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Sample records for junco red-winged blackbird

  1. Effects of the mosquito larvicide GB-1111 on red-winged blackbird embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albers, P.H.; Hoffman, D.J.; Buscemi, D.M.; Melancon, M.J

    2003-10-01

    Mosquito larvicide GB-1111 poses a minimal risk to red-winged blackbird embryos when applied according to product label guidance. - Golden Bear Oil (GB-1111; legal trade name for GB-1313) is a petroleum distillate that is used in the United States and other countries as a larvicide for mosquito suppression. As part of a multi-species evaluation of the potential effects of GB-1111 on birds, red-winged blackbird eggs were collected, artificially incubated, and treated with one of five amounts of GB-1111 varying from 0 to 10 times the expected exposure from a spray application of the maximum recommended amount (X=47 l/ha, 5 gal/ac). The application of 10 X caused a significant reduction in hatching success. A dose-related reduction of hepatic microsomal monooxygenase activity (EROD) was detected. Among body weights, skeletal measurements, and age at death, only crownrump length was different among experimental groups. Overall, the potential hazard to embryos of a representative wetland passerine appears minimal until the application rate exceeds 3 X.

  2. Resource availability, breeding site selection, and reproductive success of red-winged blackbirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Andrew M; McCarty, John P

    1997-12-01

    Red-winged blackbirds are polygynous and show strong breeding site preferences, but it is unclear which environmental factors regulate their reproductive success and are ultimately responsible for shaping their patterns of habitat selection and their mating system. We evaluated the effect of variation in insect emergence rates on the reproductive success of male and female redwings nesting on replicate ponds. The number of male and female redwings that settled on a pond varied two- to three-fold among ponds, but was not related to insect emergence rates. Insect emergence rates had a positive effect on the number of nestlings successfully fledged by females, the number of nestlings fledged from male territories, and on the mass of nestlings at fledging. Typha stem density also varied widely among ponds, and was positively related to male and female settling density and mass of nestlings at fledging, but not to the number of nestlings fledged by females or males. We conclude that alternative breeding sites differ in their ability to support redwing reproduction, and that the availability of emerging odonates is an important environmental factor influencing the reproductive success of both male and female red-winged blackbirds.

  3. Mercury concentrations in eggs of red-winged blackbirds and tree swallows breeding in Voyageurs National Park, Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin W. Tyser,; Kristofer R. Rolfhus,; James G. Wiener,; Steve K. Windels,; Custer, Thomas W.; Dummer, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Most investigations of the environmental effects of mercury (Hg) have focused on aquatic food webs that include piscivorous fish or wildlife. However, recent investigations have shown that other species, including passerine songbirds, may also be at risk from exposure to methylmercury (MeHg). We quantified Hg concentrations in eggs of two species of songbirds, red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus) and tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor), nesting in Voyageurs National Park, Minnesota, USA. Geometric mean concentrations of total Hg (THg) were lower in red-winged blackbird eggs [218 and 107 ng/g dry weight (dw) for 2012 and 2013, respectively] than in tree swallow eggs (228 and 300 ng/g dw for 2012 and 2013, respectively), presumably reflecting differences in the trophic positions of these two species. Concentrations of MeHg averaged 98.4 % of THg in red-winged blackbird eggs. Levels of THg observed in this study were well below critical toxicological benchmarks commonly applied to eggs of avian species, suggesting these breeding populations were not adversely affected by exposure to MeHg. In red-winged blackbirds, concentrations of THg in eggs collected in 2012 were twice those in eggs collected in 2013. Hg levels in eggs of both species increased with date of clutch initiation. In red-winged blackbirds, for example, temporal patterns showed that a 3-week delay in clutch initiation increased egg THg by 60 %. These observations indicate that in ovo exposure of wetland birds to MeHg can vary significantly within nesting season as well as between years.

  4. Effects of the mosquito larvicide GB-1111 on red-winged blackbird embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, P H; Hoffman, D J; Buscemi, D M; Melancon, M J

    2003-01-01

    Golden Bear Oil (GB-1111; legal trade name for GB-1313) is a petroleum distillate that is used in the United States and other countries as a larvicide for mosquito suppression. As part of a multi-species evaluation of the potential effects of GB-1111 on birds, red-winged blackbird eggs were collected, artificially incubated, and treated with one of five amounts of GB-1111 varying from 0 to 10 times the expected exposure from a spray application of the maximum recommended amount (X=47 l/ha, 5 gal/ac). The application of 10 X caused a significant reduction in hatching success. A dose-related reduction of hepatic microsomal monooxygenase activity (EROD) was detected. Among body weights, skeletal measurements, and age at death, only crownrump length was different among experimental groups. Overall, the potential hazard to embryos of a representative wetland passerine appears minimal until the application rate exceeds 3 X.

  5. Percutaneous absorption of several chemicals, some pesticides included, in the red-winged blackbird

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, J.G.; Cagan, R.H.; Kare, M.R.

    1974-01-01

    Percutaneous absorption in vivo through the skin of the feet of the red-winged blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus) has been investigated. Absorption after 18-24 hours exposure to 0.01 M solutions of salicylic acid, caffeine, urea, 2,4-D, dieldrin, diethylstilbesterol, and DDT was measured. Of these, only DDT and diethylstilbesterol were not absorbed to a measurable degree. The solvents ethanol, dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), and vegetable oil were compared with water in their effects on the absorption ofcaffeine, urea, and salicylic acid. Ethanol, DMSO,and oil each decreased percutaneous absorption of salicylic acid. DMSO increased absorption of caffeine, and ethanol had no effect on it. Neither DMSO nor ethanol affected penetration of urea. Partition coefficients (K) (epidermis/water) were determined for all seven penetrants. Compounds with higher values of K showed lower percutaneous absorption. These findings suggest that K may be useful to predict percutaneous absorption in vivo. It appears unlikely that percutaneous absorption contributes greatly to the body burden of 2,4-D and dieldrin in A. phoeniceus.

  6. Non-linear uptake and hormesis effects of selenium in red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Lee E

    2008-01-25

    Effects of selenium on reproductive success were assessed in red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus). Mean egg selenium (MES) ranged from 2.96 to 21.7 mg/kg dry weight with individual eggs up to 40 mg/kg. Uptake was non-linear: increments in MES declined as aqueous selenium increased; the asymptote was approximately 23 mg/kg. Eggs were heavier and more were laid in 2004 compared to 2005, a year of record rainfall and below-normal temperatures. Mortality of embryos that were incubated to full term was low (2.6% in 2004 and 3.2% in 2005), as was the prevalence of embryonic defects (2.7% in 2004 and 5.1% in 2005). Abnormalities in nestlings were also rare. Egg mortality was caused by predation, weather, and parental abandonment. Nestlings died from predation, starvation, and hypothermia associated with rain and cold, drowning, and bacterial infections. Nestling liver concentrations reached 81 mg/kg dry wt. selenium and were highest at the most highly selenium-exposed sites. Blood glutathione peroxidase (a selenium-dependent enzyme indicative of selenium exposure) was unrelated to liver selenium concentrations, egg selenium, or ambient selenium exposure. The selenium concentration in prey that parents fed to nestlings was higher at the selenium-exposed sites (up to 37 mg/kg dry wt. Se) compared to reference sites. Aqueous selenate:selenite ratios were related to redox differences and were much higher at the site with the highest MES, liver selenium, and prey item selenium concentrations. Hatchability showed U-shaped, or hormesis, relationships with MES: productivity increased with selenium concentrations at low exposures and decreased at high exposures. The effects threshold was approximately 22 mg/kg dry wt. MES.

  7. The hormonal regulation of premigratory fat deposition and winter fattening in red-winged blackbirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintz, J V

    2000-02-01

    Glucagon is a highly potent lipolytic agent in birds and a candidate for regulating premigratory and winter fattening. The seasonal role of glucagon in fat metabolism was determined by monitoring plasma glucagon, fatty acids and glucose in two groups of red-winged blackbirds; one group exposed to outside environmental conditions (September to May) and a second group maintained at summer conditions with respect to day length and temperature. The results of this investigation demonstrate significantly lower plasma glucagon (480.1 pg/ml) in birds exposed to outdoor conditions than in birds maintained at summer conditions (734.6 pg/ml) during September/October. The data are consistent with the view that low plasma glucagon in outdoor birds ensures the preservation of fat stores for autumn migration. Lower plasma free fatty acid (FFA) levels (0.35 mEq/l) in outdoor birds (vs. 0.54 mEq/l in indoor birds) in autumn may reflect the rapid transport of FFA to adipose tissue for lipogenesis resulting in a steady increase in body weight from September to January. The sharp decline in plasma FFA in indoor birds from 0.54 mEq/l in September/October to 0.28 mEq/l in January/February may be attributed to a marked decrease in food consumption, rather than a dramatic change in the rate of lipid transport from blood to muscle or adipose tissue. Glucagon injections caused a 600% increase in plasma FFA and a more modest (50%) increase in plasma glucose. This confirms the major role of glucagon in fat mobilization. Its lipolytic effects, however, can vary seasonally by way of down regulation of glucagon receptors. Down regulation of glucagon receptors in adipose tissue and the associated reduced sensitivity of adipocytes to the lipolytic action of glucagon would account for the progressive increase in weight of the birds throughout November/December when plasma glucagon levels were significantly higher (578.9 pg/ml) in outdoor birds as compared to indoor birds (436.9 pg/ml). Lower

  8. Thyroid development in relation to the development of endothermy in the red-winged blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, J M; McNabb, F M; Jablonski, M S; Ferris, D V

    1999-11-01

    We investigated the development of thyroid function during the transition to endothermy in red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus). Thermoregulatory capabilities of blackbirds improve markedly over their relatively short nestling period (10-12 days), with the most striking improvements occurring between days 6 and 8. We hypothesized that the development of endothermy in these birds is dependent in part on the development of thyroid function. We assessed thyroid development by measuring changes in thyroid gland histology and plasma concentrations of thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) during the nestling period. To gain insight into the role of thyroid maturation in the context of thermoregulation, we compared plasma thyroid hormone profiles in nestlings exposed to cold temperatures to those maintained at thermoneutral temperatures. The overall size of the thyroid (as cross-sectional area) increased during nestling development, with the fastest growth occurring just before the development of endothermy. By day 8, it reached the size typical of that in adults. Follicular cell height of the thyroid glands increased in nestlings up to day 6 and then decreased for the rest of the nestling period. The mean area of individual follicles increased up to day 8 of nestling life and then decreased. Individual nestlings were capable of strong endothermic responses at 7 to 8 days of age and had significantly decreased plasma T4 concentrations following cold exposure, suggesting increased T4 to T3 deiodination to maintain the plasma concentrations of the more metabolically active T3. The patterns of plasma T4 and T3 during nestling development were consistent with those of nestlings of other altricial species of birds that have been studied. Overall, the patterns of thyroid development observed were consistent with the hypothesis that the functional development of the thyroid is critical to the development of endothermic capabilities and that thyroid hormones play a role

  9. Multi-Isotopic (δ2H, δ13C, δ15N) Tracing of Molt Origin for Red-Winged Blackbirds Associated with Agro-Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Scott J.; Hobson, Keith A.; Van Wilgenburg, Steven L.; Fischer, Justin W.

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed stable-hydrogen (δ2H), carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ 15N) isotope ratios in feathers to better understand the molt origin and food habits of Red-winged Blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus) near sunflower production in the Upper Midwest and rice production in the Mid-South of the United States. Outer primary feathers were used from 661 after-second-year (ASY) male blackbirds collected in Minnesota, Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota (spring collection), and Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri and Texas (winter collection). The best-fit model indicated that the combination of feather δ2H, δ13C and δ15N best predicted the state of sample collections and thus supported the use of this approach for tracing molt origins in Red-winged Blackbirds. When considering only birds collected in spring, 56% of birds were classified to their collection state on the basis of δ2H and δ13C alone. We then developed feather isoscapes for δ13C based upon these data and for δ2H based upon continental patterns of δ2H in precipitation. We used 81 birds collected at the ten independent sites for model validation. The spatially-explicit assignment of these 81 birds to the δ2H isoscape resulted in relatively high rates (~77%) of accurate assignment to collection states. We also modeled the spatial extent of C3 (e.g. rice, sunflower) and C4 (corn, millet, sorghum) agricultural crops grown throughout the Upper Midwest and Mid-South United States to predict the relative use of C3- versus C4-based foodwebs among sampled blackbirds. Estimates of C3 inputs to diet ranged from 50% in Arkansas to 27% in Minnesota. As a novel contribution to blackbird conservation and management, we demonstrate how such feather isoscapes can be used to predict the molt origin and interstate movements of migratory blackbirds for subsequent investigations of breeding biology (e.g. sex-specific philopatry), agricultural depredation, feeding ecology, physiology of migration and sensitivity to

  10. Comparison of immune responses of brown-headed cowbird and related blackbirds to West Nile and other mosquito-borne encephalitis viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisen, W.K.; Hahn, D.C.

    2007-01-01

    The rapid geographic spread of West Nile virus (family Flaviviridae, genus Flavivirus, WNV) across the United States has stimulated interest in comparative host infection studies to delineate competent avian hosts critical for viral amplification. We compared the host competence of four taxonomically related blackbird species (Icteridae) after experimental infection with WNV and with two endemic, mosquito-borne encephalitis viruses, western equine encephalomyelitis virus (family Togaviridae, genus Alphavirus, WEEV), and St, Louis encephalitis virus (family Flaviviridae, genus Flavivirus, SLEV). We predicted differences in disease resistance among the blackbird species based on differences in life history, because they differ in geographic range and life history traits that include mating and breeding systems. Differences were observed among the response of these hosts to all three viruses, Red-winged Blackbirds were more susceptible to SLEV than Brewer's Blackbirds, whereas Brewer's Blackbirds were more susceptible to WEEV than Red-winged Blackbirds. In response to WNV infection, cowbirds showed the lowest mean viremias, cleared their infections faster, and showed lower antibody levels than concurrently infected species. Brown-headed Cowbirds also exhibited significantly lower viremia responses after infection with SLEV and WEEV as well as coinfection with WEEV and WNV than concurrently infected icterids. We concluded that cowbirds may be more resistant to infection to both native and introduced viruses because they experience heightened exposure to a variety of pathogens of parenting birds during the course of their parasitic life style.

  11. Tricolored Blackbird - Monitoring [ds98

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Observations recorded during breeding season surveys for tricolored blackbirds conducted across their range in California primarily during the 1994, 1995, 1996,...

  12. Tricolored Blackbird - Breeding [ds20

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — These data come from observations of breeding tricolored blackbirds throughout their range in California. NAD27 coordinates are given in the data for each record....

  13. Anatomopathological findings in captive-raised red-winged tinamou (Rhynchotus rufescens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Momo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The red-winged tinamou (Rhynchotus rufescens, a bird from the Tinamidae family, can be easily adapted to captivity. It is considered suitable for producing good quality meat while presenting great feed conversion rate, characteristics that make it interesting for commercial production. Therefore, in order to determine the major diseases that affect these birds, 114 birds from two different aviary types that died over a 12-year period, 1994-2006, were analyzed macro- and microscopically. Anatomical and pathological examinations showed that the most frequently affected systems were the urinary and digestive tracts. In the urinary tract, the main finding was gout, followed by amyloidosis and parasitism by the trematode Paratanaisia confusa. In the digestive tract, the presence of foreign material and parasitism by Capillaria penidoi were observed in the esophagus and crop. This study aims to describe the main anatomical and pathological findings in captive-bred red-winged tinamou and correlate them with the aviary type.

  14. A z ∼ 5.7 Lyα emission line with an ultrabroad red wing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Huan; Wang, JunXian [CAS Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Department of Astronomy, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Zheng, Zhen-Ya; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James E. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Infante, Leopoldo, E-mail: yanghuan@mail.ustc.edu.cn, E-mail: jxw@mail.ustc.edu.cn, E-mail: zzheng13@asu.edu, E-mail: smalhotr@asu.edu, E-mail: james.rhoads@asu.edu, E-mail: linfante@astro.puc.cl [Institute of Astrophysics, Ponticia Universidad Catolica, Santiago (Chile)

    2014-03-20

    Using the Lyα emission line as a tracer of high-redshift, star-forming galaxies, hundreds of Lyα emission line galaxies (LAEs) at z > 5 have been detected. These LAEs are considered to be low-mass young galaxies, critical to the re-ionization of the universe and the metal enrichment of the circumgalactic medium (CGM) and the intergalactic medium (IGM). It is assumed that outflows in LAEs can help both ionizing photons and Lyα photons escape from galaxies. However, we still know little about the outflows in high-redshift LAEs due to observational difficulties, especially at redshift >5. Models of Lyα radiative transfer predict asymmetric Lyα line profiles with broad red wings in LAEs with outflows. Here, we report a z ∼ 5.7 Lyα emission line with a broad red wing extending to >1000 km s{sup –1} relative to the peak of Lyα line, which has been detected in only a couple of z > 5 LAEs until now. If the broad red wing is ascribed to gas outflow instead of active galactic nucleus activity, the outflow velocity could be larger than the escape velocity (∼500 km s{sup –1}) of a typical halo mass of z ∼ 5.7 LAEs, which is consistent with the idea that outflows in LAEs disperse metals to CGM and IGM.

  15. A z ~ 5.7 Ly{\\alpha} Emission Line with an Ultra Broad Red Wing

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Huan; Zheng, Zhen-Ya; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James E; Infante, Leopoldo

    2014-01-01

    Using Ly{\\alpha} emission line as a tracer of high redshift star forming galaxies, hundreds of Ly{\\alpha} emission line galaxies (LAEs) at z > 5 have been detected. These LAEs are considered to be low mass young galaxies, critical to the reionization of the universe and the metal enrichment of circumgalactic medium (CGM) and intergalactic medium (IGM). It is assumed that outflows in LAEs can help ionizing photons and Ly{\\alpha} photons escape out of galaxies. However we still know little about the outflows in high redshifts LAEs due to observational difficulties, especially at redshift > 5. Models of Ly{\\alpha} radiative transfer predict asymmetric Ly{\\alpha} line profiles with broad red wing in LAEs with outflows. Here we report a z ~ 5.7 Ly{\\alpha} emission line with a broad red wing extending to > 1000 km/s relative to the peak of Ly{\\alpha} line, which has been detected in only a couple of z > 5 LAEs till now. If the broad red wing is ascribed to gas outflow instead of AGN activity, the outflow velocity c...

  16. Effect of litter substrates on the performance, carcass traits, and environmental comfort of red-winged tinamou (Rhynchotus rufescens)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carvalho Nunes, Joao; Carvalho, M.M.; Sugui, J.K.; Queiroz, F.A.; Santana, A.E.; Hata, M.E.; Aiura, A.L.O.; Oliveira, J.A.; Queiroz, De Sandra Aidar

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed at evaluating the effect of litter substrates on the performance, carcass traits, and environmental comfort of red-winged tinamou (Rhynchotus rufescens). In this experiment, 160 birds, with 100 and 300 days of age, were housed into 20 pens, and distributed according to a completel

  17. Effect of litter substrates on the performance, carcass traits, and environmental comfort of red-winged tinamou (Rhynchotus rufescens)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carvalho Nunes, Joao; Carvalho, M.M.; Sugui, J.K.; Queiroz, F.A.; Santana, A.E.; Hata, M.E.; Aiura, A.L.O.; Oliveira, J.A.; Queiroz, De Sandra Aidar

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed at evaluating the effect of litter substrates on the performance, carcass traits, and environmental comfort of red-winged tinamou (Rhynchotus rufescens). In this experiment, 160 birds, with 100 and 300 days of age, were housed into 20 pens, and distributed according to a

  18. Interpreter's Guide to Blackbird Marsh Nature Trail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Studies Center, Pensacola, FL.

    This booklet was prepared to help the user interpret the natural history of Blackbird Marsh Nature Trail in Escambia County, Florida, and serves as a guide to the animal and plant life. The publication is part of a series of illustrated guides designed for use by teachers and students of all levels in conjunction with field trips to the 1200-acre…

  19. The Evolution of the Snellen E to the Blackbird. (Blackbird Preschool Vision Screening Program).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato-Viacrucis, Kiyo

    Comparison of a variety of vision screening methods used with preschool children led to modification of the standard Snellen E test called the Blackbird Vision Screening System. An instructional story using an "E-bird" was developed to teach children the various possible positions of the E. The visual confusion caused by the chart was…

  20. Shared songs are of lower performance in the dark-eyed junco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwell, Jonathan W.

    2016-01-01

    Social learning enables the adjustment of behaviour to complex social and ecological tasks, and underlies cultural traditions. Understanding when animals use social learning versus other forms of behavioural development can help explain the dynamics of animal culture. The dark-eyed junco (Junco hyemalis) is a songbird with weak cultural song traditions because, in addition to learning songs socially, male juncos also invent or improvise novel songs. We compared songs shared by multiple males (i.e. socially learned) with songs recorded from only one male in the population (many of which should be novel) to gain insight into the advantages of social learning versus invention or improvisation. Song types shared by multiple males were on average of lower performance, on aspects of vocal performance that have been implicated in agonistic communication in several species. This was not explained by cultural selection among socially learned songs (e.g. selective learning) because, for shared song types, song performance did not predict how many males shared them. We discuss why social learning does not maximize song performance in juncos, and suggest that some songbirds may add novel songs to culturally inherited repertoires as a means to acquire higher-quality signals. PMID:27493786

  1. Shared songs are of lower performance in the dark-eyed junco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Gonçalo C; Atwell, Jonathan W

    2016-07-01

    Social learning enables the adjustment of behaviour to complex social and ecological tasks, and underlies cultural traditions. Understanding when animals use social learning versus other forms of behavioural development can help explain the dynamics of animal culture. The dark-eyed junco (Junco hyemalis) is a songbird with weak cultural song traditions because, in addition to learning songs socially, male juncos also invent or improvise novel songs. We compared songs shared by multiple males (i.e. socially learned) with songs recorded from only one male in the population (many of which should be novel) to gain insight into the advantages of social learning versus invention or improvisation. Song types shared by multiple males were on average of lower performance, on aspects of vocal performance that have been implicated in agonistic communication in several species. This was not explained by cultural selection among socially learned songs (e.g. selective learning) because, for shared song types, song performance did not predict how many males shared them. We discuss why social learning does not maximize song performance in juncos, and suggest that some songbirds may add novel songs to culturally inherited repertoires as a means to acquire higher-quality signals.

