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Sample records for junctional membrane complex

  1. Disrupted Junctional Membrane Complexes and Hyperactive Ryanodine Receptors Following Acute Junctophilin Knockdown in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oort, Ralph J.; Garbino, Alejandro; Wang, Wei; Dixit, Sayali S.; Landstrom, Andrew P.; Gaur, Namit; De Almeida, Angela C.; Skapura, Darlene G.; Rudy, Yoram; Burns, Alan R.; Ackerman, Michael J.; Wehrens, Xander H.T.

    2011-01-01

    Background Excitation-contraction coupling in striated muscle requires proper communication of plasmalemmal voltage-activated Ca2+ channels and Ca2+ release channels on sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) within junctional membrane complexes (JMCs). Whereas previous studies revealed a loss of JMCs and embryonic lethality in germ-line junctophilin-2 (JPH2) knockout mice, it has remained unclear whether JPH2 plays an essential role in JMC formation and the Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release process in the heart. Our recent work demonstrated loss-of-function mutations in JPH2 in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Methods and Results To elucidate the role of JPH2 in the heart, we developed a novel approach to conditionally reduce JPH2 protein levels using RNA interference. Cardiac-specific JPH2 knockdown resulted in impaired cardiac contractility, which caused heart failure and increased mortality. JPH2 deficiency resulted in loss of excitation-contraction coupling gain, precipitated by a reduction in the number of JMCs and increased variability in the plasmalemma-SR distance. Conclusions Loss of JPH2 had profound effects on Ca2+ release channel inactivation, suggesting a novel functional role for JPH2 in regulating intracellular Ca2+ release channels in cardiac myocytes. Thus, our novel approach of cardiac-specific shRNA-mediated knockdown of junctophilin-2 has uncovered a critical role for junctophilin in intracellular Ca2+ release in the heart. PMID:21339484

  2. Endoplasmic reticulum-plasma membrane junctions: structure, function and dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okeke, Emmanuel; Dingsdale, Hayley; Parker, Tony; Voronina, Svetlana; Tepikin, Alexei V

    2016-06-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-plasma membrane (PM) junctions are contact sites between the ER and the PM; the distance between the two organelles in the junctions is below 40 nm and the membranes are connected by protein tethers. A number of molecular tools and technical approaches have been recently developed to visualise, modify and characterise properties of ER-PM junctions. The junctions serve as the platforms for lipid exchange between the organelles and for cell signalling, notably Ca(2+) and cAMP signalling. Vice versa, signalling events regulate the development and properties of the junctions. Two Ca(2+) -dependent mechanisms of de novo formation of ER-PM junctions have been recently described and characterised. The junction-forming proteins and lipids are currently the focus of vigorous investigation. Junctions can be relatively short-lived and simple structures, forming and dissolving on the time scale of a few minutes. However, complex, sophisticated and multifunctional ER-PM junctions, capable of attracting numerous protein residents and other cellular organelles, have been described in some cell types. The road from simplicity to complexity, i.e. the transformation from simple 'nascent' ER-PM junctions to advanced stable multiorganellar complexes, is likely to become an attractive research avenue for current and future junctologists. Another area of considerable research interest is the downstream cellular processes that can be activated by specific local signalling events in the ER-PM junctions. Studies of the cell physiology and indeed pathophysiology of ER-PM junctions have already produced some surprising discoveries, likely to expand with advances in our understanding of these remarkable organellar contact sites. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2016 The Physiological Society.

  3. Export of a Toxoplasma gondii rhoptry neck protein complex at the host cell membrane to form the moving junction during invasion.

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    Sébastien Besteiro

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the most conserved features of the invasion process in Apicomplexa parasites is the formation of a moving junction (MJ between the apex of the parasite and the host cell membrane that moves along the parasite and serves as support to propel it inside the host cell. The MJ was, up to a recent period, completely unknown at the molecular level. Recently, proteins originated from two distinct post-Golgi specialised secretory organelles, the micronemes (for AMA1 and the neck of the rhoptries (for RON2/RON4/RON5 proteins, have been shown to form a complex. AMA1 and RON4 in particular, have been localised to the MJ during invasion. Using biochemical approaches, we have identified RON8 as an additional member of the complex. We also demonstrated that all RON proteins are present at the MJ during invasion. Using metabolic labelling and immunoprecipitation, we showed that RON2 and AMA1 were able to interact in the absence of the other members. We also discovered that all MJ proteins are subjected to proteolytic maturation during trafficking to their respective organelles and that they could associate as non-mature forms in vitro. Finally, whereas AMA1 has previously been shown to be inserted into the parasite membrane upon secretion, we demonstrated, using differential permeabilization and loading of RON-specific antibodies into the host cell, that the RON complex is targeted to the host cell membrane, where RON4/5/8 remain associated with the cytoplasmic face. Globally, these results point toward a model of MJ organization where the parasite would be secreting and inserting interacting components on either side of the MJ, both at the host and at its own plasma membranes.

  4. Gene knockout using transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) reveals that human NDUFA9 protein is essential for stabilizing the junction between membrane and matrix arms of complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroud, David A; Formosa, Luke E; Wijeyeratne, Xiaonan W; Nguyen, Thanh N; Ryan, Michael T

    2013-01-18

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) represent a promising approach for targeted knock-out of genes in cultured human cells. We used TALEN-technology to knock out the nuclear gene encoding NDUFA9, a subunit of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I in HEK293T cells. Screening for the knock-out revealed a mixture of NDUFA9 cell clones that harbored partial deletions of the mitochondrial N-terminal targeting signal but were still capable of import. A cell line lacking functional copies of both NDUFA9 alleles resulted in a loss of NDUFA9 protein expression, impaired assembly of complex I, and cells incapable of growth in galactose medium. Cells lacking NDUFA9 contained a complex I subcomplex consisting of membrane arm subunits but not marker subunits of the matrix arm. Re-expression of NDUFA9 restored the defects in complex I assembly. We conclude that NDUFA9 is involved in stabilizing the junction between membrane and matrix arms of complex I, a late assembly step critical for complex I biogenesis and activity.

  5. Virus interaction with the apical junctional complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Mariscal, Lorenza; Garay, Erika; Lechuga, Susana

    2009-01-01

    In order to infect pathogens must breach the epithelial barriers that separate the organism from the external environment or that cover the internal cavities and ducts of the body. Epithelia seal the passage through the paracellular pathway with the apical junctional complex integrated by tight and adherens junctions. In this review we describe how viruses like coxsackie, swine vesicular disease virus, adenovirus, reovirus, feline calcivirus, herpes viruses 1 and 2, pseudorabies, bovine herpes virus 1, poliovirus and hepatitis C use as cellular receptors integral proteins present at the AJC of epithelial cells. Interaction with these proteins contributes in a significant manner in defining the particular tropism of each virus. Besides these proteins, viruses exhibit a wide range of cellular co-receptors among which proteins present in the basolateral cell surface like integrins are often found. Therefore targeting proteins of the AJC constitutes a strategy that might allow viruses to bypass the physical barrier that blocks their access to receptors expressed on the basolateral surface of epithelial cells.

  6. 19-DEJ-1, a hemidesmosome-anchoring filament complex-associated monoclonal antibody. Definition of a new skin basement membrane antigenic defect in junctional and dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fine, J D; Horiguchi, Y; Couchman, J R

    1989-01-01

    A murine monoclonal antibody (19-DEJ-1) was recently produced that recognizes a unique antigenic epitope of human skin basement membrane localized to the midlamina lucida exclusively in those areas bordered by overlying hemidesmosomes. To determine whether the antigen defined by 19-DEJ-1 is norma...

  7. West Nile virus infection causes endocytosis of a specific subset of tight junction membrane proteins.

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    Zaikun Xu

    Full Text Available West Nile virus (WNV is a blood-borne pathogen that causes systemic infections and serious neurological disease in human and animals. The most common route of infection is mosquito bites and therefore, the virus must cross a number of polarized cell layers to gain access to organ tissue and the central nervous system. Resistance to trans-cellular movement of macromolecules between epithelial and endothelial cells is mediated by tight junction complexes. While a number of recent studies have documented that WNV infection negatively impacts the barrier function of tight junctions, the intracellular mechanism by which this occurs is poorly understood. In the present study, we report that endocytosis of a subset of tight junction membrane proteins including claudin-1 and JAM-1 occurs in WNV infected epithelial and endothelial cells. This process, which ultimately results in lysosomal degradation of the proteins, is dependent on the GTPase dynamin and microtubule-based transport. Finally, infection of polarized cells with the related flavivirus, Dengue virus-2, did not result in significant loss of tight junction membrane proteins. These results suggest that neurotropic flaviviruses such as WNV modulate the host cell environment differently than hemorrhagic flaviviruses and thus may have implications for understanding the molecular basis for neuroinvasion.

  8. The NA+/K+-ATPase controls gap junctions via membrane microdomain interactions in rat smooth muscles.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matchkov, Vladimir; Nilsson, Holger; Aalkjær, Christian

    in regulation of the intercellular communication. We have here shown that gap junctions between SMCs are regulated through an interaction between the Na+/K+-ATPase and the Na+/Ca2+-exchanger leading to an increase in [Ca2+]i in discrete areas near the plasma membrane. We have also suggested that this Na......The Na+/K+-ATPase is known to interact with many membrane and cytosolic proteins by organizing various signaling complexes. These interactions were suggested to be important in regulation of various cellular responses. Pumping activity of the Na+/K+-ATPase is suggested to be essential for some...... in rat mesenteric small arteries. Paired cultured rat smooth muscle cells (A7r5) were used as a model for electrical coupling of SMC by measuring membrane capacitance (Cm). PCR, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry were used to identify the membrane transporters. SMCs were uncoupled (evaluated...

  9. Trichomonas vaginalis perturbs the junctional complex in epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis, a protist parasite of the urogenital tract in humans, is the causative agent of trichomonosis,which in recent years have been associated with the cervical cancer development. In the present study we analyzed the modifications at the junctional complex level of Caco-2 cells after interaction with two isolates of T. vaginalis and the influence of the iron concentration present in the parasite's culture medium on the interaction effects. Our results show that T. vaginalis adheres to the epithelial cell causing alterations in the junctional complex, such as: (a) a decrease in transepithelial electrical resistance; (b) alteration in the pattern of junctional complex proteins distribution as obseryed for E-cadherin, occludin and ZO-1; and (c) enlargement of the spaces between epithelial cells. These effects were dependent on (a) the degree of the parasite virulence isolate, (b) the iron concentration in the culture medium, and (c) the expression of adhesin proteins on the parasite surface.

  10. Structures of photosynthetic membrane complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Semchonok, Dmitry Alexandrovich

    2016-01-01

    Photosynthesis is essential to all life on Earth. It is the biological process that captures energy of sunlight and converts it into chemical compounds usable by any living organism. The processes occurring within photosynthesis can be divided into the light-dependent reactions and the light-independent reactions. In my PhD thesis several integral membrane protein complexes were investigated that catalyze the light dependent reactions. Primarily the photosystem I and II that are taking part i...

  11. The apicomplexan inner membrane complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Maya; Prusty, Dhaneswar; Parkinson, John; Gilberger, Tim W

    2013-06-01

    Dinoflagellates, apicomplexans and ciliates are members of the monophyletic supergroup of Alveolata. The protists of this phylogenetic cluster have adapted to various ecological niches and lifestyles. Dinoflagellates and cilates can be found in any aquatic environment, whereas the phylum Apicomplexa solely comprises intracellular parasites. Despite their diversity all alveolates are united by the presence of membranous vesicles, so called alveoli, located beneath the plasma membrane. In addition to strengthening the cytoskeleton, these vesicles appear to possess taxon-specific functionality. In dinoflagellates and ciliates the alveoli predominantly play a structural role and can function as calcium stores. However, for the Apicomplexa, the alveolar vesicles -here jointly called the inner membrane complex (IMC)- are additionally involved in invasion of the host cell and are important scaffold elements during cytokinesis. Recent studies shed light on the architecture of the apicomplexan IMC and the number and diversity of its constituent proteins. This plethora of proteins and their varying evolutionary origin underlines the versatility of the IMC as a result of the adaption to a parasitic lifestyle.

  12. Cell membrane and cell junctions in differentiation of preimplanted mouse embryos.

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    Izquierdo, L; Fernández, S; López, T

    1976-12-01

    Cell membrane and cell junctions in differentiation of preimplanted mouse embryos, (membrana celular y uniones celulares en la diferenciación del embrión de ratón antes de la implantación). Arch. Biol. Med. Exper. 10: 130-134, 1976. The development of cell junctions that seal the peripheral blastomeres could be a decisive step in the differentiation of morulae into blastocysts. The appearance of these junctions is studied by electron microscopy of late morulae and initial blastocysts. Zonulae occludentes as well as impermeability to lanthanum emulsion precedes the appearance of the blastocel and hence might be considered as one of its necessary causes.

  13. Membrane tethering complexes in the endosomal system

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    Anne eSpang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Vesicles that are generated by endocytic events at the plasma membrane are destined to early endosomes. A prerequisite for proper fusion is the tethering of two membrane entities. Tethering of vesicles to early endosomes is mediated by the CORVET complex, while fusion of late endosomes with lysosomes depends on the HOPS complex. Recycling through the TGN and to the plasma membrane is facilitated by the GARP and EARP complexes, respectively. However, there are other tethering functions in the endosomal system as there are multiple pathways through which proteins can be delivered from endosomes to either the TGN or the plasma membrane. Furthermore, complexes that may be part of novel tethering complexes have been recently identified. Thus it is likely that more tethering factors exist. In this review, I will provide an overview of different tethering complexes of the endosomal system and discuss how they may provide specificity in membrane traffic.

  14. Eye lens membrane junctional microdomains: a comparison between healthy and pathological cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buzhynskyy, Nikolay; Scheuring, Simon [Institut Curie, Equipe Inserm Avenir, UMR168-CNRS, 26 Rue d' Ulm, 75248 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Sens, Pierre [ESPCI, CNRS-UMR 7083, 75231 Paris (France); Behar-Cohen, Francine, E-mail: simon.scheuring@curie.fr [UMRS Inserm 872, Universite Paris Descartes, Centre de Recherches des Cordeliers, 15 rue de l' Ecole de Medecine, 75270 Paris Cedex 06 (France)

    2011-08-15

    The eye lens is a transparent tissue constituted of tightly packed fiber cells. To maintain homeostasis and transparency of the lens, the circulation of water, ions and metabolites is required. Junctional microdomains connect the lens cells and ensure both tight cell-to-cell adhesion and intercellular flow of fluids through a microcirculation system. Here, we overview membrane morphology and tissue functional requirements of the mammalian lens. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has opened up the possibility of visualizing the junctional microdomains at unprecedented submolecular resolution, revealing the supramolecular assembly of lens-specific aquaporin-0 (AQP0) and connexins (Cx). We compare the membrane protein assembly in healthy lenses with senile and diabetes-II cataract cases and novel data of the lens membranes from a congenital cataract. In the healthy case, AQP0s form characteristic square arrays confined by connexons. In the cases of senile and diabetes-II cataract patients, connexons were degraded, leading to malformation of AQP0 arrays and breakdown of the microcirculation system. In the congenital cataract, connexons are present, indicating probable non-membranous grounds for lens opacification. Further, we discuss the energetic aspects of the membrane organization in junctional microdomains. The AFM hence becomes a biomedical nano-imaging tool for the analysis of single-membrane protein supramolecular association in healthy and pathological membranes.

  15. Eye lens membrane junctional microdomains: a comparison between healthy and pathological cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzhynskyy, Nikolay; Sens, Pierre; Behar-Cohen, Francine; Scheuring, Simon

    2011-08-01

    The eye lens is a transparent tissue constituted of tightly packed fiber cells. To maintain homeostasis and transparency of the lens, the circulation of water, ions and metabolites is required. Junctional microdomains connect the lens cells and ensure both tight cell-to-cell adhesion and intercellular flow of fluids through a microcirculation system. Here, we overview membrane morphology and tissue functional requirements of the mammalian lens. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has opened up the possibility of visualizing the junctional microdomains at unprecedented submolecular resolution, revealing the supramolecular assembly of lens-specific aquaporin-0 (AQP0) and connexins (Cx). We compare the membrane protein assembly in healthy lenses with senile and diabetes-II cataract cases and novel data of the lens membranes from a congenital cataract. In the healthy case, AQP0s form characteristic square arrays confined by connexons. In the cases of senile and diabetes-II cataract patients, connexons were degraded, leading to malformation of AQP0 arrays and breakdown of the microcirculation system. In the congenital cataract, connexons are present, indicating probable non-membranous grounds for lens opacification. Further, we discuss the energetic aspects of the membrane organization in junctional microdomains. The AFM hence becomes a biomedical nano-imaging tool for the analysis of single-membrane protein supramolecular association in healthy and pathological membranes.

  16. Epithelial cell-cell junctions and plasma membrane domains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giepmans, Ben N. G.; van Ijzendoorn, Sven C. D.

    Epithelial cells form a barrier against the environment, but are also required for the regulated exchange of molecules between an organism and its surroundings. Epithelial cells are characterised by a remarkable polarization of their plasma membrane, evidenced by the appearance of structurally,

  17. Epithelial cell-cell junctions and plasma membrane domains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giepmans, Ben N. G.; van Ijzendoorn, Sven C. D.

    2009-01-01

    Epithelial cells form a barrier against the environment, but are also required for the regulated exchange of molecules between an organism and its surroundings. Epithelial cells are characterised by a remarkable polarization of their plasma membrane, evidenced by the appearance of structurally, comp

  18. Focal junctions retard lateral movement and disrupt fluid phase connectivity in the plasma membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vind-Kezunovic, D.; Wojewodzka, U.; Gniadecki, R.

    2008-01-01

    containing liquid-ordered (L-o) lipids. Indeed, values of maximal fluorescence recovery after photobleaching revealed that the long-range mobility of cholera toxin B subunit (CTB, marker of L-o) was similar to 1.5-fold retarded within the focal junctions compared to the surrounding membrane. However, 1......,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI-C-18:0), which specifically partitions to the liquid-disordered (L-d), non-raft phase, was also enriched in focal junctions and its mobility was slightly retarded. Cross-linking of GM(1) by CTB or raft aggregation by methyl...

  19. A membrane fusion protein αSNAP is a novel regulator of epithelial apical junctions.

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    Nayden G Naydenov

    Full Text Available Tight junctions (TJs and adherens junctions (AJs are key determinants of the structure and permeability of epithelial barriers. Although exocytic delivery to the cell surface is crucial for junctional assembly, little is known about the mechanisms controlling TJ and AJ exocytosis. This study was aimed at investigating whether a key mediator of exocytosis, soluble N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor (NSF attachment protein alpha (αSNAP, regulates epithelial junctions. αSNAP was enriched at apical junctions in SK-CO15 and T84 colonic epithelial cells and in normal human intestinal mucosa. siRNA-mediated knockdown of αSNAP inhibited AJ/TJ assembly and establishment of the paracellular barrier in SK-CO15 cells, which was accompanied by a significant down-regulation of p120-catenin and E-cadherin expression. A selective depletion of p120 catenin effectively disrupted AJ and TJ structure and compromised the epithelial barrier. However, overexpression of p120 catenin did not rescue the defects of junctional structure and permeability caused by αSNAP knockdown thereby suggesting the involvement of additional mechanisms. Such mechanisms did not depend on NSF functions or induction of cell death, but were associated with disruption of the Golgi complex and down-regulation of a Golgi-associated guanidine nucleotide exchange factor, GBF1. These findings suggest novel roles for αSNAP in promoting the formation of epithelial AJs and TJs by controlling Golgi-dependent expression and trafficking of junctional proteins.

  20. Gap Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Morten Schak; Axelsen, Lene Nygaard; Sorgen, Paul L.; Verma, Vandana; Delmar, Mario; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Gap junctions are essential to the function of multicellular animals, which require a high degree of coordination between cells. In vertebrates, gap junctions comprise connexins and currently 21 connexins are known in humans. The functions of gap junctions are highly diverse and include exchange of metabolites and electrical signals between cells, as well as functions, which are apparently unrelated to intercellular communication. Given the diversity of gap junction physiology, regulation of gap junction activity is complex. The structure of the various connexins is known to some extent; and structural rearrangements and intramolecular interactions are important for regulation of channel function. Intercellular coupling is further regulated by the number and activity of channels present in gap junctional plaques. The number of connexins in cell-cell channels is regulated by controlling transcription, translation, trafficking, and degradation; and all of these processes are under strict control. Once in the membrane, channel activity is determined by the conductive properties of the connexin involved, which can be regulated by voltage and chemical gating, as well as a large number of posttranslational modifications. The aim of the present article is to review our current knowledge on the structure, regulation, function, and pharmacology of gap junctions. This will be supported by examples of how different connexins and their regulation act in concert to achieve appropriate physiological control, and how disturbances of connexin function can lead to disease. © 2012 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 2:1981-2035, 2012. PMID:23723031

  1. Gap junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Morten Schak; Axelsen, Lene Nygaard; Sorgen, Paul L; Verma, Vandana; Delmar, Mario; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2012-07-01

    Gap junctions are essential to the function of multicellular animals, which require a high degree of coordination between cells. In vertebrates, gap junctions comprise connexins and currently 21 connexins are known in humans. The functions of gap junctions are highly diverse and include exchange of metabolites and electrical signals between cells, as well as functions, which are apparently unrelated to intercellular communication. Given the diversity of gap junction physiology, regulation of gap junction activity is complex. The structure of the various connexins is known to some extent; and structural rearrangements and intramolecular interactions are important for regulation of channel function. Intercellular coupling is further regulated by the number and activity of channels present in gap junctional plaques. The number of connexins in cell-cell channels is regulated by controlling transcription, translation, trafficking, and degradation; and all of these processes are under strict control. Once in the membrane, channel activity is determined by the conductive properties of the connexin involved, which can be regulated by voltage and chemical gating, as well as a large number of posttranslational modifications. The aim of the present article is to review our current knowledge on the structure, regulation, function, and pharmacology of gap junctions. This will be supported by examples of how different connexins and their regulation act in concert to achieve appropriate physiological control, and how disturbances of connexin function can lead to disease. © 2012 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 2:1853-1872, 2012.

  2. Effect of intrinsic curvature and edge tension on the stability of binary mixed-membrane three-junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Jasmine M.; Deserno, Markus; Abrams, Cameron F.

    2016-08-01

    We use a combination of coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations and theoretical modeling to examine three-junctions in mixed lipid bilayer membranes. These junctions are localized defect lines in which three bilayers merge in such a way that each bilayer shares one monolayer with one of the other two bilayers. The resulting local morphology is non-lamellar, resembling the threefold symmetric defect lines in inverse hexagonal phases, but it regularly occurs during membrane fission and fusion events. We realize a system of junctions by setting up a honeycomb lattice, which in its primitive cell contains two hexagons and four three-line junctions, permitting us to study their stability as well as their line tension. We specifically consider the effects of lipid composition and intrinsic curvature in binary mixtures, which contain a fraction of negatively curved lipids in a curvature-neutral background phase. Three-junction stability results from a competition between the junction and an open edge, which arises if one of the three bilayers detaches from the other two. We show that the stable phase is the one with the lower defect line tension. The strong and opposite monolayer curvatures present in junctions and edges enhance the mole fraction of negatively curved lipids in junctions and deplete it in edges. This lipid sorting affects the two line tensions and in turn the relative stability of the two phases. It also leads to a subtle entropic barrier for the transition between junction and edge that is absent in uniform membranes.

  3. Effect of intrinsic curvature and edge tension on the stability of binary mixed-membrane three-junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Jasmine M; Deserno, Markus; Abrams, Cameron F

    2016-08-21

    We use a combination of coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations and theoretical modeling to examine three-junctions in mixed lipid bilayer membranes. These junctions are localized defect lines in which three bilayers merge in such a way that each bilayer shares one monolayer with one of the other two bilayers. The resulting local morphology is non-lamellar, resembling the threefold symmetric defect lines in inverse hexagonal phases, but it regularly occurs during membrane fission and fusion events. We realize a system of junctions by setting up a honeycomb lattice, which in its primitive cell contains two hexagons and four three-line junctions, permitting us to study their stability as well as their line tension. We specifically consider the effects of lipid composition and intrinsic curvature in binary mixtures, which contain a fraction of negatively curved lipids in a curvature-neutral background phase. Three-junction stability results from a competition between the junction and an open edge, which arises if one of the three bilayers detaches from the other two. We show that the stable phase is the one with the lower defect line tension. The strong and opposite monolayer curvatures present in junctions and edges enhance the mole fraction of negatively curved lipids in junctions and deplete it in edges. This lipid sorting affects the two line tensions and in turn the relative stability of the two phases. It also leads to a subtle entropic barrier for the transition between junction and edge that is absent in uniform membranes.

  4. Structural and functional insights into the malaria parasite moving junction complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigitte Vulliez-Le Normand

    Full Text Available Members of the phylum Apicomplexa, which include the malaria parasite Plasmodium, share many features in their invasion mechanism in spite of their diverse host cell specificities and life cycle characteristics. The formation of a moving junction (MJ between the membranes of the invading apicomplexan parasite and the host cell is common to these intracellular pathogens. The MJ contains two key parasite components: the surface protein Apical Membrane Antigen 1 (AMA1 and its receptor, the Rhoptry Neck Protein (RON complex, which is targeted to the host cell membrane during invasion. In particular, RON2, a transmembrane component of the RON complex, interacts directly with AMA1. Here, we report the crystal structure of AMA1 from Plasmodium falciparum in complex with a peptide derived from the extracellular region of PfRON2, highlighting clear specificities of the P. falciparum RON2-AMA1 interaction. The receptor-binding site of PfAMA1 comprises the hydrophobic groove and a region that becomes exposed by displacement of the flexible Domain II loop. Mutations of key contact residues of PfRON2 and PfAMA1 abrogate binding between the recombinant proteins. Although PfRON2 contacts some polymorphic residues, binding studies with PfAMA1 from different strains show that these have little effect on affinity. Moreover, we demonstrate that the PfRON2 peptide inhibits erythrocyte invasion by P. falciparum merozoites and that this strong inhibitory potency is not affected by AMA1 polymorphisms. In parallel, we have determined the crystal structure of PfAMA1 in complex with the invasion-inhibitory peptide R1 derived by phage display, revealing an unexpected structural mimicry of the PfRON2 peptide. These results identify the key residues governing the interactions between AMA1 and RON2 in P. falciparum and suggest novel approaches to antimalarial therapeutics.

  5. Protein tyrosine phosphatase σ targets apical junction complex proteins in the intestine and regulates epithelial permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murchie, Ryan; Guo, Cong-Hui; Persaud, Avinash; Muise, Aleixo; Rotin, Daniela

    2014-01-14

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP)σ (PTPRS) was shown previously to be associated with susceptibility to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). PTPσ(-/-) mice exhibit an IBD-like phenotype in the intestine and show increased susceptibility to acute models of murine colitis. However, the function of PTPσ in the intestine is uncharacterized. Here, we show an intestinal epithelial barrier defect in the PTPσ(-/-) mouse, demonstrated by a decrease in transepithelial resistance and a leaky intestinal epithelium that was determined by in vivo tracer analysis. Increased tyrosine phosphorylation was observed at the plasma membrane of epithelial cells lining the crypts of the small bowel and colon of the PTPσ(-/-) mouse, suggesting the presence of PTPσ substrates in these regions. Using mass spectrometry, we identified several putative PTPσ intestinal substrates that were hyper-tyrosine-phosphorylated in the PTPσ(-/-) mice relative to wild type. Among these were proteins that form or regulate the apical junction complex, including ezrin. We show that ezrin binds to and is dephosphorylated by PTPσ in vitro, suggesting it is a direct PTPσ substrate, and identified ezrin-Y353/Y145 as important sites targeted by PTPσ. Moreover, subcellular localization of the ezrin phosphomimetic Y353E or Y145 mutants were disrupted in colonic Caco-2 cells, similar to ezrin mislocalization in the colon of PTPσ(-/-) mice following induction of colitis. Our results suggest that PTPσ is a positive regulator of intestinal epithelial barrier, which mediates its effects by modulating epithelial cell adhesion through targeting of apical junction complex-associated proteins (including ezrin), a process impaired in IBD.

  6. Microrheology of Biopolymer-Membrane Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfer, E.; Harlepp, S.; Bourdieu, L.; Robert, J.; Mackintosh, F. C.; Chatenay, D.

    2000-07-01

    We create tailored microstructures, consisting of complexes of lipid membranes with self-assembled biopolymer shells, to study the fundamental properties and interactions of these basic components of living cells. We measure the mechanical response of these artificial structures at the micrometer scale, using optical tweezers and single-particle tracking. These systems exhibit rich dynamics that illustrate the viscoelastic character of the quasi-two-dimensional biopolymer network. We present a theoretical model relating the rheological properties of these membranes to the observed dynamics.

  7. Dynamic trafficking and delivery of connexons to the plasma membrane and accretion to gap junctions in living cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lauf, Undine; Giepmans, Ben N G; Lopez, Patricia; Braconnot, Sebastien; Chen, Shu-Chih; Falk, Matthias M

    2002-01-01

    Certain membrane channels including acetylcholine receptors, gap junction (GJ) channels, and aquaporins arrange into large clusters in the plasma membrane (PM). However, how these channels are recruited to the clusters is unknown. To address this question, we have investigated delivery of GJ channel

  8. Innexin7a forms junctions that stabilize the basal membrane during cellularization of the blastoderm in Tribolium castaneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zee, Maurijn; Benton, Matthew A; Vazquez-Faci, Tania; Lamers, Gerda E M; Jacobs, Chris G C; Rabouille, Catherine

    2015-06-15

    In insects, the fertilized egg undergoes a series of rapid nuclear divisions before the syncytial blastoderm starts to cellularize. Cellularization has been extensively studied in Drosophila melanogaster, but its thick columnar blastoderm is unusual among insects. We therefore set out to describe cellularization in the beetle Tribolium castaneum, the embryos of which exhibit a thin blastoderm of cuboidal cells, like most insects. Using immunohistochemistry, live imaging and transmission electron microscopy, we describe several striking differences to cellularization in Drosophila, including the formation of junctions between the forming basal membrane and the yolk plasmalemma. To identify the nature of this novel junction, we used the parental RNAi technique for a small-scale screen of junction proteins. We find that maternal knockdown of Tribolium innexin7a (Tc-inx7a), an ortholog of the Drosophila gap junction gene Innexin 7, leads to failure of cellularization. In Inx7a-depleted eggs, the invaginated plasma membrane retracts when basal cell closure normally begins. Furthermore, transiently expressed tagged Inx7a localizes to the nascent basal membrane of the forming cells in wild-type eggs. We propose that Inx7a forms the newly identified junctions that stabilize the forming basal membrane and enable basal cell closure. We put forward Tribolium as a model for studying a more ancestral mode of cellularization in insects.

  9. Effects of radiographic contrast media on the micromorphology of the junctional complex of erythrocytes visualized by immunocytology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Ralf-Peter; Krüger, Anne; Scharnweber, Tim; Wenzel, Folker; Jung, Friedrich

    2014-09-12

    Effects of radiographic contrast media (RCM) application were demonstrated in vitro and in vivo where the injection of RCM into the A. axillaris of patients with coronary artery disease was followed by a significant and RCM-dependent decrease of erythrocyte velocity in downstream skin capillaries. Another study in pigs revealed that the deceleration of erythrocytes coincided with a significant reduction of the oxygen partial pressure in the myocardium--supplied by the left coronary artery--after the administration of RCM into this artery. Further reports showed RCM dependent alterations of erythrocytes like echinocyte formation and exocytosis, sequestration of actin or band 3 and the buckling of endothelial cells coinciding with a formation of interendothelial fenestrations leading to areas devoid of endothelial cells. Key to morphological alterations of erythrocytes is the membrane cytoskeleton, which is linked to the band 3 in the erythrocyte membrane via the junctional complex. Fundamental observations regarding the cell biological and biochemical aspects of the structure and function of the cell membrane and the membrane cytoskeleton of erythrocytes have been reported. This review focuses on recent results gained, e.g., by advanced confocal laser scanning microscopy of different double-stained structural elements of the erythrocyte membrane cytoskeleton.

  10. Unique cell type-specific junctional complexes in vascular endothelium of human and rat liver sinusoids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyrill Géraud

    Full Text Available Liver sinusoidal endothelium is strategically positioned to control access of fluids, macromolecules and cells to the liver parenchyma and to serve clearance functions upstream of the hepatocytes. While clearance of macromolecular debris from the peripheral blood is performed by liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs using a delicate endocytic receptor system featuring stabilin-1 and -2, the mannose receptor and CD32b, vascular permeability and cell trafficking are controlled by transcellular pores, i.e. the fenestrae, and by intercellular junctional complexes. In contrast to blood vascular and lymphatic endothelial cells in other organs, the junctional complexes of LSECs have not yet been consistently characterized in molecular terms. In a comprehensive analysis, we here show that LSECs express the typical proteins found in endothelial adherens junctions (AJ, i.e. VE-cadherin as well as α-, β-, p120-catenin and plakoglobin. Tight junction (TJ transmembrane proteins typical of endothelial cells, i.e. claudin-5 and occludin, were not expressed by rat LSECs while heterogenous immunreactivity for claudin-5 was detected in human LSECs. In contrast, junctional molecules preferentially associating with TJ such as JAM-A, B and C and zonula occludens proteins ZO-1 and ZO-2 were readily detected in LSECs. Remarkably, among the JAMs JAM-C was considerably over-expressed in LSECs as compared to lung microvascular endothelial cells. In conclusion, we show here that LSECs form a special kind of mixed-type intercellular junctions characterized by co-occurrence of endothelial AJ proteins, and of ZO-1 and -2, and JAMs. The distinct molecular architecture of the intercellular junctional complexes of LSECs corroborates previous ultrastructural findings and provides the molecular basis for further analyses of the endothelial barrier function of liver sinusoids under pathologic conditions ranging from hepatic inflammation to formation of liver metastasis.

  11. Mitofilin complexes : conserved organizers of mitochondrial membrane architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zerbes, Ralf M.; van der Klei, Ida J.; Veenhuis, Marten; Pfanner, Nikolaus; van der Laan, Martin; Bohnert, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Mitofilin proteins are crucial organizers of mitochondrial architecture. They are located in the inner mitochondrial membrane and interact with several protein complexes of the outer membrane, thereby generating contact sites between the two membrane systems of mitochondria. Within the inner membran

  12. Photocleavable junctions in complex polymer architectures and photoetchable thermoplastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterner, Elizabeth Surles

    Polymer materials have become important tools in nanomanufacturing due to their facile processing and ready attainment of the necessary feature sizes. The development of cleavable junctions has led to advances in the production of polymer nanotemplates. Photocleavage strategies have come to the forefront of the field because photons, as a cleavage stimulus, do not have the mass-transport limitations of chemical methods, and provide for targeted two- and three-dimensional feature control. This dissertation presents a method for producing photocleavable materials by one-pot copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne "click" chemistry (CuAAC), activator regenerated by electron transfer atom transfer radical polymerization (ARGET ATRP) and activated ester substitution methods that have each block labeled with a fluorescent dye, enabling exploration of the polymer physics of these systems by correlation fluorescence spectroscopy. It also introduces a novel photocleavable linker, the o-nitrobenzyl-1,2,3-triazole, its behavior on photocleavage, and a facile method for the production of the o-nitrobenzyl azides necessary for their synthesis. The synthesis and properties of a bulk photodegradable polytriazole are reported, as are proof of concept experiments demonstrating its potential as a directly photoetchable material. Lastly, this dissertation contains a perspective on possible avenues of new research on the topics presented.

  13. Continuity of Monolayer-Bilayer Junctions for Localization of Lipid Raft Microdomains in Model Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Yong-Sang; Wittenberg, Nathan J; Suh, Jeng-Hun; Lee, Sang-Wook; Sohn, Youngjoo; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Parikh, Atul N; Lee, Sin-Doo

    2016-05-27

    We show that the selective localization of cholesterol-rich domains and associated ganglioside receptors prefer to occur in the monolayer across continuous monolayer-bilayer junctions (MBJs) in supported lipid membranes. For the MBJs, glass substrates were patterned with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) oligomers by thermally-assisted contact printing, leaving behind 3 nm-thick PDMS patterns. The hydrophobicity of the transferred PDMS patterns was precisely tuned by the stamping temperature. Lipid monolayers were formed on the PDMS patterned surface while lipid bilayers were on the bare glass surface. Due to the continuity of the lipid membranes over the MBJs, essentially free diffusion of lipids was allowed between the monolayer on the PDMS surface and the upper leaflet of the bilayer on the glass substrate. The preferential localization of sphingomyelin, ganglioside GM1 and cholesterol in the monolayer region enabled to develop raft microdomains through coarsening of nanorafts. Our methodology provides a simple and effective scheme of non-disruptive manipulation of the chemical landscape associated with lipid phase separations, which leads to more sophisticated applications in biosensors and as cell culture substrates.

  14. Cdc42-dependent Modulation of Tight Junctions and Membrane Protein Traffic in Polarized Madin-Darby Canine Kidney Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Raul; Ruiz, Wily G.; Leung, Som-Ming; Jou, Tzuu-Shuh; Apodaca, Gerard

    2001-01-01

    Polarized epithelial cells maintain the asymmetric composition of their apical and basolateral membrane domains by at least two different processes. These include the regulated trafficking of macromolecules from the biosynthetic and endocytic pathway to the appropriate membrane domain and the ability of the tight junction to prevent free mixing of membrane domain-specific proteins and lipids. Cdc42, a Rho family GTPase, is known to govern cellular polarity and membrane traffic in several cell types. We examined whether this protein regulated tight junction function in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells and pathways that direct proteins to the apical and basolateral surface of these cells. We used Madin-Darby canine kidney cells that expressed dominant-active or dominant-negative mutants of Cdc42 under the control of a tetracycline-repressible system. Here we report that expression of dominant-active Cdc42V12 or dominant-negative Cdc42N17 altered tight junction function. Expression of Cdc42V12 slowed endocytic and biosynthetic traffic, and expression of Cdc42N17 slowed apical endocytosis and basolateral to apical transcytosis but stimulated biosynthetic traffic. These results indicate that Cdc42 may modulate multiple cellular pathways required for the maintenance of epithelial cell polarity. PMID:11514615

  15. The NA+/K+-ATPase controls gap junctions via membrane microdomain interactions in rat smooth muscles.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matchkov, Vladimir; Nilsson, Holger; Aalkjær, Christian

    in regulation of the intercellular communication. We have here shown that gap junctions between SMCs are regulated through an interaction between the Na+/K+-ATPase and the Na+/Ca2+-exchanger leading to an increase in [Ca2+]i in discrete areas near the plasma membrane. We have also suggested that this Na+/K+-pump......The Na+/K+-ATPase is known to interact with many membrane and cytosolic proteins by organizing various signaling complexes. These interactions were suggested to be important in regulation of various cellular responses. Pumping activity of the Na+/K+-ATPase is suggested to be essential for some...... of these interactions, while other responses may be independent of pumping activity. The Na+/K+-pump differs from other P-type ATPases by its sensitivity to cardiotonic steroids such as ouabain. However, rodent tissues express both ouabain-insensitive (α1) and ouabain-sensitive (α2 and α3) isoforms of Na...

  16. A relay mechanism between EB1 and APC facilitate STIM1 puncta assembly at endoplasmic reticulum-plasma membrane junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asanov, Alexander; Sherry, Ryan; Sampieri, Alicia; Vaca, Luis

    2013-09-01

    The assembly of STIM1 protein puncta near endoplasmic reticulum-plasma membrane (ER-PM) junctions is required for optimal activation of store-operated channels (SOC). The mechanisms controlling the translocation of STIM1 puncta to ER-PM junctions remain largely unknown. In the present study, we have explored the role of the microtubule binding protein adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), on STIM1 puncta and store-operated calcium entry (SOCE). APC-depleted cells showed reduced STIM1 puncta near ER-PM junctions, instead puncta is found at the ER surrounding the cell nucleus. Reduced STIM1 puncta near ER-PM junctions in APC-depleted cells correlates with a strong inhibition of SOCE and diminished Orai whole-cell currents. Immunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy co-localization studies indicate that, upon depletion of the ER, STIM1 dissociates from EB1 and associates to APC. Deletion analysis identified an APC-binding domain in the carboxyl terminus of STIM1 (STIM1 650-685). These results together position APC as an important element in facilitating the translocation of STIM1 puncta near ER-PM junctions, which in turn is required for efficient SOCE and Orai activation upon depletion of the ER. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Impaired astrocytic gap junction coupling and potassium buffering in a mouse model of tuberous sclerosis complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lin; Zeng, Ling-Hui; Wong, Michael

    2009-05-01

    Abnormalities in astrocytes occur in the brains of patients with Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC) and may contribute to the pathogenesis of neurological dysfunction in this disease. Here, we report that knock-out mice with Tsc1 gene inactivation in glia (Tsc1(GFAP)CKO mice) exhibit decreased expression of the astrocytic connexin protein, Cx43, and an associated impairment in gap junction coupling between astrocytes. Correspondingly, hippocampal slices from Tsc1(GFAP)CKO mice have increased extracellular potassium concentration in response to stimulation. This impaired potassium buffering can be attributed to abnormal gap junction coupling, as a gap junction inhibitor elicits an additional increase in potassium concentration in control, but not Tsc1(GFAP)CKO slices. Furthermore, treatment with a mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor reverses the deficient Cx43 expression and impaired potassium buffering. These findings suggest that Tsc1 inactivation in astrocytes causes defects in astrocytic gap junction coupling and potassium clearance, which may contribute to epilepsy in Tsc1(GFAP)CKO mice.

  18. The exon junction complex as a node of post-transcriptional networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Hir, Hervé; Saulière, Jérôme; Wang, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    The exon junction complex (EJC) is deposited onto mRNAs following splicing and adopts a unique structure, which can both stably bind to mRNAs and function as an anchor for diverse processing factors. Recent findings revealed that in addition to its established roles in nonsense-mediated mRNA decay, the EJC is involved in mRNA splicing, transport and translation. While structural studies have shed light on EJC assembly, transcriptome-wide analyses revealed differential EJC loading at spliced junctions. Thus, the EJC functions as a node of post-transcriptional gene expression networks, the importance of which is being revealed by the discovery of increasing numbers of EJC-related disorders.

  19. 3D pressure field in lipid membranes and membrane-protein complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ollila, O H Samuli; Risselada, H Jelger; Louhivuori, Martti

    2009-01-01

    We calculate full 3D pressure fields for inhomogeneous nanoscale systems using molecular dynamics simulation data. The fields represent systems with increasing level of complexity, ranging from semivesicles and vesicles to membranes characterized by coexistence of two phases, including also...... a protein-membrane complex. We show that the 3D pressure field is distinctly different for curved and planar bilayers, the pressure field depends strongly on the phase of the membrane, and that an integral protein modulates the tension and elastic properties of the membrane....

  20. Membrane protein architects: the role of the BAM complex in outer membrane protein assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Timothy J; Scott-Tucker, Anthony; Overduin, Michael; Henderson, Ian R

    2009-03-01

    The folding of transmembrane proteins into the outer membrane presents formidable challenges to Gram-negative bacteria. These proteins must migrate from the cytoplasm, through the inner membrane and into the periplasm, before being recognized by the beta-barrel assembly machinery, which mediates efficient insertion of folded beta-barrels into the outer membrane. Recent discoveries of component structures and accessory interactions of this complex are yielding insights into how cells fold membrane proteins. Here, we discuss how these structures illuminate the mechanisms responsible for the biogenesis of outer membrane proteins.

  1. Still more complexity in mammalian basement membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erickson, A C; Couchman, J R

    2000-01-01

    At the epithelial/mesenchymal interface of most tissues lies the basement membrane (BM). These thin sheets of highly specialized extracellular matrix vary in composition in a tissue-specific manner, and during development and repair. For about two decades it has been apparent that all BMs contain...

  2. Carcinoembryonic antigen promotes colorectal cancer progression by targeting adherens junction complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bajenova, Olga, E-mail: o.bazhenova@spbu.ru [Theodosius Dobzhansky Center for Genome Bioinformatics, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg 199034 (Russian Federation); Department of Genetics and Biotechnology, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg 199034 (Russian Federation); Department of Surgery and Biomedical Sciences, Creighton University, Omaha, NE 68178 (United States); Chaika, Nina [Department of Surgery and Biomedical Sciences, Creighton University, Omaha, NE 68178 (United States); Tolkunova, Elena; Davydov-Sinitsyn, Alexander [Institute of Cytology, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg 194064 (Russian Federation); Gapon, Svetlana [Boston Children' s Hospital, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Thomas, Peter [Department of Surgery and Biomedical Sciences, Creighton University, Omaha, NE 68178 (United States); O’Brien, Stephen [Theodosius Dobzhansky Center for Genome Bioinformatics, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg 199034 (Russian Federation)

    2014-06-10

    Oncomarkers play important roles in the detection and management of human malignancies. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, CEACAM5) and epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin) are considered as independent tumor markers in monitoring metastatic colorectal cancer. They are both expressed by cancer cells and can be detected in the blood serum. We investigated the effect of CEA production by MIP101 colorectal carcinoma cell lines on E-cadherin adherens junction (AJ) protein complexes. No direct interaction between E-cadherin and CEA was detected; however, the functional relationships between E-cadherin and its AJ partners: α-, β- and p120 catenins were impaired. We discovered a novel interaction between CEA and beta-catenin protein in the CEA producing cells. It is shown in the current study that CEA overexpression alters the splicing of p120 catenin and triggers the release of soluble E-cadherin. The influence of CEA production by colorectal cancer cells on the function of E-cadherin junction complexes may explain the link between the elevated levels of CEA and the increase in soluble E-cadherin during the progression of colorectal cancer. - Highlights: • Elevated level of CEA increases the release of soluble E-cadherin during the progression of colorectal cancer. • CEA over-expression alters the binding preferences between E-cadherin and its partners: α-, β- and p120 catenins in adherens junction complexes. • CEA produced by colorectal cancer cells interacts with beta-catenin protein. • CEA over-expression triggers the increase in nuclear beta-catenin. • CEA over-expression alters the splicing of p120 catenin protein.

  3. Crystal structure of RuvC resolvase in complex with Holliday junction substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Górecka, Karolina M; Komorowska, Weronika; Nowotny, Marcin

    2013-11-01

    The key intermediate in genetic recombination is the Holliday junction (HJ), a four-way DNA structure. At the end of recombination, HJs are cleaved by specific nucleases called resolvases. In Gram-negative bacteria, this cleavage is performed by RuvC, a dimeric endonuclease that belongs to the retroviral integrase superfamily. Here, we report the first crystal structure of RuvC in complex with a synthetic HJ solved at 3.75 Å resolution. The junction in the complex is in an unfolded 2-fold symmetrical conformation, in which the four arms point toward the vertices of a tetrahedron. The two scissile phosphates are located one nucleotide from the strand exchange point, and RuvC approaches them from the minor groove side. The key protein-DNA contacts observed in the structure were verified using a thiol-based site-specific cross-linking approach. Compared with known complex structures of the phage resolvases endonuclease I and endonuclease VII, the RuvC structure exhibits striking differences in the mode of substrate binding and location of the cleavage site.

  4. Creating complex molecular topologies by configuring DNA four-way junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Di; Chen, Gang; Akhter, Usman; Cronin, Timothy M.; Weizmann, Yossi

    2016-10-01

    The realization of complex topologies at the molecular level represents a grand challenge in chemistry. This necessitates the manipulation of molecular interactions with high precision. Here we show that single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) knots and links can be created by utilizing the inherent topological properties that pertain to the DNA four-way junction, at which the two helical strands form a node and can be configured conveniently and connected for complex topological construction. Using this strategy, we produced series of ssDNA topoisomers with the same sequences. By finely designing the curvature and torsion, double-stranded DNA knots were accessed by hybridizing and ligating the complementary strands with the knotted ssDNA templates. Furthermore, we demonstrate the use of a constructed ssDNA knot both to probe the topological conversion catalysed by DNA topoisomerase and to study the DNA replication under topological constraint.

  5. Structure of the exon junction core complex with a trapped DEAD-box ATPase bound to RNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christian Brix Folsted; Ballut, Lionel; Johansen, Jesper Sanderhoff;

    2006-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, a multiprotein exon junction complex is deposited on spliced messenger RNAs. The complex is organized around a stable core, which serves as a binding platform for numerous factors that influence messenger RNA function. Here, we present the crystal structure of a tetrameric e...

  6. The stardust family protein MPP7 forms a tripartite complex with LIN7 and DLG1 that regulates the stability and localization of DLG1 to cell junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohl, Joanna; Brimer, Nicole; Lyons, Charles; Vande Pol, Scott B

    2007-03-30

    MPP7, a previously uncharacterized member of the p55 Stardust family of membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) proteins, was found in a tripartite complex with DLG1 and LIN7A or LIN7C. MPP7 dimerizes with all three LIN7 family members (LIN7A, -B, and -C) through interaction of the single L27 domain of LIN7 with the carboxyl-terminal L27 domain of MPP7, thereby stabilizing both proteins. The dimer of MPP7 with LIN7A or LIN7C associates with DLG1 through an interaction requiring the amino-terminal L27 domain of MPP7. The amino-terminal L27 domain of MPP7 is not sufficient for interaction with DLG1 but interacts efficiently only if MPP7 is in a complex with LIN7A or -C. Thus the specificity of interaction of DLG1 with the LIN7-MPP7 complex is determined by L27 interactions with both MPP7 and LIN7. The tripartite complex forms in a ratio of 1:1:1 and localizes to epithelial adherens junctions in a manner dependent upon MPP7. Expression of MPP7 stabilizes DLG1 in an insoluble compartment. Expression of MPP7 deleted of the PDZ or Src homology 3 domain redistributes MPP7, DLG1, and LIN7 out of adherens junctions and into the soluble cytoplasmic fraction without changing the localization of E-cadherin. Thus, the stability and localization of DLG1 to cell-cell junctions are complex functions determined by the expression and association of particular Stardust family members together with particular LIN7 family members.

  7. The Drosophila larval neuromuscular junction as a model for scaffold complexes at glutamatergic synapses: benefits and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Ulrich; Kobler, Oliver; Gundelfinger, Eckart D

    2010-09-01

    Based on unbeatable genetic accessibility and relative simplicity, the Drosophila larval neuromuscular junction has become a widely used model system for studying functional and structural aspects of excitatory glutamatergic synapses. Membrane-associated guanylate kinase-like proteins (MAGUKs) are first-order scaffolding molecules enriched at many cellular junctions, including synapses, where they coordinate multiple binding partners, including cell adhesion molecules and ion channels. The enrichment of the prototypic MAGUK Discs-Large at larval NMJs apparently parallels the high abundance of its homologs at excitatory synapses in the mammalian central nervous system. Here, the authors review selected aspects of the long-standing work on Dlg at fly neuromuscular junctions, thereby scrutinizing its subcellular localization, function, and regulation with regard to corresponding aspects of MAGUKs in vertebrate neurons.

  8. Soft versus hard junction formation for α-terthiophene molecular wires and their charge transfer complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezzoli, Andrea; Grace, Iain M.; Brooke, Carly; Nichols, Richard J.; Lambert, Colin J.; Higgins, Simon J.

    2017-03-01

    We used a range of scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM)-based methods to conduct a detailed study of single molecule junction conductance enhancement upon charge transfer complex formation, using bis(thiaalkyl)arene molecular wires as electron donors and tetracyanoethylene (TCNE) as an electron acceptor. Using the "hard" STM break junction (STM-BJ) method, in which a Au STM tip is pushed into a Au substrate and then withdrawn in the presence of molecules, we see a single, very broad, peak in the resulting conductance histogram when all data are used; the conductance enhancement is 25-fold for a terthiophene donor and 15-fold for a phenyl group. After rational data selection, in which only current-distance curves that contain a current plateau >0.2 nm long are used in the conductance histogram, three sharper peaks are resolved in the histograms for the charge transfer complexes; two substantially lower-conductance peaks are resolved for the uncomplexed molecules. Using the "soft" STM I(s) technique, in which initial contact between tip and substrate is avoided and the current limit is about an order of magnitude lower, we were able to resolve two peaks for the uncomplexed molecules depending upon the initial set point current (i.e., tip height), one at the same value as the lower of the two data-selected STM-BJ histogram peaks and an additional peak beyond the low-current limit for the STM-BJ experiment. For the terthiophene, the low, medium, and high conductance peaks for the TCNE complex are, respectively, ca. 70, 70, and 46 times higher in conductance than the corresponding peaks for the free molecule.

  9. Two Distinct MUS81-EME1 Complexes from Arabidopsis Process Holliday Junctions1[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geuting, Verena; Kobbe, Daniela; Hartung, Frank; Dürr, Jasmin; Focke, Manfred; Puchta, Holger

    2009-01-01

    The MUS81 endonuclease complex has been shown to play an important role in the repair of stalled or blocked replication forks and in the processing of meiotic recombination intermediates from yeast to humans. This endonuclease is composed of two subunits, MUS81 and EME1. Surprisingly, unlike other organisms, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) has two EME1 homologs encoded in its genome. AtEME1A and AtEME1B show 63% identity on the protein level. We were able to demonstrate that, after expression in Escherichia coli, each EME1 protein can assemble with the unique AtMUS81 to form a functional endonuclease. Both complexes, AtMUS81-AtEME1A and AtMUS81-AtEME1B, are not only able to cleave 3′-flap structures and nicked Holliday junctions (HJs) but also, with reduced efficiency, intact HJs. While the complexes have the same cleavage patterns with both nicked DNA substrates, slight differences in the processing of intact HJs can be detected. Our results are in line with an involvement of both MUS81-EME1 endonuclease complexes in DNA recombination and repair processes in Arabidopsis. PMID:19339504

  10. Two distinct MUS81-EME1 complexes from Arabidopsis process Holliday junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geuting, Verena; Kobbe, Daniela; Hartung, Frank; Dürr, Jasmin; Focke, Manfred; Puchta, Holger

    2009-06-01

    The MUS81 endonuclease complex has been shown to play an important role in the repair of stalled or blocked replication forks and in the processing of meiotic recombination intermediates from yeast to humans. This endonuclease is composed of two subunits, MUS81 and EME1. Surprisingly, unlike other organisms, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) has two EME1 homologs encoded in its genome. AtEME1A and AtEME1B show 63% identity on the protein level. We were able to demonstrate that, after expression in Escherichia coli, each EME1 protein can assemble with the unique AtMUS81 to form a functional endonuclease. Both complexes, AtMUS81-AtEME1A and AtMUS81-AtEME1B, are not only able to cleave 3'-flap structures and nicked Holliday junctions (HJs) but also, with reduced efficiency, intact HJs. While the complexes have the same cleavage patterns with both nicked DNA substrates, slight differences in the processing of intact HJs can be detected. Our results are in line with an involvement of both MUS81-EME1 endonuclease complexes in DNA recombination and repair processes in Arabidopsis.

  11. Complex wireframe DNA origami nanostructures with multi-arm junction vertices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fei; Jiang, Shuoxing; Wu, Siyu; Li, Yulin; Mao, Chengde; Liu, Yan; Yan, Hao

    2015-09-01

    Structural DNA nanotechnology and the DNA origami technique, in particular, have provided a range of spatially addressable two- and three-dimensional nanostructures. These structures are, however, typically formed of tightly packed parallel helices. The development of wireframe structures should allow the creation of novel designs with unique functionalities, but engineering complex wireframe architectures with arbitrarily designed connections between selected vertices in three-dimensional space remains a challenge. Here, we report a design strategy for fabricating finite-size wireframe DNA nanostructures with high complexity and programmability. In our approach, the vertices are represented by n × 4 multi-arm junctions (n = 2-10) with controlled angles, and the lines are represented by antiparallel DNA crossover tiles of variable lengths. Scaffold strands are used to integrate the vertices and lines into fully assembled structures displaying intricate architectures. To demonstrate the versatility of the technique, a series of two-dimensional designs including quasi-crystalline patterns and curvilinear arrays or variable curvatures, and three-dimensional designs including a complex snub cube and a reconfigurable Archimedean solid were constructed.

  12. The endogenous Mus81-Eme1 complex resolves Holliday junctions by a nick and counternick mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillard, Pierre-Henri L; Noguchi, Eishi; Shanahan, Paul; Russell, Paul

    2003-09-01

    Functional studies strongly suggest that the Mus81-Eme1 complex resolves Holliday junctions (HJs) in fission yeast, but in vitro it preferentially cleaves flexible three-way branched structures that model replication forks or 3' flaps. Here we report that a nicked HJ is the preferred substrate of endogenous and recombinant Mus81-Eme1. Cleavage occurs specifically on the strand that opposes the nick, resulting in resolution of the structure into linear duplex products. Resolving cuts made by the endogenous Mus81-Eme1 complex on an intact HJ are quasi-simultaneous, indicating that Mus81-Eme1 resolves HJs by a nick and counternick mechanism, with a large rate enhancement of the second cut arising from the flexible nature of the nicked HJ intermediate. Recombinant Mus81-Eme1 is ineffective at making the first cut. We also report that HJs accumulate in a DNA polymerase alpha mutant that lacks Mus81, providing further evidence that the Mus81-Eme1 complex targets HJs in vivo.

  13. The epithelial membrane protein 1 is a novel tight junction protein of the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangsow, Thorsten; Baumann, Ewa; Bangsow, Carmen; Jaeger, Martina H; Pelzer, Bernhard; Gruhn, Petra; Wolf, Sabine; von Melchner, Harald; Stanimirovic, Danica B

    2008-06-01

    In the central nervous system, a constant microenvironment required for neuronal cell activity is maintained by the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The BBB is formed by the brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMEC), which are sealed by tight junctions (TJ). To identify genes that are differentially expressed in BMEC compared with peripheral endothelial cells, we constructed a subtractive cDNA library from porcine BMEC (pBMEC) and aortic endothelial cells (AOEC). Screening the library for differentially expressed genes yielded 26 BMEC-specific transcripts, such as solute carrier family 35 member F2 (SLC35F2), ADP-ribosylation factor-like 5B (ARL5B), TSC22 domain family member 1 (TSC22D1), integral membrane protein 2A (ITM2A), and epithelial membrane protein 1 (EMP1). In this study, we show that EMP1 transcript is enriched in pBMEC compared with brain tissue and that EMP1 protein colocalizes with the TJ protein occludin in mouse BMEC by coimmunoprecipitation and in rat brain vessels by immunohistochemistry. Epithelial membrane protein 1 expression was transiently induced in laser-capture microdissected rat brain vessels after a 20-min global cerebral ischemia, in parallel with the loss of occludin immunoreactivity. The study identifies EMP1 as a novel TJ-associated protein of the BBB and suggests its potential role in the regulation of the BBB function in cerebral ischemia.

  14. Sub-nanometer atomic layer deposition for spintronics in magnetic tunnel junctions based on graphene spin-filtering membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Marie-Blandine; Dlubak, Bruno; Weatherup, Robert S; Yang, Heejun; Deranlot, Cyrile; Bouzehouane, Karim; Petroff, Frédéric; Anane, Abdelmadjid; Hofmann, Stephan; Robertson, John; Fert, Albert; Seneor, Pierre

    2014-08-26

    We report on the successful integration of low-cost, conformal, and versatile atomic layer deposited (ALD) dielectric in Ni–Al2O3–Co magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) where the Ni is coated with a spin-filtering graphene membrane. The ALD tunnel barriers, as thin as 0.6 nm, are grown layer-by-layer in a simple, low-vacuum, ozone-based process, which yields high-quality electron-transport barriers as revealed by tunneling characterization. Even under these relaxed conditions, including air exposure of the interfaces, a significant tunnel magnetoresistance is measured highlighting the robustness of the process. The spin-filtering effect of graphene is enhanced, leading to an almost fully inversed spin polarization for the Ni electrode of −42%. This unlocks the potential of ALD for spintronics with conformal, layer-by-layer control of tunnel barriers in magnetic tunnel junctions toward low-cost fabrication and down-scaling of tunnel resistances.

  15. Polyelectrolyte complex/PVA membranes for diffusion dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cong; Wu, Cuiming; Wu, Yonghui; Gu, Jingjing; Xu, Tongwen

    2013-10-15

    Polyelectrolyte complexes (PECs)/polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) membranes are prepared from PVA, anion exchange and cation exchange multisilicon copolymers, which contain plenty of functional groups of OH, N(+)(CH3)3/Si(OCH3)3, and SO3Na/Si(OCH3)3, respectively. The OH and Si(OCH3)3 groups can undertake sol-gel reaction to form crosslinking structure, while the N(+)(CH3)3 and SO3Na groups can be combined through electrostatic interaction. The PECs/PVA membranes exhibit improved thermal stability, swelling resistance and flexibility as compared with single anion or cation exchange hybrid membranes. The PECs/PVA membranes have the water uptakes (WR) of 25.3-70.4%, initial decomposition temperatures (IDTs) of 246-285°C, tensile strength of 23.1-33.8 MPa, and elongation at break of 3.5-13.1%. The membranes can be potentially applied for both acid and alkali recovery through diffusion dialysis (DD) process. The separation factor (S) for HCl/FeCl2 mixture can reach up to 89.9, which is about five times higher than that of commercial DF-120 membrane (18.5 at 25°C). The dialysis coefficients of NaOH (UOH) are in the range of 0.014-0.019 m/h, around 7-9 times higher than the value of commercial SPPO membrane (0.002 m/h at 25°C). The membranes also show potential usefulness for industrial acidic and alkali wastes treatment.

  16. 3D Pressure Field in Lipid Membranes and Membrane-Protein Complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ollila, O. H. Samuli; Risselada, H. Jelger; Louhivuori, Martti; Lindahl, Erik; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Marrink, Siewert J.

    2009-01-01

    We calculate full 3D pressure fields for inhomogeneous nanoscale systems using molecular dynamics simulation data. The fields represent systems with increasing level of complexity, ranging from semivesicles and vesicles to membranes characterized by coexistence of two phases, including also a protei

  17. Molecular dynamics simulations of a membrane protein/amphipol complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlmutter, Jason D; Popot, Jean-Luc; Sachs, Jonathan N

    2014-10-01

    Amphipathic polymers known as "amphipols" provide a highly stabilizing environment for handling membrane proteins in aqueous solutions. A8-35, an amphipol with a polyacrylate backbone and hydrophobic grafts, has been extensively characterized and widely employed for structural and functional studies of membrane proteins using biochemical and biophysical approaches. Given the sensitivity of membrane proteins to their environment, it is important to examine what effects amphipols may have on the structure and dynamics of the proteins they complex. Here we present the first molecular dynamics study of an amphipol-stabilized membrane protein, using Escherichia coli OmpX as a model. We begin by describing the structure of the complexes formed by supplementing OmpX with increasing amounts of A8-35, in order to determine how the amphipol interacts with the transmembrane and extramembrane surfaces of the protein. We then compare the dynamics of the protein in either A8-35, a detergent, or a lipid bilayer. We find that protein dynamics on all accessible length scales is restrained by A8-35, which provides a basis to understanding some of the stabilizing and functional effects of amphipols that have been experimentally observed.

  18. Droplet formation in a T-shaped microchannel junction: A model system for membrane emulsification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaf, van der S.; Steegmans, M.L.J.; Sman, van der R.G.M.; Schroën, C.G.P.H.; Boom, R.M.

    2005-01-01

    Droplet formation was studied in a glass microchip with a small channel containing to-be-dispersed phase perpendicular to a large channel with a cross-flowing continuous phase. This resembles the situation during cross-flow membrane emulsification. In this model system, droplets are formed at a

  19. Adherent-invasive Escherichia coli, strain LF82 disrupts apical junctional complexes in polarized epithelia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ossa Juan C

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although bacteria are implicated in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD, mechanisms of intestinal injury and immune activation remain unclear. Identification of adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC strains in IBD patients offers an opportunity to characterize the pathogenesis of microbial-induced intestinal inflammation in IBD. Previous studies have focused on the invasive phenotype of AIEC and the ability to replicate and survive in phagocytes. However, the precise mechanisms by which these newly identified microbes penetrate the epithelial lining remain to be clarified. Therefore, the aim of this study was to delineate the effects of AIEC, strain LF82 (serotype O83:H1 on model polarized epithelial monolayers as a contributor to intestinal injury in IBD. Results Infection of T84 and Madin-Darby Canine Kidney-I polarized epithelial cell monolayers with AIEC, strain LF82 led to a reduction in transepithelial electrical resistance and increased macromolecular (10 kilodalton dextran flux. Basolateral AIEC infection resulted in more severe disruption of the epithelial barrier. Increased permeability was accompanied by a redistribution of the tight junction adaptor protein, zonula occludens-1, demonstrated by confocal microscopy and formation of gaps between cells, as shown by transmission electron microscopy. After 4 h of infection of intestine 407 cells, bacteria replicated in the cell cytoplasm and were enclosed in membrane-bound vesicles positive for the late endosomal marker, LAMP1. Conclusion These findings indicate that AIEC, strain LF82 disrupts the integrity of the polarized epithelial cell barrier. This disruption enables bacteria to penetrate into the epithelium and replicate in the host cell cytoplasm. These findings provide important links between microbes related to IBD, the intestinal epithelial cell barrier and disease pathogenesis.

  20. Role of MINOS in Mitochondrial Membrane Architecture : Cristae Morphology and Outer Membrane Interactions Differentially Depend on Mitofilin Domains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zerbes, Ralf M.; Bohnert, Maria; Stroud, David A.; von der Malsburg, Karina; Kram, Anita; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Warscheid, Bettina; Becker, Thomas; Wiedemann, Nils; Veenhuis, Marten; van der Klei, Ida J.; Pfanner, Nikolaus; van der Laan, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The mitochondrial inner membrane contains a large protein complex crucial for membrane architecture, the mitochondrial inner membrane organizing system (MINOS). MINOS is required for keeping cristae membranes attached to the inner boundary membrane via crista junctions and interacts with protein com

  1. A complex craniovertebral junction malformation in a patient with late onset glycogenosis 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariasofia Cotelli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycogenosis II (GSDII is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder resulting from deficiency of acid alpha-glucosidase and subsequent lysosomal accumulation of glycogen in skeletal, cardiac and smooth muscles. The late-onset form is characterized by wide variability of the phenotypical spectrum. Clinical findings may include muscle weakness, respiratory insufficiency, vascular abnormalities, low bone mineral density and higher risk of developing osteoporosis. Craniovertebral junction (CVJ malformations have never been described so far. We here report on a GSDII 43-year-old woman who harbored the mutations IVS1-13T>G and c.2237G>A in the acid alpha-glucosidase gene. She recurrently suffered from headache, neck pain and dizziness. Brain MRI and CT scan showed the presence of a very rare complex CVJ malformation composed of basilar invagination, basiocciput hypoplasia, partial C1 assimilation, C1 posterior arch aplasia and C1 lateral mass hypoplasia and offset. Although we cannot rule out their coincidental occurrence, the rarity of multiple CVJ malformations in the general population as well as the well-known GSDII multisystem involvement should suggest to study the CVJ in the diagnostic process of GSDII patients in order to assess the CVJ malformation frequency in GSDII population and verify a possible relationship between these two conditions.

  2. Complex sarcolemmal invaginations mimicking myotendinous junctions in a case of Laing early-onset distal myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Gerald F; de la Motte, Grant; Gooding, Rebecca; Laing, Nigel G; Margeta, Marta

    2015-12-01

    Distal myopathies are a group of clinically and pathologically overlapping muscle diseases that are genetically complex and can represent a diagnostic challenge. Laing early-onset distal myopathy (MPD1) is a form of distal myopathy caused by mutations in the MYH7 gene, which encodes the beta myosin heavy chain protein expressed in type 1 skeletal muscle fibers and cardiac myocytes. Here, we present a case of genetically confirmed MPD1 with a typical clinical presentation but distinctive light microscopic and ultrastructural findings on muscle biopsy. A 39-year-old professional male cellist presented with a bilateral foot drop that developed by age 8; analysis of the family pedigree showed an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance. The physical exam demonstrated bilateral weakness of ankle dorsiflexors, toe extensors and finger extensors; creatine kinase level was normal. Biopsy of the quadriceps femoris muscle showed predominance and hypotrophy of type 1 fibers, hybrid fibers with co-expression of slow and fast myosin proteins (both in highly atrophic and normal size range), moth-eaten fibers and mini-cores, lack of rimmed vacuoles and rare desmin-positive eosinophilic sarcoplasmic inclusions. In addition to these abnormalities often observed in MPD1, the biopsy demonstrated frequent clefted fibers with complex sarcolemmal invaginations; on ultrastructural examination, these structures closely mimicked myotendinous junctions but were present away from the tendon and were almost exclusively found in type 1 fibers. Sequencing analysis of the MYH7 gene in the index patient and other affected family members demonstrated a previously described heterozygous c.4522_4524delGAG (p.Glu1508del) mutation. This case widens the pathologic spectrum of MPD1 and highlights the pathologic and clinical variability that can accompany the same genetic mutation, suggesting a significant role for modifier genes in MPD1 pathogenesis. © 2015 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  3. Evidence for condensed complexes of cholesterol in lipid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratajczak, Maria K.

    Although cholesterol is a predominant lipid in the eukaryotic plasma membrane, its interactions with other lipids are still not well understood. Insights into the nature of lipid assembly can be gained from examining lipid-cholesterol interaction using model systems. A key observation was the discovery of liquid-liquid phase diagrams with two critical points in the binary mixtures of cholesterol and lipids. The shape of the phase diagrams can be explained by a thermodynamic model of "condensed complexes". In our quest to characterize cholesterol-lipid interactions, we determined phase diagrams of cholesterol and phospholipids that point to the existence of condensed complexes. This complex formation hypothesis was further supported by experiments involving cholesterol removal by cyclodextrin, grazing x-ray diffraction and x-ray reflectivity studies and isothermal calorimetry. Our study aimed at establishing a correlation (or the lack of) between domain formation and complex formation, as well as determining the mode of cholesterol association with different lipids based on their structural and physical properties. We established a displacement assay by which we were able to probe cholesterol-lipid interactions by perturbing them in the presence of an intercalator that competes with cholesterol for association with lipids. Our data support the condensed complex model between cholesterol and lipids, and cholesterol when complexed with lipids shows low activity whereas free, uncomplexed cholesterol exhibits high activity. We were successful in modulating cholesterol activity by varying the level of intercalator while keeping the cholesterol content fixed. In this thesis, not only have we shown that cholesterol can be displaced by intercalators in model systems, we have further established that such displacement can take place in membranes of live cell.

  4. Evolution and cell physiology. 4. Why invent yet another protein complex to build junctions in epithelial cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bivic, André

    2013-12-15

    The formation of the first epithelium was an essential step for animal evolution, since it has allowed coordination of the behavior of a cell layer and creation of a selective barrier between the internal medium and the outside world. The possibility of coupling the cells in a single layer has allowed morphogenetic events, such as tube formation, or gastrulation, to form more complex animal morphologies. The invention of sealed junctions between cells has allowed, on the other hand, creation of an asymmetry of nutrients or salts between the apical and the basal side of the epithelial layer. Creation of an internal medium has led to homeostasis, allowing the evolution of more complex physiological functions and the emergence of sophisticated animal shapes. During evolution, the origins of the first animals coincided with the invention of several protein complexes, including true cadherins and the polarity protein complexes. How these complexes regulate formation of the apicolateral border and the adherens junctions is still not fully understood. This review focuses on the role of these apical polarity complexes and, in particular, the Crumbs complex, which is essential for proper organization of epithelial layers from Drosophila to humans.

