image moments of intensity profiles. The methodology was tested in rat ventricular myocardium. Our analysis yielded novel quantitative data on gap junction distributions. In particular, the analysis demonstrated that the distributions exhibit significant variability with respect to polarization, skewness, and kurtosis. We suggest that this methodology provides a quantitative alternative to current approaches based on visual inspection, with applications in particular in characterization of engineered and diseased myocardium. Furthermore, we propose that these data provide improved input for computational modeling of cardiac conduction.

  18. Ephaptic coupling rescues conduction failure in weakly coupled cardiac tissue with voltage-gated gap junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, S. H.

    2017-09-01

    Electrical conduction in cardiac tissue is usually considered to be primarily facilitated by gap junctions, providing a pathway between the intracellular spaces of neighboring cells. However, recent studies have highlighted the role of coupling via extracellular electric fields, also known as ephaptic coupling, particularly in the setting of reduced gap junction expression. Further, in the setting of reduced gap junctional coupling, voltage-dependent gating of gap junctions, an oft-neglected biophysical property in computational studies, produces a positive feedback that promotes conduction failure. We hypothesized that ephaptic coupling can break the positive feedback loop and rescue conduction failure in weakly coupled cardiac tissue. In a computational tissue model incorporating voltage-gated gap junctions and ephaptic coupling, we demonstrate that ephaptic coupling can rescue conduction failure in weakly coupled tissue. Further, ephaptic coupling increased conduction velocity in weakly coupled tissue, and importantly, reduced the minimum gap junctional coupling necessary for conduction, most prominently at fast pacing rates. Finally, we find that, although neglecting gap junction voltage-gating results in negligible differences in well coupled tissue, more significant differences occur in weakly coupled tissue, greatly underestimating the minimal gap junctional coupling that can maintain conduction. Our study suggests that ephaptic coupling plays a conduction-preserving role, particularly at rapid heart rates.

  19. Fully magnetic manganite spin filter tunnel junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Bhagwati; Blamire, Mark G.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we demonstrate spintronic devices which combine magnetic tunnel junctions with a spin-filtering tunnel barrier. These consist of an ultrathin ferromagnetic insulating barrier, Sm0.75Sr0.25MnO3, sandwiched between two ferromagnetic half-metallic manganite electrodes, La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 and La0.7Ca0.3MnO3, in a nanopillar structure. Depending on the relative magnetic configurations of barrier and electrode layers, three resistance states are well defined, which therefore represent a potential three-state memory concept. These results open the way for the development of spintronic devices by exploiting the many degrees of freedom of perovskite manganite heterostructure systems.

  20. [Remodeling of cardiac gap junctions and arrhythmias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhi-Bin; Sheng, Juan-Juan

    2011-12-25

    In the heart, gap junctions mediate electrical and chemical coupling between adjacent cardiomyocytes, forming the cell-to-cell pathways for orderly spread of the wave of electrical excitation responsible for a functional syncytium. Three principal connexins are expressed in cardiomyocytes, connexin 43 (CX43), CX40, and CX45. CX43 predominates in ventricular muscle cells. Most of the gap junctions, assembled from CX43, are located at the intercalated discs, often with larger junctional plaques at the disc periphery. The gap junctions are rarely distributed to the sides of the cardiomyocyte. The ischemia-reperfusion, cardiac hypertrophy, heart failure, hypercholesterolemia, and diabetes mellitus induce gap junction remodeling. The gap junction remodeling induced by above-mentioned diseases shows similar characteristics, including down-regulation of CX43, reduction in gap junction plaque size, increased heterogeneity and lateralization of gap junction distribution, and dephosphorylation of CX43. The elevated angiotensin II concentration in local myocardium may play an important role in the gap junction remodeling. The down-regulation of CX43 and lateralization of gap junction distribution alter anisotropic spread of the impulse of ventricular myocardium. The dephosphorylation of CX43 not only reduces electrical conductance, but also decreases permeability of chemicals between cardiomyocytes. The lateralization of gap junctions may increase the number of hemichannels formed by CX43. The opening of hemichannels induces ATP efflux and Na(+) influx, which forms a delayed after-depolarization. The gap junction remodeling in pathological condition produces arrhythmia substrate in the ventricles. In this review, the current knowledge on the relationship between the remodeling of cardiac gap junctions and arrhythmias were summarized.

  1. High-sensitivity epidermal growth factor receptor immunostaining for colorectal carcinomas, compared with EGFR PharmDx™: a study of diagnostic accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiogama, Kazuya; Wongsiri, Trai; Mizutani, Yasuyoshi; Inada, Ken-ichi; Tsutsumi, Yutaka

    2013-01-01

    Immunostaining for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is important in the contemporary therapeutic strategy of colorectal carcinomas. We tried to increase detection sensitivity, and compared the high-sensitivity EGFR immunostaining with a worldwide standard, EGFR PharmDx™ (Dako). In order to pursue high-sensitivity EGFR detection, deparaffinized sections were pressure-cooked in 1 mM EDTA solution, pH 8.0. Two mouse monoclonal antibodies against EGFR, clone EGFR2.5 and DAK-H1-WT, and six kinds of secondary detection reagents, including biotin-free catalyzed signal amplification (CSA II), Simple Stain MAX-PO, PolyVue, Novolink, EnVision™ FLEX+, and MACH3, were evaluated to compare the results with those with EGFR PharmDx™, employing a combination of 2-18-C9 as the primary monoclonal antibody and EnVision™ as the secondary reagent. Furthermore, we replaced EnVision™ in the EGFR PharmDx™ kit with CSAII. EGFR detection sensitivity was higher with DAK-H1-WT than with EGFR2.5, and among the secondary reagents, the strongest signals were observed with Novolink. All 30 colorectal carcinomas showed distinct expression of EGFR with our high-sensitivity EGFR immunostaining, while only 16 (53%) gave focal positivity with EGFR PharmDx™. When EnVision™ in EGFR PharmDx™ was replaced by CSA II, strong signals were seen in all cases, and the expression pattern was comparable with our sequence. Non-neoplastic crypt epithelial cells often showed weakly signal with the standard EGFR PharmDx™, but consistently revealed strong membrane staining in the two high-sensitivity sequences. EGFR PharmDx™ frequently gave false negativity. Importantly, EGFR was consistently and sensitively detected when the secondary polymer in the EGFR PharmDx™ kit was simply replaced by CSA II.

  2. Design of thin InGaAsN(Sb) n-i-p junctions for use in four-junction concentrating photovoltaic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Matthew M.; Gupta, James; Jaouad, Abdelatif; Bouzazi, Boussairi; Fafard, Simon; Boucherif, Abderraouf; Valdivia, Christopher E.; Arès, Richard; Aimez, Vincent; Schriemer, Henry P.; Hinzer, Karin

    2017-04-01

    Four-junction solar cells for space and terrestrial applications require a junction with a band gap of ˜1 eV for optimal performance. InGaAsN or InGaAsN(Sb) dilute nitride junctions have been demonstrated for this purpose, but in achieving the 14 mA/cm2 short-circuit current needed to match typical GaInP and GaAs junctions, the open-circuit voltage (VOC) and fill factor of these junctions are compromised. In multijunction devices incorporating materials with short diffusion lengths, we study the use of thin junctions to minimize sensitivity to varying material quality and ensure adequate transmission into lower junctions. An n-i-p device with 0.65-μm absorber thickness has sufficient short-circuit current, however, it relies less heavily on field-aided collection than a device with a 1-μm absorber. Our standard cell fabrication process, which includes a rapid thermal anneal of the contacts, yields a significant improvement in diffusion length and device performance. By optimizing a four-junction cell around a smaller 1-sun short-circuit current of 12.5 mA/cm2, we produced an InGaAsN(Sb) junction with open-circuit voltage of 0.44 V at 1000 suns (1 sun=100 mW/cm2), diode ideality factor of 1.4, and sufficient light transmission to allow >12.5 mA/cm2 in all four subcells.

  3. Physics and Applications of NIS Junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullom, J N

    2001-08-24

    This paper reviews the physics and applications of Normal-Insulator-Superconductor (NIS) tunnel junctions. The current-voltage properties of NIS junctions are diode-like with a strong temperature dependence. Hence, these structures can be used as sensitive thermometers at temperatures well below the energy gap, {Delta}, of the superconducting electrode. For junction voltages comparable to {Delta}/q, current flow removes energy from the normal electrode. This property has been exploited to build refrigerators capable of cooling thin-film circuits from 0.3 K to 0.1 K. Calorimeters and bolometers for the detection of X-rays and millimeter-wave radiation, respectively, have successfully been built from NIS junctions. NIS junctions have also been used to probe the superconducting state. Finally, recent ideas for the use of NIS junctions as simple circuit elements are described.

  4. Algorithms for Junctions in Directed Acyclic Graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Ferreira, Carlos Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Given a pair of distinct vertices u, v in a graph G, we say that s is a junction of u, v if there are in G internally vertex disjoint directed paths from s to u and from s to v. We show how to characterize junctions in directed acyclic graphs. We also consider the two problems in the following and derive efficient algorithms to solve them. Given a directed acyclic graph G and a vertex s in G, how can we find all pairs of vertices of G such that s is a junction of them? And given a directed acyclic graph G and k pairs of vertices of G, how can we preprocess G such that all junctions of k given pairs of vertices could be listed quickly? All junctions of k pairs problem arises in an application in Anthropology and we apply our algorithm to find such junctions on kinship networks of some brazilian indian ethnic groups.

  5. Micromagnetic modeling of critical current oscillations in magnetic Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovchanskiy, I. A.; Bol'ginov, V. V.; Stolyarov, V. S.; Abramov, N. N.; Ben Hamida, A.; Emelyanova, O. V.; Stolyarov, B. S.; Kupriyanov, M. Yu.; Golubov, A. A.; Ryazanov, V. V.

    2016-12-01

    In this work we propose and explore an effective numerical approach for investigation of critical current dependence on applied magnetic field for magnetic Josephson junctions with in-plane magnetization orientation. This approach is based on micromagnetic simulation of the magnetization reversal process in the ferromagnetic layer with introduced internal magnetic stiffness and subsequent reconstruction of the critical current value using total flux or reconstructed actual phase difference distribution. The approach is flexible and shows good agreement with experimental data obtained on Josephson junctions with ferromagnetic barriers. Based on this approach we have obtained a critical current dependence on applied magnetic field for rectangular magnetic Josephson junctions with high size aspect ratio. We have shown that the rectangular magnetic Josephson junctions can be considered for application as an effective Josephson magnetic memory element with the value of critical current defined by the orientation of magnetic moment at zero magnetic field. An impact of shape magnetic anisotropy on critical current is revealed and discussed. Finally, we have considered a curling magnetic state in the ferromagnetic layer and demonstrated its impact on critical current.

  6. Josephson junction detectors for Majorana modes and Dirac fermions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiti, M.; Kulikov, K. M.; Sengupta, K.; Shukrinov, Yu. M.

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate that the current-voltage (I -V ) characteristics of resistively and capacitively shunted Josephson junctions (RCSJs) hosting localized subgap Majorana states provide a phase-sensitive method for their detection. The I -V characteristics of such RCSJs, in contrast to their resistively shunted counterparts, exhibit subharmonic odd Shapiro steps. These steps, owing to their subharmonic nature, exhibit qualitatively different properties compared to harmonic odd steps of conventional junctions. In addition, the RCSJs hosting Majorana bound states also display an additional sequence of steps in the devil's staircase structure seen in their I -V characteristics; such a sequence of steps makes their I -V characteristics qualitatively distinct from that of their conventional counterparts. A similar study for RCSJs with graphene superconducting junctions hosting Dirac-like quasiparticles reveals that the Shapiro step width in their I -V curves bears a signature of the transmission resonance phenomenon of their underlying Dirac quasiparticles; consequently, these step widths exhibit a π periodic oscillatory behavior with variation of the junction barrier potential. We discuss experiments which can test our theory.

  7. Biliary manometry in choledochal cyst with abnormal choledochopancreatico ductal junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwai, N; Tokiwa, K; Tsuto, T; Yanagihara, J; Takahashi, T

    1986-10-01

    Intraoperative manometry of the biliary tract and measurement of amylase levels in choledochal cysts were performed in seven patients, aged 14 months to 5 years, with choledochal cysts, in an investigation of the pathophysiology of the biliary tract. An abnormal choledochopancreatico ductal junction was observed in these seven patients by preoperative endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography (ERCP) or intraoperative cholangiograms. All six patients examined showed a high amylase level in the choledochal cyst (5,450 to 46,500 Somogyi Units). The intraoperative manometry of the biliary tract showed that a remarkable high pressure zone as was found in the area of sphincter of Oddi was not found in the area of abnormal choledochopancreatico ductal junction. The pressure recordings also demonstrated that the sphincter of Oddi pressure in the patient with choledochal cyst was increased by gastrin stimulation. On the contrary, no pressure reaction to gastrin or secretin was found in the area of abnormal choledochopancreatic ductal junction. From these results it seems that free reflux of pancreatic juice into the biliary system occurs, and the reflux stream depends upon the pressure gradient between pancreatic ductal pressure and common bile duct pressure because of the lack of a sphincter function at the choledochopancreatico ductal junction.

  8. The junction between hyaline cartilage and engineered cartilage in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komura, Makoto; Komura, Hiroko; Otani, Yushi; Kanamori, Yutaka; Iwanaka, Tadashi; Hoshi, Kazuto; Tsuyoshi, Takato; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2013-06-01

    Tracheoplasty using costal cartilage grafts to enlarge the tracheal lumen was performed to treat congenital tracheal stenosis. Fibrotic granulomatous tissue was observed at the edge of grafted costal cartilage. We investigated the junction between the native hyaline cartilage and the engineered cartilage plates that were generated by auricular chondrocytes for fabricating the airway. Controlled, prospecive study. In group 1, costal cartilage from New Zealand white rabbits was collected and implanted into a space created in the cervical trachea. In group 2, chondrocytes from auricular cartilages were seeded on absorbable scaffolds. These constructs were implanted in the subcutaneous space. Engineered cartilage plates were then implanted into the trachea after 3 weeks of implantation of the constructs. The grafts in group 1 and 2 were retrieved after 4 weeks. In group 1, histological studies of the junction between the native hyaline cartilage and the implanted costal cartilage demonstrated chondrogenic tissue in four anastomoses sides out of the 10 examined. In group 2, the junction between the native trachea and the engineered cartilage showed neocartilage tissue in nine anastomoses sides out of 10. Engineered cartilage may be beneficial for engineered airways, based on the findings of the junction between the native and engineered grafts. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  9. Measurement of Quantum Phase-Slips in Josephson Junction Chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guichard, Wiebke

    2011-03-01

    Quantum phase-slip dynamics in Josephson junction chains could provide the basis for the realization of a new type of topologically protected qubit or for the implementation of a new current standard. I will present measurements of the effect of quantum phase-slips on the ground state of a Josephson junction chain. We can tune in situ the strength of the phase-slips. These phase-slips are the result of fluctuations induced by the finite charging energy of each junction in the chain. Our measurements demonstrate that a Josephson junction chain under phase bias constraint behaves in a collective way. I will also show evidence of coherent phase-slip interference, the so called Aharonov-Casher effect. This phenomenon is the dual of the well known Aharonov-Bohm interference. In collaboration with I.M. Pop, Institut Neel, C.N.R.S. and Universite Joseph Fourier, BP 166, 38042 Grenoble, France; I. Protopopov, L. D. Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kosygin str. 2, Moscow 119334, Russia and Institut fuer Nanotechnologie, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, 76021 Karlsruhe, Germany; and F. Lecocq, Z. Peng, B. Pannetier, O. Buisson, Institut Neel, C.N.R.S. and Universite Joseph Fourier. European STREP MIDAS, ANR QUANTJO.

  10. Patterning thick diffused junctions on CdTe

    CERN Document Server

    Kalliopuska, Juha; Sipilä, Heikki; Andersson, Hans; Vähänen, Sami; Eränen, Simo; Tlustos, Lukas

    2009-01-01

    Dividing the detector crystal into discrete pixels enables making an imaging detector, in which the charge collected by each pixel can be read separately. Even if the detector is not meant for imaging, patterns on the crystal surface may be used as guard structures that control and limit the flow of charges in the crystal. This has been exceedingly hard for the detector crystals having thick diffused layers. The paper reports a patterning method of the thick diffused junctions on CdTe. The patterning method of In-diffused pn-junction on CdTe chip is demonstrated by using a diamond blade. The patterning is done by removing material from the pn-junction side of the chip, so that the trenches penetrate the diffused layer. As the trenches extend deeper into the bulk than the junction, the regions separated by the trench are electrically isolated. Electrical characterization results are reported for the strips separated by trenches with various depths. The strip isolation is clearly seen in both measured leakage c...

  11. Tunneling transport in d-wave superconductor-silicene junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajati, Y.; Vosoughi nia, S.; Rashedi, G.

    2017-02-01

    We theoretically study the tunneling conductance of a normal/d-wave superconductor silicene junction using Blonder-Tinkham-Klapwijk (BTK) formalism. We discuss in detail how the conductances spectra are affected by inducing d-wave superconducting pairing symmetry in the buckled silicene. It is obtained that the amplitude of the spin/valley-dependent Andreev reflection and subgap conductance of the junction can be strongly modulated by the orientation angle of superconductive gap (β) and perpendicular electric field (EZ), suggesting that one may experimentally tune the transport properties of the junction through changing β and EZ. We demonstrate that the subgap conductance exhibits an oscillatory behavior as a function of the orientation angle of superconductive gap (β) with a period of π / 2 and by increasing the insulating gap of silicene, the charge conductance oscillations suppress. Remarkably, due to the buckled structure of silicene at the maximum orientation angle of the d-wave superconducting β = π / 4 , we found a very distinct behavior from the graphene-based NS junction where the charge conductance is insensitive to the bias energy. In addition, the Andreev reflection and subgap conductance can be switched on and off by applying electric field.

  12. Effect of interjunction coupling on superconducting current and charge correlations in intrinsic Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukrinov, Yu. M.; Hamdipour, M.; Kolahchi, M. R.

    2009-07-01

    Charge formations on superconducting layers and creation of the longitudinal plasma wave in the stack of intrinsic Josephson junctions change crucially the superconducting current through the stack. Investigation of the correlations of superconducting currents in neighboring Josephson junctions and the charge correlations in neighboring superconducting layers allows us to predict the additional features in the current-voltage characteristics. The charge autocorrelation functions clearly demonstrate the difference between harmonic and chaotic behavior in the breakpoint region. Use of the correlation functions gives us a powerful method for the analysis of the current-voltage characteristics of coupled Josephson junctions.

  13. Theory of Landau level mixing in heavily graded graphene p -n junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaGasse, Samuel W.; Lee, Ji Ung

    2016-10-01

    We demonstrate the use of a quantum transport model to study heavily graded graphene p -n junctions in the quantum Hall regime. A combination of p -n interface roughness and delta function disorder potential allows us to compare experimental results on different devices from the literature. We find that wide p -n junctions suppress mixing of n ≠0 Landau levels. Our simulations spatially resolve carrier transport in the device, revealing separation of higher order Landau levels in strongly graded junctions, which suppresses mixing.

  14. Electromagnetic environment and Peltier effect in normal-metal/insulator/superconductor junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardas, Athanassios

    1997-07-01

    The influence of external environment on the heat transport through a tunnel junction connecting a normal-metal and a superconductor is analyzed theoretically. It is demonstrated that at finite temperatures finite impedance of the junction electrodes, limits the maximum amount of heat that can be extracted from the normal-metal via the electric current and thus reduces the efficiency of the thermoelectric electron refrigeration. This behaviour is more pronounced for charging energies Ec of the junction, larger than the superconducting gap Δ and persists for a wide range of values of the impedance.

  15. Manipulating magnetism and conductance of an adatom-molecule junction on a metal surface: An ab initio study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tao, Kun; Stepanyuk, V.S.; Bruno, P.

    2008-01-01

    and conductance in molecule-adatom junctions can be tailored by the STM tip. Varying the tip-substrate distance the magnetic moment of the Co adatom can be switched on/off. The interplay between spin-polarized electron transport through the junction and its magnetic properties is demonstrated. A spin...

  16. Phase dynamics of two parallel stacks of coupled Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukrinov, Yu M.; Rahmonov, I. R.; Plecenik, A.; Seidel, P.; Ilʼichev, E.; Nawrocki, W.

    2014-12-01

    Two parallel stacks of coupled Josephson junctions (JJs) are investigated to clarify the physics of transitions between the rotating and oscillating states and their effect on the IV-characteristics of the system. The detailed study of phase dynamics and bias dependence of the superconducting and diffusion currents allows one to explain all features of simulated IV-characteristics and demonstrate the correspondence in their behavior. The coupling between JJ in the stacks leads to the branching of IV-characteristics and a decrease in the hysteretic region. The crucial role of the diffusion current in the formation of the IV-characteristic of the parallel stacks of coupled JJs is demonstrated. We discuss the effect of symmetry in a number of junctions in the stacks and show a decrease of the branching in the symmetrical stacks. The observed effects might be useful for development of superconducting electronic devices based on intrinsic JJs.

  17. Localization and expression pattern of amelotin, odontogenic ameloblast-associated protein and follicular dendritic cell-secreted protein in the junctional epithelium of inflamed gingiva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Yohei; Kobayashi, Ryoki; Matsui, Sari; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Iwai, Yasunobu; Noda, Keisuke; Yamazaki, Mizuho; Kurita-Ochiai, Tomoko; Yoshimura, Atsutoshi; Shinomura, Tamayuki; Ganss, Bernhard; Ogata, Yorimasa

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to elucidate the localization of amelotin (AMTN), odontogenic ameloblast-associated protein (ODAM) and follicular dendritic cell-secreted protein (FDC-SP) at the junctional epithelium (JE) in Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans infected mice and inflamed and non-inflamed human gingiva. We performed immunostaining to determine the localization and expression pattern of AMTN, ODAM and FDC-SP. AMTN, ODAM and FDC-SP in A. actinomycetemcomitans infected mice did not change dramatically compared with non-infected mice. AMTN and FDC-SP expressions were observed stronger in P. gingivalis infected mice at early stage. However, at the following stage, the coronal part of the AMTN expression disappeared from the JE, and FDC-SP expression decreased due to severe inflammation by P. gingivalis. ODAM expressed internal and external basal lamina, and the expression increased not only at early stage but also at the following stage in the inflammatory JE induced by P. gingivalis. In the human gingival tissues, AMTN was detected at the surface of the sulcular epithelium and JE in the non-inflamed and inflamed gingiva, and the localization did not change the process of inflammation. ODAM and FDC-SP were more widely detected at the sulcular epithelium and JE in the non-inflamed gingiva. In the inflamed gingiva, localization of ODAM and FDC-SP was spread into the gingival epithelium, compared to AMTN. These studies demonstrated that the expression pattern of AMTN, ODAM and FDC-SP at the JE were changed during inflammation process and these three proteins might play an important role in the resistance to inflammation.

  18. Loss models for long Josephson junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, O. H.; Samuelsen, Mogens Rugholm

    1984-01-01

    A general model for loss mechanisms in long Josephson junctions is presented. An expression for the zero-field step is found for a junction of overlap type by means of a perturbation method. Comparison between analytic solution and perturbation result shows good agreement.......A general model for loss mechanisms in long Josephson junctions is presented. An expression for the zero-field step is found for a junction of overlap type by means of a perturbation method. Comparison between analytic solution and perturbation result shows good agreement....

  19. Probe of local impurity states by bend resistance measurements in graphene cross junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, J.; Li, J. Y.; Kang, N.; Lin, Li; Peng, Hailin; Liu, Zhongfan; Xu, H. Q.

    2016-06-01

    We report on low-temperature transport measurements on four-terminal cross junction devices fabricated from high-quality graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition. At high magnetic fields, the bend resistance reveals pronounced peak structures at the quantum Hall plateau transition, which can be attributed to the edge state transport through the junctions. We further demonstrate that the bend resistance is drastically affected by the presence of local impurity states in the junction regions, and exhibits an unusual asymmetric behavior with respect to the magnetic field direction. The observations can be understood in a model taking into account the combination of the edge transport and an asymmetric scatterer. Our results demonstrate that a graphene cross junction may serve as a sensitive probe of local impurity states in graphene at the nanoscale.

  20. Toward Complementary Ionic Circuits: The npn Ion Bipolar Junction Transistor

    OpenAIRE

    Tybrandt, Klas; Gabrielsson, Erik; Berggren, Magnus

    2011-01-01

    Many biomolecules are charged and may therefore be transported with ionic currents. As a step toward addressable ionic delivery circuits, we report on the development of a npn ion bipolar junction transistor (npn-IBJT) as an active control element of anionic currents in general, and specifically, demonstrate actively modulated delivery of the neurotransmitter glutamic acid. The functional materials of this transistor are ion exchange layers and conjugated polymers. The npn-IBJT shows stable t...

  1. Reverse degradation of nickel graphene junction by hydrogen annealing

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Zhenjun; Agnihotri, Pratik; Lee, Ji Ung; Lloyd, Jim R

    2016-01-01

    Metal contacts are fundamental building components for graphene based electronic devices and their properties are greatly influenced by interface quality during device fabrication, leading to resistance variation. Here we show that nickel graphene junction degrades after air exposure, due to interfacial oxidation, thus creating a tunneling barrier. Most importantly, we demonstrate that hydrogen annealing at moderate temperature (300 0C) is an effective technique to reverse the degradation.

  2. Reverse degradation of nickel graphene junction by hydrogen annealing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenjun Zhang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Metal contacts are fundamental building components for graphene based electronic devices and their properties are greatly influenced by interface quality during device fabrication, leading to resistance variation. Here we show that nickel graphene junction degrades after air exposure, due to interfacial oxidation, thus creating a tunneling barrier. Most importantly, we demonstrate that hydrogen annealing at moderate temperature (300 0C is an effective technique to reverse the degradation.

  3. Reverse degradation of nickel graphene junction by hydrogen annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zhenjun; Yang, Fan; Agnihotri, Pratik; Lee, Ji Ung; Lloyd, J. R., E-mail: jlloyd@sunypoly.edu [College of Nanoscience and Engineering, SUNY Polytechnic Institute, Albany, NY USA 12203 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Metal contacts are fundamental building components for graphene based electronic devices and their properties are greatly influenced by interface quality during device fabrication, leading to resistance variation. Here we show that nickel graphene junction degrades after air exposure, due to interfacial oxidation, thus creating a tunneling barrier. Most importantly, we demonstrate that hydrogen annealing at moderate temperature (300 {sup 0}C) is an effective technique to reverse the degradation.

  4. Transient Dynamics in Molecular Junctions: Coherent Bichromophoric Molecular Electron Pumps

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The possibility of using single molecule junctions as electron pumps for energy conversion and storage is considered. It is argued that the small dimensions of these systems enable to make use of unique intra-molecular quantum coherences in order to pump electrons between two leads and to overcome relaxation processes which tend to suppress the pumping efficiency. In particular, we demonstrate that a selective transient excitation of one chromophore in a bi-chromophoric donor-bridge-acceptor ...

  5. Validation study of Oxford Classification of IgA Nephropathy: the significance of extracapillary hypercellularity and mesangial IgG immunostaining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ştefan, Gabriel; Ismail, Gener; Stancu, Simona; Zugravu, Adrian; Andronesi, Andreea; Mandache, Eugen; Mircescu, Gabriel

    2016-08-01

    The Oxford classification (OC) of IgA Nephropathy (IgAN) identified mesangial hypercellularity (M), endocapillary hypercellularity (E), segmental glomerulosclerosis (S), and tubular atrophy/interstitial fibrosis (T) as predictors of outcome. We aimed to validate the OC and to investigate the clinical significance of extracapillary hypercellularity and IgG immunostaining. We examined the renal outcome at December 31, 2014, of 121 adult patients with biopsy proven primary IgAN between 2003 and 2013. The primary endpoint was doubling of serum creatinine or renal replacement therapy initiation. The mean observation period was 59.7 months. Thirty-one percent of the patients presented with a grade of extracapillary hypercellularity. In comparison with the group with no crescents, they had higher grade of inflammation, lower eGFR and increased proteinuria. There were no differences between the IgA and IgA&IgG immunostaining groups regarding the disease progression risk factors. Mean kidney survival time for the entire cohort was 10.6 (9.1, 12.0) years. In the Cox regression model, the independent predictors of decreased renal survival were eGFR at time of biopsy, S1 and the presence of crescents. Our study showed that extracapillary proliferation and S1 had the greatest importance in establishing the renal prognosis of patients with IgAN.

  6. Formation and stability of ridge-ridge-ridge triple junctions in rheologically realistic lithosphere model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerya, Taras; Burov, Evgueni

    2015-04-01

    Triple junctions are probably the most remarkable features of plate boundaries since their presence constitutes one of the major demonstrations of plate tectonics theory. Divergent (R-R-R) triple junctions (at 120° and T junctions) are particular ones since their stability depends on the exact values of the relative velocities of plate divergence and hence is strongly affected by plate rheology and processes of crustal accretion. The mechanisms of their formation and long-term steadiness are not well understood even though it is commonly accepted, generally based on common sense, that the geometry and stability of triple junctions should be related to the intuitively acceptable geometric considerations that 3-branch configurations should be "stable" over the time on a 3D Earth surface. That said, most plate boundaries are in fact 2D in terms that they involve only two plates, while junctions with 3 and more branches, if even mechanically not excluded, are generally short-lived and hence rarely observed at tectonic scale. Indeed, it has been long-time suggested that triple junctions result from evolution of short-lived quadruple junctions, yet, without providing a consistent mechanical explanation or experimental demonstration of this process, due to the rheological complexity of the lithosphere and that of strain localization and crustal accretion processes. For example, it is supposed that R-R-R junctions form as result of axisymmetric mantle upwellings. However, impingement of buoyant fluid on a non-pre-stressed lithosphere should result in multiple radial cracks, as is well known from previous analog and numerical experiments. In case of uni-directionally pre-stressed lithosphere, it has also shown that linear 2D rift structures should be formed. Therefore, a complete 3D thermos-mechanically consistent approach is needed to understand the processes of formation of multi-branch junctions. With this goal we here reproduce and study the processes of multi

  7. The c-axis charge traveling wave in coupled system of Josephson junctions

    OpenAIRE

    Shukrinov, Yu M.; Hamdipour, M.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate a manifestation of the charge traveling wave along the c-axis (TW) in current voltage characteristics of coupled Josephson junctions in high-$T_c$ superconductors. The branches related to the TW with different wavelengths are found for the stacks with different number of Josephson junctions at different values of system's parameters. Transitions between the TW branches and the outermost branch are observed. Time dependence of the electric charge in the superconducting layers an...

  8. Charging of Superconducting Layers and Novel Type of Hysteresis in Coupled Josephson Junctions

    OpenAIRE

    Shukrinov, Yu M.; Gaafar, Ma. A.

    2011-01-01

    A manifestation of a novel type of hysteresis related to the parametric resonance in the system of coupled Josephson junctions is demonstrated. Opposite to McCumber and Steward hysteresis, we find that the width of this hysteresis is inversely proportional to the McCumber parameter and depends also on coupling between junctions and the boundary conditions. An investigation of time dependence of the electric charge in superconducting layers allow us to explain the origin of this hysteresis by ...

  9. Studies of chaos and thermal noise in a driven Josephson junction using an electronic analog

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pegrum, C.M.; Gurney, W.S.C.; Nisbet, R.M.

    1989-03-01

    Using an electronic analog of a resistively shunted driven Josephson junction, the authors have demonstrated a number of effects, including the appearance of a devil's staircase in the current-voltage characteristic, the onset of chaos, and the effect of noise on these phenomena. The authors stress that the analog is simple, but models the junction behavior with a high degree of accuracy and detail.

  10. Cyclic conductance switching in networks of redox-active molecular junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Jianhui; Agustsson, Jon S; Wu, Songmei; Schönenberger, Christian; Calame, Michel; Leroux, Yann; Mayor, Marcel; Jeannin, Olivier; Ran, Ying-Fen; Liu, Shi-Xia; Decurtins, Silvio

    2010-03-10

    Redox-active dithiolated tetrathiafulvalene derivatives (TTFdT) were inserted in two-dimensional nanoparticle arrays to build interlinked networks of molecular junctions. Upon oxidation of the TTFdT to the dication state, we observed a conductance increase of the networks by up to 1 order of magnitude. Successive oxidation and reduction cycles demonstrated a clear switching behavior of the molecular junction conductance. These results show the potential of interlinked nanoparticle arrays as chemical sensors.

  11. Transmission eigenvalue distributions in highly conductive molecular junctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin P. Bergfield

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The transport through a quantum-scale device may be uniquely characterized by its transmission eigenvalues τn. Recently, highly conductive single-molecule junctions (SMJ with multiple transport channels (i.e., several τn > 0 have been formed from benzene molecules between Pt electrodes. Transport through these multichannel SMJs is a probe of both the bonding properties at the lead–molecule interface and of the molecular symmetry.Results: We use a many-body theory that properly describes the complementary wave–particle nature of the electron to investigate transport in an ensemble of Pt–benzene–Pt junctions. We utilize an effective-field theory of interacting π-electrons to accurately model the electrostatic influence of the leads, and we develop an ab initio tunneling model to describe the details of the lead–molecule bonding over an ensemble of junction geometries. We also develop a simple decomposition of transmission eigenchannels into molecular resonances based on the isolated resonance approximation, which helps to illustrate the workings of our many-body theory, and facilitates unambiguous interpretation of transmission spectra.Conclusion: We confirm that Pt–benzene–Pt junctions have two dominant transmission channels, with only a small contribution from a third channel with τn << 1. In addition, we demonstrate that the isolated resonance approximation is extremely accurate and determine that transport occurs predominantly via the HOMO orbital in Pt–benzene–Pt junctions. Finally, we show that the transport occurs in a lead–molecule coupling regime where the charge carriers are both particle-like and wave-like simultaneously, requiring a many-body description.

  12. Gap junctions and connexin-interacting proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giepmans, Ben N G

    2004-01-01

    Gap junctions form channels between adjacent cells. The core proteins of these channels are the connexins. Regulation of gap junction communication (GJC) can be modulated by connexin-associating proteins, such as regulatory protein phosphatases and protein kinases, of which c-Src is the best-studied

  13. Gap junctions and connexin-interacting proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giepmans, Ben N G

    2004-01-01

    Gap junctions form channels between adjacent cells. The core proteins of these channels are the connexins. Regulation of gap junction communication (GJC) can be modulated by connexin-associating proteins, such as regulatory protein phosphatases and protein kinases, of which c-Src is the

  14. Gap junctions and connexin-interacting proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giepmans, Ben N G

    2004-01-01

    Gap junctions form channels between adjacent cells. The core proteins of these channels are the connexins. Regulation of gap junction communication (GJC) can be modulated by connexin-associating proteins, such as regulatory protein phosphatases and protein kinases, of which c-Src is the best-studied

  15. Shot noise in YBCO bicrystal Josephson junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Constantinian, K.Y.; Ovsyannikov, G.A.; Borisenko, I.V.;

    2003-01-01

    We measured spectral noise density in YBCO symmetric bicrystal Josephson junctions on sapphire substrates at bias voltages up to 100 mV and T 4.2 K. Normal state resistance of the Josephson junctions, R-N = 20-90 Omega and ICRN up to 2.2 mV have been observed in the experimental samples. Noise...

  16. Effect of inductive and capacitive coupling on the current-voltage characteristic and electromagnetic radiation from a system of Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmonov, I. R.; Shukrinov, Yu. M.; Atanasova, P. Kh.; Zemlyanaya, E. V.; Bashashin, M. V.

    2017-01-01

    We have studied the current-voltage characteristic of a system of long Josephson junctions taking into account the inductive and capacitive coupling. The dependence of the average time derivative of the phase difference on the bias current and spatiotemporal dependences of the phase difference and magnetic field in each junction are considered. The possibility of branching of the current-voltage characteristic in the region of zero field step, which is associated with different numbers of fluxons in individual Josephson junctions, is demonstrated. The current-voltage characteristic of the system of Josephson junctions is compared with the case of a single junction, and it is shown that the observed branching is due to coupling between the junctions. The intensity of electromagnetic radiation associated with motion of fluxons is calculated, and the effect of coupling between junctions on the radiation power is analyzed.

  17. Spin-crossover molecule based thermoelectric junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Dibyajyoti [Chemistry and Physics of Materials Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Bangalore 560064 (India); Parida, Prakash [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Regensburg, D-93040 Regensburg (Germany); Pati, Swapan K. [Theoretical Sciences Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Bangalore 560064 (India)

    2015-05-11

    Using ab-initio numerical methods, we explore the spin-dependent transport and thermoelectric properties of a spin-crossover molecule (i.e., iron complex of 2-(1H-pyrazol-1-yl)-6-(1H-tetrazole-5-yl)pyridine) based nano-junction. We demonstrate a large magnetoresistance, efficient conductance-switching, and spin-filter activity in this molecule-based two-terminal device. The spin-crossover process also modulates the thermoelectric entities. It can efficiently switch the magnitude as well as spin-polarization of the thermocurrent. We find that thermocurrent is changed by ∼4 orders of magnitude upon spin-crossover. Moreover, it also substantially affects the thermopower and consequently, the device shows extremely efficient spin-crossover magnetothermopower generation. Furthermore, by tuning the chemical potential of electrodes into a certain range, a pure spin-thermopower can be achieved for the high-spin state. Finally, the reasonably large values of figure-of-merit in the presence and absence of phonon demonstrate a large heat-to-voltage conversion efficiency of the device. We believe that our study will pave an alternative way of tuning the transport and thermoelectric properties through the spin-crossover process and can have potential applications in generation of spin-dependent current, information storage, and processing.

  18. Shear zone junctions: Of zippers and freeways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passchier, Cees W.; Platt, John P.

    2017-02-01

    Ductile shear zones are commonly treated as straight high-strain domains with uniform shear sense and characteristic curved foliation trails, bounded by non-deforming wall rock. Many shear zones, however, are branched, and if movement on such branches is contemporaneous, the resulting shape can be complicated and lead to unusual shear sense arrangement and foliation geometries in the wall rock. For Y-shaped shear zone triple junctions with three joining branches and transport direction at a high angle to the branchline, only eight basic types of junction are thought to be stable and to produce significant displacement. The simplest type, called freeway junctions, have similar shear sense in all three branches. The other types show joining or separating behaviour of shear zone branches similar to the action of a zipper. Such junctions may have shear zone branches that join to form a single branch (closing zipper junction), or a single shear zone that splits to form two branches, (opening zipper junction). All categories of shear zone junctions show characteristic foliation patterns and deflection of markers in the wall rock. Closing zipper junctions are unusual, since they form a non-active zone with opposite deflection of foliations in the wall rock known as an extraction fault or wake. Shear zipper junctions can form domains of overprinting shear sense along their flanks. A small and large field example are given from NE Spain and Eastern Anatolia. The geometry of more complex, 3D shear zone junctions with slip parallel and oblique to the branchline is briefly discussed.