  2. EFFECT OF LITTER SUBSTRATES ON THE PERFORMANCE, CARCASS TRAITS, AND ENVIRONMENTAL COMFORT OF RED-WINGED TINAMOU (RHYNCHOTUS RUFESCENS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JC Nunes

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The study aimed at evaluating the effect of litter substrates on the performance, carcass traits, and environmental comfort of red-winged tinamou (Rhynchotus rufescens. In this experiment, 160 birds, with 100 and 300 days of age, were housed into 20 pens, and distributed according to a completely randomized experimental design into five treatments with four replicates of eight birds each. Treatments consisted of five litter substrates: wood shavings, rice husks, peanut hulls, grass hay, or sand. Feed intake; weight gain; breast, hock, and footpad lesions; back feathering; total meat production; carcass and parts yield; and leukocyte counts were evaluated. Litter substrates were analyzed for dry matter content, standard microbial count, ammonia volatilization potential, water content, water holding capacity, temperature, and radiant heat load. The results showed that litter substrate did not influence the evaluated bird parameters, despite the higher microbial counts and released ammonia values determined in peanut hulls and sand, respectively. Sand also tended to have higher average temperature than the other litter substrates. It was concluded that litter substrate should be chosen at farmer discretion, taking into consideration its cost and utilization after use.

  3. Effect of crude protein levels and organic selenium supplementation in the diets fed during the breeding season on reproductive parameters of red-winged tinamous (Rhynchotus rufescens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Felipe

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available There is little information on the nutrition of red-winged tinamous (Rhynchotus rufescens reared in captivity, and their nutritional requirements still need to be determined. This study aimed at determining dietary crude protein requirements and testing four organic selenium supplementation levels in the diet of red-winged tinamous during the breeding season. Birds were housed in a conventional broiler house divided in 16 boxes with one male and three females each. Iso-energy (2800kcal ME/kg pelleted feeds, based on corn and soybean meal, were supplied in tube feeders. In the first experiment, treatments consisted of four different diets containing different crude protein (CP contents (15, 18, 21, or 24% and in the second experiment, the four diets contained equal protein level (22.5% and four different organic selenium levels (0, 0.2, 0.4, or 0.8ppm. Data were analyzed by the least square method. The best egg weight and eggshell thickness were obtained with 22.5% dietary CP. Organic selenium did not influence the studied reproductive traits of red-winged tinamous (Rhynchotus rufescens males or females.

  4. Speciation on oceanic islands: rapid adaptive divergence vs. cryptic speciation in a Guadalupe Island songbird (Aves: Junco.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pau Aleixandre

    Full Text Available The evolutionary divergence of island populations, and in particular the tempo and relative importance of neutral and selective factors, is of central interest to the study of speciation. The rate of phenotypic evolution upon island colonization can vary greatly among taxa, and cases of convergent evolution can further confound the inference of correct evolutionary histories. Given the potential lability of phenotypic characters, molecular dating of insular lineages analyzed in a phylogenetic framework provides a critical tool to test hypotheses of phenotypic divergence since colonization. The Guadalupe junco is the only insular form of the polymorphic dark-eyed junco (Junco hyemalis, and shares eye and plumage color with continental morphs, yet presents an enlarged bill and reduced body size. Here we use variation in mtDNA sequence, morphological traits and song variables to test whether the Guadalupe junco evolved rapidly following a recent colonization by a mainland form of the dark-eyed junco, or instead represents a well-differentiated "cryptic" lineage adapted to the insular environment through long-term isolation, with plumage coloration a result of evolutionary convergence. We found high mtDNA divergence of the island lineage with respect to both continental J. hyemalis and J. phaeonotus, representing a history of isolation of about 600,000 years. The island lineage was also significantly differentiated in morphological and male song variables. Moreover, and contrary to predictions regarding diversity loss on small oceanic islands, we document relatively high levels of both haplotypic and song-unit diversity on Guadalupe Island despite long-term isolation in a very small geographic area. In contrast to prevailing taxonomy, the Guadalupe junco is an old, well-differentiated evolutionary lineage, whose similarity to mainland juncos in plumage and eye color is due to evolutionary convergence. Our findings confirm the role of remote islands

  5. Performance Monitoring Enterprise Applications with the BlackBird System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germano, João P.; da Silva, Alberto Rodrigues; Silva, Fernando M.

    This work describes the BlackBird system, which is an analysis and monitoring service for data-intensive enterprise applications, without restrictions on the targeted architecture or employed technologies. A case study is presented for the monitoring of Billing applications from Vodafone Portugal. Monitoring systems are an essential tool for the effective management of Enterprise Applications and the attainment of the demanding service level agreements imposed to these applications. However, due to the increasing complexity and diversity of these applications, adequate monitoring systems are rarely available. The BlackBird monitoring system is able to interact with these applications through different technologies employed by the Monitored Application, and is able to produce Metrics regarding the application service level goals. The BlackBird system can be specified using a set of pre-defined Configuration Objects, allowing it to be extensible and adaptable for applications with different architectures.

  6. Winter fattening in the dark-eyed junco: plasticity and possible interaction with migration trade-offs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, C M; Nolan, V; Ketterson, E D

    1994-05-01

    Although fat often supplies the major source of metabolic fuel during winter fasts of birds, this critical life-history trait is little studied by ecologists. In the dark-eyed junco Junco hyemalis, we have in a series of studies investigated the extent of plasticity in the winter fat reserve. Earlier (Rogers et al. 1993), we reported (1) a highly variable pattern of geographic variation in the winter fat reserve of junco populations in eastern North America, (2) disappearance of statistically significant interpopulation variation after experimental displacement to a common latitude, and (3) post-displacement temporal variation in the fat reserve. In analyses reported here, recent temperature, recent snowfall (a measure of short-term predictability of resources), season (perhaps reflecting continued exposure to unpredictable resources) and daylength explained spatial variation in the fat store. Recent temperature explained temporal variation in the fat reserves of groups of displaced juncos. These results suggest that platticity in a life-history trait has evolved in an uncertain winter environment. Through environment-dependent fattening, the costs of fat can be avoided during warm periods and at locations where fat confers little benefit, whereas benefits of fat can be quickly gained if weather conditions become harsh and snowfall might restrict food. Three types of winter fatteners probably exist among birds: responders (fatten in response to the proximate environment), predictors (fatten in anticipation of long-term environmental conditions), and responder-predictors (combination of both types of regulation). Because dark-eyed juncos select different winter latitudes as they age, we hypothesize that the nonbreeding component of the life-history of juncos includes the co-adapted plastic traits of winter fattening and post-breeding migration. Life-history theory can apparently explain important traits related to fitness in the nonbreeding period.

  7. Historical trends in rusty blackbird nonbreeding habitat in forested wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul B. Hamel; Diane De Steven; Ted Leininger; Randy. Wilson

    2009-01-01

    Rusty Blackbird (Euphagus carolinus) populations have declined perhaps 95% in the recent past, creating legitimate concern that the species may become endangered. During the nonbreeding period the species occurs predominantly in southern U.S. forested wetland habitats, with concentrations in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley and in the southeastern...

  8. A repellent for protecting corn seed from blackbirds and crows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickley, A.R.; Guarineo, J.L.

    1972-01-01

    Methiocarb [4-(methylthio)-3,-5-xylyl N-methylcarbamate] was tested as a seed treatment for repelling blackbirds and crows (Corvus sp.) from sprouting corn in South Carolina. The test was conducted on eight fields within a 0.25-square-mile area. Marked repellency occurred; sprout damage averaged 44 percent in the control fields and 0.3 percent in the fields treated with methiocarb.

  9. 75 FR 75153 - Migratory Bird Permits; Removal of Rusty Blackbird and Tamaulipas (Mexican) Crow From the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-02

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 21 RIN 1018-AV66 Migratory Bird Permits; Removal of Rusty Blackbird and Tamaulipas (Mexican) Crow From the Depredation Order for Blackbirds, Cowbirds, Grackles, Crows... carolinus) and the Mexican (Tamaulipas) Crow (Corvus imparatus) from the list of species that may...

  10. Could blackbird mortality from avicide DRC-1339 contribute to avian botulism outbreaks in North Dakota?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, D.R.; Samuel, M.D.; Rocke, T.E.; Johnson, K.M.; Linz, G.

    2004-01-01

    Blackbird (family lcteridae) depredation on sunflower (Helianthus annuus) crops in the prairie states of the United States has motivated the proposed use of an avicide, DRC-1339 (3-chloro-4-methylaniline), to decrease their numbers. The resulting mortality of blackbirds at wetland roosts could increase the potential of avian botulism occurring in affected marshes. To assess this possibility, we seeded (artificially placed) blackbird carcasses in selected wetlands in Stutsman County, North Dakota, during August-September 2000 and July-September 2001 to evaluate their rate of decomposition and role in initiating avian botulism outbreaks. We monitored carcasses to determine their persistence, the frequency and amount of maggots produced, and the presence of type C botulinum toxin. In 10 of our 12 study wetlands, blackbird carcasses were not rapidly removed by scavengers, thus providing substrate for maggot growth and potential production of Clostridium botulinum toxin. Decomposition of carcasses occurred rapidly, and maggot production averaged 4a??5 g per carcass within 9 days. We were unable to detect C. botulinum type C toxin in any of the 377 blackbird carcasses or the 112 samples of maggots we collected in 2000 or 2001. None of the 25 blackbird carcasses we tested contained botulinum spores, the most probable explanation for the absence of botulinum toxin production. Our results indicate that the likelihood of DRC-1339-poisoned blackbirds causing botulism outbreaks would be minimal in North Dakota wetlands during late summer and early autumn.

  11. WATER QUALITY ANALYSIS OF AGRICULTURALLY IMPACTED TIDAL BLACKBIRD CREEK, DELAWARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Stone

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Blackbird Creek, Delaware is a small watershed in northern Delaware that has a significant proportion of land designated for agricultural land use. The Blackbird Creek water monitoring program was initiated in 2012 to assess the condition of the watershed’s habitats using multiple measures of water quality. Habitats were identified based on percent adjacent agricultural land use. Study sites varying from five to fourteen were sampled biweekly during April and November, 2012-2015. Data were analyzed using principal component analysis and generalized linear modeling. Results from these first four years of data documented no significant differences in water quality parameters (dissolved oxygen, pH, temperature, salinity, inorganic nitrate, nitrite, ammonia, orthophosphate, alkalinity, and turbidity between the two habitats, although both orthophosphate and turbidity were elevated beyond EPA-recommended values. There were statistically significant differences for all of the parameters between agriculture seasons. The lack of notable differences between habitats suggests that, while the watershed is generally impacted by agricultural land use practices, there appears to be no impact on the surface water chemistry. Because there were no differences between habitats, it was concluded that seasonal differences were likely due to basic seasonal variation and were not a function of agricultural land use practices.

  12. A new feather mite species of the genus Neumannella Trouessart, 1916 (Analgoidea, Dermoglyphidae) from the Red-winged Tinamou Rhynchotus rufescens (Temminck, 1815) (Aves, Tinamiformes) with remarks to the evolution of host-parasite associations of the genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabert, Jacek

    2014-06-01

    Neumannella skorackii, a new species of the feather mite family Dermoglyphidae (Acari, Astigmata) is described from the Red-winged Tinamou Rhynchotus rufescens (Temminck, 1815) (Aves, Tinamiformes) from Paraguay and a key to all known species of the genus is provided. The phylogenetic relationships (MP analysis of 25 morphological characters) between Neumannella species along with the evolutionary history of host-parasite associations revealed by Jungle reconciliation method are reconstructed. Relatively low cospeciation contribution to the recent host-parasite associations is discovered.

  13. Common blackbirdsTurdus merula use anthropogenic structures as nesting sites in an urbanized landscape

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanping WANG; Qin HUANG; Sisi LAN; Qin ZHANG; Shuihua CHEN

    2015-01-01

    The common blackbirdTurdus merula is one of the most highly urbanized bird species. However, to date, the use of anthropogenic structures as nesting sites in the common blackbird is rarely documented, and the factors influencing its use of the anthropogenic structures as nesting sites remain unclear. In this study, we systematically quantified and determined the factors in-fluencing the use of anthropogenic structures as nesting sites in common blackbirds in a highly urbanized city of Hangzhou, Chi-na. We searched for nests of common blackbirds during four breeding seasons from 2010 to 2013. Among the 60 nests found, 34 nests were in anthropogenic structures such as wall ledges, air condition mounts, window canopies, cable poles, guardrails, eaves, balcony frames, flowerpots and flower shelves on balconies. We found that the available anthropogenic nest sites and the availa-ble nesting trees were main factors determining the use of anthropogenic structures as nesting sites in common blackbirds. In ur-ban environments, the amount of available anthropogenic nesting sites increased significantly, whereas the number of natural nesting sites reduced greatly. Our results suggest that common blackbirds can adjust their nest sites in response to urbanization and such nesting behavior shifts may aid them to colonize urban environments. From a management viewpoint, our results indi-cate that behavioral flexibility should be taken into account for effective urban wildlife management and conservation [Current Zoology 61 (3): 435–443, 2015].

  14. Rapid postglacial diversification and long-term stasis within the songbird genus Junco: phylogeographic and phylogenomic evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friis, Guillermo; Aleixandre, Pau; Rodríguez-Estrella, Ricardo; Navarro-Sigüenza, Adolfo G; Milá, Borja

    2016-12-01

    Natural systems composed of closely related taxa that vary in the degree of phenotypic divergence and geographic isolation provide an opportunity to investigate the rate of phenotypic diversification and the relative roles of selection and drift in driving lineage formation. The genus Junco (Aves: Emberizidae) of North America includes parapatric northern forms that are markedly divergent in plumage pattern and colour, in contrast to geographically isolated southern populations in remote areas that show moderate phenotypic divergence. Here, we quantify patterns of phenotypic divergence in morphology and plumage colour and use mitochondrial DNA genes, a nuclear intron, and genomewide SNPs to reconstruct the demographic and evolutionary history of the genus to infer relative rates of evolutionary divergence among lineages. We found that geographically isolated populations have evolved independently for hundreds of thousands of years despite little differentiation in phenotype, in sharp contrast to phenotypically diverse northern forms, which have diversified within the last few thousand years as a result of the rapid postglacial recolonization of North America. SNP data resolved young northern lineages into reciprocally monophyletic lineages, indicating low rates of gene flow even among closely related parapatric forms, and suggesting a role for strong genetic drift or multifarious selection acting on multiple loci in driving lineage divergence. Juncos represent a compelling example of speciation in action, where the combined effects of historical and selective factors have produced one of the fastest cases of speciation known in vertebrates. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Sample size clay kaolin of primary in pegmatites regions Junco Serido - PB and Equador - RN; Granulometria de argila caulim primario dos pegmatitos nas regioes do Junco do Serido - PB e Equador - RN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, M.F.; Sousa, J.B.M.; Sales, L.R.; Silva, P.A.S.; Lima, A.D.D., E-mail: mauro.meyer@ifrn.edu.br [Instituto Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (IFRN), RN (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Kaolin is a clay formed mainly of kaolinite resulting from feldspar weathering or hydrothermal. This study aims to investigate the way of occurrence, kaolin particle size of the pegmatites of the Borborema Province Pegmatitic in the regions of Junco do Serido-PB and Ecuador-RN. These variables were analyzed considering granulometric intervals obtained from wet sieving of samples of pegmatite mines in the region. Kaolin was received using sieves of 200, 325, 400 and 500 mesh and the sieve fractions retained by generating statistical parameters histograms. kaolin particles are extremely fine and pass in its entirety through 500 mesh sieve. The characterization of minerals in fine fractions by diffraction of X-rays showed that the relative amount of sericite in fractions retained in sieves 400 and 500 mesh impairing the whiteness and mineralogical texture kaolin production. (author)

  16. Effects of habitat and climate change on blackbird populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forcey, Greg M.; Thogmartin, Wayne E.

    2017-01-01

    Global biodiversity loss is proceeding at an accelerating pace (Newbold et al. 2015, 2016) in large part due to land use and, climate change, and associated spread of disease and non-native species (Hobbs et al. 2006, Williams and Jackson 2007, Ellis 2011, Radeloff et al. 2015). Over the last century, U.S. average temperature has increased 0.7–1.1°C, leading to an increased frost-free season, more frequent and intense heat waves, and increased frequency and intensity of winter storms; mean precipitation has increased, with increases in heavy downpours (Melillo et al. 2014). The dominant land uses in the U.S. are lands devoted to forest (671 million acres; 30%), pasture/range (614 million acres, 27%), and agriculture (408 million acres, 18%) (Economic Research Service 2011). Martinuzzi et al. (2015) projected changes in land use to the middle of the 21st century and found that at least 11% of the U.S. land cover (an area larger than Texas) was expected to change cover class (Figure 1). At the same time, mean temperature is expected to further increase 1.1–1.7°C by mid-century and 2.2–3.9°C by end-of-century (Melillo et al. 2014). In this age of unprecedented human-induced environmental change, understanding the relationships of species to the habitat and climatic conditions they experience is crucial to conservation and management. Improved understanding of relationships with habitat and climate will better inform management decisions designed to reduce crop depredation caused by blackbirds.

  17. 78 FR 39309 - Proposed Information Collection; Depredation Order for Blackbirds, Grackles, Cowbirds, Magpies...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    ...; F09M29000--134--FXMB12320900000] Proposed Information Collection; Depredation Order for Blackbirds, Grackles... that implement the MBTA. In the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), 50 CFR 21.43 is a depredation order... found committing or about to commit depredations upon ornamental or shade trees, agricultural crops...

  18. 50 CFR 21.43 - Depredation order for blackbirds, cowbirds, grackles, crows and magpies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., EXPORTATION, AND IMPORTATION OF WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD PERMITS Control of Depredating... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Depredation order for blackbirds, cowbirds, grackles, crows and magpies. 21.43 Section 21.43 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE...

  19. Campylobacter jejuni sequence types show remarkable spatial and temporal stability in Blackbirds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Griekspoor

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The zoonotic bacterium Campylobacter jejuni has a broad host range but is especially associated with birds, both domestic and wild. Earlier studies have indicated thrushes of the genus Turdus in Europe to be frequently colonized with C. jejuni, and predominately with host-associated specific genotypes. The European Blackbird Turdus merula has a large distribution in Europe, including some oceanic islands, and was also introduced to Australia by European immigrants in the 1850s. Methods: The host specificity and temporal stability of European Blackbird C. jejuni was investigated with multilocus sequence typing in a set of isolates collected from Sweden, Australia, and The Azores. Results: Remarkably, we found that the Swedish, Australian, and Azorean isolates were genetically highly similar, despite extensive spatial and temporal isolation. This indicates adaptation, exquisite specificity, and stability in time for European Blackbirds, which is in sharp contrast with the high levels of recombination and mutation found in poultry-related C. jejuni genotypes. Conclusion: The maintenance of host-specific signals in spatially and temporally separated C. jejuni populations suggests the existence of strong purifying selection for this bacterium in European Blackbirds.

  20. Competition and habitat quality influence age and sex distribution in wintering Rusty Blackbirds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudia Mettke-Hofmann; Paul B. Hamel; Gerhard Hofmann; Theodore J. Zenzal Jr.; Anne Pellegrini; Jennifer Malpass; Megan Garfinkel; Nathan Schiff; Russell Greenberg

    2015-01-01

    Bird habitat quality is often inferred from species abundance measures during the breeding and non-breeding season and used for conservation management decisions. However, during the non-breeding season age and sex classes often occupy different habitats which suggest a need for more habitat-specific data. Rusty Blackbird (Euphagus carolinus) is a...

  1. Does song complexity matter in an intra-sexual context in common blackbirds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesler, Nana; Sacher, Thomas; Coppack, Timothy;

    Bird song is thought to be subject of both inter- and intra-sexual selection and song complexity a signal of male quality. One aspect of song complexity, repertoire size, correlates with estimates of male quality in several passerine species.  The Common Blackbird (Turdus merula) has a large...

  2. La pluma y la cruz al servicio de Franco: Alfonso Junco y el exilio republicano español en México

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Tras la Guerra Civil de 1936, el escritor y periodista mexicano Alfonso Junco habría de ser uno de los partidarios no sólo de la cruzada del general Franco en contra del bando republicano, sino de la decisión, que al término del conlicto adoptaría, de mandar a la otra España al exilio. Ferviente defensor de la cruz y detractor de ideologías como el liberalismo, el comunismo y hasta el fascismo, Alfonso Junco critica- ría con dureza la llegada de los refugiados españoles a Méxic o, bajo el pro...

  3. A comprehensive species-level molecular phylogeny of the New World blackbirds (Icteridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Alexis F L A; Barker, F Keith; Lanyon, Scott M; Burns, Kevin J; Klicka, John; Lovette, Irby J

    2014-02-01

    The New World blackbirds (Icteridae) are among the best known songbirds, serving as a model clade in comparative studies of morphological, ecological, and behavioral trait evolution. Despite wide interest in the group, as yet no analysis of blackbird relationships has achieved comprehensive species-level sampling or found robust support for most intergeneric relationships. Using mitochondrial gene sequences from all ∼108 currently recognized species and six additional distinct lineages, together with strategic sampling of four nuclear loci and whole mitochondrial genomes, we were able to resolve most relationships with high confidence. Our phylogeny is consistent with the strongly-supported results of past studies, but it also contains many novel inferences of relationship, including unexpected placement of some newly-sampled taxa, resolution of relationships among major clades within Icteridae, and resolution of genus-level relationships within the largest of those clades, the grackles and allies. We suggest taxonomic revisions based on our results, including restoration of Cacicus melanicterus to the monotypic Cassiculus, merging the monotypic Ocyalus and Clypicterus into Cacicus, restoration of Dives atroviolaceus to the monotypic Ptiloxena, and naming Curaeus forbesi to a new genus, Anumara. Our hypothesis of blackbird phylogeny provides a foundation for ongoing and future evolutionary analyses of the group.