  5. Communication of Ca(2+) signals via tunneling membrane nanotubes is mediated by transmission of inositol trisphosphate through gap junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lock, Jeffrey T; Parker, Ian; Smith, Ian F

    2016-10-01

    Tunneling membrane nanotubes (TNTs) are thin membrane projections linking cell bodies separated by many micrometers, which are proposed to mediate signaling and even transfer of cytosolic contents between distant cells. Several reports describe propagation of Ca(2+) signals between distant cells via TNTs, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Utilizing a HeLa M-Sec cell line engineered to upregulate TNTs we replicated previous findings that mechanical stimulation elicits robust cytosolic Ca(2+) elevations that propagate to surrounding, physically separate cells. However, whereas this was previously interpreted to involve intercellular communication through TNTs, we found that Ca(2+) signal propagation was abolished - even in TNT-connected cells - after blocking ATP-mediated paracrine signaling with a cocktail of extracellular inhibitors. To then establish whether gap junctions may enable cell-cell signaling via TNTs under these conditions, we expressed sfGFP-tagged connexin-43 (Cx43) in HeLa M-Sec cells. We observed robust communication of mechanically-evoked Ca(2+) signals between distant but TNT-connected cells, but only when both cells expressed Cx43. Moreover, we also observed communication of Ca(2+) signals evoked in one cell by local photorelease of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3). Ca(2+) responses in connected cells began after long latencies at intracellular sites several microns from the TNT connection site, implicating intercellular transfer of IP3 and subsequent IP3-mediated Ca(2+) liberation, and not Ca(2+) itself, as the mediator between TNT-connected, Cx43-expressing cells. Our results emphasize the need to control for paracrine transmission in studies of cell-cell signaling via TNTs and indicate that, in this cell line, TNTs do not establish cytosolic continuity between connected cells but rather point to the crucial importance of connexins to enable communication of cytosolic Ca(2+) signals via TNTs.

  6. Membrane transporters and drought resistance – a complex issue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Maria Jarzyniak

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Land plants have evolved complex adaptation strategies to survive changes in water status in the environment. Understanding the molecular nature of such adaptive changes allows the development of rapid innovations to improve crop performance. Plant membrane transport systems play a significant role when adjusting to water scarcity. Here we put proteins participating in transmembrane allocations of various molecules in the context of stomatal, cuticular and root responses, representing a part of the drought resistance strategy. Their role in the transport of signaling molecules, ions or osmolytes is summarized and the challenge of the forthcoming research, resulting from the recent discoveries, is highlighted.

  7. The mystery behind membrane insertion: a review of the complement membrane attack complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayly-Jones, Charles; Bubeck, Doryen; Dunstone, Michelle A

    2017-08-05

    The membrane attack complex (MAC) is an important innate immune effector of the complement terminal pathway that forms cytotoxic pores on the surface of microbes. Despite many years of research, MAC structure and mechanism of action have remained elusive, relying heavily on modelling and inference from biochemical experiments. Recent advances in structural biology, specifically cryo-electron microscopy, have provided new insights into the molecular mechanism of MAC assembly. Its unique 'split-washer' shape, coupled with an irregular giant β-barrel architecture, enable an atypical mechanism of hole punching and represent a novel system for which to study pore formation. This review will introduce the complement terminal pathway that leads to formation of the MAC. Moreover, it will discuss how structures of the pore and component proteins underpin a mechanism for MAC function, modulation and inhibition.This article is part of the themed issue 'Membrane pores: from structure and assembly, to medicine and technology'. © 2017 The Authors.

  8. Connexin26 regulates assembly and maintenance of cochlear gap junction macromolecular complex for normal hearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Kazusaku; Fukunaga, Ichiro; Hatakeyama, Kaori; Ikeda, Katsuhisa

    2015-12-01

    Hereditary deafness affects about 1 in 2000 children and GJB2 gene mutation is most frequent cause for this disease in the world. GJB2 encodes connexin26 (Cx26), a component in cochlear gap junction. Recently, we found macromolecular change of gap junction plaques with two different types of Cx26 mutation as major classification of clinical case, one is a model of dominant negative type, Cx26R75W+ and the other is conditional gene deficient mouse, Cx26f/fP0Cre as a model for insufficiency of gap junction protein [6]. Gap junction composed mainly of Cx26 and Cx30 in wild type mice formed large planar gap junction plaques (GJP). In contrast, Cx26R75W+ and Cx26f/fP0Cre showed fragmented small round GJPs around the cell border. In Cx26f/fP0Cre, some of the cells with Cx26 expression due to their cellular mosaicism showed normal large GJP with Cx26 and Cx30 only at the cell junction site between two Cx26 positive cells. These indicate that bilateral Cx26 expressions from both adjacent cells are essential for the formation of the cochlear linear GJP, and it is not compensated by other cochlear Connexins such as Connexin30. In the present study, we demonstrated a new molecular pathology in most common hereditary deafness with different types of Connexin26 mutations, and this machinery can be a new target for drag design of hereditary deafness.

  9. Molecular Signatures of Membrane Protein Complexes Underlying Muscular Dystrophy*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turk, Rolf; Hsiao, Jordy J.; Smits, Melinda M.; Ng, Brandon H.; Pospisil, Tyler C.; Jones, Kayla S.; Campbell, Kevin P.; Wright, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in genes encoding components of the sarcolemmal dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC) are responsible for a large number of muscular dystrophies. As such, molecular dissection of the DGC is expected to both reveal pathological mechanisms, and provides a biological framework for validating new DGC components. Establishment of the molecular composition of plasma-membrane protein complexes has been hampered by a lack of suitable biochemical approaches. Here we present an analytical workflow based upon the principles of protein correlation profiling that has enabled us to model the molecular composition of the DGC in mouse skeletal muscle. We also report our analysis of protein complexes in mice harboring mutations in DGC components. Bioinformatic analyses suggested that cell-adhesion pathways were under the transcriptional control of NFκB in DGC mutant mice, which is a finding that is supported by previous studies that showed NFκB-regulated pathways underlie the pathophysiology of DGC-related muscular dystrophies. Moreover, the bioinformatic analyses suggested that inflammatory and compensatory mechanisms were activated in skeletal muscle of DGC mutant mice. Additionally, this proteomic study provides a molecular framework to refine our understanding of the DGC, identification of protein biomarkers of neuromuscular disease, and pharmacological interrogation of the DGC in adult skeletal muscle https://www.mda.org/disease/congenital-muscular-dystrophy/research. PMID:27099343

  10. Dual Interaction of JAM-C with JAM-B and αMβ2 Integrin: Function in Junctional Complexes and Leukocyte AdhesionD⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Lamagna, Chrystelle; Meda, Paolo; Mandicourt, Guillaume; Brown, James; Gilbert, Robert J C; Jones, E Yvonne; Kiefer, Friedemann; Ruga, Pilar; Imhof, Beat A.; Aurrand-Lions, Michel

    2005-01-01

    The junctional adhesion molecules (JAMs) have been recently described as interendothelial junctional molecules and as integrin ligands. Here we show that JAM-B and JAM-C undergo heterophilic interaction in cell-cell contacts and that JAM-C is recruited and stabilized in junctional complexes by JAM-B. In addition, soluble JAM-B dissociates soluble JAM-C homodimers to form JAM-B/JAM-C heterodimers. This suggests that the affinity of JAM-C monomers to form dimers is higher for JAM-B than for JAM...

  11. Fast endocytic recycling determines TRPC1-STIM1 clustering in ER-PM junctions and plasma membrane function of the channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Lorena Brito; Ong, Hwei Ling; Liu, Xibao; Ambudkar, Indu S

    2015-10-01

    Stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) senses depletion of ER-Ca2+ store and clusters in ER-PM junctions where it associates with and gates Ca2+ influx channels, Orai1 and TRPC1. Clustering of TRPC1 with STIM1 and Orai1 in these junctions is critical since Orai1-mediated Ca2+ entry triggers surface expression of TRPC1 while STIM1 gates the channel. Thus, plasma membrane function of TRPC1 depends on the delivery of the channel to the sites where STIM1 puncta are formed. This study examines intracellular trafficking mechanism(s) that determine plasma membrane expression and function of TRPC1 in cells where Orai1 and TRPC1 are endogenously expressed and contribute to Ca2+ entry. We report that TRPC1 is internalized by Arf6-dependent pathway, sorted to Rab5-containing early endosomes, and trafficked to ER-PM junctions by Rab4-dependent fast recycling. Overexpression of Arf6, or Rab5, but not the respective dominant negative mutants, induced retention of TRPC1 in early endosomes and suppressed TRPC1 function. Notably, cells expressing Arf6 or Rab5 displayed an inwardly rectifying ICRAC current that is mediated by Orai1 instead of TRPC1-associated ISOC, demonstrating that Orai1 function was not altered. Importantly, expression of Rab4, but not STIM1, with Rab5 rescued surface expression and function of TRPC1, restoring generation of ISOC. Together, these data demonstrate that trafficking via fast recycling endosomes determines TRPC1-STIM1 clustering within ER-PM junctions following ER-Ca2+ store depletion which is critical for the surface expression and function of the channel. Ca2+ influx mediated by TRPC1 modifies Ca2+-dependent physiological response of cells. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Deoxynivanelol and Fumonisin, Alone or in Combination, Induce Changes on Intestinal Junction Complexes and in E-Cadherin Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Basso

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Fusariotoxins such as fumonisin B1 (FB1 and deoxynivalenol (DON cause deleterious effects on the intestine of pigs. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of these mycotoxins, alone and in combination, on jejunal explants from piglets, using histological, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural assays. Five 24-day old pigs were used for sampling the explants. Forty-eight explants were sampled from each animal. Explants were incubated for 4 hours in culture medium and medium containing FB1 (100 µM, DON (10 µM and both mycotoxins (100 µM FB1 plus 10 µM DON. Exposure to all treatments induced a significant decrease in the normal intestinal morphology and in the number of goblet cells, which were more severe in explants exposed to DON and both mycotoxins. A significant reduction in villus height occurred in groups treated with DON and with co-contamination. Expression of E-cadherin was significantly reduced in explants exposed to FB1 (40%, DON (93% and FB1 plus DON (100%. The ultrastructural assay showed increased intercellular spaces and no junction complexes on enterocytes exposed to mycotoxins. The present data indicate that FB1 and DON induce changes in cell junction complexes that could contribute to increase paracellular permeability. The ex vivo model was adequate for assessing intestinal toxicity induced by exposure of isolated or associated concentrations of 100 µM of FB1 and 10 µM of DON.

  13. Lateral release of proteins from the TOM complex into the outer membrane of mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harner, Max; Neupert, Walter; Deponte, Marcel

    2011-07-15

    The TOM complex of the outer membrane of mitochondria is the entry gate for the vast majority of precursor proteins that are imported into the mitochondria. It is made up by receptors and a protein conducting channel. Although precursor proteins of all subcompartments of mitochondria use the TOM complex, it is not known whether its channel can only mediate passage across the outer membrane or also lateral release into the outer membrane. To study this, we have generated fusion proteins of GFP and Tim23 which are inserted into the inner membrane and, at the same time, are spanning either the TOM complex or are integrated into the outer membrane. Our results demonstrate that the TOM complex, depending on sequence determinants in the precursors, can act both as a protein conducting pore and as an insertase mediating lateral release into the outer membrane.

  14. The ouabain-sensitive isoform of Na+-pump regulates vascular gap junctions via interaction with the Na+/Ca2+-exchanger in membrane microdomain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matchkov, Vladimir; Nilsson, Holger; Aalkjær, Christian

    leading to increases in [Ca2+]i in discrete areas near the plasma membrane. This suggests close association of these transport proteins in microdomains. Using PCR and co-immunoprecipitation we aimed to test this hypothesis in SMCs from mesenteric small arteries and in A7r5 cell line. Intercellular...... electrical coupling was evaluated in functional studies. SMCs were electrically uncoupled when the ouabain-sensitive Na+-pump was inhibited by 10 mM ouabain. Inhibition of the Na+/Ca2+-exchanger with 1 mM SEA0400 also uncoupled the SMCs. Depletion of [Na+]i and clamping [Ca2+]i at low levels prevented...... leading to local [Ca2+]i transients near the membrane which block the closely associated connexin-43 containing gap junctions....

  15. Managing the complexity of communication: regulation of gap junctions by post-translational modification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsen, Lene Nygaard; Callø, Kirstine; von Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2013-01-01

    expression by transcription and translation is of great importance, the trafficking, channel activity and degradation are also under tight control. The function of connexins can be regulated by several post translational modifications, which affect numerous parameters; including number of channels, open......Gap junctions are comprised of connexins that form cell-to-cell channels which couple neighboring cells to accommodate the exchange of information. The need for communication does, however, change over time and therefore must be tightly controlled. Although the regulation of connexin protein...... probability, single channel conductance or selectivity. The most extensively investigated post translational modifications are phosphorylations, which have been documented in all mammalian connexins. Besides phosphorylations, some connexins are known to be ubiquitinated, SUMOylated, nitrosylated, hydroxylated...

  16. Glutamine supplementation attenuates ethanol-induced disruption of apical junctional complexes in colonic epithelium and ameliorates gut barrier dysfunction and fatty liver in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Kamaljit K; Shukla, Pradeep K; Mir, Hina; Manda, Bhargavi; Gangwar, Ruchika; Yadav, Nikki; McMullen, Megan; Nagy, Laura E; Rao, RadhaKrishna

    2016-01-01

    Previous in vitro studies showed that glutamine (Gln) prevents acetaldehyde-induced disruption of tight junctions and adherens junctions in Caco-2 cell monolayers and human colonic mucosa. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of Gln supplementation on ethanol-induced gut barrier dysfunction and liver injury in mice in vivo. Ethanol feeding caused a significant increase in inulin permeability in distal colon. Elevated permeability was associated with a redistribution of tight junction and adherens junction proteins and depletion of detergent-insoluble fractions of these proteins, suggesting that ethanol disrupts apical junctional complexes in colonic epithelium and increases paracellular permeability. Ethanol-induced increase in colonic mucosal permeability and disruption of junctional complexes were most severe in mice fed Gln-free diet. Gln supplementation attenuated ethanol-induced mucosal permeability and disruption of tight junctions and adherens junctions in a dose-dependent manner, indicating the potential role of Gln in nutritional intervention to alcoholic tissue injury. Gln supplementation dose-dependently elevated reduced-protein thiols in colon without affecting the level of oxidized-protein thiols. Ethanol feeding depleted reduced protein thiols and elevated oxidized protein thiols. Ethanol-induced protein thiol oxidation was most severe in mice fed with Gln-free diet and absent in mice fed with Gln-supplemented diet, suggesting that antioxidant effect is one of the likely mechanisms involved in Gln-mediated amelioration of ethanol-induced gut barrier dysfunction. Ethanol feeding elevated plasma transaminase and liver triglyceride, which was accompanied by histopathologic lesions in the liver; ethanol-induced liver damage was attenuated by Gln supplementation. These results indicate that Gln supplementation ameliorates alcohol-induced gut and liver injury.

  17. Contribution of ankyrin-band 3 complexes to the organization and mechanical properties of the membrane skeleton of human erythrocyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, B.W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Biological and Medical Research Div.

    1995-02-01

    To understand the role of ankyrin-band 3 complexes in the organization of the spectrin-based membrane skeleton and its contribution to the mechanical properties of human erythrocytes, intact skeletons and single-layered skeleton leaflets were prepared from intact and physically sheared membrane ghosts, expanded in low salt buffer, and examined by transmission electron microscopy. While the structures of intact skeletons and single-layered skeleton leaflets shared many common features, including rigid junctional complexes of spectrin, actin, and band 4.1; short stretches ({approximately}50 {angstrom}) of flexible spectrin filaments; and globular masses of ankyrin-band 3 complexes situated close to the middle of the spectrin filaments, the definition of structural units in the intact skeleton is obscured by the superposition of the two layers. However, the spatial disposition of structural elements can be clearly defined in the images of the single-layered skeleton leaflets. Partially expanded skeletal leaflets contain conglomerates of ankyrin-band 3 complexes arranged in a circular or clove-leaf configuration that straddles multiple strands of thick spectrin cables, presumably reflecting the association of ankyrin-band 3 complexes on neighboring spectrin tetramers as well as the lateral association of the spectrin filaments. Hyperexpansion of the skeleton leaflets led to dissociation of the conglomerates of ankyrin-band 3 complexes, full-extension of the spectrin tetramers, and separation of the individual strands of spectrin tetramers. Clearly defined stands of spectrin tetramers in the hyperexpanded single-layered skeletal leaflets often contained two sets of globular protein masses that divided the spectrin tetramers into three segments of approximately equal length.

  18. Density functional theory study on Herzberg-Teller contribution in Raman scattering from 4-aminothiophenol-metal complex and metal-4-aminothiophenol-metal junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shasha; Zhao, Xiuming; Li, Yuanzuo; Zhao, Xiaohong; Chen, Maodu

    2009-06-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT calculations have been performed to investigate the Raman scattering spectra of metal-molecule complex and metal-molecule-metal junction architectures interconnected with 4-aminothiophenol (PATP) molecule. The simulated profiles of normal Raman scattering (NRS) spectra for the two complexes (Ag2-PATP and PATP-Au2) and the two junctions (Ag2-PATP-Au2 and Au2-PATP-Ag2) are similar to each other, but exhibit obviously different Raman intensities. Due to the lager static polarizabilities of the two junctions, which directly influence the ground state chemical enhancement in NRS spectra, the calculated normal Raman intensities of them are stronger than those of two complexes by the factor of 102. We calculate preresonance Raman scattering (RRS) spectra with incident light at 1064 nm, which is much lower than the S1 electronic transition energy of complexes and junctions. Ag2-PATP-Au2 and Au2-PATP-Ag2 junctions yield higher Raman intensities than those of Ag2-PATP and PATP-Au2 complexes, especially for b2 modes. This effect is mainly attributed to charge transfer (CT) between the metal gap and the PAPT molecule which results in the occurrence of CT resonance enhancement. The calculated pre-RRS spectra strongly depend on the electronic transition state produced by new structures. With excitation at 514.5 nm, the calculated pre-RRS spectra of two complexes and two junctions are stronger than those of with excitation at 1064 nm. A charge difference densities methodology has been used to visually describe chemical enhancement mechanism of RRS spectrum. This methodology aims at visualizing intermolecular CT which provides direct evidence of the Herzberg-Teller mechanism.

  19. The HOPS/Class C Vps Complex Tethers High-Curvature Membranes via a Direct Protein-Membrane Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Ruoya; Stroupe, Christopher

    2016-10-01

    Membrane tethering is a physical association of two membranes before their fusion. Many membrane tethering factors have been identified, but the interactions that mediate inter-membrane associations remain largely a matter of conjecture. Previously, we reported that the homotypic fusion and protein sorting/Class C vacuolar protein sorting (HOPS/Class C Vps) complex, which has two binding sites for the yeast vacuolar Rab GTPase Ypt7p, can tether two low-curvature liposomes when both membranes bear Ypt7p. Here, we show that HOPS tethers highly curved liposomes to Ypt7p-bearing low-curvature liposomes even when the high-curvature liposomes are protein-free. Phosphorylation of the curvature-sensing amphipathic lipid-packing sensor (ALPS) motif from the Vps41p HOPS subunit abrogates tethering of high-curvature liposomes. A HOPS complex without its Vps39p subunit, which contains one of the Ypt7p binding sites in HOPS, lacks tethering activity, though it binds high-curvature liposomes and Ypt7p-bearing low-curvature liposomes. Thus, HOPS tethers highly curved membranes via a direct protein-membrane interaction. Such high-curvature membranes are found at the sites of vacuole tethering and fusion. There, vacuole membranes bend sharply, generating large areas of vacuole-vacuole contact. We propose that HOPS localizes via the Vps41p ALPS motif to these high-curvature regions. There, HOPS binds via Vps39p to Ypt7p in an apposed vacuole membrane.

  20. Membrane proteins PmpG and PmpH are major constituents of Chlamydia trachomatis L2 outer membrane complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mygind, Per H; Christiansen, Gunna; Roepstorff, P;

    2000-01-01

    The outer membrane complex of Chlamydia is involved in the initial adherence and ingestion of Chlamydia by the host cell. In order to identify novel proteins in the outer membrane of Chlamydia trachomatis L2, proteins were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis....... By silver staining of the protein profile, a major protein doublet of 100-110 kDa was detected. In-gel tryptic digestion and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry identified these proteins as the putative outer membrane proteins PmpG and PmpH....

  1. Dissociation and purification of the endogenous membrane-bound Vo complex from Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sumei; Hong, Tao; Wang, Kun; Lu, Yinghong; Zhou, Min

    2017-10-01

    Most proteins occur and function in complexes rather than as isolated entities in membranes. In most cases macromolecules with multiple subunits are purified from endogenous sources. In this study, an endogenous membrane-protein complex was obtained from Pichia pastoris, which can be grown at high densities to significantly improve the membrane protein yield. We successfully isolated the membrane-bound Vo complex of V-ATPase from P. pastoris using a fusion FLAG tag attached to the C-terminus of subunit a to generate the vph-tag strain, which was used for dissociation and purification. After FLAG affinity and size exclusion chromatography purification, the production quantity and purity of the membrane-bound Vo complex was 20 μg l(-1) and >98%, respectively. The subunits of the endogenous membrane-bound Vo complex observed in P. pastoris were similar to those obtained from S. cerevisiae, as demonstrated by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS). Therefore, successful dissociation and purification of the membrane-bound Vo complex at a high purity and sufficient quantity was achieved via a rapid and simple procedure that can be used to obtain the endogenous membrane-protein complexes from P. pastoris. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Development of a Symmetric Ring Junction as a Four-Port Reflectometer for Complex Reflection Coefficient Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.Y. Lee

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Six-port reflectometer is well-known for its ability to measure magnitude and phase-shift of microwave signal using four power detectors that perform magnitude-only measurements. This paper presents the development of an innovative symmetric ring junction as four-port reflectometer for complex reflection coefficient measurements. It reduces the number of required detectors to two. Design optimization, new calibration modeling and algorithm are discussed in details for this four-port reflectometer. The developed four-port reflectometer is compared to five-port reflectometer and vector network analyzer. It is found that the measured magnitude and phase-shift shows good performance in comparison with the commercial vector network analyzer and the five-port reflectometer.

  3. Study of guided wave transmission through complex junction in sodium cooled reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elie, Q.; Le Bourdais, F.; Jezzine, K.; Baronian, V. [Non Destructive Testing Department at the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette CEDEX, (France)

    2015-07-01

    Ultrasonic guided wave techniques are seen as suitable candidates for the inspection of welded structures within sodium cooled fast reactors (SFR), as the long range propagation of guided waves without amplitude attenuation can overcome the accessibility problem due to the liquid sodium. In the context of the development of the Advanced Sodium Test Reactor for Industrial Demonstration (ASTRID), the French Atomic Commission (CEA) investigates non-destructive testing techniques based on guided wave propagation. In this work, guided wave NDT methods are applied to control the integrity of welds located in a junction-type structure welded to the main vessel. The method presented in this paper is based on the analysis of scattering matrices peculiar to each expected defect, and takes advantage of the multi-modal and dispersive characteristics of guided wave generation. In a simulation study, an algorithm developed using the CIVA software is presented. It permits selecting appropriate incident modes to optimize detection and identification of expected flawed configurations. In the second part of this paper, experimental results corresponding to a first validation step of the simulation results are presented. The goal of the experiments is to estimate the effectiveness of the incident mode selection in plates. The results show good agreement between experience and simulation. (authors)

  4. Complex Dynamics of Nano-Mechanical Membrane in Cavity Optomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Akram, Muhammad Javed

    2016-01-01

    Theoretical analysis of a suspended nano-mechanical membrane subject to an optical driving field in cavity optomechanics is presented, which is confirmed through numerical simulations. In the presence of an optical field between its mirrors a high finesse nano-mechanical resonator acts as an oscillator driven by radiation pressure force. The periodic nature of the radiation pressure force makes the nano-mechanical membrane in the optomechanical system as kicked harmonic oscillator. Mathematically the physical system displays a stochastic web map that helps to understand several properties of the kicked membrane in classical phase space. We find that our web map is area preserving, and displays quasi-periodic symmetrical structures in phase space which we express as q-fold symmetry. It is shown that under appropriate control of certain parameters, namely the frequency ratio (q) and the kicking strength (K), the dynamics of kicked membrane exhibits chaotic dynamics. We provide the stability analysis by means of...

  5. Compound inheritance of a low-frequency regulatory SNP and a rare null mutation in exon-junction complex subunit RBM8A causes TAR syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albers, C.A.; Paul, D.S.; Schulze, H.; Freson, K.; Stephens, J.C.; Smethurst, P.A.; Jolley, J.D.; Cvejic, A.; Kostadima, M.; Bertone, P.; Breuning, M.H.; Debili, N.; Deloukas, P.; Favier, R.; Fiedler, J.; Hobbs, C.M.; Huang, N.; Hurles, M.E.; Kiddle, G.; Krapels, I.; Nurden, P.; Ruivenkamp, C.A.; Sambrook, J.G.; Smith, K.; Stemple, D.L.; Strauss, G.; Thys, C.; Geet, C. van; Newbury-Ecob, R.; Ouwehand, W.H.; Ghevaert, C.

    2012-01-01

    The exon-junction complex (EJC) performs essential RNA processing tasks. Here, we describe the first human disorder, thrombocytopenia with absent radii (TAR), caused by deficiency in one of the four EJC subunits. Compound inheritance of a rare null allele and one of two low-frequency SNPs in the reg

  6. Gap-junction-mediated cell-to-cell communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervé, Jean-Claude; Derangeon, Mickaël

    2013-04-01

    Cells of multicellular organisms need to communicate with each other and have evolved various mechanisms for this purpose, the most direct and quickest of which is through channels that directly connect the cytoplasms of adjacent cells. Such intercellular channels span the two plasma membranes and the intercellular space and result from the docking of two hemichannels. These channels are densely packed into plasma-membrane spatial microdomains termed "gap junctions" and allow cells to exchange ions and small molecules directly. A hemichannel is a hexameric torus of junctional proteins around an aqueous pore. Vertebrates express two families of gap-junction proteins: the well-characterized connexins and the more recently discovered pannexins, the latter being related to invertebrate innexins ("invertebrate connexins"). Some gap-junctional hemichannels also appear to mediate cell-extracellular communication. Communicating junctions play crucial roles in the maintenance of homeostasis, morphogenesis, cell differentiation and growth control in metazoans. Gap-junctional channels are not passive conduits, as previously long regarded, but use "gating" mechanisms to open and close the central pore in response to biological stimuli (e.g. a change in the transjunctional voltage). Their permeability is finely tuned by complex mechanisms that have just begun to be identified. Given their ubiquity and diversity, gap junctions play crucial roles in a plethora of functions and their dysfunctions are involved in a wide range of diseases. However, the exact mechanisms involved remain poorly understood.

  7. Electrode-analytical properties of polyvinylchloride membranes based on triple metal-polymeric complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Matorina, Katerina V.; Chmilenko, Tetyana S.; Chmilenko, Fedor O.

    2015-01-01

    The influence of the nature of the electrode-active substances (EAS), the composition of the external and internal solutions on the formation of the analytical signal of polyvinylchloride (PVC) membranes based on associates and triple metal-polymeric complexes (TMPC) was established. Dehumidification of synthesized membranes increases with the content of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). The value of the swelling degree is more than two times greater for membranes, which contain as EAS TMPC, relati...

  8. Complex Polarity: Building Multicellular Tissues Through Apical Membrane Traffic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Román-Fernández, Alvaro; Bryant, David M

    2016-12-01

    The formation of distinct subdomains of the cell surface is crucial for multicellular organism development. The most striking example of this is apical-basal polarization. What is much less appreciated is that underpinning an asymmetric cell surface is an equally dramatic intracellular endosome rearrangement. Here, we review the interplay between classical cell polarity proteins and membrane trafficking pathways, and discuss how this marriage gives rise to cell polarization. We focus on those mechanisms that regulate apical polarization, as this is providing a number of insights into how membrane traffic and polarity are regulated at the tissue level. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. The Smc5-Smc6 complex is required to remove chromosome junctions in meiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Farmer

    Full Text Available Meiosis, a specialized cell division with a single cycle of DNA replication round and two consecutive rounds of nuclear segregation, allows for the exchange of genetic material between parental chromosomes and the formation of haploid gametes. The structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC proteins aid manipulation of chromosome structures inside cells. Eukaryotic SMC complexes include cohesin, condensin and the Smc5-Smc6 complex. Meiotic roles have been discovered for cohesin and condensin. However, although Smc5-Smc6 is known to be required for successful meiotic divisions, the meiotic functions of the complex are not well understood. Here we show that the Smc5-Smc6 complex localizes to specific chromosome regions during meiotic prophase I. We report that meiotic cells lacking Smc5-Smc6 undergo catastrophic meiotic divisions as a consequence of unresolved linkages between chromosomes. Surprisingly, meiotic segregation defects are not rescued by abrogation of Spo11-induced meiotic recombination, indicating that at least some chromosome linkages in smc5-smc6 mutants originate from other cellular processes. These results demonstrate that, as in mitosis, Smc5-Smc6 is required to ensure proper chromosome segregation during meiosis by preventing aberrant recombination intermediates between homologous chromosomes.

  10. Signal peptide peptidase (SPP) assembles with substrates and misfolded membrane proteins into distinct oligomeric complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrul, Bianca; Kapp, Katja; Sinning, Irmgard; Dobberstein, Bernhard

    2010-01-01

    SPP (signal peptide peptidase) is an aspartyl intramembrane cleaving protease, which processes a subset of signal peptides, and is linked to the quality control of ER (endoplasmic reticulum) membrane proteins. We analysed SPP interactions with signal peptides and other membrane proteins by co-immunoprecipitation assays. We found that SPP interacts specifically and tightly with a large range of newly synthesized membrane proteins, including signal peptides, preproteins and misfolded membrane proteins, but not with all co-expressed type II membrane proteins. Signal peptides are trapped by the catalytically inactive SPP mutant SPPD/A. Preproteins and misfolded membrane proteins interact with both SPP and the SPPD/A mutant, and are not substrates for SPP-mediated intramembrane proteolysis. Proteins interacting with SPP are found in distinct complexes of different sizes. A signal peptide is mainly trapped in a 200 kDa SPP complex, whereas a preprotein is predominantly found in a 600 kDa SPP complex. A misfolded membrane protein is detected in 200, 400 and 600 kDa SPP complexes. We conclude that SPP not only processes signal peptides, but also collects preproteins and misfolded membrane proteins that are destined for disposal. PMID:20196774

  11. Trans-complex formation by proteolipid channels in the terminal phase of membrane fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, C; Bayer, M J; Bühler, S

    2001-01-01

    +/calmodulin controls this terminal process in many intracellular fusion events. Here we identify V0, the membrane-integral sector of the vacuolar H+-ATPase, as a target of calmodulin on yeast vacuoles. Between docking and bilayer fusion, V0 sectors from opposing membranes form complexes. V0 trans...

  12. Identification of chromatophore membrane protein complexes formed under different nitrogen availability conditions in Rhodospirillum rubrum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selao, Tiago Toscano; Branca, Rui; Chae, Pil Seok

    2011-01-01

    expressed proteins, such as subunits of the succinate dehydrogenase complex and other TCA cycle enzymes that are usually found in the cytosol, thus hinting at a possible association to the membrane in response to nitrogen deficiency. We propose a redox sensing mechanism that can influence the membrane...

  13. Identification of Thylakoid Membrane Protein Complexes by Using a BN-Chip/MS Approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Longquan Fan; Yinghong Pan

    2012-01-01

    Thylakoid membrane protein complexes of wheat (Triticum aestivum Linn.)play crucial roles in growth and crop production.Knowledge of the composition and structure of protein complexes,as well as protein interactions,will result in a much deeper understanding of metabolic pathways and cellular processes than protein identities alone,especially if the complexes can be separated in the native forms.Whereas the analysis of membrane protein complexes is a significant challenge due to their hydrophobic properties and relatively low abundance.A rapid and efficient method of identifying membrane protein complexes will greatly facilitate the investigation of agriculture.The present work developed an BN-Chip/MS approach for exhaustive separation and identification of protein complexes,by combining using blue-native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE) and chip-based high-performance liquid chromatography quadruple time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-Chip/ESI-QT-OF-MS,Chip/MS).By using this approach,seventy-five nonredundant proteins of wheat thylakoid membrane complexes were identified from digested 13 bands of BN-gel.When the protocol of BN separation was not used,only 37 nonredundant proteins had been identified and among of them 9 proteins were uniquely identi? ed.This BN-Chip/MS approach is rapid and efficient for identifying protein complexes in wheat thylakoid membranes,and also providing reliable foundations for further functional research of wheat chloroplast and for identifying protein complexes of other species.

  14. Beyond membrane channelopathies: alternative mechanisms underlying complex human disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Konstantinos Dean BOUDOULAS; Peter J MOHLER

    2011-01-01

    Over the past fifteen years, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying human disease has flourished in large part due to the discovery of gene mutations linked with membrane ion channels and transporters. In fact, ion channel defects ("channelopathies" - the focus of this review series) have been associated with a spectrum of serious human disease phenotypes including cystic fibrosis, cardiac arrhythmia, diabetes, skeletal muscle defects, and neurological disorders. However, we now know that human disease, particularly excitable cell disease, may be caused by defects in non-ion channel polypeptides including in cellular components residing well beneath the plasma membrane. For example, over the past few years, a new class of potentially fatal cardiac arrhythmias has been linked with cytoplasmic proteins that include sub-membrane adapters such as ankyrin-B (ANK2),ankyrin-G (ANK3), and alpha-1 syntrophin, membrane coat proteins including caveolin-3 (CAV3), signaling platforms including yotiao (AKAPg), and cardiac enzymes (GPD1L). The focus of this review is to detail the exciting role of lamins, yet another class of gene products that have provided elegant new insight into human disease.

  15. The Golgi complex as a source for yeast autophagosomal membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vaart, Aniek; Reggiori, Fulvio

    2010-01-01

    Today, more than 50 years after the discovery of autophagy, the origin of the autophagosomal membranes remains for the most part elusive. Many sources for the lipid bilayers have been proposed, but no conclusive evidence has been found to support one particular origin. The lipids do not appear to be

  16. Integrating complex functions: coordination of nuclear pore complex assembly and membrane expansion of the nuclear envelope requires a family of integral membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneiter, Roger; Cole, Charles N

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear envelope harbors numerous large proteinaceous channels, the nuclear pore complexes (NPCs), through which macromolecular exchange between the cytosol and the nucleoplasm occurs. This double-membrane nuclear envelope is continuous with the endoplasmic reticulum and thus functionally connected to such diverse processes as vesicular transport, protein maturation and lipid synthesis. Recent results obtained from studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae indicate that assembly of the nuclear pore complex is functionally dependent upon maintenance of lipid homeostasis of the ER membrane. Previous work from one of our laboratories has revealed that an integral membrane protein Apq12 is important for the assembly of functional nuclear pores. Cells lacking APQ12 are viable but cannot grow at low temperatures, have aberrant NPCs and a defect in mRNA export. Remarkably, these defects in NPC assembly can be overcome by supplementing cells with a membrane fluidizing agent, benzyl alcohol, suggesting that Apq12 impacts the flexibility of the nuclear membrane, possibly by adjusting its lipid composition when cells are shifted to a reduced temperature. Our new study now expands these findings and reveals that an essential membrane protein, Brr6, shares at least partially overlapping functions with Apq12 and is also required for assembly of functional NPCs. A third nuclear envelope membrane protein, Brl1, is related to Brr6, and is also required for NPC assembly. Because maintenance of membrane homeostasis is essential for cellular survival, the fact that these three proteins are conserved in fungi that undergo closed mitoses, but are not found in metazoans or plants, may indicate that their functions are performed by proteins unrelated at the primary sequence level to Brr6, Brl1 and Apq12 in cells that disassemble their nuclear envelopes during mitosis.

  17. Experimental and numerical study of a complex cross-junction microchannel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Emilia; Simmons, Mark; Kahouadji, Lyes; Craster, Richard; Matar, Omar; Juric, Damir; Chergui, Jalel; Shin, Seungwon

    2016-11-01

    Microfluidic devices occur in various fields such as inkjet printing, DNA chips, lab-on-a-chip technology, micro-propulsion and droplet-based microfluidics. Here, we examine drop and plug formation of immiscible liquids in a cross-shaped microchannel via high-speed imaging, shadowgraphy and PIV that allows interface topology and flow field tracking. We also present comparisons with direct numerical simulations using the new solver, BLUE, for massively parallel simulations of fully three-dimensional multiphase flows in complex solid geometries. EPSRC UK Programme Grant MEMPHIS (EP/K003976/1).

  18. Outer membrane active transport: structure of the BtuB:TonB complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultis, David D; Purdy, Michael D; Banchs, Christian N; Wiener, Michael C

    2006-06-02

    In Gram-negative bacteria, the import of essential micronutrients across the outer membrane requires a transporter, an electrochemical gradient of protons across the inner membrane, and an inner membrane protein complex (ExbB, ExbD, TonB) that couples the proton-motive force to the outer membrane transporter. The inner membrane protein TonB binds directly to a conserved region, called the Ton-box, of the transporter. We solved the structure of the cobalamin transporter BtuB in complex with the C-terminal domain of TonB. In contrast to its conformations in the absence of TonB, the Ton-box forms a beta strand that is recruited to the existing beta sheet of TonB, which is consistent with a mechanical pulling model of transport.

  19. Biocompatible Double-Membrane Hydrogels from Cationic Cellulose Nanocrystals and Anionic Alginate as Complexing Drugs Codelivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ning; Gèze, Annabelle; Wouessidjewe, Denis; Huang, Jin; Dufresne, Alain

    2016-03-23

    A biocompatible hydrogel with a double-membrane structure is developed from cationic cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) and anionic alginate. The architecture of the double-membrane hydrogel involves an external membrane composed of neat alginate, and an internal composite hydrogel consolidates by electrostatic interactions between cationic CNC and anionic alginate. The thickness of the outer layer can be regulated by the adsorption duration of neat alginate, and the shape of the inner layer can directly determine the morphology and dimensions of the double-membrane hydrogel (microsphere, capsule, and filmlike shapes). Two drugs are introduced into the different membranes of the hydrogel, which will ensure the complexing drugs codelivery and the varied drugs release behaviors from two membranes (rapid drug release of the outer hydrogel, and prolonged drug release of the inner hydrogel). The double-membrane hydrogel containing the chemically modified cellulose nanocrystals (CCNC) in the inner membrane hydrogel can provide the sustained drug release ascribed to the "nano-obstruction effect" and "nanolocking effect" induced by the presence of CCNC components in the hydrogels. Derived from natural polysaccharides (cellulose and alginate), the novel double-membrane structure hydrogel material developed in this study is biocompatible and can realize the complexing drugs release with the first quick release of one drug and the successively slow release of another drug, which is expected to achieve the synergistic release effects or potentially provide the solution to drug resistance in biomedical application.

  20. A modular BAM complex in the outer membrane of the alpha-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khatira Anwari

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are organelles derived from an intracellular alpha-proteobacterium. The biogenesis of mitochondria relies on the assembly of beta-barrel proteins into the mitochondrial outer membrane, a process inherited from the bacterial ancestor. Caulobacter crescentus is an alpha-proteobacterium, and the BAM (beta-barrel assembly machinery complex was purified and characterized from this model organism. Like the mitochondrial sorting and assembly machinery complex, we find the BAM complex to be modular in nature. A approximately 150 kDa core BAM complex containing BamA, BamB, BamD, and BamE associates with additional modules in the outer membrane. One of these modules, Pal, is a lipoprotein that provides a means for anchorage to the peptidoglycan layer of the cell wall. We suggest the modular design of the BAM complex facilitates access to substrates from the protein translocase in the inner membrane.

  1. Integral and peripheral association of proteins and protein complexes with Yersinia pestis inner and outer membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bunai Christine L

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Yersinia pestis proteins were sequentially extracted from crude membranes with a high salt buffer (2.5 M NaBr, an alkaline solution (180 mM Na2CO3, pH 11.3 and membrane denaturants (8 M urea, 2 M thiourea and 1% amidosulfobetaine-14. Separation of proteins by 2D gel electrophoresis was followed by identification of more than 600 gene products by MS. Data from differential 2D gel display experiments, comparing protein abundances in cytoplasmic, periplasmic and all three membrane fractions, were used to assign proteins found in the membrane fractions to three protein categories: (i integral membrane proteins and peripheral membrane proteins with low solubility in aqueous solutions (220 entries; (ii peripheral membrane proteins with moderate to high solubility in aqueous solutions (127 entries; (iii cytoplasmic or ribosomal membrane-contaminating proteins (80 entries. Thirty-one proteins were experimentally associated with the outer membrane (OM. Circa 50 proteins thought to be part of membrane-localized, multi-subunit complexes were identified in high Mr fractions of membrane extracts via size exclusion chromatography. This data supported biologically meaningful assignments of many proteins to the membrane periphery. Since only 32 inner membrane (IM proteins with two or more predicted transmembrane domains (TMDs were profiled in 2D gels, we resorted to a proteomic analysis by 2D-LC-MS/MS. Ninety-four additional IM proteins with two or more TMDs were identified. The total number of proteins associated with Y. pestis membranes increased to 456 and included representatives of all six β-barrel OM protein families and 25 distinct IM transporter families.

  2. Biogenesis of membrane bound respiratory complexes in Escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Price, Claire E.; Driessen, Arnold J. M.

    2010-01-01

    Escherichia colt is one of the preferred bacteria for studies on the energetics and regulation of respiration Respiratory chains consist of primary dehydrogenases and terminal reductases or oxidases linked by quinones. In order to assemble this complex arrangement of protein complexes, synthesis of

  3. Bacterial interference with host epithelial junctional complexes: Probiotic bacteria vs. A/E lesion-forming Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TANIA TOPOUZOVA-HRISTOVA

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available During colonization, enteropathogenic (EPEC and enterohaemorrhagic (EHEC Escherichia coli are capable to manipulate host cytoskeleton and colonize gut epithelia by a specific mode of attachment known as the attaching and effacing lesion (A/E lesion. While actin rearrangements during A/E lesion formation have been extensively investigated, the possible alterations of other cytoskeletal elements like those comprising the intercellular junctional complexes (JC of polarized cells during infection have only lately attracted attention. The present mini-review addresses the opposite effects of two groups of bacteria, A/E lesion-forming pathogenic E. coli and probiotic bacterial strains, on JC. JC are important in maintaining gut barrier functions. EPEC and EHEC can disrupt JC which as a consequence leads to reduction in the transepitelial electrical resistance (TER and an increase of the permeability to macromolecules. Probiotic bacteria on the other hand stabilize JC thus increasing TER and reducing permeability to macromolecular markers. Probiotic strains can protect JC integrity of polarized cells from the damage caused by EPEC or EHEC. Together with the promise of these results, of concern is the fact that the outcome of the studies can differ dependent on experimental protocols. Studies with living bacteria and different strain combinations have also put forward strain specific effects. Therefore, an important practical item for future studies is the identification of the molecules synthesized by probiotic bacteria that may be active on JC stability.

  4. Preparation of TiO2-activated carbon complex membranes and their photoelectrocatalytic activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尤宏; 姚杰; 孙丽欣; 王强

    2003-01-01

    The experimental process of preparing TiO2-activated carbon complex membranes with activated carbon powder as main carrier, PTFE as binder and wire netting as matrix is described in detail, and both photo-catalysis and photo-electro-catalysis are measured to study the properties of complex membranes. Experimental results show that the photo-catalytic activity of the membranes is high and stable in the process of treating Rhodamine-B; the application of an electric field accelerates the speed of photo-catalysis, and the efficiency of photo-catalysis is increased 2.5 times when the applied voltage is 0.8 V; and the degradation of Rhodamine-B follows the dynamics of first order reaction. It is concluded from the discussion of experimental results that the preparation process of TiO2-activated carbon complex membranes is a simple low-cost process suitable for large scale application.

  5. Contribution of cubilin and amnionless to processing and membrane targeting of cubilin-amnionless complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coudroy, Gwénaëlle; Gburek, Jakub; Kozyraki, Renata; Madsen, Mette; Trugnan, Germain; Moestrup, Søren K; Verroust, Pierre J; Maurice, Michèle

    2005-08-01

    Cubilin is a peripheral apical membrane receptor for multiple ligands that are taken up in several absorptive epithelia. Recently, amnionless (AMN) was identified to form a functional receptor complex with cubilin. By expression in transfected polarized MDCK cells of AMN and several cubilin fragments, including a functional "mini" version of cubilin, the processing, sorting, and membrane anchoring of the complex to the apical membrane were investigated. The results show that truncation mutants, including the N-terminal domain of cubilin, did not appear at the plasma membrane but instead were retained in the endoplasmic reticulum or partially secreted into the medium. Coexpression with AMN led to efficient transport to the apical cell surface of the cubilin constructs, which included the EGF domains, and prevented release into the medium. AMN co-precipitated with cubilin and co-localized with cubilin at the apical cell surface. Apical sorting was observed for a broad set of nonoverlapping cubilin fragments without the N-terminal region, in the absence of AMN. The preference for apical sorting disappeared when glycosylation was inhibited by tunicamycin. In conclusion, it is shown that both units contribute to the processing of the cubilin-AMN complex to the apical membrane: AMN interacts with the EGF domains of cubilin and is responsible for membrane attachment and export of the complex from the endoplasmic reticulum, whereas the extracellular cubilin molecule is responsible for apical sorting of the complex in a carbohydrate-dependent manner.

  6. Knock and Drill Technique: A Simple Tips for the Instrumentation in Complex Craniovertebral Junction Anomalies without using Fluoroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Arun; Sardhara, Jayesh; Behari, Sanjay; Pavaman, Sindgikar; Joseph, Jeena; Das, Kuntal; Mehrotra, Anant; Jaiswal, Awadhesh K.; Bhaishora, Kamlesh

    2017-01-01

    Context: Existence of complex variable bony and vertebral artery (VA) anomalies at craniovertebral junction (CVJ) in subset of complex CVJ anomalies demands individualized instrumentation policy and placing screws in each bone requires strategic preoperative planning and intraoperative skills. Aim: To evaluate the clinical accuracy of knock and drill (K and D) technique for the screw placement in complex CVJ anomalies. Settings and Design: Prospective study and operative technical note. Materials and Methods: Totally 36 consecutive patients (16 - pediatrics, 20 - adult patients) of complex CVJ: Complete/partial occipitalized C1 vertebra; at least one hypoplastic (C1/C2) articular mass, rotational component, and variations in the third part of VA were included in this study. Preoperative detail computed tomography (CT) CT CVJ with three-dimensional reconstruction was done for the assessment of CVJ anatomy and facet joint orientation. The accuracy of novel technique was assessed with postoperative CT to evaluate cortical breach in between 5th and 7th postoperative day in all the patients. All patients were underwent clinico-radiological evaluation at 6-month follow-up. Results: Totally 144 screws were placed using K and D technique (pediatric group - 64 screws, adult patients - 80 screws). Total of 12 screws were placed in C1 lateral mass in both age group without any bony cortical breach and complication. Sixteen C2 pedicle screws and 12 C2 pars screw in pediatrics and 18 C2 pedicle screws in adult patients were placed without any bony breach or VA injury. Out of thirty subaxial lateral mass screws in pediatric group, the bony breach was encountered with one screw (3.3%). Total of 38 C2 pars screws was placed in adult group in which bony breach along with VA injury was encounter with 1screw (2.6%). Conclusion: A simple technique of K and D for placing a screw increases the accuracy and spectrum of bony purchase and has the potential to reduce the complication in

  7. Dielectric properties of biological tissues in which cells are connected by communicating junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asami, Koji

    2007-06-01

    The frequency dependence of the complex permittivity of biological tissues has been simulated using a simple model that is a cubic array of spherical cells in a parallel plate capacitor. The cells are connected by two types of communicating junctions: one is a membrane-lined channel for plasmodesmata in plant tissues, and the other is a conducting patch of adjoining plasma membranes for gap junctions in animal tissues. Both junctions provided similar effects on the dielectric properties of the tissue model. The model without junction showed a dielectric relaxation (called β-dispersion) that was expected from an interfacial polarization theory for a concentrated suspension of spherical cells. The dielectric relaxation was the same as that of the model in which neighbouring cells were connected by junctions perpendicular to the applied electric field. When neighbouring cells were connected by junctions parallel to the applied electric field or in all directions, a dielectric relaxation appeared at a lower frequency side in addition to the β-dispersion, corresponding to the so called α-dispersion. When junctions were randomly introduced at varied probabilities Pj, the low-frequency (LF) relaxation curve became broader, especially at Pj of 0.2-0.5, and its intensity was proportional to Pj up to 0.7. The intensity and the characteristic frequency of the LF relaxation both decreased with decreasing junction conductance. The simulations indicate that communicating junctions are important for understanding the LF dielectric relaxation in tissues.

  8. Complexation-tailored morphology of asymmetric block copolymer membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Madhavan, Poornima

    2013-08-14

    Hydrogen-bond formation between polystyrene-b-poly (4-vinylpyridine) (PS-b-P4VP) block copolymer (BCP) and -OH/-COOH functionalized organic molecules was used to tune morphology of asymmetric nanoporous membranes prepared by simultaneous self-assembly and nonsolvent induced phase separation. The morphologies were characterized by field emmision scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Hydrogen bonds were confirmed by infrared (IR), and the results were correlated to rheology characterization. The OH-functionalized organic molecules direct the morphology into hexagonal order. COOH-functionalized molecules led to both lamellar and hexagonal structures. Micelle formation in solutions and their sizes were determined using dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements and water fluxes of 600-3200 L/m 2·h·bar were obtained. The pore size of the plain BCP membrane was smaller than with additives. The following series of additives led to pores with hexagonal order with increasing pore size: terephthalic acid (COOH-bifunctionalized) < rutin (OH-multifunctionalized) < 9-anthracenemethanol (OH-monofunctionalized) < 3,5-dihydroxybenzyl alcohol (OH-trifunctionalized). © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  9. NS2B/3 proteolysis at the C-prM junction of the tick-borne encephalitis virus polyprotein is highly membrane dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, Martina; Stefan, Nikolas; Zhu, Junping; Skern, Tim

    2012-09-01

    The replication of tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV), like that of all flaviviruses, is absolutely dependent on proteolytic processing. Production of the mature proteins C and prM from their common precursor requires the activity of the viral NS2B/3 protease (NS2B/3(pro)) at the C-terminus of protein C and the host signal peptidase I (SPaseI) at the N-terminus of protein prM. Recently, we have shown in cell culture that the cleavage of protein C and the subsequent production of TBEV particles can be made dependent on the activity of the foot-and-mouth disease virus 3C protease, but not on the activity of the HIV-1 protease (HIV1(pro)) (Schrauf et al., 2012). To investigate this failure, we developed an in vitro cleavage assay to assess the two cleavage reactions performed on the C-prM precursor. Accordingly, a recombinant modular NS2B/3(pro), consisting of the protease domain of NS3 linked to the core-domain of cofactor NS2B, was expressed in E. coli and purified to homogeneity. This enzyme could cleave a C-prM protein synthesised in rabbit reticulocyte lysates. However, cleavage was only specific when protein synthesis was performed in the presence of canine pancreatic microsomal membranes and required the prevention of signal peptidase I (SPaseI) activity by lengthening the h-region of the signal peptide. The presence of membranes allowed the concentration of NS2B/3(pro) used to be reduced by 10-20 fold. Substitution of the NS2B/3(pro) cleavage motif in C-prM by a HIV-1(pro) motif inhibited NS2B/3(pro) processing in the presence of microsomal membranes but allowed cleavage by HIV-1(pro) at the C-prM junction. This system shows that processing at the C-terminus of protein C by the TBEV NS2B/3(pro) is highly membrane dependent and will allow the examination of how the membrane topology of protein C affects both SPaseI and NS2B/3(pro) processing.

  10. Contribution of cubilin and amnionless to processing and membrane targeting of cubilin-amnionless complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coudroy, Gwénaëlle; Gburek, Jakub; Kozyraki, Renata;

    2005-01-01

    Cubilin is a peripheral apical membrane receptor for multiple ligands that are taken up in several absorptive epithelia. Recently, amnionless (AMN) was identified to form a functional receptor complex with cubilin. By expression in transfected polarized MDCK cells of AMN and several cubilin...... fragments, including a functional "mini" version of cubilin, the processing, sorting, and membrane anchoring of the complex to the apical membrane were investigated. The results show that truncation mutants, including the N-terminal domain of cubilin, did not appear at the plasma membrane but instead were...... retained in the endoplasmic reticulum or partially secreted into the medium. Coexpression with AMN led to efficient transport to the apical cell surface of the cubilin constructs, which included the EGF domains, and prevented release into the medium. AMN co-precipitated with cubilin and co...

  11. Membrane deformation and scission by the HSV-1 nuclear egress complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigalke, Janna M.; Heuser, Thomas; Nicastro, Daniela; Heldwein, Ekaterina E.

    2014-06-01

    The nuclear egress complex (NEC) of herpesviruses such as HSV-1 is essential for the exit of nascent capsids from the cell nucleus. The NEC drives nuclear envelope vesiculation in cells, but the precise budding mechanism and the potential involvement of cellular proteins are unclear. Here we report that HSV-1 NEC alone is sufficient for membrane budding in vitro and thus represents a complete membrane deformation and scission machinery. It forms ordered coats on the inner surface of the budded vesicles, suggesting that it mediates scission by scaffolding the membrane bud and constricting the neck to the point of scission. The inward topology of NEC-mediated budding in vitro resembles capsid budding into the inner nuclear membrane during HSV-1 infection and nuclear envelope vesiculation in NEC-transfected cells. We propose that the NEC functions as minimal virus-encoded membrane-budding machinery during nuclear egress and does not require additional cellular factors.

  12. Membrane-elasticity model of Coatless vesicle budding induced by ESCRT complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartosz Różycki

    Full Text Available The formation of vesicles is essential for many biological processes, in particular for the trafficking of membrane proteins within cells. The Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport (ESCRT directs membrane budding away from the cytosol. Unlike other vesicle formation pathways, the ESCRT-mediated budding occurs without a protein coat. Here, we propose a minimal model of ESCRT-induced vesicle budding. Our model is based on recent experimental observations from direct fluorescence microscopy imaging that show ESCRT proteins colocalized only in the neck region of membrane buds. The model, cast in the framework of membrane elasticity theory, reproduces the experimentally observed vesicle morphologies with physically meaningful parameters. In this parameter range, the minimum energy configurations of the membrane are coatless buds with ESCRTs localized in the bud neck, consistent with experiment. The minimum energy configurations agree with those seen in the fluorescence images, with respect to both bud shapes and ESCRT protein localization. On the basis of our model, we identify distinct mechanistic pathways for the ESCRT-mediated budding process. The bud size is determined by membrane material parameters, explaining the narrow yet different bud size distributions in vitro and in vivo. Our membrane elasticity model thus sheds light on the energetics and possible mechanisms of ESCRT-induced membrane budding.

  13. On the Efficiency of NHS Ester Cross-Linkers for Stabilizing Integral Membrane Protein Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fan; Gerber, Sabina; Korkhov, Volodymyr M.; Mireku, Samantha; Bucher, Monika; Locher, Kaspar P.; Zenobi, Renato

    2015-03-01

    We have previously presented a straightforward approach based on high-mass matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS) to study membrane proteins. In addition, the stoichiometry of integral membrane protein complexes could be determined by MALDI-MS, following chemical cross-linking via glutaraldehyde. However, glutaraldehyde polymerizes in solution and reacts nonspecifically with various functional groups of proteins, limiting its usefulness for structural studies of protein complexes. Here, we investigated the capability of N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) esters, which react much more specifically, to cross-link membrane protein complexes such as PglK and BtuC2D2. We present clear evidence that NHS esters are capable of stabilizing membrane protein complexes in situ, in the presence of detergents such as DDM, C12E8, and LDAO. The stabilization efficiency strongly depends on the membrane protein structure (i.e, the number of primary amine groups and the distances between primary amines). A minimum number of primary amine groups is required, and the distances between primary amines govern whether a cross-linker with a specific spacer arm length is able to bridge two amine groups.

  14. A mammalian nervous-system-specific plasma membrane proteasome complex that modulates neuronal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Kapil V; Margolis, Seth S

    2017-04-01

    In the nervous system, rapidly occurring processes such as neuronal transmission and calcium signaling are affected by short-term inhibition of proteasome function. It is unclear how proteasomes are able to acutely regulate such processes, as this action is inconsistent with their canonical role in proteostasis. Here we describe a mammalian nervous-system-specific membrane proteasome complex that directly and rapidly modulates neuronal function by degrading intracellular proteins into extracellular peptides that can stimulate neuronal signaling. This proteasome complex is closely associated with neuronal plasma membranes, exposed to the extracellular space, and catalytically active. Selective inhibition of the membrane proteasome complex by a cell-impermeable proteasome inhibitor blocked the production of extracellular peptides and attenuated neuronal-activity-induced calcium signaling. Moreover, we observed that membrane-proteasome-derived peptides were sufficient to induce neuronal calcium signaling. Our discoveries challenge the prevailing notion that proteasomes function primarily to maintain proteostasis, and highlight a form of neuronal communication that takes place through a membrane proteasome complex.

  15. Automated builder and database of protein/membrane complexes for molecular dynamics simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunhwan Jo

    Full Text Available Molecular dynamics simulations of membrane proteins have provided deeper insights into their functions and interactions with surrounding environments at the atomic level. However, compared to solvation of globular proteins, building a realistic protein/membrane complex is still challenging and requires considerable experience with simulation software. Membrane Builder in the CHARMM-GUI website (http://www.charmm-gui.org helps users to build such a complex system using a web browser with a graphical user interface. Through a generalized and automated building process including system size determination as well as generation of lipid bilayer, pore water, bulk water, and ions, a realistic membrane system with virtually any kinds and shapes of membrane proteins can be generated in 5 minutes to 2 hours depending on the system size. Default values that were elaborated and tested extensively are given in each step to provide reasonable options and starting points for both non-expert and expert users. The efficacy of Membrane Builder is illustrated by its applications to 12 transmembrane and 3 interfacial membrane proteins, whose fully equilibrated systems with three different types of lipid molecules (DMPC, DPPC, and POPC and two types of system shapes (rectangular and hexagonal are freely available on the CHARMM-GUI website. One of the most significant advantages of using the web environment is that, if a problem is found, users can go back and re-generate the whole system again before quitting the browser. Therefore, Membrane Builder provides the intuitive and easy way to build and simulate the biologically important membrane system.

  16. Imaging and structural studies of DNA–protein complexes and membrane ion channels

    KAUST Repository

    Marini, M.

    2017-01-17

    In bio-imaging by electron microscopy, damage of the sample and limited contrast are the two main hurdles for reaching high image quality. We extend a new preparation method based on nanofabrication and super-hydrophobicity to the imaging and structural studies of nucleic acids, nucleic acid-protein complexes (DNA/Rad51 repair protein complex) and neuronal ion channels (gap-junction, K+ and GABA(A) channels) as paradigms of biological significance and increasing complexity. The preparation method is based on the liquid phase and is compatible with physiological conditions. Only in the very last stage, samples are dried for TEM analysis. Conventional TEM and high-resolution TEM (HRTEM) were used to achieve a resolution of 3.3 and 1.5 angstrom, respectively. The EM dataset quality allows the determination of relevant structural and metrological information on the DNA structure, DNA-protein interactions and ion channels, allowing the identification of specific macromolecules and their structure.

  17. Excitation energy transfer between Light-harvesting complex II and Photosystem I in reconstituted membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Parveen; Lingvay, Mónika; Kiss, Teréz; Deák, Róbert; Bóta, Attila; Ughy, Bettina; Garab, Győző; Lambrev, Petar H

    2016-04-01

    Light-harvesting complex II (LHCII), the major peripheral antenna of Photosystem II in plants, participates in several concerted mechanisms for regulation of the excitation energy and electron fluxes in thylakoid membranes. In part, these include interaction of LHCII with Photosystem I (PSI) enhancing the latter's absorption cross-section - for example in the well-known state 1 - state 2 transitions or as a long-term acclimation to high light. In this work we examined the capability of LHCII to deliver excitations to PSI in reconstituted membranes in vitro. Proteoliposomes with native plant thylakoid membrane lipids and different stoichiometric ratios of LHCII:PSI were reconstituted and studied by steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. Fluorescence emission from LHCII was strongly decreased in PSI-LHCII membranes due to trapping of excitations by PSI. Kinetic modelling of the time-resolved fluorescence data revealed the existence of separate pools of LHCII distinguished by the time scale of energy transfer. A strongly coupled pool, equivalent to one LHCII trimer per PSI, transferred excitations to PSI with near-unity efficiency on a time scale of less than 10ps but extra LHCIIs also contributed significantly to the effective antenna size of PSI, which could be increased by up to 47% in membranes containing 3 LHCII trimers per PSI. The results demonstrate a remarkable competence of LHCII to increase the absorption cross-section of PSI, given the opportunity that the two types of complexes interact in the membrane.

  18. A Blue Native-PAGE analysis of membrane protein complexes in Clostridium thermocellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Keqiang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clostridium thermocellum is a Gram-positive thermophilic anaerobic bacterium with the unusual capacity to convert cellulosic biomass into ethanol and hydrogen. Identification and characterization of protein complexes in C. thermocellum are important toward understanding its metabolism and physiology. Results A two dimensional blue native/SDS-PAGE procedure was developed to separate membrane protein complexes of C. thermocellum. Proteins spots were identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF Mass spectrometry. 24 proteins were identified representing 13 distinct protein complexes, including several putative intact complexes. Interestingly, subunits of both the F1-F0-ATP synthase and the V1-V0-ATP synthase were detected in the membrane sample, indicating C. thermocellum may use alternative mechanisms for ATP generation. Conclusion Two dimensional blue native/SDS-PAGE was used to detect membrane protein complexes in C. thermocellum. More than a dozen putative protein complexes were identified, revealing the simultaneous expression of two sets of ATP synthase. The protocol developed in this work paves the way for further functional characterization of these protein complexes.

  19. Design and Manufacture of the Irradiation Complex "Alfa" for Track Membranes Production

    CERN Document Server

    Alenitsky, Yu G; Vylov, T D; Glazov, A A; Danilov, V I; Denisov, Yu N; Dmitrievsky, V P; Dolya, S N; Zaplatin, N L; Ivashkevich, S A; Kadyshevskij, V G; Kalinichenko, V V; Karamysheva, G A; Klimkin, I P; Kochkin, V A; Morozov, N A; Novikov, D L; Smolkov, A V; Tolstoy, N S; Tychkov, Yu I; Utkin, V A; Fedorenko, S B; Chesnov, A F

    2004-01-01

    The film irradiation complex "Alfa" intended for exposing the polymer films used in the track membranes production was designed and manufactured at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research for "Trackpore Technology" holding company. The complex consists of the isochronous cyclotron with external injection of ions, the extraction system, the beam transport of accelerated ions and the film irradiation chamber. The complex "Alfa" produces polyethylene terephthalate track membranes with less than 25 {\\mu}m thickness and less than 40 cm width. The film irradiation complex "Alfa" started working in August 2002. Argon ions were accelerated to the project energy - 2.4 MeV/nucleon, extracted beam intensity was about 200 nA, extraction efficiency totaled \\sim 50 %.

  20. Electromediated formation of DNA complexes with cell membranes and its consequences for gene delivery

    CERN Document Server

    Escoffre, Jean-Michel; Favard, Cyril; Teissié, Justin; Dean, David S; Rols, Marie-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Electroporation is a physical method to induce the uptake of therapeutic drugs and DNA, by eukaryotic cells and tissues. The phenomena behind electro-mediated membrane permeabilization to plasmid DNA have been shown to be significantly more complex than those for small molecules. Small molecules cross the permeabilized membrane by diffusion whereas plasmid DNA first interacts with the electropermeabilized part of the cell surface, forming localized aggregates. The dynamics of this process is still poorly understood because direct observations have been limited to scales of the order of seconds. Here, cells are electropermeabilized in the presence of plasmid DNA and monitored with a temporal resolution of 2 ms. This allows us to show that during the first pulse application, plasmid complexes, or aggregates, start to form at distinct sites on the cell membrane. FRAP measurements show that the positions of these sites are remarkably immobile during the application of further pluses. A theoretical model is propos...

  1. Fluorescence energy transfer in quantum dot/azo dye complexes in polymer track membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromova, Yulia A.; Orlova, Anna O.; Maslov, Vladimir G.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.; Baranov, Alexander V.

    2013-10-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer in complexes of semiconductor CdSe/ZnS quantum dots with molecules of heterocyclic azo dyes, 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol and 4-(2-pyridylazo) resorcinol, formed at high quantum dot concentration in the polymer pore track membranes were studied by steady-state and transient PL spectroscopy. The effect of interaction between the complexes and free quantum dots on the efficiency of the fluorescence energy transfer and quantum dot luminescence quenching was found and discussed.

  2. Single particle electron microscopy in combination with mass spectrometry to investigate novel complexes of membrane proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arteni, Ana A.; Nowaczyk, Marc; Lax, Julia; Kouřil, Roman; Rögner, Matthias; Boekema, Egbert J.; Kouril, R.; Rogner, M.

    2005-01-01

    Large data sets of molecular projections of the membrane proteins Photosystem I and Photosystem II from cyanobacteria were analyzed by single particle electron microscopy (EM). Analysis resulted in the averaging of 2D projections from the purified complexes but also in the simultaneous detection and

  3. Importin beta negatively regulates nuclear membrane fusion and nuclear pore complex assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harel, Amnon; Chan, Rene C; Lachish-Zalait, Aurelie; Zimmerman, Ella; Elbaum, Michael; Forbes, Douglass J

    2003-11-01

    Assembly of a eukaryotic nucleus involves three distinct events: membrane recruitment, fusion to form a double nuclear membrane, and nuclear pore complex (NPC) assembly. We report that importin beta negatively regulates two of these events, membrane fusion and NPC assembly. When excess importin beta is added to a full Xenopus nuclear reconstitution reaction, vesicles are recruited to chromatin but their fusion is blocked. The importin beta down-regulation of membrane fusion is Ran-GTP reversible. Indeed, excess RanGTP (RanQ69L) alone stimulates excessive membrane fusion, leading to intranuclear membrane tubules and cytoplasmic annulate lamellae-like structures. We propose that a precise balance of importin beta to Ran is required to create a correct double nuclear membrane and simultaneously to repress undesirable fusion events. Interestingly, truncated importin beta 45-462 allows membrane fusion but produces nuclei lacking any NPCs. This reveals distinct importin beta-regulation of NPC assembly. Excess full-length importin beta and beta 45-462 act similarly when added to prefused nuclear intermediates, i.e., both block NPC assembly. The importin beta NPC block, which maps downstream of GTPgammaS and BAPTA-sensitive steps in NPC assembly, is reversible by cytosol. Remarkably, it is not reversible by 25 microM RanGTP, a concentration that easily reverses fusion inhibition. This report, using a full reconstitution system and natural chromatin substrates, significantly expands the repertoire of importin beta. Its roles now encompass negative regulation of two of the major events of nuclear assembly: membrane fusion and NPC assembly.

  4. Investigations on membrane perturbation by chrysin and its copper complex using self-assembled lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaraj, Stalin; Krishnaswamy, Sridharan; Devashya, Venkappayya; Sethuraman, Swaminathan; Krishnan, Uma Maheswari

    2011-11-01

    The mechanism of membrane interactions of most of the flavonoids in the presence of transition-metal ions is not well-understood. To understand this phenomenon, the present work aims to synthesize a chrysin-copper complex at room temperature and investigate its influence on the electrical characteristics of planar lipid bilayers. The chrysin-copper complex was characterized by various spectroscopic techniques and was found to have a metal/ligand ratio of 1:2 and of cationic nature. Its ability to inhibit 1,1'-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals was not significant at alkaline pH because of the involvement of the 5-hydroxy group in coordination with the copper ion compared to its parent flavonoid, chrysin (p copper complex to lipid bilayers decreases the resistance, indicating a strong surface interaction and partial insertion into the bilayer near the lipid-water interface. The dose-dependent reduction in resistance as a result of the chrysin-copper complex is more pronounced in comparison to chrysin, implying that the bulkier and charged chrysin-copper complex displays greater ability to distort the lipid bilayer architecture. These conclusions were further confirmed by curcumin-loaded liposome permeabilization studies, where both chrysin and its Cu(II) complex increased the fluidity in a dose-dependent manner. However, the extent of fluidization by the chrysin-copper complex was nearly twice that of chrysin alone (p copper complex on cell membranes were studied using a hypotonic hemolysis assay. Our results demonstrate that, at low concentrations (20 μM), the chrysin-copper complex exhibited twice the protection against hypotonic stress-induced membrane disruption when compared to chrysin. However, this stabilizing effect gradually decreased and became comparable to chrysin at higher concentrations. This biphasic behavior of the chrysin-copper complex could further be explored for therapeutic applications.

  5. Membraner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Finn

    2009-01-01

    Notatet giver en kort introduktion til den statiske virkemåde af membraner og membrankonstruktioner......Notatet giver en kort introduktion til den statiske virkemåde af membraner og membrankonstruktioner...

  6. A Linear Time Complexity of Breadth-First Search Using P System with Membrane Division

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Einallah Salehi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the known methods for solving the problems with exponential time complexity such as NP-complete problems is using the brute force algorithms. Recently, a new parallel computational framework called Membrane Computing is introduced which can be applied in brute force algorithms. The usual way to find a solution for the problems with exponential time complexity with Membrane Computing techniques is by P System with active membrane using division rule. It makes an exponential workspace and solves the problems with exponential complexity in a polynomial (even linear time. On the other hand, searching is currently one of the most used methods for finding solution for problems in real life, that the blind search algorithms are accurate, but their time complexity is exponential such as breadth-first search (BFS algorithm. In this paper, we proposed a new approach for implementation of BFS by using P system with division rule technique for first time. The theorem shows time complexity of BSF in this framework on randomly binary trees reduced from O(2d to O(d.

  7. Electrode-analytical properties of polyvinylchloride membranes based on triple metal-polymeric complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katerina V. Matorina

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the nature of the electrode-active substances (EAS, the composition of the external and internal solutions on the formation of the analytical signal of polyvinylchloride (PVC membranes based on associates and triple metal-polymeric complexes (TMPC was established. Dehumidification of synthesized membranes increases with the content of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP. The value of the swelling degree is more than two times greater for membranes, which contain as EAS TMPC, relative to membranes based on associates. The value of water absorption of membranes is determined by the nature of EAS. They formed a series of increasing of the swelling degree such as associate < background membrane < TMPC. Swelling of the background membrane is explained by the physical sorption of water molecules on the surface of plasticized membrane. Hydration of PVP macromolecules varies with the introduction of metal ions, macromolecules unit undergoes a conformational transition. PVP macromolecules form tunnels or cavities where complex particles distributed and additional water accumulated through the second coordination layer. Constructed sensors based on TMPC have slope of electrode function equal to 25 mV/pC. Linear dependence of potential on the polymer concentration is observed in the range of 5–7 pC units. Sensors based on associates have slope of the electrode function of 20–25 mV/pC that can be varied depending on the nature of the EAS. Working range is 4–8 pC. Response time of sensor is less than 1 min. The optimal time for conditioning of the synthesized PVC membrane is 24 hours. Potentiometric sensors have been developed for the determination of residual amounts of low molecular PVP which is a food additive E 1201 commonly used for thickening, stabilizing and clarifying of food products. The content of PVP was determined in real objects (apple juice, beer, red wine and cognac with using the polyvinylpyrrolidone sensors (Sr < 0.08. The

  8. Porcine lactoferrin-derived peptide LFP-20 protects intestinal barrier by maintaining tight junction complex and modulating inflammatory response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Xin; Hu, Wangyang; Song, Deguang; Li, Zhi; Du, Huahua; Lu, Zeqing; Wang, Yizhen

    2016-03-15

    LFP-20, a 20-amino acid antimicrobial peptide in the N terminus of porcine lactoferrin, has antimicrobial and immunomodulatory activities. This study assessed the protective effects of LFP-20 on LPS-induced intestinal damage in a LPS-induced mouse model and in vitro, using intestinal porcine epithelial cell line 1 (IPEC-1) cells. LFP-20 prevented LPS-induced impairment in colon epithelium tissues, infiltration of macrophages or leukocytes, histological evidence of inflammation and increased levels of TNF-a, IL-6 and IFN-γ. LFP-20 increased the expression of zonula occludens-1, occludin and claudin-1 and reduced permeability as well as apoptosis of the colon in LPS-treated mice. In IPEC-1 cells, LFP-20 increased transepithelial electrical resistance and tight junction expression. Moreover, we found LFP-20 decreased the MyD88 and AKT levels to affect the NF-κB signaling pathway, to modulate inflammation response and tight junction networks in the processing of LPS stimulation. In summary, LFP-20 prevents the inflammatory response and disruption of tight junction structure induced by LPS, suggesting the potential use of LFP-20 as a prophylactic agent to protect intestinal barrier function.

  9. Reconstitution of membrane protein complexes involved in pneumococcal septal cell wall assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjolaine Noirclerc-Savoye

    Full Text Available The synthesis of peptidoglycan, the major component of the bacterial cell wall, is essential to cell survival, yet its mechanism remains poorly understood. In the present work, we have isolated several membrane protein complexes consisting of the late division proteins of Streptococcus pneumoniae: DivIB, DivIC, FtsL, PBP2x and FtsW, or subsets thereof. We have co-expressed membrane proteins from S. pneumoniae in Escherichia coli. By combining two successive affinity chromatography steps, we obtained membrane protein complexes with a very good purity. These complexes are functional, as indicated by the retained activity of PBP2x to bind a fluorescent derivative of penicillin and to hydrolyze the substrate analogue S2d. Moreover, we have evidenced the stabilizing role of protein-protein interactions within each complex. This work paves the way for a complete reconstitution of peptidoglycan synthesis in vitro, which will be critical to the elucidation of its intricate regulation mechanisms.

  10. A conserved endoplasmic reticulum membrane protein complex (EMC) facilitates phospholipid transfer from the ER to mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahiri, Sujoy; Chao, Jesse T; Tavassoli, Shabnam; Wong, Andrew K O; Choudhary, Vineet; Young, Barry P; Loewen, Christopher J R; Prinz, William A

    2014-10-01

    Mitochondrial membrane biogenesis and lipid metabolism require phospholipid transfer from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to mitochondria. Transfer is thought to occur at regions of close contact of these organelles and to be nonvesicular, but the mechanism is not known. Here we used a novel genetic screen in S. cerevisiae to identify mutants with defects in lipid exchange between the ER and mitochondria. We show that a strain missing multiple components of the conserved ER membrane protein complex (EMC) has decreased phosphatidylserine (PS) transfer from the ER to mitochondria. Mitochondria from this strain have significantly reduced levels of PS and its derivative phosphatidylethanolamine (PE). Cells lacking EMC proteins and the ER-mitochondria tethering complex called ERMES (the ER-mitochondria encounter structure) are inviable, suggesting that the EMC also functions as a tether. These defects are corrected by expression of an engineered ER-mitochondrial tethering protein that artificially tethers the ER to mitochondria. EMC mutants have a significant reduction in the amount of ER tethered to mitochondria even though ERMES remained intact in these mutants, suggesting that the EMC performs an additional tethering function to ERMES. We find that all Emc proteins interact with the mitochondrial translocase of the outer membrane (TOM) complex protein Tom5 and this interaction is important for PS transfer and cell growth, suggesting that the EMC forms a tether by associating with the TOM complex. Together, our findings support that the EMC tethers ER to mitochondria, which is required for phospholipid synthesis and cell growth.

  11. A Conserved Endoplasmic Reticulum Membrane Protein Complex (EMC) Facilitates Phospholipid Transfer from the ER to Mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavassoli, Shabnam; Wong, Andrew K. O.; Choudhary, Vineet; Young, Barry P.; Loewen, Christopher J. R.; Prinz, William A.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial membrane biogenesis and lipid metabolism require phospholipid transfer from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to mitochondria. Transfer is thought to occur at regions of close contact of these organelles and to be nonvesicular, but the mechanism is not known. Here we used a novel genetic screen in S. cerevisiae to identify mutants with defects in lipid exchange between the ER and mitochondria. We show that a strain missing multiple components of the conserved ER membrane protein complex (EMC) has decreased phosphatidylserine (PS) transfer from the ER to mitochondria. Mitochondria from this strain have significantly reduced levels of PS and its derivative phosphatidylethanolamine (PE). Cells lacking EMC proteins and the ER–mitochondria tethering complex called ERMES (the ER–mitochondria encounter structure) are inviable, suggesting that the EMC also functions as a tether. These defects are corrected by expression of an engineered ER–mitochondrial tethering protein that artificially tethers the ER to mitochondria. EMC mutants have a significant reduction in the amount of ER tethered to mitochondria even though ERMES remained intact in these mutants, suggesting that the EMC performs an additional tethering function to ERMES. We find that all Emc proteins interact with the mitochondrial translocase of the outer membrane (TOM) complex protein Tom5 and this interaction is important for PS transfer and cell growth, suggesting that the EMC forms a tether by associating with the TOM complex. Together, our findings support that the EMC tethers ER to mitochondria, which is required for phospholipid synthesis and cell growth. PMID:25313861

  12. Structure of TonB in complex with FhuA, E. coli outer membrane receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawelek, Peter D; Croteau, Nathalie; Ng-Thow-Hing, Christopher; Khursigara, Cezar M; Moiseeva, Natalia; Allaire, Marc; Coulton, James W

    2006-06-02

    The cytoplasmic membrane protein TonB spans the periplasm of the Gram-negative bacterial cell envelope, contacts cognate outer membrane receptors, and facilitates siderophore transport. The outer membrane receptor FhuA from Escherichia coli mediates TonB-dependent import of ferrichrome. We report the 3.3 angstrom resolution crystal structure of the TonB carboxyl-terminal domain in complex with FhuA. TonB contacts stabilize FhuA's amino-terminal residues, including those of the consensus Ton box sequence that form an interprotein beta sheet with TonB through strand exchange. The highly conserved TonB residue arginine-166 is oriented to form multiple contacts with the FhuA cork, the globular domain enclosed by the beta barrel.

  13. Structure of TonB in Complex with FhuA, E. Coli Outer Membrane Receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawelek,P.; Croteau, N.; Ng-Thow-Hing, C.; Khursigara, C.; Moiseeva, N.; Allaire, M.; Coulton, J.

    2006-01-01

    The cytoplasmic membrane protein TonB spans the periplasm of the Gram-negative bacterial cell envelope, contacts cognate outer membrane receptors, and facilitates siderophore transport. The outer membrane receptor FhuA from Escherichia coli mediates TonB-dependent import of ferrichrome. We report the 3.3 angstrom resolution crystal structure of the TonB carboxyl-terminal domain in complex with FhuA. TonB contacts stabilize FhuA's amino-terminal residues, including those of the consensus Ton box sequence that form an interprotein {beta} sheet with TonB through strand exchange. The highly conserved TonB residue arginine-166 is oriented to form multiple contacts with the FhuA cork, the globular domain enclosed by the {beta} barrel.

  14. Mesothelium of Reissner's membrane in guinea pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvortrup, K; Rostgaard, Jørgen

    1990-01-01

    The mesothelial cells of Reissner's membrane in guinea pigs were found to be connected by junctional complexes. No cell discontinuities or gaps were observed by scanning or transmission electron microscopy. These results are not in accordance with previous studies. They were achieved by in vivo...

  15. Proteomic and bioinformatic analysis of epithelial tight junction reveals an unexpected cluster of synaptic molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Vivian W

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Zonula occludens, also known as the tight junction, is a specialized cell-cell interaction characterized by membrane "kisses" between epithelial cells. A cytoplasmic plaque of ~100 nm corresponding to a meshwork of densely packed proteins underlies the tight junction membrane domain. Due to its enormous size and difficulties in obtaining a biochemically pure fraction, the molecular composition of the tight junction remains largely unknown. Results A novel biochemical purification protocol has been developed to isolate tight junction protein complexes from cultured human epithelial cells. After identification of proteins by mass spectroscopy and fingerprint analysis, candidate proteins are scored and assessed individually. A simple algorithm has been devised to incorporate transmembrane domains and protein modification sites for scoring membrane proteins. Using this new scoring system, a total of 912 proteins have been identified. These 912 hits are analyzed using a bioinformatics approach to bin the hits in 4 categories: configuration, molecular function, cellular function, and specialized process. Prominent clusters of proteins related to the cytoskeleton, cell adhesion, and vesicular traffic have been identified. Weaker clusters of proteins associated with cell growth, cell migration, translation, and transcription are also found. However, the strongest clusters belong to synaptic proteins and signaling molecules. Localization studies of key components of synaptic transmission have confirmed the presence of both presynaptic and postsynaptic proteins at the tight junction domain. To correlate proteomics data with structure, the tight junction has been examined using electron microscopy. This has revealed many novel structures including end-on cytoskeletal attachments, vesicles fusing/budding at the tight junction membrane domain, secreted substances encased between the tight junction kisses, endocytosis of tight junction

  16. Roles of gap junctions, connexins and pannexins in epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanthini eMylvaganam

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced gap junctional communication (GJC between neurons is considered a major factor underlying the neuronal synchrony driving seizure activity. In addition, the hippocampal sharp wave ripple complexes, associated with learning and seizures, are diminished by GJC blocking agents. Although gap junctional blocking drugs inhibit experimental seizures, they all have other nonspecific actions. Besides interneuronal GJC between dendrites, inter-axonal and inter-glial GJC is also considered important for seizure generation. Interestingly, in most studies of cerebral tissue from animal seizure models and from human patients with epilepsy, there is up-regulation of glial, but not neuronal gap junctional mRNA and protein. Significant changes in the expression and post-translational modification of the astrocytic connexin Cx43, and Panx1 were observed in an in vitro Co++ seizure model, further supporting a role for glia in seizure-genesis, although the reasons for this remain unclear. Further suggesting an involvement of astrocytic GJC in epilepsy, is the fact that the expression of astrocytic Cx mRNAs (Cxs 30 and 43 is several fold higher than that of neuronal Cx mRNAs (Cxs 36 and 45, and the number of glial cells outnumber neuronal cells in mammalian hippocampal and cortical tissue. Pannexin expression is also increased in both animal and human epileptic tissues. Specific Cx43 mimetic peptides, Gap 27 and SLS, inhibit the docking of astrocytic connexin Cx43 proteins from forming intercellular gap junctions, diminishing spontaneous seizures. Besides GJs, Cx membrane hemichannels in glia and Panx membrane channels in neurons and glia are also inhibited by gap junctional pharmacological blockers. Although there is no doubt that connexin-based gap junctions and hemichannels, and pannexin-based membrane channels are related to epilepsy, the specific details of how they are involved and how we can modulate their function for therapeutic purposes remain to

  17. Bupivacaine hydrochloride complexation with some alpha- and beta-cyclodextrins studied by potentiometry with membrane electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopecký, Frantisek; Vojteková, Mária; Kaclík, Pavol; Demko, Marek; Bieliková, Zuzana

    2004-05-01

    Membrane electrodes selective to bupivacaine cations were developed and those with PVC-dibutylphthalate membrane containing sparingly soluble bupivacaine phosphotungstate appeared to be the most suitable. Inclusion complexation of bupivacaine cations with cyclodextrins was studied by potentiometric measurements of the free bupivacaine cation concentration in aqueous solutions of bupivacaine hydrochloride with cyclodextrin using the prepared electrodes. Native alpha-cyclodextrin (alpha-CD) and beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CD), as well as their random-substituted derivatives hydroxypropyl-alpha-cyclodextrin (HP-alpha-CD), hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HP-beta-CD) and methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (M-beta-CD), were chosen for the study. The measured potentiometric data processed both by a linear and nonlinear regression corroborated the formation of weak 1:1 bupivacaine cation-cyclodextrin complexes and the corresponding complexation constants K(11) approximately 50-155 M(-1) were evaluated by the non-linear least-squares method. The mutual order of K(11) values, especially alpha-CD > beta-CD, suggested that the bupivacaine butyl group was mainly responsible for the inclusion complexation; the highest K(11) was exhibited by M-beta-CD followed by alpha-CD. The observed complexation may substantially modify properties of bupivacaine hydrochloride dosage forms with sufficient concentration of cyclodextrin but bupivacaine cations are readily released from the weak cyclodextrin complexes by dilution.

  18. Structure of the poly-C9 component of the complement membrane attack complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudkina, Natalya V; Spicer, Bradley A; Reboul, Cyril F; Conroy, Paul J; Lukoyanova, Natalya; Elmlund, Hans; Law, Ruby H P; Ekkel, Susan M; Kondos, Stephanie C; Goode, Robert J A; Ramm, Georg; Whisstock, James C; Saibil, Helen R; Dunstone, Michelle A

    2016-02-04

    The membrane attack complex (MAC)/perforin-like protein complement component 9 (C9) is the major component of the MAC, a multi-protein complex that forms pores in the membrane of target pathogens. In contrast to homologous proteins such as perforin and the cholesterol-dependent cytolysins (CDCs), all of which require the membrane for oligomerisation, C9 assembles directly onto the nascent MAC from solution. However, the molecular mechanism of MAC assembly remains to be understood. Here we present the 8 Å cryo-EM structure of a soluble form of the poly-C9 component of the MAC. These data reveal a 22-fold symmetrical arrangement of C9 molecules that yield an 88-strand pore-forming β-barrel. The N-terminal thrombospondin-1 (TSP1) domain forms an unexpectedly extensive part of the oligomerisation interface, thus likely facilitating solution-based assembly. These TSP1 interactions may also explain how additional C9 subunits can be recruited to the growing MAC subsequent to membrane insertion.

  19. Bioinspired tannic acid-copper complexes as selective coating for nanofiltration membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Chakrabarty, Tina

    2017-04-27

    Bio-polyphenols that are present in tea, date fruits, chockolate and many other plants have been recognized as scaffold material for the manufacture of composite filtration membranes. These phenolic biomolecules possess abundant gallol (1,2,3-trihydroxyphenyl) and catechol (1,2-dihydroxyphenyl) functional groups, which allow the spontaneous formation of a thin polymerized layer at the right pH conditions. Here, we report a facile and cost-effective method to coat porous membranes via the complexation of tannic acid (TA) and cupric acetate (mono hydrate) through co-deposition. The modified membranes were investigated by XPS, ATR/FTIR, water contact angle, SEM and water permeance for a structural and morphological analysis. The obtained results reveal that the modified membranes with TA and cupric acetate (CuII) developed a thin skin layer, which showed excellent hydrophilicity with good water permeance. These membranes were tested with different molecular weight polyethylene glycols (PEG) in aqueous solution; the MWCO was around 600 Daltons.

  20. The role of palmitoylation for protein recruitment to the inner membrane complex of the malaria parasite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzel, Johanna; Herrmann, Susann; Swapna, Lakshmipuram Seshadri; Prusty, Dhaneswar; John Peter, Arun T; Kono, Maya; Saini, Sidharth; Nellimarla, Srinivas; Wong, Tatianna Wai Ying; Wilcke, Louisa; Ramsay, Olivia; Cabrera, Ana; Biller, Laura; Heincke, Dorothee; Mossman, Karen; Spielmann, Tobias; Ungermann, Christian; Parkinson, John; Gilberger, Tim W

    2015-01-16

    To survive and persist within its human host, the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum utilizes a battery of lineage-specific innovations to invade and multiply in human erythrocytes. With central roles in invasion and cytokinesis, the inner membrane complex, a Golgi-derived double membrane structure underlying the plasma membrane of the parasite, represents a unique and unifying structure characteristic to all organisms belonging to a large phylogenetic group called Alveolata. More than 30 structurally and phylogenetically distinct proteins are embedded in the IMC, where a portion of these proteins displays N-terminal acylation motifs. Although N-terminal myristoylation is catalyzed co-translationally within the cytoplasm of the parasite, palmitoylation takes place at membranes and is mediated by palmitoyl acyltransferases (PATs). Here, we identify a PAT (PfDHHC1) that is exclusively localized to the IMC. Systematic phylogenetic analysis of the alveolate PAT family reveals PfDHHC1 to be a member of a highly conserved, apicomplexan-specific clade of PATs. We show that during schizogony this enzyme has an identical distribution like two dual-acylated, IMC-localized proteins (PfISP1 and PfISP3). We used these proteins to probe into specific sequence requirements for IMC-specific membrane recruitment and their interaction with differentially localized PATs of the parasite.

  1. Complexation-Induced Phase Separation: Preparation of Metal-Rich Polymeric Membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Villalobos Vazquez de la Parra, Luis Francisco

    2017-08-01

    The majority of state-of-the-art polymeric membranes for industrial or medical applications are fabricated by phase inversion. Complexation induced phase separation (CIPS)—a surprising variation of this well-known process—allows direct fabrication of hybrid membranes in existing facilities. In the CIPS process, a first step forms the thin metal-rich selective layer of the membrane, and a succeeding step the porous support. Precipitation of the selective layer takes place in the same solvent used to dissolve the polymer and is induced by a small concentration of metal ions. These ions form metal-coordination-based crosslinks leading to the formation of a solid skin floating on top of the liquid polymer film. A subsequent precipitation in a nonsolvent bath leads to the formation of the porous support structure. Forming the dense layer and porous support by different mechanisms while maintaining the simplicity of a phase inversion process, results in unprecedented control over the final structure of the membrane. The thickness and morphology of the dense layer as well as the porosity of the support can be controlled over a wide range by manipulating simple process parameters. CIPS facilitates control over (i) the thickness of the dense layer throughout several orders of magnitude—from less than 15 nm to more than 6 μm, (ii) the type and amount of metal ions loaded in the dense layer, (iii) the morphology of the membrane surface, and (iv) the porosity and structure of the support. The nature of the CIPS process facilitates a precise loading of a high concentration of metal ions that are located in only the top layer of the membrane. Moreover, these metal ions can be converted—during the membrane fabrication process—to nanoparticles or crystals. This simple method opens up fascinating possibilities for the fabrication of metal-rich polymeric membranes with a new set of properties. This dissertation describes the process in depth and explores promising

  2. Connexins: a myriad of functions extending beyond assembly of gap junction channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mroue Rana M

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Connexins constitute a large family of trans-membrane proteins that allow intercellular communication and the transfer of ions and small signaling molecules between cells. Recent studies have revealed complex translational and post-translational mechanisms that regulate connexin synthesis, maturation, membrane transport and degradation that in turn modulate gap junction intercellular communication. With the growing myriad of connexin interacting proteins, including cytoskeletal elements, junctional proteins, and enzymes, gap junctions are now perceived, not only as channels between neighboring cells, but as signaling complexes that regulate cell function and transformation. Connexins have also been shown to form functional hemichannels and have roles altogether independent of channel functions, where they exert their effects on proliferation and other aspects of life and death of the cell through mostly-undefined mechanisms. This review provides an updated overview of current knowledge of connexins and their interacting proteins, and it describes connexin modulation in disease and tumorigenesis.

  3. Connexins: a myriad of functions extending beyond assembly of gap junction channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dbouk, Hashem A; Mroue, Rana M; El-Sabban, Marwan E; Talhouk, Rabih S

    2009-03-12

    Connexins constitute a large family of trans-membrane proteins that allow intercellular communication and the transfer of ions and small signaling molecules between cells. Recent studies have revealed complex translational and post-translational mechanisms that regulate connexin synthesis, maturation, membrane transport and degradation that in turn modulate gap junction intercellular communication. With the growing myriad of connexin interacting proteins, including cytoskeletal elements, junctional proteins, and enzymes, gap junctions are now perceived, not only as channels between neighboring cells, but as signaling complexes that regulate cell function and transformation. Connexins have also been shown to form functional hemichannels and have roles altogether independent of channel functions, where they exert their effects on proliferation and other aspects of life and death of the cell through mostly-undefined mechanisms. This review provides an updated overview of current knowledge of connexins and their interacting proteins, and it describes connexin modulation in disease and tumorigenesis.

  4. Quantitative analysis of complex casein hydrolysates based on chromatography and membrane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi Wei; Yu Yanjun; He Zhimin

    2006-01-01

    The enzymatic hydrolysates of casein are so complex that there is no effective method to do quantitative analysis.The common techniques,such as high performance chromatography and SDS-PAGE,can only carry out qualitative analysis.On the basis of membrane separation and high performance size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC),standard peptides with different molecular mass range were prepared,and the linear relationships between mass concentration of the standard peptides and the ultraviolet absorption of corresponding peak areas were established.Consequently,mass concentration of the different hydrolysates at different reaction times could be accurately calculated.The combination of chromatography and membrane separation is of great importance to the quantitative analysis of the complex hydrolysates,which can also be applied to the other macromolecular systems,such as carbohydrates.

  5. Targeting the Human Complement Membrane Attack Complex to Selectively Kill Prostate Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Kill Prostate Cancer Cells PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Samuel R. Denmeade, MD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Johns Hopkins University...Annual 3. DATES COVERED t 2011- 29 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER . Targeting the Human Complement Membrane Attack Complex to...Support: DOD Idea Award W81XWH-10-PCRP-IDA to SRD; DOD Predoctoral Fellowship W81XWH-09-1-0219 to MLM ; DOD Post-Doctoral Fellowship to MBK; Prostate

  6. The Glycosylphosphatidylinositol Anchor: A Complex Membrane-Anchoring Structure for Proteins†

    OpenAIRE

    Paulick, Margot G.; Bertozzi, Carolyn R

    2008-01-01

    Positioned at the C-terminus of many eukaryotic proteins, the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor is a posttranslational modification that anchors the modified protein in the outer leaflet of the cell membrane. The GPI anchor is a complex structure comprising a phosphoethanolamine linker, glycan core, and phospholipid tail. GPI-anchored proteins are structurally and functionally diverse and play vital roles in numerous biological processes. While several GPI-anchored proteins have been ...

  7. NMR spectroscopic and analytical ultracentrifuge analysis of membrane protein detergent complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Choe Senyon; Riek Roland; Johnson Casey; Kefala Georgia; Maslennikov Innokentiy; Kwiatkowski Witek

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Structural studies of integral membrane proteins (IMPs) are hampered by inherent difficulties in their heterologous expression and in the purification of solubilized protein-detergent complexes (PDCs). The choice and concentrations of detergents used in an IMP preparation play a critical role in protein homogeneity and are thus important for successful crystallization. Results Seeking an effective and standardized means applicable to genomic approaches for the characteriza...

  8. The morphogenetic MreBCD proteins of Escherichia coli form an essential membrane-bound complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Thomas; Bork-Jensen, Jette; Gerdes, Kenn

    2005-01-01

    MreB proteins of Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Caulobacter crescentus form actin-like cables lying beneath the cell surface. The cables are required to guide longitudinal cell wall synthesis and their absence leads to merodiploid spherical and inflated cells prone to cell lysis. In B...... on these and other observations we propose a model in which the membrane-associated MreBCD complex directs longitudinal cell wall synthesis in a process essential to maintain cell morphology....

  9. Crystal Structure of the Herpesvirus Nuclear Egress Complex Provides Insights into Inner Nuclear Membrane Remodeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzviya Zeev-Ben-Mordehai

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Although nucleo-cytoplasmic transport is typically mediated through nuclear pore complexes, herpesvirus capsids exit the nucleus via a unique vesicular pathway. Together, the conserved herpesvirus proteins pUL31 and pUL34 form the heterodimeric nuclear egress complex (NEC, which, in turn, mediates the formation of tight-fitting membrane vesicles around capsids at the inner nuclear membrane. Here, we present the crystal structure of the pseudorabies virus NEC. The structure revealed that a zinc finger motif in pUL31 and an extensive interaction network between the two proteins stabilize the complex. Comprehensive mutational analyses, characterized both in situ and in vitro, indicated that the interaction network is not redundant but rather complementary. Fitting of the NEC crystal structure into the recently determined cryoEM-derived hexagonal lattice, formed in situ by pUL31 and pUL34, provided details on the molecular basis of NEC coat formation and inner nuclear membrane remodeling.

  10. The ubiquitous and ancient ER membrane protein complex (EMC): tether or not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wideman, Jeremy G

    2015-01-01

    The recently discovered endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane protein complex (EMC) has been implicated in ER-associated degradation (ERAD), lipid transport and tethering between the ER and mitochondrial outer membranes, and assembly of multipass ER-membrane proteins. The EMC has been studied in both animals and fungi but its presence outside the Opisthokont clade (animals + fungi + related protists) has not been demonstrated. Here, using homology-searching algorithms, I show that the EMC is truly an ancient and conserved protein complex, present in every major eukaryotic lineage. Very few organisms have completely lost the EMC, and most, even over 2 billion years of eukaryote evolution, have retained a majority of the complex members. I identify Sop4 and YDR056C in Saccharomyces cerevisiae as Emc7 and Emc10, respectively, subunits previously thought to be specific to animals. This study demonstrates that the EMC was present in the last eukaryote common ancestor (LECA) and is an extremely important component of eukaryotic cells even though its primary function remains elusive.

  11. Structure of an asymmetric ternary protein complex provides insight for membrane interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, Brian R; Rezvanpour, Atoosa; Lee, Ting-Wai; Barber, Kathryn R; Junop, Murray S; Shaw, Gary S

    2012-10-10

    Plasma membrane repair involves the coordinated effort of proteins and the inner phospholipid surface to mend the rupture and return the cell back to homeostasis. Here, we present the three-dimensional structure of a multiprotein complex that includes S100A10, annexin A2, and AHNAK, which along with dysferlin, functions in muscle and cardiac tissue repair. The 3.5 Å resolution X-ray structure shows that a single region from the AHNAK C terminus is recruited by an S100A10-annexin A2 heterotetramer, forming an asymmetric ternary complex. The AHNAK peptide adopts a coil conformation that arches across the heterotetramer contacting both annexin A2 and S100A10 protomers with tight affinity (∼30 nM) and establishing a structural rationale whereby both S100A10 and annexin proteins are needed in AHNAK recruitment. The structure evokes a model whereby AHNAK is targeted to the membrane surface through sandwiching of the binding region between the S100A10/annexin A2 complex and the phospholipid membrane.

  12. Electrospinning fabrication and oxygen sensing properties of Cu(I) complex-polystyrene composite microfibrous membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Liyan, E-mail: wanglykmmc@163.co [Department of Orthodontics, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, XiAn (China); Xu Yun [Department of Orthodontics, School of Stomatology, KunMing Medical College, Kunming (China); Lin Zhu [Department of Orthodontics, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, XiAn (China); Zhao Ning [Department of Orthodontics, School of Stomatology, West China College, SiChuan University, ChengDu (China); Xu Yanhua [Department of Orthodontics, School of Stomatology, KunMing Medical College, Kunming (China)

    2011-07-15

    In this paper, a phosphorescent Cu(I) complex of [Cu(POP)(ECI-Phen)]BF{sub 4}, where POP=bis[2-(diphenylphosphino)phenyl]ether, and ECI-Phen=1-ethyl-2-(N-ethyl-carbazole-yl-4-)imidazo[4,5-f]1,10-phenanthroline, is incorporated into a polystyrene matrix of polystyrene (PS) to form microfibers membranes. The possibility of using the resulted composite microfibrous membranes as an optical oxygen sensor is explored. Good linearity and short response time are obtained with a sensitivity of 9.8. These results suggest that phosphorescent [Cu(POP)(ECI-Phen)]BF{sub 4} is a promising candidate for oxygen-sensors and PS is an excellent matrix for oxygen sensing material because it owns a large surface-area-to-volume ratio and can supply a homogeneous matrix for probe molecules. Further analysis suggests that the molecular structure of diamine ligand in Cu(I) complexes is critical for sensitivity due to the characteristic electronic structure of excited state Cu(I) complexes. - Highlights: {yields} Cu(I) complex is incorporated into polystyrene matrix to form nanofibers. {yields} Resulted sample exhibit good linearity and short response time. {yields} PS is an excellent matrix for oxygen sensing material for probe molecules. {yields} Molecular structure of diamine ligand is critical for sensitivity.

  13. The Exon Junction Complex Controls the Efficient and Faithful Splicing of a Subset of Transcripts Involved in Mitotic Cell-Cycle Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiro Fukumura

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The exon junction complex (EJC that is deposited onto spliced mRNAs upstream of exon–exon junctions plays important roles in multiple post-splicing gene expression events, such as mRNA export, surveillance, localization, and translation. However, a direct role for the human EJC in pre-mRNA splicing has not been fully understood. Using HeLa cells, we depleted one of the EJC core components, Y14, and the resulting transcriptome was analyzed by deep sequencing (RNA-Seq and confirmed by RT–PCR. We found that Y14 is required for efficient and faithful splicing of a group of transcripts that is enriched in short intron-containing genes involved in mitotic cell-cycle progression. Tethering of EJC core components (Y14, eIF4AIII or MAGOH to a model reporter pre-mRNA harboring a short intron showed that these core components are prerequisites for the splicing activation. Taken together, we conclude that the EJC core assembled on pre-mRNA is critical for efficient and faithful splicing of a specific subset of short introns in mitotic cell cycle-related genes.

  14. Exon Junction Complexes Show a Distributional Bias toward Alternatively Spliced mRNAs and against mRNAs Coding for Ribosomal Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Hauer

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The exon junction complex (EJC connects spliced mRNAs to posttranscriptional processes including RNA localization, transport, and regulated degradation. Here, we provide a comprehensive analysis of bona fide EJC binding sites across the transcriptome including all four RNA binding EJC components eIF4A3, BTZ, UPF3B, and RNPS1. Integration of these data sets permits definition of high-confidence EJC deposition sites as well as assessment of whether EJC heterogeneity drives alternative nonsense-mediated mRNA decay pathways. Notably, BTZ (MLN51 or CASC3 emerges as the EJC subunit that is almost exclusively bound to sites 20–24 nucleotides upstream of exon-exon junctions, hence defining EJC positions. By contrast, eIF4A3, UPF3B, and RNPS1 display additional RNA binding sites suggesting accompanying non-EJC functions. Finally, our data show that EJCs are largely distributed across spliced RNAs in an orthodox fashion, with two notable exceptions: an EJC deposition bias in favor of alternatively spliced transcripts and against the mRNAs that encode ribosomal proteins.

  15. The big and intricate dreams of little organelles: Embracing complexity in the study of membrane traffic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Allen P; Botelho, Roberto J; Antonescu, Costin N

    2017-09-01

    Compartmentalization of eukaryotic cells into dynamic organelles that exchange material through regulated membrane traffic governs virtually every aspect of cellular physiology including signal transduction, metabolism and transcription. Much has been revealed about the molecular mechanisms that control organelle dynamics and membrane traffic and how these processes are regulated by metabolic, physical and chemical cues. From this emerges the understanding of the integration of specific organellar phenomena within complex, multiscale and nonlinear regulatory networks. In this review, we discuss systematic approaches that revealed remarkable insight into the complexity of these phenomena, including the use of proximity-based proteomics, high-throughput imaging, transcriptomics and computational modeling. We discuss how these methods offer insights to further understand molecular versatility and organelle heterogeneity, phenomena that allow a single organelle population to serve a range of physiological functions. We also detail on how transcriptional circuits drive organelle adaptation, such that organelles may shift their function to better serve distinct differentiation and stress conditions. Thus, organelle dynamics and membrane traffic are functionally heterogeneous and adaptable processes that coordinate with higher-order system behavior to optimize cell function under a range of contexts. Obtaining a comprehensive understanding of organellar phenomena will increasingly require combined use of reductionist and system-based approaches. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. FGF receptor-4 (FGFR4) polymorphism acts as an activity switch of a membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase-FGFR4 complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Nami; Varjosalo, Markku; Meller, Pipsa; Lohi, Jouko; Chan, Kui Ming; Zhou, Zhongjun; Alitalo, Kari; Taipale, Jussi; Keski-Oja, Jorma; Lehti, Kaisa

    2010-09-07

    Tumor cells use membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) for invasion and metastasis. However, the signaling mechanisms that underlie MT1-MMP regulation in cancer have remained unclear. Using a systematic gain-of-function kinome screen for MT1-MMP activity, we have here identified kinases that significantly enhance MT1-MMP activity in tumor cells. In particular, we discovered an MT1-MMP/FGF receptor-4 (FGFR4) membrane complex that either stimulates or suppresses MT1-MMP and FGFR4 activities, depending on a tumor progression-associated polymorphism in FGFR4. The FGFR4-R388 allele, linked to poor cancer prognosis, increased collagen invasion by decreasing lysosomal MT1-MMP degradation. FGFR4-R388 induced MT1-MMP phosphorylation and endosomal stabilization, and surprisingly, the increased MT1-MMP in return enhanced FGFR4-R388 autophosphorylation. A phosphorylation-defective MT1-MMP was stabilized on the cell surface, where it induced simultaneous FGFR4-R388 internalization and dissociation of cell-cell junctions. In contrast, the alternative FGFR4-G388 variant down-regulated MT1-MMP, and the overexpression of MT1-MMP and particularly its phosphorylation-defective mutant vice versa induced FGFR4-G388 degradation. These results provide a mechanistic basis for FGFR4-R388 function in cancer invasion.

  17. Formation of complement membrane attack complex in mammalian cerebral cortex evokes seizures and neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Zhi-Qi; Qian, Weihua; Suzuki, Katsuaki; McNamara, James O

    2003-02-01

    The complement system consists of >30 proteins that interact in a carefully regulated manner to destroy invading bacteria and prevent the deposition of immune complexes in normal tissue. This complex system can be activated by diverse mechanisms proceeding through distinct pathways, yet all converge on a final common pathway in which five proteins assemble into a multimolecular complex, the membrane attack complex (MAC). The MAC inserts into cell membranes to form a functional pore, resulting in ion flux and ultimately osmotic lysis. Immunohistochemical evidence of the MAC decorating neurons in cortical gray matter has been identified in multiple CNS diseases, yet the deleterious consequences, if any, of MAC deposition in the cortex of mammalian brain in vivo are unknown. Here we demonstrate that the sequential infusion of individual proteins of the membrane attack pathway (C5b6, C7, C8, and C9) into the hippocampus of awake, freely moving rats induced both behavioral and electrographic seizures as well as cytotoxicity. The onset of seizures occurred during or shortly after the infusion of C8/C9. Neither seizures nor cytotoxicity resulted from the simultaneous infusion of all five proteins premixed in vitro. The requirement for the sequential infusion of all five proteins together with the temporal relationship of seizure onset to infusions of C8/C9 implies that the MAC was formed in vivo and triggered both seizures and cytotoxicity. Deposition of the complement MAC in cortical gray matter may contribute to epileptic seizures and cell death in diverse diseases of the human brain.

  18. Temperature-dependent phase transitions in zeptoliter volumes of a complex biological membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikiforov, Maxim P; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V [Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Hohlbauch, Sophia; Proksch, Roger [Asylum Research, Santa Barbara, CA 93117 (United States); King, William P [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Voitchovsky, Kislon [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Contera, Sonia Antoranz [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-04

    Phase transitions in purple membrane have been a topic of debate for the past two decades. In this work we present studies of a reversible transition of purple membrane in the 50-60 deg. C range in zeptoliter volumes under different heating regimes (global heating and local heating). The temperature of the reversible phase transition is 52 {+-} 5 deg. C for both local and global heating, supporting the hypothesis that this transition is mainly due to a structural rearrangement of bR molecules and trimers. To achieve high resolution measurements of temperature-dependent phase transitions, a new scanning probe microscopy-based method was developed. We believe that our new technique can be extended to other biological systems and can contribute to the understanding of inhomogeneous phase transitions in complex systems.

  19. Temperature-dependent phase transitions of a complex biological membrane in zeptoliter volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikiforov, Maxim [ORNL; Hohlbauch, Sophia [Asylum Research, Santa Barbara, CA; King, William P [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Voitchovsky, K [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Contera, S Antoranz [University of Oxford; Jesse, Stephen [ORNL; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL; Proksch, Roger [Asylum Research, Santa Barbara, CA

    2011-01-01

    Phase transitions in purple membrane have been a topic of debate for the past two decades. In this work we present studies of a reversible transition of purple membrane in the 50 60 C range in zeptoliter volumes under different heating regimes (global heating and local heating). The temperature of the reversible phase transition is 52 5 C for both local and global heating, supporting the hypothesis that this transition is mainly due to a structural rearrangement of bR molecules and trimers. To achieve high resolution measurements of temperature-dependent phase transitions, a new scanning probe microscopy-based method was developed. We believe that our new technique can be extended to other biological systems and can contribute to the understanding of inhomogeneous phase transitions in complex systems.

  20. Static versus dynamic gerbil tympanic membrane elasticity: derivation of the complex modulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aernouts, Jef; Dirckx, Joris J J

    2012-07-01

    An accurate estimation of tympanic membrane stiffness is important for realistic modelling of middle ear mechanics. Tympanic membrane stiffness has been investigated extensively under either quasi-static or dynamic loading conditions. It is known that biological tissues are sensitive to strain rate. Therefore, in this work, the mechanical behaviour of the tympanic membrane was studied under both quasi-static and dynamic loading conditions. Experiments were performed on the pars tensa of four gerbil tympanic membranes. A custom-built indentation apparatus was used to perform in situ tissue indentations and testing was done applying both quasi-static and dynamic sinusoidal indentations up to 8.2 Hz. The unloaded shape of the tympanic membrane was measured and used to create specimen-specific finite element models to simulate the experiments. The frequency dependent Young's modulus of each specimen was then estimated by an inverse analysis in which the error between experimental and simulated indentation data was optimised for each indentation frequency separately. Using an 8 μm central region thickness, we found Young's moduli between 71 and 106 MPa (n = 4) at 0.2 Hz indentation frequency. A standard linear viscoelastic model and a viscoelastic model with a continuous relaxation spectrum were used to derive a complex modulus in the frequency domain. Due to experimental limitations, the indentation frequency upper limit was 8.2 Hz. The average relative modulus increase in this domain was 14% and the increase was the strongest below 6 Hz.

  1. Identification of MarvelD3 as a tight junction-associated transmembrane protein of the occludin family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balda Maria S

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tight junctions are an intercellular adhesion complex of epithelial and endothelial cells, and form a paracellular barrier that restricts the diffusion of solutes on the basis of size and charge. Tight junctions are formed by multiprotein complexes containing cytosolic and transmembrane proteins. How these components work together to form functional tight junctions is still not well understood and will require a complete understanding of the molecular composition of the junction. Results Here we identify a new transmembrane component of tight junctions: MarvelD3, a four-span transmembrane protein. Its predicted transmembrane helices form a Marvel (MAL and related proteins for vesicle traffic and membrane link domain, a structural motif originally discovered in proteins involved in membrane apposition and fusion events, such as the tight junction proteins occludin and tricellulin. In mammals, MarvelD3 is expressed as two alternatively spliced isoforms. Both isoforms exhibit a broad tissue distribution and are expressed by different types of epithelial as well as endothelial cells. MarvelD3 co-localises with occludin at tight junctions in intestinal and corneal epithelial cells. RNA interference experiments in Caco-2 cells indicate that normal MarvelD3 expression is not required for the formation of functional tight junctions but depletion results in monolayers with increased transepithelial electrical resistance. Conclusions Our data indicate that MarvelD3 is a third member of the tight junction-associated occludin family of transmembrane proteins. Similar to occludin, normal expression of MarvelD3 is not essential for the formation of functional tight junctions. However, MarvelD3 functions as a determinant of epithelial paracellular permeability properties.

  2. Turnip mosaic virus moves systemically through both phloem and xylem as membrane-associated complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Juan; Cabanillas, Daniel Garcia; Zheng, Huanquan; Laliberté, Jean-François

    2015-04-01

    Plant viruses move systemically in plants through the phloem. They move as virions or as ribonucleic protein complexes, although it is not clear what these complexes are made of. The approximately 10-kb RNA genome of Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) encodes a membrane protein, known as 6K2, that induces endomembrane rearrangements for the formation of viral replication factories. These factories take the form of vesicles that contain viral RNA (vRNA) and viral replication proteins. In this study, we report the presence of 6K2-tagged vesicles containing vRNA and the vRNA-dependent RNA polymerase in phloem sieve elements and in xylem vessels. Transmission electron microscopy observations showed the presence in the xylem vessels of vRNA-containing vesicles that were associated with viral particles. Stem-girdling experiments, which leave xylem vessels intact but destroy the surrounding tissues, confirmed that TuMV could establish a systemic infection of the plant by going through xylem vessels. Phloem sieve elements and xylem vessels from Potato virus X-infected plants also contained lipid-associated nonencapsidated vRNA, indicating that the presence of membrane-associated ribonucleic protein complexes in the phloem and xylem may not be limited to TuMV. Collectively, these studies indicate that viral replication factories could end up in the phloem and the xylem. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Turnip mosaic virus Moves Systemically through Both Phloem and Xylem as Membrane-Associated Complexes1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Huanquan

    2015-01-01

    Plant viruses move systemically in plants through the phloem. They move as virions or as ribonucleic protein complexes, although it is not clear what these complexes are made of. The approximately 10-kb RNA genome of Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) encodes a membrane protein, known as 6K2, that induces endomembrane rearrangements for the formation of viral replication factories. These factories take the form of vesicles that contain viral RNA (vRNA) and viral replication proteins. In this study, we report the presence of 6K2-tagged vesicles containing vRNA and the vRNA-dependent RNA polymerase in phloem sieve elements and in xylem vessels. Transmission electron microscopy observations showed the presence in the xylem vessels of vRNA-containing vesicles that were associated with viral particles. Stem-girdling experiments, which leave xylem vessels intact but destroy the surrounding tissues, confirmed that TuMV could establish a systemic infection of the plant by going through xylem vessels. Phloem sieve elements and xylem vessels from Potato virus X-infected plants also contained lipid-associated nonencapsidated vRNA, indicating that the presence of membrane-associated ribonucleic protein complexes in the phloem and xylem may not be limited to TuMV. Collectively, these studies indicate that viral replication factories could end up in the phloem and the xylem. PMID:25717035

  4. Association of major histocompatibility complex II with cholesterol- and sphingolipid-rich membranes precedes peptide loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karacsonyi, Claudia; Knorr, Ruth; Fülbier, Angela; Lindner, Robert

    2004-08-13

    Major histocompatibility complex class II protein (MHC II) molecules present antigenic peptides to CD4-positive T-cells. Efficient T cell stimulation requires association of MHC II with membrane microdomains organized by cholesterol and glycosphingolipids or by tetraspanins. Using detergent extraction at 37 degrees C combined with a modified flotation assay, we investigated the sequence of events leading to the association of MHC II with cholesterol- and glycosphingolipid-rich membranes (DRMs) that are distinct from tetraspanins. We find two stages of association of MHC II with DRMs. In stage one, complexes of MHC II and invariant chain, a chaperone involved in MHC II transport, enter DRMs in the Golgi stack. In early endosomes, these complexes are almost quantitatively associated with DRMs. Upon transport to late endocytic compartments, MHC II-bound invariant chain is stepwise proteolyzed to the MHC class II-associated invariant chain peptide (CLIP) that remains MHC II-bound and retains a preference for DRMs. At the transition between the two stages, CLIP is exchanged against processed antigens, and the resulting MHC II-peptide complexes are transported to the cell surface. In the second stage, MHC II shows a lower overall association with DRMs. However, surface MHC II molecules occupied with peptides that induce resistance to denaturation by SDS are enriched in DRMs relative to SDS-sensitive MHC II-peptide complexes. Likewise, MHC II molecules loaded with long-lived processing products of hen-egg lysozyme containing the immunodominant epitope 48-61 show a very high preference for DRMs. Thus after an initial mainly intracellular stage of high DRM association, MHC II moves to a second stage in which its preference for DRMs is modulated by bound peptides.

  5. Stochastic resonance in a proton pumping Complex I of mitochondria membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, D; Filonenko, I; Mourokh, L; Fendler, C; Blick, R H

    2017-09-29

    We make use of the physical mechanism of proton pumping in the so-called Complex I within mitochondria membranes. Our model is based on sequential charge transfer assisted by conformational changes which facilitate the indirect electron-proton coupling. The equations of motion for the proton operators are derived and solved numerically in combination with the phenomenological Langevin equation describing the periodic conformational changes. We show that with an appropriate set of parameters, protons can be transferred against an applied voltage. In addition, we demonstrate that only the joint action of the periodic energy modulation and thermal noise leads to efficient uphill proton transfer, being a manifestation of stochastic resonance.

  6. Membrane Processes Based on Complexation Reactions of Pollutants as Sustainable Wastewater Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Poerio

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Water is today considered to be a vital and limited resource due to industrial development and population growth. Developing appropriate water treatment techniques, to ensure a sustainable management, represents a key point in the worldwide strategies. By removing both organic and inorganic species using techniques based on coupling membrane processes and appropriate complexing agents to bind pollutants are very important alternatives to classical separation processes in water treatment. Supported Liquid Membrane (SLM and Complexation Ultrafiltration (CP-UF based processes meet the sustainability criteria because they require low amounts of energy compared to pressure driven membrane processes, low amounts of complexing agents and they allow recovery of water and some pollutants (e.g., metals. A more interesting process, on the application point of view, is the Stagnant Sandwich Liquid Membrane (SSwLM, introduced as SLM implementation. It has been studied in the separation of the drug gemfibrozil (GEM and of copper(II as organic and inorganic pollutants in water. Obtained results showed in both cases the higher efficiency of SSwLM with respect to the SLM system configuration. Indeed higher stability (335.5 vs. 23.5 hours for GEM; 182.7 vs. 49.2 for copper(II and higher fluxes (0.662 vs. 0.302 mmol·h-1·m-2 for GEM; 43.3 vs. 31.0 for copper(II were obtained by using the SSwLM. Concerning the CP-UF process, its feasibility was studied in the separation of metals from waters (e.g., from soil washing, giving particular attention to process sustainability such as water and polymer recycle, free metal and water recovery. The selectivity of the CP-UF process was also validated in the separate removal of copper(II and nickel(II both contained in synthetic and real aqueous effluents. Thus, complexation reactions involved in the SSwLM and the CP-UF processes play a key role to meet the sustainability criteria.

  7. Identification of the Ndh (NAD(P)H-Plastoquinone-oxidoreductase) Complex in Etioplast Membranes of Barley : Changes during Photomorphogenesis of Chloroplasts

    OpenAIRE

    Alfredo, Guera; Pedro G.de, Nova; Bartolome, Sabater; Departamento de Biologia Vegetal, Universidad de Alcala de Henares

    2000-01-01

    In the last few years the presence in thylakoid membranes of chloroplasts of a NAD(P)H-plastoquinone oxidoreductase complex (Ndh complex) homologous to mitochondrial complex I has been well established. Herein, we report the identification of the Ndh complex in barley etioplast membranes. Two plastid DNA-encoded polypeptides of the Ndh complex (NDH-A and NDH-F) were relatively more abundant in etioplast membranes than in thylakoids from greening chloroplasts. Conversion of etioplast into chlo...

  8. GEN1/Yen1 and the SLX4 complex: solutions to the problem of Holliday junction resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svendsen, Jennifer M.; Harper, J. Wade

    2010-01-01

    Chromosomal double-strand breaks (DSBs) are considered to be among the most deleterious DNA lesions found in eukaryotic cells due to their propensity to promote genome instability. DSBs occur as a result of exogenous or endogenous DNA damage, and also occur during meiotic recombination. DSBs are often repaired through a process called homologous recombination (HR), which employs the sister chromatid in mitotic cells or the homologous chromosome in meiotic cells, as a template for repair. HR frequently involves the formation and resolution of four-way DNA structures referred to as the Holliday junction (HJ). Despite extensive study, the machinery and mechanisms used to process these structures in eukaryotes have remained poorly understood. Recent work has identified XPG and UvrC/GIY domain-containing structure-specific endonucleases that can symmetrically cleave HJs in vitro in a manner that allows for religation without additional processing, properties that are reminiscent of the classical RuvC HJ resolvase in bacteria. Genetic studies reveal potential roles for these HJ resolvases in repair after DNA damage and during meiosis. The stage is now set for a more comprehensive understanding of the specific roles these enzymes play in the response of cells to DSBs, collapsed replication forks, telomere dysfunction, and meiotic recombination. PMID:20203129

  9. The dynamics of the surface layer of lipid membranes doped by vanadium complex: computer modeling and EPR studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olchawa Ryszard

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Penetration of the liposome membranes doped with vanadium complex formed in the liquid-crystalline phase from egg yolk lecithin (EYL by the TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl spin probes has been investigated. The penetration process was followed by 360 hours at 24°C, using the electron spin resonance (EPR method. The spectroscopic parameter of the partition (F of this probe indicated that a maximum rigidity of the membrane was at 3% concentration of the vanadium complex. Computer simulations showed that the increase in the rigidity of the membrane corresponds to the closure of gaps in the surface layer of the membrane, and indicates the essential role of the membrane surface in transport processes.

  10. Microbial adhesion and biofilm formation on microfiltration membranes: a detailed characterization using model organisms with increasing complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanysacker, L; Denis, C; Declerck, P; Piasecka, A; Vankelecom, I F J

    2013-01-01

    Since many years, membrane biofouling has been described as the Achilles heel of membrane fouling. In the present study, an ecological assay was performed using model systems with increasing complexity: a monospecies assay using Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Escherichia coli separately, a duospecies assay using both microorganisms, and a multispecies assay using activated sludge with or without spiked P. aeruginosa. The microbial adhesion and biofilm formation were evaluated in terms of bacterial cell densities, species richness, and bacterial community composition on polyvinyldifluoride, polyethylene, and polysulfone membranes. The data show that biofouling formation was strongly influenced by the kind of microorganism, the interactions between the organisms, and the changes in environmental conditions whereas the membrane effect was less important. The findings obtained in this study suggest that more knowledge in species composition and microbial interactions is needed in order to understand the complex biofouling process. This is the first report describing the microbial interactions with a membrane during the biofouling development.

  11. The Escherichia coli O157:H7 cattle immunoproteome includes outer membrane protein A (OmpA), a modulator of adherence to bovine rectoanal junction squamous epithelial (RSE) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudva, Indira T; Krastins, Bryan; Torres, Alfredo G; Griffin, Robert W; Sheng, Haiqing; Sarracino, David A; Hovde, Carolyn J; Calderwood, Stephen B; John, Manohar

    2015-06-01

    Building on previous studies, we defined the repertoire of proteins comprising the immunoproteome (IP) of Escherichia coli O157:H7 (O157) cultured in DMEM supplemented with norepinephrine (O157 IP), a β-adrenergic hormone that regulates E. coli O157 gene expression in the gastrointestinal tract, using a variation of a novel proteomics-based platform proteome mining tool for antigen discovery, called "proteomics-based expression library screening" (PELS; Kudva et al., 2006). The E. coli O157 IP (O157-IP) comprised 91 proteins, and included those identified previously using proteomics-based expression library screening, and also proteins comprising DMEM and bovine rumen fluid proteomes. Outer membrane protein A (OmpA), a common component of the above proteomes, and reportedly a contributor to E. coli O157 adherence to cultured HEp-2 epithelial cells, was interestingly found to be a modulator rather than a contributor to E. coli O157 adherence to bovine rectoanal junction squamous epithelial cells. Our results point to a role for yet to be identified members of the O157-IP in E. coli O157 adherence to rectoanal junction squamous epithelial cells, and additionally implicate a possible role for the outer membrane protein A regulator, TdcA, in the expression of such adhesins. Our observations have implications for the development of efficacious vaccines for preventing E. coli O157 colonization of the bovine gastrointestinal tract.

  12. Cycloheptaamylose-dansyl chloride complex as a fluorescent label of surface membranes in living ciliates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyroba, E; Bottiroli, G; Giordano, P

    1981-12-01

    Labelling of surface membrane of living ciliates: Paramecium aurelia and Tetrahymena pyriformis with fluorescent compound--cycloheptaamylose-dansyl chloride complex (CDC) has been achieved. Fluorescence micrographs of the dried samples showed specific localization of CDC on the cell membrane without any intracellular penetration. On the contrary the ciliates which have been dead during labelling revealed a non-specific fluorescence of their whole bodies. Microspectrofluorimetric analysis of labelled Paramecium cells was performed with Leitz microspectrograph. Spectrum of fluorescence emission measured over the cell membrane level had maximum at 450 nm. Strikingly, the emission maximum of the cells dead at the moment of labelling was shifted 10 nm to a longer wavelength. The rate of photofading measured in this case was almost 3-fold higher than for the ciliates labelled as living ones. Fluorescence excitation spectra did not show any difference in the peak position. Thus CDC staining appears to be an useful method of supravital labelling of cell surface enabling also to distinguish--on the basis of spectral characteristics--the ciliates being alive from those dead at the moment of fluorochrome binding.

  13. N-terminal palmitoylation is required for Toxoplasma gondii HSP20 inner membrane complex localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Napoli, M G; de Miguel, N; Lebrun, M; Moreno, S N J; Angel, S O; Corvi, M M

    2013-06-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite and the causative agent of toxoplasmosis. Protein palmitoylation is known to play roles in signal transduction and in enhancing the hydrophobicity of proteins thus contributing to their membrane association. Global inhibition of protein palmitoylation has been shown to affect T. gondii physiology and invasion of the host cell. However, the proteins affected by this modification have been understudied. This paper shows that the small heat shock protein 20 from T. gondii (TgHSP20) is synthesized as a mature protein in the cytosol and is palmitoylated in three cysteine residues. However, its localization at the inner membrane complex (IMC) is dependent only on N-terminal palmitoylation. Absence or incomplete N-terminal palmitoylation causes TgHSP20 to partially accumulate in a membranous structure. Interestingly, TgHSP20 palmitoylation is not responsible for its interaction with the daughter cells IMCs. Together, our data describe the importance of palmitoylation in protein targeting to the IMC in T. gondii.

  14. Formation of a Bazooka-Stardust complex is essential for plasma membrane polarity in epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahn, Michael P; Bückers, Johanna; Kastrup, Lars; Wodarz, Andreas

    2010-09-01

    Apical-basal polarity in Drosophila melanogaster epithelia depends on several evolutionarily conserved proteins that have been assigned to two distinct protein complexes: the Bazooka (Baz)-PAR-6 (partitioning defective 6)-atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) complex and the Crumbs (Crb)-Stardust (Sdt) complex. These proteins operate in a functional hierarchy, in which Baz is required for the proper subcellular localization of all other proteins. We investigated how these proteins interact and how this interaction is regulated. We show that Baz recruits Sdt to the plasma membrane by direct interaction between the Postsynaptic density 95/Discs large/Zonula occludens 1 (PDZ) domain of Sdt and a region of Baz that contains a phosphorylation site for aPKC. Phosphorylation of Baz causes the dissociation of the Baz-Sdt complex. Overexpression of a nonphosphorylatable version of Baz blocks the dissociation of Sdt from Baz, causing phenotypes very similar to those of crb and sdt mutations. Our findings provide a molecular mechanism for the phosphorylation-dependent interaction between the Baz-PAR-3 and Crb complexes during the establishment of epithelial polarity.

  15. An asymmetric A-B-A' metallo-supramolecular triblock copolymer linked by Ni(2+)-bis-terpyridine complexes at one junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haixia; Wei, Wei; Xiong, Huiming

    2016-02-01

    A metallo-supramolecular triblock copolymer polystyrene-b-polyisoprene-[Ni(2+)]-polystyrene (SI-[Ni(2+)]-S') has been efficiently prepared using a one-pot, two-step procedure, where the blocks are held by bis-terpyridine complexes at the junction of SI-S'. This specific metallo-supramolecular chemistry is demonstrated to be a robust approach to potentially broaden the diversity of block copolymers. The location of the metal-ligand complexes has a profound influence on the phase separation of the triblock copolymer in the bulk, which results in a distinctive phase segregation between the end blocks and leads to an unexpected asymmetry of the triblock copolymer. The metal-ligand complexes are found to be preferentially located on the adjacent spherical domain and form a core-shell structure. The resulting multiphase material exhibits distinct elastomeric properties with significant toughness and creep recovery behavior. This type of triblock copolymer is anticipated to be a novel class of hybrid thermo-plastic elastomeric material with wide tunability and functionality.

  16. Identification of neuronal and angiogenic growth factors in an in vitro blood-brain barrier model system: Relevance in barrier integrity and tight junction formation and complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freese, Christian; Hanada, Sanshiro; Fallier-Becker, Petra; Kirkpatrick, C James; Unger, Ronald E

    2017-05-01

    We previously demonstrated that the co-cultivation of endothelial cells with neural cells resulted in an improved integrity of the in vitro blood-brain barrier (BBB), and that this model could be useful to evaluate the transport properties of potential central nervous system disease drugs through the microvascular brain endothelial. In this study we have used real-time PCR, fluorescent microscopy, protein arrays and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays to determine which neural- and endothelial cell-derived factors are produced in the co-culture and improve the integrity of the BBB. In addition, a further improvement of the BBB integrity was achieved by adjusting serum concentrations and growth factors or by the addition of brain pericytes. Under specific conditions expression of angiogenic, angiostatic and neurotrophic factors such as endostatin, pigment epithelium derived factor (PEDF/serpins-F1), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP-1), and vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF) closely mimicked the in vivo situation. Freeze-fracture analysis of these cultures demonstrated the quality and organization of the endothelial tight junction structures and their association to the two different lipidic leaflets of the membrane. Finally, a multi-cell culture model of the BBB with a transendothelial electrical resistance up to 371 (±15) Ω×cm(2) was developed, which may be useful for preliminary screening of drug transport across the BBB and to evaluate cellular crosstalk of cells involved in the neurovascular unit.

  17. Colorimetric solvent indicators based on Nafion membranes incorporating nickel(II)-chelate complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosokawa, Hitoshi; Funasako, Yusuke; Mochida, Tomoyuki

    2014-11-10

    To develop solvent-recognition films, Nafion membranes incorporating cationic nickel-chelate complexes, that is, [Ni(L(1))(L(2))](+) (HL(1) = acetylacetone, 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedione; L(2) = N,N-diethylethylenediamine, N-butyl-N,N',N'-trimethylethylenediamine), were prepared. Immersion of the films in various solvents effected the color changes varying from red to pale blue green depending on the donor number of the solvents. The color change is based on an equilibrium shift between square-planar and solvent-coordinated octahedral geometries of the cations. The degree of the color change depended on the affinity of the incorporated complex to the solvent molecules. The films were robust and exhibited a reversible solvent response. The films exhibited thermochromism when a small amount of appropriate solvents were incorporated and changed from pale blue green at low temperatures to red at high temperatures.

  18. Organization of the Escherichia coli aerobic enzyme complexes of oxidative phosphorylation in dynamic domains within the cytoplasmic membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhardt, Heiko; Dempwolff, Felix; Pfreundschuh, Moritz; Riehle, Marc; Schäfer, Caspar; Pohl, Thomas; Graumann, Peter; Friedrich, Thorsten

    2014-06-01

    The Escherichia coli cytoplasmic membrane contains the enzyme complexes of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). Not much is known about their supramolecular organization and their dynamics within the membrane in this model organism. In mitochondria and other bacteria, it was demonstrated by nondenaturing electrophoretic methods and electron microscopy that the OXPHOS complexes are organized in so-called supercomplexes, stable assemblies with a defined number of the individual enzyme complexes. To investigate the organization of the E. coli enzyme complexes of aerobic OXPHOS in vivo, we established fluorescent protein fusions of the NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase, the succinate:ubiquinone oxidoreductase, the cytochrome bd-I, and the cytochrome bo3 terminal oxidases, and the FoF1 ATP-synthase. The fusions were integrated in the chromosome to prevent artifacts caused by protein overproduction. Biochemical analysis revealed that all modified complexes were fully assembled, active, and stable. The distribution of the OXPHOS complexes in living cells was determined using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. The dynamics within the membrane were detected by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. All aerobic OXPHOS complexes showed an uneven distribution in large mobile patches within the E. coli cytoplasmic membrane. It is discussed whether the individual OXPHOS complexes are organized as clustered individual complexes, here called "segrazones."

  19. Isolation of a membrane protein complex for type VII secretion in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aly, Khaled A; Anderson, Mark; Ohr, Ryan Jay; Missiakas, Dominique

    2017-09-05

    The ESAT6-like secretion system (ESS) of Staphylococcus aureus promotes effector protein transport across the bacterial envelope. Genes in the ESS cluster are required for S. aureus establishment of persistent abscess lesions and the modulation of immune responses during blood stream infections. The biochemical functions of most of the ESS gene products, specifically the identity of secretion machine components, are however unknown. Earlier work demonstrated that deletion of essB, which encodes a membrane protein, abolishes S. aureus ESS secretion. Loss of function mutations truncating the essB gene product cause dominant-negative phenotypes on ESS secretion, suggesting that EssB may be a central component of the secretion machinery. To test this prediction, we purified native and affinity-tagged EssB from staphylococcal membranes via dodecyl-maltoside extraction, identifying a complex assembled from five proteins, EsaA, EssA, EssB, EssD and EsxA. All five proteins are essential for secretion, as knock-out mutations in the corresponding genes abolish ESS transport. Biochemical and bacterial two-hybrid analyses revealed a direct interaction between EssB and EsaA that, by engaging a mobile machine component, EsxA, may also recruit EssA and EssD.IMPORTANCE Type VII secretion systems support the lifestyle of Gram-positive bacteria, including important human pathogens such as Bacillus anthracis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and Staphylococcus aureus Genes encoding SpoIIIE-FtsK-like ATPases and WXG100 secreted products are conserved features of type VII secretion pathways, however most of the genes in T7SS clusters are not conserved between different bacterial species. Here we isolate a complex of proteins from the membranes of S. aureus that appears to represent the core secretion machinery, designated ESS (ESAT-6-like secretion system). These results suggest that three membrane proteins, EsaA, EssB and EssA form a secretion complex that associates with EssC, the Spo

  20. Roles of dynamic metal speciation and membrane permeability in metal flux through lipophilic membranes: General theory and experimental validation with nonlabile complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeshi, Zhang; Buffle, J.; Leeuwen, van H.P.

    2007-01-01

    The study of the role of dynamic metal speciation in lipophilic membrane permeability in aqueous solution requires accurate interpretation of experimental data. To meet this goal, a general theory is derived for describing 1:1 metal complex flux, under steady-state and ligand excess conditions, thro

  1. Crystal structure of the potassium-importing KdpFABC membrane complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Ching-Shin; Pedersen, Bjørn Panyella; Stokes, David L.

    2017-06-21

    Cellular potassium import systems play a fundamental role in osmoregulation, pH homeostasis and membrane potential in all domains of life. In bacteria, the kdp operon encodes a four-subunit potassium pump that maintains intracellular homeostasis, cell shape and turgor under conditions in which potassium is limiting1. This membrane complex, called KdpFABC, has one channel-like subunit (KdpA) belonging to the superfamily of potassium transporters and another pump-like subunit (KdpB) belonging to the superfamily of P-type ATPases. Although there is considerable structural and functional information about members of both superfamilies, the mechanism by which uphill potassium transport through KdpA is coupled with ATP hydrolysis by KdpB remains poorly understood. Here we report the 2.9 Å X-ray structure of the complete Escherichia coli KdpFABC complex with a potassium ion within the selectivity filter of KdpA and a water molecule at a canonical cation site in the transmembrane domain of KdpB. The structure also reveals two structural elements that appear to mediate the coupling between these two subunits. Specifically, a protein-embedded tunnel runs between these potassium and water sites and a helix controlling the cytoplasmic gate of KdpA is linked to the phosphorylation domain of KdpB. On the basis of these observations, we propose a mechanism that repurposes protein channel architecture for active transport across biomembranes.

  2. Yeast Mitochondrial Interactosome Model: Metabolon Membrane Proteins Complex Involved in the Channeling of ADP/ATP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Clémençon

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The existence of a mitochondrial interactosome (MI has been currently well established in mammalian cells but the exact composition of this super-complex is not precisely known, and its organization seems to be different from that in yeast. One major difference is the absence of mitochondrial creatine kinase (MtCK in yeast, unlike that described in the organization model of MI, especially in cardiac, skeletal muscle and brain cells. The aim of this review is to provide a detailed description of different partner proteins involved in the synergistic ADP/ATP transport across the mitochondrial membranes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and to propose a new mitochondrial interactosome model. The ADP/ATP (Aacp and inorganic phosphate (PiC carriers as well as the VDAC (or mitochondrial porin catalyze the import and export of ADP, ATP and Pi across the mitochondrial membranes. Aacp and PiC, which appear to be associated with the ATP synthase, consist of two nanomotors (F0, F1 under specific conditions and form ATP synthasome. Identification and characterization of such a complex were described for the first time by Pedersen and co-workers in 2003.

  3. Lipopolysaccharide Causes an Increase in Intestinal Tight Junction Permeability in Vitro and in Vivo by Inducing Enterocyte Membrane Expression and Localization of TLR-4 and CD14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shuhong; Al-Sadi, Rana; Said, Hamid M.; Ma, Thomas Y.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial-derived lipopolysaccharides (LPS) play an essential role in the inflammatory process of inflammatory bowel disease. A defective intestinal tight junction (TJ) barrier is an important pathogenic factor of inflammatory bowel disease and other inflammatory conditions of the gut. Despite its importance in mediating intestinal inflammation, the physiological effects of LPS on the intestinal epithelial barrier remain unclear. The major aims of this study were to determine the effects of physiologically relevant concentrations of LPS (0 to 1 ng/mL) on intestinal barrier function using an in vitro (filter-grown Caco-2 monolayers) and an in vivo (mouse intestinal perfusion) intestinal epithelial model system. LPS, at physiologically relevant concentrations (0 to 1 ng/mL), in the basolateral compartment produced a time-dependent increase in Caco-2 TJ permeability without inducing cell death. Intraperitoneal injection of LPS (0.1 mg/kg), leading to clinically relevant plasma concentrations, also caused a time-dependent increase in intestinal permeability in vivo. The LPS-induced increase in intestinal TJ permeability was mediated by an increase in enterocyte membrane TLR-4 expression and a TLR-4–dependent increase in membrane colocalization of membrane-associated protein CD14. In conclusion, these studies show for the first time that LPS causes an increase in intestinal permeability via an intracellular mechanism involving TLR-4–dependent up-regulation of CD14 membrane expression. PMID:23201091

  4. 'Special K' and a Loss of Cell-To-Cell Adhesion in Proximal Tubule-Derived Epithelial Cells: Modulation of the Adherens Junction Complex by Ketamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Claire E.; Jin, Tianrong; Siamantouras, Eleftherios; Liu, Issac K-K; Jefferson, Kieran P.; Squires, Paul E.

    2013-01-01

    Ketamine, a mild hallucinogenic class C drug, is the fastest growing ‘party drug’ used by 16–24 year olds in the UK. As the recreational use of Ketamine increases we are beginning to see the signs of major renal and bladder complications. To date however, we know nothing of a role for Ketamine in modulating both structure and function of the human renal proximal tubule. In the current study we have used an established model cell line for human epithelial cells of the proximal tubule (HK2) to demonstrate that Ketamine evokes early changes in expression of proteins central to the adherens junction complex. Furthermore we use AFM single-cell force spectroscopy to assess if these changes functionally uncouple cells of the proximal tubule ahead of any overt loss in epithelial cell function. Our data suggests that Ketamine (24–48 hrs) produces gross changes in cell morphology and cytoskeletal architecture towards a fibrotic phenotype. These physical changes matched the concentration-dependent (0.1–1 mg/mL) cytotoxic effect of Ketamine and reflect a loss in expression of the key adherens junction proteins epithelial (E)- and neural (N)-cadherin and β-catenin. Down-regulation of protein expression does not involve the pro-fibrotic cytokine TGFβ, nor is it regulated by the usual increase in expression of Slug or Snail, the transcriptional regulators for E-cadherin. However, the loss in E-cadherin can be partially rescued pharmacologically by blocking p38 MAPK using SB203580. These data provide compelling evidence that Ketamine alters epithelial cell-to-cell adhesion and cell-coupling in the proximal kidney via a non-classical pro-fibrotic mechanism and the data provides the first indication that this illicit substance can have major implications on renal function. Understanding Ketamine-induced renal pathology may identify targets for future therapeutic intervention. PMID:24009666

  5. Transport of the glutathione-methylmercury complex across liver canalicular membranes on reduced glutathione carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutczak, W J; Ballatori, N

    1994-04-01

    Methylmercury transport across liver canalicular membranes into bile, a major route of excretion of this toxic compound, is dependent upon intracellular GSH, and a glutathione-methylmercury complex (CH3Hg.SG) has been detected in liver tissue and bile. To examine whether the CH3Hg.SG complex is itself transported across the canalicular membrane and to identify the transport system involved, studies were performed in isolated rat liver canalicular plasma membrane vesicles. Uptake of CH3(203)Hg.SG (10 microM) into an osmotically active space was temperature-sensitive and unaffected by either ATP (5 mM) or an inwardly directed Na+ gradient (100 mM); however, CH3Hg.SG uptake was enhanced by a valinomycin-induced K+ diffusion potential (inside-positive) indicating that its transport was electrogenic. Transport of CH3Hg.SG exhibited saturation kinetics with both high affinity (Km = 12 +/- 2 microM, Vmax = 0.23 +/- 0.02 nmol.mg-1.20 s-1) and low affinity (Km = 1.47 +/- 0.22 mM, Vmax = 1.23 +/- 0.14 nmol.mg-1.20 s-1) components. Uptake of this complex was inhibited by GSH, the GSH analog ophthalmic acid, S-methyl, S-ethyl, S-butyl, S-hexyl, S-octyl, and S-dinitrophenyl glutathione, but not by GSSG, bile acids, amino acids, and P-glycoprotein inhibitors. Furthermore, GSH competitively inhibited (Ki = 83 microM) and trans-stimulated CH3Hg.SG uptake into the canalicular vesicles. These studies provide the first kinetic characterization of a transport system for glutathione-mercaptides and indicate that CH3Hg.SG is not a substrate for the ATP-dependent, canalicular GSSG or glutathione S-conjugate carriers, but appears to be a substrate for canalicular carriers that also transport GSH. Because efflux systems for GSH are found in all mammalian cells, transport of glutathione-metal complexes by such carriers may be a common mechanism for the removal of methylmercury and possibly other metals from cells.

  6. N-terminal structure of maize ferredoxin:NADP+ reductase determines recruitment into different thylakoid membrane complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twachtmann, Manuel; Altmann, Bianca; Muraki, Norifumi; Voss, Ingo; Okutani, Satoshi; Kurisu, Genji; Hase, Toshiharu; Hanke, Guy T

    2012-07-01

    To adapt to different light intensities, photosynthetic organisms manipulate the flow of electrons through several alternative pathways at the thylakoid membrane. The enzyme ferredoxin:NADP(+) reductase (FNR) has the potential to regulate this electron partitioning because it is integral to most of these electron cascades and can associate with several different membrane complexes. However, the factors controlling relative localization of FNR to different membrane complexes have not yet been established. Maize (Zea mays) contains three chloroplast FNR proteins with totally different membrane association, and we found that these proteins have variable distribution between cells conducting predominantly cyclic electron transport (bundle sheath) and linear electron transport (mesophyll). Here, the crystal structures of all three enzymes were solved, revealing major structural differences at the N-terminal domain and dimer interface. Expression in Arabidopsis thaliana of maize FNRs as chimeras and truncated proteins showed the N-terminal determines recruitment of FNR to different membrane complexes. In addition, the different maize FNR proteins localized to different thylakoid membrane complexes on expression in Arabidopsis, and analysis of chlorophyll fluorescence and photosystem I absorbance demonstrates the impact of FNR location on photosynthetic electron flow.

  7. Expression and characterization of plasma membrane aquaporins in stomatal complexes of Zea mays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinen, Robert B; Bienert, Gerd Patrick; Cohen, David; Chevalier, Adrien S; Uehlein, Norbert; Hachez, Charles; Kaldenhoff, Ralf; Le Thiec, Didier; Chaumont, François

    2014-10-01

    Stomata, the microscopic pores on the surface of the aerial parts of plants, are bordered by two specialized cells, known as guard cells, which control the stomatal aperture according to endogenous and environmental signals. Like most movements occurring in plants, the opening and closing of stomata are based on hydraulic forces. During opening, the activation of plasma membrane and tonoplast transporters results in solute accumulation in the guard cells. To re-establish the perturbed osmotic equilibrium, water follows the solutes into the cells, leading to their swelling. Numerous studies have contributed to the understanding of the mechanism and regulation of stomatal movements. However, despite the importance of transmembrane water flow during this process, only a few studies have provided evidence for the involvement of water channels, called aquaporins. Here, we microdissected Zea mays stomatal complexes and showed that members of the aquaporin plasma membrane intrinsic protein (PIP) subfamily are expressed in these complexes and that their mRNA expression generally follows a diurnal pattern. The substrate specificity of two of the expressed ZmPIPs, ZmPIP1;5 and ZmPIP1;6, was investigated by heterologous expression in Xenopus oocytes and yeast cells. Our data show that both isoforms facilitate transmembrane water diffusion in the presence of the ZmPIP2;1 isoform. In addition, both display CO2 permeability comparable to that of the CO2 diffusion facilitator NtAQP1. These data indicate that ZmPIPs may have various physiological roles in stomatal complexes.

  8. Design of a stable and methanol resistant membrane with cross-linked multilayered polyelectrolyte complexes for direct methanol fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Zhao, Chengji; Lin, Haidan; Zhang, Gang; Zhang, Yang; Ni, Jing; Ma, Wenjia; Na, Hui

    Sulfonated poly (arylene ether ketone) bearing carboxyl groups (SPAEK-C) membranes have been prepared as proton exchange membranes for applications in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). Multilayered polyelectrolyte complexes (PECs) which applied as methanol barrier agents are prepared by alternate deposition of the oppositely charged amino-containing poly (ether ether ketone) (Am-PEEK) and the highly sulfonated SPAEK-C via a layer-by-layer method. The cross-linked PEC (c-PEC) is derived from a simple heat-induced cross-linking reaction between Am-PEEK and SPAEK-C. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirms that Am-PEEK and SPAEK-C are assembled successfully in the multilayers. The morphology of the membranes is studied by scanning electron microscopy, which shows the presence of the thin layers coated on the SPAEK-C membrane. After PEC and c-PEC modification, the methanol permeability decreases obviously when compared to that of the pristine membrane. Notably, improved proton conductivities are obtained for the PEC modified membranes in comparison with the pristine membrane. Moreover, the selectivity of these modified membranes is one order of magnitude higher than that of Nafion 117. The thermal stability, oxidative stability, water uptake and swelling of PEC and c-PEC modified membranes are also investigated.

  9. Two-dimensional self-organization of the light-harvesting polypeptides/BChl a complex into a thermostable liposomal membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iida, K; Kiriyama, H; Fukai, A; Konings, WN; Nango, M

    2001-01-01

    The detergent-isolated light-harvesting polypeptide (LR)/bacteriochlorophyll alpha (BChl alpha) complex from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum was organized in thermostable liposomal membranes comprising membrane-spanning tetraether lipids from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius to develop a

  10. Multiscale molecular dynamics simulations of lipid interactions with P-glycoprotein in a complex membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domicevica, Laura; Koldsø, Heidi; Biggin, Philip C

    2017-09-02

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) can transport a wide range of very different hydrophobic organic molecules across the membrane. Its ability to extrude molecules from the cell creates delivery problems for drugs that target proteins in the central nervous system (CNS) and also causes drug-resistance in many forms of cancer. Whether a drug will be susceptible to export by P-gp is difficult to predict and currently this is usually assessed with empirical and/or animal models. Thus, there is a need to better understand how P-gp works at the molecular level in order to fulfil the 3Rs: Refinement, reduction and replacement of animals in research. As structural information increasingly becomes available, our understanding at the molecular level improves. Proteins like P-gp are however very dynamic entities and thus one of the most appropriate ways to study them is with molecular dynamics simulations, especially as this can capture the influence of the surrounding environment. Recent parameterization developments have meant that it is now possible to simulate lipid bilayers that more closely resemble in vivo membranes in terms of their composition. In this report we construct a complex lipid bilayer that mimics the composition of brain epithelial cells and examine the interactions of it with P-gp. We find that the negatively charged phosphatidylserine lipids in the inner leaflet of the membrane tend to form an annulus around P-gp. We also observed the interaction of cholesterol with three distinct areas of the P-gp. Potential of mean force (PMF) calculations suggest that a crevice between transmembrane helices 10 and 12 has particularly favourable interaction energy for cholesterol. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The IFT-A complex regulates Shh signaling through cilia structure and membrane protein trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liem, Karel F; Ashe, Alyson; He, Mu; Satir, Peter; Moran, Jennifer; Beier, David; Wicking, Carol; Anderson, Kathryn V

    2012-06-11

    Two intraflagellar transport (IFT) complexes, IFT-A and IFT-B, build and maintain primary cilia and are required for activity of the Sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway. A weak allele of the IFT-A gene, Ift144, caused subtle defects in cilia structure and ectopic activation of the Shh pathway. In contrast, strong loss of IFT-A, caused by either absence of Ift144 or mutations in two IFT-A genes, blocked normal ciliogenesis and decreased Shh signaling. In strong IFT-A mutants, the Shh pathway proteins Gli2, Sufu, and Kif7 localized correctly to cilia tips, suggesting that these pathway components were trafficked by IFT-B. In contrast, the membrane proteins Arl13b, ACIII, and Smo failed to localize to primary cilia in the absence of IFT-A. We propose that the increased Shh activity seen in partial loss-of-function IFT-A mutants may be a result of decreased ciliary ACIII and that the loss of Shh activity in the absence of IFT-A is a result of severe disruptions of cilia structure and membrane protein trafficking.

  12. Identification of Chlamydia trachomatis outer membrane complex proteins by differential proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoyun; Afrane, Mary; Clemmer, David E; Zhong, Guangming; Nelson, David E

    2010-06-01

    The extracellular chlamydial infectious particle, or elementary body (EB), is enveloped by an intra- and intermolecular cysteine cross-linked protein shell called the chlamydial outer membrane complex (COMC). A few abundant proteins, including the major outer membrane protein and cysteine-rich proteins (OmcA and OmcB), constitute the overwhelming majority of COMC proteins. The identification of less-abundant COMC proteins has been complicated by limitations of proteomic methodologies and the contamination of COMC fractions with abundant EB proteins. Here, we used parallel liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analyses of Chlamydia trachomatis serovar L2 434/Bu EB, COMC, and Sarkosyl-soluble EB fractions to identify proteins enriched or depleted from COMC. All well-described COMC proteins were specifically enriched in the COMC fraction. In contrast, multiple COMC-associated proteins found in previous studies were strongly enriched in the Sarkosyl-soluble fraction, suggesting that these proteins are not COMC components or are not stably associated with COMC. Importantly, we also identified novel proteins enriched in COMC. The list of COMC proteins identified in this study has provided reliable information for further understanding chlamydial protein secretion systems and modeling COMC and EB structures.

  13. Gap junctions - guards of excitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroemlund, Line Waring; Jensen, Christa Funch; Qvortrup, Klaus; Delmar, Mario; Nielsen, Morten Schak

    2015-06-01

    Cardiomyocytes are connected by mechanical and electrical junctions located at the intercalated discs (IDs). Although these structures have long been known, it is becoming increasingly clear that their components interact. This review describes the involvement of the ID in electrical disturbances of the heart and focuses on the role of the gap junctional protein connexin 43 (Cx43). Current evidence shows that Cx43 plays a crucial role in organizing microtubules at the intercalated disc and thereby regulating the trafficking of the cardiac sodium channel NaV1.5 to the membrane.

  14. Magnesium Lowers the Incidence of Postoperative Junctional Ectopic Tachycardia in Congenital Heart Surgical Patients: Is There a Relationship to Surgical Procedure Complexity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Dingchao; Sznycer-Taub, Nathaniel; Cheng, Yao; McCarter, Robert; Jonas, Richard A; Hanumanthaiah, Sridhar; Moak, Jeffrey P

    2015-08-01

    Magnesium sulfate was given to pediatric cardiac surgical patients during cardiopulmonary bypass period in an attempt to reduce the occurrence of postoperative junctional ectopic tachycardia (PO JET). We reviewed our data to evaluate the effect of magnesium on the occurrence of JET and assess a possible relationship between PO JET and procedure complexity. A total of 1088 congenital heart surgeries (CHS), performed from 2005 to 2010, were reviewed. A total of 750 cases did not receive magnesium, and 338 cases received magnesium (25 mg/kg). All procedures were classified according to Aristotle score from 1 to 4. Overall, there was a statistically significant decrease in PO JET occurrence between the two groups regardless of the Aristotle score, 15.3 % (115/750) in non-magnesium group versus 7.1 % (24/338) in magnesium group, P < 0.001. In the absence of magnesium, the risk of JET increased with increasing Aristotle score, P = 0.01. Following magnesium administration and controlling for body weight, surgical and aortic cross-clamp times in the analyses, reduction in adjusted risk of JET was significantly greater with increasing Aristotle level of complexity (JET in non-magnesium vs. magnesium group, Aristotle level 1: 9.8 vs. 14.3 %, level 4: 11.5 vs. 3.2 %; odds ratio 0.54, 95 % CI 0.31-0.94, P = 0.028). Our data confirmed that intra-operative usage of magnesium reduced the occurrence of PO JET in a larger number and more diverse group of CHS patients than has previously been reported. Further, our data suggest that magnesium's effect on PO JET occurrence seemed more effective in CHS with higher levels of Aristotle complexity.

  15. The EhCPADH112 complex of Entamoeba histolytica interacts with tight junction proteins occludin and claudin-1 to produce epithelial damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail Betanzos

    Full Text Available Entamoeba histolytica, the protozoan responsible for human amoebiasis, causes between 30,000 and 100,000 deaths per year worldwide. Amoebiasis is characterized by intestinal epithelial damage provoking severe diarrhea. However, the molecular mechanisms by which this protozoan causes epithelial damage are poorly understood. Here, we studied the initial molecular interactions between the E. histolytica EhCPADH112 virulence complex and epithelial MDCK and Caco-2 cells. By confocal microscopy, we discovered that after contact with trophozoites or trophozoite extracts (TE, EhCPADH112 and proteins forming this complex (EhCP112 and EhADH112 co-localize with occludin and claudin-1 at tight junctions (TJ. Immunoprecipitation assays revealed interaction between EhCPADH112 and occludin, claudin-1, ZO-1 and ZO-2. Overlay assays confirmed an interaction of EhCP112 and EhADH112 with occludin and claudin-1, whereas only EhADH112 interacted also with ZO-2. We observed degradation of all mentioned TJ proteins after incubation with TE. Importantly, inhibiting proteolytic activity or blocking the complex with a specific antibody not only prevented TJ protein degradation but also epithelial barrier disruption. Furthermore, we discovered that TE treatment induces autophagy and apoptosis in MDCK cells that could contribute to the observed barrier disruption. Our results suggest a model in which epithelial damage caused by E. histolytica is initiated by the interaction of EhCP112 and EhADH112 with TJ proteins followed by their degradation. Disruption of TJs then induces increased paracellular permeability, thus facilitating the entry of more proteases and other parasite molecules leading eventually to tissue destruction.

  16. Short transmembrane domains with high-volume exoplasmic halves determine retention of Type II membrane proteins in the Golgi complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroga, Rodrigo; Trenchi, Alejandra; González Montoro, Ayelén; Valdez Taubas, Javier; Maccioni, Hugo J F

    2013-12-01

    It is still unclear why some proteins that travel along the secretory pathway are retained in the Golgi complex whereas others make their way to the plasma membrane. Recent bioinformatic analyses on a large number of single-spanning membrane proteins support the hypothesis that specific features of the transmembrane domain (TMD) are relevant to the sorting of these proteins to particular organelles. Here we experimentally test this hypothesis for Golgi and plasma membrane proteins. Using the Golgi SNARE protein Sft1 and the plasma membrane SNARE protein Sso1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae as model proteins, we modified the length of their TMDs and the volume of their exoplasmic hemi-TMD, and determined their subcellular localization both in yeast and mammalian cells. We found that short TMDs with high-volume exoplasmic hemi-TMDs confer Golgi membrane residence, whereas TMDs with low-volume exoplasmic hemi-TMDs, either short or long, confer plasma membrane residence to these proteins. Results indicate that the shape of the exoplasmic hemi-TMD, in addition to the length of the entire TMD, determine retention in the Golgi or exit to the plasma membrane of Type II membrane proteins.

  17. Selective permeability of gap junction channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Gary S; Valiunas, Virginijus; Brink, Peter R

    2004-03-23

    Gap junctions mediate the transfer of small cytoplasmic molecules between adjacent cells. A family of gap junction proteins exist that form channels with unique properties, and differ in their ability to mediate the transfer of specific molecules. Mutations in a number of individual gap junction proteins, called connexins, cause specific human diseases. Therefore, it is important to understand how gap junctions selectively move molecules between cells. Rules that dictate the ability of a molecule to travel through gap junction channels are complex. In addition to molecular weight and size, the ability of a solute to transverse these channels depends on its net charge, shape, and interactions with specific connexins that constitute gap junctions in particular cells. This review presents some data and interpretations pertaining to mechanisms that govern the differential transfer of signals through gap junction channels.

  18. Phospho-regulated Drosophila adducin is a determinant of synaptic plasticity in a complex with Dlg and PIP2 at the larval neuromuscular junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Ji Hau Wang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Adducin is a ubiquitously expressed actin- and spectrin-binding protein involved in cytoskeleton organization, and is regulated through phosphorylation of the myristoylated alanine-rich C-terminal kinase (MARCKS-homology domain by protein kinase C (PKC. We have previously shown that the Drosophila adducin, Hu-li tai shao (Hts, plays a role in larval neuromuscular junction (NMJ growth. Here, we find that the predominant isoforms of Hts at the NMJ contain the MARCKS-homology domain, which is important for interactions with Discs large (Dlg and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2. Through the use of Proximity Ligation Assay (PLA, we show that the adducin-like Hts isoforms are in complexes with Dlg and PIP2 at the NMJ. We provide evidence that Hts promotes the phosphorylation and delocalization of Dlg at the NMJ through regulation of the transcript distribution of the PAR-1 and CaMKII kinases in the muscle. We also show that Hts interactions with Dlg and PIP2 are impeded through phosphorylation of the MARCKS-homology domain. These results are further evidence that Hts is a signaling-responsive regulator of synaptic plasticity in Drosophila.

  19. A Point Mutation in the Exon Junction Complex Factor Y14 Disrupts Its Function in mRNA Cap Binding and Translation Enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Tzu-Wei; Lee, Kuo-Ming; Lou, Yuan-Chao; Lu, Chia-Chen; Tarn, Woan-Yuh

    2016-04-15

    Eukaryotic mRNA biogenesis involves a series of interconnected steps mediated by RNA-binding proteins. The exon junction complex core protein Y14 is required for nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) and promotes translation. Moreover, Y14 binds the cap structure of mRNAs and inhibits the activity of the decapping enzyme Dcp2. In this report, we show that an evolutionarily conserved tryptophan residue (Trp-73) of Y14 is critical for its binding to the mRNA cap structure. A Trp-73 mutant (W73V) bound weakly to mRNAs and failed to protect them from degradation. However, this mutant could still interact with the NMD and mRNA degradation factors and retained partial NMD activity. In addition, we found that the W73V mutant could not interact with translation initiation factors. Overexpression of W73V suppressed reporter mRNA translation in vitro and in vivo and reduced the level of a set of nascent proteins. These results reveal a residue of Y14 that confers cap-binding activity and is essential for Y14-mediated enhancement of translation. Finally, we demonstrated that Y14 may selectively and differentially modulate protein biosynthesis.

  20. Crystallization of Mitochondrial Respiratory Complex II fromChicken Heart: A Membrane-Protein Complex Diffracting to 2.0Angstrom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Li-shar; Borders, Toni M.; Shen, John T.; Wang, Chung-Jen; Berry, Edward A.

    2004-12-17

    Procedure is presented for preparation of diffraction-quality crystals of a vertebrate mitochondrial respiratory Complex II. The crystals have the potential to diffract to at least 2.0 Angstrom with optimization of post-crystal-growth treatment and cryoprotection. This should allow determination of the structure of this important and medically relevant membrane protein complex at near-atomic resolution and provide great detail of the mode of binding of substrates and inhibitors at the two substrate-binding sites.

  1. Light-harvesting Complexes (LHCs) Cluster Spontaneously in Membrane Environment Leading to Shortening of Their Excited State Lifetimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natali, Alberto; Gruber, J Michael; Dietzel, Lars; Stuart, Marc C A; van Grondelle, Rienk; Croce, Roberta

    2016-08-05

    The light reactions of photosynthesis, which include light-harvesting and charge separation, take place in the amphiphilic environment of the thylakoid membrane. The light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) is the main responsible for light absorption in plants and green algae and is involved in photoprotective mechanisms that regulate the amount of excited states in the membrane. The dual function of LHCII has been extensively studied in detergent micelles, but recent results have indicated that the properties of this complex differ in a lipid environment. In this work we checked these suggestions by studying LHCII in liposomes. By combining bulk and single molecule measurements, we monitored the fluorescence characteristics of liposomes containing single complexes up to densely packed proteoliposomes. We show that the natural lipid environment per se does not alter the properties of LHCII, which for single complexes remain very similar to that in detergent. However, we show that LHCII has the strong tendency to cluster in the membrane and that protein interactions and the extent of crowding modulate the lifetimes of the excited state in the membrane. Finally, the presence of LHCII monomers at low concentrations of complexes per liposome is discussed.

  2. Symposia for a Meeting on Ion Channels and Gap Junctions

    CERN Document Server

    Sáez, Juan

    1997-01-01

    Ion channels allow us to see nature in all its magnificence, to hear a Bach suite, to smell the aroma of grandmother's cooking, and, in this regard, they put us in contact with the external world. These ion channels are protein molecules located in the cell membrane. In complex organisms, cells need to communicate in order to know about their metabolic status and to act in a coordinate manner. The latter is also accomplished by a class of ion channels able to pierce the lipid bilayer membranes of two adjacent cells. These intercellular channels are the functional subunits of gap junctions. Accordingly, the book is divided in two parts: the first part is dedicated to ion channels that look to the external world, and the second part is dedicated to gap junctions found at cell interfaces. This book is based on a series of symposia for a meeting on ion channels and gap junctions held in Santiago, Chile, on November 28-30, 1995. The book should be useful to graduate students taking the first steps in this field as...

  3. Detection of inhomogeneities in membrane ohmic resistance in geometrically complex systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svirskis, G; Hounsgaard, J; Gutman, A

    2000-01-01

    DC field-evoked transients in arbitrarily shaped neurons and syncytia were analyzed theoretically. In systems with homogeneous passive membrane properties, the transients develop much faster than the membrane discharges. Conductance of the proximal membrane could be larger due to the injury impos...

  4. Laminins promote postsynaptic maturation by an autocrine mechanism at the neuromuscular junction

    OpenAIRE

    Nishimune, Hiroshi; Jarad, George; Moulson, Casey L.; Müller, Ulrich; Miner, Jeffrey H.; Valdez, Gregorio; Sanes, Joshua R

    2008-01-01

    A prominent feature of synaptic maturation at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is the topological transformation of the acetylcholine receptor (AChR)-rich postsynaptic membrane from an ovoid plaque into a complex array of branches. We show here that laminins play an autocrine role in promoting this transformation. Laminins containing the α4, α5, and β2 subunits are synthesized by muscle fibers and concentrated in the small portion of the basal lamina that passes through the synaptic cleft at ...

  5. Synergistic enhancement of chemokine generation and lung injury by C5a or the membrane attack complex of complement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czermak, B J; Lentsch, A B; Bless, N M;

    1999-01-01

    Complement plays an important role in many acute inflammatory responses. In the current studies it was demonstrated that, in the presence of either C5a or sublytic forms of the complement-derived membrane attack complex (MAC), rat alveolar macrophages costimulated with IgG immune complexes...... increased neutrophil accumulation occurred, as did lung injury. These observations suggest that C5a and MAC function synergistically with a costimulus to enhance chemokine generation and the intensity of the lung inflammatory response....

  6. Characterization of Poly(A)-Protein Complexes Isolated from Free and Membrane-Bound Polyribosomes of Ehrlich Ascites Tumor Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Dick B.; Counotte-Potman, Anda D.; Venrooij, Walther J. van

    1976-01-01

    Proteins present in messenger ribonucleoprotein particles were labeled with [35S]-methionine in Ehrlich ascites tumor cells in which synthesis of new ribosomes was inhibited. Poly(A)-protein complexes were isolated from free and membrane-bound polyribosomes by sucrose gradient centrifugation and aff

  7. Electrochemical methods for the determination of the diffusion coefficient of ionophores and ionophore-ion complexes in plasticized PVC membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodor, Sándor; Zook, Justin M; Lindner, Erno; Tóth, Klára; Gyurcsányi, Róbert E

    2008-05-01

    The diffusion coefficients of active components in ion-selective membranes have a decisive influence on the life-time and detection limit of the respective ion-selective electrodes, as well as influencing the rate of polarization and relaxation processes of electrically perturbed ion sensors. Therefore, the rational design of mass transport controlled ion-selective electrodes with sub-nanomolar detection limits requires reliable data on the diffusion coefficients. We have implemented electrochemical methods for the quantitative assessment of both the diffusion coefficients of free ionophores and ion-ionophore complexes. The diffusion coefficients of the pH-sensitive chromoionophore ETH 5294 and the calcium-selective ionophore ETH 5234 were determined in plasticized PVC membranes with different PVC to plasticizer ratios. The diffusion coefficient of the free chromoionophore determined by a chronoamperometric method was validated with optical methods for a variety of membrane compositions. The calcium-selective ionophore ETH 5234 was used as a model compound to assess the diffusion coefficient of the ion-ionophore complex calculated from the time required for the complexes to cross a freshly prepared membrane during potentiometric ion-breakthrough experiments. The difference between the diffusion coefficients of the free ionophore ETH 5234 and the ion-ionophore complex was found to be significant and correlated well with the geometry of the respective species.

  8. Nonlinear electromagnetic responses of active membrane protein complexes in live cells and organelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawarathna, Dharmakirthi

    The response of biological cells to an applied oscillating electric field contains both linear and nonlinear components (eg. induced harmonics). Such noninvasive measurements can be used to study active processes taking place inside the cells. The measurement of induced harmonics is the tool used for the study described here. A highly sensitive superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) is used to detect the response at low frequencies, which greatly reduces electrode polarization effects. At high frequencies, a four- probe method is used. At low frequencies, harmonic generation by budding yeast cells in response to a sinusoidal electric field is reported, which is seen to be minimal when the field amplitude is less than a threshold value. Surprisingly, sodium metavanadate, an inhibitor of P-type ATPases and glucose, a substrate of P-type ATPase responsible for nonlinear response in yeast, reduces the threshold field amplitude, increasing harmonic generation at low amplitudes while reducing it at large amplitudes. We have thus proposed a model that explicitly introduces a threshold field, similar to those observed in density waves, where fields above threshold drive charge transport through an energy landscape with multiple wells, and in Coulomb blockade tunnel junctions, recently exploited to define the current standard. At high frequencies, the induced harmonics exhibit pronounced features that depend on the specific organism. Budding yeast (S. cerevisiae ) cells produce numerous harmonics. When the second or third harmonic amplitude is plotted vs. applied frequency, we observe two peaks, around 3 kHz and 12 kHz, which are suppressed by the respiratory inhibitor potassium cyanide. We then measured the response to oscillatory electric fields of intact bovine heart mitochondria, a reproducible second harmonic (at ˜3-4 kHz applied frequency) was detected. Further, with coupled mouse mitochondria, an ADP sensitive peak (˜ 12-15 kHz applied frequency) was

  9. Identification of Neisseria meningitidis outer membrane vesicle complexes using 2-D high resolution clear native/SDS-PAGE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzoa, Juan; Sánchez, Sandra; Ferreirós, Carlos M; Criado, María Teresa

    2010-01-01

    The identification and characterization of meningococcal outer membrane vesicle complexes can be important for gaining an in-depth understaining of their structure and functionality. Analysis of the vesicle complexome by 'traditional' 2-D analysis, in which isoelectrofocusing is used for separation in the first dimension, is hampered by the high hydrophobicity and extreme isoelectric points of many relevant proteins. Analysis of the meningococcal outer membrane vesicle complexome using Blue Native (nondenaturing) electrophoresis instead of isoelectrofocusing in the first dimension showed several porin complexes, but their composition could not be clearly resolved after separation by SDS-PAGE in the second dimension. In this work, using a recently described native separation technique -high resolution Clear Native Electrophoresis-and different bidimensional approaches, we were able to demonstrate the presence of relevant outer membrane complexes which could be resolved with a higher resolution than in previous analysis. The most relevant were nine porin complexes formed by different combinations of the meningococcal PorA, PorB and RmpM proteins, and comparison with the complexes formed in specific knockout mutants allowed us to infer the relevance of each porin in the formation of each complex.

  10. Deficiency of angulin-2/ILDR1, a tricellular tight junction-associated membrane protein, causes deafness with cochlear hair cell degeneration in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Tomohito; Katsuno, Tatsuya; Kitajiri, Shin-Ichiro; Furuse, Mikio

    2015-01-01

    Tricellular tight junctions seal the extracellular spaces of tricellular contacts, where the vertices of three epithelial cells meet, and are required for the establishment of a strong barrier function of the epithelial cellular sheet. Angulins and tricellulin are known as specific protein components of tricellular tight junctions, where angulins recruit tricellulin. Mutations in the genes encoding angulin-2/ILDR1 and tricellulin have been reported to cause human hereditary deafness DFNB42 and DFNB49, respectively. To investigate the pathogenesis of DFNB42, we analyzed mice with a targeted disruption of Ildr1, which encodes angulin-2/ILDR1. Ildr1 null mice exhibited profound deafness. Hair cells in the cochlea of Ildr1 null mice develop normally, but begin to degenerate by two weeks after birth. Tricellulin localization at tricellular contacts of the organ of Corti in the cochlea was retained in Ildr1 null mice, but its distribution along the depth of tricellular contacts was affected. Interestingly, compensatory tricellular contact localization of angulin-1/LSR was observed in the organ of Corti in Ildr1 null mice although it was hardly detected in the organ of Corti in wild-type mice. The onset of hair cell degeneration in Ildr1 null mice was earlier than that in the reported Tric mutant mice, which mimic one of the tricellulin mutations in DFNB49 deafness. These results indicate that the angulin-2/ILDR1 deficiency causes the postnatal degenerative loss of hair cells in the cochlea, leading to human deafness DFNB42. Our data also suggest that angulin family proteins have distinct functions in addition to their common roles of tricellulin recruitment and that the function of angulin-2/ILDR1 for hearing cannot be substituted by angulin-1/LSR.

  11. Transcriptional mechanisms coordinating tight junction assembly during epithelial differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, Felix J; Schmidt-Ott, Kai M

    2017-06-01

    Epithelial tissues form a selective barrier via direct cell-cell interactions to separate and establish concentration gradients between the different compartments of the body. Proper function and formation of this barrier rely on the establishment of distinct intercellular junction complexes. These complexes include tight junctions, adherens junctions, desmosomes, and gap junctions. The tight junction is by far the most diverse junctional complex in the epithelial barrier. Its composition varies greatly across different epithelial tissues to confer various barrier properties. Thus, epithelial cells rely on tightly regulated transcriptional mechanisms to ensure proper formation of the epithelial barrier and to achieve tight junction diversity. Here, we review different transcriptional mechanisms utilized during embryogenesis and disease development to promote tight junction assembly and maintenance of intercellular barrier integrity. We focus particularly on the Grainyhead-like transcription factors and ligand-activated nuclear hormone receptors, two central families of proteins in epithelialization. © 2017 New York Academy of Sciences.

  12. Nanoparticle-based membrane assembly and silicification in coacervate microdroplets as a route to complex colloidosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fothergill, James; Li, Mei; Davis, Sean A; Cunningham, John A; Mann, Stephen

    2014-12-01

    The chemical construction of complex colloidosomes consisting of a molecularly crowded polyelectrolyte-enriched interior surrounded by a continuous shell of closely packed silica nanoparticles is studied using optical and fluorescence microscopy, high-resolution X-ray microcomputed tomography, and synchrotron radiation X-ray tomographic microscopy. The colloidosomes are prepared by addition of partially hydrophobic silica nanoparticles to dodecane dispersions of positively or negatively charged coacervate microdroplets consisting of aqueous mixtures of poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) and adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) or PDDA and poly(acrylic acid) (PAA), respectively. Interfacial assembly of the nanoparticles produces a polydisperse population of well-defined PDDA/PAA droplets with diameters ranging from 50 to 950 μm. In contrast, reconstruction of the PDDA/ATP coacervate interior occurs on addition of the silica nanoparticles to produce a nanoparticle-stabilized oil-in-coacervate-in-oil multiphase emulsion. Transfer of the coacervate-containing colloidosomes into water and replication of their internal structure are achieved by addition of tetramethoxysilane, which serves as both a cross-linking and silicification agent to produce mineralized PDDA/PAA or PDDA/ATP microstructures with a uniform solidified texture or multichambered interior, respectively. The integration of colloidosome and coacervate technologies offers a route to a new type of multifunctional microcompartmentalized system based on the membrane-mediated incarceration of molecularly crowded chemical environments.

  13. Membrane attack complex inhibitor CD59a protects against focal cerebral ischemia in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nietfeld Wilfried

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The complement system is a crucial mediator of inflammation and cell lysis after cerebral ischemia. However, there is little information about the exact contribution of the membrane attack complex (MAC and its inhibitor-protein CD59. Methods Transient focal cerebral ischemia was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO in young male and female CD59a knockout and wild-type mice. Two models of MCAO were applied: 60 min MCAO and 48 h reperfusion, as well as 30 min MCAO and 72 h reperfusion. CD59a knockout animals were compared to wild-type animals in terms of infarct size, edema, neurological deficit, and cell death. Results and Discussion CD59a-deficiency in male mice caused significantly increased infarct volumes and brain swelling when compared to wild-type mice at 72 h after 30 min-occlusion time, whereas no significant difference was observed after 1 h-MCAO. Moreover, CD59a-deficient mice had impaired neurological function when compared to wild-type mice after 30 min MCAO. Conclusion We conclude that CD59a protects against ischemic brain damage, but depending on the gender and the stroke model used.

  14. Value of Plasmatic Membrane Attack Complex as a Marker of Severity in Acute Kidney Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Rodríguez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine if complement pathway is activated in AKI; for this purpose, we measured, through ELISA sandwich, the terminal lytic fraction of the complement system, called membrane attack complex (C5b-C9, in AKI patients compared with patients with similar clinical conditions but normal renal function. Our data showed that complement system is activated in AKI. Plasmatic MAC concentrations were significantly higher in AKI patients than in those with normal renal function; this difference is maintained independently of the AKI etiology and is proportional to the severity of AKI, measured by ADQI classification. In addition, we found that plasmatic MAC concentrations were significantly higher in patients who did not recover renal function at time of hospitalization discharge, in patients who died during the acute process, and in patients who need renal replacement therapy during hospitalization, but in this last group, the differences did not reach statistical significance. In conclusion, plasmatic MAC concentration seems valuable as a marker of AKI severity.

  15. Value of plasmatic membrane attack complex as a marker of severity in acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Eva; Riera, Marta; Barrios, Clara; Pascual, Julio

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if complement pathway is activated in AKI; for this purpose, we measured, through ELISA sandwich, the terminal lytic fraction of the complement system, called membrane attack complex (C5b-C9), in AKI patients compared with patients with similar clinical conditions but normal renal function. Our data showed that complement system is activated in AKI. Plasmatic MAC concentrations were significantly higher in AKI patients than in those with normal renal function; this difference is maintained independently of the AKI etiology and is proportional to the severity of AKI, measured by ADQI classification. In addition, we found that plasmatic MAC concentrations were significantly higher in patients who did not recover renal function at time of hospitalization discharge, in patients who died during the acute process, and in patients who need renal replacement therapy during hospitalization, but in this last group, the differences did not reach statistical significance. In conclusion, plasmatic MAC concentration seems valuable as a marker of AKI severity.

  16. The role of the interosseous membrane and triangular fibrocartilage complex in forearm stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinowitz, R S; Light, T R; Havey, R M; Gourineni, P; Patwardhan, A G; Sartori, M J; Vrbos, L

    1994-05-01

    This study investigated the relative roles of the interosseous membrane (IOM) and triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) in the transmission of force from the hand to the humerus. Our findings suggest a spectrum of forearm destabilizing injuries. The intact radius abutting the capitellum provides the primary restraint to proximal migration of the radius. After radial head excision, up to 7 mm of proximal radial migration can occur under axial compression. If the TFCC or the IOM alone is disrupted, little alteration in load or displacement is evident. When both the midportion of the IOM and TFCC are incompetent, however, further proximal radial migration occurs, the radial stump abuts the humerus, and load is shifted back to the radial column. These data suggest that the central portion of the IOM is the crucial structural subdivision within the IOM acting as a restraint to proximal radial migration. The TFCC also resists proximal radial migration and participates in load transfer. We propose that clinical migration of the radius under an axial load greater than 7 mm implies disruption of both the midportion of the IOM and TFCC.

  17. NMR spectroscopic and analytical ultracentrifuge analysis of membrane protein detergent complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choe Senyon

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Structural studies of integral membrane proteins (IMPs are hampered by inherent difficulties in their heterologous expression and in the purification of solubilized protein-detergent complexes (PDCs. The choice and concentrations of detergents used in an IMP preparation play a critical role in protein homogeneity and are thus important for successful crystallization. Results Seeking an effective and standardized means applicable to genomic approaches for the characterization of PDCs, we chose 1D-NMR spectroscopic analysis to monitor the detergent content throughout their purification: protein extraction, detergent exchange, and sample concentration. We demonstrate that a single NMR measurement combined with a SDS-PAGE of a detergent extracted sample provides a useful gauge of the detergent's extraction potential for a given protein. Furthermore, careful monitoring of the detergent content during the process of IMP production allows for a high level of reproducibility. We also show that in many cases a simple sedimentation velocity measurement provides sufficient data to estimate both the oligomeric state and the detergent-to-protein ratio in PDCs, as well as to evaluate the homogeneity of the samples prior to crystallization screening. Conclusion The techniques presented here facilitate the screening and selection of the extraction detergent, as well as help to maintain reproducibility in the detergent exchange and PDC concentration procedures. Such reproducibility is particularly important for the optimization of initial crystallization conditions, for which multiple purifications are routinely required.

  18. Membrane fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    At Stanford University, Boxer lab, I worked on membrane fusion of small unilamellar lipid vesicles to flat membranes tethered to glass surfaces. This geometry closely resembles biological systems in which liposomes fuse to plasma membranes. The fusion mechanism was studied using DNA zippering...... between complementary strands linked to the two apposing membranes closely mimicking the zippering mechanism of SNARE fusion complexes....

  19. A mitochondrial-focused genetic interaction map reveals a scaffold-like complex required for inner membrane organization in mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppins, Suzanne; Collins, Sean R; Cassidy-Stone, Ann; Hummel, Eric; Devay, Rachel M; Lackner, Laura L; Westermann, Benedikt; Schuldiner, Maya; Weissman, Jonathan S; Nunnari, Jodi

    2011-10-17

    To broadly explore mitochondrial structure and function as well as the communication of mitochondria with other cellular pathways, we constructed a quantitative, high-density genetic interaction map (the MITO-MAP) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The MITO-MAP provides a comprehensive view of mitochondrial function including insights into the activity of uncharacterized mitochondrial proteins and the functional connection between mitochondria and the ER. The MITO-MAP also reveals a large inner membrane-associated complex, which we term MitOS for mitochondrial organizing structure, comprised of Fcj1/Mitofilin, a conserved inner membrane protein, and five additional components. MitOS physically and functionally interacts with both outer and inner membrane components and localizes to extended structures that wrap around the inner membrane. We show that MitOS acts in concert with ATP synthase dimers to organize the inner membrane and promote normal mitochondrial morphology. We propose that MitOS acts as a conserved mitochondrial skeletal structure that differentiates regions of the inner membrane to establish the normal internal architecture of mitochondria.

  20. Gliding Associated Proteins Play Essential Roles during the Formation of the Inner Membrane Complex of Toxoplasma gondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Clare R; Egarter, Saskia; Gow, Matthew; Jiménez-Ruiz, Elena; Ferguson, David J P; Meissner, Markus

    2016-02-01

    The inner membrane complex (IMC) of apicomplexan parasites is a specialised structure localised beneath the parasite's plasma membrane, and is important for parasite stability and intracellular replication. Furthermore, it serves as an anchor for the myosin A motor complex, termed the glideosome. While the role of this protein complex in parasite motility and host cell invasion has been well described, additional roles during the asexual life cycle are unknown. Here, we demonstrate that core elements of the glideosome, the gliding associated proteins GAP40 and GAP50 as well as members of the GAPM family, have critical roles in the biogenesis of the IMC during intracellular replication. Deletion or disruption of these genes resulted in the rapid collapse of developing parasites after initiation of the cell cycle and led to redistribution of other glideosome components.

  1. Gliding Associated Proteins Play Essential Roles during the Formation of the Inner Membrane Complex of Toxoplasma gondii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare R Harding

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The inner membrane complex (IMC of apicomplexan parasites is a specialised structure localised beneath the parasite's plasma membrane, and is important for parasite stability and intracellular replication. Furthermore, it serves as an anchor for the myosin A motor complex, termed the glideosome. While the role of this protein complex in parasite motility and host cell invasion has been well described, additional roles during the asexual life cycle are unknown. Here, we demonstrate that core elements of the glideosome, the gliding associated proteins GAP40 and GAP50 as well as members of the GAPM family, have critical roles in the biogenesis of the IMC during intracellular replication. Deletion or disruption of these genes resulted in the rapid collapse of developing parasites after initiation of the cell cycle and led to redistribution of other glideosome components.

  2. Models for the Binary Complex of Bacteriophage T4 Gp59 Helicase Loading Protein. GP32 Single-Stranded DNA-Binding Protein and Ternary Complex with Pseudo-Y Junction DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinerman, Jennifer M. [Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States); Dignam, J. David [Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States); Mueser, Timothy C. [Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States)

    2012-04-05

    The bacteriophage T4 gp59 helicase assembly protein (gp59) is required for loading of gp41 replicative helicase onto DNA protected by gp32 single-stranded DNA-binding protein. The gp59 protein recognizes branched DNA structures found at replication and recombination sites. Binding of gp32 protein (full-length and deletion constructs) to gp59 protein measured by isothermal titration calorimetry demonstrates that the gp32 protein C-terminal A-domain is essential for protein-protein interaction in the absence of DNA. Sedimentation velocity experiments with gp59 protein and gp32ΔB protein (an N-terminal B-domain deletion) show that these proteins are monomers but form a 1:1 complex with a dissociation constant comparable with that determined by isothermal titration calorimetry. Small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) studies indicate that the gp59 protein is a prolate monomer, consistent with the crystal structure and hydrodynamic properties determined from sedimentation velocity experiments. SAXS experiments also demonstrate that gp32ΔB protein is a prolate monomer with an elongated A-domain protruding from the core. Moreover, fitting structures of gp59 protein and the gp32 core into the SAXS-derived molecular envelope supports a model for the gp59 protein-gp32ΔB protein complex. Our earlier work demonstrated that gp59 protein attracts full-length gp32 protein to pseudo-Y junctions. A model of the gp59 protein-DNA complex, modified to accommodate new SAXS data for the binary complex together with mutational analysis of gp59 protein, is presented in the accompanying article (Dolezal, D., Jones, C. E., Lai, X., Brister, J. R., Mueser, T. C., Nossal, N. G., and Hinton, D. M. (2012) J. Biol. Chem. 287, 18596–18607).

  3. Paracrine signaling through plasma membrane hemichannels

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Nan; De Bock, Marijke; Decrock, Elke; Bol, Mélissa; Gadicherla, Ashish; Vinken, Mathieu; Rogiers, Vera; Bukauskas, Feliksas F; Bultynck, Geert; Leybaert, Luc

    2013-01-01

    Plasma membrane hemichannels composed of connexin (Cx) proteins are essential components of gap junction channels but accumulating evidence suggests functions of hemichannels beyond the communication provided by junctional channels...

  4. Comparison of dot-ELISA and standard ELISA for detection of Neisseria meningitidis outer membrane complex-specific antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Elza FT Belo; Farhat,Calil K; De Gaspari,Elizabeth N.

    2010-01-01

    Dot-ELISA using the outer membrane complex antigens of Neisseria meningitidis as a target was standardized for rapid detection of meningococcal-specific antibodies in human serum. We investigated the level of meningococcal-specific IgG, IgA, and IgM in serum using dot-ELISA with outer membrane antigens prepared from Neisseria meningitidis serotype B:4.19:P1.15,3,7,9 (a strain isolated from a Brazilian epidemic). The dot-ELISA is based on the same principles as the standard ELISA and is useful...

  5. Outer Membrane Vesicles and Soluble Factors Released by Probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 and Commensal ECOR63 Enhance Barrier Function by Regulating Expression of Tight Junction Proteins in Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Carina-Shianya; Badia, Josefa; Bosch, Manel; Giménez, Rosa; Baldomà, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal epithelial layer forms a physical and biochemical barrier that maintains the segregation between host and intestinal microbiota. The integrity of this barrier is critical in maintaining homeostasis in the body and its dysfunction is linked to a variety of illnesses, especially inflammatory bowel disease. Gut microbes, and particularly probiotic bacteria, modulate the barrier integrity by reducing gut permeability and reinforcing tight junctions. Probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) is a good colonizer of the human gut with proven therapeutic efficacy in the remission of ulcerative colitis in humans. EcN positively modulates the intestinal epithelial barrier through upregulation and redistribution of the tight junction proteins ZO-1, ZO-2 and claudin-14. Upregulation of claudin-14 has been attributed to the secreted protein TcpC. Whether regulation of ZO-1 and ZO-2 is mediated by EcN secreted factors remains unknown. The aim of this study was to explore whether outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released by EcN strengthen the epithelial barrier. This study includes other E. coli strains of human intestinal origin that contain the tcpC gene, such as ECOR63. Cell-free supernatants collected from the wild-type strains and from the derived tcpC mutants were fractionated into isolated OMVs and soluble secreted factors. The impact of these extracellular fractions on the epithelial barrier was evaluated by measuring transepithelial resistance and expression of several tight junction proteins in T-84 and Caco-2 polarized monolayers. Our results show that the strengthening activity of EcN and ECOR63 does not exclusively depend on TcpC. Both OMVs and soluble factors secreted by these strains promote upregulation of ZO-1 and claudin-14, and down-regulation of claudin-2. The OMVs-mediated effects are TcpC-independent. Soluble secreted TcpC contributes to the upregulation of ZO-1 and claudin-14, but this protein has no effect on the transcriptional

  6. The ouabain-sensitive isoform of Na+-pump regulates vascular gap junctions via interaction with the Na+/Ca2+-exchanger in membrane microdomain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matchkov, Vladimir; Nilsson, Holger; Aalkjær, Christian

    Ouabain, an inhibitor of the Na+-pump, has been shown to inhibit intercellular communication. We have recently shown that gap junctions between vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) are regulated through an interaction between a ouabain-sensitive isoform of the Na+-pump and the Na+/Ca2+-exchanger...... electrical coupling was evaluated in functional studies. SMCs were electrically uncoupled when the ouabain-sensitive Na+-pump was inhibited by 10 mM ouabain. Inhibition of the Na+/Ca2+-exchanger with 1 mM SEA0400 also uncoupled the SMCs. Depletion of [Na+]i and clamping [Ca2+]i at low levels prevented......+-exchanger-1 and connexin-43. The α3 Na+-pump subunit was not associated with these proteins but co-immunoprecipitated with caveolin-1. Based on these experiments we suggest that α2 Na+ -pump subunit is involved in regulation of the intercellular communication via interaction with the Na+/Ca2+-exchanger-1...

  7. Evaluation of hydroacid complex in the forward osmosis–membrane distillation (FO–MD) system for desalination

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Peng

    2015-11-01

    The incorporation of membrane distillation (MD) into forward osmosis (FO) provides process sustainability to regenerate the draw solution and to produce clean water simultaneously. However, the reverse salt flux is the major hurdle in the FO-MD system because it not only reduces the effective osmotic driving force across the membrane but also increases the replenishment cost and scaling issue. For the first time, a hydroacid complex with abundant hydrophilic groups and ionic species is evaluated as the draw solutes in the hybrid FO-MD system consisting of multi-bore PVDF MD membranes for seawater/brackish desalination. In order to evaluate the practicality of the hydroacid complex in the FO-MD system, FO and MD experiments were conducted at elevated temperatures and concentrations. The hydroacid complex has displayed desired properties such as high solubility, low viscosity, excellent thermal stability and minimal reverse salt flux suitable for FO and MD operations. FO-MD desalination process was demonstrated with a highest seawater desalination flux of 6/32 LMH (FO/MD). This study may open up the prospective of employing the hydroacid complex as the draw solute in FO-MD hybrid systems for seawater /brackish desalination. © 2015 Elsevier B.V.

  8. Membrane thickness of microcapsules generated by complex coacervation method; Coacervation ho ni yoru microcapsule no capsule makuatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kage, H.; Ogura, H.; Matsuno, Y. [Kyushu Institute of Technology, Kitakyushu (Japan); Yada, N. [Idemitsu Engineering Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Kunimasa, M. [Takeda Chemical Industries, Ltd., Osaka (Japan)

    1996-03-10

    Microencapsulation of glass beads was carried out by complex coacervation of gelatin and acacia. Glass beads were chosen as the core material, because their surface was easily treated to be hydrophobic. We succeeded in excluding the complicated influence of emulsion on microencapsulation by the use of the coacervation method and a solid core material with narrow size distribution. The membrane of the microcapsule became thick with the increase of acetic acid dosage, while encapsulation was prevented by its excess addition because of the low pH value in the hardening process. Hydrophobizing of the core surface decreased the amount of acetic acid required to microencapsulate. A thin membrane was obtained due to the existence of salt, however the membrane thickness conversely became thick with a minute quantity of salt. 12 refs., 13 figs.

  9. Protein receptor-independent plasma membrane remodeling by HAMLET: a tumoricidal protein-lipid complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeem, Aftab; Sanborn, Jeremy; Gettel, Douglas L; James, Ho C S; Rydström, Anna; Ngassam, Viviane N; Klausen, Thomas Kjær; Pedersen, Stine Falsig; Lam, Matti; Parikh, Atul N; Svanborg, Catharina

    2015-11-12

    A central tenet of signal transduction in eukaryotic cells is that extra-cellular ligands activate specific cell surface receptors, which orchestrate downstream responses. This ''protein-centric" view is increasingly challenged by evidence for the involvement of specialized membrane domains in signal transduction. Here, we propose that membrane perturbation may serve as an alternative mechanism to activate a conserved cell-death program in cancer cells. This view emerges from the extraordinary manner in which HAMLET (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made LEthal to Tumor cells) kills a wide range of tumor cells in vitro and demonstrates therapeutic efficacy and selectivity in cancer models and clinical studies. We identify a ''receptor independent" transformation of vesicular motifs in model membranes, which is paralleled by gross remodeling of tumor cell membranes. Furthermore, we find that HAMLET accumulates within these de novo membrane conformations and define membrane blebs as cellular compartments for direct interactions of HAMLET with essential target proteins such as the Ras family of GTPases. Finally, we demonstrate lower sensitivity of healthy cell membranes to HAMLET challenge. These features suggest that HAMLET-induced curvature-dependent membrane conformations serve as surrogate receptors for initiating signal transduction cascades, ultimately leading to cell death.

  10. Multi-membrane-bound structures of Apicomplexa: II. the ovoid mitochondrial cytoplasmic (OMC) complex of Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Sabine

    2006-03-01

    Apicomplexa including the causative agents of toxoplasmosis and malaria reportedly possess one or few tubular-shaped mitochondria that permeate, more or less branched, throughout these unicellular parasites. Electron micrographs generated herein from serial-sectioned Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites demonstrated, however, a greater diversity regarding both the shape of the cultured parasite's single mitochondrion and its sub-structural organization. Moreover, a unique subcellular construction was detected that basically comprised a pouch-shaped subdivision of the tachyzoite mitochondrion plus a fraction of parasitic cytoplasm enclosed therein. This composite assembling, termed ovoid mitochondrial cytoplasmic (OMC) complex, characteristically displayed a highly reduced matrix lumen of its mitochondrial border construction, which furthermore often failed to possess any cristae or contained tightly pleated cristae, thus creating a pouch-shaped multi-laminar wall of four or more membranous layers, respectively. Given this architecture, cross-sectioned OMC complexes of T. gondii tachyzoites frequently mimicked in size and shape the parasites' plastid-like organelle (apicoplast). Moreover, like the apicoplast, the OMC complex was often found adjacent to the tachyzoite's single Golgi complex and constantly located in close proximity to the outer membrane of the parasite's nuclear envelope. The T. gondii OMC complex differed, however, from the apicoplast in its exact fine structural organization and a stage-restricted presence that was apparently linked to mitochondrial growth and/or division. Any special function(s) possibly performed by the T. gondii OMC complex remains, nevertheless, to be elucidated.

  11. A trans-outer membrane porin-cytochrome protein complex for extracellular electron transfer by Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yimo; Wang, Zheming; Liu, Juan; Levar, Caleb; Edwards, Marcus J; Babauta, Jerome T; Kennedy, David W; Shi, Zhi; Beyenal, Haluk; Bond, Daniel R; Clarke, Thomas A; Butt, Julea N; Richardson, David J; Rosso, Kevin M; Zachara, John M; Fredrickson, James K; Shi, Liang

    2014-12-01

    The multi-heme, outer membrane c-type cytochrome (c-Cyt) OmcB of Geobacter sulfurreducens was previously proposed to mediate electron transfer across the outer membrane. However, the underlying mechanism has remained uncharacterized. In G. sulfurreducens, the omcB gene is part of two tandem four-gene clusters, each is predicted to encode a transcriptional factor (OrfR/OrfS), a porin-like outer membrane protein (OmbB/OmbC), a periplasmic c-type cytochrome (OmaB/OmaC) and an outer membrane c-Cyt (OmcB/OmcC) respectively. Here, we showed that OmbB/OmbC, OmaB/OmaC and OmcB/OmcC of G. sulfurreducens PCA formed the porin-cytochrome (Pcc) protein complexes, which were involved in transferring electrons across the outer membrane. The isolated Pcc protein complexes reconstituted in proteoliposomes transferred electrons from reduced methyl viologen across the lipid bilayer of liposomes to Fe(III)-citrate and ferrihydrite. The pcc clusters were found in all eight sequenced Geobacter and 11 other bacterial genomes from six different phyla, demonstrating a widespread distribution of Pcc protein complexes in phylogenetically diverse bacteria. Deletion of ombB-omaB-omcB-orfS-ombC-omaC-omcC gene clusters had no impact on the growth of G. sulfurreducens PCA with fumarate but diminished the ability of G. sulfurreducens PCA to reduce Fe(III)-citrate and ferrihydrite. Complementation with the ombB-omaB-omcB gene cluster restored the ability of G. sulfurreducens PCA to reduce Fe(III)-citrate and ferrihydrite.

  12. Alteration of cadherin isoform expression and inhibition of gap junctions in stomach carcinoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    To explore cell malignant phenotype correlated changes of cell surface adhesion molecules and cell-cell communication in carcinogenesis, human stomach transformed and cancer cell lines were investigated. Expressions of E-cadherin, N-cadherin, ?-catenin, ?-catenin as well as gap junction (GJ) protein Cx32 were studied by utilization of immunoblotting, immunocytochemical and fluorescent dye transfer methods. Mammalian normal stomach mucosal cells expressed E-cadherin but not N-cadherin. E-cadherin immunofluorescence was detected at cell membranous adherens junctions (AJ) where colocalization with immunofluorescent staining of inner surface adhesion plaque proteins ?- and ?-catenins was observed. The existence of E-cadherin/ catenin (?-, ?-) protein complexes as AJ was suggested. In transformed and stomach cancer cells E-cadherin was inhibited, instead, N-cadherin was expressed and localized at membranous AJ where co-staining with ?- and ?-catenin fluorescence was observed. Formation of N-cadherin/catenin (?-, ?-) protein complex at AJs of transformed and cancer cells was suggested. The above observations were further supported by immunoblotting results. Normal stomach muscosal and transformed cells expressed Cx32 at membranous GJ and were competent of gap junction communication (GJIC). In stomach cancer cells, Cx32 was inhibited and GJIC was defective. The results suggested that changes of signal pathways mediated by both cell adhesion and cell communication systems are associated intracellular events of stomach carcinogenesis. The alteration of cadherin isoform from E- to N-cadherin in transformed and stomach cancer cells is the first report.

  13. Complex interplay between the P-glycoprotein multidrug efflux pump and the membrane: its role in modulating protein function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frances Jane Sharom

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Multidrug resistance in cancer is linked to expression of the P-glycoprotein multidrug transporter (Pgp, ABCB1, which exports many structurally diverse compounds from cells. Substrates first partition into the bilayer and then interact with a large flexible binding pocket within the transporter’s transmembrane regions. Pgp has been described as a hydrophobic vacuum cleaner or an outwardly-directed drug/lipid flippase. Recent X-ray crystal structures have shed some light on the nature of the drug-binding pocket and suggested routes by which substrates can enter it from the membrane. Detergents have profound effects on Pgp function, and several appear to be substrates. Biochemical and biophysical studies in vitro, some using purified reconstituted protein, have explored the effects of the membrane environment. They have demonstrated that Pgp is involved in a complex relationship with its lipid environment, which modulates the behaviour of its substrates, as well as various functions of the protein, including ATP hydrolysis, drug binding and drug transport. Membrane lipid composition and fluidity, phospholipid headgroup and acyl chain length all influence Pgp function. Recent studies focusing on thermodynamics and kinetics have revealed some important principles governing Pgp-lipid and substrate-lipid interactions, and how these affect drug binding and transport. In some cells, Pgp is associated with cholesterol-rich microdomains which may modulate its functions. The relationship between Pgp and cholesterol remains an open question; however it clearly affects several aspects of its function in addition to substrate-membrane partitioning. The action of Pgp modulators appears to depend on their membrane permeability, and membrane fluidizers and surfactants reverse drug resistance, likely via an indirect mechanism. A detailed understanding of how the membrane affects Pgp substrates and Pgp’s catalytic cycle may lead to new strategies to combat

  14. Roles of the TRAPP-II Complex and the Exocyst in Membrane Deposition during Fission Yeast Cytokinesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Wang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The cleavage-furrow tip adjacent to the actomyosin contractile ring is believed to be the predominant site for plasma-membrane insertion through exocyst-tethered vesicles during cytokinesis. Here we found that most secretory vesicles are delivered by myosin-V on linear actin cables in fission yeast cytokinesis. Surprisingly, by tracking individual exocytic and endocytic events, we found that vesicles with new membrane are deposited to the cleavage furrow relatively evenly during contractile-ring constriction, but the rim of the cleavage furrow is the main site for endocytosis. Fusion of vesicles with the plasma membrane requires vesicle tethers. Our data suggest that the transport particle protein II (TRAPP-II complex and Rab11 GTPase Ypt3 help to tether secretory vesicles or tubulovesicular structures along the cleavage furrow while the exocyst tethers vesicles at the rim of the division plane. We conclude that the exocyst and TRAPP-II complex have distinct localizations at the division site, but both are important for membrane expansion and exocytosis during cytokinesis.

  15. Targeting and assembly of components of the TOC protein import complex at the chloroplast outer envelope membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Lynn G L; Paila, Yamuna D; Siman, Steven R; Chen, Yi; Smith, Matthew D; Schnell, Danny J

    2014-01-01

    The translocon at the outer envelope membrane of chloroplasts (TOC) initiates the import of thousands of nuclear encoded preproteins required for chloroplast biogenesis and function. The multimeric TOC complex contains two GTP-regulated receptors, Toc34 and Toc159, which recognize the transit peptides of preproteins and initiate protein import through a β-barrel membrane channel, Toc75. Different isoforms of Toc34 and Toc159 assemble with Toc75 to form structurally and functionally diverse translocons, and the composition and levels of TOC translocons is required for the import of specific subsets of coordinately expressed proteins during plant growth and development. Consequently, the proper assembly of the TOC complexes is key to ensuring organelle homeostasis. This review will focus on our current knowledge of the targeting and assembly of TOC components to form functional translocons at the outer membrane. Our analyses reveal that the targeting of TOC components involves elements common to the targeting of other outer membrane proteins, but also include unique features that appear to have evolved to specifically facilitate assembly of the import apparatus.

  16. Targeting and Assembly of Components of the TOC Protein Import Complex at the Chloroplast Outer Envelope Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn G.L. Richardson

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The translocon at the outer envelope membrane of chloroplasts (TOC initiates the import of thousands of nuclear encoded preproteins required for chloroplast biogenesis and function. The multimeric TOC complex contains two GTP-regulated receptors, Toc34 and Toc159, which recognize the transit peptides of preproteins and initiate protein import through a β–barrel membrane channel, Toc75. Different isoforms of Toc34 and Toc159 assemble with Toc75 to form structurally and functionally diverse translocons, and the composition and levels of TOC translocons is required for the import of specific subsets of coordinately expressed proteins during plant growth and development. Consequently, the proper assembly of the TOC complexes is key to ensuring organelle homeostasis. This review will focus on our current knowledge of the targeting and assembly of TOC components to form functional translocons at the outer membrane. Our analyses reveal that the targeting of TOC components involves elements common to the targeting of other outer membrane proteins, but also include unique features that appear to have evolved to specifically facilitate assembly of the import apparatus.

  17. Tail-anchored membrane proteins: exploring the complex diversity of tail-anchored-protein targeting in plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abell, Ben M; Mullen, Robert T

    2011-02-01

    Tail-anchored (TA) proteins are special class of integral membrane proteins that in recent years have received a considerable amount of attention due to their diverse cellular functions and unique targeting and insertion mechanisms. Defined by the presence of a single, hydrophobic membrane-spanning domain at or near their C terminus, TA proteins must be inserted into membranes post-translationally and are orientated such that their larger N-terminal domain (most often the functional domain) faces the cytosol, while their shorter C-terminal domain faces the interior of the organelle. The C-terminal domain of TA proteins also usually contains the information responsible for their selective targeting to the proper subcellular membrane, a process that, based primarily on studies with yeasts and mammals, appears to be highly complex due to the presence of multiple pathways. Within this context, we discuss here the biogenesis of plant TA proteins and the potential for hundreds of new TA proteins identified via bioinformatics screens to contribute to the already remarkable number of roles that this class of membrane proteins participates in throughout plant growth and development.

  18. Identification of the Ndh (NAD(P)H-plastoquinone-oxidoreductase) complex in etioplast membranes of barley: changes during photomorphogenesis of chloroplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guéra, A; de Nova, P G; Sabater, B

    2000-01-01

    In the last few years the presence in thylakoid membranes of chloroplasts of a NAD(P)H-plastoquinone oxidoreductase complex (Ndh complex) homologous to mitochondrial complex I has been well established. Herein, we report the identification of the Ndh complex in barley etioplast membranes. Two plastid DNA-encoded polypeptides of the Ndh complex (NDH-A and NDH-F) were relatively more abundant in etioplast membranes than in thylakoids from greening chloroplasts. Conversion of etioplast into chloroplast, after light exposure of barley seedlings grown in the dark, was accompanied by a decrease in the NADH dehydrogenase activity associated to plastid membranes. Using native-PAGE and immunolabelling techniques we have determined that a NADH specific dehydrogenase activity associated with plastid membranes, which was more active in etioplasts than in greening chloroplasts, contained the NDH-A and NDH-F polypeptides. These results complemented by those obtained through blue-native-PAGE indicated that NDH-A and NDH-F polypeptides are part of a 580 kDa NADH dependent dehydrogenase complex present in etioplast membranes. This finding proves that accumulation of the Ndh complex is independent of light. The decrease in the relative levels and specific activity of this complex during the transition from etioplast to chloroplasts was accompanied by a parallel decrease in the specific activity of peroxidase associated to plastid membranes. Based on the mentioned observations it is proposed that an electron transport chain from NADH to H2O2 could be active in barley etioplasts.

  19. Constitutive and functional association of the platelet collagen receptor glycoprotein VI-Fc receptor gamma-chain complex with membrane rafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezumi, Yasuharu; Kodama, Kumi; Uchiyama, Takashi; Takayama, Hiroshi

    2002-05-01

    The platelet collagen receptor glycoprotein (GP) VI-Fc receptor gamma-chain (FcRgamma) complex transduces signals in an immunoreceptorlike manner. We examined a role for the Triton X-100-insoluble membrane rafts in GPVI-FcRgamma complex signaling. Methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MbetaCD)-induced disruption of the membrane rafts inhibited not only platelet aggregation and secretion but also tyrosine phosphorylation of signaling molecules on stimulation through the GPVI-FcRgamma complex. The GPVI-FcRgamma complex was constitutively associated with membrane rafts wherein the Src family kinases and LAT were also present. Their association was not affected by the complex engagement but was highly sensitive to MbetaCD treatment. Thus, we provide the first evidence that the GPVI-FcRgamma complex is constitutively and functionally associated with membrane rafts.

  20. The Cell Wall Teichuronic Acid Synthetase (TUAS Is an Enzyme Complex Located in the Cytoplasmic Membrane of Micrococcus luteus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingyi Lynn Deng

    2010-01-01

    composed of disaccharide repeating units [-4-β-D-ManNAcAp-(1→6α-D-Glcp−1-]n, which is covalently anchored to the peptidoglycan on the inner cell wall and extended to the outer surface of the cell envelope. An enzyme complex responsible for the TUA chain biosynthesis was purified and characterized. The 440 kDa enzyme complex, named teichuronic acid synthetase (TUAS, is an octomer composed of two kinds of glycosyltransferases, Glucosyltransferase, and ManNAcA-transferase, which is capable of catalyzing the transfer of disaccharide glycosyl residues containing both glucose and the N-acetylmannosaminuronic acid residues. TUAS displays hydrophobic properties and is found primarily associated with the cytoplasmic membrane. The purified TUAS contains carotinoids and lipids. TUAS activity is diminished by phospholipase digestion. We propose that TUAS serves as a multitasking polysaccharide assembling station on the bacterial membrane.

  1. Respiratory Complex I in Bos taurus and Paracoccus denitrificans Pumps Four Protons across the Membrane for Every NADH Oxidized.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Andrew J Y; Blaza, James N; Varghese, Febin; Hirst, Judy

    2017-03-24

    Respiratory complex I couples electron transfer between NADH and ubiquinone to proton translocation across an energy-transducing membrane to support the proton-motive force that drives ATP synthesis. The proton-pumping stoichiometry of complex I (i.e. the number of protons pumped for each two electrons transferred) underpins all mechanistic proposals. However, it remains controversial and has not been determined for any of the bacterial enzymes that are exploited as model systems for the mammalian enzyme. Here, we describe a simple method for determining the proton-pumping stoichiometry of complex I in inverted membrane vesicles under steady-state ADP-phosphorylating conditions. Our method exploits the rate of ATP synthesis, driven by oxidation of NADH or succinate with different sections of the respiratory chain engaged in catalysis as a proxy for the rate of proton translocation and determines the stoichiometry of complex I by reference to the known stoichiometries of complexes III and IV. Using vesicles prepared from mammalian mitochondria (from Bos taurus) and from the bacterium Paracoccus denitrificans, we show that four protons are pumped for every two electrons transferred in both cases. By confirming the four-proton stoichiometry for mammalian complex I and, for the first time, demonstrating the same value for a bacterial complex, we establish the utility of P. denitrificans complex I as a model system for the mammalian enzyme. P. denitrificans is the first system described in which mutagenesis in any complex I core subunit may be combined with quantitative proton-pumping measurements for mechanistic studies.

  2. [Effect of damage integrity rat brain synaptic membranes on the functional activity GABA(A)-receptor/Cl(-)-ionophore complex in the CNC].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebrov, I G; Kalinina, M V

    2013-01-01

    Functional activity of the CGABA(A)-receptor/Cl(-) ionophore complex was investigated the muscimol-stimulated entry of the radioactive isotope 36Cl(-) in synaptoneurosomes in changing the structure and permeability of neuronal membranes. Integrity of the membranes was damaged by removal of Ca(+2) and Mg(+2) from the incubation medium and by the method of freezing-thawing synaptoneurosomes. In both cases, an increase in basal 36Cl(-) entry into synaptoneurosomes, indicating increased nonspecific permeability of neuronal membranes, and decreased activity the CABA(A)-receptor/Cl(-) ionophore complex. The conclusion about the relationship of processes damage neuronal membranes and reducing the inhibitory processes in the epileptic focus.

  3. Capturing the multiscale dynamics of membrane protein complexes with all-atom, mixed-resolution, and coarse-grained models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Chenyi; Zhao, Xiaochuan; Liu, Jiyuan; Schneebeli, Severin T; Shelley, John C; Li, Jianing

    2017-03-20

    The structures and dynamics of protein complexes are often challenging to model in heterogeneous environments such as biological membranes. Herein, we meet this fundamental challenge at attainable cost with all-atom, mixed-resolution, and coarse-grained models of vital membrane proteins. We systematically simulated five complex models formed by two distinct G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in the lipid-bilayer membrane on the ns-to-μs timescales. These models, which suggest the swinging motion of an intracellular loop, for the first time, provide the molecular details for the regulatory role of such a loop. For the models at different resolutions, we observed consistent structural stability but various levels of speed-ups in protein dynamics. The mixed-resolution and coarse-grained models show two and four times faster protein diffusion than the all-atom models, in addition to a 4- and 400-fold speed-up in the simulation performance. Furthermore, by elucidating the strengths and challenges of combining all-atom models with reduced resolution models, this study can serve as a guide to simulating other complex systems in heterogeneous environments efficiently.

  4. Coordination kinetics of different metal ions with the amidoximated polyacrylonitrile nanofibrous membranes and catalytic behaviors of their complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Fu; Dong, Yong Chun; Kang, Wei Min; Cheng, Bowen; Qu, Xiang; Cui, Guixin [School of Textiles, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin (China)

    2016-12-15

    Two transition metal ions (Fe{sup 3+} and Cu{sup 2+}) and a rare earth metal ion (Ce{sup 3+}) were selected to coordinate with amidoximated polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofibrous membrane for preparing three metal modified PAN nanofibrous membrane complexes (M-AO-n-PANs, M = Fe, Cu, or Ce) as the heterogeneous Fenton catalysts for the dye degradation in water under visible irradiation. The coordination kinetics of three metal ions with modified PAN nanofibrous membranes was studied and the catalytic properties of the resulting complexes were also compared. The results indicated that increasing metal ion concentrations in solution or higher coordination temperature led to a significant increase in metal content, particularly in Fe and Cu contents of the complexes. Their coordination process could be described using Langmuir isotherm and pseudo-second-order kinetic equations. Moreover, Fe-AO-n-PAN had the best photocatalytic efficiency for the dye degradation in acidic medium, but a lower photocatalytic activity than Cu-AO-n-PAN in alkali medium.

  5. Characterization of inclusion complexes of organic ions with hydrophilic hosts by ion transfer voltammetry with solvent polymeric membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmos, José Manuel; Laborda, Eduardo; Ortuño, Joaquín Ángel; Molina, Ángela

    2017-03-01

    The quantitative characterization of inclusion complexes formed in aqueous phase between organic ions and hydrophilic hosts by ion-transfer voltammetry with solvent polymeric membrane ion sensors is studied, both in a theoretical and experimental way. Simple analytical solutions are presented for the determination of the binding constant of the complex from the variation with the host concentration of the electrochemical signal. These solutions are valid for any voltammetric technique and for solvent polymeric membrane ion sensors comprising one polarisable interface (1PI) and also, for the first time, two polarisable interfaces (2PIs). Suitable experimental conditions and data analysis procedures are discussed and applied to the study of the interactions of a common ionic liquid cation (1-octyl-3-metyl-imidazolium) and an ionisable drug (clomipramine) with two hydrophilic cyclodextrins: α-cyclodextrin and 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin. The experimental study is performed via square wave voltammetry with 2PIs and 1PI solvent polymeric membranes and in both cases the electrochemical experiments enable the detection of inclusion complexes and the determination of the corresponding binding constant.

  6. The Dissolution of Double Holliday Junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bizard, Anna H; Hickson, Ian D

    2014-01-01

    as "double Holliday junction dissolution." This reaction requires the cooperative action of a so-called "dissolvasome" comprising a Holliday junction branch migration enzyme (Sgs1/BLM RecQ helicase) and a type IA topoisomerase (Top3/TopoIIIα) in complex with its OB (oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide binding......) fold containing accessory factor (Rmi1). This review details our current knowledge of the dissolution process and the players involved in catalyzing this mechanistically complex means of completing homologous recombination reactions....

  7. A major prolactin-binding complex on human milk fat globule membranes contains cyclophilins A and B: the complex is not the prolactin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenson, Mary Y; Ueda, Eric K; Chen, KuanHui E; Walker, Ameae M

    2012-03-01

    Prolactin (PRL) in milk influences maturation of gastrointestinal epithelium and development of both the hypothalamo-pituitary and immune systems of offspring. Here, we demonstrate that most PRL in human milk is part of a novel, high-affinity, multicomponent binding complex found on the milk fat globule membrane and not in whey. To examine properties of the complex, a sensitive ELISA was developed such that human PRL (hPRL) binding to the complex was measured by loss of hPRL detectability; thus, as much as 50 ng of hPRL was undetectable in the presence of 10 μl of human milk. Using the same methodology, no comparable complex formation was observed with human serum or amniotic fluid. hPRL complexation in milk was rapid, time dependent, and cooperative. Antibodies to or competitors of the hPRL receptor (placental lactogen and growth hormone) showed the hPRL receptor was not involved in the complex. However, hPRL complexation was antagonized by cyclosporine A and anti-cyclophilins. The complex was very stable, resisting dissociation in SDS, urea, and dithiothreitol. Western analysis revealed an ∼75-kDa complex that included hPRL, cyclophilins A and B, and a 16-kDa cyclophilin A. Compared with noncomplexed hPRL, complexed hPRL in whole milk showed similar activation of STAT5 but markedly delayed activation of ERK. Alteration of signaling suggests that complex formation may alter hPRL biological activity. This is the first report of a unique, multicomponent, high-capacity milk fat reservoir of hPRL; all other analyses of milk PRL have utilized defatted milk.

  8. Glycosphingolipid-facilitated membrane insertion and internalization of cobra cardiotoxin. The sulfatide.cardiotoxin complex structure in a membrane-like environment suggests a lipid-dependent cell-penetrating mechanism for membrane binding polypeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chia-Hui; Liu, Jyung-Hurng; Lee, Shao-Chen; Hsiao, Chwan-Deng; Wu, Wen-Guey

    2006-01-06

    Cobra cardiotoxins, a family of basic polypeptides having lipid- and heparin-binding capacities similar to the cell-penetrating peptides, induce severe tissue necrosis and systolic heart arrest in snakebite victims. Whereas cardiotoxins are specifically retained on the cell surface via heparan sulfate-mediated processes, their lipid binding ability appears to be responsible, at least in part, for cardiotoxin-induced membrane leakage and cell death. Although the exact role of lipids involved in toxin-mediated cytotoxicity remains largely unknown, monoclonal anti-sulfatide antibody O4 has recently been shown to inhibit the action of CTX A3, the major cardiotoxin from Taiwan cobra venom, on cardiomyocytes by preventing cardiotoxin-induced membrane leakage and CTX A3 internalization into mitochondria. Here, we show that anti-sulfatide acts by blocking the binding of CTX A3 to the sulfatides in the plasma membrane to prevent sulfatide-dependent CTX A3 membrane pore formation and internalization. We also describe the crystal structure of a CTX A3-sulfatide complex in a membrane-like environment at 2.3 angstroms resolution. The unexpected orientation of the sulfatide fatty chains in the structure allows prediction of the mode of toxin insertion into the plasma membrane. CTX A3 recognizes both the headgroup and the ceramide interfacial region of sulfatide to induce a lipid conformational change that may play a key role in CTX A3 oligomerization and cellular internalization. This proposed lipid-mediated toxin translocation mechanism may also shed light on the cellular uptake mechanism of the amphiphilic cell-penetrating peptides known to involve multiple internalization pathways.

  9. The Escherichia coli O157:H7 cattle immuno-proteome includes outer membrane protein A (OmpA), a modulator of adherence to bovine recto-anal junction squamous epithelial (RSE) cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudva, Indira T.; Krastins, Bryan; Torres, Alfredo G.; Griffin, Robert W.; Sheng, Haiqing; Sarracino, David A.; Hovde, Carolyn J.; Calderwood, Stephen B.; John, Manohar

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Building on previous studies, we defined the repertoire of proteins comprising the immuno-proteome of E. coli O157:H7 (O157) cultured in DMEM supplemented with norepinephrine (NE; O157 immuno-proteome), a β-adrenergic hormone that regulates E. coli O157 gene expression in the gastrointestinal tract, using a variation of a novel proteomics-based platform proteome mining tool for antigen discovery, called Proteomics-based Expression Library Screening (PELS; Kudva et al., 2006). The E. coli O157 immuno-proteome (O157-IP) comprised 91 proteins, and included those identified previously using PELS, and also proteins comprising DMEM- and bovine rumen fluid- proteomes. Outer membrane protein A (OmpA), a common component of the above proteomes, and reportedly a contributor to E. coli O157 adherence to cultured Hep-2 epithelial cells, was interestingly found to be a modulator rather than a contributor to E. coli O157 adherence to bovine recto-anal junction squamous epithelial (RSE) cells. Our results point to a role for yet to be identified members of the O157-IP in E. coli O157 adherence to RSE-cells, and additionally implicate a possible role for the OmpA regulator, TdcA, in the expression of such adhesins. Our observations have implications for development of efficacious vaccines for preventing E. coli O157 colonization of the bovine gastrointestinal tract. PMID:25643951

  10. The gap junction cellular internet: connexin hemichannels enter the signalling limelight

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Evans, W Howard; De Vuyst, Elke; Leybaert, Luc

    2006-01-01

    Cxs (connexins), the protein subunits forming gap junction intercellular communication channels, are transported to the plasma membrane after oligomerizing into hexameric assemblies called connexin hemichannels (CxHcs...

  11. Expression of TM4SF10, a Claudin/EMP/PMP22 family cell junction protein, during mouse kidney development and podocyte differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruggeman, Leslie A; Martinka, Scott; Simske, Jeffrey S

    2007-02-01

    Cell junctions in the nephron are highly specialized to perform specific and distinct filtration and reabsorption functions. The mature kidney forms complex cell junctions including slit diaphragms that prevent the passage of serum proteins into the filtrate, and tubule cell junctions that regulate specific paracellular ion reuptake. We have investigated the expression of TM4SF10 (Trans-Membrane tetra(4)-Span Family 10) in mouse kidneys. TM4SF10 is the vertebrate orthologue of Caenorhabditis elegans VAB-9, a tetraspan adherens junction protein in the PMP22/EMP/Claudin family of proteins. We found that TM4SF10 localizes at the basal-most region of podocyte precursors before the capillary loop stage, at some tubule precursors, and at the ureteric bud junction with S-shaped bodies. Overall expression of TM4SF10 peaked at postnatal day 4 and was virtually absent in adult kidneys. The very limited expression of TM4SF10 protein that persisted into adulthood was restricted to a few tubule segments but remained localized to the basal region of lateral membranes. In undifferentiated cultured podocytes, TM4SF10 localized to the perinuclear region and translocated to the cell membrane after Cadherin appearance at cell-cell contacts. TM4SF10 colocalized with ZO1 and p120ctn in undifferentiated confluent podocytes and also colocalized with the tips of actin filaments at cell contacts. Upon differentiation of cultured podocytes, TM4SF10 protein disappeared from cell contacts and expression ceased. These results suggest that TM4SF10 functions during differentiation of podocytes and may participate in the maturation of cell junctions from simple adherens junctions to elaborate slit diaphragms. TM4SF10 may define a new class of Claudin-like proteins that function during junctional development.

  12. DNA-membrane complex damages in mammalian cells after gamma irradiation and chemical agent action and role of the complex in DNA replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saenko, A.S.; Kiseleva, V.I.; Synzynys, B.I. (Akademiya Meditsinskikh Nauk SSSR, Obninsk. Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Inst. Meditsinskoj Radiologii)

    1982-06-22

    The sedimentation behavior of the DNA-membrane complex (DMC) from Ehrlich ascites tumor (EAT) cells after gamma irradiation and carminomycin (CM) treatment was studied. The DNA and membrane containing material released by alkaline lysis from EAT cells had an anomalous sedimentation relative to denatured DNA. The DMC sediments with a great sedimentation constant (255 S). Both the chemical and physical agents induced DNA single-strand breaks and damage of the DMC. It was shown that 0.01 g/ml CM did not affect the incorporation of exogenic thymidine into DNA but the DMC was completely disrupted by this CM dose. There was no correlation between postirradiation repair kinetics of the DMC and the kinetics of /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation into DNA of ETA cells.

  13. Supported Lipid Bilayer Platform To Test Inhibitors of the Membrane Attack Complex: Insights into Biomacromolecular Assembly and Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorulmaz, Saziye; Jackman, Joshua A; Hunziker, Walter; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2015-11-01

    Complement activation plays an important role in innate immune defense by triggering formation of the membrane attack complex (MAC), which is a biomacromolecular assembly that exhibits membrane-lytic activity against foreign invaders including various pathogens and biomaterials. Understanding the details of MAC structure and function has been the subject of extensive work involving bulk liposome and erythrocyte assays. However, it is difficult to characterize the mechanism of action of MAC inhibitor drug candidates using the conventional assays. To address this issue, we employ a biomimetic supported lipid bilayer platform to investigate how two MAC inhibitors, vitronectin and clusterin, interfere with MAC assembly in a sequential addition format, as monitored by the quartz crystal microbalance-dissipation (QCM-D) technique. Two experimental strategies based on modular assembly were selected, precincubation of inhibitor and C5b-7 complex before addition to the lipid bilayer or initial addition of inhibitor followed by the C5b-7 complex. The findings indicate that vitronectin inhibits membrane association of C5b-7 via a direct interaction with C5b-7 and via competitive membrane association onto the supported lipid bilayer. On the other hand, clusterin directly interacts with C5b-7 such that C5b-7 is still able to bind to the lipid bilayer, and clusterin affects the subsequent binding of other complement proteins involved in the MAC assembly. Taken together, the findings in this study outline a biomimetic approach based on supported lipid bilayers to explore the interactions between complement proteins and inhibitors, thereby offering insight into MAC assembly and regulation.

  14. Functional characterization of the trans-membrane domain interactions of the Sec61 protein translocation complex beta-subunit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Xueqiang

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In eukaryotic cells co- and post-translational protein translocation is mediated by the trimeric Sec61 complex. Currently, the role of the Sec61 complex β-subunit in protein translocation is poorly understood. We have shown previously that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae the trans-membrane domain alone is sufficient for the function of the β-subunit Sbh1p in co-translational protein translocation. In addition, Sbh1p co-purifies not only with the protein translocation channel subunits Sec61p and Sss1p, but also with the reticulon family protein Rtn1p. Results We used random mutagenesis to generate novel Sbh1p mutants in order to functionally map the Sbh1p trans-membrane domain. These mutants were analyzed for their interactions with Sec61p and how they support co-translational protein translocation. The distribution of mutations identifies one side of the Sbh1p trans-membrane domain α-helix that is involved in interactions with Sec61p and that is important for Sbh1p function in protein translocation. At the same time, these mutations do not affect Sbh1p interaction with Rtn1p. Furthermore we show that Sbh1p is found in protein complexes containing not only Rtn1p, but also the two other reticulon-like proteins Rtn2p and Yop1p. Conclusion Our results identify functionally important amino acids in the Sbh1p trans-membrane domain. In addition, our results provide additional support for the involvement of Sec61β in processes unlinked to protein translocation.

  15. Molecular electronic junction transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solomon, Gemma C.; Herrmann, Carmen; Ratner, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Whenasinglemolecule,oracollectionofmolecules,isplacedbetween two electrodes and voltage is applied, one has a molecular transport junction. We discuss such junctions, their properties, their description, and some of their applications. The discussion is qualitative rather than quantitative, and f...

  16. Structural insights into the organization of the cavin membrane coat complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovtun, Oleksiy; Tillu, Vikas A; Jung, WooRam; Leneva, Natalya; Ariotti, Nicholas; Chaudhary, Natasha; Mandyam, Ramya A; Ferguson, Charles; Morgan, Garry P; Johnston, Wayne A; Harrop, Stephen J; Alexandrov, Kirill; Parton, Robert G; Collins, Brett M

    2014-11-24

    Caveolae are cell-surface membrane invaginations that play critical roles in cellular processes including signaling and membrane homeostasis. The cavin proteins, in cooperation with caveolins, are essential for caveola formation. Here we show that a minimal N-terminal domain of the cavins, termed HR1, is required and sufficient for their homo- and hetero-oligomerization. Crystal structures of the mouse cavin1 and zebrafish cavin4a HR1 domains reveal highly conserved trimeric coiled-coil architectures, with intersubunit interactions that determine the specificity of cavin-cavin interactions. The HR1 domain contains a basic surface patch that interacts with polyphosphoinositides and coordinates with additional membrane-binding sites within the cavin C terminus to facilitate membrane association and remodeling. Electron microscopy of purified cavins reveals the existence of large assemblies, composed of a repeating rod-like structural element, and we propose that these structures polymerize through membrane-coupled interactions to form the unique striations observed on the surface of caveolae in vivo.

  17. Presynaptic spike broadening reduces junctional potential amplitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, A N; Przysiezniak, J; Acosta-Urquidi, J; Basarsky, T A

    1989-08-24

    Presynaptic modulation of action potential duration may regulate synaptic transmission in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Such synaptic plasticity is brought about by modifications to membrane currents at presynaptic release sites, which, in turn, lead to changes in the concentration of cytosolic calcium available for mediating transmitter release. The 'primitive' neuromuscular junction of the jellyfish Polyorchis penicillatus is a useful model of presynaptic modulation. In this study, we show that the durations of action potentials in the motor neurons of this jellyfish are negatively correlated with the amplitude of excitatory junctional potentials. We present data from in vitro voltage-clamp experiments showing that short duration voltage spikes, which elicit large excitatory junctional potentials in vivo, produce larger and briefer calcium currents than do long duration action potentials, which elicit small excitatory junctional potentials.

  18. Complexation induced phase separation: preparation of composite membranes with a nanometer thin dense skin loaded with metal ions

    KAUST Repository

    Villalobos Vazquez de la Parra, Luis Francisco

    2015-04-21

    We present the development of a facile phase-inversion method for forming asymmetric membranes with a precise high metal ion loading capacity in only the dense layer. The approach combines the use of macromolecule-metal intermolecular complexes to form the dense layer of asymmetric membranes with nonsolvent-induced phase separation to form the porous support. This allows the independent optimization of both the dense layer and porous support while maintaining the simplicity of a phase-inversion process. Moreover, it facilitates control over (i) the thickness of the dense layer throughout several orders of magnitude—from less than 15 nm to more than 6 μm, (ii) the type and amount of metal ions loaded in the dense layer, (iii) the morphology of the membrane surface, and (iv) the porosity and structure of the support. This simple and scalable process provides a new platform for building multifunctional membranes with a high loading of well-dispersed metal ions in the dense layer.

  19. Complexation-induced phase separation: preparation of composite membranes with a nanometer-thin dense skin loaded with metal ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalobos, Luis Francisco; Karunakaran, Madhavan; Peinemann, Klaus-Viktor

    2015-05-13

    We present the development of a facile phase-inversion method for forming asymmetric membranes with a precise high metal ion loading capacity in only the dense layer. The approach combines the use of macromolecule-metal intermolecular complexes to form the dense layer of asymmetric membranes with nonsolvent-induced phase separation to form the porous support. This allows the independent optimization of both the dense layer and porous support while maintaining the simplicity of a phase-inversion process. Moreover, it facilitates control over (i) the thickness of the dense layer throughout several orders of magnitude from less than 15 nm to more than 6 μm, (ii) the type and amount of metal ions loaded in the dense layer, (iii) the morphology of the membrane surface, and (iv) the porosity and structure of the support. This simple and scalable process provides a new platform for building multifunctional membranes with a high loading of well-dispersed metal ions in the dense layer.

  20. Complex formation between primycin and ergosterol: entropy-driven initiation of modification of the fungal plasma membrane structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virág, Eszter; Pesti, Miklós; Kunsági-Máté, Sándor

    2012-04-01

    The interaction of the antibiotic primycin with the main fungal sterol, ergosterol, was investigated in vitro in order to monitor the effect of primycin on the fungal plasma membrane at the molecular level. The thermodynamic parameters of complex formation were determined by measuring Rayleigh scattering as a signal sensitive to particle size. The Benesi-Hildebrand method validated the 1 : 1 stoichiometry of the primycin-ergosterol complexes. A very low enthalpy change (ΔH=-1.14 kJ mol(-1)) was measured during the complex formation, which itself cannot be responsible for the molecular association. However, the entropy production (ΔS=29.78 J mol K(-1)) observed during the complex formation can describe the molecular interaction. This effect is probably due to the partial destruction of the solvation shell of the interacting species before the interlinking of the molecules. The results highlight the importance of ergosterol as concerns the mode of effect of primycin in the treatment of fungal infections. As the entropy has a determinant role in the ergosterol-primycin interaction, this interaction exhibits a very high temperature dependence, with the important consequence that the effect exerted by primycin on the cell membranes increases with rising temperature, and the effect is therefore pronounced in fevered bodies.

  1. Urinary excretion of the C5b-9 membrane attack complex of complement is a marker of immune disease activity in autologous immune complex nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruchno, C J; Burns, M M; Schulze, M; Johnson, R J; Baker, P J; Alpers, C E; Couser, W G

    1991-01-01

    The urinary excretion of the C5b-9 membrane attack complex of complement correlates with glomerular deposition of antibody in the passive Heymann nephritis (PHN) model of membranous nephropathy (MN). To determine if this parameter can be correlated with antibody deposition in a model of MN induced by an autologous mechanism and thus more analogous to human MN, the relationship of urinary C5b-9 to ongoing glomerular immune complex formation late in autologous immune complex nephritis (AICN) was studied. Based on urinary C5b-9, the animals were divided into two groups at 12 weeks after induction of AICN, those with persistently high urinary C5b-9 excretion and those in whom urinary excretion of C5b-9 returned to undetectable levels. While all rats developed glomerular deposition of rat IgG and significant proteinuria, high C5b-9 excretors had greater proteinuria and prolonged positive staining for glomerular C3. When normal syngeneic kidneys were transplanted into rats (n = 3) from each group, only those with persistent C5b-9 excretion developed subepithelial immune deposits of rat IgG in the transplanted kidney. As in the PHN model of MN, proteinuria was dissociated widely from urinary C5b-9 excretion, glomerular C3 staining, and evidence of circulating antibody. Thus these findings demonstrate that urinary excretion of C5b-9 serves as an index of on-going immunologic disease activity in the AICN model of MN, while proteinuria does not.

  2. Distribution and dynamics of electron transport complexes in cyanobacterial thylakoid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lu-Ning

    2016-03-01

    The cyanobacterial thylakoid membrane represents a system that can carry out both oxygenic photosynthesis and respiration simultaneously. The organization, interactions and mobility of components of these two electron transport pathways are indispensable to the biosynthesis of thylakoid membrane modules and the optimization of bioenergetic electron flow in response to environmental changes. These are of fundamental importance to the metabolic robustness and plasticity of cyanobacteria. This review summarizes our current knowledge about the distribution and dynamics of electron transport components in cyanobacterial thylakoid membranes. Global understanding of the principles that govern the dynamic regulation of electron transport pathways in nature will provide a framework for the design and synthetic engineering of new bioenergetic machinery to improve photosynthesis and biofuel production. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Organization and dynamics of bioenergetic systems in bacteria, edited by Conrad Mullineaux.

  3. A ternary complex comprising transportin1, Rab8 and the ciliary targeting signal directs proteins to ciliary membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madugula, Viswanadh

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The sensory functions of cilia are dependent on the enrichment of cilium-resident proteins. Although it is known that ciliary targeting signals (CTSs) specifically target ciliary proteins to cilia, it is still unclear how CTSs facilitate the entry and retention of cilium-resident proteins at the molecular level. We found that non-ciliary membrane reporters can passively diffuse into cilia through the lateral transport pathway, and the translocation of membrane reporters through the ciliary diffusion barrier is facilitated by importin binding motifs and domains. Screening known CTSs of ciliary membrane residents uncovered that fibrocystin, photoreceptor retinol dehydrogenase, rhodopsin and retinitis pigmentosa 2 interact with transportin1 (TNPO1) through previously identified CTSs. We further discovered that a new ternary complex, comprising TNPO1, Rab8 and a CTS, can assemble or disassemble under the guanine nucleotide exchange activity of Rab8. Our study suggests a new mechanism in which the TNPO1–Rab8–CTS complex mediates selective entry into and retention of cargos within cilia. PMID:27633000

  4. Imbibition in porous membranes of complex shape: quasi-stationary flow in thin rectangular segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Sergio; Fenton, Erin M; Gallegos, Gil R; Petsev, Dimiter N; Sibbett, Scott S; Stone, Howard A; Zhang, Yi; López, Gabriel P

    2010-01-19

    The sustained liquid flow of a typical lateral flow assay can be mimicked by two-dimensional shaped, thin porous membranes, specifically rectangular membranes appended to circular sectors. In designing these fan-shaped devices, we have been aided by analytical equations and finite-element simulations. We show both mathematically and experimentally how a continuous increase in unwetted pore volume causes a deviation from traditional imbibition, and leads to quasi-stationary flow in the rectangular element. These results are both theoretically and practically important because they indicate how medical diagnostic test strips may be fabricated without incorporating an absorbent pad.

  5. Chitosan-phosphotungstic acid complex as membranes for low temperature H2-O2 fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaria, M.; Pecoraro, C. M.; Di Quarto, F.; Bocchetta, P.

    2015-02-01

    Free-standing Chitosan/phosphotungstic acid polyelectrolyte membranes were prepared by an easy and fast in-situ ionotropic gelation process performed at room temperature. Scanning electron microscopy was employed to study their morphological features and their thickness as a function of the chitosan concentration. The membrane was tested as proton conductor in low temperature H2-O2 fuel cell allowing to get peak power densities up to 350 mW cm-2. Electrochemical impedance measurements allowed to estimate a polyelectrolyte conductivity of 18 mS cm-1.

  6. Cholesterol depletion of enterocytes. Effect on the Golgi complex and apical membrane trafficking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Gert Helge; Niels-Christiansen, L L; Thorsen, Evy

    2000-01-01

    Intestinal brush border enzymes, including aminopeptidase N and sucrase-isomaltase, are associated with "rafts" (membrane microdomains rich in cholesterol and sphingoglycolipids). To assess the functional role of rafts in the present work, we studied the effect of cholesterol depletion on apical...... membrane trafficking in enterocytes. Cultured mucosal explants of pig small intestine were treated for 2 h with the cholesterol sequestering agent methyl-beta-cyclodextrin and lovastatin, an inhibitor of hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase. The treatment reduced the cholesterol content >50...

  7. CR2-mediated activation of the complement alternative pathway results in formation of membrane attack complexes on human B lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C H; Marquart, H V; Prodinger, W M;

    2001-01-01

    Normal human B lymphocytes activate the alternative pathway of complement via complement receptor type 2 (CR2, CD21), that binds hydrolysed C3 (iC3) and thereby promotes the formation of a membrane-bound C3 convertase. We have investigated whether this might lead to the generation of a C5...... convertase and consequent formation of membrane attack complexes (MAC). Deposition of C3 fragments and MAC was assessed on human peripheral B lymphocytes in the presence of 30% autologous serum containing 4.4 mM MgCl2/20 mM EGTA, which abrogates the classical pathway of complement without affecting...... the alternative pathway. Blockade of the CR2 ligand-binding site with the monoclonal antibody FE8 resulted in 56 +/- 13% and 71 +/- 9% inhibition of the C3-fragment and MAC deposition, respectively, whereas the monoclonal antibody HB135, directed against an irrelevant CR2 epitope, had no effect. Blockade...

  8. The beta-barrel outer membrane protein assembly complex of Neisseria meningitidis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volokhina, E.B.; Beckers, F.; Tommassen, J.; Bos, M.P.

    2009-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved protein Omp85 is required for outer membrane protein (OMP) assembly in gram-negative bacteria and in mitochondria. Its Escherichia coli homolog, designated BamA, functions with four accessory lipoproteins, BamB, BamC, BamD, and BamE, together forming the beta-barrel asse

  9. Analysis of proteins in Chlamydia trachomatis L2 outer membrane complex, COMC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkelund, Svend; Morgan-Fisher, Marie; Timmerman, Evy;

    2009-01-01

    amino groups of in vivo generated proteolytic cleavage sites facilitated identification of such sites in known outer membrane proteins (MOMPs). Our results further support a proposed prediction of the topology of the MOMPs. Furthermore, a previously unknown MOMP, CTL0626 (Ct372), was assigned as an MOMP...

  10. Comparison of dot-ELISA and standard ELISA for detection of Neisseria meningitidis outer membrane complex-specific antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elza FT Belo

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Dot-ELISA using the outer membrane complex antigens of Neisseria meningitidis as a target was standardized for rapid detection of meningococcal-specific antibodies in human serum. We investigated the level of meningococcal-specific IgG, IgA, and IgM in serum using dot-ELISA with outer membrane antigens prepared from Neisseria meningitidis serotype B:4.19:P1.15,3,7,9 (a strain isolated from a Brazilian epidemic. The dot-ELISA is based on the same principles as the standard ELISA and is useful for detection of anti-N. meningitidis B antibodies in serum of patients with meningococcal infections. For the assay, outer membrane complexes (OMCs were absorbed by nitrocellulose membrane and blocked with a 5% skim milk solution. Serum samples were drawn upon hospital admission and during convalescence from patients with meningococcal septicemia, and single samples were drawn from uninfected controls. We retrospectively examined a total of 57 serum samples: 35 from patients infected with N. meningitidis B, 12 from patients infected with Haemophilus influenzae b, and 10 from health individuals. When performed at room temperature, dot-ELISA took approximately four hours to perform, and the optimum antigen concentration was 0.42 µg per dot. The specificity of IgG, IgM, and IgA demonstrates that dot-ELISA using OMCs from N. meningitidis B as a target is suitable for serologic verification of clinically suspected meningococcal disease in patients and for titer determination of antibodies produced during different phases of natural infection. Furthermore, the sensitivity of dot-ELISA was comparable to that of standard ELISA. Overall, dot-ELISA is simple to perform, rapid, and low cost. Further validation of the test as a screening tool is required.

  11. Comparison of dot-ELISA and standard ELISA for detection of Neisseria meningitidis outer membrane complex-specific antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belo, Elza Ft; Farhat, Calil K; Gaspari, Elizabeth N De

    2010-01-01

    Dot-ELISA using the outer membrane complex antigens of Neisseria meningitidis as a target was standardized for rapid detection of meningococcal-specific antibodies in human serum. We investigated the level of meningococcal-specific IgG, IgA, and IgM in serum using dot-ELISA with outer membrane antigens prepared from Neisseria meningitidis serotype B:4.19:P1.15,3,7,9 (a strain isolated from a Brazilian epidemic). The dot-ELISA is based on the same principles as the standard ELISA and is useful for detection of anti-N. meningitidis B antibodies in serum of patients with meningococcal infections. For the assay, outer membrane complexes (OMCs) were absorbed by nitrocellulose membrane and blocked with a 5% skim milk solution. Serum samples were drawn upon hospital admission and during convalescence from patients with meningococcal septicemia, and single samples were drawn from uninfected controls. We retrospectively examined a total of 57 serum samples: 35 from patients infected with N. meningitidis B, 12 from patients infected with Haemophilus influenzae b, and 10 from health individuals. When performed at room temperature, dot-ELISA took approximately four hours to perform, and the optimum antigen concentration was 0.42 microg per dot. The specificity of IgG, IgM, and IgA demonstrates that dot-ELISA using OMCs from N. meningitidis B as a target is suitable for serologic verification of clinically suspected meningococcal disease in patients and for titer determination of antibodies produced during different phases of natural infection. Furthermore, the sensitivity of dot-ELISA was comparable to that of standard ELISA. Overall, dot-ELISA is simple to perform, rapid, and low cost. Further validation of the test as a screening tool is required.

  12. Comparison of dot-ELISA and standard ELISA for detection of Neisseria meningitidis outer membrane complex-specific antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elza FT Belo

    Full Text Available Dot-ELISA using the outer membrane complex antigens of Neisseria meningitidis as a target was standardized for rapid detection of meningococcal-specific antibodies in human serum. We investigated the level of meningococcal-specific IgG, IgA, and IgM in serum using dot-ELISA with outer membrane antigens prepared from Neisseria meningitidis serotype B:4.19:P1.15,3,7,9 (a strain isolated from a Brazilian epidemic. The dot-ELISA is based on the same principles as the standard ELISA and is useful for detection of anti-N. meningitidis B antibodies in serum of patients with meningococcal infections. For the assay, outer membrane complexes (OMCs were absorbed by nitrocellulose membrane and blocked with a 5% skim milk solution. Serum samples were drawn upon hospital admission and during convalescence from patients with meningococcal septicemia, and single samples were drawn from uninfected controls. We retrospectively examined a total of 57 serum samples: 35 from patients infected with N. meningitidis B, 12 from patients infected with Haemophilus influenzae b, and 10 from health individuals. When performed at room temperature, dot-ELISA took approximately four hours to perform, and the optimum antigen concentration was 0.42 µg per dot. The specificity of IgG, IgM, and IgA demonstrates that dot-ELISA using OMCs from N. meningitidis B as a target is suitable for serologic verification of clinically suspected meningococcal disease in patients and for titer determination of antibodies produced during different phases of natural infection. Furthermore, the sensitivity of dot-ELISA was comparable to that of standard ELISA. Overall, dot-ELISA is simple to perform, rapid, and low cost. Further validation of the test as a screening tool is required.

  13. Mitochondrial membrane potential in human neutrophils is maintained by complex III activity in the absence of supercomplex organisation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bram J van Raam

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neutrophils depend mainly on glycolysis for their energy provision. Their mitochondria maintain a membrane potential (Deltapsi(m, which is usually generated by the respiratory chain complexes. We investigated the source of Deltapsi(m in neutrophils, as compared to peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes and HL-60 cells, and whether neutrophils can still utilise this Deltapsi(m for the generation of ATP. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Individual activity of the oxidative phosphorylation complexes was significantly reduced in neutrophils, except for complex II and V, but Deltapsi(m was still decreased by inhibition of complex III, confirming the role of the respiratory chain in maintaining Deltapsi(m. Complex V did not maintain Deltapsi(m by consumption of ATP, as has previously been suggested for eosinophils. We show that complex III in neutrophil mitochondria can receive electrons from glycolysis via the glycerol-3-phosphate shuttle. Furthermore, respiratory supercomplexes, which contribute to efficient coupling of the respiratory chain to ATP synthesis, were lacking in neutrophil mitochondria. When HL-60 cells were differentiated to neutrophil-like cells, they lost mitochondrial supercomplex organisation while gaining increased aerobic glycolysis, just like neutrophils. CONCLUSIONS: We show that neutrophils can maintain Deltapsi(m via the glycerol-3-phosphate shuttle, whereby their mitochondria play an important role in the regulation of aerobic glycolysis, rather than producing energy themselves. This peculiar mitochondrial phenotype is acquired during differentiation from myeloid precursors.

  14. Gap junction communication in myelinating glia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nualart-Marti, Anna; Solsona, Carles; Fields, R Douglas

    2013-01-01

    Gap junction communication is crucial for myelination and axonal survival in both the peripheral nervous system (PNS) and central nervous system (CNS). This review examines the different types of gap junctions in myelinating glia of the PNS and CNS (Schwann cells and oligodendrocytes respectively), including their functions and involvement in neurological disorders. Gap junctions mediate intercellular communication among Schwann cells in the PNS, and among oligodendrocytes and between oligodendrocytes and astrocytes in the CNS. Reflexive gap junctions mediating transfer between different regions of the same cell promote communication between cellular compartments of myelinating glia that are separated by layers of compact myelin. Gap junctions in myelinating glia regulate physiological processes such as cell growth, proliferation, calcium signaling, and participate in extracellular signaling via release of neurotransmitters from hemijunctions. In the CNS, gap junctions form a glial network between oligodendrocytes and astrocytes. This transcellular communication is hypothesized to maintain homeostasis by facilitating restoration of membrane potential after axonal activity via electrical coupling and the re-distribution of potassium ions released from axons. The generation of transgenic mice for different subsets of connexins has revealed the contribution of different connexins in gap junction formation and illuminated new subcellular mechanisms underlying demyelination and cognitive defects. Alterations in metabolic coupling have been reported in animal models of X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMTX) and Pelizaeus-Merzbarcher-like disease (PMLD), which are caused by mutations in the genes encoding for connexin 32 and connexin 47 respectively. Future research identifying the expression and regulation of gap junctions in myelinating glia is likely to provide a better understanding of myelinating glia in nervous system function, plasticity, and disease. This

  15. Vipp1 is required for basic thylakoid membrane formation but not for the assembly of thylakoid protein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aseeva, Elena; Ossenbühl, Friederich; Sippel, Claudia; Cho, Won K; Stein, Bernhard; Eichacker, Lutz A; Meurer, Jörg; Wanner, Gerhard; Westhoff, Peter; Soll, Jürgen; Vothknecht, Ute C

    2007-02-01

    Vipp1 (vesicle inducing protein in plastids 1) is found in cyanobacteria and chloroplasts where it is essential for thylakoid formation. Arabidopsis thaliana mutant plants with a reduction of Vipp1 to about 20% of wild type content become albinotic at an early stage. We propose that this drastic phenotype results from an inability of the remaining Vipp1 protein to assemble into a homo-oligomeric complex, indicating that oligomerization is a prerequisite for Vipp1 function. A Vipp1-ProteinA fusion protein, expressed in the Deltavipp1 mutant background, is able to reinstate oligomerization and restore photoautotrophic growth. Plants containing Vipp1-ProteinA in amounts comparable to Vipp1 in the wild type exhibit a wild type phenotype. However, plants with a reduced amount of Vipp1-ProteinA protein are growth-retarded and significantly paler than the wild type. This phenotype is caused by a decrease in thylakoid membrane content and a concomitant reduction in photosynthetic activity. To the extent that thylakoid membranes are made in these plants they are properly assembled with protein-pigment complexes and are photosynthetically active. This strongly supports a function of Vipp1 in basic thylakoid membrane formation and not in the functional assembly of thylakoid protein complexes. Intriguingly, electron microscopic analysis shows that chloroplasts in the mutant plants are not equally affected by the Vipp1 shortage. Indeed, a wide range of different stages of thylakoid development ranging from wild-type-like chloroplasts to plastids nearly devoid of thylakoids can be observed in organelles of one and the same cell.

  16. Insights into the composition and assembly of the membrane arm of plant complex I through analysis of subcomplexes in Arabidopsis mutant lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Etienne H; Solheim, Cory; Tanz, Sandra K; Bonnard, Géraldine; Millar, A Harvey

    2011-07-22

    NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Complex I, EC 1.6.5.3) is the largest complex of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. In eukaryotes, it is composed of more than 40 subunits that are encoded by both the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. Plant Complex I differs from the enzyme described in other eukaryotes, most notably due to the large number of plant-specific subunits in the membrane arm of the complex. The elucidation of the assembly pathway of Complex I has been a long-standing research aim in cellular biochemistry. We report the study of Arabidopsis mutants in Complex I subunits using a combination of Blue-Native PAGE and immunodetection to identify stable subcomplexes containing Complex I components, along with mass spectrometry analysis of Complex I components in membrane fractions and two-dimensional diagonal Tricine SDS-PAGE to study the composition of the largest subcomplex. Four subcomplexes of the membrane arm of Complex I with apparent molecular masses of 200, 400, 450, and 650 kDa were observed. We propose a working model for the assembly of the membrane arm of Complex I in plants and assign putative roles during the assembly process for two of the subunits studied.

  17. The Flavivirus Precursor Membrane-Envelope Protein Complex: Structure and Maturation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Long; Lok, Shee-Mei; Yu, I-Mei; Zhang, Ying; Kuhn, Richard J.; Chen, Jue; Rossmann, Michael G. (Purdue)

    2008-09-17

    Many viruses go through a maturation step in the final stages of assembly before being transmitted to another host. The maturation process of flaviviruses is directed by the proteolytic cleavage of the precursor membrane protein (prM), turning inert virus into infectious particles. We have determined the 2.2 angstrom resolution crystal structure of a recombinant protein in which the dengue virus prM is linked to the envelope glycoprotein E. The structure represents the prM-E heterodimer and fits well into the cryo-electron microscopy density of immature virus at neutral pH. The pr peptide {beta}-barrel structure covers the fusion loop in E, preventing fusion with host cell membranes. The structure provides a basis for identifying the stages of its pH-directed conformational metamorphosis during maturation, ending with release of pr when budding from the host.

  18. Recovery of volatile fatty acids (VFA) from complex waste effluents using membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharof, M-P; Lovitt, R W

    2014-01-01

    Waste effluents from anaerobic digesters of agricultural waste were treated with a range of membranes, including microfiltration and nanofiltration (NF), to concentrate volatile fatty acids (VFA). Microfiltration was applied successfully to produce sterile, particle-free solutions with a VFA concentration of 21.08 mM of acetic acid and 15.81 mM of butyric acid. These were further treated using a variety of NF membranes: NF270 (Dow Chemicals, USA), HL, DL, DK (Osmonics, USA) and LF10 (Nitto Denko, Japan), achieving retention ratios of up to 75%, and giving retentates of up to 53.94 mM of acetate and 28.38 mM of butyrate. DK and NF270 membranes were identified as the best candidates for VFA separation and concentration from these multicomponent effluents, both in terms of retention and permeate flux. When the effluents are adjusted to alkali conditions, the highest productivity, retention and flux were achieved at pH 7. At higher pH there was a significant reduction in flux.

  19. Penicillin-binding protein 5 can form a homo-oligomeric complex in the inner membrane of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoog, Karl; Bruzell, Filippa Stenberg; Ducroux, Aurélie; Hellberg, Mårten; Johansson, Henrik; Lehtiö, Janne; Högbom, Martin; Daley, Daniel O

    2011-09-01

    Penicillin-binding protein 5 (PBP5) is a DD-carboxypeptidase, which cleaves the terminal D-alanine from the muramyl pentapeptide in the peptidoglycan layer of Escherichia coli and other bacteria. In doing so, it varies the substrates for transpeptidation and plays a key role in maintaining cell shape. In this study, we have analyzed the oligomeric state of PBP5 in detergent and in its native environment, the inner membrane. Both approaches indicate that PBP5 exists as a homo-oligomeric complex, most likely as a homo-dimer. As the crystal structure of the soluble domain of PBP5 (i.e., lacking the membrane anchor) shows a monomer, we used our experimental data to generate a model of the homo-dimer. This model extends our understanding of PBP5 function as it suggests how PBP5 can interact with the peptidoglycan layer. It suggests that the stem domains interact and the catalytic domains have freedom to move from the position observed in the crystal structure. This would allow the catalytic domain to have access to pentapeptides at different distances from the membrane. Copyright © 2011 The Protein Society.

  20. Localization of Membrane Proteins in the Cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC7942 (Radial Asymmetry in the Photosynthetic Complexes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, D. M.; Troyan, T. A.; Sherman, L. A.

    1994-09-01

    Localization of membrane proteins in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC7942 was determined by transmission electron microscopy utilizing immunocytochemistry with cells prepared by freeze-substitution. This preparation procedure maintained cellular morphology and permitted detection of cellular antigens with high sensitivity and low background. Synechococcus sp. PCC7942 is a unicellular cyanobacterium with thylakoids organized in concentric layers toward the periphery of the cell. Cytochrome oxidase was localized almost entirely in the cytoplasmic membrane, whereas a carotenoprotein (P35) was shown to be a cell wall component. The major photosystem II (PSII) proteins (D1, D2 CP43, and CP47) were localized throughout the thylakoids. Proteins of the Cyt b6/f complex were found to have a similar distribution. Thylakoid luminal proteins, such as the Mn-stabilizing protein, were located primarily in the thylakoid, but a small, reproducible fraction was found in the outer compartment. The photosystem I (PSI) reaction center proteins and the ATP synthase proteins were found associated mostly with the outermost thylakoid and with the cytoplasmic membrane. These results indicated that the photosynthetic apparatus is not evenly distributed throughout the thylakoids. Rather, there is a radial asymmetry such that much of the PSI and the ATPase synthase is located in the outermost thylakoid. The relationship of this structure to the photosynthetic mechanism is discussed. It is suggested that the photosystems are separated because of kinetic differences between PSII and PSI, as hypothesized by H.-W. Trissl and C. Wilhelm (Trends Biochem Sci [1993] 18:415-419).

  1. Content of endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complex membranes positively correlates with the proliferative status of brain cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, David C; Maccioni, Hugo J F; Caputto, Beatriz L

    2009-03-01

    Although the molecular and cellular basis of particular events that lead to the biogenesis of membranes in eukaryotic cells has been described in detail, understanding of the intrinsic complexity of the pleiotropic response by which a cell adjusts the overall activity of its endomembrane system to accomplish these requirements is limited. Here we carried out an immunocytochemical and biochemical examination of the content and quality of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi apparatus membranes in two in vivo situations characterized by a phase of active cell proliferation followed by a phase of declination in proliferation (rat brain tissue at early and late developmental stages) or by permanent active proliferation (gliomas and their most malignant manifestation, glioblastomas multiforme). It was found that, in highly proliferative phases of brain development (early embryo brain cells), the content of ER and Golgi apparatus membranes, measured as total lipid phosphorous content, is higher than in adult brain cells. In addition, the concentration of protein markers of ER and Golgi is also higher in early embryo brain cells and in human glioblastoma multiforme cells than in adult rat brain or in nonpathological human brain cells. Results suggest that the amount of endomembranes and the concentration of constituent functional proteins diminish as cells decline in their proliferative activity.

  2. Evolution and architecture of the inner membrane complex in asexual and sexual stages of the malaria parasite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Maya; Herrmann, Susann; Loughran, Noeleen B; Cabrera, Ana; Engelberg, Klemens; Lehmann, Christine; Sinha, Dipto; Prinz, Boris; Ruch, Ulrike; Heussler, Volker; Spielmann, Tobias; Parkinson, John; Gilberger, Tim W

    2012-09-01

    The inner membrane complex (IMC) is a unifying morphological feature of all alveolate organisms. It consists of flattened vesicles underlying the plasma membrane and is interconnected with the cytoskeleton. Depending on the ecological niche of the organisms, the function of the IMC ranges from a fundamental role as reinforcement system to more specialized roles in motility and cytokinesis. In this article, we present a comprehensive evolutionary analysis of IMC components, which exemplifies the adaptive nature of the IMCs' protein composition. Focusing on eight structurally distinct proteins in the most prominent "genus" of the Alveolata-the malaria parasite Plasmodium-we demonstrate that the level of conservation is reflected in phenotypic characteristics, accentuated in differential spatial-temporal patterns of these proteins in the motile stages of the parasite's life cycle. Colocalization studies with the centromere and the spindle apparatus reveal their discriminative biogenesis. We also reveal that the IMC is an essential structural compartment for the development of the sexual stages of Plasmodium, as it seems to drive the morphological changes of the parasite during the long and multistaged process of sexual differentiation. We further found a Plasmodium-specific IMC membrane matrix protein that highlights transversal structures in gametocytes, which could represent a genus-specific structural innovation required by Plasmodium. We conclude that the IMC has an additional role during sexual development supporting morphogenesis of the cell, which in addition to its functions in the asexual stages highlights the multifunctional nature of the IMC in the Plasmodium life cycle.

  3. Role for Ribosome-Associated Complex and Stress-Seventy subfamily B (RAC-Ssb) in integral membrane protein translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta-Sampson, Ligia; Döring, Kristina; Lin, Yuping; Yu, Vivian Y; Bukau, Bernd; Kramer, Günter; Cate, Jamie H D

    2017-10-02

    Targeting of most integral membrane proteins to the endoplasmic reticulum is controlled by the signal recognition particle (SRP), which recognizes a hydrophobic signal sequence near the protein N-terminus. Proper folding of these proteins is monitored by the unfolded protein response, and involves protein degradation pathways to ensure quality control. Here, we identify a new pathway for quality control of major facilitator superfamily transporters that occurs before the first transmembrane helix--the signal sequence recognized by SRP--is made by the ribosome. Increased rates of translation elongation of the N-terminal sequence of these integral membrane proteins can divert the nascent protein chains to the ribosome-associated complex (RAC) and Stress-Seventy Subfamily B (Ssb) chaperones. We also show that quality control of integral membrane proteins by RAC-Ssb couples translation rate to the unfolded protein response, which has implications for understanding mechanisms underlying human disease and protein production in biotechnology. Copyright © 2017, The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  4. Tracking energy transfer between light harvesting complex 2 and 1 in photosynthetic membranes grown under high and low illumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüer, Larry; Moulisová, Vladimíra; Henry, Sarah; Polli, Dario; Brotosudarmo, Tatas H P; Hoseinkhani, Sajjad; Brida, Daniele; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Cerullo, Giulio; Cogdell, Richard J

    2012-01-31

    Energy transfer (ET) between B850 and B875 molecules in light harvesting complexes LH2 and LH1/RC (reaction center) complexes has been investigated in membranes of Rhodopseudomonas palustris grown under high- and low-light conditions. In these bacteria, illumination intensity during growth strongly affects the type of LH2 complexes synthesized, their optical spectra, and their amount of energetic disorder. We used a specially built femtosecond spectrometer, combining tunable narrowband pump with broadband white-light probe pulses, together with an analytical method based on derivative spectroscopy for disentangling the congested transient absorption spectra of LH1 and LH2 complexes. This procedure allows real-time tracking of the forward (LH2 → LH1) and backward (LH2←LH1) ET processes and unambiguous determination of the corresponding rate constants. In low-light grown samples, we measured lower ET rates in both directions with respect to high-light ones, which is explained by reduced spectral overlap between B850 and B875 due to partial redistribution of oscillator strength into a higher energetic exciton transition. We find that the low-light adaptation in R. palustris leads to a reduced elementary backward ET rate, in accordance with the low probability of two simultaneous excitations reaching the same LH1/RC complex under weak illumination. Our study suggests that backward ET is not just an inevitable consequence of vectorial ET with small energetic offsets, but is in fact actively managed by photosynthetic bacteria.

  5. Modeling two-phase flow in three-dimensional complex flow-fields of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinyong; Luo, Gang; Wang, Chao-Yang

    2017-10-01

    3D fine-mesh flow-fields recently developed by Toyota Mirai improved water management and mass transport in proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell stacks, suggesting their potential value for robust and high-power PEM fuel cell stack performance. In such complex flow-fields, Forchheimer's inertial effect is dominant at high current density. In this work, a two-phase flow model of 3D complex flow-fields of PEMFCs is developed by accounting for Forchheimer's inertial effect, for the first time, to elucidate the underlying mechanism of liquid water behavior and mass transport inside 3D complex flow-fields and their adjacent gas diffusion layers (GDL). It is found that Forchheimer's inertial effect enhances liquid water removal from flow-fields and adds additional flow resistance around baffles, which improves interfacial liquid water and mass transport. As a result, substantial improvements in high current density cell performance and operational stability are expected in PEMFCs with 3D complex flow-fields, compared to PEMFCs with conventional flow-fields. Higher current density operation required to further reduce PEMFC stack cost per kW in the future will necessitate optimizing complex flow-field designs using the present model, in order to efficiently remove a large amount of product water and hence minimize the mass transport voltage loss.

  6. The effects of insulin-like growth factorI (IGF I) complex from seminal plasma on capacitation, membrane integrity andDNA fragmentation in goat spermatozoa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suherni Susilowati; Indah Norma Triana; Abdul Malik

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the effects of the insulin-like growth factor I (IGF I) complex from seminal plasma on capacitation, membrane integrity and DNA fragmentation.Methods:A total of 0.5 mL of fresh semen was added to 1 mL of Bracket-Oliphant (BO) medium, and the sample was then centrifuged at a speed of 1 800 rpm for 10 minutes. The samples were analyzed before and after centrifugation for sperm viability, motility, membrane integrity and capacitation. The centrifuged samples were divided into three groups, each consisting of 3í 106spermatozoa. BO medium was added to group 1, BO ¬+ 12 ng IGF I complex medium was added to group 2, and 12 ng IGF I complex was added to group 3. Then, the samples were incubated for 15 minutes. Results:The result showed that sperm motility, viability and membrane integrity were significantly lower (P<0.05) after centrifugation. Furthermore, the sperm capacitation was significantly increased (P<0.05) after centrifugation. The percentages of sperm capacitation, membrane integrity and DNA fragmentation were significantly different (P< 0.05) in all media, including BO, BO + IGF-I complex and the IGF-I complex alone. Conclusions:Sperm quality include motility, viability and membrane integrity were lower after centrifugation. whereas DNA fragmentation after incubation in the IGF-I complex medium also was lower compared to that of specimens in the BO and BO + IGF-I complex media.

  7. Ultrastructural localization of the core protein of a basement membrane-specific chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan in adult rat skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McCarthy, K J; Horiguchi, Y; Couchman, J R

    1990-01-01

    Basement membranes are complex extracellular matrices present at epithelial/mesenchymal interfaces of tissues. The dermal-epidermal junction has been shown to contain numerous components, some of the most well known being laminin, types IV and VII collagens, heparan sulfate proteoglycan, fibronec...

  8. Shear zone junctions: Of zippers and freeways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passchier, Cees W.; Platt, John P.

    2017-02-01

    Ductile shear zones are commonly treated as straight high-strain domains with uniform shear sense and characteristic curved foliation trails, bounded by non-deforming wall rock. Many shear zones, however, are branched, and if movement on such branches is contemporaneous, the resulting shape can be complicated and lead to unusual shear sense arrangement and foliation geometries in the wall rock. For Y-shaped shear zone triple junctions with three joining branches and transport direction at a high angle to the branchline, only eight basic types of junction are thought to be stable and to produce significant displacement. The simplest type, called freeway junctions, have similar shear sense in all three branches. The other types show joining or separating behaviour of shear zone branches similar to the action of a zipper. Such junctions may have shear zone branches that join to form a single branch (closing zipper junction), or a single shear zone that splits to form two branches, (opening zipper junction). All categories of shear zone junctions show characteristic foliation patterns and deflection of markers in the wall rock. Closing zipper junctions are unusual, since they form a non-active zone with opposite deflection of foliations in the wall rock known as an extraction fault or wake. Shear zipper junctions can form domains of overprinting shear sense along their flanks. A small and large field example are given from NE Spain and Eastern Anatolia. The geometry of more complex, 3D shear zone junctions with slip parallel and oblique to the branchline is briefly discussed.

  9. Translocation of the papillomavirus L2/vDNA complex across the limiting membrane requires the onset of mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calton, Christine M; Bronnimann, Matthew P; Manson, Ariana R; Li, Shuaizhi; Chapman, Janice A; Suarez-Berumen, Marcela; Williamson, Tatum R; Molugu, Sudheer K; Bernal, Ricardo A; Campos, Samuel K

    2017-05-01

    The human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) L2 protein acts as a chaperone to ensure that the viral genome (vDNA) traffics from endosomes to the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and eventually the nucleus, where HPV replication occurs. En route to the nucleus, the L2/vDNA complex must translocate across limiting intracellular membranes. The details of this critical process remain poorly characterized. We have developed a system based on subcellular compartmentalization of the enzyme BirA and its cognate substrate to detect membrane translocation of L2-BirA from incoming virions. We find that L2 translocation requires transport to the TGN and is strictly dependent on entry into mitosis, coinciding with mitotic entry in synchronized cells. Cell cycle arrest causes retention of L2/vDNA at the TGN; only release and progression past G2/M enables translocation across the limiting membrane and subsequent infection. Microscopy of EdU-labeled vDNA reveals a rapid and dramatic shift in vDNA localization during early mitosis. At late G2/early prophase vDNA egresses from the TGN to a pericentriolar location, accumulating there through prometaphase where it begins to associate with condensed chromosomes. By metaphase and throughout anaphase the vDNA is seen bound to the mitotic chromosomes, ensuring distribution into both daughter nuclei. Mutations in a newly defined chromatin binding region of L2 potently blocked translocation, suggesting that translocation is dependent on chromatin binding during prometaphase. This represents the first time a virus has been shown to functionally couple the penetration of limiting membranes to cellular mitosis, explaining in part the tropism of HPV for mitotic basal keratinocytes.

  10. Gap junctions: structure and function (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, W Howard; Martin, Patricia E M

    2002-01-01

    Gap junctions are plasma membrane spatial microdomains constructed of assemblies of channel proteins called connexins in vertebrates and innexins in invertebrates. The channels provide direct intercellular communication pathways allowing rapid exchange of ions and metabolites up to approximately 1 kD in size. Approximately 20 connexins are identified in the human or mouse genome, and orthologues are increasingly characterized in other vertebrates. Most cell types express multiple connexin isoforms, making likely the construction of a spectrum of heteromeric hemichannels and heterotypic gap junctions that could provide a structural basis for the charge and size selectivity of these intercellular channels. The precise nature of the potential signalling information traversing junctions in physiologically defined situations remains elusive, but extensive progress has been made in elucidating how connexins are assembled into gap junctions. Also, participation of gap junction hemichannels in the propagation of calcium waves via an extracellular purinergic pathway is emerging. Connexin mutations have been identified in a number of genetically inherited channel communication-opathies. These are detected in connexin 32 in Charcot Marie Tooth-X linked disease, in connexins 26 and 30 in deafness and skin diseases, and in connexins 46 and 50 in hereditary cataracts. Biochemical approaches indicate that many of the mutated connexins are mistargeted to gap junctions and/or fail to oligomerize correctly into hemichannels. Genetic ablation approaches are helping to map out a connexin code and point to specific connexins being required for cell growth and differentiation as well as underwriting basic intercellular communication.

  11. Sensitive determination of trace mercury by UV-visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy after complexation and membrane filtration-enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Changhai; Iqbal, Jibran; Hu, Huilian; Liu, Bingxiang; Zhang, Lei; Zhu, Bilin; Du, Yiping

    2012-09-30

    A simple, sensitive and selective solid phase reflectometry method is proposed for the determination of trace mercury in aqueous samples. The complexation reagent dithizone was firstly injected into the properly buffered solution with vigorous stirring, which started a simultaneous formation of nanoparticles suspension of dithizone and its complexation reaction with the mercury(II) ions to make Hg-dithizone nanoparticles. After a definite time, the mixture was filtered with membrane, and then quantified directly on the surface of the membrane by using integrating sphere accessory of the UV-visible spectrophotometer. The quantitative analysis was carried out at a wavelength of 485 nm since it yielded the largest difference in diffuse reflectance spectra before and after reaction with mercury(II).A good linear correlation in the range of 0.2-4.0 μg/L with a squared correlation coefficient (R(2)) of 0.9944 and a detection limit of 0.12 μg/L were obtained. The accuracy of the method was evaluated by the analysis of spiked mercury(II) concentrations determined using this method along with those determined by the atomic fluorescence mercury vapourmeter and the results obtained were in good agreement. The proposed method was applied to the determination of mercury in tap water and river water samples with the recovery in an acceptable range (95.7-105.3%). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Dynamic Organization of SecA and SecY Secretion Complexes in the B. subtilis Membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Dajkovic

    Full Text Available In prokaryotes, about one third of cellular proteins are translocated across the plasma membrane or inserted into it by concerted action of the cytoplasmic ATPase SecA and the universally conserved SecYEG heterotrimeric polypeptide-translocating pore. Secretion complexes have been reported to localize in specific subcellular sites in Bacillus subtilis. In this work, we used a combination of total internal reflection microscopy, scanning fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, and pair correlation function to study the localization and dynamics of SecA and SecY in growing Bacillus subtilis cells. Both SecA and SecY localized in transient and dynamic foci in the cytoplasmic membrane, which displayed no higher-level organization in helices. Foci of SecA and SecY were in constant flux with freely diffusing SecA and SecY molecules. Scanning FCS confirmed the existence of populations of cellular SecA and SecY molecules with a wide range of diffusion coefficients. Diffusion of SecY as an uncomplexed molecular species was short-lived and only local while SecY complexed with its protein partners traversed distances of over half a micrometer in the cell.

  13. Structure of a membrane-attack complex/perforin (MACPF) family protein from the human gut symbiont Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qingping; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L; Bakolitsa, Constantina; Cai, Xiaohui; Carlton, Dennis; Chen, Connie; Chiu, Hsiu Ju; Clayton, Thomas; Das, Debanu; Deller, Marc C; Duan, Lian; Ellrott, Kyle; Farr, Carol L; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C; Grzechnik, Anna; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K; Klock, Heath E; Knuth, Mark W; Kozbial, Piotr; Krishna, S Sri; Kumar, Abhinav; Lam, Winnie W; Marciano, David; Miller, Mitchell D; Morse, Andrew T; Nigoghossian, Edward; Nopakun, Amanda; Okach, Linda; Puckett, Christina; Reyes, Ron; Tien, Henry J; Trame, Christine B; van den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; Wooten, Tiffany; Yeh, Andrew; Zhou, Jiadong; Hodgson, Keith O; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc André; Deacon, Ashley M; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A; Wilson, Ian A

    2010-10-01

    Membrane-attack complex/perforin (MACPF) proteins are transmembrane pore-forming proteins that are important in both human immunity and the virulence of pathogens. Bacterial MACPFs are found in diverse bacterial species, including most human gut-associated Bacteroides species. The crystal structure of a bacterial MACPF-domain-containing protein BT_3439 (Bth-MACPF) from B. thetaiotaomicron, a predominant member of the mammalian intestinal microbiota, has been determined. Bth-MACPF contains a membrane-attack complex/perforin (MACPF) domain and two novel C-terminal domains that resemble ribonuclease H and interleukin 8, respectively. The entire protein adopts a flat crescent shape, characteristic of other MACPF proteins, that may be important for oligomerization. This Bth-MACPF structure provides new features and insights not observed in two previous MACPF structures. Genomic context analysis infers that Bth-MACPF may be involved in a novel protein-transport or nutrient-uptake system, suggesting an important role for these MACPF proteins, which were likely to have been inherited from eukaryotes via horizontal gene transfer, in the adaptation of commensal bacteria to the host environment.

  14. Preparation of ethambutol-copper(II) complex and fabrication of PVC based membrane potentiometric sensor for copper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vinod K; Prasad, Rajendra; Kumar, Azad

    2003-05-28

    Copper(II) complex of ethambutol (I) was prepared and used in the fabrication of Cu(2+) selective ISE membrane. The membrane having Cu(II)-ethambutol complex (I) as electroactive material, along with sodium tetraphenylborate (NaTPB) as anion discriminator, dioctylphthalate (DOP) as plasticizer in poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) matrix in the percentage ratio 6:2:190:200 (I:NaTPB:DOP:PVC) (w/w) gave a linear response in the concentration range 7.94x10(-6) to 1.0x10(-1) M of Cu(2+) with a slope of 29.9+/-0.2 mV per decade of activity and a fast response time of 11+/-2 s. The sensor works well in the pH range 2.1-6.3 and could be satisfactorily used in presence of 40% (v/v) methanol, ethanol and acetone and is selective for copper over a large number of cations with slight interference from Na(+) and Co(2+) if present at a level 1.5x10(-5) and 6.5x10(-5) M, respectively. It works well over a period of 6 months and can also be used as indicator electrode for the end point determination in the potentiometric titration of Cu(2+) against EDTA as well as in the determination of Cu(2+) in real samples.

  15. A complex microdeletion 17q12 phenotype in a patient with recurrent de novo membranous nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinkes Bernward

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microdeletions on chromosome 17q12 cause of diverse spectrum of disorders and have only recently been identified as a rare cause of Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuester-Hauser-Syndrome (MRKH, which is characterized by uterus aplasia ± partial/complete vaginal aplasia in females with a regular karyotype. For the first time we report about a patient with a 17q12 microdeletion who is affected by MRKH in combination with a vascular and soft tissue disorder. Repeatedly she suffered from kidney transplant failure caused by consuming membranous nephropathy. Case presentation A 38-year-old female patient had been diagnosed with right kidney aplasia, left kidney dysplasia and significantly impaired renal function during infancy. Aged 16 she had to start hemodialysis. Three years later she received her first kidney transplant. Only then she was diagnosed with MRKH. The kidney transplant was lost due to consuming nephrotic syndrome caused by de novo membranous nephropathy, as was a second kidney transplant years later. In addition, a hyperelasticity syndrome affects the patient with congenital joint laxity, kyphoscoliosis, bilateral hip dysplasia, persistent hypermobility of both elbows, knees and hips. Her clinical picture resembles a combination of traits of a hypermobile and a vascular form of Ehlers-Danlos-Syndrome, but no mutations in the COL3A1 gene was underlying. Instead, array-based comparative genomic hybridisation (CGH detected a heterozygous 1.43 Mb deletion on chromosome 17q12 encompassing the two renal developmental genes HNF1β and LHX1. Conclusions Deletions of HNF1β have recently drawn significant attention in pediatric nephrology as an important cause of prenatally hyperechogenic kidneys, renal aplasia and renal hypodysplasia. In contrast, membranous nephropathy represents an often-unaccounted cause of nephrotic syndrome in the adult population. A causative connection between theses two conditions has never been postulated, but

  16. Lipid peroxidation of rabbit small intestinal microvillus membrane vesicles by iron complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fodor, I; Marx, J J

    1988-07-01

    Fe(II)- and Fe(III)-induced lipid peroxidation of rabbit small intestinal microvillus membrane vesicles was studied. Ferrous ammonium sulphate, ferrous ascorbate at a molar ratio of 10:1, and ferric citrate, at molar ratios of 1:1 and 1:20, did not stimulate lipid peroxidation. Ferrous ascorbate, 1:1, induced low stimulation, while ferrous ascorbate, 1:20 gave higher stimulation of lipid peroxidation. These results show that in our experimental system, ascorbate is a promotor rather than an inhibitor of lipid peroxidation. Ferric nitrilotriacetate (at molar ratios of 1:2 and 1:10), at an iron concentration of 200 microM, was by far the most effective in inducing lipid peroxidation. Superoxide dismutase, mannitol and glutathione had no effect, while catalase, thiourea and vitamin E markedly decreased ferrous ascorbate 1:20-induced lipid peroxidation. Ferric nitrilotriacetate-induced lipid peroxidation was slightly reduced by catalase and mannitol, significantly reduced by superoxide dismutase, and completely inhibited by thiourea. Glutathione caused a 100% increase in the ferric nitrilotriacetate-induced lipid peroxidation. These results suggest that Fe(II) in the presence of trace amounts of Fe(III), or an oxidizing agent and Fe(III) in the presence of Fe(II) or a reducing agent, are potent stimulators of lipid peroxidation of microvillus membrane vesicles. Addition of deferoxamine completely inhibited both ferrous ascorbate, 1:20 and ferric nitrilotriacetate-induced lipid peroxidation, demonstrating the requirement for iron for its stimulation. Iron-induced peroxidation of microvillus membrane may have physiological significance because it could already be demonstrated at 2 microM iron concentration.

  17. Glucocorticoids upregulates transepithelial electrical resistance and expression of tight junction-related protein in human trabecular meshwork cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUO Ye-hong; HUANG Ya-lin; WEI Yan-tao; LING Yun-lan; LIN Ming-kai; GE Jian

    2005-01-01

    @@ The trabecular meshwork is located at the anterior chamber angle, and is the main route for the outflow of aqueous humor. It is composed of perforated sheets of collagen and elastic tissue covered by trabecular meshwork (TM) cells, forming a filter with decreasing pore size as the canal of Schlemm is approached. TM cells have some endothelial properties, such as the presence of intercellular junctional complexes, particularly tight junctions (TJs). TJs form paracellular seals between adjacent cells and act as fences that segregate protein (and partially lipid) components of the apical and basolateral plasma membrane domains. Under the electron microscope, TJs appear as a series of discrete contacts between the lateral membranes of adjacent cells.

  18. ANTI-NUCLEOSOME ANTIBODIES COMPLEXED TO NUCLEOSOMAL ANTIGENS SHOW ANTI-DNA REACTIVITY AND BIND TO RAT GLOMERULAR-BASEMENT-MEMBRANE IN-VIVO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KRAMERS, C; HYLKEMA, MN; VANBRUGGEN, MCJ; VANDELAGEMAAT, R; DIJKMAN, HBPM; ASSMANN, KJM; SMEENK, RJT; BERDEN, JHM; Hylkema, Machteld

    1994-01-01

    Histones can mediate the binding of DNA and anti-DNA to the glomerular basement membrane (GBM). Zn ELISA histone/DNA/anti-DNA complexes are able to bind to heparan sulfate (HS), an intrinsic constituent of the GBM. We questioned whether histone containing immune complexes are able to bind to the GBM

  19. The effects of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I complex from seminal plasma on capacitation, membrane integrity and DNA fragmentation in goat spermatozoa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suherni Susilowati

    2015-09-01

    Conclusions: Sperm quality include motility, viability and membrane integrity were lower after centrifugation. Whereas DNA fragmentation after incubation in the IGF-I complex medium also was lower compared to that of specimens in the BO and BO + IGF-I complex media.

  20. Hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor-1 has a complex subcellular itinerary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godiksen, Sine; Selzer-Plon, Joanna; Pedersen, Esben D K;

    2008-01-01

    it is a key regulator of carcinogenesis. HAI-1 is expressed in polarized epithelial cells, which have the plasma membrane divided by tight junctions into an apical and a basolateral domain. In the present study we show that HAI-1 at steady-state is mainly located on the basolateral membrane of both Madin...... in transporting matriptase as a matriptase-HAI-1 complex from the basolateral plama membrane to the apical plasma membrane, as matriptase is known to interact with prostasin, located at the apical plasma membrane....... and then recycles between the basolateral plasma membrane and endosomes for hours until it is transcytosed to the apical plasma membrane. Minor amounts of HAI-1 present at the apical plasma membrane are proteolytically cleaved and released into the apical medium. Full-length membrane-bound HAI-1 has a half...

  1. Alternative Pathway Dysregulation and the Conundrum of Complement Activation by IgG4 Immune Complexes in Membranous Nephropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borza, Dorin-Bogdan

    2016-01-01

    Membranous nephropathy (MN), a major cause of nephrotic syndrome, is a non-inflammatory immune kidney disease mediated by IgG antibodies that form glomerular subepithelial immune complexes. In primary MN, autoantibodies target proteins expressed on the podocyte surface, often phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R1). Pathology is driven by complement activation, leading to podocyte injury and proteinuria. This article overviews the mechanisms of complement activation and regulation in MN, addressing the paradox that anti-PLA2R1 and other antibodies causing primary MN are predominantly (but not exclusively) IgG4, an IgG subclass that does not fix complement. Besides immune complexes, alterations of the glomerular basement membrane (GBM) in MN may lead to impaired regulation of the alternative pathway (AP). The AP amplifies complement activation on surfaces insufficiently protected by complement regulatory proteins. Whereas podocytes are protected by cell-bound regulators, the GBM must recruit plasma factor H, which inhibits the AP on host surfaces carrying certain polyanions, such as heparan sulfate (HS) chains. Because HS chains present in the normal GBM are lost in MN, we posit that the local complement regulation by factor H may be impaired as a result. Thus, the loss of GBM HS in MN creates a micro-environment that promotes local amplification of complement activation, which in turn may be initiated via the classical or lectin pathways by subsets of IgG in immune complexes. A detailed understanding of the mechanisms of complement activation and dysregulation in MN is important for designing more effective therapies. PMID:27199983

  2. A 3D model of the membrane protein complex formed by the white spot syndrome virus structural proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Shiang Chang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Outbreaks of white spot disease have had a large negative economic impact on cultured shrimp worldwide. However, the pathogenesis of the causative virus, WSSV (whit spot syndrome virus, is not yet well understood. WSSV is a large enveloped virus. The WSSV virion has three structural layers surrounding its core DNA: an outer envelope, a tegument and a nucleocapsid. In this study, we investigated the protein-protein interactions of the major WSSV structural proteins, including several envelope and tegument proteins that are known to be involved in the infection process. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present report, we used coimmunoprecipitation and yeast two-hybrid assays to elucidate and/or confirm all the interactions that occur among the WSSV structural (envelope and tegument proteins VP51A, VP19, VP24, VP26 and VP28. We found that VP51A interacted directly not only with VP26 but also with VP19 and VP24. VP51A, VP19 and VP24 were also shown to have an affinity for self-interaction. Chemical cross-linking assays showed that these three self-interacting proteins could occur as dimers. CONCLUSIONS: From our present results in conjunction with other previously established interactions we construct a 3D model in which VP24 acts as a core protein that directly associates with VP26, VP28, VP38A, VP51A and WSV010 to form a membrane-associated protein complex. VP19 and VP37 are attached to this complex via association with VP51A and VP28, respectively. Through the VP26-VP51C interaction this envelope complex is anchored to the nucleocapsid, which is made of layers of rings formed by VP664. A 3D model of the nucleocapsid and the surrounding outer membrane is presented.

  3. Complex roles of hybrid lipids in the composition, order, and size of lipid membrane domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan-Zadeh, Ebrahim; Baykal-Caglar, Eda; Alwarawrah, Mohammad; Huang, Juyang

    2014-02-11

    Hybrid lipids (HL) are phospholipids with one saturated chain and one unsaturated chain. HL are hypothesized to act as linactants (i.e., 2D surfactants) in cell membranes, reducing line tension and creating nanoscopic lipid domains. Here we compare three hybrid lipids of different chain unsaturation (16:0-18:1PC (POPC), 16:0-18:2PC (PLPC), and 16:0-20:4PC (PAPC)) in their abilities to alter the composition, line tension, order, and compactness of lipid domains. We found that the liquid-ordered (Lo) and liquid-disordered (Ld) lipid domains in PAPC/di18:0PC(DSPC)/cholesterol and PLPC/DSPC/cholesterol mixtures are micrometer-sized, and only the POPC/DSPC/cholesterol system has nanoscopic domains. The results indicate that some HLs with polyunsaturated chains are not linactants, and the monounsaturated POPC displays both properties of weak linactants and "Ld-phase" lipids such as di18:1PC (DOPC). The obtained phase boundaries from giant unilamellar vesicles (GUV) show that both POPC and PLPC partition well in the Lo phases. Our MD simulations reveal that these hybrid lipids decrease the order and compactness of Lo domains. Thus, hybrid lipids distinguish themselves from other lipid groups in this combined "partitioning and loosening" ability, which could explain why the Lo domains of GUVs, which often do not contain HL, are more compact than the raft domains in cell membranes. Our line tension measurement and Monte Carlo simulation both show that even the monounsaturated POPC is a weak linactant with only modest ability to occupy domain boundaries and reduce line tension. A more important property of HLs is that they can reduce physical property differences of Lo and Ld bulk domains, which also reduces line tension at domain boundaries.

  4. Membrane Guanylyl Cyclase Complexes Shape the Photoresponses of Retinal Rods and Cones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Hong eWen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In vertebrate rods and cones, photon capture by rhodopsin leads to the destruction of cyclic GMP (cGMP and the subsequent closure of cyclic nucleotide gated (CNG ion channels in the outer segment plasma membrane. Replenishment of cGMP and reopening of the channels limit the growth of the photon response and are requisite for its recovery. In different vertebrate retinas, there may be as many as four types of membrane guanylyl cyclases (GCs for cGMP synthesis. Ten neuronal Ca2+ sensor proteins could potentially modulate their activities. The mouse is proving to be an effective model for characterizing the roles of individual components because its relative simplicity can be reduced further by genetic engineering. There are two types of guanylyl cyclase activating proteins (GCAPs and two types of GCs in mouse rods, whereas cones express one type of GCAP and one type of GC. Mutant mouse rods and cones bereft of both GCAPs have large, long lasting photon responses. Thus, GCAPs normally mediate negative feedback tied to the light-induced decline in intracellular Ca2+ that accelerates GC activity to curtail the growth and duration of the photon response. Rods from other mutant mice that express a single GCAP type reveal how the two GCAPs normally work together as a team. Because of its lower Ca2+ affinity, GCAP1 is the first responder that senses the initial decrease in Ca2+ following photon absorption and acts to limit response amplitude. GCAP2, with a higher Ca2+ affinity, is recruited later during the course of the photon response as Ca2+ levels continue to decline further. The main role of GCAP2 is to provide for a timely response recovery and it is particularly important after exposure to very bright light. The multiplicity of GC isozymes and GCAP homologs in the retinas of other vertebrates confers greater flexibility in shaping the photon responses in order to tune visual sensitivity, dynamic range and frequency response.

  5. Morphogenesis of rat myotendinous junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curzi, Davide; Ambrogini, Patrizia; Falcieri, Elisabetta; Burattini, Sabrina

    2013-10-01

    Myotendinous junction (MTJ) is the highly specialized complex which connects the skeletal muscle to the tendon for transmitting the contractile force between the two tissues. The purpose of this study was to investigate the MTJ development and rat EDL was chosen as a model. 1, 15, 30 day animals were considered and the junctions were analyzed by light and electron microscopy. The MTJ interface architecture increased during the development, extending the interaction between muscle and tendon. 1-day-old rats showed disorganized myofibril bundles, spread cytosol and incomplete rough endoplasmic reticulum, features partially improved in 15-day-old rats, and completely developed in 30-day-old animals. These findings indicate that muscle-tendon interface displays, during rat lifetime, numerically increased and longer tendon interdigitations, correlated with an improved organization of both tissues and with a progressive acquirement of full functionality.

  6. Efficiency of membrane technology, activated charcoal, and a micelle-clay complex for removal of the acidic pharmaceutical mefenamic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalaf, Samer; Al-Rimawi, Fuad; Khamis, Mustafa; Nir, Shlomo; Bufo, Sabino A; Scrano, Laura; Mecca, Gennaro; Karaman, Rafik

    2013-01-01

    The efficiency of sequential advanced membrane technology wastewater treatment plant towards removal of a widely used non-steroid anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) mefenamic acid was investigated. The sequential system included activated sludge, ultrafiltration by hollow fibre membranes with 100 kDa cutoff, and spiral wound membranes with 20 kDa cutoff, activated carbon and a reverse osmosis (RO) unit. The performance of the integrated plant showed complete removal of mefenamic acid from spiked wastewater samples. The activated carbon column was the most effective component in removing mefenamic acid with a removal efficiency of 97.2%. Stability study of mefenamic acid in pure water and Al-Quds activated sludge revealed that the anti-inflammatory drug was resistant to degradation in both environments. Batch adsorption of mefenamic acid by activated charcoal and a composite micelle (otadecyltrimethylammonium (ODTMA)-clay (montmorillonite) was determined at 25.0°C. Langmuir isotherm was found to fit the data with Qmax of 90.9 mg g(-1) and 100.0 mg g(-1) for activated carbon and micelle-clay complex, respectively. Filtration experiment by micelle-clay columns mixed with sand in the mg L(-1) range revealed complete removal of the drug with much larger capacity than activated carbon column. The combined results demonstrated that an integration of a micelle-clay column in the plant system has a good potential to improve the removal efficiency of the plant towards NSAID drugs such as mefenamic acid.

  7. Magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    We review the giant tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) in ferromagnetic-insulator-ferromagnetic junctions discovered in recent years, which is the magnetoresistance (MR) associated with the spin-dependent tunneling between two ferromagnetic metal films separated by an insulating thin tunnel barrier. The theoretical and experimental results including junction conductance, magnetoresistance and their temperature and bias dependences are described.

  8. Stacked Josephson Junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Søren Find; Pedersen, Niels Falsig; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    2010-01-01

    Long Josephson junctions have for some time been considered as a source of THz radiation. Solitons moving coherently in the junctions is a possible source for this radiation. Analytical computations of the bunched state and bunching-inducing methods are reviewed. Experiments showing THz radiation...

  9. Trp[superscript 2313]-His[superscript 2315] of Factor VIII C2 Domain Is Involved in Membrane Binding Structure of a Complex Between the C[subscript 2] Domain and an Inhibitor of Membrane Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhuo; Lin, Lin; Yuan, Cai; Nicolaes, Gerry A.F.; Chen, Liqing; Meehan, Edward J.; Furie, Bruce; Furie, Barbara; Huang, Mingdong (Harvard-Med); (UAH); (Maastricht); (Chinese Aca. Sci.)

    2010-11-03

    Factor VIII (FVIII) plays a critical role in blood coagulation by forming the tenase complex with factor IXa and calcium ions on a membrane surface containing negatively charged phospholipids. The tenase complex activates factor X during blood coagulation. The carboxyl-terminal C2 domain of FVIII is the main membrane-binding and von Willebrand factor-binding region of the protein. Mutations of FVIII cause hemophilia A, whereas elevation of FVIII activity is a risk factor for thromboembolic diseases. The C2 domain-membrane interaction has been proposed as a target of intervention for regulation of blood coagulation. A number of molecules that interrupt FVIII or factor V (FV) binding to cell membranes have been identified through high throughput screening or structure-based design. We report crystal structures of the FVIII C2 domain under three new crystallization conditions, and a high resolution (1.15 {angstrom}) crystal structure of the FVIII C2 domain bound to a small molecular inhibitor. The latter structure shows that the inhibitor binds to the surface of an exposed {beta}-strand of the C2 domain, Trp{sup 2313}-His{sup 2315}. This result indicates that the Trp{sup 2313}-His{sup 2315} segment is an important constituent of the membrane-binding motif and provides a model to understand the molecular mechanism of the C2 domain membrane interaction.

  10. High-resolution Structures of Protein-Membrane Complexes by Neutron Reflection and MD Simulation: Membrane Association of the PTEN Tumor Suppressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lösche, Matthias

    2012-02-01

    The lipid matrix of biomembranes is an in-plane fluid, thermally and compositionally disordered leaflet of 5 nm thickness and notoriously difficult to characterize in structural terms. Yet, biomembranes are ubiquitous in the cell, and membrane-bound proteins are implicated in a variety of signaling pathways and intra-cellular transport. We developed methodology to study proteins associated with model membranes using neutron reflection measurements and showed recently that this approach can resolve the penetration depth and orientation of membrane proteins with ångstrom resolution if their crystal or NMR structure is known. Here we apply this technology to determine the membrane bindung and unravel functional details of the PTEN phosphatase, a key player in the PI3K apoptosis pathway. PTEN is an important regulatory protein and tumor suppressor that performs its phosphatase activity as an interfacial enzyme at the plasma membrane-cytoplasm boundary. Acting as an antagonist to phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) in cell signaling, it is deleted in many human cancers. Despite its importance in regulating the levels of the phosphoinositoltriphosphate PI(3,4,5)P3, there is little understanding of how PTEN binds to membranes, is activated and then acts as a phosphatase. We investigated the structure and function of PTEN by studying its membrane affinity and localization on in-plane fluid, thermally disordered synthetic membrane models. The membrane association of the protein depends strongly on membrane composition, where phosphatidylserine (PS) and phosphatidylinositol diphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) act synergetically in attracting the enzyme to the membrane surface. Membrane affinities depend strongly on membrane fluidity, which suggests multiple binding sites on the protein for PI(4,5)P2. Neutron reflection measurements show that the PTEN phosphatase ``scoots'' along the membrane surface (penetration protein, ˜ 60 å away from the bilayer surface, in a rather compact

  11. N-acetylation and phosphorylation of Sec complex subunits in the ER membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soromani Christina

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Covalent modifications of proteins provide a mechanism to control protein function. Here, we have investigated modifications of the heptameric Sec complex which is responsible for post-translational protein import into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. It consists of the Sec61 complex (Sec61p, Sbh1p, Sss1p which on its own mediates cotranslational protein import into the ER and the Sec63 complex (Sec63p, Sec62p, Sec71p, Sec72p. Little is known about the biogenesis and regulation of individual Sec complex subunits. Results We show that Sbh1p when it is part of the Sec61 complex is phosphorylated on T5 which is flanked by proline residues. The phosphorylation site is conserved in mammalian Sec61ß, but only partially in birds, and not in other vertebrates or unicellular eukaryotes, suggesting convergent evolution. Mutation of T5 to A did not affect the ability of mutant Sbh1p to complement the growth defect in a Δsbh1Δsbh2 strain, and did not result in a hypophosphorylated protein which shows that alternate sites can be used by the T5 kinase. A survey of yeast phosphoproteome data shows that Sbh1p can be phosphorylated on multiple sites which are organized in two patches, one at the N-terminus of its cytosolic domain, the other proximal to the transmembrane domain. Surprisingly, although N-acetylation has been shown to interfere with ER targeting, we found that both Sbh1p and Sec62p are cotranslationally N-acetylated by NatA, and N-acetyl-proteome data indicate that Sec61p is modified by the same enzyme. Mutation of the N-acetylation site, however, did not affect Sec62p function in posttranslational protein import into the ER. Disabling NatA resulted in growth retardation, but not in co- or posttranslational translocation defects or instability of Sec62p or Sbh1p. Conclusions We conclude that N-acetylation of transmembrane and tail-anchored proteins does not interfere with their ER-targeting, and that Sbh1p phosphorylation on T5

  12. Large-scale preparation of the homogeneous LolA–lipoprotein complex and efficient in vitro transfer of lipoproteins to the outer membrane in a LolB-dependent manner

    OpenAIRE

    Watanabe, Shoji; Oguchi, Yuki; Yokota, Naoko; Tokuda, Hajime

    2007-01-01

    An ATP-binding cassette transporter LolCDE complex of Escherichia coli releases lipoproteins destined to the outer membrane from the inner membrane as a complex with a periplasmic chaperone, LolA. Interaction of the LolA–lipoprotein complex with an outer membrane receptor, LolB, then causes localization of lipoproteins to the outer membrane. As far as examined, formation of the LolA–lipoprotein complex strictly depends on ATP hydrolysis by the LolCDE complex in the presence of LolA. It has be...

  13. SMU.746-SMU.747, a putative membrane permease complex, is involved in aciduricity, acidogenesis, and biofilm formation in Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Król, Jaroslaw E; Biswas, Saswati; King, Clay; Biswas, Indranil

    2014-01-01

    Dental caries induced by Streptococcus mutans is one of the most prevalent chronic infectious diseases worldwide. The pathogenicity of S. mutans relies on the bacterium's ability to colonize tooth surfaces and survive a strongly acidic environment. We performed an ISS1 transposon mutagenesis to screen for acid-sensitive mutants of S. mutans and identified an SMU.746-SMU.747 gene cluster that is needed for aciduricity. SMU.746 and SMU.747 appear to be organized in an operon and encode a putative membrane-associated permease. SMU.746- and SMU.747-deficient mutants showed a reduced ability to grow in acidified medium. However, the short-term or long-term acid survival capacity and F1F0 ATPase activity remained unaffected in the mutants. Furthermore, deletion of both genes did not change cell membrane permeability and the oxidative and heat stress responses. Growth was severely affected even with slight acidification of the defined medium (pH 6.5). The ability of the mutant strain to acidify the defined medium during growth in the presence of glucose and sucrose was significantly reduced, although the glycolysis rate was only slightly affected. Surprisingly, deletion of the SMU.746-SMU.747 genes triggered increased biofilm formation in low-pH medium. The observed effects were more striking in a chemically defined medium. We speculate that the SMU.746-SMU.747 complex is responsible for amino acid transport, and we discuss its possible role in colonization and survival in the oral environment.

  14. Characterization of lysosomal membrane proteins of Dictyostelium discoideum. A complex population of acidic integral membrane glycoproteins, Rab GTP-binding proteins and vacuolar ATPase subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temesvari, L; Rodriguez-Paris, J; Bush, J; Steck, T L; Cardelli, J

    1994-10-14

    Highly purified lysosomes, prepared by magnetic fractionation of homogenates from Dictyostelium discoideum cells fed colloidal iron, were lysed under hypoosmotic conditions, and the membrane-associated proteins were subjected to gel electrophoresis. Thirteen major membrane polypeptides, ranging in molecular weight from 25,000 to 100,000 were identified. The isoelectric points of these proteins ranged from below 3.8 to greater than 7.0. Most of these proteins were stripped from membranes exposed to a chaotropic agent, 3,5-diodo-2-hydroxybenzoic acid lithium salt, and were therefore classified as peripheral membrane proteins. Twenty five glycoprotein species were detected by lectin blot analysis; 19 were classified as integral membrane proteins, and were, in general, larger than 45 kDa and negatively charged due in part to the presence of mannose 6-sulfate. Western blot analysis also demonstrated that a Rab 4-like GTPase, a Rab 7-like GTPase, and at least three subunits of the vacuolar ATPase were associated with the lysosomal membrane; the ATPase subunits appeared to be major proteins in lysosomal membranes. Finally, based on N-terminal sequence analysis of a major 41-kDa lysosome-associated membrane protein, we cloned a cDNA that encodes a protein (DVA41) highly homologous to a yeast and a bovine vacuolar ATPase subunit of approximately 41 kDa. The D. discoideum DVA41 gene was apparently a single copy gene, expressed at constant levels during growth and development.

  15. L-Galactono-1,4-lactone dehydrogenase is an assembly factor of the membrane arm of mitochondrial complex I in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimmeyer, Joram; Bock, Ralph; Meyer, Etienne H

    2016-01-01

    L-Galactono-1,4-lactone dehydrogenase (GLDH) catalyses the last enzymatic step of the ascorbate biosynthetic pathway in plants. GLDH is localised to mitochondria and several reports have shown that GLDH is associated with complex I of the respiratory chain. In a gldh knock-out mutant, complex I is not detectable, suggesting that GLDH is essential for complex I assembly or stability. GLDH has not been identified as a genuine complex I subunit, instead, it is present in a smaller, lowly abundant version of complex I called complex I*. In addition, GLDH activity has also been detected in smaller protein complexes within mitochondria membranes. Here, we investigated the role of GLDH during complex I assembly. We identified GLDH in complexes co-localising with some complex I assembly intermediates. Using a mutant that accumulates complex I assembly intermediates, we confirmed that GLDH is associated with the complex I assembly intermediates of 400 and 450 kDa. In addition, we detected accumulation of the 200 kDa complex I assembly intermediate in the gldh mutant. Taken together, our data suggest that GLDH is an assembly factor of the membrane arm of complex I. This function appears to be independent of the role of GLDH in ascorbate synthesis, as evidenced by the ascorbate-deficient mutant vtc2-1 accumulating wild-type levels of complex I. Therefore, we propose that GLDH is a dual-function protein that has a second, non-enzymatic function in complex I assembly as a plant-specific assembly factor. We propose an updated model for complex I assembly that includes complex I* as an assembly intermediate.

  16. Complex collagen fiber and membrane morphologies of the whole porcine aortic valve.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher A Rock

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Replacement aortic valves endeavor to mimic native valve function at the organ, tissue, and in the case of bioprosthetic valves, the cellular levels. There is a wealth of information about valve macro and micro structure; however, there presently is limited information on the morphology of the whole valve fiber architecture. The objective of this study was to provide qualitative and quantitative analyses of whole valve and leaflet fiber bundle branching patterns using a novel imaging system. METHODS: We developed a custom automated microscope system with motor and imaging control. Whole leaflets (n = 25 were imaged at high resolution (e.g., 30,000×20,000 pixels using elliptically polarized light to enhance contrast between structures without the need for staining or other methods. Key morphologies such as fiber bundle size and branching were measured for analyses. RESULTS: The left coronary leaflet displayed large asymmetry in fiber bundle organization relative to the right coronary and non-coronary leaflets. We observed and analyzed three main patterns of fiber branching; tree-like, fan-like, and pinnate structures. High resolution images and quantitative metrics are presented such as fiber bundle sizes, positions, and branching morphological parameters. SIGNIFICANCE: To our knowledge there are currently no high resolution images of whole fresh leaflets available in the literature. The images of fiber/membrane structures and analyses presented here could be highly valuable for improving the design and development of more advanced bioprosthetic and/or bio-mimetic synthetic valve replacements.

  17. Synchrotron Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering Investigation on Integral Membrane Protein Light-Harvesting Complex LH2 from Photosynthetic Bacterium Rhodopseudomonas Acidophila

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Lu-Chao; WENG Yu-Xiang; HONG Xin-Guo; XIAN Ding-Chang; Kobayashi Katsumi

    2006-01-01

    @@ Structures of membrane protein in solution are different from that in crystal phase. We present the primary results of small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) resolved topological structures of a light harvesting antenna membrane protein complex LH2 from photosynthetic bacteria Rhodopseudomonas acidophila in detergent solution for the first time. Our results show that the elliptical shape of the LH2 complex in solution clearly deviates from its circular structure in crystal phase determined by x-ray diffraction. This result provides an insight into the structure and function interplay in LH2.

  18. Heteronuclear 2D-correlations in a uniformly [13C, 15N] labeled membrane-protein complex at ultra-high magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egorova-Zachernyuk, T.A.; Hollander, J. [Gorlaeus Laboratories (Netherlands); Fraser, N. [University of Glasgow, Division of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (United Kingdom); Gast, P.; Hoff, A.J. [Leiden University, Huygens Laboratories (Netherlands); Cogdell, R. [University of Glasgow, Division of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (United Kingdom); Groot, H.J.M. de; Baldus, M. [Gorlaeus Laboratories (Netherlands)

    2001-03-15

    One- and two-dimensional solid-state NMR experiments on a uniformly labeled intrinsic membrane-protein complex at ultra-high magnetic fields are presented. Two-dimensional backbone and side-chain correlations for a [U-{sup 13}C,{sup 15}N] labeled version of the LH2 light-harvesting complex indicate significant resolution at low temperatures and under Magic Angle Spinning. Tentative assignments of some of the observed correlations are presented and attributed to the {alpha}-helical segments of the protein, mostly found in the membrane interior.

  19. Diurnal variation of tight junction integrity associates inversely with matrix metalloproteinase expression in Xenopus laevis corneal epithelium: implications for circadian regulation of homeostatic surface cell desquamation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan F Wiechmann

    Full Text Available The corneal epithelium provides a protective barrier against pathogen entrance and abrasive forces, largely due to the intercellular junctional complexes between neighboring cells. After a prescribed duration at the corneal surface, tight junctions between squamous surface cells must be disrupted to enable them to desquamate as a component of the tissue homeostatic renewal. We hypothesize that matrix metalloproteinase (MMPs are secreted by corneal epithelial cells and cleave intercellular junctional proteins extracellularly at the epithelial surface. The purpose of this study was to examine the expression of specific MMPs and tight junction proteins during both the light and dark phases of the circadian cycle, and to assess their temporal and spatial relationships in the Xenopus laevis corneal epithelium.Expression of MMP-2, tissue inhibitor of MMP-2 (TIMP-2, membrane type 1-MMP (MT1-MMP and the tight junction proteins occludin and claudin-4 were examined by confocal double-label immunohistochemistry on corneas obtained from Xenopus frogs at different circadian times. Occludin and claudin-4 expression was generally uniformly intact on the surface corneal epithelial cell lateral membranes during the daytime, but was frequently disrupted in small clusters of cells at night. Concomitantly, MMP-2 expression was often elevated in a mosaic pattern at nighttime and associated with clusters of desquamating surface cells. The MMP-2 binding partners, TIMP-2 and MT1-MMP were also localized to surface corneal epithelial cells during both the light and dark phases, with TIMP-2 tending to be elevated during the daytime.MMP-2 protein expression is elevated in a mosaic pattern in surface corneal epithelial cells during the nighttime in Xenopus laevis, and may play a role in homeostatic surface cell desquamation by disrupting intercellular junctional proteins. The sequence of MMP secretion and activation, tight junction protein cleavage, and subsequent surface

  20. Crystal structure of GAP50, the anchor of the invasion machinery in the inner membrane complex of Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Jürgen; Paige, Matthew H; Vaidya, Akhil B; Bergman, Lawrence W; Hol, Wim G J

    2012-04-01

    The glideosome associated protein GAP50 is an essential protein in apicomplexan parasites such as Plasmodium, Toxoplasma and Cryptosporidium, several species of which are important human pathogens. The 44.6kDa protein is part of a multi-protein complex known as the invasion machinery or glideosome, which is required for cell invasion and substrate gliding motility empowered by an actin-myosin motor. GAP50 is anchored through its C-terminal transmembrane helix into the inner membrane complex and interacts via a short six residue C-terminal tail with other proteins of the invasion machinery in the pellicle of the parasite. In this paper we describe the 1.7Å resolution crystal structure of the soluble GAP50 domain from the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. The structure shows an αßßα fold with overall similarity to purple acid phosphatases with, however, little homology regarding the nature of the residues in the active site region of the latter enzyme. While purple acid phosphatases contain a phosphate bridged binuclear Fe-site coordinated by seven side chains with the Fe-ions 3.2Å apart, GAP50 in our crystals contains two cobalt ions each with one protein ligand and a distance between the Co(2+) ions of 18Å. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The novel endosomal membrane protein Ema interacts with the class C Vps-HOPS complex to promote endosomal maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sungsu; Wairkar, Yogesh P; Daniels, Richard W; DiAntonio, Aaron

    2010-03-08

    Endosomal maturation is critical for accurate and efficient cargo transport through endosomal compartments. Here we identify a mutation of the novel Drosophila gene, ema (endosomal maturation defective) in a screen for abnormal synaptic overgrowth and defective protein trafficking. Ema is an endosomal membrane protein required for trafficking of fluid-phase and receptor-mediated endocytic cargos. In the ema mutant, enlarged endosomal compartments accumulate as endosomal maturation fails, with early and late endosomes unable to progress into mature degradative late endosomes and lysosomes. Defective endosomal down-regulation of BMP signaling is responsible for the abnormal synaptic overgrowth. Ema binds to and genetically interacts with Vps16A, a component of the class C Vps-HOPS complex that promotes endosomal maturation. The human orthologue of ema, Clec16A, is a candidate susceptibility locus for autoimmune disorders, and its expression rescues the Drosophila mutant demonstrating conserved function. Characterizing this novel gene family identifies a new component of the endosomal pathway and provides insights into class C Vps-HOPS complex function.

  2. THE EFFECT OF INSULIN LIKE GROWTH FACTOR – I COMPLEX TO CORELATION MALONDIALDEHIDE CONCENTRATE WITH INTAC MEMBRAN PLASMA OF SPERM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suherni Susilowati

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was study of Insulin Like Growth -I Complex to level of malondialdehide (MDA and percentage of intact membrane plasm. Report of several species suggest that seminal plasma contains factors that may influence sperm viability. Seminal plasma was reported to be important for maintaining spermatozoa motility in bull and ram. For improving ram sperm viability and for increasing the resistance of boar spermatozoa to cold shock damage. IGF-I has been identified in the testis, where secreted by Leydig and Sertoli cells. Collection of semen by using artificial vagina from male goats and then characterized of motility and viability of spermatozoa. Identification of Insulin Like Growth Factor –I Complex were done by Native-PAGE 12% techniques, after several bands were identified and was done isolate of first band protein Insulin Like Growth Factor-I Complex. Insulin Like Growth Factor – I (IGF-I Complex seminal plasma have molecular weight of 150,288 kDa, respectively. Sperm preparation for this research by centrifugation of semen with Bracket and Oliphan’s medium. These sperm preparation were characterized of motility, viability. Then after sperm preparation divided into three groups. The group I, added with Bracket and Oliphan’t medium, group II added with Bracket Oliphan’t and IGF – I Complex medium, group III added with IGF – I Complex medium and then were exposed 45 minutes for incubation and then percentage of MPU and level of MDA was evaluated. The result of this research showed that percentage of level MDA has significant different between group I,group II and group III, (p<0,05. The percentage of MPU sperm has significant different between groups I, group II and group III (p<0,05. The highest of percentage MPU was found in group III and the lower of level MDA was found in group III. Regresion test showed that negative correlation between level of MDA and percentage of MPU sperm.

  3. Paracellular drug absorption enhancement through tight junction modulation

    OpenAIRE

    Lemmer, Hendrik Jacobus Righard; Josias H. Hamman

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Inclusion of absorption-enhancing agents in dosage forms is one approach to improve the bioavailability of active pharmaceutical ingredients with low membrane permeability. Tight junctions are dynamic protein structures that form a regulated barrier for movement of molecules through the intercellular spaces across the intestinal epithelium. Some drug absorption enhancers are capable of loosening tight junctions and thereby facilitate paracellular absorption of drug molecules. ...

  4. F-Theory Description of 3-String Junction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANGFu-Zhong

    2003-01-01

    The geometrical description of BPS 3-string junction in the F-theory background is given by lifting a string junction in lib into F-theory and constructing a holomorphic curve in K3 with respect to a special complex structure of K3. The holomorphic curve is fibration of 1-cycles of the elliptic fiber over the geodesic string junction. The F-theory picture in this paper provides a unifying description of both string and string junction, and is advantageous over their M-theory picture.

  5. F-Theory Description of 3-String Junction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Fu-Zhong

    2003-01-01

    The geometrical description of BPS 3-string junction in the F-theory background is given by lifting a string junction in IIB into F-theory and constructing a holomorphic curve in K3 with respect to a special complex structure of K3. The holomorphic curve is fibration of 1-cycles of the elliptic fiber over the geodesic string junction. The F-theory picture in this paper provides a unifying description of both string and string junction, and is advantageous over their M-theory picture.

  6. Alteration of Tight and Adherens Junctions on 50-Hz Magnetic Field Exposure in Madin Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoltán Somosy

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Adherens (AJ and tight junctions (TJ, as integrated parts of the junctional complex, are multifunctional specialized regions of the cell membrane in epithelial cells. They are responsible for cell-to-cell interactions and also have great importance in cellular signaling processes including Wnt protein-mediated signals. As electromagnetic field (EMF exposure is known to cause alterations in the function as well as supramolecular organization of different cell contacts, our goal was to investigate the effect of 50-Hz magnetic field (MF exposures on the subcellular distribution of some representative structural proteins (occludin, β-catenin, and cadherin found in AJ and TJ. Additionally, cellular β-catenin content was also quantified by Western blot analysis. 50-Hz MF exposures seemed to increase the staining intensity (amount of occludin, cadherins, and β-catenin in the junctional area of MDCK cells, while Western blot data indicated the quantity of b-catenin was found significantly decreased at both time points after EM exposures. Our results demonstrate that MF are able to modify the distribution of TJ and AJ structural proteins, tending to stabilize these cell contacts. The quantitative changes of β-catenin suggest a causative relationship between MF effects on the cell junctional complex and the Wnt signaling pathway.

  7. Comparative analysis of theophylline and cholera toxin in rat colon reveals an induction of sealing tight junction proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markov, Alexander G; Falchuk, Evgeny L; Kruglova, Natalia M; Rybalchenko, Oksana V; Fromm, Michael; Amasheh, Salah

    2014-11-01

    Claudin tight junction proteins have been identified to primarily determine intestinal epithelial barrier properties. While functional contribution of single claudins has been characterized in detail, information on the interplay with secretory mechanisms in native intestinal epithelium is scarce. Therefore, effects of cholera toxin and theophylline on rat colon were analyzed, including detection of sealing claudins. Tissue specimens were stripped off submucosal tissue layers and mounted in Ussing chambers, and short-circuit current (ISC) and transepithelial resistance (TER) were recorded. In parallel, expression and localization of claudins was analyzed and histological studies were performed employing hematoxylin-eosin staining and light and electron microscopy. Theophylline induced a strong increase of ISC in colon tissue specimens. In parallel, a decrease of TER was observed. In contrast, cholera toxin did not induce a significant increase of ISC, whereas an increase of TER was detected after 120 min. Western blots of membrane fractions revealed an increase of claudin-3 and -4 after incubation with cholera toxin, and theophylline induced an increase of claudin-4. In accordance, confocal laser-scanning microscopy exhibited increased signals of claudin-3 and -4 after incubation with cholera toxin, and increased signals of claudin-4 after incubation with theophylline, within tight junction complexes. Morphological analyses revealed no general changes of tight junction complexes, but intercellular spaces were markedly widened after incubation with cholera toxin and theophylline. We conclude that cholera toxin and theophylline have different effects on sealing tight junction proteins in native colon preparations, which may synergistically contribute to transport functions, in vitro.

  8. An ER-resident membrane protein complex regulates nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit composition at the synapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almedom, Ruta B; Liewald, Jana F; Hernando, Guillermina; Schultheis, Christian; Rayes, Diego; Pan, Jie; Schedletzky, Thorsten; Hutter, Harald; Bouzat, Cecilia; Gottschalk, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are homo- or heteropentameric ligand-gated ion channels mediating excitatory neurotransmission and muscle activation. Regulation of nAChR subunit assembly and transfer of correctly assembled pentamers to the cell surface is only partially understood. Here, we characterize an ER transmembrane (TM) protein complex that influences nAChR cell-surface expression and functional properties in Caenorhabditis elegans muscle. Loss of either type I TM protein, NRA-2 or NRA-4 (nicotinic receptor associated), affects two different types of muscle nAChRs and causes in vivo resistance to cholinergic agonists. Sensitivity to subtype-specific agonists of these nAChRs is altered differently, as demonstrated by whole-cell voltage-clamp of dissected adult muscle, when applying exogenous agonists or after photo-evoked, channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) mediated acetylcholine (ACh) release, as well as in single-channel recordings in cultured embryonic muscle. These data suggest that nAChRs desensitize faster in nra-2 mutants. Cell-surface expression of different subunits of the ‘levamisole-sensitive' nAChR (L-AChR) is differentially affected in the absence of NRA-2 or NRA-4, suggesting that they control nAChR subunit composition or allow only certain receptor assemblies to leave the ER. PMID:19609303

  9. A protein complex in the brush-border membrane explains a Hartnup disorder allele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczuk, Sonja; Bröer, Angelika; Tietze, Nadine; Vanslambrouck, Jessica M; Rasko, John E J; Bröer, Stefan

    2008-08-01

    Protein absorption in the intestine is mediated by proteases and brush-border peptidases together with peptide and amino acid transporters. Neutral amino acids are generated by a variety of aminopeptidases and carboxypeptidases and are subsequently taken up by the amino acid transporter B(0)AT1 (SLC6A19), which is mutated in Hartnup disorder. Coexpression of B(0)AT1 together with the brush-border carboxypeptidase angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) in Xenopus laevis oocytes led to a dramatic increase of transporter expression at the oocyte surface. Other members of the SLC6 family were not stimulated by coexpression with ACE2. Addition of a peptide containing a carboxyterminal leucine residue to ACE2- and B(0)AT1-coexpressing oocytes caused inward currents due to Na(+)-leucine cotransport, demonstrating the formation of a metabolic complex. Coexpression of the Hartnup disorder causing mutation B(0)AT1(R240Q) showed reduced interaction with ACE2 and its renal paralogue collectrin. This would result in reduced surface expression in both kidney and intestine, thereby explaining the onset of the disorder in individuals carrying this mutation.

  10. Bead-based flow-cytometry for semi-quantitative analysis of complex membrane vesicle populations released by bacteria and host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volgers, Charlotte; Benedikter, Birke J; Grauls, Gert E; Savelkoul, Paul H M; Stassen, Frank R M

    2017-07-01

    During infection, the release of nano-sized membrane vesicle is a process which is common both for bacteria and host cells. Host cell-derived membrane vesicles can be involved in innate and adaptive immunity whereas bacterial membrane vesicles can contribute to bacterial pathogenicity. To study the contribution of both membrane vesicle populations during infection is highly complicated as most vesicles fall within a similar size range of 30-300nm. Specialized techniques for purification are required and often no single technique complies on its own. Moreover, techniques for vesicle quantification are either complicated to use or do not distinguish between host cell-derived and bacterial membrane vesicle subpopulations. Here we demonstrate a bead-based platform that allows a semi-quantitatively analysis by flow-cytometry of bacterial and host-cell derived membrane vesicles. We show this method can be used to study heterogeneous and complex vesicle populations composed of bacterial and host-cell membrane vesicles. The easy accessible design of the protocol makes it also highly suitable for screening procedures to assess how intrinsic and environmental factors affect vesicle release. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. No junctional communication between epithelial cells in hydra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Laat, S W; Tertoolen, L G; Grimmelikhuijzen, C J

    1980-01-01

    junctions between epithelial cells of hydra. However, until now, there has been no report published on whether these junctions enable the epithelial cells to exchange molecules of small molecular weight, as has been described in other organisms. Therefore we decided to investigate the communicative...... properties of the junctional membranes by electrophysiological methods and by intracellular-dye iontophoresis. We report here that no electrotonic coupling is detectable between epithelial cells of Hydra attenuata in: (1) intact animals, (2) head-regenerating animals, (3) cell re-aggregates, and (4) hydra...

  12. Equivalent Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyadjiev, T. L.; Semerdjieva, E. G.; Shukrinov, Yu. M.

    2008-01-01

    The magnetic field dependences of critical current are numerically constructed for a long Josephson junction with a shunt-or resistor-type microscopic inhomogeneities and compared to the critical curve of a junction with exponentially varying width. The numerical results show that it is adequate to replace the distributed inhomogeneity of a long Josephson junction by an inhomogeneity localized at one of its ends, which has certain technological advantages. It is also shown that the critical curves of junctions with exponentially varying width and inhomogeneities localized at the ends are unaffected by the mixed fluxon-antifluxon distributions of the magnetic flow. This fact may explain the improvement of the spectra of microwave radiation noted in the literature.

  13. Distribution of interleukin-1 receptor complex at the synaptic membrane driven by interleukin-1β and NMDA stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardoni, Fabrizio; Boraso, Mariaserena; Zianni, Elisa; Corsini, Emanuela; Galli, Corrado L; Cattabeni, Flaminio; Marinovich, Marina; Di Luca, Monica; Viviani, Barbara

    2011-02-11

    Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that contributes to neuronal injury in various degenerative diseases, and is therefore a potential therapeutic target. It exerts its biological effect by activating the interleukin-1 receptor type I (IL-1RI) and recruiting a signalling core complex consisting of the myeloid differentiation primary response protein 88 (MyD88) and the IL-1R accessory protein (IL-1RAcP). This pathway has been clearly described in the peripheral immune system, but only scattered information is available concerning the molecular composition and distribution of its members in neuronal cells. The findings of this study show that IL-1RI and its accessory proteins MyD88 and IL-1RAcP are differently distributed in the hippocampus and in the subcellular compartments of primary hippocampal neurons. In particular, only IL-1RI is enriched at synaptic sites, where it co-localises with, and binds to the GluN2B subunit of NMDA receptors. Furthermore, treatment with NMDA increases IL-1RI interaction with NMDA receptors, as well as the surface expression and localization of IL-1RI at synaptic membranes. IL-1β also increases IL-1RI levels at synaptic sites, without affecting the total amount of the receptor in the plasma membrane. Our results reveal for the first time the existence of a dynamic and functional interaction between NMDA receptor and IL-1RI systems that could provide a molecular basis for IL-1β as a neuromodulator in physiological and pathological events relying on NMDA receptor activation.

  14. Distribution of interleukin-1 receptor complex at the synaptic membrane driven by interleukin-1β and NMDA stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinovich Marina

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Interleukin-1β (IL-1β is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that contributes to neuronal injury in various degenerative diseases, and is therefore a potential therapeutic target. It exerts its biological effect by activating the interleukin-1 receptor type I (IL-1RI and recruiting a signalling core complex consisting of the myeloid differentiation primary response protein 88 (MyD88 and the IL-1R accessory protein (IL-1RAcP. This pathway has been clearly described in the peripheral immune system, but only scattered information is available concerning the molecular composition and distribution of its members in neuronal cells. The findings of this study show that IL-1RI and its accessory proteins MyD88 and IL-1RAcP are differently distributed in the hippocampus and in the subcellular compartments of primary hippocampal neurons. In particular, only IL-1RI is enriched at synaptic sites, where it co-localises with, and binds to the GluN2B subunit of NMDA receptors. Furthermore, treatment with NMDA increases IL-1RI interaction with NMDA receptors, as well as the surface expression and localization of IL-1RI at synaptic membranes. IL-1β also increases IL-1RI levels at synaptic sites, without affecting the total amount of the receptor in the plasma membrane. Our results reveal for the first time the existence of a dynamic and functional interaction between NMDA receptor and IL-1RI systems that could provide a molecular basis for IL-1β as a neuromodulator in physiological and pathological events relying on NMDA receptor activation.

  15. Insight in the transport behavior of copper glycinate complexes through the porcine gastrointestinal membrane using an Ussing chamber assisted by mass spectrometry analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tastet, Laure; Schaumlöffel, Dirk; Yiannikouris, Alexandros; Power, Ronan; Lobinski, Ryszard

    2010-04-01

    An Ussing chamber study was conducted in order to investigate the transport behavior of copper glycinate complexes through a porcine gastrointestinal membrane. Organic copper complexes such as copper tri- and tetraglycinates (GGG-Cu(II) and GGGG-Cu(II)) were used as model system. In a novel analytical approach the Ussing chamber was combined with mass spectrometry. Therefore, relevant analytical methods based on MALDI-MS and a coupling of capillary electrophoresis to ICP-MS and ESI-MS were developed for the determination of copper complexes in the mucosal and serosal half-chambers. It was found that 86.1+/-8.5% of copper triglycinate but only 20.8+/-9.9% of copper tetraglycinate penetrated the digestive membrane without modification. Furthermore, inorganic copper species were not detected but a new copper complex (m/z 442) was found to be formed in both compartments of the Ussing chamber. 2009 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. N-terminal arginines modulate plasma-membrane localization of Kv7.1/KCNE1 channel complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenawit Girmatsion

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: The slow delayed rectifier current (I(Ks is important for cardiac action potential termination. The underlying channel is composed of Kv7.1 α-subunits and KCNE1 β-subunits. While most evidence suggests a role of KCNE1 transmembrane domain and C-terminus for the interaction, the N-terminal KCNE1 polymorphism 38G is associated with reduced I(Ks and atrial fibrillation (a human arrhythmia. Structure-function relationship of the KCNE1 N-terminus for I(Ks modulation is poorly understood and was subject of this study. METHODS: We studied N-terminal KCNE1 constructs disrupting structurally important positively charged amino-acids (arginines at positions 32, 33, 36 as well as KCNE1 constructs that modify position 38 including an N-terminal truncation mutation. Experimental procedures included molecular cloning, patch-clamp recording, protein biochemistry, real-time-PCR and confocal microscopy. RESULTS: All KCNE1 constructs physically interacted with Kv7.1. I(Ks resulting from co-expression of Kv7.1 with non-atrial fibrillation '38S' was greater than with any other construct. Ionic currents resulting from co-transfection of a KCNE1 mutant with arginine substitutions ('38G-3xA' were comparable to currents evoked from cells transfected with an N-terminally truncated KCNE1-construct ('Δ1-38'. Western-blots from plasma-membrane preparations and confocal images consistently showed a greater amount of Kv7.1 protein at the plasma-membrane in cells co-transfected with the non-atrial fibrillation KCNE1-38S than with any other construct. CONCLUSIONS: The results of our study indicate that N-terminal arginines in positions 32, 33, 36 of KCNE1 are important for reconstitution of I(Ks. Furthermore, our results hint towards a role of these N-terminal amino-acids in membrane representation of the delayed rectifier channel complex.

  17. Theoretical and Experimental Thermal Performance Analysis of Complex Thermal Storage Membrane Containing Bio-Based Phase Change Material (PCM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosny, Jan [ORNL; Stovall, Therese K [ORNL; Shrestha, Som S [ORNL; Yarbrough, David W [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Since 2000, an ORNL research team has been testing different configurations of PCM-enhanced building envelop components to be used in residential and commercial buildings. During 2009, a novel type of thermal storage membrane was evaluated for building envelope applications. Bio-based PCM was encapsulated between two layers of heavy-duty plastic film forming a complex array of small PCM cells. Today, a large group of PCM products are packaged in such complex PCM containers or foils containing arrays of PCM pouches of different shapes and sizes. The transient characteristics of PCM-enhanced building envelope materials depend on the quality and amount of PCM, which is very often difficult to estimate because of the complex geometry of many PCM heat sinks. The only widely used small-scale analysis method used to evaluate the dynamic characteristics of PCM-enhanced building products is the differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). Unfortunately, this method requires relatively uniform, and very small, specimens of the material. However, in numerous building thermal storage applications, PCM products are not uniformly distributed across the surface area, making the results of traditional DSC measurements unrealistic for these products. In addition, most of the PCM-enhanced building products contain blends of PCM with fire retardants and chemical stabilizers. This combination of non-uniform distribution and non-homogenous composition make it nearly impossible to select a representative small specimen suitable for DSC tests. Recognizing these DSC limitations, ORNL developed a new methodology for performing dynamic heat flow analysis of complex PCM-enhanced building materials. An experimental analytical protocol to analyze the dynamic characteristics of PCM thermal storage makes use of larger specimens in a conventional heat-flow meter apparatus, and combines these experimental measurements with three-dimensional (3-D) finite-difference modeling and whole building energy

  18. Theoretical and Experimental Thermal Performance Analysis of Complex Thermal Storage Membrane Containing Bio-Based Phase Change Material (PCM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosny, Jan [ORNL; Stovall, Therese K [ORNL; Shrestha, Som S [ORNL; Yarbrough, David W [ORNL

    2010-12-01

    Since 2000, an ORNL research team has been testing different configurations of PCM-enhanced building envelop components to be used in residential and commercial buildings. During 2009, a novel type of thermal storage membrane was evaluated for building envelope applications. Bio-based PCM was encapsulated between two layers of heavy-duty plastic film forming a complex array of small PCM cells. Today, a large group of PCM products are packaged in such complex PCM containers or foils containing arrays of PCM pouches of different shapes and sizes. The transient characteristics of PCM-enhanced building envelope materials depend on the quality and amount of PCM, which is very often difficult to estimate because of the complex geometry of many PCM heat sinks. The only widely used small-scale analysis method used to evaluate the dynamic characteristics of PCM-enhanced building products is the differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). Unfortunately, this method requires relatively uniform, and very small, specimens of the material. However, in numerous building thermal storage applications, PCM products are not uniformly distributed across the surface area, making the results of traditional DSC measurements unrealistic for these products. In addition, most of the PCM-enhanced building products contain blends of PCM with fire retardants and chemical stabilizers. This combination of non-uniform distribution and non-homogenous composition make it nearly impossible to select a representative small specimen suitable for DSC tests. Recognizing these DSC limitations, ORNL developed a new methodology for performing dynamic heat flow analysis of complex PCM-enhanced building materials. An experimental analytical protocol to analyze the dynamic characteristics of PCM thermal storage makes use of larger specimens in a conventional heat-flow meter apparatus, and combines these experimental measurements with three-dimensional (3-D) finite-difference modeling and whole building energy

  19. A histologic, histomorphometric, and radiographic comparison between two complexes of CenoBoen/CenoMembrane and Bio-Oss/Bio-Gide in lateral ridge augmentation: A clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Babak Amoian; Ehsan Moudi; Maryam Seyed Majidi; S. M. Ali Tabatabaei

    2016-01-01

    Background: Several grafting materials have been used for alveolar ridge augmentation. The literature lacks researches to compare CenoBone to other grafting materials. The aim of this study was to compare CenoBone/CenoMembrane complex to Bio-Oss/Bio-Gide complex in lateral alveolar bone augmentation in terms of radiographic, histologic, and histomorphometric parameters. Materials and Methods: In this randomized controlled trial, ten patients who needed lateral ridge augmentation were sele...

  20. Intercellular junctions of the hen parathyroid gland. A freeze-fracture study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setoguti, T; Inoue, Y; Suematsu, T

    1982-01-01

    The fine structure of the intercellular junctions of the hen parathyroid gland was studied using freeze-fracture replicas and thin sections. In the conventional thin sections, desmosomes, intermediate junctions (maculae adherentes) and gap junctions were observed, and in the lanthanum-fixed sections, tight junctions (maculae occludentes) were demonstrated as well. In the freeze-fracture replicas, desmosomes, gap junctions, tight junctions and combination forms of gap and tight junctions occurred, but intermediate junctions were not identified. Junctional complexes (zonulae occludentes) were not encountered in any preparations. The gap junctions varied in size and shape; they ranged from irregularly shaped, minute assemblages of particles to large aggregations of a round or elliptic outline. Both the tight junctions and the combination forms of gap and tight junctions also exhibited a variety of shape and dimension, and, depending on the form of the tight junctional strands, they were classified into three types: type I consisted of a simple line of strands; type II consisted of a closed network of strands; and type III consisted of an open network of strands. The combination forms were more numerous than the typical tight junctions. The possible significance of these junctions is discussed in relation to the function of the parathyroid parenchymal cell. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 PMID:7174510

  1. Quantum Junction Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Tang, Jiang

    2012-09-12

    Colloidal quantum dot solids combine convenient solution-processing with quantum size effect tuning, offering avenues to high-efficiency multijunction cells based on a single materials synthesis and processing platform. The highest-performing colloidal quantum dot rectifying devices reported to date have relied on a junction between a quantum-tuned absorber and a bulk material (e.g., TiO 2); however, quantum tuning of the absorber then requires complete redesign of the bulk acceptor, compromising the benefits of facile quantum tuning. Here we report rectifying junctions constructed entirely using inherently band-aligned quantum-tuned materials. Realizing these quantum junction diodes relied upon the creation of an n-type quantum dot solid having a clean bandgap. We combine stable, chemically compatible, high-performance n-type and p-type materials to create the first quantum junction solar cells. We present a family of photovoltaic devices having widely tuned bandgaps of 0.6-1.6 eV that excel where conventional quantum-to-bulk devices fail to perform. Devices having optimal single-junction bandgaps exhibit certified AM1.5 solar power conversion efficiencies of 5.4%. Control over doping in quantum solids, and the successful integration of these materials to form stable quantum junctions, offers a powerful new degree of freedom to colloidal quantum dot optoelectronics. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  2. Target-stimulated metallic HgS nanostructures on a DNA-based polyion complex membrane for highly efficient impedimetric detection of dissolved hydrogen sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Junyang; Fu, Libing; Lai, Wenqiang; Tang, Dianping; Chen, Guonan

    2013-12-11

    Target-stimulated metallic HgS nanostructures formed on the DNA-based polyion complex (PIC) membrane were for the first time utilized as an efficient scheme for impedimetric detection of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) by coupling insoluble precipitation with sensitivity enhancement.

  3. Soluble form of membrane attack complex independently predicts mortality and cardiovascular events in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Søren; Pedersen, Sune H; Mogelvang, Rasmus

    2012-01-01

    The complement system is an important mediator of inflammation, which plays a pivotal role in atherosclerosis and acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Animal studies suggest that activation of the complement cascade resulting in the formation of soluble membrane attack complex (sMAC), contributes...

  4. Cell junction proteins within the cochlea:A review of recent research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Wang; Bohua Hu; Shiming Yang

    2015-01-01

    Cell—cell junctions in the cochlea are highly complex and well organized. The role of these junctions is to maintain structural and functional integrity of the cochlea. In this review, we describe classification of cell junction-associated proteins identified within the cochlea and provide a brief overview of the function of these proteins in adherent junctions, gap junctions and tight junctions. Copyright © 2016, PLA General Hospital Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery. Production and hosting by Elsevier (Singapore) Pte Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

  5. The EhCPADH112 Complex of Entamoeba histolytica Interacts with Tight Junction Proteins Occludin and Claudin-1 to Produce Epithelial Damage

    OpenAIRE

    Abigail Betanzos; Rosario Javier-Reyna; Guillermina García-Rivera; Cecilia Bañuelos; Lorenza González-Mariscal; Michael Schnoor; Esther Orozco

    2013-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica, the protozoan responsible for human amoebiasis, causes between 30,000 and 100,000 deaths per year worldwide. Amoebiasis is characterized by intestinal epithelial damage provoking severe diarrhea. However, the molecular mechanisms by which this protozoan causes epithelial damage are poorly understood. Here, we studied the initial molecular interactions between the E. histolytica EhCPADH112 virulence complex and epithelial MDCK and Caco-2 cells. By confocal microscopy, we...

  6. Thermal stability, complexing behavior, and ionic transport of polymeric gel membranes based on polymer PVdF-HFP and ionic liquid, [BMIM][BF4].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalu; Chaurasia, S K; Singh, R K; Chandra, S

    2013-01-24

    PVdF-HFP + IL(1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate; [BMIM][BF(4)]) polymeric gel membranes containing different amounts of ionic liquid have been synthesized and characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and complex impedance spectroscopic techniques. Incorporation of IL in PVdF-HFP polymer changes different physicochemical properties such as melting temperature (T(m)), thermal stability, structural morphology, amorphicity, and ionic transport. It is shown by FTIR, TGA (also first derivative of TGA, "DTGA") that IL partly complexes with the polymer PVdF-HFP and partly remains dispersed in the matrix. The ionic conductivity of polymeric gel membranes has been found to increase with increasing concentration of IL and attains a maximum value of 1.6 × 10(-2) S·cm(-1) for polymer gel membrane containing 90 wt % IL at room temperature. Interestingly, the values of conductivity of membranes with 80 and 90 wt % of IL were higher than that of pure IL (100 wt %). The polymer chain breathing model has been suggested to explain it. The variation of ionic conductivity with temperature of these gel polymeric membranes follows Arrhenius type thermally activated behavior.

  7. Fabrication of copper-selective PVC membrane electrode based on newly synthesized copper complex of Schiff base as carrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulekh Chandra

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The newly synthesized copper(II complex of Schiff base p-hydroxyacetophenone semicarbazone was explored as neutral ionophore for the fabrication of poly(vinylchloride (PVC based membrane electrode selective to Cu(II ions. The electrode shows a Nernstian slope of 29.8 ± 0.3 mV/decade with improved linear range of 1.8 × 10−7 to 1.0 × 10−1 M, comparatively lower detection limit 5.7 × 10−8 M between pH range of 2.0–8.0, giving a relatively fast response within 5s and can be used for at least 16 weeks without any divergence in potential. The selectivity coefficient was calculated using the fixed interference method (FIM. The electrode can also be used in partially non-aqueous media having up to 25% (v/v methanol, ethanol or acetone content with no significant change in the value of slope or working concentration range. It was successfully applied for the direct determination of copper content in water and tea samples with satisfactory results. The electrode has been used in the potentiometric titration of Cu2+ with EDTA.

  8. Membrane proteins of the triad junction and excitation-contraction coupling in skeletal muscles%骨骼肌三联管膜蛋白与兴奋收缩偶联

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马国震; 李文惠; 骆硕; 马彦芬

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The mechanism of excitation-contraction coupling (E-C coupling) in skeletal muscles and a fast and responsive E-C coupling mechanism directly determine the motor ability. The triad junction, which is the specific structure in skeletal muscles,is the infrastructures of E-C coupling. The membrane proteins in the triads play a key role in the development of the triads,maintaining the normal structural form of the triads and exerting the triadic full functions.OBJECTIVE: To review the research advances of triadic membrane proteins and to summarize the structure and functions of dihydropyridine receptor (DHPR), ryanodine receptor, MG29 protein, JP protein, Calumin and STIM1 protein, calsequestrin and TRIC.METHODS: Papers regarding skeletal muscle senescence and power-velocity were searched by computer in databases of CNKI,Duxiu, Elsevier SD and Springer Link from 1980 to 2010. The change laws of skeletal muscle power-velocity with aging and effect of this law on muscle was analyzed.RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Totally 28 documents were included in this paper. Literature summary showed that, DHPR,ryanodine receptor, MG29 protein, JP protein, Calumin and STIM1 protein, calsequestrin and TRIC doing its own job in skeletal muscles, all of them play an indispensable role in maintaining normal function of skeletal muscles. However, the study of these proteins remains limited. which need further exDloration.%背景:骨骼肌的兴奋收缩偶联机制及快速、有效的兴奋收缩偶联直接决定了运动能力.三联管是骨骼肌中特有的结构,是兴奋收缩偶联的结构基础.位于三联管上的膜蛋白在三联管结构的发育、正常形态的维持和功能的发挥中均起着关键作用.目的:介绍三联管膜蛋白的研究进展,对双氢吡啶受体蛋白,兰诺定受体蛋白,MG29 蛋白,JP 蛋白,Calumin 与STIM1蛋白,隐钙素和TRIC 通道蛋白等的结构和功能进行了归纳总结.方法:电子检索中国学术期刊数据

  9. Emerging relationship between CFTR, actin and tight junction organization in cystic fibrosis airway epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellani, Stefano; Favia, Maria; Guerra, Lorenzo; Carbone, Annalucia; Abbattiscianni, Anna Claudia; Di Gioia, Sante; Casavola, Valeria; Conese, Massimo

    2017-05-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF), one of the most common genetic disorders affecting primarily Caucasians, is due to mutations in the CF Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) gene, encoding for a chloride channel also acting as regulator of other transmembrane proteins. In healthy subjects, CFTR is maintained in its correct apical plasma membrane location via the formation of a multiprotein complex in which scaffold proteins (such as NHERF1) and signaling molecules (such as cAMP and protein kinases) guarantee its correct functioning. In CF, a disorganized and dysfunctional airway epithelium brings an altered flux of ions and water into the lumen of bronchioles, consequent bacterial infections and an enormous influx of inflammatory cells (mainly polymorphonuclear neutrophils) into the airway lumen. Recent evidence in healthy airway cells supports the notion that CFTR protein/function is strictly correlated with the actin cytoskeleton and tight junctions status. In CF cells, the most frequent CFTR gene mutation, F508del, has been shown to be associated with a disorganized actin cytoskeleton and altered tight junction permeability. Thus, the correct localization of CFTR on the apical plasma membrane domain through the formation of the scaffolding and signaling complex is likely fundamental to determine a physiological airway epithelium. The correction of CFTR mutations by either gene or drug therapies, as well as by stem cell-based interventions, can determine the resumption of a physiological organization of actin stress fibers and TJ structure and barrier function, further indicating the close interrelationship among these processes.

  10. Fingerprinting the macro-organisation of pigment-protein complexes in plant thylakoid membranes in vivo by circular-dichroism spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, Tünde N; Rai, Neha; Solymosi, Katalin; Zsiros, Ottó; Schröder, Wolfgang P; Garab, Győző; van Amerongen, Herbert; Horton, Peter; Kovács, László

    2016-09-01

    Macro-organisation of the protein complexes in plant thylakoid membranes plays important roles in the regulation and fine-tuning of photosynthetic activity. These delicate structures might, however, undergo substantial changes during isolating the thylakoid membranes or during sample preparations, e.g., for electron microscopy. Circular-dichroism (CD) spectroscopy is a non-invasive technique which can thus be used on intact samples. Via excitonic and psi-type CD bands, respectively, it carries information on short-range excitonic pigment-pigment interactions and the macro-organisation (chiral macrodomains) of pigment-protein complexes (psi, polymer or salt-induced). In order to obtain more specific information on the origin of the major psi-type CD bands, at around (+)506, (-)674 and (+)690nm, we fingerprinted detached leaves and isolated thylakoid membranes of wild-type and mutant plants and also tested the effects of different environmental conditions in vivo. We show that (i) the chiral macrodomains disassemble upon mild detergent treatments, but not after crosslinking the protein complexes; (ii) in different wild-type leaves of dicotyledonous and monocotyledonous angiosperms the CD features are quite robust, displaying very similar excitonic and psi-type bands, suggesting similar protein composition and (macro-) organisation of photosystem II (PSII) supercomplexes in the grana; (iii) the main positive psi-type bands depend on light-harvesting protein II contents of the membranes; (iv) the (+)506nm band appears only in the presence of PSII-LHCII supercomplexes and does not depend on the xanthophyll composition of the membranes. Hence, CD spectroscopy can be used to detect different macro-domains in the thylakoid membranes with different outer antenna compositions in vivo.

  11. Recognition of membrane-bound fusion-peptide/MPER complexes by the HIV-1 neutralizing 2F5 antibody: implications for anti-2F5 immunogenicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nerea Huarte

    Full Text Available The membrane proximal external region (MPER of the fusogenic HIV-1 glycoprotein-41 harbors the epitope sequence recognized by 2F5, a broadly neutralizing antibody isolated from an infected individual. Structural mimicry of the conserved MPER 2F5 epitope constitutes a pursued goal in the field of anti-HIV vaccine development. It has been proposed that 2F5 epitope folding into its native state is attained in the vicinity of the membrane interface and might involve interactions with other viral structures. Here we present results indicating that oligomeric complexes established between MPER and the conserved amino-terminal fusion peptide (FP can partition into lipid vesicles and be specifically bound by the 2F5 antibody at their surfaces. Cryo-transmission electron microscopy of liposomes doped with MPER:FP peptide mixtures provided the structural grounds for complex recognition by antibody at lipid bilayer surfaces. Supporting the immunogenicity of the membrane-bound complex, these MPER:FP peptide-vesicle formulations could trigger cross-reactive anti-MPER antibodies in rabbits. Thus, our observations suggest that contacts with N-terminal regions of gp41 may stabilize the 2F5 epitope as a membrane-surface antigen.

  12. High resolution clear native electrophoresis is a good alternative to blue native electrophoresis for the characterization of the Escherichia coli membrane complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diéguez-Casal, Ernesto; Freixeiro, Paula; Costoya, Liliana; Criado, M Teresa; Ferreirós, Carlos; Sánchez, Sandra

    2014-07-01

    Blue native electrophoresis (BNE) has become the most popular method for the global analysis of membrane protein complexes. Although it has been shown to be very useful for that purpose, it can produce the dissociation of complexes with weak interactions and, due to the use of Coomassie Brilliant Blue, does not allow the subsequent application of fluorimetric and/or enzymatic techniques. Recently, we have successfully used the high resolution clear native electrophoresis (hrCNE) for the analysis of Neisseria meningitidis outer membrane porin complexes. The aim of this study was to determine the composition of the complexome of the Escherichia coli envelope by using hrCNE and to compare our results with those previously obtained using BNE. The bidimensional electrophoresis approaches used, hrCN/hrCNE and hrCN/SDS-PAGE, coupled to mass spectrometry allowed a detailed analysis of the complexome of E. coli membranes. For the first time, the three subunits of the formate dehydrogenase FDH-O were identified forming a single complex and hrCNE also allowed the identification of both the HflK and HflC proteins as components of the HflA complex. This technique also allowed us to suggest a relationship between OmpF and DLDH and, although OmpA is considered to be monomeric in vivo, we found this protein structured as homodimers. Thus hrCNE provides a good tool for future analyses of bacterial membrane proteins and complexes and is an important alternative to the commonly used BNE.

  13. FGF receptor-4 (FGFR4) polymorphism acts as an activity switch of a membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase - FGFR4 complex

    OpenAIRE

    Sugiyama, N.; Varjosalo, M.; Meller, P.; Lohi, J; Chan, K.M.; Zhou, Z.; Alitalo, K; Taipale, J; Keski-Oja, J.; Lehti, K

    2010-01-01

    Tumor cells use membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) for invasion and metastasis. However, the signaling mechanisms that underlie MT1-MMP regulation in cancer have remained unclear. Using a systematic gain-of-function kinome screen for MT1-MMP activity, we have here identified kinases that significantly enhance MT1-MMP activity in tumor cells. In particular, we discovered an MT1-MMP/FGF receptor-4 (FGFR4) membrane complex that either stimulates or suppresses MT1-MMP and FGFR4 ac...

  14. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of calmodulin in complex with the regulatory domain of the plasma-membrane Ca2+-ATPase ACA8

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tidow, Henning; Hein, Kim Langmach; Bækgaard, Lone

    2010-01-01

    -bound calmodulin (Ca(2+)-CaM) to this tail and a conformational change that displaces the autoinhibitory tail from the catalytic domain. The complex between calmodulin and the regulatory domain of the plasma-membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase ACA8 from Arabidopsis thaliana has been crystallized. The crystals belonged to space......Plasma-membrane Ca(2+)-ATPases (PMCAs) are calcium pumps that expel Ca(2+) from eukaryotic cells to maintain overall Ca(2+) homoeostasis and to provide local control of intracellular Ca(2+) signalling. They are of major physiological importance, with different isoforms being essential, for example...

  15. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of calmodulin in complex with the regulatory domain of the plasma-membrane Ca2+-ATPase ACA8

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tidow, Henning; Hein, Kim Langmach; Palmgren, Michael Broberg

    2010-01-01

    -bound calmodulin (Ca2+-CaM) to this tail and a conformational change that displaces the autoinhibitory tail from the catalytic domain. The complex between calmodulin and the regulatory domain of the plasma-membrane Ca2+-ATPase ACA8 from Arabidopsis thaliana has been crystallized. The crystals belonged to space......Plasma-membrane Ca2+-ATPases (PMCAs) are calcium pumps that expel Ca2+ from eukaryotic cells to maintain overall Ca2+ homoeostasis and to provide local control of intracellular Ca2+ signalling. They are of major physiological importance, with different isoforms being essential, for example...

  16. Polyphosphonium-based ion bipolar junction transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielsson, Erik O; Tybrandt, Klas; Berggren, Magnus

    2014-11-01

    Advancements in the field of electronics during the past few decades have inspired the use of transistors in a diversity of research fields, including biology and medicine. However, signals in living organisms are not only carried by electrons but also through fluxes of ions and biomolecules. Thus, in order to implement the transistor functionality to control biological signals, devices that can modulate currents of ions and biomolecules, i.e., ionic transistors and diodes, are needed. One successful approach for modulation of ionic currents is to use oppositely charged ion-selective membranes to form so called ion bipolar junction transistors (IBJTs). Unfortunately, overall IBJT device performance has been hindered due to the typical low mobility of ions, large geometries of the ion bipolar junction materials, and the possibility of electric field enhanced (EFE) water dissociation in the junction. Here, we introduce a novel polyphosphonium-based anion-selective material into npn-type IBJTs. The new material does not show EFE water dissociation and therefore allows for a reduction of junction length down to 2 μm, which significantly improves the switching performance of the ion transistor to 2 s. The presented improvement in speed as well the simplified design will be useful for future development of advanced iontronic circuits employing IBJTs, for example, addressable drug-delivery devices.

  17. Proteomic Analysis of the Rat Canalicular Membrane Reveals Expression of a Complex System of P4-ATPases in Liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaubey, Pururawa Mayank; Hofstetter, Lia; Roschitzki, Bernd; Stieger, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Transport processes in the canalicular membrane are key elements in bile formation and are the driving force of the enterohepatic circulation of bile salts. The canalicular membrane is constantly exposed to the detergent action of bile salts. One potential element protecting the canalicular membrane from the high canalicular bile salt concentrations may be bile salt resistant microdomains, however additional factors are likely to play a role. To obtain more insights into the molecular composition of the canalicular membrane, the proteome of highly purified rat canalicular membrane vesicles was determined. Isolated rat canalicular membrane vesicles were stripped from adhering proteins, deglycosylated and protease digested before subjecting the samples to shot gun proteomic analysis. The expression of individual candidates was studied by PCR, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. A total of 2449 proteins were identified, of which 1282 were predicted to be membrane proteins. About 50% of the proteins identified here were absent from previously published liver proteomes. In addition to ATP8B1, four more P4-ATPases were identified. ATP8A1 and ATP9A showed expression specific to the canalicular membrane, ATP11C at the bLPM and ATP11A in an intracellular vesicular compartment partially colocalizing with RAB7A and EEA1 as markers of the endosomal compartment. This study helped to identify additional P4-ATPases from rat liver particularly in the canalicular membrane, previously not known to be expressed in liver. These P4-ATPases might be contributing for maintaining transmembrane lipid homeostasis in hepatocytes.

  18. Folding outer membrane proteins independently of the β-barrel assembly machinery: an assembly pathway for multimeric complexes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huysmans, Gerard H M

    2016-06-15

    Since the discovery of the essential role of the β-barrel assembly machinery (BAM) for the membrane insertion of outer membrane proteins (OMPs) that are unrelated in sequence, members of this universally conserved family dominate discussions on OMP assembly in bacteria, mitochondria and chloroplasts. However, several multimeric bacterial OMPs assemble independently of the catalyzing BAM-component BamA. Recent progress on this alternative pathway is reviewed here, and a model for BAM-independent assembly for multimeric OMPs is proposed in which monomer delivery to the membrane and stable prepore formation are key steps towards productive membrane insertion.

  19. Malaria Parasite CLAG3, a Protein Linked to Nutrient Channels, Participates in High Molecular Weight Membrane-Associated Complexes in the Infected Erythrocyte.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayvan Zainabadi

    Full Text Available Malaria infected erythrocytes show increased permeability to a number of solutes important for parasite growth as mediated by the Plasmodial Surface Anion Channel (PSAC. The P. falciparum clag3 genes have recently been identified as key determinants of PSAC, though exactly how they contribute to channel function and whether additional host/parasite proteins are required remain unknown. To begin to answer these questions, I have taken a biochemical approach. Here I have used an epitope-tagged CLAG3 parasite to perform co-immunoprecipitation experiments using membrane fractions of infected erythrocytes. Native PAGE and mass spectrometry studies reveal that CLAG3 participate in at least three different high molecular weight complexes: a ~720kDa complex consisting of CLAG3, RHOPH2 and RHOPH3; a ~620kDa complex consisting of CLAG3 and RHOPH2; and a ~480kDa complex composed solely of CLAG3. Importantly, these complexes can be found throughout the parasite lifecycle but are absent in untransfected controls. Extracellular biotin labeling and protease susceptibility studies localize the 480kDa complex to the erythrocyte membrane. This complex, likely composed of a homo-oligomer of 160kDa CLAG3, may represent a functional subunit, possibly the pore, of PSAC.

  20. Operating condition and membrane thickness of microcapsules generated by complex coacervation method; Coacervation ho ni yoru seisei microcapsule no sosa joken to capsule makuatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kage, H.; Ogura, H.; Matsuno, Y. [Kyushu Institute of Technology, Kitakyushu (Japan); Kunimasa, M. [Takeda Chemical Industries, Ltd., Osaka (Japan); Kawahara, H. [Dainippon Ink Chemicals, Inc., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-03-10

    Microencapsulation of glass beads with a narrow size distribution was carried out by complex coacervation of gelatin and acacia. The coacervation process was observed in detail and the effects of agitation strength, cooling rate, addition time of core material, addition plans of acetic acid and distilled water, and heating rate in the hardening process on membrane thickness of the microcapsules were investigated systematically. The membrane thickness of the microcapsules increased under the operating conditions where low cooling rate and relatively strong agitation were utilized, and pH was changed moderately by discrete addition of acetic acid or distilled water over a certain time interval. It became clear that strict control of operating conditions at 19{degree}C in the cooling process where the viscosity of the coacervate suddenly increases is remarkably important for the control of membrane thickness. 3 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Correlation between spatial (3D) structure of pea and bean thylakoid membranes and arrangement of chlorophyll-protein complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rumak, Izabela; Mazur, Radoslaw; Gieczewska, Katarzyna; Koziol-Lipinska, Joanna; Kierdaszuk, Borys; Michalski, Wojtek P.; Shiell, Brian J.; Venema, Jan Henk; Vredenberg, Wim J.; Mostowska, Agnieszka; Garstka, Maciej

    2012-01-01

    Background: The thylakoid system in plant chloroplasts is organized into two distinct domains: grana arranged in stacks of appressed membranes and non-appressed membranes consisting of stroma thylakoids and margins of granal stacks. It is argued that the reason for the development of appressed membr

  2. Detection and analysis of protein-protein interactions in organellar and prokaryotic proteomes by native gel electrophoresis: (Membrane) protein complexes and supercomplexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Frank

    2006-07-01

    It is an essential and challenging task to unravel protein-protein interactions in their actual in vivo context. Native gel systems provide a separation platform allowing the analysis of protein complexes on a rather proteome-wide scale in a single experiment. This review focus on blue-native (BN)-PAGE as the most versatile and successful gel-based approach to separate soluble and membrane protein complexes of intricate protein mixtures derived from all biological sources. BN-PAGE is a charge-shift method with a running pH of 7.5 relying on the gentle binding of anionic CBB dye to all membrane and many soluble protein complexes, leading to separation of protein species essentially according to their size and superior resolution than other fractionation techniques can offer. The closely related colorless-native (CN)-PAGE, whose applicability is restricted to protein species with intrinsic negative net charge, proved to provide an especially mild separation capable of preserving weak protein-protein interactions better than BN-PAGE. The essential conditions determining the success of detecting protein-protein interactions are the sample preparations, e.g. the efficiency/mildness of the detergent solubilization of membrane protein complexes. A broad overview about the achievements of BN- and CN-PAGE studies to elucidate protein-protein interactions in organelles and prokaryotes is presented, e.g. the mitochondrial protein import machinery and oxidative phosphorylation supercomplexes. In many cases, solubilization with digitonin was demonstrated to facilitate an efficient and particularly gentle extraction of membrane protein complexes prone to dissociation by treatment with other detergents. In general, analyses of protein interactomes should be carried out by both BN- and CN-PAGE.

  3. Compositional asynchronous membrane systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cosmin Bonchis; Cornel Izbasa; Gabriel Ciobanu

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an algorithmic way of building complex membrane systems by coupling elementary membranes. Its application seems particularly valuable in the case of asynchronous membrane systems, since the resulting membrane system remains asynchronous. The composition method is based on a handshake mechanism implemented by using antiport rules and promoters.

  4. A comprehensive review of the lipid cubic phase or in meso method for crystallizing membrane and soluble proteins and complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caffrey, Martin, E-mail: martin.caffrey@tcd.ie [Trinity College Dublin, Dublin (Ireland)

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive and up-to-date review of the lipid cubic phase or in meso method for crystallizing membrane and soluble proteins and complexes is reported. Recent applications of the method for in situ serial crystallography at X-ray free-electron lasers and synchrotrons are described. The lipid cubic phase or in meso method is a robust approach for crystallizing membrane proteins for structure determination. The uptake of the method is such that it is experiencing what can only be described as explosive growth. This timely, comprehensive and up-to-date review introduces the reader to the practice of in meso crystallogenesis, to the associated challenges and to their solutions. A model of how crystallization comes about mechanistically is presented for a more rational approach to crystallization. The possible involvement of the lamellar and inverted hexagonal phases in crystallogenesis and the application of the method to water-soluble, monotopic and lipid-anchored proteins are addressed. How to set up trials manually and automatically with a robot is introduced with reference to open-access online videos that provide a practical guide to all aspects of the method. These range from protein reconstitution to crystal harvesting from the hosting mesophase, which is noted for its viscosity and stickiness. The sponge phase, as an alternative medium in which to perform crystallization, is described. The compatibility of the method with additive lipids, detergents, precipitant-screen components and materials carried along with the protein such as denaturants and reducing agents is considered. The powerful host and additive lipid-screening strategies are described along with how samples that have low protein concentration and cell-free expressed protein can be used. Assaying the protein reconstituted in the bilayer of the cubic phase for function is an important element of quality control and is detailed. Host lipid design for crystallization at low temperatures and for

  5. Alpha-catenin-Dependent Recruitment of the Centrosomal Protein CAP350 to Adherens Junctions Allows Epithelial Cells to Acquire a Columnar Shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurbano, Angel; Formstecher, Etienne; Martinez-Morales, Juan R.; Bornens, Michel; Rios, Rosa M.

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial morphogenesis involves a dramatic reorganisation of the microtubule cytoskeleton. How this complex process is controlled at the molecular level is still largely unknown. Here, we report that the centrosomal microtubule (MT)-binding protein CAP350 localises at adherens junctions in epithelial cells. By two-hybrid screening, we identified a direct interaction of CAP350 with the adhesion protein α-catenin that was further confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation experiments. Block of epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin)-mediated cell-cell adhesion or α-catenin depletion prevented CAP350 localisation at cell-cell junctions. Knocking down junction-located CAP350 inhibited the establishment of an apico-basal array of microtubules and impaired the acquisition of columnar shape in Madin-Darby canine kidney II (MDCKII) cells grown as polarised epithelia. Furthermore, MDCKII cystogenesis was also defective in junctional CAP350-depleted cells. CAP350-depleted MDCKII cysts were smaller and contained either multiple lumens or no lumen. Membrane polarity was not affected, but cortical microtubule bundles did not properly form. Our results indicate that CAP350 may act as an adaptor between adherens junctions and microtubules, thus regulating epithelial differentiation and contributing to the definition of cell architecture. We also uncover a central role of α-catenin in global cytoskeleton remodelling, in which it acts not only on actin but also on MT reorganisation during epithelial morphogenesis. PMID:25764135

  6. Outer membrane protein complex of Meningococcus enhances the antipolysaccharide antibody response to pneumococcal polysaccharide-CRM₁₉₇ conjugate vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Zengzu; Schreiber, John R

    2011-05-01

    Bacterial polysaccharides (PS) are T cell-independent antigens that do not induce immunologic memory and are poor immunogens in infants. Conjugate vaccines in which the PS is covalently linked to a carrier protein have enhanced immunogenicity that resembles that of T cell-dependent antigens. The Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) conjugate vaccine, which uses the outer membrane protein complex (OMPC) from meningococcus as a carrier protein, elicits protective levels of anti-capsular PS antibody (Ab) after a single dose, in contrast to other conjugate vaccines, which require multiple doses. We have previously shown that OMPC robustly engages Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and enhances the early anti-Hib PS Ab titer associated with an increase in TLR2-mediated induction of cytokines. We now show that the addition of OMPC to the 7-valent pneumococcal PS-CRM₁₉₇ conjugate vaccine during immunization significantly increases the anti-PS IgG and IgM responses to most serotypes of pneumococcus contained in the vaccine. The addition of OMPC also increased the likelihood of anti-PS IgG3 production against serotypes 4, 6B, 9V, 18C, 19F, and 23F. Splenocytes from mice who had received OMPC with the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine produced significantly more interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) than splenocytes from mice who received phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) plus the conjugate vaccine. We conclude that OMPC enhances the anti-PS Ab response to pneumococcal PS-CRM₁₉₇ conjugate vaccine, an effect associated with a distinct change in cytokine profile. It may be possible to reduce the number of conjugate vaccine doses required to achieve protective Ab levels by priming with adjuvants that are TLR2 ligands.

  7. Model cell membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Günther-Pomorski, Thomas; Nylander, Tommy; Cardenas Gomez, Marite

    2014-01-01

    The high complexity of biological membranes has motivated the development and application of a wide range of model membrane systems to study biochemical and biophysical aspects of membranes in situ under well defined conditions. The aim is to provide fundamental understanding of processes...... controlled by membrane structure, permeability and curvature as well as membrane proteins by using a wide range of biochemical, biophysical and microscopic techniques. This review gives an overview of some currently used model biomembrane systems. We will also discuss some key membrane protein properties...... that are relevant for protein-membrane interactions in terms of protein structure and how it is affected by membrane composition, phase behavior and curvature....

  8. Reduction of Gap Junctional Conductance by Microinjection of Antibodies against the 27-kDa Liver Gap Junction Polypeptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertzberg, E. L.; Spray, D. C.; Bennett, M. V. L.

    1985-04-01

    Antibody raised against isolated rat liver gap junctions was microinjected into coupled cells in culture to assess its influence on gap junctional conductance. A rapid inhibition of fluorescent dye transfer and electrical coupling was produced in pairs of freshly dissociated adult rat hepatocytes and myocardial cells as well as in pairs of superior cervical ganglion neurons from neonatal rats cultured under conditions in which electrotonic synapses form. The antibodies have been shown by indirect immunofluorescence to bind to punctate regions of the plasma membrane in liver. By immunoreplica analysis of rat liver homogenates, plasma membranes, and isolated gap junctions resolved on NaDodSO4/polyacrylamide gels, binding was shown to be specific for the 27-kDa major polypeptide of gap junctions. This and similar antibodies should provide a tool for further investigation of the role of cell-cell communication mediated by gap junctions and indicate that immunologically similar polypeptides comprise gap junctions in adult mammalian cells derived from all three germ layers.

  9. Porous rod-like MgO complex membrane with good anti-bacterial activity directed by conjugated linolenic acid polymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hua-Jie, E-mail: wanghuajie972001@163.com; Chen, Meng [Henan Normal University, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering (China); Mi, Li-Wei, E-mail: mlwzzu@163.com [Zhongyuan University of Technology, Center for Advanced Materials Research (China); Shi, Li-Hua [Anyang 101 Education Center (China); Cao, Ying, E-mail: caoying1130@sina.com [Zhongyuan University of Technology, Center for Advanced Materials Research (China)

    2016-02-15

    The problem of infection in the tissue engineering substitutes is driving us to seek new coating materials. We previously found that conjugated linolenic acid (CLnA) has well biocompatibility and excellent membrane-forming property. The objective of this study is to endow the anti-bacterial activity to CLnA membra ne by linking with MgO. The results showed that the CLnA polymer membrane can be loaded with porous rod-like MgO and such complex membrane showed anti-bacterial sensitivity against gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus) even at the low concentration (0.15 μg/mm{sup 2}). In the present study, the best zone of inhibition got to 18.2 ± 0.8 mm when the amount of MgO reach 2.42 ± 0.58 μg/mm{sup 2}. It was deduced that the porous rod-like structure of MgO was directed by CLnA in its polymerization process. Such CLnA/MgO complex membrane can be helpful in the tissue engineering, medicine, food engineering, food preservation, etc. on the basis of its good anti-bacterial activity.

  10. The human myotendinous junction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, A B; Larsen, M; Mackey, Abigail

    2015-01-01

    The myotendinous junction (MTJ) is a specialized structure in the musculotendinous system, where force is transmitted from muscle to tendon. Animal models have shown that the MTJ takes form of tendon finger-like processes merging with muscle tissue. The human MTJ is largely unknown and has never ...

  11. Doped semiconductor nanocrystal junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borowik, Ł.; Mélin, T., E-mail: thierry.melin@isen.iemn.univ-lille1.fr [Institut d’Electronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie, CNRS-UMR8520, Avenue Poincaré, F-59652 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); Nguyen-Tran, T.; Roca i Cabarrocas, P. [Laboratoire de Physique des Interfaces et des Couches Minces, CNRS-UMR7647, Ecole Polytechnique, F-91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2013-11-28

    Semiconductor junctions are the basis of electronic and photovoltaic devices. Here, we investigate junctions formed from highly doped (N{sub D}≈10{sup 20}−10{sup 21}cm{sup −3}) silicon nanocrystals (NCs) in the 2–50 nm size range, using Kelvin probe force microscopy experiments with single charge sensitivity. We show that the charge transfer from doped NCs towards a two-dimensional layer experimentally follows a simple phenomenological law, corresponding to formation of an interface dipole linearly increasing with the NC diameter. This feature leads to analytically predictable junction properties down to quantum size regimes: NC depletion width independent of the NC size and varying as N{sub D}{sup −1/3}, and depleted charge linearly increasing with the NC diameter and varying as N{sub D}{sup 1/3}. We thus establish a “nanocrystal counterpart” of conventional semiconductor planar junctions, here however valid in regimes of strong electrostatic and quantum confinements.

  12. Proteomic Analysis of the Rat Canalicular Membrane Reveals Expression of a Complex System of P4-ATPases in Liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pururawa Mayank Chaubey

    Full Text Available Transport processes in the canalicular membrane are key elements in bile formation and are the driving force of the enterohepatic circulation of bile salts. The canalicular membrane is constantly exposed to the detergent action of bile salts. One potential element protecting the canalicular membrane from the high canalicular bile salt concentrations may be bile salt resistant microdomains, however additional factors are likely to play a role. To obtain more insights into the molecular composition of the canalicular membrane, the proteome of highly purified rat canalicular membrane vesicles was determined. Isolated rat canalicular membrane vesicles were stripped from adhering proteins, deglycosylated and protease digested before subjecting the samples to shot gun proteomic analysis. The expression of individual candidates was studied by PCR, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. A total of 2449 proteins were identified, of which 1282 were predicted to be membrane proteins. About 50% of the proteins identified here were absent from previously published liver proteomes. In addition to ATP8B1, four more P4-ATPases were identified. ATP8A1 and ATP9A showed expression specific to the canalicular membrane, ATP11C at the bLPM and ATP11A in an intracellular vesicular compartment partially colocalizing with RAB7A and EEA1 as markers of the endosomal compartment. This study helped to identify additional P4-ATPases from rat liver particularly in the canalicular membrane, previously not known to be expressed in liver. These P4-ATPases might be contributing for maintaining transmembrane lipid homeostasis in hepatocytes.

  13. Junction trees of general graphs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaofei WANG; Jianhua GUO

    2008-01-01

    In this paper,we study the maximal prime subgraphs and their corresponding structure for any undirected graph.We introduce the notion of junction trees and investigate their structural characteristics,including junction properties,induced-subtree properties,running-intersection properties and maximum-weight spanning tree properties.Furthermore,the characters of leaves and edges on junction trees are discussed.

  14. Integrative Structure–Function Mapping of the Nucleoporin Nup133 Suggests a Conserved Mechanism for Membrane Anchoring of the Nuclear Pore Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Joong; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Sampathkumar, Parthasarathy; Martel, Anne; Matsui, Tsutomu; Tsuruta, Hiro; Weiss, Thomas M.; Shi, Yi; Markina-Inarrairaegui, Ane; Bonanno, Jeffery B.; Sauder, J. Michael; Burley, Stephen K.; Chait, Brian T.; Almo, Steven C.; Rout, Michael P.; Sali, Andrej

    2014-08-19

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) is the sole passageway for the transport of macromolecules across the nuclear envelope. Nup133, a major component in the essential Y-shaped Nup84 complex, is a large scaffold protein of the NPC's outer ring structure. Here, we describe an integrative modeling approach that produces atomic models for multiple states of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Sc) Nup133, based on the crystal structures of the sequence segments and their homologs, including the related Vanderwaltozyma polyspora (Vp) Nup133 residues 55 to 502 (VpNup13355–502) determined in this study, small angle X-ray scattering profiles for 18 constructs of ScNup133 and one construct of VpNup133, and 23 negative-stain electron microscopy class averages of ScNup1332–1157. Using our integrative approach, we then computed a multi-state structural model of the full-length ScNup133 and validated it with mutational studies and 45 chemical cross-links determined via mass spectrometry. Finally, the model of ScNup133 allowed us to annotate a potential ArfGAP1 lipid packing sensor (ALPS) motif in Sc and VpNup133 and discuss its potential significance in the context of the whole NPC; we suggest that ALPS motifs are scattered throughout the NPC's scaffold in all eukaryotes and play a major role in the assembly and membrane anchoring of the NPC in the nuclear envelope. Our results are consistent with a common evolutionary origin of Nup133 with membrane coating complexes (the protocoatomer hypothesis); the presence of the ALPS motifs in coatomer-like nucleoporins suggests an ancestral mechanism for membrane recognition present in early membrane coating complexes.

  15. Role of PINK1 binding to the TOM complex and alternate intracellular membranes in recruitment and activation of the E3 ligase Parkin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarou, Michael; Jin, Seok Min; Kane, Lesley A; Youle, Richard J

    2012-02-14

    Mutations in the mitochondrial kinase PINK1 and the cytosolic E3 ligase Parkin can cause Parkinson's disease. Damaged mitochondria accumulate PINK1 on the outer membrane where, dependent on kinase activity, it recruits and activates Parkin to induce mitophagy, potentially maintaining organelle fidelity. How PINK1 recruits Parkin is unknown. We show that endogenous PINK1 forms a 700 kDa complex with the translocase of the outer membrane (TOM) selectively on depolarized mitochondria whereas PINK1 ectopically targeted to the outer membrane retains association with TOM on polarized mitochondria. Inducibly targeting PINK1 to peroxisomes or lysosomes, which lack a TOM complex, recruits Parkin and activates ubiquitin ligase activity on the respective organelles. Once there, Parkin induces organelle selective autophagy of peroxisomes but not lysosomes. We propose that the association of PINK1 with the TOM complex allows rapid reimport of PINK1 to rescue repolarized mitochondria from mitophagy, and discount mitochondrial-specific factors for Parkin translocation and activation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Overdamped Josephson junctions for digital applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Febvre, P., E-mail: Pascal.Febvre@univ-savoie.fr [University of Savoie, IMEP-LAHC – CNRS UMR5130, 73376 Le Bourget du Lac (France); De Leo, N.; Fretto, M.; Sosso, A. [I.N.Ri.M., Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica, Strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 Torino (Italy); Belogolovskii, M. [Donetsk Institute for Physics and Engineering, 72 R. Luxemburg str., 83114 Donetsk (Ukraine); Collot, R. [University of Savoie, IMEP-LAHC – CNRS UMR5130, 73376 Le Bourget du Lac (France); Lacquaniti, V. [I.N.Ri.M., Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica, Strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 Torino (Italy)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: ► Properties of self-shunted sub-micron Nb/Al–AlO{sub x}/Nb SNIS junctions are studied. ► 1–100 kA/cm{sup 2} current densities and 0.1–0.7 mV critical voltages are obtained. ► The critical voltage-vs-temperature behavior of SNIS junctions is discussed. ► Numerical results showing an effect of the aluminum film thickness are presented. ► A Josephson balanced comparator is studied for different temperatures of operation. -- Abstract: An interesting feature of Superconductor–Normal metal–Superconductor Josephson junctions for digital applications is due to their non-hysteretic current–voltage characteristics in a broad temperature range below T{sub c}. This allows to design Single-Flux-Quantum (SFQ) cells without the need of external shunts. Two advantages can be drawn from this property: first the SFQ cells can be more compact which leads to a more integrated solution towards nano-devices and more complex circuits; second the absence of electrical parasitic elements associated with the wiring of resistors external to the Josephson junctions increases the performance of SFQ circuits, in particular regarding the ultimate speed of operation. For this purpose Superconductor–Normal metal–Insulator–Superconductor Nb/Al–AlO{sub x}/Nb Josephson junctions have been recently developed at INRiM with aluminum layer thicknesses between 30 and 100 nm. They exhibit non-hysteretic current–voltage characteristics with I{sub c}R{sub n} values higher than 0.5 mV in a broad temperature range and optimal Stewart McCumber parameters at 4.2 K for RSFQ applications. The main features of obtained SNIS junctions regarding digital applications are presented.

  17. Complex reconstruction of the dorsal hand using the induced membrane technique associated with bone substitute: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivien Moris

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: The induced membrane technique allowed the reconstruction of small bone deficits in the long bones of the hand in a two-step procedure, the first step taking place in an emergency context of composite tissue trauma.

  18. Complex formation between primycin and ergosterol: entropy-driven initiation of modification of the fungal plasma membrane structure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Virág, Eszter; Pesti, Miklós; Kunsági-Máté, Sándor

    2012-01-01

    The interaction of the antibiotic primycin with the main fungal sterol, ergosterol, was investigated in vitro in order to monitor the effect of primycin on the fungal plasma membrane at the molecular level...

  19. Interaction of the human N-Ras protein with lipid raft model membranes of varying degrees of complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Alexander; Nikolaus, Jörg; Weise, Katrin; Triola, Gemma; Waldmann, Herbert; Winter, Roland; Herrmann, Andreas; Huster, Daniel

    2014-07-01

    Ternary lipid mixtures composed of cholesterol, saturated (frequently with sphingosine backbone), and unsaturated phospholipids show stable phase separation and are often used as model systems of lipid rafts. Yet, their ability to reproduce raft properties and function is still debated. We investigated the properties and functional aspects of three lipid raft model systems of varying degrees of biological relevance--PSM/POPC/Chol, DPPC/POPC/Chol, and DPPC/DOPC/Chol--using 2H solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, fluorescence microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. While some minor differences were observed, the general behavior and properties of all three model mixtures were similar to previously investigated influenza envelope lipid membranes, which closely mimic the lipid composition of biological membranes. For the investigation of the functional aspects, we employed the human N-Ras protein, which is posttranslationally modified by two lipid modifications that anchor the protein to the membrane. It was previously shown that N-Ras preferentially resides in liquid-disordered domains and exhibits a time-dependent accumulation in the domain boundaries of influenza envelope lipid membranes. For all three model mixtures, we observed the same membrane partitioning behavior for N-Ras. Therefore, we conclude that even relatively simple models of raft membranes are able to reproduce many of their specific properties and functions.

  20. The mitochondrial contact site complex, a determinant of mitochondrial architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harner, Max; Körner, Christian; Walther, Dirk; Mokranjac, Dejana; Kaesmacher, Johannes; Welsch, Ulrich; Griffith, Janice; Mann, Matthias; Reggiori, Fulvio; Neupert, Walter

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondria are organelles with a complex architecture. They are bounded by an envelope consisting of the outer membrane and the inner boundary membrane (IBM). Narrow crista junctions (CJs) link the IBM to the cristae. OMs and IBMs are firmly connected by contact sites (CS). The molecular nature of the CS remained unknown. Using quantitative high-resolution mass spectrometry we identified a novel complex, the mitochondrial contact site (MICOS) complex, formed by a set of mitochondrial membrane proteins that is essential for the formation of CS. MICOS is preferentially located at the CJs. Upon loss of one of the MICOS subunits, CJs disappear completely or are impaired, showing that CJs require the presence of CS to form a superstructure that links the IBM to the cristae. Loss of MICOS subunits results in loss of respiratory competence and altered inheritance of mitochondrial DNA. PMID:22009199

  1. Dual Role of Mitofilin in Mitochondrial Membrane Organization and Protein Biogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    von der Malsburg, Karina; Mueller, Judith M.; Bohnert, Maria; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Kwiatkowska, Paulina; Becker, Thomas; Loniewska-Lwowska, Adrianna; Wiese, Sebastian; Rao, Sanjana; Milenkovic, Dusanka; Hutu, Dana P.; Zerbes, Ralf M.; Schulze-Specking, Agnes; Meyer, Helmut E.; Martinou, Jean-Claude; Rospert, Sabine; Rehling, Peter; Meisinger, Chris; Veenhuis, Marten; Warscheid, Bettina; van der Klei, Ida J.; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Chacinska, Agnieszka; van der Laan, Martin; Müller, Judith M.

    2011-01-01

    The mitochondrial inner membrane consists of two domains, inner boundary membrane and cristae membrane that are connected by crista junctions. Mitofilin/Fcj1 was reported to be involved in formation of crista junctions, however, different views exist on its function and possible partner proteins. We

  2. Holliday junction resolvases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Haley D M; West, Stephen C

    2014-09-02

    Four-way DNA intermediates, called Holliday junctions (HJs), can form during meiotic and mitotic recombination, and their removal is crucial for chromosome segregation. A group of ubiquitous and highly specialized structure-selective endonucleases catalyze the cleavage of HJs into two disconnected DNA duplexes in a reaction called HJ resolution. These enzymes, called HJ resolvases, have been identified in bacteria and their bacteriophages, archaea, and eukaryotes. In this review, we discuss fundamental aspects of the HJ structure and their interaction with junction-resolving enzymes. This is followed by a brief discussion of the eubacterial RuvABC enzymes, which provide the paradigm for HJ resolvases in other organisms. Finally, we review the biochemical and structural properties of some well-characterized resolvases from archaea, bacteriophage, and eukaryotes. Copyright © 2014 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  3. Wireless Josephson Junction Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Laura

    2015-03-01

    We report low temperature, microwave transmission measurements on a wireless two- dimensional network of Josephson junction arrays composed of superconductor-insulator -superconductor tunnel junctions. Unlike their biased counterparts, by removing all electrical contacts to the arrays and superfluous microwave components and interconnects in the transmission line, we observe new collective behavior in the transmission spectra. In particular we will show emergent behavior that systematically responds to changes in microwave power at fixed temperature. Likewise we will show the dynamic and collective response of the arrays while tuning the temperature at fixed microwave power. We discuss these spectra in terms of the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition and Shapiro steps. We gratefully acknowledge the support Prof. Steven Anlage at the University of Maryland and Prof. Allen Goldman at the University of Minnesota. Physics and School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

  4. Mouse Hepatitis Virus Infection Remodels Connexin43-Mediated Gap Junction Intercellular Communication In Vitro and In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Rahul; Banerjee, Kaveri; Bose, Abhishek; Das Sarma, Jayasri

    2015-12-16

    Gap junctions (GJs) form intercellular channels which directly connect the cytoplasm between neighboring cells to facilitate the transfer of ions and small molecules. GJs play a major role in the pathogenesis of infection-associated inflammation. Mutations of gap junction proteins, connexins (Cxs), cause dysmyelination and leukoencephalopathy. In multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalitis (EAE), Cx43 was shown to be modulated in the central nervous system (CNS). The mechanism behind Cx43 alteration and its role in MS remains unexplored. Mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) infection-induced demyelination is one of the best-studied experimental animal models for MS. Our studies demonstrated that MHV infection downregulated Cx43 expression at protein and mRNA levels in vitro in primary astrocytes obtained from neonatal mouse brains. After infection, a significant amount of Cx43 was retained in endoplasmic reticulum/endoplasmic reticulum Golgi intermediate complex (ER/ERGIC) and GJ plaque formation was impaired at the cell surface, as evidenced by a reduction of the Triton X-100 insoluble fraction of Cx43. Altered trafficking and impairment of GJ plaque formation may cause the loss of functional channel formation in MHV-infected primary astrocytes, as demonstrated by a reduced number of dye-coupled cells after a scrape-loading Lucifer yellow dye transfer assay. Upon MHV infection, a significant downregulation of Cx43 was observed in the virus-infected mouse brain. This study demonstrates that astrocytic Cx43 expression and function can be modulated due to virus stress and can be an appropriate model to understand the basis of cellular mechanisms involved in the alteration of gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) in CNS neuroinflammation. We found that MHV infection leads to the downregulation of Cx43 in vivo in the CNS. In addition, results show that MHV infection impairs Cx43 expression in addition to gap junction

  5. Localization of the Carnation Italian ringspot virus replication protein p36 to the mitochondrial outer membrane is mediated by an internal targeting signal and the TOM complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gidda Satinder K

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carnation Italian ringspot virus (CIRV is a positive-strand RNA virus that causes massive structural alterations of mitochondria in infected host cells, the most conspicuous being the formation of numerous internal vesicles/spherules that are derived from the mitochondrial outer membrane and serve as the sites for viral RNA replication. While the membrane-bound components of the CIRV replication complex, including a 36-kD RNA-binding protein (p36, are known to be essential for these changes in mitochondrial morphology and are relatively well characterized in terms of their roles in nascent viral RNA synthesis, how these proteins are specifically targeted and inserted into mitochondria is poorly defined. Results Here we report on the molecular signal responsible for sorting p36 to the mitochondrial outer membrane. Using a combination of gain-of-function assays with portions of p36 fused to reporter proteins and domain-swapping assays with p36 and another closely-related viral RNA-binding protein, p33, that sorts specifically to the peroxisomal boundary membrane, we show that the mitochondrial targeting information in p36 resides within its two transmembrane domains (TMDs and intervening hydrophilic loop sequence. Comprehensive mutational analysis of these regions in p36 revealed that the primary targeting determinants are the moderate hydrophobicity of both TMDs and the positively-charged face of an amphipathic helix within the intervening loop sequence. We show also using bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC that p36 interacts with certain components of the translocase complex in the mitochondrial outer membrane (TOM, but not with the sorting and assembly machinery (SAM. Conclusion Our results provide insight to how viruses, such as CIRV, exploit specific host-cell protein sorting pathways to facilitate their replication. The characterization of the targeting and insertion of p36 into the mitochondrial outer

  6. The gap junction proteome and its relationship to disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laird, Dale W

    2010-02-01

    In recent years our understanding of connexins has advanced from viewing them simply as proteins with a surprisingly short lifespan that form gap junction channels. Connexins are now known to be multifaceted proteins at the core of many multiprotein complexes that link to structural junctional complexes and cytoskeletal elements, and also to the cellular machinery that facilitates their transport, assembly, function and internalization. Collectively, these connexin-binding proteins can be termed the 'gap junction proteome'. The mechanistic understanding of the gap junction proteome with regards to the dynamic life cycle of connexins has grown further in importance in light of the large number of human diseases attributed to connexin gene mutations and regulatory changes in connexin spatial localization and expression levels.

  7. NSF- and SNARE-mediated membrane fusion is required for nuclear envelope formation and completion of nuclear pore complex assembly in Xenopus laevis egg extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baur, Tina; Ramadan, Kristijan; Schlundt, Andreas; Kartenbeck, Jürgen; Meyer, Hemmo H

    2007-08-15

    Despite the progress in understanding nuclear envelope (NE) reformation after mitosis, it has remained unclear what drives the required membrane fusion and how exactly this is coordinated with nuclear pore complex (NPC) assembly. Here, we show that, like other intracellular fusion reactions, NE fusion in Xenopus laevis egg extracts is mediated by SNARE proteins that require activation by NSF. Antibodies against Xenopus NSF, depletion of NSF or the dominant-negative NSF(E329Q) variant specifically inhibited NE formation. Staging experiments further revealed that NSF was required until sealing of the envelope was completed. Moreover, excess exogenous alpha-SNAP that blocks SNARE function prevented membrane fusion and caused accumulation of non-flattened vesicles on the chromatin surface. Under these conditions, the nucleoporins Nup107 and gp210 were fully recruited, whereas assembly of FxFG-repeat-containing nucleoporins was blocked. Together, we define NSF- and SNARE-mediated membrane fusion events as essential steps during NE formation downstream of Nup107 recruitment, and upstream of membrane flattening and completion of NPC assembly.

  8. Dynamin-like protein 1 at the Golgi complex: a novel component of the sorting/targeting machinery en route to the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonekamp, Nina A; Vormund, Kerstin; Jacob, Ralf; Schrader, Michael

    2010-12-10

    The final step in the liberation of secretory vesicles from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) involves the mechanical action of the large GTPase dynamin as well as conserved dynamin-independent fission mechanisms, e.g. mediated by Brefeldin A-dependent ADP-ribosylated substrate (BARS). Another member of the dynamin family is the mammalian dynamin-like protein 1 (DLP1/Drp1) that is known to constrict and tubulate membranes, and to divide mitochondria and peroxisomes. Here, we examined a potential role for DLP1 at the Golgi complex. DLP1 localized to the Golgi complex in some but not all cell lines tested, thus explaining controversial reports on its cellular distribution. After silencing of DLP1, an accumulation of the apical reporter protein YFP-GL-GPI, but not the basolateral reporter VSVG-SP-GFP at the Golgi complex was observed. A reduction in the transport of YFP-GL-GPI to the plasma membrane was confirmed by surface immunoprecipitation and TGN-exit assays. In contrast, YFP-GL-GPI trafficking was not disturbed in cells silenced for BARS, which is involved in basolateral sorting and trafficking of VSVG-SP-GFP in COS-7 cells. Our data indicate a new role for DLP1 at the Golgi complex and thus a role for DLP1 as a novel component of the apical sorting machinery at the TGN is discussed.

  9. Dynamin-like protein 1 at the Golgi complex: A novel component of the sorting/targeting machinery en route to the plasma membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonekamp, Nina A. [Centre for Cell Biology and Department of Biology, University of Aveiro, Campus Universitario de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Vormund, Kerstin; Jacob, Ralf [Department of Cell Biology and Cell Pathology, University of Marburg, Robert-Koch-Str. 6, 35037 Marburg (Germany); Schrader, Michael, E-mail: mschrader@ua.pt [Centre for Cell Biology and Department of Biology, University of Aveiro, Campus Universitario de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)

    2010-12-10

    The final step in the liberation of secretory vesicles from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) involves the mechanical action of the large GTPase dynamin as well as conserved dynamin-independent fission mechanisms, e.g. mediated by Brefeldin A-dependent ADP-ribosylated substrate (BARS). Another member of the dynamin family is the mammalian dynamin-like protein 1 (DLP1/Drp1) that is known to constrict and tubulate membranes, and to divide mitochondria and peroxisomes. Here, we examined a potential role for DLP1 at the Golgi complex. DLP1 localized to the Golgi complex in some but not all cell lines tested, thus explaining controversial reports on its cellular distribution. After silencing of DLP1, an accumulation of the apical reporter protein YFP-GL-GPI, but not the basolateral reporter VSVG-SP-GFP at the Golgi complex was observed. A reduction in the transport of YFP-GL-GPI to the plasma membrane was confirmed by surface immunoprecipitation and TGN-exit assays. In contrast, YFP-GL-GPI trafficking was not disturbed in cells silenced for BARS, which is involved in basolateral sorting and trafficking of VSVG-SP-GFP in COS-7 cells. Our data indicate a new role for DLP1 at the Golgi complex and thus a role for DLP1 as a novel component of the apical sorting machinery at the TGN is discussed.

  10. A retinoic acid receptor RARα pool present in membrane lipid rafts forms complexes with G protein αQ to activate p38MAPK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskunov, A; Rochette-Egly, C

    2012-07-12

    Retinoic acid (RA) regulates several gene programs by nuclear RA receptors (RARs) that are ligand-dependent transcriptional transregulators. The basic mechanism for switching on transcription of cognate-target genes involves RAR binding at specific response elements and a network of interactions with coregulatory protein complexes. In addition to these classical genomic effects, we recently demonstrated that RA also induces the rapid activation of the p38MAPK/MSK1 pathway, with characteristic downstream consequences on the phosphorylation of RARs and the expression of their target genes. Here, we aimed at deciphering the underlying mechanism of the rapid non-genomic effects of RA. We highlighted a novel paradigm in which a fraction of the cellular RARα pool is present in membrane lipid rafts, where it forms complexes with G protein alpha Q (Gαq) in response to RA. This rapid RA-induced formation of RARα/Gαq complexes in lipid rafts is required for the activation of p38MAPK that occurs in response to RA. Accordingly, in RA-resistant cancer cells, characterized by the absence of p38MAPK activation, RARα present in membrane lipid rafts does not associate with Gαq, pointing out the essential contribution of RARα/Gαq complexes in RA signaling.

  11. Tight Junctions in Salivary Epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga J. Baker

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Epithelial cell tight junctions (TJs consist of a narrow belt-like structure in the apical region of the lateral plasma membrane that circumferentially binds each cell to its neighbor. TJs are found in tissues that are involved in polarized secretions, absorption functions, and maintaining barriers between blood and interstitial fluids. The morphology, permeability, and ion selectivity of TJ vary among different types of tissues and species. TJs are very dynamic structures that assemble, grow, reorganize, and disassemble during physiological or pathological events. Several studies have indicated the active role of TJ in intestinal, renal, and airway epithelial function; however, the functional significance of TJ in salivary gland epithelium is poorly understood. Interactions between different combinations of the TJ family (each with their own unique regulatory proteins define tissue specificity and functions during physiopathological processes; however, these interaction patterns have not been studied in salivary glands. The purpose of this review is to analyze some of the current data regarding the regulatory components of the TJ that could potentially affect cellular functions of the salivary epithelium.

  12. FasL, Fas, and death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) proteins are recruited to membrane rafts after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Angela R; Lotocki, George; Marcillo, Alex E; Dietrich, W Dalton; Keane, Robert W

    2007-05-01

    The Fas/CD95 receptor-ligand system plays an essential role in apoptosis that contributes to secondary damage after spinal cord injury (SCI), but the mechanism regulating the efficiency of FasL/Fas signaling in the central nervous system (CNS) is unknown. Here, FasL/Fas signaling complexes in membrane rafts were investigated in the spinal cord of adult female Fischer rats subjected to moderate cervical SCI and sham operation controls. In sham-operated animals, a portion of FasL, but not Fas was present in membrane rafts. SCI resulted in FasL and Fas translocation into membrane raft microdomains where Fas associates with the adaptor proteins Fas-associated death domain (FADD), caspase-8, cellular FLIP long form (cFLIPL ), and caspase-3, forming a death-inducing signaling complex (DISC). Moreover, SCI induced expression of Fas in clusters around the nucleus in both neurons and astrocytes. The formation of the DISC signaling platform leads to rapid activation of initiator caspase-8 and effector caspase-3, and the modification of signaling intermediates such as FADD and cFLIP(L) . Thus, FasL/Fas-mediated signaling after SCI is similar to Fas expressing Type I cell apoptosis.

  13. The tight junction protein ZO-2 and Janus kinase 1 mediate intercellular communications in vascular smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tkachuk, Natalia; Tkachuk, Sergey; Patecki, Margret [Department of Nephrology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover D-30625 (Germany); Kusch, Angelika [Department of Nephrology and Intensive Care Medicine, Charite Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Berlin D-13353 (Germany); Korenbaum, Elena; Haller, Hermann [Department of Nephrology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover D-30625 (Germany); Dumler, Inna, E-mail: dumler.inna@mh-hannover.de [Department of Nephrology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover D-30625 (Germany)

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} The tight junction protein ZO-2 associates with Jak1 in vascular smooth muscle cells via ZO-2 N-terminal fragment. {yields} Jak1 mediates ZO-2 tyrosine phosphorylation and ZO-2 localization to the sites of homotypic intercellular contacts. {yields} The urokinase receptor uPAR regulates ZO-2/Jak1 functional association. {yields} The ZO-2/Jak1/uPAR signaling complex is required for vascular smooth muscle cells functional network formation. -- Abstract: Recent evidence points to a multifunctional role of ZO-2, the tight junction protein of the MAGUK (membrane-associated guanylate kinase-like) family. Though ZO-2 has been found in cell types lacking tight junction structures, such as vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC), little is known about ZO-2 function in these cells. We provide evidence that ZO-2 mediates specific homotypic cell-to-cell contacts between VSMC. Using mass spectrometry we found that ZO-2 is associated with the non-receptor tyrosine kinase Jak1. By generating specific ZO-2 constructs we further found that the N-terminal fragment of ZO-2 molecule is responsible for this interaction. Adenovirus-based expression of Jak1 inactive mutant demonstrated that Jak1 mediates ZO-2 tyrosine phosphorylation. By means of RNA silencing, expression of Jak1 mutant form and fluorescently labeled ZO-2 fusion protein we further specified that active Jak1, but not Jak1 inactive mutant, mediates ZO-2 localization to the sites of intercellular contacts. We identified the urokinase receptor uPAR as a pre-requisite for these cellular events. Functional requirement of the revealed signaling complex for VSMC network formation was confirmed in experiments using Matrigel and in contraction assay. Our findings imply involvement of the ZO-2 tight junction independent signaling complex containing Jak1 and uPAR in VSMC intercellular communications. This mechanism may contribute to vascular remodeling in occlusive cardiovascular diseases and in arteriogenesis.

  14. Primordial membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanczyc, Martin M; Monnard, Pierre-Alain

    2017-01-01

    Cellular membranes, which are self-assembled bilayer structures mainly composed of lipids, proteins and conjugated polysaccharides, are the defining feature of cell physiology. It is likely that the complexity of contemporary cells was preceded by simpler chemical systems or protocells during the...

  15. Scattering form factors for self-assembled network junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, T.; Safran, S. A.; Sottmann, T.; Strey, R.

    2007-11-01

    The equilibrium microstructures in microemulsions and other self-assembled systems show complex, connected shapes such as symmetric bicontinuous spongelike structures and asymmetric bicontinuous networks formed by cylinders interconnected at junctions. In microemulsions, these cylinder network microstructures may mediate the structural transition from a spherical or globular phase to the bicontinuous microstructure. To understand the structural and statistical properties of such cylinder network microstructures as measured by scattering experiments, models are needed to extract the real-space structure from the scattering data. In this paper, we calculate the scattering functions appropriate for cylinder network microstructures. We focus on such networks that contain a high density of network junctions that connect the cylindrical elements. In this limit, the network microstructure can be regarded as an assembly of randomly oriented, closed packed network junctions (i.e., the cylinder scattering contributions are neglected). Accordingly, the scattering spectrum of the network microstructure can be calculated as the product of the junction number density, the junction form factor, which describes the scattering from the surface of a single junction, and a structure factor, which describes the local correlations of different junctions due to junction interactions (including their excluded volume). This approach is applied to analyze the scattering data from a bicontinuous microemulsion with equal volumes of water and oil. In a second approach, we included the cylinder scattering contribution in the junction form factor by calculating the scattering intensity of Y junctions to which three rods with spherical cross section are attached. The respective theoretical predictions are compared with results of neutron scattering measurements on a water-in-oil microemulsion with a connected microstructure.

  16. Complexity

    CERN Document Server

    Gershenson, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    The term complexity derives etymologically from the Latin plexus, which means interwoven. Intuitively, this implies that something complex is composed by elements that are difficult to separate. This difficulty arises from the relevant interactions that take place between components. This lack of separability is at odds with the classical scientific method - which has been used since the times of Galileo, Newton, Descartes, and Laplace - and has also influenced philosophy and engineering. In recent decades, the scientific study of complexity and complex systems has proposed a paradigm shift in science and philosophy, proposing novel methods that take into account relevant interactions.

  17. Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) assembles a macromolecular complex regulating growth and survival of prostate cancer cells "in vitro" and correlating with progression "in vivo".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perico, Maria Elisa; Grasso, Silvia; Brunelli, Matteo; Martignoni, Guido; Munari, Enrico; Moiso, Enrico; Fracasso, Giulio; Cestari, Tiziana; Naim, Hassan Y; Bronte, Vincenzo; Colombatti, Marco; Ramarli, Dunia

    2016-11-08

    The expression of Prostate Specific-Membrane Antigen (PSMA) increases in high-grade prostate carcinoma envisaging a role in growth and progression. We show here that clustering PSMA at LNCaP or PC3-PSMA cell membrane activates AKT and MAPK pathways thus promoting proliferation and survival. PSMA activity was dependent on the assembly of a macromolecular complex including filamin A, beta1 integrin, p130CAS, c-Src and EGFR. Within this complex beta1 integrin became activated thereby inducing a c-Src-dependent EGFR phosphorylation at Y1086 and Y1173 EGF-independent residues. Silencing or blocking experiments with drugs demonstrated that all the complex components were required for full PSMA-dependent promotion of cell growth and/or survival in 3D culture, but that p130CAS and EGFR exerted a major role. All PSMA complex components were found assembled in multiple samples of two high-grade prostate carcinomas and associated with EGFR phosphorylation at Y1086. The expression of p130CAS and pEGFRY1086 was thus analysed by tissue micro array in 16 castration-resistant prostate carcinomas selected from 309 carcinomas and stratified from GS 3+4 to GS 5+5. Patients with Gleason Score ≤5 resulted negative whereas those with GS≥5 expressed p130CAS and pEGFRY1086 in 75% and 60% of the cases, respectively.Collectively, our results demonstrate for the first time that PSMA recruits a functionally active complex which is present in high-grade patients. In addition, two components of this complex, p130CAS and the novel pEGFRY1086, correlate with progression in castration-resistant patients and could be therefore useful in therapeutic or surveillance strategies of these patients.

  18. A high-molecular-weight complex of membrane proteins BAP29/BAP31 is involved in the retention of membrane-bound IgD in the endoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schamel, Wolfgang W A; Kuppig, Stephan; Becker, Bernd; Gimborn, Kerstin; Hauri, Hans-Peter; Reth, Michael

    2003-08-19

    B cell antigen receptors (BCRs) are multimeric transmembrane protein complexes comprising membrane-bound immunoglobulins (mIgs) and Ig-alpha/Ig-beta heterodimers. In most cases, transport of mIgs from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the cell surface requires assembly with the Ig-alpha/Ig-beta subunits. In addition to Ig-alpha/Ig-beta, mIg molecules also bind two ER-resident membrane proteins, BAP29 and BAP31, and the chaperone heavy chain binding protein (BiP). In this article, we show that neither Ig-alpha/Ig-beta nor BAP29/BAP31 nor BiP bind simultaneously to the same mIgD molecule. Blue native PAGE revealed that only a minor fraction of intracellular mIgD is associated with high-molecular-weight BAP29/BAP31 complexes. BAP-binding to mIgs was found to correlate with ER retention of chimeric mIgD molecules. On high-level expression in Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells, mIgD molecules were detected on the cell surface in the absence of Ig-alpha/Ig-beta. This aberrant transport was prevented by coexpression of BAP29 and BAP31. Thus, BAP complexes contribute to ER retention of mIg complexes that are not bound to Ig-alpha/Ig-beta. Furthermore, the mechanism of ER retention of both BAP31 and mIgD is not through retrieval from a post-ER compartment, but true ER retention. In conclusion, BAP29 and BAP31 might be the long sought after retention proteins and/or chaperones that act on transmembrane regions of various proteins.

  19. Investigating how the attributes of self-associated drug complexes influence the passive transport of molecules through biological membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inacio, R; Barlow, D; Kong, X; Keeble, J; Jones, S A

    2016-05-01

    Relatively little is known about how drug self-association influences absorption into the human body. This study presented two hydrophobic membranes with a series of solutions containing different types of tetracaine aggregates with the aim of understanding how the attributes of supramolecular aggregate formation influenced passive membrane transport. The data showed that aqueous solutions of the unprotonated form of tetracaine displayed a significantly higher (ptransport compared to solutions with mixtures of the unprotonated and protonated drug microspecies (e.g. transport through the skin was 0.96±0.31μgcm(-2)min(-1) and 1.59±0.26μgcm(-2)min(-1) respectively). However, despite an enhanced rate of drug transport and a better membrane partitioning the unionised molecules showed a significantly longer (ptransport studies showed that larger tetracaine aggregates with smaller surface charge gave rise to the longer lag times. These large aggregates demonstrated more extensive intermolecular bonding and therefore, it was suggest that it was the enhanced propensity of the unionised species to form tightly bound drug aggregates that caused the delay in the membrane penetration.

  20. In-vivo identification of direct electron transfer from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 to electrodes via outer-membrane OmcA-MtrCAB protein complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamoto, Akihiro [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Nakamura, Ryuhei, E-mail: nakamura@light.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Hashimoto, Kazuhito, E-mail: hashimoto@light.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); ERATO/JST, HASHIMOTO Light Energy Conversion Project (Japan)

    2011-06-30

    Graphical abstract: . Display Omitted Highlights: > Monolayer biofilm of Shewanella cells was prepared on an ITO electrode. > Extracellular electron transfer (EET) process was examined with series of mutants. > Direct ET was confirmed with outer-membrane-bound OmcA-MtrCAB complex. > The EET process was not prominently influenced by capsular polysaccharide. - Abstract: The direct electron-transfer (DET) property of Shewanella bacteria has not been resolved in detail due to the complexity of in vivo electrochemistry in whole-cell systems. Here, we report the in vivo assignment of the redox signal indicative of the DET property in biofilms of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 by cyclic voltammetry (CV) with a series of mutants and a chemical marking technique. The CV measurements of monolayer biofilms formed by deletion mutants of c-type cytochromes ({Delta}mtrA, {Delta}mtrB, {Delta}mtrC/{Delta}omcA, and {Delta}cymA), and pilin ({Delta}pilD), capsular polysaccharide ({Delta}SO3177) and menaquinone ({Delta}menD) biosynthetic proteins demonstrated that the electrochemical redox signal with a midpoint potential at 50 mV (vs. SHE) was due to an outer-membrane-bound OmcA-MtrCAB protein complex of decaheme cytochromes, and did not involve either inner-membrane-bound CymA protein or secreted menaquinone. Using the specific binding affinity of nitric monoxide for the heme groups of c-type cytochromes, we further confirmed this conclusion. The heterogeneous standard rate constant for the DET process was estimated to be 300 {+-} 10 s{sup -1}, which was two orders of magnitude higher than that previously reported for the electron shuttling process via riboflavin. Experiments using a mutant unable to produce capsular polysaccharide ({Delta}SO3177) revealed that the DET property of the OmcA-MtrCAB complex was not influenced by insulating and hydrophilic extracellular polysaccharide. Accordingly, under physiological conditions, S. oneidensis MR-1 utilizes a high density of outer-membrane

  1. Liquid-liquid-solid microextraction based on membrane-protected molecularly imprinted polymer fiber for trace analysis of triazines in complex aqueous samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuling; Wang, Yangyang; Hu, Yufei; Li, Gongke

    2009-11-20

    A novel liquid-liquid-solid microextraction (LLSME) technique based on porous membrane-protected molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP)-coated silica fiber has been developed. In this technique, a MIP-coated silica fiber was protected with a length of porous polypropylene hollow fiber membrane which was filled with water-immiscible organic phase. Subsequently the whole device was immersed into aqueous sample for extraction. The LLSME technique was a three-phase microextraction approach. The target analytes were firstly extracted from the aqueous sample through a few microliters of organic phase residing in the pores and lumen of the membrane, and were then finally extracted onto the MIP fiber. A terbutylazine MIP-coated silica fiber was adopted as an example to demonstrate the feasibility of the novel LLSME method. The extraction parameters such as the organic solvent, extraction and desorption time were investigated. Comparison of the LLSME technique was made with molecularly imprinted polymer based solid-phase microextraction (MIP-SPME) and hollow fiber membrane-based liquid-phase microextraction (HF-LPME), respectively. The LLSME, integrating the advantages of high selectivity of MIP-SPME and enrichment and sample cleanup capability of the HF-LPME into a single device, is a promising sample preparation method for complex samples. Moreover, the new technique overcomes the problem of disturbance from water when the MIP-SPME fiber was exposed directly to aqueous samples. Applications to analysis of triazine herbicides in sludge water, watermelon, milk and urine samples were evaluated to access the real sample application of the LLSME method by coupling with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Low limits of detection (0.006-0.02 microg L(-1)), satisfactory recoveries and good repeatability for real sample (RSD 1.2-9.6%, n = 5) were obtained. The method was demonstrated to be a fast, selective and sensitive pretreatment method for trace analysis of triazines

  2. The TIC complex uncovered: The alternative view on the molecular mechanism of protein translocation across the inner envelope membrane of chloroplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakai, Masato

    2015-09-01

    Chloroplasts must import thousands of nuclear-encoded preproteins synthesized in the cytosol through two successive protein translocons at the outer and inner envelope membranes, termed TOC and TIC, respectively, to fulfill their complex physiological roles. The molecular identity of the TIC translocon had long remained controversial; two proteins, namely Tic20 and Tic110, had been proposed to be central to protein translocation across the inner envelope membrane. Tic40 also had long been considered to be another central player in this process. However, recently, a novel 1-megadalton complex consisting of Tic20, Tic56, Tic100, and Tic214 was identified at the chloroplast inner membrane of Arabidopsis and was demonstrated to constitute a general TIC translocon which functions in concert with the well-characterized TOC translocon. On the other hand, direct interaction between this novel TIC transport system and Tic110 or Tic40 was hardly observed. Consequently, the molecular model for protein translocation across the inner envelope membrane of chloroplasts might need to be extensively revised. In this review article, I intend to propose such alternative view regarding the TIC transport system in contradistinction to the classical view. I also would emphasize importance of reevaluation of previous works in terms of with what methods these classical Tic proteins such as Tic110 or Tic40 were picked up as TIC constituents at the very beginning as well as what actual evidence there were to support their direct and specific involvement in chloroplast protein import. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Chloroplast Biogenesis.

  3. TGF-α/HA complex promotes tympanic membrane keratinocyte migration and proliferation via ErbB1 receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mei Teh, Bing, E-mail: bing.teh@earscience.org.au [Ear Sciences Centre, School of Surgery, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA (Australia); Ear Science Institute Australia, Subiaco, WA (Australia); Department of Otolaryngology, Head, Neck and Skull Base Surgery, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, WA (Australia); Redmond, Sharon L. [Ear Sciences Centre, School of Surgery, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA (Australia); Ear Science Institute Australia, Subiaco, WA (Australia); Shen, Yi [Ear Sciences Centre, School of Surgery, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA (Australia); Ear Science Institute Australia, Subiaco, WA (Australia); Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck, Ningbo Lihuili Hospital (Ningbo Medical Centre), Ningbo, Zhejiang (China); Atlas, Marcus D. [Ear Sciences Centre, School of Surgery, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA (Australia); Ear Science Institute Australia, Subiaco, WA (Australia); Department of Otolaryngology, Head, Neck and Skull Base Surgery, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, WA (Australia); Marano, Robert J.; Dilley, Rodney J. [Ear Sciences Centre, School of Surgery, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA (Australia); Ear Science Institute Australia, Subiaco, WA (Australia)

    2013-04-01

    Tympanic membrane perforations are common and represent a management challenge to clinicians. Current treatments for chronic perforations involve a graft surgery and require general anaesthesia, including associated costs and morbidities. Bioactive molecules (e.g. growth factors, cytokines) play an important role in promoting TM wound healing following perforation and the use of growth factors as a topical treatment for tympanic membrane perforations has been suggested as an alternative to surgery. However, the choice of bioactive molecules best suited to promote wound healing has yet to be identified. We investigated the effects of hyaluronic acid, vitronectin, TGF-α, IL-24 and their combinations on migration, proliferation and adhesion of cultured human tympanic membrane-derived keratinocytes (hTM), in addition to their possible mechanisms of action. We found that TGF-α, TGF-α/HA and TGF-α/IL-24 promoted wound healing by significantly increasing both migration and proliferation. TGF-α and/or HA treated cells showed comparable cell–cell adhesion whilst maintaining an epithelial cell phenotype. With the use of receptor binding inhibitors for ErbB1 (AG1478) and CD44 (BRIC235), we revealed that the activation of ErbB1 is required for TGF-α/HA-mediated migration and proliferation. These results suggest factors that may be incorporated into a tissue-engineered membrane or directly as topical treatment for tympanic membrane perforations and hence reduce the need for a surgery. - Highlights: ► TGF-α, TGF-α/HA and TGF-α/IL-24 improved hTM keratinocyte migration and proliferation. ► TGF-α and/or HA maintained epithelial cell phenotype. ► TGF-α/HA-mediated migration and proliferation requires activation of ErbB1 receptor.

  4. Ruthenium(II) complexes: DNA-binding, cytotoxicity, apoptosis, cellular localization, cell cycle arrest, reactive oxygen species, mitochondrial membrane potential and western blot analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Jiang, Guang-Bin; Yao, Jun-Hua; Wang, Xiu-Zhen; Wang, Ji; Han, Bing-Jie; Xie, Yang-Yin; Lin, Gan-Jian; Huang, Hong-Liang; Liu, Yun-Jun

    2014-11-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate DNA-binding and cytotoxic activity of the four new Ru(II) polypyridyl complexes [Ru(dmb)₂(HMHPIP)](ClO₄)₂ (1), [Ru(bpy)₂(HMHPIP)](ClO₄)₂ (2), [Ru(phen)₂(HMHPIP)](ClO₄)₂ (3) and [Ru(dmp)₂(HMHPIP)](ClO₄)₂ (4). The complexes interact with DNA through intercalative mode and show relatively high cytotoxic activity against A549 cells, no cytotoxicity toward MG-63 cells. Complexes 1-4 can enhance the levels of ROS in A549 cells and induce the decrease of the mitochondrial membrane potential. These complexes inhibit the cell growth in A549 cells at G0/G1 or S phase. Complex 3 activated caspase 7, and down-regulated the expression of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. Complexes 1-4 induce apoptosis in A549 cells through ROS-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction pathway. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Reversible Opening of Intercellular Junctions of Intestinal Epithelial and Brain Endothelial Cells With Tight Junction Modulator Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocsik, Alexandra; Walter, Fruzsina R; Gyebrovszki, Andrea; Fülöp, Lívia; Blasig, Ingolf; Dabrowski, Sebastian; Ötvös, Ferenc; Tóth, András; Rákhely, Gábor; Veszelka, Szilvia; Vastag, Monika; Szabó-Révész, Piroska; Deli, Mária A

    2016-02-01

    The intercellular junctions restrict the free passage of hydrophilic compounds through the paracellular clefts. Reversible opening of the tight junctions of biological barriers is investigated as one of the ways to increase drug delivery to the systemic circulation or the central nervous system. Six peptides, ADT-6, HAV-6, C-CPE, 7-mer (FDFWITP, PN-78), AT-1002, and PN-159, acting on different integral membrane and linker junctional proteins were tested on Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cell line and a coculture model of the blood-brain barrier. All peptides tested in nontoxic concentrations showed a reversible tight junctions modulating effect and were effective to open the paracellular pathway for the marker molecules fluorescein and albumin. The change in the structure of cell-cell junctions was verified by immunostaining for occludin, claudin-4,-5, ZO-1, β-catenin, and E-cadherin. Expression levels of occludin and claudins were measured in both models. We could demonstrate a selectivity of C-CPE, ADT-6, and HAV-6 peptides for epithelial cells and 7-mer and AT-1002 peptides for brain endothelial cells. PN-159 was the most effective modulator of junctional permeability in both models possibly acting via claudin-1 and -5. Our results indicate that these peptides can be effectively and selectively used as potential pharmaceutical excipients to improve drug delivery across biological barriers.

  6. Magi Is Associated with the Par Complex and Functions Antagonistically with Bazooka to Regulate the Apical Polarity Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padash Barmchi, Mojgan; Samarasekera, Gayathri; Gilbert, Mary; Auld, Vanessa J.; Zhang, Bing

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian MAGI proteins play important roles in the maintenance of adherens and tight junctions. The MAGI family of proteins contains modular domains such as WW and PDZ domains necessary for scaffolding of membrane receptors and intracellular signaling components. Loss of MAGI leads to reduced junction stability while overexpression of MAGI can lead to increased adhesion and stabilization of epithelial morphology. However, how Magi regulates junction assembly in epithelia is largely unknown. We investigated the single Drosophila homologue of Magi to study the in vivo role of Magi in epithelial development. Magi is localized at the adherens junction and forms a complex with the polarity proteins, Par3/Bazooka and aPKC. We generated a Magi null mutant and found that Magi null mutants were viable with no detectable morphological defects even though the Magi protein is highly conserved with vertebrate Magi homologues. However, overexpression of Magi resulted in the displacement of Baz/Par3 and aPKC and lead to an increase in the level of PIP3. Interestingly, we found that Magi and Baz functioned in an antagonistic manner to regulate the localization of the apical polarity complex. Maintaining the balance between the level of Magi and Baz is an important determinant of the levels and localization of apical polarity complex. PMID:27074039

  7. An induced junction photovoltaic cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Call, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Silicon solar cells operating with induced junctions rather than diffused junctions have been fabricated and tested. Induced junctions were created by forming an inversion layer near the surface of the silicon by supplying a sheet of positive charge above the surface. Measurements of the response of the inversion layer cell to light of different wavelengths indicated it to be more sensitive to the shorter wavelengths of the sun's spectrum than conventional cells. The greater sensitivity occurs because of the shallow junction and the strong electric field at the surface.

  8. Variable conformation of GAP junctions linking bone cells: a transmission electron microscopic study of linear, stacked linear, curvilinear, oval, and annular junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, F

    1997-10-01

    There is a marked variability in the conformation of bone cell gap junctions in newborn murine cortical bone as defined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Studies were done in newborn BALB/c mouse and Sprague-Dawley rat femurs and tibias. Femoral and tibial cortices were dissected into 1 mm3 fragments and prepared in standardized fashion using modified Karnovsky fixation, 7.5% EDTA decalcification, 1% osmium tetroxide-sym collidine buffer with 1% lanthanum nitrate postfixation, Epon resin, 60 nm sections, lead citrate/uranyl acetate staining, and examination at 60 kV. Previous TEM descriptions of bone junctions have, with rare exceptions, noted only isolated linear or mildly curvilinear structures. In this study we noted gap junctional shapes on thin-section TEM preparations of osteoblasts and osteocytes to be extremely variable and complex encompassing linear, curvilinear, stacked linear, oval, and annular conformations. Multiple observations revealed linear gap junctions linking surface osteoblast cell bodies; linear, curvilinear, stacked linear, and oval junctions linking osteoblast processes in osteoid; linear and curvilinear junctions where cell processes joined with osteocyte cell bodies and each of the five conformations linking osteocyte processes within canaliculi. The annular junctions were found within osteoblast and osteocyte cytoplasm and in osteocyte cell processes within canaliculi. The annular junctions are intracellular, degenerating structures which appear as ultrastructural markers of gap junction involution. The more complex shapes reported here must be considered in (1) interpreting quantitative studies using freeze-fracture replicas, thin sections, and confocal microscopy immunolabeled junction connexin-43 components and (2) assessing gap junction biogenesis and turnover. 3-D reconstruction of bone junctions will enhance our understanding of these complex conformations.

  9. Understanding age-related macular degeneration (AMD): relationships between the photoreceptor/retinal pigment epithelium/Bruch's membrane/choriocapillaris complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhutto, Imran; Lutty, Gerard

    2012-08-01

    There is a mutualistic symbiotic relationship between the components of the photoreceptor/retinal pigment epithelium (RPE)/Bruch's membrane (BrMb)/choriocapillaris (CC) complex that is lost in AMD. Which component in the photoreceptor/RPE/BrMb/CC complex is affected first appears to depend on the type of AMD. In atrophic AMD (~85-90% of cases), it appears that large confluent drusen formation and hyperpigmentation (presumably dysfunction in RPE) are the initial insult and the resorption of these drusen and loss of RPE (hypopigmentation) can be predictive for progression of geographic atrophy (GA). The death and dysfunction of photoreceptors and CC appear to be secondary events to loss in RPE. In neovascular AMD (~10-15% of cases), the loss of choroidal vasculature may be the initial insult to the complex. Loss of CC with an intact RPE monolayer in wet AMD has been observed. This may be due to reduction in blood supply because of large vessel stenosis. Furthermore, the environment of the CC, basement membrane and intercapillary septa, is a proinflammatory milieu with accumulation of complement components as well as proinflammatory molecules like CRP during AMD. In this toxic milieu, CC die or become dysfunction making adjacent RPE hypoxic. These hypoxic cells then produce angiogenic substances like VEGF that stimulate growth of new vessels from CC, resulting in choroidal neovascularization (CNV). The loss of CC might also be a stimulus for drusen formation since the disposal system for retinal debris and exocytosed material from RPE would be limited. Ultimately, the photoreceptors die of lack of nutrients, leakage of serum components from the neovascularization, and scar formation. Therefore, the mutualistic symbiotic relationship within the photoreceptor/RPE/BrMb/CC complex is lost in both forms of AMD. Loss of this functionally integrated relationship results in death and dysfunction of all of the components in the complex.

  10. The classical and alternative pathways of complement activation play distinct roles in spontaneous C3 fragment deposition and membrane attack complex (MAC) formation on human B lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leslie, Robert Graham Quinton; Nielsen, Claus Henrik

    2004-01-01

    The contributions of the classical (CP) and alternative (AP) pathways of complement activation to the spontaneous deposition of C3 fragments and the formation of membrane attack complexes (MAC) on human B lymphocytes, were assessed by incubating peripheral blood mononuclear cells with autologous ...... of MAC formation was also found to be highly pathway dependent, with the AP being about 15-fold more efficient at initiating this process than the CP. A model accounting for the effectiveness of the AP in both preserving C3 fragment integrity and initiating MAC is presented....

  11. Large-scale preparation of the homogeneous LolA lipoprotein complex and efficient in vitro transfer of lipoproteins to the outer membrane in a LolB-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Shoji; Oguchi, Yuki; Yokota, Naoko; Tokuda, Hajime

    2007-12-01

    An ATP-binding cassette transporter LolCDE complex of Escherichia coli releases lipoproteins destined to the outer membrane from the inner membrane as a complex with a periplasmic chaperone, LolA. Interaction of the LolA-lipoprotein complex with an outer membrane receptor, LolB, then causes localization of lipoproteins to the outer membrane. As far as examined, formation of the LolA-lipoprotein complex strictly depends on ATP hydrolysis by the LolCDE complex in the presence of LolA. It has been speculated, based on crystallographic and biochemical observations, that LolA undergoes an ATP-dependent conformational change upon lipoprotein binding. Thus, preparation of a large amount of the LolA-lipoprotein complex is difficult. Moreover, lipoproteins bound to LolA are heterogeneous. We report here that the coexpression of LolA and outer membrane-specific lipoprotein Pal from a very efficient plasmid causes the unusual accumulation of the LolA-Pal complex in the periplasm. The complex was purified to homogeneity and shown to be a functional intermediate of the lipoprotein localization pathway. In vitro incorporation of Pal into outer membranes revealed that a single molecule of LolB catalyzes the incorporation of more than 100 molecules of Pal into outer membranes. Moreover, the LolB-dependent incorporation of Pal was not affected by excess-free LolA, indicating that LolB specifically interacts with liganded LolA. Finally, the LolB depletion caused the accumulation of a significant amount of Pal in the periplasm, thereby establishing the conditions for preparation of the homogeneous LolA-lipoprotein complex.

  12. Two highly similar DEAD box proteins, OsRH2 and OsRH34, homologous to eukaryotic initiation factor 4AIII, play roles of the exon junction complex in regulating growth and development in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chun-Kai; Sie, Yi-Syuan; Chen, Yu-Fu; Huang, Tian-Sheng; Lu, Chung-An

    2016-04-12

    The exon junction complex (EJC), which contains four core components, eukaryotic initiation factor 4AIII (eIF4AIII), MAGO/NASHI (MAGO), Y14/Tsunagi/RNA-binding protein 8A, and Barentsz/Metastatic lymph node 51, is formed in both nucleus and cytoplasm, and plays important roles in gene expression. Genes encoding core EJC components have been found in plants, including rice. Currently, the functional characterizations of MAGO and Y14 homologs have been demonstrated in rice. However, it is still unknown whether eIF4AIII is essential for the functional EJC in rice. This study investigated two DEAD box RNA helicases, OsRH2 and OsRH34, which are homologous to eIF4AIII, in rice. Amino acid sequence analysis indicated that OsRH2 and OsRH34 had 99 % identity and 100 % similarity, and their gene expression patterns were similar in various rice tissues, but the level of OsRH2 mRNA was about 58-fold higher than that of OsRH34 mRNA in seedlings. From bimolecular fluorescence complementation results, OsRH2 and OsRH34 interacted physically with OsMAGO1 and OsY14b, respectively, which indicated that both of OsRH2 and OsRH34 were core components of the EJC in rice. To study the biological roles of OsRH2 and OsRH34 in rice, transgenic rice plants were generated by RNA interference. The phenotypes of three independent OsRH2 and OsRH34 double-knockdown transgenic lines included dwarfism, a short internode distance, reproductive delay, defective embryonic development, and a low seed setting rate. These phenotypes resembled those of mutants with gibberellin-related developmental defects. In addition, the OsRH2 and OsRH34 double-knockdown transgenic lines exhibited the accumulation of unspliced rice UNDEVELOPED TAPETUM 1 mRNA. Rice contains two eIF4AIII paralogous genes, OsRH2 and OsRH34. The abundance of OsRH2 mRNA was about 58-fold higher than that of OsRH34 mRNA in seedlings, suggesting that the OsRH2 is major eIF4AIII in rice. Both OsRH2 and OsRH34 are core components of the EJC

  13. Complex

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CLEMENT O BEWAJI

    Schiff bases and their complex compounds have been studied for their .... establishing coordination of the N–(2 – hydroxybenzyl) - L - α - valine Schiff base ..... (1967); “Spectrophotometric Identification of Organic Compounds”, Willey, New.

  14. Polymeric membrane sensors based on Cd(II) Schiff base complexes for selective iodide determination in environmental and medicinal samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ashok Kumar; Mehtab, Sameena

    2008-01-15

    The two cadmium chelates of schiff bases, N,N'-bis(salicylidene)-1,4-diaminobutane, (Cd-S(1)) and N,N'-bis(salicylidene)-3,4-diaminotoluene (Cd-S(2)), have been synthesized and explored as ionophores for preparing PVC-based membrane sensors selective to iodide(I) ion. Potentiometric investigations indicate high affinity of these receptors for iodide ion. Polyvinyl chloride (PVC)-based membranes of Cd-S(1) and Cd-S(2) using as hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (HTAB) cation discriminator and o-nitrophenyloctyl ether (o-NPOE), dibutylphthalate (DBP), acetophenone (AP) and tributylphosphate (TBP) as plasticizing solvent mediators were prepared and investigated as iodide-selective sensors. The best performance was shown by the membrane of composition (w/w) of (Cd-S(1)) (7%):PVC (31%):DBP (60%):HTAB (2%). The sensor works well over a wide concentration range 5.3x10(-7) to 1.0x10(-2)M with Nernstian compliance (59.2mVdecade(-1) of activity) within pH range 2.5-9.0 with a response time of 11s and showed good selectivity for iodide ion over a number of anions. The sensor exhibits adequate life (3 months) with good reproducibility (S.D.+/-0.24mV) and could be used successfully for the determination of iodide content in environmental water samples and mouth wash samples.

  15. PLEKHA7 is an adherens junction protein with a tissue distribution and subcellular localization distinct from ZO-1 and E-cadherin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Pulimeno

    Full Text Available The pleckstrin-homology-domain-containing protein PLEKHA7 was recently identified as a protein linking the E-cadherin-p120 ctn complex to the microtubule cytoskeleton. Here we characterize the expression, tissue distribution and subcellular localization of PLEKHA7 by immunoblotting, immunofluorescence microscopy, immunoelectron microscopy, and northern blotting in mammalian tissues. Anti-PLEKHA7 antibodies label the junctional regions of cultured kidney epithelial cells by immunofluorescence microscopy, and major polypeptides of M(r approximately 135 kDa and approximately 145 kDa by immunoblotting of lysates of cells and tissues. Two PLEKHA7 transcripts ( approximately 5.5 kb and approximately 6.5 kb are detected in epithelial tissues. PLEKHA7 is detected at epithelial junctions in sections of kidney, liver, pancreas, intestine, retina, and cornea, and its tissue distribution and subcellular localization are distinct from ZO-1. For example, PLEKHA7 is not detected within kidney glomeruli. Similarly to E-cadherin, p120 ctn, beta-catenin and alpha-catenin, PLEKHA7 is concentrated in the apical junctional belt, but unlike these adherens junction markers, and similarly to afadin, PLEKHA7 is not localized along the lateral region of polarized epithelial cells. Immunoelectron microscopy definitively establishes that PLEKHA7 is localized at the adherens junctions in colonic epithelial cells, at a mean distance of 28 nm from the plasma membrane. In summary, we show that PLEKHA7 is a cytoplasmic component of the epithelial adherens junction belt, with a subcellular localization and tissue distribution that is distinct from that of ZO-1 and most AJ proteins, and we provide the first description of its distribution and localization in several tissues.

  16. An Important Member of Tight Junctions: Claudins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozlem Demirpence

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The tight junction (TJs, the most apically located of the intercellular junctional complexes, inhibits solute and water flow through the paracellular space, termed the %u201Cbarrier%u201D function. TJs participate in signal transduction mechanisms that regulate epithelial cell proliferation, gene expression, differentiation and morphogenesis. The claudin family of transmembrane proteins localized to the TJ. Loss of expression of Claudin causes of suppression TJs function. Recent studies have shown that altered levels of the different claudins may be related to invasion and progression of carcinoma cells in several primary neoplasms. A better knowledge of the mechanisms underlying carcinogenesis will likely result in the development of novel approaches for the diagnosis and therapy.

  17. Formation of palmitic acid/Ca2+ complexes in the mitochondrial membrane: a possible role in the cyclosporin-insensitive permeability transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironova, Galina D; Gritsenko, Elena; Gateau-Roesch, Odile; Levrat, Christiane; Agafonov, Alexey; Belosludtsev, Konstantin; Prigent, Annie France; Muntean, Danina; Dubois, Madeleine; Ovize, Michel

    2004-04-01

    A possible role of palmitic acid/Ca2+ (PA/Ca2+) complexes in the cyclosporin-insensitive permeability transition in mitochondria has been studied. It has been shown that in the presence of Ca2+, PA induces a swelling of mitochondria, which is not inhibited by cyclosporin A. The swelling is accompanied by a drop in membrane potential, which cannot be explained only by a work of the Ca2+ uniporter. With time, the potential is restored. Evidence has been obtained indicating that the specific content of mitochondrial lipids would favor the PA/Ca2+ -induced permeabilization of the membrane. In experiments with liposomes, the PA/Ca2+ -induced membrane permeabilization was larger for liposomes formed from the mitochondrial lipids, as compared to the azolectin liposomes. Additionally, it has been found that in mitochondria of the TNF (tumor necrosis factor)-sensitive cells (WEHI-164 line), the content of PA is larger than in mitochondria of the TNF-insensitive cells (C6 line), with this difference being mainly provided by PA incorporated in phosphatidylethanolamine and especially, cardiolipin. The PA/Ca2+ -dependent mechanism of permeability transition in mitochondria might be related to some pathologies, e.g. myocardial ischemia. The heaviness of myocardial infarction of ischemic patients has been demonstrated to correlate directly with the content of PA in the human blood serum.

  18. Structural and biophysical characterization of an epitope-specific engineered Fab fragment and complexation with membrane proteins: implications for co-crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jennifer L; Entzminger, Kevin C; Hyun, Jeongmin; Kalyoncu, Sibel; Heaner, David P; Morales, Ivan A; Sheppard, Aly; Gumbart, James C; Maynard, Jennifer A; Lieberman, Raquel L

    2015-04-01

    Crystallization chaperones are attracting increasing interest as a route to crystal growth and structure elucidation of difficult targets such as membrane proteins. While strategies to date have typically employed protein-specific chaperones, a peptide-specific chaperone to crystallize multiple cognate peptide epitope-containing client proteins is envisioned. This would eliminate the target-specific chaperone-production step and streamline the co-crystallization process. Previously, protein engineering and directed evolution were used to generate a single-chain variable (scFv) antibody fragment with affinity for the peptide sequence EYMPME (scFv/EE). This report details the conversion of scFv/EE to an anti-EE Fab format (Fab/EE) followed by its biophysical characterization. The addition of constant chains increased the overall stability and had a negligible impact on the antigen affinity. The 2.0 Å resolution crystal structure of Fab/EE reveals contacts with larger surface areas than those of scFv/EE. Surface plasmon resonance, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and size-exclusion chromatography were used to assess Fab/EE binding to EE-tagged soluble and membrane test proteins: namely, the β-barrel outer membrane protein intimin and α-helical A2a G protein-coupled receptor (A2aR). Molecular-dynamics simulation of the intimin constructs with and without Fab/EE provides insight into the energetic complexities of the co-crystallization approach.

  19. The antioxidant Trolox restores mitochondrial membrane potential and Ca2+ -stimulated ATP production in human complex I deficiency.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Distelmaier, F.; Visch, H.J.; Smeitink, J.A.M.; Mayatepek, E.; Koopman, W.J.H.; Willems, P.H.G.M.

    2009-01-01

    Malfunction of mitochondrial complex I caused by nuclear gene mutations causes early-onset neurodegenerative diseases. Previous work using cultured fibroblasts of complex-I-deficient patients revealed elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reductions in both total Ca(2+) content of the

  20. Tight junctions at the blood brain barrier: physiological architecture and disease-associated dysregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luissint Anny-Claude

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Blood–brain barrier (BBB, present at the level of the endothelium of cerebral blood vessels, selectively restricts the blood-to-brain paracellular diffusion of compounds; it is mandatory for cerebral homeostasis and proper neuronal function. The barrier properties of these specialized endothelial cells notably depend on tight junctions (TJs between adjacent cells: TJs are dynamic structures consisting of a number of transmembrane and membrane-associated cytoplasmic proteins, which are assembled in a multimolecular complex and acting as a platform for intracellular signaling. Although the structural composition of these complexes has been well described in the recent years, our knowledge about their functional regulation still remains fragmentary. Importantly, pericytes, embedded in the vascular basement membrane, and perivascular microglial cells, astrocytes and neurons contribute to the regulation of endothelial TJs and BBB function, altogether constituting the so-called neurovascular unit. The present review summarizes our current understanding of the structure and functional regulation of endothelial TJs at the BBB. Accumulating evidence points to a correlation between BBB dysfunction, alteration of TJ complexes and progression of a variety of CNS diseases, such as stroke, multiple sclerosis and brain tumors, as well as neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases. Understanding how TJ integrity is controlled may thus help improve drug delivery across the BBB and the design of therapeutic strategies for neurological disorders.

  1. Kinetics of reduction of Fe(III) complexes by outer membrane cytochromes MtrC and OmcA of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheming; Liu, Chongxuan; Wang, Xuelin; Marshall, Matthew J; Zachara, John M; Rosso, Kevin M; Dupuis, Michel; Fredrickson, James K; Heald, Steve; Shi, Liang

    2008-11-01

    Because of their cell surface locations, the outer membrane c-type cytochromes MtrC and OmcA of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 have been suggested to be the terminal reductases for a range of redox-reactive metals that form poorly soluble solids or that do not readily cross the outer membrane. In this work, we determined the kinetics of reduction of a series of Fe(III) complexes with citrate, nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), and EDTA by MtrC and OmcA using a stopped-flow technique in combination with theoretical computation methods. Stopped-flow kinetic data showed that the reaction proceeded in two stages, a fast stage that was completed in less than 1 s, followed by a second, relatively slower stage. For a given complex, electron transfer by MtrC was faster than that by OmcA. For a given cytochrome, the reaction was completed in the order Fe-EDTA > Fe-NTA > Fe-citrate. The kinetic data could be modeled by two parallel second-order bimolecular redox reactions with second-order rate constants ranging from 0.872 microM(-1) s(-1) for the reaction between MtrC and the Fe-EDTA complex to 0.012 microM(-1) s(-1) for the reaction between OmcA and Fe-citrate. The biphasic reaction kinetics was attributed to redox potential differences among the heme groups or redox site heterogeneity within the cytochromes. The results of redox potential and reorganization energy calculations showed that the reaction rate was influenced mostly by the relatively large reorganization energy. The results demonstrate that ligand complexation plays an important role in microbial dissimilatory reduction and mineral transformation of iron, as well as other redox-sensitive metal species in nature.

  2. Kinetics of Reduction of Fe(III) Complexes by Outer Membrane Cytochromes MtrC and OmcA of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheming; Liu, Chongxuan; Wang, Xuelin; Marshall, Matthew J.; Zachara, John M.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Dupuis, Michel; Fredrickson, James K.; Heald, Steve; Shi, Liang

    2008-01-01

    Because of their cell surface locations, the outer membrane c-type cytochromes MtrC and OmcA of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 have been suggested to be the terminal reductases for a range of redox-reactive metals that form poorly soluble solids or that do not readily cross the outer membrane. In this work, we determined the kinetics of reduction of a series of Fe(III) complexes with citrate, nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), and EDTA by MtrC and OmcA using a stopped-flow technique in combination with theoretical computation methods. Stopped-flow kinetic data showed that the reaction proceeded in two stages, a fast stage that was completed in less than 1 s, followed by a second, relatively slower stage. For a given complex, electron transfer by MtrC was faster than that by OmcA. For a given cytochrome, the reaction was completed in the order Fe-EDTA > Fe-NTA > Fe-citrate. The kinetic data could be modeled by two parallel second-order bimolecular redox reactions with second-order rate constants ranging from 0.872 μM−1 s−1 for the reaction between MtrC and the Fe-EDTA complex to 0.012 μM−1 s−1 for the reaction between OmcA and Fe-citrate. The biphasic reaction kinetics was attributed to redox potential differences among the heme groups or redox site heterogeneity within the cytochromes. The results of redox potential and reorganization energy calculations showed that the reaction rate was influenced mostly by the relatively large reorganization energy. The results demonstrate that ligand complexation plays an important role in microbial dissimilatory reduction and mineral transformation of iron, as well as other redox-sensitive metal species in nature. PMID:18791025

  3. A miniature condensed-phase membrane introduction mass spectrometry (CP-MIMS) probe for direct and on-line measurements of pharmaceuticals and contaminants in small, complex samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Kyle D; Willis, Megan D; Krogh, Erik T; Gill, Christopher G

    2013-06-15

    High-throughput, automated analytical measurements are desirable in many analytical scenarios, as are rapid sample pre-screening techniques to identify 'positive' samples for subsequent measurements using more time-consuming conventional methodologies (e.g., liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS)). A miniature condensed-phase membrane introduction mass spectrometry (CP-MIMS) probe for the direct and continuous, on-line measurement of pharmaceuticals and environmental contaminants in small, complex samples is presented. A miniature polydimethylsiloxane hollow fibre membrane (PDMS-HFM) probe is coupled with an electrospray ionization (ESI) triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. Analytes are transported from the probe to the ESI source by a methanol acceptor phase. The probe can be autosampler mounted and directly inserted in small samples (≥400 μL) allowing continuous and simultaneous pptr-ppb level detection of target analytes (chlorophenols, triclosan, gemfibrozil, nonylphenol) in complex samples (artificial urine, beer, natural water, waste water, plant tissue). The probe has been characterized and optimized for acceptor phase flow rate, sample mixing and probe washing. Signal response times, detection limits and calibration data are given for selected ion monitoring (SIM) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) measurements of target analytes at trace levels. Comparisons with flow cell type CP-MIMS systems are given. Analyte depletion effects are evaluated for small samples (≥400 μL). On-line measurements in small volumes of complex samples, temporally resolved reaction monitoring and in situ/in vivo demonstrations are presented. The miniature CP-MIMS probe developed was successfully used for the direct, on-line detection of target analytes in small volumes (40 mL to 400 μL) of complex samples at pptr to low ppb levels. The probe can be readily automated as well as deployed for in situ/in vivo monitoring, including reaction monitoring, small sample

  4. Mixing in T-junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, Jacobus B.W.; van der Wal, S.

    1996-01-01

    The transport processes that are involved in the mixing of two gases in a T-junction mixer are investigated. The turbulent flow field is calculated for the T-junction with the k- turbulence model by FLOW3D. In the mathematical model the transport of species is described with a mixture fraction

  5. From biological membranes to biomimetic model membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eeman, M.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Biological membranes play an essential role in the cellular protection as well as in the control and the transport of nutrients. Many mechanisms such as molecular recognition, enzymatic catalysis, cellular adhesion and membrane fusion take place into the biological membranes. In 1972, Singer et al. provided a membrane model, called fluid mosaic model, in which each leaflet of the bilayer is formed by a homogeneous environment of lipids in a fluid state including globular assembling of proteins and glycoproteins. Since its conception in 1972, many developments were brought to this model in terms of composition and molecular organization. The main development of the fluid mosaic model was made by Simons et al. (1997 and Brown et al. (1997 who suggested that membrane lipids are organized into lateral microdomains (or lipid rafts with a specific composition and a molecular dynamic that are different to the composition and the dynamic of the surrounding liquid crystalline phase. The discovery of a phase separation in the plane of the membrane has induced an explosion in the research efforts related to the biology of cell membranes but also in the development of new technologies for the study of these biological systems. Due to the high complexity of biological membranes and in order to investigate the biological processes that occur on the membrane surface or within the membrane lipid bilayer, a large number of studies are performed using biomimicking model membranes. This paper aims at revisiting the fundamental properties of biological membranes in terms of membrane composition, membrane dynamic and molecular organization, as well as at describing the most common biomimicking models that are frequently used for investigating biological processes such as membrane fusion, membrane trafficking, pore formation as well as membrane interactions at a molecular level.

  6. F Plasmid TraF and TraH Are Components of an Outer Membrane Complex Involved in Conjugation▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arutyunov, Denis; Arenson, Barbara; Manchak, Jan; Frost, Laura S.

    2010-01-01

    F plasmid TraF and TraH are required for F pilus assembly and F plasmid transfer. Using flotation sucrose density gradients, we found that TraF and TraH (as well as TraU and TraW) localized to the outer membrane in the presence of the complete F transfer region, especially TraV, the putative anchor. Mutational analysis of TraH revealed two domains that are important for its function and possible interaction with TrbI, which in turn has a role in stabilizing TraH. PMID:20081027

  7. F plasmid TraF and TraH are components of an outer membrane complex involved in conjugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arutyunov, Denis; Arenson, Barbara; Manchak, Jan; Frost, Laura S

    2010-03-01

    F plasmid TraF and TraH are required for F pilus assembly and F plasmid transfer. Using flotation sucrose density gradients, we found that TraF and TraH (as well as TraU and TraW) localized to the outer membrane in the presence of the complete F transfer region, especially TraV, the putative anchor. Mutational analysis of TraH revealed two domains that are important for its function and possible interaction with TrbI, which in turn has a role in stabilizing TraH.

  8. Saponins do not affect the ecdysteroid receptor complex but cause membrane permeation in insect culture cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Geyter, Ellen; Swevers, Luc; Soin, Thomas; Geelen, Danny; Smagghe, Guy

    2012-01-01

    This project studied the effects of four saponins with a triterpenoid (Quillajasaponaria saponin and aescin) or steroid structure (digitonin and diosgenin which is the deglycosylated form of dioscin) on insect cells, namely Schneider S2 cells of Drosophila melanogaster (Diptera). A series of different experiments were performed to investigate potential mechanisms of action by saponins with regard to ecdysteroid receptor (EcR) responsiveness, cell viability, cell membrane permeation, and induction of apoptosis with DNA fragmentation and caspase-3 like activity. Major results were that (1) exposure of S2 cells containing an EcR-based reporter construct to a concentration series of each saponin scored no EcR activation, while (2) a loss of ecdysteroid signaling was observed with median inhibitory concentrations (IC(50)'s) of 3-50 μM, and in parallel (3) a concentration-dependent change in loss of cell numbers in an cell viability assay with median effective concentrations (EC(50)'s) of 8-699 μM. In continuation, it was of interest that (4) a trypan blue assay with Q. saponaria saponin confirmed the cell membrane permeation effect leading to cell toxicity with a median lethal concentration (LC(50)) value of 44 μM, and interestingly this effect was very rapid. Another three interesting observations were that (5) exposure to 20E at 500 nM as used in the EcR-based report assay induced caspase-3 like activities which may help to explain the discrepancies between loss of EcR-responsiveness and cell viability, (6) low concentrations of saponins induced DNA fragmentation and caspase-3 like activities, confirming their potential to induce apoptosis, and (7) the saponin effects were counteracted with addition of cholesterol to the culture medium. In general the data obtained provide evidence that the anti-ecdysteroid action by saponins is not based on a true antagonistic interaction with EcR signaling, but can be explained by a cytotoxic action due to permeation of the

  9. Gap junction channels and cardiac impulse propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desplantez, Thomas; Dupont, Emmanuel; Severs, Nicholas J; Weingart, Robert

    2007-08-01

    The role of gap junction channels on cardiac impulse propagation is complex. This review focuses on the differential expression of connexins in the heart and the biophysical properties of gap junction channels under normal and disease conditions. Structural determinants of impulse propagation have been gained from biochemical and immunocytochemical studies performed on tissue extracts and intact cardiac tissue. These have defined the distinctive connexin coexpression patterns and relative levels in different cardiac tissues. Functional determinants of impulse propagation have emerged from electrophysiological experiments carried out on cell pairs. The static properties (channel number and conductance) limit the current flow between adjacent cardiomyocytes and thus set the basic conduction velocity. The dynamic properties (voltage-sensitive gating and kinetics of channels) are responsible for a modulation of the conduction velocity during propagated action potentials. The effect is moderate and depends on the type of Cx and channel. For homomeric-homotypic channels, the influence is small to medium; for homomeric-heterotypic channels, it is medium to strong. Since no data are currently available on heteromeric channels, their influence on impulse propagation is speculative. The modulation by gap junction channels is most prominent in tissues at the boundaries between cardiac tissues such as sinoatrial node-atrial muscle, atrioventricular node-His bundle, His bundle-bundle branch and Purkinje fibers-ventricular muscle. The data predict facilitation of orthodromic propagation.

  10. Metallic Junction Thermoelectric Device Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duzik, Adam J.; Choi, Sang H.

    2017-01-01

    Thermoelectric junctions made of semiconductors have existed in radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG) for deep space missions, but are currently being adapted for terrestrial energy harvesting. Unfortunately, these devices are inefficient, operating at only 7% efficiency. This low efficiency has driven efforts to make high-figure-of-merit thermoelectric devices, which require a high electrical conductivity but a low thermal conductivity, a combination that is difficult to achieve. Lowered thermal conductivity has increased efficiency, but at the cost of power output. An alternative setup is to use metallic junctions rather than semiconductors as thermoelectric devices. Metals have orders of magnitude more electrons and electronic conductivities higher than semiconductors, but thermal conductivity is higher as well. To evaluate the viability of metallic junction thermoelectrics, a two dimensional heat transfer MATLAB simulation was constructed to calculate efficiency and power output. High Seebeck coefficient alloys, Chromel (90%Ni-10%Cr) and Constantan (55%Cu-45%Ni), produced efficiencies of around 20-30%. Parameters such as the number of layers of junctions, lateral junction density, and junction sizes for both series- and parallel-connected junctions were explored.

  11. Internalization of cycloheptaamylose-dansyl chloride complex during labelling of surface membrane in living Paramecium aurelia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, P A; Wyroba, E; Bottiroli, G

    1985-01-01

    Internalization of cycloheptaamylose-dansyl chloride complex during surface labelling of living long-term starved Paramecium aurelia cells has been observed. This process may be inhibited by pretreatment of the ciliates with dichloroisoproterenol. Uptake of cycloheptaamylose-dansyl chloride may be visualized only after UV preirradiation: the appearance of orange-fluorescing vacuoles of diameter 2.3-4.5 micron may then be observed. Microspectrographic analysis performed on the cells and dansyl derivatives indicates that this fluorescence is produced by a photochemical reaction of dansyl chloride - released from CDC complex inside the digestive vacuoles-under the influence of UV irradiation.

  12. Membrane Protein Complex ExbB4-ExbD1-TonB1 from Escherichia coli Demonstrates Conformational Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sverzhinsky, Aleksandr; Chung, Jacqueline W.; Deme, Justin C.; Fabre, Lucien; Levey, Kristian T.; Plesa, Maria; Carter, David M.; Lypaczewski, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Iron acquisition at the outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria is powered by the proton motive force (PMF) of the cytoplasmic membrane (CM), harnessed by the CM-embedded complex of ExbB, ExbD, and TonB. Its stoichiometry, ensemble structural features, and mechanism of action are unknown. By panning combinatorial phage libraries, periplasmic regions of dimerization between ExbD and TonB were predicted. Using overexpression of full-length His6-tagged exbB-exbD and S-tagged tonB, we purified detergent-solubilized complexes of ExbB-ExbD-TonB from Escherichia coli. Protein-detergent complexes of ∼230 kDa with a hydrodynamic radius of ∼6.0 nm were similar to previously purified ExbB4-ExbD2 complexes. Significantly, they differed in electronegativity by native agarose gel electrophoresis. The stoichiometry was determined to be ExbB4-ExbD1-TonB1. Single-particle electron microscopy agrees with this stoichiometry. Two-dimensional averaging supported the phage display predictions, showing two forms of ExbD-TonB periplasmic heterodimerization: extensive and distal. Three-dimensional (3D) particle classification showed three representative conformations of ExbB4-ExbD1-TonB1. Based on our structural data, we propose a model in which ExbD shuttles a proton across the CM via an ExbB interprotein rearrangement. Proton translocation would be coupled to ExbD-mediated collapse of extended TonB in complex with ligand-loaded receptors in the OM, followed by repositioning of TonB through extensive dimerization with ExbD. Here we present the first report for purification of the ExbB-ExbD-TonB complex, molar ratios within the complex (4:1:1), and structural biology that provides insights into 3D organization. IMPORTANCE Receptors in the OM of Gram-negative bacteria allow entry of iron-bound siderophores that are necessary for pathogenicity. Numerous iron-acquisition strategies rely upon a ubiquitous and unique protein for energization: TonB. Complexed with ExbB and Exb

  13. Organization of cellular receptors into a nanoscale junction during HIV-1 adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terrence M Dobrowsky

    Full Text Available The fusion of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 with its host cell is the target for new antiretroviral therapies. Viral particles interact with the flexible plasma membrane via viral surface protein gp120 which binds its primary cellular receptor CD4 and subsequently the coreceptor CCR5. However, whether and how these receptors become organized at the adhesive junction between cell and virion are unknown. Here, stochastic modeling predicts that, regarding binding to gp120, cellular receptors CD4 and CCR5 form an organized, ring-like, nanoscale structure beneath the virion, which locally deforms the plasma membrane. This organized adhesive junction between cell and virion, which we name the viral junction, is reminiscent of the well-characterized immunological synapse, albeit at much smaller length scales. The formation of an organized viral junction under multiple physiopathologically relevant conditions may represent a novel intermediate step in productive infection.

  14. Structure of the gap junction channel and its implications for its biological functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Shoji; Tsukihara, Tomitake

    2011-04-01

    Gap junctions consist of arrays of intercellular channels composed of integral membrane proteins called connexin in vertebrates. Gap junction channels regulate the passage of ions and biological molecules between adjacent cells and, therefore, are critically important in many biological activities, including development, differentiation, neural activity, and immune response. Mutations in connexin genes are associated with several human diseases, such as neurodegenerative disease, skin disease, deafness, and developmental abnormalities. The activity of gap junction channels is regulated by the membrane voltage, intracellular microenvironment, interaction with other proteins, and phosphorylation. Each connexin channel has its own property for conductance and molecular permeability. A number of studies have tried to reveal the molecular architecture of the channel pore that should confer the connexin-specific permeability/selectivity properties and molecular basis for the gating and regulation. In this review, we give an overview of structural studies and describe the structural and functional relationship of gap junction channels.

  15. Organization of cellular receptors into a nanoscale junction during HIV-1 adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrowsky, Terrence M; Daniels, Brian R; Siliciano, Robert F; Sun, Sean X; Wirtz, Denis

    2010-07-15

    The fusion of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) with its host cell is the target for new antiretroviral therapies. Viral particles interact with the flexible plasma membrane via viral surface protein gp120 which binds its primary cellular receptor CD4 and subsequently the coreceptor CCR5. However, whether and how these receptors become organized at the adhesive junction between cell and virion are unknown. Here, stochastic modeling predicts that, regarding binding to gp120, cellular receptors CD4 and CCR5 form an organized, ring-like, nanoscale structure beneath the virion, which locally deforms the plasma membrane. This organized adhesive junction between cell and virion, which we name the viral junction, is reminiscent of the well-characterized immunological synapse, albeit at much smaller length scales. The formation of an organized viral junction under multiple physiopathologically relevant conditions may represent a novel intermediate step in productive infection.

  16. Tight junction protein Par6 interacts with an evolutionarily conserved region in the amino terminus of PALS1/stardust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Hurd, Toby W; Margolis, Ben

    2004-07-16

    Tight junctions are the structures in mammalian epithelial cells that separate the apical and basolateral membranes and may also be important in the establishment of cell polarity. Two evolutionarily conserved multiprotein complexes, Crumbs-PALS1 (Stardust)-PATJ and Cdc42-Par6-Par3-atypical protein kinase C, have been implicated in the assembly of tight junctions and in polarization of Drosophila melanogaster epithelia. These two complexes have been linked physically and functionally by an interaction between PALS1 and Par6. Here we identify an evolutionarily conserved region in the amino terminus of PALS1 as the Par6 binding site and identify valine and aspartic acid residues in this region as essential for interacting with the PDZ domain of Par6. We have also characterized, in more detail, the amino terminus of Drosophila Stardust and demonstrate that the interaction mechanism between Stardust and Drosophila Par6 is evolutionarily conserved. Par6 interferes with PATJ in binding PALS1, and these two interactions do not appear to function synergistically. Taken together, these results define the molecular mechanisms linking two conserved polarity complexes.

  17. Affordance-based individuation of junctions in Open Street Map

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Scheider

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We propose an algorithm that can be used to identify automatically the subset of street segments of a road network map that corresponds to a junction. The main idea is to use turn-compliant locomotion affordances, i.e., restricted patterns of supported movement, in order to specify junctions independently of their data representation, and in order to motivate tractable individuation and classification strategies. We argue that common approaches based solely on geometry or topology of the street segment graph are useful but insufficient proxies. They miss certain turn restrictions essential to junctions. From a computational viewpoint, the main challenge of affordance-based individuation of junctions lies in its complex recursive definition. In this paper, we show how Open Street Map data can be interpreted into locomotion affordances, and how the recursive junction definition can be translated into a deterministic algorithm. We evaluate this algorithm by applying it to small map excerpts in order to delineate the contained junctions.

  18. The Nicastrin-like protein Nicalin regulates assembly and stability of the Nicalin-nodal modulator (NOMO) membrane protein complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haffner, Christof; Dettmer, Ulf; Weiler, Timotheus; Haass, Christian

    2007-04-06

    The assembly of the gamma-secretase complex, an Alzheimer disease-related protease required for beta-amyloid generation, is tightly regulated and predominantly limited by the stoichiometrical availability of its components. We have identified a novel endoplasmic reticulum-located protein complex that is regulated in a similar fashion. It contains the recently identified Nodal signaling antagonists Nicalin (a distant homolog of the gamma-secretase component Nicastrin) and NOMO (Nodal modulator). Using an RNA interference approach, we found that Nicalin and NOMO became unstable in the absence of the respective binding partner, suggesting that complex formation has a stabilizing effect. Overexpression of Nicalin resulted in an increase in NOMO, whereas endogenous Nicalin was reduced below the detection limit. Both effects were shown to occur at a post-transcriptional level. Thus, NOMO is most likely produced in excess amounts and either stabilized by Nicalin or rapidly degraded. In contrast, Nicalin levels are limited independently of NOMO. We, therefore, propose that Nicalin controls the assembly and stability of the Nicalin-NOMO complex.

  19. SynProt: A Comprehensive Database for Proteins of the Detergent-Resistant Synaptic Junctions Fraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rainer ePielot

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Chemical synapses are highly specialized cell-cell contacts for communication between neurons in the CNS characterized by complex and dynamic protein networks at both synaptic membranes. The cytomatrix at the active zone (CAZ organizes the apparatus for the regulated release of transmitters from the presynapse. At the postsynaptic side, the postsynaptic density constitutes the machinery for detection, integration and transduction of the transmitter signal. Both pre- and postsynaptic protein networks represent the molecular substrates for synaptic plasticity. Their function can be altered both by regulating their composition and by post-translational modification of their components. For a comprehensive understanding of synaptic networks the entire ensemble of synaptic proteins has to be considered. To support this, we established a comprehensive database for synaptic junction proteins (SynProt database primarily based on proteomics data obtained from biochemical preparations of detergent-resistant synaptic junctions. The database currently contains 2,788 non-redundant entries of rat, mouse and some human proteins, which mainly have been manually extracted from twelve proteomic studies and annotated for synaptic subcellular localization. Each dataset is completed with manually added information including protein classifiers as well as automatically retrieved and updated information from public databases (UniProt and PubMed. We intend that the database will be used to support modeling of synaptic protein networks and rational experimental design.

  20. Gap junction proteins: master regulators of the planarian stem cell response to tissue maintenance and injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiris, T Harshani; Oviedo, Néstor J

    2013-01-01

    Gap junction (GJ) proteins are crucial mediators of cell-cell communication during embryogenesis, tissue regeneration and disease. GJ proteins form plasma membrane channels that facilitate passage of small molecules across cells and modulate signaling pathways and cellular behavior in different tissues. These properties have been conserved throughout evolution, and in most invertebrates GJ proteins are known as innexins. Despite their critical relevance for physiology and disease, the mechanisms by which GJ proteins modulate cell behavior are poorly understood. This review summarizes findings from recent work that uses planarian flatworms as a paradigm to analyze GJ proteins in the complexity of the whole organism. The planarian model allows access to a large pool of adult somatic stem cells (known as neoblasts) that support physiological cell turnover and tissue regeneration. Innexin proteins are present in planarians and play a fundamental role in controlling neoblast behavior. We discuss the possibility that GJ proteins participate as cellular sensors that inform neoblasts about local and systemic physiological demands. We believe that functional analyses of GJ proteins will bring a complementary perspective to studies that focus on the temporal expression of genes. Finally, integrating functional studies along with molecular genetics and epigenetic approaches would expand our understanding of cellular regulation in vivo and greatly enhance the possibilities for rationally modulating stem cell behavior in their natural environment. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The communicating junctions, roles and dysfunctions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Generalised Israel Junction Conditions for a Gauss-Bonnet Brane World

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, S C

    2003-01-01

    In spacetimes of dimension greater than four it is natural to consider higher order (in R) corrections to the Einstein equations. In this letter generalized Israel junction conditions for a membrane in such a theory are derived. This is achieved by generalising the Gibbons-Hawking boundary term. The junction conditions are applied to simple brane world models, and are compared to the many contradictory results in the literature.

  2. Anatomy and biomechanics of the craniovertebral junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Alejandro J; Scheer, Justin K; Leibl, Kayla E; Smith, Zachary A; Dlouhy, Brian J; Dahdaleh, Nader S

    2015-04-01

    The craniovertebral junction (CVJ) has unique anatomical structures that separate it from the subaxial cervical spine. In addition to housing vital neural and vascular structures, the majority of cranial flexion, extension, and axial rotation is accomplished at the CVJ. A complex combination of osseous and ligamentous supports allow for stability despite a large degree of motion. An understanding of anatomy and biomechanics is essential to effectively evaluate and address the various pathological processes that may affect this region. Therefore, the authors present an up-to-date narrative review of CVJ anatomy, normal and pathological biomechanics, and fixation techniques.

  3. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the outer membrane complex HasA–HasR from Serratia marcescens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huché, Frédéric, E-mail: huche@pasteur.fr [Fachbereich Biologie, Universität Konstanz, 78457 Konstanz (Germany); Unité des Membranes Bactériennes, CNRS URA 2172, Département de Microbiologie Fondamentale et Médicale, Institut Pasteur, 25-28 Rue du Dr Roux, 75724 Paris CEDEX 15 (France); Delepelaire, Philippe; Wandersman, Cécile [Unité des Membranes Bactériennes, CNRS URA 2172, Département de Microbiologie Fondamentale et Médicale, Institut Pasteur, 25-28 Rue du Dr Roux, 75724 Paris CEDEX 15 (France); Welte, Wolfram [Fachbereich Biologie, Universität Konstanz, 78457 Konstanz (Germany)

    2006-01-01

    The expression, purification, and crystallization in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} of the complex HasA-HasR from S. marcescens are reported. Diffraction data have been collected and processed to 6.8 Å. Serratia marcescens is able to acquire iron using its haem-acquisition system (‘has’), which contains an outer membrane receptor HasR and a soluble haemophore HasA. After secretion, HasA binds free haem in the extracellular medium or extracts it from haemoproteins and delivers it to the receptor. Here, the crystallization of a HasA–HasR complex is reported. HasA and HasR have been overexpressed in Escherichia coli and the complex formed and crystallized. Small platelets and bunches of needles of dimensions 0.01 × 0.1 × 1 mm were obtained. A native data set has been collected to 6.8 Å.

  4. GAP junctional communication in brain secondary organizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosone, Camilla; Andreu, Abraham; Echevarria, Diego

    2016-06-01

    Gap junctions (GJs) are integral membrane proteins that enable the direct cytoplasmic exchange of ions and low molecular weight metabolites between adjacent cells. They are formed by the apposition of two connexons belonging to adjacent cells. Each connexon is formed by six proteins, named connexins (Cxs). Current evidence suggests that gap junctions play an important part in ensuring normal embryo development. Mutations in connexin genes have been linked to a variety of human diseases, although the precise role and the cell biological mechanisms of their action remain almost unknown. Among the big family of Cxs, several are expressed in nervous tissue but just a few are expressed in the anterior neural tube of vertebrates. Many efforts have been made to elucidate the molecular bases of Cxs cell biology and how they influence the morphogenetic signal activity produced by brain signaling centers. These centers, orchestrated by transcription factors and morphogenes determine the axial patterning of the mammalian brain during its specification and regionalization. The present review revisits the findings of GJ composed by Cx43 and Cx36 in neural tube patterning and discuss Cx43 putative enrollment in the control of Fgf8 signal activity coming from the well known secondary organizer, the isthmic organizer. © 2016 The Authors. Development, Growth & Differentiation published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  5. Paracetamol biodegradation by activated sludge and photocatalysis and its removal by a micelle-clay complex, activated charcoal, and reverse osmosis membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaman, Rafik; Khamis, Mustafa; Abbadi, Jehad; Amro, Ahmad; Qurie, Mohannad; Ayyad, Ibrahim; Ayyash, Fatima; Hamarsheh, Omar; Yaqmour, Reem; Nir, Shlomo; Bufo, Sabino A; Scrano, Laura; Lerman, Sofia; Gur-Reznik, Shirra; Dosoretz, Carlos G

    2016-10-01

    Kinetic studies on the stability of the pain killer paracetamol in Al-Quds activated sludge demonstrated that paracetamol underwent biodegradation within less than one month to furnish p-aminophenol in high yields. Characterizations of bacteria contained in Al-Quds sludge were accomplished. It was found that Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the bacterium most responsible for the biodegradation of paracetamol to p-aminophenol and hydroquinone. Batch adsorptions of paracetamol and its biodegradation product (p-aminophenol) by activated charcoal and a composite micelle (octadecyltrimethylammonium)-clay (montmorillonite) were determined at 25°C. Adsorption was adequately described by a Langmuir isotherm, and indicated better efficiency of removal by the micelle-clay complex. The ability of bench top reverse osmosis (RO) plant as well as advanced membrane pilot plant to remove paracetamol was also studied at different water matrixes to test the effect of organic matter composition. The results showed that at least 90% rejection was obtained by both plants. In addition, removal of paracetamol from RO brine was investigated by using photocatalytic processes; optimal conditions were found to be acidic or basic pH, in which paracetamol degraded in less than 5 min. Toxicity studies indicated that the effluent and brine were not toxic except for using extra low energy membrane which displayed a half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC-50) value of 80%.

  6. [The enlarged diagnosis of the fatal penicillin accident. Immunehistologic demonstration of antigen-antibody complexes and of antibodies against the tubular basement membrane after administraiton of depot penicillin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirnhofer, R; Sonnabend, W; Sigrist, T

    1978-05-20

    In a case of fatal penicillin allergy it proved possible at autopsy to demonstrate (by immunohistological examination of basal membranes of proximal renal tubuli) antigen-antibody complexes belonging to the penicillin (BPO) group and to an anti-penicilloyl antibody of the IgG type. In addition, complement C3 was detected. Antibodies against the basal membranes or renal tubuli were also demonstrated in material eluted from the kidney, although an inflammatory reaction ot the immunoligical changes had not yet been observed in light microscopy. It is undecided whether this discrepancy is due to the low dose of penicillin administered or the relatively short time lag between first injection and time of fatality. It is assumed that, pathogenetically, a reaction of the serum sickness type is probably involved. For etiological clarification the use of immunohistological methods in addition to serological procedures provides further indices for an antecedent sensitization to penicillin, because assay effectiveness does not decrease even after a lengthy postmortal time-lapse. On the other hand, tissues and serum for examination should be frozen at low temperatures immediately after autopsy.

  7. A Selective Membrane Electrode for Thiocyanate Ion Based on a Bis-taurine-salicylic Binuclear Copper(Ⅱ) Complex as Ionophore

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王福昌; 柴雅琴; 袁若; 陈春华; 戴建远; 徐岚

    2005-01-01

    The response characteristics of a new potentiometric membrane electrode with unique selectivity towards thiocyanate ion were reported. The electrode was prepared by incorporating bis-taurine-salicylic binuclear copper(Ⅱ) complex into a plasticized PVC-membrane. The resulting electrode exhibits anti-Hofmeister selectivity sequence: SCN->I-> ClO4- >Sal-> NO3- > NO2- >Br->Cl-> SO3- > SO42- and a near-Nernstian potential linear range for thiocyanate from 1.0×10-1 to 1.0× 10-6 mol·L-1 with a detection limit of 8.0× 10-7 mol·L-1 and a slope of - 56.5 mV/PCSCN- in phosphate buffer solution of pH 5.0 at 20 ℃. The UV/Vis spectra, IR spectroscopy and AC impedance studies showed that the excellent selectivity to thiocyanate was related to the unique interaction between the central metal and the analyte and a steric effect associated with the structure of the carrier. The electrode was successfully applied to the determination of thiocyanate in waste water and human urine samples.

  8. In situ solid-state NMR spectroscopy of protein in heterogeneous membranes: the baseplate antenna complex of Chlorobaculum tepidum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulminskaya, Natalia V; Pedersen, Marie Ø; Bjerring, Morten; Underhaug, Jarl; Miller, Mette; Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Nielsen, Jakob T; Nielsen, Niels Chr

    2012-07-01

    A clever combination: an in situ solid-state NMR analysis of CsmA proteins in the heterogeneous environment of the photoreceptor of Chlorobaculum tepidum is reported. Using different combinations of 2D and 3D solid-state NMR spectra, 90 % of the CsmA resonances are assigned and provide on the basis of chemical shift data information about the structure and conformation of CsmA in the CsmA-bacteriochlorophyll a complex.

  9. Interaction of pyracetam with specific /sup 3/H-imipramine binding sites and GABA-benzodiazepine receptor complex of brain membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozhanets, V.V.; Chakhbra, K.K.; Danchev, N.D.; Malin, K.M.; Rusakov, D.Yu.; Val' dman, A.V.

    1986-06-01

    This paper studies the effect of pyracetam on parameters of specific binding of tritium-imipramine and GABA-activated binding of tritium-flunitrazepam with rat brain membranes. The experimental method is described and it is shown that pyracetam and mebicar in experiments in vivo on normal animals can exert their anxiolytic action without the participation of bensodiazepine receptors. Either the interaction of pyracetam and mebicar with benzodiazeprine receptors has a different interpretation than competition of these compounds with specific binding sites of tritium-flunitrazepam, or in experiments on normal animals in vivo GABA-benzodiazepine receptor complex does not accept pyracetam and mebicar, for it contains endogenous inhibitors of GABA-modulating action.

  10. Imaging of cervicothoracic junction trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wongwaisayawan S

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sirote Wongwaisayawan,1 Ruedeekorn Suwannanon,2 Rathachai Kaewlai11Department of Radiology, Ramathibodi Hospital and Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand; 2Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, ThailandAbstract: Cervicothoracic junction trauma is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in trauma patients. Imaging has played an important role in identifying injuries and guiding appropriate, timely therapy. Computed tomography is currently a method of choice for diagnosing cervicothoracic junction trauma, in which the pattern of injuries often suggests possible mechanisms and potential injuries. In this article, the authors describe and illustrate common and uncommon injuries that can occur in the cervicothoracic junction.Keywords: cervicothoracic junction, cervical spine, trauma, imaging, radiology

  11. Tl(+) showed negligible interaction with inner membrane sulfhydryl groups of rat liver mitochondria, but formed complexes with matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korotkov, Sergey M; Brailovskaya, Irina V; Kormilitsyn, Boris N; Furaev, Viktor V

    2014-04-01

    The effects of Tl(+) on protein sulfhydryl (SH) groups, swelling, and respiration of rat liver mitochondria (RLM) were studied in a medium containing TlNO3 and sucrose, or TlNO3 and KNO3 as well as glutamate plus malate, or succinate plus rotenone. Detected with Ellman's reagent, an increase in the content of the SH groups was found in the inner membrane fraction, and a simultaneous decline was found in the content of the matrix-soluble fraction for RLM, incubated and frozen in 25-75 mM TlNO3 . This increase was greater in the medium containing KNO3 regardless of the presence of Ca(2+) . It was eliminated completely for RLM injected in the medium containing TlNO3 and then washed and frozen in the medium containing KNO3 . Calcium-loaded RLM showed increased swelling and decreased respiration. These results suggest that a ligand interaction of Tl(+) with protein SH groups, regardless of the presence of calcium, may underlie the mechanism of thallium toxicity.

  12. Reorganization of endothelial cord-like structures on basement membrane complex (Matrigel): involvement of transforming growth factor beta 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzuya, M; Kinsella, J L

    1994-11-01

    The formation of capillary-like network structures by cultured vascular endothelial cells on reconstituted basement membrane matrix, Matrigel, models endothelial cell differentiation, the final step of angiogenesis (Kubota et al., 1988; Grant et al., 1989). When endothelial cells derived from bovine aorta and brain capillaries were plated on Matrigel, DNA synthesis was suppressed and a network of capillary-like structures rapidly formed in 8-12 h. With time, the network broke down, resulting in dense cellular cords radiating from multiple cellular clusters in 16-24 h. Finally, multicellular aggregates of cells were formed as the network underwent further retraction. Network regression was prevented when either dithiothreitol (DTT) or anti-TGF-beta 1 antibodies were added during the assay. The addition of exogenous TGF-beta 1 promoted the regression of endothelial cells into the clusters. This response to TGF-beta 1 was blocked by potent serine threonine protein kinase inhibitors, H-7 and HA100. TGF-beta 1 was released from polymerized Matrigel by incubation with Dulbecco's modified eagle's medium (DMEM) in the absence of cells. The Matrigel-conditioned DMEM inhibited endothelial DNA synthesis even in the presence of anti-TGF-beta 1 antibodies. These results suggest that TGF-beta 1 and possibly other soluble factors from Matrigel may be important for differentiation and remodeling of endothelial cells in a capillary network with possible implications for wound healing and development.

  13. Nonspecific effects of the gap junction blocker mefloquine on fast hippocampal network oscillations in the adult rat in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, C J; Ul Haq, R; Liotta, A; Anderson, M L; Heinemann, U

    2011-09-29

    It has been suggested that gap junctions are involved in the synchronization during high frequency oscillations as observed during sharp wave-ripple complexes (SPW-Rs) and during recurrent epileptiform discharges (REDs). Ripple oscillations during SPW-Rs, possibly involved in memory replay and memory consolidation, reach frequencies of up to 200 Hz while ripple oscillations during REDs display frequencies up to 500 Hz. These fast oscillations may be synchronized by intercellular interactions through gap junctions. In area CA3, connexin 36 (Cx36) proteins are present and potentially sensitive to mefloquine. Here, we used hippocampal slices of adult rats to investigate the effects of mefloquine, which blocks Cx36, Cx43 and Cx50 gap junctions on both SPW-Rs and REDs. SPW-Rs were induced by high frequency stimulation in the CA3 region while REDs were recorded in the presence of the GABA(A) receptor blocker bicuculline (5 μM). Both, SPW-Rs and REDs were blocked by the gap junction blocker carbenoxolone. Mefloquine (50 μM), which did not affect stimulus-induced responses in area CA3, neither changed SPW-Rs nor superimposed ripple oscillations. During REDs, 25 and 50 μM mefloquine exerted only minor effects on the expression of REDs but significantly reduced the amplitude of superimposed ripples by ∼17 and ∼54%, respectively. Intracellular recordings of CA3 pyramidal cells revealed that mefloquine did not change their resting membrane potential and input resistance but significantly increased the afterhyperpolarization following evoked action potentials (APs) resulting in reduced probability of AP firing during depolarizing current injection. Similarly, mefloquine caused a reduction in AP generation during REDs. Together, our data suggest that mefloquine depressed RED-related ripple oscillations by reducing high frequency discharges and not necessarily by blocking electrical coupling.

  14. Cisplatin-induced premature senescence with concomitant reduction of gap junctions in human fibroblasts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei ZHAO; Zhong Xiang LIN; Zhi Qian ZHANG

    2004-01-01

    To examine the role of gap junctions in cell senescence,the changes of gap junctions in cisplatin-induced premature senescence of primary cultured fibroblasts were studied and compared with the replicative senescent human fibroblasts.Dye transfer assay for gap junction function and immunofluorescent staining for connexin 43 protein distribution were done respectively. Furthermore,cytofluorimetry and DAPI fluorescence staining were performed for cell cycle and apoptosis analysis. p53 gene expression level was detected with indirect immunofluorescence. We found that cisplatin (10 mM) treatment could block cell growth cycle at G1 and induced premature senescence. The premature senescence changes included high frequency of apoptosis,elevation of p53 expression,loss of membranous gap junctions and reduction of dye-transfer capacity. These changes were comparable to the changes of replicative senescence of human fibroblasts. It was also concluded that cisplatin could induce premature senescence concomitant with inhibition of gap junctions in the fibroblasts. Loss of functional gap junctions from the cell membrane may account for the reduced intercellular communication in the premature senescent fibroblasts. The cell system we used may provide a model useful for the study of the gap junction thus promoting agents against premature senescence.

  15. Neisseria gonorrhoeae breaches the apical junction of polarized epithelial cells for transmigration by activating EGFR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Vonetta L; Wang, Liang-Chun; Dawson, Valerie; Stein, Daniel C; Song, Wenxia

    2013-06-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae initiates infection at the apical surface of columnar endocervical epithelial cells in the female reproductive tract. These cells provide a physical barrier against pathogens by forming continuous apical junctional complexes between neighbouring cells. This study examines the interaction of gonococci (GC) with polarized epithelial cells. We show that viable GC preferentially localize at the apical side of the cell-cell junction in polarized endometrial and colonic epithelial cells, HEC-1-B and T84. In GC-infected cells, continuous apical junctional complexes are disrupted, and the junction-associated protein β-catenin is redistributed from the apical junction to the cytoplasm and to GC adherent sites; however, overall cellular levels remain unchanged. This redistribution of junctional proteins is associated with a decrease in the 'fence' function of the apical junction but not its 'gate' function. Disruption of the apical junction by removing calcium increases GC transmigration across the epithelial monolayer. GC inoculation induces the phosphorylation of both epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and β-catenin, while inhibition of EGFR kinase activity significantly reduces both GC-induced β-catenin redistribution and GC transmigration. Therefore, the gonococcus is capable of weakening the apical junction and polarity of epithelial cells by activating EGFR, which facilitates GC transmigration across the epithelium.

  16. The inner membrane complex sub-compartment proteins critical for replication of the apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii adopt a pleckstrin homology fold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonkin, Michelle L; Beck, Josh R; Bradley, Peter J; Boulanger, Martin J

    2014-05-16

    Toxoplasma gondii, an apicomplexan parasite prevalent in developed nations, infects up to one-third of the human population. The success of this parasite depends on several unique structures including an inner membrane complex (IMC) that lines the interior of the plasma membrane and contains proteins important for gliding motility and replication. Of these proteins, the IMC sub-compartment proteins (ISPs) have recently been shown to play a role in asexual T. gondii daughter cell formation, yet the mechanism is unknown. Complicating mechanistic characterization of the ISPs is a lack of sequence identity with proteins of known structure or function. In support of elucidating the function of ISPs, we first determined the crystal structures of representative members TgISP1 and TgISP3 to a resolution of 2.10 and 2.32 Å, respectively. Structural analysis revealed that both ISPs adopt a pleckstrin homology fold often associated with phospholipid binding or protein-protein interactions. Substitution of basic for hydrophobic residues in the region that overlays with phospholipid binding in related pleckstrin homology domains, however, suggests that ISPs do not retain phospholipid binding activity. Consistent with this observation, biochemical assays revealed no phospholipid binding activity. Interestingly, mapping of conserved surface residues combined with crystal packing analysis indicates that TgISPs have functionally repurposed the phospholipid-binding site likely to coordinate protein partners. Recruitment of larger protein complexes may also be aided through avidity-enhanced interactions resulting from multimerization of the ISPs. Overall, we propose a model where TgISPs recruit protein partners to the IMC to ensure correct progression of daughter cell formation.

  17. Demonstrated Anomalous Pancreaticobiliary Ductal Junction

    OpenAIRE

    Koçkar, Cem; ?ENOL, Altu?; BA?TÜRK, Abdulkadir; AYDIN, Bünyamin; Cüre, Erkan

    2015-01-01

    Anomalies of the pancreaticobiliary junction are rare. Clinically anomalies of the pancreaticobiliary junction are uncommonly symptomatic but may present themselves with associated conditions ranging from benign acute abdominal pain to carcinomas. A 52 years old man was admitted to gastroenterology service with complaints of fever, nausea, vomiting and recurrent epigastric pain. He was diagnosed with biliary pancreatitis. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreato-graphy was performed. Papilla ...

  18. Josephson junctions with ferromagnetic interlayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wild, Georg Hermann

    2012-03-04

    We report on the fabrication of superconductor/insulator/ferromagnetic metal/superconductor (Nb/AlO{sub x}/Pd{sub 0.82}Ni{sub 0.18}/Nb) Josephson junctions (SIFS JJs) with high critical current densities, large normal resistance times area products, and high quality factors. For these junctions, a transition from 0- to {pi}-coupling is observed for a thickness d{sub F}=6 nm of the ferromagnetic Pd{sub 0.82}Ni{sub 0.18} interlayer. The magnetic field dependence of the critical current of the junctions demonstrates good spatial homogeneity of the tunneling barrier and ferromagnetic interlayer. Magnetic characterization shows that the Pd{sub 0.82}Ni{sub 0.18} has an out-of-plane anisotropy and large saturation magnetization indicating negligible dead layers at the interfaces. A careful analysis of Fiske modes up to about 400 GHz provides valuable information on the junction quality factor and the relevant damping mechanisms. Whereas losses due to quasiparticle tunneling dominate at low frequencies, at high frequencies the damping is explained by the finite surface resistance of the junction electrodes. High quality factors of up to 30 around 200 GHz have been achieved. They allow to study the junction dynamics, in particular the switching probability from the zero-voltage into the voltage state with and without microwave irradiation. The experiments with microwave irradiation are well explained within semi-classical models and numerical simulations. In contrast, at mK temperature the switching dynamics without applied microwaves clearly shows secondary quantum effects. Here, we could observe for the first time macroscopic quantum tunneling in Josephson junctions with a ferromagnetic interlayer. This observation excludes fluctuations of the critical current as a consequence of an unstable magnetic domain structure of the ferromagnetic interlayer and affirms the suitability of SIFS Josephson junctions for quantum information processing.

  19. Intertwined αβ spectrin meeting helical actin protofilament in the erythrocyte membrane skeleton: wrap-around vs. point-attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sche, Paul; Vera, Carlos; Sung, L Amy

    2011-07-01

    Our 3-D model for a junctional complex (JC) in the erythrocyte membrane skeleton proposed that the helical actin protofilament functions as a mechanical axis for three pairs of αβ spectrin (Sp), and each pair wraps around the protofilament in a back-to-back fashion. The distal end of each Sp is further associated with the lipid bilayer by a suspension complex (SC). Here, we detail how splitting and rejoining of αβ Sp around a protofilament may form a loop that sustains and equilibrates tension. Sequential association of β and α Sp solves the challenge of constructing multiple loops along the protofilament, and topological connection facilitates their re-association. The wrap-around model minimizes the strain of the actin binding site on β Sp due to tension, redirection, or sliding of intertwined Sp. Pairing Sp balances the opposing forces and provides a mechanism for elastic recovery. The wrap-around junction thus provides mechanical advantages over a point-attachment junction in maintaining the integrity and functionality of the network. Severing α or β Sp may convert a wrapping-around junction to a point-attachment junction. In that case, a "bow up" motion of JC during deformation may disturb or flip the overlaid lipid bilayer, and mark stressed erythrocytes for phagocytosis.

  20. Electronic thermometry in tunable tunnel junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maksymovych, Petro

    2016-03-15

    A tunable tunnel junction thermometry circuit includes a variable width tunnel junction between a test object and a probe. The junction width is varied and a change in thermovoltage across the junction with respect to the change in distance across the junction is determined. Also, a change in biased current with respect to a change in distance across the junction is determined. A temperature gradient across the junction is determined based on a mathematical relationship between the temperature gradient, the change in thermovoltage with respect to distance and the change in biased current with respect to distance. Thermovoltage may be measured by nullifying a thermoelectric tunneling current with an applied voltage supply level. A piezoelectric actuator may modulate the probe, and thus the junction width, to vary thermovoltage and biased current across the junction. Lock-in amplifiers measure the derivatives of the thermovoltage and biased current modulated by varying junction width.

  1. The use of microbead-based spoligotyping for Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex to evaluate the quality of the conventional method: Providing guidelines for Quality Assurance when working on membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garzelli Carlo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The classical spoligotyping technique, relying on membrane reverse line-blot hybridization of the spacers of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis CRISPR locus, is used world-wide (598 references in Pubmed on April 8th, 2011. However, until now no inter-laboratory quality control study had been undertaken to validate this technique. We analyzed the quality of membrane-based spoligotyping by comparing it to the recently introduced and highly robust microbead-based spoligotyping. Nine hundred and twenty-seven isolates were analyzed totaling 39,861 data points. Samples were received from 11 international laboratories with a worldwide distribution. Methods The high-throughput microbead-based Spoligotyping was performed on CTAB and thermolyzate DNA extracted from isolated Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC strains coming from the genotyping participating centers. Information regarding how the classical Spoligotyping method was performed by center was available. Genotype discriminatory analyses were carried out by comparing the spoligotypes obtained by both methods. The non parametric U-Mann Whitney homogeneity test and the Spearman rank correlation test were performed to validate the observed results. Results Seven out of the 11 laboratories (63 %, perfectly typed more than 90% of isolates, 3 scored between 80-90% and a single center was under 80% reaching 51% concordance only. However, this was mainly due to discordance in a single spacer, likely having a non-functional probe on the membrane used. The centers using thermolyzate DNA performed as well as centers using the more extended CTAB extraction procedure. Few centers shared the same problematic spacers and these problematic spacers were scattered over the whole CRISPR locus (Mostly spacers 15, 14, 18, 37, 39, 40. Conclusions We confirm that classical spoligotyping is a robust method with generally a high reliability in most centers. The applied DNA extraction procedure (CTAB

  2. Confocal Annular Josephson Tunnel Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaco, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    The physics of Josephson tunnel junctions drastically depends on their geometrical configurations and here we show that also tiny geometrical details play a determinant role. More specifically, we develop the theory of short and long annular Josephson tunnel junctions delimited by two confocal ellipses. The behavior of a circular annular Josephson tunnel junction is then seen to be simply a special case of the above result. For junctions having a normalized perimeter less than one, the threshold curves in the presence of an in-plane magnetic field of arbitrary orientations are derived and computed even in the case with trapped Josephson vortices. For longer junctions, a numerical analysis is carried out after the derivation of the appropriate motion equation for the Josephson phase. We found that the system is modeled by a modified and perturbed sine-Gordon equation with a space-dependent effective Josephson penetration length inversely proportional to the local junction width. Both the fluxon statics and dynamics are deeply affected by the non-uniform annulus width. Static zero-field multiple-fluxon solutions exist even in the presence of a large bias current. The tangential velocity of a traveling fluxon is not determined by the balance between the driving and drag forces due to the dissipative losses. Furthermore, the fluxon motion is characterized by a strong radial inward acceleration which causes electromagnetic radiation concentrated at the ellipse equatorial points.

  3. Characteristic features of inhibitory junction potentials evoked by single stimuli in the guinea-pig isolated taenia caeci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridgewater, M; Cunnane, T C; Brading, A F

    1995-05-15

    1. Changes in membrane potential of the guinea-pig isolated taenia caeci evoked by single stimuli have been investigated using intracellular recording techniques. Nifedipine (10 microM) was used to arrest spontaneous muscle action potentials. Single stimuli elicited complex junction potentials which consisted of both excitatory and inhibitory components. 2. The excitatory component of the compound junction potential was unaffected by hexamethonium (100 microM) but abolished by atropine (1 microM) and omega-conotoxin GVIA (10-100 nM). 3. In the presence of atropine, single stimuli elicited fast inhibitory junction potentials (IJPs). IJPs were sometimes biphasic during repolarization with a noticeable 'slow tail'. Apamin (30-100 nM) potently inhibited the fast IJP and revealed an underlying slow IJP. 4. The fast IJP was also abolished by omega-conotoxin GVIA (100 nM). However, the slow IJP was insensitive to omega-conotoxin GVIA but was abolished by cadmium (30 microM). 5. Guanethidine (3 microM) and N omega-nitro-L-arginine (10-100 microM) had no detectable effects on either of the IJPs. The dye Reactive Blue 2 reduced the amplitude of the fast IJP but this reduction was associated with a membrane hyperpolarization. 6. The existence of two distinct IJPs in the guinea-pig taenia caeci has been demonstrated. The ability of omega-conotoxin GVIA to selectively abolish the fast IJP leaving the slow IJP intact suggests that separate nerves are involved in mediating these responses.

  4. A Characeae Cells Plasma Membrane as a Model for Selection of Bioactive Compounds and Drugs: Interaction of HAMLET-Like Complexes with Ion Channels of Chara corallina Cells Plasmalemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataev, Anatoly; Zherelova, Olga; Grishchenko, Valery

    2016-12-01

    Interaction of a HAMLET-like La-OA cytotoxic complex (human α-lactalbumin-oleic acid) and its constituents with the excitable plasmalemma of giant Chara corallina cells was investigated. The voltage-clamp technique was used to study Ca(2+) and Cl(-) transient currents in the plasmalemma of intact cells. The action of the complex and OA on the target cell membrane has a dose-dependent character. It was found that the La-OA complex has an inhibiting effect on Ca(2+) current across the plasmalemma, while α-lactalbumin alone does not affect the electrophysiological characteristics of the cellular membrane. However, oleic acid blocks Ca(2+) current across the plasmalemma. This is accompanied by the induction of a non-selective conductivity in the cellular membrane, a decrease in the resting potential and plasma membrane resistance of algal cells. We propose that the cytotoxicity of La-OA and other HAMLET-like complexes is determined by oleic acid acting as a blocker of potential-dependent Ca(2+) channels in the plasma membrane of target cells. The presented results show that the study model of green algae C. corallina cells plasmalemma is a convenient tool for the investigation of ion channels in many animal cells.

  5. The Alteration of the Epidermal Basement Membrane Complex of Human Nevus Tissue and Keratinocyte Attachment after High Hydrostatic Pressurization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Morimoto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported that human nevus tissue was inactivated after high hydrostatic pressure (HHP higher than 200 MPa and that human cultured epidermis (hCE engrafted on the pressurized nevus at 200 MPa but not at 1000 MPa. In this study, we explore the changes to the epidermal basement membrane in detail and elucidate the cause of the difference in hCE engraftment. Nevus specimens of 8 mm in diameter were divided into five groups (control and 100, 200, 500, and 1000 MPa. Immediately after HHP, immunohistochemical staining was performed to detect the presence of laminin-332 and type VII collagen, and the specimens were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM. hCE was placed on the pressurized nevus specimens in the 200, 500, and 1000 MPa groups and implanted into the subcutis of nude mice; the specimens were harvested at 14 days after implantation. Then, human keratinocytes were seeded on the pressurized nevus and the attachment was evaluated. The immunohistochemical staining results revealed that the control and 100 MPa, 200 MPa, and 500 MPa groups were positive for type VII collagen and laminin-332 immediately after HHP. TEM showed that, in all of the groups, the lamina densa existed; however, anchoring fibrils were not clearly observed in the 500 or 1000 MPa groups. Although the hCE took in the 200 and 500 MPa groups, keratinocyte attachment was only confirmed in the 200 MPa group. This result indicates that HHP at 200 MPa is preferable for inactivating nevus tissue to allow its reuse for skin reconstruction in the clinical setting.

  6. Complex reconstruction of the dorsal hand using the induced membrane technique associated with bone substitute: A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillier, David; Rizzi, Philippe; De Taddeo, Alice; Henault, Benoit; Tchurukdichian, Alain; Zwetyenga, Narcisse

    2016-01-01

    Introduction High-energy trauma of the hand often causes tissue loss involving bone, tendon and skin and is sometimes accompanied by devascularization of digits. Bone stabilization is the first step in the management of such injuries. Materials and methods A young patient presented composite tissue loss of the dorsum of his right (dominant) hand following an accident with a surface planer. Tissue loss involved the diaphyses of the first 4 metacarpals, tendons and skin with almost complete amputation of the 3rd finger. Bone stabilization comprised osteosynthesis using pins associated with cement to fill the bone defect. Hunter tendon rods were used for tendon repair and a pedicle groin flap (McGregor) was used to achieve skin coverage. The cement was replaced with autologous cortico-cancellous bone graft combined with bone paste (Nanostim) 3 months after the cement stabilization. Results Eleven months after the accident, the patient was able to return to work as a carpenter. Pinch and Grasp strength in the injured hand were half that in the contralateral hand, but there was no loss of sensitivity. Mobility was very satisfactory with a Kapandji score of 9 and a mean TAM of 280°. The patient can write, open a bottle and does not feel limited for everyday activities. Radiographically, the bone of the 3 reconstructed metacarpals appears consolidated. Conclusion The induced membrane technique allowed the reconstruction of small bone deficits in the long bones of the hand in a two-step procedure, the first step taking place in an emergency context of composite tissue trauma. PMID:27077131

  7. Distribution of interleukin-1 receptor complex at the synaptic membrane driven by interleukin-1β and NMDA stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Marinovich Marina; Cattabeni Flaminio; Galli Corrado L; Corsini Emanuela; Zianni Elisa; Boraso Mariaserena; Gardoni Fabrizio; Di Luca Monica; Viviani Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that contributes to neuronal injury in various degenerative diseases, and is therefore a potential therapeutic target. It exerts its biological effect by activating the interleukin-1 receptor type I (IL-1RI) and recruiting a signalling core complex consisting of the myeloid differentiation primary response protein 88 (MyD88) and the IL-1R accessory protein (IL-1RAcP). This pathway has been clearly described in the peripheral immun...

  8. Octagonal Defects at Carbon Nanotube Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaskólski, W.; Pelc, M.; Chico, Leonor; Ayuela, A.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate knee-shaped junctions of semiconductor zigzag carbon nanotubes. Two dissimilar octagons appear at such junctions; one of them can reconstruct into a pair of pentagons. The junction with two octagons presents two degenerate localized states at Fermi energy (EF). The reconstructed junction has only one state near EF, indicating that these localized states are related to the octagonal defects. The inclusion of Coulomb interaction splits the localized states in the junction with two octagons, yielding an antiferromagnetic system. PMID:24089604

  9. Charge mediation by ruthenium poly(pyridine) complexes in 'second-generation' glucose biosensors based on carboxymethylated beta-cyclodextrin polymer membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosela, Edyta; Elzanowska, Hanna; Kutner, Wlodzimierz

    2002-04-01

    Four different poly(pyridine) complexes of ruthenium, viz. Ru(II)(trpy)(phen)(OH(2))](2+) (1), trans-[Ru(III)(2,2'bpy)(2)(OH(2))(OH)](2+) (2), [(2,2'bpy)(2)(OH)Ru(III)ORu(III)(OH)(2,2'bpy)(2)](4+) (3), and [Ru(II)(4,4'bpy)(NH(3))(5)](2+) (4) (2,2'bpy=2,2'-bipyridine, 4,4'bpy=4,4'-bipyridine, trpy=2,2',2"-terpyridine, phen=1,10-phenanthroline), were tested as non-physiological charge mediators of 'second-generation' glucose biosensors. The membranes for these biosensors were prepared by casting anionic carboxymethylated beta-cyclodextrin polymer films (beta-CDPA) directly onto the Pt or glassy carbon (GC) disk electrodes. Simultaneously, glucose oxidase (GOD) was immobilized in the films by covalent bonding and the Ru complexes were incorporated both by inclusion in the beta-CD molecular cavities and by ion exchange at the fixed carboxymethyl cation-exchange sites. The leakage of the mediator from the polymer has been minimized by adopting a suitable pre-treatment procedure. The biosensors catalytic activities increased in the order 1inclusion complex with beta-CD, the biosensor sensitivity was the highest and equal to 7.2 micro A mM(-1) cm(-2), detectability was as low as 1 mM, but the linear concentration range was limited only to 4 mM. In contrast, for complexes 2 and 3 the sensitivity was 0.4 and 3.2 micro A mM(-1) cm(-2), while the linear concentration range extended up to at least 24 and 14 mM glucose, respectively. Even though some common interfering substances, such as ascorbate, paracetamol or urea, are oxidized at potentials close to those of the Ru complex redox couples, their electro-oxidation currents at physiological concentrations are insignificant compared to those due to the biocatalytic oxidation of glucose. The biosensor response to glucose is reversible as demonstrated by the inhibition of GOD activity by Cu(II). That is, the Cu(II) concentration required to inhibit by half the response to glucose of the biosensor containing complex 2 was 1.0 m

  10. Architecture of Human IgM in Complex with P. falciparum Erythrocyte Membrane Protein 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reetesh Raj Akhouri

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Plasmodium falciparum virulence is associated with sequestration of infected erythrocytes. Microvascular binding mediated by PfEMP1 in complex with non-immune immunoglobulin M (IgM is common among parasites that cause both severe childhood malaria and pregnancy-associated malaria. Here, we present cryo-molecular electron tomography structures of human IgM, PfEMP1 and their complex. Three-dimensional reconstructions of IgM reveal that it has a dome-like core, randomly oriented Fab2s units, and the overall shape of a turtle. PfEMP1 is a C- shaped molecule with a flexible N terminus followed by an arc-shaped backbone and a bulky C terminus that interacts with IgM. Our data demonstrate that the PfEMP1 binding pockets on IgM overlap with those of C1q, and the bulkiness of PfEMP1 limits the capacity of IgM to interact with PfEMP1. We suggest that P. falciparum exploits IgM to cluster PfEMP1 into an organized matrix to augment its affinity to host cell receptors.

  11. Combining blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry as an effective strategy for analyzing potential membrane protein complexes of Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Weijun

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tuberculosis is an infectious bacterial disease in humans caused primarily by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and infects one-third of the world's total population. Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG vaccine has been widely used to prevent tuberculosis worldwide since 1921. Membrane proteins play important roles in various cellular processes, and the protein-protein interactions involved in these processes may provide further information about molecular organization and cellular pathways. However, membrane proteins are notoriously under-represented by traditional two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE and little is known about mycobacterial membrane and membrane-associated protein complexes. Here we investigated M. bovis BCG by an alternative proteomic strategy coupling blue native PAGE to liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS to characterize potential protein-protein interactions in membrane fractions. Results Using this approach, we analyzed native molecular composition of protein complexes in BCG membrane fractions. As a result, 40 proteins (including 12 integral membrane proteins, which were organized in 9 different gel bands, were unambiguous identified. The proteins identified have been experimentally confirmed using 2-D SDS PAGE. We identified MmpL8 and four neighboring proteins that were involved in lipid transport complexes, and all subunits of ATP synthase complex in their monomeric states. Two phenolpthiocerol synthases and three arabinosyltransferases belonging to individual operons were obtained in different gel bands. Furthermore, two giant multifunctional enzymes, Pks7 and Pks8, and four mycobacterial Hsp family members were determined. Additionally, seven ribosomal proteins involved in polyribosome complex and two subunits of the succinate dehydrogenase complex were also found. Notablely, some proteins with high hydrophobicity or multiple transmembrane

  12. Dysfunction of mitochondria and deformed gap junctions in the heart of IL-18-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen; Jin, Denan; Hata, Masaki; Takai, Shinji; Yamanishi, Kyosuke; Shen, Weili; El-Darawish, Yosif; Yamanishi, Hiromichi; Okamura, Haruki

    2016-08-01

    Interleukin-18 (IL-18) was discovered as an interferon-γ-inducing factor and has been regarded as a proinflammatory cytokine. However, IL-18 is ubiquitously expressed both in immune/inflammatory cells and in nonimmune cells, and its biological roles have not been sufficiently elucidated. Here, we demonstrate that IL-18-deficient [IL-18 knockout (KO)] mice have heart abnormalities that may be related to impaired autophagy. In endurance running tests, IL-18KO mice ran significantly shorter distances compared with wild-type (WT) mice. Echocardiographs indicated disability in the systolic and diastolic functions of the IL-18KO mouse heart. Immunostaining of connexin 43 showed heterogeneous localization of gap junctions in the lateral membranes of the IL-18KO cardiac myocytes. Western blotting analysis revealed decreased phosphorylated connexin 43 in the IL-18KO heart. Electron microscopy revealed unusual localization of intercalated disks, swollen or damaged mitochondria, and broad, indistinct Z-lines in the IL-18KO heart. In accordance with the morphological observation, mitochondrial respiratory function, including that of complexes I and IV, was impaired, and production of reactive oxygen species was augmented in IL-18KO hearts. Notably, levels of LC3-II were markedly lower in the IL-18KO hearts than in WT hearts. In the culture of cardiac myocytes of IL-18KO neonates, exogenous IL-18 upregulated LC3-II and increased the number of intact mitochondria with high mitochondrial membrane potential. These results indicated that IL-18 has roles apart from those as a proinflammatory cytokine in cardiac myocytes and suggested that IL-18 contributes to the homeostatic maintenance of mitochondrial function and gap-junction turnover in cardiac myocytes, possibly by upregulating autophagy.

  13. Oxygen-evolving Activity in Photosystem Ⅱ Core Complex of Photosynthetic Membrane in the Presence of Native Lipid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG,Zhen-Le(阳振乐); WANG,Ze-Neng(王则能); LI,Liang-Bi(李良璧); KUANG,Ting-Yun(匡廷云)

    2002-01-01

    The techniques of oxygen electrode polarography and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy were employed to explore the involvement of digalactosyl diacylglycerol (DGDG) in functional and structural roles in the photosysten Ⅱ core com-plex (PSⅡCC). It was shown that DGDG exhibited the ability to stimulate the oxygen evolution in PSⅡCC, which was accompanied by the changes in the strucctures of PSⅡCC proteins.Tne results revealed that there existed hydrogen-bonding interactions between DGDG molecules and PSⅡCC proteins. It is most likely that the sites of PSⅡCC interaction with DGDG are in the extrinsic protein of 33 kDa.

  14. Highly Selective Salicylate Membrane Electrode Based on N,N'-(Aminoethyl)ethylenediamide Bis(2-salicylideneimine) Binuclear Copper(Ⅱ) Complex as Neutral Carrier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN, Ai-Li; CHAI, Ya-Qin; YUAN, Ruo; GUI, Guo-Feng

    2006-01-01

    A new ion selective electrode for salicylate based on N,N'-(aminoethyl)ethylenediamide bis(2-salicylideneimine)binuclear copper(Ⅱ) complex [Cu(Ⅱ)2-AEBS] as an ionophore was developed. The electrode has a linear range from 1.0 × 10-1 to 5.0 × 10-7 mol· L-1 with a near-Nemstian slope of (-55 ± 1) mV/decade and a detection limit of 2.0 ×10-7 mol·L-1 in phosphorate buffer solution of pH 5.0 at 25 ℃. It shows good selectivity for Sal and displays anti-Hofmeister selectivity sequence: Sal- > SCN-> ClO4-> I- > NO2- > Br- > NO3- > Cl- > SO32- > SO42-The proposed sensor based on binuclear copper(Ⅱ)complex has a fast response time of 5-10 s and can be used for at least 2 months without any major deviation. The response mechanism is discussed in view of the alternating current (AC) impedance technique and the UV-vis spectroscopy technique. The effect of the electrode membrane compositions and the experimental conditions were studied. The electrode has been successfully used for the determination of salicylate ion in drug pharmaceutical preparations.

  15. Membrane dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    Current topics include membrane-protein interactions with regard to membrane deformation or curvature sensing by BAR domains. Also, we study the dynamics of membrane tubes of both cells and simple model membrane tubes. Finally, we study membrane phase behavior which has important implications...... for the lateral organization of membranes as wells as for physical properties like bending, permeability and elasticity...

  16. DNA gridiron nanostructures based on four-arm junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dongran; Pal, Suchetan; Yang, Yang; Jiang, Shuoxing; Nangreave, Jeanette; Liu, Yan; Yan, Hao

    2013-03-22

    Engineering wireframe architectures and scaffolds of increasing complexity is one of the important challenges in nanotechnology. We present a design strategy to create gridiron-like DNA structures. A series of four-arm junctions are used as vertices within a network of double-helical DNA fragments. Deliberate distortion of the junctions from their most relaxed conformations ensures that a scaffold strand can traverse through individual vertices in multiple directions. DNA gridirons were assembled, ranging from two-dimensional arrays with reconfigurability to multilayer and three-dimensional structures and curved objects.

  17. Modelling of Dual-Junction Solar Cells including Tunnel Junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelaziz Amine

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Monolithically stacked multijunction solar cells based on III–V semiconductors materials are the state-of-art of approach for high efficiency photovoltaic energy conversion, in particular for space applications. The individual subcells of the multi-junction structure are interconnected via tunnel diodes which must be optically transparent and connect the component cells with a minimum electrical resistance. The quality of these diodes determines the output performance of the solar cell. The purpose of this work is to contribute to the investigation of the tunnel electrical resistance of such a multi-junction cell through the analysis of the current-voltage (J-V characteristics under illumination. Our approach is based on an equivalent circuit model of a diode for each subcell. We examine the effect of tunnel resistance on the performance of a multi-junction cell using minimization of the least squares technique.

  18. A modular LHC built on the DNA three-way junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probst, Markus; Langenegger, Simon M; Häner, Robert

    2014-01-07

    A light-harvesting complex composed of a π-stacked multichromophoric array in a DNA three-way junction is described. The modular design allows for a ready exchange of non-covalently attached energy acceptors.

  19. Nano-Assemblies of Modified Cyclodextrins and Their Complexes with Guest Molecules: Incorporation in Nanostructured Membranes and Amphiphile Nanoarchitectonics Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leïla Zerkoune

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A variety of cyclodextrin-based molecular structures, with substitutions of either primary or secondary faces of the natural oligosaccharide macrocycles of α-, β-, or γ-cyclodextrins, have been designed towards innovative applications of self-assembled cyclodextrin nanomaterials. Amphiphilic cyclodextrins have been obtained by chemical or enzymatic modifications of their macrocycles using phospholipidyl, peptidolipidyl, cholesteryl, and oligo(ethylene oxide anchors as well as variable numbers of grafted hydrophobic hydrocarbon or fluorinated chains. These novel compounds may self-assemble in an aqueous medium into different types of supramolecular nanoassemblies (vesicles, micelles, nanorods, nanospheres, and other kinds of nanoparticles and liquid crystalline structures. This review discusses the supramolecular nanoarchitectures, which can be formed by amphiphilic cyclodextrin derivatives in mixtures with other molecules (phospholipids, surfactants, and olygonucleotides. Biomedical applications are foreseen for nanoencapsulation of drug molecules in the hydrophobic interchain volumes and nanocavities of the amphiphilic cyclodextrins (serving as drug carriers or pharmaceutical excipients, anticancer phototherapy, gene delivery, as well as for protection of instable active ingredients through inclusion complexation in nanostructured media.

  20. Higher-order assemblies of oligomeric cargo receptor complexes form the membrane scaffold of the Cvt vesicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertipaglia, Chiara; Schneider, Sarah; Jakobi, Arjen J; Tarafder, Abul K; Bykov, Yury S; Picco, Andrea; Kukulski, Wanda; Kosinski, Jan; Hagen, Wim Jh; Ravichandran, Arvind C; Wilmanns, Matthias; Kaksonen, Marko; Briggs, John Ag; Sachse, Carsten

    2016-07-01

    Selective autophagy is the mechanism by which large cargos are specifically sequestered for degradation. The structural details of cargo and receptor assembly giving rise to autophagic vesicles remain to be elucidated. We utilize the yeast cytoplasm-to-vacuole targeting (Cvt) pathway, a prototype of selective autophagy, together with a multi-scale analysis approach to study the molecular structure of Cvt vesicles. We report the oligomeric nature of the major Cvt cargo Ape1 with a combined 2.8 Å X-ray and negative stain EM structure, as well as the secondary cargo Ams1 with a 6.3 Å cryo-EM structure. We show that the major dodecameric cargo prApe1 exhibits a tendency to form higher-order chain structures that are broken upon interaction with the receptor Atg19 in vitro The stoichiometry of these cargo-receptor complexes is key to maintaining the size of the Cvt aggregate in vivo Using correlative light and electron microscopy, we further visualize key stages of Cvt vesicle biogenesis. Our findings suggest that Atg19 interaction limits Ape1 aggregate size while serving as a vehicle for vacuolar delivery of tetrameric Ams1.