  19. Intercellular deposits of basement membrane material in active human pituitary adenomas detected by immunostaining for laminin and electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holck, S; Wewer, U M; Albrechtsen, R

    1986-01-01

    Thirty-eight human pituitary adenomas (24 endocrine active and 14 endocrine inactive tumors) were studied immunohistochemically for the presence of the basement membrane component, laminin, and ultrastructurally for the presence of basement membrane. Immunoreactivity of laminin delineated staining...... and one patient with Cushing's syndrome). Concurrently, at the ultrastructural level, bunches of basement membrane-like material intermingled between the adenoma cells were demonstrated in seven of these ten active adenomas. Furthermore, secretory granules were entrapped occasionally in this intercellular...... matrix, indicating a mutual dependence between excessive hormone extrusion and an increase of "misplaced" deposits of basement membrane components, e.g., laminin....

  20. Breathing charge density waves in intrinsic Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukrinov, Yu. M.; Abdelhafiz, H.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate the creation of a charge density wave (CDW) along a stack of coupled Josephson junctions (JJs) in layered superconductors. Electric charge in each superconducting layer oscillates around some average value, forming a breathing CDW. We show the transformation of a longitudinal plasma wave to CDW in the state corresponding to the outermost branch. Transition between different types of CDW's related to the inner branches of IV characteristic is demonstrated. The effect of the external electromagnetic radiation on the states corresponding to the inner branches differs crucially from the case of the single JJ. The Shapiro steps in the IV characteristics of the junctions in the stack do not correspond directly to the frequency of radiation ω. The system of JJs behaves like a single whole system: the Shapiro steps or their harmonics in the total IV characteristics appear at voltage , where V l is the voltage in the lth junction, N R is the number of JJs in the rotating state, and m and n are integers.

  1. Junction conditions of cosmological perturbations

    CERN Document Server

    Tomita, K

    2004-01-01

    The behavior of perturbations is studied in cosmological models which consist of two different homogeneous regions connected in a spherical shell boundary. The junction conditions for the metric perturbations and the displacements of the shell boundary are analyzed and the surface densities of the perturbed energy and momentum in the shell are derived, using Mukohyama's gauge-invariant formalism and the Israel discontinuity condition. In both homogeneous regions the perturbations of scalar, vector and tensor types are expanded using the 3-dimensional harmonic functions, but the model coupling among them is caused in the shell by the inhomogeneity. By treating the perturbations with odd and even parities separately, it is found, however, that we can have consistent displacements and surface densities for given metric parturbations

  2. Direct Preparation of Carbon Nanotube Intramolecular Junctions on Structured Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Jianing; Zhan, Zhaoyao; Sun, Gengzhi; Mohan, Hari Krishna Salila Vijayalal; Zhou, Jinyuan; Kim, Young-Jin; Zheng, Lianxi

    2016-12-01

    Leveraging the unique properties of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) intramolecular junctions (IMJs) in innovative nanodevices and next-generation nanoelectronics requires controllable, repeatable, and large-scale preparation, together with rapid identification and comprehensive characterization of such structures. Here we demonstrate SWNT IMJs through directly growing ultralong SWNTs on trenched substrates. It is found that the trench configurations introduce axial strain in partially suspended nanotubes, and promote bending deformation in the vicinity of the trench edges. As a result, the lattice and electronic structure of the nanotubes can be locally modified, to form IMJs in the deformation regions. The trench patterns also enable pre-defining the formation locations of SWNT IMJs, facilitating the rapid identification. Elaborate Raman characterization has verified the formation of SWNT IMJs and identified their types. Rectifying behavior has been observed by electrical measurements on the as-prepared semiconducting-semiconducting (S-S) junction.

  3. Semiclassical Quantization of Spinning Quasiparticles in Ballistic Josephson Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konschelle, François; Bergeret, F. Sebastián; Tokatly, Ilya V.

    2016-06-01

    A Josephson junction made of a generic magnetic material sandwiched between two conventional superconductors is studied in the ballistic semiclassic limit. The spectrum of Andreev bound states is obtained from the single valuedness of a particle-hole spinor over closed orbits generated by electron-hole reflections at the interfaces between superconducting and normal materials. The semiclassical quantization condition is shown to depend only on the angle mismatch between initial and final spin directions along such closed trajectories. For the demonstration, an Andreev-Wilson loop in the composite position-particle-hole-spin space is constructed and shown to depend on only two parameters, namely, a magnetic phase shift and a local precession axis for the spin. The details of the Andreev-Wilson loop can be extracted via measuring the spin-resolved density of states. A Josephson junction can thus be viewed as an analog computer of closed-path-ordered exponentials.

  4. Thermoelectricity in molecular junctions with harmonic and anharmonic modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijay Kumar Agarwalla

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We study charge and energy transfer in two-site molecular electronic junctions in which electron transport is assisted by a vibrational mode. To understand the role of mode harmonicity/anharmonicity in transport behavior, we consider two limiting situations: (i the mode is assumed harmonic, (ii we truncate the mode spectrum to include only two levels, to represent an anharmonic mode. Based on the cumulant generating functions of the models, we analyze the linear-response and nonlinear performance of these junctions and demonstrate that while the electrical and thermal conductances are sensitive to whether the mode is harmonic/anharmonic, the Seebeck coefficient, the thermoelectric figure-of-merit, and the thermoelectric efficiency beyond linear response, conceal this information.

  5. Transient Dynamics in Molecular Junctions: Coherent Bichromophoric Molecular Electron Pumps

    CERN Document Server

    Volkovich, Roie

    2010-01-01

    The possibility of using single molecule junctions as electron pumps for energy conversion and storage is considered. It is argued that the small dimensions of these systems enable to make use of unique intra-molecular quantum coherences in order to pump electrons between two leads and to overcome relaxation processes which tend to suppress the pumping efficiency. In particular, we demonstrate that a selective transient excitation of one chromophore in a bi-chromophoric donor-bridge-acceptor molecular junction model yields currents which transfer charge (electron and holes) unevenly to the two leads in the absence of a bias potential. The utility of this mechanism for charge pumping in steady state conditions is proposed.

  6. Innexin gap junctions in nerve cells coordinate spontaneous contractile behavior in Hydra polyps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaku, Yasuharu; Hwang, Jung Shan; Wolf, Alexander; Böttger, Angelika; Shimizu, Hiroshi; David, Charles N.; Gojobori, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Nerve cells and spontaneous coordinated behavior first appeared near the base of animal evolution in the common ancestor of cnidarians and bilaterians. Experiments on the cnidarian Hydra have demonstrated that nerve cells are essential for this behavior, although nerve cells in Hydra are organized in a diffuse network and do not form ganglia. Here we show that the gap junction protein innexin-2 is expressed in a small group of nerve cells in the lower body column of Hydra and that an anti-innexin-2 antibody binds to gap junctions in the same region. Treatment of live animals with innexin-2 antibody eliminates gap junction staining and reduces spontaneous body column contractions. We conclude that a small subset of nerve cells, connected by gap junctions and capable of synchronous firing, act as a pacemaker to coordinate the contraction of the body column in the absence of ganglia.

  7. Innexin gap junctions in nerve cells coordinate spontaneous contractile behavior in Hydra polyps

    KAUST Repository

    Takaku, Yasuharu

    2014-01-07

    Nerve cells and spontaneous coordinated behavior first appeared near the base of animal evolution in the common ancestor of cnidarians and bilaterians. Experiments on the cnidarian Hydra have demonstrated that nerve cells are essential for this behavior, although nerve cells in Hydra are organized in a diffuse network and do not form ganglia. Here we show that the gap junction protein innexin-2 is expressed in a small group of nerve cells in the lower body column of Hydra and that an anti-innexin-2 antibody binds to gap junctions in the same region. Treatment of live animals with innexin-2 antibody eliminates gap junction staining and reduces spontaneous body column contractions. We conclude that a small subset of nerve cells, connected by gap junctions and capable of synchronous firing, act as a pacemaker to coordinate the contraction of the body column in the absence of ganglia.

  8. Characterization of sputtering CoFe-ITO junction for spin injection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEN Qiye; SONG Yuanqiang; YANG Qinghui; ZHANG Huaiwu

    2006-01-01

    The combination of ferromagnetic metal (FM) and semiconductor (SC) for spin injection was studied and demonstrated with FM-SC-FM junction. The semiconductor was chosen to be doped Indium-Tin-Oxide(ITO). Both ITO single-layer film and CoFe-ITO-CoFe junction were sputtering deposited. The ITO single-layer film wasn-type with a small resistance of about 100 Ω/Square. I-V curves and Magnetoresistance (MR) effect of the CoFe-ITO-CoFe junction were measured at room temperature and 77 K. Results show that the CoFe forms an ohmic contact to ITO film. But at low temperature, the I-V curves show a Schottky-like characteristic, which is strongly affect by applied magnetic field. The MR effect was measured to be 1% at 77 K, which indicates a spin injection into semiconductor to be realized in this sandwich junction.

  9. 2D SQIF arrays using 20 000 YBCO high R n Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, E. E.; Hannam, K. E.; Lazar, J.; Leslie, K. E.; Lewis, C. J.; Grancea, A.; Keenan, S. T.; Lam, S. K. H.; Foley, C. P.

    2016-06-01

    Superconducting quantum interference filters (SQIFs) have been created using two dimensional arrays of YBCO step-edge Josephson junctions connected together in series and parallel configurations via superconducting loops with a range of loop areas and loop inductances. A SQIF response, as evidenced by a single large anti-peak at zero applied flux, is reported at 77 K for step-edge junction arrays with the junction number N = 1 000 up to 20 000. The SQIF sensitivity (slope of peak) increased linearly with N up to a maximum of 1530 V T-1. Array parameters related to geometry and average junction characteristics are investigated in order to understand and improve the SQIF performance in high temperature superconducting arrays. Initial investigations also focus on the effect of the SQUID inductance factor on the SQIF sensitivity by varying both the mean critical current and the mean inductance of the loops in the array. The RF response to a 30 MHz signal is demonstrated.

  10. Response of an on-chip coil-integrated superconducting tunnel junction to x-rays

    CERN Document Server

    Maehata, K; Taino, T

    2003-01-01

    An on-chip coil-integrated superconducting tunnel junction (OC sup 2 -STJ) was irradiated by X-rays emitted from an sup 5 sup 5 Fe source to the examine the performance of X-ray detection by applying a magnetic field produced by a superconducting microstrip coil integrated into the junction chip. Response characteristics were obtained for a diamond-shaped Nd-based tunnel junction with a sensitive area of 100 x 100 mu m sup 2 in the OC sup 2 -STJ chip. Two kinds of stable operation modes with different pulse heights were observed by changing the magnetic flux density in the barrier region of the junction. In the low-pulse-height mode, the pulse height distribution exhibits two full-energy peaks corresponding to signals created in the top and base electrodes. Stable operation of the OC sup 2 -STJ was demonstrated without using conventional external electromagnets. (author)

  11. Two-dimensional simulations of the superconducting proximity in superconductor-semiconductor junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Victor; Vissers, Michael; Law, Stephanie A.; Vishveshwara, Smitha; Eckstein, James N.

    2015-03-01

    We simulate the consequences of the superconducting proximity effect on the DC current response of a semiconductor-superconductor proximity device within the quasiclassical formalism in the diffusively disordered limit. The device is modeled on in-situ fabricated NS junctions of superconducting Nb films on metallic doped InAs films, with electrical terminals placed in an N-S-N T-junction configuration. Due to the non-collinear configuration of this three terminal device, a theoretical model based on coupled two dimensional spectral and distributional Usadel equations was constructed and numerically solved using Finite-Elements methods. In the regime of high junction conductance, our numerical results demonstrate strong temperature and spatial dependencies of the proximity induced modifications to spectral and transport properties. Such characteristics deviate strongly from usual tunnel junction behavior and aspects of this have been observed in prior experiments[arXiv:1402.6055].

  12. Reversed polarity of the glandular epithelial cells in micropapillary carcinoma of the large intestine and the EMA/MUC1 immunostain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cserni, Gábor

    2014-10-01

    Micropapillary carcinoma of the colon and rectum is associated with an adverse prognosis. This tumour type displays reverse polarity of the tumour cells and is stated to be characterised by an inside-out epithelial membrane antigen (EMA)/MUC1 staining. Nine cases of primary colorectal carcinoma and one omental metastasis were studied by means of immunohistochemistry, using antibodies to detect EMA, MUC1, MUC2, MUC3, MUC5AC, MUC6, CD10, CA125, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). The inside-out pattern staining with EMA/MUC1 ranged from diffuse circumferential through focal and partial to negative, but in some cases CEA, MUC3 and CD10 also showed this pattern staining, sometimes more clearly than did EMA or MUC1. The reverse polarity of colorectal micropapillary carcinomas is sometimes better visualised by immunostains other than EMA/MUC1.

  13. Interfacial Engineering of Semiconductor-Superconductor Junctions for High Performance Micro-Coolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnarsson, D.; Richardson-Bullock, J. S.; Prest, M. J.; Nguyen, H. Q.; Timofeev, A. V.; Shah, V. A.; Whall, T. E.; Parker, E. H. C.; Leadley, D. R.; Myronov, M.; Prunnila, M.

    2015-12-01

    The control of electronic and thermal transport through material interfaces is crucial for numerous micro and nanoelectronics applications and quantum devices. Here we report on the engineering of the electro-thermal properties of semiconductor-superconductor (Sm-S) electronic cooler junctions by a nanoscale insulating tunnel barrier introduced between the Sm and S electrodes. Unexpectedly, such an interface barrier does not increase the junction resistance but strongly reduces the detrimental sub-gap leakage current. These features are key to achieving high cooling power tunnel junction refrigerators, and we demonstrate unparalleled performance in silicon-based Sm-S electron cooler devices with orders of magnitudes improvement in the cooling power in comparison to previous works. By adapting the junctions in strain-engineered silicon coolers we also demonstrate efficient electron temperature reduction from 300 mK to below 100 mK. Investigations on junctions with different interface quality indicate that the previously unexplained sub-gap leakage current is strongly influenced by the Sm-S interface states. These states often dictate the junction electrical resistance through the well-known Fermi level pinning effect and, therefore, superconductivity could be generally used to probe and optimize metal-semiconductor contact behaviour.

  14. Gap junction remodeling and cardiac arrhythmogenesis in a murine model of oculodentodigital dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalcheva, Nellie; Qu, Jiaxiang; Sandeep, Nefthi; Garcia, Luis; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Zhiyong; Lampe, Paul D; Suadicani, Sylvia O; Spray, David C; Fishman, Glenn I

    2007-12-18

    Gap junction channels are required for normal cardiac impulse propagation, and gap junction remodeling is associated with enhanced arrhythmic risk. Oculodentodigital dysplasia (ODDD) is a multisystem syndrome due to mutations in the connexin43 (Cx43) gap junction channel gene. To determine the effects of a human connexin channelopathy on cardiac electrophysiology and arrhythmogenesis, we generated a murine model of ODDD by introducing the disease-causing I130T mutant allele into the mouse genome. Cx43 abundance was markedly reduced in mutant hearts with preferential loss of phosphorylated forms that interfered with trafficking and assembly of gap junctions in the junctional membrane. Dual whole-cell patch-clamp studies showed significantly lower junctional conductance between neonatal cell pairs from mutant hearts, and optical mapping of isolated-perfused hearts with voltage-sensitive dyes demonstrated significant slowing of conduction velocity. Programmed electrical stimulation revealed a markedly increased susceptibility to spontaneous and inducible ventricular tachyarrhythmias. In summary, our data demonstrate that the I130T mutation interferes with Cx43 posttranslational processing, resulting in diminished cell-cell coupling, slowing of impulse propagation, and a proarrhythmic substrate.

  15. Positive immunostaining for feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) in a Sphinx cat with cutaneous lesions and bilateral panuveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Bianca S; Kerr, Moira E; Sandmeyer, Lynne S; Grahn, Bruce H

    2013-07-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a common, fatal, systemic disease of cats. This case report describes the antemortem diagnosis of FIP in a 2-year-old spayed female Sphinx cat that presented with a bilateral panuveitis and multiple papular cutaneous lesions. Histopathologically, the skin lesions were characterized by perivascular infiltrates of macrophages, neutrophils, with fewer plasma cells, mast cells, and small lymphocytes in the mid- to deep dermis. Immunohistochemistry for intracellular feline coronavirus (FeCoV) antigen demonstrated positive staining in dermal macrophages providing an antemortem diagnosis of a moderate, nodular to diffuse, pyogranulomatous perivascular dermatitis due to FIP infection. Obtaining an antemortem diagnosis of FIP can be a challenge and cutaneous lesions are rare in the disease. Recognition and biopsy of any cutaneous lesions in cats with panuveitis and suspected FIP can help establish an antemortem diagnosis of the disease.

  16. Duodenal crypt health following exposure to Cr(VI): Micronucleus scoring, γ-H2AX immunostaining, and synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Chad M.; Wolf, Jeffrey C.; Elbekai, Reem H.; Paranjpe, Madhav G.; Seiter, Jennifer M.; Chappell, Mark A.; Tappero, Ryan V.; Suh, Mina; Proctor, Deborah M.; Bichteler, Anne; Haws, Laurie C.; Harris, Mark A.

    2015-08-01

    Lifetime exposure to high concentrations of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] in drinking water results in intestinal damage and an increase in duodenal tumors in B6C3F1 mice. To assess whether these tumors could be the result of a direct mutagenic or genotoxic mode of action, we conducted a GLP-compliant 7-day drinking water study to assess crypt health along the entire length of the duodenum. Mice were exposed to water (vehicle control), 1.4, 21, or 180 ppm Cr(VI) via drinking water for 7 consecutive days. Crypt enterocytes in Swiss roll sections were scored as normal, mitotic, apoptotic, karyorrhectic, or as having micronuclei. A single oral gavage of 50 mg/kg cyclophosphamide served as a positive control for micronucleus induction. Exposure to 21 and 180 ppm Cr(VI) significantly increased the number of crypt enterocytes. Micronuclei and γ-H2AX immunostaining were not elevated in the crypts of Cr(VI)-treated mice. In contrast, treatment with cyclophosphamide significantly increased numbers of crypt micronuclei and qualitatively increased γ-H2AX immunostaining. Synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence (XRF) microscopy revealed the presence of strong Cr fluorescence in duodenal villi, but negligible Cr fluorescence in the crypt compartment. Together, these data indicate that Cr(VI) does not adversely effect the crypt compartment where intestinal stem cells reside, and provide additional evidence that the mode of action for Cr(VI)-induced intestinal cancer in B6C3F1 mice involves chronic villous wounding resulting in compensatory crypt enterocyte hyperplasia.

  17. Gap junction communication in myelinating glia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nualart-Marti, Anna; Solsona, Carles; Fields, R Douglas

    2013-01-01

    Gap junction communication is crucial for myelination and axonal survival in both the peripheral nervous system (PNS) and central nervous system (CNS). This review examines the different types of gap junctions in myelinating glia of the PNS and CNS (Schwann cells and oligodendrocytes respectively), including their functions and involvement in neurological disorders. Gap junctions mediate intercellular communication among Schwann cells in the PNS, and among oligodendrocytes and between oligodendrocytes and astrocytes in the CNS. Reflexive gap junctions mediating transfer between different regions of the same cell promote communication between cellular compartments of myelinating glia that are separated by layers of compact myelin. Gap junctions in myelinating glia regulate physiological processes such as cell growth, proliferation, calcium signaling, and participate in extracellular signaling via release of neurotransmitters from hemijunctions. In the CNS, gap junctions form a glial network between oligodendrocytes and astrocytes. This transcellular communication is hypothesized to maintain homeostasis by facilitating restoration of membrane potential after axonal activity via electrical coupling and the re-distribution of potassium ions released from axons. The generation of transgenic mice for different subsets of connexins has revealed the contribution of different connexins in gap junction formation and illuminated new subcellular mechanisms underlying demyelination and cognitive defects. Alterations in metabolic coupling have been reported in animal models of X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMTX) and Pelizaeus-Merzbarcher-like disease (PMLD), which are caused by mutations in the genes encoding for connexin 32 and connexin 47 respectively. Future research identifying the expression and regulation of gap junctions in myelinating glia is likely to provide a better understanding of myelinating glia in nervous system function, plasticity, and disease. This

  18. Vibrationally coupled electron transport through single-molecule junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haertle, Rainer

    2012-04-26

    vibrational effects have a profound influence on the transport characteristics of a single-molecule contact and play therefore a fundamental role in this transport problem. Our findings demonstrate that vibrationally coupled electron transport through a molecular junction involves two types of processes: (i) transport processes, where an electron tunnels through the molecular bridge from one lead to the other, and (ii) electron-hole pair creation processes, where an electron tunnels from one of the leads onto the molecular bridge and back to the same lead again. Transport processes directly contribute to the electrical current flowing through a molecular contact and involve both excitation and deexcitation processes of the vibrational modes of the junction. Electron-hole pair creation processes do not directly contribute to the electrical current and typically involve only deexcitation processes. Nevertheless, they constitute a cooling mechanism for the vibrational modes of a single-molecule junction that is as important as cooling by transport processes. As the level of vibrational excitation determines the efficiency of electron transport processes, they have an indirect influence on the electrical current flowing through the junction. As we show, however, this influence can be substantial, in particular, if the molecule is coupled asymmetrically to the leads. Accounting for all these processes and their complex interrelationship, we analyze a number of intriguing transport phenomena, including rectification, negative differential resistance, anomalous peak broadening, mode-selective vibrational excitation and vibrationally induced decoherence. Moreover, we show that higher levels of vibrational excitation are obtained for weaker electronic-vibrational coupling. Thus, based on physical grounds, we establish a relation between the weak electronic-vibrational coupling limit and the limit of large bias voltages, where the level of vibrational excitation in a molecular junction

  19. Fluxon dynamics in three stacked Josephson junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorria, Carlos; Christiansen, Peter Leth; Gaididei, Yuri Borisovich

    2002-01-01

    /sub -/, the coupling between junctions leads to a repulsion of the fluxons with the same polarity. Above this critical velocity a fluxon will induce radiation in the neighboring junctions, leading to a bunching of the fluxons in the stacked junctions. Using the Sakai-Bodin-Pedersen model, three coupled perturbed sine......-Gordon equations are numerically studied for different values of coupling, damping, and bias parameters. In a narrow range of velocities bunching occurs. Outside this interval the fluxons split and new fluxons may be created. I-V characteristics are presented...

  20. Temperature dependence of thermopower in molecular junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngsang; Lenert, Andrej; Meyhofer, Edgar; Reddy, Pramod

    2016-07-01

    The thermoelectric properties of molecular junctions are of considerable interest due to their promise for efficient energy conversion. While the dependence of thermoelectric properties of junctions on molecular structure has been recently studied, their temperature dependence remains unexplored. Using a custom built variable temperature scanning tunneling microscope, we measured the thermopower and electrical conductance of individual benzenedithiol junctions over a range of temperatures (100 K-300 K). We find that while the electrical conductance is independent of temperature, the thermopower increases linearly with temperature, confirming the predictions of the Landauer theory.

  1. Phase qubits fabricated with trilayer junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weides, M; Bialczak, R C; Lenander, M; Lucero, E; Mariantoni, Matteo; Neeley, M; O' Connell, A D; Sank, D; Wang, H; Wenner, J; Yamamoto, T; Yin, Y; Cleland, A N; Martinis, J, E-mail: martin.weides@nist.gov, E-mail: martinis@physics.ucsb.edu [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)

    2011-05-15

    We have developed a novel Josephson junction geometry with minimal volume of lossy isolation dielectric, suitable for higher quality trilayer junctions implemented in qubits. The junctions are based on in situ deposited trilayers with thermal tunnel oxide, have micron-sized areas and a low subgap current. In qubit spectroscopy only a few avoided level crossings are observed, and the measured relaxation time of T{sub 1{approx}}400 ns is in good agreement with the usual phase qubit decay time, indicating low loss due to the additional isolation dielectric.

  2. Seebeck effect in magnetic tunnel junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Marvin; Walowski, Jakob; Zbarsky, Vladyslav; Münzenberg, Markus; Schäfers, Markus; Ebke, Daniel; Reiss, Günter; Thomas, Andy; Peretzki, Patrick; Seibt, Michael; Moodera, Jagadeesh S; Czerner, Michael; Bachmann, Michael; Heiliger, Christian

    2011-10-01

    Creating temperature gradients in magnetic nanostructures has resulted in a new research direction, that is, the combination of magneto- and thermoelectric effects. Here, we demonstrate the observation of one important effect of this class: the magneto-Seebeck effect. It is observed when a magnetic configuration changes the charge-based Seebeck coefficient. In particular, the Seebeck coefficient changes during the transition from a parallel to an antiparallel magnetic configuration in a tunnel junction. In this respect, it is the analogue to the tunnelling magnetoresistance. The Seebeck coefficients in parallel and antiparallel configurations are of the order of the voltages known from the charge-Seebeck effect. The size and sign of the effect can be controlled by the composition of the electrodes' atomic layers adjacent to the barrier and the temperature. The geometric centre of the electronic density of states relative to the Fermi level determines the size of the Seebeck effect. Experimentally, we realized 8.8% magneto-Seebeck effect, which results from a voltage change of about -8.7 μV K⁻¹ from the antiparallel to the parallel direction close to the predicted value of -12.1 μV K⁻¹. In contrast to the spin-Seebeck effect, it can be measured as a voltage change directly without conversion of a spin current.

  3. Parallel Quantum Circuit in a Tunnel Junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faizy Namarvar, Omid; Dridi, Ghassen; Joachim, Christian

    2016-07-01

    Spectral analysis of 1 and 2-states per line quantum bus are normally sufficient to determine the effective Vab(N) electronic coupling between the emitter and receiver states through the bus as a function of the number N of parallel lines. When Vab(N) is difficult to determine, an Heisenberg-Rabi time dependent quantum exchange process must be triggered through the bus to capture the secular oscillation frequency Ωab(N) between those states. Two different linear and regimes are demonstrated for Ωab(N) as a function of N. When the initial preparation is replaced by coupling of the quantum bus to semi-infinite electrodes, the resulting quantum transduction process is not faithfully following the Ωab(N) variations. Because of the electronic transparency normalisation to unity and of the low pass filter character of this transduction, large Ωab(N) cannot be captured by the tunnel junction. The broadly used concept of electrical contact between a metallic nanopad and a molecular device must be better described as a quantum transduction process. At small coupling and when N is small enough not to compensate for this small coupling, an N2 power law is preserved for Ωab(N) and for Vab(N).

  4. Parallel Quantum Circuit in a Tunnel Junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faizy Namarvar, Omid; Dridi, Ghassen; Joachim, Christian

    2016-07-25

    Spectral analysis of 1 and 2-states per line quantum bus are normally sufficient to determine the effective Vab(N) electronic coupling between the emitter and receiver states through the bus as a function of the number N of parallel lines. When Vab(N) is difficult to determine, an Heisenberg-Rabi time dependent quantum exchange process must be triggered through the bus to capture the secular oscillation frequency Ωab(N) between those states. Two different linear and regimes are demonstrated for Ωab(N) as a function of N. When the initial preparation is replaced by coupling of the quantum bus to semi-infinite electrodes, the resulting quantum transduction process is not faithfully following the Ωab(N) variations. Because of the electronic transparency normalisation to unity and of the low pass filter character of this transduction, large Ωab(N) cannot be captured by the tunnel junction. The broadly used concept of electrical contact between a metallic nanopad and a molecular device must be better described as a quantum transduction process. At small coupling and when N is small enough not to compensate for this small coupling, an N(2) power law is preserved for Ωab(N) and for Vab(N).

  5. Increasing gap junctional coupling: a tool for dissecting the role of gap junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelsen, Lene Nygaard; Haugan, Ketil; Stahlhut, Martin; Kjølbye, Anne-Louise; Hennan, James K; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik; Petersen, Jørgen Søberg; Nielsen, Morten Schak

    2007-03-01

    Much of our current knowledge about the physiological and pathophysiological role of gap junctions is based on experiments where coupling has been reduced by either chemical agents or genetic modification. This has brought evidence that gap junctions are important in many physiological processes. In a number of cases, gap junctions have been implicated in the initiation and progress of disease, and experimental uncoupling has been used to investigate the exact role of coupling. The inverse approach, i.e., to increase coupling, has become possible in recent years and represents a new way of testing the role of gap junctions. The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge obtained with agents that selectively increase gap junctional intercellular coupling. Two approaches will be reviewed: increasing coupling by the use of antiarrhythmic peptide and its synthetic analogs and by interfering with the gating of gap junctional channels.

  6. Branching in current-voltage characteristics of intrinsic Josephson junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukrinov, Yu M [BLTP, JINR, Dubna, Moscow Region, 141980 (Russian Federation); Mahfouzi, F [Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences, PO Box 45195-1159, Zanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2007-02-15

    We study branching in the current-voltage characteristics of the intrinsic Josephson junctions of high-temperature superconductors in the framework of the capacitively coupled Josephson junction model with diffusion current. A system of dynamical equations for the gauge-invariant phase differences between superconducting layers for a stack of ten intrinsic junctions has been numerically solved. We have obtained a total branch structure in the current-voltage characteristics. We demonstrate the existence of a 'breakpoint region' on the current-voltage characteristics and explain it as a result of resonance between Josephson and plasma oscillations. The effect of the boundary conditions is investigated. The existence of two outermost branches and correspondingly two breakpoint regions for the periodic boundary conditions is shown. One branch, which is observed only at periodic boundary conditions, corresponds to the propagating of the plasma mode. The second one corresponds to the situation when the charge oscillations on the superconducting layers are absent, excluding the breakpoint. A time dependence of the charge oscillations at breakpoints is presented.

  7. Branching in current voltage characteristics of intrinsic Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukrinov, Yu M.; Mahfouzi, F.

    2007-02-01

    We study branching in the current-voltage characteristics of the intrinsic Josephson junctions of high-temperature superconductors in the framework of the capacitively coupled Josephson junction model with diffusion current. A system of dynamical equations for the gauge-invariant phase differences between superconducting layers for a stack of ten intrinsic junctions has been numerically solved. We have obtained a total branch structure in the current-voltage characteristics. We demonstrate the existence of a 'breakpoint region' on the current-voltage characteristics and explain it as a result of resonance between Josephson and plasma oscillations. The effect of the boundary conditions is investigated. The existence of two outermost branches and correspondingly two breakpoint regions for the periodic boundary conditions is shown. One branch, which is observed only at periodic boundary conditions, corresponds to the propagating of the plasma mode. The second one corresponds to the situation when the charge oscillations on the superconducting layers are absent, excluding the breakpoint. A time dependence of the charge oscillations at breakpoints is presented.

  8. Immersed boundary simulation of flow through arterial junctions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    DWAIPAYAN SARKAR; NISHANT UPADHYAY; SOMNATH ROY; SUBHAS CHANDRA RANA

    2017-04-01

    The present work demonstrates implementation of a mass-conserving sharp-interface immersed boundary for simulation of flows in branched arterial geometries. A simplistic two-dimensional arterial junction is considered to capture the preliminary flow physics in the aortic regions. Numerical solutions are benchmarked against established available experimental PIV results in Ensley et al (Annu. Thorac. Surg. 68(4):1384–1390,1999) and numerical predictions in Gilmanov and Sotiropoulos (J. Comput. Phys. 207(2):457–492, 2005) and deZelicourt et al (Comput. Fluids 38(9):1749–1762, 2009). Simulations are further carried out for pulsated flows and effects of blockages near the junctions (due to stenosis or atherosclerosis). Instabilities in the flow structures near the junction and the resulting changes in the downstream pulsation frequency were observed. These changes account for the physiological heart defects that arise from the poorly working valve (due to blockage),giving rise to chest pain and breathing instability, and can potentially be used as a detection tool for arterial diseases.

  9. How physical exercise changes rat myotendinous junctions: an ultrastructural study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Curzi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Myotendinous junctions can be easily injured by overloading or trauma, and exercise training may be a way of increasing their resistance to mechanical stress. To this end, we examined herein the morphological changes induced by moderate exercise training in the myotendinous junctions of extensor digitorum longus and gastrocnemius muscles in rats. Twelve Sprague-Dawley rats were used in this investigation. Six of them were trained to run on a treadmill for 1 h/day, 3 days/week over 10 weeks in order for them to achieve a running rate of 25 m/min at the end of the training period. Six age-matched sedentary rats were used as controls. The rats were sacrificed 24 h after the final training session, and the extensor digitorum longum (EDL and the gastrocnemium were excised; the myotendinous junctions (MTJ were then prepared and observed with electron microscopy. Digitation branching was evaluated by counting the bifurcations in the MTJ protrusions. Our observations indicate that exercise does indeed induce changes in MTJ morphology. In both muscles the number of bifurcated interdigitations increased significantly, as well as, in gastrocnemius, the branching of the finger-like processes. It was demonstrated that the MTJ is able to adapt to an increase in tensile force by enlarging the muscle-tendon contact area and, consequently, mechanical resistance.

  10. How physical exercise changes rat myotendinous junctions: an ultrastructural study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curzi, D; Salucci, S; Marini, M; Esposito, F; Agnello, L; Veicsteinas, A; Burattini, S; Falcieri, E

    2012-04-16

    Myotendinous junctions can be easily injured by overloading or trauma, and exercise training may be a way of increasing their resistance to mechanical stress. To this end, we examined herein the morphological changes induced by moderate exercise training in the myotendinous junctions of extensor digitorum longus and gastrocnemius muscles in rats. Twelve Sprague-Dawley rats were used in this investigation. Six of them were trained to run on a treadmill for 1 h/day, 3 days/week over 10 weeks in order for them to achieve a running rate of 25 m/min at the end of the training period. Six age-matched sedentary rats were used as controls. The rats were sacrificed 24 h after the final training session, and the extensor digitorum longum (EDL) and the gastrocnemium were excised; the myotendinous junctions (MTJ) were then prepared and observed with electron microscopy. Digitation branching was evaluated by counting the bifurcations in the MTJ protrusions. Our observations indicate that exercise does indeed induce changes in MTJ morphology. In both muscles the number of bifurcated interdigitations increased significantly, as well as, in gastrocnemius, the branching of the finger-like processes. It was demonstrated that the MTJ is able to adapt to an increase in tensile force by enlarging the muscle-tendon contact area and, consequently, mechanical resistance.

  11. Presynaptic spike broadening reduces junctional potential amplitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, A N; Przysiezniak, J; Acosta-Urquidi, J; Basarsky, T A

    1989-08-24

    Presynaptic modulation of action potential duration may regulate synaptic transmission in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Such synaptic plasticity is brought about by modifications to membrane currents at presynaptic release sites, which, in turn, lead to changes in the concentration of cytosolic calcium available for mediating transmitter release. The 'primitive' neuromuscular junction of the jellyfish Polyorchis penicillatus is a useful model of presynaptic modulation. In this study, we show that the durations of action potentials in the motor neurons of this jellyfish are negatively correlated with the amplitude of excitatory junctional potentials. We present data from in vitro voltage-clamp experiments showing that short duration voltage spikes, which elicit large excitatory junctional potentials in vivo, produce larger and briefer calcium currents than do long duration action potentials, which elicit small excitatory junctional potentials.

  12. Laparoscopically assisted pyeloplasty for ureteropelvic junction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    junction obstruction: a transperitoneal versus a retroperitoneal approach ... laparoscopic-assisted dismembered pyeloplasty (TLADP) ... to an open technique for two patients of the TLADP group; ... Annals of Pediatric Surgery 2012, 8:29–31.

  13. Tight Junctions in Salivary Epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga J. Baker

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Epithelial cell tight junctions (TJs consist of a narrow belt-like structure in the apical region of the lateral plasma membrane that circumferentially binds each cell to its neighbor. TJs are found in tissues that are involved in polarized secretions, absorption functions, and maintaining barriers between blood and interstitial fluids. The morphology, permeability, and ion selectivity of TJ vary among different types of tissues and species. TJs are very dynamic structures that assemble, grow, reorganize, and disassemble during physiological or pathological events. Several studies have indicated the active role of TJ in intestinal, renal, and airway epithelial function; however, the functional significance of TJ in salivary gland epithelium is poorly understood. Interactions between different combinations of the TJ family (each with their own unique regulatory proteins define tissue specificity and functions during physiopathological processes; however, these interaction patterns have not been studied in salivary glands. The purpose of this review is to analyze some of the current data regarding the regulatory components of the TJ that could potentially affect cellular functions of the salivary epithelium.

  14. Androgen-Dependent Sertoli Cell Tight Junction Remodeling Is Mediated by Multiple Tight Junction Components

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chakraborty, Papia; William Buaas, F; Sharma, Manju; Smith, Benjamin E; Greenlee, Anne R; Eacker, Stephen M; Braun, Robert E

    2014-01-01

    Sertoli cell tight junctions (SCTJs) of the seminiferous epithelium create a specialized microenvironment in the testis to aid differentiation of spermatocytes and spermatids from spermatogonial stem cells...

  15. Junction Plasmon-Induced Molecular Reorientation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Hu, Dehong; Hess, Wayne P.

    2013-10-17

    Time and frequency dependent intensity variations in sequences of Raman spectra recorded at plasmonic junctions can be assigned to molecular reorientation. This is revealed through Raman trajectories recorded at a nanojunction formed between a silver AFM tip and a corrugated silver surface coated with biphenyl-4,4’-dithiol. Molecular motion is not observed when the tip is retracted and only surface enhancement is operative. In effect, junction plasmon induced molecular reorientation is tracked.

  16. [Clinical anatomy of the esophagogastric junction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tănase, M; Aldea, A S

    2012-01-01

    The esophagogastric junction is a controversial anatomical area, due to its sphincteric mechanism which does not show an obvious anatomical basis. The aim of this study is to investigate the anatomical components that endoscopically indicate the mucosal esophagogastric junction in hiatal hernia patients. The esophagogastric junction was investigated in 27 hiatal hernia patients undergoing surgery. Hiatal hernia is an extension of the stomach situated between the esophagogastric junction and the diaphragmatic indentation. The following types of hiatal hernia were found: sliding hiatal hernia (type I) in 4 patients (14.81%), rolling hiatal hernia (type II) in 2 (7.4%), mixed hiatal hernia (type III) in 12 (44.44%), type IV hiatal hernia in 4 (14.81%) and recurrent hiatal hernia in 5 (18.51%). Of the 27 hiatal hernia patients, 8 (29.6%) were operated using classical procedures: laparotomy--6 (75%) and laparoscopic surgery--2 (25%). The angle of His cannot be used for marking the mucosal esophagogastric junction due to the severe damage of the lower esophageal sphincter in hiatal hernia patients. The squamocolumnar junction is displaced in hiatal hernia patients and was not an option for the study group. The distal end of the esophageal longitudinal palisading vessels needs medication (proton pump inhibitors that reduce the gastric acid production), in order to enhance the visibility of these vessels. The proximal end of gastric longitudinal mucosal folds proved to be the most reliable site to identify endoscopically the mucosal esophagogastric junction. The anatomical structure of the esophagogastric junction differs in hiatal hernia patients and these peculiarities are very important in surgery.

  17. The Dissolution of Double Holliday Junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bizard, Anna H; Hickson, Ian D

    2014-01-01

    as "double Holliday junction dissolution." This reaction requires the cooperative action of a so-called "dissolvasome" comprising a Holliday junction branch migration enzyme (Sgs1/BLM RecQ helicase) and a type IA topoisomerase (Top3/TopoIIIα) in complex with its OB (oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide binding......) fold containing accessory factor (Rmi1). This review details our current knowledge of the dissolution process and the players involved in catalyzing this mechanistically complex means of completing homologous recombination reactions....

  18. A Simple Apparatus to Demonstrate the Peltier Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougal, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the Peltier, or thermoelectric effect, which provides a way of cooling a system by coupling it thermally to the junction of two materials suitably chosen, shaped, and connected to a d.c. current. Describes an apparatus which simply and inexpensively demonstrates this effect. (MLH)

  19. Berberine potentizes apoptosis induced by X-rays irradiation probably through modulation of gap junctions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Bing; WANG Qin; YUAN Dong-dong; HONG Xiao-ting; TAO Liang

    2011-01-01

    Background Clinical combination of some traditional Chinese medical herbs, including berberine, with irradiation is demonstrated to improve efficacy of tumor radiotherapy, yet the mechanisms for such effect remain largely unknown. The present study investigated the effect of berberine on apoptosis induced by X-rays irradiation and the relation between this effect and gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC).Methods The role of gap junctions in the modulation of X-rays irradiation-induced apoptosis was explored by manipulation of connexin (Cx) expression, and gap junction function, using oleamide, a GJIC inhibitor, and berberine.Results In transfected HeLa cells, Cx32 expression increased apoptosis induced by X-rays irradiation, while inhibition of gap junction by oleamide reduced the irradiation responses, indicating the dependence of X-rays irradiation-induced apoptosis on GJIC. Berberine, at the concentrations without cytotoxicity, enhanced apoptosis induced by irradiation only in the presence of functional gap junctions.Conclusions These results suggest that berberine potentizes cell apoptosis induced by X-rays irradiation, probably through enhancement of gap junction activity.

  20. MRI characterization of paranodal junction failure and related spinal cord changes in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morito Takano

    Full Text Available The paranodal junction is a specialized axon-glia contact zone that is important for normal neuronal activity and behavioral locomotor function in the central nervous system (CNS. Histological examination has been the only method for detecting pathological paranodal junction conditions. Recently, diffusion tensor MRI (DTI has been used to detect microstructural changes in various CNS diseases. This study was conducted to determine whether MRI and DTI could detect structural changes in the paranodal junctions of the spinal cord in cerebroside sulfotransferase knock-out (CST-KO mice. Here, we showed that high-resolution MRI and DTI characteristics can reflect paranodal junction failure in CST-KO mice. We found significantly lower T1 times and significantly higher T2 times in the spinal cord MRIs of CST-KO mice as compared to wild-type (WT mice. Spinal cord DTI showed significantly lower axial diffusivity and significantly higher radial diffusivity in CST-KO mice as compared to WT mice. In contrast, the histological differences in the paranodal junctions of WT and CST-KO mice were so subtle that electron microscopy or immunohistological analyses were necessary to detect them. We also measured gait disturbance in the CST-KO mice, and determined the conduction latency by electrophysiology. These findings demonstrate the potential of using MRI and DTI to evaluate white matter disorders that involve paranodal junction failure.

  1. Dissection of neuronal gap junction circuits that regulate social behavior in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Heeun; Levy, Sagi; Flavell, Steven W.; Mende, Fanny; Latham, Richard; Zimmer, Manuel; Bargmann, Cornelia I.

    2017-01-01

    A hub-and-spoke circuit of neurons connected by gap junctions controls aggregation behavior and related behavioral responses to oxygen, pheromones, and food in Caenorhabditis elegans. The molecular composition of the gap junctions connecting RMG hub neurons with sensory spoke neurons is unknown. We show here that the innexin gene unc-9 is required in RMG hub neurons to drive aggregation and related behaviors, indicating that UNC-9–containing gap junctions mediate RMG signaling. To dissect the circuit in detail, we developed methods to inhibit unc-9–based gap junctions with dominant-negative unc-1 transgenes. unc-1(dn) alters a stomatin-like protein that regulates unc-9 electrical signaling; its disruptive effects can be rescued by a constitutively active UNC-9::GFP protein, demonstrating specificity. Expression of unc-1(dn) in RMG hub neurons, ADL or ASK pheromone-sensing neurons, or URX oxygen-sensing neurons disrupts specific elements of aggregation-related behaviors. In ADL, unc-1(dn) has effects opposite to those of tetanus toxin light chain, separating the roles of ADL electrical and chemical synapses. These results reveal roles of gap junctions in a complex behavior at cellular resolution and provide a tool for similar exploration of other gap junction circuits. PMID:28143932

  2. Ambient organic molecular passivation of Si yields near-ideal, Schottky-Mott limited, junctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rotem Har-Lavan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We report near-perfect transfer of the electrical properties of oxide-free Si surface, modified by a molecular monolayer, to the interface of a junction made with that modified Si surface. Such behavior is highly unusual for a covalent, narrow bandgap semiconductor, such as Si. Short, ambient atmosphere, room temperature treatment of oxide-free Si(100 in hydroquinone (HQ/alkyl alcohol solutions, fully passivates the Si surface, while allowing controlled change of the resulting surface potential. The junctions formed, upon contacting such surfaces with Hg, a metal that does not chemically interact with Si, follow the Schottky-Mott model for metal-semiconductor junctions closer than ever for Si-based junctions. Two examples of such ideal behavior are demonstrated: a Tuning the molecular surface dipole over 400 mV, with only negligible band bending, by changing the alkyl chain length. Because of the excellent passivation this yields junctions with Hg with barrier heights that follow the change in the Si effective electron affinity nearly ideally. b HQ/ methanol passivation of Si is accompanied by a large surface dipole, which suffices, as interface dipole, to drive the Si into strong inversion as shown experimentally via its photovoltaic effect. With only ∼0.3 nm molecular interlayer between the metal and the Si, our results proves that it is passivation and prevention of metal-semiconductor interactions that allow ideal metal-semiconductor junction behavior, rather than an insulating transport barrier.

  3. Actin-interacting protein 1 controls assembly and permeability of intestinal epithelial apical junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechuga, Susana; Baranwal, Somesh; Ivanov, Andrei I

    2015-05-01

    Adherens junctions (AJs) and tight junctions (TJs) are crucial regulators of the integrity and restitution of the intestinal epithelial barrier. The structure and function of epithelial junctions depend on their association with the cortical actin cytoskeleton that, in polarized epithelial cells, is represented by a prominent perijunctional actomyosin belt. The assembly and stability of the perijunctional cytoskeleton is controlled by constant turnover (disassembly and reassembly) of actin filaments. Actin-interacting protein (Aip) 1 is an emerging regulator of the actin cytoskeleton, playing a critical role in filament disassembly. In this study, we examined the roles of Aip1 in regulating the structure and remodeling of AJs and TJs in human intestinal epithelium. Aip1 was enriched at apical junctions in polarized human intestinal epithelial cells and normal mouse colonic mucosa. Knockdown of Aip1 by RNA interference increased the paracellular permeability of epithelial cell monolayers, decreased recruitment of AJ/TJ proteins to steady-state intercellular contacts, and attenuated junctional reassembly in a calcium-switch model. The observed defects of AJ/TJ structure and functions were accompanied by abnormal organization and dynamics of the perijunctional F-actin cytoskeleton. Moreover, loss of Aip1 impaired the apico-basal polarity of intestinal epithelial cell monolayers and inhibited formation of polarized epithelial cysts in 3-D Matrigel. Our findings demonstrate a previously unanticipated role of Aip1 in regulating the structure and remodeling of intestinal epithelial junctions and early steps of epithelial morphogenesis.

  4. Dynamic visualization of axial p-n junctions in single gallium nitride nanorods under electrical bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yu-Jung; Lu, Ming-Yen; Yang, Yu-Chen; Chen, Hung-Ying; Chen, Lih-Juann; Gwo, Shangjr

    2013-09-24

    We demonstrate a direct visualization method based on secondary electron (SE) imaging in scanning electron microscopy for mapping electrostatic potentials across axial semiconductor nanorod p-n junctions. It is found that the SE doping contrast can be directly related to the spatial distribution of electrostatic potential across the axial nanorod p-n junction. In contrast to the conventional SE doping contrast achieved for planar p-n junctions, the quasi-one-dimensional geometry of nanorods allows for high-resolution, versatile SE imaging under high accelerating voltage, long working distance conditions. Furthermore, we are able to delineate the electric field profiles across the axial nanorod p-n junction as well as depletion widths at different reverse biases. By using standard p-n junction theory and secondary ion mass spectroscopy, the carrier concentrations of p- and n-regions can be further extracted from the depletion widths under reverse biasing conditions. This direct imaging method enables determination of electrostatic potential variation of p-n junctions in semiconductor nanorod and nanowire devices with a spatial resolution better than 10 nm.

  5. Gap Junction Enhancer Potentiates Cytotoxicity of Cisplatin in Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Ying; Nguyen, Thu Annelise

    2012-11-01

    Cisplatin is one of the most widely used anti-cancer drugs due to its ability to damage DNA and induce apoptosis. However, increasing reports of side effects and drug resistance indicate the limitation of cisplatin in cancer therapeutics. Recent studies showed that inhibition of gap junctions diminishes the cytotoxic effect and contributes to drug resistance. Therefore, identification of molecules that counteract gap junctional inhibition without decreasing the anti-cancer effect of cisplatin could be used in combinational treatment, potentiating cisplatin efficacy and preventing resistance. This study investigates the effects of combinational treatment of cisplatin and PQ1, a gap junction enhancer, in T47D breast cancer cells. Our results showed that combinational treatment of PQ1 and cisplatin increased gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) as well as expressions of connexins (Cx26, Cx32 and Cx43), and subsequently decreased cell viability. Ki67, a proliferation marker, was decreased by 75% with combinational treatment. Expressions of pro-apoptotic factors (cleaved caspase-3/-8/-9 and bax) were increased by the combinational treatment with PQ1 and cisplatin; whereas, the pro-survival factor, bcl-2, was decreased by the combinational treatment. Our study demonstrates for the first time that the combinational treatment with gap junction enhancers can counteract cisplatin induced inhibition of gap junctional intercellular communication and reduction of connexin expression, thereby increasing the efficacy of cisplatin in cancer cells.

  6. Turn-on and turn-off voltages of an avalanche p-n junction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Guoqing; Han Dejun; Zhu Changjun; Zhai Xuejun

    2012-01-01

    Characteristics of the turn-on and turn-off voltage of avalanche p-n junctions were demonstrated and studied.As opposed to existing reports,the differences between the turn-on and turn-off voltage cannot be neglected when the size of the p-n junction is in the order of microns.The difference increases inversely with the area of a junction,exerting significant influences on characterizing some parameters of devices composed of small avalanche junctions.Theoretical analyses show that the mechanism for the difference lies in the increase effect of the threshold multiplication factor at the turn-on voltage of a junction when the area of a junction decreases.Moreover,the "breakdown voltage" in the formula of the avalanche asymptotic current is,in essence,the avalanche turn-off voltage,and consequently,the traditional expression of the avalanche asymptotic current and the gain of a Geiger mode avalanche photodiode were modified.

  7. Gap junction intercellular communication and benzene toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivedal, Edgar; Witz, Gisela; Leithe, Edward

    2010-03-19

    Aberrant regulation of gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) has been linked to several human diseases, including cancer and abnormal hematopoietic development. Benzene exposure has been shown to cause hematotoxicity and leukemia, but the underlying mechanisms involved remain unclear. We have observed that several metabolites of benzene have the ability to block gap junction intercellular communication. The ring-opened trans,trans-muconaldehyde (MUC) was found to be the most potent inhibitor of gap junction channels. MUC was found to induce cross-linking of the gap junction protein connexin43, which seemed to be responsible for the induced inhibition of GJIC. Glutaraldehyde, which has a similar molecular structure as MUC, was found to possess similar effects on gap junctions as MUC, while the mono-aldehyde formaldehyde shows lower potency, both as a connexin cross-linker, and as an inhibitor of GJIC. Both glutaraldehyde and formaldehyde have previously been associated with induction of leukemia and disturbance of hematopoiesis. Taken together, the data support a possible link between the effect of MUC on gap junctions, and the toxic effects of benzene. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Gap junctions: structure and function (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, W Howard; Martin, Patricia E M

    2002-01-01

    Gap junctions are plasma membrane spatial microdomains constructed of assemblies of channel proteins called connexins in vertebrates and innexins in invertebrates. The channels provide direct intercellular communication pathways allowing rapid exchange of ions and metabolites up to approximately 1 kD in size. Approximately 20 connexins are identified in the human or mouse genome, and orthologues are increasingly characterized in other vertebrates. Most cell types express multiple connexin isoforms, making likely the construction of a spectrum of heteromeric hemichannels and heterotypic gap junctions that could provide a structural basis for the charge and size selectivity of these intercellular channels. The precise nature of the potential signalling information traversing junctions in physiologically defined situations remains elusive, but extensive progress has been made in elucidating how connexins are assembled into gap junctions. Also, participation of gap junction hemichannels in the propagation of calcium waves via an extracellular purinergic pathway is emerging. Connexin mutations have been identified in a number of genetically inherited channel communication-opathies. These are detected in connexin 32 in Charcot Marie Tooth-X linked disease, in connexins 26 and 30 in deafness and skin diseases, and in connexins 46 and 50 in hereditary cataracts. Biochemical approaches indicate that many of the mutated connexins are mistargeted to gap junctions and/or fail to oligomerize correctly into hemichannels. Genetic ablation approaches are helping to map out a connexin code and point to specific connexins being required for cell growth and differentiation as well as underwriting basic intercellular communication.

  9. Predictive modelling of ferroelectric tunnel junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velev, Julian P.; Burton, John D.; Zhuravlev, Mikhail Ye; Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    2016-05-01

    Ferroelectric tunnel junctions combine the phenomena of quantum-mechanical tunnelling and switchable spontaneous polarisation of a nanometre-thick ferroelectric film into novel device functionality. Switching the ferroelectric barrier polarisation direction produces a sizable change in resistance of the junction—a phenomenon known as the tunnelling electroresistance effect. From a fundamental perspective, ferroelectric tunnel junctions and their version with ferromagnetic electrodes, i.e., multiferroic tunnel junctions, are testbeds for studying the underlying mechanisms of tunnelling electroresistance as well as the interplay between electric and magnetic degrees of freedom and their effect on transport. From a practical perspective, ferroelectric tunnel junctions hold promise for disruptive device applications. In a very short time, they have traversed the path from basic model predictions to prototypes for novel non-volatile ferroelectric random access memories with non-destructive readout. This remarkable progress is to a large extent driven by a productive cycle of predictive modelling and innovative experimental effort. In this review article, we outline the development of the ferroelectric tunnel junction concept and the role of theoretical modelling in guiding experimental work. We discuss a wide range of physical phenomena that control the functional properties of ferroelectric tunnel junctions and summarise the state-of-the-art achievements in the field.

  10. Tunnel Field-Effect Transistor with Epitaxially Grown Tunnel Junction Fabricated by Source/Drain-First and Tunnel-Junction-Last Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Yukinori; Mori, Takahiro; Migita, Shinji; Mizubayashi, Wataru; Tanabe, Akihito; Fukuda, Koichi; Masahara, Meishoku; Ota, Hiroyuki

    2013-04-01

    We fabricate p- and n-channel Si tunnel field-effect transistors (TFETs) with an epitaxially grown tunnel junction. In a novel source/drain-first and tunnel-junction-last fabrication process, a thin epitaxial undoped Si channel (epichannel) is deposited on a preferentially fabricated p- or n-type source area. The epichannel sandwiched by a gate insulator and a highly doped source well acts as a parallel-plate tunnel capacitor, which effectively multiplies drain current with an enlarged tunnel area. On the basis of its simple structure and easy fabrication, symmetric n- and p-transistor and complementary metal oxide semiconductor inverter operations were successfully demonstrated.

  11. Stretching of BDT-gold molecular junctions: Thiol or thiolate termination?

    KAUST Repository

    Souza, Amaury De Melo

    2014-01-01

    It is often assumed that the hydrogen atoms in the thiol groups of a benzene-1,4-dithiol dissociate when Au-benzene-1,4-dithiol-Au junctions are formed. We demonstrate, by stability and transport property calculations, that this assumption cannot be made. We show that the dissociative adsorption of methanethiol and benzene-1,4-dithiol molecules on a flat Au(111) surface is energetically unfavorable and that the activation barrier for this reaction is as high as 1 eV. For the molecule in the junction, our results show, for all electrode geometries studied, that the thiol junctions are energetically more stable than their thiolate counterparts. Due to the fact that density functional theory (DFT) within the local density approximation (LDA) underestimates the energy difference between the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital and the highest occupied molecular orbital by several electron-volts, and that it does not capture the renormalization of the energy levels due to the image charge effect, the conductance of the Au-benzene-1,4-dithiol-Au junctions is overestimated. After taking into account corrections due to image charge effects by means of constrained-DFT calculations and electrostatic classical models, we apply a scissor operator to correct the DFT energy level positions, and calculate the transport properties of the thiol and thiolate molecular junctions as a function of the electrode separation. For the thiol junctions, we show that the conductance decreases as the electrode separation increases, whereas the opposite trend is found for the thiolate junctions. Both behaviors have been observed in experiments, therefore pointing to the possible coexistence of both thiol and thiolate junctions. Moreover, the corrected conductance values, for both thiol and thiolate, are up to two orders of magnitude smaller than those calculated with DFT-LDA. This brings the theoretical results in quantitatively good agreement with experimental data.

  12. Laser direct writing of modulation-doped nanowire p/n junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Woongsik; Mitchell, James I.; Xu, Xianfan

    2016-12-01

    We demonstrate a single-step, laser-based technique to fabricate axial modulation-doped silicon nanowires. Our method is based on laser-direct-write chemical vapor deposition and has the capability to fabricate nanowires as small as 60 nm, which is far below the diffraction limit of the laser wavelength of 395 nm, with precise control of nanowire position, length, and orientation. By switching dopant gases during nanowire writing, p-n junction nanowires are produced. The p-n junction nanowires are fabricated into multifinger devices with parallel metal contacts and electrically tested to demonstrate diode characteristics.

  13. Surface-acoustic-wave-driven luminescence from a lateral p-n junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gell, J. R.; Atkinson, P.; Bremner, S. P.; Sfigakis, F.; Kataoka, M.; Anderson, D.; Jones, G. A. C.; Barnes, C. H. W.; Ritchie, D. A.; Ward, M. B.; Norman, C. E.; Shields, A. J.

    2006-12-01

    The authors report surface-acoustic-wave-driven luminescence from a lateral p-n junction formed by molecular beam epitaxy regrowth of a modulation doped GaAs /AlGaAs quantum well on a patterned GaAs substrate. Surface-acoustic-wave-driven transport is demonstrated by peaks in the electrical current and light emission from the GaAs quantum well at the resonant frequency of the transducer. This type of junction offers high carrier mobility and scalability. The demonstration of surface-acoustic-wave luminescence is a significant step towards single-photon applications in quantum computation and quantum cryptography.

  14. Calcium Channels and Oxidative Stress Mediate a Synergistic Disruption of Tight Junctions by Ethanol and Acetaldehyde in Caco-2 Cell Monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samak, Geetha; Gangwar, Ruchika; Meena, Avtar S; Rao, Roshan G; Shukla, Pradeep K; Manda, Bhargavi; Narayanan, Damodaran; Jaggar, Jonathan H; Rao, RadhaKrishna

    2016-12-13

    Ethanol is metabolized into acetaldehyde in most tissues. In this study, we investigated the synergistic effect of ethanol and acetaldehyde on the tight junction integrity in Caco-2 cell monolayers. Expression of alcohol dehydrogenase sensitized Caco-2 cells to ethanol-induced tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction, whereas aldehyde dehydrogenase attenuated acetaldehyde-induced tight junction disruption. Ethanol up to 150 mM did not affect tight junction integrity or barrier function, but it dose-dependently increased acetaldehyde-mediated tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction. Src kinase and MLCK inhibitors blocked this synergistic effect of ethanol and acetaldehyde on tight junction. Ethanol and acetaldehyde caused a rapid and synergistic elevation of intracellular calcium. Calcium depletion by BAPTA or Ca(2+)-free medium blocked ethanol and acetaldehyde-induced barrier dysfunction and tight junction disruption. Diltiazem and selective knockdown of TRPV6 or CaV1.3 channels, by shRNA blocked ethanol and acetaldehyde-induced tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction. Ethanol and acetaldehyde induced a rapid and synergistic increase in reactive oxygen species by a calcium-dependent mechanism. N-acetyl-L-cysteine and cyclosporine A, blocked ethanol and acetaldehyde-induced barrier dysfunction and tight junction disruption. These results demonstrate that ethanol and acetaldehyde synergistically disrupt tight junctions by a mechanism involving calcium, oxidative stress, Src kinase and MLCK.

  15. Trimethylsilyl-terminated oligo(phenylene ethynylene)s: an approach to single-molecule junctions with covalent Au-C σ-bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Wenjing; Li, Hui; Liu, Shi-Xia; Fu, Yongchun; Li, Jianfeng; Kaliginedi, Veerabhadrarao; Decurtins, Silvio; Wandlowski, Thomas

    2012-11-28

    A new and efficient approach using cleaving of trimethylsilyl groups to create covalent Au-C anchoring sites has been developed for single-molecule junction conductance measurements. Employing the mechanically controllable break junction (MCBJ) technique in liquid, we demonstrate the formation of highly conducting single molecular junctions of several OPE derivatives. The created junctions are mechanically stable and exhibit conductances around one order of magnitude higher than those of their dithiol analogues. Extended assembly and reaction times lead to oligomerization. Combined STM imaging and gap-mode Raman experiments provide structure evidence to support the formation of covalent Au-C contacts and further oligomerization.

  16. Alteration in synaptic junction proteins following traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlo, Lucia; Cimino, Francesco; Angileri, Filippo Flavio; La Torre, Domenico; Conti, Alfredo; Cardali, Salvatore Massimiliano; Saija, Antonella; Germanò, Antonino

    2014-08-15

    Extensive research and scientific efforts have been focused on the elucidation of the pathobiology of cellular and axonal damage following traumatic brain injury (TBI). Conversely, few studies have specifically addressed the issue of synaptic dysfunction. Synaptic junction proteins may be involved in post-TBI alterations, leading to synaptic loss or disrupted plasticity. A Synapse Protein Database on synapse ontology identified 109 domains implicated in synaptic activities and over 5000 proteins, but few of these demonstrated to play a role in the synaptic dysfunction after TBI. These proteins are involved in neuroplasticity and neuromodulation and, most importantly, may be used as novel neuronal markers of TBI for specific intervention.

  17. Toward complementary ionic circuits: the npn ion bipolar junction transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tybrandt, Klas; Gabrielsson, Erik O; Berggren, Magnus

    2011-07-06

    Many biomolecules are charged and may therefore be transported with ionic currents. As a step toward addressable ionic delivery circuits, we report on the development of a npn ion bipolar junction transistor (npn-IBJT) as an active control element of anionic currents in general, and specifically, demonstrate actively modulated delivery of the neurotransmitter glutamic acid. The functional materials of this transistor are ion exchange layers and conjugated polymers. The npn-IBJT shows stable transistor characteristics over extensive time of operation and ion current switch times below 10 s. Our results promise complementary chemical circuits similar to the electronic equivalence, which has proven invaluable in conventional electronic applications.

  18. Graphene-Based Josephson-Junction Single-Photon Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Evan D.; Efetov, Dmitri K.; Lee, Gil-Ho; Heuck, Mikkel; Crossno, Jesse; Ohki, Thomas A.; Kim, Philip; Englund, Dirk; Fong, Kin Chung

    2017-08-01

    We propose to use graphene-based Josephson junctions (GJJs) to detect single photons in a wide electromagnetic spectrum from visible to radio frequencies. Our approach takes advantage of the exceptionally low electronic heat capacity of monolayer graphene and its constricted thermal conductance to its phonon degrees of freedom. Such a system could provide high-sensitivity photon detection required for research areas including quantum information processing and radio astronomy. As an example, we present our device concepts for GJJ single-photon detectors in both the microwave and infrared regimes. The dark count rate and intrinsic quantum efficiency are computed based on parameters from a measured GJJ, demonstrating feasibility within existing technologies.

  19. Influence of functional groups on charge transport in molecular junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mowbray, Duncan; Jones, Glenn; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2008-01-01

    Using density functional theory (DFT), we analyze the influence of five classes of functional groups, as exemplified by NO2, OCH3, CH3, CCl3, and I, on the transport properties of a 1,4-benzenedithiolate (BDT) and 1,4-benzenediamine (BDA) molecular junction with gold electrodes. Our analysis...... demonstrates how ideas from functional group chemistry may be used to engineer a molecule's transport properties, as was shown experimentally and using a semiempirical model for BDA [Nano Lett. 7, 502 (2007)]. In particular, we show that the qualitative change in conductance due to a given functional group can...

  20. Chaotic Dynamics of a Periodically Modulated Josephson Junction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Qin; LI Fei

    2007-01-01

    We study the chaotic dynamics of a periodically modulated Josephson junction with damping. The general solution of the first-order perturbed equation is constructed by using the direct perturbation technique. It is theoretically found that the boundedness conditions of the general solution contain the Melnikov chaotic criterion.When the perturbation conditions cannot be satisfied, numerical simulations demonstrate that the system can step into chaos through a period doubling route with the increase of the amplitude of the modulating term.Regulating specific parameters can effectively suppress the chaos.

  1. Photocurrent generation efficiency of a carbon nanotube pn junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCulley, Daniel; Aspitarte, Lee; Minot, Ethan

    Carrier multiplication effects can enhance the quantum efficiency of photovoltaic devices. For example, quantum dot solar cells have demonstrated photon-to-electron conversion efficiencies greater than 100% when photon energies exceed twice the band gap. Carbon nanotube photodiodes exhibit carrier multiplication effects (Gabor et al., Science 2009), but the quantum efficiency of such photodiodes has not previously been characterized. We have reproduced the carrier multiplication phenomena in individual CNT pn junctions and investigated the conditions under which it occurs. We will present early results quantifying the internal quantum efficiency of the process.

  2. Gap Junctions Contribute to Ictal/Interictal Genesis in Human Hypothalamic Hamartomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jie; Gao, Ming; Rice, Stephen G; Tsang, Candy; Beggs, John; Turner, Dharshaun; Li, Guohui; Yang, Bo; Xia, Kunkun; Gao, Fenfei; Qiu, Shenfeng; Liu, Qiang; Kerrigan, John F

    2016-06-01

    Human hypothalamic hamartoma (HH) is a rare subcortical lesion associated with treatment-resistant epilepsy. Cellular mechanisms responsible for epileptogenesis are unknown. We hypothesized that neuronal gap junctions contribute to epileptogenesis through synchronous activity within the neuron networks in HH tissue. We studied surgically resected HH tissue with Western-blot analysis, immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy, biocytin microinjection of recorded HH neurons, and microelectrode patch clamp recordings with and without pharmacological blockade of gap junctions. Normal human hypothalamus tissue was used as a control. Western blots showed increased expression of both connexin-36 (Cx36) and connexin-43 (Cx43) in HH tissue compared with normal human mammillary body tissue. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that Cx36 and Cx43 are expressed in HH tissue, but Cx36 was mainly expressed within neuron clusters while Cx43 was mainly expressed outside of neuron clusters. Gap-junction profiles were observed between small HH neurons with electron microscopy. Biocytin injection into single recorded small HH neurons showed labeling of adjacent neurons, which was not observed in the presence of a neuronal gap-junction blocker, mefloquine. Microelectrode field recordings from freshly resected HH slices demonstrated spontaneous ictal/interictal-like discharges in most slices. Bath-application of gap-junction blockers significantly reduced ictal/interictal-like discharges in a concentration-dependent manner, while not affecting the action-potential firing of small gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurons observed with whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from the same patient's HH tissue. These results suggest that neuronal gap junctions between small GABAergic HH neurons participate in the genesis of epileptic-like discharges. Blockade of gap junctions may be a new therapeutic strategy for controlling seizure activity in HH patients.

  3. Gap Junctions Contribute to Ictal/Interictal Genesis in Human Hypothalamic Hamartomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Wu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Human hypothalamic hamartoma (HH is a rare subcortical lesion associated with treatment-resistant epilepsy. Cellular mechanisms responsible for epileptogenesis are unknown. We hypothesized that neuronal gap junctions contribute to epileptogenesis through synchronous activity within the neuron networks in HH tissue. We studied surgically resected HH tissue with Western-blot analysis, immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy, biocytin microinjection of recorded HH neurons, and microelectrode patch clamp recordings with and without pharmacological blockade of gap junctions. Normal human hypothalamus tissue was used as a control. Western blots showed increased expression of both connexin-36 (Cx36 and connexin-43 (Cx43 in HH tissue compared with normal human mammillary body tissue. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that Cx36 and Cx43 are expressed in HH tissue, but Cx36 was mainly expressed within neuron clusters while Cx43 was mainly expressed outside of neuron clusters. Gap-junction profiles were observed between small HH neurons with electron microscopy. Biocytin injection into single recorded small HH neurons showed labeling of adjacent neurons, which was not observed in the presence of a neuronal gap-junction blocker, mefloquine. Microelectrode field recordings from freshly resected HH slices demonstrated spontaneous ictal/interictal-like discharges in most slices. Bath-application of gap-junction blockers significantly reduced ictal/interictal-like discharges in a concentration-dependent manner, while not affecting the action-potential firing of small gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA neurons observed with whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from the same patient's HH tissue. These results suggest that neuronal gap junctions between small GABAergic HH neurons participate in the genesis of epileptic-like discharges. Blockade of gap junctions may be a new therapeutic strategy for controlling seizure activity in HH patients.

  4. Josephson tunnel junctions with ferromagnetic interlayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weides, M.P.

    2006-07-01

    Superconductivity and ferromagnetism are well-known physical properties of solid states that have been widely studied and long thought about as antagonistic phenomena due to difference in spin ordering. It turns out that the combination of both superconductor and ferromagnet leads to a very rich and interesting physics. One particular example, the phase oscillations of the superconducting order parameter inside the ferromagnet, will play a major role for the devices discussed in this work. In this thesis, I present Josephson junctions with a thin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} tunnel barrier and a ferromagnetic interlayer, i.e. superconductor-insulator-ferromagnet-superconductor (SIFS) stacks. The fabrication of junctions was optimized regarding the insulation of electrodes and the homogeneity of the current transport. The junctions were either in the 0 or {pi} coupled ground state, depending on the thickness of the ferromagnetic layer and on temperature. The influence of ferromagnetic layer thickness on the transport properties and the coupling (0, {pi}) of SIFS tunnel junctions was studied. Furthermore, using a stepped ferromagnetic layer with well-chosen thicknesses, I obtained the so-called 0-{pi} Josephson junction. At a certain temperature this 0-{pi} junction can be made perfectly symmetric. In this case the ground state corresponds to a vortex of supercurrent creating a magnetic flux which is a fraction of the magnetic flux quantum {phi}{sub 0}. Such structures allow to study the physics of fractional vortices and to build various electronic circuits based on them. The SIFS junctions presented here have an exponentially vanishing damping at T {yields} 0. The SIFS technology developed within the framework of this work may be used to construct classical and quantum devices such as oscillators, memory cells and qubits. (orig.)

  5. Model Building to Facilitate Understanding of Holliday Junction and Heteroduplex Formation, and Holliday Junction Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvarajah, Geeta; Selvarajah, Susila

    2016-01-01

    Students frequently expressed difficulty in understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in chromosomal recombination. Therefore, we explored alternative methods for presenting the two concepts of the double-strand break model: Holliday junction and heteroduplex formation, and Holliday junction resolution. In addition to a lecture and…

  6. Characterization of 65 epitope-specific dystrophin monoclonal antibodies in canine and murine models of duchenne muscular dystrophy by immunostaining and western blot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodippili, Kasun; Vince, Lauren; Shin, Jin-Hong; Yue, Yongping; Morris, Glenn E; McIntosh, Mark A; Duan, Dongsheng

    2014-01-01

    Epitope-specific monoclonal antibodies can provide unique insights for studying cellular proteins. Dystrophin is one of the largest cytoskeleton proteins encoded by 79 exons. The absence of dystrophin results in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Over the last two decades, dozens of exon-specific human dystrophin monoclonal antibodies have been developed and successfully used for DMD diagnosis. Unfortunately, the majority of these antibodies have not been thoroughly characterized in dystrophin-deficient dogs, an outstanding large animal model for translational research. To fill the gap, we performed a comprehensive study on 65 dystrophin monoclonal antibodies in normal and dystrophic dogs (heart and skeletal muscle) by immunofluorescence staining and western blot. For comparison, we also included striated muscles from normal BL10 and dystrophin-null mdx mice. Our analysis revealed distinctive species, tissue and assay-dependent recognition patterns of different antibodies. Importantly, we identified 15 antibodies that can consistently detect full-length canine dystrophin in both immunostaining and western blot. Our results will serve as an important reference for studying DMD in the canine model.

  7. Natural mixtures of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) suppress ovarian follicle development, liver vitellogenin immunostaining and hepatocyte proliferation in female zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraugerud, Marianne, E-mail: Marianne.Kraugerud@nvh.no [Dept. of Basic Sciences and Aquatic Medicine, Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, POB 8146 Dep., 0033 Oslo (Norway); Doughty, Richard William, E-mail: vetrwdoughty@yahoo.co.uk [Sundveien 22, 2015 Leirsund (Norway); Lyche, Jan L., E-mail: Jan.Lyche@nvh.no [Dept. of Food Safety and Infection Biology, Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, POB 8146 Dep., 0033 Oslo (Norway); Berg, Vidar, E-mail: Vidar.Berg@nvh.no [Dept. of Food Safety and Infection Biology, Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, POB 8146 Dep., 0033 Oslo (Norway); Tremoen, Nina H., E-mail: Nina.Hardnes@nvh.no [Dept. of Production Animal Clinical Sciences, Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, POB 8146 Dep., 0033 Oslo (Norway); Alestrom, Peter, E-mail: Peter.Alestrom@nvh.no [Dept. of Basic Sciences and Aquatic Medicine, Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, POB 8146 Dep., 0033 Oslo (Norway); Aleksandersen, Mona, E-mail: Mona.Aleksandersen@nvh.no [Dept. of Basic Sciences and Aquatic Medicine, Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, POB 8146 Dep., 0033 Oslo (Norway); Ropstad, Erik, E-mail: Erik.Ropstad@nvh.no [Dept. of Production Animal Clinical Sciences, Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, POB 8146 Dep., 0033 Oslo (Norway)

    2012-07-15

    Persistent organic pollutants such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) are present in high concentrations in livers of burbot (Lota lota) in Lake Mjosa, Norway. In order to assess effects of such pollutants on fish gonadal morphology, female zebrafish were exposed in two generations by food to mixtures of pollutants extracted from livers of burbot from Lake Mjosa (high and low dose) and Lake Losna, which represents background pollution, and compared to a control group. Ovarian follicle counts detected a significant decrease in late vitellogenic follicle stages in fish exposed to the Losna and the high concentrations of Mjosa mixtures in fish from the first generation. In addition, proliferation of granulosa cells, visualized by immunohistochemistry against proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), was decreased in all exposure groups in either early or late vitellogenic follicle stages compared to control. This was accompanied by increased apoptosis of granulosa cells. There was a decrease in proliferation of liver hepatocytes with exposure to both Mjosa mixtures. In addition, immunopositivity for vitellogenin in the liver was significantly lower in the Mjosa high group than in the control group. When analysing effects of parental exposure, fish with parents exposed to Mjosa high mixture had significantly higher numbers of perinucleolar follicles than fish with control parents. We conclude that long-term exposure of a real-life mixture of pollutants containing high- and background levels of chemicals supress ovarian follicle development, liver vitellogenin immunostaining intensity and hepatocyte proliferation in the zebrafish model.

  8. Touch imprint cytology with cytokeratin immunostaining versus Papanicolau staining for intraoperative evaluation of sentinel lymph node metastasis in clinically node-negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujishima, M; Watatani, M; Inui, H; Hashimoto, Y; Yamamoto, N; Hojo, T; Hirai, K; Yamato, M; Shiozaki, H

    2009-04-01

    This study investigated whether intraoperative assessment of SLN status in patients with clinically node-negative breast cancer was improved using touch imprint immunohistochemistry. Each SLN was cut into slices 2mm thick and evaluated intraoperatively by touch imprint cytology with Papanicolaou staining until the end of 2005, or by a combination of Papanicolaou staining and immunostaining with an anti-cytokeratin antibody from early 2006. When intraoperative cytology of SLN in 85 patients who were clinically node-negative was evaluated with Papanicolaou staining, 81 patients were diagnosed as negative and four were positive. Intraoperative cytology with Papanicolaou staining had a sensitivity of 30%, specificity of 99%, false-negative rate of 70%, false-positive rate of 1.3%, and accuracy of 90.6%. When intraoperative cytology was done with immunohistochemistry plus Papanicolaou staining for SLN evaluation, 92 patients were diagnosed as negative and 17 patients were positive. Intraoperative cytology with immunohistochemistry had a sensitivity of 79%, specificity of 98%, false-negative rate of 21%, false-positive rate of 2.2%, and accuracy of 94.5%. Compared with intraoperative cytology using Papanicolaou staining alone, the combination of immunohistochemistry and Papanicolaou staining achieved a significant increase in sensitivity and a significant decrease in the false-negative rate. Intraoperative SLN evaluation by imprint cytology with immunohistochemistry achieves a more accurate diagnosis of metastasis than imprint cytology alone. This combined method is considered useful for deciding whether to perform axillary lymph node dissection.

  9. Elution of High-affinity (>10-9 KD) Antibodies from Tissue Sections: Clues to the Molecular Mechanism and Use in Sequential Immunostaining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendusa, Rossella; Scalia, Carla Rossana; Buscone, Serena; Cattoretti, Giorgio

    2014-07-01

    Inconsistent results obtained with published methods for the elution of antibodies from tissue sections prompted the assessment of both old and new methods in combination with monoclonal rabbit antibodies of known, increased affinity (above 1×10(-9) KD). We tested an acidic (pH 2) glycine buffer, a 6 M urea hot buffer and a 2-Mercaptoethanol, SDS buffer (2-ME/SDS). Some antibodies were not removed by the glycine pH 2 or 6 M urea hot buffers, indicating that antibodies survive much harsher conditions than previously believed. We found that the elution is dependent upon the antibody affinity and is reduced by species-specific crosslinking via a dimeric or Fab fragments of a secondary antibody. The high affinity bond of exogenous streptavidin with the endogenous biotin can be removed by 6 M urea but not by the other buffers. 2-ME/SDS buffer is superior to glycine pH 2 and 6 M urea hot elution buffers for all antibodies because of its irreversible effect on the structure of the antibodies. It also has a mild retrieving effect on some antigens present on routinely treated sections and no detrimental effect on the immunoreactivity of the tissue. Therefore, 2-ME/SDS buffer is the method of choice to perform multiple rounds of immunostaining on a single routine section.

  10. Increasing gap junctional coupling: a tool for dissecting the role of gap junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsen, Lene Nygaard; Haugan, Ketil; Stahlhut, Martin;

    2007-01-01

    . In a number of cases, gap junctions have been implicated in the initiation and progress of disease, and experimental uncoupling has been used to investigate the exact role of coupling. The inverse approach, i.e., to increase coupling, has become possible in recent years and represents a new way of testing......Much of our current knowledge about the physiological and pathophysiological role of gap junctions is based on experiments where coupling has been reduced by either chemical agents or genetic modification. This has brought evidence that gap junctions are important in many physiological processes...... the role of gap junctions. The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge obtained with agents that selectively increase gap junctional intercellular coupling. Two approaches will be reviewed: increasing coupling by the use of antiarrhythmic peptide and its synthetic analogs...

  11. Musical molecules: the molecular junction as an active component in audio distortion circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergren, Adam Johan; Zeer-Wanklyn, Lucas; Semple, Mitchell; Pekas, Nikola; Szeto, Bryan; McCreery, Richard L

    2016-03-09

    Molecular junctions that have a non-linear current-voltage characteristic consistent with quantum mechanical tunneling are demonstrated as analog audio clipping elements in overdrive circuits widely used in electronic music, particularly with electric guitars. The performance of large-area molecular junctions fabricated at the wafer level is compared to currently standard semiconductor diode clippers, showing a difference in the sound character. The harmonic distributions resulting from the use of traditional and molecular clipping elements are reported and discussed, and differences in performance are noted that result from the underlying physics that controls the electronic properties of each clipping component. In addition, the ability to tune the sound using the molecular junction is demonstrated. Finally, the hybrid circuit is compared to an overdriven tube amplifier, which has been the standard reference electric guitar clipped tone for over 60 years. In order to investigate the feasibility of manufacturing molecular junctions for use in commercial applications, devices are fabricated using a low-density format at the wafer level, where 38 dies per wafer, each containing two molecular junctions, are made with exceptional non-shorted yield (99.4%, representing 718 out of 722 tested devices) without requiring clean room facilities.

  12. Musical molecules: the molecular junction as an active component in audio distortion circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergren, Adam Johan; Zeer-Wanklyn, Lucas; Semple, Mitchell; Pekas, Nikola; Szeto, Bryan; McCreery, Richard L.

    2016-03-01

    Molecular junctions that have a non-linear current-voltage characteristic consistent with quantum mechanical tunneling are demonstrated as analog audio clipping elements in overdrive circuits widely used in electronic music, particularly with electric guitars. The performance of large-area molecular junctions fabricated at the wafer level is compared to currently standard semiconductor diode clippers, showing a difference in the sound character. The harmonic distributions resulting from the use of traditional and molecular clipping elements are reported and discussed, and differences in performance are noted that result from the underlying physics that controls the electronic properties of each clipping component. In addition, the ability to tune the sound using the molecular junction is demonstrated. Finally, the hybrid circuit is compared to an overdriven tube amplifier, which has been the standard reference electric guitar clipped tone for over 60 years. In order to investigate the feasibility of manufacturing molecular junctions for use in commercial applications, devices are fabricated using a low-density format at the wafer level, where 38 dies per wafer, each containing two molecular junctions, are made with exceptional non-shorted yield (99.4%, representing 718 out of 722 tested devices) without requiring clean room facilities.

  13. Photocurrent generation in lateral graphene p-n junction created by electron-beam irradiation

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Xuechao

    2015-07-08

    Graphene has been considered as an attractive material for optoelectronic applications such as photodetectors owing to its extraordinary properties, e.g. broadband absorption and ultrahigh mobility. However, challenges still remain in fundamental and practical aspects of the conventional graphene photodetectors which normally rely on the photoconductive mode of operation which has the drawback of e.g. high dark current. Here, we demonstrated the photovoltaic mode operation in graphene p-n junctions fabricated by a simple but effective electron irradiation method that induces n-type doping in intrinsic p-type graphene. The physical mechanism of the junction formation is owing to the substrate gating effect caused by electron irradiation. Photoresponse was obtained for this type of photodetector because the photoexcited electron-hole pairs can be separated in the graphene p-n junction by the built-in potential. The fabricated graphene p-n junction photodetectors exhibit a high detectivity up to ~3 × 1010 Jones (cm Hz1/2 W−1) at room temperature, which is on a par with that of the traditional III–V photodetectors. The demonstrated novel and simple scheme for obtaining graphene p-n junctions can be used for other optoelectronic devices such as solar cells and be applied to other two dimensional materials based devices.

  14. LIMB Demonstration Project Extension and Coolside Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goots, T.R.; DePero, M.J.; Nolan, P.S.

    1992-11-10

    This report presents results from the limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) Demonstration Project Extension. LIMB is a furnace sorbent injection technology designed for the reduction of sulfur dioxide (SO[sub 2]) and nitrogen oxides (NO[sub x]) emissions from coal-fired utility boilers. The testing was conducted on the 105 Mwe, coal-fired, Unit 4 boiler at Ohio Edison's Edgewater Station in Lorain, Ohio. In addition to the LIMB Extension activities, the overall project included demonstration of the Coolside process for S0[sub 2] removal for which a separate report has been issued. The primary purpose of the DOE LIMB Extension testing, was to demonstrate the generic applicability of LIMB technology. The program sought to characterize the S0[sub 2] emissions that result when various calcium-based sorbents are injected into the furnace, while burning coals having sulfur content ranging from 1.6 to 3.8 weight percent. The four sorbents used included calcitic limestone, dolomitic hydrated lime, calcitic hydrated lime, and calcitic hydrated lime with a small amount of added calcium lignosulfonate. The results include those obtained for the various coal/sorbent combinations and the effects of the LIMB process on boiler and plant operations.

  15. Alterations of intercellular junctions in peritoneal mesothelial cells from patients undergoing dialysis: effect of retinoic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retana, Carmen; Sanchez, Elsa; Perez-Lopez, Alejandro; Cruz, Armando; Lagunas, Jesus; Cruz, Carmen; Vital, Socorro; Reyes, Jose L

    2015-01-01

    Dialysis patients are classified according to their peritoneal permeability as low transporter (LT, low solute permeability) or high transporter (HT, high solute permeability). Tight junction (TJ) proteins are critical to maintain ions, molecules and water paracellular transport through peritoneum. Exposure to peritoneal dialysis solutions causes damage to TJ in human peritoneal mesothelial cells (HPMCs). We analyzed the quantity, distribution and function of TJ proteins: claudin-1, -2 and -8, ZO-1 and occludin, in HPMC cultures from LT and HT patients. Since all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) might modify the expression of TJ proteins, we studied its effect on HPMCs. Control HPMCs were isolated from human omentum, while HT or LT cells were obtained from dialysis effluents. Cells were cultured in presence of ATRA 0, 50 or 100 nM. Transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) measurement, immunostaining and Western blot analyses were performed. HT exhibited lower TER than control and LT monolayers. Immunofluorescence for TJ was weak and discontinuous along the cell contour, in LT and HT. Furthermore, claudin-1, occludin and ZO-1 expressions were decreased. In all groups, claudin-2 was localized at nuclei. We observed that ATRA improved TJ distribution and increased TJ expression in HT. This retinoid did not modify claudin-2 and -8 expressions. All-trans retinoic acid decreased TER in HT, but had no effect in LT. Tight junctions were altered in HPMCs from dialyzed patients. The HT monolayer has lower TER than LT, which might be associated with the peritoneal permeability in these patients. ATRA might be a therapeutic alternative to maintain mesothelial integrity, since it improved TJ localization and expression. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Peritoneal Dialysis.

  16. Gap junction disorders of myelinating cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleopa, Kleopas A; Orthmann-Murphy, Jennifer; Sargiannidou, Irene

    2010-01-01

    Gap junctions (GJs) are channels that allow the diffusion of ions and small molecules across apposed cell membranes. In peripheral nerves, Schwann cells express the GJ proteins connexin32 (Cx32) and Cx29, which have distinct localizations. Cx32 forms GJs through non-compact myelin areas, whereas Cx29 forms hemichannels in the innermost layers of myelin apposing axonal Shaker-type K+ channels. In the CNS, rodent oligodendrocytes express Cx47, Cx32 and Cx29. Cx47 is expressed by all types of oligodendrocytes both in the white and grey matter and forms GJs on cell bodies and proximal processes, as well as most of the intercellular channels with astrocytes. Cx32 is expressed mostly by white matter oligodendrocytes and is localized in the myelin sheath of large diameter fibers. Cx29, and its human ortholog Cx31.3, appear to be restricted to oligodendrocytes that myelinate small caliber fibers, likely forming hemichannels. The importance of intercellular and intracellular GJs in myelinating cells are demonstrated by human disorders resulting from mutations affecting GJ proteins. The X-linked Charcot Marie Tooth disease (CMT1X) is caused by hundreds of mutations affecting Cx32. Patients with CMT1X present mainly with a progressive peripheral neuropathy, which may be accompanied by CNS myelin dysfunction. Mutations in Cx47 may cause a devastating leukodystrophy called Pelizaeus-Merzbacher-like disease or a milder spastic paraplegia. In addition, CNS demyelination may be caused by defects in genes expressing astrocytic GJ proteins, which are essential for oligodendrocytes. Findings from in vitro and in vivo models of these disorders developed over the last decade indicate that most mutations cause loss of function and an inability of the mutant connexins to form functional GJs. Here we review the clinical, genetic, and neurobiological aspects of GJ disorders affecting the PNS and CNS myelinating cells.

  17. Dislocation Multi-junctions and Strain Hardening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulatov, V; Hsiung, L; Tang, M; Arsenlis, A; Bartelt, M; Cai, W; Florando, J; Hiratani, M; Rhee, M; Hommes, G; Pierce, T; Diaz de la Rubia, T

    2006-06-20

    At the microscopic scale, the strength of a crystal derives from the motion, multiplication and interaction of distinctive line defects--dislocations. First theorized in 1934 to explain low magnitudes of crystal strength observed experimentally, the existence of dislocations was confirmed only two decades later. Much of the research in dislocation physics has since focused on dislocation interactions and their role in strain hardening: a common phenomenon in which continued deformation increases a crystal's strength. The existing theory relates strain hardening to pair-wise dislocation reactions in which two intersecting dislocations form junctions tying dislocations together. Here we report that interactions among three dislocations result in the formation of unusual elements of dislocation network topology, termed hereafter multi-junctions. The existence of multi-junctions is first predicted by Dislocation Dynamics (DD) and atomistic simulations and then confirmed by the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) experiments in single crystal molybdenum. In large-scale Dislocation Dynamics simulations, multi-junctions present very strong, nearly indestructible, obstacles to dislocation motion and furnish new sources for dislocation multiplication thereby playing an essential role in the evolution of dislocation microstructure and strength of deforming crystals. Simulation analyses conclude that multi-junctions are responsible for the strong orientation dependence of strain hardening in BCC crystals.

  18. Thermionic refrigeration at CNT-CNT junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C.; Pipe, K. P.

    2016-10-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is used to study carrier energy relaxation following thermionic emission at the junction of two van der Waals bonded single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). An energy-dependent transmission probability gives rise to energy filtering at the junction, which is predicted to increase the average electron transport energy by as much as 0.115 eV, leading to an effective Seebeck coefficient of 386 μV/K. MC results predict a long energy relaxation length (˜8 μm) for hot electrons crossing the junction into the barrier SWCNT. For SWCNTs of optimal length, an analytical transport model is used to show that thermionic cooling can outweigh parasitic heat conduction due to high SWCNT thermal conductivity, leading to a significant cooling capacity (2.4 × 106 W/cm2).

  19. Vortex structures in exponentially shaped Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukrinov, Yu. M.; Semerdjieva, E. G.; Boyadjiev, T. L.

    2005-04-01

    We report the numerical calculations of the static vortex structure and critical curves in exponentially shaped long Josephson junctions for in-line and overlap geometries. Stability of the static solutions is investigated by checking the sign of the smallest eigenvalue of the associated Sturm-Liouville problem. The change in the junction width leads to the renormalization of the magnetic flux in comparison with the case of a linear one-dimensional model. We study the influence of the model's parameters, and particularly, the shape parameter on the stability of the states of the magnetic flux. We compare the vortex structure and critical curves for the in-line and overlap geometries. Our numerically constructed critical curve of the Josephson junction matches well with the experimental one.

  20. Holographic Josephson Junction from Massive Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Ya-Peng; Zeng, Hua-Bi; Zhang, Hai-Qing

    2015-01-01

    We study the holographic superconductor-normal metal-superconductor (SNS) Josephon junction in the massive gravity. In the homogeneous case of the chemical potential, we find that the graviton mass will make the normal metal-superconductor phase transition harder to take place. In the holographic model of Josephson junction, it is found that the maximal tunneling current will decrease according to the graviton mass. Besides, the coherence length of the junction decreases as well with respect to the graviton mass. If one interprets the graviton mass as the effect of momentum dissipation in the boundary field theory, it indicates that the stronger the momentum dissipation is, the smaller the coherence length is.

  1. Characterization of magnetic tunnel junction test pads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østerberg, Frederik Westergaard; Kjær, Daniel; Nielsen, Peter Folmer

    2015-01-01

    We show experimentally as well as theoretically that patterned magnetic tunnel junctions can be characterized using the current-in-plane tunneling (CIPT) method, and the key parameters, the resistance-area product (RA) and the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR), can be determined. The CIPT method...... on square tunnel junction pads with varying sizes and analyze the measured data using both the original and the modified CIPT model. Thus, we determine in which sample size range the modified CIPT model is needed to ensure validity of the extracted sample parameters, RA and TMR. In addition, measurements...... as a function of position on a square tunnel junction pad are used to investigate the sensitivity of the measurement results to probe misalignment....

  2. Gap junction diseases of the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Steensel, M A M

    2004-11-15

    Gap junctions are intercellular channels that allow the passage of water, ions, and small molecules. They are involved in quick, short-range messaging between cells and are found in skin, nervous tissue, heart, and muscle. An increasing number of hereditary skin disorders appear to be caused by mutations in one of the genes coding for the constituent proteins of gap junctions, known as connexins. In this review, the currently known connexin disorders that feature skin abnormalities are described: keratitis-ichthyosis deafness syndrome, erythrokeratoderma variabilis, Vohwinkel's syndrome, and a novel disorder called hypotrichosis-deafness syndrome. What is known about the pathogenesis of these disorders is discussed and related to gap junction physiology. (c) 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Overdamped Josephson junctions for digital applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Febvre, P., E-mail: Pascal.Febvre@univ-savoie.fr [University of Savoie, IMEP-LAHC – CNRS UMR5130, 73376 Le Bourget du Lac (France); De Leo, N.; Fretto, M.; Sosso, A. [I.N.Ri.M., Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica, Strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 Torino (Italy); Belogolovskii, M. [Donetsk Institute for Physics and Engineering, 72 R. Luxemburg str., 83114 Donetsk (Ukraine); Collot, R. [University of Savoie, IMEP-LAHC – CNRS UMR5130, 73376 Le Bourget du Lac (France); Lacquaniti, V. [I.N.Ri.M., Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica, Strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 Torino (Italy)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: ► Properties of self-shunted sub-micron Nb/Al–AlO{sub x}/Nb SNIS junctions are studied. ► 1–100 kA/cm{sup 2} current densities and 0.1–0.7 mV critical voltages are obtained. ► The critical voltage-vs-temperature behavior of SNIS junctions is discussed. ► Numerical results showing an effect of the aluminum film thickness are presented. ► A Josephson balanced comparator is studied for different temperatures of operation. -- Abstract: An interesting feature of Superconductor–Normal metal–Superconductor Josephson junctions for digital applications is due to their non-hysteretic current–voltage characteristics in a broad temperature range below T{sub c}. This allows to design Single-Flux-Quantum (SFQ) cells without the need of external shunts. Two advantages can be drawn from this property: first the SFQ cells can be more compact which leads to a more integrated solution towards nano-devices and more complex circuits; second the absence of electrical parasitic elements associated with the wiring of resistors external to the Josephson junctions increases the performance of SFQ circuits, in particular regarding the ultimate speed of operation. For this purpose Superconductor–Normal metal–Insulator–Superconductor Nb/Al–AlO{sub x}/Nb Josephson junctions have been recently developed at INRiM with aluminum layer thicknesses between 30 and 100 nm. They exhibit non-hysteretic current–voltage characteristics with I{sub c}R{sub n} values higher than 0.5 mV in a broad temperature range and optimal Stewart McCumber parameters at 4.2 K for RSFQ applications. The main features of obtained SNIS junctions regarding digital applications are presented.

  4. Polarized Light Corridor Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, G. R.

    1990-01-01

    Eleven demonstrations of light polarization are presented. Each includes a brief description of the apparatus and the effect demonstrated. Illustrated are strain patterns, reflection, scattering, the Faraday Effect, interference, double refraction, the polarizing microscope, and optical activity. (CW)

  5. Inhibition of Rho and Rac geranylgeranylation by atorvastatin is critical for preservation of endothelial junction integrity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongbing Xiao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Small GTPases (guanosine triphosphate, GTP are involved in many critical cellular processes, including inflammation, proliferation, and migration. GTP loading and isoprenylation are two important post-translational modifications of small GTPases, and are critical for their normal function. In this study, we investigated the role of post-translational modifications of small GTPases in regulating endothelial cell inflammatory responses and junctional integrity. METHODS AND RESULTS: Confluent human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVECs treated with atorvastatin demonstrated significantly decreased lipopolysaccharide (LPS-mediated IL-6 and IL-8 generation. The inhibitory effect of atorvastatin (Atorva was attenuated by co-treatment with 100 µM mevalonate (MVA or 10 µM geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP, but not by 10 µM farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP. Atorvastatin treatment of HUVECs produced a time-dependent increase in GTP loading of all Rho GTPases, and induced the translocation of small Rho GTPases from the cellular membrane to the cytosol, which was reversed by 100 µM MVA and 10 µM GGPP, but not by 10 µM FPP. Atorvastatin significantly attenuated thrombin-induced HUVECs permeability, increased VE-cadherin targeting to cell junctions, and preserved junction integrity. These effects were partially reversed by GGPP but not by FPP, indicating that geranylgeranylation of small GTPases plays a major role in regulating endothelial junction integrity. Silencing of small GTPases showed that Rho and Rac, but not Cdc42, play central role in HUVECs junction integrity. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, our studies show that post-translational modification of small GTPases plays a vital role in regulating endothelial inflammatory response and endothelial junction integrity. Atorvastatin increased GTP loading and inhibited isoprenylation of small GTPases, accompanied by reduced inflammatory response and preserved cellular junction integrity.

  6. T-junction cross-flow mixing with thermally driven density stratification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kickhofel, John, E-mail: jkickhofel@gmail.com [Laboratory of Nuclear Energy Systems, ETH Zurich, Sonneggstrasse 3, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Prasser, Horst-Michael, E-mail: prasser@lke.mavt.ethz.ch [Laboratory of Nuclear Energy Systems, ETH Zurich, Sonneggstrasse 3, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Selvam, P. Karthick, E-mail: karthick.selvam@ike.uni-stuttgart.de [Institute of Nuclear Technology and Energy Systems (IKE), University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 31, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Laurien, Eckart, E-mail: eckart.laurien@ike.uni-stuttgart.de [Institute of Nuclear Technology and Energy Systems (IKE), University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 31, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Kulenovic, Rudi, E-mail: rudi.kulenovic@ike.uni-stuttgart.de [Institute of Nuclear Technology and Energy Systems (IKE), University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 31, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • Mesh sensor for realistic nuclear thermal hydraulic scenarios is demonstrated. • Flow temperature behavior across a wide range of Richardson numbers measured. • Upstream stratified flow in the T-junction results in a thermal shock scenario. • Large, stable near-wall thermal gradients exist in spite of turbulent flows. - Abstract: As a means of further elucidating turbulence- and stratification-driven thermal fatigue in the vicinity of T-junctions in nuclear power plants, a series of experiments have been conducted at the high temperature high pressure fluid–structure interaction T-junction facility of the University of Stuttgart with novel fluid measurement instrumentation. T-junction mixing with large fluid temperature gradients results in complex flow behavior, the result of density driven effects. Deionized water mixing at temperature differences of up to 232 K at 7 MPa pressure have been investigated in a T-junction with main pipe diameter 71.8 mm and branch line diameter 38.9 mm. The experiments have been performed with fixed flow rates of 0.4 kg/s in the main pipe and 0.1 kg/s in the branch line. A novel electrode-mesh sensor compatible with the DN80 PN100 pipeline upstream and downstream of the T-junction has been utilized as a temperature sensor providing a high density information in the pipe cross-section in both space and time. Additionally, in-flow and in-wall thermocouples quantify the damping of thermal fluctuations by the wall material. The results indicate that large inflow temperature differences lead to strong turbulence damping, and ultimately stable stratification extending both downstream and upstream of the T-junction resulting in large local thermal gradients.

  7. Microwave oscillator based on an intrinsic BSCCO-type Josephson junction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Niels Falsig; Madsen, Søren Peder

    2005-01-01

    . The resulting model is a set of coupled nonlinear partial differential equations. By direct numerical simulations we have demonstrated that the qualitative behavior of the combined intrinsic Josephson junction and cavity system can be understood on the basis of general concepts of nonlinear oscillators...

  8. On-chip measurement of the Brownian relaxation frequency of magnetic beads using magnetic tunneling junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donolato, M.; Sogne, E.; Dalslet, Bjarke Thomas

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate the detection of the Brownian relaxation frequency of 250 nm diameter magnetic beads using a lab-on-chip platform based on current lines for exciting the beads with alternating magnetic fields and highly sensitive magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) sensors with a superparamagnetic free...

  9. Modeling superconducting networks containing Josephson junctions by means of PC-based circuit simulation software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackburn, J.A. (Department of Physics and Computing, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, ON (Canada)); Smith, H.J.T. (Department of Physics, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON (Canada))

    1990-09-01

    Software packages are now available with which complex analog electronic circuits can be simulated on desktop computers. Using Micro Cap III it is demonstrated that the modeling capabilities of such software can be extended to include {ital superconducting} networks by means of an appropriate equivalent circuit for a Josephson junction.

  10. Investigation of the breakpoint region in stacks with a finite number of intrinsic Josephson junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shukrinov, Yu M.; Mahfouzi, F.; Pedersen, Niels Falsig

    2007-01-01

    We study the breakpoint region on the outermost branch of current-voltage characteristics of the stacks with di_erent number of intrinsic Josephson junctions. E_ect of the boundary conditions on the breakpoint region is demonstrated. At periodic boundary conditions the breakpoint region is absent...

  11. Multiplication in Silicon p-n Junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moll, John L.

    1965-01-01

    Multiplication values were measured in the collector junctions of silicon p-n-p and n-p-n transistors before and after bombardment by 1016 neutrons/cm2. Within experimental error there was no change either in junction fields, as deduced from capacitance measurements, or in multiplication values...... in any of the transistors. The implication is that the electron and hole ionization rates did not change as a result of the addition of extra scattering centers. This result is in direct contradiction to observations of Lee et al. The most likely explanation for the discrepancy is erroneous determination...

  12. Fast transient response of novel Peltier junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoyos, G.E.; Rao, K.R.; Jerger, D.

    1977-01-01

    The fast transient response of a thermoelectric (TE) cooler with novel geometry is discussed. This geometry involves conical semiconductor legs whose hot to cold junction cross-sectional area ratios can be varied. The novel TE junctions are fabricated such that the thermal capacitance and electrical conductance are decreased while simultaneously increasing the thermal resistance. The experimental apparatus which includes the vacuum system, power supplies, pulse and control circuitry, sensing and measuring instrumentation etc. is described. With narrow pulse width and large amplitudes, additional cooling of the order of 45/sup 0/C below the steady-state maximum with recovery times in the range of 1 to 3 sec is obtained.

  13. Rectangular-to-circular groove waveguide junction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI; Licheng; (崔立成); YANG; Hongsheng; (杨鸿生)

    2003-01-01

    Mode matching method is used to analyze the scattering characteristics of the rectangular-to-circular groove waveguide junction. Firstly, the scattering matrix equation is obtained by matching the electromagnetic fields at the boundary of the junction. The scattering coefficients can be obtained from the equation. Secondly the scattering characteristics of the iris with rectangular window positioned in circular groove waveguide are briefly analyzed. Thirdly, the convergent problem is discussed and the numerical results are given. At last experiment is made and good agreement is found between the calculated results and the measured results.

  14. Electroplated Ni on the PN Junction Semiconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Joo; Uhm, Young Rang; Son, Kwang Jae; Kim, Jong Bum; Choi, Sang Moo; Park, Jong Han; Hong, Jintae [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Nickel (Ni) electroplating was implemented by using a metal Ni powder in order to establish a Ni-63 plating condition on the PN junction semiconductor needed for production of betavoltaic battery. PN junction semiconductors with a Ni seed layer of 500 and 1000 A were coated with Ni at current density from 10 to 50 mA cm{sup 2}. The surface roughness and average grain size of Ni deposits were investigated by XRD and SEM techniques. The roughness of Ni deposit was increased as the current density was increased, and decreased as the thickness of Ni seed layer was increased.

  15. Canonical Wnt Signaling Regulates Atrioventricular Junction Programming and Electrophysiological Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillers, Benjamin S; Chiplunkar, Aditi; Aly, Haytham; Valenta, Tomas; Basler, Konrad; Christoffels, Vincent M.; Efimov, Igor R; Boukens, Bastiaan J; Rentschler, Stacey

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Proper patterning of the atrioventricular canal (AVC) is essential for delay of electrical impulses between atria and ventricles, and defects in AVC maturation can result in congenital heart disease. Objective To determine the role of canonical Wnt signaling in the myocardium during AVC development. Methods and Results We utilized a novel allele of β-catenin that preserves β-catenin’s cell adhesive functions but disrupts canonical Wnt signaling, allowing us to probe the effects of Wnt loss of function independently. We show that loss of canonical Wnt signaling in the myocardium results in tricuspid atresia with hypoplastic right ventricle associated with loss of AVC myocardium. In contrast, ectopic activation of Wnt signaling was sufficient to induce formation of ectopic AV junction-like tissue as assessed by morphology, gene expression, and electrophysiologic criteria. Aberrant AVC development can lead to ventricular preexcitation, a characteristic feature of Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. We demonstrate that postnatal activation of Notch signaling downregulates canonical Wnt targets within the AV junction. Stabilization of β-catenin protein levels can rescue Notch-mediated ventricular preexcitation and dysregulated ion channel gene expression. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that myocardial canonical Wnt signaling is an important regulator of AVC maturation and electrical programming upstream of Tbx3. Our data further suggests that ventricular preexcitation may require both morphologic patterning defects, as well as myocardial lineage reprogramming, to allow robust conduction across accessory pathway tissue. PMID:25599332

  16. Mefloquine gap junction blockade and risk of pregnancy loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevin, Remington Lee

    2012-09-01

    Obstetric use of the antimalarial drug mefloquine has historically been discouraged during the first trimester and immediately before conception owing to concerns of potential fetal harm. With the rise of resistance to the antimalarial drug sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP), mefloquine is now being considered as a replacement for SP for universal antenatal administration to women from malaria-endemic regions. Recent recommendations have also suggested that mefloquine may be used cautiously among pregnant travelers who cannot otherwise avoid visiting these areas. Mefloquine has been demonstrated to cause blockade of gap junction protein alpha 1 (GJA1) gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC), and recent evidence suggests that GJA1 GJIC is critical to successful embryonic implantation and early placental development. During routine use, mefloquine accumulates in organ and peripheral tissue, crosses the blood-placental barrier, and may plausibly accumulate in developing decidua and trophoblast at concentrations sufficient to interfere with GJA1 GJIC and, thus, cause deleterious effects on fetal outcomes. This conclusion is supported by epidemiological evidence that demonstrates use of the drug during early development is associated with an increased risk of miscarriage and stillbirth. Confirmatory studies are pending, but the available experimental and epidemiological evidence support renewed adherence, where feasible, to existing mefloquine package insert guidance that women avoid the drug during the periconceptional period.

  17. The POSEIDON Demonstrator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laar, P.J.L.J. van de

    2013-01-01

    In this chapter, we discuss the Poseidon demonstrator: a demonstrator that integrates the individual research results of all partners of the Poseidon project. After describing how the Poseidon demonstrator was built, deployed, and operated, we will not only show many results obtained from the demons

  18. Overhead Projector Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Doris, Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Details two demonstrations for use with an overhead projector in a chemistry lecture. Includes "A Very Rapidly Growing Silicate Crystal" and "A Colorful Demonstration to Simulate Orbital Hybridization." The materials and directions for each demonstration are included as well as a brief explanation of the essential learning involved. (CW)

  19. Altered detrusor gap junction communications induce storage symptoms in bladder inflammation: a mouse cyclophosphamide-induced model of cystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okinami, Takeshi; Imamura, Masaaki; Nishikawa, Nobuyuki; Negoro, Hiromitsu; Sugino, Yoshio; Yoshimura, Koji; Kanematsu, Akihiro; Hashitani, Hikaru; Ogawa, Osamu

    2014-01-01

    Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) include storage, voiding and post-micturition symptoms, featuring many urological diseases. Storage symptoms are the most frequent among these and associated with overactive bladder and non-bacterial bladder inflammation such as interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS). Gap junction, a key regulator of hyperactive conditions in the bladder, has been reported to be involved in pathological bladder inflammation. Here we report involvement of gap junction in the etiology of storage symptoms in bladder inflammation. In this study, cyclophosphamide-induced cystitis was adapted as a model of bladder inflammation. Cyclophosphamide-treated mice showed typical storage symptoms including increased urinary frequency and reduced bladder capacity, with concurrent up-regulation of connexin 43 (GJA1), one of the major gap junction proteins in the bladder. In isometric tension study, bladder smooth muscle strips taken from the treated mice showed more pronounced spontaneous contraction than controls, which was attenuated by carbenoxolone, a gap junction inhibitor. In voiding behavior studies, the storage symptoms in the treated mice characterized by frequent voiding were alleviated by 18α-glycyrrhetinic acid, another gap junction inhibitor. These results demonstrate that cyclophosphamide-induced mouse model of cystitis shows clinical storage symptoms related with bladder inflammation and that gap junction in the bladder may be a key molecule of these storage symptoms. Therefore, gap junction in the bladder might be an alternative therapeutic target for storage symptoms in bladder inflammation.

  20. Altered detrusor gap junction communications induce storage symptoms in bladder inflammation: a mouse cyclophosphamide-induced model of cystitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Okinami

    Full Text Available Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS include storage, voiding and post-micturition symptoms, featuring many urological diseases. Storage symptoms are the most frequent among these and associated with overactive bladder and non-bacterial bladder inflammation such as interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS. Gap junction, a key regulator of hyperactive conditions in the bladder, has been reported to be involved in pathological bladder inflammation. Here we report involvement of gap junction in the etiology of storage symptoms in bladder inflammation. In this study, cyclophosphamide-induced cystitis was adapted as a model of bladder inflammation. Cyclophosphamide-treated mice showed typical storage symptoms including increased urinary frequency and reduced bladder capacity, with concurrent up-regulation of connexin 43 (GJA1, one of the major gap junction proteins in the bladder. In isometric tension study, bladder smooth muscle strips taken from the treated mice showed more pronounced spontaneous contraction than controls, which was attenuated by carbenoxolone, a gap junction inhibitor. In voiding behavior studies, the storage symptoms in the treated mice characterized by frequent voiding were alleviated by 18α-glycyrrhetinic acid, another gap junction inhibitor. These results demonstrate that cyclophosphamide-induced mouse model of cystitis shows clinical storage symptoms related with bladder inflammation and that gap junction in the bladder may be a key molecule of these storage symptoms. Therefore, gap junction in the bladder might be an alternative therapeutic target for storage symptoms in bladder inflammation.

  1. Connexin 30 expression and frequency of connexin heterogeneity in astrocyte gap junction plaques increase with age in the rat retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Hussein; McColm, Janet R; Cole, Louise; Weible, Michael; Korlimbinis, Anastasia; Chan-Ling, Tailoi

    2013-01-01

    We investigated age-associated changes in retinal astrocyte connexins (Cx) by assaying Cx numbers, plaque sizes, protein expression levels and heterogeneity of gap junctions utilizing six-marker immunohistochemistry (IHC). We compared Wistar rat retinal wholemounts in animals aged 3 (young adult), 9 (middle-aged) and 22 months (aged). We determined that retinal astrocytes have gap junctions composed of Cx26, -30, -43 and -45. Cx30 was consistently elevated at 22 months compared to younger ages both when associated with parenchymal astrocytes and vascular-associated astrocytes. Not only was the absolute number of Cx30 plaques significantly higher (Pgap junctions was demonstrated by the significant increase in the number of Cx26/Cx45 gap junctions with age. We also found gap junctions comprised of 1, 2, 3 or 4 Cx proteins suggesting that retinal astrocytes use various connexin protein combinations in their gap junctions during development and aging. These data provides new insight into the dynamic and extensive Cx network utilized by retinal astrocytes for communication within both the parenchyma and vasculature for the maintenance of normal retinal physiology with age. This characterisation of the changes in astrocytic gap junctional communication with age in the CNS is crucial to the understanding of physiological aging and age-related neurodegenerative diseases.

  2. Monoclonal antibodies against muscle actin isoforms: epitope identification and analysis of isoform expression by immunoblot and immunostaining in normal and regenerating skeletal muscle [version 2; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Chaponnier

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Higher vertebrates (mammals and birds express six different highly conserved actin isoforms that can be classified in three subgroups: 1 sarcomeric actins, α-skeletal (α-SKA and α-cardiac (α-CAA, 2 smooth muscle actins (SMAs, α-SMA and γ-SMA, and 3 cytoplasmic actins (CYAs, β-CYA and γ-CYA. The variations among isoactins, in each subgroup, are due to 3-4 amino acid differences located in their acetylated N-decapeptide sequence. The first monoclonal antibody (mAb against an actin isoform (α-SMA was produced and characterized in our laboratory in 1986 (Skalli  et al., 1986 . We have further obtained mAbs against the 5 other isoforms. In this report, we focus on the mAbs anti-α-SKA and anti-α-CAA obtained after immunization of mice with the respective acetylated N-terminal decapeptides using the Repetitive Immunizations at Multiple Sites Strategy (RIMMS. In addition to the identification of their epitope by immunoblotting, we describe the expression of the 2 sarcomeric actins in mature skeletal muscle and during muscle repair after micro-lesions. In particular, we analyze the expression of α-CAA, α-SKA and α-SMA by co-immunostaining in a time course frame during the muscle repair process. Our results indicate that a restricted myocyte population expresses α-CAA and suggest a high capacity of self-regeneration in muscle cells. These antibodies may represent a helpful tool for the follow-up of muscle regeneration and pathological changes.

  3. Origin Use of CD4, CD8, and CD1a Immunostains in Distinguishing Mycosis Fungoides from its Inflammatory Mimics: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajalakshmi Tirumalae

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Patch-stage/early mycosis fungoides (MF is difficult to differentiate from benign dermatoses, despite several robust histologic criteria. Most studies include advanced lesions and data about early disease is limited. Objectives: (1 To compare the CD4:CD8 ratio in patch-stage MF versus inflammatory mimics. (2 To study patterns of CD1a expression in the epidermis and dermis in the two groups. Materials and Methods: Twenty cases each of early MF and inflammatory dermatoses were selected. The diagnoses were established after clinicopathologic correlation, repeat biopsies, and follow-up. The inflammatory group included pityriasis lichenoides chronica, actinic reticuloid, lichenoid purpura, and various psoriasiform dermatoses. Immunohistochemistry was done for CD4, CD8, and CD1a. Epidermal CD4, CD8 cells were quantified and CD1a was graded semi-quantitatively in the epidermis and dermis. Results: The average CD4:CD8 ratio was 4.2 in MF (range: 1-16.8, and 0.9 in inflammatory diseases (range: 0.43-5, which was statistically significant (P 1. CD1a cells had a continuous or confluent epidermal pattern in almost all cases of MF, while they occurred as small or large groups in the dermis. In inflammatory dermatoses, there were either isolated or scattered CD1a+ cells in both epidermis and dermis. Conclusions: Elevated CD4:CD8 ratio favors MF. But there is an overlap in the lower range with pityriasis lichenoides chronica. These cases require good clinicopathologic correlation and follow-up. Patterns of CD1a expression are more reliable. Immunostains buttress morphology and are a valuable addition.

  4. The c-axis charge traveling wave in a coupled system of Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukrinov, Yu. M.; Hamdipour, M.

    2012-05-01

    We demonstrate a manifestation of the charge traveling wave along the c axis (TW) in current voltage characteristics of coupled Josephson junctions in high- T c superconductors. The branches related to the TW with different wavelengths are found for the stacks with different number of Josephson junctions at different values of system's parameters. Transitions between the TW branches and the outermost branch are observed. The electric charge in the superconducting layers and charge-charge correlation functions for TW and outermost branches show different behavior with bias current. We propose an experimental testing of the TW branching by microwave irradiation.

  5. Breakpoint region in the IV-characteristics of intrinsic Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukrinov, Yu M.; Mahfouzi, F.

    2008-02-01

    We study theoretically the IV-characteristics of intrinsic Josephson junctions in HTSC. We solve numerically a set of differential equations for N intrinsic Josephson junctions and investigate the nonlinear dynamics of the system. The charging effect is taken into account. We demonstrate that the breakpoint region in the current-voltage characteristics naturally follows from the solution of the system of the dynamical equations for the phase difference. In the breakpoint region the plasma mode is a stationary solution of the system and this fact might be used in some applications, particularly, in high frequency devices such as THz oscillators and mixers.

  6. Influence of position and parameters of inhomogeneities on vortex structure in long Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreeva, O. Yu; Boyadjiev, T. L.; Shukrinov, Yu M.

    2008-10-01

    Numerical experiment results on long Josephson junction with one and two rectangular inhomogeneities in the barrier layer are presented. We demonstrate the efiect of the shifting of the inhomogeneity and the value of the Josephson current on the vortex structure. The disappearance of mixed fluxon-antifluxon states is shown when the position of inhomogeneity shifted to the end of the junction. A change of the amplitude of Josephson current at the end makes a strong efiect on the stability of the fluxon states and smoothes the maximums of the dependence 'critical current-magnetic field'.

  7. Influence of position and parameters of inhomogeneities on vortex structure in long Josephson junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreeva, O Yu [OAO ' Ural Thermal Network Company' , Tumen, 625023 (Russian Federation); Boyadjiev, T L; Shukrinov, Yu M [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation)], E-mail: shukrinv@theor.jinr.ru

    2008-10-15

    Numerical experiment results on long Josephson junction with one and two rectangular inhomogeneities in the barrier layer are presented. We demonstrate the effect of the shifting of the inhomogeneity and the value of the Josephson current on the vortex structure. The disappearance of mixed fluxon-antifluxon states is shown when the position of inhomogeneity shifted to the end of the junction. A change of the amplitude of Josephson current at the end makes a strong effect on the stability of the fluxon states and smoothes the maximums of the dependence 'critical current-magnetic field'.

  8. Dynamic imaging of disorders at craniovertebral junction using fast gradient echo imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nambu, Toshikazu; Miyasaka, Kazuo [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). School of Medicine; Yamamoto, Isao; Itoh, Hajime

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated the usefulness of Turbo-FLASH MR imaging in the dynamic evaluations of the disorders at craniovertebral junction. Using this fast scan program, serial fifteen dynamic images of the midline cervical plane could be obtained in 53 seconds, while the patient had very slow autonomous flexion-extension movement. Twelve cases including atlanto-axial dislocation, os odontoideum and Chiari malformation were investigated. The dynamic images could demonstrate findings of upper spinal cord compression which correlated well to the static functional SE images. We conclude that ultrafast MR imaging shows promise as a convenient dynamic evaluation of craniovertebral junctional disorders. (author).

  9. Fast and efficient silicon thermo-optic switching based on reverse breakdown of pn junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianyao; Xu, Hao; Xiao, Xi; Li, Zhiyong; Yu, Yude; Yu, Jinzhong

    2014-02-15

    We propose and demonstrate a fast and efficient silicon thermo-optic switch based on reverse breakdown of the pn junction. Benefiting from the direct heating of silicon waveguide by embedding the pn junction into the waveguide center, fast switching with on/off time of 330 and 450 ns and efficient thermal tuning of 0.12  nm/mW for a 20 μm radius microring resonator are achieved, indicating a high figure of merit of only 8.8  mW·μs. The results here show great potential for application in the future optical interconnects.

  10. Strategy Guideline: Demonstration Home

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savage, C.; Hunt, A.

    2012-12-01

    This guideline will provide a general overview of the different kinds of demonstration home projects, a basic understanding of the different roles and responsibilities involved in the successful completion of a demonstration home, and an introduction into some of the lessons learned from actual demonstration home projects. Also, this guideline will specifically look at the communication methods employed during demonstration home projects. And lastly, we will focus on how to best create a communication plan for including an energy efficient message in a demonstration home project and carry that message to successful completion.

  11. Strategy Guideline. Demonstration Home

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, A.; Savage, C.

    2012-12-01

    This guideline will provide a general overview of the different kinds of demonstration home projects, a basic understanding of the different roles and responsibilities involved in the successful completion of a demonstration home, and an introduction into some of the lessons learned from actual demonstration home projects. Also, this guideline will specifically look at the communication methods employed during demonstration home projects. And lastly, we will focus on how to best create a communication plan for including an energy efficient message in a demonstration home project and carry that message to successful completion.

  12. Two-Dimensional Measurement of n+-p Asymmetrical Junctions in Multicrystalline Silicon Solar Cells Using AFM-Based Electrical Techniques with Nanometer Resolution: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, C. S.; Moutinho, H. R.; Li, J. V.; Al-Jassim, M. M.; Heath, J. T.

    2011-07-01

    Lateral inhomogeneities of modern solar cells demand direct electrical imaging with nanometer resolution. We show that atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based electrical techniques provide unique junction characterizations, giving a two-dimensional determination of junction locations. Two AFM-based techniques, scanning capacitance microscopy/spectroscopy (SCM/SCS) and scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy (SKPFM), were significantly improved and applied to the junction characterizations of multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) cells. The SCS spectra were taken pixel by pixel by precisely controlling the tip positions in the junction area. The spectra reveal distinctive features that depend closely on the position relative to the electrical junction, which allows us to indentify the electrical junction location. In addition, SKPFM directly probes the built-in potential over the junction area modified by the surface band bending, which allows us to deduce the metallurgical junction location by identifying a peak of the electric field. Our results demonstrate resolutions of 10-40 nm, depending on the techniques (SCS or SKPFM). These direct electrical measurements with nanometer resolution and intrinsic two-dimensional capability are well suited for investigating the junction distribution of solar cells with lateral inhomogeneities.

  13. Transcriptional mechanisms coordinating tight junction assembly during epithelial differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, Felix J; Schmidt-Ott, Kai M

    2017-06-01

    Epithelial tissues form a selective barrier via direct cell-cell interactions to separate and establish concentration gradients between the different compartments of the body. Proper function and formation of this barrier rely on the establishment of distinct intercellular junction complexes. These complexes include tight junctions, adherens junctions, desmosomes, and gap junctions. The tight junction is by far the most diverse junctional complex in the epithelial barrier. Its composition varies greatly across different epithelial tissues to confer various barrier properties. Thus, epithelial cells rely on tightly regulated transcriptional mechanisms to ensure proper formation of the epithelial barrier and to achieve tight junction diversity. Here, we review different transcriptional mechanisms utilized during embryogenesis and disease development to promote tight junction assembly and maintenance of intercellular barrier integrity. We focus particularly on the Grainyhead-like transcription factors and ligand-activated nuclear hormone receptors, two central families of proteins in epithelialization. © 2017 New York Academy of Sciences.

  14. Mechanical properties of DNA origami nanoassemblies are determined by Holliday junction mechanophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Prakash; Emura, Tomoko; Koirala, Deepak; Cui, Yunxi; Hidaka, Kumi; Maximuck, William J; Endo, Masayuki; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Mao, Hanbin

    2016-08-19

    DNA nanoassemblies have demonstrated wide applications in various fields including nanomaterials, drug delivery and biosensing. In DNA origami, single-stranded DNA template is shaped into desired nanostructure by DNA staples that form Holliday junctions with the template. Limited by current methodologies, however, mechanical properties of DNA origami structures have not been adequately characterized, which hinders further applications of these materials. Using laser tweezers, here, we have described two mechanical properties of DNA nanoassemblies represented by DNA nanotubes, DNA nanopyramids and DNA nanotiles. First, mechanical stability of DNA origami structures is determined by the effective density of Holliday junctions along a particular stress direction. Second, mechanical isomerization observed between two conformations of DNA nanotubes at 10-35 pN has been ascribed to the collective actions of individual Holliday junctions, which are only possible in DNA origami with rotational symmetric arrangements of Holliday junctions, such as those in DNA nanotubes. Our results indicate that Holliday junctions control mechanical behaviors of DNA nanoassemblies. Therefore, they can be considered as 'mechanophores' that sustain mechanical properties of origami nanoassemblies. The mechanical properties observed here provide insights for designing better DNA nanostructures. In addition, the unprecedented mechanical isomerization process brings new strategies for the development of nano-sensors and actuators.

  15. Modulation of Intercellular Junction by Utilization of Cadherin Peptides as an Effort to Improve Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usman Sumo Friend Tambunan

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Rapid advances in combinatorial chemistry and molecular biology has influenced the discovery of many proteins, peptides and peptidomimetics as potential therapeutic agents. Unfortunately, the practical application of these potential drugs is often restricted by the difficulties of delivering them to target site(s due to the presence of biological barriers. Recently, a new method to improve the drug delivery, that is by modulating the intercellular junction, has been evaluated. Modulation of intercellular junction could be achieved by modulating the proteins which play important role in establishing the intercellular junction, one of which is cadherin. In the present work we have demonstrated the ability of several cadherin peptides, i.e. Ac-LFSHAVSSNG-NH2 (HAV-10, Ac-SHAVSS-NH2 (HAV-6, Ac-QGADTPPVGV-NH2 (ADT-10, and Ac-ADTPPV-NH2 (ADT-6 to modulate the intercellular junction of MDCK (Madin Darby Canine Kidney cells, this finding is a contribution to the establishment of a new method to improve the drug delivery by utilization of cadherin peptides by modulating the intercellular junction.

  16. Fibroblast growth factor signaling potentiates VE-cadherin stability at adherens junctions by regulating SHP2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunihiko Hatanaka

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The fibroblast growth factor (FGF system plays a critical role in the maintenance of vascular integrity via enhancing the stability of VE-cadherin at adherens junctions. However, the precise molecular mechanism is not well understood. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the detailed mechanism of FGF regulation of VE-cadherin function that leads to endothelial junction stabilization. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In vitro studies demonstrated that the loss of FGF signaling disrupts the VE-cadherin-catenin complex at adherens junctions by increasing tyrosine phosphorylation levels of VE-cadherin. Among protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs known to be involved in the maintenance of the VE-cadherin complex, suppression of FGF signaling reduces SHP2 expression levels and SHP2/VE-cadherin interaction due to accelerated SHP2 protein degradation. Increased endothelial permeability caused by FGF signaling inhibition was rescued by SHP2 overexpression, indicating the critical role of SHP2 in the maintenance of endothelial junction integrity. CONCLUSIONS: These results identify FGF-dependent maintenance of SHP2 as an important new mechanism controlling the extent of VE-cadherin tyrosine phosphorylation, thereby regulating its presence in adherens junctions and endothelial permeability.

  17. Transition voltages of vacuum-spaced and molecular junctions with Ag and Pt electrodes

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Kunlin

    2014-07-07

    The transition voltage of vacuum-spaced and molecular junctions constructed with Ag and Pt electrodes is investigated by non-equilibrium Green\\'s function formalism combined with density functional theory. Our calculations show that, similarly to the case of Au-vacuum-Au previously studied, the transition voltages of Ag and Pt metal-vacuum-metal junctions with atomic protrusions on the electrode surface are determined by the local density of states of the p-type atomic orbitals of the protrusion. Since the energy position of the Pt 6p atomic orbitals is higher than that of the 5p/6p of Ag and Au, the transition voltage of Pt-vacuum-Pt junctions is larger than that of both Ag-vacuum-Ag and Au-vacuum-Au junctions. When one moves to analyzing asymmetric molecular junctions constructed with biphenyl thiol as central molecule, then the transition voltage is found to depend on the specific bonding site for the sulfur atom in the thiol group. In particular agreement with experiments, where the largest transition voltage is found for Ag and the smallest for Pt, is obtained when one assumes S binding at the hollow-bridge site on the Ag/Au(111) surface and at the adatom site on the Pt(111) one. This demonstrates the critical role played by the linker-electrode binding geometry in determining the transition voltage of devices made of conjugated thiol molecules. © 2014 AIP Publishing LLC.

  18. Transition voltages of vacuum-spaced and molecular junctions with Ag and Pt electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kunlin; Bai, Meilin; Sanvito, Stefano; Hou, Shimin

    2014-07-01

    The transition voltage of vacuum-spaced and molecular junctions constructed with Ag and Pt electrodes is investigated by non-equilibrium Green's function formalism combined with density functional theory. Our calculations show that, similarly to the case of Au-vacuum-Au previously studied, the transition voltages of Ag and Pt metal-vacuum-metal junctions with atomic protrusions on the electrode surface are determined by the local density of states of the p-type atomic orbitals of the protrusion. Since the energy position of the Pt 6p atomic orbitals is higher than that of the 5p/6p of Ag and Au, the transition voltage of Pt-vacuum-Pt junctions is larger than that of both Ag-vacuum-Ag and Au-vacuum-Au junctions. When one moves to analyzing asymmetric molecular junctions constructed with biphenyl thiol as central molecule, then the transition voltage is found to depend on the specific bonding site for the sulfur atom in the thiol group. In particular agreement with experiments, where the largest transition voltage is found for Ag and the smallest for Pt, is obtained when one assumes S binding at the hollow-bridge site on the Ag/Au(111) surface and at the adatom site on the Pt(111) one. This demonstrates the critical role played by the linker-electrode binding geometry in determining the transition voltage of devices made of conjugated thiol molecules.

  19. Tight junction-associated MARVEL proteins marveld3, tricellulin, and occludin have distinct but overlapping functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raleigh, David R; Marchiando, Amanda M; Zhang, Yong; Shen, Le; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Wang, Yingmin; Long, Manyuan; Turner, Jerrold R

    2010-04-01

    In vitro studies have demonstrated that occludin and tricellulin are important for tight junction barrier function, but in vivo data suggest that loss of these proteins can be overcome. The presence of a heretofore unknown, yet related, protein could explain these observations. Here, we report marvelD3, a novel tight junction protein that, like occludin and tricellulin, contains a conserved four-transmembrane MARVEL (MAL and related proteins for vesicle trafficking and membrane link) domain. Phylogenetic tree reconstruction; analysis of RNA and protein tissue distribution; immunofluorescent and electron microscopic examination of subcellular localization; characterization of intracellular trafficking, protein interactions, dynamic behavior, and siRNA knockdown effects; and description of remodeling after in vivo immune activation show that marvelD3, occludin, and tricellulin have distinct but overlapping functions at the tight junction. Although marvelD3 is able to partially compensate for occludin or tricellulin loss, it cannot fully restore function. We conclude that marvelD3, occludin, and tricellulin define the tight junction-associated MARVEL protein family. The data further suggest that these proteins are best considered as a group with both redundant and unique contributions to epithelial function and tight junction regulation.

  20. Two-dimensional dopant profiling of gallium nitride p–n junctions by scanning capacitance microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamhamdi, M. [GREMAN UMR 7347-Université de Tours, 10 Rue Thales de Milet, BP 7155, 37071 Tours (France); Ecole national des sciences appliquées khouribga, Université Hassan 1er, 26000 Settat (Morocco); Cayrel, F. [GREMAN UMR 7347-Université de Tours, 10 Rue Thales de Milet, BP 7155, 37071 Tours (France); Frayssinet, E. [CRHEA-CNRS, Rue Bernard Grégory, Sophia Antipolis, 06560 Valbonne (France); Bazin, A.E.; Yvon, A.; Collard, E. [STMicroelectronics, 16 Rue Pierre et Marie Curie, BP 7155, 37071 Tours (France); Cordier, Y. [CRHEA-CNRS, Rue Bernard Grégory, Sophia Antipolis, 06560 Valbonne (France); Alquier, D. [GREMAN UMR 7347-Université de Tours, 10 Rue Thales de Milet, BP 7155, 37071 Tours (France)

    2016-04-01

    Two-dimensional imaging of dopant profiles for n and p-type regions are relevant for the development of new power semiconductors, especially for gallium nitride (GaN) for which classical profiling techniques are not adapted. This is a challenging task since it needs a technique with simultaneously good sensitivity, high spatial resolution and high dopant gradient resolution. To face these challenges, scanning capacitance microscopy combined with Atomic Force Microscopy is a good candidate, presenting reproducible results, as demonstrated in literature. In this work, we attempt to distinguish reliably and qualitatively the various doping concentrations and type at p–n and unipolar junctions. For both p–n and unipolar junctions three kinds of samples were prepared and measured separately. The space-charge region of the p–n metallurgical junction, giving rise to different contrasts under SCM imaging, is clearly observed, enlightening the interest of the SCM technique.

  1. Equidistance of branch structure in capacitively coupled Josephson junctions model with diffusion current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukrinov, Yu.M. [BLTP, JINR, Dubna, Moscow Region, 141980 (Russian Federation) and Physical Technical Institute, Dushanbe 734063 (Tajikistan)]. E-mail: shukrinv@theor.jinr.ru; Mahfouzi, F. [Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences, P.O. Box 45195-1159, Zanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Seidel, P. [Institut fuer Festkorperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, D-07743 Jena (Germany)

    2006-11-01

    Branch structure in current-voltage characteristics of intrinsic Josephson junctions of HTSC is studied in the framework of two models: capacitively coupled Josephson junctions (CCJJ) model and CCJJ model with diffusion current (CCJJ + DC). We investigate the coupling dependence of the branch's slopes and demonstrate that the equidistance of the branch structure in CCJJ model is broken at enough small values of coupling parameter (at {alpha} << 1). We show that the inclusion of diffusion in the tunneling current through intrinsic Josephson junctions might restore the equidistance of the branch structure. Change of the current-voltage characteristics in CCJJ + DC model under variation of the coupling and McCumber parameters and effect of boundary conditions on the branch structure is analyzed.

  2. Equidistance of branch structure in capacitively coupled Josephson junctions model with diffusion current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukrinov, Yu. M.; Mahfouzi, F.; Seidel, P.

    2006-11-01

    Branch structure in current-voltage characteristics of intrinsic Josephson junctions of HTSC is studied in the framework of two models: capacitively coupled Josephson junctions (CCJJ) model and CCJJ model with diffusion current (CCJJ + DC). We investigate the coupling dependence of the branch’s slopes and demonstrate that the equidistance of the branch structure in CCJJ model is broken at enough small values of coupling parameter (at α ≪ 1). We show that the inclusion of diffusion in the tunneling current through intrinsic Josephson junctions might restore the equidistance of the branch structure. Change of the current-voltage characteristics in CCJJ + DC model under variation of the coupling and McCumber parameters and effect of boundary conditions on the branch structure is analyzed.

  3. Efficient electronic coupling and improved stability with dithiocarbamate-based molecular junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Wrochem, Florian; Gao, Deqing; Scholz, Frank; Nothofer, Heinz-Georg; Nelles, Gabriele; Wessels, Jurina M.

    2010-08-01

    Molecular electronic devices require stable and highly conductive contacts between the metal electrodes and molecules. Thiols and amines are widely used to attach molecules to metals, but they form poor electrical contacts and lack the robustness required for device applications. Here, we demonstrate that dithiocarbamates provide superior electrical contact and thermal stability when compared to thiols on metals. Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory show the presence of electronic states at 0.6 eV below the Fermi level of Au, which effectively reduce the charge injection barrier across the metal-molecule interface. Charge transport measurements across oligophenylene monolayers reveal that the conductance of terphenyl-dithiocarbamate junctions is two orders of magnitude higher than that of terphenyl-thiolate junctions. The stability and low contact resistance of dithiocarbamate-based molecular junctions represent a significant step towards the development of robust, organic-based electronic circuits.

  4. Performance evaluation of multi-junction solar cells by spatially resolved electroluminescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Lijing; Wu, Zhiming; Chen, Shanshan; Cao, Yiyan; Zhang, Yong; Li, Heng; Kang, Junyong

    2015-01-01

    An electroluminescence microscopy combined with a spectroscopy was developed to visually analyze multi-junction solar cells. Triple-junction solar cells with different conversion efficiencies were characterized by using this system. The results showed that the mechanical damages and material defects in solar cells can be clearly distinguished, indicating a high-resolution imaging. The external quantum efficiency (EQE) measurements demonstrated that different types of defects or damages impacted cell performance in various degrees and the electric leakage mostly degraded the EQE. Meanwhile, we analyzed the relationship between electroluminescence intensity and short-circuit current density J SC. The results indicated that the gray value of the electroluminescence image corresponding to the intensity was almost proportional to J SC. This technology provides a potential way to evaluate the current matching status of multi-junction solar cells.

  5. Spin-dependent thermoelectric effects in graphene-based superconductor junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiranvand, Razieh; Hamzehpour, Hossein

    2017-02-01

    Using the Bogoliubov-de Gennes formalism, we investigate the charge and spin-dependent thermoelectric effects in graphene-based superconductor junctions. The results demonstrate that despite normal-superconductor junctions, there is a temperature-dependent spin thermopower in both the graphene-based ferromagnetic-superconductor and ferromagnetic-Rashba spin-orbit region-superconductor junctions. It is also shown that in the presence of Rashba spin-orbit interaction, the charge and spin-dependent Seebeck coefficients reach their maximum up to 3.5 k B / e and 2.5 k B / e , respectively. Remarkably, these coefficients have a zero-point critical value with respect to the magnetic exchange field and chemical potential. This effect disappears when the Rashba coupling is absent. These results suggest that graphene-based superconductors can be used in spin-caloritronic devices.

  6. Transport measurements of negative refractive behavior in ballistic graphene hetero junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gil-Ho; Park, Geon-Hyoung; Kim, Minsoo; Lee, Jae Hyeong; Lee, Hu-Jong

    2015-03-01

    We investigated the electronic current refraction at p-n junctions (PNJs) in ballistic monolayer graphene. Given a peculiar band structure of the graphene, the transmission of electrons through a PNJ is predicted to be similar to the optical refraction at the boundary of metamaterials with negative refractive index. In consequence, electrons waves injected at a point in one side of a junction can be refocused into a single point in the other side of the junction, which demonstrates Veselago lensing for the electrons. By adopting high-yield dry-transfer technique, we fabricated fully ballistic graphene devices encapsulated by hexagonal boron nitrides with a local top gate. We will present the signatures of negative refractive transport behavior of electrons in PNJs and also discuss about the electronic current focusing in p-n-p heterojunctions in terms of Veselago lensing.

  7. Single wire radial junction photovoltaic devices fabricated using aluminum catalyzed silicon nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ke, Y; Weng, X J; Kendrick, C E; Eichfeld, S M; Redwing, J M [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Materials Research Institute, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Wang, X; Yu, Y A; Yoon, H P; Mayer, T S [Department of Electrical Engineering, Materials Research Institute, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Habib, Y M, E-mail: jmr31@psu.edu, E-mail: tsm2@psu.edu [Illuminex Corp., Lancaster, PA 17601 (United States)

    2011-11-04

    Single nanowire radial junction solar cell devices were fabricated using Si nanowires synthesized by Al-catalyzed vapor-liquid-solid growth of the p{sup +} core (Al auto-doping) and thin film deposition of the n{sup +}-shell at temperatures below 650 deg. C. Short circuit current densities of {approx} 11.7 mA cm{sup -2} were measured under 1-sun AM1.5G illumination, showing enhanced optical absorption. The power conversion efficiencies were limited to < 1% by the low open circuit voltage and fill factor of the devices, which was attributed to junction shunt leakage promoted by the high p{sup +}/n{sup +} doping. This demonstration of a radial junction device represents an important advance in the use of Al-catalyzed Si nanowire growth for low cost photovoltaics.

  8. Development of a liquid-junction/low-flow interface for phosphate buffer capillary electrophoresis mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fu-An; Huang, Ju-Li; Shen, Shang-Yu; Wang, Che-Wei; Her, Guor-Rong

    2009-04-01

    To alleviate ion suppression from phosphate buffer and to preserve separation integrity, a new capillary electrophoresis mass spectrometry (CE-MS) interface was developed. The interface consisted of a low-flow interface and a liquid junction. In this design, both the inlet reservoir and the liquid-junction reservoir were filled with phosphate running buffer. Because the phosphate anions in the column migrated toward the inlet reservoir (away from the electrospray ionization (ESI) source) the problem of ion suppression in ESI was avoided. The liquid junction was incorporated to eliminate issues of degraded separation observed when sheath liquid interfaces use different buffers for separation and MS analysis attributed to differences in anion velocity. The utility of the interface was demonstrated by the analysis of antihistamines at pH 3.5 and the analysis of perfluorocarboxylic acid at pH 9.5.

  9. Carbon nanotube and CdSe nanobelt Schottky junction solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Luhui; Jia, Yi; Wang, Shanshan; Li, Zhen; Ji, Chunyan; Wei, Jinquan; Zhu, Hongwei; Wang, Kunlin; Wu, Dehai; Shi, Enzheng; Fang, Ying; Cao, Anyuan

    2010-09-08

    Developing nanostructure junctions is a general and effective way for making photovoltaics. We report Schottky junction solar cells by coating carbon nanotube films on individual CdSe nanobelts with open-circuit voltages of 0.5 to 0.6 V and modest power-conversion efficiencies (0.45-0.72%) under AM 1.5G, 100 mW/cm(2) light condition. In our planar device structure, the CdSe nanobelt serves as a flat substrate to sustain a network of nanotubes, while the nanotube film forms Shottky junction with the underlying nanobelt at their interface and also makes a transparent electrode for the device. The nanotube-on-nanobelt solar cells can work either in front (nanotube side) or back (nanobelt side) illumination with stable performance in air. Our results demonstrate a promising way to develop large-area solar cells based on thin films of carbon nanotubes and semiconducting nanostructures.

  10. Efficient spin injection and giant magnetoresistance in Fe / MoS 2 / Fe junctions

    KAUST Repository

    Dolui, Kapildeb

    2014-07-02

    We demonstrate giant magnetoresistance in Fe/MoS2/Fe junctions by means of ab initio transport calculations. We show that junctions incorporating either a monolayer or a bilayer of MoS2 are metallic and that Fe acts as an efficient spin injector into MoS2 with an efficiency of about 45%. This is the result of the strong coupling between the Fe and S atoms at the interface. For junctions of greater thickness, a maximum magnetoresistance of ∼300% is obtained, which remains robust with the applied bias as long as transport is in the tunneling limit. A general recipe for improving the magnetoresistance in spin valves incorporating layered transition metal dichalcogenides is proposed. © 2014 American Physical Society.

  11. Spin-orbit Josephson ϕ0-junction in nanowire quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szombati, Daniel; Nadj-Perge, Stevan; Car, Diana; Bakkers, Erik; Kouwenhoven, Leo

    The Josephson effect describes supercurrent flowing through a junction connecting two superconducting leads by a thin barrier. This current is driven by a superconducting phase difference ϕ between the leads and it is strictly zero when ϕ vanishes, due to the chiral and time reversal symmetry of the Cooper pair tunneling process. Only if these underlying symmetries are broken the supercurrent for ϕ = 0 may be finite. This corresponds to a ground state of the junction being offset by a phase ϕ0. Here, for the first time, we report such Josephson ϕ0-junction. Our realization is based on a nanowire quantum dot. We use a quantum interferometer device in order to investigate phase offsets and demonstrate that ϕ0 can be controlled by electrostatic gating. Our results have possible far reaching implications for superconducting flux and phase defined quantum bits as well as for exploring topological superconductivity in quantum dot systems.

  12. Structure-Property Relationships in Atomic-Scale Junctions: Histograms and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hybertsen, Mark S; Venkataraman, Latha

    2016-03-15

    Over the past 10 years, there has been tremendous progress in the measurement, modeling and understanding of structure-function relationships in single molecule junctions. Numerous research groups have addressed significant scientific questions, directed both to conductance phenomena at the single molecule level and to the fundamental chemistry that controls junction functionality. Many different functionalities have been demonstrated, including single-molecule diodes, optically and mechanically activated switches, and, significantly, physical phenomena with no classical analogues, such as those based on quantum interference effects. Experimental techniques for reliable and reproducible single molecule junction formation and characterization have led to this progress. In particular, the scanning tunneling microscope based break-junction (STM-BJ) technique has enabled rapid, sequential measurement of large numbers of nanoscale junctions allowing a statistical analysis to readily distinguish reproducible characteristics. Harnessing fundamental link chemistry has provided the necessary chemical control over junction formation, enabling measurements that revealed clear relationships between molecular structure and conductance characteristics. Such link groups (amines, methylsuflides, pyridines, etc.) maintain a stable lone pair configuration that selectively bonds to specific, undercoordinated transition metal atoms available following rupture of a metal point contact in the STM-BJ experiments. This basic chemical principle rationalizes the observation of highly reproducible conductance signatures. Subsequently, the method has been extended to probe a variety of physical phenomena ranging from basic I-V characteristics to more complex properties such as thermopower and electrochemical response. By adapting the technique to a conducting cantilever atomic force microscope (AFM-BJ), simultaneous measurement of the mechanical characteristics of nanoscale junctions as they

  13. Preface: Charge transport in nanoscale junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Tim; Kornyshev, Alexei; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2008-09-01

    Understanding the fundamentals of nanoscale charge transfer is pivotal for designing future nano-electronic devices. Such devices could be based on individual or groups of molecular bridges, nanotubes, nanoparticles, biomolecules and other 'active' components, mimicking wire, diode and transistor functions. These have operated in various environments including vacuum, air and condensed matter, in two- or three-electrode configurations, at ultra-low and room temperatures. Interest in charge transport in ultra-small device components has a long history and can be dated back to Aviram and Ratner's letter in 1974 (Chem. Phys. Lett. 29 277-83). So why is there a necessity for a special issue on this subject? The area has reached some degree of maturity, and even subtle geometric effects in the nanojunction and noise features can now be resolved and rationalized based on existing theoretical concepts. One purpose of this special issue is thus to showcase various aspects of nanoscale and single-molecule charge transport from experimental and theoretical perspectives. The main principles have 'crystallized' in our minds, but there is still a long way to go before true single-molecule electronics can be implemented. Major obstacles include the stability of electronic nanojunctions, reliable operation at room temperature, speed of operation and, last but not least, integration into large networks. A gradual transition from traditional silicon-based electronics to devices involving a single (or a few) molecule(s) therefore appears to be more viable from technologic and economic perspectives than a 'quantum leap'. As research in this area progresses, new applications emerge, e.g. with a view to characterizing interfacial charge transfer at the single-molecule level in general. For example, electrochemical experiments with individual enzyme molecules demonstrate that catalytic processes can be studied with nanometre resolution, offering a route towards optimizing biosensors at

  14. Ballistic transport in InSb Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damasco, John Jeffrey; Gill, Stephen; Car, Diana; Bakkers, Erik; Mason, Nadya

    We present transport measurements on Josephson junctions consisting of InSb nanowires contacted by Al at various junction lengths. Junction behavior as a function of gate voltage, electric field, and magnetic field is discussed. We show that short junctions behave as 1D quantum wires, exhibiting quantized conductance steps. In addition, we show how Josephson behavior changes as transport evolves from ballistic to diffusive as a function of contact spacing.

  15. Dynamics near Resonance Junctions in Hamiltonian Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Goto, S; Goto, Shin-itiro; Nozaki, Kazuhiro

    1999-01-01

    An approximate Poincare map near equally strong multiple resonances is reduced by means the method of averaging. Near the resonance junction of three degrees of freedom, we find that some homoclinic orbits ``whiskers'' in single resonance lines survive and form nearly periodic orbits, each of which looks like a pair of homoclinic orbits.

  16. Polyphosphonium-based ion bipolar junction transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielsson, Erik O; Tybrandt, Klas; Berggren, Magnus

    2014-11-01

    Advancements in the field of electronics during the past few decades have inspired the use of transistors in a diversity of research fields, including biology and medicine. However, signals in living organisms are not only carried by electrons but also through fluxes of ions and biomolecules. Thus, in order to implement the transistor functionality to control biological signals, devices that can modulate currents of ions and biomolecules, i.e., ionic transistors and diodes, are needed. One successful approach for modulation of ionic currents is to use oppositely charged ion-selective membranes to form so called ion bipolar junction transistors (IBJTs). Unfortunately, overall IBJT device performance has been hindered due to the typical low mobility of ions, large geometries of the ion bipolar junction materials, and the possibility of electric field enhanced (EFE) water dissociation in the junction. Here, we introduce a novel polyphosphonium-based anion-selective material into npn-type IBJTs. The new material does not show EFE water dissociation and therefore allows for a reduction of junction length down to 2 μm, which significantly improves the switching performance of the ion transistor to 2 s. The presented improvement in speed as well the simplified design will be useful for future development of advanced iontronic circuits employing IBJTs, for example, addressable drug-delivery devices.

  17. Flux interactions on stacked Josephson junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scott, Alwyn C.; A., Petraglia

    1996-01-01

    Perturbation methods are used to study the dynamics of locked fluxon modes on stacked Josephson junctions and single crystals of certain high-T-c, superconductors. Two limiting cases are considered: (i) The nonlinear diffusion regime in which fluxon dynamics are dominated by energy exchange betwe...

  18. Defect formation in long Josephson junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gordeeva, Anna; Pankratov, Andrey

    2010-01-01

    We study numerically a mechanism of vortex formation in a long Josephson junction within the framework of the one-dimensional sine-Gordon model. This mechanism is switched on below the critical temperature. It is shown that the number of fluxons versus velocity of cooling roughly scales according...

  19. Gap junction diseases of the skin.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steensel, M.A.M. van

    2004-01-01

    Gap junctions are intercellular channels that allow the passage of water, ions, and small molecules. They are involved in quick, short-range messaging between cells and are found in skin, nervous tissue, heart, and muscle. An increasing number of hereditary skin disorders appear to be caused by muta

  20. Gap junctions-guards of excitability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stroemlund, Line Waring; Jensen, Christa Funch; Qvortrup, Klaus;

    2015-01-01

    Cardiomyocytes are connected by mechanical and electrical junctions located at the intercalated discs (IDs). Although these structures have long been known, it is becoming increasingly clear that their components interact. This review describes the involvement of the ID in electrical disturbances...

  1. Fluxon density waves in long Josephson junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, O. H.; Ustinov, A. V.; Pedersen, Niels Falsig

    1993-01-01

    Numerical simulations of the multiple fluxon dynamics stimulated by an external oscillating force applied at a boundary of a long Josephson junction are presented. The calculated IV characteristics agree well with a recent experimental observation of rf-induced satellite flux-flow steps. The volt...... density waves....

  2. Transmembrane potentials of canine AV junctional tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, W W

    1986-06-01

    The atrioventricular (AV) junction comprises the AV node, His bundle (HB), and specialized tissues proximal to the node called paranodal fibers (PNF). In the present study, an in vitro, dissection-exposed canine right atrial (RA), transitional fiber (TF), AV junctional preparation was used. The TF and PNF formed a pathway running along the base of the septal cusp of the tricuspid valve (SCTV). In the first experiment, impulses elicited at the RA were monitored to propagate sequentially through the TF, PNF, AV node, and then the HB. This functional evidence supports the concept that a conduction pathway connecting the RA and the AV node exists along the base of the SCTV. This internodal pathway is referred to as the septal cusp pathway. In another experiment, transmembrane potentials and Vmax were determined on each of the AV junctional tissues. Results showed that PNF had the lowest Vmax (2.5 V/sec), followed by AV node (7.0 V/sec) and HB (33 V/sec). This finding showed that PNF, and not the AV node, has the lowest Vmax, suggesting that the PNF has the lowest conductivity among the AV junctional tissues, and this study advances our understanding on the mechanism of AV conduction delay in dog hearts.

  3. Lateral junction dynamics lead the way out.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrndt, Martin; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2014-02-01

    Epithelial cell layers need to be tightly regulated to maintain their integrity and correct function. Cell integration into epithelial sheets is now shown to depend on the N-WASP-regulated stabilization of cortical F-actin, which generates distinct patterns of apical-lateral contractility at E-cadherin-based cell-cell junctions.

  4. Soliton excitations in Josephson tunnel junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomdahl, P. S.; Sørensen, O. H.; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    1982-01-01

    on the Nth ZFS yields the frequency Nf1 Coexistence of two adjacent frequencies is found on the third ZFS of the longer junction (L / λJ=6) in a narrow range of bias current as also found in the experiments. Small asymmetries in the experimental environment, a weak magnetic field, e.g., is introduced via...

  5. Gap junction diseases of the skin.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steensel, M.A.M. van

    2004-01-01

    Gap junctions are intercellular channels that allow the passage of water, ions, and small molecules. They are involved in quick, short-range messaging between cells and are found in skin, nervous tissue, heart, and muscle. An increasing number of hereditary skin disorders appear to be caused by muta

  6. Fluxon Dynamics in Elliptic Annular Josephson Junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monaco, Roberto; Mygind, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the dynamics of a magnetic flux quantum (current vortex) trapped in a current-biased long planar elliptic annular Josephson tunnel junction. The system is modeled by a perturbed sine-Gordon equation that determines the spatial and temporal behavior of the phase difference across the tu...

  7. Intercellular junctions in nerve-free hydra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McDowall, A W; Grimmelikhuijzen, C J

    1980-01-01

    with particles in an "enplaque conformation appearing as a raised plateau on the E-face or as a depression on the P-face; (ii) structures morphologically similar to gap junctions in rat liver, containing particles on the P-face and corresponding pits on the E-face, both having hexagonal packing with a lattice...

  8. All-carbon molecular tunnel junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Haijun; Bergren, Adam Johan; McCreery, Richard L

    2011-11-30

    This Article explores the idea of using nonmetallic contacts for molecular electronics. Metal-free, all-carbon molecular electronic junctions were fabricated by orienting a layer of organic molecules between two carbon conductors with high yield (>90%) and good reproducibility (rsd of current density at 0.5 V carbon devices exhibit current density-voltage (J-V) behavior similar to those with metallic Cu top contacts. However, the all-carbon devices display enhanced stability to bias extremes and greatly improved thermal stability. Completed carbon/nitroazobenzene(NAB)/carbon junctions can sustain temperatures up to 300 °C in vacuum for 30 min and can be scanned at ±1 V for at least 1.2 × 10(9) cycles in air at 100 °C without a significant change in J-V characteristics. Furthermore, these all-carbon devices can withstand much higher voltages and current densities than can Cu-containing junctions, which fail upon oxidation and/or electromigration of the copper. The advantages of carbon contacts stem mainly from the strong covalent bonding in the disordered carbon materials, which resists electromigration or penetration into the molecular layer, and provides enhanced stability. These results highlight the significance of nonmetallic contacts for molecular electronics and the potential for integration of all-carbon molecular junctions with conventional microelectronics.

  9. Mesh Currents and Josephson Junction Arrays

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    A simple but accurate mesh current analysis is performed on a XY model and on a SIMF model to derive the equations for a Josephson junction array. The equations obtained here turn out to be different from other equations already existing in the literature. Moreover, it is shown that the two models come from an unique hidden structure

  10. Neural progenitor cells isolated from the subventricular zone present hemichannel activity and form functional gap junctions with glial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocío eTalaverón

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The postnatal subventricular zone lining the walls of the lateral ventricles contains neural progenitor cells (NPCs that generate new olfactory bulb interneurons. Communication via gap junctions between cells in the subventricular zone is involved in NPC proliferation and in neuroblast migration towards the olfactory bulb. Subventricular zone NPCs can be expanded in vitro in the form of neurospheres that can be used for transplantation purposes after brain injury. We have previously reported that neurosphere-derived NPCs form heterocellular gap junctions with host glial cells when they are implanted after mechanical injury. To analyze functionality of NPC-glial cell gap junctions we performed dye coupling experiments in co-cultures of subventricular zone NPCs with astrocytes or microglia. Neurosphere-derived cells expressed mRNA for at least the hemichannel/gap junction channel proteins connexin 26 (Cx26, Cx43, Cx45 and pannexin 1. Dye coupling experiments revealed that gap junctional communication occurred among neurosphere cells (incidence of coupling: 100%. Moreover, hemichannel activity was also detected in neurosphere cells as evaluated in time-lapse measurements of ethidium bromide uptake. Heterocellular coupling between NPCs and glial cells was evidenced in co-cultures of neurospheres with astrocytes (incidence of coupling: 91.0 ± 4.7% or with microglia (incidence of coupling: 71.9 ± 6.7%. Dye coupling in neurospheres and in co-cultures was inhibited by octanol, a gap junction blocker. Altogether, these results suggest the existence of functional hemichannels and gap junction channels in postnatal subventricular zone neurospheres. In addition, they demonstrate that subventricular zone-derived NPCs can establish functional gap junctions with astrocytes or microglia. Therefore, cell-cell communication via gap junctions and hemichannels with host glial cells might subserve a role in the functional integration of NPCs after implantation in

  11. Neural progenitor cells isolated from the subventricular zone present hemichannel activity and form functional gap junctions with glial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talaverón, Rocío; Fernández, Paola; Escamilla, Rosalba; Pastor, Angel M; Matarredona, Esperanza R; Sáez, Juan C

    2015-01-01

    The postnatal subventricular zone (SVZ) lining the walls of the lateral ventricles contains neural progenitor cells (NPCs) that generate new olfactory bulb interneurons. Communication via gap junctions between cells in the SVZ is involved in NPC proliferation and in neuroblast migration towards the olfactory bulb. SVZ NPCs can be expanded in vitro in the form of neurospheres that can be used for transplantation purposes after brain injury. We have previously reported that neurosphere-derived NPCs form heterocellular gap junctions with host glial cells when they are implanted after mechanical injury. To analyze functionality of NPC-glial cell gap junctions we performed dye coupling experiments in co-cultures of SVZ NPCs with astrocytes or microglia. Neurosphere-derived cells expressed mRNA for at least the hemichannel/gap junction channel proteins connexin 26 (Cx26), Cx43, Cx45 and pannexin 1 (Panx1). Dye coupling experiments revealed that gap junctional communication occurred among neurosphere cells (incidence of coupling: 100%). Moreover, hemichannel activity was also detected in neurosphere cells as evaluated in time-lapse measurements of ethidium bromide uptake. Heterocellular coupling between NPCs and glial cells was evidenced in co-cultures of neurospheres with astrocytes (incidence of coupling: 91.0 ± 4.7%) or with microglia (incidence of coupling: 71.9 ± 6.7%). Dye coupling in neurospheres and in co-cultures was inhibited by octanol, a gap junction blocker. Altogether, these results suggest the existence of functional hemichannels and gap junction channels in postnatal SVZ neurospheres. In addition, they demonstrate that SVZ-derived NPCs can establish functional gap junctions with astrocytes or microglia. Therefore, cell-cell communication via gap junctions and hemichannels with host glial cells might subserve a role in the functional integration of NPCs after implantation in the damaged brain.

  12. Neural progenitor cells isolated from the subventricular zone present hemichannel activity and form functional gap junctions with glial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talaverón, Rocío; Fernández, Paola; Escamilla, Rosalba; Pastor, Angel M.; Matarredona, Esperanza R.; Sáez, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    The postnatal subventricular zone (SVZ) lining the walls of the lateral ventricles contains neural progenitor cells (NPCs) that generate new olfactory bulb interneurons. Communication via gap junctions between cells in the SVZ is involved in NPC proliferation and in neuroblast migration towards the olfactory bulb. SVZ NPCs can be expanded in vitro in the form of neurospheres that can be used for transplantation purposes after brain injury. We have previously reported that neurosphere-derived NPCs form heterocellular gap junctions with host glial cells when they are implanted after mechanical injury. To analyze functionality of NPC-glial cell gap junctions we performed dye coupling experiments in co-cultures of SVZ NPCs with astrocytes or microglia. Neurosphere-derived cells expressed mRNA for at least the hemichannel/gap junction channel proteins connexin 26 (Cx26), Cx43, Cx45 and pannexin 1 (Panx1). Dye coupling experiments revealed that gap junctional communication occurred among neurosphere cells (incidence of coupling: 100%). Moreover, hemichannel activity was also detected in neurosphere cells as evaluated in time-lapse measurements of ethidium bromide uptake. Heterocellular coupling between NPCs and glial cells was evidenced in co-cultures of neurospheres with astrocytes (incidence of coupling: 91.0 ± 4.7%) or with microglia (incidence of coupling: 71.9 ± 6.7%). Dye coupling in neurospheres and in co-cultures was inhibited by octanol, a gap junction blocker. Altogether, these results suggest the existence of functional hemichannels and gap junction channels in postnatal SVZ neurospheres. In addition, they demonstrate that SVZ-derived NPCs can establish functional gap junctions with astrocytes or microglia. Therefore, cell-cell communication via gap junctions and hemichannels with host glial cells might subserve a role in the functional integration of NPCs after implantation in the damaged brain. PMID:26528139

  13. Cascade of parametric resonances in coupled Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukrinov, Yu. M.; Azemtsa-Donfack, H.; Rahmonov, I. R.; Botha, A. E.

    2016-06-01

    We found that the coupled system of Josephson junctions under external electromagnetic radiation demonstrates a cascade of parametric instabilities. These instabilities appear along the IV characteristics within bias current intervals corresponding to Shapiro step subharmonics and lead to charging in the superconducting layers. The amplitudes of the charge oscillations increase with increasing external radiation power. We demonstrate the existence of longitudinal plasma waves at the corresponding bias current values. An essential advantage of the parametric instabilities in the case of subharmonics is the lower amplitude of radiation that is needed for the creation of the longitudinal plasma wave. This fact gives a unique possibility to create and control longitudinal plasma waves in layered superconductors. We propose a novel experiment for studying parametric instabilities and the charging of superconducting layers based on the simultaneous variation of the bias current and radiation amplitude.

  14. Orthogonally modulated molecular transport junctions for resettable electronic logic gates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fanben; Hervault, Yves-Marie; Shao, Qi; Hu, Benhui; Norel, Lucie; Rigaut, Stéphane; Chen, Xiaodong

    2014-01-01

    Individual molecules have been demonstrated to exhibit promising applications as functional components in the fabrication of computing nanocircuits. Based on their advantage in chemical tailorability, many molecular devices with advanced electronic functions have been developed, which can be further modulated by the introduction of external stimuli. Here, orthogonally modulated molecular transport junctions are achieved via chemically fabricated nanogaps functionalized with dithienylethene units bearing organometallic ruthenium fragments. The addressable and stepwise control of molecular isomerization can be repeatedly and reversibly completed with a judicious use of the orthogonal optical and electrochemical stimuli to reach the controllable switching of conductivity between two distinct states. These photo-/electro-cooperative nanodevices can be applied as resettable electronic logic gates for Boolean computing, such as a two-input OR and a three-input AND-OR. The proof-of-concept of such logic gates demonstrates the possibility to develop multifunctional molecular devices by rational chemical design.

  15. Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The U.S. Department of Energy Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) provides a collaborative, shared infrastructure to...

  16. Zero-voltage nondegenerate parametric mode in Josephson tunnel junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Niels Falsig

    1976-01-01

    A new parametric mode in a Josephson tunnel junction biased in the zero-voltage mode is suggested. It is a nondegenerate parametric excitation where the junction plasma resonance represents the input circuit, and a junction geometrical resonance represents the idler circuit. This nondegenerate mo...... for such a coupling. Journal of Applied Physics is copyrighted by The American Institute of Physics....

  17. Systematic study of shallow junction formation on germanium substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellings, Geert; Rosseel, Erik; Clarysse, Trudo

    2011-01-01

    Published results on Ge junctions are benchmarked systematically using RS–XJ plots. The electrical activation level required to meet the ITRS targets is calculated. Additionally, new results are presented on shallow furnace-annealed B junctions and shallow laser-annealed As junctions. Co-implanti...

  18. Long Josephson Junction Stack Coupled to a Cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Søren Peder; Pedersen, Niels Falsig; Groenbech-Jensen, N.

    2007-01-01

    A stack of inductively coupled long Josephson junctions are modeled as a system of coupled sine-Gordon equations. One boundary of the stack is coupled electrically to a resonant cavity. With one fluxon in each Josephson junction, the inter-junction fluxon forces are repulsive. We look at a possible...

  19. Structure Stability of Ⅰ-Type Carbon Nanotube Junctions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏丹; 袁喆; 李家明

    2002-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes with junctions may play an important role in future ‘nanoelectronics' and future ‘nano devices'.In particular, junctions constructed with metal and semiconducting nanotubes have potential applications. Basedon the orthogonal tight-binding molecular dynamics method, we present our study of the structure stability ofI-type carbon nanotube junctions.

  20. Toy Demonstrator's "VISIT" Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenstein, Phyllis

    The role of the toy demonstrator in a home-based, mother-involved intervention effort (Verbal Interaction Project) is presented in this handbook for staff members. It is believed that the prerequisites for functioning in the toy demonstrator's role are a sense of responsibility, patience with the children and their mothers, and willingness to be…

  1. Levitation Kits Demonstrate Superconductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthy, Ward

    1987-01-01

    Describes the "Project 1-2-3" levitation kit used to demonstrate superconductivity. Summarizes the materials included in the kit. Discusses the effect demonstrated and gives details on how to obtain kits. Gives an overview of the documentation that is included. (CW)

  2. Kinetics and Catalysis Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconer, John L.; Britten, Jerald A.

    1984-01-01

    Eleven videotaped kinetics and catalysis demonstrations are described. Demonstrations include the clock reaction, oscillating reaction, hydrogen oxidation in air, hydrogen-oxygen explosion, acid-base properties of solids, high- and low-temperature zeolite reactivity, copper catalysis of ammonia oxidation and sodium peroxide decomposition, ammonia…

  3. Better Ira Remsen Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalby, David K.; Maynard, James H.; Moore, John W.

    2011-01-01

    Many versions of the classic Ira Remsen experience involving copper and concentrated nitric acid have been used as lecture demonstrations. Remsen's original reminiscence from 150 years ago is included in the Supporting Information, and his biography can be found on the Internet. This article presents a new version that makes the demonstration more…

  4. Levitation Kits Demonstrate Superconductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthy, Ward

    1987-01-01

    Describes the "Project 1-2-3" levitation kit used to demonstrate superconductivity. Summarizes the materials included in the kit. Discusses the effect demonstrated and gives details on how to obtain kits. Gives an overview of the documentation that is included. (CW)

  5. Isolation, Culture, and Immunostaining of Skeletal Muscle Myofibers from Wildtype and Nestin-GFP Mice as a Means to Analyze Satellite Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuelsatz, Pascal; Keire, Paul; Yablonka-Reuveni, Zipora

    2017-01-01

    Multinucleated myofibers, the functional contractile units of adult skeletal muscle, harbor mononuclear Pax7(+) myogenic progenitors on their surface between the myofiber basal lamina and plasmalemma. These progenitors, known as satellite cells, are the primary myogenic stem cells in adult muscle. This chapter describes our laboratory protocols for isolating, culturing, and immunostaining intact myofibers from mouse skeletal muscle as a means for studying satellite cell dynamics. The first protocol discusses myofiber isolation from the flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) muscle. These short myofibers are plated in dishes coated with PureCol collagen (formerly known as Vitrogen) and maintained in a mitogen-poor medium (± supplemental growth factors). Employing such conditions, satellite cells remain at the surface of the parent myofiber while synchronously undergoing a limited number of proliferative cycles and rapidly differentiate. The second protocol discusses the isolation of longer myofibers from the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle. These EDL myofibers are routinely plated individually as adherent myofibers in wells coated with Matrigel and maintained in a mitogen-rich medium, conditions in which satellite cells migrate away from the parent myofiber, proliferate extensively, and generate numerous differentiating progeny. Alternatively, these EDL myofibers can be plated as non-adherent myofibers in uncoated wells and maintained in a mitogen-poor medium (± supplemental growth factors), conditions that retain satellite cell progeny at the myofiber niche similar to the FDB myofiber cultures. However, the adherent myofiber format is our preferred choice for monitoring satellite cells in freshly isolated (Time 0) myofibers. We conclude this chapter by promoting the Nestin-GFP transgenic mouse as an efficient tool for direct analysis of satellite cells in isolated myofibers. While satellite cells have been often detected by their expression of the Pax7 protein or

  6. The Carboxyl Tail of Connexin32 Regulates Gap Junction Assembly in Human Prostate and Pancreatic Cancer Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoch, Parul; Mitra, Shalini; Ray, Anuttoma; Kelsey, Linda; Roberts, Brett J.; Wahl, James K.; Johnson, Keith R.; Mehta, Parmender P.

    2015-01-01

    Connexins, the constituent proteins of gap junctions, are transmembrane proteins. A connexin (Cx) traverses the membrane four times and has one intracellular and two extracellular loops with the amino and carboxyl termini facing the cytoplasm. The transmembrane and the extracellular loop domains are highly conserved among different Cxs, whereas the carboxyl termini, often called the cytoplasmic tails, are highly divergent. We have explored the role of the cytoplasmic tail of Cx32, a Cx expressed in polarized and differentiated cells, in regulating gap junction assembly. Our results demonstrate that compared with the full-length Cx32, the cytoplasmic tail-deleted Cx32 is assembled into small gap junctions in human pancreatic and prostatic cancer cells. Our results further document that the expression of the full-length Cx32 in cells, which express the tail-deleted Cx32, increases the size of gap junctions, whereas the expression of the tail-deleted Cx32 in cells, which express the full-length Cx32, has the opposite effect. Moreover, we show that the tail is required for the clustering of cell-cell channels and that in cells expressing the tail-deleted Cx32, the expression of cell surface-targeted cytoplasmic tail alone is sufficient to enhance the size of gap junctions. Our live-cell imaging data further demonstrate that gap junctions formed of the tail-deleted Cx32 are highly mobile compared with those formed of full-length Cx32. Our results suggest that the cytoplasmic tail of Cx32 is not required to initiate the assembly of gap junctions but for their subsequent growth and stability. Our findings suggest that the cytoplasmic tail of Cx32 may be involved in regulating the permeability of gap junctions by regulating their size. PMID:25548281

  7. Superconducting tunnel junctions as direct detectors for submillimeter astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teufel, John Daniel

    This thesis presents measurements on the of performance of superconducting tunnel junctions (STJ) as direct detectors for submillimeter radiation. Over the past several decades, STJ's have been successfully implemented as energy-resolving detectors of X-ray and optical photons. This work extends their application to ultra-sensitive direct detection of photons near 100 GHz. The focus of this research is to integrate the detector with a readout that is sensitive, fast, and able to be scaled for use in large format arrays. We demonstrate the performance of a radio frequency single electron transistor (RF-SET) configured as a transimpedance current amplifier as one such readout. Unlike traditional semiconductor amplifiers, the RF-SET is compatible with cryogenic operation and naturally lends itself to frequency domain multiplexing. This research progressed to the invention of RF-STJ, whereby the same RF reflectometry as used in the RF-SET is applied directly to the detector junction. This results in a greatly simplified design that preserves many of the advantages of the RF-SET while achieving comparable sensitivity. These experiments culminate in calibration of the detector with an on-chip, mesoscopic noise source. Millimeter wave Johnson noise from a gold microbridge illuminates the detector in situ. This allows for direct measurement of the "optical" properties of the detector and its RF readout, including the response time, responsivity and sensitivity.

  8. Diffusion current in a system of coupled Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukrinov, Yu. M.; Rahmonov, I. R.

    2012-08-01

    The role of a diffusion current in the phase dynamics of a system of coupled Josephson junctions (JJs) has been analyzed. It is shown that, by studying the temporal dependences of the superconducting, quasi-particle, diffusion, and displacement currents and the dependences of average values of these currents on the total current, it is possible to explain the main features of the current-voltage characteristic (CVC) of the system. The effect of a diffusion current on the character of CVC branching in the vicinity of a critical current and in the region of hysteresis, as well as on the part of CVC branch corresponding to a parametric resonance in the system is demonstrated. A clear interpretation of the differences in the character of CVC branching in a model of capacitively coupled JJs (CCJJ model) and a model of capacitive coupling with diffusion current (CCJJ+DC model) is proposed. It is shown that a decrease in the diffusion current in a JJ leads to the switching of this junction to an oscillating state. The results of model calculations are qualitatively consistent with the experimental data.

  9. Diffusion current in a system of coupled Josephson junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukrinov, Yu. M., E-mail: shukrinv@theor.jinr.ru; Rahmonov, I. R. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)

    2012-08-15

    The role of a diffusion current in the phase dynamics of a system of coupled Josephson junctions (JJs) has been analyzed. It is shown that, by studying the temporal dependences of the superconducting, quasi-particle, diffusion, and displacement currents and the dependences of average values of these currents on the total current, it is possible to explain the main features of the current-voltage characteristic (CVC) of the system. The effect of a diffusion current on the character of CVC branching in the vicinity of a critical current and in the region of hysteresis, as well as on the part of CVC branch corresponding to a parametric resonance in the system is demonstrated. A clear interpretation of the differences in the character of CVC branching in a model of capacitively coupled JJs (CCJJ model) and a model of capacitive coupling with diffusion current (CCJJ+DC model) is proposed. It is shown that a decrease in the diffusion current in a JJ leads to the switching of this junction to an oscillating state. The results of model calculations are qualitatively consistent with the experimental data.

  10. Effect of microwave irradiation on parametric resonance in intrinsic Josephson junctions

    OpenAIRE

    Gaafar, Mahmoud; Shukrinov, Yury

    2012-01-01

    The effect of microwave irradiation on the phase dynamics of intrinsic Josephson junctions in high temperature superconductors is investigated. We demonstrate the influence of microwave's amplitude variation on the current-voltage characteristics and on the time dependence (temporal oscillations) of the electric charge in the superconducting layers. A remarkable changing of the longitudinal plasma wavelength at parametric resonance is shown. We demonstrate an effect of the microwave radiation...

  11. Effect of microwave irradiation on parametric resonance in intrinsic Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaafar, Mahmoud; Shukrinov, Yury

    2013-08-01

    The effect of microwave irradiation on the phase dynamics of intrinsic Josephson junctions in high temperature superconductors is investigated. We demonstrate the influence of microwave’s amplitude variation on the current-voltage characteristics and on the time dependence (temporal oscillations) of the electric charge in the superconducting layers. A remarkable changing of the longitudinal plasma wavelength at parametric resonance is shown. We demonstrate an effect of the microwave radiation on the width of the parametric resonance region.

  12. Planar Josephson tunnel junctions in a transverse magnetic field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monacoa, R.; Aarøe, Morten; Mygind, Jesper

    2007-01-01

    Traditionally, since the discovery of the Josephson effect in 1962, the magnetic diffraction pattern of planar Josephson tunnel junctions has been recorded with the field applied in the plane of the junction. Here we discuss the static junction properties in a transverse magnetic field where...... demagnetization effects imposed by the tunnel barrier and electrodes geometry are important. Measurements of the junction critical current versus magnetic field in planar Nb-based high-quality junctions with different geometry, size, and critical current density show that it is advantageous to use a transverse...

  13. The computation of first order moments on junction trees

    CERN Document Server

    Djuric, Milos B; Stankovic, Miomir S

    2012-01-01

    We review some existing methods for the computation of first order moments on junction trees using Shafer-Shenoy algorithm. First, we consider the problem of first order moments computation as vertices problem in junction trees. In this way, the problem is solved using the memory space of an order of the junction tree edge-set cardinality. After that, we consider two algorithms, Lauritzen-Nilsson algorithm, and Mau\\'a et al. algorithm, which computes the first order moments as the normalization problem in junction tree, using the memory space of an order of the junction tree leaf-set cardinality.

  14. Methanol Cannon Demonstrations Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolson, David A.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes two variations on the traditional methanol cannon demonstration. The first variation is a chain reaction using real metal chains. The second example involves using easily available components to produce sequential explosions that can be musical in nature. (AIM)

  15. TENCompetence tool demonstration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluijfhout, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Kluijfhout, E. (2009). TENCompetence tool demonstration. Presented at Zorgacademie Parkstad (Health Academy Parkstad), Limburg Leisure Academy, Life Long Learning Limburg and a number of regional educational institutions. May, 18, 2009, Heerlen, The Netherlands: Open University of the Netherlands, T

  16. Land Management Research Demonstration

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In 2002, Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge became one of the first Land Management and Research Demonstration (LMRD) sites. These sites are intended to serve as...

  17. Pancreaticopleural fistula : CT demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahm, Jin Kyeung [Chuncheon Medical Center, ChunChon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-03-01

    In patients with chronic pancreatitis, the pancreaticopleural fistula is known to cause recurrent exudative or hemorrhagic pleural effusions. These are often large in volume and require treatment, unlike the effusions in acute pancreatitis. Diagnosis can be made either by the finding of elevated pleural fluid amylase level or, using imaging studies, by the direct demonstration of the fistulous tract. We report two cases of pancreaticopleural fistula demonstrated by computed tomography.

  18. Education Payload Operation - Demonstrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keil, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Education Payload Operation - Demonstrations (EPO-Demos) are recorded video education demonstrations performed on the International Space Station (ISS) by crewmembers using hardware already onboard the ISS. EPO-Demos are videotaped, edited, and used to enhance existing NASA education resources and programs for educators and students in grades K-12. EPO-Demos are designed to support the NASA mission to inspire the next generation of explorers.

  19. Edible Astronomy Demonstrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubowich, Donald A.

    2007-12-01

    Astronomy demonstrations with edible ingredients are an effective way to increase student interest and knowledge of astronomical concepts. This approach has been successful with all age groups from elementary school through college students - and the students remember these demonstrations after they are presented. In this poster I describe edible demonstrations I have created to simulate the expansion of the universe (using big-bang chocolate chip cookies); differentiation during the formation of the Earth and planets (using chocolate or chocolate milk with marshmallows, cereal, candy pieces or nuts); and radioactivity/radioactive dating (using popcorn). Other possible demonstrations include: plate tectonics (crackers with peanut butter and jelly); convection (miso soup or hot chocolate); mud flows on Mars (melted chocolate poured over angel food cake); formation of the Galactic disk (pizza); formation of spiral arms (coffee with cream); the curvature of Space (Pringles); constellations patterns with chocolate chips and chocolate chip cookies; planet shaped cookies; star shaped cookies with different colored frostings; coffee or chocolate milk measurement of solar radiation; Oreo cookie lunar phases. Sometimes the students eat the results of the astronomical demonstrations. These demonstrations are an effective teaching tool and can be adapted for cultural, culinary, and ethnic differences among the students.

  20. Hybrid tunnel junction contacts to III-nitride light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Erin C.; Yonkee, Benjamin P.; Wu, Feng; Oh, Sang Ho; DenBaars, Steven P.; Nakamura, Shuji; Speck, James S.

    2016-02-01

    In this work, we demonstrate highly doped GaN p-n tunnel junction (TJ) contacts on III-nitride heterostructures where the active region of the device and the top p-GaN layers were grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition and highly doped n-GaN was grown by NH3 molecular beam epitaxy to form the TJ. The regrowth interface in these hybrid devices was found to have a high concentration of oxygen, which likely enhanced tunneling through the diode. For optimized regrowth, the best tunnel junction device had a total differential resistivity of 1.5 × 10-4 Ω cm2, including contact resistance. As a demonstration, a blue-light-emitting diode on a (20\\bar{2}\\bar{1}) GaN substrate with a hybrid tunnel junction and an n-GaN current spreading layer was fabricated and compared with a reference sample with a transparent conducting oxide (TCO) layer. The tunnel junction LED showed a lower forward operating voltage and a higher efficiency at a low current density than the TCO LED.

  1. Hybrid tunnel junction contacts to III–nitride light-emitting diodes

    KAUST Repository

    Young, Erin C.

    2016-01-26

    In this work, we demonstrate highly doped GaN p–n tunnel junction (TJ) contacts on III–nitride heterostructures where the active region of the device and the top p-GaN layers were grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition and highly doped n-GaN was grown by NH3 molecular beam epitaxy to form the TJ. The regrowth interface in these hybrid devices was found to have a high concentration of oxygen, which likely enhanced tunneling through the diode. For optimized regrowth, the best tunnel junction device had a total differential resistivity of 1.5 × 10−4 Ω cm2, including contact resistance. As a demonstration, a blue-light-emitting diode on a ($20\\\\bar{2}\\\\bar{1}$) GaN substrate with a hybrid tunnel junction and an n-GaN current spreading layer was fabricated and compared with a reference sample with a transparent conducting oxide (TCO) layer. The tunnel junction LED showed a lower forward operating voltage and a higher efficiency at a low current density than the TCO LED.

  2. Thermal transport across carbon nanotube-graphene covalent and van der Waals junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jingjing; Dong, Yalin; Fisher, Timothy; Ruan, Xiulin

    2015-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes and graphene are promising materials for thermal management applications due to their high thermal conductivities. However, their thermal properties are anisotropic, and the radial or cross-plane direction thermal conductivity is low. A 3D Carbon nanotube (CNT)-graphene structure has previously been proposed to address this limitation, and direct molecular dynamics simulations have been used to predict the associated thermal conductivity. In this work, by recognizing that thermal resistance primarily comes from CNT-graphene junctions, a simple network model of thermal transport in pillared graphene structure is developed. Using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics, the resistance across an individual CNT-graphene junction with sp2 covalent bonds is found to be around 6 ×10-11 m2K/W, which is significantly lower than typical values reported for planar interfaces between dissimilar materials. In contrast, the resistance across a van der Waals junction is about 4 ×10-8 m2K/W. Interestingly, when the CNT pillar length is small, the interfacial resistance of the sp2 covalent junction is found to decrease as the CNT pillar length decreases, suggesting the presence of coherence effects. To explain this intriguing trend, the junction thermal resistance is decomposed into interfacial region and boundary components, and it is found that while the boundary resistance has little dependence on the pillar length, the interfacial region resistance decreases as the pillar length decreases. This is explained by calculating the local phonon density of states (LDOS) of different regions near the boundary. The LDOS overlap between the interfacial region and the center region of CNT increases as the pillar length decreases, leading to the decrease of interfacial region resistance. The junction resistance Rj is eventually used in the network model to estimate the effective thermal conductivity, and the results agree well with direct MD simulation data, demonstrating the

  3. A supine cranio-spinal irradiation technique using moving field junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Karthick Raj; Sapru, Shantanu; Maria Das, K. J.; Basu, Ayan

    2016-12-01

    Aim: To demonstrate a simple technique of cranio-spinal irradiation (CSI) in supine position using inter fraction moving field junctions to feather out any potential hot and cold spots. Materials and Methods: Fifteen patients diagnosed with medulloblastoma were treated during the period February 2011 to June 2015 were included in this study. Out of fifteen patients in the study nine were male and 6 were female with a median age of 13.4 years (range 5-27 years). All the patients were positioned supine on CT simulation, immobilized using thermoplastic mask and aligned using room based laser system. Two parallel opposed lateral fields for the whole brain using an asymmetrical jaw with isocenter at C2 vertebral body. A posterior field also placed to cover the cervical and dorsal field using the same isocenter at C2. The second isocenter was placed at lumbar vertebral region to cover the remaining dorsal, lumbar and sacral region using an inter-fraction moving junction. Field-in-field and enhanced dynamic wedge used to homogeneous dose distribution when required. Results and Discussion: In this study, we found that only two patients failed in the primary site, no radiation myelitis or recurrences in the filed junctions were reported in these fifteen patients with a median follow-up of 36.4 months. The automated sequence of treatment plans with moving junctions in the comfortable supine position negating the need for manual junction matching or junction shifts avoiding potential treatment errors and also facilitating delivery of anesthesia where necessary.

  4. MoRe-based and MgB{sub 2} -based tunnel junctions and their characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaternik, V; Noskov, V; Chubatyy, V [Kurdyumov Institute for Metal Physics of National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Vernadskii boulevard 36, 02142 Kiev (Ukraine); Larkin, S [Concern ' Nauka' , Dovnar-Zapol' skii street 2/20, 03116 Kiev (Ukraine); Belogolovskii, M, E-mail: shaternik@mail.r [Donetsk Institute for Physics and Engineering, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 83114 Donetsk (Ukraine)

    2010-06-01

    Perspective Josephson Mo-Re alloy-oxide-Pb, MgB{sub 2}- oxide - Mo-Re alloy and Mo-Re alloy-normal metal-oxide- normal metal-Mo-Re alloy junctions have been fabricated and investigated. Thin ({approx}50-100 nm) MoRe superconducting films are deposited on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrates by using a dc magnetron sputtering of MoRe target. Thin ({approx}50-100 nm) MgB{sub 2} superconducting films are deposited on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrates by using e-beam evaporation of boron and thermal coevaporation of magnesium. To investigate a transparency spread for the fabricated junctions barriers the computer simulation of the measured quasiparticle I-V curves have been done in framework of the model of multiple Andreev reflections in double-barrier junction interfaces. It's demonstrated the investigated junctions can be described as highly asymmetric double-barrier Josephson junctions with great difference between the two barrier transparencies. Results of computer simulation of quasiparticles I-V curves of junctions are presented and discussed. The I{sub C}(T) characteristics, measured for Josephson heterostructures with different thickness of metal layer s and exposure dose E, essentially deviate from an Ambegaokar- Baratoff (A and B) I{sub C}(T) behavior and Kulik-Omelianchuck (K and O) curves, because of proximity effect caused by the comparatively high value of s (up to 100 nm).

  5. Connexin26 regulates assembly and maintenance of cochlear gap junction macromolecular complex for normal hearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Kazusaku; Fukunaga, Ichiro; Hatakeyama, Kaori; Ikeda, Katsuhisa

    2015-12-01

    Hereditary deafness affects about 1 in 2000 children and GJB2 gene mutation is most frequent cause for this disease in the world. GJB2 encodes connexin26 (Cx26), a component in cochlear gap junction. Recently, we found macromolecular change of gap junction plaques with two different types of Cx26 mutation as major classification of clinical case, one is a model of dominant negative type, Cx26R75W+ and the other is conditional gene deficient mouse, Cx26f/fP0Cre as a model for insufficiency of gap junction protein [6]. Gap junction composed mainly of Cx26 and Cx30 in wild type mice formed large planar gap junction plaques (GJP). In contrast, Cx26R75W+ and Cx26f/fP0Cre showed fragmented small round GJPs around the cell border. In Cx26f/fP0Cre, some of the cells with Cx26 expression due to their cellular mosaicism showed normal large GJP with Cx26 and Cx30 only at the cell junction site between two Cx26 positive cells. These indicate that bilateral Cx26 expressions from both adjacent cells are essential for the formation of the cochlear linear GJP, and it is not compensated by other cochlear Connexins such as Connexin30. In the present study, we demonstrated a new molecular pathology in most common hereditary deafness with different types of Connexin26 mutations, and this machinery can be a new target for drag design of hereditary deafness.

  6. String networks with junctions in competition models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avelino, P. P.; Bazeia, D.; Losano, L.; Menezes, J.; de Oliveira, B. F.

    2017-03-01

    In this work we give specific examples of competition models, with six and eight species, whose three-dimensional dynamics naturally leads to the formation of string networks with junctions, associated with regions that have a high concentration of enemy species. We study the two- and three-dimensional evolution of such networks, both using stochastic network and mean field theory simulations. If the predation, reproduction and mobility probabilities do not vary in space and time, we find that the networks attain scaling regimes with a characteristic length roughly proportional to t 1 / 2, where t is the physical time, thus showing that the presence of junctions, on its own, does not have a significant impact on their scaling properties.

  7. Vibrational Heat Transport in Molecular Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Dvira; Agarwalla, Bijay Kumar

    2016-05-01

    We review studies of vibrational energy transfer in a molecular junction geometry, consisting of a molecule bridging two heat reservoirs, solids or large chemical compounds. This setup is of interest for applications in molecular electronics, thermoelectrics, and nanophononics, and for addressing basic questions in the theory of classical and quantum transport. Calculations show that system size, disorder, structure, dimensionality, internal anharmonicities, contact interaction, and quantum coherent effects are factors that combine to determine the predominant mechanism (ballistic/diffusive), effectiveness (poor/good), and functionality (linear/nonlinear) of thermal conduction at the nanoscale. We review recent experiments and relevant calculations of quantum heat transfer in molecular junctions. We recount the Landauer approach, appropriate for the study of elastic (harmonic) phononic transport, and outline techniques that incorporate molecular anharmonicities. Theoretical methods are described along with examples illustrating the challenge of reaching control over vibrational heat conduction in molecules.

  8. String networks with junctions in competition models

    CERN Document Server

    Avelino, P P; Losano, L; Menezes, J; de Oliveira, B F

    2016-01-01

    In this work we give specific examples of competition models, with six and eight species, whose three-dimensional dynamics naturally leads to the formation of string networks with junctions, associated with regions that have a high concentration of enemy species. We study the two- and three-dimensional evolution of such networks, both using stochastic network and mean field theory simulations. If the predation, reproduction and mobility probabilities do not vary in space and time, we find that the networks attain scaling regimes with a characteristic length roughly proportional to $t^{1/2}$, where $t$ is the physical time, thus showing that the presence of junctions, on its own, does not have a significant impact on their scaling properties.

  9. Junction between surfaces of two topological insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Diptiman; Deb, Oindrila

    2012-02-01

    We study scattering from a line junction which separates the surfaces of two three-dimensional topological insulators; some aspects of this problem were recently studied in Takahashi and Murakami, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 166805 (2011). The velocities of the Dirac electrons on the two surfaces may be unequal and may even have opposite signs; in the latter case, we find that the electrons must, in general, go into the two-dimensional interface separating the two topological insulators. We also study what happens if the two surfaces are at an angle φ with respect to each other. We find in this case that there are bound states which propagate along the line junction with a velocity and direction of spin which depend on the bending angle φ.

  10. Current distributions in stripe Majorana junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osca, Javier; Llorenç, Serra

    2017-02-01

    We calculate current and density distributions in stripe (2D planar) junctions between normal and Majorana nanowires having a finite ( y) transverse length. In presence of a magnetic field with vertical and in-plane components, the y-symmetry of the charge current distribution in the normal lead changes strongly across the Majorana phase transition: from center-symmetric if a Majorana mode is present to laterally-shifted (as expected by the Hall effect) if the field is tilted such as to destroy the Majorana mode due to the projection rule. We compare quasi-particle and charge distributions of current and density, as well as spin magnetizations. The Majorana mode causes opposite spin accumulations on the transverse sides of the junction and the emergence of a spin current.

  11. Boson Josephson Junction with Trapped Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, S.; Smerzi, A.; Fantoni, S.; Shenoy, S. R.

    We consider coherent atomic tunneling between two weakly coupled Bose-Einstein condensates at T=0 in a double-well trap. The condensate dynamics of the macroscopic amplitudes in the two wells is modeled by two Gross-Pitaevskii equations (GPE) coupled by a tunneling matrix element. Analytic elliptic function solutions are obtained for the time evolution of the inter-well fractional population imbalance z(t) (related to the condensate phase difference) of the Boson Josephson junction (BJJ). Surprisingly, the neutral-atom BJJ shows (non-sinusoidal generalizations of) effects seen in charged-electron superconductor Josephson junctions (SJJ). The BJJ elliptic-function behavior has a singular dependence on a GPE parameter ratio Λ at a critical ratio Λ=Λc, beyond which a novel 'macroscopic quantum self-trapping' effect sets in with a non-zero time-averaged imbalance ≠0.

  12. Non-Lagrangian theories from brane junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, Ling [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden); Mitev, Vladimir [Humboldt Univ., Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Mathematik und Inst. fuer Physik; Pomoni, Elli [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group; Taki, Masato [RIKEN Nishina Center, Saitama (Japan). Mathematical Physics Lab.; Yagi, Futoshi [International School of Advanced Studies (SISSA), Trieste (Italy); INFN, Trieste (Italy); Korea Institute for Advanced Study (KIAS), Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    In this article we use 5-brane junctions to study the 5D T{sub N} SCFTs corresponding to the 5D N=1 uplift of the 4D N=2 strongly coupled gauge theories, which are obtained by compactifying N M5 branes on a sphere with three full punctures. Even though these theories have no Lagrangian description, by using the 5-brane junctions proposed by Benini, Benvenuti and Tachikawa, we are able to derive their Seiberg-Witten curves and Nekrasov partition functions. We cross-check our results with the 5D superconformal index proposed by Kim, Kim and Lee. Through the AGTW correspondence, we discuss the relations between 5D superconformal indices and n-point functions of the q-deformed W{sub N} Toda theories.

  13. An Important Member of Tight Junctions: Claudins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozlem Demirpence

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The tight junction (TJs, the most apically located of the intercellular junctional complexes, inhibits solute and water flow through the paracellular space, termed the %u201Cbarrier%u201D function. TJs participate in signal transduction mechanisms that regulate epithelial cell proliferation, gene expression, differentiation and morphogenesis. The claudin family of transmembrane proteins localized to the TJ. Loss of expression of Claudin causes of suppression TJs function. Recent studies have shown that altered levels of the different claudins may be related to invasion and progression of carcinoma cells in several primary neoplasms. A better knowledge of the mechanisms underlying carcinogenesis will likely result in the development of novel approaches for the diagnosis and therapy.

  14. Electron transport in doped fullerene molecular junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Milanpreet; Sawhney, Ravinder Singh; Engles, Derick

    The effect of doping on the electron transport of molecular junctions is analyzed in this paper. The doped fullerene molecules are stringed to two semi-infinite gold electrodes and analyzed at equilibrium and nonequilibrium conditions of these device configurations. The contemplation is done using nonequilibrium Green’s function (NEGF)-density functional theory (DFT) to evaluate its density of states (DOS), transmission coefficient, molecular orbitals, electron density, charge transfer, current, and conductance. We conclude from the elucidated results that Au-C16Li4-Au and Au-C16Ne4-Au devices behave as an ordinary p-n junction diode and a Zener diode, respectively. Moreover, these doped fullerene molecules do not lose their metallic nature when sandwiched between the pair of gold electrodes.

  15. Charge Transport Phenomena in Peptide Molecular Junctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Luchini

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS is a valuable in situ spectroscopic analysis technique that provides a direct portrait of the electron transport properties of a molecular species. In the past, IETS has been applied to small molecules. Using self-assembled nanoelectronic junctions, IETS was performed for the first time on a large polypeptide protein peptide in the phosphorylated and native form, yielding interpretable spectra. A reproducible 10-fold shift of the I/V characteristics of the peptide was observed upon phosphorylation. Phosphorylation can be utilized as a site-specific modification to alter peptide structure and thereby influence electron transport in peptide molecular junctions. It is envisioned that kinases and phosphatases may be used to create tunable systems for molecular electronics applications, such as biosensors and memory devices.

  16. Peltier Junction heats and cools car seat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottschalk, M.A.

    1994-10-10

    Electrically heated seats may soon become heated and cooled seats. The design called the CCS module exploits the heat-pump capability of a class of semiconductor thermoelectric devices (TEDs) known as Peltier Junction. Every CCS module contain two TEDs. Heating and cooling occurs through convection and conduction. The heart of the system is the thermoelectric heat pump. This is originally conceived as the sole heating/cooling options for a prototype electric vehicle.

  17. Internal dynamics of long Josephson junction oscillators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Peter Leth; Lomdahl, P. S.; Scott, Alwyn C.;

    1981-01-01

    Numerical computations on a sine-Gordon model of the Josephson junction fluxon oscillator are compared with experimental measurements. Good agreement is found for the voltage current characteristic, oscillator power output, and range of current bias over which oscillation is observed. Our numeric...... results imply a ''bunched-fluxon'' mode of oscillation at larger values of bias current. Applied Physics Letters is copyrighted by The American Institute of Physics....

  18. Decreased Vision and Junctional Scotoma from Pituicytoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Huynh

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Pituicytomas are rare neoplasms of the sellar region. We report a case of vision loss and a junctional scotoma in a 43-year-old woman caused by compression of the optic chiasm by a pituitary tumor. The morphological and immunohistochemical characteristics of the tumor were consistent with the diagnosis of pituicytoma. The tumor was debulked surgically, and the patient’s vision improved.

  19. Brownian refrigeration by hybrid tunnel junctions

    OpenAIRE

    Peltonen, J. T.; Helle, M.; Timofeev, A. V.; Solinas, P.; Hekking, F. W. J.; Pekola, Jukka P.

    2011-01-01

    Voltage fluctuations generated in a hot resistor can cause extraction of heat from a colder normal metal electrode of a hybrid tunnel junction between a normal metal and a superconductor. We extend the analysis presented in Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 210604 (2007) of this heat rectifying system, bearing resemblance to a Maxwell’s demon. Explicit analytic calculations show that the entropy of the total system is always increasing. We then consider a single-electron transistor configuration with two ...

  20. RADIOLOGICAL EVALUATION OF CRANIOVERTEBRAL JUNCTION ANOMALIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joji Reddy

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Detailed discussions of the CVJ are conspicuously absent in many standard textbooks and chapters addressing the skull or cervical spine, since it lies in between these regions . CVJ anomalies are common in India subcontinent. OBJECTIVES : To outline the normal anatomy and various abnormalities of craniovertebral junction. To evaluate the most common developmental and acquired craniovertebral junction abnormalities . CRANIOMETRY AND DIAGNOSIS: Radiological evaluation of CVJ requir es identification of only a few anatomic structures. Over the years multiple lines , planes and angles have been described for assessment of CVJ relationship , initially with radiography and later with polytomography. Two lines have remained particularly use ful for evaluation of CVJ relationship with virtually any imaging modality: the chamberlain`s line and weckenheim ’ s clivus base line . Two angles also continue to be useful: the welcher basal angle and atlanto occipital joint axis angle. PATIENTS AND METHOD S: The prospective study of craniovertebral junction anomalies was carried out at Kurnool medical college , Governament general hospital Kurnool from NOV 2012 to AUG 2014. The patients are subjected to clinical evaluation and radiological evaluation. OBSERV ATIONS AND RESULTS : In our study there is male predominance with male to female ratio of 2:1 . Majority of patients are in the age group of 11 - 40 (73.26%. The commonest symptom seen is weakness of extremities ( 70% with associated numbness (50%. On clinica l examination pyramidal tract involvement noticed in 70% of cases. Basilar invagination is the most common followed by Atlantoocoipital assimilation (40% and AAD (30% . CONCLUSION : Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are invalvable adjuncts to the plain radiographs in the evaluation of the craniovertebral junction anomalies. Chamberlain’s line and McGregor line are the most commonly applied craniometric measurements

  1. Interfacial capacitance effects in magnetic tunneling junctions

    CERN Document Server

    Landry, G; Du, J; Xiao, J Q

    2001-01-01

    We have investigated the AC transport properties of magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJ) in order to characterize interfacial properties. One such property is interfacial charge accumulation, which leads to a voltage drop in the electrodes of the MTJ and the measured capacitance differing from the geometrical capacitance. Through measurement of capacitance spectra, we have extracted an interfacial capacitance of 16 mu F/cm sup 2 per interface and a screening length of 0.55 A for FeNi electrodes.

  2. Solar renovation demonstration projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruun Joergensen, O. [ed.

    1998-10-01

    In the framework of the IEA SHC Programme, a Task on building renovation was initiated, `Task 20, Solar Energy in Building Renovation`. In a part of the task, Subtask C `Design of Solar Renovation Projects`, different solar renovation demonstration projects were developed. The objective of Subtask C was to demonstrate the application of advanced solar renovation concepts on real buildings. This report documents 16 different solar renovation demonstration projects including the design processes of the projects. The projects include the renovation of houses, schools, laboratories, and factories. Several solar techniques were used: building integrated solar collectors, glazed balconies, ventilated solar walls, transparent insulation, second skin facades, daylight elements and photovoltaic systems. These techniques are used in several simple as well as more complex system designs. (au)

  3. Magnetic tunnel junction based spintronic logic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyle, Andrew Paul

    The International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) predicts that complimentary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) based technologies will hit their last generation on or near the 16 nm node, which we expect to reach by the year 2025. Thus future advances in computational power will not be realized from ever-shrinking device sizes, but rather by 'outside the box' designs and new physics, including molecular or DNA based computation, organics, magnonics, or spintronic. This dissertation investigates magnetic logic devices for post-CMOS computation. Three different architectures were studied, each relying on a different magnetic mechanism to compute logic functions. Each design has it benefits and challenges that must be overcome. This dissertation focuses on pushing each design from the drawing board to a realistic logic technology. The first logic architecture is based on electrically connected magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) that allow direct communication between elements without intermediate sensing amplifiers. Two and three input logic gates, which consist of two and three MTJs connected in parallel, respectively were fabricated and are compared. The direct communication is realized by electrically connecting the output in series with the input and applying voltage across the series connections. The logic gates rely on the fact that a change in resistance at the input modulates the voltage that is needed to supply the critical current for spin transfer torque switching the output. The change in resistance at the input resulted in a voltage margin of 50--200 mV and 250--300 mV for the closest input states for the three and two input designs, respectively. The two input logic gate realizes the AND, NAND, NOR, and OR logic functions. The three input logic function realizes the Majority, AND, NAND, NOR, and OR logic operations. The second logic architecture utilizes magnetostatically coupled nanomagnets to compute logic functions, which is the basis of

  4. Demonstrating marketing accountability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gombeski, William R; Britt, Jason; Taylor, Jan; Riggs, Karen; Wray, Tanya; Adkins, Wanda; Springate, Suzanne

    2008-01-01

    Pressure on health care marketers to demonstrate effectiveness of their strategies and show their contribution to organizational goals is growing. A seven-tiered model based on the concepts of structure (having the right people, systems), process (doing the right things in the right way), and outcomes (results) is discussed. Examples of measures for each tier are provided and the benefits of using the model as a tool for measuring, organizing, tracking, and communicating appropriate information are provided. The model also provides a framework for helping management understand marketing's value and can serve as a vehicle for demonstrating marketing accountability.

  5. Demonstrating Supernova Remnant Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahy, Denis A.; Williams, Jacqueline

    2017-01-01

    We have created a software tool to calculate at display supernova remnant evolution which includes all stages from early ejecta dominated phase to late-time merging with the interstellar medium. The software was created using Python, and can be distributed as Python code, or as an executable file. The purpose of the software is to demonstrate the different phases and transitions that a supernova remnant undergoes, and will be used in upper level undergraduate astrophysics courses as a teaching tool. The usage of the software and its graphical user interface will be demonstrated.

  6. Gigashot Optical Laser Demonstrator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deri, R. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-10-13

    The Gigashot Optical Laser Demonstrator (GOLD) project has demonstrated a novel optical amplifier for high energy pulsed lasers operating at high repetition rates. The amplifier stores enough pump energy to support >10 J of laser output, and employs conduction cooling for thermal management to avoid the need for expensive and bulky high-pressure helium subsystems. A prototype amplifier was fabricated, pumped with diode light at 885 nm, and characterized. Experimental results show that the amplifier provides sufficient small-signal gain and sufficiently low wavefront and birefringence impairments to prove useful in laser systems, at repetition rates up to 60 Hz.

  7. Connexins, E-cadherin, Claudin-7 and β-catenin transiently form junctional nexuses during the post-natal mammary gland development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dianati, Elham; Poiraud, Jérémy; Weber-Ouellette, Anne; Plante, Isabelle

    2016-08-01

    Gap junctions are intercellular channels made of connexins (Cxs) that allow direct communication between adjacent cells. Modulation of Cxs has been associated with abnormal development and function of the mammary gland and breast cancer. However, the mechanisms underlying their expression during normal mammary gland are not yet known. Cxs interact with components of tight and adherens junctions. Thus, we hypothesized that the expression levels of Cxs vary during mammary gland development and are regulated through stage-dependent interactions with members of the tight and adherens junctions. Our specific objectives were to: 1) determine the expression of Cxs and tight and adherens junction proteins throughout development and 2) characterize Cxs interactions with components of tight and adherens junctions. Murine mammary glands were sampled at various developmental stages (pre-pubescent to post-weaning). RT-qPCR and western-blot analyses demonstrated differential expression patterns for all gap (Cx43, Cx32, Cx26, Cx30), tight (Claudin-1, -3, -4, -7) and adherens (β-catenin, E- and P-cadherins) junctions throughout development. Interestingly, co-immunoprecipitation demonstrated interactions between these different types of junctions. Cx30 interacted with Cx26 just at the late pregnancy stage. While Cx43 showed a persistent interaction with β-catenin from virginity to post-weaning, its interactions with E-cadherin and Claudin-7 were transient. Cx32 interacted with Cx26, E-cadherin and β-catenin during lactation. Immunofluorescence results confirmed the existence of a junctional nexus that remodeled during mammary gland development. Together, our results confirm that the expression levels of Cxs vary concomitantly and that Cxs form junctional nexuses with tight and adherens junctions, suggesting the existence of common regulatory pathways.

  8. Gap junction channels and cardiac impulse propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desplantez, Thomas; Dupont, Emmanuel; Severs, Nicholas J; Weingart, Robert

    2007-08-01

    The role of gap junction channels on cardiac impulse propagation is complex. This review focuses on the differential expression of connexins in the heart and the biophysical properties of gap junction channels under normal and disease conditions. Structural determinants of impulse propagation have been gained from biochemical and immunocytochemical studies performed on tissue extracts and intact cardiac tissue. These have defined the distinctive connexin coexpression patterns and relative levels in different cardiac tissues. Functional determinants of impulse propagation have emerged from electrophysiological experiments carried out on cell pairs. The static properties (channel number and conductance) limit the current flow between adjacent cardiomyocytes and thus set the basic conduction velocity. The dynamic properties (voltage-sensitive gating and kinetics of channels) are responsible for a modulation of the conduction velocity during propagated action potentials. The effect is moderate and depends on the type of Cx and channel. For homomeric-homotypic channels, the influence is small to medium; for homomeric-heterotypic channels, it is medium to strong. Since no data are currently available on heteromeric channels, their influence on impulse propagation is speculative. The modulation by gap junction channels is most prominent in tissues at the boundaries between cardiac tissues such as sinoatrial node-atrial muscle, atrioventricular node-His bundle, His bundle-bundle branch and Purkinje fibers-ventricular muscle. The data predict facilitation of orthodromic propagation.

  9. Gap Junctions: The Claymore for Cancerous Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ailar Nakhlband

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Gap junctions play an important role in the cell proliferation in mammalian cells as well as carcinogenesis. However, there are controversial issues about their role in cancer pathogenesis. This study was designed to evaluate genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of Carbenoxolone (CBX as a prototype of inter-cellular gap junction blocker in MCF7 and BT20 human breast cancer cells. Methods: The MCF7and BT20 human breast cancer cell lines were cultivated, and treated at designated confluency with different doses of CBX. Cellular cytotoxicity was examined using standard colorimetric assay associated with cell viability tests. Gene expression evaluation was carried out using real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Results: MCF7 and BT20 cells were significantly affected by CBX in a dose dependent manner in cell viability assays. Despite varying expression of genes, down regulation of pro- and anti-apoptotic genes was observed in these cells. Conclusion: Based upon this investigation, it can be concluded that CBX could affect both low and high proliferative types of breast cancer cell lines and disproportionate down regulation of both pre- and anti-apoptotic genes may be related to interacting biomolecules, perhaps via gap junctions.

  10. Monty Roberts’ public demonstrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loftus, Loni; Marks, Kelly; Jones-McVey, Rosie; Gonzales, Jose L.; Fowler, Veronica L.

    2016-01-01

    Effective training of horses relies on the trainer’s awareness of learning theory and equine ethology, and should be undertaken with skill and time. Some trainers, such as Monty Roberts, share their methods through the medium of public demonstrations. This paper describes the opportunistic analys

  11. Arctic Craft Demonstration Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    it received a lot of attention from the local population. Demonstration personnel, both Coast Guard and contractors, were asked to be receptive to...www.uscg.mil/top/missions/ . Counter-Drug Interdiction and Alien Migrant Interdiction operations are currently not included. In the non-Polar regions

  12. Participatory Lecture Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battino, Rubin

    1979-01-01

    The use of participatory lecture demonstrations in the classroom is described. Examples are given for the following topics: chromatography, chemical kinetics, balancing equations, the gas laws, kinetic molecular theory, Henry's law of gas solubility, electronic energy levels in atoms, and translational, vibrational, and rotational energies of…

  13. Demonstrating the Gas Laws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holko, David A.

    1982-01-01

    Presents a complete computer program demonstrating the relationship between volume/pressure for Boyle's Law, volume/temperature for Charles' Law, and volume/moles of gas for Avagadro's Law. The programing reinforces students' application of gas laws and equates a simulated moving piston to theoretical values derived using the ideal gas law.…

  14. Polarized Light: Three Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goehmann, Ruth; Welty, Scott

    1984-01-01

    Describes three demonstrations used in the Chicago Museum of Science and Industry polarized light show. The procedures employed are suitable for the classroom by using smaller polarizers and an overhead projector. Topic areas include properties of cellophane tape, nondisappearing arrows, and rope through a picket fence. (JN)

  15. Passive damping technology demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Robert E.; Spencer, Susan M.; Austin, Eric M.; Johnson, Conor D.

    1995-05-01

    A Hughes Space Company study was undertaken to (1) acquire the analytical capability to design effective passive damping treatments and to predict the damped dynamic performance with reasonable accuracy; (2) demonstrate reasonable test and analysis agreement for both baseline and damped baseline hardware; and (3) achieve a 75% reduction in peak transmissibility and 50% reduction in rms random vibration response. Hughes Space Company teamed with CSA Engineering to learn how to apply passive damping technology to their products successfully in a cost-effective manner. Existing hardware was selected for the demonstration because (1) previous designs were lightly damped and had difficulty in vibration test; (2) multiple damping concepts could be investigated; (3) the finite element model, hardware, and test fixture would be available; and (4) damping devices could be easily implemented. Bracket, strut, and sandwich panel damping treatments that met the performance goals were developed by analysis. The baseline, baseline with damped bracket, and baseline with damped strut designs were built and tested. The test results were in reasonable agreement with the analytical predictions and demonstrated that the desired reduction in dynamic response could be achieved. Having successfully demonstrated this approach, it can now be used with confidence for future designs as a means for reducing weight and enhancing reliability.

  16. PHARUS ASAR demonstrator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, A.J.E.; Bree, R.J.P. van; Calkoen, C.J.; Dekker, R.J.; Otten, M.P.G.; Rossum, W.L. van

    2001-01-01

    PHARUS is a polarimetric phased array C-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), designed and built for airborne use. Advanced SAR (ASAR) data in image and alternating polarization mode have been simulated with PHARUS to demonstrate the use of Envisat for a number of typical SAR applications that are no

  17. Distance Learning Environment Demonstration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-11-01

    The Distance Learning Environment Demonstration (DLED) was a comparative study of distributed multimedia computer-based training using low cost high...measurement. The DLED project provides baseline research in the effective use of distance learning and multimedia communications over a wide area ATM/SONET

  18. Calculus Demonstrations Using MATLAB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Peter K.; Harman, Chris

    2002-01-01

    The note discusses ways in which technology can be used in the calculus learning process. In particular, five MATLAB programs are detailed for use by instructors or students that demonstrate important concepts in introductory calculus: Newton's method, differentiation and integration. Two of the programs are animated. The programs and the…

  19. Palpability Support Demonstrated

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønsted, Jeppe; Grönvall, Erik; Fors, David

    2007-01-01

    is based on the Active Surfaces concept in which therapists rehabilitate physically and mentally impaired children by means of an activity that stimulates the children both physically and cognitively. In this paper we demonstrate how palpability can be supported in a prototype of the Active Surfaces...

  20. Polarized Light: Three Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goehmann, Ruth; Welty, Scott

    1984-01-01

    Describes three demonstrations used in the Chicago Museum of Science and Industry polarized light show. The procedures employed are suitable for the classroom by using smaller polarizers and an overhead projector. Topic areas include properties of cellophane tape, nondisappearing arrows, and rope through a picket fence. (JN)

  1. Acute obstructive hydrocephalus complicating decompression surgery of the craniovertebral junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohya, Junichi; Chikuda, Hirotaka; Nakatomi, Hirofumi; Sakamoto, Ryuji; Saito, Nobuhito; Tanaka, Sakae

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive hydrocephalus has been described as a rare complication following foramen magnum decompression for Chiari malformation. However, there are few reports of obstructive hydrocephalus after spinal surgery for other pathologies of the craniovertebral junction (CVJ). The authors herein report a 52-year-old female with achondroplasia presenting with an 8-month history of myelopathy due to spinal cord compression at CVJ. She underwent resection of the C1 posterior arch and part of the edge of the occipital bone. A computed tomography (CT) scan obtained 1-week after the surgery revealed bilateral infratentorial fluid collection. The patient was first managed conservatively; however, on the 17th day, her consciousness level showed sudden deterioration. Emergency CT demonstrated marked hydrocephalus due to obstruction of the cerebral aqueduct. Acute obstructive hydrocephalus can occur late after decompression surgery at the CVJ, and thus should be included in the differential diagnosis of a deteriorating mental status. PMID:27366268

  2. Thermal analysis of Josephson junctions array in cryocooler

    CERN Document Server

    Durandetto, P; Trinchera, B; Lolli, L; Serazio, D; Fretto, M; Sosso, A

    2016-01-01

    Complex cryogenics is still a strong limitation to the spread of quantum voltage standards and cryogen-free operation is then particularly interesting for Josephson standards. The main difficulties in He-free refrigeration are related to chip thermalization. We tested different solutions and interface materials between the chip and the cooling surface, to improve thermal conduction. Some junctions were chosen as elements to dissipate electrical power, while some others were operated as on-chip temperature sensors. Indium foil between chip and Cu support was demonstrated to provide a good thermal interface suitable for programmable voltage standard operation. However, thermal conduction can be further increased by thermal contacting the chip at the top. Finally, general physical constraints in vacuum thermal contacts are analyzed in terms of known properties of thermal interfaces at cryogenics temperatures.

  3. Quasiparticle current and phase locking of intrinsic Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, P.; Grib, A. N.; Shukrinov, Yu. M.; Scherbel, J.; Hübner, U.; Schmidl, F.

    2001-09-01

    On the base of our experiments on thin film Josephson junctions in mesa geometry we discuss the quasiparticle branches of the intrinsic arrays within a tunnelling model using d-wave superconductor density of states. We find temperature dependent current contributions and a zero bias anomaly. The coherent behaviour is studied for intrinsic arrays with an additional side-wall shunt. The existence of thresholds of phase locking at small as well as at large inductances is demonstrated. We discuss the problems with experimental realisation of the shunts as well as with an alternative concept to enhance phase locking in such arrays towards application as oscillators in the frequency range up to some THz.

  4. Devil's staircases and continued fractions in Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukrinov, Yu. M.; Medvedeva, S. Yu.; Botha, A. E.; Kolahchi, M. R.; Irie, A.

    2013-12-01

    Detailed numerical simulations of the IV characteristics of a Josephson junction under external electromagnetic radiation show the devil's staircase within different bias current intervals. We have found that the observed steps form very precisely continued fractions. Increase of the amplitude of the radiation shifts the devil's staircase to higher Shapiro steps. An algorithm for the appearance and detection of subharmonics with increasing radiation amplitude is proposed. We demonstrate that the subharmonic steps registered in the well-known experiments by Dayem and Wiegand [Phys. Rev. 155, 419 (1967), 10.1103/PhysRev.155.419] and Clarke [Phys. Rev. B 4, 2963 (1971), 10.1103/PhysRevB.4.2963] also form continued fractions.

  5. A Broadband Terahertz Waveguide T-Junction Variable Power Splitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichel, Kimberly S; Mendis, Rajind; Mittleman, Daniel M

    2016-06-29

    In order for the promise of terahertz (THz) wireless communications to become a reality, many new devices need to be developed, such as those for routing THz waves. We demonstrate a power splitting router based on a parallel-plate waveguide (PPWG) T-junction excited by the TE1 waveguide mode. By integrating a small triangular septum into the waveguide plate, we are able to direct the THz light down either one of the two output channels with precise control over the ratio between waveguide outputs. We find good agreement between experiment and simulation in both amplitude and phase. We show that the ratio between waveguide outputs varies exponentially with septum translation offset and that nearly 100% transmission can be achieved. The splitter operates over almost the entire range in which the waveguide is single mode, providing a sensitive and broadband method for THz power splitting.

  6. A ballistic gate-tunable contact junction in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmart, Quentin; Rosticher, Michael; Boukhicha, Mohamed; Inhofer, Andreas; Morfin, Pascal; Feve, Gwendal; Berroir, Jean-Marc; Placais, Bernard; Equipe de Physique Mésoscopique Team

    2015-03-01

    Field-effect control of carrier is very efficient in graphene and allows controlling the doping profile with a great accuracy and high spatial resolution. This is needed if one wants to implement Dirac fermion optics experiments or simply to improve the performance of graphene devices. In this work we realize graphene transistors equipped with a set of local back-gates that provide control of local electric fields in the 108 V / m range at the 10 nanometer scale. In particular we demonstrate ballistic contact junctions using transistors with independent channel and contact back-gates. We shall discuss the possibilities offered by this technology for ballistic electronic and opto-electronic applications.

  7. Computed tomography of the craniocervical junction in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castor, W R; Miller, J D; Russell, A S; Chiu, P L; Grace, M; Hanson, J

    1983-02-01

    Thirty-three patients with rheumatoid arthritis had computed tomographic examination of the craniocervical junction. This demonstrated soft tissue features which have not previously been described in published reports. A low attenuation lesion between the odontoid and the transverse ligament shown in 11 patients was considered a premonitory sign of rupture of the transverse ligament or a manifestation of active disease. Computed tomography revealed spinal cord compression in 3 patients and ligamentous changes in the transverse ligament and the alar and spinal ligaments in 26 patients. Erosion of the odontoid was shown in 19 patients and subluxation in 20 patients. No relationship could be found between the clinical signs and symptoms and the radiological abnormalities except in the case of cord compression.

  8. Spatial valley separation in strained graphene pn junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, HongYu; Wang, Jun

    2017-09-01

    Valleytronics in analogy to spintronics aims to use the electron valley degree of freedom to carry and manipulate information, and one of urgent tasks in this field is to generate valley-polarized electrons. In this work, we propose using the electron focusing effect in a strained graphene pn junction to separate valleys spatially through a beam of valley-unpolarized electrons, since the strain-induced pseudo-gauge potentials are opposite for K and K^\\prime valleys and severely affect the trajectories of K and K^\\prime electron propagation. We numerically simulate this valley-separated Veselago lens effect in a lattice model and demonstrate that pseudo-gauge potentials can efficiently control valley separation patterns.

  9. Heterospin Junctions in Zigzag-Edged Graphene Nanoribbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo C. Girão

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We propose a graphene nanoribbon-based heterojunction, where a defect-free interface separates two zigzag graphene nanoribbons prepared in opposite antiferromagnetic spin configurations. This heterospin junction is found to allow the redirecting of low-energy electrons from one edge to the other. The basic scattering mechanisms and their relation to the system’s geometry are investigated through a combination of Landauer–Green’s function and the S-matrix and eigen-channel methods within a tight-binding + Hubbard model validated with density functional theory. The findings demonstrate the possibility of using zigzag-edged graphene nanoribbons (zGNRs in complex networks where current can be transmitted across the entire system, instead of following the shortest paths along connected edges belonging to the same sub-lattice.

  10. Coexistence of tunneling magnetoresistance and Josephson effects in SFIFS junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vávra, O.; Soni, R.; Petraru, A.; Himmel, N.; Vávra, I.; Fabian, J.; Kohlstedt, H.; Strunk, Ch.

    2017-02-01

    We demonstrate an integration of tunneling magnetoresistance and the Josephson effects within one tunneling junction. Several sets of Nb-Fe-Al-Al2O3-Fe-Nb wafers with varying Al and Fe layers thickness were prepared to systematically explore the competition of TMR and Josephson effects. A coexistence of the critical current IC(dFe) and the tunneling magnetoresistance ratio T M R(dFe) is observed for iron layer dFe thickness range 1.9 and 2.9 nm. Further optimization such as thinner Al2O3 layer leads to an enhancement of the critical current and thus to an extension of the coexistence regime up to dFe≃3.9 nm Fe.

  11. A Broadband Terahertz Waveguide T-Junction Variable Power Splitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichel, Kimberly S.; Mendis, Rajind; Mittleman, Daniel M.

    2016-06-01

    In order for the promise of terahertz (THz) wireless communications to become a reality, many new devices need to be developed, such as those for routing THz waves. We demonstrate a power splitting router based on a parallel-plate waveguide (PPWG) T-junction excited by the TE1 waveguide mode. By integrating a small triangular septum into the waveguide plate, we are able to direct the THz light down either one of the two output channels with precise control over the ratio between waveguide outputs. We find good agreement between experiment and simulation in both amplitude and phase. We show that the ratio between waveguide outputs varies exponentially with septum translation offset and that nearly 100% transmission can be achieved. The splitter operates over almost the entire range in which the waveguide is single mode, providing a sensitive and broadband method for THz power splitting.

  12. Giant thermal spin-torque-assisted magnetic tunnel junction switching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pushp, Aakash; Phung, Timothy; Rettner, Charles; Hughes, Brian P; Yang, See-Hun; Parkin, Stuart S P

    2015-05-26

    Spin-polarized charge currents induce magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) switching by virtue of spin-transfer torque (STT). Recently, by taking advantage of the spin-dependent thermoelectric properties of magnetic materials, novel means of generating spin currents from temperature gradients, and their associated thermal-spin torques (TSTs), have been proposed, but so far these TSTs have not been large enough to influence MTJ switching. Here we demonstrate significant TSTs in MTJs by generating large temperature gradients across ultrathin MgO tunnel barriers that considerably affect the switching fields of the MTJ. We attribute the origin of the TST to an asymmetry of the tunneling conductance across the zero-bias voltage of the MTJ. Remarkably, we estimate through magneto-Seebeck voltage measurements that the charge currents that would be generated due to the temperature gradient would give rise to STT that is a thousand times too small to account for the changes in switching fields that we observe.

  13. Characterization of cytoskeletal and junctional proteins expressed by cells cultured from human arachnoid granulation tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehta Bhavya C

    2005-10-01

    the in vitro culture of arachnoidal cells grown from human AG tissue. We demonstrated that these cells in vitro continue to express some of the cytoskeletal and junctional proteins characterized previously in human AG tissue, such as proteins involved in the formation of gap junctions, desmosomes, epithelial specific adherens junctions, as well as tight junctions. These junctional proteins in particular may be important in allowing these arachnoidal cells to regulate CSF outflow.

  14. Nucla CFB Demonstration Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-01

    This report documents Colorado-Ute Electric Association's Nucla Circulating Atmospheric Fluidized-Bed Combustion (AFBC) demonstration project. It describes the plant equipment and system design for the first US utility-size circulating AFBC boiler and its support systems. Included are equipment and system descriptions, design/background information and appendices with an equipment list and selected information plus process flow and instrumentation drawings. The purpose of this report is to share the information gathered during the Nucla circulating AFBC demonstration project and present it so that the general public can evaluate the technical feasibility and cost effectiveness of replacing pulverized or stoker-fired boiler units with circulating fluidized-bed boiler units. (VC)

  15. IGCC technology and demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palonen, J. [A. Ahlstrom Corporation, Karhula (Finland). Hans Ahlstrom Lab.; Lundqvist, R.G. [A. Ahlstrom Corporation, Helsinki (Finland); Staahl, K. [Sydkraft AB, Malmoe (Sweden)

    1996-12-31

    Future energy production will be performed by advanced technologies that are more efficient, more environmentally friendly and less expensive than current technologies. Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants have been proposed as one of these systems. Utilising biofuels in future energy production will also be emphasised since this lowers substantially carbon dioxide emissions into the atmosphere due to the fact that biomass is a renewable form of energy. Combining advanced technology and biomass utilisation is for this reason something that should and will be encouraged. A. Ahlstrom Corporation of Finland and Sydkraft AB of Sweden have as one part of company strategies adopted this approach for the future. The companies have joined their resources in developing a biomass-based IGCC system with the gasification part based on pressurised circulating fluidized-bed technology. With this kind of technology electrical efficiency can be substantially increased compared to conventional power plants. As a first concrete step, a decision has been made to build a demonstration plant. This plant, located in Vaernamo, Sweden, has already been built and is now in commissioning and demonstration stage. The system comprises a fuel drying plant, a pressurised CFB gasifier with gas cooling and cleaning, a gas turbine, a waste heat recovery unit and a steam turbine. The plant is the first in the world where the integration of a pressurised gasifier with a gas turbine will be realised utilising a low calorific gas produced from biomass. The capacity of the Vaernamo plant is 6 MW of electricity and 9 MW of district heating. Technology development is in progress for design of plants of sizes from 20 to 120 MWe. The paper describes the Bioflow IGCC system, the Vaernamo demonstration plant and experiences from the commissioning and demonstration stages. (orig.)

  16. The Majorana Demonstrator

    CERN Document Server

    Aguayo, E; Hoppe, E W; Keillor, M E; Kephart, J D; Kouzes, R T; LaFerriere, B D; Merriman, J; Orrell, J L; Overman, N R; Avignone, F T; Back, H O; Combs, D C; Leviner, L E; Young, A R; Barabash, A S; Konovalov, S I; Vanyushin, I; Yumatov, V; Bergevin, M; Chan, Y-D; Detwiler, J A; Loach, J C; Martin, R D; Poon, A W P; Prior, G; Vetter, K; Bertrand, F E; Cooper, R J; Radford, D C; Varner, R L; Yu, C -H; Boswell, M; Elliott, S R; Gehman, V M; Hime, A; Kidd, M F; LaRoque, B H; Rielage, K; Ronquest, M C; Steele, D; Brudanin, V; Egorov, V; Gusey, K; Kochetov, O; Shirchenko, M; Timkin, V; Yakushev, E; Busch, M; Esterline, J; Tornow, W; Christofferson, C D; Horton, M; Howard, S; Sobolev, V; Collar, J I; Fields, N; Creswick, R J; Doe, P J; Johnson, R A; Knecht, A; Leon, J; Marino, M G; Miller, M L; Robertson, R G H; Schubert, A G; Wolfe, B A; Efremenko, Yu; Ejiri, H; Hazama, R; Nomachi, M; Shima, T; Finnerty, P; Fraenkle, F M; Giovanetti, G K; Green, M P; Henning, R; Howe, M A; MacMullin, S; Phillips, D G; Snavely, K J; Strain, J; Vorren, K; Guiseppe, V E; Keller, C; Mei, D -M; Perumpilly, G; Thomas, K; Zhang, C; Hallin, A L; Keeter, K J; Mizouni, L; Wilkerson, J F

    2011-01-01

    A brief review of the history and neutrino physics of double beta decay is given. A description of the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR research and development program including background reduction techniques is presented in some detail. The application of point contact (PC) detectors to the experiment is discussed, including the effectiveness of pulse shape analysis. The predicted sensitivity of a PC detector array enriched to 86% in 76Ge is given.

  17. The Majorana Demonstrator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguayo, Estanislao; Fast, James E.; Hoppe, Eric W.; Keillor, Martin E.; Kephart, Jeremy D.; Kouzes, Richard T.; LaFerriere, Brian D.; Merriman, Jason H.; Orrell, John L.; Overman, Nicole R.; Avignone, Frank T.; Back, Henning O.; Combs, Dustin C.; Leviner, L.; Young, A.; Barabash, Alexander S.; Konovalov, S.; Vanyushin, I.; Yumatov, Vladimir; Bergevin, M.; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Detwiler, Jason A.; Loach, J. C.; Martin, R. D.; Poon, Alan; Prior, Gersende; Vetter, Kai; Bertrand, F.; Cooper, R. J.; Radford, D. C.; Varner, R. L.; Yu, Chang-Hong; Boswell, M.; Elliott, S.; Gehman, Victor M.; Hime, Andrew; Kidd, M. F.; LaRoque, B. H.; Rielage, Keith; Ronquest, M. C.; Steele, David; Brudanin, V.; Egorov, Viatcheslav; Gusey, K.; Kochetov, Oleg; Shirchenko, M.; Timkin, V.; Yakushev, E.; Busch, Matthew; Esterline, James H.; Tornow, Werner; Christofferson, Cabot-Ann; Horton, Mark; Howard, S.; Sobolev, V.; Collar, J. I.; Fields, N.; Creswick, R.; Doe, Peter J.; Johnson, R. A.; Knecht, A.; Leon, Jonathan D.; Marino, Michael G.; Miller, M. L.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Schubert, Alexis G.; Wolfe, B. A.; Efremenko, Yuri; Ejiri, H.; Hazama, R.; Nomachi, Masaharu; Shima, T.; Finnerty, P.; Fraenkle, Florian; Giovanetti, G. K.; Green, M.; Henning, Reyco; Howe, M. A.; MacMullin, S.; Phillips, D.; Snavely, Kyle J.; Strain, J.; Vorren, Kris R.; Guiseppe, Vincente; Keller, C.; Mei, Dong-Ming; Perumpilly, Gopakumar; Thomas, K.; Zhang, C.; Hallin, A. L.; Keeter, K.; Mizouni, Leila; Wilkerson, J. F.

    2011-09-03

    A brief review of the history and neutrino physics of double beta decay is given. A description of the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR research and development program, including background reduction techniques, is presented in some detail. The application of point contact (PC) detectors to the experiment is discussed, including the effectiveness of pulse shape analysis. The predicted sensitivity of a PC detector array enriched to 86% to 76Ge is given.

  18. Correlation between amplitude of spin accumulation signals investigated by Hanle effect measurement and effective junction barrier height in CoFe/MgO/n+-Si junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Y.; Ishikawa, M.; Sugiyama, H.; Inokuchi, T.; Hamaya, K.; Tezuka, N.

    2015-05-01

    Correlation between the amplitude of the spin accumulation signals and the effective barrier height estimated from the slope of the log (RA) - tMgO plot (RA: resistance area product, tMgO: thickness of MgO tunnel barrier) in CoFe/MgO/n+-Si junctions was investigated. The amplitude of spin accumulation signals increases with increasing effective barrier heights. This increase of the amplitude of spin accumulation is originated from the increase of the spin polarization ( P S i ) in Si. The estimated absolute values of P S i using three-terminal Hanle signals are consistent with those estimated by four-terminal nonlocal-magnetoresistance (MR) and two-terminal local-MR. To demonstrate large spin accumulation in Si bulk band and enhance the local-MR through Si channel, these results indicate that the increase of the effective barrier height at ferromagnet/(tunnel barrier)/n+-Si junction electrode is important.

  19. Electron Transport through Porphyrin Molecular Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qi

    The goal of this work is to study the properties that would affect the electron transport through a porphyrin molecular junction. This work contributes to the field of electron transport in molecular junctions in the following 3 aspects. First of all, by carrying out experiments comparing the conductance of the iron (III) porphyrin (protected) and the free base porphyrin (protected), it is confirmed that the molecular energy level broadening and shifting occurs for porphyrin molecules when coupled with the metal electrodes, and this level broadening and shifting plays an important role in the electron transport through molecular junctions. Secondly, by carrying out an in-situ deprotection of the acetyl-protected free base porphyrin molecules, it is found out that the presence of acetyl groups reduces the conductance. Thirdly, by incorporating the Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) spectrum and the in-situ deprotection prior to formation of molecular junctions, it allows a more precise understanding of the molecules involved in the formation of molecular junctions, and therefore allows an accurate analysis of the conductance histogram. The molecules are prepared by self-assembly and the junctions are formed using a Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) molecular break junction technique. The porphyrin molecules are characterized by MALDI in solution before self-assembly to a gold/mica substrate. The self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of porphyrins on gold are characterized by Ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) reflection spectroscopy to confirm that the molecules are attached to the substrate. The SAMs are then characterized by Angle-Resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS) to determine the thickness and the average molecular orientation of the molecular layer. The electron transport is measured by conductance-displacement (G-S) experiments under a given bias (-0.4V). The conductance value of a single molecule is identified by a statistical analysis

  20. Experimental setup for the investigation of fluid–structure interactions in a T-junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuschewski, M., E-mail: mario.kuschewski@ike.uni-stuttgart.de [University of Stuttgart, Institute for Nuclear Technology and Energy Systems, Pfaffenwaldring 31, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Kulenovic, R., E-mail: rudi.kulenovic@ike.uni-stuttgart.de [University of Stuttgart, Institute for Nuclear Technology and Energy Systems, Pfaffenwaldring 31, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Laurien, E., E-mail: eckart.laurien@ike.uni-stuttgart.de [University of Stuttgart, Institute for Nuclear Technology and Energy Systems, Pfaffenwaldring 31, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2013-11-15

    Water experiments were carried out for fluid structure interaction aspects of non-isothermal mixing in a T-junction which is part of a new test facility. The main subject of this paper is firstly to present the new facility and secondly, to demonstrate the Near-Wall LED-Induced-Fluorescence (NWLED-IF) technique, which is a new experimental method for studying fluid–structure interaction under conditions similar to those in LWR. The Fluid–Structure-Interaction-Setup is a closed-loop T-junction facility with a design pressure of 75 bar and a maximum temperature of 280 °C. The water streams are mixed in a horizontally aligned, sharp-edge, 90° T-junction. The forged T-junction is made of austenitic steel 1.4550 (X6 CrNiNb 18-10) with reduced carbon content in accordance with the German KTA 3201.1. It is equipped with 24 thermocouples (1 mm in diameter) in blind holes, which have a surface offset of 1–3 mm. The facility design comprises interchangeable modules, which can be arranged upstream or downstream of the T-junction. Two of these modules provide an optical access to the fluid by means of flanges and tubes made of glass. Additional experiments are conducted in an isothermal T-junction facility and at the Fluid–Structure Interaction Facility. It is demonstrated that the Near-Wall LED-Induced-Fluorescence technique is an image-based measurement method that provides spatially and temporally resolved information of the turbulent flow in the mixing region of the T-junction even under presence of high density differences. In all experiments a buoyancy-driven stratified flow is observed. The light fluid arranges itself on top of the denser which is characterized by a meander-like structure. The experiments are conducted under different fluid-mechanical boundary conditions, yet fluid patterns were similar and the stratification and the meander-like structures were captured by the Near-Wall LED-Induced-Fluorescence technique. The presented experiment is the first

  1. Electron optics with p-n junctions in ballistic graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shaowen; Han, Zheng; Elahi, Mirza M.; Habib, K. M. Masum; Wang, Lei; Wen, Bo; Gao, Yuanda; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Hone, James; Ghosh, Avik W.; Dean, Cory R.

    2016-09-01

    Electrons transmitted across a ballistic semiconductor junction are expected to undergo refraction, analogous to light rays across an optical boundary. In graphene, the linear dispersion and zero-gap band structure admit highly transparent p-n junctions by simple electrostatic gating. Here, we employ transverse magnetic focusing to probe the propagation of carriers across an electrostatically defined graphene junction. We find agreement with the predicted Snell’s law for electrons, including the observation of both positive and negative refraction. Resonant transmission across the p-n junction provides a direct measurement of the angle-dependent transmission coefficient. Comparing experimental data with simulations reveals the crucial role played by the effective junction width, providing guidance for future device design. Our results pave the way for realizing electron optics based on graphene p-n junctions.

  2. Single P-N junction tandem photovoltaic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walukiewicz, Wladyslaw; Ager, III, Joel W.; Yu, Kin Man

    2011-10-18

    A single P-N junction solar cell is provided having two depletion regions for charge separation while allowing the electrons and holes to recombine such that the voltages associated with both depletion regions of the solar cell will add together. The single p-n junction solar cell includes an alloy of either InGaN or InAlN formed on one side of the P-N junction with Si formed on the other side in order to produce characteristics of a two junction (2J) tandem solar cell through only a single P-N junction. A single P-N junction solar cell having tandem solar cell characteristics will achieve power conversion efficiencies exceeding 30%.

  3. The critical power to maintain thermally stable molecular junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanlei; Xu, Zhiping

    2014-07-01

    With the rise of atomic-scale devices such as molecular electronics and scanning probe microscopies, energy transport processes through molecular junctions have attracted notable research interest recently. In this work, heat dissipation and transport across diamond/benzene/diamond molecular junctions are explored by performing atomistic simulations. We identify the critical power Pcr to maintain thermal stability of the junction through efficient dissipation of local heat. We also find that the molecule-probe contact features a power-dependent interfacial thermal resistance RK in the order of 109 kW-1. Moreover, both Pcr and RK display explicit dependence on atomic structures of the junction, force and temperature. For instance, Pcr can be elevated in multiple-molecule junctions, and streching the junction enhances RK by a factor of 2. The applications of these findings in molecular electronics and scanning probing measurements are discussed, providing practical guidelines in their rational design.

  4. Single P-N junction tandem photovoltaic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walukiewicz, Wladyslaw [Kensington, CA; Ager, III, Joel W.; Yu, Kin Man [Lafayette, CA

    2012-03-06

    A single P-N junction solar cell is provided having two depletion regions for charge separation while allowing the electrons and holes to recombine such that the voltages associated with both depletion regions of the solar cell will add together. The single p-n junction solar cell includes an alloy of either InGaN or InAlN formed on one side of the P-N junction with Si formed on the other side in order to produce characteristics of a two junction (2J) tandem solar cell through only a single P-N junction. A single P-N junction solar cell having tandem solar cell characteristics will achieve power conversion efficiencies exceeding 30%.

  5. Structure, regulation and function of gap junctions in liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, Michaël; Decrock, Elke; Wang, Nan; Leybaert, Luc; da Silva, Tereza Cristina; Veloso Alves Pereira, Isabel; Jaeschke, Hartmut; Cogliati, Bruno; Vinken, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    Gap junctions are a specialized group of cell-to-cell junctions that mediate direct intercellular communication between cells. They arise from the interaction of 2 hemichannels of adjacent cells, which in turn are composed of 6 connexin proteins. In liver, gap junctions are predominantly found in hepatocytes and play critical roles in virtually all phases of the hepatic life cycle, including cell growth, differentiation, liver-specific functionality and cell death. Liver gap junctions are directed through a broad variety of mechanisms ranging from epigenetic control of connexin expression to posttranslational regulation of gap junction activity. This paper reviews established and novel aspects regarding the architecture, control and functional relevance of liver gap junctions. PMID:27001459

  6. Gap state charge induced spin-dependent negative differential resistance in tunnel junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jun; Zhang, X.-G.; Han, X. F.

    2016-04-01

    We propose and demonstrate through first-principles calculation a new spin-dependent negative differential resistance (NDR) mechanism in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJ) with cubic cation disordered crystals (CCDC) AlO x or Mg1-x Al x O as barrier materials. The CCDC is a class of insulators whose band gap can be changed by cation doping. The gap becomes arched in an ultrathin layer due to the space charge formed from metal-induced gap states. With an appropriate combination of an arched gap and a bias voltage, NDR can be produced in either spin channel. This mechanism is applicable to 2D and 3D ultrathin junctions with a sufficiently small band gap that forms a large space charge. It provides a new way of controlling the spin-dependent transport in spintronic devices by an electric field. A generalized Simmons formula for tunneling current through junction with an arched gap is derived to show the general conditions under which ultrathin junctions may exhibit NDR.

  7. The adherens junctions control susceptibility to Staphylococcus aureus α-toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Lauren M; Marceau, Caleb D; Starkl, Philipp M; Lumb, Jennifer H; Shah, Jimit; Guerrera, Diego; Cooper, Rachel L; Merakou, Christina; Bouley, Donna M; Meng, Wenxiang; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Takeichi, Masatoshi; Galli, Stephen J; Bagnoli, Fabio; Citi, Sandra; Carette, Jan E; Amieva, Manuel R

    2015-11-17

    Staphylococcus aureus is both a transient skin colonizer and a formidable human pathogen, ranking among the leading causes of skin and soft tissue infections as well as severe pneumonia. The secreted bacterial α-toxin is essential for S. aureus virulence in these epithelial diseases. To discover host cellular factors required for α-toxin cytotoxicity, we conducted a genetic screen using mutagenized haploid human cells. Our screen identified a cytoplasmic member of the adherens junctions, plekstrin-homology domain containing protein 7 (PLEKHA7), as the second most significantly enriched gene after the known α-toxin receptor, a disintegrin and metalloprotease 10 (ADAM10). Here we report a new, unexpected role for PLEKHA7 and several components of cellular adherens junctions in controlling susceptibility to S. aureus α-toxin. We find that despite being injured by α-toxin pore formation, PLEKHA7 knockout cells recover after intoxication. By infecting PLEKHA7(-/-) mice with methicillin-resistant S. aureus USA300 LAC strain, we demonstrate that this junctional protein controls disease severity in both skin infection and lethal S. aureus pneumonia. Our results suggest that adherens junctions actively control cellular responses to a potent pore-forming bacterial toxin and identify PLEKHA7 as a potential nonessential host target to reduce S. aureus virulence during epithelial infections.

  8. Group A Streptococcus exploits human plasminogen for bacterial translocation across epithelial barrier via tricellular tight junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumitomo, Tomoko; Nakata, Masanobu; Higashino, Miharu; Yamaguchi, Masaya; Kawabata, Shigetada

    2016-01-01

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS) is a human-specific pathogen responsible for local suppurative and life-threatening invasive systemic diseases. Interaction of GAS with human plasminogen (PLG) is a salient characteristic for promoting their systemic dissemination. In the present study, a serotype M28 strain was found predominantly localized in tricellular tight junctions of epithelial cells cultured in the presence of PLG. Several lines of evidence indicated that interaction of PLG with tricellulin, a major component of tricellular tight junctions, is crucial for bacterial localization. A site-directed mutagenesis approach revealed that lysine residues at positions 217 and 252 within the extracellular loop of tricellulin play important roles in PLG-binding activity. Additionally, we demonstrated that PLG functions as a molecular bridge between tricellulin and streptococcal surface enolase (SEN). The wild type strain efficiently translocated across the epithelial monolayer, accompanied by cleavage of transmembrane junctional proteins. In contrast, amino acid substitutions in the PLG-binding motif of SEN markedly compromised those activities. Notably, the interaction of PLG with SEN was dependent on PLG species specificity, which influenced the efficiency of bacterial penetration. Our findings provide insight into the mechanism by which GAS exploits host PLG for acceleration of bacterial invasion into deeper tissues via tricellular tight junctions. PMID:26822058

  9. Four-state non-volatile memory in a multiferroic spin filter tunnel junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Jieji; Li, Chen; Yuan, Zhoushen; Wang, Peng; Li, Aidong; Wu, Di

    2016-12-01

    We report a spin filter type multiferroic tunnel junction with a ferromagnetic/ferroelectric bilayer barrier. Memory functions of a spin filter magnetic tunnel junction and a ferroelectric tunnel junction are combined in this single device, producing four non-volatile resistive states that can be read out in a non-destructive manner. This concept is demonstrated in a LaNiO3/Pr0.8Ca0.2MnO3/BaTiO3/La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 all-oxide tunnel junction. The ferromagnetic insulator Pr0.8Ca0.2MnO3 serves as the spin filter and the ferromagnetic metal La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 is the spin analyzer. The ferroelectric polarization reversal in the BaTiO3 barrier switches the tunneling barrier height to produce a tunneling electroresistance. The ferroelectric switching also modulates the spin polarization and the spin filtering efficiency in Pr0.8Ca0.2MnO3.

  10. Nano-analysis of grain boundary and triple junction transport in nanocrystalline Ni/Cu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reda Chellali, Mohammed; Balogh, Zoltan; Schmitz, Guido

    2013-09-01

    Nanocrystalline materials are distinguished by a high density of structural defects and grain boundaries. Due to the small grain size, a particular defect of the grain boundary topology, the so-called triple junction takes a dominant role for grain growth and atomic transport. We demonstrate by atom probe tomography that triple junctions in nanocrystalline Cu have 100-300 times higher diffusivity of Ni than standard high angle grain boundaries. Also, a previously unexpected systematic variation of the grain boundary width with temperature is detected. The impurity segregation layer at the grain boundaries grows from the 0.7 nm at 563 K to 2.5 nm at 643 K. This variation is clearly not controlled by simple bulk diffusion. Taking this effect into consideration, the activation energies for Ni diffusion in triple junctions and grain boundaries in Cu can be determined to be (83 ± 10) and (120 ± 15) kJ/mol, respectively. Thus, triple junctions are distinguished by considerably lower activation energy with respect to grain boundaries.

  11. The energy barrier at noble metal/TiO{sub 2} junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hossein-Babaei, F., E-mail: fhbabaei@kntu.ac.ir, E-mail: fhbabaei@yahoo.com; Lajvardi, Mehdi M., E-mail: mm.lajvardi@gmail.com; Alaei-Sheini, Navid, E-mail: navid-alaei@yahoo.com [Electronic Materials Laboratory, Industrial Control Center of Excellence, Electrical Engineering Department, K. N. Toosi University of Technology, Tehran 16317-14191 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-02-23

    Nobel metal/TiO{sub 2} structures are used as catalysts in chemical reactors, active components in TiO{sub 2}-based electronic devices, and connections between such devices and the outside circuitry. Here, we investigate the energy barrier at the junctions between vacuum-deposited Ag, Au, and Pt thin films and TiO{sub 2} layers by recording their electrical current vs. voltage diagrams and spectra of optical responses. Deposited Au/, Pt/, and Ag/TiO{sub 2} behave like contacts with zero junction energy barriers, but the thermal annealing of the reverse-biased devices for an hour at 523 K in air converts them to Schottky diodes with high junction energy barriers, decreasing their reverse electric currents up to 10{sup 6} times. Similar thermal processing in vacuum or pure argon proved ineffective. The highest energy barrier and the lowest reverse current among the devices examined belong to the annealed Ag/TiO{sub 2} contacts. The observed electronic features are described based on the physicochemical parameters of the constituting materials. The formation of higher junction barriers with rutile than with anatase is demonstrated.

  12. Spin-dependent Seebeck effects in a graphene superlattice p–n junction with different shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Benhu; Zhou, Benliang; Yao, Yagang; Zhou, Guanghui; Hu, Ming

    2017-10-01

    We theoretically calculate the spin-dependent transmission probability and spin Seebeck coefficient for a zigzag-edge graphene nanoribbon p–n junction with periodically attached stubs under a perpendicular magnetic field and a ferromagnetic insulator. By using the nonequilibrium Green’s function method combining with the tight-binding Hamiltonian, it is demonstrated that the spin-dependent transmission probability and spin Seebeck coefficient for two types of superlattices can be modulated by the potential drop, the magnetization strength, the number of periods of the superlattice, the strength of the perpendicular magnetic field, and the Anderson disorder strength. Interestingly, a metal to semiconductor transition occurs as the number of the superlattice for a crossed superlattice p–n junction increases, and its spin Seebeck coefficient is much larger than that for the T-shaped one around the zero Fermi energy. Furthermore, the spin Seebeck coefficient for crossed systems can be much pronounced and their maximum absolute value can reach 528 μV K-1 by choosing optimized parameters. Besides, the spin Seebeck coefficient for crossed p–n junction is strongly enhanced around the zero Fermi energy for a weak magnetic field. Our results provide theoretical references for modulating the thermoelectric properties of a graphene superlattice p–n junction by tuning its geometric structure and physical parameters.

  13. Gate-controlled energy barrier at a graphene/molecular semiconductor junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parui, S.; Pietrobon, L.; Ciudad, D.; Velez, S.; Sun, X.; Stoliar, P.; Casanova, F.; Hueso, L. E.

    The formation of an energy barrier at a metal/molecular semiconductor junction is both a ubiquitous phenomenon as well as the subject of intense research in order to improve the performance of molecular semiconductor-based electronic and optoelectronic devices. For these devices, a junction with a large energy barrier provides rectification, leading to a diode behavior, whereas a relatively small energy barrier provides nearly-ohmic behavior, resulting in efficient carrier injection (extraction) into the molecular semiconductor. Typically, a specific metal/molecular semiconductor combination leads to a fixed energy barrier; therefore, the possibility of a gate-controlled energy barrier is very appealing for advanced applications. Here, we present a graphene/C60 junction-based vertical field-effect transistor in which we demonstrate control of the interfacial energy-barrier such that the junction switches from a highly rectifying diode at negative gate voltages to a nearly-ohmic behavior at positive gate voltages and at room temperature. We extract an energy-barrier modulation of up to 660 meV, a transconductance of up to five orders of magnitude and a gate-modulated photocurrent.

  14. CMOS Interface Circuits for Spin Tunneling Junction Based Magnetic Random Access Memories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganesh Saripalli

    2002-12-31

    Magneto resistive memories (MRAM) are non-volatile memories which use magnetic instead of electrical structures to store data. These memories, apart from being non-volatile, offer a possibility to achieve densities better than DRAMs and speeds faster than SRAMs. MRAMs could potentially replace all computer memory RAM technologies in use today, leading to future applications like instan-on computers and longer battery life for pervasive devices. Such rapid development was made possible due to the recent discovery of large magnetoresistance in Spin tunneling junction devices. Spin tunneling junctions (STJ) are composite structures consisting of a thin insulating layer sandwiched between two magnetic layers. This thesis research is targeted towards these spin tunneling junction based Magnetic memories. In any memory, some kind of an interface circuit is needed to read the logic states. In this thesis, four such circuits are proposed and designed for Magnetic memories (MRAM). These circuits interface to the Spin tunneling junctions and act as sense amplifiers to read their magnetic states. The physical structure and functional characteristics of these circuits are discussed in this thesis. Mismatch effects on the circuits and proper design techniques are also presented. To demonstrate the functionality of these interface structures, test circuits were designed and fabricated in TSMC 0.35{micro} CMOS process. Also circuits to characterize the process mismatches were fabricated and tested. These results were then used in Matlab programs to aid in design process and to predict interface circuit's yields.

  15. Schottky junction photovoltaic devices based on CdS single nanobelts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Y; Dai, L; Wu, P C; Liu, C; Sun, T; Ma, R M; Qin, G G

    2009-09-16

    Schottky junction photovoltaic (PV) devices were fabricated on single CdS nanobelts (NBs). Au was used as the Schottky contact, and In/Au was used as the ohmic contact to CdS NB. Typically, the Schottky junction exhibits a well-defined rectifying behavior in the dark with a rectification ratio greater than 10(3) at +/- 0.3 V; and the PV device exhibits a clear PV behavior with an open circuit photovoltage of about 0.16 V, a short circuit current of about 23.8 pA, a maximum output power of about 1.6 pW, and a fill factor of 42%. Moreover, the output power can be multiplied by connecting two or more of the Schottky junction PV devices, made on a single CdS NB, in parallel or in series. This study demonstrates that the 1D Schottky junction PV devices, which have the merits of low cost, easy fabrication and material universality, can be an important candidate for power sources in nano-optoelectronic systems.

  16. CMOS Interface Circuits for Spin Tunneling Junction Based Magnetic Random Access Memories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saripalli, Ganesh [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Magneto resistive memories (MRAM) are non-volatile memories which use magnetic instead of electrical structures to store data. These memories, apart from being non-volatile, offer a possibility to achieve densities better than DRAMs and speeds faster than SRAMs. MRAMs could potentially replace all computer memory RAM technologies in use today, leading to future applications like instan-on computers and longer battery life for pervasive devices. Such rapid development was made possible due to the recent discovery of large magnetoresistance in Spin tunneling junction devices. Spin tunneling junctions (STJ) are composite structures consisting of a thin insulating layer sandwiched between two magnetic layers. This thesis research is targeted towards these spin tunneling junction based Magnetic memories. In any memory, some kind of an interface circuit is needed to read the logic states. In this thesis, four such circuits are proposed and designed for Magnetic memories (MRAM). These circuits interface to the Spin tunneling junctions and act as sense amplifiers to read their magnetic states. The physical structure and functional characteristics of these circuits are discussed in this thesis. Mismatch effects on the circuits and proper design techniques are also presented. To demonstrate the functionality of these interface structures, test circuits were designed and fabricated in TSMC 0.35μ CMOS process. Also circuits to characterize the process mismatches were fabricated and tested. These results were then used in Matlab programs to aid in design process and to predict interface circuit's yields.

  17. Photovoltaic effect in few-layer black phosphorus PN junctions defined by local electrostatic gating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscema, Michele; Groenendijk, Dirk J; Steele, Gary A; van der Zant, Herre S J; Castellanos-Gomez, Andres

    2014-01-01

    In conventional photovoltaic solar cells, photogenerated carriers are extracted by the built-in electric field of a semiconductor PN junction, defined by ionic dopants. In atomically thin semiconductors, the doping level can be controlled by the field effect, enabling the implementation of electrically tunable PN junctions. However, most two-dimensional (2D) semiconductors do not show ambipolar transport, which is necessary to realize PN junctions. Few-layer black phosphorus (b-P) is a recently isolated 2D semiconductor with direct bandgap, high mobility, large current on/off ratios and ambipolar operation. Here we fabricate few-layer b-P field-effect transistors with split gates and hexagonal boron nitride dielectric. We demonstrate electrostatic control of the local charge carrier type and density in the device. Illuminating a gate-defined PN junction, we observe zero-bias photocurrents and significant open-circuit voltages due to the photovoltaic effect. The small bandgap of the material allows power generation for illumination wavelengths up to 940 nm, attractive for energy harvesting in the near-infrared.

  18. Do we really understand the role of the oesophagogastric junction in disease?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McMahon, Barry P

    2012-02-01

    The role of the oesophago-gastric junction (OGJ) in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease is still not completely understood, and there is no clinically used method to assess the OGJ function in patients. Only indirect methods such as pH studies are carried out. The OGJ acts a valve controlling the flow of solids, liquids and gases between the oesophagus and the stomach. Manometry can determine if a sphincter is toned or relaxed; but, it cannot confirm that the sphincter region is actually open. Distension is a new technique for measuring function in the OGJ. By measuring the cross-sectional area through the narrow region in the junction during distension of a catheter mounted bag, much more information on the opening and closing patterns of the junction can be determined. This technique has already been demonstrated to show changes in the OGJ after surgical treatments for reflux disease. New measurement ideas around the concept of distending the OGJ offer new hope that a clinically useable test for compliance at the junction can be developed and could potentially help in determining appropriate therapy.

  19. Learning From Demonstration?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Christian; Bertelsen, Niels Haldor

    2014-01-01

    . This paper reports on an early demonstration project, the Building of a passive house dormitory in the Central Region of Denmark in 2006-2009. The project was supposed to deliver value, lean design, prefabrication, quality in sustainability, certification according to German standards for passive houses...... of control, driven by such challenges as complying with cost goals, the need to choose a German prefab supplier, and local contractors. Energy calculations, indoor climate, issues related to square meter requirements, and the hydrogen element became problematic. The aim to obtain passive house certification...

  20. Learning From Demonstration?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Christian; Bertelsen, Niels Haldor

    2014-01-01

    , and micro combined heat and power using hydrogen. Using sociological and business economic theories of innovation, the paper discusses how early movers of innovation tend to obtain only partial success when demonstrating their products and often feel obstructed by minor details. The empirical work...... encompasses both an evaluation of the design and Construction process as well as a post-occupancy evaluation. Process experiences include the use of a multidisciplinary competence group and performance measurement. The commencement of the project was enthusiastic, but it was forced into more traditional forms...

  1. Visual Electricity Demonstrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, James

    2017-09-01

    The Visual Electricity Demonstrator (VED) is a linear diode array that serves as a dynamic alternative to an ammeter. A string of 48 red light-emitting diodes (LEDs) blink one after another to create the illusion of a moving current. Having the current represented visually builds an intuitive and qualitative understanding about what is happening in a circuit. In this article, I describe several activities for this device and explain how using this technology in the classroom can enhance the understanding and appreciation of physics.

  2. Exploration Medical System Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, D. A.; Watkins, S. D.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exploration class missions will present significant new challenges and hazards to the health of the astronauts. Regardless of the intended destination, beyond low Earth orbit a greater degree of crew autonomy will be required to diagnose medical conditions, develop treatment plans, and implement procedures due to limited communications with ground-based personnel. SCOPE: The Exploration Medical System Demonstration (EMSD) project will act as a test bed on the International Space Station (ISS) to demonstrate to crew and ground personnel that an end-to-end medical system can assist clinician and non-clinician crew members in optimizing medical care delivery and data management during an exploration mission. Challenges facing exploration mission medical care include limited resources, inability to evacuate to Earth during many mission phases, and potential rendering of medical care by non-clinicians. This system demonstrates the integration of medical devices and informatics tools for managing evidence and decision making and can be designed to assist crewmembers in nominal, non-emergent situations and in emergent situations when they may be suffering from performance decrements due to environmental, physiological or other factors. PROJECT OBJECTIVES: The objectives of the EMSD project are to: a. Reduce or eliminate the time required of an on-orbit crew and ground personnel to access, transfer, and manipulate medical data. b. Demonstrate that the on-orbit crew has the ability to access medical data/information via an intuitive and crew-friendly solution to aid in the treatment of a medical condition. c. Develop a common data management framework that can be ubiquitously used to automate repetitive data collection, management, and communications tasks for all activities pertaining to crew health and life sciences. d. Ensure crew access to medical data during periods of restricted ground communication. e. Develop a common data management framework that

  3. NAVAJO ELECTRIFICATION DEMONSTRATION PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terry W. Battiest

    2008-06-11

    The Navajo Electrification Demonstration Project (NEDP) is a multi-year project which addresses the electricity needs of the unserved and underserved Navajo Nation, the largest American Indian tribe in the United States. The program serves to cumulatively provide off-grid electricty for families living away from the electricty infrastructure, line extensions for unserved families living nearby (less than 1/2 mile away from) the electricity, and, under the current project called NEDP-4, the construction of a substation to increase the capacity and improve the quality of service into the central core region of the Navajo Nation.

  4. Education Demonstration Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, A.; Lee, R. L.

    2003-10-01

    The General Atomics fusion education program ``Scientist in the Classroom" (SIC) now in its sixth year, uses scientists and engineers to present plasma as a state of matter to students in the classroom. Using hands-on equipment, students see how magnets, gas pressure changes, and different gases are turned into plasmas. A piston, sealed volume, and vacuum chamber illuminate ideal gas laws. Liquid nitrogen is used to explore thermodynamic temperature effects and changes in states of matter. Light bulbs are excited with a Tesla coil to ionize gases, thus becoming an inexpensive plasma devices and a plasma tube shows magnetic interactions with plasma. The demonstration equipment used in this program is built with simple designs and common commercial equipment keeping in mind a teacher's tight budget. The SIC program ( ˜25 school presentations per year) has become very popular and has acquired an enthusiastic group of regular teacher clientele requesting repeat visits. In addition, three very popular and successful ``Build-It" days, sponsored by the General Atomics Fusion Education Outreach Program, enables teachers to build and keep in their classroom some of this equipment. The demonstration devices will be presented along with their ``build-it" details.

  5. Inseparable phone books demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balta, Nuri; Çetin, Ali

    2017-05-01

    This study is aimed at first introducing a well-known discrepant event; inseparable phone books and second, turning it into an experiment for high school or middle school students. This discrepant event could be used especially to indicate how friction force can be effective in producing an unexpected result. Demonstration, discussion, explanation and experiment steps are presented on how to turn a simple discrepant event into an instructional activity. Results showed the relationships between number of pages and force, as well as between amounts of interleave and force. In addition to these, the mathematical equation for the total force between all interleaved pages is derived. As a conclusion, this study demonstrated that not only can phone books be used, but also ordinary books, to investigate this discrepant event. This experiment can be conducted as an example to show the agreement between theoretical and experimental results along with the confounding variables. This discrepant event can be used to create a cognitive conflict in students’ minds about the concepts of ‘force and motion’ and ‘friction force’.

  6. PFBC Utility Demonstration Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-11-01

    This report provides a summary of activities by American Electric Power Service Corporation during the first budget period of the PFBC Utility Demonstration Project. In April 1990, AEP signed a Cooperative Agreement with the US Department of Energy to repower the Philip Sporn Plant, Units 3 4 in New Haven, West Virginia, with a 330 KW PFBC plant. The purpose of the program was to demonstrate and verify PFBC in a full-scale commercial plant. The technical and cost baselines of the Cooperative Agreement were based on a preliminary engineering and design and a cost estimate developed by AEP subsequent to AEP's proposal submittal in May 1988, and prior to the signing of the Cooperative Agreement. The Statement of Work in the first budget period of the Cooperative Agreement included a task to develop a preliminary design and cost estimate for erecting a Greenfield plant and to conduct a comparison with the repowering option. The comparative assessment of the options concluded that erecting a Greenfield plant rather than repowering the existing Sporn Plant could be the technically and economically superior alternative. The Greenfield plant would have a capacity of 340 MW. The ten additional MW output is due to the ability to better match the steam cycle to the PFBC system with a new balance of plant design. In addition to this study, the conceptual design of the Sporn Repowering led to several items which warranted optimization studies with the goal to develop a more cost effective design.

  7. Smart Grid Demonstration Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Craig [National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, Arlington, VA (United States); Carroll, Paul [National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, Arlington, VA (United States); Bell, Abigail [National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, Arlington, VA (United States)

    2015-03-11

    The National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA) organized the NRECA-U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Smart Grid Demonstration Project (DE-OE0000222) to install and study a broad range of advanced smart grid technologies in a demonstration that spanned 23 electric cooperatives in 12 states. More than 205,444 pieces of electronic equipment and more than 100,000 minor items (bracket, labels, mounting hardware, fiber optic cable, etc.) were installed to upgrade and enhance the efficiency, reliability, and resiliency of the power networks at the participating co-ops. The objective of this project was to build a path for other electric utilities, and particularly electrical cooperatives, to adopt emerging smart grid technology when it can improve utility operations, thus advancing the co-ops’ familiarity and comfort with such technology. Specifically, the project executed multiple subprojects employing a range of emerging smart grid technologies to test their cost-effectiveness and, where the technology demonstrated value, provided case studies that will enable other electric utilities—particularly electric cooperatives— to use these technologies. NRECA structured the project according to the following three areas: Demonstration of smart grid technology; Advancement of standards to enable the interoperability of components; and Improvement of grid cyber security. We termed these three areas Technology Deployment Study, Interoperability, and Cyber Security. Although the deployment of technology and studying the demonstration projects at coops accounted for the largest portion of the project budget by far, we see our accomplishments in each of the areas as critical to advancing the smart grid. All project deliverables have been published. Technology Deployment Study: The deliverable was a set of 11 single-topic technical reports in areas related to the listed technologies. Each of these reports has already been submitted to DOE, distributed to co-ops, and

  8. Turbulence-induced magnetic flux asymmetry at nanoscale junctions

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    It was recently predicted [J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 18, 11059 (2006)] that turbulence of the electron flow may develop at nonadiabatic nanoscale junctions under appropriate conditions. Here we show that such an effect leads to an asymmetric current-induced magnetic field on the two sides of an otherwise symmetric junction. We propose that by measuring the fluxes ensuing from these fields across two surfaces placed at the two sides of the junction would provide direct and noninvasive evidence...

  9. Magnetic interaction between spatially extended superconducting tunnel junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbech-Jensen, Niels; Samuelsen, Mogens Rugholm

    2002-01-01

    A general description of magnetic interactions between superconducting tunnel junctions is given. The description covers a wide range of possible experimental systems, and we explicitly explore two experimentally relevant limits of coupled junctions. One is the limit of junctions with tunneling...... been considered through arrays of superconducting weak links based on semiconductor quantum wells with superconducting electrodes. We use the model to make direct interpretations of the published experiments and thereby propose that long-range magnetic interactions are responsible for the reported...

  10. Endoplasmic reticulum-plasma membrane junctions: structure, function and dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okeke, Emmanuel; Dingsdale, Hayley; Parker, Tony; Voronina, Svetlana; Tepikin, Alexei V

    2016-06-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-plasma membrane (PM) junctions are contact sites between the ER and the PM; the distance between the two organelles in the junctions is below 40 nm and the membranes are connected by protein tethers. A number of molecular tools and technical approaches have been recently developed to visualise, modify and characterise properties of ER-PM junctions. The junctions serve as the platforms for lipid exchange between the organelles and for cell signalling, notably Ca(2+) and cAMP signalling. Vice versa, signalling events regulate the development and properties of the junctions. Two Ca(2+) -dependent mechanisms of de novo formation of ER-PM junctions have been recently described and characterised. The junction-forming proteins and lipids are currently the focus of vigorous investigation. Junctions can be relatively short-lived and simple structures, forming and dissolving on the time scale of a few minutes. However, complex, sophisticated and multifunctional ER-PM junctions, capable of attracting numerous protein residents and other cellular organelles, have been described in some cell types. The road from simplicity to complexity, i.e. the transformation from simple 'nascent' ER-PM junctions to advanced stable multiorganellar complexes, is likely to become an attractive research avenue for current and future junctologists. Another area of considerable research interest is the downstream cellular processes that can be activated by specific local signalling events in the ER-PM junctions. Studies of the cell physiology and indeed pathophysiology of ER-PM junctions have already produced some surprising discoveries, likely to expand with advances in our understanding of these remarkable organellar contact sites. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2016 The Physiological Society.

  11. Engineering of Droplet Manipulation in Tertiary Junction Microfluidic Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-30

    in silico investigation of path selection by a single droplet inside a tertiary junction microchannel using oil-in-water as a model system. The...droplet was generated at a T-junction inside a microfluidic chip and its flow behaviour as a function of droplet size, streamline position, viscosity...investigation of path selection by a single droplet inside a tertiary- junction microchannel using oil-in-water as a model system. The droplet was generated at

  12. ACCIDENT PREDICTION MODELS FOR UNSIGNALISED URBAN JUNCTIONS IN GHANA

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammed SALIFU, MSc., PhD, MIHT, MGhIE

    2004-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to provide an improved method for safety appraisal in Ghana through the development and application of suitable accident prediction models for unsignalised urban junctions. A case study was designed comprising 91 junctions selected from the two most cosmopolitan cities in Ghana. A wide range of traffic and road data together with the corresponding accident data for each junction for the three-year period 1996-1998 was utilized in the model development p...

  13. Photothermoelectric p-n junction photodetector with intrinsic broadband polarimetry based on macroscopic carbon nanotube films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaowei; Wang, Xuan; Nanot, Sébastien; Cong, Kankan; Jiang, Qijia; Kane, Alexander A; Goldsmith, John E M; Hauge, Robert H; Léonard, François; Kono, Junichiro

    2013-08-27

    Light polarization is used in the animal kingdom for communication, navigation, and enhanced scene interpretation and also plays an important role in astronomy, remote sensing, and military applications. To date, there have been few photodetector materials demonstrated to have direct polarization sensitivity, as is usually the case in nature. Here, we report the realization of a carbon-based broadband photodetector, where the polarimetry is intrinsic to the active photodetector material. The detector is based on p-n junctions formed between two macroscopic films of single-wall carbon nanotubes. A responsivity up to ~1 V/W was observed in these devices, with a broadband spectral response spanning the visible to the mid-infrared. This responsivity is about 35 times larger than previous devices without p-n junctions. A combination of experiment and theory is used to demonstrate the photothermoelectric origin of the responsivity and to discuss the performance attributes of such devices.

  14. Effect of sound on gap-junction-based intercellular signaling: Calcium waves under acoustic irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deymier, P A; Swinteck, N; Runge, K; Deymier-Black, A; Hoying, J B

    2015-01-01

    We present a previously unrecognized effect of sound waves on gap-junction-based intercellular signaling such as in biological tissues composed of endothelial cells. We suggest that sound irradiation may, through temporal and spatial modulation of cell-to-cell conductance, create intercellular calcium waves with unidirectional signal propagation associated with nonconventional topologies. Nonreciprocity in calcium wave propagation induced by sound wave irradiation is demonstrated in the case of a linear and a nonlinear reaction-diffusion model. This demonstration should be applicable to other types of gap-junction-based intercellular signals, and it is thought that it should be of help in interpreting a broad range of biological phenomena associated with the beneficial therapeutic effects of sound irradiation and possibly the harmful effects of sound waves on health.

  15. Lipopolysaccharide disrupts the milk-blood barrier by modulating claudins in mammary alveolar tight junctions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Kobayashi

    Full Text Available Mastitis, inflammation of the mammary gland, is the most costly common disease in the dairy industry, and is caused by mammary pathogenic bacteria, including Escherichia coli. The bacteria invade the mammary alveolar lumen and disrupt the blood-milk barrier. In normal mammary gland, alveolar epithelial tight junctions (TJs contribute the blood-milk barrier of alveolar epithelium by blocking the leakage of milk components from the luminal side into the blood serum. In this study, we focused on claudin subtypes that participate in the alveolar epithelial TJs, because the composition of claudins is an important factor that affects TJ permeability. In normal mouse lactating mammary glands, alveolar TJs consist of claudin-3 without claudin-1, -4, and -7. In lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced mastitis, alveolar TJs showed 2-staged compositional changes in claudins. First, a qualitative change in claudin-3, presumably caused by phosphorylation and participation of claudin-7 in alveolar TJs, was recognized in parallel with the leakage of fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated albumin (FITC-albumin via the alveolar epithelium. Second, claudin-4 participated in alveolar TJs with claudin-3 and claudin-7 12 h after LPS injection. The partial localization of claudin-1 was also observed by immunostaining. Coinciding with the second change of alveolar TJs, the severe disruption of the blood-milk barrier was recognized by ectopic localization of β-casein and much leakage of FITC-albumin. Furthermore, the localization of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 on the luminal side and NFκB activation by LPS was observed in the alveolar epithelial cells. We suggest that the weakening and disruption of the blood-milk barrier are caused by compositional changes of claudins in alveolar epithelial TJs through LPS/TLR4 signaling.

  16. Fuel Cell Demonstration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerald Brun

    2006-09-15

    In an effort to promote clean energy projects and aid in the commercialization of new fuel cell technologies the Long Island Power Authority (LIPA) initiated a Fuel Cell Demonstration Program in 1999 with six month deployments of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) non-commercial Beta model systems at partnering sites throughout Long Island. These projects facilitated significant developments in the technology, providing operating experience that allowed the manufacturer to produce fuel cells that were half the size of the Beta units and suitable for outdoor installations. In 2001, LIPA embarked on a large-scale effort to identify and develop measures that could improve the reliability and performance of future fuel cell technologies for electric utility applications and the concept to establish a fuel cell farm (Farm) of 75 units was developed. By the end of October of 2001, 75 Lorax 2.0 fuel cells had been installed at the West Babylon substation on Long Island, making it the first fuel cell demonstration of its kind and size anywhere in the world at the time. Designed to help LIPA study the feasibility of using fuel cells to operate in parallel with LIPA's electric grid system, the Farm operated 120 fuel cells over its lifetime of over 3 years including 3 generations of Plug Power fuel cells (Lorax 2.0, Lorax 3.0, Lorax 4.5). Of these 120 fuel cells, 20 Lorax 3.0 units operated under this Award from June 2002 to September 2004. In parallel with the operation of the Farm, LIPA recruited government and commercial/industrial customers to demonstrate fuel cells as on-site distributed generation. From December 2002 to February 2005, 17 fuel cells were tested and monitored at various customer sites throughout Long Island. The 37 fuel cells operated under this Award produced a total of 712,635 kWh. As fuel cell technology became more mature, performance improvements included a 1% increase in system efficiency. Including equipment, design, fuel, maintenance

  17. Some chaotic features of intrinsically coupled Josephson junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolahchi, M.R., E-mail: kolahchi@iasbs.ac.ir [Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences, Zanjan 45195-1159 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shukrinov, Yu.M. [BLTP, JINR, Dubna, Moscow Region 141980 (Russian Federation); Max-Planck-Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Hamdipour, M. [Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences, Zanjan 45195-1159 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); BLTP, JINR, Dubna, Moscow Region 141980 (Russian Federation); Botha, A.E. [Department of Physics, University of South Africa, P.O. Box 392, Pretoria 0003 (South Africa); Suzuki, M. [Photonics and Electronics Science and Engineering Center and Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan)

    2013-08-15

    Highlights: ► Intrinsically coupled Josephson junctions model a high-T{sub c} superconductor. ► Intrinsically coupled Josephson junctions can act as a chaotic nonlinear system. ► Chaos could be due to resonance overlap. ► Avoiding parameters that lead to chaos is important for the design of resonators. -- Abstract: We look for chaos in an intrinsically coupled system of Josephson junctions. This study has direct applications for the high-T{sub c} resonators which require coherence amongst the junctions.

  18. Imaging snake orbits at graphene n -p junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolasiński, K.; Mreńca-Kolasińska, A.; Szafran, B.

    2017-01-01

    We consider conductance mapping of the snake orbits confined along the n -p junction defined in graphene by the electrostatic doping in the quantum Hall regime. We explain the periodicity of conductance oscillations at the magnetic field and the Fermi energy scales by the properties of the n -p junction as a conducting channel. We evaluate the conductance maps for a floating gate scanning the surface of the device. In the quantum Hall conditions the currents flow near the edges of the sample and along the n -p junction. The conductance mapping resolves only the n -p junction and not the edges. The conductance oscillations along the junction are found in the maps with periodicity related to the cyclotron orbits of the scattering current. Stronger probe potentials provide support to localized resonances at one of the sides of the junction with current loops that interfere with the n -p junction currents. The interference results in a series of narrow lines parallel to the junction with positions that strongly depend on the magnetic field through the Aharonov-Bohm effect. The consequences of a limited transparency of finite-width n -p junctions are also discussed.

  19. Assemble four-arm DNA junctions into nanoweb

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    DNA is of structural polymorphism, which is useful in nanoarchitecture; especially, four-arm DNA junc tions can be used to assemble nanowebs. The static four-arm DNA junctions were designed and synthesized. One-arm DNA and two-arm DNA came out simultaneously with the four-arm DNA junction's formation. A new method, termed the two-step method, was proposed and the productivity of four-arm DNA junctions was increased. A nanoweb was assembled successfully, but it showed irregularity itself. It was not the same as we expected. We consider that it is aresult from the flexibility of four-arm DNA junction.

  20. Terahertz Detection with Twin Superconductor-Insulator-Superconductor Tunnel Junctions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jing; WANG Ming-Jye; SHI Sheng-Cai; Hiroshi Mat-suo

    2007-01-01

    Terahertz detection with twin superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) tunnel junctions, which are connected in parallel via an inductive thin-film superconducting microstrip line, is mainly studied. Firstly, we investigate the direct-detection response of a superconducting twin-junction device by means of a Fourier transform spectrometer. Secondly, we construct a direct-detection model of twin SIS tunnel junctions. The superconducting twin-junction device is then simulated in terms of the constructed model. The simulation result is found to be in good agreement with the measured one. In addition, we observe that the direct-detection response of the device is consistent with the noise temperature behaviour.