  4. Blackbird Creek Monitoring Program to Study the impact of Climate Change and Land Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozbay, G.; Chintapenta, L. K.; Roeske, K. P.; Stone, M.; Phalen, L.

    2014-12-01

    The Blackbird Creek Monitoring Program at Delaware State University continues to utilize various perspectives to study the dynamics of one of Delaware's most pristine ecosystems. The water quality of Blackbird Creek has been constantly monitored for 3 years and correlated with the rain and storm events. Soil nutrients composition has been studied by extracting the water associated with soil aggregates and analyzing the levels of different nutrients. Soil quality is also assessed for heavy metals to identify potential human impact that may affect the health of ecosystem. Within the Blackbird Creek there is a threat to native plant communities from invasive plant species as they alter the ecosystem dynamics. Saltmarsh cord grass (Spartina alterniflora) and common reed (Phragmites australius) are the common wetland plants. Aerial mapping of the creek has been conducted to determine the area covered by invasive plant species. The microbial community structure plays a key role in soil carbon and nitrogen cycles in the ecosystem. Molecular analysis has been performed to study the microbial diversity with respect to the type of marsh grasses. This program has also incorporated the use of diatoms as biological indicators to assess the health of ecosystem and correlate that data with physical and chemical water quality data. The abundance and diversity of macro fauna such as blue crabs, fish and other significant species has also been studied. Stable isotopic analysis of these macro fauna has also been performed to study the food web. The results from this program will be helpful in addressing environmental challenges and designing management strategies.

  5. Song repertoire size correlates with measures of body size in Eurasian blackbirds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesler, Nana; Mundry, Roger; Sacher, Thomas;

    2012-01-01

    organisation. Here we investigated whether repertoire size in Eurasian blackbirds correlates with measures of body size, namely length of wing, 8th primary, beak and tarsus. So far, very few studies have investigated species with large repertoires and a flexible song organisation in this context. We found...... positive correlations, meaning that larger males had larger repertoires. Larger males may have better fighting abilities and, thus, advantages in territorial defence. Larger structural body size may also reflect better conditions during early development. Therefore, under the assumption that body size...

  6. Breeding biology of the European Blackbird Turdus merula in orange orchards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Zeraoula

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available During two successive years (2013–2014, we studied the breeding ecology of the European Blackbird Turdus merula in Guelma province, north-east of Algeria. The study was carried out in orange orchards of the region. We investigated nest placement in the orange trees and determined the factors of reproductive failure at this study area. Nests were placed at low height (mean ± SD = 1.42 ± 0.04 m and located near the trunk (mean ± SD = 0.61 ± 0.04 m. The breeding season occurred between mid-May and mid-June and the peak of egg laying took place during the first half of May. The mean clutch size was 2.96 ± 0.05, density of breeding pairs was 0.83 ± 0.30 p/ha. The breeding success reported in the present study was higher than that recorded in other studies. Predation was the leading cause of nest failure of the population under investigation. The present study shows that the orange orchards appear to be the preferred breeding area for Blackbird population.

  7. Evaluation of glyphosate herbicide (Rodeo formulation) for managing blackbird roosting habitat in sunflower growing areas of the northcentral United States: Year II.

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This proposal is to select twelve Wetland Production Areas in the Nelson County area for cattail control with glyphosate in conjunction with blackbird depredation...

  8. Testosterone affects neural gene expression differently in male and female juncos: a role for hormones in mediating sexual dimorphism and conflict.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark P Peterson

    Full Text Available Despite sharing much of their genomes, males and females are often highly dimorphic, reflecting at least in part the resolution of sexual conflict in response to sexually antagonistic selection. Sexual dimorphism arises owing to sex differences in gene expression, and steroid hormones are often invoked as a proximate cause of sexual dimorphism. Experimental elevation of androgens can modify behavior, physiology, and gene expression, but knowledge of the role of hormones remains incomplete, including how the sexes differ in gene expression in response to hormones. We addressed these questions in a bird species with a long history of behavioral endocrinological and ecological study, the dark-eyed junco (Junco hyemalis, using a custom microarray. Focusing on two brain regions involved in sexually dimorphic behavior and regulation of hormone secretion, we identified 651 genes that differed in expression by sex in medial amygdala and 611 in hypothalamus. Additionally, we treated individuals of each sex with testosterone implants and identified many genes that may be related to previously identified phenotypic effects of testosterone treatment. Some of these genes relate to previously identified effects of testosterone-treatment and suggest that the multiple effects of testosterone may be mediated by modifying the expression of a small number of genes. Notably, testosterone-treatment tended to alter expression of different genes in each sex: only 4 of the 527 genes identified as significant in one sex or the other were significantly differentially expressed in both sexes. Hormonally regulated gene expression is a key mechanism underlying sexual dimorphism, and our study identifies specific genes that may mediate some of these processes.

  9. Mineralogical characterization and beneficiation study of kaolin from Equador (RN and Junco do Seridó (PB to increase the brightness index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. J. S. Campos

    Full Text Available Abstract Kaolin is a rock composed mainly of kaolinite. It is used in many industrial segments, such as paper and ceramics. However, for these uses it is necessary to submit the ore to appropriate beneficiation, which generally involves magnetic separation and chemical bleaching, aiming to remove iron oxide and hydroxide, raising brightness index. This work reports the mineralogical characterization and analysis of the beneficiation of three samples of kaolin, two from Equador (Rio Grande do Norte - RN and the third from Junco do Seridó (Paraíba - PB. The samples were submitted to granulometric classification in sieve of 44 μm, magnetic separation in a magnetic induction of 14000 gauss, and chemical bleaching with sodium dithionite during 240 min. The processes were divided into two beneficiation routes. X-ray diffraction, chemical analysis by X-ray fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy were used for mineralogical characterization of the ore and measurement of the brightness index, while electron paramagnetic resonance was applied to study the variation of iron oxides and hydroxides during beneficiation. The results indicate that just 30 min of chemical bleaching without magnetic separation was sufficient to increase the brightness index from 78.2 to 90.2% and from 91.3 to 95.7% in the two samples from Equador (RN and from 86.9 to 90.4% in the sample from Junco do Seridó (PB. The magnetic separation, although causing a small increase in the brightness index, was inefficient for removal of iron oxides and hydroxides. The results indicated no need for using magnetic separation in plants for beneficiation of kaolin from these two locations, providing the reduction of production costs allowing better exploitation of the ore.

  10. Avian exposure to agricultural chemicals in Minnesota : Final pilot study report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In June 1992, we collected 52 plasma samples from nestling red-winged blackbirds (Age latus phoeniceus), house sparrows (Passer domesticus), and brown-headed...

  11. Carotenoid-based bill colour is an integrative signal of multiple parasite infection in blackbird

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biard, Clotilde; Saulnier, Nicolas; Gaillard, Maria; Moreau, Jérôme

    2010-11-01

    In the study of parasite-mediated sexual selection, there has been controversial evidence for the prediction that brighter males should have fewer parasites. Most of these studies have focused on one parasite species. Our aim was to investigate the expression of carotenoid-based coloured signals in relation to patterns of multiple parasite infections, to determine whether colour reflects parasite load of all parasite species, or whether different relationships might be found when looking at each parasite species independently. We investigated the relationship between bill colour, body mass and plasma carotenoids and parasite load (feather chewing lice, blood parasite Plasmodium sp., intestinal parasites cestodes and coccidia) in the blackbird ( Turdus merula). Bill colour on its own appeared to be a poor predictor of parasite load when investigating its relationships with individual parasite species. Variation in parasite intensities at the community level was summarised using principal component analysis to derive synthetic indexes of relative parasite species abundance and absolute parasite load. The relative abundance of parasite species was strongly related to bill colour, plasma carotenoid levels and body mass: birds with relatively more cestodes and chewing lice and relatively less Plasmodium and coccidia had a more colourful bill, circulated more carotenoids and were heavier. These results suggest that bill colour more accurately reflects the relative intensities of parasite infection, rather than one-by-one relationships with parasites or absolute parasite burden. Investigating patterns of multiple parasite infection would thus improve our understanding of the information conveyed by coloured signals on parasite load.

  12. Conceptual design of high speed supersonic aircraft: A brief review on SR-71 (Blackbird) aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Hui; Khawaja, H.; Moatamedi, M.

    2014-12-01

    The paper presents the conceptual design of high-speed supersonic aircraft. The study focuses on SR-71 (Blackbird) aircraft. The input to the conceptual design is a mission profile. Mission profile is a flight profile of the aircraft defined by the customer. This paper gives the SR-71 aircraft mission profile specified by US air force. Mission profile helps in defining the attributes the aircraft such as wing profile, vertical tail configuration, propulsion system, etc. Wing profile and vertical tail configurations have direct impact on lift, drag, stability, performance and maneuverability of the aircraft. A propulsion system directly influences the performance of the aircraft. By combining the wing profile and the propulsion system, two important parameters, known as wing loading and thrust to weight ratio can be calculated. In this work, conceptual design procedure given by D. P. Raymer (AIAA Educational Series) is applied to calculate wing loading and thrust to weight ratio. The calculated values are compared against the actual values of the SR-71 aircraft. Results indicates that the values are in agreement with the trend of developments in aviation.

  13. Variation of plumage patterns, geographic distribution and taxonomy of the Unicolored Blackbird (Aves: Icteridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Leonardo Esteves

    2017-01-19

    The Unicolored Blackbird Agelasticus cyanopus (Vieillot, 1819) is a marsh bird with four allopatric subspecies restricted to lowlands in South America east of the Andes. I conducted a taxonomic revision of the species based on analysis of external morphological characters of 288 study skins, including all types available. My revision shows that: 1) Leistes unicolor Swainson, 1838, is a senior synonym of A. c. xenicus (Parkes, 1966) and, therefore, the correct name of the taxon should be A. c. unicolor (Swainson, 1838); 2) the range of A. c. unicolor (Swainson, 1838) is much wider than previously thought, extending from the mouth of the Rio Amazonas to the state of São Paulo, in southeastern Brazil, where it intergrades with A. c. atroolivaceus (zu Wied-Neuwied, 1831); 3) A. c. atroolivaceus extends its range well beyond the coast of Rio de Janeiro, reaching the coast of São Paulo, the central part of Minas Gerais, Bahia and Espírito Santo; and 4) specimens attributed to A. c. beniensis are highly variable, so this name must be considered a subjective junior synonym of the nominotypical taxon. Under the Biological Species Concept, two broadly parapatric species should be recognized, A. cyanopus and A. atroolivaceus (including unicolor as a subspecies). Under the Phylogenetic Species Concept or the General Lineage Concept of Species, the best taxonomic treatment is to recognize three species: A. cyanopus, A. atroolivaceus, and A. unicolor.

  14. Baseline corticosterone levels are higher in migrating than sedentary common blackbirds in autumn, but not in spring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eikenaar, Cas; Müller, Florian; Klinner, Thomas; Bairlein, Franz

    2015-12-01

    Corticosterone at baseline levels is thought to be mainly involved in the regulation of uptake, storage and release of energy, processes central to avian migration. Consequently, corticosterone levels are thought to be upregulated during migration, but the temporal pattern of its secretion during migration is not well defined. For example, although it appears that corticosterone levels decrease from flight to stopover, it is unknown if levels at stopover are still elevated and it is largely unclear how these levels compare to non-migratory life-history stages. Furthermore, what role corticosterone plays in crucial migratory processes, such as refueling and departure from stopover, is far from understood. We here determined baseline corticosterone levels in migrating and resident common blackbirds (Turdus merula), sampled simultaneously on Helgoland, a stopover site that also supports a sedentary breeding population. In autumn, migrants had higher corticosterone levels than residents, but in spring levels did not differ between the two groups. Corticosterone levels of migrants were very similar in spring and autumn, whereas in residents levels tended to be higher in spring than autumn. Higher levels in residents in spring than autumn most likely reflect the higher daily workload faced by birds during the pre-breeding than the post-breeding period. Our study thus indicates that, relative to the levels observed in residents in autumn, in spring baseline corticosterone levels were moderately elevated in both migrants and residents and that in autumn levels were moderately elevated in migrants only. Currently, corticosterone's main function at stopover is thought to lie in the regulation of departure. Because most migrant blackbirds stay only one or two days on Helgoland, our results are in line with this idea and suggest that migrating blackbirds up-regulated their corticosterone level in anticipation of an oncoming flight bout.

  15. Migratory New World blackbirds (icterids are more neophobic than closely related resident icterids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Mettke-Hofmann

    Full Text Available Environments undergo short-term and long-term changes due to natural or human-induced events. Animals differ in their ability to cope with such changes which can be related to their ecology. Changes in the environment often elicit avoidance reactions (neophobia which protect animals from dangerous situations but can also inhibit exploration and familiarization with novel situations and thus, learning about new resources. Studies investigating the relationship between a species' ecology and its neophobia have so far been restricted to comparing only a few species and mainly in captivity. The current study investigated neophobia reactions to experimentally-induced changes in the natural environment of six closely-related blackbird species (Icteridae, including two species represented by two distinct populations. For analyses, neophobic reactions (difference in number of birds feeding and time spent feeding with and without novel objects were related to several measures of ecological plasticity and the migratory strategy (resident or migratory of the population. Phylogenetic relationships were incorporated into the analysis. The degree of neophobia was related to migratory strategy with migrants expressing much higher neophobia (fewer birds feeding and for a shorter time with objects present than residents. Furthermore, neophobia showed a relationship to diet breadth with fewer individuals of diet generalists than specialists returning when objects were present supporting the dangerous niche hypothesis. Residents may have evolved lower neophobia as costs of missing out on opportunities may be higher for residents than migrants as the former are restricted to a smaller area. Lower neophobia allows them approaching changes in the environment (e.g. novel objects quickly, thereby securing access to resources. Additionally, residents have a greater familiarity with similar situations in the area than migrants and the latter may, therefore, initially

  16. Corticosterone levels in relation to trace element contamination along an urbanization gradient in the common blackbird (Turdus merula).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meillère, Alizée; Brischoux, François; Bustamante, Paco; Michaud, Bruno; Parenteau, Charline; Marciau, Coline; Angelier, Frédéric

    2016-10-01

    In a rapidly urbanizing world, trace element pollution may represent a threat to human health and wildlife, and it is therefore crucial to assess both exposition levels and associated effects of trace element contamination on urban vertebrates. In this study, we investigated the impact of urbanization on trace element contamination and stress physiology in a wild bird species, the common blackbird (Turdus merula), along an urbanization gradient (from rural to moderately urbanized areas). Specifically, we described the contamination levels of blackbirds by 4 non-essential (Ag, Cd, Hg, Pb) and 9 essential trace elements (As, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Se, Zn), and explored the putative disrupting effects of the non-essential element contamination on corticosterone levels (a hormonal proxy for environmental challenges). We found that non-essential trace element burden (Cd and Pb specifically) increased with increasing urbanization, indicating a significant trace element contamination even in medium sized cities and suburban areas. Interestingly, the increased feather non-essential trace element concentrations were also associated with elevated feather corticosterone levels, suggesting that urbanization probably constrains birds and that this effect may be mediated by trace element contamination. Future experimental studies are now required to disentangle the influence of multiple urban-related constraints on corticosterone levels and to specifically test the influence of each of these trace elements on corticosterone secretion.

  17. Caution on the assessment of intestinal parasitic load in studying parasite-mediated sexual selection: the case of Blackbirds coccidiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipiak, L; Mathieu, F; Moreau, J

    2009-05-01

    The parasite-mediated sexual selection (PMSS) theory has led to an increasing number of experimental studies essentially focussed on blood parasites. Currently, more research is being carried out on intestinal parasites in relationship to this theory. Before testing the theory with gastrointestinal parasites, it is important: (i) to determine an optimal research methodology to obtain an accurate assessment of parasite burden and (ii) to have information about life-history traits of the parasite to interpret data appropriately. In this study, we present data on oocyst output of Isosporaturdi in the faeces of blackbirds (Turdus merula) that illustrate the importance of developing methods that are relevant for a particular model system, instead of relying on existing methods that may work in other systems. Our results show that: (i) a single droplet of faeces will accurately indicate the parasitic load in blackbirds, (ii) oocyst shedding varies greatly within and between days, (iii) the course of infection is characterised with two successive peaks of oocyst shedding, (iv) infection lasts approximately 1 month and (iv) there is no effect of sex, size of infective dose or re-infection on the course of infection. We discuss the practical implications of these results in determining the reliability of, and in avoiding erroneous conclusions about, PMSS when using intestinal parasites as models. In particular, we emphasise that numerous measurements must be performed on different days. In addition, faeces must be collected at a particular time of day because there is a strong temporal variation in oocyst shedding. Finally, a standardised methodology that has been developed for a particular host-parasite assemblage does not necessarily work with other biological models. Together, our results should encourage future investigators to identify an accurate methodology for assessing parasitic load as a first step before testing hypotheses associated with the PMSS theory.

  18. Caballos de Poseidón. Barcos de juncos y "hippoi" en el sur de la Península ibérica y el litoral atlántico norteafricano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Mederos Martín

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Actualmente conocemos la presencia de embarcaciones de junco en Menorca, Cádiz, Larache (Marruecos y Tenerife. Estos barcos, queparecen indicar una marina indígena, se asocian a cauces fluviales navegables como el río Guadiaro en Laja Alta (Jimena de la Frontera,Cádiz y el río Lucos en Larache o a zonas costeras insulares como el Barranco de Macarella (Menorca o La Baranda (El Sauzal, Tenerife. Coexisten barcos grandes en Laja Alta y embarcaciones pequeñas, que no superan los 3 m., en el río Lucos y Tenerife, aunque usan vela. En dos de los casos, Laja Alta y La Baranda, se asocian con barcos de posible procedencia foránea, que en Tenerife se trata de 4 o 5 hippoi, procedentes quizás de Gadir.

  19. Variation in candidate genes CLOCK and ADCYAP1 does not consistently predict differences in migratory behavior in the songbird genus Junco [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/11p

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark P Peterson

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies exploring the molecular genetic basis for migratory variation in animals have identified polymorphisms in two genes (CLOCK and ADCYAP1 that are linked to circadian rhythms and correlate with migratory propensity and phenology among individuals and populations. Results from these initial studies are mixed, however, and additional data are needed to assess the generality and diversity of the molecular mechanisms that regulate the biology of migration. We sequenced CLOCK and ADCYAP1 in 15 populations across the two species of the avian genus Junco, a North American lineage in which multiple recently diverged subspecies and populations range from sedentary to long-distance migrants. We found no consistent associations between allele length and migratory status across the genus for either CLOCK or ADCYAP1. However, within two subspecies groups, populations that migrate longer distances have longer CLOCK alleles on average. Additionally, there was a positive relationship between ADCYAP1 allele length and migratory restlessness (zugunruhe among individuals within one of two captive populations studied—a result similar to those reported previously within captive blackcaps (Sylvia atricapilla. We conclude that, while both ADCYAP1 and CLOCK may correlate with migratory propensity within or among certain populations or species, previously identified relationships between migratory behavior and sequence variants cannot be easily generalized across taxa.

  20. Habitat-induced degradation of sound signals: Quantifying the effects of communication sounds and bird location on blur ratio, excess attenuation, and signal-to-noise ratio in blackbird song

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dabelsteen, T.; Larsen, O N; Pedersen, Simon Boel

    1993-01-01

    The habitat-induced degradation of the full song of the blackbird (Turdus merula) was quantified by measuring excess attenuation, reduction of the signal-to-noise ratio, and blur ratio, the latter measure representing the degree of blurring of amplitude and frequency patterns over time. All three...

  1. Cholinesterase inhibition of birds inhabiting wheat fields treated with methyl parathion and toxaphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niethammer, K.R.; Baskett, T.S.

    1983-01-01

    Red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus) and dickcissels (Spiza americana) inhabiting wheat fields treated with 0.67 kg AI/ha methyl parathion and 1.35 kg AI/ha toxaphene showed brain cholinesterase (ChE) inhibition compared with birds inhabiting untreated fields. Maximum inhibition occurred about five days after insecticide application. ChE activities again approached normal 10 days after treatment. ChE inhibition for dickcissels and red-winged blackbirds differed significantly (p<0.05); maximum inhibition for the former species was 74%, and for the latter, 40%. These differences could not be explained by the diets of the two species, as they were similar.

  2. Constraints on the timing of Co-Cu ± Au mineralization in the Blackbird district, Idaho, using SHRIMP U-Pb ages of monazite and xenotime plus zircon ages of related Mesoproterozoic orthogneisses and metasedimentary rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleinikoff, John N.; Slack, John F.; Lund, Karen; Evans, Karl V.; Fanning, C. Mark; Mazdab, Frank K.; Wooden, Joseph L.; Pillers, Renee M.

    2012-01-01

    The Blackbird district, east-central Idaho, contains the largest known Co reserves in the United States. The origin of strata-hosted Co-Cu ± Au mineralization at Blackbird has been a matter of controversy for decades. In order to differentiate among possible genetic models for the deposits, including various combinations of volcanic, sedimentary, magmatic, and metamorphic processes, we used U-Pb geochronology of xenotime, monazite, and zircon to establish time constraints for ore formation. New age data reported here were obtained using sensitive high resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) microanalysis of (1) detrital zircons from a sample of Mesoproterozoic siliciclastic metasedimentary country rock in the Blackbird district, (2) igneous zircons from Mesoproterozoic intrusions, and (3) xenotime and monazite from the Merle and Sunshine prospects at Blackbird. Detrital zircon from metasandstone of the biotite phyllite-schist unit has ages mostly in the range of 1900 to 1600 Ma, plus a few Neoarchean and Paleoproterozoic grains. Age data for the six youngest grains form a coherent group at 1409 ± 10 Ma, regarded as the maximum age of deposition of metasedimentary country rocks of the central structural domain. Igneous zircons from nine samples of megacrystic granite, granite augen gneiss, and granodiorite augen gneiss that crop out north and east of the Blackbird district yield ages between 1383 ± 4 and 1359 ± 7 Ma. Emplacement of the Big Deer Creek megacrystic granite (1377 ± 4 Ma), structurally juxtaposed with host rocks in the Late Cretaceous ca. 5 km north of Blackbird, may have been involved in initial deposition of rare earth elements (REE) minerals and, possibly, sulfides. In situ SHRIMP ages of xenotime and monazite in Co-rich samples from the Merle and Sunshine prospects, plus backscattered electron imagery and SHRIMP analyses of trace elements, indicate a complex sequence of Mesoproterozoic and Cretaceous events. On the basis of textural relationships

  3. Structural controls and evolution of gold-, silver-, and REE-bearing copper-cobalt ore deposits, Blackbird district, east-central Idaho: Epigenetic origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, K.; Tysdal, R.G.; Evans, K.V.; Kunk, M.J.; Pillers, R.M.

    2011-01-01

    The Cu-Co ± Au (± Ag ± Ni ± REE) ore deposits of the Blackbird district, east-central Idaho, have previously been classified as Besshi-type VMS, sedex, and IOCG deposits within an intact stratigraphic section. New studies indicate that, across the district, mineralization was introduced into the country rocks as a series of structurally controlled vein and alteration systems. Quartz-rich and biotite-rich veins (and alteration zones) and minor albite and siderite veinlets maintain consistent order and sulfide mineral associations across the district. Both early and late quartz veins contain chalcopyrite and pyrite, whereas intermediate-stage tourmaline-biotite veins host the cobaltite. Barren early and late albite and late carbonate (generally siderite) form veins or are included in the quartz veins. REE minerals, principally monazite, allanite, and xenotime, are associated with both tourmaline-biotite and late quartz veins. The veins are in mineralized intervals along axial planar cleavage, intrafolial foliation, and shears.

  4. Differentiating the evolution of female song and male-female duets in the New World blackbirds: can tropical natural history traits explain duet evolution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odom, Karan J; Omland, Kevin E; Price, J Jordan

    2015-03-01

    Female bird song and combined vocal duets of mated pairs are both frequently associated with tropical, monogamous, sedentary natural histories. Little is known, however, about what selects for duetting behavior versus female song. Female song likely preceded duet evolution and could drive apparent relationships between duets and these natural histories. We compared the evolution of female song and male-female duets in the New World blackbirds (Icteridae) by investigating patterns of gains and losses of both traits and their relationships with breeding latitude, mating system, nesting pattern, and migratory behavior. We found that duets evolved only in lineages in which female song was likely ancestral. Both female song and duets were correlated with tropical breeding, social monogamy, territorial nesting, and sedentary behavior when all taxa were included; however, correlations between duets and these natural history traits disappeared when comparisons were limited to taxa with female song. Also, likelihood values supported stronger relationships between the natural history traits and female song than between these traits and duets. Our results suggest that the natural histories thought to favor the evolution of duetting may in fact be associated with female song and that additional selection pressures are responsible for the evolution of duets. © 2015 The Author(s).

  5. Combining site occupancy, breeding population sizes and reproductive success to calculate time-averaged reproductive output of different habitat types: an application to Tricolored Blackbirds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Holyoak

    Full Text Available In metapopulations in which habitat patches vary in quality and occupancy it can be complicated to calculate the net time-averaged contribution to reproduction of particular populations. Surprisingly, few indices have been proposed for this purpose. We combined occupancy, abundance, frequency of occurrence, and reproductive success to determine the net value of different sites through time and applied this method to a bird of conservation concern. The Tricolored Blackbird (Agelaius tricolor has experienced large population declines, is the most colonial songbird in North America, is largely confined to California, and breeds itinerantly in multiple habitat types. It has had chronically low reproductive success in recent years. Although young produced per nest have previously been compared across habitats, no study has simultaneously considered site occupancy and reproductive success. Combining occupancy, abundance, frequency of occurrence, reproductive success and nest failure rate we found that that large colonies in grain fields fail frequently because of nest destruction due to harvest prior to fledging. Consequently, net time-averaged reproductive output is low compared to colonies in non-native Himalayan blackberry or thistles, and native stinging nettles. Cattail marshes have intermediate reproductive output, but their reproductive output might be improved by active management. Harvest of grain-field colonies necessitates either promoting delay of harvest or creating alternative, more secure nesting habitats. Stinging nettle and marsh colonies offer the main potential sources for restoration or native habitat creation. From 2005-2011 breeding site occupancy declined 3x faster than new breeding colonies were formed, indicating a rapid decline in occupancy. Total abundance showed a similar decline. Causes of variation in the value for reproduction of nesting substrates and factors behind continuing population declines merit urgent

  6. Surfactants as blackbird stressing agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, P.W.; Seubert, J.L.

    1970-01-01

    Applications of wetting-agent solutions produce mortality in birds. The exact cause of death is undetermined but it is believed that destruction of the insulating qualities of the plumage permits ambient cold temperatures and evaporation to lower the body temperature to a lethal level. The original concept of using these materials as bird-control tools was developed in 1958 at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife Laurel, Maryland. Early field trials by personnel of the Division of Wildlife Services and the Denver Wildlife Research Center indicated that ground-application techniques had promise but limitations of the equipment precluded successful large-scale roost treatments. In 1966, Patuxent Center personnel began using tanker-type aircraft to evaluate high-volume aerial applications of wetting agents. The success of these tests led to the use of small aircraft to make low-volume, high-concentration aerial applications just prior to expected rainfall. Recent trials of the low-volume method show that, with some limitations, it is effective, inexpensive, and safe to the environment. Current research emphasizes the screening of new candidate materials for efficacy, biodegradability, and toxicity to plants and non-target animals, as well as basic investigations of the avian physiological mechanisms involved. Field trials to develop more effective application techniques will continue.

  7. Air and Ground Gunnery: Test Areas A-73, A-77, A-78, A-79, B-7, and B-75, Range Environmental Assessment, Eglin Air Force Base, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    The coastal zone includes islands, transitional and inner tidal areas, salt marshes, wetlands, and beaches. Coastal waters are defined as any...Parula americana Flatwoods Longleaf Pine Pinus palustris Wood Duck Aix sponsa Runner Oak Quercus pumila Red-winged Blackbird Agelaius phoenicius...ponds during the cool, rainy months of October through December. The females lay their eggs in vegetation at the edges of the ponds. Flatwoods

  8. Effect of salt on the response of birds to sucrose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, J.G.; Maller, O.

    1973-01-01

    The preference of male red-winged blackbirds for solutions of sucrose and sucrose with 0.03 M sodium chloride was tested, using a two-bottle choice test. Preliminary experiments demonstrated that the birds were indifferent to 0.03 M NaCl in water. Both control and experimental animals exhibited indifference to the solutions at the lowest concentration and aversion at the highest. The data suggest that the added sodium chloride makes the sucrose stimulus more discriminable.

  9. Birds of Swale Marshes on John F. Kennedy Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breininger, David R.

    1992-01-01

    Birds were surveyed in several isolated freshwater wetlands on John F. Kennedy Space Center to determine species composition and the importance of these wet- lands to birds. The Red-winged Blackbird and Green-backed Heron were the two most abundant breeders in the swale marshes. The Common Yellowthroat was the most common winter resident but was rare in summer. These marshes are important features within landscapes dominated by uplands particularly because of their significance to amphibians and reptiles.

  10. Fluid sources and metallogenesis in the Blackbird Co-Cu-Au-Bi-Y-REE district, Idaho, U.S.A.: Insights from major-element and boron isotopic compositions of tourmaline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trumbull, R.B.; Slack, J.F.; Krienitz, M.-S.; Belkin, H.E.; Wiedenbeck, M.

    2011-01-01

    Tourmaline is a widespread mineral in the Mesoproterozoic Blackbird Co-Cu-Au-Bi-Y-REE district, Idaho, where it occurs in both mineralized zones and wallrocks. We report here major-element and B-isotope compositions of tourmaline from stratabound sulfide deposits and their metasedimentary wallrocks, from mineralized and barren pipes of tourmaline breccia, from late barren quartz veins, and from Mesoproterozoic granite. The tourmalines are aluminous, intermediate in the schorl-dravite series, with Fe/(Fe + Mg) values of 0.30 to 0.85, and 10 to 50% X-site vacancies. Compositional zoning is prominent only in tourmaline from breccias and quartz veins; crystal rims are enriched in Mg, Ca and Ti, and depleted in Fe and Al relative to cores. The chemical composition of tourmaline does not correlate with the presence or absence of mineralization. The ??11B values fall into two groups. Isotopically light tourmaline (-21.7 to-7.6%o) occurs in unmineralized samples from wallrocks, late quartz veins and Mesoproterozoic granite, whereas heavy tourmaline (-6.9 to +3.2%o) is spatially associated with mineralization (stratabound and breccia-hosted), and is also found in barren breccia. At an inferred temperature of 300??C, boron in the hydrothermal fluid associated with mineralization had ??11B values of-3 to +7%o. The high end of this range indicates a marine source of the boron. A likely scenario involves leaching of boron principally from marine carbonate beds or B-bearing evaporites in Mesoproterozoic strata of the region. The ??11B values of the isotopically light tourmaline in the sulfide deposits are attributed to recrystallization during Cretaceous metamorphism, superimposed on a light boron component derived from footwall siliciclastic sediments (e.g., marine clays) during Mesoproterozoic mineralization, and possibly a minor component of light boron from a magmatic-hydrothermal fluid. The metal association of Bi-Be-Y-REE in the Blackbird ores suggests some magmatic input

  11. Experimental arrest of cerebral blood flow in human subjects: the red wing studies revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Brian A; Clayton, Ellen Wright; Robertson, David

    2011-01-01

    Loss of consciousness in pilots during rapid ascent after bombing missions was a major problem in World War II, and experiments were undertaken to study the cause of this phenomenon. Postulating impaired cerebral blood flow as a likely mechanism, the investigators developed a neck device, the KRA Cuff, which when inflated could shut off blood supply to the brain. With cessation of blood flow for up to 100 seconds, the investigators observed a sequence of responses, including unconsciousness, followed by dilated pupils, tonic/clonic movements, loss of bladder and eventually bowel control, and appearance of pathological reflexes. This study, carried out in prisoners and patients with schizophrenia in 1941-42, largely disappeared from public discourse for a number of years. It has received occasional attention subsequently and been considered controversial. Recently discovered records, including extensive written and photographic data from the studies, shed new light on the methods and motives of the research team. We describe here this new information and its implications for the scientific and ethical assessment of the study.

  12. Lead poisoning in six captive avian species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, W.N.; Spann, J.W.; Sileo, L.; Franson, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    Red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus), brown-headed cowbirds (Molothrus ater), common grackles (Quiscalus quiscula), mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), northern bobwhites (Colinus virginianus), and eastern screech-owls (Otus asio) were poisoned with a concentration of lead (Pb) acetate in the diet which was increased by 60% each week until half of the birds in each treatment group died; surviving birds and all control birds except screech-owls were then killed by euthanasia. An additional group of mallards was poisoned with Pb shot. The gizzards of mallards poisoned either way usually were stained with bile; some of these birds also had proventricular impaction. Most poisoned birds of the other species were emaciated but lacked other gross lesions caused by Pb poisoning. In birds other than mallards, Pb poisoning could not be diagnosed without histological or hematological examinations or analysis of tissues. Poisoned birds of all six species could be reliably separated from control birds by an increase in the protoporphyrin concentrations in the blood and by a decrease in the activity of delta-aminoievulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) in red blood cells. Hepatic iron (Fe) concentrations varied so much among individual birds that even though median hepatic Fe concentrations increased in poisoned birds, hepatic Fe concentrations were not useful in identifying poisoned birds. Renal intranuclear inclusion bodies occurred in 83% of all birds dying from Pb poisoning. Nephrosis, myocardial necrosis, and arterial fibrinoid necrosis were occasionally present. Median hepatic Pb concentrations varied from 20 ppm (wet wt) in male red-winged blackbirds to III ppm in female northern bobwhites. Median renal Pb concentrations varied from 22 ppm in red-winged blackbirds to 190 ppm in female northern bobwhites. Hepatic and renal Pb concentrations varied substantially among birds within each species. Median hepatic and renal Pb concentrations of birds that died were not statistically

  13. Mortality of passerines adjacent to a North Carolina corn field treated with granular carbofuran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augspurger, Tom; Smith, Milton R.; Meteyer, Carol U.; Converse, Kathryn A.

    1996-01-01

    Red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus) were collected during an epizootic in southeastern North Carolina (USA). Activity of brain cholinesterase (ChE) was inhibited by 14 to 48% in three of five specimens, and returned to normal levels after incubation. Gastrointestinal tracts were analyzed for 30 anti-ChE agents. Carbofuran, the only compound detected, was present in all specimens at levels from 5.44 to 72.7 μg/g wet weight. Application of granular carbofuran in an adjacent corn field, results of necropsy examinations, and chemical analyses are consistent with a diagnosis of carbofuran poisoning in these specimens.

  14. Male and female helper effects on maternal investment and adult survival in red-winged fairy-wrens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lejeune, Léa; van de Pol, Martijn; Cockburn, Andrew; Louter, Marina; Brouwer, Lyanne

    2016-01-01

    Despite its importance for the evolution of cooperative breeding, it has proven difficult to determine whether helpers improve their recipients’ fitness. Helpers affect fitness in multiple ways, both positive and negative, but their effects can also be concealed through reduced maternal investment.

  15. Reproductive and behavioral aspects of red-winged tinamous (Rhynchotus rufescens in groups with different sex ratios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VU Cromberg

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research study was to evaluate the reproductive performance of tinamous submitted to five different male:female ratios. The study was carried out with 72 birds in a randomized experimental design with 4 replications. Tinamous were housed in cages, using the ratios of one (1:1, two (2:1, three (3:1 and four (4:1 females per male, and also one male was housed with three females individually (3R:1, in a rotational system. Reproductive records of the breeding season from September 2004 to March 2005 were used. The reproductive traits studied were: number of eggs laid, fertility, and percentage of eggs damaged and cracked by pecking. Nonparametric analyses of these traits were performed using Kruskal-Wallis test. Two replications of treatments 1:1 and 4:1, and one of treatment 2:1 were video-taped for three days, 12 hours/day. The videotapes were sampled according to the scan method to fit an ethogram. Birds were also watched for one hour per day to study dominance and agonistic behavior. None of the reproductive traits was affected by mating sex ratio (p<0.05. Female dominance could be related to displacement behavior (r=1.00, and male sitting in immobility plus sitting in activity behaviors were related to lower number of damaged eggs (r=-0.90. Social dominance was indirectly determined by displacement behavior in the study situation. A large number of damaged eggs occurred in all treatments, thereby not allowing a clear conclusion on the best male:female ratio.

  16. The influence of local- and landscape-level factors on wetland breeding birds in the Prairie Pothole Region of North and South Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igl, Lawrence D.; Shaffer, Jill A.; Johnson, Douglas H.; Buhl, Deborah A.

    2017-08-17

    We examined the relationship between local- (wetland) and landscape-level factors and breeding bird abundances on 1,190 depressional wetlands in the Prairie Pothole Region of North and South Dakota during the breeding seasons in 1995–97. The surveyed wetlands were selected from five wetland classes (alkali, permanent, semipermanent, seasonal, or temporary), two wetland types (natural or restored), and two landowner groups (private or Federal). We recorded 133 species of birds in the surveyed wetlands during the 3 years. We analyzed the nine most common (or focal) species (that is, species that were present in 25 percent or more of the 1,190 wetlands): the Red-winged Blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus), Blue-winged Teal (Anas discors), Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), American Coot (Fulica americana), Gadwall (Anas strepera), Common Yellowthroat (Geothlypis trichas), Yellow-headed Blackbird (Xanthocephalus xanthocephalus), Northern Shoveler (Anas clypeata), and Savannah Sparrow (Passerculus sandwichensis). Our results emphasize the ecological value of all wetland classes, natural and restored wetlands, and publicly and privately owned wetlands in this region, including wetlands that are generally smaller and shallower (that is, temporary and seasonal wetlands) and thus most vulnerable to drainage. Blue-winged Teal, Northern Shoveler, Gadwall, Common Yellowthroat, and Red-winged Blackbird had higher abundances on Federal than on private wetlands. Abundances differed among wetland classes for seven of the nine focal species: Blue-winged Teal, Northern Shoveler, Mallard, American Coot, Common Yellowthroat, Yellow-headed Blackbird, Red-winged Blackbird. American Coot had higher abundances on restored wetlands than on natural wetlands overall, and Gadwall and Common Yellowthroat had higher abundances on private restored wetlands than on private natural wetlands. The Common Yellowthroat was the only species that had higher abundances on restored private wetlands than on

  17. Acute oral toxicities of wildland fire control chemicals to birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, N.B.; Spann, J.W.; Hill, E.F.

    2009-01-01

    Wildland fire control chemicals are released into the environment by aerial and ground applications to manage rangeland, grassland, and forest fires. Acute oral 24 h median lethal dosages (LD50) for three fire retardants (Fire-Trol GTS-R?, Phos-Chek D-75F?, and Fire-Trol LCG-R?) and two Class A fire suppressant foams (Silv-Ex? and Phos-Chek WD881?) were estimated for northern bobwhites, Colinus virginianus, American kestrels, Falco sparverius, and red-winged blackbirds, Agelaius phoeniceus. The LD50s of all chemicals for the bobwhites and red-winged blackbirds and for kestrels dosed with Phos-Chek WD881? and Silv-Ex? were above the predetermined 2000 mg chemical/kg body mass regulatory limit criteria for acute oral toxicity. The LD50s were not quantifiable for kestrels dosed with Fire-Trol GTS-R?, Phos-Chek D-75F?, and Fire-Trol LCG-R? because of the number of birds which regurgitated the dosage. These chemicals appear to be of comparatively low order of acute oral toxicity to the avian species tested.

  18. ESI-PR39 Juncos, Puerto Rico 2000 (Environmental Sensitivity Index Map)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) maps are an integral component in oil-spill contingency planning and assessment. They serve as a source of information in the...

  19. TIGER/Line Shapefile, 2013, county, Juncos Municipio, PR, Current Address Ranges Relationship File

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Census Bureau, Department of Commerce — The TIGER/Line shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census Bureau's Master...

  20. "My Name Is a Blackbird": Release, Transparency, and Agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanahan, Molly

    2015-01-01

    This essay traces the author's embodied practices toward the creation of an evening-length, spontaneously composed solo. Specifically, the author focuses on her work to release superficial and deep abdominal musculature to discover a new movement vocabulary, and greater access to the mobility of the pelvis/belly, ribs, and spine. The author…

  1. After the Blackbird Whistles: Listening to Silence in Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Katherine

    2010-01-01

    Background/Context: Students spend a large part of their time in schools in silence. However, teachers tend to spend most of their time attending to student talk. Anthropological and linguistic research has contributed to an understanding of silence in particular communities, offering explanations for students' silence in school. This research…

  2. Project Blackbird: Deploying Condor in a Blackboard Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Sam

    2009-01-01

    Clemson University implemented Condor architecture on the Blackboard learning management system (LMS) application servers in order to gain higher throughput when processing Blackboard course archives. Condor has typically been used for high-throughput research computing, not applied to non-research problems involving long processing times. This…

  3. Project Blackbird: Deploying Condor in a Blackboard Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Sam

    2009-01-01

    Clemson University implemented Condor architecture on the Blackboard learning management system (LMS) application servers in order to gain higher throughput when processing Blackboard course archives. Condor has typically been used for high-throughput research computing, not applied to non-research problems involving long processing times. This…

  4. Purification and immunochemical detections of ?-naphthoflavone- and phenobarbital-induced avian cytochrome P450 enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, R.L.; Levi, P.E.; Hodgson, E.; Melancon, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    Livers from mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) were treated with either -naphthoflavone (50 mg/kg) or phenobarbital (70 mg/kg). Purification of induced hepatic cytochrome P450 was accomplished using both DEAE and hydroxyapatite columns, as well as sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis separation. Polyclonal antibodies to these proteins were then produced in young male New Zealand White rabbits. ?-naphthoflavone (?NF)- and phenobarbital(PB)-treated red-winged blackbird, screech owl, European starling and lesser scaup liver microsomes were analyzed in western blots for species cross-reactivity. Although all four of these avian species exhibited cross-reactivity with antibodies to ?NF-induced mallard P450, all but the lesser scaup revealed a protein of higher molecular weight than that of the ?NF-induced mallard. In addition, only the lesser scaup exhibited cross-reactivity with the anti-PB-induced mallard P450 antibodies.

  5. Histoplasmosis associated with a bamboo bonfire--Arkansas, October 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haselow, Dirk T; Safi, Haytham; Holcomb, David; Smith, Nathaniel; Wagner, Kendall D; Bolden, Branson B; Harik, Nada S

    2014-02-28

    On October 27, 2011, the Arkansas Department of Health (ADH) was notified by a northeast Arkansas primary care provider of a cluster of three histoplasmosis cases. On November 4, ADH was notified by a pediatric infectious diseases specialist regarding seven potential cases of pulmonary histoplasmosis associated with a family gathering that included a bonfire that burned bamboo from a grove that had been a red-winged blackbird roost. These reports prompted an outbreak investigation to ensure that the persons involved received appropriate medical care, to identify whether any novel exposures were associated with illness, and to determine whether any factors were associated with hospitalization. The investigation found that, among the 19 attendees at the family gathering, seven were confirmed with histoplasmosis, 11 were probable, and one did not have histoplasmosis.

  6. Parathion poisoning of Mississippi kites in Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franson, J. Christian

    1994-01-01

    Parathion(phosphorothioic acid O, O-diethyl O-[4-nitrophenyl] ester) is a broad spectrum organophosphorus insecticide, used on a variety of crops and occasionally for mosquito control, and is highly toxic to birds (Smith 1987). Intentional poisoning with parathion is reported to have killed more than 8000 red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus), common grackles (Quiscalus quiscula), brown-headed cowbirds (Molothrus ater) and European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) in two separate instances (Stone et al. 1984). Use of parathion on wheat fields has resulted in the mortality of about 1600 Canada geese (Branta canadensis) and other waterfowl in one instance (White et al. 1982) and about 200 Canada geese in another (Flickinger et al. 1991). More than 200 laughing gulls (Larus atricilla) died near cotton fields treated with parathion (White et al. 1979). Secondary poisoning of raptors resulting from the consumption of prey exposed to parathion, has been reported experimentally and in the field. Stone et al. (1984) found two dead red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis), a Cooper's hawk (Accipiter cooperii) and an American kestrel (Falco sparverius) that had fed on blackbirds killed by parathion. One of four American kestrels died after being fed cricket frogs (Acris crepitans) that had been exposed to 10ppm parathion for 96 hr (Fleming et al. 1982). The Mississippi kite (Ictinia mississippensis) is highly insectivorous (Brown and Amadon 1968) and is thus subject to secondary poisoning resulting from consumption of insects exposed to pesticides. I report here an instance of secondary parathion poisoning in wild Mississippi kites.

  7. Improved method for quantifying the avicide 3-chloro-p-toluidine hydrochloride in bird tissues using a deuterated surrogate/GC/MS method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, R.S.; Custer, T.W.; Pochop, P.A.; Johnston, J.J.

    2002-01-01

    A method using a deuterated surrogate of the avicide 3-chloro-p-toluidine hydrochloride (CPTH) was developed to quantify the CPTH residues in the gastrointestinal (Gl) tract and breast muscle tissues in birds collected in CPTH-baited sunflower and rice fields. This method increased the range of a previous surrogate/gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy method from 0-2 to 0-20mug/g in tissue samples and greatly simplified the extraction procedure. The modified method also sought to increase recoveries over a range of matrix effects introduced by analyzing tissues from birds collected in the field, where the GI tract contents would be affected by varying diet. The new method was used to determine the CPTH concentration In GI tract samples fortified with CPTH-treated rice bait to simulate the consumption of varying amounts of treated bait by two nontargeted bird species, pigeon (Columbia livia) and house sparrow (Passer domesticus). The new method was then used to examine the CPTH concentrations in the gizzard contents of the targeted bird species, red-winged black bird (Agelaius phoeniceus) and brown-headed cowbird (Molothrus ater) that were collected after feeding at a treated bait site. The method proved sufficiently sensitive to quantify CPTH in the breast muscle tissues and the gizzard contents of red-winged blackbirds and brown-headed cowbirds during an operational baiting program. The levels of CPTH determined for these birds in both tissue samples were determined to be highly correlated. The appearance of CPTH in the breast muscle tissue immediately after feeding was not anticipated. The potential secondary hazard posed by the targeted birds to potential scavengers and predators was also evaluated.

  8. Gene regulatory networks reused to build novel traits: co-option of an eye-related gene regulatory network in eye-like organs and red wing patches on insect wings is suggested by optix expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Antónia

    2012-03-01

    Co-option of the eye developmental gene regulatory network may have led to the appearance of novel functional traits on the wings of flies and butterflies. The first trait is a recently described wing organ in a species of extinct midge resembling the outer layers of the midge's own compound eye. The second trait is red pigment patches on Heliconius butterfly wings connected to the expression of an eye selector gene, optix. These examples, as well as others, are discussed regarding the type of empirical evidence and burden of proof that have been used to infer gene network co-option underlying the origin of novel traits. A conceptual framework describing increasing confidence in inference of network co-option is proposed. Novel research directions to facilitate inference of network co-option are also highlighted, especially in cases where the pre-existent and novel traits do not resemble each other.

  9. Does song repertoire size in Common Blackbirds play a role in an intra-sexual context?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesler, Nana; Mundry, Roger; Dabelsteen, Torben

    2011-01-01

    Bird song is thought to have a function in both inter- and intra-sexual contexts with song complexity serving as an honest signal of male quality. Theory predicts that males use repertoire sizes to estimate rivals’ fighting ability. Here we tested whether element repertoire size plays a role in a...

  10. The Blackbird Whistling or Just After? Vygotsky's Tool and Sign as an Analytic for Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbrenda, Jon-Philip

    2016-01-01

    Based on Vygotsky's theory of the interplay of the tool and sign functions of language, this study presents a textual analysis of a corpus of student-authored texts to illuminate aspects of development evidenced through the dialectical tension of tool and sign. Data were drawn from a series of reflective memos I authored during a seminar for new…

  11. Winter habitat associations of blackbirds and starlings wintering in the south-central United States

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Matthew Strassburg; Shawn M Crimmins; George M Linz; Patrick C McKann; Wayne E Thogmartin

    2015-01-01

    .... We used the National Audubon Society Christmas Bird Count data from the south-central United States and mixed-effects models to identify habitat factors associated with population trend and abundance for 5 species...

  12. The Blackbird Whistling or Just After? Vygotsky's Tool and Sign as an Analytic for Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbrenda, Jon-Philip

    2016-01-01

    Based on Vygotsky's theory of the interplay of the tool and sign functions of language, this study presents a textual analysis of a corpus of student-authored texts to illuminate aspects of development evidenced through the dialectical tension of tool and sign. Data were drawn from a series of reflective memos I authored during a seminar for new…

  13. Breeding bird assemblages associated with stages of forest succession in large river floodplains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutson, M.G.; McColl, L.E.; Suarez, S.A.

    2005-01-01

    Floodplain forests rival all other habitat types in bird density and diversity. However, major successional changes are predicted for floodplain forests along the Mississippi River in the coming decades; young forests may replace the existing mature silver maple (Acer saccharinum L.) forests in some areas. We wanted to assess how the breeding bird community might respond to these changes. We studied stands of young forests along the middle Mississippi River, comparing the breeding bird assemblages among three stages of forest succession: shrub/scrub, young cottonwood (Populus deltoides Marshall) and willow (Salix nigra Marshall) forests, and mature silver maple dominated forests. We recorded a total of 54 bird species; the most frequently observed species were the indigo bunting (Passerina cyanea), red-winged blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus), and yellow-billed cuckoo (Coccyzus americanus). Bird species richness differed among the habitat types, with mature forests supporting the largest number of species and the most species of management concern. The shrub/scrub and mature forest bird assemblages were distinct and shared few species, but the young forests had no identifiable bird species assemblage, sharing species found in both of the other habitat types. The bird assemblages we observed in young forests may become more prevalent as aging floodplain forests are replaced with younger stages of forest succession. Under this scenario, we would expect a temporary local decrease in bird species richness and habitat for species of management concern.

  14. Avian response to bottomland hardwood reforestation: the first 10 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twedt, D.J.; Wilson, R.R.; Henne-Kerr, J.L.; Grosshuesch, D.A.

    2002-01-01

    Bttomland hardwood forests were planted on agricultural fields in Mississippi and Louisiana using either predominantly Quercus species (oaks) or Populus deltoides (eastern cottonwood). We assessed avian colonization of these reforested sites between 2 and 10 years after planting. Rapid vertical growth of cottonwoods (circa 2 - 3 m / yr) resulted in sites with forest structure that supported greater species richness of breeding birds, increased Shannon diversity indices, and supported greater territory densities than on sites planted with slower-growing oak species. Grassland birds (Spiza americana [Dickcissel], and Sturnella magna [Eastern Meadowlark]) were indicative of species breeding on oak-dominated reforestation # 10 years old. Agelaius phoeniceus (Red-winged Blackbird) and Colinus virginianus (Northern Bobwhite) characterized cottonwood reforestation # 4 years old, whereas 14 species of shrub-scrub birds (e.g., Passerina cyanea [Indigo Bunting]) and early-successional forest birds (e.g., Vireo gilvus [Warbling Vireo]) typified cottonwood reforestation 5 to 9 years after planting. Rates of daily nest survival did not differ between reforestation strategies. Nest parasitism increased markedly in older cottonwood stands, but was overwhelmed by predation as a cause of nest failure. Based on Partners in Flight prioritization scores and territory densities, the value of cottonwood reforestation for avian conservation was significantly greater than that of oak reforestation during their first 10 years. Because of benefits conferred on breeding birds, we recommend reforestation of bottomland hardwoods include a high proportion of fast-growing, early successional species such as cottonwood.

  15. Breeding bird communities of reclaimed coal-mine grasslands in the American midwest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeVault, T.L.; Scott, P.E.; Bajema, R.A.; Lima, S.L.

    2002-07-01

    The breeding bird communities of 19 reclaimed surface coal-mine grasslands in southwestern Indiana in 1997-1998, using roadside point counts and off-road transects were investigated. The mine grasslands in this study were large, ranging from 110 to 3180 ha in area (median, 590 ha). Although dominated by a few Eurasian grass species, they supported diverse bird communities in which grassland-dependent species were prominent along with grassland-associated and successional scrub species. The mean abundances of species (relative to one another) on roadside and off-road counts were positively correlated. Red-winged Blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus), Eastern Meadowlarks (Sturnella magna), and Grasshopper Sparrows (Ammodramus savannarum) were present at {gt} 90% of piza americana), Eastern point count locations. Other common species, in descending order, included Dickcissels (S mon Yellowthroats (Geothlypis trichas), Killdeers (Charadrius vociferus), Indigo Buntings (Passerina cyanea), Henslow's Sparrows (Ammodramus henslowii), Field Sparrows (Spizella pusilla), and Song Sparrows (Melospiza melodia). Brown-headed Cowbirds (Molothrus ater) were rare, as were seven grassland-dependent species that were near the edges of their geographic distributions.

  16. Influence of grazing and available moisture on breeding densities of grassland birds in the central platte river valley, Nebraska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, D.H.; Newton, W.E.; Lingle, G.R.; Chavez-Ramirez, F.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between grassland breeding bird densities and both grazing and available moisture in the central Platte River Valley. Nebraska between 1980 and 1996. We also compared species richness and community similarity of breeding birds in sedge (Carex spp.) meadows and mesic grasslands. Densities of two species had a significant relationship with grazing and six of seven focal species had a significant relationship with available moisture. Bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus) and Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) densities were lower in grazed plots compared to ungrazed plots, whereas Red-winged Blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus) densities were greater in sedge-meadow plots compared to mesic grassland plots. Bobolink, Dickcissel (Spiza americana). and Brown-headed Cowbird were negatively associated with available moisture with breeding densities peaking during the driest conditions. Our results suggest that wet conditions increase species richness for the community through addition of wetland-dependant and wetland-associated birds, but decrease densities of ground-nesting grassland birds in wet-meadow habitats, whereas dry conditions reduce species richness but increase the density of the avian assemblage. We propose that wet-meadow habitats serve as local refugia for grassland-nesting birds during local or regional droughts.

  17. Carvalhos, juncos, árvores e rizomas: paradigmas na formação de professores Oaks reeds, trees and rhizomes: paradigms in teacher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarissa Menezes Jordão

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo tem por objetivo discutir, a partir da análise de dados empíricos, as metáforas do mundo enquanto rizoma e enquanto árvore, tal como apresentadas por Deleuze e Guattari (1995, relacionando-as à formação inicial e continuada de professores de línguas estrangeiras. Para tanto, analisamos uma atividade realizada durante um curso de formação de professores de inglês "em serviço", na qual os participantes tiveram como tarefa representar o seu desenvolvimento profissional por meio do desenho de uma árvore. A análise interpretativa situa essas representações em relação aos paradigmas arbóreo e rizomático, assim como problematiza a própria perspectiva adotada na proposição da atividade. Embora os desenhos tivessem uma clara relação com a metáfora da árvore, uma vez que a tarefa em si induzia a isso, pudemos também encontrar referências à metáfora do rizoma, o que nos levou a considerar que a perspectiva rizomática encontra espaço mesmo em meio à rigidez disciplinar da formação, desestabilizando e transformando processos identitários no desenvolvimento profissional.This paper aims at promoting a discussion of the rhizome versus tree metaphor as presented by Deleuze and Guattari (1995; 2009, relating such metaphor to the field of foreign language teacher education. In order to do so, we analyse a task presented to the participants of an in-service EFL teacher education course: the task required the teachers to represent their professional development by drawing a tree that would signify the different stages of such development. Our interpretive analysis examines not only the drawings produced by the teachers, but also the task itself in their relation to the rhizome and tree metaphor. Although the drawings showed obvious traces of the tree metaphor, if only because the task itself required that, we could also find references to the rhizome metaphor, what allowed us to conclude that the rhizome perspective finds its way even within academic disciplinary rigidity, thus destabilizing and transforming identity processes in professional development.

  18. Environmental Impact Assessment Sandia Laboratories, New Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-05-01

    Indigo Bunting ( Passerina cyanea) 102. Lazuli Bunting ( Passerina amoena) 103. Evening Grosbeak (Hesperiphona vespertina) 104. Cassin’s Finch...Junco caniceps) 119. Dark-eyed (Oregon) Junco-(Junco hyemalis)----.. 120. Chipping Sparrow (Spizella passerina ) 121. Brewer’s Sparrow (Spizella

  19. Assessing the Value of Department of Defense Lands in Alaska to a Declining Species, the Rusty Blackbird

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-02-01

    for nesting tree (alive or dead), diameter-at-breast height ( dbh [cm] at 1.37 m) and height (m) of tree or shrubs tree . When more than one tree or...shrub stem was used to support the nest, we measured the height of the tallest supporting tree or shrub and the dbh of each stem of each individual...number of stems of standing trees and shrubs ( dbh ≥ 2.5 cm) by species and state of morbidity. At 21 points within each subplot, we measured

  20. Supplementary Feeding, Plumage Documentation and Early Season Prey of Peregrine Falcons at the New Mexico Alpha Eyrie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponton, David A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-03-20

    A review of what is known about avian physiology and the biological effects of DDE suggests that some benefit to peregrine falcon egg condition could be attained by artificially feeding DDE free prey to the female from the time of her arrival on the nesting grounds until completion of egg laying; the magnitude of potential benefit is unknown. Sporadic efforts in the past demonstrated the need for precision methods of prey delivery. Two methods were developed and tried; providing dead prey items by dropping them in a day perch, and delivery of live prey by remotely controlled release from compartments positioned at the top of the cliff occupied by the falcons. Maintaining quail in the day perch for 21 days resulted in at least one and probably two meals for the female peregrine. Of 16 live birds released (mostly pigeons) 13 were pursued and three caught. Blinding the pigeons with tape proved to be necessary to enable capture. Also, some reluctance of the male peregrine to attack pigeons was observed, and problems with equipment, visibility, and the proximity of the falcons to the release box were encountered. Manpower was the most significant resource requirement. Baiting of great-horned owls, possibly leading to owl attack on the falcons, is judged to be the largest detrimental effect of supplemental feeding. It is recommended that supplemental feeding be reserved for falcons or eyries where complete reproductive failure is expected. Plumage documentation photography was successfully conducted by a remotely controlled camera as an aid to identification of individual falcons. American robin, red-winged blackbird, starling, white-throated swift, bluebird, and mourning dove were among natural prey consumed by the peregrines before completion of egg laying. All activities in close proximity to the cliff were conducted at night to preclude direct disturbance of the falcons.

  1. Bottomland hardwood establishment and avian colonization of reforested sites in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, R.R.; Twedt, D.J.; Fredrickson, L.H.; King, S.L.; Kaminski, R.M.

    2005-01-01

    Reforestation of bottomland hardwood sites in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley has markedly increased in recent years, primarily due to financial incentive programs such as the Wetland Reserve Program, Partners for Wildlife Program, and state and private conservation programs. An avian conservation plan for the Mississippi Alluvial Valley proposes returning a substantial area of cropland to forested wetlands. Understanding how birds colonize reforested sites is important to assess the effectiveness of avian conservation. We evaluated establishment of woody species and assessed bird colonization on 89 reforested sites. These reforested sites were primarily planted with heavy-seeded oaks (Quercus spp.) and pecans (Carya illinoensis). Natural invasion of light-seeded species was expected to diversify these forests for wildlife and sustainable timber harvest. Planted tree species averaged 397 + 36 stems/ha-1, whereas naturally invading trees averaged 1675 + 241 stems/ha. However, naturally invading trees were shorter than planted trees and most natural invasion occurred <100 m from an existing forested edge. Even so, planted trees were relatively slow to develop vertical structure, especially when compared with tree species planted and managed for pulpwood production. Slow development of vertical structure resulted in grassland bird species, particularly dickcissel (Spiza americana) and red-winged blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus), being the dominant avian colonizers for the first 7 years post-planting. High priority bird species (as defined by Partners in Flight), such as prothonotary warbler (Protonotaria citrea) and wood thrush (Hylocichla mustelina), were not frequently detected until stands were 15 years old. Canonical correspondence analysis revealed tree height had the greatest influence on the bird communities colonizing reforested sites. Because colonization by forest birds is dependent on tree height, we recommend inclusion of at least one fast-growing tree

  2. Obligate brood parasites show more functionally effective innate immune responses: an eco-immunological hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, D. Caldwell; Summers, Scott G.; Genovese, Kenneth J.; He, Haiqi; Kogut, Michael H.

    2013-01-01

    Immune adaptations of obligate brood parasites attracted interest when three New World cowbird species (Passeriformes, Icteridae, genus Molothrus) proved unusually resistant to West Nile virus. We have used cowbirds as models to investigate the eco-immunological hypothesis that species in parasite-rich environments characteristically have enhanced immunity as a life history adaptation. As part of an ongoing program to understand the cowbird immune system, in this study we measured degranulation and oxidative burst, two fundamental responses of the innate immune system. Innate immunity provides non-specific, fast-acting defenses against a variety of invading pathogens, and we hypothesized that innate immunity experiences particularly strong selection in cowbirds, because their life history strategy exposes them to diverse novel and unpredictable parasites. We compared the relative effectiveness of degranulation and oxidative burst responses in two cowbird species and one related, non-parasitic species. Both innate immune defenses were significantly more functionally efficient in the two parasitic cowbird species than in the non-parasitic red-winged blackbird (Icteridae, Agelaius phoeniceus). Additionally, both immune defenses were more functionally efficient in the brown-headed cowbird (M. ater), an extreme host-generalist brood parasite, than in the bronzed cowbird (M. aeneus), a moderate host-specialist with lower exposure to other species and their parasites. Thus the relative effectiveness of these two innate immune responses corresponds to the diversity of parasites in the niche of each species and to their relative resistance to WNV. This study is the first use of these two specialized assays in a comparative immunology study of wild avian species.

  3. Cascade of ecological consequences for West Nile virus transmission when aquatic macrophytes invade stormwater habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, Andrew J; Muturi, Ephantus J; Ward, Michael P; Allan, Brian F

    2016-01-01

    Artificial aquatic habitats are ubiquitous in anthropogenic landscapes and highly susceptible to colonization by invasive plant species. Recent research into the ecology of infectious diseases indicates that the establishment of invasive plant species can trigger ecological cascades which alter the transmission dynamics of vector-borne pathogens that imperil human health. Here, we examined whether the presence or management of two invasive, emergent plants, cattails (Typha spp.) and phragmites (Phragmites australis), in stormwater dry detention basins (DDBs) alter the local distribution of vectors, avian hosts, or West Nile virus (WNV) transmission risk in an urban residential setting. Mosquitoes and birds were surveyed at 14 DDBs and paired adjacent residential sites. During the study period, emergent vegetation was mowed by site managers in three DDBs. In the absence of vegetation management, the overall abundance and species composition of both adult vectors and avian hosts differed between residential and DDB habitats; however, WNV entomological risk indices were equivalent. Communal bird roosts composed primarily of three species, European Starlings (Sturnus vulgaris), Red-winged Blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus), and Common Grackles (Quiscalus quiscula), representing a broad range of WNV reservoir competence, were observed at half (three out of six) of the DDBs containing unmanaged stands of phragmites; however, their presence was associated with a lower seasonal increase in vector infection rate. Conversely, mowing of emergent vegetation resulted in a significant and sustained increase in the abundance of WNV-infected vectors in DDBs and the increase in risk extended to adjacent residential sites. These findings indicate that management of invasive plants in DDBs during the growing season can increase, while presence of communal bird roosts can decrease, WNV transmission risk.

  4. Estimating the Effects of Habitat and Biological Interactions in an Avian Community.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M Dorazio

    Full Text Available We used repeated sightings of individual birds encountered in community-level surveys to investigate the relative roles of habitat and biological interactions in determining the distribution and abundance of each species. To analyze these data, we developed a multispecies N-mixture model that allowed estimation of both positive and negative correlations between abundances of different species while also estimating the effects of habitat and the effects of errors in detection of each species. Using a combination of single- and multispecies N-mixture modeling, we examined for each species whether our measures of habitat were sufficient to account for the variation in encounter histories of individual birds or whether other habitat variables or interactions with other species needed to be considered. In the community that we studied, habitat appeared to be more influential than biological interactions in determining the distribution and abundance of most avian species. Our results lend support to the hypothesis that abundances of forest specialists are negatively affected by forest fragmentation. Our results also suggest that many species were associated with particular types of vegetation as measured by structural attributes of the forests. The abundances of 6 of the 73 species observed in our study were strongly correlated. These species included large birds (American Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos and Red-winged Blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus that forage on the ground in open habitats and small birds (Red-eyed Vireo (Vireo olivaceus, House Wren (Troglodytes aedon, Hooded Warbler (Setophaga citrina, and Prairie Warbler (Setophaga discolor that are associated with dense shrub cover. Species abundances were positively correlated within each size group and negatively correlated between groups. Except for the American Crow, which preys on eggs and nestlings of small song birds, none of the other 5 species is known to display direct interactions, so we

  5. Estimating the Effects of Habitat and Biological Interactions in an Avian Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorazio, Robert M; Connor, Edward F; Askins, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    We used repeated sightings of individual birds encountered in community-level surveys to investigate the relative roles of habitat and biological interactions in determining the distribution and abundance of each species. To analyze these data, we developed a multispecies N-mixture model that allowed estimation of both positive and negative correlations between abundances of different species while also estimating the effects of habitat and the effects of errors in detection of each species. Using a combination of single- and multispecies N-mixture modeling, we examined for each species whether our measures of habitat were sufficient to account for the variation in encounter histories of individual birds or whether other habitat variables or interactions with other species needed to be considered. In the community that we studied, habitat appeared to be more influential than biological interactions in determining the distribution and abundance of most avian species. Our results lend support to the hypothesis that abundances of forest specialists are negatively affected by forest fragmentation. Our results also suggest that many species were associated with particular types of vegetation as measured by structural attributes of the forests. The abundances of 6 of the 73 species observed in our study were strongly correlated. These species included large birds (American Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) and Red-winged Blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus)) that forage on the ground in open habitats and small birds (Red-eyed Vireo (Vireo olivaceus), House Wren (Troglodytes aedon), Hooded Warbler (Setophaga citrina), and Prairie Warbler (Setophaga discolor)) that are associated with dense shrub cover. Species abundances were positively correlated within each size group and negatively correlated between groups. Except for the American Crow, which preys on eggs and nestlings of small song birds, none of the other 5 species is known to display direct interactions, so we suspect that

  6. Estimation of (covariance components and genetic parameters for weights of red-winged tinamou using random regression models Estimação de componentes de covariância e de parâmetros genéticos de pesos de perdizes utilizando-se modelos de regressão aleatória

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Tholon

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to determine genetic parameters for body weight of tinamou in captivity. It was used random regression models in analyses of data by considering the direct additive genetic (DA and permanent environmental effects of the animal (PE as random effects. Residual variances were modeled by using a fifth-order variance function. The mean population growth curve was fitted by sixth-order Legendre orthogonal polynomials. Direct additive genetic effects and animal environmental permanent effect were modeled by using Legendre polynomials of order two to nine. The best results were obtained by models with orders of fit of 6 for direct additive genetic effect and of order 3 for permanent effect by Akaike information criterion and of order 3 for both additive genetic effect and permanent effect by Schwarz Bayesian information criterion and likelihood ratio test. Heritability estimates ranged from 0.02 to 0.57. The first eigenvalue explained 94% and 90% of the variation from additive direct and permant environmental effects, respectively. Selection of tinamou for body weight is more effective after 112 days of age.Com este trabalho objetivou-se determinar parâmetros genéticos para peso corporal de perdizes em cativeiro. Foram utilizados modelos de regressão aleatória na análise dos dados considerando os efeitos genéticos aditivos diretos (AD e de ambiente permanente de animal (AP como aleatórios. As variâncias residuais foram modeladas utilizando-se funções de variância de ordem 5. A curva média da população foi ajustada por polinômios ortogonais de Legendre de ordem 6. Os efeitos genéticos aditivos diretos e de ambiente permanente de animal foram modelados utilizando-se polinômios de Legendre de segunda a nona ordem. Os melhores resultados foram obtidos pelos modelos de ordem 6 de ajuste para os efeitos genéticos aditivos diretos e de ordem 3 para os de ambiente permanente pelo Critério de Informação de Akaike e ordem 3 para ambos os efeitos pelos Critério de Informação Bayesiano de Schwartz e Teste de Razão de Verossimilhança. As herdabilidades estimadas variaram de 0,02 a 0,57. O primeiro autovalor respondeu por 94 e 90% da variação decorrente de efeitos aditivos diretos e de ambiente permanente, respectivamente. A seleção de perdizes para peso corporal é mais efetiva a partir de 112 dias de idade.

  7. Evaluation of management practices in wetland meadows at Grays Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Idaho, 1997-2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, J.E.; Pyle, W.H.; Keough, J.R.; Johnson, D.H.

    2002-01-01

    We assessed the relative values of 4 management practices (idle, late season grazing, fall prescribed burning, and rotation of idle and summer grazing) to biotic resources of the grassland-wetland meadow ecosystem at Grays Lake during 1997-2000. Three replicates of each treatment were randomly assigned to 12 experimental units that bordered the deep emergent marsh. Biotic factors examined included the breeding bird community and abundance, nesting activity and nest success, small mammal abundance, plant community, and annual plant biomass production. Fall burns achieved treatment objectives, removing most residual vegetation across a range of cover types. Objectives for grazing treatments were mostly attained; however, vegetation use levels were insufficient for consistent attainment of treatment objectives. Savannah sparrow, American coot, Canada goose, sandhill crane, mallard, and yellow-headed blackbird were the most common bird species present. Densities of 2 bird species (savannah sparrow and red-winged blackbird) were related to year effect only. The effect of unit on densities of redhead, lesser scaup, ruddy duck, sora, long-billed curlew, and common snipe likely reflects habitat differences among units. Densities of 6 species (eared grebe, canvasback, American coot, American avocet, willet, and common yellowthroat) were related to both year and unit effects. Treatment affected densities of 6 of the 29 species examined (mallard, northern shoveler, cinnamon teal, blue-winged teal, American crow, and yellow-headed blackbird); we found no common trend in response to treatments among those species. Overall, idled habitat did not stand out to be a valuable treatment, whereas grazing tended to have positive responses for a number of species. Burning was more likely to result in reduced bird densities than other treatments. We also describe the distribution of species observations among 8 different habitat types. Of the 23 nesting species sampled in the

  8. 76 FR 56464 - Puerto Rico; Amendment No. 1 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-13

    ... Individual Assistance. Aguas Buenas, Comer o, Juncos, and Orocovis Municipalities for Individual Assistance..., Salinas, San Lorenzo, Santa Isabel, Trujillo Alto, Vieques, Yabucoa and Yauco Municipalities for...

  9. 76 FR 64005 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-17

    ... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26,1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a... Minimums and Obstacle DP, Orig Red Wing, MN, Red Wing Rgnl, RNAV (GPS) RWY 27, Amdt 2B Malta, MT, Malta, RNAV (GPS) RWY 8, Amdt 1 Malta, MT, Malta, RNAV (GPS) RWY 26, Amdt 1 Malta, MT, Malta, Takeoff...

  10. Song of the Disrupted

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCue, Frances

    2015-01-01

    This article is delivered to the reader in 13 stanzas, and is a modest takeoff of Wallace Stevens' poem, "Thirteen Ways of Looking at A Blackbird." The poem may be better known for the art and arguments created in its wake than for the original. In "Blackbird," Stevens displays a blackbird in a tree, then cuts language to its…

  11. High and low, fast or slow : the complementary contributions of altitude and latitude to understand life-history variation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tieleman, B. Irene; Bradshaw, Corey

    2009-01-01

    H. Bears, K. Martin & G.C. White (2009) Breeding in high-elevation habitat results in shift to slower life-history strategy within a single species. Journal of Animal Ecology, 78, 365-375. Dark-eyed juncos (Junco hyemalis) from two elevations in the Rocky Mountains of Canada display different life h

  12. Study on the blackbird (Agelaius ruficapillus Viellot- Emberizidae, Aves) in the rice production areas of Southern Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil : basis for a population control management program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva, da J.J.C.

    1999-01-01

    Rice is one of the main components of the Brazilian diet. The State of Rio Grande do Sul produces approximately 4,6 millions tons per year - more than 54% of total Brazilian rice production. The average production in Southern Brazil is 5,2 tons per ha, with yields of 10 tons per ha being

  13. Study on the blackbird (Agelaius ruficapillus Viellot- Emberizidae, Aves) in the rice production areas of Southern Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil : basis for a population control management program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Centeno da Silva, J.J.

    1999-01-01

    Rice is one of the main components of the Brazilian diet. The State of Rio Grande do Sul produces approximately 4,6 millions tons per year - more than 54% of total Brazilian rice production. The average production in Southern Brazil is 5,2 tons per ha, with yields of 10 tons per ha being recorded. T

  14. Influence of landscape composition and diversity on contaminant flux in terrestrial food webs: A case study of trace metal transfer to European blackbirds Turdus merula

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fritsch, C.; Coeurdassier, M.; Faivre, B.; Baurand, P.E.; Giraudoux, P.; Brink, van den N.W.; Scheifler, R.

    2012-01-01

    Although understanding the influence of the spatial arrangement of habitats and interacting communities on the processes of pollutant flux and impacts is critical for exposure and risk assessment, to date few studies have been devoted to this emergent topic. We tested the hypothesis that landscape

  15. Landscape and vegetation effects on avian reproduction on bottomland forest restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twedt, Daniel J.; Somershoe, Scott G.; Hazler, Kirsten R.; Cooper, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Forest restoration has been undertaken on >200,000 ha of agricultural land in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley, USA, during the past few decades. Decisions on where and how to restore bottomland forests are complex and dependent upon landowner objectives, but for conservation of silvicolous (forest-dwelling) birds, ecologists have espoused restoration through planting a diverse mix of densely spaced seedlings that includes fast-growing species. Application of this planting strategy on agricultural tracts that are adjacent to extant forest or within landscapes that are predominately forested has been advocated to increase forest area and enhance forested landscapes, thereby benefiting area-sensitive, silvicolous birds. We measured support for these hypothesized benefits through assessments of densities of breeding birds and reproductive success of 9 species on 36 bottomland forest restoration sites. Densities of thamnic (shrub-scrub dwelling) and silvicolous birds, such as yellow-breasted chat (Icteria virens), indigo bunting (Passerina cyanea), and white-eyed vireo (Vireo griseus) were positively associated with 1) taller trees, 2) greater stem densities, and 3) a greater proportion of forest within the landscape, whereas densities of birds associated with grasslands, such as dickcissel (Spiza americana) and red-winged blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus), were negatively associated with these variables. Vegetation structure, habitat edge, and temporal effects had greater influence on nest success than did landscape effects. Taller trees, increased density of woody stems, greater vegetation density, and more forest within the landscape were often associated with greater nest success. Nest success of grassland birds was positively related to distance from forest edge but, for thamnic birds, success was greater near edges. Moreover, nest success and estimated fecundity of thamnic species suggested their populations are self-sustaining on forest restoration sites, whereas

  16. Lead, mercury, cadmium, chromium, and arsenic levels in eggs, feathers, and tissues of Canada geese of the New Jersey Meadowlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsipoura, Nellie [New Jersey Audubon Society, 11 Hardscrabble Road, Bernardsville, NJ 07924 (United States); Burger, Joanna, E-mail: burger@biology.rutgers.edu [Division of Life Sciences, 604 Allison Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8082 (United States); Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute, Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Newhouse, Michael [NJ Meadowlands Commission, One DeKorte Park Plaza, Lyndhurst, NJ 07071 (United States); Jeitner, Christian [Division of Life Sciences, 604 Allison Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8082 (United States); Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute, Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Gochfeld, Michael [Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute, Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Environmental and Occupational Medicine. Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, 170 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Mizrahi, David [New Jersey Audubon Society, 11 Hardscrabble Road, Bernardsville, NJ 07924 (United States)

    2011-08-15

    The New Jersey Meadowlands are located within the heavily urbanized New York/New Jersey Harbor Estuary and have been subject to contamination due to effluent and runoff from industry, traffic, and homes along the Hackensack River and nearby waterways. These extensive wetlands, though heavily impacted by development and pollution, support a wide array of bird and other wildlife species. Persistent contaminants may pose threats to birds in these habitats, affecting reproduction, egg hatchability, nestling survival, and neurobehavioral development. Metals of concern in the Meadowlands include arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, and mercury. These metals were analyzed in eggs, feathers, muscle, and liver of Canada geese (Branta canadensis) breeding in four wetland sites. We sampled geese collected during control culling (n=26) and collected eggs from goose nests (n=34). Levels of arsenic were below the minimum quantification level (MQL) in most samples, and cadmium and mercury were low in all tissues sampled. Chromium levels were high in feather samples. Mercury levels in eggs of Canada geese, an almost exclusively herbivorous species, were lower (mean {+-}SE 4.29{+-}0.30 {mu}g/g wet weight) than in eggs of omnivorous mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), and insectivorous red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus) and marsh wrens (Cistothorus palustris) from the Meadowlands, consistent with trophic level differences. However, lead levels were higher in the goose eggs (161{+-}36.7 ng/g) than in the other species. Geese also had higher levels of lead in feathers (1910{+-}386 ng/g) than those seen in Meadowlands passerines. By contrast, muscle and liver lead levels were within the range reported in waterfowl elsewhere, possibly a reflection of metal sequestration in eggs and feathers. Elevated lead levels may be the result of sediment ingestion or ingestion of lead shot and sinkers. Finally, lead levels in goose liver (249{+-}44.7 ng/g) and eggs (161{+-}36.7 ng/g) may pose a

  17. Cultural Resources Mitigation at the McIlvaine Island Site (47Lc160) in Navigation Pool 7, Upper Mississippi River

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-03-01

    margins 8. Occipital fragments (3) 9. Rt. Sphenoid fragment - rt. greater wing and foramina 10. Parietal fragment (5) 11. Lt. Sphenoid fragment 12...Assemblages", paper presented at the conference on Western Oneota Ceramics, April 16-17, Red Wing , Minnesota. 1983 Gallagher, J. P., R. Boszhardt, and K...Variation within and between assemblages. Paper presented at the conference on Western Oneota Ceramics, Red Wing , Minnesota (April 16-17). Junior author with

  18. Environmental Assessment: Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mission Beddown Minneapolis-St. Paul Air Reserve Station Minneapolis, Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    cardinalis), mourning dove (Zenaida macroura), house sparrow (Passer domesticus ), and juncos (Junco hyemalis). White-tailed deer (Odocoileus...reported seeing deer, wild turkey, black bear (Ursus americanus) and coyotes ( Canis latrans) near the site. No wildlife was observed at the Lima Range site...Sensitive Species The USFWS’s responsibilities under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) include: (1) the identification of threatened and endangered

  19. Three anomalies: A scythebill in the Greater Antillean Grackle (blackbird, a crown pattern in the Rock Beauty (angelfish, and a double spot in the Butter Hamlet (grouper, and their possible genetic significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernest H Williams, Jr

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Three anomalies are described: a scythebill in Greater Antillean Grackle, Quiscalus niger (Boddaert (Passeriformes: Emberizidae, a crown color pattern in Rock Beauty, Holacanthus tricolor (Bloch (Perciformes: Pomacanthidae, and a double-spot color pattern in Butter Hamlet, Hypoplectrus unicolor (Walbaum (Perciformes: Pomacanthidae. Bill anomalies are generally thought to be genetic in origin and genetic changes in bill shape can occur rapidly in a population. The scythebill anomally demonstrates how quickly a drastic bill modification may occur. The crown color pattern anomaly is similar to distinctive markings found in other members of this genus [Queen Angelfish, H. ciliaris (Linnaeus and hybrid Townsend Angelfish H. ciliaris X H. bermudensis Goode] in the tropical western Atlantic. It suggests how quickly this pattern could have originated in the other species, and/or some propensity of this pattern in the genus. The distinct double-spot color pattern anomaly suggests how quickly new color patterns can originate in genus Hypoplectrus. This is important because species in this genus are distinguished almost solely on the basis of color pattern and speciation may be occurring rapidly. Anomalies should be recorded because they may give us some hints at the genetic origin of species characters and some could represent potentially inheritable characters. We suggest these potentially inheritable characters could be recognized and described when they first arise in an individual and before they become inherited by a population. Following these potentially inheritable characters could help to explain how such characters enter into a population. This approach to the study of inherited characters could fill a void in our knowledge of evolution and speciation. Rev. Biol. Trop. 54 (Suppl. 3: 161-169. Epub 2007 Jan. 15.Se describen tres anomalías: el pico de guadaña en el chinchilín, Quiscalus niger (Boddaert (Passeriformes: Emberizidae, un patrón de color de corona en el isabelita medioluto, Holacanthus tricolor (Bloch (Perciformes: Pomacanthidae, y un patrón de color de doble mancha en el vaca blanca, Hypoplectrus unicolor (Walbaum (Perciformes: Pomacanthidae. Generalmente se piensa que las anomalías en el pico son de origen genético y que los cambios genéticos en la forma del pico pueden ocurrir rápidamente en una población. La anomalía del pico de guadaña demuestra cuan rápido puede ocurrir una modificación drástica del pico. La anomalía del patrón de color de corona es similar a otras marcas distintivas encontradas en otros miembros de este género [isabelita reina, H. ciliaris (Linnaeus y el híbrido isabelita azul H. ciliaris X H. bermudensis Goode] en el Atlántico occidental tropical y también indica cambios rápidos. Esto es importante porque las especies de este género se distinguen casi solamente por patrones de color. Las anomalías deberían ser registradas ya que podrían darnos algunas pistas acerca del origen genético de las características de las especies. Proponemos que los caracteres potencialmente heredables pueden reconocerse y describirse cuando aparecen en un individuo, antes de que sean heredados a la población, llenando un vacío en nuestro conocimiento de la evolución y la especiación.

  20. Field screening of water quality, bottom sediment, and biota associated with irrigation drainage in the Yuma Valley, Arizona, 1995

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadayon, Saeid; King, K.A.; Andrews, Brenda; Roberts, William

    1997-01-01

    , and concentrations ranged from 11 to 16 micrograms per gram. Concentrations ofaluminum, beryllium, boron, copper, lead, and zinc were highest in samples from Main Drain at southerly international boundary near San Luis, Arizona. Selenium was detected in all bottom-sediment samples, and concentrations ranged from 0.1 to 0.7 micrograms per gram. Concentrations of cadmium, europium, homium, mercury, molybdenum, silver, tantalum, tin, and uranium were below analytical reporting limits in the bottom-sediment samples. Concentrations of trace elements in bottom-sediment samples were within the ranges found in a study of soils of the western United States and did not indicate a significant accumulation of these constituents. p,p'Dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (commonly referred to as p,-p'-DDE) was detected in one bottom-sediment sample at a concentration of 1.4 micrograms per gram. No other organochlorine compounds were detected in the bottom-sediment samples. DDE was present in all fish and bird samples. Almost one-half of the fish samples contained DDE residues that were two times higher than the mean calculated for a national study in 1984-85. Twenty-tree percent of the fish contained more than three times the national mean. Fish from downstream parts of the Main Drain had the highest concentrations of DDE. Although concentrations of DDE in fish and in bird carcasses and eggs were above background levels, residues generally were below thresholds associated with chronic poisoning and reproductive problems in figh and wildlife. Concentrations of 18 trace elements were detected in cattail (Typha sp.) roots, freshwater clam (Corbicula fluminea), fish, and bird samples. Selenium in most fish and in livers of red-winged (Agelaius phoeniceus) and yellow-headed (Xanthocephalus xanthocephalus) blackbirds was above background concentrations but below toxic concentrations. In contrast, selenium was present in a killdeer (Charadrium vociferus) liver sample at potentially toxic con

  1. The occurrence and significance of polychlorinated biphenyls in the environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dustman, E.H.; Stickel, L.F.; Blus, L.J.; Reichel, W.L.; Wiemeyer, Stanley N.

    1971-01-01

    SUMMARY: Polychlorinated biphenyls constitute a group of chlorine-bearing compounds of industrial origin that have permeated the natural environment throughout the world. Their chemical structure resembles that of some of the organochlorine pesticides. They are troublesome interferences in gas chromatographic analysis of these pesticides. Although methods have been developed to overcome analytical problems, measurements of quantity still are only approximate. Special studies in the United States, Netherlands, and Great Britain have traced PCB's to industrial effluent, but other possible sources have not been followed. Their use in paints, cartons, and insulating fluids suggests that environmental pollution may be from many different sources. PCB's are present in fish and wildlife in many countries of the world. Quantities are higher in animals living near industrial areas. PCB's build up in biological food chains with increases of tens to thousands of times from lower to higher organisms. Experimental studies have shown that PCB's have a toxicity to mallards, pheasants, bobwhite quail, coturnix quail, red-winged blackbirds, starlings, cowbirds, and grackles that is of the same order as the toxicity of DDE to these species. Overt signs of poisoning also are similar to those caused by compounds of the DDT group. Toxic effects of DDE and Aroclor 1254 to coturnix chicks were additive, but not synergistic. PCB's containing higher percentages of chlorine are more toxic to birds than those containing lower percentages. PCB's of foreign manufacture contained contaminants to an extent that greatly increased their toxicity Aroclor 1242. Statistical evaluations of the role that different chemicals may play in thinning of eggshells of brown pelicans show that DDE residues correlate better with shell thinning than do residues of dieldrin or PCB's. Studies of the effects of PCB's in the environment are as yet insufficient for well-rounded conclusions. The evidence available

  2. Biological data on PCBs in animals other than man

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickel, L.F.

    1972-01-01

    SUMMARY: Polychlorinated biphenyls have become ubiquitous in the world ecosystem in quantities similar to those of DDE. Experimental studies have shown that PCBs have a toxicity to mallards, pheasants, bobwhite quail, coturnix quail, red-winged blackbirds, starlings, cowbirds, and grackles that is of the same order as the toxicity of DDE to these species. Overt signs of poisoning also are similar to those caused by compounds of the DDT group. Toxic effects of DDE and Aroclor 1254 to coturnix chicks were additive, but not synergistic. PCBs containing higher percentages of chlorine are more toxic to birds than those containing lower percentages. PCBs of foreign manufacture contained contaminants to an extent that greatly increased their toxicity. Residues of PCBs in the brains of birds killed by these compounds measure in the hundreds of parts per million. PCBs may have contributed to mortality of some birds in the field. Toxicity to insects of PCBs of different degrees of chlorination is the reverse of the pattern in birds: the lower chlorinations are more toxic to insects. PCBs enhanced the toxicity of dieldrin and DDT to insects. Shrimp are very sensitive to PCBs and most will die as a result of 20-day exposure to a concentration of 5 ppb. PCBs also inhibit shell growth of oysters. Crabs are less sensitive; all accumulate residues to many times the concentrations in the water, and a test with crabs showed that they lost the residues very slowly. Growth of certain species of marine diatoms was experimentally inhibited by PCBs, but algae were not affected. The small marine crustacean, Gammarus, is sensitive to PCBs in concentrations of thousandths to tenths of a part per billion. Exposure to 5 ppb of Aroclor 1254 caused mortality of two species of fish in 14-45 days. Onset of death was delayed and was accompanied by fungus-like lesions. Rainbow trout were quickly killed by terphenyls at 10 ppb under normal oxygen conditions and at 2 ppb with reduced oxygen

  3. 78 FR 66759 - Information Collection Request Sent to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for Approval...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-06

    ... (OMB) for Approval; Depredation Order for Blackbirds, Grackles, Cowbirds, Magpies, and Crows AGENCY...: OMB Control Number: 1018-0146. Title: Depredation Order for Blackbirds, Grackles, Cowbirds, Magpies... implement the MBTA. In the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), 50 CFR 21.43 is a depredation order that...

  4. Estructura narrativa en el discurso oral de adultos mayores

    OpenAIRE

    Wittig,Fernando

    2004-01-01

    El envejecimiento implica cambios cognitivos que se traducen en distintos problemas en la producción de discurso narrativo (Kemper, 1992; Craik, Andreson, Kerr & Li, 1995; Juncos, 1998). Juncos y Pereiro (1998) sostienen que el nivel educacional es un factor que incide positivamente en el manejo de la estructura de este tipo de discurso. Para evaluar lo anterior se analizan 167 narraciones orales de 24 sujetos con distinto nivel educacional (básico y universitario) y se clasifican según l...

  5. Operation and Maintenance of Clarks Hill Lake, Savannah River, Georgia, and South Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-10-01

    on a case by case basis. 48 , . € .- " w ii i , - mi . " ’ ." ,: ,.’ .. -. . .,- .-’-..-... - APPENDIX A PROJECT MAPS (Enlarged maps with color coding...Stizostedion canadense Sauger * S. v. vitreum Wal leye B-4 1 I . . - - - CLJ -4 -4 A u -4 0 U L,00~ 4)-4 *)4. 0 c 0 Ai 4 0 0 "a 44 -4 0 4 0 4 -4 J.J...gramineus Vesper Sparrow C/W X *Aimophila aestivalis Bachman’s Sparrow U/P X Junco hyemalis Slate- colored Junco C/W X X Spizella passerina Chipping

  6. Evaluation of Title I CAI Programs at Minnesota State Correctional Institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandman, Richard S.; Welch, Wayne W.

    Three Minnesota correctional institutions used computer-assisted instruction (CAI) on PLATO terminals to improve reading and mathematics skills: (1) the State Reformatory for Men, St. Cloud (males, ages 17-21); (2) the Minnesota Home School, Sauk Centre (males and females, ages 12-18); and (3) the State Training School, Red Wing (males, ages…

  7. Discovery of high-frequency iron K lags in Ark 564 and Mrk 335

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kara, E.; Fabian, A.C.; Cackett, E.M.; Uttley, P.; Wilkins, D.R.; Zoghbi, A.

    2013-01-01

    We use archival XMM-Newton observations of Ark 564 and Mrk 335 to calculate the frequency-dependent time lags for these two well-studied sources. We discover high-frequency Fe K lags in both sources, indicating that the red wing of the line precedes the rest-frame energy by roughly 100 and 150 s for

  8. The curious time lags of PG 1244+026: discovery of the iron K reverberation lag

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kara, E.; Cackett, E.M.; Fabian, A.C.; Reynolds, C.; Uttley, P.

    2014-01-01

    High-frequency iron K reverberation lags, where the red wing of the line responds before the line centroid, are a robust signature of relativistic reflection off the inner accretion disc. In this Letter, we report the discovery of the Fe K lag in PG 1244+026 from ∼120 ks of data (one orbit of the

  9. Nontarget Bird Exposure to DRC-1339 During Fall in North Dakota and Spring in South Dakota

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Blackbirds frequently use ripening sunflower (Helianthus annuus) as a food source in the northern Great Plains. In 1999 and 2000, the avicide DRC-1339...

  10. 78 FR 66058 - Habitat Conservation Plan for South Sacramento County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-04

    ...) Pallid bat (Antrozous pallidus) Western red bat (Lasiurus blossevillii) Yuma myotis bat (Myotis yumanensis) White-tailed kite (Elanus leucurus) Cooper's hawk (Accipiter cooperii) Ferruginous hawk (Buteo...) ] Northern harrier (Circus cyaneus) Swainson's hawk (Buteo swainsoni) Tricolored blackbird (Agelaius...

  11. Educación en valores. Ideología y religión en la escuela pública. [Reseña

    OpenAIRE

    Albert, M.

    2009-01-01

    Reseña de: Antonio LÓPEZ CASTILLO (ed.). Educación en valores. Ideología y religión en la escuela pública. Estudio introductorío de José Alvarez Junco, Centro de Estudios Políticos y Constitucionales, Cuademos y Debates, n. 176, Madríd, 2007, 316 pp.

  12. Reproductive allochrony in seasonally sympatric populations maintained by differential response to photoperiod: Implications for population divergence and response to climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fudickar, A.M.; Grieves, T.J.; Atwell, Jonathan W.; Stricker, Craig A.; Ketterson, Ellen D.

    2016-01-01

    Reproductive allochrony presents a potential barrier to gene flow and is common in seasonally sympatric migratory and sedentary birds. Mechanisms mediating reproductive allochrony can influence population divergence and the capacity of populations to respond to environmental change. We asked whether reproductive allochrony in seasonally sympatric birds results from a difference in response to supplementary or photoperiodic cues and whether the response varies in relation to the distance separating breeding and wintering locations as measured by stable isotopes. We held seasonally sympatric migratory and sedentary male dark-eyed juncos (Junco hyemalis) in a common garden in early spring under simulated natural changes in photoperiod and made measurements of reproductive and migratory physiology. On the same dates and photoperiods, sedentary juncos had higher testosterone (initial and gonadotropin-releasing hormone induced), more developed cloacal protuberances, and larger testes than migrants. In contrast, migratory juncos had larger fat reserves (fuel for migration). We found a negative relationship between testis mass and feather hydrogen isotope ratios, indicating that testis growth was more delayed in migrants making longer migrations. We conclude that reproductive allochrony in seasonally sympatric migratory and sedentary birds can result from a differential response to photoperiodic cues in a common garden, and as a result, gene flow between migrants and residents may be reduced by photoperiodic control of reproductive development. Further, earlier breeding in response to future climate change may currently be constrained by differential response to photoperiodic cues.

  13. 77 FR 38269 - Approval for Expanded Manufacturing Authority; Foreign-Trade Subzone 7M; Amgen Manufacturing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-27

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Approval for Expanded Manufacturing Authority; Foreign-Trade Subzone 7M; Amgen Manufacturing Limited (Biotechnology and Healthcare Products); Juncos, Puerto Rico Pursuant to its authority... Company, grantee of FTZ 7, has requested an expansion of the scope of manufacturing authority on behalf...

  14. 76 FR 80332 - Foreign-Trade Zone 7-Mayaguez, PR, Expansion of Manufacturing Authority; Amgen Manufacturing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-23

    ...-Trade Zone 7--Mayaguez, PR, Expansion of Manufacturing Authority; Amgen Manufacturing Limited... expansion of the scope of manufacturing authority approved within Subzone 7M, on behalf of Amgen Manufacturing Limited (Amgen) in Juncos, Puerto Rico. The application was submitted pursuant to the...

  15. Next-generation sequencing reveals phylogeographic structure and a species tree for recent bird divergences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McCormack, John E.; Maley, James M.; Hird, Sarah M.;

    2012-01-01

    nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) mined from the loci, we detected population differentiation in each of the four bird systems, including: a case of ecological speciation in rails (Rallus); a rapid postglacial radiation in the genus Junco; recent in situ speciation among hummingbirds (Trochilus) in Jamaica...

  16. Reproductive Allochrony in Seasonally Sympatric Populations Maintained by Differential Response to Photoperiod: Implications for Population Divergence and Response to Climate Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fudickar, Adam M; Greives, Timothy J; Atwell, Jonathan W; Stricker, Craig A; Ketterson, Ellen D

    2016-04-01

    Reproductive allochrony presents a potential barrier to gene flow and is common in seasonally sympatric migratory and sedentary birds. Mechanisms mediating reproductive allochrony can influence population divergence and the capacity of populations to respond to environmental change. We asked whether reproductive allochrony in seasonally sympatric birds results from a difference in response to supplementary or photoperiodic cues and whether the response varies in relation to the distance separating breeding and wintering locations as measured by stable isotopes. We held seasonally sympatric migratory and sedentary male dark-eyed juncos (Junco hyemalis) in a common garden in early spring under simulated natural changes in photoperiod and made measurements of reproductive and migratory physiology. On the same dates and photoperiods, sedentary juncos had higher testosterone (initial and gonadotropin-releasing hormone induced), more developed cloacal protuberances, and larger testes than migrants. In contrast, migratory juncos had larger fat reserves (fuel for migration). We found a negative relationship between testis mass and feather hydrogen isotope ratios, indicating that testis growth was more delayed in migrants making longer migrations. We conclude that reproductive allochrony in seasonally sympatric migratory and sedentary birds can result from a differential response to photoperiodic cues in a common garden, and as a result, gene flow between migrants and residents may be reduced by photoperiodic control of reproductive development. Further, earlier breeding in response to future climate change may currently be constrained by differential response to photoperiodic cues.

  17. On the statistical analysis of vegetation change: a wetland affected by water extraction and soil acidification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braak, ter C.J.F.; Wiertz, J.

    1994-01-01

    A case study is presented on the statistical analysis and interpretation of vegetation change without precise information on environmental change. The changes in a vegetation of a Junco-Molinion grassland are evaluated on the basis of relevés of 1977 and 1988 (20 plots) from a small nature reserve o

  18. Zur Soziologie von Ctenidium molluscum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, Gea

    1979-01-01

    Bei einer Untersuchung in einer Anzahl von niederländischen „blauwgraslanden“ (d. h. „blaue Wiesen“, Cirsio-Molinietum, Junco-Molinion) wurde Ctenidium molluscum angetroffen, eine Art, welche in den Niederlanden mehr oder weniger zum Mesobromion gerechnet wird. Untersuchungen an altem Herbarmaterial

  19. Vlozegge (Carex pulicaris L.) in Nederlandse duingebieden

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weeda, E.J.

    1989-01-01

    In the Netherlands as well as in adjacent countries Carex pulicaris is a strongly declining species. It is mainly known as an inhabitant of little or not manured fen-meadows (Junco-Molinion). Besides there are a limited number of localities of C. pulicaris in the dunes, and in one of these (on the W

  20. Fen-meadow succession in relation to spatial and temporal differences in hydrological and soil conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoek, van der D.; Sykora, K.V.

    2006-01-01

    Question: In fen meadows with Junco-Molinion plant communities, falling groundwater levels may not lead to a boosted above-ground biomass production if limitation of nutrients persists. Instead, depending on drainage intensity and microtopography, acidification may trigger a shift into drier and mor

  1. Detection of a proton beam during the impulsive phase of a stellar flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodgate, Bruce E.; Robinson, Richard D.; Carpenter, Kenneth G.; Maran, Stephen P.; Shore, Steven N.

    1992-01-01

    A transient event consistent with the predicted temporal and spectral signatures of an energetic proton beam was detected in the impulsive phase of a small flare on the red dwarf star AU Microscopii. It consisted of a prominent increase in the flux in the red wing of Lyman-alpha near 1223 A, simultaneously with the peak of a flare observed in the 1206 A transition region line of Si III. The probability that the red wing event was a chance fluctuation is one chance in 2.5 x 10 exp 4. This observation represents a confirmation of the prediction by Orrall and Zirker (1976) in which downstreaming protons accelerated during the impulsive phase of a flare charge exchange with ambient neutral hydrogen and emit Lyman-alpha radiation from 1 to 15 A redward of line center.

  2. The Close Environment of the C-star TX Psc as Seen with CRIRES Spectro-Astrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hron, J.; Lebzelter, T.; Paladini, C.; Uttenthaler, S.; Aringer, B.; Wiedemann, G.

    2015-08-01

    We present CRIRES observations of the "normal" carbon star TX Psc in the K, L and M bands, taken in 2010 and 2013. The spectro-astrometry shows clear signatures for the presence of a bright blob south of the star and several photospheric radii away. The flux ratio between blob and star is between 5% and 10%. This blob also shows up as an additional absorption component in the red wings of the CO lines.

  3. Archaeology, Geomorphology and Historic Surveys in Pools 13-14, Upper Mississippi River. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-09-01

    counties (Fig. 3.15). Like most of the towns along the river, it traces its origins to a couple of backwoods land sharks, in this case Abraham Mitchell...Middle West. University of Oklahoma Press, Norman. (Interpretive series of essays dealing with regional culture history.] Nasatir, Abraham Phineas...Mississippi River at Isle Pelee (Prairie Island), near present day Red Wing, Minnesota. In 1700, Le Sueur leads an expedition from the Gulf of Mexico to

  4. Project Summary: Biology-Inspired Autonomous Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    relative high performance predictability currently associated with automated machines. Anyone who has walked a normally well behaved male dog in the...possibilities as well. Attitude control systems normally include proportional and integral control on sensed attitude, with damping and robustness provided...attacking predators. Some examples include red-wing black bird nest defense [1], meerkat predator mobbing [2], and predator identification in guppy schools

  5. Bibliographie

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Alexander Robert Jackson, « The Latin American Aprista Parties », Political Quarterly, n° 20, 1949, p. 236-247 Álvarez Junco José, Gonzalez Luis (comp.), El populismo en España y América, Madrid, Catriel, 1994. Álvarez Junco José, El emperador del Paralelo. Lerroux et la demagogia populista, Madrid, Alianza, 1990. Ansart Pierre, La gestion des passions politiques, Lausanne, L’Âge d’Homme, 1983. Baciu Sergio, « Un Continente en Busca de Una Doctrina », Journal of Inter-American Studies, n° 2, ...

  6. Intraspecific correlations of basal and maximal metabolic rates in birds and the aerobic capacity model for the evolution of endothermy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L Swanson

    Full Text Available The underlying assumption of the aerobic capacity model for the evolution of endothermy is that basal (BMR and maximal aerobic metabolic rates are phenotypically linked. However, because BMR is largely a function of central organs whereas maximal metabolic output is largely a function of skeletal muscles, the mechanistic underpinnings for their linkage are not obvious. Interspecific studies in birds generally support a phenotypic correlation between BMR and maximal metabolic output. If the aerobic capacity model is valid, these phenotypic correlations should also extend to intraspecific comparisons. We measured BMR, M(sum (maximum thermoregulatory metabolic rate and MMR (maximum exercise metabolic rate in a hop-flutter chamber in winter for dark-eyed juncos (Junco hyemalis, American goldfinches (Carduelis tristis; M(sum and MMR only, and black-capped chickadees (Poecile atricapillus; BMR and M(sum only and examined correlations among these variables. We also measured BMR and M(sum in individual house sparrows (Passer domesticus in both summer, winter and spring. For both raw metabolic rates and residuals from allometric regressions, BMR was not significantly correlated with either M(sum or MMR in juncos. Moreover, no significant correlation between M(sum and MMR or their mass-independent residuals occurred for juncos or goldfinches. Raw BMR and M(sum were significantly positively correlated for black-capped chickadees and house sparrows, but mass-independent residuals of BMR and M(sum were not. These data suggest that central organ and exercise organ metabolic levels are not inextricably linked and that muscular capacities for exercise and shivering do not necessarily vary in tandem in individual birds. Why intraspecific and interspecific avian studies show differing results and the significance of these differences to the aerobic capacity model are unknown, and resolution of these questions will require additional studies of potential

  7. West Nile Virus Antibodies in Permanent Resident and Overwintering Migrant Birds in South-Central Kansas

    OpenAIRE

    Shelite, Thomas R.; Rogers, Christopher M.; Litzner, Brandon R.; Johnson, R. Roy; Schneegurt, Mark A.

    2008-01-01

    We conducted serological studies, using epitope-blocking ELISAs directed at West Nile virus (WNV) and flavivirus antibodies, of wild birds in south-central Kansas, the first for this state, in the winters of 2003–04 through 2005–06. Overwintering migratory species (primarily the American tree sparrow and dark-eyed junco) consistently showed significantly lower seropositivity than permanent residents (primarily the northern cardinal). The cardinal showed annual variation in seropositivity betw...

  8. Zero prevalence of extended spectrum beta-lactamase-producing bacteria in 300 breeding Collared Flycatchers in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef D. Järhult

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Wild birds are important indicators and potential spreaders of antibiotic resistance. The order Passerines is scarcely studied apart from Corvus sp. but extended spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs has been found in Blackbirds. We tested 300 fecal samples from a well-studied population of Collared Flycatchers (Ficedula albicollis at the Island of Gotland in Sweden and found no ESBL-producing bacteria. These results support the idea of ‘ecological guild’ as Blackbirds are ground-foraging invertebrate feeders, whereas Collared Flycatchers are aerial insectivores not regularly coming into contact with fecal contaminations and therefore less prone to acquire pathogens spread by the fecal–oral route.

  9. Recovery of a mining-damaged stream ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mebane, Christopher A.; Eakins, Robert J.; Fraser, Brian G.; Adams, William J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a 30+ year record of changes in benthic macroinvertebrate communities and fish populations associated with improving water quality in mining-influenced streams. Panther Creek, a tributary to the Salmon River in central Idaho, USA suffered intensive damage from mining and milling operations at the Blackbird Mine that released copper (Cu), arsenic (As), and cobalt (Co) into tributaries. From the 1960s through the 1980s, no fish and few aquatic invertebrates could be found in 40 km of mine-affected reaches of Panther Creek downstream of the metals contaminated tributaries, Blackbird and Big Deer Creeks.

  10. Social environment has a primary influence on the microbial and odor profiles of a chemically signaling songbird

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle June Whittaker

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Chemical signaling is an underappreciated means of communication among birds, as may be the potential contributions of symbiotic microbes to animal chemical communication in general. The dark-eyed junco (Junco hyemalis produces and detects volatile compounds that may be important in reproductive behavior. These compounds are found in preen oil secreted by the uropygial gland, and this gland supports diverse bacterial communities including genera known to produce some of these volatile compounds. We investigated the relative contributions of shared environments and genetic relatedness in shaping juncos’ symbiotic bacterial communities, and investigated whether these bacterial communities underlie juncos’ chemical signaling behavior. We sampled parents and nestlings at 9 junco nests during one breeding season at Mountain Lake Biological Station in Virginia, USA. From each individual, we collected swabs of the uropygial gland and the cloaca, preen oil, and a small blood sample for paternity testing. We characterized junco bacterial communities through 16S rRNA gene surveys and preen oil volatile compounds via gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Nest membership and age class had the strongest influence on the structure of bacterial and volatile profiles. We compared father-offspring similarity based on paternity, and nestling similarity in nests containing full siblings and half siblings, and found that relatedness did not noticeably affect bacterial or volatile profiles. While we cannot rule out an influence of genetic relatedness on these profiles, it is clear that shared environments are more influential in shaping bacterial and volatile profiles among juncos.We did not find significant covariation between individual bacterial and volatile profiles. Possible explanations for this result include: 1 bacteria do not underlie volatile production; 2 ample redundancy in volatile production among bacterial types obscures covariation; or 3 the

  11. Nontarget bird exposure to DRC-1339 during fall in North Dakota and spring in South Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custer, Thomas W.; Custer, Christine M.; Dummer, Paul M.; Linz, George M.; Sileo, Louis; Stahl, Randal S.; Johnston, John J.; Linz, G.M.

    2003-01-01

    Blackbirds frequently use ripening sunflower (Heltantbus annuus) as a food source in the northern Great Plains. In 1999 and 2000, the avicide DRC-1339 (3-chloro-4-methylaniline hydrochloride) was used experimentally on fall-ripening sunflower fields in North Dakota so researchers could evaluate its effectiveness for reducing crop depredations by blackbirds. DRC-1339 was applied to rice and broadcast on the ground in a confined area within ripening sunflower fields. One objective of this study was to determine whether nontarget birds, birds other than blackbirds, were eating rice and were exposed to the DRC-1339. In 1999, 8 of 11 (73%) sparrows collected by shotgun in sunflower fields treated with DRe-1339 had rice in their gastrointestinal (GI) tracts. In 2000, 5 mourning doves (Zenaida macroura) and 3 sparrows were collected by shotgun in sunflower fields treated with DRC-1339. Three doves had rice in their GI tracts, 4 doves and all 3 sparrows had measurable DRC1339 concentrations in their GI tracts, and 3 mourning doves and 1 savannah sparrow (Passerculus sanduncbensis) exhibited histopathological signs of kidney damage. In April 2002, untreated rice was applied to corn stubble plots in South Dakota to determine which bird species ate rice. In 2002, 3 of 3 song sparrows (Melospiza melodia) collected by shotgun had rice in their GI tracts. Our results demonstrate that the use of DRC-1339 to control blackbirds in the northern Great Plains will likely expose nontarget birds to the DRC-1339 bait.

  12. Understanding "Romeo and Juliet": A Thematic Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koveleski, Erin

    This curriculum unit for Grade 9 combines the classic Shakespeare play "Romeo and Juliet" with three young adult novels: "The Outsiders" (S.E. Hinton), "Summer of My German Soldier" (Bette Greene), and "The Witch of Blackbird Pond" (Elizabeth George Speare). To complete the unit, all students will be required to read the Shakespeare play; however,…

  13. Blood meal analysis, flavivirus screening, and in!uence of meteorological variables on the dynamics of potential mosquito vectors of West Nile virus in northern Italy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roiz, David; Vazquez, Ana; Rosà, Roberto;

    2012-01-01

    . Analysis of blood meals showed that Culex pipiens fed mainly on blackbirds (Turdus merula) and house sparrows (Passer domesticus), while Culex hortensis fed strictly on lizards. The abundance of Cx. pipiens females correlated positively with mean temperature and negatively with rainfall (one to four weeks...

  14. The seroprevalence of avipoxvirus and its association with avian malaria (Plasmodium spp.) infection in introduced passerine birds in the southern regions of the North Island of New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, H J; Banda, M; Alley, M R; Howe, L; Gartrell, B D

    2013-03-01

    Blood samples were collected from 65 free-ranging birds from six species in the southern North Island of New Zealand. Sera from the birds were tested for the presence of avipoxvirus (APV) antibodies by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and blood cells from 55 birds were also tested for Plasmodium spp. by PCR. Forty-five birds (69.2%) tested seropositive to APV. Song thrushes (Turdus philomelos) presented the highest seroprevalence at 100% (4/4), followed by Eurasian blackbirds (Turdus merula) (96.86%, 31/32), chaffinches (Fringilla coelebs) (54.55%, 6/11), starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) (25%, 3/12), greenfinches (Carduelis chloris) (25%, 1/4), and European goldfinches (Carduelis carduelis) (0%, 0/2). Plasmodium spp. DNA was detected in 15/55 birds (27.3%), including 11 Eurasian blackbirds, one song thrush, and three starlings. Eight Eurasian blackbird isolates (73%) grouped within the subgenus Novyella. Two Eurasian blackbird isolates and the song thrush isolate clustered within a different group with previously reported lineages LINN1 and AFTRU5. In addition, all three starling isolates clustered within the well-characterized lineage Plasmodium (Huffia) elongatum GRW06. All Plasmodium-positive Eurasian blackbirds and the song thrush were seropositive to APV, whereas only 67% of Plasmodium-positive starlings showed evidence of previous exposure to APV. A significant relationship between birds seropositive to APV and birds infected by Plasmodium spp. was observed (chi2 = 5.69, df = 1, P = 0.0086). To the authors' knowledge this is the first report describing the seroprevalence of APV and its association with Plasmodium spp. infection in introduced bird species in New Zealand.

  15. Stellar model chromospheres. IV - The formation of the H-epsilon feature in the sun /G2 V/ and Arcturus /K2 III/

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, T. R.; Linsky, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    The formation of the Balmer-series member H-epsilon in the near-red wing of the Ca II H line is discussed for two cases: the sun (H-epsilon absorption profile) and Arcturus (H-epsilon emission profile). It is shown that although the H-epsilon source functions in both stars are dominated by the Balmer-continuum radiation field through photoionizations, the line-formation problems in the two stars are quantitatively different, owing to a substantial difference in the relative importance of the stellar chromosphere temperature inversion as compared with the stellar photosphere.

  16. ASSOCIATIONS OF MOLINIETALIA KOCH 1926 (MOLINIO-ARRHENATHERETEA R. Tx. 1937 IDENTIFIED IN NEAGRA BROSTENILOR BASIN (EASTERN CARPATHIANS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARDARI CONSTANTIN

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents eight vegetal communities (Junco-Molinietum coeruleae Preising in R. Tx. et Preising ex Klapp 1954, Calthetum laetae Krajina 1933, Scirpetum sylvatici Ralski 1931, Epilobio-Juncetum effusi Oberd. 1957, Cirsietum rivularis Nowinski 1928, Angelico-Cirsietum oleracei R. Tx. 1937, Filipendulo-Geranietum palustris W. Koch 1926, Deschampsietum caespitosae Hayek ex Horvatic 1930 from Molinietalia Koch 1926 (Molinio-Arrhenatheretea R. Tx. 1937 identified in Neagra Brostenilor hydrographic basin. These are analyzed from the chorology, floristic and phytosociological composition, bio-forms, floristic elements and ecological requests perspectives.

  17. ESTUDIO SOBRE PRODUCCION DE ORACIONES CON RAMIFICACION A LA IZQUIERDA Y A LA DERECHA EN ESPAÑOL

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCCIÓN La vejez es un estado de involución y no de enfermedad. Durante la involución senil, los órganos constitutivos del ser vivo se modifican y van sufriendo una regresión o atrofia en su estructura y sus funciones van experimentando una disminución. Estas modificaciones se manifiestan tanto en el plano físico como en el plano cognitivo. Según Juncos-Rabadán et al. (2006), el envejecimiento cognitivo es un proceso normal que tiene lugar a lo largo de los años y que produce un...

  18. Bibliografía y documentación citada

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    OBRAS GENERALES Abarca Junco, A. Derecho Internacional Privado, vol. i, Madrid, uned, 2004. Albaladejo García, M. Derecho civil, t. ii, Barcelona, Bosch, 2002. Arrubla Paucar, J. A. Contratos mercantiles, Medellín, Diké, 2009. Ascarelli, T. Teoría de la concurrencia y de los bienes inmateriales, E. Verdera y L. Suárez Llanos (trads.), Barcelona, Bosch, 1970. Ballarino, T. Diritto internazionale privato, 2.ª ed., Padova, Cedam, 1996. Bercovitz, A. Contratos mercantiles, Navarra, Aranzadi, 2001...

  19. Discovery of the Red-Skewed K-alpha Iron Line in Cyg X-2 with Suzaku

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaposhnikov, Nikolai; Titarchuk, Lev; Laurent, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    We report on the Suzaku observation of neutron star low-mass X-ray binary Cygnus X-2 which reveals strong iron K-alpha emission line. The line profile shows a prominent red wing extending down to 4 keV. This discovery increases the number of neutron star sources where red-skewed iron lines were observed and strongly suggests that this phenomenon is common not only in black holes but also in other types of compact objects. We examine the line profile by fitting it with the model which attributes its production to the relativistic effects due to disk reflection of X-ray radiation. We also apply an alternative model where the red wing is a result of down-scattering effect of the first order with respect to electron velocity in the wind outflow. Both models describe adequately the observed line profile. However, the X-ray variability in a state similar to that in the Suzaku observation which we establish by analysing RXTE observation favors the wind origin of the line formation.

  20. Narrow C IV absorption doublets on quasar spectra of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhi-Fu; Gu, Qiu-Sheng; Zhou, Luwenjia; Chen, Yan-Mei

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we extend our work of Papers I and II, which are assigned to systematically survey C IV λλ1548,1551 narrow absorption lines (NALs) with zabs ≪ zem on quasar spectra of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) to collect C IV NALs with zabs ≈ zem from blue to red wings of C IV λ1549 emission lines. Together with Papers I and II, we have collected a total number of 41 479 C IV NALs with 1.4544 ≤ zabs ≤ 4.9224 in surveyed spectral region redward of Lyα until red wing of C IV λ1549 emission line. We find that the stronger C IV NALs tend to be the more saturated absorptions, and associated systems (zabs ≈ zem) seem to have larger absorption strengths when compared to intervening ones (zabs ≪ zem). The redshift density evolution behaviour of absorbers (the number of absorbers per redshift path) is similar to the history of the cosmic star formation. When compared to the quasar-frame velocity (β) distribution of Mg II absorbers, the β distribution of C IV absorbers is broader at β ≈ 0, shows longer extended tail, and exhibits a larger dispersion for environmental absorptions. In addition, for associated C IV absorbers, we find that low-luminosity quasars seem to exhibit smaller β and stronger absorptions when compared to high-luminosity quasars.

  1. Narrow C IV absorption doublets on quasar spectra of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Zhi-fu, Chen; Luwenjia, Zhou; Yanmei, Chen

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we extend our works of Papers I and II, which are assigned to systematically survey \\CIVab\\ narrow absorption lines (NALs) with \\zabs$\\ll$\\zem\\ on quasar spectra of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), to collect \\CIV\\ NALs with \\zabs$\\approx$\\zem\\ from blue to red wings of \\CIVwave\\ emission lines. Together with Papers I and II, we have collected a total number of 41,479 \\CIV\\ NALs with $1.4544\\le$\\zabs$\\le4.9224$ in surveyed spectral region redward of \\lya\\ until red wing of \\CIVwave\\ emission line. We find that the stronger \\CIV\\ NALs tend to be the more saturated absorptions, and associated systems (\\zabs$\\approx$\\zem) seem to have larger absorption strengths when compared to intervening ones (\\zabs$\\ll$\\zem). The redshift density evolution behavior of absorbers (the number of absorbers per redshift path) is similar to the history of the cosmic star formation. When compared to the quasar-frame velocity ($\\beta$) distribution of \\MgII\\ absorbers, the $\\beta$ distribution of \\C...

  2. Effects of tannins on fruit selection in three southern African frugivorous birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zungu, Manqoba M; Downs, Colleen T

    2015-02-01

    Tannins are common secondary compounds in plant material and are known for their ability to bind to protein which reduces nitrogen availability in the diet. In fruits, these compounds are responsible for their astringency which is thought to result in reduced food intake. In this study, the repellent effects of tannins were examined in three species of frugivorous birds: red-winged starlings Onychognathus morio, speckled mousebirds Colius striatus and Cape white-eyes Zosterops virens. Birds were fed artificial fruit diets containing varying levels of tannins in paired choice tests with the amount of food eaten by birds used to determine preference. Red-winged starlings were attracted to the control diet, indifferent to the medium tannin diet and deterred by the high tannin diet whereas speckled mousebirds and Cape white-eyes were not deterred at all concentrations. The discrepancy in the results was attributed to differences in taste sensitivity, tolerance levels and detoxification mechanisms of secondary compounds between species. Because fruit selection and ultimately fruit removal rates affect plant community composition, the disparity in the results suggests that frugivorous birds do not contribute equally to plant community dynamics. However, plant secondary compounds in fruits are diverse and their effects are similarly diverse and there is potential that different groups of secondary compounds generate disparate effects. Similar studies on other types of secondary compounds may thus contribute towards a broader understanding of the role of secondary compounds in mediating fruit-frugivore interactions.

  3. The different origins of high- and low-ionization broad emission lines revealed by gravitational microlensing in the Einstein cross

    CERN Document Server

    Braibant, Lorraine; Sluse, Dominique; Anguita, Timo

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the kinematics and ionization structure of the broad emission line region of the gravitationally lensed quasar QSO2237+0305 (the Einstein cross) using differential microlensing in the high- and low-ionization broad emission lines. We combine visible and near-infrared spectra of the four images of the lensed quasar and detect a large-amplitude microlensing effect distorting the high-ionization CIV and low-ionization H$\\alpha$ line profiles in image A. While microlensing only magnifies the red wing of the Balmer line, it symmetrically magnifies the wings of the CIV emission line. Given that the same microlensing pattern magnifies both the high- and low-ionization broad emission line regions, these dissimilar distortions of the line profiles suggest that the high- and low-ionization regions are governed by different kinematics. Since this quasar is likely viewed at intermediate inclination, we argue that the differential magnification of the blue and red wings of H$\\alpha$ favors a flattened, viri...

  4. The different origins of high- and low-ionization broad emission lines revealed by gravitational microlensing in the Einstein cross

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braibant, L.; Hutsemékers, D.; Sluse, D.; Anguita, T.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the kinematics and ionization structure of the broad emission line region of the gravitationally lensed quasar QSO2237+0305 (the Einstein cross) using differential microlensing in the high- and low-ionization broad emission lines. We combine visible and near-infrared spectra of the four images of the lensed quasar and detect a large-amplitude microlensing effect distorting the high-ionization CIV and low-ionization Hα line profiles in image A. While microlensing only magnifies the red wing of the Balmer line, it symmetrically magnifies the wings of the CIV emission line. Given that the same microlensing pattern magnifies both the high- and low-ionization broad emission line regions, these dissimilar distortions of the line profiles suggest that the high- and low-ionization regions are governed by different kinematics. Since this quasar is likely viewed at intermediate inclination, we argue that the differential magnification of the blue and red wings of Hα favors a flattened, virialized, low-ionization region whereas the symmetric microlensing effect measured in CIV can be reproduced by an emission line formed in a polar wind, without the need of fine-tuned caustic configurations. Based on observations made with the ESO-VLT, Paranal, Chile; Proposals 076.B-0197 and 076.B-0607 (PI: Courbin).

  5. The curious time lags of PG 1244+026: Discovery of the iron K reverberation lag

    CERN Document Server

    Kara, E; Fabian, A C; Reynolds, C; Uttley, P

    2013-01-01

    High-frequency iron K reverberation lags, where the red wing of the line responds before the line centroid, are a robust signature of relativistic reflection off the inner accretion disc. In this letter, we report the discovery of the Fe K lag in PG 1244+026 from ~120 ks of data (1 orbit of the XMM-Newton telescope). The amplitude of the lag with respect to the continuum is 1000 s at a frequency of ~1e-4 Hz. We also find a possible frequency-dependence of the line: as we probe higher frequencies (i.e. shorter timescales from a smaller emitting region) the Fe K lag peaks at the red wing of the line, while at lower frequencies (from a larger emitting region) we see the dominant reflection lag from the rest frame line centroid. The mean energy spectrum shows a strong soft excess, though interestingly, there is no indication of a soft lag. Given that this source has radio emission and it has little reported correlated variability between the soft excess and the hard band, we explore one possible explanation in wh...

  6. Mg II Chromospheric Emission Line Bisectors Of HD39801 And Its Relation With The Activity Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    García García, Leonardo Enrique; Pérez Martínez, M. Isabel

    2016-07-01

    Betelgeuse is a cool star of spectral type M and luminosity class I. In the present work, the activity cycle of Betelgeuse was obtained from the integrated emission flux of the Mg II H and K lines, using more than 250 spectra taken from the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) online database. Of which it was found, based on a Lomb Scargle periodogram, a cycle of 16 years, along with 2 sub-cycles with a period of the order of 0.60 and 0.65 years, which may be due to turbulence or possible stellar flares. In addition, an analysis of line asymmetry was made by means of the chromospheric emission line bisectors, due to the strong self-absorption observed in this lines, the blue and red wings were analyzed independently. In order to measure such asymmetry, a "line shift" was calculated, from which several cycles of variability were obtained from a Lomb Scargle periodogram, spanning from few months to 4 years. In the sense, the most significant cycle is about 0.44 and 0.33 years in the blue and red wing respectively. It is worth noting, that the rotation period of the star doesn't play an important role in the variability of the Mg II lines. This technique provides us with a new way to study activity cycles of evolved stars.

  7. Habitat Equivalency Analysis: A Potential Tool for Estimating Environmental Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    subject to periodic anoxia (low oxygen conditions), which results in elimination of the benthic community. Raising the bottom will restore circulation...Mine Hazardous Waste Site in east-central Idaho (Chapman et al. 1998). The Blackbird site was mined for copper and cobalt for over 70 years and wastes...from the mine seriously contaminated 40 km (25 miles) of nearby Panther Creek, a tributary of the Salmon River. Water quality, benthic fauna, and

  8. Recovery of a mining-damaged stream ecosystem

    OpenAIRE

    Mebane, Christopher A.; Robert J. Eakins; Brian G. Fraser; William J. Adams

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This paper presents a 30+ year record of changes in benthic macroinvertebrate communities and fish populations associated with improving water quality in mining-influenced streams. Panther Creek, a tributary to the Salmon River in central Idaho, USA suffered intensive damage from mining and milling operations at the Blackbird Mine that released copper (Cu), arsenic (As), and cobalt (Co) into tributaries. From the 1960s through the 1980s, no fish and few aquatic invertebrates could be...

  9. Birds in Human Modified Environments and Bird Damage Control: Social, Economic, and Health Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-12-01

    Methiocarb has also been successfully used to reduce bird damage to fruit: sweet cherries (Guarino et al. 1973, 1974); sour cherries (Guarino et al...during the milk and dough stages of kernel development (Kelly and Dolbeer 1984, Avitrol label). Upon ingestion of 4-AP, blackbirds elicit strong distress...English sparrows Sweet Cherries Finches Sour Cherries Jays Grapes Orioles Robins Methiocarb birds Taste repellent (Registration Corn questionable

  10. Draft Environmental Impact Report/Environmental Impact Statement. Cullinan Ranch Specific Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-05-01

    represented. Even though 63% of the birds seen in the agricultural fields were flocking starlings , the large numbers of birds indicate a need for...warbler Starling (Most abundant species) Ruby-crowned kingletSavannah sparrow American robin Western meadowlark Barn owl Brewer’s blackbird Great horned owl...tanks should be painted a light blue grey or blue-green color to reflect water, sky or vegetation colors. Fast growing evergreen trees should be planted

  11. Phylogenetic characterization and virulence of two Newcastle disease viruses isolated from wild birds in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haijin; Zhang, Peng; Wu, Pengpeng; Chen, Shengli; Mu, Guohui; Duan, Xuji; Hao, Huafang; Du, Enqi; Wang, Xinglong; Yang, Zengqi

    2013-12-01

    Wild birds are considered as a natural reservoir of Newcastle disease virus (NDV). However, there is no information about genotype IX NDV from wild birds, especially from Columbiformes. In this study, two genotype IX NDV viruses were isolated from wild birds. One was from Eurasian Blackbird, while the other was from Spotted-necked dove. After purification by plaque technique, complete genomes of both viruses were sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis of partial fusion (F) gene and complete genome indicated both strains belonged to genotype IX. Based on intracerebral pathogenicity index (ICPI), the virus from Eurasian Blackbird was velogenic virus, while the strain from Spotted-necked dove was lentogenic virus. However, both strains showed one of velogenic cleavage sites. In addition, the strain from Eurasian Blackbird showed greater replication ability and generated larger fusion foci in vitro than that of strain from Spotted-necked dove. Comparing all the corresponding protein sequences of both strains, there were only 9 different amino acid residues between them. Furthermore, after analysis of these differences, the information about lentogenic NDV with multi-basic cleavage site was presented.

  12. Transmission of avian influenza A viruses among species in an artificial barnyard.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenna E Achenbach

    Full Text Available Waterfowl and shorebirds harbor and shed all hemagglutinin and neuraminidase subtypes of influenza A viruses and interact in nature with a broad range of other avian and mammalian species to which they might transmit such viruses. Estimating the efficiency and importance of such cross-species transmission using epidemiological approaches is difficult. We therefore addressed this question by studying transmission of low pathogenic H5 and H7 viruses from infected ducks to other common animals in a quasi-natural laboratory environment designed to mimic a common barnyard. Mallards (Anas platyrhynchos recently infected with H5N2 or H7N3 viruses were introduced into a room housing other mallards plus chickens, blackbirds, rats and pigeons, and transmission was assessed by monitoring virus shedding (ducks or seroconversion (other species over the following 4 weeks. Additional animals of each species were directly inoculated with virus to characterize the effect of a known exposure. In both barnyard experiments, virus accumulated to high titers in the shared water pool. The H5N2 virus was transmitted from infected ducks to other ducks and chickens in the room either directly or through environmental contamination, but not to rats or blackbirds. Ducks infected with the H7N2 virus transmitted directly or indirectly to all other species present. Chickens and blackbirds directly inoculated with these viruses shed significant amounts of virus and seroconverted; rats and pigeons developed antiviral antibodies, but, except for one pigeon, failed to shed virus.

  13. Costs and benefits of competitive traits in females: aggression, maternal care and reproductive success.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristal E Cain

    Full Text Available Recent research has shown that female expression of competitive traits can be advantageous, providing greater access to limited reproductive resources. In males increased competitive trait expression often comes at a cost, e.g. trading off with parental effort. However, it is currently unclear whether, and to what extent, females also face such tradeoffs, whether the costs associated with that tradeoff overwhelm the potential benefits of resource acquisition, and how environmental factors might alter those relationships. To address this gap, we examine the relationships between aggression, maternal effort, offspring quality and reproductive success in a common songbird, the dark-eyed junco (Junco hyemalis, over two breeding seasons. We found that compared to less aggressive females, more aggressive females spent less time brooding nestlings, but fed nestlings more frequently. In the year with better breeding conditions, more aggressive females produced smaller eggs and lighter hatchlings, but in the year with poorer breeding conditions they produced larger eggs and achieved greater nest success. There was no relationship between aggression and nestling mass after hatch day in either year. These findings suggest that though females appear to tradeoff competitive ability with some forms of maternal care, the costs may be less than previously thought. Further, the observed year effects suggest that costs and benefits vary according to environmental variables, which may help to account for variation in the level of trait expression.

  14. Costs and benefits of competitive traits in females: aggression, maternal care and reproductive success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Kristal E; Ketterson, Ellen D

    2013-01-01

    Recent research has shown that female expression of competitive traits can be advantageous, providing greater access to limited reproductive resources. In males increased competitive trait expression often comes at a cost, e.g. trading off with parental effort. However, it is currently unclear whether, and to what extent, females also face such tradeoffs, whether the costs associated with that tradeoff overwhelm the potential benefits of resource acquisition, and how environmental factors might alter those relationships. To address this gap, we examine the relationships between aggression, maternal effort, offspring quality and reproductive success in a common songbird, the dark-eyed junco (Junco hyemalis), over two breeding seasons. We found that compared to less aggressive females, more aggressive females spent less time brooding nestlings, but fed nestlings more frequently. In the year with better breeding conditions, more aggressive females produced smaller eggs and lighter hatchlings, but in the year with poorer breeding conditions they produced larger eggs and achieved greater nest success. There was no relationship between aggression and nestling mass after hatch day in either year. These findings suggest that though females appear to tradeoff competitive ability with some forms of maternal care, the costs may be less than previously thought. Further, the observed year effects suggest that costs and benefits vary according to environmental variables, which may help to account for variation in the level of trait expression.

  15. Estimation of avian population sizes and species richness across a boreal landscape in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handel, C.M.; