WorldWideScience

Sample records for junctions composition structure

  1. Axially connected nanowire core-shell p-n junctions: a composite structure for high-efficiency solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sijia; Yan, Xin; Zhang, Xia; Li, Junshuai; Ren, Xiaomin

    2015-01-01

    A composite nanostructure for high-efficiency solar cells that axially connects nanowire core-shell p-n junctions is proposed. By axially connecting the p-n junctions in one nanowire, the solar spectrum is separated and absorbed in the top and bottom cells with respect to the wavelength. The unique structure of nanowire p-n junctions enables substantial light absorption along the nanowire and efficient radial carrier separation and collection. A coupled three-dimensional optoelectronic simulation is used to evaluate the performance of the structure. With an excellent current matching, a promising efficiency of 19.9% can be achieved at a low filling ratio of 0.283 (the density of the nanowire array), which is much higher than the tandem axial p-n junctions.

  2. Gap junctions: structure and function (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, W Howard; Martin, Patricia E M

    2002-01-01

    Gap junctions are plasma membrane spatial microdomains constructed of assemblies of channel proteins called connexins in vertebrates and innexins in invertebrates. The channels provide direct intercellular communication pathways allowing rapid exchange of ions and metabolites up to approximately 1 kD in size. Approximately 20 connexins are identified in the human or mouse genome, and orthologues are increasingly characterized in other vertebrates. Most cell types express multiple connexin isoforms, making likely the construction of a spectrum of heteromeric hemichannels and heterotypic gap junctions that could provide a structural basis for the charge and size selectivity of these intercellular channels. The precise nature of the potential signalling information traversing junctions in physiologically defined situations remains elusive, but extensive progress has been made in elucidating how connexins are assembled into gap junctions. Also, participation of gap junction hemichannels in the propagation of calcium waves via an extracellular purinergic pathway is emerging. Connexin mutations have been identified in a number of genetically inherited channel communication-opathies. These are detected in connexin 32 in Charcot Marie Tooth-X linked disease, in connexins 26 and 30 in deafness and skin diseases, and in connexins 46 and 50 in hereditary cataracts. Biochemical approaches indicate that many of the mutated connexins are mistargeted to gap junctions and/or fail to oligomerize correctly into hemichannels. Genetic ablation approaches are helping to map out a connexin code and point to specific connexins being required for cell growth and differentiation as well as underwriting basic intercellular communication.

  3. Vortex structures in exponentially shaped Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukrinov, Yu. M.; Semerdjieva, E. G.; Boyadjiev, T. L.

    2005-04-01

    We report the numerical calculations of the static vortex structure and critical curves in exponentially shaped long Josephson junctions for in-line and overlap geometries. Stability of the static solutions is investigated by checking the sign of the smallest eigenvalue of the associated Sturm-Liouville problem. The change in the junction width leads to the renormalization of the magnetic flux in comparison with the case of a linear one-dimensional model. We study the influence of the model's parameters, and particularly, the shape parameter on the stability of the states of the magnetic flux. We compare the vortex structure and critical curves for the in-line and overlap geometries. Our numerically constructed critical curve of the Josephson junction matches well with the experimental one.

  4. Structure Stability of Ⅰ-Type Carbon Nanotube Junctions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏丹; 袁喆; 李家明

    2002-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes with junctions may play an important role in future ‘nanoelectronics' and future ‘nano devices'.In particular, junctions constructed with metal and semiconducting nanotubes have potential applications. Basedon the orthogonal tight-binding molecular dynamics method, we present our study of the structure stability ofI-type carbon nanotube junctions.

  5. Composite Structures Manufacturing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Composite Structures Manufacturing Facility specializes in the design, analysis, fabrication and testing of advanced composite structures and materials for both...

  6. Endoplasmic reticulum-plasma membrane junctions: structure, function and dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okeke, Emmanuel; Dingsdale, Hayley; Parker, Tony; Voronina, Svetlana; Tepikin, Alexei V

    2016-06-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-plasma membrane (PM) junctions are contact sites between the ER and the PM; the distance between the two organelles in the junctions is below 40 nm and the membranes are connected by protein tethers. A number of molecular tools and technical approaches have been recently developed to visualise, modify and characterise properties of ER-PM junctions. The junctions serve as the platforms for lipid exchange between the organelles and for cell signalling, notably Ca(2+) and cAMP signalling. Vice versa, signalling events regulate the development and properties of the junctions. Two Ca(2+) -dependent mechanisms of de novo formation of ER-PM junctions have been recently described and characterised. The junction-forming proteins and lipids are currently the focus of vigorous investigation. Junctions can be relatively short-lived and simple structures, forming and dissolving on the time scale of a few minutes. However, complex, sophisticated and multifunctional ER-PM junctions, capable of attracting numerous protein residents and other cellular organelles, have been described in some cell types. The road from simplicity to complexity, i.e. the transformation from simple 'nascent' ER-PM junctions to advanced stable multiorganellar complexes, is likely to become an attractive research avenue for current and future junctologists. Another area of considerable research interest is the downstream cellular processes that can be activated by specific local signalling events in the ER-PM junctions. Studies of the cell physiology and indeed pathophysiology of ER-PM junctions have already produced some surprising discoveries, likely to expand with advances in our understanding of these remarkable organellar contact sites. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2016 The Physiological Society.

  7. Common features of a vortex structure in long exponentially shaped Josephson junctions and Josephson junctions with inhomogeneities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyadjiev, T. L.; Semerdjieva, E. G.; Shukrinov, Yu. M.

    2007-09-01

    We study the vortex structure in three different models of the long Josephson junction: the exponentially shaped Josephson junction and the Josephson junctions with the resistor and the shunt inhomogeneities in the barrier layer. For these three models the critical curves “critical current-magnetic field” are numerically constructed. We develop the idea of the equivalence of the exponentially shaped Josephson junction and the rectangular junction with the distributed inhomogeneity and demonstrate that at some parameters of the shunt and the resistor inhomogeneities in the ends of the junction the corresponding critical curves are very close to the exponentially shaped one.

  8. Common features of a vortex structure in long exponentially shaped Josephson junctions and Josephson junctions with inhomogeneities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyadjiev, T.L. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Semerdjieva, E.G. [Plovdiv University, 24 Tzar Asen Str., Plovdiv 4000 (Bulgaria); Shukrinov, Yu.M. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation)], E-mail: shukrinv@theor.jinr.ru

    2007-09-01

    We study the vortex structure in three different models of the long Josephson junction: the exponentially shaped Josephson junction and the Josephson junctions with the resistor and the shunt inhomogeneities in the barrier layer. For these three models the critical curves 'critical current-magnetic field' are numerically constructed. We develop the idea of the equivalence of the exponentially shaped Josephson junction and the rectangular junction with the distributed inhomogeneity and demonstrate that at some parameters of the shunt and the resistor inhomogeneities in the ends of the junction the corresponding critical curves are very close to the exponentially shaped one.

  9. Temporal correlations and structural memory effects in break junction measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magyarkuti, A.; Lauritzen, Kasper Primdal; Balogh, Zoltan Imre

    2017-01-01

    that correlations between the opening and subsequent closing traces may indicate structural memory effects in atomic-sized metallic and molecular junctions. Applying these methods on measured and simulated gold metallic contacts as a test system, we show that the surface diffusion induced flattening of the broken......-molecule junctions, we demonstrate pronounced contact memory effects and recovery of the molecule for junctions breaking before atomic chains are formed. However, if chains are pulled the random relaxation of the chain and molecule after rupture prevents opening-closing correlations....

  10. Vortex structure in a long Josephson junction with two inhomogeneities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreeva, O.Yu. [Tumen Thermal Networks OAO ' TRGK' , Tobolsk 626150 (Russian Federation); Boyadjiev, T.L. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Shukrinov, Yu.M. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation)], E-mail: shukrinv@theor.jinr.ru

    2007-09-01

    We study the vortex structure in the long Josephson junctions with one and two rectangular inhomogeneities in the barrier layer. In case of one inhomogeneity we demonstrate the existence of the asymmetric fluxon states. The disappearance of the mixed fluxon-antifluxon states is shown when the position of the inhomogeneity shifted to the end of the junction. In case of two inhomogeneities the change of the amplitude of Josephson current through the inhomogeneity in the end of the junction makes strong effect on the stability of the fluxon states and smoothes the maximums on the dependence 'critical current-magnetic field'.

  11. Vortex structure in a long Josephson junction with two inhomogeneities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreeva, O. Yu.; Boyadjiev, T. L.; Shukrinov, Yu. M.

    2007-09-01

    We study the vortex structure in the long Josephson junctions with one and two rectangular inhomogeneities in the barrier layer. In case of one inhomogeneity we demonstrate the existence of the asymmetric fluxon states. The disappearance of the mixed fluxon-antifluxon states is shown when the position of the inhomogeneity shifted to the end of the junction. In case of two inhomogeneities the change of the amplitude of Josephson current through the inhomogeneity in the end of the junction makes strong effect on the stability of the fluxon states and smoothes the maximums on the dependence “critical current-magnetic field”.

  12. Biomimetic tendon extracellular matrix composite gradient scaffold enhances ligament-to-bone junction reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huanhuan; Yang, Long; Zhang, Erchen; Zhang, Rui; Cai, Dandan; Zhu, Shouan; Ran, Jisheng; Bunpetch, Varitsara; Cai, Youzhi; Heng, Boon Chin; Hu, Yejun; Dai, Xuesong; Chen, Xiao; Ouyang, Hongwei

    2017-07-01

    Management of ligament/tendon-to-bone-junction healing remains a formidable challenge in the field of orthopedic medicine to date, due to deficient vascularity and multi-tissue transitional structure of the junction. Numerous strategies have been employed to improve ligament-bone junction healing, including delivery of stem cells, bioactive factors, and synthetic materials, but these methods are often inadequate at recapitulating the complex structure-function relationships at native tissue interfaces. Here, we developed an easily-fabricated and effective biomimetic composite to promote the regeneration of ligament-bone junction by physically modifying the tendon extracellular matrix (ECM) into a Random-Aligned-Random composite using ultrasound treatment. The differentiation potential of rabbit bone marrow stromal cells on the modified ECM were examined in vitro. The results demonstrated that the modified ECM enhanced expression of chondrogenesis and osteogenesis-associated epigenetic genes (Jmjd1c, Kdm6b), transcription factor genes (Sox9, Runx2) and extracellular matrix genes (Col2a1, Ocn), resulting in higher osteoinductivity than the untreated tendon ECM in vitro. In the rabbit anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction model in vivo, micro-computed tomography (Micro-CT) and histological analysis showed that the modified Random-Aligned-Random composite scaffold enhanced bone and fibrocartilage formation at the interface, more efficaciously than the unmodified tendon ECM. Therefore, these results demonstrated that the biomimetic Random-Aligned-Random composite could be a promising scaffold for ligament/tendon-bone junction repair. The native transitional region consists of several distinct yet contiguous tissue regions, composed of soft tissue, non-calcified fibrocartilage, calcified fibrocartilage, and bone. A stratified graft whose phases are interconnected with each other is essential for supporting the formation of functionally continuous multi

  13. Efficient photocatalytic degradation of acid orange 7 on metal oxide p-n junction composites under visible light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suk Jang, Jum; Gyu Kim, Hyun; Lee, Se-Hee

    2012-11-01

    MO(=CuO, Co3O4, NiO)/BiVO4 p-n junction composites were synthesized by urea-precipitation and wet impregnation method. The physicochemical and optical properties of the as-prepared materials were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and UV-visible diffuse reflectance spectra. The photocatalytic performance of the as-prepared materials was investigated for decomposition of azo dye, acid orange 7. The CuO/BiVO4 and Co3O4/BiVO4 p-n junction composite photocatalysts exhibited the higher photocatalytic degradation of acid orange 7 than those of BiVO4 and NiO/BiVO4 as-prepared samples under visible light irradiation. We also discussed the mechanism of enhanced photocatalytic activity of p-n junctioned composites based on their energy band structures.

  14. Gap junctions in cells of the immune system: structure, regulation and possible functional roles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C. Sáez

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available Gap junction channels are sites of cytoplasmic communication between contacting cells. In vertebrates, they consist of protein subunits denoted connexins (Cxs which are encoded by a gene family. According to their Cx composition, gap junction channels show different gating and permeability properties that define which ions and small molecules permeate them. Differences in Cx primary sequences suggest that channels composed of different Cxs are regulated differentially by intracellular pathways under specific physiological conditions. Functional roles of gap junction channels could be defined by the relative importance of permeant substances, resulting in coordination of electrical and/or metabolic cellular responses. Cells of the native and specific immune systems establish transient homo- and heterocellular contacts at various steps of the immune response. Morphological and functional studies reported during the last three decades have revealed that many intercellular contacts between cells in the immune response present gap junctions or "gap junction-like" structures. Partial characterization of the molecular composition of some of these plasma membrane structures and regulatory mechanisms that control them have been published recently. Studies designed to elucidate their physiological roles suggest that they might permit coordination of cellular events which favor the effective and timely response of the immune system.

  15. Experimental observation of subharmonic gap structures in long Josephson junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordahn, M.A.; Manscher, Martin; Mygind, Jesper

    1999-01-01

    The subharmonic gap structure (SGS) in long-overlap Nb-AlOx-Nb Josephson tunnel junctions has been investigated. The experimental results show peaks in the differential conductance at both odd and even integer fractions of the gap voltage, VG Furthermore, the conductance peaks at V-G/2 has been...

  16. Collagen Scaffolds Incorporating Coincident Gradations of Instructive Structural and Biochemical Cues for Osteotendinous Junction Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliari, Steven R; Weisgerber, Daniel W; Grier, William K; Mahmassani, Ziad; Boppart, Marni D; Harley, Brendan A C

    2015-04-22

    A fully 3D biomaterial containing overlapping gradations of structural, compositional, and biomolecular cues as seen in native orthopedic interfaces is described for the first time. A multi-compartment collagen scaffold is created for engineering tendon-bone junctions connected by a continuous interface that can induce spatially specific MSC differentiation down tenogenic and osteogenic lineages without the use of differentiation media. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Direct Preparation of Carbon Nanotube Intramolecular Junctions on Structured Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Jianing; Zhan, Zhaoyao; Sun, Gengzhi; Mohan, Hari Krishna Salila Vijayalal; Zhou, Jinyuan; Kim, Young-Jin; Zheng, Lianxi

    2016-12-01

    Leveraging the unique properties of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) intramolecular junctions (IMJs) in innovative nanodevices and next-generation nanoelectronics requires controllable, repeatable, and large-scale preparation, together with rapid identification and comprehensive characterization of such structures. Here we demonstrate SWNT IMJs through directly growing ultralong SWNTs on trenched substrates. It is found that the trench configurations introduce axial strain in partially suspended nanotubes, and promote bending deformation in the vicinity of the trench edges. As a result, the lattice and electronic structure of the nanotubes can be locally modified, to form IMJs in the deformation regions. The trench patterns also enable pre-defining the formation locations of SWNT IMJs, facilitating the rapid identification. Elaborate Raman characterization has verified the formation of SWNT IMJs and identified their types. Rectifying behavior has been observed by electrical measurements on the as-prepared semiconducting-semiconducting (S-S) junction.

  18. Microwave dependence of subharmonic gap structure in superconducting junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, O. Hoffman; Kofoed, Bent; Pedersen, Niels Falsig

    1974-01-01

    with the superconducting energy gap itself. The location in voltage of all these structures is given by eV=(2Δ±nh ν) / m, where 2Δ is the superconducting energy gap, ν is the applied frequency, h is Planck's constant, e is the magnitude of the electronic charge, V is the dc voltage drop across the junction, and m and n...

  19. An oxide filled extended trench gate super junction MOSFET structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Cai-Lin; Sun Jun

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposes an oxide filled extended trench gate super junction (SJ) MOSFET structure to meet the need of higher frequency power switches application. Compared with the conventional trench gate SJ MOSFET, new structure has the smaller input and output capacitances, and the remarkable improvements in the breakdown voltage, on-resistance and switching speed. Furthermore, the SJ in the new structure can be realized by the existing trench etching and shallow angle implantation, which offers more freedom to SJ MOSFET device design and fabrication.

  20. Theories of subharmonic gap structures in superconducting junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselberg, L.E.; Levinsen, M. T.; Samuelsen, Mogens Rugholm

    1974-01-01

    The two theories of subharmonic gap structures in superconducting junctions, multiparticle tunneling and self-coupling due to an electromagnetic field set up by the ac Josephson current, are analyzed when microwaves are applied. Both theories give the same location in voltage for the microwave......-induced satellites and the same microwave-power dependence for the subharmonic gap structure and the satellites. Therefore other properties than these are to be considered in order to distinguish between the two theories. We suggest that self-coupling is the main cause of the subharmonic gap structure....

  1. Scanning electron microscopic observations of fibrous structure of cemento-dentinal junction in healthy teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratebha, B; Jaikumar, N D; Sudhakar, R

    2014-01-01

    The cemento-dentinal junction (CDJ) is a structural and biologic link between cementum and dentin present in the roots of teeth. Conflicting reports about the origin, structure and composition of this layer are present in literature. The width of this junctional tissue is reported to be about 2-4 μm with adhesion of cementum and dentin by proteoglycans and by collagen fiber intermingling. The objective of this study is to observe and report the fibrous architecture of the CDJ of healthy tooth roots. A total of 15 healthy teeth samples were collected, sectioned into halves, demineralized in 5% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, processed using NaOH maceration technique and observed under a scanning electron microscope. The CDJ appeared to be a fibril poor groove with a width of 2-4 µm. Few areas of collagen fiber intermingling could be appreciated. A detailed observation of these tissues has been presented.

  2. Lightweight Composite Intertank Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehle, Greg V.

    1995-01-01

    Report presents results of study for proposed lightweight composite material alternative to present semimonocoque aluminum intertank structure for advanced launch vehicles. Proposed structure integrated assembly of sandwich panels made of laminated epoxy-matrix/carbon-fiber skins, and aluminum honeycomb core.

  3. Monitoring drilling mud composition using flowing liquid junction electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jasinski, R.; Fletcher, P.; Vercaemer, C.

    1990-06-27

    The concentration of a chosen ionic component of a drilling mud is determined from the potential difference between an ion selective electrode, selective to the component and a reference electrode, the reference electrode being connected to the mud by a liquid junction through which reference electrolyte flows from the electrode to the mud. The system avoids errors due to undesirable interactions between the mud and the reference electrode materials. (author).

  4. Modulation of Tight Junction Structure and Function by Kinases and Phosphatases Targeting Occludin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Johannes Dörfel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tight junctions (TJs typically represent the most apical contacts in epithelial and endothelial cell layers where they play an essential role in the separation of extracellular or luminal spaces from underlying tissues in the body. Depending on the protein composition, TJs define the barrier characteristics and in addition maintain cell polarity. Two major families of integral membrane proteins form the typical TJ strand network, the tight junction-associated MARVEL protein (TAMP family members occludin, tricellulin, and MarvelD3 as well as a specific set of claudins. Occludin was the first identified member of these tetraspanins and is now widely accepted as a regulator of TJ assembly and function. Therefore, occludin itself has to be tightly regulated. Phosphorylation of occludin appears to be of central importance in this context. Here we want to summarize current knowledge on the kinases and phosphatases directly modifying occludin, and their role in the regulation of TJ structure, function, and dynamics.

  5. Repairs of composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Hee Seok

    Repair on damaged composite panels was conducted. To better understand adhesively bonded repair, the study investigates the effect of design parameters on the joint strength. The design parameters include bondline length, thickness of adherend and type of adhesive. Adhesives considered in this study were tested to measure their tensile material properties. Three types of adhesively bonded joints, single strap, double strap, and single lap joint were considered under changing bondline lengths, thickness of adherend and type of adhesive. Based on lessons learned from bonded joints, a one-sided patch repair method for composite structures was conducted. The composite patch was bonded to the damaged panel by either film adhesive FM-73M or paste adhesive EA-9394 and the residual strengths of the repaired specimens were compared under varying patch sizes. A new repair method using attachments has been suggested to enhance the residual strength. Results obtained through experiments were analyzed using finite element analysis to provide a better repair design and explain the experimental results. It was observed that the residual strength of the repaired specimen was affected by patch length. Method for rapid repairs of damaged composite structures was investigated. The damage was represented by a circular hole in a composite laminated plate. Pre-cured composite patches were bonded with a quick-curing commercial adhesive near (rather than over) the hole. Tensile tests were conducted on specimens repaired with various patch geometries. The test results showed that, among the methods investigated, the best repair method restored over 90% of the original strength of an undamaged panel. The interfacial stresses in the adhesive zone for different patches were calculated in order to understand the efficiencies of the designs of these patch repairs. It was found that the composite patch that yielded the best strength had the lowest interfacial peel stress between the patch and

  6. Thermal cycling effects on adhesion of resin-bovine enamel junction among different composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Cheng; Ko, Chia-Ling; Wu, Hui-Yu; Lai, Pei-Ling; Shih, Chi-Jen

    2014-10-01

    Thermal cycling is used to mimic the changes in oral cavity temperature experienced by composite resins when used clinically. The purpose of this study is to assess the thermal cycling effects of in-house produced composite resin on bonding strength. The dicalcium phosphate anhydrous filler surfaces are modified using nanocrystals and silanization (w/NP/Si). The resin is compared with commercially available composite resins Filtek Z250, Z350, and glass ionomer restorative material GIC Fuji-II LC (control). Different composite resins were filled into the dental enamel of bovine teeth. The bond force and resin-enamel junction graphical structures of the samples were determined after thermal cycling between 5 and 55°C in deionized water for 600 cycles. After thermal cycling, the w/NP/Si 30wt%, 50wt% and Filtek Z250, Z350 groups showed higher shear forces than glass ionomer GIC, and w/NP/Si 50wt% had the highest shear force. Through SEM observations, more of the fillings with w/NP/Si 30wt% and w/NP/Si 50wt% groups flowed into the enamel tubule, forming closed tubules with the composite resins. The push-out force is proportional to the resin flow depth and uniformity. The push-out tubule pore and resin shear pattern is the most uniform and consistent in the w/NP/Si 50wt% group. Accordingly, this developed composite resin maintains great mechanical properties after thermal cycling. Thus, it has the potential to be used in a clinical setting when restoring non-carious cervical lesions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Deployable Soft Composite Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Wang; Hugo Rodrigue; Sung-Hoon Ahn

    2016-01-01

    Deployable structure composed of smart materials based actuators can reconcile its inherently conflicting requirements of low mass, good shape adaptability, and high load-bearing capability. This work describes the fabrication of deployable structures using smart soft composite actuators combining a soft matrix with variable stiffness properties and hinge-like movement through a rigid skeleton. The hinge actuator has the advantage of being simple to fabricate, inexpensive, lightweight and sim...

  8. Hybrid composite laminate structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, C. C.; Lark, R. F. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An invention which relates to laminate structures and specifically to essentially anisotropic fiber composite laminates is described. Metal foils are selectively disposed within the laminate to produce increased resistance to high velocity impact, fracture, surface erosion, and other stresses within the laminate.

  9. Unibody Composite Pressurized Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rufer, Markus; Conger, Robert; Bauer, Thomas; Newman, John

    2013-01-01

    An integrated, generic unibody composite pressurized structure (UCPS) combined with a positive expulsion device (PED), consisting of an elastomeric bladder for monopropellant hydrazine, has been quasi-standardized for spacecraft use. The combination functions as an all-composite, non-metallic, propellant tank with bladder. The integrated UCPS combines several previous innovations - specifically, the linerless, all-composite cryogenic tank technology; all-composite boss; resin formulation; and integrated stringer system. The innovation combines the UCPS with an integrated propellant management device (PMD), the PED or bladder, to create an entirely unique system for in-space use. The UCPS is a pressure vessel that incorporates skirts, stringers, and other structures so that it is both an in-space hydrazine tank, and also a structural support system for a spacecraft in a single, all-composite unit. This innovation builds on the progress in the development of a previous SBIR (Small Business Innovation Research) Phase I with Glenn Research Center and an SBIR III with Johnson Space Center that included the fabrication of two 42-in. (˜107-cm) diameter all-composite cryogenic (LOX and liquid methane) UCPS test tanks for a lunar lander. This Phase II provides hydra zine compatibility testing of the elastomeric bladder, a see-through PED to validate the expulsion process and model, and a complete UCPS-based PED with stringers and skirts that will be used to conduct initial qualification and expulsion tests. This extends the UCPS technology to include hydrazine-based, in-space pro - pulsion applications and can also be used for electric propulsion. This innovation creates a system that, in comparison to the traditional approach, is lower in weight, cost, volume, and production time; is stronger; and is capable of much higher pressures. It also has fewer failure modes, and is applicable to both chemical and electric propulsion systems.

  10. Structural Origins of Conductance Fluctuations in Gold–Thiolate Molecular Transport Junctions

    KAUST Repository

    French, William R.

    2013-03-21

    We report detailed atomistic simulations combined with high-fidelity conductance calculations to probe the structural origins of conductance fluctuations in thermally evolving Au-benzene-1,4-dithiolate-Au junctions. We compare the behavior of structurally ideal junctions (where the electrodes are modeled as flat surfaces) to structurally realistic, experimentally representative junctions resulting from break-junction simulations. The enhanced mobility of metal atoms in structurally realistic junctions results in significant changes to the magnitude and origin of the conductance fluctuations. Fluctuations are larger by a factor of 2-3 in realistic junctions compared to ideal junctions. Moreover, in junctions with highly deformed electrodes, the conductance fluctuations arise primarily from changes in the Au geometry, in contrast to results for junctions with nondeformed electrodes, where the conductance fluctuations are dominated by changes in the molecule geometry. These results provide important guidance to experimentalists developing strategies to control molecular conductance, and also to theoreticians invoking simplified structural models of junctions to predict their behavior. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  11. Deployable Soft Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Rodrigue, Hugo; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2016-02-01

    Deployable structure composed of smart materials based actuators can reconcile its inherently conflicting requirements of low mass, good shape adaptability, and high load-bearing capability. This work describes the fabrication of deployable structures using smart soft composite actuators combining a soft matrix with variable stiffness properties and hinge-like movement through a rigid skeleton. The hinge actuator has the advantage of being simple to fabricate, inexpensive, lightweight and simple to actuate. This basic actuator can then be used to form modules capable of different types of deformations, which can then be assembled into deployable structures. The design of deployable structures is based on three principles: design of basic hinge actuators, assembly of modules and assembly of modules into large-scale deployable structures. Various deployable structures such as a segmented triangular mast, a planar structure comprised of single-loop hexagonal modules and a ring structure comprised of single-loop quadrilateral modules were designed and fabricated to verify this approach. Finally, a prototype for a deployable mirror was developed by attaching a foldable reflective membrane to the designed ring structure and its functionality was tested by using it to reflect sunlight onto to a small-scale solar panel.

  12. Deployable Soft Composite Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Rodrigue, Hugo; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2016-02-19

    Deployable structure composed of smart materials based actuators can reconcile its inherently conflicting requirements of low mass, good shape adaptability, and high load-bearing capability. This work describes the fabrication of deployable structures using smart soft composite actuators combining a soft matrix with variable stiffness properties and hinge-like movement through a rigid skeleton. The hinge actuator has the advantage of being simple to fabricate, inexpensive, lightweight and simple to actuate. This basic actuator can then be used to form modules capable of different types of deformations, which can then be assembled into deployable structures. The design of deployable structures is based on three principles: design of basic hinge actuators, assembly of modules and assembly of modules into large-scale deployable structures. Various deployable structures such as a segmented triangular mast, a planar structure comprised of single-loop hexagonal modules and a ring structure comprised of single-loop quadrilateral modules were designed and fabricated to verify this approach. Finally, a prototype for a deployable mirror was developed by attaching a foldable reflective membrane to the designed ring structure and its functionality was tested by using it to reflect sunlight onto to a small-scale solar panel.

  13. Structure, regulation and function of gap junctions in liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, Michaël; Decrock, Elke; Wang, Nan; Leybaert, Luc; da Silva, Tereza Cristina; Veloso Alves Pereira, Isabel; Jaeschke, Hartmut; Cogliati, Bruno; Vinken, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    Gap junctions are a specialized group of cell-to-cell junctions that mediate direct intercellular communication between cells. They arise from the interaction of 2 hemichannels of adjacent cells, which in turn are composed of 6 connexin proteins. In liver, gap junctions are predominantly found in hepatocytes and play critical roles in virtually all phases of the hepatic life cycle, including cell growth, differentiation, liver-specific functionality and cell death. Liver gap junctions are directed through a broad variety of mechanisms ranging from epigenetic control of connexin expression to posttranslational regulation of gap junction activity. This paper reviews established and novel aspects regarding the architecture, control and functional relevance of liver gap junctions. PMID:27001459

  14. Structured chaos in a devil's staircase of the Josephson junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukrinov, Yu. M.; Botha, A. E.; Medvedeva, S. Yu.; Kolahchi, M. R.; Irie, A.

    2014-09-01

    The phase dynamics of Josephson junctions (JJs) under external electromagnetic radiation is studied through numerical simulations. Current-voltage characteristics, Lyapunov exponents, and Poincaré sections are analyzed in detail. It is found that the subharmonic Shapiro steps at certain parameters are separated by structured chaotic windows. By performing a linear regression on the linear part of the data, a fractal dimension of D = 0.868 is obtained, with an uncertainty of ±0.012. The chaotic regions exhibit scaling similarity, and it is shown that the devil's staircase of the system can form a backbone that unifies and explains the highly correlated and structured chaotic behavior. These features suggest a system possessing multiple complete devil's staircases. The onset of chaos for subharmonic steps occurs through the Feigenbaum period doubling scenario. Universality in the sequence of periodic windows is also demonstrated. Finally, the influence of the radiation and JJ parameters on the structured chaos is investigated, and it is concluded that the structured chaos is a stable formation over a wide range of parameter values.

  15. Silicide/Silicon Hetero-Junction Structure for Thermoelectric Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Dongsuk; Kim, Soojung; Choi, Wonchul; Kim, Junsoo; Zyung, Taehyoung; Jang, Moongyu

    2015-10-01

    We fabricated silicide/silicon hetero-junction structured thermoelectric device by CMOS process for the reduction of thermal conductivity with the scatterings of phonons at silicide/silicon interfaces. Electrical conductivities, Seebeck coefficients, power factors, and temperature differences are evaluated using the steady state analysis method. Platinum silicide/silicon multilayered structure showed an enhanced Seebeck coefficient and power factor characteristics, which was considered for p-leg element. Also, erbium silicide/silicon structure showed an enhanced Seebeck coefficient, which was considered for an n-leg element. Silicide/silicon multilayered structure is promising for thermoelectric applications by reducing thermal conductivity with an enhanced Seebeck coefficient. However, because of the high thermal conductivity of the silicon packing during thermal gradient is not a problem any temperature difference. Therefore, requires more testing and analysis in order to overcome this problem. Thermoelectric generators are devices that based on the Seebeck effect, convert temperature differences into electrical energy. Although thermoelectric phenomena have been used for heating and cooling applications quite extensively, it is only in recent years that interest has increased in energy generation.

  16. Bonded and Stitched Composite Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalewski, Bart F. (Inventor); Dial, William B. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A method of forming a composite structure can include providing a plurality of composite panels of material, each composite panel having a plurality of holes extending through the panel. An adhesive layer is applied to each composite panel and a adjoining layer is applied over the adhesive layer. The method also includes stitching the composite panels, adhesive layer, and adjoining layer together by passing a length of a flexible connecting element into the plurality of holes in the composite panels of material. At least the adhesive layer is cured to bond the composite panels together and thereby form the composite structure.

  17. Multifunctional Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    1  I.  INTRODUCTION ...create  the model  is significantly  lower because structured  mesh generation is easily automated.         3 I. INTRODUCTION Composite  materials...specialized materials  such  as  piezoelectric  and  magnetostrictive  materials  that  have  been used to design and build both actuators and sensors

  18. Coexistance of Giant Tunneling Electroresistance and Magnetoresistance in an All-Oxide Composite Magnetic Tunnel Junction

    KAUST Repository

    Caffrey, Nuala Mai

    2012-11-30

    We propose, by performing advanced abinitio electron transport calculations, an all-oxide composite magnetic tunnel junction, within which both large tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) and tunneling electroresistance (TER) effects can coexist. The TMR originates from the symmetry-driven spin filtering provided by an insulating BaTiO3 barrier to the electrons injected from the SrRuO3 electrodes. Following recent theoretical suggestions, the TER effect is achieved by intercalating a thin insulating layer, here SrTiO3, at one of the SrRuO3/BaTiO3 interfaces. As the complex band structure of SrTiO3 has the same symmetry as that of BaTiO3, the inclusion of such an intercalated layer does not negatively alter the TMR and in fact increases it. Crucially, the magnitude of the TER also scales with the thickness of the SrTiO3 layer. The SrTiO3 thickness becomes then a single control parameter for both the TMR and the TER effect. This protocol offers a practical way to the fabrication of four-state memory cells. © 2012 American Physical Society.

  19. Combustible structural composites and methods of forming combustible structural composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Michael A.; Heaps, Ronald J.; Steffler, Eric D; Swank, William D.

    2011-08-30

    Combustible structural composites and methods of forming same are disclosed. In an embodiment, a combustible structural composite includes combustible material comprising a fuel metal and a metal oxide. The fuel metal is present in the combustible material at a weight ratio from 1:9 to 1:1 of the fuel metal to the metal oxide. The fuel metal and the metal oxide are capable of exothermically reacting upon application of energy at or above a threshold value to support self-sustaining combustion of the combustible material within the combustible structural composite. Structural-reinforcing fibers are present in the composite at a weight ratio from 1:20 to 10:1 of the structural-reinforcing fibers to the combustible material. Other embodiments and aspects are disclosed.

  20. Precision Composite Space Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-10-15

    and shear failures ar matrix failure. Out-of-plane shear and norma e l stresses are used when delamination is included. ome degradation models avoid...variation of the norma lamina modulus ith increasing crack density corresponding to the laminate test cases defined in Fig. 42. Fig. 44 and Fig. 45...and Reifsnider KL, (1982), Stiffness-Reduction Mechanisms in Composite P 775, K. L. Reifsnider, Ed., ALaminates,” Damage in Composite Materials. ASTM

  1. Deployable Composite Structures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA is seeking innovative structure technologies that will advance expandable modules for orbital and surface based habitats. These secondary structures must...

  2. Spectroscopy of Deep Traps in Cu2S-CdS Junction Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenijus Gaubas

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Cu2S-CdS junctions of the polycrystalline material layers have been examined by combining the capacitance deep level transient spectroscopy technique together with white LED light additional illumination (C-DLTS-WL and the photo-ionization spectroscopy (PIS implemented by the photocurrent probing. Three types of junction structures, separated by using the barrier capacitance characteristics of the junctions and correlated with XRD distinguished precipitates of the polycrystalline layers, exhibit different deep trap spectra within CdS substrates.

  3. Structure of the gap junction channel and its implications for its biological functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Shoji; Tsukihara, Tomitake

    2011-04-01

    Gap junctions consist of arrays of intercellular channels composed of integral membrane proteins called connexin in vertebrates. Gap junction channels regulate the passage of ions and biological molecules between adjacent cells and, therefore, are critically important in many biological activities, including development, differentiation, neural activity, and immune response. Mutations in connexin genes are associated with several human diseases, such as neurodegenerative disease, skin disease, deafness, and developmental abnormalities. The activity of gap junction channels is regulated by the membrane voltage, intracellular microenvironment, interaction with other proteins, and phosphorylation. Each connexin channel has its own property for conductance and molecular permeability. A number of studies have tried to reveal the molecular architecture of the channel pore that should confer the connexin-specific permeability/selectivity properties and molecular basis for the gating and regulation. In this review, we give an overview of structural studies and describe the structural and functional relationship of gap junction channels.

  4. Structural Molecular Components of Septate Junctions in Cnidarians Point to the Origin of Epithelial Junctions in Eukaryotes

    KAUST Repository

    Ganot, P.

    2014-09-21

    Septate junctions (SJs) insure barrier properties and control paracellular diffusion of solutes across epithelia in invertebrates. However, the origin and evolution of their molecular constituents in Metazoa have not been firmly established. Here, we investigated the genomes of early branching metazoan representatives to reconstruct the phylogeny of the molecular components of SJs. Although Claudins and SJ cytoplasmic adaptor components appeared successively throughout metazoan evolution, the structural components of SJs arose at the time of Placozoa/Cnidaria/Bilateria radiation. We also show that in the scleractinian coral Stylophora pistillata, the structural SJ component Neurexin IV colocalizes with the cortical actin network at the apical border of the cells, at the place of SJs. We propose a model for SJ components in Cnidaria. Moreover, our study reveals an unanticipated diversity of SJ structural component variants in cnidarians. This diversity correlates with gene-specific expression in calcifying and noncalcifying tissues, suggesting specific paracellular pathways across the cell layers of these diploblastic animals.

  5. Field-structured composite studies.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, James Ellis; Williamson, Rodney L.

    2004-04-01

    Field-structured composites (FSCs) were produced by hosting micron-sized gold-coated nickel particles in a pre-polymer and allowing the mixture to cure in a magnetic field environment. The feasibility of controlling a composite's electrical conductivity using feedback control applied to the field coils was investigated. It was discovered that conductivity in FSCs is primarily determined by stresses in the polymer host matrix due to cure shrinkage. Thus, in cases where the structuring field was uniform and unidirectional so as to produce chainlike structures in the composite, no electrical conductivity was measured until well after the structuring field was turned off at the gel point. In situations where complex, rotating fields were used to generate complex, three-dimensional structures in a composite, very small, but measurable, conductivity was observed prior to the gel point. Responsive, sensitive prototype chemical sensors were developed based on this technology with initial tests showing very promising results.

  6. Composition and adaptation of human myotendinous junction and neighboring muscle fibers to heavy resistance training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, J R; Mackey, A L; Knudsen, A B

    2016-01-01

    The myotendinous junction (MTJ) is a common site of strain injury and yet understanding of its composition and ability to adapt to loading is poor. The main aims of this study were to determine the profile of selected collagens and macrophage density in human MTJ and adjoining muscle fibers...... and were sectioned and stained immunohistochemically for collagen types I, III, VI, XII, XIV, XXII, Tenascin-C and CD68. Macrophage density and distribution was evaluated and the amount of each collagen type in muscle and MTJ was graded. Collagen XXII was observed solely at the MTJ, while all other...... collagens were abundant at the MTJ and in muscle perimysium or endomysium. The endomysial content of collagen XIV, macrophages and Tenascin-C increased following 4 weeks of training. These findings illustrate the heterogeneity of collagen type composition of human MTJ. The increase in collagen XIV following...

  7. A rare nucleotide base tautomer in the structure of an asymmetric DNA junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuu, Patricia; Ho, P Shing

    2009-08-25

    The single-crystal structure of a DNA Holliday junction assembled from four unique sequences shows a structure that conforms to the general features of models derived from similar constructs in solution. The structure is a compact stacked-X form junction with two sets of stacked B-DNA-type arms that coaxially stack to form semicontinuous duplexes interrupted only by the crossing of the junction. These semicontinuous helices are related by a right-handed rotation angle of 56.5 degrees, which is nearly identical to the 60 degree angle in the solution model but differs from the more shallow value of approximately 40 degrees for previous crystal structures of symmetric junctions that self-assemble from single identical inverted-repeat sequences. This supports the model in which the unique set of intramolecular interactions at the trinucleotide core of the crossing strands, which are not present in the current asymmetric junction, affects both the stability and geometry of the symmetric junctions. An unexpected result, however, is that a highly wobbled A.T base pair, which is ascribed here to a rare enol tautomer form of the thymine, was observed at the end of a CCCC/GGGG sequence within the stacked B-DNA arms of this 1.9 A resolution structure. We suggest that the junction itself is not responsible for this unusual conformation but served as a vehicle for the study of this CG-rich sequence as a B-DNA duplex, mimicking the form that would be present in a replication complex. The existence of this unusual base lends credence to and defines a sequence context for the "rare tautomer hypothesis" as a mechanism for inducing transition mutations during DNA replication.

  8. Equidistance of branch structure in capacitively coupled Josephson junctions model with diffusion current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukrinov, Yu.M. [BLTP, JINR, Dubna, Moscow Region, 141980 (Russian Federation) and Physical Technical Institute, Dushanbe 734063 (Tajikistan)]. E-mail: shukrinv@theor.jinr.ru; Mahfouzi, F. [Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences, P.O. Box 45195-1159, Zanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Seidel, P. [Institut fuer Festkorperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, D-07743 Jena (Germany)

    2006-11-01

    Branch structure in current-voltage characteristics of intrinsic Josephson junctions of HTSC is studied in the framework of two models: capacitively coupled Josephson junctions (CCJJ) model and CCJJ model with diffusion current (CCJJ + DC). We investigate the coupling dependence of the branch's slopes and demonstrate that the equidistance of the branch structure in CCJJ model is broken at enough small values of coupling parameter (at {alpha} << 1). We show that the inclusion of diffusion in the tunneling current through intrinsic Josephson junctions might restore the equidistance of the branch structure. Change of the current-voltage characteristics in CCJJ + DC model under variation of the coupling and McCumber parameters and effect of boundary conditions on the branch structure is analyzed.

  9. Equidistance of branch structure in capacitively coupled Josephson junctions model with diffusion current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukrinov, Yu. M.; Mahfouzi, F.; Seidel, P.

    2006-11-01

    Branch structure in current-voltage characteristics of intrinsic Josephson junctions of HTSC is studied in the framework of two models: capacitively coupled Josephson junctions (CCJJ) model and CCJJ model with diffusion current (CCJJ + DC). We investigate the coupling dependence of the branch’s slopes and demonstrate that the equidistance of the branch structure in CCJJ model is broken at enough small values of coupling parameter (at α ≪ 1). We show that the inclusion of diffusion in the tunneling current through intrinsic Josephson junctions might restore the equidistance of the branch structure. Change of the current-voltage characteristics in CCJJ + DC model under variation of the coupling and McCumber parameters and effect of boundary conditions on the branch structure is analyzed.

  10. Deployable Composite Structures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA is seeking innovative structure technologies that will advance expandable exploration space modules and surface based habitats. To address this need CTD has...

  11. Structure-Property Relationships in Atomic-Scale Junctions: Histograms and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hybertsen, Mark S; Venkataraman, Latha

    2016-03-15

    Over the past 10 years, there has been tremendous progress in the measurement, modeling and understanding of structure-function relationships in single molecule junctions. Numerous research groups have addressed significant scientific questions, directed both to conductance phenomena at the single molecule level and to the fundamental chemistry that controls junction functionality. Many different functionalities have been demonstrated, including single-molecule diodes, optically and mechanically activated switches, and, significantly, physical phenomena with no classical analogues, such as those based on quantum interference effects. Experimental techniques for reliable and reproducible single molecule junction formation and characterization have led to this progress. In particular, the scanning tunneling microscope based break-junction (STM-BJ) technique has enabled rapid, sequential measurement of large numbers of nanoscale junctions allowing a statistical analysis to readily distinguish reproducible characteristics. Harnessing fundamental link chemistry has provided the necessary chemical control over junction formation, enabling measurements that revealed clear relationships between molecular structure and conductance characteristics. Such link groups (amines, methylsuflides, pyridines, etc.) maintain a stable lone pair configuration that selectively bonds to specific, undercoordinated transition metal atoms available following rupture of a metal point contact in the STM-BJ experiments. This basic chemical principle rationalizes the observation of highly reproducible conductance signatures. Subsequently, the method has been extended to probe a variety of physical phenomena ranging from basic I-V characteristics to more complex properties such as thermopower and electrochemical response. By adapting the technique to a conducting cantilever atomic force microscope (AFM-BJ), simultaneous measurement of the mechanical characteristics of nanoscale junctions as they

  12. Structure of the breakpoint region on current-voltage characteristics of intrinsic Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukrinov, Yu. M.; Mahfouzi, F.; Suzuki, M.

    2008-10-01

    A fine structure of the breakpoint region in the current-voltage characteristics of the coupled intrinsic Josephson junctions in the layered superconductors is found. We establish a correspondence between the features in the current-voltage characteristics and the character of the charge oscillations in superconducting layers in the stack and explain the origin of the breakpoint region structure.

  13. Optimization of Laminated Composite Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henrichsen, Søren Randrup

    Laminated composite materials are widely used in the design of light weight high performance structures like wind turbine blades and aeroplanes due to their superior stiffness and strength-to-weight-ratios compared to their metal counter parts. Furthermore, the use of laminated composite materials...... allows for a higher degree of tailoring of the resulting material. To enable better utilization of the composite materials, optimum design procedures can be used to assist the engineer. This PhD thesis is focused on developing numerical methods for optimization of laminated composite structures....... The first part of the thesis is intended as an aid to read the included papers. Initially the field of research is introduced and the performed research is motivated. Secondly, the state-of-the-art is reviewed. The review includes parameterizations of the constitutive properties, linear and geometrically...

  14. Neto-mediated intracellular interactions shape postsynaptic composition at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathy I Ramos

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms controlling the subunit composition of glutamate receptors are crucial for the formation of neural circuits and for the long-term plasticity underlying learning and memory. Here we use the Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ to examine how specific receptor subtypes are recruited and stabilized at synaptic locations. In flies, clustering of ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs requires Neto (Neuropillin and Tolloid-like, a highly conserved auxiliary subunit that is essential for NMJ assembly and development. Drosophila neto encodes two isoforms, Neto-α and Neto-β, with common extracellular parts and distinct cytoplasmic domains. Mutations that specifically eliminate Neto-β or its intracellular domain were generated. When Neto-β is missing or is truncated, the larval NMJs show profound changes in the subtype composition of iGluRs due to reduced synaptic accumulation of the GluRIIA subunit. Furthermore, neto-β mutant NMJs fail to accumulate p21-activated kinase (PAK, a critical postsynaptic component implicated in the synaptic stabilization of GluRIIA. Muscle expression of either Neto-α or Neto-β rescued the synaptic transmission at neto null NMJs, indicating that Neto conserved domains mediate iGluRs clustering. However, only Neto-β restored PAK synaptic accumulation at neto null NMJs. Thus, Neto engages in intracellular interactions that regulate the iGluR subtype composition by preferentially recruiting and/or stabilizing selective receptor subtypes.

  15. Zurek-Kibble domain structures: The dynamics of spontaneous vortex formation in annular Josephson tunnel junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monaco, R.; Mygind, Jesper; Rivers, R.J.

    2002-01-01

    Phase transitions create a domain structure with defects, which has been argued by Zurek and Kibble (ZK) to depend in a characteristic way on the quench rate. We present an experiment to measure the ZK scaling exponent sigma. Using long symmetric Josephson tunnel junctions, for which the predicted...

  16. Simulations of fine structures on the zero field steps of Josephson tunnel junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheuermann, M.; Chi, C. C.; Pedersen, Niels Falsig;

    1986-01-01

    are generated by the interaction of the bias current with the fluxon at the junction edges. On the first zero field step, the voltages of successive fine structures are given by Vn=[h-bar]/2e(2omegap/n), where n is an even integer. Applied Physics Letters is copyrighted by The American Institute of Physics....

  17. Structure and composition of soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snežana Nenadović

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study of soils structure and composition using up to date technique, such as scanning electronic microscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence, as well as some other characterization methods. It was shown that soil particles have porous structure and dimensions in the range from several millimeters to several hundreds of nanometers and consist of different minerals such as kaolin, quartz and feldspate.

  18. Influence of position and parameters of inhomogeneities on vortex structure in long Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreeva, O. Yu; Boyadjiev, T. L.; Shukrinov, Yu M.

    2008-10-01

    Numerical experiment results on long Josephson junction with one and two rectangular inhomogeneities in the barrier layer are presented. We demonstrate the efiect of the shifting of the inhomogeneity and the value of the Josephson current on the vortex structure. The disappearance of mixed fluxon-antifluxon states is shown when the position of inhomogeneity shifted to the end of the junction. A change of the amplitude of Josephson current at the end makes a strong efiect on the stability of the fluxon states and smoothes the maximums of the dependence 'critical current-magnetic field'.

  19. Influence of position and parameters of inhomogeneities on vortex structure in long Josephson junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreeva, O Yu [OAO ' Ural Thermal Network Company' , Tumen, 625023 (Russian Federation); Boyadjiev, T L; Shukrinov, Yu M [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation)], E-mail: shukrinv@theor.jinr.ru

    2008-10-15

    Numerical experiment results on long Josephson junction with one and two rectangular inhomogeneities in the barrier layer are presented. We demonstrate the effect of the shifting of the inhomogeneity and the value of the Josephson current on the vortex structure. The disappearance of mixed fluxon-antifluxon states is shown when the position of inhomogeneity shifted to the end of the junction. A change of the amplitude of Josephson current at the end makes a strong effect on the stability of the fluxon states and smoothes the maximums of the dependence 'critical current-magnetic field'.

  20. Orientation relationships between recrystallization nuclei at triple junctions and deformed structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabin, T.J.; Winther, G.; Juul Jensen, D

    2003-08-15

    Pure aluminium has been cold rolled and partially annealed to yield recrystallization nuclei. The orientations present around a number of triple junctions were characterised using the Electron Back Scattered Diffraction (EBSD) technique before and after the annealing, so that a direct comparison could be made between the orientations in the local deformed structure and the nuclei. It was found that triple junctions were particularly good nucleation sites within the microstructure. Approximately half of the nuclei found had orientations that fell within the scatter from one of the original grains and the remainder were rotated about a pole close to <111> relative to a deformed grain.

  1. Analysis of composite structural elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Baier

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The themes of the study are composite structural components. For this purpose have been designed and built several research positions.Design/methodology/approach: Using different structural materials to build new device components requires multiple tests of the components. Research posts were designed in the advanced graphical program CAx Siemens NX 7.5. Analysed samples were made from the glass fibre, aramid and carbon of various weights. Due to the specific use of composite materials it focuses on the elements in the form of plates and flat bars. For the examination of experimental strain gauge technique was used bead, the force sensor and displacement sensor. The experimental methods were compared with computer simulation using the FEM.Findings: The aim of this study was to determine the basic material constants and a comparison of the experimental method and the method of computer simulation.Research limitations/implications: Change the number of layers and how to connect the laminate with the steel plate changes mechanical properties of the structural component.Practical implications: The ultimate result will be knowledge on the different forms of laminates, such as material properties, the stresses in all layers, strain and comparing the results obtained by two methods.Originality/value: The expected outcome of the study will be the composition and method of joining composite laminate with a steel plate to the possible application in the repair and construction of structural elements of freight wagons.

  2. Experimental setup for the investigation of fluid–structure interactions in a T-junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuschewski, M., E-mail: mario.kuschewski@ike.uni-stuttgart.de [University of Stuttgart, Institute for Nuclear Technology and Energy Systems, Pfaffenwaldring 31, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Kulenovic, R., E-mail: rudi.kulenovic@ike.uni-stuttgart.de [University of Stuttgart, Institute for Nuclear Technology and Energy Systems, Pfaffenwaldring 31, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Laurien, E., E-mail: eckart.laurien@ike.uni-stuttgart.de [University of Stuttgart, Institute for Nuclear Technology and Energy Systems, Pfaffenwaldring 31, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2013-11-15

    Water experiments were carried out for fluid structure interaction aspects of non-isothermal mixing in a T-junction which is part of a new test facility. The main subject of this paper is firstly to present the new facility and secondly, to demonstrate the Near-Wall LED-Induced-Fluorescence (NWLED-IF) technique, which is a new experimental method for studying fluid–structure interaction under conditions similar to those in LWR. The Fluid–Structure-Interaction-Setup is a closed-loop T-junction facility with a design pressure of 75 bar and a maximum temperature of 280 °C. The water streams are mixed in a horizontally aligned, sharp-edge, 90° T-junction. The forged T-junction is made of austenitic steel 1.4550 (X6 CrNiNb 18-10) with reduced carbon content in accordance with the German KTA 3201.1. It is equipped with 24 thermocouples (1 mm in diameter) in blind holes, which have a surface offset of 1–3 mm. The facility design comprises interchangeable modules, which can be arranged upstream or downstream of the T-junction. Two of these modules provide an optical access to the fluid by means of flanges and tubes made of glass. Additional experiments are conducted in an isothermal T-junction facility and at the Fluid–Structure Interaction Facility. It is demonstrated that the Near-Wall LED-Induced-Fluorescence technique is an image-based measurement method that provides spatially and temporally resolved information of the turbulent flow in the mixing region of the T-junction even under presence of high density differences. In all experiments a buoyancy-driven stratified flow is observed. The light fluid arranges itself on top of the denser which is characterized by a meander-like structure. The experiments are conducted under different fluid-mechanical boundary conditions, yet fluid patterns were similar and the stratification and the meander-like structures were captured by the Near-Wall LED-Induced-Fluorescence technique. The presented experiment is the first

  3. Composition and adaptation of human myotendinous junction and neighboring muscle fibers to heavy resistance training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, J R; Mackey, A L; Knudsen, A B; Koch, M; Kjaer, M; Krogsgaard, M R

    2016-10-26

    The myotendinous junction (MTJ) is a common site of strain injury and yet understanding of its composition and ability to adapt to loading is poor. The main aims of this study were to determine the profile of selected collagens and macrophage density in human MTJ and adjoining muscle fibers, and to investigate whether heavy exercise loading would alter this profile. Fifteen individuals scheduled for anterior cruciate ligament repair surgery were randomized into three groups: control, acute or 4 weeks heavy resistance training. MTJ samples were collected from the semitendinosus and gracilis muscles and were sectioned and stained immunohistochemically for collagen types I, III, VI, XII, XIV, XXII, Tenascin-C and CD68. Macrophage density and distribution was evaluated and the amount of each collagen type in muscle and MTJ was graded. Collagen XXII was observed solely at the MTJ, while all other collagens were abundant at the MTJ and in muscle perimysium or endomysium. The endomysial content of collagen XIV, macrophages and Tenascin-C increased following 4 weeks of training. These findings illustrate the heterogeneity of collagen type composition of human MTJ. The increase in collagen XIV following 4 weeks of training may reflect a training-induced protection against strain injuries in this region. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Lectures on Composite Materials for Aircraft Structures,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-10-01

    lectures are related to structural applications of composites . In Lecture 7, the basic theory that is needed for composite structural analysis is...which composites have been taken up for aeronautical applications. Several specific applications of composites in aircraft structures am described in

  5. Tracking the motion trajectories of junction structures in 4D CT images of the lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Guanglei; Chen, Chuangzhen; Chen, Jianzhou; Xie, Yaoqin; Xing, Lei

    2012-08-01

    Respiratory motion poses a major challenge in lung radiotherapy. Based on 4D CT images, a variety of intensity-based deformable registration techniques have been proposed to study the pulmonary motion. However, the accuracy achievable with these approaches can be sub-optimal because the deformation is defined globally in space. Therefore, the accuracy of the alignment of local structures may be compromised. In this work, we propose a novel method to detect a large collection of natural junction structures in the lung and use them as the reliable markers to track the lung motion. Specifically, detection of the junction centers and sizes is achieved by analysis of local shape profiles on one segmented image. To track the temporal trajectory of a junction, the image intensities within a small region of interest surrounding the center are selected as its signature. Under the assumption of the cyclic motion, we describe the trajectory by a closed B-spline curve and search for the control points by maximizing a metric of combined correlation coefficients. Local extrema are suppressed by improving the initial conditions using random walks from pair-wise optimizations. Several descriptors are introduced to analyze the motion trajectories. Our method was applied to 13 real 4D CT images. More than 700 junctions in each case are detected with an average positive predictive value of greater than 90%. The average tracking error between automated and manual tracking is sub-voxel and smaller than the published results using the same set of data.

  6. Connexin composition in apposed gap junction hemiplaques revealed by matched double-replica freeze-fracture replica immunogold labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rash, John E; Kamasawa, Naomi; Davidson, Kimberly G V; Yasumura, Thomas; Pereda, Alberto E; Nagy, James I

    2012-06-01

    Despite the combination of light-microscopic immunocytochemistry, histochemical mRNA detection techniques and protein reporter systems, progress in identifying the protein composition of neuronal versus glial gap junctions, determination of the differential localization of their constituent connexin proteins in two apposing membranes and understanding human neurological diseases caused by connexin mutations has been problematic due to ambiguities introduced in the cellular and subcellular assignment of connexins. Misassignments occurred primarily because membranes and their constituent proteins are below the limit of resolution of light microscopic imaging techniques. Currently, only serial thin-section transmission electron microscopy and freeze-fracture replica immunogold labeling have sufficient resolution to assign connexin proteins to either or both sides of gap junction plaques. However, freeze-fracture replica immunogold labeling has been limited because conventional freeze fracturing allows retrieval of only one of the two membrane fracture faces within a gap junction, making it difficult to identify connexin coupling partners in hemiplaques removed by fracturing. We now summarize progress in ascertaining the connexin composition of two coupled hemiplaques using matched double-replicas that are labeled simultaneously for multiple connexins. This approach allows unambiguous identification of connexins and determination of the membrane "sidedness" and the identities of connexin coupling partners in homotypic and heterotypic gap junctions of vertebrate neurons.

  7. Gap Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Morten Schak; Axelsen, Lene Nygaard; Sorgen, Paul L.; Verma, Vandana; Delmar, Mario; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Gap junctions are essential to the function of multicellular animals, which require a high degree of coordination between cells. In vertebrates, gap junctions comprise connexins and currently 21 connexins are known in humans. The functions of gap junctions are highly diverse and include exchange of metabolites and electrical signals between cells, as well as functions, which are apparently unrelated to intercellular communication. Given the diversity of gap junction physiology, regulation of gap junction activity is complex. The structure of the various connexins is known to some extent; and structural rearrangements and intramolecular interactions are important for regulation of channel function. Intercellular coupling is further regulated by the number and activity of channels present in gap junctional plaques. The number of connexins in cell-cell channels is regulated by controlling transcription, translation, trafficking, and degradation; and all of these processes are under strict control. Once in the membrane, channel activity is determined by the conductive properties of the connexin involved, which can be regulated by voltage and chemical gating, as well as a large number of posttranslational modifications. The aim of the present article is to review our current knowledge on the structure, regulation, function, and pharmacology of gap junctions. This will be supported by examples of how different connexins and their regulation act in concert to achieve appropriate physiological control, and how disturbances of connexin function can lead to disease. © 2012 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 2:1981-2035, 2012. PMID:23723031

  8. Gap junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Morten Schak; Axelsen, Lene Nygaard; Sorgen, Paul L; Verma, Vandana; Delmar, Mario; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2012-07-01

    Gap junctions are essential to the function of multicellular animals, which require a high degree of coordination between cells. In vertebrates, gap junctions comprise connexins and currently 21 connexins are known in humans. The functions of gap junctions are highly diverse and include exchange of metabolites and electrical signals between cells, as well as functions, which are apparently unrelated to intercellular communication. Given the diversity of gap junction physiology, regulation of gap junction activity is complex. The structure of the various connexins is known to some extent; and structural rearrangements and intramolecular interactions are important for regulation of channel function. Intercellular coupling is further regulated by the number and activity of channels present in gap junctional plaques. The number of connexins in cell-cell channels is regulated by controlling transcription, translation, trafficking, and degradation; and all of these processes are under strict control. Once in the membrane, channel activity is determined by the conductive properties of the connexin involved, which can be regulated by voltage and chemical gating, as well as a large number of posttranslational modifications. The aim of the present article is to review our current knowledge on the structure, regulation, function, and pharmacology of gap junctions. This will be supported by examples of how different connexins and their regulation act in concert to achieve appropriate physiological control, and how disturbances of connexin function can lead to disease. © 2012 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 2:1853-1872, 2012.

  9. Hybrid Simulation of Composite Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgh, Jacob Herold

    Hybrid simulation is a substructural method combining a numerical simulation with a physical experiment. A structure is thereby simulated under the assumption that a substructure’s response is well known and easily modelled while a given substructure is studied more accurately in a physical...... of freedom. In this dissertation the main focus is to develop hybrid simulation for composite structures e.g. wind turbine blades where the boundary between the numerical model and the physical experiment is continues i.e. in principal infinite amount of degrees of freedom. This highly complicates...

  10. Radial junction solar cells based on heterojunction with intrinsic thin layer (HIT) structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Haoting

    The radial junction wire array structure was previously proposed as a solar cell geometry to separate the direction of carrier collection from the direction of light absorption, thereby circumventing the need to use high quality but expensive single crystal silicon (c-Si) material that has long minority carrier diffusion lengths. The Si radial junction structure can be realized by forming radial p-n junctions on Si pillar/wire arrays that have a diameter comparable to the minority carrier diffusion length. With proper design, the Si pillar arrays are also able to enhance light trapping and thereby increase the light absorption. However, the larger junction area and surface area on the pillar arrays compared to traditional planar junction Si solar cells makes it challenging to fabricate high performance devices due an in increase in surface defects. Therefore, effective surface passivation strategies are essential for radial junction devices. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) using a heterojunction with intrinsic thin layer (HIT) structure has previously been demonstrated as a very effective surface passivation layer for planar c-Si solar cells. It is therefore of interest to use a-Si:H in a HIT layer structure for radial p-n junction c-Si pillar array solar cells. This poses several challenges, however, including the need to fabricate ultra-thin a-Si:H layers conformally on high aspect ratio Si pillars, control the crystallinity at the a-Si:H/c-Si interface to yield a low interface state density and optimize the layer thicknesses, doping and contacts to yield high performance devices. This research in this thesis was aimed at developing the processing technology required to apply the HIT structure to radial junction Si pillar array solar cell devices and to evaluate the device characteristics. Initial studies focused on understanding the effects of process conditions on the growth rate and

  11. Structural integrity of hierarchical composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Paggi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Interface mechanical problems are of paramount importance in engineering and materials science. Traditionally, due to the complexity of modelling their mechanical behaviour, interfaces are often treated as defects and their features are not explored. In this study, a different approach is illustrated, where the interfaces play an active role in the design of innovative hierarchical composites and are fundamental for their structural integrity. Numerical examples regarding cutting tools made of hierarchical cellular polycrystalline materials are proposed, showing that tailoring of interface properties at the different scales is the way to achieve superior mechanical responses that cannot be obtained using standard materials

  12. Refinement of the solution structure of a branched DNA three-way junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouporov, I V; Leontis, N B

    1995-01-01

    We have refined the structure of the DNA Three-Way Junction complex, TWJ-TC, described in the companion paper by quantitative analysis of two 2D NOESY spectra (mixing times 60 and 200 ms) obtained in D2O solution. NOESY crosspeak intensities extracted from these spectra were used in two kinds of refinement procedure: 1) distance-restrained energy minimization (EM) and molecular dynamics (MD) and 2) full relaxation matrix back calculation refinement. The global geometry of the refined model is very similar to that of a published, preliminary model (Leontis, 1993). Two of the helical arms of the junction are stacked. These are Helix 1, defined by basepairs S1-G1/S3-C12 through S1-C5/S3-G8 and Helix 2, which comprises basepairs S1-C6/S2-G5 through S1-G10/S2-G1. The third helical arm (Helix 3), comprised of basepairs S2-C6/S3-G5 through S2-C10/S3-G1 extends almost perpendicularly from the axis defined by Helices 1 and 2. The bases S1-C5 and S1-C6 of Strand 1 are continuously stacked across the junction region. The conformation of this strand is close to that of B-form DNA along its entire length, including the S1-C5 to S1-C6 dinucleotide step at the junction. The two unpaired bases S3-T6 and S3-C7 lie outside of the junction along the minor groove of Helix 1 and largely exposed to solvent. Analysis of the refined structure reveals that the glycosidic bond of S3-T6 exists in the syn conformation, allowing the methyl group of this residue to contact the hydrophobic surface of the minor groove of Helix 1, at S3-G11. The helical parameters of the three helical arms of the structure exhibit only weak deviations from typical values for right-handed B-form DNA. Unusual dihedral angles are only observed for the sugarphosphate backbone joining the "hinge" residues, S2-G5 and S2-C6, and S3-G5 through S3-G8. The glycosidic bond of S3-G8also lies within the syn range, allowing favorable Watson-Crick base-pairing interactions with Si -C5. The stability of this structure was checked

  13. The junction of Fensch and Moselle rivers, France; mineralogy and composition of river materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montarges-Pelletier, Emmanuelle; Jeanneau, Laurent; Faure, Pierre; Bihannic, Isabelle; Barres, Odile; Lartiges, Bruno S.

    2007-09-01

    The Moselle river flows in the north-east of France, from Vosges Mountains to neighboring countries Luxembourg and Germany. One of its tributaries, the Fensch river, drains a highly industrialized watershed, strongly impacted by mining, smelting and surfacing activities. The objective of this work, part of a general research program on Moselle watershed (Zone Atelier Moselle) was to assess the impact of the polluted Fensch river on the global quality of the Moselle river. For that purpose, water, sediments and suspended particulate matter were sampled in both rivers, upstream and downstream the junction. Four main sampling campaigns were carried out, in winter during a flood event and in spring at low water level. On a first step, mineralogical analyses (XRD and FTIR) and chemical analyses (ICP-MS, ICP-AES), were performed on sediments, suspended particulate matters and filtered waters. Major and trace elements concentrations were obtained on two different granulometric fractions (0-2 mm and 0-50 μm) revealing the enrichment in heavy metals of fine particles. From one collecting campaign to another, seasonal variations could be evidenced on suspended matter composition even though major minerals (calcite, quartz and kaolinite) were always present. Furthermore, spatial variations were evidenced for Fensch and Moselle downstream sediments. Thus, very fine-grained sediments, poorly crystallized, displaying at the same time higher metal concentrations and higher organic matter content than in Fensch river material, were collected downstream, in a low hydrodynamic conditions zone, assumed as a preferential sedimentary zone or even as a placer. Strong correlations could be revealed between iron content and contaminant concentrations, confirming the origin of polluted material.

  14. Model for the fine structure of zero field steps in long Josephson tunnel junctions and its comparison with experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barbara, Paola; Monaco, R.; Ustinov, A. V.

    1996-01-01

    The single fluxon dynamics in the resonant regime has been investigated on high-quality low-loss Nb/Al–AlOx/Nb window Josephson tunnel junctions. A new model accounting for the fine structure of zero field steps in linear junctions is proposed. Depending on the fluxon velocity and on the junction...... simulations, and experiments. The presence of the idle region has been proved to play a determinant role for the occurrence of the fine structure. ©1996 American Institute of Physics....

  15. Hybrid Composite Cryogenic Tank Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLay, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    A hybrid lightweight composite tank has been created using specially designed materials and manufacturing processes. The tank is produced by using a hybrid structure consisting of at least two reinforced composite material systems. The inner composite layer comprises a distinct fiber and resin matrix suitable for cryogenic use that is a braided-sleeve (and/or a filamentwound layer) aramid fiber preform that is placed on a removable mandrel (outfitted with metallic end fittings) and is infused (vacuum-assisted resin transfer molded) with a polyurethane resin matrix with a high ductility at low temperatures. This inner layer is allowed to cure and is encapsulated with a filamentwound outer composite layer of a distinct fiber resin system. Both inner and outer layer are in intimate contact, and can also be cured at the same time. The outer layer is a material that performs well for low temperature pressure vessels, and it can rely on the inner layer to act as a liner to contain the fluids. The outer layer can be a variety of materials, but the best embodiment may be the use of a continuous tow of carbon fiber (T-1000 carbon, or others), or other high-strength fibers combined with a high ductility epoxy resin matrix, or a polyurethane matrix, which performs well at low temperatures. After curing, the mandrel can be removed from the outer layer. While the hybrid structure is not limited to two particular materials, a preferred version of the tank has been demonstrated on an actual test tank article cycled at high pressures with liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen, and the best version is an inner layer of PBO (poly-pphenylenebenzobisoxazole) fibers with a polyurethane matrix and an outer layer of T-1000 carbon with a high elongation epoxy matrix suitable for cryogenic temperatures. A polyurethane matrix has also been used for the outer layer. The construction method is ideal because the fiber and resin of the inner layer has a high strain to failure at cryogenic

  16. Crystal structure of RuvC resolvase in complex with Holliday junction substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Górecka, Karolina M; Komorowska, Weronika; Nowotny, Marcin

    2013-11-01

    The key intermediate in genetic recombination is the Holliday junction (HJ), a four-way DNA structure. At the end of recombination, HJs are cleaved by specific nucleases called resolvases. In Gram-negative bacteria, this cleavage is performed by RuvC, a dimeric endonuclease that belongs to the retroviral integrase superfamily. Here, we report the first crystal structure of RuvC in complex with a synthetic HJ solved at 3.75 Å resolution. The junction in the complex is in an unfolded 2-fold symmetrical conformation, in which the four arms point toward the vertices of a tetrahedron. The two scissile phosphates are located one nucleotide from the strand exchange point, and RuvC approaches them from the minor groove side. The key protein-DNA contacts observed in the structure were verified using a thiol-based site-specific cross-linking approach. Compared with known complex structures of the phage resolvases endonuclease I and endonuclease VII, the RuvC structure exhibits striking differences in the mode of substrate binding and location of the cleavage site.

  17. Multifunctional Composite Nanofibers for Smart Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-13

    translated to the composite nanofibrous structures in the form of nonwovens and yarns? (3) Can these functional composite fibers be integrated into...nanoparticles were co- electrospun into nonwoven mat and over meter long yarn. The SEM and TEM image in Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No...functional composite nanofiber structures (yarn and nonwoven ) characterized we explored the feasibility of integrating these functional composite fibers into

  18. Lamb Wave Propagation in Laminated Composite Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Gopalakrishnan, S.

    2013-01-01

    Damage detection using guided Lamb waves is an important tool in Structural health Monitoring. In this paper, we outline a method of obtaining Lamb wave modes in composite structures using two dimensional Spectral Finite Elements. Using this approach, Lamb wave dispersion curves are obtained for laminated composite structures with different fibre orientation. These propagating Lamb wave modes are pictorially captured using tone burst signal.

  19. Fe3O4/MgO/Fe Heteroepitaxial Structures for Magnetic Tunnel Junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orna, J. [University of Zaragoza, Spain; Morellon, Luis [University of Zaragoza, Spain; Algarabel, Pedro A. [University of Zaragoza, Spain; Pardo, J. A. [University of Zaragoza, Spain; Sangiao, S [Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragón, Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza, 50009 Spain; Magen, C [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Snoeck, E. [CEMES-CNRS, Toulouse, France; De Teresa, J M [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón, Universidad de Zaragoza-CSIC, Zaragoza, 50009 Spain; Ibarra, M. Ricardo [University of Zaragoza, Spain

    2008-01-01

    In this work we report the growth and structural and magnetic characterization of heteroepitaxial Fe O/MgO/Fe junctions. All three layers have been deposited by pulsed laser deposition. Combining High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy and X-ray results, we have obtained for the heterostructure the epitaxy relation MgO(001) [100]//Fe O(001)[100]/MgO(001) [100]/Fe(001)[110]. All interfaces appear very sharp with relatively small root-mean square (rms) roughness, 0.2 nm. The magnetic coupling between Fe O and Fe electrodes is also very small, 0.03 mJ/

  20. First principles investigations of electronic structure and transport properties of graphitic structures and single molecular junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Jonathan R.

    properties of the IV curves of single molecule nano-junctions. Specifically, these systems consist of a zinc-porphyrin molecule coupled between two gold electrodes, i.e., a nano-gap. The first observation we want to explain is the asymmetric nature of the experimental IV curve for this porphyrin system, where the IV curve is skewed heavily to the negative bias region. Using a plane-wave DFT calculation, we present the density of states of the porphyrin molecule (both in the presence and absence of the electrodes) and indeed see highly delocalized states (as confirmed by site-projection of the DOS) only in the negative bias region, meaning that the channels with high transmission probability reside there, in agreement with experimental observation. The next problem studied pertains to observed switching in an experimentally-measured IV curve, this time of a longer zinc porphyrin molecule, still within a gold nano-gap. The switching behavior is observed only at 300K, not at 4.2K. The temperature-dependance of this problem renders our previous toolset of DFT calculations void; DFT is a ground-state theory. Instead, we employ a density functional-based tight-binding (DFTB) approach in a molecular dynamics simulation. Basically, the structural configuration evaluated at each time step is based on a tight-binding electronic structure calculation, instead of a typical MD force field. Trajectories are presented at varying temperatures and electric field strengths. Indeed, we observe a conformation of the porphyrin molecule between two configurations of the dihedral angle of the central nitrogen ring, ±15. {o} at 300K, but not 4.2K. These confirmations are equally likely, i.e., the structure assumes these configurations an equal number of teams, meaning the average structure has an angle of 0. {o}. After computing the DOS of all three aforementioned configurations (0. {text{o}} and ±15. {text{o}}), we indeed see a difference between the DOS curves at ±15. {text{o}} (which are

  1. The deep structures of the junction of the Urals with the Russian and West Siberian Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, K. S.; Koroteev, V. A.; Kostrov, N. P.

    2017-07-01

    A new model of the junction of the Ural fold belt with the Russian and West Siberian Platforms along the Europrobe Seismic Reflection profiling in the Urals (ESRU) down to a depth of 15 km is constructed. 2Dmodeling of the density and magnetic properties was performed using seven profiles and was accompanied by an estimate of applicability of the method. In the west, the upper part of the model is represented by terrigeneous- carbonate deposits, and the bottom part shows the structures of the basement of the Russian platform, which becomes thinner eastward and plunges beneath the Ural structures. The most significant difference in the West Siberian part of the transect is the great "length" of the entire structure of the Earth's crust. This is caused by the Early Triassic extension accompanied by the formation of a system of Triassic graben-rifts.

  2. Band structure of topological insulators from noise measurements in tunnel junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cascales, Juan Pedro, E-mail: juanpedro.cascales@uam.es; Martínez, Isidoro; Aliev, Farkhad G., E-mail: farkhad.aliev@uam.es [Dpto. Fisica Materia Condensada C3, Instituto Nicolas Cabrera (INC), Condensed Matter Physics Institute (IFIMAC), Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Madrid 28049 (Spain); Katmis, Ferhat; Moodera, Jagadeesh S. [Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Chang, Cui-Zu [Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Guerrero, Rubén [Instituto Madrileño de Estudios Avanzados en Nanociencia (IMDEA-Nanociencia), Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-12-21

    The unique properties of spin-polarized surface or edge states in topological insulators (TIs) make these quantum coherent systems interesting from the point of view of both fundamental physics and their implementation in low power spintronic devices. Here we present such a study in TIs, through tunneling and noise spectroscopy utilizing TI/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Co tunnel junctions with bottom TI electrodes of either Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} or Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}. We demonstrate that features related to the band structure of the TI materials show up in the tunneling conductance and even more clearly through low frequency noise measurements. The bias dependence of 1/f noise reveals peaks at specific energies corresponding to band structure features of the TI. TI tunnel junctions could thus simplify the study of the properties of such quantum coherent systems that can further lead to the manipulation of their spin-polarized properties for technological purposes.

  3. Application of Nanostructured Materials and Multi-junction Structure in Polymer Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Gao, Yangqin

    2015-12-09

    With power conversion efficiency surpassing the 10% milestone for commercialization, photovoltaic technology based on solution-processable polymer solar cells (PSCs) provides a promising route towards a cost-efficient strategy to address the ever-increasing worldwide energy demands. However, to make PSCs successful, challenges such as insufficient light absorption, high maintenance costs, and relatively high production costs must be addressed. As solutions to some of these problems, the unique properties of nanostructured materials and complimentary light absorption in multi-junction device structure could prove to be highly beneficial. As a starting point, integrating nanostructure-based transparent self-cleaning surfaces in PSCs was investigated first. By controlling the length of the hydrothermally grown ZnO nanorods and covering their surface with a thin layer of chemical vapor-deposited SiO2, a highly transparent and UV-resistant superhydrophobic surface was constructed. Integrating the transparent superhydrophobic surface in a PSC shows minimal impact on the figure of merit of the PSC. To address the low mechanical durability of the transparent superhydrophobic surface based on SiO2-coated ZnO nanorods, a novel method inspired by the water condensation process was developed. This method involved directly growing hollow silica half-nanospheres on the substrate through the condensation of water in the presence of a silica precursor. Benefit from the decreased back scattering efficiency and increased light transport mean free path arise from the hollow nature, a transparent superhydrophobic surface was realized using submicrometer sized silica half-nanospheres. The decent mechanical property of silica and the “direct-grown” protocol are expected to impart improved mechanical durability to the transparent superhydrophobic surface. Regarding the application of multi-junction device structure in PSCs, homo multi-junction PSCs were constructed from an identical

  4. Seismicity and crustal structure at the Mendocino triple junction, Northern California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dicke, M.

    1998-12-01

    A high level of seismicity at the Mendocino triple junction in Northern California reflects the complex active tectonics associated with the junction of the Pacific, North America, and Gorda plates. To investigate seismicity patterns and crustal structure, 6193 earthquakes recorded by the Northern California Seismic Network (NCSN) are relocated using a one-dimensional crustal velocity model. A near vertical truncation of the intense seismic activity offshore Cape Mendocino follows the strike of the Mattole Canyon fault and is interpreted to define the Pacific plate boundary. Seismicity along this boundary displays a double seismogenic layer that is attributed to interplate activity with the North America plate and Gorda plate. The interpretation of the shallow seismogenic zone as the North America - Pacific plate boundary implies that the Mendocino triple junction is situated offshore at present. Seismicity patterns and focal mechanisms for events located within the subducting Gorda pl ate are consistent with internal deformation on NE-SW and NW-SE trending rupture planes in response to north-south compression. Seismic sections indicate that the top of the Gorda plate locates at a depth of about 18 Km beneath Cape Mendocino and dips gently east-and southward. Earthquakes that are located in the Wadati-Benioff zone east of 236{sup o}E show a change to an extensional stress regime indicative of a slab pull force. This slab pull force and scattered seismicity within the contractional forearc region of the Cascadia subduction zone suggest that the subducting Gorda plate and the overriding North America plate are strongly coupled. The 1992 Cape Mendocino thrust earthquake is believed to have ruptured a blind thrust fault in the forearc region, suggesting that strain is accumulating that must ultimately be released in a potential M 8+ subduction earthquake.

  5. Composite Materials for Structural Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-03-01

    Introduction to Composite Materials , Technomic, Westport, Connecticut, 1980, pp. 19-20, 388-401. 8. W.D. Bascom, J.L. Bitner, R.J. Moulton, and A.R. Siebert...34 Introduction to Composite Materials ", Technomic Publishing Co., pp. 8-18,(1980). [6] Beckwith, S. W., "Viscoelastic Characterization of a Nonlinear Glass

  6. Difference of Oxide Hetero-structure Junctions with Semiconductor Electronic Devices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIONG Guang-Cheng; CHEN Yuan-Sha; CHEN Li-Ping; LIAN Gui-Jun

    2008-01-01

    Charge carrier injection is performed in Pro.TCao.aMnOa (PCMO) hetero-structure junctions, exhibiting the stability without electric fields and dramatic changes in both resistance and interface barriers, which are entirely different from behaviour of semiconductor devices. The disappearance and reversion of interface barriers suggest that the adjustable resistance switching of such hereto-structure oxide devices should associate with motion of charge carriers across interfaces. The results suggest that injected carriers should be still staying in devices and result in changes of properties, which lead to a carrier self-trapping and releasing picture in a strongly correlated electronic framework. Observations in PCMO and oxygen deficient CeO2-δ devices show that oxides as functional materials could be used in microelectronics with some novel properties, in which the interface is very important.

  7. Structural characteristics of the tendinous cord-papillary muscle junction in healthy and hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francia-Farje, Luis Alberto Domingo; Almeida-Francia, Camila Contin Diniz; Matheus, Selma Maria Michelin; Torrejais, Marcia Miranda; Soares, Jair de Campos

    2009-10-01

    Although the myotendinous junction (MTJ) of skeletal striated muscle is well known, more detailed studies regarding the structure of the cardiac MTJ are scarce. The objective of the present study was to investigate the morphological characteristics of the MTJ in hearts of healthy and hypertensive (SHR) female rats using histological, ultrastructural and three-dimensional (SEM) methods, as well as to evaluate the expression of vinculin by immunofluorescence. In the two groups, light microscopy showed branching tendinous cords and collagen bundles penetrating the apex of the finger-like projections of the papillary muscle. SEM analysis revealed an enlarged apex of the papillary muscle in SHR which was not observed in healthy animals. The loss of force transmission appears to be compensated by the amplified connection between the papillary muscle and valvular collagen. A large number of intercalated disks close to the fiber apex, small amounts of an amorphous intercellular substance and numerous vesicles were observed in SHR. In these animals, the expression of vinculin was more marked showing a regular distribution and a pattern of transverse striations along the sarcolemma. The presence of this protein in transverse bands suggests that vinculin surrounds myofibrils in the region of the Z band. Vinculin staining was also more marked in the region of the tendinous cord-papillary muscle junctions of SHR compared to control animals. Vinculin was quantified by electrophoresis and higher amounts of this protein were observed in SHR compared to control animals.

  8. Creep of Structural Nuclear Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Will Windes; R.W. Lloyd

    2005-09-01

    A research program has been established to investigate fiber reinforced ceramic composites to be used as control rod components within a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design. Two candidate systems have been identified, carbon fiber reinforced carbon (Cf/C) and silicon carbide fiber reinforced silicon carbide (SiCf/SiC) composites. One of the primary degradation mechanisms anticipated for these core components is high temperature thermal and irradiation enhanced creep. As a consequence, high temperature test equipment, testing methodologies, and test samples for very high temperature (up to 1600º C) tensile strength and long duration creep studies have been established. Actual testing of both tubular and flat, "dog-bone"-shaped tensile composite specimens will begin next year. Since there is no precedence for using ceramic composites within a nuclear reactor, ASTM standard test procedures are currently being established from these high temperature mechanical tests.

  9. Thermomechanics of composite structures under high temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Dimitrienko, Yu I

    2016-01-01

    This pioneering book presents new models for the thermomechanical behavior of composite materials and structures taking into account internal physico-chemical transformations such as thermodecomposition, sublimation and melting at high temperatures (up to 3000 K). It is of great importance for the design of new thermostable materials and for the investigation of reliability and fire safety of composite structures. It also supports the investigation of interaction of composites with laser irradiation and the design of heat-shield systems. Structural methods are presented for calculating the effective mechanical and thermal properties of matrices, fibres and unidirectional, reinforced by dispersed particles and textile composites, in terms of properties of their constituent phases. Useful calculation methods are developed for characteristics such as the rate of thermomechanical erosion of composites under high-speed flow and the heat deformation of composites with account of chemical shrinkage. The author expan...

  10. Adaptive, tolerant and efficient composite structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiedemann, Martin; Sinapius, Michael (eds.) [German Aerospace Center DLR, Braunschweig (Germany). Inst. of Composite Structures and Adaptive Systems

    2013-07-01

    Polymer composites offer the possibility for functional integration since the material is produced simultaneously with the product. The efficiency of composite structures raises through functional integration. The specific production processes of composites offer the possibility to improve and to integrate more functions thus making the structure more valuable. Passive functions can be improved by combination of different materials from nano to macro scale, i.e. strength, toughness, bearing strength, compression after impact properties or production tolerances. Active functions can be realized by smart materials, i.e. morphing, active vibration control, active structure acoustic control or structure health monitoring. The basis is a comprehensive understanding of materials, simulation, design methods, production technologies and adaptronics. These disciplines together deliver advanced lightweight solutions for applications ranging from mechanical engineering to vehicles, airframe and space structures along the complete process chain. The book provides basics as well as inspiring ideas for engineers working in the field of adaptive, tolerant and robust composite structures.

  11. Assembling carbon fiber-graphene-carbon fiber hetero-structures into 1D-2D-1D junction fillers and patterned structures for improved microwave absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huimin; Liu, Lin; Li, Hai-Bing; Song, Wei-Li; Bian, Xing-Ming; Zhao, Quan-Liang; Chen, Mingji; Yuan, Xujin; Chen, Haosen; Fang, Daining

    2017-04-01

    Since carbon-based structures of various dimensions, including one-dimensional (1D) carbon nanotubes, two-dimensional (2D) graphene and three-dimensional (3D) carbon foams, have attracted significant attention as microwave absorption fillers, we present an exceptional hetero-junction filler with a 1D-2D-1D feature, achieved by manipulating 2D graphene into 1D carbon fibers in the fiber-extruding process under the electric field. The as-fabricated 1D-2D-1D structural fillers exhibited much-improved dielectric properties and promoted microwave absorption performance in their composites, which is linked to the establishment of enhanced polarization capability, the generation of increased electric loss pathway and the creation of more favorable electromagnetic energy consumption conditions. The results suggest that employing 2D graphene in the 1D-2D-1D nanostructures played the critical role in tuning the electromagnetic response ability, because of its intrinsic electric advantages and dimensional features. To broaden the effective absorption bandwidth, periodic pattern-absorbing structures were designed, which showed combined absorption advantages for various thicknesses. Our strategy for fabricating 1D-2D-1D structural fillers illuminates a universal approach for manipulating dimensions and structures in the nanotechnology.

  12. Gap junctions in the inner ear: comparison of distribution patterns in different vertebrates and assessement of connexin composition in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forge, Andrew; Becker, David; Casalotti, Stefano; Edwards, Jill; Marziano, Nerissa; Nevill, Graham

    2003-12-08

    The distribution and size of gap junctions (GJ) in the sensory epithelia of the inner ear have been examined in a reptile (gecko), birds (chicken and owl), and mammals (mouse, guinea pig, gerbil, and bat), and the connexin composition of GJs in the mammalian inner ear has been assessed. Freeze fracture revealed a common pattern of GJ distribution in auditory and vestibular sensory epithelia in the different vertebrate classes. In all these tissues, GJs are numerous, often occupying more than 25% of the plasma membrane area of supporting cells and sometimes composed of more than 100,000 channels. Screening for 12 members of the connexin family in the mammalian inner ear by RT-PCR, Western blotting, and immunohistochemistry revealed four connexin isotypes, cx26, cx30, cx31, and cx43, in the cochlea and three, cx26, cx30, and cx43, in the vestibular organs. With antibodies characterised for their specificity, cx26 and cx30 colocalised in supporting cells of the organ of Corti, in the basal cell region of the stria vascularis, and in type 1 fibrocytes of the spiral ligament. No other connexin was detected in these regions. Cx31 was localised among type 2 fibrocytes below the spiral prominence, a region where cx30 was not expressed and cx26 expression appeared to be low. Cx43 was detected only in the region of "tension fibrocytes" lining the inner aspect of the otic capsule. This suggests separate functional compartments in the cochlea. In addition to cx26 and cx30, cx43 was detected in supporting cells of the vestibular sensory epithelia. Where cx26 and cx30 were colocalised, double immunogold labelling of thin sections showed both cx26 and cx30 evenly distributed in individual GJ plaques, a pattern consistent with the presence of heteromeric connexons. Coimmunoprecipitation of cochlear membrane proteins solubilised with a procedure that preserves the oligomeric structure of connexons confirmed the presence of heteromeric cx26/cx30 connexons. Heteromeric cx26/cx30

  13. Fluid Structure Interaction Effect on Sandwich Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    14. SUBJECT TERMS Fluid Structure Interaction, FSI, composite, balsa, low velocity impact, sandwich composites, VARTM , Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer...11 1. Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding ( VARTM ) ...................11 2. Procedure...required equipment for VARTM composite production. ..............10 Figure 4. VARTM Lay-up (From [8

  14. Multi-functional composite structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulligan, Anthony C.; Halloran, John; Popovich, Dragan; Rigali, Mark J.; Sutaria, Manish P.; Vaidyanathan, K. Ranji; Fulcher, Michael L.; Knittel, Kenneth L.

    2010-04-27

    Fibrous monolith processing techniques to fabricate multifunctional structures capable of performing more than one discrete function such as structures capable of bearing structural loads and mechanical stresses in service and also capable of performing at least one additional non-structural function.

  15. Multi-functional composite structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulligan, Anthony C.; Halloran, John; Popovich, Dragan; Rigali, Mark J.; Sutaria, Manish P.; Vaidyanathan, K. Ranji; Fulcher, Michael L.; Knittel, Kenneth L.

    2004-10-19

    Fibrous monolith processing techniques to fabricate multifunctional structures capable of performing more than one discrete function such as structures capable of bearing structural loads and mechanical stresses in service and also capable of performing at least one additional non-structural function.

  16. Raman imaging to study structural and chemical features of the dentin enamel junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alebrahim, M. Anwar; Krafft, C.; Popp, J.

    2015-10-01

    The structure and chemical features of the human dentin enamel junction (DEJ) were characterized using Raman spectroscopic imaging. Slices were prepared from 10 German, and 10 Turkish teeth. Raman images were collected at 785 nm excitation and the average Raman spectra were calculated for analysis. Univariate and multivariate spectral analysis were applied for investigation. Raman images were obtained based on the intensity ratios of CH at 1450 cm-1 (matrix) to phosphate at 960 cm-1 (mineral), and carbonate to phosphate (1070/960) ratios. Different algorithms (HCA, K-means cluster and VCA) also used to study the DEJ. The obtained results showed that the width of DEJ is about 5 pm related to univariate method while it varies from 6 to 12 μm based on multivariate spectral technique. Both spectral analyses showed increasing in carbonate content inside the DEJ compared to the dentin, and the amide I (collagen) peak in dentin spectra is higher than DEJ spectra peak.

  17. Electron Holography of Barrier Structures in Co/ZrAlOx/Co Magnetic Tunnel Junctions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhe; ZHU Tao; SHEN Feng; SHENG Wen-Ting; WANG Wei-Gang; XIAO John Q; ZHANG Ze

    2005-01-01

    @@ We investigate the potential profiles and elemental distribution of barriers in Co/ZrAlOx/Co magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) using electron holography (EH) and scanning transmission electron microscopy. The MTJ barriers are introduced by oxidizing a bilayer consisting with a uniform 0.45-nm Al layer and a wedge-shaped Zr layer (0-2 nm). From the scanning transmission electron microscopy, AlOx and ZrOx layers are mixed together,indicating that compact AlOx layer cannot be formed in such a bilayer structure of barriers. The EH results reveal that there are no sharp interfaces between the barrier and magnetic electrodes, which may be responsible for a smaller tunnelling magnetoresistance compared with the MTJs of Co/AlOx/Co.

  18. Growth Hormone Plus Resistance Exercise Attenuate Structural Changes in Rat Myotendinous Junctions Resulting from Chronic Unloading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curzi, D.; Lattanzi, D.; Ciuffoli, S.; Burattini, S.; Grindeland, R.E.; Edgerton, V.R.; Roy, R.R.; Tidball, J.G.; Falcieri, E.

    2013-01-01

    Myotendinous junctions (MTJs) are specialized sites on the muscle surface where forces generated by myofibrils are transmitted across the sarcolemma to the extracellular matrix. At the ultrastructural level, the interface between the sarcolemma and extracellular matrix is highly folded and interdigitated at these junctions. In this study, the effect of exercise and growth hormone (GH) treatments on the changes in MTJ structure that occur during muscle unloading, has been analyzed. Twenty hypophysectomized rats were assigned randomly to one of five groups: ambulatory control, hindlimb unloaded, hindlimb unloaded plus exercise (3 daily bouts of 10 climbs up a ladder with 50% body wt attached to the tail), hindlimb unloaded plus GH (2 daily injections of 1 mg/kg body wt, i.p.), and hindlimb unloaded plus exercise plus GH. MTJs of the plantaris muscle were analyzed by electron microscopy and the contact between muscle and tendon was evaluated using an IL/B ratio, where B is the base and IL is the interface length of MTJ’s digit-like processes. After 10 days of unloading, the mean IL/B ratio was significantly lower in unloaded (3.92), unloaded plus exercise (4.18), and unloaded plus GH (5.25) groups than in the ambulatory control (6.39) group. On the opposite, the mean IL/B ratio in the group treated with both exercise and GH (7.3) was similar to control. These findings indicate that the interaction between exercise and GH treatments attenuates the changes in MTJ structure that result from chronic unloading and thus can be used as a countermeasure to these adaptations. PMID:24441190

  19. Growth hormone plus resistance exercise attenuate structural changes in rat myotendinous junctions resulting from chronic unloading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Curzi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Myotendinous junctions (MTJs are specialized sites on the muscle surface where forces generated by myofibrils are transmitted across the sarcolemma to the extracellular matrix. At the ultrastructural level, the interface between the sarcolemma and extracellular matrix is highly folded and interdigitated at these junctions. In this study, the effect of exercise and growth hormone (GH treatments on the changes in MTJ structure that occur during muscle unloading, has been analyzed. Twenty hypophysectomized rats were assigned randomly to one of five groups: ambulatory control, hindlimb unloaded, hindlimb unloaded plus exercise (3 daily bouts of 10 climbs up a ladder with 50% body wt attached to the tail, hindlimb unloaded plus GH (2 daily injections of 1 mg/kg body wt, i.p., and hindlimb unloaded plus exercise plus GH. MTJs of the plantaris muscle were analyzed by electron microscopy and the contact between muscle and tendon was evaluated using an IL/B ratio, where B is the base and IL is the interface length of MTJ’s digit-like processes. After 10 days of unloading, the mean IL/B ratio was significantly lower in unloaded (3.92, unloaded plus exercise (4.18, and unloaded plus GH (5.25 groups than in the ambulatory control (6.39 group. On the opposite, the mean IL/B ratio in the group treated with both exercise and GH (7.3 was similar to control. These findings indicate that the interaction between exercise and GH treatments attenuates the changes in MTJ structure that result from chronic unloading and thus can be used as a countermeasure to these adaptations.

  20. Growth hormone plus resistance exercise attenuate structural changes in rat myotendinous junctions resulting from chronic unloading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curzi, D; Lattanzi, D; Ciuffoli, S; Burattini, S; Grindeland, R E; Edgerton, V R; Roy, R R; Tidball, J G; Falcieri, E

    2013-11-13

    Myotendinous junctions (MTJs) are specialized sites on the muscle surface where forces generated by myofibrils are transmitted across the sarcolemma to the extracellular matrix. At the ultrastructural level, the interface between the sarcolemma and extracellular matrix is highly folded and interdigitated at these junctions. In this study, the effect of exercise and growth hormone (GH) treatments on the changes in MTJ structure that occur during muscle unloading, has been analyzed. Twenty hypophysectomized rats were assigned randomly to one of five groups: ambulatory control, hindlimb unloaded, hindlimb unloaded plus exercise (3 daily bouts of 10 climbs up a ladder with 50% body wt attached to the tail), hindlimb unloaded plus GH (2 daily injections of 1 mg/kg body wt, i.p.), and hindlimb unloaded plus exercise plus GH. MTJs of the plantaris muscle were analyzed by electron microscopy and the contact between muscle and tendon was evaluated using an IL/B ratio, where B is the base and IL is the interface length of MTJ's digit-like processes. After 10 days of unloading, the mean IL/B ratio was significantly lower in unloaded (3.92), unloaded plus exercise (4.18), and unloaded plus GH (5.25) groups than in the ambulatory control (6.39) group. On the opposite, the mean IL/B ratio in the group treated with both exercise and GH (7.3) was similar to control. These findings indicate that the interaction between exercise and GH treatments attenuates the changes in MTJ structure that result from chronic unloading and thus can be used as a countermeasure to these adaptations.

  1. Forming of shape memory composite structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santo, Loredana; Quadrini, Fabrizio; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    A new forming procedure was developed to produce shape memory composite structures having structural composite skins over a shape memory polymer core. Core material was obtained by solid state foaming of an epoxy polyester resin with remarkably shape memory properties. The composite skin consisted...... damaging (i.e. after room temperature compression). Compressing the panel at a temperature higher than the foam resin glass transition temperature minimally affects composite stiffness. Copyright © 2013 Trans Tech Publications Ltd....... of a two-layer unidirectional thermoplastic composite (glass filled polypropylene). Skins were joined to the foamed core by hot compression without any adhesive: a very good adhesion was obtained as experimental tests confirmed. The structure of the foam core was investigated by means of computer axial...

  2. 17.6%-Efficient radial junction solar cells using silicon nano/micro hybrid structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kangmin; Hwang, Inchan; Kim, Namwoo; Choi, Deokjae; Um, Han-Don; Kim, Seungchul; Seo, Kwanyong

    2016-07-01

    We developed a unique nano- and microwire hybrid structure by selectively modifying only the tops of microwires using metal-assisted chemical etching. The proposed nano/micro hybrid structure not only minimizes surface recombination but also absorbs 97% of incident light under AM 1.5G illumination, demonstrating outstanding light absorption compared to that of planar (59%) and microwire arrays (85%). The proposed hybrid solar cells with an area of 1 cm2 exhibit power conversion efficiencies (Eff) of up to 17.6% under AM 1.5G illumination. In particular, the solar cells show a high short-circuit current density (Jsc) of 39.5 mA cm-2 because of the high light-absorbing characteristics of the nanostructures. This corresponds to an approximately 61.5% and 16.5% increase in efficiency compared to that of a planar silicon solar cell (Eff = 10.9%) and a microwire solar cell (Eff = 15.1%), respectively. Therefore, we expect the proposed hybrid structure to become a foundational technology for the development of highly efficient radial junction solar cells.We developed a unique nano- and microwire hybrid structure by selectively modifying only the tops of microwires using metal-assisted chemical etching. The proposed nano/micro hybrid structure not only minimizes surface recombination but also absorbs 97% of incident light under AM 1.5G illumination, demonstrating outstanding light absorption compared to that of planar (59%) and microwire arrays (85%). The proposed hybrid solar cells with an area of 1 cm2 exhibit power conversion efficiencies (Eff) of up to 17.6% under AM 1.5G illumination. In particular, the solar cells show a high short-circuit current density (Jsc) of 39.5 mA cm-2 because of the high light-absorbing characteristics of the nanostructures. This corresponds to an approximately 61.5% and 16.5% increase in efficiency compared to that of a planar silicon solar cell (Eff = 10.9%) and a microwire solar cell (Eff = 15.1%), respectively. Therefore, we expect the

  3. Mechanical Model Development for Composite Structural Supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricks, Trenton M.; Lacy, Thomas E., Jr.; Santiago, Diana; Bednarcyk, Brett A.

    2016-01-01

    Novel composite structural supercapacitor concepts have recently been developed as a means both to store electrical charge and to provide modest mechanical load carrying capability. Double-layer composite supercapacitors are often fabricated by impregnating a woven carbon fiber fabric, which serves as the electrodes, with a structural polymer electrolyte. Polypropylene or a glass fabric is often used as the separator material. Recent research has been primarily limited to evaluating these composites experimentally. In this study, mechanical models based on the Multiscale Generalized Method of Cells (MSGMC) were developed and used to calculate the shear and tensile properties and response of two composite structural supercapacitors from the literature. The modeling approach was first validated against traditional composite laminate data. MSGMC models for composite supercapacitors were developed, and accurate elastic shear/tensile properties were obtained. It is envisioned that further development of the models presented in this work will facilitate the design of composite components for aerospace and automotive applications and can be used to screen candidate constituent materials for inclusion in future composite structural supercapacitor concepts.

  4. Structural evolution of the Ural-Tian Shan junction: A view from Karatau ridge, South Kazakhstan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexeiev, D.V.; Cook, H.E.; Buvtyshkin, V.M.; Golub, L.Y.

    2009-01-01

    The deformation history of the Late Palaeozoic Ural-Tian Shan junction is discussed for the example of the Karatau ridge in southern Kazakhstan. Three deformation events are recognized. The Late Carboniferous D1 event is characterized by Laramide-style thrust-and-fold structures on the southern margin of Kazakhstan with shortening in a NE-SW direction. The Latest Permian and Triassic D2 event is controlled by compression in an east-west direction, which reflects collisional deformation in the Urals. The main structures are submeridional folds and north-west-striking sinistral strike-slip faults. The Triassic D3 event with shortening in a north-south direction reflects collision of the Turan microcontinent against the southern margin of Kazakhstan. The main structures are north-west-striking dextral strike-slip faults. Our new data provides important clues for the reconstruction of pre-Cretaceous structures between the Urals and the Tian Shan. ?? 2008 Acad??mie des sciences.

  5. Structured chaos in a devil's staircase of the Josephson junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukrinov, Yu. M. [BLTP, JINR, Dubna, Moscow Region 141980 (Russian Federation); Botha, A. E., E-mail: bothaae@unisa.ac.za [Department of Physics, University of South Africa, Science Campus, Private Bag X6, Florida Park 1710 (South Africa); Medvedeva, S. Yu. [BLTP, JINR, Dubna, Moscow Region 141980 (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region 141700 (Russian Federation); Kolahchi, M. R. [Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences, P.O. Box 45195-1159, Zanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Irie, A. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Systems Engineering, Utsunomiya University, 7-1-2 Yoto, Utsunomiya 321-8585 (Japan)

    2014-09-01

    The phase dynamics of Josephson junctions (JJs) under external electromagnetic radiation is studied through numerical simulations. Current-voltage characteristics, Lyapunov exponents, and Poincaré sections are analyzed in detail. It is found that the subharmonic Shapiro steps at certain parameters are separated by structured chaotic windows. By performing a linear regression on the linear part of the data, a fractal dimension of D = 0.868 is obtained, with an uncertainty of ±0.012. The chaotic regions exhibit scaling similarity, and it is shown that the devil's staircase of the system can form a backbone that unifies and explains the highly correlated and structured chaotic behavior. These features suggest a system possessing multiple complete devil's staircases. The onset of chaos for subharmonic steps occurs through the Feigenbaum period doubling scenario. Universality in the sequence of periodic windows is also demonstrated. Finally, the influence of the radiation and JJ parameters on the structured chaos is investigated, and it is concluded that the structured chaos is a stable formation over a wide range of parameter values.

  6. Structure of the exon junction core complex with a trapped DEAD-box ATPase bound to RNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christian Brix Folsted; Ballut, Lionel; Johansen, Jesper Sanderhoff;

    2006-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, a multiprotein exon junction complex is deposited on spliced messenger RNAs. The complex is organized around a stable core, which serves as a binding platform for numerous factors that influence messenger RNA function. Here, we present the crystal structure of a tetrameric e...

  7. Edge geometry superconducting tunnel junctions utilizing an NbN/MgO/NbN thin film structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Brian D. (Inventor); Leduc, Henry G. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An edge defined geometry is used to produce very small area tunnel junctions in a structure with niobium nitride superconducting electrodes and a magnesium oxide tunnel barrier. The incorporation of an MgO tunnel barrier with two NbN electrodes results in improved current-voltage characteristics, and may lead to better junction noise characteristics. The NbN electrodes are preferably sputter-deposited, with the first NbN electrode deposited on an insulating substrate maintained at about 250 C to 500 C for improved quality of the electrode.

  8. Intelligent composites and structures -- a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, B.Z. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Functionally responsive composites, as precursors to intelligent or smart material systems, are reviewed. These include composites containing a complex network of sensors that can monitor several parameters simultaneously over the entire lifetime of the structure. For instance, fiber optic sensors can be used for (1) monitoring the manufacturing process, (2) augmenting nondestructive evaluation technique, (3) enabling structure health monitoring and damage assessment systems, and (4) supporting control system. Significant progress has been made towards controlling structural radiated noise by active/adaptive means applied directly to the structure. By incorporating electrorheological (ER) fluids in composites, one can produce a new class of materials of which the mechanical properties can be changed in situ. By adjusting the rheological properties of the ER fluid through an electric field, both stiffness and damping capabilities can be altered. Active vibration control can also be achieved by incorporating a shape memory alloy (SMA, e.g. Nitinol) in a fiber reinforced composite as the embedded distributed actuators. The SMA embedded laminates have the capabilities to change their material properties, modify the stress and strain state of the structure, and possibly alter its configuration possibly in a controlled manner. The advantages and limitations of ER fluids, piezoelectric ceramics, and SMAs as the actuators for smart structures will be discussed. Also to be discussed are the theoretical basis, some fabrication techniques, and potential applications of piezoelectric composites and optical composites.

  9. Voids' System in the Woven Composite Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pavla VOZKOVA

    2006-01-01

    Composites are common material constructions for high-tech use now. Mechanical properties of woven reinforced composites are influenced by voids inside the structure.Voids could be classified to the two sections. Long and thin cracks are more dangerous than pores. It is important to find relations between preparation and place of occurrence of voids. This paper classifies defects according to rise mechanism, point of occurrence, orientation, size and affect to the properties. Image analysis was used for observing samples. Future work would be oriented not only to observing real samples, but also to calculate mechanical properties from real and ideal structures in 3D woven reinforced composites.

  10. On the structural analysis of textile composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanovich, Alexander E.; Pastore, Christopher M.

    The local structural inhomogeneities which distinguish textile composites from laminated materials are discussed. Techniques for quantifying these inhomogeneities through three dimensional geometric modelling are introduced and methods of translating them into elastic properties are presented. Some basic ideas on application of spline functions to the stress field analysis in textile composites are proposed. The significance of internal continuity conditions for these materials is emphasized. Several analytical techniques based on the concept of a meso-volume are discussed. An example is presented to demonstrate the application of the method to structural analysis of textile composites.

  11. Adaptive, tolerant and efficient composite structures

    CERN Document Server

    Sinapius, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Polymer composites offer the possibility for functional integration since the material is produced simultaneously with the product. The efficiency of composite structures raises through functional integration. The specific production processes of composites offer the possibility to improve and to integrate more functions thus making the structure more valuable. Passive functions can be improved by combination of different materials from nano to macro scale, i.e. strength, toughness, bearing strength, compression after impact properties or production tolerances.  Active functions can be realized by smart materials, i.e. morphing, active vibration control, active structure acoustic control or structure health monitoring. The basis is a comprehensive understanding of materials, simulation, design methods, production technologies and adaptronics. These disciplines together deliver advanced lightweight solutions for applications ranging from mechanical engineering to vehicles, airframe and space structures along ...

  12. Study of CoFeB thickness and composition dependence in a modified CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, M.; Chong, H.; Vu, Q. B.; Brooks, R.; Stamper, H.; Bennett, S.

    2016-02-01

    We studied the CoFeB thickness and composition dependence of tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) and resistance-area product (RA) in a modified CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ), in which the bottom CoFeB is coupled to an in-plane exchange biased magnetic layer. This stack structure allows us to measure TMR and RA of the MTJs in sheet film format without patterning them, using current-in-plane-tunneling (CIPT) technique. The thickness ranges for both top and bottom CoFeB to exhibit perpendicular magnetic anisotropy are similar to what are seen in each single magnetic film stack. However, CIPT measurement revealed that there exists an optimal thickness for both top and bottom CoFeB to achieve the highest TMR value. Magnetic hysteresis loops also suggest the thickness-dependent coupling between the top and bottom CoFeB layers. We studied MTJs with two CoFeB compositions (Co40Fe40B20 and Co20Fe60B20) and found that Co20Fe60B20 MTJs give higher TMR and also wider perpendicular thickness range when used at the top layer.

  13. Quantitative NDE of Composite Structures at NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, K. Elliott; Leckey, Cara A. C.; Howell, Patricia A.; Johnston, Patrick H.; Burke, Eric R.; Zalameda, Joseph N.; Winfree, William P.; Seebo, Jeffery P.

    2015-01-01

    The use of composite materials continues to increase in the aerospace community due to the potential benefits of reduced weight, increased strength, and manufacturability. Ongoing work at NASA involves the use of the large-scale composite structures for spacecraft (payload shrouds, cryotanks, crew modules, etc). NASA is also working to enable the use and certification of composites in aircraft structures through the Advanced Composites Project (ACP). The rapid, in situ characterization of a wide range of the composite materials and structures has become a critical concern for the industry. In many applications it is necessary to monitor changes in these materials over a long time. The quantitative characterization of composite defects such as fiber waviness, reduced bond strength, delamination damage, and microcracking are of particular interest. The research approaches of NASA's Nondestructive Evaluation Sciences Branch include investigation of conventional, guided wave, and phase sensitive ultrasonic methods, infrared thermography and x-ray computed tomography techniques. The use of simulation tools for optimizing and developing these methods is also an active area of research. This paper will focus on current research activities related to large area NDE for rapidly characterizing aerospace composites.

  14. Structural evolution of the Kamchatka - Aleutian arc junction area in the Late Mesozoic and Tertiary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexeiev, D.; Gaedicke, C.; Tsukanov, N. V.; Freitag, R.; Harbert, W.

    2002-05-01

    Structural, sedimentological and paleomagnetic studies have been conducted within the Kamchatka - Aleutian junction area aiming to a reconstruction of the tectonic history of the region from the Late Cretaceous to the Miocene. Pre-Pliocene structures of the area are comprised of 1) Achaivayam -Valaginskiy (Olyutorskiy) arc, 2) Vetlovskiy terrane, 3) Kronotskiy arc, and 4) Tyushevka basin, which goes along the boundary between Vetlovskiy and Kronotskiy units. In the Late Cretaceous and Tertiary deformations within the area of study were controlled by the following processes: 1) Northward subduction of the Pacific and Kula plates underneath the Kronotskiy arc and accretion in the fore-arc wedge south of the arc from the Late Cretaceous to the Middle Eocene. 2) Collision of the Achaivayam - Valaginskiy arc against Eurasia during the Early and Middle Eocene. 3) Northwest directed subduction in Proto-Kamchatka subduction zone and development of the accretionary wedge within Vetlovskiy terrane in the Middle and Late Eocene. 4) Collision of the Kronotskiy arc against Kamchatka during the Late Eocene through the Middle Miocene. We reconstruct seven structural complexes with individual structural patterns, which document different episodes of the regional deformation history. Age of the Kronotskiy arc collision is constrained by that 1) the Tyushevka foreland basin developed during the Late Eocene (?), Oligocene, Early and Middle Miocene, and 2) the foreland basin discordantly crosses syn-collisional plunging folds within the Kronotskiy arc. Syn-collisional deformations were controlled by the northwest motion of the Kronotskiy arc as part of the Pacific plate, and by the simultaneous motion of the entire northeast Eurasia margin toward the South. This caused deflection of the western segment of the Kronotskiy arc toward the south; it's rotation up to 90o counterclockwise and the subsequent bent of the arc into a large knee-like structure. The eastern portion of the

  15. Lithographically defined microporous carbon-composite structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burckel, David Bruce; Washburn, Cody M.; Lambert, Timothy N.; Finnegan, Patrick Sean; Wheeler, David R.

    2016-12-06

    A microporous carbon scaffold is produced by lithographically patterning a carbon-containing photoresist, followed by pyrolysis of the developed resist structure. Prior to exposure, the photoresist is loaded with a nanoparticulate material. After pyrolysis, the nanonparticulate material is dispersed in, and intimately mixed with, the carbonaceous material of the scaffold, thereby yielding a carbon composite structure.

  16. Vortex domain structures and dc current dependence of magneto-resistances in magnetic tunnel junctions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Hong-Xiang; Lu Qing-Feng; Zhao Su-Fen; Zhang Xie-Qun; Feng Jia-Feng; Han Xiu-Feng

    2004-01-01

    Microfabrication and the magneto-transport characteristics of the magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) with a spin-valve-type structure of Ta (5nm)/Ni7gFe21 (25nm)/Ir22Mn78 (12nm)/Co75Fe25 (4nm)/Al(0.8nm) oxide/Co75Fe25(4nm)/Ni7gFe21 (20nm)/Ta(5nm) were investigated in this paper. A series of experimental data measured with a MTJ was used to verify a magnon-assisted tunnelling model and theory. Furthermore, a micromagnetics simulation shows that the butterfly-like vortex domain structures can be formed under a current-induced Oersted field, which decreases the net magnetization values of the ferromagnetic electrodes under a large dc current (i.e., in high voltage regimes). It is one of the main reasons for the tunnel magnetoresistance ratios to decrease significantly at high voltage biasing.

  17. Structural dynamics of a single-stranded RNA–helix junction using NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichhorn, Catherine D.; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.

    2014-01-01

    Many regulatory RNAs contain long single strands (ssRNA) that adjoin secondary structural elements. Here, we use NMR spectroscopy to study the dynamic properties of a 12-nucleotide (nt) ssRNA tail derived from the prequeuosine riboswitch linked to the 3′ end of a 48-nt hairpin. Analysis of chemical shifts, NOE connectivity, 13C spin relaxation, and residual dipolar coupling data suggests that the first two residues (A25 and U26) in the ssRNA tail stack onto the adjacent helix and assume an ordered conformation. The following U26-A27 step marks the beginning of an A6-tract and forms an acute pivot point for substantial motions within the tail, which increase toward the terminal end. Despite substantial internal motions, the ssRNA tail adopts, on average, an A-form helical conformation that is coaxial with the helix. Our results reveal a surprising degree of structural and dynamic complexity at the ssRNA–helix junction, which involves a fine balance between order and disorder that may facilitate efficient pseudoknot formation on ligand recognition. PMID:24742933

  18. Nano-scale structure and mechanical properties of the human dentine-enamel junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Y L; Ngan, A H W; King, N M

    2011-07-01

    Despite being an interface between two mechanically mismatched phases of the soft dentine and hard enamel, the dentine-enamel junction (DEJ) in a human tooth is in general capable of withstanding a long working life of repeated dynamic loading. The current poor understanding of the structure and properties of the DEJ has presented a major obstacle to designing better therapeutic protocols for complications concerning the DEJ. In this investigation, it was discovered that the DEJ is a thin, but gradual interface with characteristics transiting from those of dentine to those of enamel. The collagen fibres in dentine enter into the enamel side of the DEJ and terminate in a region in which the hydroxyapatite crystals begin to show enamel characteristics. Using focused ion beam machining, micro-beams were fabricated from regions within 50 μm of the DEJ and were subjected to bend tests. In spite of the similarity in the flexural strength of the DEJ and enamel, fractographs revealed cracks in the DEJ that propagated along structures with dentine characteristics. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the testing of the mechanical properties of the DEJ.

  19. Composite Structure with Origami Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-19

    preparation). Hence, we are able to produce foldcores in any given shape. Mechanical behaviour of sandwich shells with foldcores Equipped with the...being pressed in order to invert the tube inside out. For a tube with circular section, this particular mode of failure has been proven to consume the...to design the most suitable folded core structure for given applications. Gattas J M and You Z, The Behaviour of Curved-Crease Foldcores under

  20. Energy Finite Element Analysis Developments for Vibration Analysis of Composite Aircraft Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlahopoulos, Nickolas; Schiller, Noah H.

    2011-01-01

    The Energy Finite Element Analysis (EFEA) has been utilized successfully for modeling complex structural-acoustic systems with isotropic structural material properties. In this paper, a formulation for modeling structures made out of composite materials is presented. An approach based on spectral finite element analysis is utilized first for developing the equivalent material properties for the composite material. These equivalent properties are employed in the EFEA governing differential equations for representing the composite materials and deriving the element level matrices. The power transmission characteristics at connections between members made out of non-isotropic composite material are considered for deriving suitable power transmission coefficients at junctions of interconnected members. These coefficients are utilized for computing the joint matrix that is needed to assemble the global system of EFEA equations. The global system of EFEA equations is solved numerically and the vibration levels within the entire system can be computed. The new EFEA formulation for modeling composite laminate structures is validated through comparison to test data collected from a representative composite aircraft fuselage that is made out of a composite outer shell and composite frames and stiffeners. NASA Langley constructed the composite cylinder and conducted the test measurements utilized in this work.

  1. Shock Wave Structure in Particulate Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauls, Michael; Ravichandran, Guruswami

    2015-06-01

    Shock wave experiments are conducted on a particulate composite consisting of a polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) matrix reinforced by glass beads. Such a composite with an impedance mismatch of 4.3 closely mimics heterogeneous solids of interest such as concrete and energetic materials. The composite samples are prepared using a compression molding process. The structure and particle velocity rise times of the shocks are examined using forward ballistic experiments. Reverse ballistic experiments are used to track how the interface density influences velocity overshoot above the steady state particle velocity. The effects of particle size (0.1 to 1 mm) and volume fraction of glass beads (30-40%) on the structure of the leading shock wave are investigated. It is observed that the rise time increases with increasing particle size and scales linearly for the range of particle sizes considered here. Results from numerical simulations using CTH are compared with experimental results to gain insights into wave propagation in heterogeneous particulate composites.

  2. Atomic structure and oxygen deficiency of the ultrathin aluminium oxide barrier in Al/AlOx/Al Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Lunjie; Tran, Dung Trung; Tai, Cheuk-Wai; Svensson, Gunnar; Olsson, Eva

    2016-07-01

    Al/AlOx/Al Josephson junctions are the building blocks of a wide range of superconducting quantum devices that are key elements for quantum computers, extremely sensitive magnetometers and radiation detectors. The properties of the junctions and the superconducting quantum devices are determined by the atomic structure of the tunnel barrier. The nanoscale dimension and disordered nature of the barrier oxide have been challenges for the direct experimental investigation of the atomic structure of the tunnel barrier. Here we show that the miniaturized dimension of the barrier and the interfacial interaction between crystalline Al and amorphous AlOx give rise to oxygen deficiency at the metal/oxide interfaces. In the interior of the barrier, the oxide resembles the atomic structure of bulk aluminium oxide. Atomic defects such as oxygen vacancies at the interfaces can be the origin of the two-level systems and contribute to decoherence and noise in superconducting quantum circuits.

  3. Branch structure of IV-characteristics in the capacitively coupled Josephson junctions model with the diffusion current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukrinov, Yu.M. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Physical Technical Institute, Dushanbe 734063 (Tajikistan)], E-mail: shukrinv@theor.jinr.ru; Mahfouzi, F. [Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences, P.O. Box 45195-1159, Zanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Seidel, P. [Institut fuer Festkorperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, D-07743 Jena (Germany)

    2007-09-01

    We have solved numerically a system of dynamical equations for the gauge-invariant phase differences between superconducting layers for a stack of N intrinsic junctions and obtained a total branch structure in the current-voltage characteristics (IVC) of the stack. The coupling dependence of the branch's slopes is investigated and demonstrated that the equidistance of the branch structure in capacitively coupled Josephson junctions (CCJJ) model is broken at small values of coupling parameter. Changes in the parameters of the boundary conditions and the use of periodic boundary conditions do not affect this result. In the framework of the CCJJ model with the diffusion current we simulate an experiment and obtain the IV-characteristic with equidistant branch structure at different values of model parameters.

  4. Branch structure of IV-characteristics in the capacitively coupled Josephson junctions model with the diffusion current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukrinov, Yu. M.; Mahfouzi, F.; Seidel, P.

    2007-09-01

    We have solved numerically a system of dynamical equations for the gauge-invariant phase differences between superconducting layers for a stack of N intrinsic junctions and obtained a total branch structure in the current-voltage characteristics (IVC) of the stack. The coupling dependence of the branch’s slopes is investigated and demonstrated that the equidistance of the branch structure in capacitively coupled Josephson junctions (CCJJ) model is broken at small values of coupling parameter. Changes in the parameters of the boundary conditions and the use of periodic boundary conditions do not affect this result. In the framework of the CCJJ model with the diffusion current we simulate an experiment and obtain the IV-characteristic with equidistant branch structure at different values of model parameters.

  5. Atomic structure and oxygen deficiency of the ultrathin aluminium oxide barrier in Al/AlOx/Al Josephson junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Lunjie; Tran, Dung Trung; Tai, Cheuk-Wai; Svensson, Gunnar; Olsson, Eva

    2016-07-12

    Al/AlOx/Al Josephson junctions are the building blocks of a wide range of superconducting quantum devices that are key elements for quantum computers, extremely sensitive magnetometers and radiation detectors. The properties of the junctions and the superconducting quantum devices are determined by the atomic structure of the tunnel barrier. The nanoscale dimension and disordered nature of the barrier oxide have been challenges for the direct experimental investigation of the atomic structure of the tunnel barrier. Here we show that the miniaturized dimension of the barrier and the interfacial interaction between crystalline Al and amorphous AlOx give rise to oxygen deficiency at the metal/oxide interfaces. In the interior of the barrier, the oxide resembles the atomic structure of bulk aluminium oxide. Atomic defects such as oxygen vacancies at the interfaces can be the origin of the two-level systems and contribute to decoherence and noise in superconducting quantum circuits.

  6. Composite electrode/electrolyte structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visco, Steven J.; Jacobson, Craig P.; DeJonghe, Lutgard C.

    2004-01-27

    Provided is an electrode fabricated from highly electronically conductive materials such as metals, metal alloys, or electronically conductive ceramics. The electronic conductivity of the electrode substrate is maximized. Onto this electrode in the green state, a green ionic (e.g., electrolyte) film is deposited and the assembly is co-fired at a temperature suitable to fully densify the film while the substrate retains porosity. Subsequently, a catalytic material is added to the electrode structure by infiltration of a metal salt and subsequent low temperature firing. The invention allows for an electrode with high electronic conductivity and sufficient catalytic activity to achieve high power density in ionic (electrochemical) devices such as fuel cells and electrolytic gas separation systems.

  7. Silver Matrix Composites - Structure and Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wieczorek J.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Phase compositions of composite materials determine their performance as well as physical and mechanical properties. Depending on the type of applied matrix and the kind, amount and morphology of the matrix reinforcement, it is possible to shape the material properties so that they meet specific operational requirements. In the paper, results of investigations on silver alloy matrix composites reinforced with ceramic particles are presented. The investigations enabled evaluation of hardness, tribological and mechanical properties as well as the structure of produced materials. The matrix of composite material was an alloy of silver and aluminium, magnesium and silicon. As the reinforcing phase, 20-60 μm ceramic particles (SiC, SiO2, Al2O3 and Cs were applied. The volume fraction of the reinforcing phase in the composites was 10%. The composites were produced using the liquid phase (casting technology, followed by plastic work (the KOBO method. The mechanical and tribological properties were analysed for plastic work-subjected composites. The mechanical properties were assessed based on a static tensile and hardness tests. The tribological properties were investigated under dry sliding conditions. The analysis of results led to determination of effects of the composite production technology on their performance. Moreover, a relationship between the type of reinforcing phase and the mechanical and tribological properties was established.

  8. Characterization of the structural and protein recognition properties of hybrid PNA-DNA four-way junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, Douglas; Serrano, Crystal; Brahan, Ann Marie; Shams, Arik; Totsingan, Filbert; Bell, Anthony J

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the structure and protein recognition properties of hybrid four-way junctions (4WJs) composed of DNA and peptide nucleic acid (PNA) strands. We compare a classic immobile DNA junction, J1, vs. six PNA-DNA junctions, including a number with blunt DNA ends and multiple PNA strands. Circular dichroism (CD) analysis reveals that hybrid 4WJs are composed of helices that possess structures intermediate between A- and B-form DNA, the apparent level of A-form structure correlates with the PNA content. The structure of hybrids that contain one PNA strand is sensitive to Mg(+2). For these constructs, the apparent B-form structure and conformational stability (Tm) increase in high Mg(+2). The blunt-ended junction, b4WJ-PNA3, possesses the highest B-form CD signals and Tm (40.1 °C) values vs. all hybrids and J1. Protein recognition studies are carried out using the recombinant DNA-binding protein, HMGB1b. HMGB1b binds the blunt ended single-PNA hybrids, b4WJ-PNA1 and b4WJ-PNA3, with high affinity. HMGB1b binds the multi-PNA hybrids, 4WJ-PNA1,3 and b4WJ-PNA1,3, but does not form stable protein-nucleic acid complexes. Protein interactions with hybrid 4WJs are influenced by the ratio of A- to B-form helices: hybrids with helices composed of higher levels of B-form structure preferentially associate with HMGB1b.

  9. Structural and functional insights into the malaria parasite moving junction complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigitte Vulliez-Le Normand

    Full Text Available Members of the phylum Apicomplexa, which include the malaria parasite Plasmodium, share many features in their invasion mechanism in spite of their diverse host cell specificities and life cycle characteristics. The formation of a moving junction (MJ between the membranes of the invading apicomplexan parasite and the host cell is common to these intracellular pathogens. The MJ contains two key parasite components: the surface protein Apical Membrane Antigen 1 (AMA1 and its receptor, the Rhoptry Neck Protein (RON complex, which is targeted to the host cell membrane during invasion. In particular, RON2, a transmembrane component of the RON complex, interacts directly with AMA1. Here, we report the crystal structure of AMA1 from Plasmodium falciparum in complex with a peptide derived from the extracellular region of PfRON2, highlighting clear specificities of the P. falciparum RON2-AMA1 interaction. The receptor-binding site of PfAMA1 comprises the hydrophobic groove and a region that becomes exposed by displacement of the flexible Domain II loop. Mutations of key contact residues of PfRON2 and PfAMA1 abrogate binding between the recombinant proteins. Although PfRON2 contacts some polymorphic residues, binding studies with PfAMA1 from different strains show that these have little effect on affinity. Moreover, we demonstrate that the PfRON2 peptide inhibits erythrocyte invasion by P. falciparum merozoites and that this strong inhibitory potency is not affected by AMA1 polymorphisms. In parallel, we have determined the crystal structure of PfAMA1 in complex with the invasion-inhibitory peptide R1 derived by phage display, revealing an unexpected structural mimicry of the PfRON2 peptide. These results identify the key residues governing the interactions between AMA1 and RON2 in P. falciparum and suggest novel approaches to antimalarial therapeutics.

  10. High-strain composites and dual-matrix composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqueda Jimenez, Ignacio

    Most space applications require deployable structures due to the limiting size of current launch vehicles. Specifically, payloads in nanosatellites such as CubeSats require very high compaction ratios due to the very limited space available in this typo of platform. Strain-energy-storing deployable structures can be suitable for these applications, but the curvature to which these structures can be folded is limited to the elastic range. Thanks to fiber microbuckling, high-strain composite materials can be folded into much higher curvatures without showing significant damage, which makes them suitable for very high compaction deployable structure applications. However, in applications that require carrying loads in compression, fiber microbuckling also dominates the strength of the material. A good understanding of the strength in compression of high-strain composites is then needed to determine how suitable they are for this type of application. The goal of this thesis is to investigate, experimentally and numerically, the microbuckling in compression of high-strain composites. Particularly, the behavior in compression of unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced silicone rods (CFRS) is studied. Experimental testing of the compression failure of CFRS rods showed a higher strength in compression than the strength estimated by analytical models, which is unusual in standard polymer composites. This effect, first discovered in the present research, was attributed to the variation in random carbon fiber angles respect to the nominal direction. This is an important effect, as it implies that microbuckling strength might be increased by controlling the fiber angles. With a higher microbuckling strength, high-strain materials could carry loads in compression without reaching microbuckling and therefore be suitable for several space applications. A finite element model was developed to predict the homogenized stiffness of the CFRS, and the homogenization results were used in

  11. Predicting the Structural Performance of Composite Structures Under Cyclic Loading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kassapoglou, C.

    2012-01-01

    The increased use of advanced composite materials on primary aircraft structure has brought back to the forefront the question of how such structures perform under repeated loading. In particular, when damage or other stress risers are present, tests have shown that the load to cause failure after

  12. Junction trees of general graphs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaofei WANG; Jianhua GUO

    2008-01-01

    In this paper,we study the maximal prime subgraphs and their corresponding structure for any undirected graph.We introduce the notion of junction trees and investigate their structural characteristics,including junction properties,induced-subtree properties,running-intersection properties and maximum-weight spanning tree properties.Furthermore,the characters of leaves and edges on junction trees are discussed.

  13. Life of structures of composite materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koznetsov, N.D.; Stepanenko, N.D.

    1986-06-01

    The introduction of composite materials in gas turbine engines is rationally done in stages. It is desirable to concentrate efforts on the use of them for production of vanes, sound deadening panes, the reverse rod, and other elements of the stator. The authors use compressor blades as an example of the basic principles of design, the selection of the reinforcing structure, and inspection of the quality of structures of composite materials. A method of determination of the elastodamping properties of polymer composite materials on specimens with free ends in high frequency flexural vibrations excited by a modulated jet of compressed air has been developed and standardized. With the use of this method such defects as separations, cracks, disorientation of the reinforcing, deviations in the order of alternation and the angular orientation of the layers are revealed.

  14. Failure Analysis of Composite Structure Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-05-01

    8MATERIAL STRUCTURES DISCONTINUITY T•R PLY DROPOFF i 7ARC LAP/GAP . PRPAATION A, ,OM LY , 1e, ’ •INS ERVICE MAINTENANCE DAMAGE SVv , S IMPACT \\\\ CHESIE ...composite joints such as box beam members, for example, are difficult to inspect by ultrasonic techniques, and the X-ray attenuation coefficients of

  15. Adjustable 3-D structure with enhanced interfaces and junctions towards microwave response using FeCo/C core-shell nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Daoran; Liang, Xiaohui; Liu, Wei; Ma, Jianna; Zhang, Yanan; Ji, Guangbin; Meng, Wei

    2017-12-01

    In this work, the 3-D honeycomb-like FeCo/C nanocomposites were synthesized through the carbon thermal reduction under an inert atmosphere. The enhanced microwave absorption properties of the composites were mainly attributed to the unique three dimensional structure of the FeCo/C nanocomposites, abundant interfaces and junctions, and the appropriate impedance matching. The Cole-Cole semicircles proved the sufficient dielectric relaxation process. The sample calcinated at 600°C for 4h showed the best microwave absorption properties. A maximum reflection loss of -54.6dB was achieved at 10.8GHz with a thickness of 2.3mm and the frequency bandwidth was as large as 5.3GHz. The results showed that the as-prepared FeCo/C nanocomposite could be a potential candidate for microwave absorption. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Analysis of the Intrinsically Disordered N-Terminus of the DNA Junction-Resolving Enzyme T7 Endonuclease I: Identification of Structure Formed upon DNA Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Alasdair D J; Stevens, Michael; Declais, Anne-Cecile; Leahy, Adam; Mackay, Katherine; El Mkami, Hassane; Lilley, David M J; Norman, David G

    2016-08-01

    The four-way (Holliday) DNA junction of homologous recombination is processed by the symmetrical cleavage of two strands by a nuclease. These junction-resolving enzymes bind to four-way junctions in dimeric form, distorting the structure of the junction in the process. Crystal structures of T7 endonuclease I have been determined as free protein, and the complex with a DNA junction. In neither crystal structure was the N-terminal 16-amino acid peptide visible, yet deletion of this peptide has a marked effect on the resolution process. Here we have investigated the N-terminal peptide by inclusion of spin-label probes at unique sites within this region, studied by electron paramagnetic resonance. Continuous wave experiments show that these labels are mobile in the free protein but become constrained on binding a DNA junction, with the main interaction occurring for residues 7-10 and 12. Distance measurements between equivalent positions within the two peptides of a dimer using PELDOR showed that the intermonomeric distances for residues 2-12 are long and broadly distributed in the free protein but are significantly shortened and become more defined on binding to DNA. These results suggest that the N-terminal peptides become more organized on binding to the DNA junction and nestle into the minor grooves at the branchpoint, consistent with the biochemical data indicating an important role in the resolution process. This study demonstrates the presence of structure within a protein region that cannot be viewed by crystallography.

  17. A Nonlinear Theory for Smart Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Aditi

    2002-01-01

    The paper discusses the following: (1) Development of a completely coupled thermo-piezoelectric-mechanical theory for the analysis of composite shells with segmented and distributed piezoelectric sensor/actuators and shape memory alloys. The higher order displacement theory will be used to capture the transverse shear effects in anisotropic composites. The original theory will be modified to satisfy the stress continuity at ply interfaces. (2) Development of a finite element technique to implement the mathematical model. (3) Investigation of the coupled structures/controls interaction problem to study the complex trade-offs associated with the coupled problem.

  18. Dynamic Failure of Composite and Sandwich Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Abrate, Serge; Rajapakse, Yapa D S

    2013-01-01

    This book presents a broad view of the current state of the art regarding the dynamic response of composite and sandwich structures subjected to impacts and explosions. Each chapter combines a thorough assessment of the literature with original contributions made by the authors.  The first section deals with fluid-structure interactions in marine structures.  The first chapter focuses on hull slamming and particularly cases in which the deformation of the structure affects the motion of the fluid during the water entry of flexible hulls. Chapter 2 presents an extensive series of tests underwater and in the air to determine the effects of explosions on composite and sandwich structures.  Full-scale structures were subjected to significant explosive charges, and such results are extremely rare in the open literature.  Chapter 3 describes a simple geometrical theory of diffraction for describing the interaction of an underwater blast wave with submerged structures. The second section addresses the problem of...

  19. Electric field induced structural modifications in metal/SrTiO{sub 3} junctions and their resistive properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoecker, Hartmut [TU Dresden (Germany). Institut fuer Strukturphysik; TU Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany). Institut fuer Experimentelle Physik; Seibt, Juliane; Hanzig, Florian; Wintz, Susi; Meyer, Dirk C. [TU Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany). Institut fuer Experimentelle Physik; Zschornak, Matthias [TU Dresden (Germany). Institut fuer Strukturphysik

    2010-07-01

    In oxides with perovskite-type of structure, mobile oxygen can cause the formation of non-stoichiometric regions when an electric field of sufficient strength ({proportional_to}1000 V/mm) is applied. Our in-situ investigations of metal/SrTiO{sub 3} junctions revealed reversible structural changes at room temperature caused by a systematic field-induced redistribution of oxygen. The investigations were carried out using wide-angle X-ray scattering, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, photoluminescence, nanoindentation and time-dependent electric I-U measurements. Motivated by the successful use of SrTiO{sub 3} with different doping metals for memory cells on the basis of resistive switching combined with the findings on the major importance of oxygen vacancy redistribution, we show the possibility of realizing a resistance change memory based on vacancy-doped SrTiO{sub 3}. The formation of corresponding metal/SrTiO{sub 3} junctions in an electric field is discussed as well as the switching between ohmic and Schottky-type resistive properties. A notable hysteresis in the I-U characteristics can be used to carry out Write, Read and Erase operations to test the memory cell properties of such junctions.

  20. Fiber reinforced polymer composites for bridge structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra CANTORIU

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Rapid advances in construction materials technology have led to the emergence of new materials with special properties, aiming at safety, economy and functionality of bridges structures. A class of structural materials which was originally developed many years ago, but recently caught the attention of engineers involved in the construction of bridges is fiber reinforced polymer composites. This paper provides an overview of fiber reinforced polymer composites used in bridge structures including types, properties, applications and future trends. The results of this study have revealed that this class of materials presents outstanding properties such as high specific strength, high fatigue and environmental resistance, lightweight, stiffness, magnetic transparency, highly cost-effective, and quick assembly, but in the same time high initial costs, lack of data on long-term field performance, low fire resistance. Fiber reinforced polymer composites were widely used in construction of different bridge structures such as: deck and tower, I-beams, tendons, cable stands and proved to be materials for future in this field.

  1. Breaking the GaN material limits with nanoscale vertical polarisation super junction structures: A simulation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unni, Vineet; Sankara Narayanan, E. M.

    2017-04-01

    This is the first report on the numerical analysis of the performance of nanoscale vertical superjunction structures based on impurity doping and an innovative approach that utilizes the polarisation properties inherent in III–V nitride semiconductors. Such nanoscale vertical polarisation super junction structures can be realized by employing a combination of epitaxial growth along the non-polar crystallographic axes of Wurtzite GaN and nanolithography-based processing techniques. Detailed numerical simulations clearly highlight the limitations of a doping based approach and the advantages of the proposed solution for breaking the unipolar one-dimensional material limits of GaN by orders of magnitude.

  2. Structural and mechanistic insight into Holliday-junction dissolution by topoisomerase IIIα and RMI1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bocquet, Nicolas; Bizard, Anna H; Abdulrahman, Wassim;

    2014-01-01

    Repair of DNA double-strand breaks via homologous recombination can produce double Holliday junctions (dHJs) that require enzymatic separation. Topoisomerase IIIα (TopIIIα) together with RMI1 disentangles the final hemicatenane intermediate obtained once dHJs have converged. How binding of RMI1 t...

  3. Imaging of the dynamic magnetic structure in a parallel array of shunted Josephson junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doderer, T.; Kaplunenko, V. K.; Mygind, Jesper

    1994-01-01

    is applied to the edge junction of the array. This effect was found to be due to the self-induced magnetic field produced by the edge current. This nonuniform field divides the array into domains each spanning several unit cells and each containing the same number of flux quanta. We report on experimental...

  4. Structural and Electrical Properties of Heteroepitaxial Magnetic Oxide Junction Diode Fabricated by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, M. K.; Wong, K. H.

    2010-11-01

    Heteroepitaxial junctions formed by p-type strontium doped lanthanum manganite and n-type cobalt doped titanium dioxide were fabricated on LaAlO3 (100) substrates by pulsed laser deposition. The La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSMO) layers were grown at 650° C and under 150 mTorr ambient oxygen pressure. They showed room temperature ferromagnetism and metallic-like electrical conduction with a resistivity of 0.015 ohm cm at 300 K. The CoxTi1-xO2[x = 0.05 and 0.1] (CTO), which, at anatase phase, was reported as a wide-band-gap dilute magnetic semiconductor, was deposited on the LSMO film surface at 600° C with an ambient oxygen pressure of 20 mTorr. The as-grown CTO films exhibited pure anatase crystalline phase and semiconductor-like conduction. Under optimized fabrication conditions the CTO/LSMO junction revealed a heteroepitaxial relationship of (004)CTO‖‖(001)LSMO‖‖(001)LAO. Electrical characterization of these p-n junctions yielded excellent rectifying characteristics with a current rectifying ratio over 1000 at room temperature. The electrical transport across these diodes was dominated by diffusion current at low current (low bias voltage) regime and by recombination current at high current (high bias voltage) regime. Our results have demonstrated an all-oxide spintronic junction diode with good transport property. The simultaneous of electrical and magnetic modulation in a diode junction is therefore potentially realizable.

  5. Structural dynamic analysis of composite beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, J. K.; Venkatesan, C.; Ramamurti, V.

    1990-12-01

    In the treatment of the structural dynamic problem of composite materials, two alternate types of formulations, based on the elastic modulus and compliance quantities, exist in the literature. The definitions of the various rigidities are observed to differ in these two approaches. Following these two types of formulation, the structural dynamic characteristics of a composite beam are analyzed. The results of the analysis are compared with those available in the literature. Based on the comparison, the influence of the warping function in defining the coupling terms in the modulus approach and also on the natural frequencies of the beam has been identified. It is found from the analysis that, in certain cases, the difference between the results of the two approaches is appreciable. These differences may be attributed to the constraints imposed on the deformation and flexibility of the beam by the choice of the description of the warping behaviour. Finally, the influence of material properties on the structural dynamic characteristics of the beam is studied for different composites for various angles of orthotropy.

  6. OOA composite structures applicable in railway industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rusnáková Soňa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Composite sandwich structures offers several advantages over conventional structural materials such as lightweight, high bending and torsional stiffness, superior thermal insulation and excellent acoustic damping. In the aerospace industry, sandwich composites are commonly manufactured using the autoclave process which is associated with high operating cost. Out-of-autoclave (OOA manufacturing has been shown to be capable of producing low cost and high performance composites. In this paper we present results of experimental testing of various sandwich materials according various standards and actual requirements in transport industry. We compared the different types of surface and paint systems, because these layers are the most important in contact with the surrounding environment and load conditions. In the experimental measurements were used various materials. For the core of the sandwich structure were selected aluminium honeycomb, aramid honeycomb and PET (Polyethylene terephthalate foam core. Support layers were chosen two kinds of predimpregnated materials. The conditions of measurements were requirements for strength and rigidity, safety - flame resistance and reflectivity resistance. The samples were tested at the 3 - point bending test according to standard EN ISO 178, by modified test to determine the force required to rapture threaded insert, by test of reflectivity according to UIC CODE 844-4 R and according to standard EN 45545-2 fire protection of railway vehicles.

  7. Structural analysis of key gap junction domains--Lessons from genome data and disease-linked mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Donglin

    2016-02-01

    A gap junction (GJ) channel is formed by docking of two GJ hemichannels and each of these hemichannels is a hexamer of connexins. All connexin genes have been identified in human, mouse, and rat genomes and their homologous genes in many other vertebrates are available in public databases. The protein sequences of these connexins align well with high sequence identity in the same connexin across different species. Domains in closely related connexins and several residues in all known connexins are also well-conserved. These conserved residues form signatures (also known as sequence logos) in these domains and are likely to play important biological functions. In this review, the sequence logos of individual connexins, groups of connexins with common ancestors, and all connexins are analyzed to visualize natural evolutionary variations and the hot spots for human disease-linked mutations. Several gap junction domains are homologous, likely forming similar structures essential for their function. The availability of a high resolution Cx26 GJ structure and the subsequently-derived homology structure models for other connexin GJ channels elevated our understanding of sequence logos at the three-dimensional GJ structure level, thus facilitating the understanding of how disease-linked connexin mutants might impair GJ structure and function. This knowledge will enable the design of complementary variants to rescue disease-linked mutants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Thick-walled carbon composite multifunctional structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haake, John M.; Jacobs, Jack H.; McIlroy, Bruce E.

    1997-06-01

    Satellite programs are moving in the direction of smaller and lighter structures. Technological advances have permitted more sophisticated equipment to be consolidated into compact spaces. Micro-satellites, between 10 and 100 kg, will incorporate micro-electric devices into the lay-up of the satellite structure. These structures will be designed to carry load, provide thermal control, enhance damping, and include integrated passive electronics. These multifunctional structures offer lighter weight, reduced volume, and a 'smarter' overall package for incorporation of sensors, electronics, fiber optics, powered appendages or active components. McDonnell Douglas Corporation (MDC) has applied technology from the synthesis and processing of intelligent cost effective structures (SPICES) and independent research and development (IRAD) programs to the modular instrument support system (MISS) for multifunctional space structures and micro-satellites. The SPICES program was funded by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to develop affordable manufacturing processes for smart materials to be used in vibration control, and the MISS program was funded by NASA-Langley. The MISS program was conceived to develop concepts and techniques to make connections between different multifunctional structures. MDA fabricated a trapezoidal carbon composite structure out of IM7/977-3 tape prepreg. Flex circuits, thermal and optical conduits were embedded to realize a utility modular connector. These provide electrical, thermal, optical and mechanical connections between micro- satellite components. A quick disconnect mount was also developed to accommodate a variety of devices such as solar arrays, power sources, thermal transfer and vibration control modules.

  9. Holliday junction-containing DNA structures persist in cells lacking Sgs1 or Top3 following exposure to DNA damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mankouri, Hocine W; Ashton, Thomas M; Hickson, Ian D

    2011-01-01

    The Sgs1-Rmi1-Top3 "dissolvasome" is required for the maintenance of genome stability and has been implicated in the processing of various types of DNA structures arising during DNA replication. Previous investigations have revealed that unprocessed (X-shaped) homologous recombination repair (HRR......) intermediates persist when S-phase is perturbed by using methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells with impaired Sgs1 or Top3. However, the precise nature of these persistent DNA structures remains poorly characterized. Here, we report that ectopic expression of either of two heterologous...... and structurally unrelated Holliday junction (HJ) resolvases, Escherichia coli RusA or human GEN1(1-527), promotes the removal of these X-structures in vivo. Moreover, other types of DNA replication intermediates, including stalled replication forks and non-HRR-dependent X-structures, are refractory to RusA or GEN...

  10. Deciphering the structure of nano-nickel composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Oliver K [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    A model has been developed to predict piezoresistivity in Silicone/Nickel Nanostrand composites. This model combines the theory of quantum mechanical tunneling with percolation theory to obtain macroscopic composite resistivity as a function of strain from quantum mechanical principles and statistical characterization of constituent morphology. It has been shown that a model incorporating quantum mechanical tunneling and percolation theory can be used to predict piezoresistivity in Silicone/Nickel Nanostrand composites. The predictions of this model qualitatively demonstrate the large drop in resistivity with strain that these composites exhibit. The quantitative accuracy of the model was shown to be usually within one order of magnitude. Further work must be done to obtain an empirical distribution of inter-nanostrand gap distances, the tunneling barrier height ({lambda}), and the fraction of conductive junctions as a function of strain for these composites.

  11. Interfacial chemistry and structure in ceramic composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, R.H.; Saenz, N.T.; Schilling, C.H.

    1990-09-01

    The interfacial chemistry and structure of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) play a major role in the properties of these materials. Fiber-matrix interfaces chemistries are vitally important in the fracture strength, fracture toughness, and fracture resistance of ceramic composites because they influence fiber loading and fiber pullout. Elevated-temperature properties are also linked to the interfacial characteristics through the chemical stability of the interface in corrosive environments and the creep/pullout behavior of the interface. Physical properties such as electrical and thermal conductivity are also dependent on the interface. Fiber-matrix interfaces containing a 1-{mu}m-thick multilayered interface with amorphous and graphitic C to a 1-nm-thick SiO{sub 2} layer can result from sintering operations for some composite systems. Fibers coated with C, BN, C/BC/BN, and Si are also used to produce controlled interface chemistries and structures. Growth interfaces within the matrix resulting from processing of CMCs can also be crucial to the behavior of these materials. Evaluation of the interfacial chemistry and structure of CMCs requires the use of a variety of analytical tools, including optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive x-ray analysis. A review of the interfacial chemistry and structure of SiC whisker- and fiber-reinforced Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and SiC/SiC materials is presented. Where possible, correlations with fracture properties and high-temperature stability are made. 94 refs., 10 figs.

  12. Structural optimization and shear performances of the nanopins based on Y-junction carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zhong-Qiang, E-mail: zhangzq@mail.ujs.edu.cn [Micro/Nano Science and Technology Center, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Center of Photovoltaic Science and Engineering, Changzhou University, Changzhou 213164, Jiangsu (China); State Key Laboratory of Structural Analysis for Industrial Equipment, Department of Engineering Mechanics, Faculty of Vehicle Engineering and Mechanics, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zhong, Jun [Micro/Nano Science and Technology Center, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Ye, Hong-Fei [State Key Laboratory of Structural Analysis for Industrial Equipment, Department of Engineering Mechanics, Faculty of Vehicle Engineering and Mechanics, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Cheng, Guang-Gui [Micro/Nano Science and Technology Center, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Ding, Jian-Ning, E-mail: dingjn@ujs.edu.cn [Micro/Nano Science and Technology Center, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Center of Photovoltaic Science and Engineering, Changzhou University, Changzhou 213164, Jiangsu (China)

    2017-01-01

    Utilizing the classical molecular dynamic, we have briefly conducted geometry optimization on several typical nanopins based on Y-junction carbon nanotubes (CNTs), and further investigated their shear performance. The service performance of the nanopin is not sensitive to the length of the inserting end, while as the height of the branch tube increases, the maximum unloading force increases firstly and then keeps relatively stable. The overlong inserting end and high branch tube can lead to the severe oscillation in unloading force due to the continuous morphology change. Moreover, results show that a small angle included in Y-junction CNTs can contribute to both of the fixity of the nanopin and instability of the uninstallation process. Further investigation indicates that the orientation of the branch tubes of the nanopin determines the maximum shear performance, while the radial stability of the CNTs plays an important role in the shear performance of the nanopin. And the microstructure of the Y-junction CNT occurred during the using process can also influence its service performance.

  13. Structural optimization and shear performances of the nanopins based on Y-junction carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhong-Qiang; Zhong, Jun; Ye, Hong-Fei; Cheng, Guang-Gui; Ding, Jian-Ning

    2017-01-01

    Utilizing the classical molecular dynamic, we have briefly conducted geometry optimization on several typical nanopins based on Y-junction carbon nanotubes (CNTs), and further investigated their shear performance. The service performance of the nanopin is not sensitive to the length of the inserting end, while as the height of the branch tube increases, the maximum unloading force increases firstly and then keeps relatively stable. The overlong inserting end and high branch tube can lead to the severe oscillation in unloading force due to the continuous morphology change. Moreover, results show that a small angle included in Y-junction CNTs can contribute to both of the fixity of the nanopin and instability of the uninstallation process. Further investigation indicates that the orientation of the branch tubes of the nanopin determines the maximum shear performance, while the radial stability of the CNTs plays an important role in the shear performance of the nanopin. And the microstructure of the Y-junction CNT occurred during the using process can also influence its service performance.

  14. Assembly induced delaminations in composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goering, J.; Bohlmann, R.; Wanthal, S.; Kautz, E.; Neri, Lawrence M.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental and analytical studies of the development of delaminations around fastener holes in composite structures are presented. This type of delamination is known to occur in composite skins that are mechanically fastened to a poorly mating substructure. Results of an experimental study to determine the resistance of laminates to the initiation of assembly induced delaminations and the residual strength of assembly damaged coupons are presented for AS4/3501-6, IM7/8551-7A, and AS4/PEEK material systems. A survey of existing analytical models for predicting the residual strength and stability of delaminations is presented, and the development of a new model for predicting the initiation of delaminations around a fastener hole is outlined. The fastener hole damage initiation model utilizes a finite element based Fourier series solution, and is validated through comparisons of analytical and experimental results.

  15. Composition and structure of calcium aluminosilicate microspheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharonova, O. M.; Oreshkina, N. A.; Zhizhaev, A. M.

    2017-06-01

    The composition was studied of calcium aluminosilicate microspheres of three morphological types in high-calcium fly ash from combustion of brown coal from the Kansk-Achinsk basin in slag-tap boilers at temperatures from 1400 to 1500°C and sampled in the first field of electrostatic precipitators at the Krasnoyarsk Cogeneration Power Station no. 2 (TETs-2). Gross compositions and the composition of local areas were determined using a scanning electron microscopy technique and an energy-dispersive analysis with full mapping of globules. With a high content of basic oxides O ox (68 to 79 wt %) and a low content of acid oxides K ox (21 to 31 wt %), type 1 microspheres are formed. They consist of heterogeneous areas having a porous structure and crystalline components in which the content of CaO, SiO2, or Al2O3 differs by two to three times and the content of MgO differs by seven times. With a lower content of O ox (55 to 63 wt %) and an elevated content of K ox (37 to 45 wt %), type 2 microspheres are formed. They are more homogeneous in the composition and structure and consist of similar crystalline components. Having a close content of O ox (46 to 53 wt %) and K ox (47 to 54 wt %), type 3 microspheres, which are a dense matter consisting of amorphous substance with submicron- and nanostructure of crystalline components, are formed. The basic precursor in formation of high-calcium aluminosilicate microspheres is calcium from the organomineral matter of coals with various contribution of Mg, Fe, S, or Na from the coal organic matter and Al, Fe, S, or Si in the form of single mineral inclusions in a coal particle. On the basis of the available data, the effect was analyzed of the composition of a CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2-FeO system on the melting and viscous properties of the matter in microspheres and formation of globules of different morphology. The results of this analysis will help to find a correlation with properties of microspheres in their use as functional

  16. Structural Health Monitoring of Composite Structures Using Fiber Optic Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Anthony

    Structural health monitoring is the process of detecting damage to a structure, where damage can be characterized as changes to material/mechanical properties including but not limited to plastically deforming the material or the modification of connections. Fiber optic cables with fiber Bragg gratings have emerged as a reliable method of locally measuring strains within a structure. During the manufacturing of composite structures, the fiber optic cables can be embedded between lamina plies, allowing the ability to measure strain at discrete locations within the structure as opposed to electrical strain gauges, which must typically be applied to the surface only. The fiber optic sensors may be used to see if the local strain at the sensor location is beyond desired limits, or the array response may be mined to determine additional information about the loading applied to the structure. The work presented in this thesis is to present novel and potential applications of FBG sensors being used to assess the health of the structure. The first application is the dual application of the FBG sensor as a method to determine the strain around a bolt connection as well as the preload of the fastener using a single fiber optic sensor. The composite material around the bolted connections experience stress concentrations and are often the location of damage to the structure from operational cyclic loading over the lifetime of the structure. The degradation can occur more quickly if the fastener is insufficiently tight to transfer load properly. The second application is the ability to locate the impact location of a projectile with damaging and non-damaging energy. By locating and quantifying the damage, the sensor array provides the basis for a structural health monitoring system that has the potential to determine if the damage is extensive enough to replace, or if the part can be salvaged and retrofitted.

  17. Biomimetic Composite Structural T-joints

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vimal Kumar Thummalapalli; Steven L.Donaldson

    2012-01-01

    Biological structural fixed joints exhibit unique attributes,including highly optimized fiber paths which minimize stress concentrations.In addition,since the joints consist of continuous,uncut fiber architectures,the joints enable the organism to transport information and chemicals from one part of the body to the other.To the contrary,sections of man-made composite material structures are often joined using bolted or bonded joints,which involve low strength and high stress concentrations.These methods are also expensive to achieve.Additional functions such as fluid transport,electrical signal delivery,and thermal conductivity across the joints typically require parasitic tubes,wires,and attachment clips.By using the biomimetic methods,we seek to overcome the limitations which are present in the conventional methods. In the present work,biomimetic co-cured composite sandwich T-joints were constructed using unidirectional glass fiber,epoxy resin,and structural foam.The joints were fabricated using the wet lay-up vacuum bag resin infusion method.Foam sandwich T-joints with multiple continuous fiber architectures and sandwich foam thickness were prepared.The designs were tested in quasi-static bending using a mechanical load frame.The significantweight savings using the biomimetic approaches is discussed,as well as a comparison of failure modes versus architecture is described.

  18. CHSalign: A Web Server That Builds upon Junction-Explorer and RNAJAG for Pairwise Alignment of RNA Secondary Structures with Coaxial Helical Stacking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Hua

    Full Text Available RNA junctions are important structural elements of RNA molecules. They are formed when three or more helices come together in three-dimensional space. Recent studies have focused on the annotation and prediction of coaxial helical stacking (CHS motifs within junctions. Here we exploit such predictions to develop an efficient alignment tool to handle RNA secondary structures with CHS motifs. Specifically, we build upon our Junction-Explorer software for predicting coaxial stacking and RNAJAG for modelling junction topologies as tree graphs to incorporate constrained tree matching and dynamic programming algorithms into a new method, called CHSalign, for aligning the secondary structures of RNA molecules containing CHS motifs. Thus, CHSalign is intended to be an efficient alignment tool for RNAs containing similar junctions. Experimental results based on thousands of alignments demonstrate that CHSalign can align two RNA secondary structures containing CHS motifs more accurately than other RNA secondary structure alignment tools. CHSalign yields a high score when aligning two RNA secondary structures with similar CHS motifs or helical arrangement patterns, and a low score otherwise. This new method has been implemented in a web server, and the program is also made freely available, at http://bioinformatics.njit.edu/CHSalign/.

  19. Gap junctions mediate large-scale Turing structures in a mean-field cortex driven by subcortical noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steyn-Ross, Moira L.; Steyn-Ross, D. A.; Wilson, M. T.; Sleigh, J. W.

    2007-07-01

    One of the grand puzzles in neuroscience is establishing the link between cognition and the disparate patterns of spontaneous and task-induced brain activity that can be measured clinically using a wide range of detection modalities such as scalp electrodes and imaging tomography. High-level brain function is not a single-neuron property, yet emerges as a cooperative phenomenon of multiply-interacting populations of neurons. Therefore a fruitful modeling approach is to picture the cerebral cortex as a continuum characterized by parameters that have been averaged over a small volume of cortical tissue. Such mean-field cortical models have been used to investigate gross patterns of brain behavior such as anesthesia, the cycles of natural sleep, memory and erasure in slow-wave sleep, and epilepsy. There is persuasive and accumulating evidence that direct gap-junction connections between inhibitory neurons promote synchronous oscillatory behavior both locally and across distances of some centimeters, but, to date, continuum models have ignored gap-junction connectivity. In this paper we employ simple mean-field arguments to derive an expression for D2 , the diffusive coupling strength arising from gap-junction connections between inhibitory neurons. Using recent neurophysiological measurements reported by Fukuda [J. Neurosci. 26, 3434 (2006)], we estimate an upper limit of D2≈0.6cm2 . We apply a linear stability analysis to a standard mean-field cortical model, augmented with gap-junction diffusion, and find this value for the diffusive coupling strength to be close to the critical value required to destabilize the homogeneous steady state. Computer simulations demonstrate that larger values of D2 cause the noise-driven model cortex to spontaneously crystalize into random mazelike Turing structures: centimeter-scale spatial patterns in which regions of high-firing activity are intermixed with regions of low-firing activity. These structures are consistent with the

  20. Double junction photoelectrochemical solar cells based on Cu2ZnSnS4/Cu2ZnSnSe4 thin film as composite photocathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, L.; Qiang, Y. H.; Zhao, Y. L.; Gu, X. Q.

    2014-02-01

    A solvothermal method was used to synthesize Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) and Cu2ZnSnSe4 (CZTSe) nanoparticles. CZTS/CZTSe bilayer films have been fabricated via a layer-by-layer blade coating process on the fluorine dope tin oxide (FTO) substrates. We converted conventional dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) into double junction photoelectrochemical solar cells with the replacement of the Pt-coated counter electrode with the as-prepared films as composite photocathodes. Compared with conventional DSSCs, the cells show an increased short circuit current and power conversion efficiency.

  1. Comparative study of anchoring groups for molecular electronics: structure and conductance of Au-S-Au and Au-NH2-Au junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Iben Sig; Mowbray, Duncan; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2008-01-01

    The electrical properties of single-molecule junctions, consisting of an organic molecule coupled to metal electrodes, are sensitive to the detailed atomic structure of the molecule-metal contact. This, in turn, is determined by the anchoring group linking the molecule to the metal. With the aim...... of identifying and comparing the intrinsic properties of two commonly used anchoring groups, namely thiol and amine groups, we have calculated the atomic structure and conductance traces of different Au-S-Au and Au-NH2-Au nanojunctions using density functional theory (DFT). Whereas NH2 shows a strong structural...... selectivity towards atop-gold configurations, S shows large variability in its bonding geometries. As a result, the conductance of the Au-NH2-Au junction is less sensitive to the structure of the gold contacts than the Au-S-Au junction. These findings support recent experiments which show that amine...

  2. Structural Health Monitoring for Impact Damage in Composite Structures.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roach, Dennis P.; Raymond Bond (Purdue); Doug Adams (Purdue)

    2014-08-01

    Composite structures are increasing in prevalence throughout the aerospace, wind, defense, and transportation industries, but the many advantages of these materials come with unique challenges, particularly in inspecting and repairing these structures. Because composites of- ten undergo sub-surface damage mechanisms which compromise the structure without a clear visual indication, inspection of these components is critical to safely deploying composite re- placements to traditionally metallic structures. Impact damage to composites presents one of the most signi fi cant challenges because the area which is vulnerable to impact damage is generally large and sometimes very dif fi cult to access. This work seeks to further evolve iden- ti fi cation technology by developing a system which can detect the impact load location and magnitude in real time, while giving an assessment of the con fi dence in that estimate. Fur- thermore, we identify ways by which impact damage could be more effectively identi fi ed by leveraging impact load identi fi cation information to better characterize damage. The impact load identi fi cation algorithm was applied to a commercial scale wind turbine blade, and results show the capability to detect impact magnitude and location using a single accelerometer, re- gardless of sensor location. A technique for better evaluating the uncertainty of the impact estimates was developed by quantifying how well the impact force estimate meets the assump- tions underlying the force estimation technique. This uncertainty quanti fi cation technique was found to reduce the 95% con fi dence interval by more than a factor of two for impact force estimates showing the least uncertainty, and widening the 95% con fi dence interval by a fac- tor of two for the most uncertain force estimates, avoiding the possibility of understating the uncertainty associated with these estimates. Linear vibration based damage detection tech- niques were investigated in the

  3. Anodization-based process for the fabrication of all niobium nitride Josephson junction structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Lucci

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We studied the growth and oxidation of niobium nitride (NbN films that we used to fabricate superconductive tunnel junctions. The thin films were deposited by dc reactive magnetron sputtering using a mixture of argon and nitrogen. The process parameters were optimized by monitoring the plasma with an optical spectroscopy technique. This technique allowed us to obtain NbN as well as good quality AlN films and both were used to obtain NbN/AlN/NbN trilayers. Lift-off lithography and selective anodization of the NbN films were used, respectively, to define the main trilayer geometry and/or to separate electrically, different areas of the trilayers. The anodized films were characterized by using Auger spectroscopy to analyze compounds formed on the surface and by means of a nano-indenter in order to investigate its mechanical and adhesion properties. The transport properties of NbN/AlN/NbN Josephson junctions obtained as a result of the above described fabrication process were measured in liquid helium at 4.2 K.

  4. Analytical model and new structure of the enhancement-mode polarization-junction HEMT with vertical conduction channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chao; Xiong, Jiayun; Wei, Jie; Wu, Junfeng; Peng, Fu; Deng, Siyu; Zhang, Bo; Luo, Xiaorong

    2016-04-01

    A novel enhancement-mode (E-mode) polarization-junction HEMT with vertical conduction channel (PVC-HEMT) is proposed, and its analytical model for threshold voltage (Vth) is presented. It has two features: one is GaN/AlGaN/GaN double hetero-structure, the other is that source and drain locate at the same side of trench-type MOS gate (T-gate), and the source contacts with the T-gate, which forms vertical conduction channel (VC). The 2-D hole gas (2-DHG) and 2-D electron gas (2-DEG) are formed at the GaN-top/AlGaN and AlGaN/GaN-buffer interface, respectively, forming the polarization-junction. First, the E-mode operation is realized because 2-DHG under the source prevents the electrons injecting from source to 2-DEG, breaking through the conventional E-mode method by depleting 2-DEG under the gate. Second, a uniform electric field (E-field) distribution is achieved due to the assisted depletion effect by polarization-junction. Third, the source reduces the E-field peak at the T-gate side and modulates the E-field distribution. The breakdown voltage (BV) of PVC-HEMT is 705 V and specific ON-resistance (RON,sp) is 1.18 mΩ cm2. Compared with conventional HEMT (C-HEMT), PVC-HEMT has a smaller size due to the special location of the source and T-gate. An analytic threshold voltage model is presented and the analytical results agree well with the simulated results.

  5. Flow field and pressure loss analysis of junction and its structure optimization of aircraft hydraulic pipe system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Xin; Wang Shaoping

    2013-01-01

    The flow field in junction is complicated due to the ripple property of oil flow velocity and different frequencies of two pumps in aircraft.In this study,the flow fields of T-junction and Y-junction were analyzed using shear stress transport (SST) model in ANSYS/CFX software.The simulation results identified the variation rule of velocity peak in T-junction with different frequencies and phase-differences,meanwhile,the eddy and velocity shock existed in the corner of the T-junction,and the limit working state was obtained.Although the eddy disappeared in Y-junction,the velocity shock and pressure loss were still too big.To address these faults,an arc-junction was designed.Based on the flow fields of arc-junction,the eddy in the junction corner disappeared and the maximum of velocity peak declined compared to T-and Y-junction.Additionally,8 series of arcjunction with different radiuses were tested to get the variation rule of velocity peak.Through the computation of the pressure loss of three junctions,the arc-junction had a lowest loss value,and its pressure loss reached the minimum value when the curvature radius is 35.42 mm,meanwhile,the velocity shock has decreased in a low phase.

  6. High-accuracy CFD prediction methods for fluid and structure temperature fluctuations at T-junction for thermal fatigue evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, Shaoxiang, E-mail: qian.shaoxiang@jgc.com [EN Technology Center, Process Technology Division, JGC Corporation, 2-3-1 Minato Mirai, Nishi-ku, Yokohama 220-6001 (Japan); Kanamaru, Shinichiro [EN Technology Center, Process Technology Division, JGC Corporation, 2-3-1 Minato Mirai, Nishi-ku, Yokohama 220-6001 (Japan); Kasahara, Naoto [Nuclear Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Numerical methods for accurate prediction of thermal loading were proposed. • Predicted fluid temperature fluctuation (FTF) intensity is close to the experiment. • Predicted structure temperature fluctuation (STF) range is close to the experiment. • Predicted peak frequencies of FTF and STF also agree well with the experiment. • CFD results show the proposed numerical methods are of sufficiently high accuracy. - Abstract: Temperature fluctuations generated by the mixing of hot and cold fluids at a T-junction, which is widely used in nuclear power and process plants, can cause thermal fatigue failure. The conventional methods for evaluating thermal fatigue tend to provide insufficient accuracy, because they were developed based on limited experimental data and a simplified one-dimensional finite element analysis (FEA). CFD/FEA coupling analysis is expected as a useful tool for the more accurate evaluation of thermal fatigue. The present paper aims to verify the accuracy of proposed numerical methods of simulating fluid and structure temperature fluctuations at a T-junction for thermal fatigue evaluation. The dynamic Smagorinsky model (DSM) is used for large eddy simulation (LES) sub-grid scale (SGS) turbulence model, and a hybrid scheme (HS) is adopted for the calculation of convective terms in the governing equations. Also, heat transfer between fluid and structure is calculated directly through thermal conduction by creating a mesh with near wall resolution (NWR) by allocating grid points within the thermal boundary sub-layer. The simulation results show that the distribution of fluid temperature fluctuation intensity and the range of structure temperature fluctuation are remarkably close to the experimental results. Moreover, the peak frequencies of power spectrum density (PSD) of both fluid and structure temperature fluctuations also agree well with the experimental results. Therefore, the numerical methods used in the present paper are

  7. Superficial roughness on composite surface, composite enamel and composite dentin junctions after different finishing and polishing procedures. Part I: roughness after treatments with tungsten carbide vs diamond burs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraris, Federico; Conti, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate different instruments for finishing composite restorations, as well as examining different surfaces and interfaces of the same restoration. The null hypothesis is represented by the fact that there are no significant differences on roughness of composite restorations finishing between tungsten carbide and diamond burs, furthermore the null hypothesis is that there are no significant differences on roughness between finishing on composite surfaces (C), compositeenamel (CE) and composite-dentin (CD) interfaces. The study was performed on 28 teeth, and class V cavities were prepared on the extracted teeth. Restorations were done in Filtek XTE nanofilled composite (3M Espe) in a standardized method, to then be finished. A comparison was made in the phase 1 between tungsten carbide burs (16 blades), diamond burs (46 μm), with a similar shape by the same manufacturer (Komet). Each surface received 5 bur applications. Consequently, an analysis with a profilometer was performed. Phase 2 involved further confrontation of ulterior finishing with ultrafine tungsten carbide burs (30 blades) and with extra and ultrafine diamond burs (25 and 8 μm) (the same shape as previously mentioned). A second analysis was then performed with a profilometer. All measurements were taken on C surfaces, CE and CD interfaces. Statistical analyses were carried out with c2 test (a = 0.05). The finishing procedures with fine grit or toothing burs gave a better smoothness with tungsten carbide burs compared to diamond burs. While with the ultrafine grit no significant differences were noted between tungsten carbide and diamond burs on the CE and CD interfaces, the diamond bur left less superficial roughness on the C surfaces. With regards to the superficial roughness of the different areas of restoration, it can be concluded that: minor roughness was detected on C surfaces, while the CD interface had the most superficial roughness, regardless of whether the

  8. Some Lower Valence Vanadium Fluorides: Their Crystal Distortions, Domain Structures, Modulated Structures, Ferrimagnetism, and Composition Dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Y. S.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Describes some contemporary concepts unique to the structure of advanced solids, i.e., their crystal distortions, domain structures, modulated structures, ferrimagnetism, and composition dependence. (Author/CS)

  9. ZnSe/GaAs/Ge Triple Junction Solar Cell and Its Structure Design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aikun WANG; Guochang LI; Guoxiang ZHOU; Jertrude F. Neumark

    2004-01-01

    A new method is given to increase doping concentration of p-type ZnSe up to 1× 10i8 cm-3 through adding a little Te. This method gets over the difficulty of the high doping concentration of p-type ZnSe for many years. The external quantum efficiency (QE) of ZnSe p-n junction solar cell has been measured, and ZnSe is a good material of the top cell in the tandem solar cells. The solar cells made from ZnSe/GaAs/Ge can cover 94% of the total solar spectrum under AM (air mass) 1.5, and their theoretical efficiency is 56%.

  10. Interface electronic structure at the topological insulator-ferrimagnetic insulator junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Y.; Murata, K.; Miyawaki, J.; Ozawa, K.; Onbasli, M. C.; Shirasawa, T.; Feng, B.; Yamamoto, Sh; Liu, R.-Y.; Yamamoto, S.; Mahatha, S. K.; Sheverdyaeva, P.; Moras, P.; Ross, C. A.; Suga, S.; Harada, Y.; Wang, K. L.; Matsuda, I.

    2017-02-01

    An interface electron state at the junction between a three-dimensional topological insulator film, Bi2Se3, and a ferrimagnetic insulator film, Y3Fe5O12 (YIG), was investigated by measurements of angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and x-ray absorption magnetic circular dichroism. The surface state of the Bi2Se3 film was directly observed and localized 3d spin states of the Fe3+ in the YIG film were confirmed. The proximity effect is likely described in terms of the exchange interaction between the localized Fe 3d electrons in the YIG film and delocalized electrons of the surface and bulk states in the Bi2Se3 film.

  11. Differential mouse-strain specific expression of Junctional Adhesion Molecule (JAM)-B in placental structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelzer, Ina Annelies; Mori, Mayumi; DeMayo, Francesco; Lydon, John; Arck, Petra Clara; Solano, Maria Emilia

    2016-03-03

    The junctional adhesion molecule (JAM)-B, a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily, is involved in stabilization of interendothelial cell-cell contacts, formation of vascular tubes, homeostasis of stem cell niches and promotion of leukocyte adhesion and transmigration. In the human placenta, JAM-B protein is abundant and mRNA transcripts are enriched in first-trimester extravillous trophoblast in comparison to the villous trophoblast. We here aimed to elucidate the yet unexplored spatio-temporal expression of JAM-B in the mouse placenta. We investigated and semi-quantified JAM-B protein expression by immunohistochemistry in early post-implantation si tes and in mid- to late gestation placentae of various murine mating combinations. Surprisingly, the endothelium of the placental labyrinth was devoid of JAM-B expression. JAM-B was mainly present in spongiotrophoblast cells of the junctional zone, as well as in the fetal vessels of the chorionic plate, the umbilical cord and in maternal myometrial smooth muscle. We observed a strain-specific placental increase of JAM-B protein expression from mid- to late gestation in Balb/c-mated C57BL/6 females, which was absent in DBA/2J-mated Balb/c females. Due to the essential role of progesterone during gestation, we further assessed a possible modulation of JAM-B in mid-gestational placentae deficient in the progesterone receptor (Pgr(-/-)) and observed an increased expression of JAM-B in Pgr(-/-) placentae, compared to Pgr(+/+) tissue samples. We propose that JAM-B is an as yet underappreciated trophoblast lineage-specific protein, which is modulated via the progesterone receptor and shows unique strain-specific kinetics. Future work is needed to elucidate its possible contribution to placental processes necessary to ensuring its integrity, ultimately facilitating placental development and fetal growth.

  12. Advanced fiber-composite hybrids--A new structural material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, C. C.; Lark, R. F.; Sullivan, T. L.

    1974-01-01

    Introduction of metal foil as part of matrix and fiber composite, or ""sandwich'', improves strength and stiffness for multidirectional loading, improves resistance to cyclic loading, and improves impact and erosion resistance of resultant fiber-composite hybrid structure.

  13. Progress in patch repair of aerospace composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Weiguo; Zhang, Weifang; Tang, Qingyun

    2012-04-01

    With the rapid application of the composite structure in the aerospace industry, more load-bearing structures and components are used with composites instead of conventional engineering materials. However, the composite structures are inevitably suffered damages in the complex environment, the composites structures repair become more important in the airplane maintenance. This paper describes the composites patch repair progress. Firstly, the flaws and damages concerned to composite structures are concluded, and also the repair principles are presented. Secondly, the advantages and disadvantages for different repair methods are analyzed, as well as the different bonded repair and their applicability to different structures is discussed. According the recent research in theory and experiment, the scarf repair effects under different parameters are analyzed. Finally, the failure mechanisms of repair structure are discussed, and some prospects are put forward.

  14. Coupling of intrinsic Josephson junctions and subgap structure in the current-voltage characteristics of high-T{sub c} superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukrinov, Yu.M. [Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences, Zanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Physical Technical Institute of Tajik Academy of Sciences, Dushanbe (Tajikistan); Nasrulaev, Kh. [Physical Technical Institute of Tajik Academy of Sciences, Dushanbe (Tajikistan); Sargolzaei, M. [Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences, Zanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Oya, G.; Irie, A. [Utsunomiya University, Yoto, Utsunomiya (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Corporation (JST), Kawaguchi, Saitama (Japan)

    2002-01-01

    The subgap structure in current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of a stack of intrinsic Josephson junctions in high-T{sub c} superconductors is studied. An analytical formula for the I-V characteristics is obtained which had taken into account the influence of the dynamically breaking of charge neutrality (DBCN) in CuO{sub 2} layers on the subgap structure. It is shown that DBCN does not affect the positions and the amplitudes of the subgap peaks, but changes the curvature of the branches in the I-V characteristics. As a possible manifestation of the non-equivalence of the junction, the experimental I-V characteristics of intrinsic Josephson junctions are presented. (author)

  15. Composite structure of auxin response elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulmasov, T; Liu, Z B; Hagen, G; Guilfoyle, T J

    1995-10-01

    The auxin-responsive soybean GH3 gene promoter is composed of multiple auxin response elements (AuxREs), and each AuxRE contributes incrementally to the strong auxin inducibility to the promoter. Two independent AuxREs of 25 bp (D1) and 32 bp (D4) contain the sequence TGTCTC. Results presented here show that the TGTCTC element in D1 and D4 is required but not sufficient for auxin inducibility in carrot protoplast transient expression assays. Additional nucleotides upstream of TGTCTC are also required for auxin inducibility. These upstream sequences showed constitutive activity and no auxin inducibility when part or all of the TGTCTC element was mutated or deleted. In D1, the constitutive element overlaps the 5' portion of TGTCTC; in D4, the constitutive element is separated from TGTCTC. An 11-bp element in D1, CCTCGTGTCTC, conferred auxin inducibility to a minimal cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter in transgenic tobacco seedlings as well as in carrot protoplasts (i.e., transient expression assays). Both constitutive elements bound specifically to plant nuclear proteins, and the constitutive element in D1 bound to a recombinant soybean basic leucine zipper transcription factor with G-box specificity. To demonstrate further the composite nature of AuxREs and the ability of the TGTCTC element to confer auxin inducibility, we created a novel AuxRE by placing a yeast GAL4 DNA binding site adjacent to the TGTCTC element. Expression of a GAL4-c-Rel transactivator in the presence of this novel AuxRE resulted in auxin-inducible expression. Our results indicate that at least some AuxREs have a composite structure consisting of a constitutive element adjacent to a conserved TGTCTC element that confers auxin inducibility.

  16. Efficiently Harvesting Sun Light for Silicon Solar Cells through Advanced Optical Couplers and A Radial p-n Junction Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Cheng Lee

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Silicon-based solar cells (SCs promise to be an alternative energy source mainly due to: (1 a high efficiency-to-cost ratio, (2 the absence of environmental-degradation issues, and (3 great reliability. Transition from wafer-based to thin-film SC significantly reduces the cost of SCs, including the cost from the material itself and the fabrication process. However, as the thickness of the absorption (or the active layer decreases, the energy-conversion efficiency drops dramatically. As a consequence, we discuss here three techniques to increase the efficiency of silicon-based SCs: (1 photonic crystal (PC optical couplers and (2 plasmonic optical couplers to increase efficiency of light absorption in the SCs, and (3 a radial p-n junction structure, decomposing light absorption and diffusion path into two orthogonal directions. The detailed mechanisms and recent research progress regarding these techniques are discussed in this review article.

  17. Study on voids of epoxy matrix composites sandwich structure parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Simin; Wen, Youyi; Yu, Wenjun; Liu, Hong; Yue, Cheng; Bao, Jing

    2017-03-01

    Void is the most common tiny defect of composite materials. Porosity is closely related to composite structure property. The voids forming behaviour in the composites sandwich structural parts with the carbon fiber reinforced epoxy resin skins was researched by adjusting the manufacturing process parameters. The composites laminate with different porosities were prepared with the different process parameter. The ultrasonic non-destructive measurement method for the porosity was developed and verified through microscopic examination. The analysis results show that compaction pressure during the manufacturing process had influence on the porosity in the laminate area. Increasing the compaction pressure and compaction time will reduce the porosity of the laminates. The bond-line between honeycomb core and carbon fiber reinforced epoxy resin skins were also analyzed through microscopic examination. The mechanical properties of sandwich structure composites were studied. The optimization process parameters and porosity ultrasonic measurement method for composites sandwich structure have been applied to the production of the composite parts.

  18. Multi-material Preforming of Structural Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norris, Robert E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Eberle, Cliff C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Pastore, Christopher M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Sudbury, Thomas Z. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Xiong, Fue [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hartman, David [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Fiber-reinforced composites offer significant weight reduction potential, with glass fiber composites already widely adopted. Carbon fiber composites deliver the greatest performance benefits, but their high cost has inhibited widespread adoption. This project demonstrates that hybrid carbon-glass solutions can realize most of the benefits of carbon fiber composites at much lower cost. ORNL and Owens Corning Reinforcements along with program participants at the ORISE collaborated to demonstrate methods for produce hybrid composites along with techniques to predict performance and economic tradeoffs. These predictions were then verified in testing coupons and more complex demonstration articles.

  19. Predictive Modeling of Complex Contoured Composite Structures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The existing HDWLT (pictured) contoured composite structure design, its analyses and manufacturing tools, will be used to validate key analyses inputs through...

  20. Atomic structure of water/Au, Ag, Cu and Pt atomic junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu; Kaneko, Satoshi; Fujii, Shintaro; Nishino, Tomoaki; Kiguchi, Manabu

    2017-02-08

    Much progress has been made in understanding the transport properties of atomic-scale conductors. We prepared atomic-scale metal contacts of Cu, Ag, Au and Pt using a mechanically controllable break junction method at 10 K in a cryogenic vacuum. Water molecules were exposed to the metal atomic contacts and the effect of molecular adsorption was investigated by electronic conductance measurements. Statistical analysis of the electronic conductance showed that the water molecule(s) interacted with the surface of the inert Au contact and the reactive Cu ant Pt contacts, where molecular adsorption decreased the electronic conductance. A clear conductance signature of water adsorption was not apparent at the Ag contact. Detailed analysis of the conductance behaviour during a contact-stretching process indicated that metal atomic wires were formed for the Au and Pt contacts. The formation of an Au atomic wire consisting of low coordination number atoms leads to increased reactivity of the inert Au surface towards the adsorption of water.

  1. Structure and mechanics of the San Andreas-San Gregorio fault junction, San Francisco, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Tom; Bruns, Terry R.; Sliter, Ray

    2005-01-01

    The right-lateral San Gregorio and San Andreas faults meet west of the Golden Gate near San Francisco. Coincident seismic reflection and refraction profiling across the San Gregorio and San Andreas faults south of their junction shows the crust between them to have formed shallow extensional basins that are dissected by parallel strike-slip faults. We employ a regional finite element model to investigate the long-term consequences of the fault geometry. Over the course of 2-3 m.y. of slip on the San Andreas-San Gregorio fault system, elongated extensional basins are predicted to form between the two faults. An additional consequence of the fault geometry is that the San Andreas fault is expected to have migrated eastward relative to the San Gregorio fault. We thus propose a model of eastward stepping right-lateral fault formation to explain the observed multiple fault strands and depositional basins. The current manifestation of this process might be the observed transfer of slip from the San Andreas fault east to the Golden Gate fault.

  2. Damage Threshold Characterization in Structural Composite Materials and Composite Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-28

    polyester, vinyl ester and epoxy, as reported earlier [1-3], the differences between resins are significant. The Vectorply ELT 5500 fabric (D) contains a...Delamination Testing,” AIAA Journal , vol. 28, 1990, pp. 1270-1276. 15. Agastra, P., "Mixed Mode Delamination of Glass Fiber/Polymer Matrix Composite

  3. Piezoelectric and mechanical properties of structured PZT-epoxy composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    James, N.K.; Ende, D.A. van den; Lafont, U.; Zwaag, S. van der; Groen, W.A.

    2013-01-01

    Structured lead zirconium titanate (PZT)-epoxy composites are prepared by dielectrophoresis. The piezoelectric and dielectric properties of the composites as a function of PZT volume fraction are investigated and compared with the corresponding unstructured composites. The effect of poling voltage o

  4. Piezoelectric and mechanical properties of structured PZT–epoxy composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunnamkuzhakkal James, N.; Van den Ende, D.; Lafont, U.; Van der Zwaag, S.; Groen, W.A.

    2013-01-01

    Structured lead zirconium titanate (PZT)–epoxy composites are prepared by dielectrophoresis. The piezoelectric and dielectric properties of the composites as a function of PZT volume fraction are investigated and compared with the corresponding unstructured composites. The effect of poling voltage o

  5. Composites structures for bone tissue reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neto, W.; Santos, João [Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Departament of Materials Engineering - Rd. Washington Luis, Km 235, 13565-905, São Carlos-SP (Brazil); Avérous, L.; Schlatter, G.; Bretas, Rosario, E-mail: bretas@ufscar.br [Université de Strasbourg, ECPM-LIPHT - 25 rue Becquerel, 67087, Strasbourg (France)

    2015-05-22

    The search for new biomaterials in the bone reconstitution field is growing continuously as humane life expectation and bone fractures increase. For this purpose, composite materials with biodegradable polymers and hydroxyapatite (HA) have been used. A composite material formed by a film, nanofibers and HA has been made. Both, the films and the non-woven mats of nanofibers were formed by nanocomposites made of butylene adipate-co-terephthalate (PBAT) and HA. The techniques used to produce the films and nanofibers were spin coating and electrospinning, respectively. The composite production and morphology were evaluated. The composite showed an adequate morphology and fibers size to be used as scaffold for cell growth.

  6. Composite Transparent Electrode of Graphene Nanowalls and Silver Nanowires on Micropyramidal Si for High-Efficiency Schottky Junction Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Tianpeng; Liu, Jian; Wei, Dapeng; Feng, Yanhui; Song, Xuefen; Shi, Haofei; Jia, Shuming; Sun, Wentao; Du, Chunlei

    2015-09-16

    The conventional graphene-silicon Schottky junction solar cell inevitably involves the graphene growth and transfer process, which results in complicated technology, loss of quality of the graphene, extra cost, and environmental unfriendliness. Moreover, the conventional transfer method is not well suited to conformationally coat graphene on a three-dimensional (3D) silicon surface. Thus, worse interfacial conditions are inevitable. In this work, we directly grow graphene nanowalls (GNWs) onto the micropyramidal silicon (MP) by the plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition method. By controlling growth time, the cell exhibits optimal pristine photovoltaic performance of 3.8%. Furthermore, we improve the conductivity of the GNW electrode by introducing the silver nanowire (AgNW) network, which could achieve lower sheet resistance. An efficiency of 6.6% has been obtained for the AgNWs-GNWs-MP solar cell without any chemical doping. Meanwhile, the cell exhibits excellent stability exposed to air. Our studies show a promising way to develop simple-technology, low-cost, high-efficiency, and stable Schottky junction solar cells.

  7. A simulation study of the micro-grooved electrode structure for back-contact back-junction silicon solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Yang, Jianfeng

    2015-01-01

    A micro-grooved electrode structure is investigated to illustrate its advantages when applied to the back-contact back-junction (BC-BJ) silicon solar cell. The finite element analysis shows that the micro-grooved electrodes enhances the photo-carrier collection and weakens the dependence of collection ability on pitch distance. The geometries of micro-groove are found to have little impact on the cell performance. These advantages open possibilities for the implementation of low cost fabrication methods. As a demonstration, a process involving laser doping and screen printing techniques are proposed and analyzed. The simulation results show that the laser induced lattice damage causes negligible deterioration of device electrical properties and the presence of parasitic metal insulator semiconductor structure near the screen printed electrodes actually leads to a performance improvement rather than degradation. Our preliminary results indicate that the micro-grooved electrode structure is promising for fabricating low cost high efficiency BC-BJ silicon solar cells.

  8. Atomic-Scale Structure and Local Chemistry of CoFeB-MgO Magnetic Tunnel Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhongchang; Saito, Mitsuhiro; McKenna, Keith P; Fukami, Shunsuke; Sato, Hideo; Ikeda, Shoji; Ohno, Hideo; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2016-03-09

    Magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) constitute a promising building block for future nonvolatile memories and logic circuits. Despite their pivotal role, spatially resolving and chemically identifying each individual stacking layer remains challenging due to spatially localized features that complicate characterizations limiting understanding of the physics of MTJs. Here, we combine advanced electron microscopy, spectroscopy, and first-principles calculations to obtain a direct structural and chemical imaging of the atomically confined layers in a CoFeB-MgO MTJ, and clarify atom diffusion and interface structures in the MTJ following annealing. The combined techniques demonstrate that B diffuses out of CoFeB electrodes into Ta interstitial sites rather than MgO after annealing, and CoFe bonds atomically to MgO grains with an epitaxial orientation relationship by forming Fe(Co)-O bonds, yet without incorporation of CoFe in MgO. These findings afford a comprehensive perspective on structure and chemistry of MTJs, helping to develop high-performance spintronic devices by atomistic design.

  9. Superficial roughness on composite surface, composite-enamel and composite-dentin junctions after different finishing and polishing procedures. Part II: roughness with diamond finishing and differences between enamel composite vs body composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraris, Federico; Conti, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    The following study asks three principle questions relative to composite finishing and composite polishing: 1) Will the superficial roughness of different restoration surfaces have different values, utilizing the same polishing system (multistep), after finishing with the tungsten carbide or diamond bur? 2) Under the same conditions of finishing and polishing sequences, will the composite surfaces (C), the composite-enamel (CE) and composite-dentin (CD) interfaces show different roughness values? 3) Will the surface roughness of composites of different translucency in the various phases of finishing and polishing, and on different interfaces, have different results? The null hypothesis is represented by the fact that there are no significant differences on roughness of composite restorations when polishing, after finishing with tungsten carbide or diamond burs. Furthermore, the null hypothesis is that there are no significant differences on roughness between polishing on composite surface, composite-enamel and composite-dentin interfaces, and finally there are no differences on roughness after finishing and polishing of two composite with different translucency. For the study, 56 class V cavities were prepared on extracted teeth. Restorations were done in nanofilled composite Filtek XTE (3M Espe) in a standard fashion, and then finished and polished. The 28 buccal cavities were restored on the surface with composite enamel and the 28 palatals with composite body. Finishing was done with fine toothing burs in tungsten carbide (16 blades) or fine grit diamond burs (46 μm), and made by the same manufacturer (Komet). The second phase of finishing was done with burs (with the same form as already mentioned) ultrafine toothing tungsten carbide (30 blades) or with extra and ultrafine grit diamond (25 and 8 μm). The polishing phase for both of the earlier sequences was done with the application of three rubber tips with decreasing abrasiveness and an application with a

  10. Hybrid Composite Structures: Multifunctionality through Metal Fibres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed, T.

    2009-01-01

    The introduction of fibre reinforced polymer composites into the wings and fuselages of the newest aircraft are changing the design and manufacturing approach. Composites provide greater freedom to designers who want to improve aircraft performance in an affordable way. In this quest, researchers ar

  11. Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in composite MgO/CoFeB/Ta/[Co/Pd]n structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Vazquez, Valentin; Chang, Yao-Jen; Canizo-Cabrera, A.; Garzon-Roman, Abel; Wu, Te-ho

    2016-02-01

    The impact of a non-magnetic Ta spacer layer on the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) of composite magnetic structures constituted by ultra-thin Co/Pd multilayers (MLs) and MgO/CoFeB was studied. Composite structures lacking a Ta layer present in-plane magnetic anisotropy. The strong perpendicular anisotropy observed in sole Co/Pd MLs is not sufficient to pull the magnetic moment out of the film plane, not even after annealing at 300 or 350 °C. PMA with squareness values close to unity and annealing stability up to 350 °C is observed after the insertion of an ultra-thin Ta layer. Our study demonstrates that Ta layer is essential for obtaining perpendicular magnetic axis in MgO/CoFeB/Ta/[Co/Pd]6. The exchange coupling between the MgO/CoFeB bilayer and the Co/Pd MLs is ferromagnetic with sharp switching characteristics. Perpendicular composite structures with sharp magnetization reversal and annealing stability are relevant in perpendicular CoFeB-based magnetic tunnel junctions for the development of gigabit-scale nonvolatile memory.

  12. The structural damping of composite beams with tapered boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coni, M.; Benchekchou, B.; White, R. G.

    1994-11-01

    Most metallic and composite structures of conventional construction are lightly damped. It is obviously advantageous, in terms of response to in-service dynamic loading, if damping can be increased with minimal weight addition. This report describes finite element analyses and complementary experiments carried out on composite, carbon fiber reinforced plastic, beams with tapered boundaries composed of layers of highly damped composite material. It is shown that modal damping of the structure may be significantly increased by this method.

  13. Topology optimization of photonic crystal structures: a high-bandwidth low-loss T-junction waveguide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard; Sigmund, Ole

    2005-01-01

    A T junction in a photonic crystal waveguide is designed with the topology-optimization method. The gradientbased optimization tool is used to modify the material distribution in the junction area so that the power transmission in the output ports is maximized. To obtain high transmission...

  14. Progressive fracture of polymer matrix composite structures: A new approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, C. C.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Minnetyan, L.

    1992-01-01

    A new approach independent of stress intensity factors and fracture toughness parameters has been developed and is described for the computational simulation of progressive fracture of polymer matrix composite structures. The damage stages are quantified based on physics via composite mechanics while the degradation of the structural behavior is quantified via the finite element method. The approach account for all types of composite behavior, structures, load conditions, and fracture processes starting from damage initiation, to unstable propagation and to global structural collapse. Results of structural fracture in composite beams, panels, plates, and shells are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness and versatility of this new approach. Parameters and guidelines are identified which can be used as criteria for structural fracture, inspection intervals, and retirement for cause. Generalization to structures made of monolithic metallic materials are outlined and lessons learned in undertaking the development of new approaches, in general, are summarized.

  15. Structural Composites Corrosive Management by Computational Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Minnetyan, Levon

    2006-01-01

    A simulation of corrosive management on polymer composites durability is presented. The corrosive environment is assumed to manage the polymer composite degradation on a ply-by-ply basis. The degradation is correlated with a measured Ph factor and is represented by voids, temperature, and moisture which vary parabolically for voids and linearly for temperature and moisture through the laminate thickness. The simulation is performed by a computational composite mechanics computer code which includes micro, macro, combined stress failure, and laminate theories. This accounts for starting the simulation from constitutive material properties and up to the laminate scale which exposes the laminate to the corrosive environment. Results obtained for one laminate indicate that the ply-by-ply managed degradation degrades the laminate to the last one or the last several plies. Results also demonstrate that the simulation is applicable to other polymer composite systems as well.

  16. Development of Biobased Composites of Structural Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Christopher Alan

    Highly biobased composites with properties and costs rivaling those consisting of synthetic constituents are a goal of much current research. The obvious material choices, vegetable oil based resins and natural fibers, present the challenges of poor resin properties and weak fiber/matrix bonding, respectively. Conventional methods of overcoming poor resin quality involve the incorporation of additives, which dilutes the resulting composite's bio-content and increases cost. To overcome these limitations while maintaining high bio-content and low cost, epoxidized sucrose soyate is combined with surface-treated flax fiber to produce biocomposites. These composites are fabricated using methods emphasizing scalability and efficiency, for cost effectiveness of the final product. This approach resulted in the successful production of biocomposites having properties that meet or exceed those of conventional pultruded members. These properties, such as tensile and flexural strengths of 223 and 253 MPa, respectively, were achieved by composites having around 85% bio-content.

  17. Lightweight, Composite Cryogenic Tank Structures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Microcosm has developed and qualified strong, all-composite LOX tanks for launch vehicles. Our new 42-inch diameter tank design weighs 486 lbs and burst without...

  18. Structural and failure mechanics of sandwich composites

    CERN Document Server

    Carlsson, LA; Carlsson, Leif A

    2011-01-01

    Focusing on important deformation and failure modes of sandwich structures, this volume describes the mechanics behind fracture processes. The text also reviews test methods developed for the cr, structural integrity, and failure mechanisms of sandwich structures.

  19. Composite Materials and Sandwich Structures - A Primer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    quality and protects prepreg from handling damage. Non - woven unidirectional tapes can otherwise split between fibers. Clean, white lint-free cotton ...applications and S glass fibers are used in strength critical situations. S glass fibers are sometimes woven in composite materials to increase toughness...A woven form of the reinforcements (Figure 1b) is also used in certain cases, depending on the application of the composite. Figure 1a- Fiber

  20. Research on Composite Materials for Structural Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-04-01

    Residual Stresses in Composite Laminates", (August 1983); the M.Sc. thesis of E.J. Porth , titled "Effect of an External Stress on Moisture Diffusion in...Rates in OUnidirectional Double Cantilevered Beam Fracture Toughness Specimens", December 1982. 4. Porth , E.J., "Effect of an External Stress on...Composite Materials (December 1983) Edward John Porth , B.S., University of Colorado Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Y. Weitsman This work concerns

  1. [Editorial introduction: from the structure and functions of the neuromuscular junction to the diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamori, Masaharu

    2011-07-01

    The neuromuscular junction has been recognized as a site for autoimmune and genetic disorders. Myasthenia gravis (MG) is mainly caused by postsynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) IgG1 antibodies that are directed against α-subunit 67-76 and 125-147 and activate complement. Thymic abnormalities are present in the autoimmune background. A proportion of MG patients without conformation-dependent AChR antibodies assayed by the cell-based method have muscle-specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK) antibodies which are largely IgG4 and partially IgG1. MuSK is activated by Dok-7 and Lrp4 (agrin receptor) and contributes to AChR clustering at the postsynaptic membrane via various kinase cascades in collaboration with Wnt-MuSK/Frizzled-Dishevelled signaling. Rapsyn interacts with MuSK-linked chaperones to stabilize postsynaptic architecture and also contributes to AChR phosphorylation. MG-associated thymomas express antigens that trigger antibody responses which play a part in disease generation and modification. Among these, ryanodine receptor-1 (RyR1; acts on sarcoplasmic Ca2+ release) antibodies cause muscle contractile weakness. Transient receptor potential canonical-3 (TRPC3) antibodies are also detected in thymoma-associated MG patients; they may participate in muscle contractile weakness because TRPC3 acts on RyR1, and may also impair the refill of sarcoplasmic Ca2+ stores since TRPCs contribute to the receptor-operated Ca2+ influx via the phospholipase C (PLC)-diacylglycerol (DAG) pathway in cooperation with the store-operated, STIM1/Orai1-mediated Ca2+ influx and TRPCs-Homerl-IP3R interaction. Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS) is caused by reduced ACh quantal release that occurs mainly because of presynaptic P/Q-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channel (VGCC) antibodies. Physicians should be vigilant for LEMS because it may predict an underlying malignancy, particularly small-cell lung carcinoma; SOX-1 antibodies are usually present in these patients and are

  2. Photo-excited terahertz switch based on composite metamaterial structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guocui; Zhang, Jianna; Zhang, Bo; He, Ting; He, Yanan; Shen, Jingling

    2016-09-01

    A photo-excited terahertz switch based on a composite metamaterial structure was designed by integration of photoconductive silicon into the gaps of split-ring resonators. The conductivity of the silicon that was used to fill the gaps in the split-ring resonators was tuned dynamically as a function of the incident pump power using laser excitation, leading to a change in the composite metamaterial structure's properties. We studied the transmission characteristics of the composite metamaterial structure for various silicon conductivities, and the results indicated that this type of composite metamaterial structure could be used as a resonance frequency tunable terahertz metamaterial switch. We also designed other structures by filling different gaps with silicon, and proved that these structures could be used as terahertz metamaterial switches can change the working mode from a single frequency to multiple frequencies.

  3. Composition-structure-property relation of oxide glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermansen, Christian

    The composition of glass can be varied continuously within their glass-forming regions. This compositional flexibility makes it possible to tailor the properties of a glass for a variety of specific uses. In the industry such tailoring is done on a trial-and-error basis with only the intuition...... also increases such properties. Yet, these rules are not strictly followed even for the simplest binary oxide glasses, such as alkali silicates, borates and phosphates. In this thesis it is argued that the missing link between composition and properties is the glass structure. Structural models...... capable of ab initio prediction of the oxide glass properties from composition....

  4. Structural Ceramic Composites for Nuclear Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William Windes; P.A. Lessing; Y. Katoh; L. L. Snead; E. Lara-Curzio; J. Klett; C. Henager, Jr.; R. J. Shinavski

    2005-08-01

    A research program has been established to investigate fiber reinforced ceramic composites to be used as control rod components within a Very High Temperature Reactor. Two candidate systems have been identified, carbon fiber reinforced carbon (Cf/C) and silicon carbide fiber reinforced silicon carbide (SiCf/SiC) composites. Initial irradiation stability studies to determine the maximum dose for each composite type have been initiated within the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Test samples exposed to 10 dpa irradiation dose have been completed with future samples to dose levels of 20 and 30 dpa scheduled for completion in following years. Mechanical and environmental testing is being conducted concurrently at the Idaho National Laboratory and at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. High temperature test equipment, testing methodologies, and test samples for high temperature (up to 1600º C) tensile strength and long duration creep studies have been established. Specific attention was paid to the architectural fiber preform design as well as the materials used in construction of the composites. Actual testing of both tubular and flat, "dog-bone" shaped tensile composite specimens will begin next year. Since there is no precedence for using ceramic composites within a nuclear reactor, ASTM standard test procedures will be established from these mechanical and environmental tests. Close collaborations between the U.S. national laboratories and international collaborators (i.e. France and Japan) are being forged to establish both national and international test standards to be used to qualify ceramic composites for nuclear reactor applications.

  5. Woven Structures from Natural Fibres for Reinforcing Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Maniņš, M; Bernava, A; Strazds, G.

    2015-01-01

    The increase of production of woven structures from natural fibres for reinforced composites can be noticed in different sectors of economy. This can be explained by limited sources of raw materials and different environmental issues, as well as European Union guidelines for car manufacture [4]. This research produced 2D textile structures of hemp yarn and polypropylene yarn and tested the impact of added glass fibre yarn on the mechanical properties of the woven structures and the composites...

  6. AN EXACT ANALYSIS FOR FREE VIBRATION OF A COMPOSITE SHELL STRUCTURE- HERMETIC CAPSULE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尚新春

    2001-01-01

    An exact analytical solution was presented for free vibration of composite shell structure-hermetic capsule. The basic equations on axisymmetric vibration were based on the Love classical thin shell theory and derived for shells of revolution with arbitrary meridian shape. The conditions of the junction between the spherical and the cylindrical shell segments are given by the continuity of deformation and the equilibrium relations near the junction point. The mathematical model of problem is reduced to as an eigenvalue problem for a system of ordinary differential equations in two separate domains corresponding to the spherical and the cylindrical shell segments. By using Legendre and trigonometric functions, exact and explicitly analytical solutions of the mode functions were constructed and the exact frequency equation were obtained. The implementation of Maple programme indicates that all calculations are simple and efficient in both the exact symbolic calculation and the numerical results of natural frequencies compare with the results using finite element methods and other numerical methdos. As a benchmark, the exactly analytical solutions presented in this paper is valuable to examine the accuracy of various approximate methods.

  7. The human myotendinous junction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, A B; Larsen, M; Mackey, Abigail

    2015-01-01

    The myotendinous junction (MTJ) is a specialized structure in the musculotendinous system, where force is transmitted from muscle to tendon. Animal models have shown that the MTJ takes form of tendon finger-like processes merging with muscle tissue. The human MTJ is largely unknown and has never ...

  8. The effect of flowable materials on the microleakage of Class II composite restorations that extend apical to the cemento-enamel junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Mostafa; Lynch, Christopher D

    2009-01-01

    This in vitro study investigated the effects of a thin layer of flowable composite or compomer on microleakage occurring in Class II packable and nanofilled composite restorations that extend apical to the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ). The current study also investigated any differences in microleakage that occur between restorations light-cured using a light-emitting diode (LED) and a quartz tungsten halogen (QTH) light-curing unit. Standardized Class II "slot" cavity preparations were prepared on the mesial and distal surfaces of 72 extracted, unrestored, non-carious premolars (n = 144). The gingival margins were placed 1 mm apical to the CEJ. The teeth were divided into two groups (n = 72) and restored with a "packable composite" (Filtek P60) or a "nano-filled composite" (Universal Filtek Supreme XT) with or without flowable composite (Flowable Filtek Supreme XT) or flowable composite (Dyract Flow) as gingival liners placed with thicknesses of 1.0 mm. Each increment was cured for 20 seconds before adding the next. One-half of the samples in each group was cured with QTH (Coltolux 75) and the other half with LED (Coltolux LED) LCUs. After a two-week incubation period at 37 degrees C, the specimens were thermocycled (5 degrees C-55 degrees C x 1500), immersed in 0.5% basic fuchsin dye for 24 hours, sectioned and the microleakage was then evaluated at the gingival margin by two examiners using a 0-3 score scale. Within the current study, when flowable liners were used, both the packable (Filtek P60) and nanofilled (Filtek Supreme XT Universal Restorative) composite materials had significantly less microleakage than when flowable liners were not used (p flowable liners (Flowable Filtek Supreme XT and Dyract Flow) resulted in a significant reduction of the microleakage occurring under both types of composite materials at the gingival floors ( p < 0.05), but there was no significant difference between them. The choice of light curing technology (LED vs QTH) had no

  9. The Compositional Structure of the Asteroid Belt

    CERN Document Server

    DeMeo, Francesca E; Walsh, Kevin J; Chapman, Clark R; Binzel, Richard P

    2015-01-01

    The past decade has brought major improvements in large-scale asteroid discovery and characterization with over half a million known asteroids and over 100,000 with some measurement of physical characterization. This explosion of data has allowed us to create a new global picture of the Main Asteroid Belt. Put in context with meteorite measurements and dynamical models, a new and more complete picture of Solar System evolution has emerged. The question has changed from "What was the original compositional gradient of the Asteroid Belt?" to "What was the original compositional gradient of small bodies across the entire Solar System?" No longer is the leading theory that two belts of planetesimals are primordial, but instead those belts were formed and sculpted through evolutionary processes after Solar System formation. This article reviews the advancements on the fronts of asteroid compositional characterization, meteorite measurements, and dynamical theories in the context of the heliocentric distribution of...

  10. Research progress of relationship between gap junctions and movement disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-lei WANG

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Gap junctions (GJ is an important way to transmit signals among body cells. Studies have confirmed that changes on structure and composition of gap junction proteins are associated with many kinds of diseases. Movement disorders is a common disease of the central nervous system (CNS, which has a certain degree of correlation with GJ, and it has become a key factor in the domestic and foreign research of pathogenesis and treatment mechanism of central nervons system diseases. This paper reviews GJ and its relationship with movement disorders. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2016.12.011

  11. Control of Nanofilament Structure and Observations of Quantum Point Contact Behavior in Ni/NiO Nanowire Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Sean; Fairfield, Jessamyn; Lee, Sunghun; Bellew, Allen; Stone, Iris; Ruppalt, Laura; Boland, John; Vora, Patrick

    Resistive switching is ideal for use in non-volatile memory where information is stored in a metallic or insulating state. Nanowire junctions formed at the intersection of two Ni/NiO core/shell nanowires have emerged as a leading candidate structure where resistive switching occurs due to the formation and destruction of conducting filaments. However, significant knowledge gaps remain regarding the conduction mechanisms as measurements are typically only performed at room temperature. Here, we combine temperature-dependent current-voltage (IV) measurements from 15 - 300 K with magnetoresistance studies and achieve new insight into the nature of the conducting filaments. We identify a novel semiconducting state that behaves as a quantum point contact and find evidence for a possible electric-field driven phase transition. The insulating state exhibits unexpectedly complex IV characteristics that highlight the disordered nature of the ruptured filament while we find clear signs of anisotropic magnetoresistance in the metallic state. Our results expose previously unobserved behaviors in nanowire resistive switching devices and pave the way for future applications where both electrical and magnetic switching can be achieved in a single device. This work was supported by ONR Grant N-00014-15-1-2357.

  12. Thermo-structural optimization of the ITER ICRH Four Port Junction and Straps against in-vessel design criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lafuente, Antonio, E-mail: anlafuente@gmail.com; Fursdon, Mike; Shannon, Mark

    2014-10-15

    Design optimization work has been conducted on the ITER Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) Four Port Junction (4PJ) and Straps – a sub-assembly of the antenna. The aim of the analysis is to evaluate ways of making the component compliant with SDC-IC rules while balancing the competing demands of different performance requirements. Of particular interest are the bends that connect the 316L(N) strap pipes to its housing, where previous work had shown that primary plus secondary stresses would result in a low predicted fatigue life. The aim of the study was to explore the possibility of reducing stresses in these bends. Coupled ANSYS CFX and structural models are used to calculate coolant and metal temperatures and resulting stresses due to incident and self-generated heat. Although all of the modifications explored resulted in primary plus secondary stresses exceeding the cyclic damage design criteria, some avenues are identified for future studies and a reduction in stress toward the target is obtained.

  13. Seismic structure at the Kairei Hydrothermal vent field near the Rodriguez Triple Junction in the Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takata, H.; Sato, T.; Imai, Y.; Mori, T.; Noguchi, Y.; Kono, A.; Yamada, T.; Shinohara, M.

    2014-12-01

    Central Indian Ridge is located at the north of the Rodriguez Triple Junction and shows slow-intermediate spreading rate. The Kairei hydrothermal Field (KHF) was discovered in the first segment of Central Indian Ridge near the Rodriguez Triple Junction. The vent fluid which is extruding at the KHF has higher H2 content compared with other hydrothermal vent fluid in the world. Although The KHF itself exists above a basaltic rock massif, gabbro and mafic rocks were discovered on the seafloor around the KHF. These deep-seated rocks may contribute to the high H2concentration of the Kairei vent fluid .To understand how gabbro and mafic rocks are uplifted and exhumed on the seafloor, we conducted a seismic refraction/reflection survey using ocean bottom seismograms (OBSs). We conducted the seismic refraction/reflection survey from January 27 to March 19 in 2013 using S/V Yokosuka of Jamstec. In the experiment, we used 21 OBSs, an air gun (G.I.gun) and a single channel steamer cable. We obtained 5 survey lines NNW-SSE direction parallel to the ridge axis, 5 lines E-W direction and 5 lines NNE-SSW direction. In addition to these lines, we acquired other 5 lines passing through the point above the KHF or Yokoniwa Rise, which is the north of the KHF. In analysis of refraction data, firstly, we estimated 2D velocity model under survey lines, which are parallel to the ridge axis, using the progressive model development method developed by Sato and Kennett (2000). Then, we constructed a 3D initial model and run the 3D tomographic method developed by Zelt and Barton (1998). The 1D velocity profile of the KHF seems to be similar to that of mid ocean ridges such as Mid Atlantic Ridge, East Pacific Rise. Seismic velocities under the KHF and Yokoniwa Rise reach about 6km/s at depth of 1~2 km below seafloor, probably indicating uplift of deep-seated rocks. In this presentation we will show 3D seismic structure of this area.

  14. Lithosphere/Asthenosphere Structure beneath the Mendocino Triple Junction from the Analysis of Surface Wave, Ambient Noise, and Receiver Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, K.; Zhai, Y.; Levander, A.; Porritt, R. W.; Allen, R. M.; Schmandt, B.; Humphreys, E.; O'Driscoll, L.

    2010-12-01

    We have developed a 3-D shear velocity model using finite-frequency Rayleigh wave phase velocity dispersion, PdS receiver functions, and ambient noise tomography to better understand the complex lithosphere/asthenosphere structures in the Mendocino Triple Junction (MTJ) region. Using approximately 100 events (July 2007-December 2008) recorded by the stations of the Flexible Array Mendocino Experiment (FAME), the USArray Transportable Array (TA) network, and the Berkeley Digital Seismograph network, we have obtained the phase velocities (20-100s) from the finite-frequency Rayleigh wave tomography, which agrees well with the ambient noise tomography results (7-40 s, Porritt & Allen, 2010) in the overlapping period range. We subsequently inverted for a 3-D Vs model on a 0.25°x0.25° grid from the combined dispersion datasets, constrained by interface depths from the PdS receiver functions (Zhai & Levander, 2010). The resulting crustal and upper mantle Vs model (~150 km) reveals strong lateral heterogeneity in the subduction and transform regimes of the Mendocino Triple Junction region where the Gorda, Pacific, and North American plates intersect. The subducting Gorda slab is well-imaged as an eastward-dipping high-velocity anomaly to ~100 km depth. At the same depth to the east we observe a large-scale low velocity zone, which is the mantle wedge beneath the North American Plate. The southern edge of the Gorda plate (SEDGE) is imaged at 80-100 km depth and is in excellent agreement with measurements made from PdS receiver functions, body-wave tomography (Schmandt & Humphreys, 2010; Obrebski et al., 2010), and active source studies. At depths greater than 80 km, we interpret low velocities under the Cascadia subduction zone as the asthenosphere below the Gorda plate, in agreement with measured LAB depths from RFs. South of the SEDGE shallow strong low-velocities appear beneath the transform region, which we interpret as the asthenosphere in the slab-gap region left by

  15. The connexin43 carboxyl terminus and cardiac gap junction organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palatinus, Joseph A; Rhett, J Matthew; Gourdie, Robert G

    2012-08-01

    The precise spatial order of gap junctions at intercalated disks in adult ventricular myocardium is thought vital for maintaining cardiac synchrony. Breakdown or remodeling of this order is a hallmark of arrhythmic disease of the heart. The principal component of gap junction channels between ventricular cardiomyocytes is connexin43 (Cx43). Protein-protein interactions and modifications of the carboxyl-terminus of Cx43 are key determinants of gap junction function, size, distribution and organization during normal development and in disease processes. Here, we review data on the role of proteins interacting with the Cx43 carboxyl-terminus in the regulation of cardiac gap junction organization, with particular emphasis on Zonula Occludens-1. The rapid progress in this area suggests that in coming years we are likely to develop a fuller understanding of the molecular mechanisms causing pathologic remodeling of gap junctions. With these advances come the promise of novel approach to the treatment of arrhythmia and the prevention of sudden cardiac death. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The Communicating junctions, composition, structure and characteristics. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Active Structural Fibers for Multifunctional Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-31

    31, 2012 X - ray Diffraction of BST Coatings • BaxSr1-xTiO3 films can be grown with stoichiometry control • Process allows for control of the film...thickness from ~500nm to 20mm •Other perovskite compositions can be synthesized 2q Henry A Sodano – AFOSR Mech. of Multifunctional and

  17. Atomic and electronic structure of a Rashba p-n junction at the BiTeI surface

    OpenAIRE

    Tournier-Colletta, C.; Autes, G.; Kierren, B.; Bugnon, Ph.; Berger, H.; Fagot-Revurat, Y.; Yazyev, O. V.; Grioni, M.; Malterre, D.

    2014-01-01

    The non-centrosymmetric semiconductor BiTeI exhibits two distinct surface terminations that support spin-split Rashba surface states. Their ambipolarity can be exploited for creating spin-polarized $p$-$n$ junctions at the boundaries between domains with different surface terminations. We use scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS) to locate such junctions and investigate their atomic and electronic properties. The Te- and I-terminated surfaces are identified owing to their disti...

  18. Nano-structured polymer composites and process for preparing same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillmyer, Marc; Chen, Liang

    2013-04-16

    A process for preparing a polymer composite that includes reacting (a) a multi-functional monomer and (b) a block copolymer comprising (i) a first block and (ii) a second block that includes a functional group capable of reacting with the multi-functional monomer, to form a crosslinked, nano-structured, bi-continuous composite. The composite includes a continuous matrix phase and a second continuous phase comprising the first block of the block copolymer.

  19. Stiff, Strong Splice For A Composite Sandwich Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmaling, D.

    1991-01-01

    New type of splice for composite sandwich structure reduces peak shear stress in structure. Layers of alternating fiber orientation interposed between thin ears in adhesive joint. Developed for structural joint in spar of helicopter rotor blade, increases precision of control over thickness of adhesive at joint. Joint easy to make, requires no additional pieces, and adds little weight.

  20. Structural asymmetry in the Thermus thermophilus RuvC dimer suggests a basis for sequential strand cleavages during Holliday junction resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Luan; Shi, Ke; Yin, Zhiqi; Aihara, Hideki

    2013-01-07

    Holliday junction (HJ) resolvases are structure-specific endonucleases that cleave four-way DNA junctions (HJs) generated during DNA recombination and repair. Bacterial RuvC, a prototypical HJ resolvase, functions as homodimer and nicks DNA strands precisely across the junction point. To gain insights into the mechanisms underlying symmetrical strand cleavages by RuvC, we performed crystallographic and biochemical analyses of RuvC from Thermus thermophilus (T.th. RuvC). The crystal structure of T.th. RuvC shows an overall protein fold similar to that of Escherichia coli RuvC, but T.th. RuvC has a more tightly associated dimer interface possibly reflecting its thermostability. The binding mode of a HJ-DNA substrate can be inferred from the shape/charge complementarity between the T.th. RuvC dimer and HJ-DNA, as well as positions of sulfate ions bound on the protein surface. Unexpectedly, the structure of T.th. RuvC homodimer refined at 1.28 Å resolution shows distinct asymmetry near the dimer interface, in the region harboring catalytically important aromatic residues. The observation suggests that the T.th. RuvC homodimer interconverts between two asymmetric conformations, with alternating subunits switched on for DNA strand cleavage. This model provides a structural basis for the 'nick-counter-nick' mechanism in HJ resolution, a mode of HJ processing shared by prokaryotic and eukaryotic HJ resolvases.

  1. Structural arrangement trade study. Volume 3: Reusable Hydrogen Composite Tank System (RHCTS) and Graphite Composite Primary Structures (GCPS). Addendum

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    This volume is the third of a 3 volume set that addresses the structural trade study plan that will identify the most suitable structural configuration for an SSTO winged vehicle capable of delivering 25,000 lbs to a 220 nm circular orbit at 51.6 deg inclination. The most suitable Reusable Hydrogen Composite Tank System (RHCTS), and Graphite Composite Tank System (GCPS) composite materials for intertank, wing and thrust structures are identified. Vehicle resizing charts, selection criteria and back-up charts, parametric costing approach and the finite element method analysis are discussed.

  2. Inside-Out Manufacturing of Composite Structures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Demonstrate the inside-out manufacturing process by manufacturing a complex shaped composite structure with imbedded wiring and fluid handling without the use of a...

  3. Cradle-to-Grave Monitoring of Composite Aircraft Structures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NextGen is proposing a simple yet powerful damage identification technique for advanced composite structures. We propose to develop a damage index based on vibration...

  4. Composite Structure Monitoring using Direct Write Sensors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This NASA SBIR Phase II project seeks to develop and demonstrate a suite of sensor products to monitor the health of composite structures. Sensors will be made using...

  5. variabilty in parasites' community structure and composition in cat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mgina

    ABSTRACT. This study investigated the composition and structure of the parasite communities in Cat fish ... The western shore is mainly sandy ... part of which is sandy and rocky and along the shores ..... Sediment And Microalgae From Lake ...

  6. Linguistic Structure as Composition and Perturbation

    CERN Document Server

    De Marcken, C

    1996-01-01

    This paper discusses the problem of learning language from unprocessed text and speech signals, concentrating on the problem of learning a lexicon. In particular, it argues for a representation of language in which linguistic parameters like words are built by perturbing a composition of existing parameters. The power of this representation is demonstrated by several examples in text segmentation and compression, acquisition of a lexicon from raw speech, and the acquisition of mappings between text and artificial representations of meaning.

  7. Active Structural Fibers for Multifunctional Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-06

    Sebald [3] used extrusion methods to produce fibers with a platinum core surrounded by a PNN-PZT/ polymer binder which was fired to leave a platinum/PNN...researchers have developed composite piezoelectric devices consisting of an active piezoceramic fiber embedded in a polymer matrix. The polymer matrix acts...active fibers are embedded in a polymer matrix, the rule of mixtures can be applied again a second time by taking the piezoelectric shell to be an

  8. Dilemma game structure observed in traffic flow at a 2-to-1 lane junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Atsuo; Tanimoto, Jun; Hagishima, Aya; Sagara, Hiroki

    2009-03-01

    Using a cellular automaton traffic model based on the stochastic optimal velocity model with appropriate assumptions for both incoming and outgoing vehicle boundaries, the so-called bottleneck issue on a lane-closing section was investigated in terms of game theory. In the system, two classified driver agents coexist: C agents (cooperative strategy) always driving in the first lane and D agents (defective strategy) trying to drive in a lower-density lane whether the first or the second lane. In high-density flow, D agents' interruption into the first lane from the second just before the lane-closing section creates a heavier traffic jam, which reduces social efficiency. This particular event can be described with a prisoner's dilemma game structure.

  9. Self-healing sandwich composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fugon, D.; Chen, C.; Peters, K.

    2012-04-01

    Previous research demonstrated that a thin self-healing layer is effective in recovering partial sandwich composite performance after an impact event. Many studies have been conducted that show the possibility of using Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors to monitor the cure of a resin through strain and temperature monitoring. For this experiment, FBG sensors were used to monitor the curing process of a self-healing layer within a twelve-layer fiberglass laminate after impact. First, five self-healing sandwich composite specimens were manufactured. FBG sensors were embedded between the fiberglass and foam core. Then the fiberglass laminate was impacted with the use of a drop tower and the curing process was monitored. The collected data was used to compare the cure of the resin and fiberglass alone to the cure of the resin from a self-healing specimen. For the low viscosity resin system tested, these changes were not sufficiently large to identify different polymerization states in the resin as it cured. These results indicate that applying different resin systems might increase the efficiency of the self-healing in the sandwich composites.

  10. Composite materials applied to the E-ELT structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajuelo, Eugenio; Gómez, José Ramón; Ronquillo, Bernardo; Brunetto, Enzo; Koch, Fran

    2008-07-01

    The upper part of the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) altitude structure is one of the most critical areas of the telescope's structure. This part hosts sensitive optical elements of the telescope. Its structural performance has a major impact on the whole system. The most critical requirements are low optical path obscuration, high static and dynamic performance (high specific modulus), high mechanical safety (high specific strength), low wind cross section and low weight. Composite materials are ideally suited to meet these requirements. This study is carried out in order to quantify the relative advantage of composite material over mild steel, in terms of performance and costs. The mechanical behavior of the steel structure can be easily improved with a structure manufactured with composite materials. This structure is significantly lighter than the steel one and reduces relative displacements between primary and secondary mirror. Consequently, optical performance is improved, assembly process is simplified and transport cost is reduced.

  11. Structural Composites with Intrinsic Multifunctionality Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Development of multifunctional, structural materials for applications in terrestrial and space-based platforms is proposed. The principle innovation is the...

  12. Structural Composites with Intrinsic Multifunctionality Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Development of a multifunctional, structural material for applications in terrestrial and space-based platforms used for instrumentation in earth observation is...

  13. The feasible study of the water flow in the micro channel with the Y-junction and narrow structure for various flow rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasikova D.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we present the results of measurement in micro-channel with the Y-junction and narrow structure for various flow rates. There was used BSG micro-channel with trapezoidal cross-section. The parameters of the channel are described in the paper. The flow in the micro-channel was invested with micro-PIV technique and various flow rates were set on each inlet. The resulting flow rate in the steady area follows the laminar flow with very low Re 30. Here we are focused on the flow characteristic in the Y-junction and in selected narrow structure. The fluid flow is evaluated with vector and scalar maps and the profile plots that were taken in the point of interest.

  14. Structural evolution of chitosan–palygorskite composites and removal of aqueous lead by composite beads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rusmin, Ruhaida, E-mail: ruhaida.rusmin@mymail.unisa.edu.au [CERAR – Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation, Building X, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095 (Australia); Faculty of Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA Negeri Sembilan, Kuala Pilah 72000 (Malaysia); Sarkar, Binoy, E-mail: binoy.sarkar@unisa.edu.au [CERAR – Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation, Building X, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095 (Australia); CRC CARE – Cooperative Research Centre for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment, P.O. Box 486, Salisbury, SA 5106 (Australia); Liu, Yanju [CERAR – Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation, Building X, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095 (Australia); CRC CARE – Cooperative Research Centre for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment, P.O. Box 486, Salisbury, SA 5106 (Australia); McClure, Stuart [CERAR – Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation, Building X, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095 (Australia); Naidu, Ravi, E-mail: Ravi.Naidu@newcastle.edu.au [CERAR – Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation, Building X, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095 (Australia); CRC CARE – Cooperative Research Centre for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment, P.O. Box 486, Salisbury, SA 5106 (Australia)

    2015-10-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Facile preparation of chitosan–palygorskite composite beads demonstrated. • Components’ mass ratio impacted structural characteristics of composites. • Mechanism of composite formation and structure of composite beads proposed. • Composite beads adsorbed significantly greater amount of Pb than pristine materials. • In-depth investigation done on Pb adsorption mechanisms. - Abstract: This paper investigates the structural evolution of chitosan–palygorskite (CP) composites in relation to variable mass ratios of their individual components. The composite beads’ performance in lead (Pb) adsorption from aqueous solution was also examined. The composite beads were prepared through direct dispersion of chitosan and palygorskite at 1:1, 1:2 and 2:1 mass ratios (CP1, CP2 and C2P, respectively). Analyses by Fourier transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) surface area, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) confirmed the dependence of the composites’ structural characteristics on their composition mass ratio. The chitosan–palygorskite composite beads exhibited a better Pb adsorption performance than the pristine materials (201.5, 154.5, 147.1, 27.7 and 9.3 mg g{sup −1} for CP1, C2P, CP2, chitosan and palygorskite, respectively). Adsorption of Pb by CP1 and CP2 followed Freundlich isothermal model, while C2P fitted to Langmuir model. Kinetic studies showed that adsorption by all the composites fitted to the pseudo-second order model with pore diffusion also acting as a major rate governing step. The surface properties and specific interaction between chitosan and palygorskite in the composites were the most critical factors that influenced their capabilities in removing toxic metals from water.

  15. Crustal structure of the Walvis Ridge at the junction with the Namibian coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromm, Tanja; Jokat, Wilfried; Behrmann, Jan H.; Ryberg, Trond; Weber, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Continental breakup is commonly preceded or accompanied by massive volcanism and deposition of flood basalts. The large volumes of magma are thought to originate from hot upwelling mantle plumes arriving at the lithosphere. The following plume conduit often leaves a trail in form of volcanic islands or aseismic ridges on the newly created oceanic crust. Due to this correlation in space and time between plume-derived structures and continental breakup, plumes are considered to have a triggering effect or even cause continental breakups. The South Atlantic is a classical example for this model including the Parana (South America) and Etendeka (Africa) flood basalts as well as the aseismic ridges Rio Grande Rise and Walvis Ridge on both conjugate margins. The Walvis Ridge connects the Etendeka flood basalts with the active volcanic islands of Tristan da Cunha, the current hotspot position. To investigate the modification of the continent ocean transition (COT) by the arriving plume head, a large geophysical on- and offshore experiment was conducted in 2011 at the intersection of Walvis Ridge with the African continent. We present two P-wave velocity models of the deep crustal structure derived from seismic refraction data. One profile crosses the ridge ~500km away from the coastline, while the other one extends along the ridge and continues onshore. 27 ocean bottom stations (OBS, spacing 13 km) were deployed for the perpendicular profile, 28 OBS, 50 land stations and 8 dynamite shots were used for the longitudinal profile. Crustal velocities beneath Walvis Ridge range between 5.5 km/s and 7.0 km/s, which are typical velocities for oceanic crust. The thickness, however, is approximately three times than normal, 17 km in the western part and increasing to 22 km towards the continent. The COT is characterized by 30 km thick crust with a high velocity lower crustal body (HVLCB) with seismic velocities up to 7.5 km/s. The western boundary of the HVLCB is at a similar

  16. CFRP composites for optics and structures in telescope applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, Robert C.

    1995-10-01

    The use of continuous fiber reinforced plastic, CFRP, composite materials is introduced here as a viable material for optical telescopes. The thermal characteristics of CFRPs make them attractive as dimensionally stable materials for all-composite telescope structures and mirrors. Composite mirrors have only recently shown promise as replacements for heavier and more fragile glass mirrors. The areal density of a CFRP mirror can be as much as 10 times less than that of a glass mirror. Optical test results show CFRP composite mirrors can be fabricated with an average surface roughness of less than 10 angstroms. Concept models of scope and CFRP optics with associated figure and roughness data are presented.

  17. NASTRAN as an analytical research tool for composite mechanics and composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.; Sullivan, T. L.

    1976-01-01

    Selected examples are described in which NASTRAN is used as an analysis research tool for composite mechanics and for composite structural components. The examples were selected to illustrate the importance of using NASTRAN as an analysis tool in this rapidly advancing field.

  18. DYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF UNDERGROUND COMPOSITE STRUCTURES UNDER EXPLOSION LOADING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵晓兵; 薛大为; 赵玉祥

    2004-01-01

    In selecting rational types of underground structures resisting explosion, in order to improve stress states of the structural section and make full use of material strength of each part of the section, the research method of composite structures is presented. Adopting the analysis method of micro-section free body, equilibrium equations, constraint equations and deformation coordination equations are given. Making use of the concept of generalized work and directly introducing Lagrange multiplier specific in physical meaning, the validity of the constructed generalized functional is proved by using variation method. The rational rigidity matching relationship of composite structure section is presented through example calculations.

  19. Blast Testing and Modelling of Composite Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giversen, Søren

    The motivation for this work is based on a desire for finding light weight alternatives to high strength steel as the material to use for armouring in military vehicles. With the use of high strength steel, an increase in the level of armouring has a significant impact on the vehicle weight......, affecting for example the manoeuvrability and top speed negatively, which ultimately affects the safety of the personal in the vehicle. Strong and light materials, such as fibre reinforced composites, could therefore act as substitutes for the high strength steel, and minimize the impact on the vehicle...

  20. Composite timber-concrete road bridge structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojić Dragoslav

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents preliminary design of the road bridge made of laminated timber. The supporting system of the main bearing elements is made of the laminated timber in the system of arch with three joints; the bridge slab is designed as continuous slab, made of nine equal fields; each pair is made as composite timber-concrete beam, where the road slab is made of concrete and the needle pieces are made of timber. Fundament is based on HW piles. All the elements are designed to Eurocode.

  1. VARTM Process Modeling of Aerospace Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiao-Lan; Grimsley, Brian W.; Hubert, Pascal; Cano, Roberto J.; Loos, Alfred C.

    2003-01-01

    A three-dimensional model was developed to simulate the VARTM composite manufacturing process. The model considers the two important mechanisms that occur during the process: resin flow, and compaction and relaxation of the preform. The model was used to simulate infiltration of a carbon preform with an epoxy resin by the VARTM process. The model predicted flow patterns and preform thickness changes agreed qualitatively with the measured values. However, the predicted total infiltration times were much longer than measured most likely due to the inaccurate preform permeability values used in the simulation.

  2. Production defects in marine composite structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hayman, Brian; Berggreen, Christian; Tsouvalis, Nicholas G.

    2007-01-01

    , and to have a good understanding of the way in which production defects and imperfections influence the structural performance, so that adequate levels of structural safety and reliability can be achieved without having to apply excessively large factors of safety. A review is made of the types of defects...... that arise in the relevant production processes, of their causes and the means that can be used to reduce or eliminate them, and of models that enable the effects of defects and imperfections on structural performance to be predicted....

  3. Deep crustal structure of the Walvis Ridge at the junction with the Namibian coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromm, Tanja; Jokat, Wilfried; Behrmann, Jan H.; Ryberg, Trond; Weber, Michael

    2013-04-01

    The Walvis Ridge perpendicular to the African coast offshore Namibia is believed to be caused by a long-lived hotspot, which started to erupt with the opening of the South Atlantic in mid Cretaceous. The ridge in combination with the large igneous provinces (Etendeka and Parana) in South America and Namibia is today considered to be a classical model for hotspot driven continental break-up. To unravel details on how the crust and mantle were modified by such a major thermal event, a large-scale geophysical on- and offshore experiment was conducted in 2011. We present p-wave velocity models of two active seismic profiles along and across Walvis Ridge. The profile along the ridge continues onshore, has a total length of ~730 km and consists of 28 ocean bottom stations, 50 land stations and 8 dynamite shots. This section reveals a complex structure with multiple buried seamounts, strong lateral velocity gradients and indication of a high velocity body at the crust-mantle boundary beneath the shelf area. Lower crustal velocities range from 6.5 km/s in the west to 7.0 km/s in the east while the crustal thickness is approximately 28 km at the coast thinning westwards. The second profile perpendicular to the ridge is located about 140 km west of the first profile, has a length of ~480 km and consists of 27 ocean bottom stations. The crustal thickness is well constrained by multiple Moho reflections showing a thickness of 20km under the crest of the ridge and gradually thinning to 8km towards north and south. A seamount marks the northern termination of the ridge leading to an abrupt thickening of the crust to 14km before reaching the Angola Basin. While crustal velocities of 5.5 km/s and 6.5 km/s in the upper and lower crust are similar to the first profile, lower crustal velocities north of the crest are approximately 6% higher.

  4. Structural Abort Trigger for Ares Composites Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Structural health monitoring (SHM) methods have been limited for wide-area applications due to the implied infrastructure, including sensors, power/communication...

  5. Intrinsic manufacture of hollow thermoplastic composite/metal structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barfuss, Daniel; Grützner, Raik; Garthaus, Christian; Gude, Maik; Müller, Roland; Langrebe, Dirk

    2016-10-01

    In contrast to common and classical joining technologies for composite/metal hybrid structures such as bonding and riveting, profile and contour joints offer a promising potential for novel lightweight hybrid structures. First and foremost, joining systems with a form closure function enable to pass very high loads into rod- and tube-shaped fibre reinforced structures and achieve high degrees of material utilization for the composite part. This paper demonstrates the theoretical and technological principals for a resource efficient design and production of highly loaded thermoplastic composite profile structures with integrated metallic load introduction elements and a multi scale form closure. The hybrid structures are produced in an integral blow moulding process in which a braided tape-preform is simultaneously consolidated and formed into the metallic load introduction element. These metallic load introduction elements are manufactured in a two-stage process of external and internal hydroforming, after forming simulations have assured process stability for consistent quality.

  6. Modeling of composite piezoelectric structures with the finite volume method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolborici, Valentin; Dawson, Francis P; Pugh, Mary C

    2012-01-01

    Piezoelectric devices, such as piezoelectric traveling- wave rotary ultrasonic motors, have composite piezoelectric structures. A composite piezoelectric structure consists of a combination of two or more bonded materials, at least one of which is a piezoelectric transducer. Piezoelectric structures have mainly been numerically modeled using the finite element method. An alternative approach based on the finite volume method offers the following advantages: 1) the ordinary differential equations resulting from the discretization process can be interpreted directly as corresponding circuits; and 2) phenomena occurring at boundaries can be treated exactly. This paper presents a method for implementing the boundary conditions between the bonded materials in composite piezoelectric structures modeled with the finite volume method. The paper concludes with a modeling example of a unimorph structure.

  7. On the Mechanical Behavior of Advanced Composite Material Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinson, Jack

    During the period between 1993 and 2004, the author, as well as some colleagues and graduate students, had the honor to be supported by the Office of Naval Research to conduct research in several aspects of the behavior of structures composed of composite materials. The topics involved in this research program were numerous, but all contributed to increasing the understanding of how various structures that are useful for marine applications behaved. More specifically, the research topics focused on the reaction of structures that were made of fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites when subjected to various loads and environmental conditions. This included the behavior of beam, plate/panel and shell structures. It involved studies that are applicable to fiberglass, graphite/carbon and Kevlar fibers imbedded in epoxy, polyester and other polymeric matrices. Unidirectional, cross-ply, angle ply, and woven composites were involved, both in laminated, monocoque as well as in sandwich constructions. Mid-plane symmetric as well as asymmetric laminates were studied, the latter involving bending-stretching coupling and other couplings that only can be achieved with advanced composite materials. The composite structures studied involved static loads, dynamic loading, shock loading as well as thermal and hygrothermal environments. One major consideration was determining the mechanical properties of composite materials subjected to high strain rates because the mechanical properties vary so significantly as the strain rate increases. A considerable number of references are cited for further reading and study for those interested.

  8. Holliday junction resolvases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Haley D M; West, Stephen C

    2014-09-02

    Four-way DNA intermediates, called Holliday junctions (HJs), can form during meiotic and mitotic recombination, and their removal is crucial for chromosome segregation. A group of ubiquitous and highly specialized structure-selective endonucleases catalyze the cleavage of HJs into two disconnected DNA duplexes in a reaction called HJ resolution. These enzymes, called HJ resolvases, have been identified in bacteria and their bacteriophages, archaea, and eukaryotes. In this review, we discuss fundamental aspects of the HJ structure and their interaction with junction-resolving enzymes. This is followed by a brief discussion of the eubacterial RuvABC enzymes, which provide the paradigm for HJ resolvases in other organisms. Finally, we review the biochemical and structural properties of some well-characterized resolvases from archaea, bacteriophage, and eukaryotes. Copyright © 2014 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  9. Computational modeling and impact analysis of textile composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Hae-Kyu

    This study is devoted to the development of an integrated numerical modeling enabling one to investigate the static and the dynamic behaviors and failures of 2-D textile composite as well as 3-D orthogonal woven composite structures weakened by cracks and subjected to static-, impact- and ballistic-type loads. As more complicated modeling about textile composite structures is introduced, some of homogenization schemes, geometrical modeling and crack propagations become more difficult problems to solve. To overcome these problems, this study presents effective mesh-generation schemes, homogenization modeling based on a repeating unit cell and sinusoidal functions, and also a cohesive element to study micro-crack shapes. This proposed research has two: (1) studying behavior of textile composites under static loads, (2) studying dynamic responses of these textile composite structures subjected to the transient/ballistic loading. In the first part, efficient homogenization schemes are suggested to show the influence of textile architectures on mechanical characteristics considering the micro modeling of repeating unit cell. Furthermore, the structures of multi-layered or multi-phase composites combined with different laminar such as a sub-laminate, are considered to find the mechanical characteristics. A simple progressive failure mechanism for the textile composites is also presented. In the second part, this study focuses on three main phenomena to solve the dynamic problems: micro-crack shapes, textile architectures and textile effective moduli. To obtain a good solutions of the dynamic problems, this research attempts to use four approaches: (I) determination of governing equations via a three-level hierarchy: micro-mechanical unit cell analysis, layer-wise analysis accounting for transverse strains and stresses, and structural analysis based on anisotropic plate layers, (II) development of an efficient computational approach enabling one to perform transient

  10. Structural Composites With Tuned EM Chirality

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-23

    ray -­‐ tracing   analysis.   A   composite  is  created  using  coils  of... MATLAB   code  directly  computes  the  group  velocity  and  pass  bands  for  a  given  set  of  wave  vectors   and...the  input  frequency  and  angle   of   incidence.    A   MATLAB  code  directly  computes   the  group

  11. Ink composition for making a conductive silver structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Steven B.; Lewis, Jennifer A.

    2016-10-18

    An ink composition for making a conductive silver structure comprises a silver salt and a complex of (a) a complexing agent and a short chain carboxylic acid or (b) a complexing agent and a salt of a short chain carboxylic acid, according to one embodiment. A method for making a silver structure entails combining a silver salt and a complexing agent, and then adding a short chain carboxylic acid or a salt of the short chain carboxylic acid to the combined silver salt and a complexing agent to form an ink composition. A concentration of the complexing agent in the ink composition is reduced to form a concentrated formulation, and the silver salt is reduced to form a conductive silver structure, where the concentrated formulation and the conductive silver structure are formed at a temperature of about 120.degree. C. or less.

  12. Effects of bath composition on the morphology of electroless-plated Cu electrodes for hetero-junctions with intrinsic thin layer solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Woon Young [Surface Technology R& BD Group, Korea Institute of Industrial Technology (KITECH), Gaetbeol-ro 156, Yeonsu-gu, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yu Jin [Surface Technology R& BD Group, Korea Institute of Industrial Technology (KITECH), Gaetbeol-ro 156, Yeonsu-gu, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Materials Science & Engineering, Yonsei University, Yonsei-ro 50, Seodaemun-Gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Min Hyung, E-mail: minhyung@kitech.re.kr [Surface Technology R& BD Group, Korea Institute of Industrial Technology (KITECH), Gaetbeol-ro 156, Yeonsu-gu, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-31

    The morphology of an electroless-plated Cu electrode was investigated as a function of bath composition. To enhance the selectivity of Cu electrode deposition on the surface of an indium tin oxide layer, a Ti/Cu multi-layer was deposited as a Cu electrode seed layer by physical vapor deposition, and then electroless plating was performed using various complexing agents and a surfactant. The degree of selectivity was effectively influenced by the type of complexing agent. The electroless plating solution containing N,N,N′,N′-tetrakis(2-hydroxypropyl)ethylenediamine (THPED) as complexing agent showed excellent selective growth of the Cu electrode as compared to the solution containing ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. Even though THPED led to better selective growth of the electroless-plated Cu electrode, the aspect ratio of electrode lateral growth was about 2.7 times that of vertical growth. By adding a nonionic surfactant, the ratio between vertical growth rate and lateral growth rate was improved about 4.6 times. The Cu–THPED electroless plating with nonionic surfactant provided a drastic decrease in lateral growth rate, compared with the Cu–THPED electroless plating bath excluding nonionic surfactant. The Cu–THPED solution including nonionic surfactant is a promising composition of electroless plating solution for the clear selective plating of Cu electrodes on hetero-junctions with intrinsic thin layer solar cells. - Highlights: • Selective electroless plating (SEP) depends on binding strength of complexing agent. • The SEP was performed using Cu-N,N,N′,N′-tetrakis(2-hydroxypropyl)ethylenediamine. • A surfactant is able to remove hydrogen bubbles on Cu electrode surface. • The growth of Cu electrode was improved in vertical direction by adding surfactant.

  13. The function of tight junctions in maintaining differences in lipid composition between the apical and the basolateral cell surface domains of MDCK cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Meer, G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/068570368; Simons, K.

    1986-01-01

    Tight junctions in epithelial cells have been postulated to act as barriers inhibiting lateral diffusion of lipids and proteins between the apical and basolateral plasma membrane domains. To study the fence function of the tight junction in more detail, we have fused liposomes containing the

  14. A synthetic holliday junction is sandwiched between two tetrameric Mycobacterium leprae RuvA structures in solution: new insights from neutron scattering contrast variation and modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, D; Keeley, A; Aslam, M; Arenas-Licea, J; Brown, T; Tsaneva, I R; Perkins, S J

    1998-11-27

    The interaction between homologous DNA molecules in recombination and DNA repair leads to the formation of crossover intermediates known as Holliday junctions. Their enzymatic processing by the RuvABC system in bacteria involves the formation of a complex between RuvA and the Holliday junction. To study the solution structure of this complex, contrast variation by neutron scattering was applied to Mycobacterium leprae RuvA (MleRuvA), a synthetic analogue of a Holliday junction with 16 base-pairs in each arm, and their stable complex. Unbound MleRuvA was octameric in solution, and formed an octameric complex with the DNA junction. The radii of gyration at infinite contrast were determined to be 3.65 nm, 2.74 nm and 4.15 nm for MleRuvA, DNA junction and their complex, respectively, showing that the complex was structurally more extended than MleRuvA. No difference was observed in the presence or absence of Mg2+. The large difference in RG values for the free and complexed protein in 65% 2H2O, where the DNA component is "invisible", showed that a substantial structural change had occurred in complexed MleRuvA. The slopes of the Stuhrmann plots for MleRuvA and the complex were 19 and 15 or less (x10(-5)), respectively, indicating that DNA passed through the centre of the complex. Automated constrained molecular modelling based on the Escherichia coli RuvA crystal structure demonstrated that the scattering curve of octameric MleRuvA in 65% and 100% 2H2O is explained by a face-to-face association of two MleRuvA tetramers stabilised by salt-bridges. The corresponding modelling of the complex in 65% 2H2O showed that the two tetramers are separated by a void space of about 1-2 nm, which can accommodate the width of B-form DNA. Minor conformational changes between unbound and complexed MleRuvA may occur. These observations show that RuvA plays a more complex role in homologous recombination than previously thought.

  15. Structural and functional characterization of barium zirconium titanate / epoxy composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filiberto González Garcia

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The dielectric behavior of composite materials (barium zirconium titanate / epoxy system was analyzed as a function of ceramic concentration. Structure and morphologic behavior of the composites was investigated by X-ray Diffraction (XRD, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, Raman spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM analyses. Composites were prepared by mixing the components and pouring them into suitable moulds. It was demonstrated that the amount of inorganic phase affects the morphology of the presented composites. XRD revealed the presence of a single phase while Raman scattering confirmed structural transitions as a function of ceramic concentration. Changes in the ceramic concentration affected Raman modes and the distribution of particles along into in epoxy matrix. Dielectric permittivity and dielectric losses were influenced by filler concentration.

  16. Influence of particle structure on electrochemical character of composite graphite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The natural graphite has been used as the anode material for Lithium-Ion batteries, because of its low cost, chemical stability and excellent reversibility for Li+ insertion. However, the slow diffusion rate of lithium ion and poor compatibility with electrolyte solutions make it difficult to use in some conditions. In order to solve these problems, an epoxy-coke/graphite composite has been manufactured. The particle of composite carbonaceous material coated on non-graphitizable (hard) carbon matrix. Due to the disordered structure,the diffusion rate of lithium species in the non-graphitzable carbon is remarkably fast and less anisotropic. The process for preparing a composite carbon powder provides a promising new anode material with superior electrochemical properties for Li-ion batteries. The unique structure of epoxy-coke/graphite composite electrodes results in much better kinetics, also better recharge ability and initial charge/discharge efficiency.

  17. Structural design of composite sealing systems for automotive applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarnowski, T. [Dow Chemical Co., Southfield, MI (United States)

    1996-11-01

    New applications for composites in under-the-hood closure systems such as engine valve covers, transmission side covers, oil pans, and timing chain covers are developing rapidly. The primary driving forces are lighter weight of finished components, integrated designs, improved isolation of engine noise, improved materials systems, and matured manufacturing processes for composite materials. Thermoset-based composite materials, especially those based on high-temperature resistant epoxy vinylester matrices, offer improved elevated-temperature performance with respect to thermoplastic composites. This paper presents the current state-of-the-art design, engineering and optimization techniques for engine closure systems. The performance requirements of systems such as valve covers and oil pans are explained in detail. Techniques for long-term structural stiffness evaluation, vibration performance assessment and noise transmission estimation are described. The material characterization required to develop design allowables for long-term, high-temperature composite applications are also included.

  18. Specific features of current flow mechanisms in the semiconductor structure of a photoelectric converter with an n +- p-junction and an antireflective porous silicon film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tregulov, V. V.; Stepanov, V. A.; Litvinov, V. G.; Ermachikhin, A. V.

    2016-11-01

    The temperature dependence of forward and reverse branches of the current-voltage characteristic of the semiconductor structure of a photoelectric converter with an n +- p-junction based on single-crystal silicon and an antireflective porous silicon film on the front surface has been studied. The presence of several current flow mechanisms has been revealed. It has been demonstrated that traps that emerge in the process of the formation of the porous silicon film have a considerable effect on the current flow processes in the semiconductor structure under consideration.

  19. Adaptation of the jejunal mucosa in the experimental blind loop syndrome: changes in paracellular conductance and tight junction structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulzke, J D; Fromm, M; Bentzel, C J; Menge, H; Riecken, E O

    1987-01-01

    Self-filling blind loops of rat jejunum exhibit hyperregenerative transformation of the mucosa. We used this experimental model to characterise mechanisms, which may occur under similar conditions in man (stagnant loop syndrome). Epithelial and subepithelial resistance were measured in the Ussing-chamber by voltage divider ratio measurements after positioning a microelectrode between epithelium and subepithelial tissue layers. In the blind loop, epithelial resistance increased from 8 +/- 1 to 23 +/- 1 omega cm2 and subepithelial resistance from 39 +/- 4 to 86 +/- 8 omega cm2 as compared with control jejunum. The increase in the subepithelial resistance was paralleled anatomically by an increase in the thickness of the subepithelial tissue layers from 63 +/- 4 microns to 177 +/- 19 microns. Ultrastructural analysis of the tight junction area by freeze fracture electron microscopy revealed an increase in the total junctional 'depth' in the crypts from 243 +/- 9 nm in control jejunum to 396 +/- 17 nm in the blind loop, while the number of horizontally oriented 'strands' remained unchanged. Villus tight junctions did not differ between blind loop and control. We interpret the alterations in the self-filling blind loop as an adaptive response of the epithelium which reduces backleakage of already absorbed electrolytes across the tight junction into the intestinal lumen. This mechanism is suitable to support the intestine in maintaining body electrolyte and water contents during cellular electrolyte malabsorption.

  20. Compression strength of composite primary structural components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Eric R.

    1994-12-01

    The linear elastic response is determined for an internally pressurized, long circular cylindrical shell stiffened on the inside by a regular arrangement of identical stringers and identical rings. Periodicity of this configuration permits the analysis of a portion of the shell wall centered over a generic stringer-ring joint; i.e., a unit cell model. The stiffeners are modeled as discrete beams, and the stringer is assumed to have a symmetrical cross section and the ring an asymmetrical section. Asymmetery causes out-of-plane bending and torsion of the ring. Displacements are assumed as truncated double Fourier series plus simple terms in the axial coordinate to account for the closed and pressure vessel effect (a non-periodic effect). The interacting line loads between the stiffeners and the inside shell wall are Lagrange multipliers in the formulation, and they are also assumed as truncated Fourier series. Displacement continuity constraints between the stiffeners and shell along the contact lines are satisfied point-wise. Equilibrium is imposed by the principle of virtual work. A composite material crown panel from the fuselage of a large transport aircraft is the numerical example. The distributions of the interacting line loads, and the out-of-plane bending moment and torque in the ring, are strongly dependent on modeling the deformations due to transverse shear and cross-sectional warping of the ring in torsion. This paper contains the results from the semiannual report on research on 'Pressure Pillowing of an Orthogonally Stiffened Cylindrical Shell'. The results of the new work are illustrated in the included appendix.

  1. The evolution of composite materials in submarine structures.

    OpenAIRE

    Lemiere, Y

    1992-01-01

    Since the sixties, the amount of composite structures on submarines has increased continuously. The main reasons are their low apparent weight in water, good behaviour in a marine environment, excellent mechanical properties and acoustic transparency. The new applications required the use of prepreg. Relevant processes had to be adapted to the large dimensions and thickness of the structures. Future applications will be concerned with both structures and internal equipment. A lively debate is...

  2. Structural Arrangement Trade Study. Volume 1: Reusable Hydrogen Composite Tank System (RHCTS) and Graphite Composite Primary Structures (GCPS). Executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    This volume is the first of a three volume set that discusses the structural arrangement trade study plan that will identify the most suitable configuration for an SSTO winged vehicle capable of delivering 25,000 lbs to a 220 nm circular orbit at 51.6 deg inclination. The Reusable Hydrogen Composite Tank System (RHCTS), and Graphite Composite Primary Structures most suitable for intertank, wing and thrust structures are identified. This executive summary presents the trade study process, the selection process, requirements used, analysis performed and data generated. Conclusions and recommendations are also presented.

  3. Structural applications of Avimid K3B LDF thermoplastic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrella, Andrew P.

    Composite applications on advanced aircraft require lightweight, high performance, tough material systems which are capable of operating at high service temperatures. These composite systems must also be producible and cost effective. Avimid K3B composite materials and related process and part manufacturing technologies offers a unique solutions to these requirements. The objective of this paper is to describe selected Avimid K3B processing approaches such as Long Discontinuous Fiber thermoforming and fusion bonding. A review of the Avimid K3B F-16 Strake Door Joint Development Program is presented. This program successfully developed, built and structurally validated a flight demonstration component using these materials and manufacturing methods.

  4. Preparation of well-aligned carbon nanotubes/silicon nanowires core-sheath composite structure arrays in porous anodic aluminum oxide templates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李梦轲; 陆梅; 王成伟; 力虎林

    2002-01-01

    The well-aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) arrays with opened ends were prepared in ordered pores of anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) template by the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. After then, silicon nanowires (SiNWs) were deposited in the hollow cavities of CNTs. By using this method, CNTs/SiNWs core-sheath composite structure arrays were synthesized successfully. Growing structures and physical properties of the CNTs/SiNWs composite structure arrays were analyzed and researched by the scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction spectrum (XRD), respectively. The field emission (FE) behavior of the CNTs/SiNWs composite structure arrays was studied based on Fowler- Nordheim tunneling mechanism and current-voltage (I -V) curve. And the photoluminescence (PL) was also characterized. Significantly, the CNTs/SiNWs core-sheath composite structure nanowire fabricated by AAO template method is characteristic of a metal/semiconductor (M/S) behavior and can be utilized to synthesize nanoscale PN junction or Schottky diode device. This process also could be useful for the fabrication of SiNWs and other nanoscale core-sheath composite structure nanowires with chemically inert interfaces for nanoscale electronic and device applications where surface oxidation is undesirable. The diameters and lengths of nanoscale composite structure arrays can be dominated easily, and the experimental result shows that the curling and twisting structures are fewer than those prepared by other synthesized methods.

  5. Structure Change of the Insulating Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaclav Mentlik

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern power electric drives brought advantages in induction motor control. In the same time appeared problems with high frequency square waveform voltage (pulse stress produced by the voltage converters. Voltage converters produce repetitive pulses with high level of voltage rise fronts (slew rates. Rise fronts attained values of up to tens kilovolts per microsecond and voltage pulse repetition frequency up to some tens of kilohertz. This technology is an advantage for a drive control. Significant is the impact of these voltage waveforms on the motor insulations. Degradation of the main wall insulation can reduce the reliability of the electric motor and whole drive. In this paper is discussed one possible solution. The promising modification in the insulation material structure is presented in the paper.

  6. Topologically ordered magnesium-biopolymer hybrid composite structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosterbeek, Reece N; Seal, Christopher K; Staiger, Mark P; Hyland, Margaret M

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium and its alloys are intriguing as possible biodegradable biomaterials due to their unique combination of biodegradability and high specific mechanical properties. However, uncontrolled biodegradation of magnesium during implantation remains a major challenge in spite of the use of alloying and protective coatings. In this study, a hybrid composite structure of magnesium metal and a biopolymer was fabricated as an alternative approach to control the corrosion rate of magnesium. A multistep process that combines metal foam production and injection molding was developed to create a hybrid composite structure that is topologically ordered in all three dimensions. Preliminary investigations of the mechanical properties and corrosion behavior exhibited by the hybrid Mg-polymer composite structures suggest a new potential approach to the development of Mg-based biomedical devices.

  7. Well-formedness and typing rules for UML Composite Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Dragomir, Iulia

    2010-01-01

    Starting from version 2.0, UML introduced hierarchical composite structures, which are an expressive way of defining complex software architectures, but which have a very loosely defined semantics in the standard. In this paper we propose a set of consistency rules that disambiguate the meaning of UML composite structures. Our primary goal was to have an operational model of composite structures for the OMEGA UML profile, an executable profile dedicated to the formal specification and validation of real-time systems, developed in a past project to which we contributed. However, the rules and principles stated here are applicable to other hierarchical component models based on the same concepts, such as SysML. The presented ruleset is supported by an OCL formalization which is described in this report. This formalization was applied on different complex models for the evaluation and validation of the proposed principles.

  8. Use of lightweight composites for GAS payload structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Mark B.

    1987-01-01

    A key element in the design of a small self-contained payload is the supporting structure. This structure must support the experiments and other components while using as little space and weight as possible. Hence, the structure material must have characteristics of being both strong and light. Aluminum was used for the structure on the first Purdue University payload, but consumed a relatively large percentage of the total payload weight. The current payload has a larger power supply requirement than did the previous payload. To allow additional weight for the batteries, a composite material has been chosen for the structure which has the required strength while being considerably lighter than aluminum. A radial fin design has been chosen for ease of composite material lay-up and its overall strength of design. A composite plate will connect the free ends of the fins and add strength and reduce vibration. The physical characteristics of the composite material and the method of open lay-up construction is described. Also discussed are the testing, modifications, and problems encountered during assembly of the experiments to the structure.

  9. The Inorganic-organic Hybrid Junction with n-ZnO Nanorods/p-polyfluorene Structure Grown with Low-temperature Aqueous Chemical Growth Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Wei; BIAN Jiming; SUN Yinglan; CHENG Chuanhui; SUN Jingchang; LLANG Hongwei; LUO Yingmin; DU Guotong

    2012-01-01

    The inorganic-organic hybrid junction was synthesized on ITO glass substrate,which was consisted of an n-type ZnO nanorods (NRs) grown by low-temperature aqueous chemical growth method and a p-type polyfluorene (PF) organic film fabricated by spin-coating.The experimental results indicate that densely and uniformly distributed ZnO nanorods are successfully grown on the PF layer.The thickness of the PF layer plays a dominant role for the current-voltage (Ⅰ-Ⅴ) characteristic of the ZnO NRs/PF inorganic-organic hybrid junction device,and a p-n junction with obviously rectifying behavior is achieved with optimal PF layer thickness.The photoluminescence (PL) spectrum coveting the broad visible range was obtained from the n-ZnO nanorods/p-polyfluorene (PF) structure,which was originated from the combination of the PF-related blue emission and the ZnO-related deep level emission.

  10. Design and analysis of composite structures with applications to aerospace structures

    CERN Document Server

    Kassapoglou, Christos

    2010-01-01

    Design and Analysis of Composite Structures enables graduate students and engineers to generate meaningful and robust designs of complex composite structures. Combining analysis and design methods for structural components, the book begins with simple topics such as skins and stiffeners and progresses through to entire components of fuselages and wings. Starting with basic mathematical derivation followed by simplifications used in real-world design, Design and Analysis of Composite Structures presents the level of accuracy and range of applicability of each method. Examples taken from ac

  11. Boreal Forests of Kamchatka: Structure and Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus P. Eichhorn

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Central Kamchatka abounds in virgin old-growth boreal forest, formed primarily by Larix cajanderi and Betula platyphylla in varying proportions. A series of eight 0.25–0.30 ha plots captured the range of forests present in this region and their structure is described. Overall trends in both uplands and lowlands are for higher sites to be dominated by L. cajanderi with an increasing component of B. platyphylla with decreasing altitude. The tree line on wet sites is commonly formed by mono-dominant B. ermanii forests. Basal area ranged from 7.8–38.1 m2/ha and average tree height from 8.3–24.7 m, both being greater in lowland forests. Size distributions varied considerably among plots, though they were consistently more even for L. cajanderi than B. platyphylla. Upland sites also contained a dense subcanopy of Pinus pumila averaging 38% of ground area. Soil characteristics differed among plots, with upland soils being of lower pH and containing more carbon. Comparisons are drawn with boreal forests elsewhere and the main current threats assessed. These forests provide a potential baseline to contrast with more disturbed regions elsewhere in the world and therefore may be used as a target for restoration efforts or to assess the effects of climate change independent of human impacts.

  12. Composition-Structure-Property Relationships in Boroaluminosilicate Glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Qiuju; Potuzak, M.; Mauro, J.C.

    2012-01-01

    The complicated structural speciation in boroaluminosilicate glasses leads to a mixed network former effect yielding nonlinear variation in many macroscopic properties as a function of chemical composition. Here we study the composition–structure–property relationships in a series of sodium...... boroaluminosilicate glasses from peralkaline to peraluminous compositions by substituting Al2O3 for SiO2. Our results reveal a pronounced change in all the measured physical properties (density, elastic moduli, hardness, glass transition temperature, and liquid fragility) around [Al2O3]–[Na2O]=0. The structural...

  13. Composition-Structure-Property Relationships in Boroaluminosilicate Glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Qiuju; Potuzak, M.; Mauro, J.C.

    2012-01-01

    boroaluminosilicate glasses from peralkaline to peraluminous compositions by substituting Al2O3 for SiO2. Our results reveal a pronounced change in all the measured physical properties (density, elastic moduli, hardness, glass transition temperature, and liquid fragility) around [Al2O3]–[Na2O]=0. The structural......The complicated structural speciation in boroaluminosilicate glasses leads to a mixed network former effect yielding nonlinear variation in many macroscopic properties as a function of chemical composition. Here we study the composition–structure–property relationships in a series of sodium...

  14. Development of Textile Reinforced Composites for Aircraft Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexter, H. Benson

    1998-01-01

    NASA has been a leader in development of composite materials for aircraft applications during the past 25 years. In the early 1980's NASA and others conducted research to improve damage tolerance of composite structures through the use of toughened resins but these resins were not cost-effective. The aircraft industry wanted affordable, robust structures that could withstand the rigors of flight service with minimal damage. The cost and damage tolerance barriers of conventional laminated composites led NASA to focus on new concepts in composites which would incorporate the automated manufacturing methods of the textiles industry and which would incorporate through-the-thickness reinforcements. The NASA Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) Program provided the resources to extensively investigate the application of textile processes to next generation aircraft wing and fuselage structures. This paper discusses advanced textile material forms that have been developed, innovative machine concepts and key technology advancements required for future application of textile reinforced composites in commercial transport aircraft. Multiaxial warp knitting, triaxial braiding and through-the-thickness stitching are the three textile processes that have surfaced as the most promising for further development. Textile reinforced composite structural elements that have been developed in the NASA ACT Program are discussed. Included are braided fuselage frames and window-belt reinforcements, woven/stitched lower fuselage side panels, stitched multiaxial warp knit wing skins, and braided wing stiffeners. In addition, low-cost processing concepts such as resin transfer molding (RTM), resin film infusion (RFI), and vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) are discussed. Process modeling concepts to predict resin flow and cure in textile preforms are also discussed.

  15. COMPOSITION AND STRUCTURAL STUDIES OF STRONG GLOW DISCHARGE POLYMER COATINGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CZECHOWICZ, DG; CASTILLO, ER; NIKROO, A

    2002-04-01

    OAK A271 COMPOSITION AND STRUCTURAL STUDIES OF STRONG GLOW DISCHARGE POLYMER COATINGS. An investigation of the chemical composition and structure of strong glow discharge (GDP) polymer shells made for cryogenic experiments at OMEGA is described. The investigation was carried out using combustion and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis. The strongest coatings were observed to have the lowest hydrogen content or hydrogen/carbon H/C ratio, whereas the weakest coatings had the highest hydrogen content or H/C ratio. Chemical composition results from combustion were used to complement FTIR analysis to determine the relative hydrogen content of as-fabricated coatings. Good agreement was observed between composition results obtained from combustion and FTIR analysis. FTIR analysis of coating structures showed the strongest coatings to have less terminal methyl groups and a more double bond or olefinic structure. Strong GDP coatings that were aged in air react more with oxygen and moisture than standard GDP coatings. In addition to a more olefinic structure, there may also be more free-radial sites present in strong GDP coatings, which leads to greater oxygen uptake.

  16. Uniform circular array for structural health monitoring of composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepinski, Tadeusz; Engholm, Marcus

    2008-03-01

    Phased array with all-azimuth angle coverage would be extremely useful in structural health monitoring (SHM) of planar structures. One method to achieve the 360° coverage is to use uniform circular arrays (UCAs). In this paper we present the concept of UCA adapted for SHM applications. We start from a brief presentation of UCA beamformers based on the principle of phase mode excitation. UCA performance is illustrated by the results of beamformer simulations performed for the narrowband and wideband ultrasonic signals. Preliminary experimental results obtained with UCA used for the reception of ultrasonic signals propagating in an aluminum plate are also presented.

  17. Carbon Nanotube Enhanced Aerospace Composite Materials A New Generation of Multifunctional Hybrid Structural Composites

    CERN Document Server

    Kostopoulos, V

    2013-01-01

    The well documented increase in the use of high performance composites as structural materials in aerospace components is continuously raising the demands in terms of dynamic performance, structural integrity, reliable life monitoring systems and adaptive actuating abilities. Current technologies address the above issues separately; material property tailoring and custom design practices aim to the enhancement of dynamic and damage tolerance characteristics, whereas life monitoring and actuation is performed with embedded sensors that may be detrimental to the structural integrity of the component. This publication explores the unique properties of carbon nanotubes (CNT) as an additive in the matrix of Fibre Reinforced Plastics (FRP), for producing structural composites with improved mechanical performance as well as sensing/actuating capabilities. The successful combination of the CNT properties and existing sensing actuating technologies leads to the realization of a multifunctional FRP structure. The curre...

  18. Net-Shape Tailored Fabrics For Complex Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Gary L.

    1995-01-01

    Proposed novel looms used to make fabric preforms for complex structural elements, both stiffening elements and skin, from continuous fiber-reinforced composite material. Components of looms include custom reed and differential fabric takeup system. Structural parts made best explained by reference to curved "I" cross-section frame. Technology not limited to these fiber orientations or geometry; fiber angles, frame radius of curvature, frame height, and flange width changed along length of structure. Weaving technology equally applicable to structural skins, such as wing of fuselage skins.

  19. Application of the self-diagnosis composite into concrete structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Hideaki; Shin, Soon-Gi; Okuhara, Yoshiki; Nomura, Hiroshi; Yanagida, Hiroaki

    2001-04-01

    The function and performance of the self-diagnosis composites embedded in mortar/concrete blocks and concrete piles were investigated by bending tests and electrical resistance measurements. Carbon powder (CP) and carbon fiber (CF) were introduced in glass fiber reinforced plastics composites to obtain electrical conductivity. The CP composite has commonly good performances in various bending tests of block and pile specimens, comparing to the CF composite. The electrical resistance of the CP composite increases in a small strain to response remarkably micro-crack formation at about 200 (mu) strain and to detect well to smaller deformations before the crack formation. The CP composite possesses a continuous resistance change up to a large strain level near the final fracture of concrete structures reinforced by steel bars. The cyclic bending tests showed that the micro crack closed at unloading state was able to be evaluated from the measurement of residual resistance. It has been concluded that the self- diagnosis composite is fairly useful for the measurement of damage and fracture in concrete blocks and piles.

  20. Automated web service composition supporting conditional branch structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pengwei; Ding, Zhijun; Jiang, Changjun; Zhou, Mengchu

    2014-01-01

    The creation of value-added services by automatic composition of existing ones is gaining a significant momentum as the potential silver bullet in service-oriented architecture. However, service composition faces two aspects of difficulties. First, users' needs present such characteristics as diversity, uncertainty and personalisation; second, the existing services run in a real-world environment that is highly complex and dynamically changing. These difficulties may cause the emergence of nondeterministic choices in the process of service composition, which has gone beyond what the existing automated service composition techniques can handle. According to most of the existing methods, the process model of composite service includes sequence constructs only. This article presents a method to introduce conditional branch structures into the process model of composite service when needed, in order to satisfy users' diverse and personalised needs and adapt to the dynamic changes of real-world environment. UML activity diagrams are used to represent dependencies in composite service. Two types of user preferences are considered in this article, which have been ignored by the previous work and a simple programming language style expression is adopted to describe them. Two different algorithms are presented to deal with different situations. A real-life case is provided to illustrate the proposed concepts and methods.

  1. Structure and content of competitive group compositions in sports aerobics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetiana Moshenska

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to make the analysis of modern competitive group compositions in sports aerobics. Material & Methods: pedagogical, sociological and methods of mathematical statistics were used. 10 coaches took part in the experimental part; analysis of protocols and video records of competitions of the aged category of children of 9–11 years old, who perform in the nomination of triplets and quintuples (group exercises, is carried out. Results: the content of competitive compositions and the allocated indicators are studied which defined it. Conclusions: the basic structural elements, which characterize competitive compositions, are allocated. Their components, quantity and time of performance are defined. It is established that variety of aerobic contents, spaces, and means of registration, musical compliance and logicality of creation of the whole competitive composition at high quality of performance characterizes teams – winners.

  2. Studies on structural properties of clay magnesium ferrite nano composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, Manpreet, E-mail: manpreetchem@pau.edu; Singh, Mandeep [Department of Chemistry, Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana-141004 (India); Jeet, Kiran, E-mail: kiranjeet@pau.edu; Kaur, Rajdeep [Electron Microscopy and Nanoscience Laboratory, Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana-141004 (India)

    2015-08-28

    Magnesium ferrite-bentonite clay composite was prepared by sol-gel combustion method employing citric acid as complexing agent and fuel. The effect of clay on the structural properties was studied with X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) Spectroscopy, Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), SEM- Energy dispersive Spectroscope (EDS) and BET surface area analyzer. Decrease in particle size and density was observed on addition of bentonite clay. The BET surface area of nano composite containing just 5 percent clay was 74.86 m{sup 2}/g. Whereas porosity increased from 40.5 per cent for the pure magnesium ferrite to 81.0 percent in the composite showing that nano-composite has potential application as an adsorbent.

  3. Structural Analysis of Novel Lignin-derived Carbon Composite Anodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNutt, Nicholas W [ORNL; Rios, Orlando [ORNL; Feygenson, Mikhail [ORNL; Proffen, Thomas E [ORNL; Keffer, David J [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    The development of novel lignin-based carbon composite anodes consisting of nanocrystalline and amorphous domains motivates the understanding of a relationship of the structural properties characterizing these materials, such as crystallite size, intracrystallite dspacing, crystalline volume fraction and composite density, with their pair distribution functions (PDF), obtained from both molecular dynamics simulation and neutron scattering. A model for these composite materials is developed as a function of experimentally measurable parameters and realized in fifteen composite systems, three of which directly match all parameters of their experimental counterparts. The accurate reproduction of the experimental PDFs using the model systems validates the model. The decomposition of the simulated PDFs provides an understanding of each feature in the PDF and allows for the development of a mapping between the defining characteristics of the PDF and the material properties of interest.

  4. Structure-Composition-Property Relationships in Polymeric Amorphous Calcium Phosphate-Based Dental Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drago Skrtic

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Our studies of amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP-based materials over the last decade have yielded bioactive polymeric composites capable of protecting teeth from demineralization or even regenerating lost tooth mineral. The anti-cariogenic/remineralizing potential of these ACP composites originates from their propensity, when exposed to the oral environment, to release in a sustained manner sufficient levels of mineral-forming calcium and phosphate ions to promote formation of stable apatitic tooth mineral. However, the less than optimal ACP filler/resin matrix cohesion, excessive polymerization shrinkage and water sorption of these experimental materials can adversely affect their physicochemical and mechanical properties, and, ultimately, limit their lifespan. This study demonstrates the effects of chemical structure and composition of the methacrylate monomers used to form the matrix phase of composites on degree of vinyl conversion (DVC and water sorption of both copolymers and composites and the release of mineral ions from the composites. Modification of ACP surface via introducing cations and/or polymers ab initio during filler synthesis failed to yield mechanically improved composites. However, moderate improvement in composite’s mechanical stability without compromising its remineralization potential was achieved by silanization and/or milling of ACP filler. Using ethoxylated bisphenol A dimethacrylate or urethane dimethacrylate as base monomers and adding moderate amounts of hydrophilic 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate or its isomer ethyl-α-hydroxymethacrylate appears to be a promising route to maximize the remineralizing ability of the filler while maintaining high DVC. Exploration of the structure/composition/property relationships of ACP fillers and polymer matrices is complex but essential for achieving a better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms that govern dissolution/re-precipitation of bioactive ACP fillers, and

  5. Method for producing edge geometry superconducting tunnel junctions utilizing an NbN/MgO/NbN thin film structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Brian D. (Inventor); Leduc, Henry G. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A method for fabricating an edge geometry superconducting tunnel junction device is discussed. The device is comprised of two niobium nitride superconducting electrodes and a magnesium oxide tunnel barrier sandwiched between the two electrodes. The NbN electrodes are preferably sputter-deposited, with the first NbN electrode deposited on an insulating substrate maintained at about 250 C to 500 C for improved quality of the electrode.

  6. Mechanistical studies on gap junctions and their role in tumour promotion : Structure-activity relationships of polychlorinated biphelyls

    OpenAIRE

    Bager, Yvonne

    1997-01-01

    Chemically induced carcinogenesis is a multi-stage process that can be divided into at least three major stages, initiation, promotion and progression. The promotion stage involves clonal expansion of genetically altered cells (i.e. initiated cells). The final stage, progression, includes a karyotypic instability of cells that may result in malignancy. Several lines of evidence support the theory that inhibition of gap junctional intercellular communication plays a sig...

  7. Global structure of a three-way junction in a phi29 packaging RNA dimer determined using site-directed spin labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaojun; Tung, Chang-Shung; Sowa, Glenna Z; Hatmal, Ma'mon M; Haworth, Ian S; Qin, Peter Z

    2012-02-08

    The condensation of bacteriophage phi29 genomic DNA into its preformed procapsid requires the DNA packaging motor, which is the strongest known biological motor. The packaging motor is an intricate ring-shaped protein/RNA complex, and its function requires an RNA component called packaging RNA (pRNA). Current structural information on pRNA is limited, which hinders studies of motor function. Here, we used site-directed spin labeling to map the conformation of a pRNA three-way junction that bridges binding sites for the motor ATPase and the procapsid. The studies were carried out on a pRNA dimer, which is the simplest ring-shaped pRNA complex and serves as a functional intermediate during motor assembly. Using a nucleotide-independent labeling scheme, stable nitroxide radicals were attached to eight specific pRNA sites without perturbing RNA folding and dimer formation, and a total of 17 internitroxide distances spanning the three-way junction were measured using Double Electron-Electron Resonance spectroscopy. The measured distances, together with steric chemical constraints, were used to select 3662 viable three-way junction models from a pool of 65 billion. The results reveal a similar conformation among the viable models, with two of the helices (H(T) and H(L)) adopting an acute bend. This is in contrast to a recently reported pRNA tetramer crystal structure, in which H(T) and H(L) stack onto each other linearly. The studies establish a new method for mapping global structures of complex RNA molecules, and provide information on pRNA conformation that aids investigations of phi29 packaging motor and developments of pRNA-based nanomedicine and nanomaterial.

  8. Global Structure of a Three-Way Junction in a Phi29 Packaging RNA Dimer Determined Using Site-Directed Spin Labeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiaojun; Tung, Chang-Shung; Sowa, Glenna; Hatmal, Ma' mon M.; Haworth, Ian S.; Qin, Peter Z.

    2012-02-08

    The condensation of bacteriophage phi29 genomic DNA into its preformed procapsid requires the DNA packaging motor, which is the strongest known biological motor. The packaging motor is an intricate ring-shaped protein/RNA complex, and its function requires an RNA component called packaging RNA (pRNA). Current structural information on pRNA is limited, which hinders studies of motor function. Here, we used site-directed spin labeling to map the conformation of a pRNA three-way junction that bridges binding sites for the motor ATPase and the procapsid. The studies were carried out on a pRNA dimer, which is the simplest ring-shaped pRNA complex and serves as a functional intermediate during motor assembly. Using a nucleotide-independent labeling scheme, stable nitroxide radicals were attached to eight specific pRNA sites without perturbing RNA folding and dimer formation, and a total of 17 internitroxide distances spanning the three-way junction were measured using Double Electron-Electron Resonance spectroscopy. The measured distances, together with steric chemical constraints, were used to select 3662 viable three-way junction models from a pool of 65 billion. The results reveal a similar conformation among the viable models, with two of the helices (HT and HL) adopting an acute bend. This is in contrast to a recently reported pRNA tetramer crystal structure, in which HT and HL stack onto each other linearly. The studies establish a new method for mapping global structures of complex RNA molecules, and provide information on pRNA conformation that aids investigations of phi29 packaging motor and developments of pRNA-based nanomedicine and nanomaterial.

  9. A critical review of nanotechnologies for composite aerospace structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostopoulos, Vassilis; Masouras, Athanasios; Baltopoulos, Athanasios; Vavouliotis, Antonios; Sotiriadis, George; Pambaguian, Laurent

    2017-03-01

    The past decade extensive efforts have been invested in understanding the nano-scale and revealing the capabilities offered by nanotechnology products to structural materials. Integration of nano-particles into fiber composites concludes to multi-scale reinforced composites and has opened a new wide range of multi-functional materials in industry. In this direction, a variety of carbon based nano-fillers has been proposed and employed, individually or in combination in hybrid forms, to approach the desired performance. Nevertheless, a major issue faced lately more seriously due to the interest of industry is on how to incorporate these nano-species into the final composite structure through existing manufacturing processes and infrastructure. This interest originates from several industrial applications needs that request the development of new multi-functional materials which combine enhanced mechanical, electrical and thermal properties. In this work, an attempt is performed to review the most representative processes and related performances reported in literature and the experience obtained on nano-enabling technologies of fiber composite materials. This review focuses on the two main composite manufacturing technologies used by the aerospace industry; Prepreg/Autoclave and Resin Transfer technologies. It addresses several approaches for nano-enabling of composites for these two routes and reports latest achieved results focusing on performance of nano-enabled fiber reinforced composites extracted from literature. Finally, this review work identifies the gap between available nano-technology integration routes and the established industrial composite manufacturing techniques and the challenges to increase the Technology Readiness Level to reach the demands for aerospace industry applications.

  10. Structural characterization and lipid composition of acquired cholesteatoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloksgaard, Maria; Svane-Knudsen, Viggo; Sørensen, Jens A

    2012-01-01

    along a depth of more than 200 μm and resembles the stratum corneum of hyperorthokeratotic skin. Lipid compositional analyses of the cholesteatoma show the presence of all major lipid classes found in normal skin stratum corneum (ceramides, long chain fatty acids, and cholesterol). Consistent with this......HYPOTHESIS: The goal of this work is to characterize the morphology and lipid composition of acquired cholesteatoma. We hypothesize that constitutive lipid membranes are present in the cholesteatoma and resemble those found in human skin stratum corneum. METHODS: We performed a comparative...... noninvasive structural and lipid compositional study of acquired cholesteatoma and control human skin using multiphoton excitation fluorescence microscopy-related techniques and high-performance thin-layer chromatography. RESULTS: The structural arrangement of the cholesteatoma is morphologically invariant...

  11. Adhesive bonding of composite aircraft structures: Challenges and recent developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantelakis, Sp.; Tserpes, K. I.

    2014-01-01

    In this review paper, the challenges and some recent developments of adhesive bonding technology in composite aircraft structures are discussed. The durability of bonded joints is defined and presented for parameters that may influence bonding quality. Presented is also, a numerical design approach for composite joining profiles used to realize adhesive bonding. It is shown that environmental ageing and pre-bond contamination of bonding surfaces may degrade significantly fracture toughness of bonded joints. Moreover, it is obvious that additional research is needed in order to design joining profiles that will enable load transfer through shearing of the bondline. These findings, together with the limited capabilities of existing non-destructive testing techniques, can partially explain the confined use of adhesive bonding in primary composite aircraft structural parts.

  12. Composite Structures and Materials Research at NASA Langley Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starnes, James H., Jr.; Dexter, H. Benson; Johnston, Norman J.; Ambur, Damodar R.; Cano, roberto J.

    2003-01-01

    A summary of recent composite structures and materials research at NASA Langley Research Center is presented. Fabrication research to develop low-cost automated robotic fabrication procedures for thermosetting and thermoplastic composite materials, and low-cost liquid molding processes for preformed textile materials is described. Robotic fabrication procedures discussed include ply-by-ply, cure-on-the-fly heated placement head and out-of-autoclave electron-beam cure methods for tow and tape thermosetting and thermoplastic materials. Liquid molding fabrication processes described include Resin Film Infusion (RFI), Resin Transfer Molding (RTM) and Vacuum-Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM). Results for a full-scale composite wing box are summarized to identify the performance of materials and structures fabricated with these low-cost fabrication methods.

  13. Mechanical properties of Composite Engineering Structures by Multivolume Micromechanical Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Novotný

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Engineering structures often consist of elements having the character of a periodically repeated composite structure. A multivolume micromechanical model based on a representative cell division into r1 × r2 × r3 subcells with different elastic material properties has been used in this paper to derive macromechanical characteristics of the composite construction response to applied load and temperature changes. The multivolume method is based on ensuring the equilibrium of the considered volume on an average basis. In the same (average way, the continuity conditions of displacements and tractions at the interfaces between subcells and between neighboring representative elements are imposed, resulting in a homogenization procedure that eliminates the discrete nature of the composite model. The details of the method are shown for the case of a concrete block pavement. A parametric study is presented illustrating the influence of joint thickness, joint filling material properties and the quality of bonding between block and filler elements.

  14. Characterization of the structure and composition of gecko adhesive setae

    OpenAIRE

    Rizzo, N. W.; Gardner, K.H.; Walls, D.J; Keiper-Hrynko, N.M; Ganzke, T.S; Hallahan, D.L

    2005-01-01

    The ability of certain reptiles to adhere to vertical (and hang from horizontal) surfaces has been attributed to the presence of specialized adhesive setae on their feet. Structural and compositional studies of such adhesive setae will contribute significantly towards the design of biomimetic fibrillar adhesive materials. The results of electron microscopy analyses of the structure of such setae are presented, indicating their formation from aggregates of proteinaceous fibrils held together b...

  15. Better Finite-Element Analysis of Composite Shell Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Gregory

    2007-01-01

    A computer program implements a finite-element-based method of predicting the deformations of thin aerospace structures made of isotropic materials or anisotropic fiber-reinforced composite materials. The technique and corresponding software are applicable to thin shell structures in general and are particularly useful for analysis of thin beamlike members having open cross-sections (e.g. I-beams and C-channels) in which significant warping can occur.

  16. Extended propagation model for interfacial crack in composite material structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫相桥; 冯希金

    2002-01-01

    An interfacial crack is a common damage in a composite material structure . An extended propaga-tion model has been established for an interfacial crack to study the dependence of crack growth on the relativesizes of energy release rates at left and right crack tips and the properties of interfacial material characterize thegrowth of interfacial crack better.

  17. Design of a robust SHM system for composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, Shawn; Liu, Ching-Chao; Chang, Fu-Kuo

    2007-04-01

    Composites are becoming increasingly popular materials used in a wide range of applications on large-scale structures such as windmill blades, rocket motor cases, and aircraft fuselage and wings. For these large structures, using composites greatly enhances the operation and performance of the application, but also introduces extraordinary inspection challenges that push the limits of traditional NDE in terms of time and cost. Recent advances in Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) technologies offer a promising solution to these inspection challenges. But efficient design methodologies and implementation procedures are needed to ensure the reliability and robustness of SHM technologies for use in real-world applications. This paper introduces the essential elements of the design and implementation process by way of example. State-of-the-art techniques to optimize sensor placement, perform self-diagnostics, compensate for environmental conditions, and generate probability of detection (POD) curves for any application are discussed. The techniques are presented in relation to Acellent's recently developed SmartComposite System that is used to monitor the integrity of large composite structures. The system builds on the active sensor network technology of Acellent that is analogous to a built-in acousto-ultrasonic NDE system. Key features of the system include new miniaturized lightweight hardware, self-diagnostics and adaptive algorithm to automatically compensate for damaged sensors, reliable damage detection under different environmental conditions, and generation of POD curves. This paper will provide an overview of the system and demonstrate its key features.

  18. Materials research at Stanford University. [composite materials, crystal structure, acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    Research activity related to the science of materials is described. The following areas are included: elastic and thermal properties of composite materials, acoustic waves and devices, amorphous materials, crystal structure, synthesis of metal-metal bonds, interactions of solids with solutions, electrochemistry, fatigue damage, superconductivity and molecular physics and phase transition kinetics.

  19. The influence of compositional and structural diversity on forest productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    James N. Long; John D. Shaw

    2010-01-01

    Data from ~1500 ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa C. Lawson) stands in the western United States were used to examine the potential influence of compositional and structural diversity on forest productivity. Relative density, height and site quality were combined in a conceptually sound expression of the relationship between growth and growing stock for ponderosa pine-...

  20. Fluid-Structure Interaction in a Fluid-Filled Composite Structure Subjected to Low Velocity Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    this study of impact force, deflection, and strain were measured in a carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite cylinder subjected to low...Sanchez, J. Lopez-Puente, and D. Varas, “On the influence of filling level in CFRP aircraft fuel tank subjected to high velocity impacts,” Composite ...and back sides. The baffle provided the greatest strain reduction at the high fill levels. 14. SUBJECT TERMS glass fiber composite , fluid structure

  1. Innovative Structural Materials and Sections with Strain Hardening Cementitious Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Vikram

    The motivation of this work is based on development of new construction products with strain hardening cementitious composites (SHCC) geared towards sustainable residential applications. The proposed research has three main objectives: automation of existing manufacturing systems for SHCC laminates; multi-level characterization of mechanical properties of fiber, matrix, interface and composites phases using servo-hydraulic and digital image correlation techniques. Structural behavior of these systems were predicted using ductility based design procedures using classical laminate theory and structural mechanics. SHCC sections are made up of thin sections of matrix with Portland cement based binder and fine aggregates impregnating continuous one-dimensional fibers in individual or bundle form or two/three dimensional woven, bonded or knitted textiles. Traditional fiber reinforced concrete (FRC) use random dispersed chopped fibers in the matrix at a low volume fractions, typically 1-2% to avoid to avoid fiber agglomeration and balling. In conventional FRC, fracture localization occurs immediately after the first crack, resulting in only minor improvement in toughness and tensile strength. However in SHCC systems, distribution of cracking throughout the specimen is facilitated by the fiber bridging mechanism. Influence of material properties of yarn, composition, geometry and weave patterns of textile in the behavior of laminated SHCC skin composites were investigated. Contribution of the cementitious matrix in the early age and long-term performance of laminated composites was studied with supplementary cementitious materials such as fly ash, silica fume, and wollastonite. A closed form model with classical laminate theory and ply discount method, coupled with a damage evolution model was utilized to simulate the non-linear tensile response of these composite materials. A constitutive material model developed earlier in the group was utilized to characterize and

  2. A Study of Flexible Composites for Expandable Space Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotti, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Payload volume for launch vehicles is a critical constraint that impacts spacecraft design. Deployment mechanisms, such as those used for solar arrays and antennas, are approaches that have successfully accommodated this constraint, however, providing pressurized volumes that can be packaged compactly at launch and expanded in space is still a challenge. One approach that has been under development for many years is to utilize softgoods - woven fabric for straps, cloth, and with appropriate coatings, bladders - to provide this expandable pressure vessel capability. The mechanics of woven structure is complicated by a response that is nonlinear and often nonrepeatable due to the discrete nature of the woven fiber architecture. This complexity reduces engineering confidence to reliably design and certify these structures, which increases costs due to increased requirements for system testing. The present study explores flexible composite materials systems as an alternative to the heritage softgoods approach. Materials were obtained from vendors who utilize flexible composites for non-aerospace products to determine some initial physical and mechanical properties of the materials. Uniaxial mechanical testing was performed to obtain the stress-strain response of the flexible composites and the failure behavior. A failure criterion was developed from the data, and a space habitat application was used to provide an estimate of the relative performance of flexible composites compared to the heritage softgoods approach. Initial results are promising with a 25% mass savings estimated for the flexible composite solution.

  3. Natural Kenaf Fiber Reinforced Composites as Engineered Structural Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittenber, David B.

    The objective of this work was to provide a comprehensive evaluation of natural fiber reinforced polymer (NFRP)'s ability to act as a structural material. As a chemical treatment, aligned kenaf fibers were treated with sodium hydroxide (alkalization) in different concentrations and durations and then manufactured into kenaf fiber / vinyl ester composite plates. Single fiber tensile properties and composite flexural properties, both in dry and saturated environments, were assessed. Based on ASTM standard testing, a comparison of flexural, tensile, compressive, and shear mechanical properties was also made between an untreated kenaf fiber reinforced composite, a chemically treated kenaf fiber reinforced composite, a glass fiber reinforced composite, and oriented strand board (OSB). The mechanical properties were evaluated for dry samples, samples immersed in water for 50 hours, and samples immersed in water until saturation (~2700 hours). Since NFRPs are more vulnerable to environmental effects than synthetic fiber composites, a series of weathering and environmental tests were conducted on the kenaf fiber composites. The environmental conditions studied include real-time outdoor weathering, elevated temperatures, immersion in different pH solutions, and UV exposure. In all of these tests, degradation was found to be more pronounced in the NFRPs than in the glass FRPs; however, in nearly every case the degradation was less than 50% of the flexural strength or stiffness. Using a method of overlapping and meshing discontinuous fiber ends, large mats of fiber bundles were manufactured into composite facesheets for structural insulated panels (SIPs). The polyisocyanurate foam cores proved to be poorly matched to the strength and stiffness of the NFRP facesheets, leading to premature core shear or delamination failures in both flexure and compressive testing. The NFRPs were found to match well with the theoretical stiffness prediction methods of classical lamination

  4. Hybrid Composites for LH2 Fuel Tank Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimsley, Brian W.; Cano, Roberto J.; Johnston, Norman J.; Loos, Alfred C.; McMahon, William M.

    2001-01-01

    The application of lightweight carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) as structure for cryogenic fuel tanks is critical to the success of the next generation of Reusable Launch Vehicles (RLV). The recent failure of the X-33 composite fuel tank occurred in part due to microcracking of the polymer matrix, which allowed cryogen to permeate through the inner skin to the honeycomb core. As part of an approach to solve these problems, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) and Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) are working to develop and investigate polymer films that will act as a barrier to the permeation of LH2 through the composite laminate. In this study two commercially available films and eleven novel LaRC films were tested in an existing cryogenics laboratory at MSFC to determine the permeance of argon at room temperature. Several of these films were introduced as a layer in the composite to form an interleaved, or hybrid, composite to determine the effects on permeability. In addition, the effects of the interleaved layer thickness, number, and location on the mechanical properties of the composite laminate were investigated. In this initial screening process, several of the films were found to exhibit lower permeability to argon than the composite panels tested.

  5. Composites for Cryotank Structures. Present and Future: MSFC Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Timothy P.

    1999-01-01

    The development of reusable launch vehicle systems for a single stage to orbit vehicle requires vehicles at liftoff with 85% to 94% of its mass consisting exclusively of propellants. These dry mass requirements drive designs to utilize stronger, lighter weight materials for structures. This technology development focus has allowed the introduction of composite materials in lieu of conventional metallic materials due to their higher specific strengths. Composite materials were successfully used for the liquid hydrogen tanks for the DC-XA, and a multi-lobed liquid hydrogen tank will be employed for the X-33. Another potential non-traditional application for composite materials is for liquid oxygen tanks, which is still being investigated. Traditionally, organic materials have been avoided wherever possible, due the potential fire hazard and the fact that composites fail conventional oxygen compatibility requirements. However, the potential weight savings warrant the investigation of the use of polymeric composite materials in oxygen environments. Since composites fail the conventional, time-proven test methods because they are considered flammable by test, we have embarked on an innovative approach to oxygen compatibility testing and evaluation focused on the use environments and attempts to eliminate or "design away" all potential ignition sources. Oxygen compatibility is defined as the ability of a material to coexist with oxygen and potential ignition sources with an acceptable, manageable degree of risk.

  6. Structure of metal matrix composites with an addition of tuff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Łach

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The article presents preliminary results of tests of metal matrix composites structure which was modified by an addition of powderedvolcanic tuff. Distribution and shape of ceramic particles as well as the quality of the bonding along the tuff- metal matrix interface werestudied. Depth of tuff element diffusion in the matrix as well as diffusion in tuff particles were checked. Micro-hardness and porosity of the composites were also tested. The tuff from Filipowice near the town of Krzeszowice was used for the tests. Powder metallurgy wasapplied to obtain the composites and the matrix materials were copper and 316L steel powders. The tuff was introduced in 2, 5 and 10 %by weight. To remove water from the channels of aluminosilicates, the tuff was baked at 850 oC for 4 hours and then cooled together withthe oven. The tests revealed good quality of the bonding of the tuff particles and the matrix and their even distribution. The addition of tuff improved the hardness of the composites and reduced their porosity which has great significance because of possible applications of this kind of materials in general and copper composites in particular. This gives grounds for further studies on volcanic tuff use in metal composites

  7. Structural efficiency study of composite wing rib structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Gary D.; Gurdal, Zafer; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    A series of short stiffened panel designs which may be applied to a preliminary design assessment of an aircraft wing rib is presented. The computer program PASCO is used as the primary design and analysis tool to assess the structural efficiency and geometry of a tailored corrugated panel, a corrugated panel with a continuous laminate, a hat stiffened panel, a blade stiffened panel, and an unstiffened flat plate. To correct some of the shortcomings in the PASCO analysis when shear is present, a two step iterative process using the computer program VICON is used. The loadings considered include combinations of axial compression, shear, and lateral pressure. The loading ranges considered are broad enough such that the designs presented may be applied to other stiffened panel applications. An assessment is made of laminate variations, increased spacing, and nonoptimum geometric variations, including a beaded panel, on the design of the panels.

  8. Local structure, composition, and crystallization mechanism of a model two-phase "composite nanoglass"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Soma; Kelly, S. D.; Shibata, Tomohiro; Balasubramanian, M.; Srinivasan, S. G.; Du, Jincheng; Banerjee, Rajarshi; Ayyub, Pushan

    2016-02-01

    We report a detailed study of the local composition and structure of a model, bi-phasic nanoglass with nominal stoichiometry Cu55Nb45. Three dimensional atom probe data suggest a nanoscale-phase-separated glassy structure having well defined Cu-rich and Nb-rich regions with a characteristic length scale of ≈3 nm. However, extended x-ray absorption fine structure analysis indicates subtle differences in the local environments of Cu and Nb. While the Cu atoms displayed a strong tendency to cluster and negligible structural order beyond the first coordination shell, the Nb atoms had a larger fraction of unlike neighbors (higher chemical order) and a distinctly better-ordered structural environment (higher topological order). This provides the first experimental indication that metallic glass formation may occur due to frustration arising from the competition between chemical ordering and clustering. These observations are complemented by classical as well as ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. Our study indicates that these nanoscale phase-separated glasses are quite distinct from the single phase nanoglasses (studied by Gleiter and others) in the following three respects: (i) they contain at least two structurally and compositionally distinct, nanodispersed, glassy phases, (ii) these phases are separated by comparatively sharp inter-phase boundaries, and (iii) thermally induced crystallization occurs via a complex, multi-step mechanism. Such materials, therefore, appear to constitute a new class of disordered systems that may be called a composite nanoglass.

  9. Local structure, composition, and crystallization mechanism of a model two-phase “composite nanoglass”

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chattopadhyay, Soma; Shibata, Tomohiro [CSRRI-IIT, MRCAT, Sector 10, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Kelly, S. D. [EXAFS Analysis, Bolingbrook, Illinois 60440 (United States); Balasubramanian, M. [Sector 20 XOR, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Srinivasan, S. G.; Du, Jincheng; Banerjee, Rajarshi [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas 76203-5017 (United States); Ayyub, Pushan, E-mail: pushan@tifr.res.in [Department of Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India)

    2016-02-14

    We report a detailed study of the local composition and structure of a model, bi-phasic nanoglass with nominal stoichiometry Cu{sub 55}Nb{sub 45}. Three dimensional atom probe data suggest a nanoscale-phase-separated glassy structure having well defined Cu-rich and Nb-rich regions with a characteristic length scale of ≈3 nm. However, extended x-ray absorption fine structure analysis indicates subtle differences in the local environments of Cu and Nb. While the Cu atoms displayed a strong tendency to cluster and negligible structural order beyond the first coordination shell, the Nb atoms had a larger fraction of unlike neighbors (higher chemical order) and a distinctly better-ordered structural environment (higher topological order). This provides the first experimental indication that metallic glass formation may occur due to frustration arising from the competition between chemical ordering and clustering. These observations are complemented by classical as well as ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. Our study indicates that these nanoscale phase-separated glasses are quite distinct from the single phase nanoglasses (studied by Gleiter and others) in the following three respects: (i) they contain at least two structurally and compositionally distinct, nanodispersed, glassy phases, (ii) these phases are separated by comparatively sharp inter-phase boundaries, and (iii) thermally induced crystallization occurs via a complex, multi-step mechanism. Such materials, therefore, appear to constitute a new class of disordered systems that may be called a composite nanoglass.

  10. Analysis of gallstone composition and structure in Jharkhand region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Rajani; Soy, Snehi; Kumar, Chandan; Sachan, Shashwati Ghosh; Sharma, Shubha Rani

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze gallstones structurally and chemically as this may help to direct the measures for its treatment. On the basis of morphology, 459 gallstones were categorized into pigmented, cholesterol, and mixed gallstones and analyzed for their chemical structure and composition. Elementary analysis was done with the help of inductively coupled plasma, optical emission spectrophotometry. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used for compound analysis. The effects of thermal stability were analyzed by thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). Statistical analysis was done to correlate gallstone composition with their shape and number in gallbladder. Pigmented gallstones were predominant and generally occurred in multiple forms, cholesterol as solitaire and black pigmented as slug (χ (2) = 3.56; p gallstones while pigmented gallstones were more compact in structure. Both types of structure were seen in mixed stones while black pigmented stones were amorphous in nature. This difference in structures might be due to difference in chemical compositions. Cholesterol and mixed stones contained basically cholesterol, brown pigmented constituted bilirubin as a major component, and black stones differed from brown pigmented stones by the presence of Ca palmitate. Bilirubin and palmitate were thermally more stable than cholesterol; hence pigmented gallstones were thermally more stable than cholesterol gallstones, as seen in TGA study. Pigmented gallstones were most common in this study of gallstones from the Jharkhand region.

  11. Vibration based structural health monitoring of composite skin-stiffener structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ooijevaar, T.H.

    2014-01-01

    Composite materials combine a high strength and stiffness with a relatively low density. These materials can, however, exhibit complex types of damage, like transverse cracks and delaminations. These damage scenarios can severely influence the structural performance of a component. Periodic

  12. Applications of virtual manufacturing in composite airframe structure assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D.E.; Hahn, H.T. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

    1995-12-31

    In order to produce composite airframe structures cost-effectively and time-efficiently, quantitative and qualitative tools for composite virtual manufacturing (CVM) are being applied to analyze assembly problems based on a concurrent engineering approach. This approach to product development stresses the importance of bringing together integrated product and process development teams (IPPDT) to rapidly design, manufacture and ship cost-competitive transportation systems. Virtual manufacturing tools are being used to employ an integrated set of process models and product data information to simulate the processes required to fabricate composite aircraft structures. By coupling both product and process development, different members of the IPPDT can be provided with information important to assessing potential assembly problems prior to actual product manufacture. Quantitative measures of component deformations and contact conditions are computed to analyze the forces and alignments required for airframe assembly. By minimizing problems prior to actual physical assembly and designing composite aircraft structures that can be easily manufactured and assembled, different aircraft design variations are evaluated and produced to meet specific cost and time constraints.

  13. Vanadium-spinel composites for structural applications in hostile environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, R.B.; Wetteland, C.J.; Shen, T.D. [and others

    1997-05-01

    Vanadium-spinel composites are promising materials for structural applications in radiation environments. Powders of two Vanadium-spinel composites, 20/80 vol. %, were prepared by (a) ball milling mixtures of vanadium and spinel powders (alloy VSLP) and (b) through a self-sustained reaction synthesis of vanadium, MgO, and Al powders (alloy VSHP). These powders were consolidated by hot isostatic pressing. Most of the V and spinel domains in the the compacts are sub-micron in size. The compacts have K{sub c} toughness values of 3.9, about three times the toughness obtained by hipping mixtures of commercial powders.

  14. Laminated Ti-Al composites: Processing, structure and strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Yan; Fan, Guohua; Yu, Tianbo

    2016-01-01

    . The mechanical properties of the composites with different volume fractions of Al from 10% to 67% show a good combination of strength and ductility. A constraint strain in the hot-rolled laminated structure between the hard and soft phases introduces an elastic-plastic deformation stage, which becomes more...... pronounced as the volume fraction of Al decreases. Moreover, the thin intermetallic interface layer may also contribute to the strength of the composites, and this effect increases with increasing volume fraction of the interface layer....

  15. Composite modelling of interactions between beaches and structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerritsen, Herman; Sutherland, James; Deigaard, Rolf

    2011-01-01

    An overview of Composite Modelling (CM) is presented, as elaborated in the EU/HYDRALAB joint research project Composite Modelling of the Interactions Between Beaches and Structures. An introduction and a review of the main literature on CM in the hydraulic community are given. In Section 3...... in the various case studies. The related subject of Good Modelling Practice is summarized in Section 5. Then guidelines are given on how to decide if CM may be beneficial, and how to set up a CM experiment. It is concluded that CM in the hydraulic community is still in its infancy but involves challenging...... research with significant potential....

  16. Optimization of SMA layers in composite structures to enhance damping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghdoust, P.; Cinquemani, S.; Lecis, N.; Bassani, P.

    2016-04-01

    The performance of lightweight structures can be severely affected by vibration. New design concepts leading to lightweight, slender structural components can increase the vulnerability of the components to failure due to excessive vibration. The intelligent approach to address the problem would be the use of materials which are more capable in dissipating the energy due to their high value of loss factor. Among the different materials available to achieve damping, much attention has been attached to the use of shape memory alloys (SMAs) because of their unique microstructure, leading to good damping capacity. This work describes the design and optimization of a hybrid layered composite structure for the passive suppression of flexural vibrations in slender and light structures. Embedding the SMA layers in composite structure allows to combine different properties: the lightness of the base composite (e.g. fiber glass), the mechanical strength of the insert of metallic material and the relevant damping properties of SMA, in the martensitic phase. In particular, we put our attention on embedding the CuZnAl in the form of thin sheet in a layered composite made by glass fiber reinforced epoxy. By appropriately positioning of the SMA sheets so that they are subjected to the maximum curvature, the damping of the hybrid system can be considerably enhanced. Accordingly analytical method for evaluating the energy dissipation of the thin sheets with different shapes and patterns is developed and is followed by a shape optimization based on genetic algorithm. Eventually different configurations of the hybrid beam structure with different patterns of SMA layer are proposed and compared in the term of damping capacity.

  17. Improvement of soft x-ray detection performance in superconducting-tunnel-junction array detectors with close-packed arrangement by three-dimensional structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, G.; Ukibe, M.; Ohkubo, M.

    2015-10-01

    Superconducting-tunnel-junction (STJ) array detectors have exhibited excellent characteristics for fluorescence-yield x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) for trace light elements in structural and functional materials. For XAFS, we have developed new fabrication processes for close-packed STJ pixels by using a three-dimensional structure (3D-STJ), in which the layers of STJ pixels are formed after caldera planarization of the base SiO2 layer deposited on the patterned wiring leads. The 3D-STJ has an operation yield of 88% and a mean energy resolution of 23.8 +/-1.9 eV for the C-Kα x-ray.

  18. Molecular rectification and conductance switching in carbon-based molecular junctions by structural rearrangement accompanying electron injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCreery, Richard; Dieringer, Jon; Solak, Ali Osman; Snyder, Brian; Nowak, Aletha M; McGovern, William R; DuVall, Stacy

    2003-09-01

    Molecular junctions were fabricated consisting of a 3.7 nm thick layer of nitroazobenzene (NAB) molecules between a pyrolyzed photoresist substrate (PPF) and a titanium top contact which was protected from oxidation by a layer of gold. Raman spectroscopy, XPS, and AFM revealed that the NAB layer was 2-3 molecules thick and was bonded to the two conducting contacts by C-C and N-Ti covalent bonds. The current/voltage behavior of the PPF/NAB(3.7)/Ti junctions showed strong and reproducible rectification, with the current at +2 V exceeding that at -2 V by a factor of 600. The observed current density at +3 V was 0.71 A/cm(2), or about 10(5) e(-)/s/molecule. The i/V response was strongly dependent on temperature and scan rate, with the rectification ratio decreasing for lower temperature and faster scans. Junction conductivity increased with time over several seconds at room temperature in response to positive voltage pulses, with the rate of increase larger for more positive potentials. Voltage pulses to positive potentials and back to zero volts revealed that electrons are injected from the Ti to the NAB, to the extent of about 0.1-1 e(-)/molecule for a +3 V pulse. These electrons cause an activated transition of the NAB into a more conductive quinoid state, which in turn causes an increase in conductivity. The transition to the quinoid state involves nuclear rearrangement which occurs on a submillisecond to several second time scale, depending on the voltage applied. The quinoid state is stable as long as the applied electric field is present, but reverts back to NAB within several minutes after the field is relaxed. The results are interpreted in terms of a thermally activated, potential dependent electron transfer into the 3.7 nm NAB layer, which brings about a conductivity increase of several orders of magnitude.

  19. Uncertainty Quantification in Experimental Structural Dynamics Identification of Composite Material Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luczak, Marcin; Peeters, Bart; Kahsin, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    Aerospace and wind energy structures are extensively using components made of composite materials. Since these structures are subjected to dynamic environments with time-varying loading conditions, it is important to model their dynamic behavior and validate these models by means of vibration...... for uncertainty evaluation in experimentally estimated models. Investigated structures are plates, fuselage panels and helicopter main rotor blades as they represent different complexity levels ranging from coupon, through sub-component up to fully assembled structures made of composite materials. To evaluate...

  20. Proteomic and bioinformatic analysis of epithelial tight junction reveals an unexpected cluster of synaptic molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Vivian W

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Zonula occludens, also known as the tight junction, is a specialized cell-cell interaction characterized by membrane "kisses" between epithelial cells. A cytoplasmic plaque of ~100 nm corresponding to a meshwork of densely packed proteins underlies the tight junction membrane domain. Due to its enormous size and difficulties in obtaining a biochemically pure fraction, the molecular composition of the tight junction remains largely unknown. Results A novel biochemical purification protocol has been developed to isolate tight junction protein complexes from cultured human epithelial cells. After identification of proteins by mass spectroscopy and fingerprint analysis, candidate proteins are scored and assessed individually. A simple algorithm has been devised to incorporate transmembrane domains and protein modification sites for scoring membrane proteins. Using this new scoring system, a total of 912 proteins have been identified. These 912 hits are analyzed using a bioinformatics approach to bin the hits in 4 categories: configuration, molecular function, cellular function, and specialized process. Prominent clusters of proteins related to the cytoskeleton, cell adhesion, and vesicular traffic have been identified. Weaker clusters of proteins associated with cell growth, cell migration, translation, and transcription are also found. However, the strongest clusters belong to synaptic proteins and signaling molecules. Localization studies of key components of synaptic transmission have confirmed the presence of both presynaptic and postsynaptic proteins at the tight junction domain. To correlate proteomics data with structure, the tight junction has been examined using electron microscopy. This has revealed many novel structures including end-on cytoskeletal attachments, vesicles fusing/budding at the tight junction membrane domain, secreted substances encased between the tight junction kisses, endocytosis of tight junction

  1. Galerkin finite element scheme for magnetostrictive structures and composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Kidambi Srinivasan

    The ever increasing-role of magnetostrictives in actuation and sensing applications is an indication of their importance in the emerging field of smart structures technology. As newer, and more complex, applications are developed, there is a growing need for a reliable computational tool that can effectively address the magneto-mechanical interactions and other nonlinearities in these materials and in structures incorporating them. This thesis presents a continuum level quasi-static, three-dimensional finite element computational scheme for modeling the nonlinear behavior of bulk magnetostrictive materials and particulate magnetostrictive composites. Models for magnetostriction must deal with two sources of nonlinearities-nonlinear body forces/moments in equilibrium equations governing magneto-mechanical interactions in deformable and magnetized bodies; and nonlinear coupled magneto-mechanical constitutive models for the material of interest. In the present work, classical differential formulations for nonlinear magneto-mechanical interactions are recast in integral form using the weighted-residual method. A discretized finite element form is obtained by applying the Galerkin technique. The finite element formulation is based upon three dimensional eight-noded (isoparametric) brick element interpolation functions and magnetostatic infinite elements at the boundary. Two alternative possibilities are explored for establishing the nonlinear incremental constitutive model-characterization in terms of magnetic field or in terms of magnetization. The former methodology is the one most commonly used in the literature. In this work, a detailed comparative study of both methodologies is carried out. The computational scheme is validated, qualitatively and quantitatively, against experimental measurements published in the literature on structures incorporating the magnetostrictive material Terfenol-D. The influence of nonlinear body forces and body moments of magnetic origin

  2. Josephson junctions with ferromagnetic interlayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wild, Georg Hermann

    2012-03-04

    We report on the fabrication of superconductor/insulator/ferromagnetic metal/superconductor (Nb/AlO{sub x}/Pd{sub 0.82}Ni{sub 0.18}/Nb) Josephson junctions (SIFS JJs) with high critical current densities, large normal resistance times area products, and high quality factors. For these junctions, a transition from 0- to {pi}-coupling is observed for a thickness d{sub F}=6 nm of the ferromagnetic Pd{sub 0.82}Ni{sub 0.18} interlayer. The magnetic field dependence of the critical current of the junctions demonstrates good spatial homogeneity of the tunneling barrier and ferromagnetic interlayer. Magnetic characterization shows that the Pd{sub 0.82}Ni{sub 0.18} has an out-of-plane anisotropy and large saturation magnetization indicating negligible dead layers at the interfaces. A careful analysis of Fiske modes up to about 400 GHz provides valuable information on the junction quality factor and the relevant damping mechanisms. Whereas losses due to quasiparticle tunneling dominate at low frequencies, at high frequencies the damping is explained by the finite surface resistance of the junction electrodes. High quality factors of up to 30 around 200 GHz have been achieved. They allow to study the junction dynamics, in particular the switching probability from the zero-voltage into the voltage state with and without microwave irradiation. The experiments with microwave irradiation are well explained within semi-classical models and numerical simulations. In contrast, at mK temperature the switching dynamics without applied microwaves clearly shows secondary quantum effects. Here, we could observe for the first time macroscopic quantum tunneling in Josephson junctions with a ferromagnetic interlayer. This observation excludes fluctuations of the critical current as a consequence of an unstable magnetic domain structure of the ferromagnetic interlayer and affirms the suitability of SIFS Josephson junctions for quantum information processing.

  3. Activation and micropore structure of carbon-fiber composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagtoyen, M.; Derbyshire, F.; Kimber, G. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research

    1997-12-01

    Rigid, high surface area activated carbon fiber composites have been produced with high permeabilities for environmental applications in gas and water purification. The project involves a collaboration between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER), University of Kentucky. The main focus of recent work has been to find a satisfactory means to uniformly activate large samples of carbon fiber composites to produce controlled pore structures. Processes have been developed using activation in steam and CO{sub 2}, and a less conventional method involving oxygen chemisorption and subsequent heat treatment. Another objective has been to explore applications for the activated composites in environmental applications related to fossil energy production.

  4. Use of microfasteners to produce damage tolerant composite structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, Ivana K; Hallett, Stephen R

    2016-07-13

    The paper concerns the mechanical performance of continuous fibre/thermosetting polymer matrix composites reinforced in the through-thickness direction with fibrous or metallic rods or threads in order to mitigate against low delamination resistance. Specific illustrations of the effects of microfasteners in reducing delamination crack growth are made for Z-pinned and tufted composites. Response to loading in such 'structured materials' is subject to multiple parameters defining their in-plane and out-of-plane properties. Single microfastener mechanical tests are well suited to establish the crack bridging laws under a range of loading modes, from simple delamination crack opening to shear, and provide the basis for predicting the corresponding response of microfastener arrays, within a given material environment. The fundamental experiments on microfasteners can be used to derive analytical expressions to describe the crack bridging behaviour in a general sense, to cover all possible loadings. These expressions can be built into cohesive element constitutive laws in a finite-element framework for modelling the effects of microfastener arrays on the out-of-plane mechanical response of reinforced structural elements, including the effects of known manufacturing imperfections. Such predictive behaviour can then be used to assess structural integrity under complex loading, as part of the component design process. This article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling of the structural integrity of composite materials'.

  5. Structure - property relations of high-temperature composite polymer matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, R.J.; Jurek, R.J.; Larive, D.E. [Michigan Molecular Institute, Midland, MI (United States); Tung, C.M. [Northrop Corp., Hawthorne, CA (United States); Donnellan, T. [Naval Air Development Center, Warminster, PA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The structure-deformation-failure mode-mechanical property relations of high-temperature thermoplastic polyimide and thermoset bismaleimide (BMI) polymeric matrices and their composites will be discussed. In the case of polyimides, the effects of test temperature, thermal history, strain rate, type of filler, and filler volume fraction on structure - property relations will be discussed. For BMIs we report systematic Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry studies of the cure reactions as a function of chemical composition and time - temperature cure conditions and then describe the resultant cross-linked network structure based on our understanding of the cure reactions. The optimization of the BMI matrix toughness will be considered in terms of network structure and process-induced matrix microcracking. We also describe optimization of composite prepreg, lamination and postcure conditions based on cure kinetics, and their relationship to the BMI viscosity-time-temperature profiles. The critical processing-performance limitations of high-temperature polymer matrices will be critically discussed, and toughening approaches to address these limitations, such as toughness over a wide temperature range, will be presented. 7 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Photoluminescence structure, and composition of laterally anodized porous Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, K. H.; Shih, S.; Kwong, D. L.; George, T.; Lin, T. L.; Liu, H. Y.; Zavada, J.

    1992-01-01

    We have studied the photoluminescence (PL), structure, and composition of laterally anodized porous Si. Broad PL peaks were observed centered between about 620-720 nm with strong intensities measured from 500 to 860 nm. Macroscopic variations in PL intensities and peak positions are explained in terms of the structure and anodization process. Structural studies suggest that the PL appears to originate from a multilayered porous Si structure in which the top two layers are amorphous. X-ray diffraction spectra also suggest the presence of a significant amorphous phase. In addition to high concentrations of B and N, we have measured extremely high concentrations much greater than 10 exp 20 cu cm of H, C, O, and F. Our results indicate that laterally anodized porous Si does not fit the crystalline Si quantum wire model prevalent in the literature suggesting that some other structure is responsible for the observed luminescence.

  7. Composites on the way to structural automotive applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedrich, H.; Kopp, J.; Stieg, J. [Volkswagen AG, Wolfsburg (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    Against the background of a steady increase of the standards on comfort, passive safety and driving performance of vehicles as well as the commitment to reduce fuel consumption and carbon dioxide emissions, the demand for lightweight construction attains paramount importance. The use of aluminum, magnesium or new steel alloys in the body structure can lead to significant weight reduction compared with conventional steel concepts. Furthermore, maximum weight reduction will require an intensive use of advanced composites in primary structures. The paper deals with the potentials and the challenges coming along with the introduction of advanced composites into automotive series production. Presently, liquid composite molding and compression molding of high-performance SMC are the most promising technologies to achieve demanding composite parts with high fiber volume fraction, good surface quality and controlled mechanical properties. The performance of specific automotive application processed in these techniques is presented and discussed. On principle, the cost/benefit aspect is of decisive importance for larger volume applications. Considerable efforts are necessary to reduce material and semi-finished product costs and to provide manufacturing technologies which are capable of allowing large-volume automotive production of composite components. Especially concepts are desirable which do not only provide a basic material substitution but rather an intelligent design based on component and functional integration as one of the most effective strategies to exploit the advantages of advanced composites. These aspects will be regarded and a brief summary on some other remaining challenges like recycling, crash simulation or joining and assembly technologies for mixed material concepts will be given. (orig.)

  8. Polyurethane structural adhesives applied in automotive composite joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josue Garcia Quini

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years structural adhesives technology has demonstrated great potential for application due to its capacity to transform complex structures into solid unitary and monolithic assemblies using different materials. Thus, seams or joints integrate these structures providing, besides a reduction in weight, a considerable increase in the mechanical resistance and stiffness. The increase in the industrial use of structural adhesives is mainly due to their ability to efficiently bond different materials in an irreversible manner, even replacing systems involving mechanical joints. In the automobile industry structural adhesives have been widely used for the bonding of metal substrates, thermoplastics and composites, frequently employing these in combination, particularly glass fiber and polyester resin composites molded using RTM and SMC processes. However, the use of urethane structural adhesives in applications involving composites and thermoplastics has been the subject of few investigations. In this study the effects of temperature and time on the shear strength of RTM, SMC and ABS joints, applying temperatures of -40, 25, 80, 120 and 177 °C and times of 20 minutes and 500 hours, were determined. The objective was to evaluate the performance under extreme conditions of use in order to assess whether these joints could be used in passenger or off-road vehicles. The results showed that the urethane structural adhesive promoted the efficient bonding of these materials, considering that due to the high adhesive strength the failures occurred in the substrates without adversely affecting the bonded area. For each test condition the joint failure modes were also determined.

  9. Fine structure of myotendinous junction between the anterior belly of the digastric muscle and intermediate tendon in adults rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciena, Adriano Polican; de Almeida, Sonia Regina Yokomizo; Dias, Fernando José; Bolina, Cristina de Sousa; Issa, João Paulo Mardegan; Iyomasa, Mamie Mizusaki; Ogawa, Koichi; Watanabe, Ii-sei

    2012-02-01

    This study analyzed the ultrastructural characteristics of the myotendinous junction (MTJ) between anterior belly of digastrics muscle and the intermediate tendon in adult rats. Six male Wistar rats were used and were anesthetized with an overdose of urethane and sacrificed by intracardiac perfusion with modified Karnovsky solution, postfixed in 1% osmium tetroxide, dehydrated in increasing series of alcohols and embedded in Spurr resin for transmission electron microscopic analysis. Ultrastructural analysis showed conical shape of the fiber extremity in MTJ region, highlighting the presence of numerous mitochondria arranged in groups in the subsarcolemmal and intermyofibrillary regions. Atypical MTJ characteristics were seen interspersed with bundles of collagen fibers. Classic characteristics such as finger-like processes by means of sarcoplasmic projections were observed among interdigitations. Terminals and periphericals bundles of myofibrils showed close relationship with the adjacent muscle fiber's endomysium through lateral junctions. In the distal portion, it was observed that the communication region of microtendons forming the intermediate tendon of digastric muscle, and it can highlight the columns disposition of tenocytes. In conclusion, the MTJ ultrastructure between the anterior belly of digastric muscle and intermediate tendon of adult rats showed classical morphologic descriptions and presented an atypical region revealed by the subspecialization between the myofibrils bundles and collagen fibers in the MTJ region. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Advanced Ceramic Matrix Composites with Multifunctional and Hybrid Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mrityunjay; Morscher, Gregory N.

    2004-01-01

    Ceramic matrix composites are leading candidate materials for a number of applications in aeronautics, space, energy, and nuclear industries. Potential composite applications differ in their requirements for thickness. For example, many space applications such as "nozzle ramps" or "heat exchangers" require very thin (structures whereas turbine blades would require very thick parts (> or = 1 cm). Little is known about the effect of thickness on stress-strain behavior or the elevated temperature tensile properties controlled by oxidation diffusion. In this study, composites consisting of woven Hi-Nicalon (trademark) fibers a carbon interphase and CVI SiC matrix were fabricated with different numbers of plies and thicknesses. The effect of thickness on matrix crack formation, matrix crack growth and diffusion kinetics will be discussed. In another approach, hybrid fiber-lay up concepts have been utilized to "alloy" desirable properties of different fiber types for mechanical properties, thermal stress management, and oxidation resistance. Such an approach has potential for the C(sub I)-SiC and SiC(sub f)-SiC composite systems. CVI SiC matrix composites with different stacking sequences of woven C fiber (T300) layers and woven SiC fiber (Hi-Nicalon (trademark)) layers were fabricated. The results will be compared to standard C fiber reinforced CVI SiC matrix and Hi-Nicalon reinforced CVI SiC matrix composites. In addition, shear properties of these composites at different temperatures will also be presented. Other design and implementation issues will be discussed along with advantages and benefits of using these materials for various components in high temperature applications.

  11. Structural and biological properties of carbon nanotube composite films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narayan, Roger J. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0245 (United States)]. E-mail: roger.narayan@mse.gatech.edu; Berry, C.J. [Environmental Biotechnology Section, Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Brigmon, R.L. [Environmental Biotechnology Section, Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2005-11-20

    Carbon nanotube composite films have been developed that exhibit unusual structural and biological properties. These novel materials have been created by pulsed laser ablation of graphite and bombardment of nitrogen ions at temperatures between 600 and 700 deg. C. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and radial distribution function analysis demonstrate that this material consists of sp{sup 2}-bonded concentric ribbons that are wrapped approximately 15 deg. normal to the silicon substrate. The interlayer order in this material extends to approximately 15-30 A. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy data suggest that this material is predominantly trigonally coordinated. The carbon nanotube composite structure results from the use of energetic ions, which allow for non-equilibrium growth of graphitic planes. In vitro testing has revealed significant antimicrobial activity of carbon nanotube composite films against Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus warneri colonization. Carbon nanotube composite films may be useful for inhibiting microorganism attachment and biofilm formation in hemodialysis catheters and other medical devices.

  12. Large Area Nondestructive Evaluation of a Fatigue Loaded Composite Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Burke, Eric R.; Horne, Michael R.; Madaras, Eric I.

    2016-01-01

    Large area nondestructive evaluation (NDE) inspections are required for fatigue testing of composite structures to track damage initiation and growth. Of particular interest is the progression of damage leading to ultimate failure to validate damage progression models. In this work, passive thermography and acoustic emission NDE were used to track damage growth up to failure of a composite three-stringer panel. Fourteen acoustic emission sensors were placed on the composite panel. The signals from the array were acquired simultaneously and allowed for acoustic emission location. In addition, real time thermal data of the composite structure were acquired during loading. Details are presented on the mapping of the acoustic emission locations directly onto the thermal imagery to confirm areas of damage growth leading to ultimate failure. This required synchronizing the acoustic emission and thermal data with the applied loading. In addition, processing of the thermal imagery which included contrast enhancement, removal of optical barrel distortion and correction of angular rotation before mapping the acoustic event locations are discussed.

  13. Microscopic structure and properties of wood-based foaming composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng WANG; Li GAO; Guilan ZHANG; Liang CHANG

    2008-01-01

    In order to reduce the density of wood-based composites without causing a deterioration of their mech-anical properties, we studied the process of manufacturing wood-based composites. A combination of polymer foaming technology and flat hot-pressing technology was used. The microscopic structure of the various wood-based composites was analyzed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Modulus of rupture (MOR), modulus of elasticity (MOE), impact strength, and thickness expansion rate of water sorption (TS) were all measured. The results showed that fibers loosely inter-weave, and fibers had been connected by micropore. They also showed that spaces between fibers had big micropore structure. MOR, MOE and impact strength were the high-est among three levels of ratio. When the total content of resin and foaming agent were 20% by weight, TS was higher. A hot-pressing temperature of 120℃ was optimal. At the low temperatures of 80℃, the foaming process was uncompleted. At a higher temperature, micropores burst at a certain pressure. Based on the variance analysis and maximum difference analysis, a significance test shows that the optimum conditions for the total content of resin and foaming agent is 20% by weight, with a hot pressing temperature of 120℃ for 15 min. Under these conditions, the properties of wood-based foaming composites all achieved the industry standard.

  14. Composite failure prediction of π-joint structures under bending

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Hong-me; YUAN Shen-fang

    2012-01-01

    In this article,the composite π-joint is investigated under bending loads.The "L" preform is the critical component regarding composite π-joint failure.The study is presented in the failure detection of a carbon fiber composite π-joint structure under bending loads using fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor.Firstly,based on the general finite element method (FEM)software,the 3-D finite element (FE) model of composite π-joint is established,and the failure process and every lamina failure load of composite π-joint are investigated by maximum stress criteria.Then,strain distributions along the length of FBG are extracted,and the reflection spectra of FBG are calculated according to the strain distribution.Finally,to verify the numerical results,a test scheme is performed and the experimental spectra of FBG are recorded.The experimental results indicate that the failure sequence and the corresponding critical loads of failure are consistent with the numerical predictions,and the computational error of failure load is less than 6.4%.Furthermore,it also verifies the feasibility of the damage detection system.

  15. Unambiguous UML Composite Structures: The OMEGA2 Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ober, Iulian; Dragomir, Iulia

    Starting from version 2.0, UML introduced hierarchical composite structures, which are a very expressive way of defining complex software architectures, but which have a very loosely defined semantics in the standard. In this paper we propose a set of consistency rules that ensure UML composite structures are unambiguous and can be given a precise semantics. Our primary application of the static consistency rules defined in this paper is within the OMEGA UML profile [6], but these rules are general and applicable to other hierarchical component models based on the same concepts, such as MARTE GCM or SysML. The rule set has been formalized in OCL and is currently used in the OMEGA UML compiler.

  16. Structural Intensity Characterization of Composite Laminates Subjected to Impact Load

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Dong-fang; HE Peng-fei; LIU Zi-shun

    2008-01-01

    Structural intensity (SI) characterization of composite laminates subjected to impact load was dis-cussed. The SI pattern of the laminates which have different fiber orientations and boundary conditions wasanalyzed. The resultant forces and velocities of the laminates were calculated, and the structural intensity wasevaluated. The SI streamlines of carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composite laminates and the steel plates werediscussed. The results show that the SI streamlines of the graphite/epoxy laminates are different from that ofthe steel plates, and the SI streamlines are influenced by the boundaries, the stacking sequence of the compositelaminates. The change of the historical central displacement of the graphite/epoxy laminates is fasten thanthat of the steel plates.

  17. Freeform fabrication of polymer-matrix composite structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaufman, S.G.; Spletzer, B.L.; Guess, T.L.

    1997-05-01

    The authors have developed, prototyped, and demonstrated the feasibility of a novel robotic technique for rapid fabrication of composite structures. Its chief innovation is that, unlike all other available fabrication methods, it does not require a mold. Instead, the structure is built patch by patch, using a rapidly reconfigurable forming surface, and a robot to position the evolving part. Both of these components are programmable, so only the control software needs to be changed to produce a new shape. Hence it should be possible to automatically program the system to produce a shape directly from an electronic model of it. It is therefore likely that the method will enable faster and less expensive fabrication of composites.

  18. Properties and Structure of Microcrystal Muscovite Composite Superabsorbent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WAN Tao; XIONG Lei; HUANG Runqiu; SUN Mengmeng; QIN Lili; TAN Xuemei; HU Junyan

    2014-01-01

    Microcrystal muscovite composite superabsorbents (MMCSA) were prepared by water solution polymerization using acrylic acid, acrylamide and itaconic acid as comonomers and microcrystal muscovite as an inorganic additive. Properties, such as water absorbency, salt absorbency, gel strength, water retention capacity and structure of MMCSA characterized by SEM and XRD, were investigated. Water absorbency, salt absorbency, gel strength, water retention capacity and thermostability were enhanced by incorporation of suitable amount of microcrystal muscovite. Water absorption of MMCSA was rapid, requiring 24.55 min to reach 63% of equilibrium absorbency (1218 g/g). Microcrystal muscovite was physically combined into the polymeric network without destroying its polycrystalline structure and microcrystal muscovite composite superabsorbent had some irregular, undulant, and small microporous holes with sheet-like microcrystal muscovite distributed in the polymeric matrix.

  19. Optimum lay-up design of variable stiffness composite structures

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Advancements in automated fibre-placement (AFP) technology make it possible to take laminate tailoring further than just stacking sequence optimisation; they enable the designer to vary the fibre orientation angle spatially within each ply. Spatial variation of fibre orientation angles results in a variable stiffness (VS) laminate. The work presented in this thesis constitutes a possible second step of a two-step design process for VS composite structures. The first step is to optimise a VS c...

  20. Blast and Impact Resistant Composite Structures for Navy Ships

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Kinetic Energy of flying particles Beginning with the pioneering work by Mandelbrot et al. [1], numerous investigators have focused on statistical...affine [10]. Self affinity is defined and well-described in the context of fractals by Mandelbrot [2]. As the crack propagates, the scale of...manufactured by Larry Drzal’s group at Michigan State University—Composite Materials and Structures Center. References 1. Mandelbrot , B.B.; Passoja

  1. Effect of interfacial structures on spin dependent tunneling in epitaxial L1{sub 0}-FePt/MgO/FePt perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, G.; Li, D. L.; Wang, S. G., E-mail: Sgwang@iphy.ac.cn; Ma, Q. L.; Liang, S. H.; Wei, H. X.; Han, X. F. [State Key Laboratory of Magnetism, Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Hesjedal, T.; Ward, R. C. C. [Clarendon Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Kohn, A.; Elkayam, A.; Tal, N. [Department of Materials Engineering and the Ilse Katz Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Zhang, X.-G. [Department of Physics and Quantum Theory Project, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences and Computer Science and Mathematics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6493 (United States)

    2015-02-28

    Epitaxial FePt(001)/MgO/FePt magnetic tunnel junctions with L1{sub 0}-FePt electrodes showing perpendicular magnetic anisotropy were fabricated by molecular beam epitaxial growth. Tunnel magnetoresistance ratios of 21% and 53% were obtained at 300 K and 10 K, respectively. Our previous work, based on transmission electron microscopy, confirmed a semi-coherent interfacial structure with atomic steps (Kohn et al., APL 102, 062403 (2013)). Here, we show by x-ray photoemission spectroscopy and first-principles calculation that the bottom FePt/MgO interface is either Pt-terminated for regular growth or when an Fe layer is inserted at the interface, it is chemically bonded to O. Both these structures have a dominant role in spin dependent tunneling across the MgO barrier resulting in a decrease of the tunneling magnetoresistance ratio compared with previous predictions.

  2. Physics and Applications of NIS Junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullom, J N

    2001-08-24

    This paper reviews the physics and applications of Normal-Insulator-Superconductor (NIS) tunnel junctions. The current-voltage properties of NIS junctions are diode-like with a strong temperature dependence. Hence, these structures can be used as sensitive thermometers at temperatures well below the energy gap, {Delta}, of the superconducting electrode. For junction voltages comparable to {Delta}/q, current flow removes energy from the normal electrode. This property has been exploited to build refrigerators capable of cooling thin-film circuits from 0.3 K to 0.1 K. Calorimeters and bolometers for the detection of X-rays and millimeter-wave radiation, respectively, have successfully been built from NIS junctions. NIS junctions have also been used to probe the superconducting state. Finally, recent ideas for the use of NIS junctions as simple circuit elements are described.

  3. UHPC SANDWICH STRUCTURES WITH COMPOSITE COATING UNDER COMPRESSIVE LOAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Markowski

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Ultra-high-performance concrete (UHPC sandwich structures with composite coating serve as multipurpose load-bearing elements. The UHPC’s extraordinary compressive strength is used in a multi-material construction element, while issues regarding the concrete’s brittle failure behaviour are properly addressed. A hollow section concrete core is covered by two steel tubes. The outer steel tube is wrapped in a composite material. By this design, UHPC is used in a material- and shape-optimised way with a low dead weight ratio[1] concerning the load-bearing capacity and stability[2]. The cross-section’s hollow shape optimises the construction’s buckling stability while saving self-weight. The composite coating on the column’s outside functions both as a layer increasing the construction’s durability and as a structural component increasing the the maximum and the residual load capacity. Investigations on the construction’s structural behaviour were performed.

  4. Health monitoring studies on composite structures for aerospace applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, G.; Roach, D.; Hansche, B.; Meza, R.; Robinson, N.

    1996-02-01

    This paper discusses ongoing work to develop structural health monitoring techniques for composite aerospace structures such as aircraft control surfaces, fuselage sections or repairs, and reusable launch vehicle fuel tanks. The overall project is divided into four tasks: Operational evaluation, diagnostic measurements, information condensation, and damage detection. Five composite plates were constructed to study delaminations, disbonds, and fluid retention issues as the initial step in creating an operational system. These four square feet plates were graphite-epoxy with nomex honeycomb cores. The diagnostic measurements are composed of modal tests with a scanning laser vibrometer at over 500 scan points per plate covering the frequency range up to 2000 Hz. This data has been reduced into experimental dynamics matrices using a generic, software package developed at the University of Colorado at Boulder. The continuing effort will entail performing a series of damage identification studies to detect, localize, and determine the extent of the damage. This work is providing understanding and algorithm development for a global NDE technique for composite aerospace structures.

  5. Recent developments of discrete material optimization of laminated composite structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Erik; Sørensen, Rene

    2015-01-01

    This work will give a quick summary of recent developments of the Discrete Material Optimization approach for structural optimization of laminated composite structures. This approach can be seen as a multi-material topology optimization approach for selecting the best ply material and number....... The different interpolation schemes used are described, and it is briefly outlined how design rules/manufacturing constraints can be included in the optimization. The approach has been demonstrated for a number of global design criteria like mass, compliance, buckling load factors, etc., but recent work makes...

  6. Structural integrity of engineering composite materials: a cracking good yarn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, Peter W R; Soutis, Costas

    2016-07-13

    Predicting precisely where a crack will develop in a material under stress and exactly when in time catastrophic fracture of the component will occur is one the oldest unsolved mysteries in the design and building of large-scale engineering structures. Where human life depends upon engineering ingenuity, the burden of testing to prove a 'fracture safe design' is immense. Fitness considerations for long-life implementation of large composite structures include understanding phenomena such as impact, fatigue, creep and stress corrosion cracking that affect reliability, life expectancy and durability of structure. Structural integrity analysis treats the design, the materials used, and figures out how best components and parts can be joined, and takes service duty into account. However, there are conflicting aims in the complete design process of designing simultaneously for high efficiency and safety assurance throughout an economically viable lifetime with an acceptable level of risk. This article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling of the structural integrity of composite materials'.

  7. Nonlinear damage detection in composite structures using bispectral analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciampa, Francesco; Pickering, Simon; Scarselli, Gennaro; Meo, Michele

    2014-03-01

    Literature offers a quantitative number of diagnostic methods that can continuously provide detailed information of the material defects and damages in aerospace and civil engineering applications. Indeed, low velocity impact damages can considerably degrade the integrity of structural components and, if not detected, they can result in catastrophic failure conditions. This paper presents a nonlinear Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) method, based on ultrasonic guided waves (GW), for the detection of the nonlinear signature in a damaged composite structure. The proposed technique, based on a bispectral analysis of ultrasonic input waveforms, allows for the evaluation of the nonlinear response due to the presence of cracks and delaminations. Indeed, such a methodology was used to characterize the nonlinear behaviour of the structure, by exploiting the frequency mixing of the original waveform acquired from a sparse array of sensors. The robustness of bispectral analysis was experimentally demonstrated on a damaged carbon fibre reinforce plastic (CFRP) composite panel, and the nonlinear source was retrieved with a high level of accuracy. Unlike other linear and nonlinear ultrasonic methods for damage detection, this methodology does not require any baseline with the undamaged structure for the evaluation of the nonlinear source, nor a priori knowledge of the mechanical properties of the specimen. Moreover, bispectral analysis can be considered as a nonlinear elastic wave spectroscopy (NEWS) technique for materials showing either classical or non-classical nonlinear behaviour.

  8. Structural integrity of engineering composite materials: a cracking good yarn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, Peter W. R.

    2016-01-01

    Predicting precisely where a crack will develop in a material under stress and exactly when in time catastrophic fracture of the component will occur is one the oldest unsolved mysteries in the design and building of large-scale engineering structures. Where human life depends upon engineering ingenuity, the burden of testing to prove a ‘fracture safe design’ is immense. Fitness considerations for long-life implementation of large composite structures include understanding phenomena such as impact, fatigue, creep and stress corrosion cracking that affect reliability, life expectancy and durability of structure. Structural integrity analysis treats the design, the materials used, and figures out how best components and parts can be joined, and takes service duty into account. However, there are conflicting aims in the complete design process of designing simultaneously for high efficiency and safety assurance throughout an economically viable lifetime with an acceptable level of risk. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Multiscale modelling of the structural integrity of composite materials’. PMID:27242293

  9. Twin boundary effects on spontaneous half-quantized vortices in superconducting composite structures (d-dot’s)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita, Norio; Kato, Masaru [Department of Mathematical Sciences, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1, Gakuencho, Nakaku, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Ishida, Takekazu [Department of Physics and Electronics, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1, Gakuencho, Nakaku, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • A d-dot is a nano-scaled composite structure that consists of a d- and s-wave SC. • Two-components GL equations with anisotropic effective mass of electrons are derived. • Anisotropic effective mass suppress spontaneous half-quantized vortices in d-dot’s. • Thin junctions are good for spontaneous half-quantized vortices in d-dot’s. - Abstract: We investigate effects of anisotropy of an orthorhombic structure in twin domains on spontaneous half-quantized vortices (SHQVs) in a d-dot, which is a nano-scaled composite structure that consists of a d-wave superconductor embedded in an s-wave matrix. Since YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7−δ} (YBCO) has the orthorhombic structure, there are twin domains separated by twin boundaries (TBs). In order to analyze effects of TBs on SHQVs, we derive two-component Ginzburg–Landau equations, in which electrons in YBCO have anisotropic effective mass. It is found that the magnitude of field around SHQVs is monotonically decreasing with increasing anisotropy of effective mass and finally peak values of the fields become zero. This means that anisotropy of the effective mass suppresses SHQVs and when the anisotropy is too large, SHQVs do not appear in d-dot’s.

  10. Selection process for trade study: Graphite Composite Primary Structure (GCPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, H. S.

    1994-01-01

    This TA 2 document describes the selection process that will be used to identify the most suitable structural configuration for an SSTO winged vehicle capable of delivering 25,000 lbs to a 220 nm circular orbit at 51.6 degree inclination. The most suitable unpressurized graphite composite structures and material selections is within this configuration and will be the prototype design for subsequent design and analysis and the basis for the design and fabrication of payload bay, wing, and thrust structure full scale test articles representing segments of the prototype structures. The selection process for this TA 2 trade study is the same as that for the TA 1 trade study. As the trade study progresses additional insight may result in modifications to the selection criteria within this process. Such modifications will result in an update of this document as appropriate.

  11. Structural and optical studies of GaN pn-junction with AlN buffer layer grown on Si (111) by RF plasma enhanced MBE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yusoff, Mohd Zaki Mohd; Hassan, Zainuriah; Woei, Chin Che; Hassan, Haslan Abu; Abdullah, Mat Johar [Nano-Optoelectronics Research and Technology Laboratory School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Penang, Malaysia and Department of Applied Sciences Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM) 13500 Permatang Pauh, Penang (Malaysia); Department of Applied Sciences Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM) 13500 Permatang Pauh, Penang (Malaysia)

    2012-06-29

    GaN pn-junction grown on silicon substrates have been the focus in a number of recent reports and further effort is still necessary to improve its crystalline quality for practical applications. GaN has the high n-type background carrier concentration resulting from native defects commonly thought to be nitrogen vacancies. In this work, we present the growth of pn-junction of GaN on Si (111) substrate using RF plasma-enhanced molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Both of the layers show uniformity with an average thickness of 0.709 {mu}m and 0.095 {mu}m for GaN and AlN layers, respectively. The XRD spectra indicate that no sign of cubic phase of GaN are found, so it is confirmed that the sample possessed hexagonal structure. It was found that all the allowed Raman optical phonon modes of GaN, i.e. the E2 (low), E1 (high) and A1 (LO) are clearly visible.

  12. Damage Assessment of Composite Structures Using Digital Image Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caminero, M. A.; Lopez-Pedrosa, M.; Pinna, C.; Soutis, C.

    2014-02-01

    The steady increase of Carbon-Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) Structures in modern aircraft will reach a new dimension with the entry into service of the Boeing 787 and Airbus 350. Replacement of damaged parts will not be a preferable solution due to the high level of integration and the large size of the components involved. Consequently the need to develop repair techniques and processes for composite components is readily apparent. Bonded patch repair technologies provide an alternative to mechanically fastened repairs with significantly higher performance, especially for relatively thin skins. Carefully designed adhesively bonded patches can lead to cost effective and highly efficient repairs in comparison with conventional riveted patch repairs that cut fibers and introduce highly strained regions. In this work, the assessment of the damage process taking place in notched (open-hole) specimens under uniaxial tensile loading was studied. Two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) Digital Image Correlation (DIC) techniques were employed to obtain full-field surface strain measurements in carbon-fiber/epoxy T700/M21 composite plates with different stacking sequences in the presence of an open circular hole. Penetrant enhanced X-ray radiographs were taken to identify damage location and extent after loading around the hole. DIC strain fields were compared to finite element predictions. In addition, DIC techniques were used to characterise damage and performance of adhesively bonded patch repairs in composite panels under tensile loading. This part of work relates to strength/stiffness restoration of damaged composite aircraft that becomes more important as composites are used more extensively in the construction of modern jet airliners. The behaviour of bonded patches under loading was monitored using DIC full-field strain measurements. Location and extent of damage identified by X-ray radiography correlates well with DIC strain results giving confidence to

  13. Structural insights into substrate recognition by the Neurospora Varkud satellite ribozyme: importance of U-turns at the kissing-loop junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Patricia; Legault, Pascale

    2014-01-14

    Substrate recognition by the Neurospora Varkud satellite ribozyme depends on the formation of a magnesium-dependent kissing-loop interaction between the stem-loop I (SLI) substrate and stem-loop V (SLV) of the catalytic domain. From mutagenesis studies, it has been established that this I/V kissing-loop interaction involves three Watson-Crick base pairs and is associated with a structural rearrangement of the SLI substrate that facilitates catalysis. Here, we report the NMR structural characterization of this I/V kissing-loop using isolated stem-loops. NMR studies were performed on different SLI/SLV complexes containing a common SLV and shiftable, preshifted, or double-stranded SLI variants. These studies confirm the presence of three Watson-Crick base pairs at the kissing-loop junction and provide evidence for the structural rearrangement of shiftable SLI variants upon SLV binding. NMR structure determination of an SLI/SLV complex demonstrates that both the SLI and SLV loops adopt U-turn structures, which facilitates intermolecular Watson-Crick base pairing. Several other interactions at the I/V interface, including base triples and base stacking, help create a continuously stacked structure. These NMR studies provide a structural basis to understand the stability of the I/V kissing-loop interaction and lead us to propose a kinetic model for substrate activation in the VS ribozyme.

  14. Transcriptional mechanisms coordinating tight junction assembly during epithelial differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, Felix J; Schmidt-Ott, Kai M

    2017-06-01

    Epithelial tissues form a selective barrier via direct cell-cell interactions to separate and establish concentration gradients between the different compartments of the body. Proper function and formation of this barrier rely on the establishment of distinct intercellular junction complexes. These complexes include tight junctions, adherens junctions, desmosomes, and gap junctions. The tight junction is by far the most diverse junctional complex in the epithelial barrier. Its composition varies greatly across different epithelial tissues to confer various barrier properties. Thus, epithelial cells rely on tightly regulated transcriptional mechanisms to ensure proper formation of the epithelial barrier and to achieve tight junction diversity. Here, we review different transcriptional mechanisms utilized during embryogenesis and disease development to promote tight junction assembly and maintenance of intercellular barrier integrity. We focus particularly on the Grainyhead-like transcription factors and ligand-activated nuclear hormone receptors, two central families of proteins in epithelialization. © 2017 New York Academy of Sciences.

  15. Food Composition Database Format and Structure: A User Focused Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, Annabel K; Woods, Kaitlyn; McMahon, Anne; Probst, Yasmine

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the needs of Australian food composition database user's regarding database format and relate this to the format of databases available globally. Three semi structured synchronous online focus groups (M = 3, F = 11) and n = 6 female key informant interviews were recorded. Beliefs surrounding the use, training, understanding, benefits and limitations of food composition data and databases were explored. Verbatim transcriptions underwent preliminary coding followed by thematic analysis with NVivo qualitative analysis software to extract the final themes. Schematic analysis was applied to the final themes related to database format. Desktop analysis also examined the format of six key globally available databases. 24 dominant themes were established, of which five related to format; database use, food classification, framework, accessibility and availability, and data derivation. Desktop analysis revealed that food classification systems varied considerably between databases. Microsoft Excel was a common file format used in all databases, and available software varied between countries. User's also recognised that food composition databases format should ideally be designed specifically for the intended use, have a user-friendly food classification system, incorporate accurate data with clear explanation of data derivation and feature user input. However, such databases are limited by data availability and resources. Further exploration of data sharing options should be considered. Furthermore, user's understanding of food composition data and databases limitations is inherent to the correct application of non-specific databases. Therefore, further exploration of user FCDB training should also be considered.

  16. Nepheline structural and chemical dependence on melt composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcial, José; Crum, Jarrod; Neill, Owen; McCloy, John

    2016-02-01

    Nepheline crystallizes upon slow-cooling in some melts concentrated in Na2O and Al2O3, which can result in a residual glass phase of low chemical durability. Nepheline can incorporate many components often found in high-level waste radioactive borosilicate glass, including glass network ions (e.g., Si, Al, Fe), alkali metals (e.g., Cs, K, Na, and possibly Li), alkaline-earth metals (e.g., Ba, Sr, Ca, Mg), and transition metals (e.g., Mn, and possibly Cr, Zn, Ni). When crystallized from melts of different compositions, nepheline chemistry varies as a function of starting glass composition. Five simulated high level nuclear waste borosilicate glasses shown to crystallize large fractions of nepheline on slow cooling, were selected for study. These melts constituted a range of Al2O3, B2O3, CaO, Na2O, K2O, Fe2O3, and SiO2 compositions. Compositional analyses of nepheline crystals in glass by electron probe micro-analysis (EPMA) indicate that boron is unlikely to be present in any significant concentration, if at all, in nepheline. Also, several models are presented for calculating the fraction of vacancies in the nepheline structure.

  17. Food Composition Database Format and Structure: A User Focused Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annabel K Clancy

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the needs of Australian food composition database user's regarding database format and relate this to the format of databases available globally. Three semi structured synchronous online focus groups (M = 3, F = 11 and n = 6 female key informant interviews were recorded. Beliefs surrounding the use, training, understanding, benefits and limitations of food composition data and databases were explored. Verbatim transcriptions underwent preliminary coding followed by thematic analysis with NVivo qualitative analysis software to extract the final themes. Schematic analysis was applied to the final themes related to database format. Desktop analysis also examined the format of six key globally available databases. 24 dominant themes were established, of which five related to format; database use, food classification, framework, accessibility and availability, and data derivation. Desktop analysis revealed that food classification systems varied considerably between databases. Microsoft Excel was a common file format used in all databases, and available software varied between countries. User's also recognised that food composition databases format should ideally be designed specifically for the intended use, have a user-friendly food classification system, incorporate accurate data with clear explanation of data derivation and feature user input. However, such databases are limited by data availability and resources. Further exploration of data sharing options should be considered. Furthermore, user's understanding of food composition data and databases limitations is inherent to the correct application of non-specific databases. Therefore, further exploration of user FCDB training should also be considered.

  18. Glassy Carbon Coating Deposited on Hybrid Structure of Composite Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Posmyk A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method of production metal matrix composites with aluminum oxide foam covered by glassy carbon layer used as reinforcement. The glassy carbon coating was formed for decreasing of friction coefficient and reducing the wear. In first step of technology liquid glassy carbon precursor is on ceramic foam deposited, subsequently cured and carbonated at elevated temperature. In this way ceramic foam is covered with glassy carbon coating with thickness of 2-8 μm. It provides desirable amount of glassy carbon in the structure of the material. In the next step, porous spheres with carbon coating are infiltrated by liquid matrix of Al-Cu-Mg alloy. Thereby, equable distribution of glassy carbon in composite volume is achieved. Moreover, typical problems for composites reinforced by particles like sedimentation, agglomeration and clustering of particles are avoided. Tribological characteristics during friction in air versus cast iron as a counterpart were made. Produced composites with glassy carbon layer are characterised by friction coefficient between 0.08-0.20, thus meeting the typical conditions for solid lubricants.

  19. Advanced Design of Composite Steel-Concrete Structural element

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. D. R. Panchal

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Composite framing system consisting of steel beams acting interactively with metal deck-concrete slab and concrete encased composite columns, has been as a viable alternative to the conventional steel or reinforced concrete system in the high-rise construction. However, in Indian context, it is comparatively new and no appropriate design codes are available for the same. Complications in the analysis and design of composite structures have led numerous researchers to develop simplified methods so as to eliminate a number of large scale tests needed for the design. In the present work, a simplified method of composite slabs, beams and columns design is used and software is developed with pre- and post- processing facilities in VB.NET. All principal design checks are incorporated in the software. The full and partial shear connection and the requirement for transverse reinforcement are also considered. To facilitate direct selection of steel section, a database is prepared and is available at the back end with the properties of all standard steel sections. Screen shots are included in the paper to illustrate the method employed for selecting the appropriate section and shear connectors and thus to verify the design adequacy.

  20. Manufacturing and NDE of Large Composite Aerospace Structures at MSFC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Ann

    2000-01-01

    NASA's vision for transportation to orbit calls for new vehicles built with new materials technology. The goals of this new launch system development are to improve safety, dramatically reduce cost to orbit, and improve vehicle turn around time. Planned Space Shuttle upgrades include new reusable liquid propellant boosters to replace the solid propellant boosters. These boosters are to have wings and return to the launch site for a horizontal landing on an airport runway. New single and two stages to orbit concepts are being investigated. To reduce weight and improve performance composite materials are proposed for fuel and oxidizer tanks, fuel feedlines, valve bodies, aerostructures, turbomachinery components. For large composite structures new methods of fabrication are being proposed and developed. Containment of cryogenic fuel or oxidizer requires emphases on composite material densification and chemical compatibility. Ceramic matrix and fiber composites for hot rotating turbomachinery have been developed with new fabrication processes. The new requirements on the materials for launcher components are requiring development of new manufacturing and inspection methods. This talk will examine new and proposed manufacturing methods to fabricate the revolutionary components. New NDE methods under consideration include alternative X-ray methods, X-ray laminagraphy, advanced CT, Thermography, new ultrasonic methods, and imbedded sensors. The sizes, complexity, use environment, and contamination restrictions will challenge the inspection process. In flight self-diagnosis and rapid depot inspection are also goals of the NDE development.

  1. Asymptotic Analysis of Fiber-Reinforced Composites of Hexagonal Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalamkarov, Alexander L.; Andrianov, Igor V.; Pacheco, Pedro M. C. L.; Savi, Marcelo A.; Starushenko, Galina A.

    2016-08-01

    The fiber-reinforced composite materials with periodic cylindrical inclusions of a circular cross-section arranged in a hexagonal array are analyzed. The governing analytical relations of the thermal conductivity problem for such composites are obtained using the asymptotic homogenization method. The lubrication theory is applied for the asymptotic solution of the unit cell problems in the cases of inclusions of large and close to limit diameters, and for inclusions with high conductivity. The lubrication method is further generalized to the cases of finite values of the physical properties of inclusions, as well as for the cases of medium-sized inclusions. The analytical formulas for the effective coefficient of thermal conductivity of the fiber-reinforced composite materials of a hexagonal structure are derived in the cases of small conductivity of inclusions, as well as in the cases of extremely low conductivity of inclusions. The three-phase composite model (TPhM) is applied for solving the unit cell problems in the cases of the inclusions with small diameters, and the asymptotic analysis of the obtained solutions is performed for inclusions of small sizes. The obtained results are analyzed and illustrated graphically, and the limits of their applicability are evaluated. They are compared with the known numerical and asymptotic data in some particular cases, and very good agreement is demonstrated.

  2. Integration of fluidic jet actuators in composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schueller, Martin; Lipowski, Mathias; Schirmer, Eckart; Walther, Marco; Otto, Thomas; Geßner, Thomas; Kroll, Lothar

    2015-04-01

    Fluidic Actuated Flow Control (FAFC) has been introduced as a technology that influences the boundary layer by actively blowing air through slots or holes in the aircraft skin or wind turbine rotor blade. Modern wing structures are or will be manufactured using composite materials. In these state of the art systems, AFC actuators are integrated in a hybrid approach. The new idea is to directly integrate the active fluidic elements (such as SJAs and PJAs) and their components in the structure of the airfoil. Consequently, the integration of such fluidic devices must fit the manufacturing process and the material properties of the composite structure. The challenge is to integrate temperature-sensitive active elements and to realize fluidic cavities at the same time. The transducer elements will be provided for the manufacturing steps using roll-to-roll processes. The fluidic parts of the actuators will be manufactured using the MuCell® process that provides on the one hand the defined reproduction of the fluidic structures and, on the other hand, a high light weight index. Based on the first design concept, a demonstrator was developed in order to proof the design approach. The output velocity on the exit was measured using a hot-wire anemometer.

  3. Thermal properties of composite materials with a complex fractal structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes-Álvarez, F.; Reyes-Salgado, J. J.; Dossetti, V.; Carrillo, J. L.

    2014-06-01

    In this work, we report the thermal characterization of platelike composite samples made of polyester resin and magnetite inclusions. By means of photoacoustic spectroscopy and thermal relaxation, the thermal diffusivity, conductivity and volumetric heat capacity of the samples were experimentally measured. The volume fraction of the inclusions was systematically varied in order to study the changes in the effective thermal conductivity of the composites. For some samples, a static magnetic field was applied during the polymerization process, resulting in anisotropic inclusion distributions. Our results show a decrease in the thermal conductivity of some of the anisotropic samples, compared to the isotropic randomly distributed ones. Our analysis indicates that the development of elongated inclusion structures leads to the formation of magnetite and resin domains, causing this effect. We correlate the complexity of the inclusion structure with the observed thermal response through a multifractal and lacunarity analysis. All the experimental data are contrasted with the well known Maxwell-Garnett effective media approximation for composite materials.

  4. Active structural health monitoring of composite plates and sandwiches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadílek P.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of presented work is to design, assemble and test a functional system, that is able to reveal damage from impact loading. This is done by monitoring of change of spectral characteristics on a damaged structure that is caused by change of mechanical properties of material or by change of structure’s geometry. Excitation and monitoring of structures was done using piezoelectric patches. Unidirectional composite plate was tested for eigenfrequencies using chirp signal. The eigenfrequencies were compared to results from experiments with an impact hammer and consequently with results from finite element method. Same method of finding eigenfrequencies was used on a different unidirectional composite specimen. Series of impacts were performed. Spectrum of eigenfrequencies was measured on undamaged plate and then after each impact. Measurements of the plate with different level of damage were compared. Following experiments were performed on sandwich materials where more different failures may happen. Set of sandwich beams (cut out from one plate made of two outer composite layers and a foam core was investigated and subjected to several impacts. Several samples were impacted in the same manner to get comparable results. The impacts were performed with growing impact energy.

  5. Caul and method for bonding and curing intricate composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willden, Kurtis S. (Inventor); Goodno, Kenneth N. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The invention disclosed here is a method for forming and curing an intricate structure of criss-crossing composite stringers and frames that are bonded to a skin panel. A structure constructed in accordance with the invention would be well-suited for use as a portion of an aircraft fuselage, a boat hull, or the like. The method is preferably practiced by applying uncured composite stringers to an uncured composite sheet panel. This is followed by placing cured frames crosswise over the stringers. The frames have openings at the locations where they intersect with the stringers which enables the frames to come into direct contact with the skin along most of their length. During the forming and curing process, the stringers are covered with a plurality of cauls, and the entire assembly of skin panel, stringers, frames and cauls is subjected to a vacuum bagging and curing process. The cauls serve to maintain both part shape and to control the flow of resin within the stringers as they are cured. Further, they probably eliminate the need for intermediate protective materials between the vacuum bag and the stringers.

  6. COMPOSITIONAL AND SUBSTANTIAL STRUCTURE OF THE MEDICAL DOCUMENT: FORMATION STAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romashova Olga Vladimirovna

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the compositional and substantial structure of the ambulatory medical record, or "case history", which has being formed for a long time. The author allocates the three main periods in the formation of this medical document: the first period (the beginning of the 19th century – 1920s is connected with the origin and formation; the second period (1920-1980s is marked by emergence of the normative legal acts regulating registration and maintaining; the third period (1980s – up to the present is associated with the cancellation of regulations and the introduction of the new order of the Ministry of Health of the USSR that changed the document's form and name. It is determined that the composition of the case history consists of the title page and the main part. The following processes take place in the course of ambulatory medical record's formation: strengthening formalization, increase in the number of pattern text fragments, increase in the text's volume, and the implementation of bigger number of functions. The author reveals the main (informative and cumulative, accounting and additional (scientific, controlling, legal, financial functions of the document. The implementation of these functions is reflected in the compositional and substantial structure of the document text and is conditioned by a number of extralinguistic factors.

  7. Composition, structure and mechanical properties of several natural cellular materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The stem piths of sunflower, kaoliang and corn are natural cellular materials. In this paper, the contents of the compositions of these piths are determined and their cell shapes and structures are examined through scanning electron microscope (SEM) and optical microscope. Further research is conducted in the effects of the compositions and structures of the piths on the mechanical properties after testing the partial mechanical properties. The results show that the total cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin content of each sample approaches 75% of the dry mass of its primary cell walls. With the fall of R value, a parameter relative to the contents of the main compositions, the flexibilities of the cellular piths descend while their stresses and rigidities increase. The basic cell shape making up the sunflower pith is approximately a tetrakaidehedron. The stem piths of kaoliang and corn are made up of cells close to hexangular prisms and a few tubular ones which can observably reinforce their mechanical properties in the axial directions.

  8. Monitoring of Structural Integrity of Composite Structures by Embedded Optical Fiber Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osei, Albert J.

    2002-01-01

    Real time monitoring of the mechanical integrity and stresses on key aerospace composite structures like aircraft wings, walls of pressure vessels and fuel tanks or any other structurally extended components and panels as in space telescopes is very important to NASA. Future military and commercial aircraft as well as NASA space systems such as Space Based Radar and International Space Station will incorporate a monitoring system to sense any degradation to the structure. In the extreme flight conditions of an aerospace vehicle it might be desirable to measure the strain every ten centimeters and thus fully map out the strain field of a composite component. A series of missions and vehicle health management requirements call for these measurements. At the moment thousands of people support a few vehicle launches per year. This number can be significantly reduced by implementing intelligent vehicles with integral nervous systems (smart structures). This would require maintenance to be performed only as needed. Military and commercial aircrafts have an equally compelling case. Maintenance yearly costs are currently reaching astronomical heights. Monitoring techniques are therefore required that allow for maintenance to be performed only when needed. This would allow improved safety by insuring that necessary tasks are performed while reducing costs by eliminating procedures that are costly and not needed. The advantages fiber optical sensors have over conventional electro-mechanical systems like strain gauges have been widely extolled in the research literature. These advantages include their small size, low weight, immunity to electrical resistance, corrosion resistance, compatibility with composite materials and process conditions, and multiplexing capabilities. One fiber optic device which is suitable for distributed sensing is the fiber Bragg grating (FBG). Researchers at NASA MSFC are currently developing techniques for using FBGs for monitoring the integrity of

  9. Design and development of conformal antenna composite structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zonghong; Zhao, Wei; Zhang, Peng; Li, Xiang

    2017-09-01

    In the manufacturing process of the common smart skin antenna, the adhesive covered on the radiating elements of the antenna led to severe deviation of the resonant frequency, which degraded the electromagnetic performance of the antenna. In this paper, a new component called package cover was adopted to prevent the adhesive from covering on the radiating elements of the microstrip antenna array. The package cover and the microstrip antenna array were bonded together as packaged antenna which was then embedded into the composite sandwich structure to develop a new structure called conformal antenna composite structure (CACS). The geometric parameters of the microstrip antenna array and the CACS were optimized by the commercial software CST microwave studio. According to the optimal results, the microstrip antenna array and the CACS were manufactured and tested. The experimental and numerical results of electromagnetic performance showed that the resonant frequency of the CACS was close to that of the microstrip antenna array (with error less than 1%) and the CACS had a higher gain (about 2 dB) than the microstrip antenna array. The package system would increase the electromagnetic radiating energy at the design frequency nearly 66%. The numerical model generated by CST microwave studio in this study could successfully predict the electromagnetic performance of the microstrip antenna array and the CACS with relatively good accuracy. The mechanical analysis results showed that the CACS had better flexural property than the composite sandwich structure without the embedment of packaged antenna. The comparison of the electromagnetic performance for the CACS and the MECSSA showed that the package system was useful and effective.

  10. Desmosomal Molecules In and Out of Adhering Junctions: Normal and Diseased States of Epidermal, Cardiac and Mesenchymally Derived Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Pieperhoff

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Current cell biology textbooks mention only two kinds of cell-to-cell adhering junctions coated with the cytoplasmic plaques: the desmosomes (maculae adhaerentes, anchoring intermediate-sized filaments (IFs, and the actin microfilament-anchoring adherens junctions (AJs, including both punctate (puncta adhaerentia and elongate (fasciae adhaerentes structures. In addition, however, a series of other junction types has been identified and characterized which contain desmosomal molecules but do not fit the definition of desmosomes. Of these special cell-cell junctions containing desmosomal glycoproteins or proteins we review the composite junctions (areae compositae connecting the cardiomyocytes of mature mammalian hearts and their importance in relation to human arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathies. We also emphasize the various plakophilin-2-positive plaques in AJs (coniunctiones adhaerentes connecting proliferatively active mesenchymally-derived cells, including interstitial cells of the heart and several soft tissue tumor cell types. Moreover, desmoplakin has also been recognized as a constituent of the plaques of the complexus adhaerentes connecting certain lymphatic endothelial cells. Finally, we emphasize the occurrence of the desmosomal transmembrane glycoprotein, desmoglein Dsg2, out of the context of any junction as dispersed cell surface molecules in certain types of melanoma cells and melanocytes. This broadening of our knowledge on the diversity of AJ structures indicates that it may still be too premature to close the textbook chapters on cell-cell junctions.

  11. Modelling of Dual-Junction Solar Cells including Tunnel Junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelaziz Amine

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Monolithically stacked multijunction solar cells based on III–V semiconductors materials are the state-of-art of approach for high efficiency photovoltaic energy conversion, in particular for space applications. The individual subcells of the multi-junction structure are interconnected via tunnel diodes which must be optically transparent and connect the component cells with a minimum electrical resistance. The quality of these diodes determines the output performance of the solar cell. The purpose of this work is to contribute to the investigation of the tunnel electrical resistance of such a multi-junction cell through the analysis of the current-voltage (J-V characteristics under illumination. Our approach is based on an equivalent circuit model of a diode for each subcell. We examine the effect of tunnel resistance on the performance of a multi-junction cell using minimization of the least squares technique.

  12. Active zone stability: insights from fly neuromuscular junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolin Tian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The presynaptic active zone is a dynamic structure that orchestrates regulated release of neurotransmitters. Developmental and aging processes, and changes in neuronal network activity can all modulate the number, size and composition of active zone and thereby synaptic efficacy. However, very little is known about the mechanism that controls the structural stability of active zone. By studying a model synapse, the Drosophila neuromuscular junction, our recent work shed light on how two scaffolding proteins at the active zone regulate active zone stability by promoting a localized dephosphorylation event at the nerve terminal. Here we discuss the major insights from our findings and their implications for future research.

  13. Polymer sol-gel composite inverse opal structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoran; Blanchard, G J

    2015-03-25

    We report on the formation of composite inverse opal structures where the matrix used to form the inverse opal contains both silica, formed using sol-gel chemistry, and poly(ethylene glycol), PEG. We find that the morphology of the inverse opal structure depends on both the amount of PEG incorporated into the matrix and its molecular weight. The extent of organization in the inverse opal structure, which is characterized by scanning electron microscopy and optical reflectance data, is mediated by the chemical bonding interactions between the silica and PEG constituents in the hybrid matrix. Both polymer chain terminus Si-O-C bonding and hydrogen bonding between the polymer backbone oxygens and silanol functionalities can contribute, with the polymer mediating the extent to which Si-O-Si bonds can form within the silica regions of the matrix due to hydrogen-bonding interactions.

  14. Substantiation of concrete core rational parameters for bending composite structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vatulia Glib

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to provide bending structures rationalization for reducing the materials consumption, labor and power inputs, construction or renovation terms, the authors considered the possibility of utilizing the structures with external steel sheet reinforcement and concrete layer made from fibers of different types. Experimental researches of various authors, both domestic and overseas, have been analyzed during the preliminary investigations. As a result, the steel and basalt fibers were selected for further inquiry, proved their rational sizes, percentage to concrete mass in structures worked under thermal and force impacts. It was developed the algorithm and software, helps to determine the stress-strain state and carrying capacity of composite floor slabs with different end and load conditions. It was concluded the necessity of physical-mechanical and thermal physic properties clarification of heated fibrous concrete. The experiment planning was performed to obtain the temperature dependences of strength and modulus of deformation, thermal conductivity and specific heat capacity of fibrous concrete mix.

  15. Trade study plan for Graphite Composite Primary Structure (GCPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, H. S.

    1994-01-01

    This TA 2 document (with support from TA 1) describes the trade study plan that will identify the most suitable structural configuration for an SSTO winged vehicle capable of delivering 25,000 lbs to a 220 nm circular orbit at 51.6 degree inclination For this most suitable configuration the structural attachment of the wing, and the most suitable GCPS composite materials for intertank, wing, tail and thrust structure are identified. This trade study analysis uses extensive information derived in the TA 1 trade study plan and is identified within the study plan. In view of this, for convenience, the TA 1 study plan is included as an appendix to this document.

  16. Structural and Compositional Transformations of Biomass Chars during Fast Pyrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trubetskaya, Anna; Steibel, Markus; Spliethoff, Hartmut

    In this work the physical and chemical transformations of biomass chars during fast pyrolysis, considered as a 2nd stage of combustion, has been investigated. Seven biomasses containing different amount of ash and organic components were reacted at up to 1673 K with high heating rates in a wire......-mesh reactor and the resulting chars were retrieved. In order to obtain information on the structural and compositional transformations of the biomass chars, samples were subjected to elemental analysis, scanning electron microcopy with EDX and Raman spectrometry. The results show that there are significant...... changes in both the organic and inorganic constituents of the chars.Under high heating rates (> 100 K/s) char particles underwent different types of melting and pores of different size were developed in dependency on the temperature and biomass composition. The Si-rich rice husks char did not show any...

  17. Structural Acoustic Response of Shape Memory Alloy Hybrid Composite Panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Travis L.

    1996-01-01

    A method has been developed to predict the structural acoustic response of shape memory alloy hybrid composite panels subjected to acoustic excitation. The panel is modeled by a finite element analysis and the radiated field is predicted using Rayleigh's integral. Transmission loss predictions for the case of an aluminum panel excited by a harmonic acoustic pressure are shown to compare very well with a classical analysis. Predictions of the normal velocity response and transmitted acoustic pressure for a clamped aluminum panel show excellent agreement with experimental measurements. Predicted transmission loss performance for a composite panel with and without shape memory alloy reinforcement are also presented. The preliminary results demonstrate that the transmission loss can be significantly increased with shape memory alloy reinforcement.

  18. How Muscle Structure and Composition Influence Meat and Flesh Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Listrat

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle consists of several tissues, such as muscle fibers and connective and adipose tissues. This review aims to describe the features of these various muscle components and their relationships with the technological, nutritional, and sensory properties of meat/flesh from different livestock and fish species. Thus, the contractile and metabolic types, size and number of muscle fibers, the content, composition and distribution of the connective tissue, and the content and lipid composition of intramuscular fat play a role in the determination of meat/flesh appearance, color, tenderness, juiciness, flavor, and technological value. Interestingly, the biochemical and structural characteristics of muscle fibers, intramuscular connective tissue, and intramuscular fat appear to play independent role, which suggests that the properties of these various muscle components can be independently modulated by genetics or environmental factors to achieve production efficiency and improve meat/flesh quality.

  19. Structural mechanics and helical geometry of thin elastic composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Hirofumi

    2016-09-21

    Helices are ubiquitous in nature, and helical shape transition is often observed in residually stressed bodies, such as composites, wherein materials with different mechanical properties are glued firmly together to form a whole body. Inspired by a variety of biological examples, the basic physical mechanism responsible for the emergence of twisting and bending in such thin composite structures has been extensively studied. Here, we propose a simplified analytical model wherein a slender membrane tube undergoes a helical transition driven by the contraction of an elastic ribbon bound to the membrane surface. We analytically predict the curvature and twist of an emergent helix as functions of differential strains and elastic moduli, which are confirmed by our numerical simulations. Our results may help understand shapes observed in different biological systems, such as spiral bacteria, and could be applied to novel designs of soft machines and robots.

  20. Molecular electronic junction transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solomon, Gemma C.; Herrmann, Carmen; Ratner, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Whenasinglemolecule,oracollectionofmolecules,isplacedbetween two electrodes and voltage is applied, one has a molecular transport junction. We discuss such junctions, their properties, their description, and some of their applications. The discussion is qualitative rather than quantitative, and f...

  1. Implementing optical fibres for the structural health monitoring of composite patch repaired structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karatzas, Vasileios; Kotsidis, Elias A.; Tsouvalis, Nicholas G.

    2017-01-01

    are reflected to the recorded strain measurements, finite element models have been generated. Results indicate that composite patch repairing drastically increased the load bearing capacity of the plates and that optical fibres constitute an appealing health monitoring system for such applications, being able......Structural health monitoring is increasingly being implemented to improve the level of safety of structures and to reduce inspection and repair costs by allowing for correct planning of these actions, if needed. Composite patch repairing presents an appealing alternative to traditional repair...... methods as it enables the reduction of closedown time and the mitigation of complications associated with traditional repair methods. As reinforcement with the use of composite patches is predominantly performed at defected structures, the urge to monitor the performance of the repair becomes even greater...

  2. Structure of Al-CF composites obtained by infiltration methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Dolata-Grosz

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The structure of the composites obtained in infiltration processes 2D and 3D carbon preform by liquid Al alloy have been presented in thispaper. An aluminum alloy with silicon and manganese AlSi9Mn (trimal 37-TR37 was applied in the researches. As the reinforcementused carbon perform prepared with various protective barriers such as the nickel coating, the coating of silicon carbide and pyrolyticcarbon coating. Carbon preforms was prepared at the Institute for Lightweight Structures and Polymer Technology (ILK TU Dresden andat the Institute of Technology and Ceramic Systems (Fraunhofer-IKTS. The process of infiltration of carbon perform by liquid aluminiumalloy was carried out using a pressure-vacuum infiltration on the Degussa press and gas-pressure infiltration (GPI in an autoclavedesigned and built at the Department of Materials Technology at the Silesian University of Technology. The obtained composites werecharacterized by a regular shape, with no surface casting defects. The best connection of components was observed in AlSi9Mn/Cf(Nicomposite, obtained by gas-pressure infiltration method (GPI. On metallographic specimens, good interface between fibres and thealuminium matrix were observed. The obtained research results justify the application of nickel coatings on the fibres. During the failurecrack propagated across fiber. There was no presence of aluminum carbide on the fiber-matrix. It can be assumed that the composite willbe characterized by the good mechanical properties. However, this requires further experimental verification planned in the next stage of research, in the project realized within the DFG program: "3D textile reinforced aluminium matrix composites for complex loadingsituations in lightweight automobile and machine parts".

  3. Structural, spectral and dielectric properties of piezoelectric-piezomagnetic composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemeda, O.M., E-mail: omhemeda@yahoo.co.uk [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Taif University, Al-Hawiah, P.O. Box 888, Taif 21974 (Saudi Arabia); Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Tanta University (Egypt); Tawfik, A.; Amer, M.A. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Tanta University (Egypt); Kamal, B.M.; El Refaay, D.E. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Suez Canal University (Egypt)

    2012-10-15

    Composite materials of spinel ferrite (SF) NiZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (NZF) and barium titanate (BT) BaTiO{sub 3} were prepared by double sintering ceramic technique. X-ray diffraction patterns for the composite system (1-x) NZF+x BT, showed the presence of mainly of 2 phases, hence confirming the successful preparation of the composite. Some structural and microstructural parameters like porosity, X-ray density, particle size and lattice constant were deduced from the analysis of X-ray data for both phases. Scan electron microscope (SEM) analysis shows nearly a homogeneous microstructure with good dispersion of BT grains as well as the presence of some pores. There was also an enlargement of BT grains with increasing its content. Infra red (IR) spectra of the composite system indicate that BT content affects the intermolecular character of the SF phase. A rise in the dielectric constant occurred at high temperature which was attributed to the effect of space change resulting from the increase of the change carriers in the paramagnetic region. The dielectric loss (tan {delta}) decreased by increasing BT content. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Double phase NZF-BT composite has a high magnetoelectric coefficient compared with other materials. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This makes it strongly candidates for electromagnetic wave sensors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Addition of BT phase enhance dielectric constant which make it very useful for capacitor industry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ni ferrite shifts the transition temperature of BT from 120 Degree-Sign C near room temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decrease of dielectric loss which supply with good material with law eddy current loss for cores of t ransformers at microwave frequency.

  4. Ultrasonic guided wave mechanics for composite material structural health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Huidong

    The ultrasonic guided wave based method is very promising for structural health monitoring of aging and modern aircraft. An understanding of wave mechanics becomes very critical for exploring the potential of this technology. However, the guided wave mechanics in complex structures, especially composite materials, are very challenging due to the nature of multi-layer, anisotropic, and viscoelastic behavior. The purpose of this thesis is to overcome the challenges and potentially take advantage of the complex wave mechanics for advanced sensor design and signal analysis. Guided wave mechanics is studied in three aspects, namely wave propagation, excitation, and damage sensing. A 16 layer quasi-isotropic composite with a [(0/45/90/-45)s]2 lay up sequence is used in our study. First, a hybrid semi-analytical finite element (SAFE) and global matrix method (GMM) is used to simulate guided wave propagation in composites. Fast and accurate simulation is achieved by using SAFE for dispersion curve generation and GMM for wave structure calculation. Secondly, the normal mode expansion (NME) technique is used for the first time to study the wave excitation characteristics in laminated composites. A clear and simple definition of wave excitability is put forward as a result of NME analysis. Source influence for guided wave excitation is plotted as amplitude on a frequency and phase velocity spectrum. This spectrum also provides a guideline for transducer design in guided wave excitation. The ultrasonic guided wave excitation characteristics in viscoelastic media are also studied for the first time using a modified normal mode expansion technique. Thirdly, a simple physically based feature is developed to estimate the guided wave sensitivity to damage in composites. Finally, a fuzzy logic decision program is developed to perform mode selection through a quantitative evaluation of the wave propagation, excitation and sensitivity features. Numerical simulation algorithms are

  5. Fibre Optic Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring of Aircraft Composite Structures: Recent Advances and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaella Di Sante

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In-service structural health monitoring of composite aircraft structures plays a key role in the assessment of their performance and integrity. In recent years, Fibre Optic Sensors (FOS have proved to be a potentially excellent technique for real-time in-situ monitoring of these structures due to their numerous advantages, such as immunity to electromagnetic interference, small size, light weight, durability, and high bandwidth, which allows a great number of sensors to operate in the same system, and the possibility to be integrated within the material. However, more effort is still needed to bring the technology to a fully mature readiness level. In this paper, recent research and applications in structural health monitoring of composite aircraft structures using FOS have been critically reviewed, considering both the multi-point and distributed sensing techniques.

  6. Fibre Optic Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring of Aircraft Composite Structures: Recent Advances and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Sante, Raffaella

    2015-07-30

    In-service structural health monitoring of composite aircraft structures plays a key role in the assessment of their performance and integrity. In recent years, Fibre Optic Sensors (FOS) have proved to be a potentially excellent technique for real-time in-situ monitoring of these structures due to their numerous advantages, such as immunity to electromagnetic interference, small size, light weight, durability, and high bandwidth, which allows a great number of sensors to operate in the same system, and the possibility to be integrated within the material. However, more effort is still needed to bring the technology to a fully mature readiness level. In this paper, recent research and applications in structural health monitoring of composite aircraft structures using FOS have been critically reviewed, considering both the multi-point and distributed sensing techniques.

  7. Gap junctions - guards of excitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroemlund, Line Waring; Jensen, Christa Funch; Qvortrup, Klaus; Delmar, Mario; Nielsen, Morten Schak

    2015-06-01

    Cardiomyocytes are connected by mechanical and electrical junctions located at the intercalated discs (IDs). Although these structures have long been known, it is becoming increasingly clear that their components interact. This review describes the involvement of the ID in electrical disturbances of the heart and focuses on the role of the gap junctional protein connexin 43 (Cx43). Current evidence shows that Cx43 plays a crucial role in organizing microtubules at the intercalated disc and thereby regulating the trafficking of the cardiac sodium channel NaV1.5 to the membrane.

  8. Surface structure of CdS layer at the interface of CdS-SnO2 junction and the diagram of surface states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caraman, I.; Lazar, I.; Caraman, M.; Rusu, D.

    2009-01-01

    The SnO2-CdS type structures with SnO2 film deposited by thermal pirolize in SnCl4-etanol solution were obtained. The CdS film with submicron thickness was obtained in cvasiclosed volume. The transversal section of the SnO2-CdS junction as well as the outer surface of the CdS film was analyzed using the electronic microscope. The density of the crystallization germs in the CdS film was about 1013cm-2. The luminescence spectrum of CdS has been examined. The existence of exciton line (n=1) in reflection and emission spectrum serves as a criteria of crystalline perfection of surface film.

  9. Design and fabrication of a perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction based nonvolatile programmable switch achieving 40% less area using shared-control transistor structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, D; Natsui, M; Mochizuki, A; Miura, S; Honjo, H; Kinoshita, K; Fukami, S; Sato, H; Ikeda, S; Endoh, T; Ohno, H; Hanyu, T

    2014-05-07

    A compact nonvolatile programmable switch (NVPS) using 90 nm CMOS technology together with perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction (p-MTJ) devices is fabricated for zero-standby-power field-programmable gate array. Because routing information does not change once it is programmed into an NVPS, high-speed read and write accesses are not required and a write-control transistor can be shared among all the NVPSs, which greatly simplifies structure of the NVPS. In fact, the effective area of the proposed NVPS is reduced by 40% compared to that of a conventional MTJ-based NVPS. The instant on/off behavior without external nonvolatile memory access is also demonstrated using the fabricated test chip.

  10. Damage Detection in Composite Structures with Wavenumber Array Data Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhenhua; Leckey, Cara; Yu, Lingyu

    2013-01-01

    Guided ultrasonic waves (GUW) have the potential to be an efficient and cost-effective method for rapid damage detection and quantification of large structures. Attractive features include sensitivity to a variety of damage types and the capability of traveling relatively long distances. They have proven to be an efficient approach for crack detection and localization in isotropic materials. However, techniques must be pushed beyond isotropic materials in order to be valid for composite aircraft components. This paper presents our study on GUW propagation and interaction with delamination damage in composite structures using wavenumber array data processing, together with advanced wave propagation simulations. Parallel elastodynamic finite integration technique (EFIT) is used for the example simulations. Multi-dimensional Fourier transform is used to convert time-space wavefield data into frequency-wavenumber domain. Wave propagation in the wavenumber-frequency domain shows clear distinction among the guided wave modes that are present. This allows for extracting a guided wave mode through filtering and reconstruction techniques. Presence of delamination causes spectral change accordingly. Results from 3D CFRP guided wave simulations with delamination damage in flat-plate specimens are used for wave interaction with structural defect study.

  11. CARBONIZED STARCH MICROCELLULAR FOAM-CELLULOSE FIBER COMPOSITE STRUCTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew R. Rutledge

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The production of microporous carbon foams from renewable starch microcellular foam-fiber (SMCF-Fiber composites is described. Carbon foams are used in applications such as thermal insulation, battery electrodes, filters, fuel cells, and medical devices. SMCF-Fiber compos-ites were created from an aquagel. The water in the aquagel was exchanged with ethanol and then dried and carbonized. Higher amylose content starches and fiber contents of up to 4% improved the processability of the foam. The SMCF structure revealed agglomerates of swollen starch granules connected by a web of starch with pores in the 50-200 nanometer range. Heating the SMCF-fiber in a nitrogen atmosphere to temperatures between 350-700˚C produced carbon foams with a three-dimensional closed cell foam structure with cell diameters around 50 microns and pore walls around 1-3 microns. The stress versus strain compression data for carbonized samples displayed a linear elastic region and a plateau indicative of brittle crushing, typical of an elastic-brittle foam. The carbon foam products from these renew-able precursors are promising carbon structures with moderate strength and low density.

  12. Structural alteration of tight and adherens junctions in villous and crypt epithelium of the small and large intestine of conventional nursing piglets infected with porcine epidemic diarrhea virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kwonil; Eyerly, Bryan; Annamalai, Thavamathi; Lu, Zhongyan; Saif, Linda J

    2015-06-12

    Integrity of the intestinal epithelium is critical for proper functioning of the barrier that regulates absorption of water and restricts uptake of luminal bacteria. It is maintained mainly by tight junctions (TJs) and adherens junctions (AJs). We conducted immunofluorescence (IF) staining for in situ identification of zonula occludin (ZO)-1 proteins for TJ and E-Cadherin proteins for AJ in the small and large intestinal villous and crypt epithelium of nursing pigs infected with porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV). Twenty 9-day-old piglets [PEDV-infected (n=9) and Mock (n=11)] from PEDV seronegative sows, were orally inoculated [8.9 log₁₀ genomic equivalents/pig] with PEDV PC21A strain or mock. At post-inoculation days (PIDs) 1-5, infected pigs showed severe watery diarrhea and/or vomiting and severe atrophic enteritis. By immunohistochemistry, PEDV antigens were evident in enterocytes lining the villous epithelium. At PIDs 1-5, PEDV-infected pigs exhibited mildly to extensively disorganized, irregular distribution and reduced expression of ZO-1 or E-Cadherin in villous, but not crypt epithelial cells of the jejunum and ileum, but not in the large intestine, when compared to the negative controls. The structural destruction and disorganization of TJ and AJ were extensive in PEDV-infected pigs at PIDs 1-3, but then appeared to reversibly recover at PID 5, as evident by increased numbers of ZO-1-positive epithelial cells and markedly improved appearance of E-Cadherin-positive villous epithelium. Our results suggest a possible involvement of structurally impaired TJ and AJ in the pathogenesis of PEDV, potentially leading to secondary bacterial infections.

  13. Optical Spectroscopy Study of Transparent Non-Carious Human Dentin and Dentin-Enamel Junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, G.W.; Marshall, S.J.; Gallagher, R.R.; Demos, S.

    1999-12-14

    Improving our knowledge of the morphology, composition and properties of the dentin, enamel, and the dentin-enamel junction (DEJ) is vital for the development of improved restorative materials and clinical placement techniques. Most studies of dental tissues have used light microscopy for characterization. In our investigation, the spectroscopic properties of normal and non-carious transparent human root dentin, and the dentin-enamel junction were investigated using emission imaging microscopy, and micro-spectroscopy. Experimental results reveal new information on the structural and biochemical characteristics of these dental tissues.

  14. Structural and functional polymer-matrix composites for electromagnetic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Junhua

    This dissertation addresses the science and technology of functional and structural polymer-matrix composite materials for electromagnetic applications, which include electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding and low observability (Stealth). The structural composites are continuous carbon fiber epoxy-matrix composites, which are widely used for airframes. The functional composites are composites with discontinuous fillers and in both bulk and coating forms. Through composite structure variation, attractive electromagnetic properties have been achieved. With no degradation of the tensile strength or modulus, the shielding effectiveness of the structural composites has been improved by enhancing multiple reflections through light activation of the carbon fiber. The multiple reflections loss of the electromagnetic wave increases from 1.1 to 10.2 dB at 1.0 GHz due to the activation. Such a large effect of multiple reflections has not been previously reported in any material. The observability of these composites has been lowered by decreasing the electrical conductivity (and hence decreasing the reflection loss) through carbon fiber coating. The incorporation of mumetal, a magnetic alloy particulate filler (28-40 mum size), in a latex paint has been found to be effective for enhancing the shielding only if the electrical resistivity of the resulting composite coating is below 10 O.cm, as rendered by a conductive particulate filler, such as nickel flake (14-20 mum size). This effectiveness (39 dB at 1.0 GHz) is attributed to the absorption of the electromagnetic wave by the mumetal and the nickel flake, with the high conductivity rendered by the presence of the nickel flake resulting in a relatively high reflection loss of 15.5 dB. Without the nickel flake, the mumetal gives only 3 dB of shielding and 1.5 dB of reflection loss at 1.0 GHz. Nickel powder (0.3-0.5 mum size) has been found to be an effective filler for improving the shielding of polyethersulfone (PES

  15. Innovative design of composite structures: The use of curvilinear fiber format in composite structure design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyer, M. W.; Charette, R. F.

    1990-01-01

    The gains in structural efficiency are investigated that can be achieved by aligning the fibers in some or all of the layers in a laminate with the principal stress directions in those layers. The name curvilinear fiber format is given to this idea. The problem studied is a plate with a central circular hole subjected to a uniaxial tensile load. An iteration scheme is used to find the fiber directions at each point in the laminate. Two failure criteria are used to evaluate the tensile load capacity of the plates with a curvilinear format, and for comparison, counterpart plates with a conventional straightline fiber format. The curvilinear designs for improved tensile capacity are then checked for buckling resistance. It is concluded that gains in efficiency can be realized with the curvilinear format.

  16. Measuring Moisture Levels in Graphite Epoxy Composite Sandwich Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurge, Mark; Youngquist, Robert; Starr, Stanley

    2011-01-01

    Graphite epoxy composite (GEC) materials are used in the construction of rocket fairings, nose cones, interstage adapters, and heat shields due to their high strength and light weight. However, they absorb moisture depending on the environmental conditions they are exposed to prior to launch. Too much moisture absorption can become a problem when temperature and pressure changes experienced during launch cause the water to vaporize. The rapid state change of the water can result in structural failure of the material. In addition, heat and moisture combine to weaken GEC structures. Diffusion models that predict the total accumulated moisture content based on the environmental conditions are one accepted method of determining if the material strength has been reduced to an unacceptable level. However, there currently doesn t exist any field measurement technique to estimate the actual moisture content of a composite structure. A multi-layer diffusion model was constructed with Mathematica to predict moisture absorption and desorption from the GEC sandwich structure. This model is used in conjunction with relative humidity/temperature sensors both on the inside and outside of the material to determine the moisture levels in the structure. Because the core materials have much higher diffusivity than the face sheets, a single relative humidity measurement will accurately reflect the moisture levels in the core. When combined with an external relative humidity measurement, the model can be used to determine the moisture levels in the face sheets. Since diffusion is temperaturedependent, the temperature measurements are used to determine the diffusivity of the face sheets for the model computations.

  17. Advanced ultrasonic testing of complex shaped composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolmatov, D.; Zhvyrblya, V.; Filippov, G.; Salchak, Y.; Sedanova, E.

    2016-06-01

    Due to the wide application of composite materials it is necessary to develop unconventional quality control techniques. One of the methods that can be used for this purpose is ultrasonic tomography. In this article an application of a robotic ultrasonic system is considered. Precise positioning of the robotic scanner and path generating are defined as ones of the most important aspects. This study proposes a non-contact calibration method of a robotic ultrasonic system. Path of the scanner requires a 3D model of controlled objects which are created in accordance with the proposed algorithm. The suggested techniques are based on implementation of structured light method.

  18. Retentive strength of fiber-reinforced composite posts with composite resin cores: Effect of remaining coronal structure and root canal dentin conditioning protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saker, Samah; Özcan, Mutlu

    2015-12-01

    The prognosis of a fixed dental prosthesis cemented to endodontically treated teeth is primarily determined by the presence of a ferrule on the tooth. Adhesion of the post in the root canal, conditioning methods for the canal and the amount of coronal structure could also be decisive on survival of reconstructions cemented on endodontically treated teeth. The purpose of this in vitro study was to test the effect of remaining coronal structure on the retention of airborne-particle abraded fiber-reinforced composite resin posts built up with composite resin cores after the treatment of root canal dentin with different conditioning protocols. One hundred and fifty extracted human teeth with single root canal space were endodontically treated and divided into 3 groups as follows: group CEJ: the teeth were sectioned at the level of cementoenamel junction (CEJ); group CEJ1: the teeth were sectioned 1 mm above the CEJ; group CEJ2: the teeth were sectioned 2 mm above the CEJ. Each group was further divided into 5 subgroups (n=10 per group) according to the root canal treatments as follows: group C: no conditioning (control); group PH: conditioning with 37% phosphoric acid gel for 15 seconds; group E: conditioning with 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) for 60 seconds; group CHX: conditioning with 2% chlorhexidine (CHX) for 60 seconds; group Q: conditioning with combination of 2% CHX with 17% EDTA and a surfactant solution for 60 seconds. Glass fiber-reinforced composite resin posts were airborne-particle abraded and luted to the root canal dentin with a self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX Unicem). The retentive force was tested by applying a tensile load parallel to the long axis of these posts at a crosshead speed of 2 mm/min. Two-way ANOVA and the Tukey HSD post hoc test were used to analyze the data. The highest retention (N) was obtained with the CHX-EDTA conditioned group (374.7 ±29.8) followed by 17% EDTA (367.9 ±33.3) conditioning when 2 mm remaining

  19. Human MUS81-EME2 can cleave a variety of DNA structures including intact Holliday junction and nicked duplex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amangyeld, Tamir; Shin, Yong-Keol; Lee, Miju; Kwon, Buki; Seo, Yeon-Soo

    2014-05-01

    MUS81 shares a high-degree homology with the catalytic XPF subunit of the XPF-ERCC1 endonuclease complex. It is catalytically active only when complexed with the regulatory subunits Mms4 or Eme1 in budding and fission yeasts, respectively, and EME1 or EME2 in humans. Although Mus81 complexes are implicated in the resolution of recombination intermediates in vivo, recombinant yeast Mus81-Mms4 and human MUS81-EME1 isolated from Escherichia coli fail to cleave intact Holliday junctions (HJs) in vitro. In this study, we show that human recombinant MUS81-EME2 isolated from E. coli cleaves HJs relatively efficiently, compared to MUS81-EME1. Furthermore, MUS81-EME2 catalyzed cleavage of nicked and gapped duplex deoxyribonucleic acids (DNAs), generating double-strand breaks. The presence of a 5' phosphate terminus at nicks and gaps rendered DNA significantly less susceptible to the cleavage by MUS81-EME2 than its absence, raising the possibility that this activity could play a role in channeling damaged DNA duplexes that are not readily repaired into the recombinational repair pathways. Significant differences in substrate specificity observed with unmodified forms of MUS81-EME1 and MUS81-EME2 suggest that they play related but non-overlapping roles in DNA transactions. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  20. Compact-device model development for the energy-delay analysis of magneto-electric magnetic tunnel junction structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, N.; Bird, J. P.; Dowben, P. A.; Marshall, A.

    2016-06-01

    We discuss the application of a novel class of device, the magneto-electric magnetic tunnel junction (ME-MTJ) to realize a variety of computational functions, including majority logic and the XNOR/XOR gate. We also develop a compact model to describe the operation of these devices, which function by utilizing the phenomenon of ‘voltage-controlled magnetism’ to switch the operational state of MTJs. The model breaks down the switching process into three key stages of operation: electrical-to-magnetic conversion, magnetization transfer, and final-state readout. Estimates for the switching energy and delay of these devices, obtained from this compact model, reveal significant improvements in both of these parameters when compared to conventional MTJs switched by spin-transfer-torque. In fact, the capacity to use the ME-MTJ to implement complex logical operations within a single device allows its energy costs to even approach those of low-power CMOS. The added benefits of non-volatility and compact circuit footprint, combined with their potential for heterogeneous integration with CMOS, make the ME devices of considerable interest for post-CMOS technology.

  1. FORMATION REGULARITIES OF PHASE COMPOSITION, STRUCTURE AND PROPERTIES DURING MECHANICAL ALLOYING OF BINARY ALUMINUM COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. G. Lovshenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents investigation results pertaining to  ascertainment of formation regularities of phase composition and structure during mechanical alloying of binary aluminium composites/substances. The invetigations have been executed while applying a wide range of methods, devices and equipment used in modern material science. The obtained data complement each other. It has been established that presence of oxide and hydro-oxide films on aluminium powder  and introduction of surface-active substance in the composite have significant effect on mechanically and thermally activated phase transformations and properties of semi-finished products.  Higher fatty acids have been used as a surface active substance.The mechanism of mechanically activated solid solution formation has been identified. Its essence is  a formation of  specific quasi-solutions at the initial stage of processing. Mechanical and chemical interaction between components during formation of other phases has taken place along with dissolution  in aluminium while processing powder composites. Granule basis is formed according to the dynamic recrystallization mechanism and possess submicrocrystal structural type with the granule dimension basis less than 100 nm and the grains are divided in block size of not more than 20 nm with oxide inclusions of 10–20 nm size.All the compounds  with the addition of  surface-active substances including aluminium powder without alloying elements obtained by processing in mechanic reactor are disperse hardened. In some cases disperse hardening is accompanied by dispersive and solid solution hardnening process. Complex hardening predetermines a high temperature of recrystallization in mechanically alloyed compounds,  its value exceeds 400 °C.

  2. Structure recognition from high resolution images of ceramic composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ushizima, Daniela; Perciano, Talita; Krishnan, Harinarayan; Loring, Burlen; Bale, Hrishikesh; Parkinson, Dilworth; Sethian, James

    2015-01-05

    Fibers provide exceptional strength-to-weight ratio capabilities when woven into ceramic composites, transforming them into materials with exceptional resistance to high temperature, and high strength combined with improved fracture toughness. Microcracks are inevitable when the material is under strain, which can be imaged using synchrotron X-ray computed micro-tomography (mu-CT) for assessment of material mechanical toughness variation. An important part of this analysis is to recognize fibrillar features. This paper presents algorithms for detecting and quantifying composite cracks and fiber breaks from high-resolution image stacks. First, we propose recognition algorithms to identify the different structures of the composite, including matrix cracks and fibers breaks. Second, we introduce our package F3D for fast filtering of large 3D imagery, implemented in OpenCL to take advantage of graphic cards. Results show that our algorithms automatically identify micro-damage and that the GPU-based implementation introduced here takes minutes, being 17x faster than similar tools on a typical image file.

  3. Possible Internal Structures and Compositions of Proxima Centauri b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugger, B.; Mousis, O.; Deleuil, M.; Lunine, J. I.

    2016-11-01

    We explore the possible interiors of Proxima Centauri b, assuming that the planet belongs to the class of dense solid planets (rocky with possible addition of water) and derive the corresponding radii. To do so, we use an internal structure model that computes the radius of the planet along with the locations of the different layers of materials, assuming that its mass and bulk composition are known. Lacking detailed elementary abundances of the host star to constrain the planet’s composition, we base our model on solar system values. We restrained the simulations to the case of solid planets without massive atmospheres. With these assumptions, the possible radius of Proxima Centauri b spans the 0.94-1.40 R ⊕ range. The minimum value is obtained considering a 1.10 M ⊕ Mercury-like planet with a 65% core mass fraction, whereas the highest radius is reached for 1.46 M ⊕ with 50% water in mass, constituting an ocean planet. Although this range of radii still allows for very different planet compositions, it helps to characterize many aspects of Proxima Centauri b, such as the formation conditions of the system or the current amount of water on the planet. This work can also help rule out future measurements of the planet’s radius that would be physically incompatible with a solid planetary body.

  4. Certification of Discontinuous Composite Material Forms for Aircraft Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arce, Michael Roger

    New, high performance chopped, discontinuous, or short fiber composites (DFCs), DFCs, such as HexMC and Lytex, made by compression molding of randomly oriented pre-impregnated unidirectional tape, can be formed into complex geometry while retaining mechanical properties suitable for structural use. These DFCs provide the performance benefits of Continuous Fiber Composites (CFCs) in form factors that were previously unavailable. These materials demonstrate some notably different properties from continuous fiber composites, especially with respect to damage tolerance and failure behavior. These behaviors are not very well understood, and fundamental research efforts are ongoing to better characterize the material and to ease certification for future uses. Despite this, these new DFCs show such promise that they are already in service in the aerospace industry, for instance in the Boeing 787. Unfortunately, the relative novelty of these parts means that they needed to be certified by “point design”, an excess of physical testing, rather than by a mix of physical testing and finite element analysis, which would be the case for CFCs or metals. In this study, one particular approach to characterizing both linear-elastic and failure behaviors are considered. The Stochastic Laminate Analogy, which represents a novel approach to modeling DFCs, and its combination with a Ply Discount scheme. Owing to limited available computational resources, only preliminary results are available, but those results are quite promising and warrant further investigation.

  5. Stability and controllability of InGaAs/GaAsP wire-on-well (WoW) structure for multi-junction solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hirofumi; Toprasertpong, Kasidit; Sodabanlu, Hassanet; Watanabe, Kentaroh; Sugiyama, Masakazu; Nakano, Yoshiaki

    2017-04-01

    Wire on Well (WoW) structure embedded in a matrix is naturally formed by growing InxGa1-xAs/GaAs1-yPy strained multiple quantum wells (MQW) on vicinal substrates and employing triethylgallium (TEGa) as a precursor in low-temperature MOVPE. The structure is useful for the subcell in current-matched mult-junction solar cells with lattice-matched materials because of its ability of band-gap tuning. In this research, high density and uniform In0.30Ga0.70As/GaAs0.6P0.4 WoW was obtained up to 200 stacks and its structure was analyzed by X-ray diffraction reciprocal space mapping, atomic force microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy. The structure of the wire can be controlled by changing the equivalent layer thicknesses of In0.30Ga0.70As and GaAs0.6P0.4. The photoluminescence peak from the WoW shifted according to the size of InGaAs wires and the intensity was dependent on the accumulation of lattice-mismatch stress.

  6. Composition and structure of Ti-C/DLC graded composite films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙明仁; 夏立芳

    2002-01-01

    The Ti-C→DLC gradient composite films were characterized systematically.The elemental depth profile and elemental chemical state evolution were determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS).The transmission electron microscope (TEM) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) were used to study the structure of interfacial zone between DLC film and Ti-C layers.Results show that there are composition transition zone between DLC film and either Ti-C layer or steel substrate on condition that pre-deposited Ti layers on the steel substrate then plasma based bias deposited DLC films.In Ti-C graded layer,the chemical state of titanium and carbon are changed gradually.The structures of zone in Ti-C layer near the DLC film is consisted of random oriented nanocrystallines TiC dispersed in amorphous DLC matrix.The structure of the zone between DLC film and Ti-C graded layer is gradually changed too.

  7. Open-structure composite mirrors for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    CERN Document Server

    Dyrda, Michal; Niemiec, Jacek; Stodulski, Marek

    2013-01-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) Observatory for high-energy gamma-ray astronomy will comprise several tens of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs) of different size with a total reflective area of about 10,000 m$^2$. Here we present a new technology for the production of IACT mirrors that has been developed in the Institute of Nuclear Physics PAS in Krakow, Poland. An open-structure composite mirror consists of a rigid flat sandwich support structure and cast-in-mould spherical epoxy resin layer. To this layer a thin glass sheet complete with optical coating is cold-slumped to provide the spherical reflective layer of the mirror. The main components of the sandwich support structure are two flat float glass panels inter spaced with V-shape aluminum spacers of equal length. The sandwich support structure is open, thus enabling good cooling and ventilation of the mirror. A special arrangement of the aluminum spacers also prohibits water being trapped inside. The open-structure technology thus re...

  8. Identification of MarvelD3 as a tight junction-associated transmembrane protein of the occludin family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balda Maria S

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tight junctions are an intercellular adhesion complex of epithelial and endothelial cells, and form a paracellular barrier that restricts the diffusion of solutes on the basis of size and charge. Tight junctions are formed by multiprotein complexes containing cytosolic and transmembrane proteins. How these components work together to form functional tight junctions is still not well understood and will require a complete understanding of the molecular composition of the junction. Results Here we identify a new transmembrane component of tight junctions: MarvelD3, a four-span transmembrane protein. Its predicted transmembrane helices form a Marvel (MAL and related proteins for vesicle traffic and membrane link domain, a structural motif originally discovered in proteins involved in membrane apposition and fusion events, such as the tight junction proteins occludin and tricellulin. In mammals, MarvelD3 is expressed as two alternatively spliced isoforms. Both isoforms exhibit a broad tissue distribution and are expressed by different types of epithelial as well as endothelial cells. MarvelD3 co-localises with occludin at tight junctions in intestinal and corneal epithelial cells. RNA interference experiments in Caco-2 cells indicate that normal MarvelD3 expression is not required for the formation of functional tight junctions but depletion results in monolayers with increased transepithelial electrical resistance. Conclusions Our data indicate that MarvelD3 is a third member of the tight junction-associated occludin family of transmembrane proteins. Similar to occludin, normal expression of MarvelD3 is not essential for the formation of functional tight junctions. However, MarvelD3 functions as a determinant of epithelial paracellular permeability properties.

  9. STRUCTURE AND PROPERTIES OF COMPOSITE POLYURETHANE HOLLOW FIBER MEMBRANES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xian-feng Li; Chang-fa Xiao

    2005-01-01

    Composite polyurethane (PU)-SiO2 hollow fiber membranes were successfully prepared via optimizing the technique of dry-jet wet spinning, and their pressure-responsibilities were confirmed by the relationships of pure water fluxtransmembrane pressure (PWF-TP) for the first time. The origin for this phenomenon was analyzed on the basis of membrane structure and material characteristics. The effects of SiO2 content on the structure and properties of membrane were investigated. The experimental results indicated that SiO2 in membrane created a great many interfacial micro-voids and played an important role in pressure-responsibility, PWF and rejection of membrane: with the increase of SiO2 content, the ability of membrane recovery weakened, PWF increased, and rejection decreased slightly.

  10. Laser Surface Preparation and Bonding of Aerospace Structural Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcher, M. A.; Wohl, C. J.; Hopkins, J. W.; Connell, J. W.

    2010-01-01

    Adhesive bonds are critical to the integrity of built-up structures. Disbonds can often be detected but the strength of adhesion between surfaces in contact is not obtainable without destructive testing. Typically the number one problem in a bonded structure is surface contamination, and by extension, surface preparation. Standard surface preparation techniques, including grit blasting, manual abrasion, and peel ply, are not ideal because of variations in their application. Etching of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) panels using a neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser appears to be a highly precise and promising way to both clean a composite surface prior to bonding and provide a bond-promoting patterned surface akin to peel ply without the inherent drawbacks from the same (i.e., debris and curvature). CFRP surfaces prepared using laser patterns conducive to adhesive bonding were compared to typical prebonding surface treatments through optical microscopy, contact angle goniometry, and post-bonding mechanical testing.

  11. RTM: Cost-effective processing of composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasko, Greg; Dexter, H. Benson

    1991-01-01

    Resin transfer molding (RTM) is a promising method for cost effective fabrication of high strength, low weight composite structures from textile preforms. In this process, dry fibers are placed in a mold, resin is introduced either by vacuum infusion or pressure, and the part is cured. RTM has been used in many industries, including automotive, recreation, and aerospace. Each of the industries has different requirements of material strength, weight, reliability, environmental resistance, cost, and production rate. These requirements drive the selection of fibers and resins, fiber volume fractions, fiber orientations, mold design, and processing equipment. Research is made into applying RTM to primary aircraft structures which require high strength and stiffness at low density. The material requirements are discussed of various industries, along with methods of orienting and distributing fibers, mold configurations, and processing parameters. Processing and material parameters such as resin viscosity, perform compaction and permeability, and tool design concepts are discussed. Experimental methods to measure preform compaction and permeability are presented.

  12. Structure and antibacterial properties of polyethylene/organo-vermiculite composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hundáková, Marianna; Tokarský, Jonáš; Valášková, Marta; Slobodian, Petr; Pazdziora, Erich; Kimmer, Dušan

    2015-10-01

    Vermiculite (VER) was modified by cation exchange with hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA+) bromide in three concentrations and used as organo-VER clay mineral nanofillers (denoted as HDTMA+1-VER, HDTMA+2-VER, and HDTMA+3-VER) in polyethylene (PE). PE/organo-VER composites were prepared via a melt compounding technique and pressed into thin plates. The organo-VER nanofillers and composite plates were characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis which in combination with molecular modeling confirmed the intercalation of HDTMA+ molecules. It was found that alkyl tails of HDTMA+ molecules create a non-polar, water-free area which may help the PE chains to enter the VER interlayer space. The nanocomposite structure was confirmed for PE/HDTMA+3-VER. PE/organo-VER composites were also studied by scanning electron microscopy and light microscopy and by creep testing. Antibacterial activity of powder organo-VER nanofillers was tested on Gram-positive (G+) (Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis) and Gram-negative (G-) (Escherichia coli) bacterial strains. The most sensitive G+ bacteria responded by stopping their bacterial growth after 24 h with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) 0.014% (w/v) at all samples. Growth of G- bacteria was inhibited after 24 h with higher MIC value 0.041-10% (w/v) in relation to the content of HDTMA+ in samples. The surfaces of PE/organo-VER composites are very active against G+ bacterial strain E. faecalis. The number of bacterial colonies forming units (cfu) on surfaces of samples was reduced by approximately several orders. The number of bacterial colonies after 48 h was 0 cfu on the surface of PE/HDTMA+3-VER nanocomposite.

  13. Continuation of tailored composite structures of ordered staple thermoplastic material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santare, Michael H.; Pipes, R. Byron

    1992-01-01

    The search for the cost effective composite structure has motivated the investigation of several approaches to develop composite structure from innovative material forms. Among the promising approaches is the conversion of a planar sheet to components of complex curvature through sheet forming or stretch forming. In both cases, the potential for material stretch in the fiber direction appears to offer a clear advantage in formability over continuous fiber systems. A framework was established which allows the simulation of the anisotropic mechanisms of deformation of long discontinuous fiber laminates wherein the matrix phase is a viscous fluid. Predictions for the effective viscosities of a hyper-anisotropic medium consisting of collimated, discontinuous fibers suspended in viscous matrix were extended to capture the characteristics of typical polymers including non-Newtonian behavior and temperature dependence. In addition, the influence of fiber misorientation was also modeled by compliance averaging to determine ensemble properties for a given orientation distribution. A design tool is presented for predicting the effect of material heterogeneity on the performance of curved composite beams such as those used in aircraft fuselage structures. Material heterogeneity can be induced during manufacturing processes such as sheet forming and stretch forming of thermoplastic composites. This heterogeneity can be introduced in the form of fiber realignment and spreading during the manufacturing process causing radial and tangential gradients in material properties. Two analysis procedures are used to solve the beam problems. The first method uses separate two-dimensional elasticity solutions for the stresses in the flange and web sections of the beam. The separate solutions are coupled by requiring that forces and displacements match section boundaries. The second method uses an approximate Rayleigh-Ritz technique to find the solutions for more complex beams. Analyses

  14. Effects of Fluid-Structure Interaction on Dynamic Response of Composite Structures: Experimental and Numerical Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    effective material properties using a multiscale analysis technique. 3 Multiscale Analysis of Composite Structures The schematic diagram in Fig. 3...Strain Rate on Mechanical Properties and Failure Mechanism of Structural Al-Mg Alloys,” Mater. Sci. Eng., A, 492, pp. 283–292. 2 Mukai, T., Ishikawa ...A, 492, pp. 283–292. 2 Mukai, T., Ishikawa , K., and Higashi, K., 1995, “Influence of Strain Rate on the Mechanical Properties in Fine-Grained

  15. Four-dimensional space groups for pedestrians: composite structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Junliang; Lee, Stephen; Lin, Jianhua

    2007-10-01

    Higher-dimensional crystals have been studied for the last thirty years. However, most practicing chemists, materials scientists, and crystallographers continue to eschew the use of higher-dimensional crystallography in their work. Yet it has become increasingly clear in recent years that the number of higher-dimensional systems continues to grow from hundreds to as many as a thousand different compounds. Part of the problem has to do with the somewhat opaque language that has developed over the past decades to describe higher-dimensional systems. This language, while well-suited to the specialist, is too sophisticated for the neophyte wishing to enter the field, and as such can be an impediment. This Focus Review hopes to address this issue. The goal of this article is to show the regular chemist or materials scientist that knowledge of regular 3D crystallography is all that is really necessary to understand 4D crystal systems. To this end, we have couched higher-dimensional composite structures in the language of ordinary 3D crystals. In particular, we developed the principle of complementarity, which allows one to identify correctly 4D space groups solely from examination of the two 3D components that make up a typical 4D composite structure.

  16. Autonomous stimulus triggered self-healing in smart structural composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, C. J.; White, J. A. P.; McCombe, G.; Chatterjee, P.; Bond, I. P.; Trask, R. S.

    2012-09-01

    Inspired by the ability of biological systems to sense and autonomously heal damage, this research has successfully demonstrated the first autonomous, stimulus triggered, self-healing system in a structural composite material. Both the sensing and healing mechanisms are reliant on microvascular channels incorporated within a laminated composite material. For the triggering mechanism, a single air filled vessel was pressurized, sealed and monitored. Upon drop weight impact (10 J), delamination and microcrack connectivity between the pressurized vessel and those open to ambient led to a pressure loss which, with the use of a suitable sensor, triggered a pump to deliver a healing agent to the damage zone. Using this autonomous healing approach, near full recovery of post-impact compression strength was achieved (94% on average). A simplified alternative system with healing agent continuously flowing through the vessels, akin to blood flow, was found to offer 100% recovery of the material’s virgin strength. Optical microscopy and ultrasonic C-scanning provided further evidence of large-scale infusion of matrix damage with the healing agent. The successful implementation of this bioinspired technology could substantially enhance the integrity and reliability of aerospace structures, whilst offering benefits through improved performance/weight ratios and extended lifetimes.

  17. Towards composite spheres as building blocks for structured molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lloyd L.; Pellicane, Giuseppe

    2016-10-01

    In order to design a flexible molecular model that mimics the chemical moieties of a polyatomic molecule, we propose the ‘composite-sphere’ model that can assemble the essential elements to produce the structure of the target molecule. This is likened to the polymerization process where monomers assemble to form the polymer. The assemblage is built into the pair interaction potentials which can ‘react’ (figuratively) with selective pieces into various bonds. In addition, we preserve the spherical symmetries of the individual pair potentials so that the isotropic Ornstein-Zernike equation (OZ) for multi-component mixtures can be used as a theoretical framework. We first test our approach on generating a dumbbell molecule. An equimolar binary mixture of hard spheres and square-well spheres are allowed to react to form a dimer. As the bond length shrinks to zero, we create a site-site model of a Janus-like molecule with a repulsive moiety and an attractive moiety. We employ the zero-separation (ZSEP) closure to solve the OZ equations. The structure and thermodynamic properties are calculated at three isotherms and at several densities and the results are compared with Monte Carlo simulations. The close agreement achieved demonstrates that the ZSEP closure is a reliable theory for this composite-sphere fluid model. Contribution to the George Stell Memorial Issue.

  18. Structure and composition of the continental crust in East China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高山; 骆庭川; 张本仁; 张宏飞; 韩吟文; 赵志丹; KERN; Hartmut

    1999-01-01

    Crustal structures of nine broad tectonic units in China, except the Tarim craton, are derived from 18 seismic refraction profiles including 12 geoscience transects. Abundances of 63 major, trace and rare earth elements in the upper crust in East China are estimated. The estimates are based on sampling of 11 451 individual rock samples over an area of 950 000 km~2, from which 905 large composite samples are prepared and analyzed by 13 methods. The middle, lower and total crust compositions of East China are also estimated from studies of exposed crustal cross sections and granulite xenoliths and by correlation of seismic data with lithologies. All the tectonic units except the Tarim craton and the Qinling orogen show a four-layered crustal structure, consisting of the upper, middle, upper lower, and lowermost crusts. P-wave velocities of the bulk lower crust and total crust are 6.8—7.0 and 6.4—6.5 km/s, respectively. They are slower by 0.2—0.4 km/s than the global averages. The bulk lower crust is su

  19. Analysis of SMA Hybrid Composite Structures using Commercial Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Travis L.; Patel, Hemant D.

    2004-01-01

    A thermomechanical model for shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators and SMA hybrid composite (SMAHC) structures has been recently implemented in the commercial finite element codes MSC.Nastran and ABAQUS. The model may be easily implemented in any code that has the capability for analysis of laminated composite structures with temperature dependent material properties. The model is also relatively easy to use and requires input of only fundamental engineering properties. A brief description of the model is presented, followed by discussion of implementation and usage in the commercial codes. Results are presented from static and dynamic analysis of SMAHC beams of two types; a beam clamped at each end and a cantilevered beam. Nonlinear static (post-buckling) and random response analyses are demonstrated for the first specimen. Static deflection (shape) control is demonstrated for the cantilevered beam. Approaches for modeling SMAHC material systems with embedded SMA in ribbon and small round wire product forms are demonstrated and compared. The results from the commercial codes are compared to those from a research code as validation of the commercial implementations; excellent correlation is achieved in all cases.

  20. Increased complexity of gene structure and base composition in vertebrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Wu; Huizhong Yuan; Shengjun Tan; Jian-Qun Chen; Dacheng Tian; Haiwang Yang

    2011-01-01

    How the structure and base composition of genes changed with the evolution of vertebrates remains a puzzling question. Here we analyzed 895 orthologous protein-coding genes in six multicellular animals: human, chicken, zebrafish, sea squirt, fruit fly, and worm. Our analyses reveal that many gene regions, particularly intron and 3' UTR, gradually expanded throughout the evolution of vertebrates from their invertebrate ancestors, and that the number of exons per gene increased. Studies based on all protein-coding genes in each genome provide consistent results.We also find that GC-content increased in many gene regions (especially 5' UTR) in the evolution of endotherms, except in coding-exons.Analysis of individual genomes shows that 3′ UTR demonstrated stronger length and CC-content correlation with intron than 5' UTR, and gene with large intron in all six species demonstrated relatively similar GC-content. Our data indicates a great increase in complexity in vertebrate genes and we propose that the requirement for morphological and functional changes is probably the driving force behind the evolution of structure and base composition complexity in multicellular animal genes.

  1. Optimization Design System for Composite Structures Based on Grid Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Wen-yuan; CHANG Yan; CUI De-gang; XIE Xiang-hui

    2007-01-01

    To solve the topology optimization of complicated multi-objective continuous/discrete design variables in aircraft structure design, a Parallel Pareto Genetic Algorithm (PPGA) is presented based on grid platform in this paper. In the algorithm, the commercial finite element analysis (FEA) software is integrated as the calculating tool for analyzing the objective functions and the filter of Pareto solution set based on weight information is introduced to deal with the relationships among all objectives. Grid technology is utilized in PPGA to realize the distributed computations and the user interface is developed to realize the job submission and job management locally/remotely. Taking the aero-elastic tailoring of a composite wing for optimization as an example, a set of Pareto solutions are obtained for the decision-maker. The numerical results show that the aileron reversal problem can be solved by adding the limited skin weight in this system. The algorithm can be used to solve complicated topology optimization for composite structures in engineering and the computation efficiency can be improved greatly by using the grid platform that aggregates numerous idle resources.

  2. Role of contamination on the bondline integrity of composite structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shang, Xu [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Adhesively bonding composite structures have many applications in aerospace, automotive and submarine industries. The adhesive bonding joints have substantial advantage over the traditional metallic mechanical bonding joints, such as rivet and welding. However, the adhesive bonding joints require additional steps of surface preparation and cleaning to ensure consistent bond strength. In application, the adhesively bonded joints are exposed to environmental degradation and industrial solvent contaminates. Accordingly, the assurance of reliability of bonded composite structures requires detailed investigation of the role of contaminates on bondline integrity. This dissertation focuses on assessing the contaminates effect on the adhesive bondline integrity. A combined experimental and numerical framework is developed to study the contamination effect on the adhesive mechanical properties and adhesive joint strength. The bondline integrity were examined for a system of adhesive (EA9394) and the carbonfiber system (Hexply IM7/8552), after being subjected to different level of exposures to aviation hydraulic fluids and mold cleaning agents. A testing protocol based on nanoindentation for initial screening is used to predict the interfacial fracture characteristics after exposure to contamination. It is found the adhesive modulus and stiffness dropped by up to 10% for the hydraulic fluid contaminates, suggesting increase of the plastic dissipation within the bondline. However, the trend for the cleaning agent was not clear since the modulus drop while its hardness increased.

  3. Structural and electrical measurements of CdZnSe composite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Kishore; Vibhav K Saraswat; N S Saxena; T P Sharma

    2005-08-01

    The – characterization and the electrical resistivity of selenium rich Se85Cd15–Zn ( = 0, 3, 7, 11 and 15) system at room temperature have been studied. Samples were obtained using melt cooling technique. So prepared samples were then characterized in terms of their crystal structure and lattice parameter using X-ray diffraction method. The materials were found to be polycrystalline in nature, having zinc blend structure over the whole range of zinc concentration. The measurements of – characteristics have been carried out at different temperatures from room to 140°C. The electrical resistivity of the samples with composition at room temperature has been found to vary between maximum 2.7 × 108 m and minimum 7.3 × 105 m and shows a maximum at 3 at. wt.% of Zn. The carrier activation energy of the samples with composition has also been determined and found to vary from 0.026 eV to 0.111 eV.

  4. Self-Healing Concept for Damaged Composite Structure of Automobile Bonnet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Hyunbum

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a structural design and analysis on automobile bonnet using natural flax fiber composite is performed. Through the structural analyses using commercial FEM software, it is confirmed that the designed automobile bonnet using natural composite is acceptable for structural safety. And also, the damage is a critical problem in composites during their service in structural applications. Therefore, study on self-healing concept of bonnet structure was performed.

  5. Vibration based structural health monitoring of composite skin-stiffener structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ooijevaar, T.H.

    2014-01-01

    Composite materials combine a high strength and stiffness with a relatively low density. These materials can, however, exhibit complex types of damage, like transverse cracks and delaminations. These damage scenarios can severely influence the structural performance of a component. Periodic inspecti

  6. Composition and structure of whey protein/gum arabic coacervates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinbreck, F; Tromp, R H; de Kruif, C G

    2004-01-01

    Complex coacervation in whey protein/gum arabic (WP/GA) mixtures was studied as a function of three main key parameters: pH, initial protein to polysaccharide mixing ratio (Pr:Ps)(ini), and ionic strength. Previous studies had already revealed under which conditions a coacervate phase was obtained. This study is aimed at understanding how these parameters influence the phase separation kinetics, the coacervate composition, and the internal coacervate structure. At a defined (Pr:Ps)(ini), an optimum pH of complex coacervation was found (pH(opt)), at which the strength of electrostatic interaction was maximum. For (Pr:Ps)(ini) = 2:1, the phase separation occurred the fastest and the final coacervate volume was the largest at pH(opt) = 4.0. The composition of the coacervate phase was determined after 48 h of phase separation and revealed that, at pH(opt), the coacervate phase was the most concentrated. Varying the (Pr:Ps)(ini) shifted the pH(opt) to higher values when (Pr:Ps)(ini) was increased and to lower values when (Pr:Ps)(ini) was decreased. This phenomenon was due to the level of charge compensation of the WP/GA complexes. Finally, the structure of the coacervate phase was studied with small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). SAXS data confirmed that at pH(opt) the coacervate phase was dense and structured. Model calculations revealed that the structure factor of WP induced a peak at Q = 0.7 nm(-1), illustrating that the coacervate phase was more structured, inducing the stronger correlation length of WP molecules. When the pH was changed to more acidic values, the correlation peak faded away, due to a more open structure of the coacervate. A shoulder in the scattering pattern of the coacervates was visible at small Q. This peak was attributed to the presence of residual charges on the GA. The peak intensity was reduced when the strength of interaction was increased, highlighting a greater charge compensation of the polyelectrolyte. Finally, increasing the ionic

  7. Structural properties of the active layer of discotic hexabenzocoronene/perylene diimide bulk hetero junction photovoltaic devices: The role of alkyl side chain length

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Hussein, M., E-mail: m.alhussein@ju.edu.jo [Department of Physics, University of Jordan, Amman 11942 (Jordan); Hesse, H.C.; Weickert, J. [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Department of Physics and Center for NanoScience(CeNS), Amalienstr.54, 80799 Munich (Germany); Doessel, L.; Feng, X.; Muellen, K. [Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Schmidt-Mende, L. [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Department of Physics and Center for NanoScience(CeNS), Amalienstr.54, 80799 Munich (Germany)

    2011-10-31

    We investigate thin blend films of phenyl-substituted hexa-peri-hexabenzocoronenes (HBC) with various alkyl side chain lengths ((CH{sub 2})n, n = 6, 8, 12 and 16)/perylenediimide (PDI). These blends constitute the active layers in bulk-hetero junction organic solar cells we studied recently [1]. Their structural properties are studied by both scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction measurements. The results support the evidence for the formation of HBC donor-PDI acceptor complexes in all blends regardless of the side chain length of the HBC molecule. These complexes are packed into a layered structure parallel to the substrate for short side chain HBC molecules (n = 6 and 8). The layered structure is disrupted by increasing the side chain length of the HBC molecule and eventually a disordered structure is formed for long side chains (n > 12). We attribute this behavior to the size difference between the aromatic parts of the HBC and PDI molecules. For short side chains, the size difference results in a room for the side chains of the two molecules to fill in the space around the aromatic cores. For long side chains (n > 12), the empty space will not be enough to accommodate this increase, leading to the disruption of the layered structure and a rather disordered structure is formed. Our results highlight the importance of the donor-acceptor interaction in a bulk heterojunction active layer as well as the geometry of the two molecules and their role in determining the structure of the active layer and thus their photovoltaic performance.

  8. Highlighting Kathleen Green and Mario Delmar, guest editors of special issue (part 2): junctional targets of skin and heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowin, Pamela

    2014-06-01

    Cell Communication and Adhesion has been fortunate to enlist two pioneers of epidermal and cardiac cell junctions, Kathleen Green and Mario Delmar, as Guest Editors of a two part series on junctional targets of skin and heart disease. Part 2 of this series begins with an overview from Dipal Patel and Kathy Green comparing epidermal desmosomes to cardiac area composita junctions, and surveying the pathogenic mechanisms resulting from mutations in their components in heart disease. This is followed by a review from David Kelsell on the role of desmosomal mutation in inherited syndromes involving skin fragility. Agnieszka Kobeliak discusses how structural deficits in the epidermal barrier intersect with the NFkB signaling pathway to induce inflammatory diseases such as psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. Farah Sheikh reviews the specialized junctional components in cardiomyocytes of the cardiac conduction system and Robert Gourdie discusses how molecular complexes between sodium channels and gap junction proteins within the perijunctional microdomains within the intercalated disc facilitate conduction. Glenn Radice evaluates the role of N-cadherin in heart. Andre Kleber and Chris Chen explore new approaches to study junctional mechanotransduction in vitro with a focus on the effects of connexin ablation and the role of cadherins, respectively. To complement this series of reviews, we have interviewed Werner Franke, whose systematic documentation the tissue-specific complexity of desmosome composition and pioneering discovery of the cardiac area composita junction greatly facilitated elucidation of the role of desmosomal components in the pathophysiology of human heart disease.

  9. [Compositions and structure characterizations of coal tar refined soft pitch].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Li-Juan; Zhao, Xue-Fei; Lai, Shi-Quan; Cheng, Jun-Xia; Lu, Yi-Qiang

    2009-08-01

    High temperature coal tar was used as raw materials, and was distilled to 280 degrees C for getting coal tar soft pitch. Then refined soft pitch was obtained by solvent extracting and subsequent settlement method. Its soft point was 32 degrees C; the group compositions consisted of 53.67% heptane soluble, 39.47% heptane insoluble but toluene soluble, 6.86% toluene insoluble and 0.06% quinoline insoluble. The relative average molecular weight was about 292. Its average molecular formula was C22.22 H16.32 N0.12 S0.06 O0.33; the total content of heteroatom was less than 1. IR analytic results showed that its heteroatom O existed in the R-O-R and Ar-O-R structure; its heteroatom N existed in the R-NH-R and -N=, with the latter being primary. Its average structure was obtained by improved Brown-Lander model: five-membered condensed rings. UV analysis indicated that the majority was linear arrangement, and the minority was surface arrangement; namely, the chemical structure of the samples was mainly the cata-condensed structure, while the minority was peri-condensation.

  10. PREFACE: International Conference on Structural Nano Composites (NANOSTRUC 2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njuguna, James

    2012-09-01

    Dear Colleagues It is a great pleasure to welcome you to NanoStruc2012 at Cranfield University. The purpose of the 2012 International Conference on Structural Nano Composites (NanoStruc2012) is to promote activities in various areas of materials and structures by providing a forum for exchange of ideas, presentation of technical achievements and discussion of future directions. NanoStruc brings together an international community of experts to discuss the state-of-the-art, new research results, perspectives of future developments, and innovative applications relevant to structural materials, engineering structures, nanocomposites, modelling and simulations, and their related application areas. The conference is split in 7 panel sessions, Metallic Nanocomposites and Coatings, Silica based Nanocomposites, safty of Nanomaterials, Carboin based Nanocomposites, Multscale Modelling, Bio materials and Application of Nanomaterials. All accepted Papers will be published in the IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering (MSE), and included in the NanoStruc online digital library. The abstracts will be indexed in Scopus, Compedex, Inspec, INIS (International Nuclear Information System), Chemical Abstracts, NASA Astrophysics Data System and Polymer Library. Before ending this message, I would like to acknowledge the hard work, professional skills and efficiency of the team which ensured the general organisation. As a conclusion, I would like to Welcome you to the Nanostruc2012 and wish you a stimulating Conference and a wonderful time. On behalf of the scientific committee, Signature James Njuguna Conference Chair The PDF of this preface also contains committee listings and associates logos.

  11. Composite structure of wood cells in petrified wood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowak, Jakub [Department of Chemistry, Catholic University of Lublin, 20-718 Lublin (Poland); Florek, Marek [Department of Chemistry, Catholic University of Lublin, 20-718 Lublin (Poland); Kwiatek, Wojciech [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Department of Nuclear Spectroscopy, 31-342 Cracow (Poland); Lekki, Janusz [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Department of Nuclear Spectroscopy, 31-342 Cracow (Poland); Chevallier, Pierre [LPS, CEN Saclay et LURE, Universite Paris-Sud, Bat 209D, F-91405 Orsay (France); Zieba, Emil [Department of Chemistry, Catholic University of Lublin, 20-718 Lublin (Poland); Mestres, Narcis [Institut de Ciencia de Materials de Barcelona (ICMAB), Campus de la UAB, E-08193-Bellaterra (Spain); Dutkiewicz, E.M. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Department of Nuclear Spectroscopy, 31-342 Cracow (Poland); Kuczumow, Andrzej [Department of Chemistry, Catholic University of Lublin, 20-718 Lublin (Poland)

    2005-04-28

    Special kinds of petrified wood of complex structure were investigated. All the samples were composed of at least two different inorganic substances. The original cell structure was preserved in each case. The remnants of the original biological material were detected in some locations, especially in the cell walls. The complex inorganic structure was superimposed on the remnant organic network. The first inorganic component was located in the lumena (l.) of the cells while another one in the walls (w.) of the cells. The investigated arrangements were as follows: calcite (l.)-goethite-hematite (w.)-wood from Dunarobba, Italy; pyrite (l.)-calcite (w.)-wood from Lukow, Poland; goethite (l.)-silica (w.)-wood from Kwaczala, Poland. The inorganic composition was analysed and spatially located by the use of three spectral methods: electron microprobe, X-ray synchrotron-based microprobe, {mu}-PIXE microprobe. The accurate mappings presenting 2D distribution of the chemical species were presented for each case. Trace elements were detected and correlated with the distribution of the main elements. In addition, the identification of phases was done by the use of {mu}-Raman and {mu}-XRD techniques for selected and representative points. The possible mechanisms of the described arrangements are considered. The potential synthesis of similar structures and their possible applications are suggested.

  12. Structure of Yeast OSBP-Related Protein Osh1 Reveals Key Determinants for Lipid Transport and Protein Targeting at the Nucleus-Vacuole Junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manik, Mohammad Kawsar; Yang, Huiseon; Tong, Junsen; Im, Young Jun

    2017-03-10

    Yeast Osh1 belongs to the oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP) family of proteins and contains multiple targeting modules optimized for lipid transport at the nucleus-vacuole junction (NVJ). The key determinants for NVJ targeting and the role of Osh1 at NVJs have remained elusive because of unknown lipid specificities. In this study, we determined the structures of the ankyrin repeat domain (ANK), and OSBP-related domain (ORD) of Osh1, in complex with Nvj1 and ergosterol, respectively. The Osh1 ANK forms a unique bi-lobed structure that recognizes a cytosolic helical segment of Nvj1. We discovered that Osh1 ORD binds ergosterol and phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate PI(4)P in a competitive manner, suggesting counter-transport function of the two lipids. Ergosterol is bound to the hydrophobic pocket in a head-down orientation, and the structure of the PI(4)P-binding site in Osh1 is well conserved. Our results suggest that Osh1 performs non-vesicular transport of ergosterol and PI(4)P at the NVJ.

  13. Compositions comprising enhanced graphene oxide structures and related methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Priyank Vijaya; Bardhan, Neelkanth M.; Belcher, Angela; Grossman, Jeffrey

    2016-12-27

    Embodiments described herein generally relate to compositions comprising a graphene oxide species. In some embodiments, the compositions advantageously have relatively high oxygen content, even after annealing.

  14. Compositions comprising enhanced graphene oxide structures and related methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Priyank Vijaya; Bardhan, Neelkanth M.; Belcher, Angela; Grossman, Jeffrey

    2016-12-27

    Embodiments described herein generally relate to compositions comprising a graphene oxide species. In some embodiments, the compositions advantageously have relatively high oxygen content, even after annealing.

  15. Project on strengthening of structures using advanced composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Recuero, A.

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Restoration, strengthening and rehabilitation of buildings becomes one of the more interesting aspects of the use of composites. Construction industry has not yet accepted the wide structural use of these new materials because it does not know the advantages of composites in comparison with traditional materials, such as concrete or steel. Engineers involved in design and construction are conservative and resist to changes. They require codes and specifications, what makes that an entity should lead the use of the new material or technology. At present, the experience needed to prepare those codes does not exist. Experimental tests and successful cases are necessary for the acceptance of these materials in construction. A project is presented, with the aim to provide the experimental basis, needed to update design codes and standards, and the technology for the use of these new composites in building and civil structures strengthening, taking actual pathology, quality and durability into account, as well as urban aesthetics. Research specialists in composites, structural analysis and testing, and in structural pathology, as well as composites and adhesives manufacturers and users, designers and final users will co-work in this project. This will allow that all relevant aspects of the problem be considered.

    La restauración, refuerzo o rehabilitación de estructuras resulta ser uno de los campos de aplicación de mayor interés y más directamente relacionado con los nuevos materiales compuestos. La Industria de la Construcción no ha aceptado aún el uso estructural extenso de los nuevos materiales compuestos porque todavía no conoce bien sus ventajas respecto a los materiales tradicionales, tales como el hormigón o el acero. Los profesionales implicados en el proyecto y en la ejecución de obras suelen ser conservadores y resistirse a los cambios. Para aceptar un nuevo material requieren disponer de normativa relativa a la nueva

  16. Strength of Composite Joints in Structural Components and Articles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Bakulin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, the composite materials (CM are widely used in the aerospace technology and mechanical engineering where the key parameters characterizing structural components and articles are related to their weight characteristics as well as their performance under high temperatures.For the experimental investigation of composite-based threaded items, the rod-based 3Dreinforced carbon-carbon composite material (CCCM was chosen.The subject of the research was the metric thread. The test samples were cut of the aforesaid material along one of the reinforcement direction. The following thread sizes were analyzed: М24×1.5; М24×2; М24×3.Dependence of the thread strength on the number of thread turns was determined within the range of 1 to 10 thread turns for М24×2 thread size. The remaining test samples were used to obtain the relationship between the thread load bearing capacity and the thread pitch.The obtained dependence of the thread load bearing capacity on the number of thread turns showed the following:a An increment in the thread load bearing capacity decreases with increasing number of thread turns. However, this effect is less pronounced than that observed for the metal ‘screw/nut’ pair.b With the CCCM material under study, it proved to be impossible to test configurations having only 1 or 2 thread turns.c The wide confidence range (CR of the failure load can be explained by the fact that the material under study features an apparent structural heterogeneity, with a different probability of hitting a unit cell of the matrix and filler of the material. Nevertheless, the confidence range is stable, thus indicating indirectly the possibility of using this test method for further study of composite-based threaded items.There is an explicit correlation between the thread load bearing capacity and the thread pitch. Increase in the thread strength with increasing thread pitch depends on the relationship between the pitch size and the

  17. Unit cell geometry of multiaxial preforms for structural composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Frank; Lei, Charles; Rahman, Anisur; Du, G. W.; Cai, Yun-Jia

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the yarn geometry of multiaxial preforms. The importance of multiaxial preforms for structural composites is well recognized by the industry but, to exploit their full potential, engineering design rules must be established. This study is a step in that direction. In this work the preform geometry for knitted and braided preforms was studied by making a range of well designed samples and studying them by photo microscopy. The structural geometry of the preforms is related to the processing parameters. Based on solid modeling and B-spline methodology a software package is developed. This computer code enables real time structural representations of complex fiber architecture based on the rule of preform manufacturing. The code has the capability of zooming and section plotting. These capabilities provide a powerful means to study the effect of processing variables on the preform geometry. the code also can be extended to an auto mesh generator for downstream structural analysis using finite element method. This report is organized into six sections. In the first section the scope and background of this work is elaborated. In section two the unit cell geometries of braided and multi-axial warp knitted preforms is discussed. The theoretical frame work of yarn path modeling and solid modeling is presented in section three. The thin section microscopy carried out to observe the structural geometry of the preforms is the subject in section four. The structural geometry is related to the processing parameters in section five. Section six documents the implementation of the modeling techniques into the computer code MP-CAD. A user manual for the software is also presented here. The source codes and published papers are listed in the Appendices.

  18. Variational asymptotic modeling of composite dimensionally reducible structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wenbin

    A general framework to construct accurate reduced models for composite dimensionally reducible structures (beams, plates and shells) was formulated based on two theoretical foundations: decomposition of the rotation tensor and the variational asymptotic method. Two engineering software systems, Variational Asymptotic Beam Sectional Analysis (VABS, new version) and Variational Asymptotic Plate and Shell Analysis (VAPAS), were developed. Several restrictions found in previous work on beam modeling were removed in the present effort. A general formulation of Timoshenko-like cross-sectional analysis was developed, through which the shear center coordinates and a consistent Vlasov model can be obtained. Recovery relations are given to recover the asymptotic approximations for the three-dimensional field variables. A new version of VABS has been developed, which is a much improved program in comparison to the old one. Numerous examples are given for validation. A Reissner-like model being as asymptotically correct as possible was obtained for composite plates and shells. After formulating the three-dimensional elasticity problem in intrinsic form, the variational asymptotic method was used to systematically reduce the dimensionality of the problem by taking advantage of the smallness of the thickness. The through-the-thickness analysis is solved by a one-dimensional finite element method to provide the stiffnesses as input for the two-dimensional nonlinear plate or shell analysis as well as recovery relations to approximately express the three-dimensional results. The known fact that there exists more than one theory that is asymptotically correct to a given order is adopted to cast the refined energy into a Reissner-like form. A two-dimensional nonlinear shell theory consistent with the present modeling process was developed. The engineering computer code VAPAS was developed and inserted into DYMORE to provide an efficient and accurate analysis of composite plates and

  19. Damage tolerance of bonded composite aircraft repairs for metallic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Randal John

    This thesis describes the development and validation of methods for damage tolerance substantiation of bonded composite repairs applied to cracked plates. This technology is used to repair metal aircraft structures, offering improvements in fatigue life, cost, manufacturability, and inspectability when compared to riveted repairs. The work focuses on the effects of plate thickness and bending on repair life, and covers fundamental aspects of fracture and fatigue of cracked plates and bonded joints. This project falls under the UBC Bonded Composite Repair Program, which has the goal of certification and widespread use of bonded repairs in civilian air transportation. This thesis analyses the plate thickness and transverse stress effects on fracture of repaired plates and the related problem of induced geometrically nonlinear bending in unbalanced (single-sided) repairs. The author begins by developing a classification scheme for assigning repair damage tolerance substantiation requirements based upon stress-based adhesive fracture/fatigue criteria and the residual strength of the original structure. The governing equations for bending of cracked plates are then reformulated and line-spring models are developed for linear and nonlinear coupled bending and extension of reinforced cracks. The line-spring models were used to correct the Wang and Rose energy method for the determination of the long-crack limit stress intensity, and to develop a new interpolation model for repaired cracks of arbitrary length. The analysis was validated using finite element models and data from mechanical tests performed on hybrid bonded joints and repair specimens that are representative of an in-service repair. This work will allow designers to evaluate the damage tolerance of the repaired plate, the adhesive, and the composite patch, which is an airworthiness requirement under FAR (Federal Aviation Regulations) 25.571. The thesis concludes by assessing the remaining barriers to

  20. Material Distribution Optimization for the Shell Aircraft Composite Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevtsov, S.; Zhilyaev, I.; Oganesyan, P.; Axenov, V.

    2016-09-01

    One of the main goal in aircraft structures designing isweight decreasing and stiffness increasing. Composite structures recently became popular in aircraft because of their mechanical properties and wide range of optimization possibilities.Weight distribution and lay-up are keys to creating lightweight stiff strictures. In this paperwe discuss optimization of specific structure that undergoes the non-uniform air pressure at the different flight conditions and reduce a level of noise caused by the airflowinduced vibrations at the constrained weight of the part. Initial model was created with CAD tool Siemens NX, finite element analysis and post processing were performed with COMSOL Multiphysicsr and MATLABr. Numerical solutions of the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations supplemented by k-w turbulence model provide the spatial distributions of air pressure applied to the shell surface. At the formulation of optimization problem the global strain energy calculated within the optimized shell was assumed as the objective. Wall thickness has been changed using parametric approach by an initiation of auxiliary sphere with varied radius and coordinates of the center, which were the design variables. To avoid a local stress concentration, wall thickness increment was defined as smooth function on the shell surface dependent of auxiliary sphere position and size. Our study consists of multiple steps: CAD/CAE transformation of the model, determining wind pressure for different flow angles, optimizing wall thickness distribution for specific flow angles, designing a lay-up for optimal material distribution. The studied structure was improved in terms of maximum and average strain energy at the constrained expense ofweight growth. Developed methods and tools can be applied to wide range of shell-like structures made of multilayered quasi-isotropic laminates.

  1. Characterization of the structure and composition of gecko adhesive setae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, N W; Gardner, K H; Walls, D J; Keiper-Hrynko, N M; Ganzke, T S; Hallahan, D L

    2006-06-22

    The ability of certain reptiles to adhere to vertical (and hang from horizontal) surfaces has been attributed to the presence of specialized adhesive setae on their feet. Structural and compositional studies of such adhesive setae will contribute significantly towards the design of biomimetic fibrillar adhesive materials. The results of electron microscopy analyses of the structure of such setae are presented, indicating their formation from aggregates of proteinaceous fibrils held together by a matrix and potentially surrounded by a limiting proteinaceous sheath. Microbeam X-ray diffraction analysis has shown conclusively that the only ordered protein constituent in these structures exhibits a diffraction pattern characteristic of beta-keratin. Raman microscopy of individual setae, however, clearly shows the presence of additional protein constituents, some of which may be identified as alpha-keratins. Electrophoretic analysis of solubilized setal proteins supports these conclusions, indicating the presence of a group of low-molecular-weight beta-keratins (14-20 kDa), together with alpha-keratins, and this interpretation is supported by immunological analyses.

  2. Fracture behavior of structurally compromised non-vital maxillary premolars restored using experimental fiber reinforced composite crowns.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokkinga, W.A.; Kreulen, C.M.; Bell-Ronnlof, A.M. Le; Lassila, L.V.; Vallittu, P.K.; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: To study the fracture behavior of direct resin composite crowns with or without experimental fiber reinforcement. METHODS: Clinical crowns of single-rooted maxillary premolars were cut off at the cemento-enamel junction. Canals were prepared with Gates Glidden drills up to size 4. No additi

  3. Mechanistic Effects of Porosity on Structural Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siver, Andrew

    As fiber reinforced composites continue to gain popularity as primary structures in aerospace, automotive, and powersports industries, quality control becomes an extremely important aspect of materials and mechanical engineering. The ability to recognize and control manufacturing induced defects can greatly reduce the likelihood of unexpected catastrophic failure. Porosity is the result of trapped volatiles or air bubbles during the layup process and can significantly compromise the strength of fiber reinforced composites. A comprehensive study was performed on an AS4C-UF3352 TCR carbon fiber-epoxy prepreg system to determine the effect of porosity on flexural, shear, low-velocity impact, and damage residual strength properties. Autoclave cure pressure was controlled to induce varying levels of porosity to construct six laminates with porosity concentrations between 0-40%. Porosity concentrations were measured using several destructive and nondestructive techniques including resin burnoff, sectioning and optical analysis, and X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanning. Ultrasonic transmission, thermography, and CT scanning provided nondestructive imaging to evaluate impact damage. A bilinear relationship accurately characterizes the change in mechanical properties with increasing porosity. Strength properties are relatively unaffected when porosity concentrations are below approximately 2.25% and decrease linearly by up to 40% in high porosity specimens.

  4. Possible Internal Structures and Compositions of Proxima Centauri b

    CERN Document Server

    Brugger, B; Deleuil, M; Lunine, J I

    2016-01-01

    We explore the possible Proxima Centauri b's interiors assuming the planet belongs to the class of dense solid planets (rocky with possible addition of water) and derive the corresponding radii. To do so, we use an internal structure model that computes the radius of the planet along with the locations of the different layers of materials, assuming that its mass and bulk composition are known. Lacking detailed elementary abundances of the host star to constrain the planet's composition, we base our model on solar system values. We restrained the simulations to the case of solid planets without massive atmospheres. With these assumptions, the possible radius of Proxima Centauri b spans the 0.94--1.40 $R_\\oplus$ range. The minimum value is obtained considering a 1.10 $M_\\oplus$ Mercury-like planet with a 65% core mass fraction, whereas the highest radius is reached for 1.46 $M_\\oplus$ with 50% water in mass, constituting an ocean planet. Although this range of radii still allows very different planet compositio...

  5. Health monitoring of composite structures throughout the life cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilles, James; Croxford, Anthony; Bond, Ian

    2016-04-01

    This study demonstrates the capability of inductively coupled piezoelectric sensors to monitor the state of health throughout the lifetime of composite structures. A single sensor which generated guided elastic waves was embedded into the stacking sequence of a large glass fiber reinforced plastic plate. The progress of cure was monitored by measuring variations in the amplitude and velocity of the waveforms reflected from the plate's edges. Baseline subtraction techniques were then implemented to detect barely visible impact damage (BVID) created by a 10 Joule impact, at a distance of 350 mm from the sensor embedded in the cured plate. To investigate the influence of mechanical loading on sensor performance, a single sensor was embedded within a glass fiber panel and subjected to tensile load. The panel was loaded up to a maximum strain of 1%, in increments of 0.1% strain. Guided wave measurements were recorded by the embedded sensor before testing, when the panel was under load, and after testing. The ultrasonic measurements showed a strong dependence on the applied load. Upon removal of the mechanical load the guided wave measurements returned to their original values recorded before testing. The results in this work show that embedded piezoelectric sensors can be used to monitor the state of health throughout the life-cycle of composite parts, even when subjected to relatively large strains. However the influence of load on guided wave measurements has implications for online monitoring using embedded piezoelectric transducers.

  6. On the Deflexion of Anisotropic Structural Composite Aerodynamic Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Whitty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents closed form solutions to the classical beam elasticity differential equation in order to effectively model the displacement of standard aerodynamic geometries used throughout a number of industries. The models assume that the components are constructed from in-plane generally anisotropic (though shown to be quasi-isotropic composite materials. Exact solutions for the displacement and strains for elliptical and FX66-S-196 and NACA 63-621 aerofoil approximations thin wall composite material shell structures, with and without a stiffening rib (shear-web, are presented for the first time. Each of the models developed is rigorously validated via numerical (Runge-Kutta solutions of an identical differential equation used to derive the analytical models presented. The resulting calculated displacement and material strain fields are shown to be in excellent agreement with simulations using the ANSYS and CATIA commercial finite element (FE codes as well as experimental data evident in the literature. One major implication of the theoretical treatment is that these solutions can now be used in design codes to limit the required displacement and strains in similar components used in the aerospace and most notably renewable energy sectors.

  7. Resin infusion of large composite structures modeling and manufacturing process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loos, A.C. [Michigan State Univ., Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2006-07-01

    The resin infusion processes resin transfer molding (RTM), resin film infusion (RFI) and vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) are cost effective techniques for the fabrication of complex shaped composite structures. The dry fibrous preform is placed in the mold, consolidated, resin impregnated and cured in a single step process. The fibrous performs are often constructed near net shape using highly automated textile processes such as knitting, weaving and braiding. In this paper, the infusion processes RTM, RFI and VARTM are discussed along with the advantages of each technique compared with traditional composite fabrication methods such as prepreg tape lay up and autoclave cure. The large number of processing variables and the complex material behavior during infiltration and cure make experimental optimization of the infusion processes costly and inefficient. Numerical models have been developed which can be used to simulate the resin infusion processes. The model formulation and solution procedures for the VARTM process are presented. A VARTM process simulation of a carbon fiber preform was presented to demonstrate the type of information that can be generated by the model and to compare the model predictions with experimental measurements. Overall, the predicted flow front positions, resin pressures and preform thicknesses agree well with the measured values. The results of the simulation show the potential cost and performance benefits that can be realized by using a simulation model as part of the development process. (au)

  8. Applications for thermal NDT on advanced composites in aerospace structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baughman, Steve R.

    1998-03-01

    Following several years of investigating active thermal imaging techniques, Lockheed Martin Aeronautical Systems Company (LMASC) has introduced a portable, time-dependent thermography (TDT) system into the production inspection environment. Originally pursued as a rapid, non-contacting, nondestructive evaluation (NDE) tool for inspecting large surface areas, the TDT system has proven most useful as a rapid verification tool on advanced composite assemblies. TDT is a relatively new NDE methodology as compared to conventional ultrasonic and radiography testing. SEveral technical issues are being addressed as confidence in the system's capabilities increase. These include inspector training and certification, system sensitivity assessments, and test results interpretation. Starting in 1991, LMASC began a beta-site evaluation of a prototype TDT system developed by the Institute of Manufacturing Research at Wayne State University. This prototype was the forerunner of the current production system, which is offered commercially as a fully integrated thermal NDE system. Applications investigated to data include quality assurance of advanced aerospace composite structures/assemblies for disbonds/voids between skin and core. TDT has a number of advantages over traditional NDT methods. The process of acquiring thermal images is fast, and can decrease inspection time required to locate suspect areas. The system also holds promise for depot level inspections due to its portability. This paper describes a systematic approach to implementing TDT into the production inspection arena.

  9. Smart aircraft composite structures with embedded small-diameter optical fiber sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Nobuo; Minakuchi, Shu

    2012-02-01

    This talk describes the embedded optical fiber sensor systems for smart aircraft composite structures. First, a summary of the current Japanese national project on structural integrity diagnosis of aircraft composite structures is described with special emphasis on the use of embedded small-diameter optical fiber sensors including FBG sensors. Then, some examples of life-cycle monitoring of aircraft composite structures are presented using embedded small-diameter optical fiber sensors for low-cost and reliable manufacturing merits.

  10. Giant Planets of Our Solar System Atmospheres, Composition, and Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Irwin, Patrick G. J

    2009-01-01

    This book reviews the current state of knowledge of the atmospheres of the giant gaseous planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. The current theories of their formation are reviewed and their recently observed temperature, composition and cloud structures are contrasted and compared with simple thermodynamic, radiative transfer and dynamical models. The instruments and techniques that have been used to remotely measure their atmospheric properties are also reviewed, and the likely development of outer planet observations over the next two decades is outlined. This second edition has been extensively updated following the Cassini mission results for Jupiter/Saturn and the newest ground-based measurements for Uranus/Neptune as well as on the latest development in the theories on planet formation.

  11. Macroparticle Movement Velocity in Dusty Structures of Various Compositions

    CERN Document Server

    Khakhaev, A D; Podryadchikov, S F

    2012-01-01

    The results of experimental investigations of the movement velocity of a macroparticle in the dusty structures of various physicalchemical compositions formed in a stratified column of a dc glow discharge, are presented. The macroparticle substances are alumina (r = 10 - 35 microns), polydisperse Zn (r = 1 - 20 microns) and Zn0 (r = 20 - 35 microns). Plasma-forming gases are inert gases (Ne, Ar). The inverse relation between the velocity and the gas pressure (in the range 40-400 Pa) is found and, for the same material of macroparticles in different gas plasmas, is confirmed by theory and does not contradict observations. But, to explain a difference of quantitative data for macroparticles made from different materials in Ar plasma, the additional research is required.

  12. Optimal Design of Composite Structures Under Manufacturing Constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marmaras, Konstantinos

    mixed integer 0–1 programming problems. The manufacturing constraints have been treated by developing explicit models with favorable properties. In this thesis we have developed and implemented special purpose global optimization methods and heuristic techniques for solving this class of problems......This thesis considers discrete multi material and thickness optimization of laminated composite structures including local failure criteria and manufacturing constraints. Our models closely follow an immediate extension of the Discrete Material Optimization scheme, which allows simultaneous....... The continuous relaxation of the mixed integer programming problems is being solved by an implementation of a primal–dual interior point method for nonlinear programming that updates the barrier parameter adaptively. The method is chosen for its excellent convergence properties and the ability of the method...

  13. Specific detection of DNA and RNA targets using a novel isothermal nucleic acid amplification assay based on the formation of a three-way junction structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wharam, S D; Marsh, P; Lloyd, J S; Ray, T D; Mock, G A; Assenberg, R; McPhee, J E; Brown, P; Weston, A; Cardy, D L

    2001-06-01

    The formation of DNA three-way junction (3WJ) structures has been utilised to develop a novel isothermal nucleic acid amplification assay (SMART) for the detection of specific DNA or RNA targets. The assay consists of two oligonucleotide probes that hybridise to a specific target sequence and, only then, to each other forming a 3WJ structure. One probe (template for the RNA signal) contains a non-functional single-stranded T7 RNA polymerase promoter sequence. This promoter sequence is made double-stranded (hence functional) by DNA polymerase, allowing T7 RNA polymerase to generate a target-dependent RNA signal which is measured by an enzyme-linked oligosorbent assay (ELOSA). The sequence of the RNA signal is always the same, regardless of the original target sequence. The SMART assay was successfully tested in model systems with several single-stranded synthetic targets, both DNA and RNA. The assay could also detect specific target sequences in both genomic DNA and total RNA from Escherichia coli. It was also possible to generate signal from E.coli samples without prior extraction of nucleic acid, showing that for some targets, sample purification may not be required. The assay is simple to perform and easily adaptable to different targets.

  14. BiOI/TiO2 nanotube arrays, a unique flake-tube structured p-n junction with remarkable visible-light photoelectrocatalytic performance and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiaqin; Ruan, Lili; Adeloju, Samuel B; Wu, Yucheng

    2014-01-28

    A series of unique flake-tube structured p-n heterojunctions of BiOI/TiO2 nanotube arrays (TNTAs) were successfully prepared by loading large amounts of BiOI nanoflakes onto both the outer and inner walls of well-separated TiO2 nanotubes using anodization followed by the sequential chemical bath deposition (S-CBD) method. The as-prepared BiOI/TNTAs samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and nitrogen sorption. The photoelectrocatalytic (PEC) activity and stability of the BiOI/TNTAs samples toward degradation of methyl orange (MO) solutions under visible-light irradiation (λ > 420 nm) were evaluated. The visible-light PEC performance of BiOI/TNTAs samples was further confirmed by the transient photocurrent response test. The results from the current study revealed that the 5-BiOI/TNTAs sample exhibited the best PEC activity, favourable stability, and the highest photocurrent density among all the BiOI/TNTAs heterostructured samples. The combined effects of several factors may contribute to the remarkable visible-light PEC performance for the 5-BiOI/TNTAs sample including a 3D connected intertube spacing system and an open tube-mouth structure, strong visible-light absorption by BiOI, the formation of a p-n junction, larger specific surface area, and the impact of the applied external electrostatic field.

  15. Metallic layered composite materials produced by explosion welding: Structure, properties, and structure of the transition zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mal'tseva, L. A.; Tyushlyaeva, D. S.; Mal'tseva, T. V.; Pastukhov, M. V.; Lozhkin, N. N.; Inyakin, D. V.; Marshuk, L. A.

    2014-10-01

    The structure, morphology, and microhardness of the transition zone in multilayer metallic composite joints are studied, and the cohesion strength of the plates to be joined, the mechanical properties of the formed composite materials, and fracture surfaces are analyzed. The materials to be joined are plates (0.1-1 mm thick) made of D16 aluminum alloy, high-strength maraging ZI90-VI (03Kh12N9K4M2YuT) steel, BrB2 beryllium bronze, and OT4-1 titanium alloy. Composite materials made of different materials are shown to be produced by explosion welding. The dependence of the interface shape (smooth or wavelike) on the physicomechanical properties of the materials to be joined is found. The formation of a wavelike interface is shown to result in the formation of intense-mixing regions in transition zones. Possible mechanisms of layer adhesion are discussed.

  16. Finite element model updating of natural fibre reinforced composite structure in structural dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sani M.S.M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Model updating is a process of making adjustment of certain parameters of finite element model in order to reduce discrepancy between analytical predictions of finite element (FE and experimental results. Finite element model updating is considered as an important field of study as practical application of finite element method often shows discrepancy to the test result. The aim of this research is to perform model updating procedure on a composite structure as well as trying improving the presumed geometrical and material properties of tested composite structure in finite element prediction. The composite structure concerned in this study is a plate of reinforced kenaf fiber with epoxy. Modal properties (natural frequency, mode shapes, and damping ratio of the kenaf fiber structure will be determined using both experimental modal analysis (EMA and finite element analysis (FEA. In EMA, modal testing will be carried out using impact hammer test while normal mode analysis using FEA will be carried out using MSC. Nastran/Patran software. Correlation of the data will be carried out before optimizing the data from FEA. Several parameters will be considered and selected for the model updating procedure.

  17. Cyanate ester-nanoparticle composites as multifunctional structural capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Leon, J. Eliseo

    An important goal of engineering is to increase the energy density of electrical energy storage devices used to deliver power onboard mobile platforms. Equally important is the goal to reduce the overall mass of the vehicles transporting these devices to achieve increased fuel and cost efficiency. One approach to meeting both these objectives is to develop multifunctional systems that serve as both energy storage and load bearing structural devices. Multifunctional devices consist of constituents that individually perform a subset of the overall desired functions. However, the synergy achieved by the combination of each constituent's characteristics allows for system-level benefits that cannot be achieved by simply optimizing the separate subsystems. We investigated multifunctional systems consisting of light weight polymer matrix and high dielectric constant fillers to achieve these objectives. The monomer of bisphenol E cyanate ester exhibited excellent processing ability because of its low room temperature viscosity. Additionally, the fully cured thermoset demonstrated excellent thermal stability, specific strength and stiffness. Fillers, including multi-walled carbon nanotubes, nanometer scale barium titanate and nanometer scale calcium copper titanate, offer high dielectric constants that raised the effective dielectric constant of the polymer matrix composite. The combination of high epsilon'and high dielectric strength produce high energy density components exhibiting increased electrical energy storage. Mechanical (load bearing) improvements of the PMCs were attributed to covalently bonded nanometer and micrometer sized filler particles, as well as the continuous glass fiber, integrated into the resin systems which increased the structural characteristics of the cured composites. Breakdown voltage tests and dynamic mechanical analysis were employed to demonstrate that precise combinations of these constituents, under the proper processing conditions, can

  18. Thermal and compositional structure of the upper mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Hersh Joseph

    Constraints for models of the convective, thermal, and mineralogical structure within the mantle depend heavily on seismic observations of the deep, and otherwise inaccessible, Earth. Studies presented within this dissertation focus primarily on the upper mantle discontinuities that bound the transition zone between the upper and lower mantle at the nominal depths of 410 and 660 km. These discontinuities are attributed to phase transitions of the mantle mineral olivine to denser configurations. Additionally, they may demark compositional layers within the mantle. This region figures prominently in the convective style of the planet. I address the questions of whether the 660-km discontinuity in some way inhibits flow from crossing between the upper and lower mantle and, more specifically, if it coincides with a compositional barrier in the mantle. Thermal variations associated with warm-rising and cool-sinking material in the mantle produce observable variations in the depths of the discontinuities. If rising or sinking materials cross the entire extent of the mantle, then the transition zone should respond to its associated thermal perturbations in a correlated manner. If instead, convection were divided between the upper and lower mantle, then thermal perturbations in the transition zone need not be spatially correlated. Observations presented in this dissertation display regions in which both the 410- and 660-km discontinuities possess greater than 20 km of peak-to-peak topography that is not correlated between the two. Studying the upper mantle below the western United States, I find no correlation between the upper mantle and the surface tectonics of the region. The topography on both discontinuities in this region is nearly as pronounced as that found where the cold subducting Tonga slab interacts with the upper mantle, suggesting the presence of a similar thermal anomaly. Additionally, amplitudes of the velocity jumps associated with the discontinuities

  19. Effect of the structure distortion on the high photocatalytic performance of C60/g-C3N4 composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaojuan; Li, Xinru; Li, Mengmeng; Ma, Xiangchao; Yu, Lin; Dai, Ying

    2017-08-01

    C60/g-C3N4 composite was reported experimentally to be of high photocatalytic activity in degrading organics. To investigate the underlying mechanism of high photocatalytic performance, the structural and electronic properties of g-C3N4 monolayers with adsorbing and removing fullerene C60 are studied by means of density functional theory calculations. After 25 possible configurations examination, it is found that C60 prefers to stay upon the ;junction nitrogen; with the carbon atom of fullerene being nearest to monolayers. Correspondingly, a type-I band alignment appears. Our results further demonstrate that the adsorption of C60 can lead to an irreversible structure distortion for g-C3N4 from flat to wrinkle, which plays a crucial role in improving photocatalytic performance other than the separation of carriers at interface due to the formation of type-II heterojunctions as previous report. Compared to flat one, the light absorption of wrinkled structure shows augmented, the valence band maximum shifts towards lower position along with a stronger photo-oxidation capability. Interestingly, the results indicate that the energy, light absorption and band edge all have a particular relationship with wrinkle degree. The work presented here can be helpful to understand the mechanism behind the better photocatalytic performance for C60 modified g-C3N4.

  20. On the structure of anomalous composite Higgs models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gripaios, Ben; Nardecchia, Marco; You, Tevong

    2017-01-01

    We describe the anomaly structure of a composite Higgs model in which the SO(5) / SO(4) coset structure of the minimal model is extended by an additional, non-linearly realised U(1)_{η }. In addition, we show that the effective Lagrangian admits a term that, like the Wess-Zumino-Witten term in the chiral Lagrangian for QCD, is not invariant under the non-linearly realised symmetries, but rather changes by a total derivative. This term is unlike the Wess-Zumino-Witten term in that it does not arise from anomalies. If present, it may give rise to the rare decay η → h W^+ W^-Z. The phenomenology of the singlet in this model differs from that in a model based on SO(6) / SO(5), in that couplings to both gluons and photons, arising via anomalies, are present. We show that while some tuning is needed to accommodate flavour and electroweak precision constraints, the model is no worse than the minimal model in this regard.

  1. Laser Surface Preparation for Adhesive Bonding of Aerospace Structural Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcher, M. A.; Wohl, C. J.; Hopkins, J. W.; Connell, J. W.

    2010-01-01

    Adhesive bonds are critical to the integrity of built-up structures. Disbonds can often be detected but the strength of adhesion between surfaces in contact is not obtainable without destructive testing. Typically the number one problem in a bonded structure is surface contamination, and by extension, surface preparation. Standard surface preparation techniques, including grit blasting, manual abrasion, and peel ply, are not ideal because of variations in their application. Etching of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) panels using a neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser appears to be a highly precise and promising way to both clean a composite surface prior to bonding and provide a bond-promoting patterned surface akin to peel ply without the inherent drawbacks from the same (i.e., debris and curvature). CFRP surfaces prepared using laser patterns conducive to adhesive bonding were compared to typical pre-bonding surface treatments through optical microscopy, contact angle goniometry, and post-bonding mechanical testing.

  2. Structural features of ZnxOy/nanosilica composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gun'ko, V. M.; Bogatyrov, V. M.; Oranska, O. I.; Borysenko, L. I.; Skubiszewska-Zięba, J.; Książek, A.; Leboda, R.

    2013-07-01

    Nanocomposites with nanosilica A380 (SBET = 378 m2/g) and grafted ZnO or/and zinc silicate were prepared using zinc acetate adsorbed onto nanosilica and then treated at 600-900 °C. The samples studied using a variety of methods demonstrated the dependences of the textural and structural characteristics and phase transformations on the amounts of adsorbed precursor and treatment conditions. Thermodestruction of zinc acetate Zn(ac)2 at 600 °C results in the formation of ZnO which is amorphous according to XRD data. However, HRTEM images show the presence of a small amount of ZnO crystallites of 2-5 nm in size. A portion of surface silanols interacts with adsorbed Zn-containing compounds to form Sisbnd Osbnd Zn bonds, a number of which increases with increasing Zn(ac)2 content and heating temperature. Heating at 800-900 °C leads to transformation of ZnO and other structures into crystalline zinc silicate β-Zn2SiO4 with larger particles more strongly packed in aggregates. The specific surface area of the composites decreases with increasing zinc content and heating temperature.

  3. High Energy Wide Area Blunt Impact on Composite Aircraft Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFrancisci, Gabriela K.

    The largest source of damage to commercial aircraft is caused by accidental contact with ground service equipment (GSE). The cylindrical bumper typically found on GSE distributes the impact load over a large contact area, possibly spanning multiple internal structural elements (frame bays) of a stiffened-skin fuselage. This type of impact can lead to damage that is widespread and difficult to detect visually. To address this problem, monolithic composite panels of various size and complexity have been modeled and tested quasi-statically and dynamically. The experimental observations have established that detectability is dependent on the impact location and immediately-adjacent internal structure of the panel, as well as the impactor geometry and total deformation of the panel. A methodology to model and predict damage caused by wide area blunt impact events was established, which was then applied to more general cases that were not tested in order to better understand the nature of this type of impact event and how it relates to the final damage state and visual detectability.

  4. On the composition of modal structures of Tuvan traditional songs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayasmaa D.-B. Baranmaa

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important aspects of musical language of song folklore of Tuvans – the scale – is as yet underinvestigated in contemporary Tuvan musicology. The author is studying the effect of structural principles in scale and sound gamut of Tuvan folk songs. The theory of monodic scales (S.P. Galitskaya, E.V. Gertsman, Yu.G. Kon, Kh.S. Kushnarev, etc. forms the methodological basis for the analysis. The object of our studies are manuscripts of traditional Tuvan songs published by Russian musicologists (A. N. Aksenov, Z. K. Kyrgys, etc. serves as material base for analysis. The analysis revealed that traditional Tuvan songs are usually based on two- or three-part composite gamut structures. This significantly enriched the substantial aspect of the process by complicating types of links between the sounds, making the medium more profound, compact and complete. Scale links and subscales were detected that can interconnect in four manners (discrete, monolithic, catenary, inclusive. Conjunction principles are illustrated by a few folk songs. Catenary and inclusive manners of conjunctions have been noticed to be dominating. A vast variety of different link combinations has been detected. This is a point where intonational abundance of folklore melos reveals its inexhaustibility.

  5. Temperature dependence of thermopower in molecular junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngsang; Lenert, Andrej; Meyhofer, Edgar; Reddy, Pramod

    2016-07-01

    The thermoelectric properties of molecular junctions are of considerable interest due to their promise for efficient energy conversion. While the dependence of thermoelectric properties of junctions on molecular structure has been recently studied, their temperature dependence remains unexplored. Using a custom built variable temperature scanning tunneling microscope, we measured the thermopower and electrical conductance of individual benzenedithiol junctions over a range of temperatures (100 K-300 K). We find that while the electrical conductance is independent of temperature, the thermopower increases linearly with temperature, confirming the predictions of the Landauer theory.

  6. Geodesy constraints on the interior structure and composition of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivoldini, A.; Van Hoolst, T.; Verhoeven, O.; Mocquet, A.; Dehant, V.

    2011-06-01

    Knowledge of the interior structure of Mars is of fundamental importance to the understanding of its past and present state as well as its future evolution. The most prominent interior structure properties are the state of the core, solid or liquid, its radius, and its composition in terms of light elements, the thickness of the mantle, its composition, the presence of a lower mantle, and the density of the crust. In the absence of seismic sounding only geodesy data allow reliably constraining the deep interior of Mars. Those data are the mass, moment of inertia, and tides. They are related to Mars' composition, to its internal mass distribution, and to its deformational response to principally the tidal forcing of the Sun. Here we use the most recent estimates of the moment of inertia and tidal Love number k2 in order to infer knowledge about the interior structure of the Mars. We have built precise models of the interior structure of Mars that are parameterized by the crust density and thickness, the volume fractions of upper mantle mineral phases, the bulk mantle iron concentration, and the size and the sulfur concentration of the core. From the bulk mantle iron concentration and from the volume fractions of the upper mantle mineral phases, the depth dependent mineralogy is deduced by using experimentally determined phase diagrams. The thermoelastic properties at each depth inside the mantle are calculated by using equations of state. Since it is difficult to determine the temperature inside the mantle of Mars we here use two end-member temperature profiles that have been deduced from studies dedicated to the thermal evolution of Mars. We calculate the pressure and temperature dependent thermoelastic properties of the core constituents by using equations state and recent data about reference thermoelastic properties of liquid iron, liquid iron-sulfur, and solid iron. To determine the size of a possible inner core we use recent data on the melting temperature of

  7. Fabrication and Structure Characterization of Alumina-Aluminum Interpenetrating Phase Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolata, Anna J.

    2016-08-01

    Alumina-Aluminum composites with interpenetrating networks structure belong to advanced materials with potentially better properties when compared with composites reinforced by particles or fibers. The paper presents the experimental results of fabrication and structure characterization of Al matrix composites locally reinforced via Al2O3 ceramic foam. The composites were obtained using centrifugal infiltration of porous ceramics by liquid aluminum alloy. Both scanning electron microscopy (SEM + EDS) and x-ray tomography were used to determine the structure of foams and composites especially in reinforced areas. The quality of castings, degree of pore filling in ceramic foams by Al alloy, and microstructure in area of interface were assessed.

  8. Discrete Material Buckling Optimization of Laminated Composite Structures considering "Worst" Shape Imperfections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henrichsen, Søren Randrup; Lindgaard, Esben; Lund, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Robust design of laminated composite structures is considered in this work. Because laminated composite structures are often thin walled, buckling failure can occur prior to material failure, making it desirable to maximize the buckling load. However, as a structure always contains imperfections...

  9. Synthesis and structural characterization of polyaniline/cobalt chloride composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asha, E-mail: arana5752@gmail.com [Department of Basic and Applied Sciences, Bhagat Phool Singh Mahilla Vishwavidyalaya, Khanpur Kalan, Sonipat-131305 (India); Goyal, Sneh Lata; Kishore, Nawal [Department of Applied Physics, Guru Jambheshwar University of Science and Technology, Hisar-125001 (India)

    2016-05-23

    Polyaniline (PANI) and PANI /cobalt chloride composites were synthesized by in situ chemical oxidative polymerization of aniline with CoCl{sub 2}.6H{sub 2}O using ammonium peroxidisulphate as an oxidant. These composites were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The XRD study reveals that both PANI and composites are amorphous. The XRD and SEM results confirm the presence of cobalt chloride in the composites.

  10. Synthesis and structural characterization of polyaniline/cobalt chloride composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asha, Goyal, Sneh Lata; Kishore, Nawal

    2016-05-01

    Polyaniline (PANI) and PANI /cobalt chloride composites were synthesized by in situ chemical oxidative polymerization of aniline with CoCl2.6H2O using ammonium peroxidisulphate as an oxidant. These composites were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The XRD study reveals that both PANI and composites are amorphous. The XRD and SEM results confirm the presence of cobalt chloride in the composites.

  11. Sea urchin vault structure, composition, and differential localization during development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dickey-Sims Carrie

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vaults are intriguing ribonucleoprotein assemblies with an unknown function that are conserved among higher eukaryotes. The Pacific coast sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, is an invertebrate model organism that is evolutionarily closer to humans than Drosophila and C. elegans, neither of which possesses vaults. Here we compare the structures of sea urchin and mammalian vaults and analyze the subcellular distribution of vaults during sea urchin embryogenesis. Results The sequence of the sea urchin major vault protein (MVP was assembled from expressed sequence tags and genome traces, and the predicted protein was found to have 64% identity and 81% similarity to rat MVP. Sea urchin MVP includes seven ~50 residue repeats in the N-terminal half of the protein and a predicted coiled coil domain in the C-terminus, as does rat MVP. A cryoelectron microscopy (cryoEM reconstruction of isolated sea urchin vaults reveals the assembly to have a barrel-shaped external structure that is nearly identical to the rat vault structure. Analysis of the molecular composition of the sea urchin vault indicates that it contains components that may be homologs of the mammalian vault RNA component (vRNA and protein components (VPARP and TEP1. The sea urchin vault appears to have additional protein components in the molecular weight range of 14–55 kDa that might correspond to molecular contents. Confocal experiments indicate a dramatic relocalization of MVP from the cytoplasm to the nucleus during sea urchin embryogenesis. Conclusions These results are suggestive of a role for the vault in delivering macromolecules to the nucleus during development.

  12. Global Failure Modes in Composite Structures for High Altitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knauss, W. G.

    2004-01-01

    This report summarizes the accomplishments under the referenced grant. The work described was started under the guidance and supervision of the late Dr. James Stames as the technical contact. It was aimed at investigating the development of analysis tools to deal with the problem of rupture in reinforced structural skin of future composites-based aircraft. It was of particular interest to assess methods by which failure features reminiscent of cracks in metallic structures would develop and propagate in fiber reinforced structures in interaction with the reinforcing frame. To eventually achieve that goal it was necessary to first understand the stress or strain distribution at the front of such features so that interactions between such features and reinforcing agents could be assessed computationally. Thus the major emphasis here was on the assessment of damage front and methods on how to assess or characterize it. During the conduct of this research program Dr. Stames changed to a different NASA- internal assignment, which divorced him of the direct supervision of this grant. A student who was approximately % into the completion of his Ph.D. research needed to finish this work, and NASA funds were made available under Dr. Damodar Ambur, the successor Branch Manager for Dr. James Starnes, for the completion of this work. The current grant was the thus a new and fmal support increment for completion of the started research. Final reports for previous funding have been completed and submitted. Because of the interconnection of this last phase of the investigation with previous work it is deemed useful to make the Ph.D. thesis by Luis Gonzales the body of this report.

  13. Change of Electronic Structure and Magnetic Properties with MgO and Fe Thicknesses in Fe/MgO/Fe Magnetic Tunnel Junction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Fan; BI Xiao-fang

    2006-01-01

    The effects of the thickness of MgO and Fe on the electronic structure and magnetic properties of Fe/MgO/Fe magnetic tunnel junction was studied using the first principle method. Two series of models with MgO of different thicknesses: Fe(3)MgO(t)Fe(3) (t=1,3,5,7) and with Fe of varied thicknesses: Fe(t)MgO(3)Fe(t) (t=3,4,5,6,7) were established. Calculated results show that in all the models the magnetic moment of Fe increases at the Fe/MgO interface and surface as compared with that of the inner layers. The magnetic moment of each Fe layer was found to be independent of MgO thicknesses, while the spin-polarization of Fe layer at the interface shows a slight change in function of the MgO thicknesses. The tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) ratio estimated by the Julliere model has the same change tendency as the spin-polarization has, and the largest value is obtained at the MgO thickness of 5 atomic layers. When the Fe thickness increases, the spin-polarization of interface Fe layer follows up an increase with a decrease. The highest TMR value is achieved when the Fe thickness is of 4 atomic layers.

  14. Improved surface plasmon enhanced photodetection at an Au-GaAs Schottky junction using a novel molecular beam epitaxy grown Otto coupling structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daboo, C.; Baird, M.J.; Hughes, H.P. (PCS Group, Cavendish Lab., Cambridge (UK)); Apsley, N.; Emeny, M.T. (Royal Signals and Radar Establishment, Great Malvern (UK))

    1991-06-05

    Measurements of reflectivity and photocurrent as a function of angle of incidence and wavelength have been made for a GaAs-AlAs-GaAs-Au Schottky structure based on an Otto coupling geometry which allows incident p-polarized radiation to couple to the surface plasmon (SP) mode at the Au-GaAs interface. At resonance, E fields associated with the SP excitation are concentrated at the GaAs-Au Schottky interface itself, enabling strong enhancement of the internal photoemission photocurrent across the Schottky barrier. Enhancement factors of the order of 20 have been achieved. A direct comparison between the resonant effects of exciting the SP at the GaAs-Au Schottky junction itself and at the outer Au-air interface has been made. A simple model for the photocurrent in the device indicates that the excited photocarriers created in the gold film have a very short scattering length {delta}{approx equal}10 nm, which emphasizes the importance of exciting the SP at the Schottky interface. (orig.).

  15. Structure-dependent magnetoresistance and spin-transfer torque in antiferromagnetic Fe |MgO |FeMn |Cu tunnel junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xingtao; Tang, Huimin; Wang, Shizhuo; Qin, Minghui

    2017-02-01

    We predict large magnetoresistance (MR) and spin transfer torque (STT) in antiferromagnetic Fe |MgO |FeMn |Cu tunnel junctions based on first-principles scattering theory. MR as large as ˜100 % is found in one junction. Magnetic dynamic simulations show that STT acting on the antiferromagnetic order parameter dominates the spin dynamics, and an electronic bias of order 10-1mV and current density of order 105Acm-2 can switches a junction of three-layer MgO, they are about one order smaller than that in Fe |MgO |Fe junction with the same barrier thickness, respectively. The multiple scattering in the antiferromagnetic region is considered to be responsible for the enhanced spin torque and smaller switching current density.

  16. Magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    We review the giant tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) in ferromagnetic-insulator-ferromagnetic junctions discovered in recent years, which is the magnetoresistance (MR) associated with the spin-dependent tunneling between two ferromagnetic metal films separated by an insulating thin tunnel barrier. The theoretical and experimental results including junction conductance, magnetoresistance and their temperature and bias dependences are described.

  17. Stacked Josephson Junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Søren Find; Pedersen, Niels Falsig; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    2010-01-01

    Long Josephson junctions have for some time been considered as a source of THz radiation. Solitons moving coherently in the junctions is a possible source for this radiation. Analytical computations of the bunched state and bunching-inducing methods are reviewed. Experiments showing THz radiation...

  18. A Tailorable Structural Composite for GCR and Albedo Neutron Protection on the Lunar Surface Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A tailorable structural composite that will provide protection from the lunar radiation environment, including GCR and albedo neutrons will be developed. This...

  19. CNT-based Reinforcing Polymer Matrix Composites for Lightweight Structures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Carbon Polymer Matrix Composites (PMCs) are attractive structural materials for NASA applications due to their high strength to weight ratio, mechanical properties...

  20. CMOS Interface Circuits for Spin Tunneling Junction Based Magnetic Random Access Memories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganesh Saripalli

    2002-12-31

    Magneto resistive memories (MRAM) are non-volatile memories which use magnetic instead of electrical structures to store data. These memories, apart from being non-volatile, offer a possibility to achieve densities better than DRAMs and speeds faster than SRAMs. MRAMs could potentially replace all computer memory RAM technologies in use today, leading to future applications like instan-on computers and longer battery life for pervasive devices. Such rapid development was made possible due to the recent discovery of large magnetoresistance in Spin tunneling junction devices. Spin tunneling junctions (STJ) are composite structures consisting of a thin insulating layer sandwiched between two magnetic layers. This thesis research is targeted towards these spin tunneling junction based Magnetic memories. In any memory, some kind of an interface circuit is needed to read the logic states. In this thesis, four such circuits are proposed and designed for Magnetic memories (MRAM). These circuits interface to the Spin tunneling junctions and act as sense amplifiers to read their magnetic states. The physical structure and functional characteristics of these circuits are discussed in this thesis. Mismatch effects on the circuits and proper design techniques are also presented. To demonstrate the functionality of these interface structures, test circuits were designed and fabricated in TSMC 0.35{micro} CMOS process. Also circuits to characterize the process mismatches were fabricated and tested. These results were then used in Matlab programs to aid in design process and to predict interface circuit's yields.

  1. CMOS Interface Circuits for Spin Tunneling Junction Based Magnetic Random Access Memories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saripalli, Ganesh [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Magneto resistive memories (MRAM) are non-volatile memories which use magnetic instead of electrical structures to store data. These memories, apart from being non-volatile, offer a possibility to achieve densities better than DRAMs and speeds faster than SRAMs. MRAMs could potentially replace all computer memory RAM technologies in use today, leading to future applications like instan-on computers and longer battery life for pervasive devices. Such rapid development was made possible due to the recent discovery of large magnetoresistance in Spin tunneling junction devices. Spin tunneling junctions (STJ) are composite structures consisting of a thin insulating layer sandwiched between two magnetic layers. This thesis research is targeted towards these spin tunneling junction based Magnetic memories. In any memory, some kind of an interface circuit is needed to read the logic states. In this thesis, four such circuits are proposed and designed for Magnetic memories (MRAM). These circuits interface to the Spin tunneling junctions and act as sense amplifiers to read their magnetic states. The physical structure and functional characteristics of these circuits are discussed in this thesis. Mismatch effects on the circuits and proper design techniques are also presented. To demonstrate the functionality of these interface structures, test circuits were designed and fabricated in TSMC 0.35μ CMOS process. Also circuits to characterize the process mismatches were fabricated and tested. These results were then used in Matlab programs to aid in design process and to predict interface circuit's yields.

  2. Composition, structure and properties of sediment thermal springs of Kamchatka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanina, Violetta; Smolyakov, Pavel; Parfenov, Oleg

    2016-04-01

    The paper deals with the physical and mechanical properties sediment thermal fields Mutnovsky, Lower Koshelevo and Bannyh (Kamchatka). This multi-component soils, mineral and chemical composition of which depends on the formation factors (pH, temperature, salinity of water, composition and structure of the host volcanic rocks). Samples Lower Koshelevo sediment thermal sources differ in the following composition: smectite, kaolinite, kaolinite-smectite mixed-mineral. Samples of sediment thermal springs Mutnovsky volcano in accordance with the X-ray analysis has the following composition: volcanic glass, crystalline sulfur, plagioclase, smectite, illite-smectite mixed, illite, chlorite, quartz, cristobalite, pyrite, melanterite, kaolinite. Natural moisture content samples of sediment thermal springs from 45 to 121%, hygroscopic moisture content of 1.3 to 3.7%. A large amount of native sulfur (up to 92%) and the presence of amorphous material gives low values of density of solid particles (up to 2.1 g/cm3) samples Mutnovskii thermal field. The values of the density of solids sediment Koshelevo and Bannyh hot springs close to those of the main components of mineral densities (up to 2.6-3.0 g/cm3). The results of the particle size distribution and microaggregate analysis of sediment thermal springs Lower Koshelevo field shows that the predominance observed of particles with a diameter from 0.05 mm to 0.25 mm, the coefficient of soil heterogeneity heterogeneous. In the bottom sediments of the thermal springs of the volcano Mutnovsky poorly traced predominance of one faction. Most prevalent fraction with particle size 0.01 - 0.05 mm. When analyzing the content in the soil microaggregates their content is shifted towards particles with a diameter of 0.25 mm. The contents of a large number of large (1-10 mm), porous rock fragments, due to the deposition of pyroclastic material from the eruptions of the last century. Present in large amounts rounded crystals of native sulfur

  3. Strength and toughness of structural fibres for composite material reinforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herráez, M; Fernández, A; Lopes, C S; González, C

    2016-07-13

    The characterization of the strength and fracture toughness of three common structural fibres, E-glass, AS4 carbon and Kevlar KM2, is presented in this work. The notched specimens were prepared by means of selective carving of individual fibres by means of the focused ion beam. A straight-fronted edge notch was introduced in a plane perpendicular to the fibre axis, with the relative notch depth being a0/D≈0.1 and the notch radius at the tip approximately 50 nm. The selection of the appropriate beam current during milling operations was performed to avoid to as much as possible any microstructural changes owing to ion impingement. Both notched and un-notched fibres were submitted to uniaxial tensile tests up to failure. The strength of the un-notched fibres was characterized in terms of the Weibull statistics, whereas the residual strength of the notched fibres was used to determine their apparent toughness. To this end, the stress intensity factor of a fronted edge crack was computed by means of the finite-element method for different crack lengths. The experimental results agreed with those reported in the literature for polyacrylonitrile-based carbon fibres obtained by using similar techniques. After mechanical testing, the fracture surface of the fibres was analysed to ascertain the failure mechanisms. It was found that AS4 carbon and E-glass fibres presented the lower toughness with fracture surfaces perpendicular to the fibre axis, emanating from the notch tip. The fractured region of Kevlar KM2 fibres extended along the fibre and showed large permanent deformation, which explains their higher degree of toughness when compared with carbon and glass fibres. This article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling of the structural integrity of composite materials'.

  4. Structure and phase composition of deposited tantalum-carbon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuleushev, Yu. Zh.; Volodin, V. N.; Zhakanbaev, E. A.; Alimzhan, B.

    2016-08-01

    Ion plasma sputtering and the subsequent codeposition of ultrafine tantalum and carbon particles were used to prepare coatings with 4.6-71.5 at % C. Structural studies of the coatings showed the existence of carbon solid solutions in β Ta at carbon contents to 4.6 at %, carbon solid solutions in α Ta at carbon contents of 4.6-10.3 at %, and direct synthesis of TaC at carbon contents of 44.7-71.5 at %. During heat treatments to 700°C, the substantial concentration widening of regions of the existence of Ta2C and TaC was found. The lattice parameters of hexagonal Ta2C and fcc TaC carbides were determined for composition ranges of the existence of phases during heating to 700°C. Upon heating above 600°C, the progressive transition of quasiamorphous Ta2C carbide into the crystalline Ta2C carbide was found to take place. The possibility of applying the direct synthesis of TaC carbide in engineering was noted.

  5. Structure, composition, and mechanical properties of shark teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enax, Joachim; Prymak, Oleg; Raabe, Dierk; Epple, Matthias

    2012-06-01

    The teeth of two different shark species (Isurus oxyrinchus and Galeocerdo cuvier) and a geological fluoroapatite single crystal were structurally and chemically characterized. In contrast to dentin, enameloid showed sharp diffraction peaks which indicated a high crystallinity of the enameloid. The lattice parameters of enameloid were close to those of the geological fluoroapatite single crystal. The inorganic part of shark teeth consisted of fluoroapatite with a fluoride content in the enameloid of 3.1 wt.%, i.e., close to the fluoride content of the geological fluoroapatite single crystal (3.64 wt.%). Scanning electron micrographs showed that the crystals in enameloid were highly ordered with a special topological orientation (perpendicular towards the outside surface and parallel towards the center). By thermogravimetry, water, organic matrix, and biomineral in dentin and enameloid of both shark species were determined. Dentin had a higher content of water, organic matrix, and carbonate than enameloid but contained less fluoride. Nanoindentation and Vicker's microhardness tests showed that the enameloid of the shark teeth was approximately six times harder than the dentin. The hardness of shark teeth and human teeth was comparable, both for dentin and enamel/enameloid. In contrast, the geological fluoroapatite single crystal was much harder than both kinds of teeth due to the absence of an organic matrix. In summary, the different biological functions of the shark teeth ("tearing" for Isurus and "cutting" for Galeocerdo) are controlled by the different geometry and not by the chemical or crystallographic composition.

  6. Optimization of compositional and structural properties in probiotic sausage production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bağdatli, Aytunga; Kundakci, Akif

    2016-03-01

    In this study, the effects of different fat levels and different particle sizes on compositional and structural characteristics of probiotic fermented sausage were investigated. In order to obtain probiotic character, Lactobacillus casei CRL431 was added. The physicochemical, microbiological and sensory analysis were done. The effect of fat level x mincer hole diameter interaction on hardness values were statistically significant (p < 0.005). At the end of the fermentation-ripening period, L.casei CRL-431 count has reached to sufficient microbial count (10(6) cfu/g of probiotic bacteria) to demonstrate the character of probiotic food. A significant positive correlation was found between L.casei CRL431 count and surface appearance, texture and overall acceptability scores (r = 0.60, 0.52, 0.53). The values of TBARS number of probiotic sucuk samples increased during fermentation-ripening. A significant correlation between taste-aroma scores and fat level was detected (r = -0.61,p = 0.0008). Consiquently, the best sensorial quality was determined in L3 samples and the worst sensorial quality was determined in H8 samples.

  7. Composite Polymer Electrolytes: Nanoparticles Affect Structure and Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Composite polymer electrolytes (CPEs can significantly improve the performance in electrochemical devices such as lithium-ion batteries. This review summarizes property/performance relationships in the case where nanoparticles are introduced to polymer electrolytes. It is the aim of this review to provide a knowledge network that elucidates the role of nano-additives in the CPEs. Central to the discussion is the impact on the CPE performance of properties such as crystalline/amorphous structure, dielectric behavior, and interactions within the CPE. The amorphous domains of semi-crystalline polymer facilitate the ion transport, while an enhanced mobility of polymer chains contributes to high ionic conductivity. Dielectric properties reflect the relaxation behavior of polymer chains as an important factor in ion conduction. Further, the dielectric constant (ε determines the capability of the polymer to dissolve salt. The atom/ion/nanoparticle interactions within CPEs suggest ways to enhance the CPE conductivity by generating more free lithium ions. Certain properties can be improved simultaneously by nanoparticle addition in order to optimize the overall performance of the electrolyte. The effects of nano-additives on thermal and mechanical properties of CPEs are also presented in order to evaluate the electrolyte competence for lithium-ion battery applications.

  8. The Okhansk Meteorite: Specifics of Composition, Structure, and Genesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.I. Bakhtin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The Okhansk meteorite fell on August 18, 1887 near the village of Tabor, about 15 km away from the town of Okhansk in Perm province and weighed 186.5 kg (the total weight of collected fragments, according to P.I. Krotov, was more than 245 kg. The shock wave from the meteorite entry knocked down animals and riders on horses. Despite the fact that it was significantly stronger than that caused by the Chelyabinsk meteorite of 2013, all information about this meteorite has completely erased from people's memory. It has been shown that the meteorite is an ordinary olivine-bronzite chondrite. Its main silicate minerals are olivine, bronzite, plagioclase, and diopside. The main ore minerals are kamacite and troilite. The meteorite contains silicate glass in large amounts. The analysis of the composition and structure of the Okhansk meteorite has demonstrated that it was formed at the early stages of accretion of the melted substance of the protosolar nebula without undergoing endogenous, temperature, or pressure changes.

  9. Structure, morphology and optical studies of Li+ doped polyaniline composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesappa, L.; Niranjana, M.; Ashokkumar, S. P.; Vijeth, Chapi, Sharanappa; Raghu, S.; Devendrappa, H.

    2017-05-01

    Conjugating Polyaniline (PANI) composites have many interesting optical property useful in optical device applications. The pure PANI and PANI-Lithium perchlorate composites (PL1 & PL10) were prepared by chemical reaction method. The composites are characterized with the help of FT-IR, SEM and UV-Vis to confirm the chemical interactions, change in surface morphology and optical changes respectively. The direct optical band gap was found decreased from 3.89 to 2.97eV with increasing the LiClO4. The obtained results suggesting these polymer composites are suitable candidates for optoelectronics display, electrode material and electrochromic devices.

  10. Application of Ultrasonic Phased Array Technology to the Detection of Defect in Composite Stiffened-structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuan-Qi; Zhan, Li-Hua

    2016-05-01

    Composite stiffened-structure consists of the skin and stringer has been widely used in aircraft fuselage and wings. The main purpose of the article is to detect the composite material reinforced structure accurately and explore the relationship between defect formation and structural elements or curing process. Based on ultrasonic phased array inspection technology, the regularity of defects in the manufacture of composite materials are obtained, the correlation model between actual defects and nondestructive testing are established. The article find that the forming quality of deltoid area in T-stiffened structure is obviously improved by pre-curing, the defects of hat-stiffened structure are affected by the mandrel. The results show that the ultrasonic phased array inspection technology can be an effectively way for the detection of composite stiffened-structures, which become an important means to control the defects of composite and improve the quality of the product.

  11. Preparation of Desirable Porous Cell Structure Polylactide/Wood Flour Composite Foams Assisted by Chain Extender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youyong Wang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Polylactide (PLA/wood flour composite foam were prepared through a batch foaming process. The effect of the chain extender on the crystallization behavior and dynamic rheological properties of the PLA/wood flour composites were investigated as well as the crystal structure and cell morphology of the composite foams. The incorporation of the chain extender enhanced the complex viscosity and storage modulus of PLA/wood flour composites, indicating the improved melt elasticity. The chain extender also led to a decreased crystallization rate and final crystallinity of PLA/wood flour composites. With an increasing chain extender content, a finer and more uniform cell structure was formed, and the expansion ratio of PLA/wood flour composite foams was much higher than without the chain extender. Compared to the unfoamed composites, the crystallinity of the foamed PLA/wood flour composites was improved and the crystal was loosely packed. However, the new crystalline form was not evident.

  12. Electron transport in molecular junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Chengjun

    This thesis addresses the electron transport in molecular junctions, focusing on the energy level alignment and correlation effects. Various levels of theory have been applied to study the structural and electronic effects in different molecular junctions, starting from the single particle density...... charge position are in quantitative agreement with the experiments, while pure DFT is not. This is the consequence of the accurate energy level alignment, where the DFT+∑ method corrects the self-interaction error in the standard DFT functional and uses a static image charge model to include the image...... charge effect on the energy level renormalization. Additionally, the gating of the 4,4’-bipyridine (44BP) molecule contacted to either Ni or Au electrodes has been investigated. Here it is found that the gating mechanism is conceptually different between two cases. In the case of Ni contacts where...

  13. Spiral Passive Electromagnetic Sensor (SPES) for composite structural changes in aircraft structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iervolino, Onorio; Meo, Michele

    2016-04-01

    A major goal of structural health monitoring (SHM) is to provide accurate and responsive detection and monitoring of flaws. This research work reports an investigation of SPES sensors for damage detection, investigating different sensor sizes and how they affect the sensor's signal. A sensor able to monitor structural change that can be remotely interrogated and does not need a power supply is presented in this work. The SPES-sensor presents the great advantage of monitoring conductive and non-conductive structures such as fiberglass-reinforced composites (FRC) and carbon fiber-reinforced polymers (CFRP). Any phenomena that affect the magnetic field of the SPES can be detected and monitored. A study was conducted to investigate the capability of sensor to give information on structural changes, simulated by the presence of an external mass placed in the proximity of sensor. Effect of different positions of the SPES within the sample, and how to extend the area of inspection using multiple sensors was investigated. The sensor was tested embedded in the samples, simulating the structural change on both sides of the sample. In both configurations the sensor described herein demonstrated a great potential to monitor structural changes.

  14. Mechanical Response of All-composite Pyramidal Lattice Truss Core Sandwich Structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Li; Linzhi Wu; Li Ma; Bing Wang; Zhengxi Guan

    2011-01-01

    The mechanical performance of an all-composite pyramidal lattice truss core sandwich structure was investigated both theoretically and experimentally. Sandwich structures were fabricated with a hot compression molding method using carbon fiber reinforced composite T700/3234. The out-of-plane compression and shear tests were conducted. Experimental results showed that the all-composite pyramidal lattice truss core sandwich structures were more weight efficient than other metallic lattice truss core sandwich structures. Failure modes revealed that node rupture dominated the mechanical behavior of sandwich structures.

  15. Structural Performance of Fiber-Placed, Variable-Stiffness Composite Conical and Cylindrical Shells

    OpenAIRE

    Blom, A. W.

    2010-01-01

    The use of fiber-reinforced composites in aerospace structures has increased dramatically over the past decades. The high specific strength and stiffness, the tailorability, and the possibilities to integrate parts and reduce the number of fasteners give composites an advantage over metals. Automation of the production process enables large-scale production of composites in a repeatable, reliable fashion. Fiber-reinforced composite laminates are traditionally made of 0◦, 90◦ and ±45◦ plies. A...

  16. Fatigue fracture of fiber reinforced polymer honeycomb composite sandwich structures for gas turbine engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikhamkin, Mikhail; Sazhenkov, Nikolai; Samodurov, Danil

    2017-05-01

    Fiber reinforced polymer honeycomb composite sandwich structures are commonly used in different industries. In particular, they are used in the manufacture of gas turbine engines. However, fiber reinforced polymer honeycomb composite sandwich structures often have a manufacturing flaw. In theory, such flaws due to their rapid propagation reduce the durability of fiber reinforced polymer honeycomb composite sandwich structures. In this paper, bending fatigue tests of fiber reinforced polymer honeycomb composite sandwich structures with manufacturing flaws were conducted. Comparative analysis of fatigue fracture of fiber reinforced polymer honeycomb composite sandwich specimens was conducted before and after their bending fatigue tests. The analysis was based on the internal damage X-ray observation of fiber reinforced polymer honeycomb composite sandwich specimens.

  17. Structure-performance maps of polymeric, metal, and ceramic matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Tsu-Wei; Yang, Jenn-Ming

    1986-09-01

    This paper presents the results of extensive analytical studies of the thermo-elastic properties of unidirectional laminated composites, as well as two-dimensional and three-dimensional textile structural composites with polymeric, metal, and ceramic matrices. Some comparisons of the theoretical predictions with experimental data have been made. By the construction of the structure-performance maps, the effective composite properties based upon various reinforcement forms and fiber and matrix combinations can be easily assessed. The uniqueness of various textile structural reinforcements also has been demonstrated. These comprehensive performance maps can provide the data base necessary for material selections and guidance for future investigations of advanced composites.

  18. Certification Testing Methodology for Composite Structure. Volume 2. Methodology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-10-01

    J.E., "F-18 Composites Development Tests," N00019- 79-C-0044 (January 1981). 3. Stenberg , K.V., et al., "YAV-8B Composite Wing Development," Volumes I...Louis, MO 63166 (Attn: K. Stenberg , R. Garrett, R. Riley, J. Doerr). . . 4 MCDONNELL-DOUGLAS CORP., Long Beach, CA 90846 (Attn: J. Palmer

  19. High Temperature Advanced Structural Composites. Volume 3. Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-04-02

    of Mechanics Associaqao Brasileira de CiUncias MecAnicas Hosted by Departamento de Engenharia Civil Pontiffcia Universidade Cat61ica do Rio de Janeiro...plastic composite materiale , Jnl. Appl. Mach., Vol. 53 (1986). Mechanics of Matenals 7 (1989) 305-317 305 North-Holland STRESS FIELDS IN COMPOSITES

  20. Structural changes during pitch-based carbon granular composites carbonisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendez, A.; Santamaria, R.; Granda, M.; Menendez, R. [CSIC, Oviedo (Spain)

    2008-02-15

    This article deals with the study of carbon composites behavior during their carbonization. Composites were prepared using four granular carbons (graphite, anthracite, green petroleum coke, and foundry coke) and four pitches (a commercial impregnating coal-tar pitch, an air-blown and two thermally treated pitches). The evolution of the optical microstructure, porosity, volume, and weight of carbon composites was monitored at different intermediate carbonization temperatures (350, 500, 700, and finally 1000{sup o}C). The porosity of composites increases with carbonization due to volume changes and weight loss of pitches. Weight loss of carbon composites during their carbonization mainly depends on the pitch characteristics and it was slightly influenced by the presence of granular carbon. On the other hand, carbon composites with the commercial coal-tar pitch and foundry coke, anthracite, or graphite deform in the initial stages of carbonization (<350{sup o}C) probably due to the lower porosity of the green pellets and the high amount of low-molecular weight compounds of the pitch. Carbon composites with green petroleum coke underwent important dimensional changes during their carbonization, expanding initially and then shrinking at temperatures above 700{sup o}C. The type of granular carbon strongly influenced the microstructure of the final carbon composite, as a result of its effect on the development of mesophase. Graphite, anthracite and foundry coke delays mesophase development, whereas green petroleum coke accelerates mesophase formation.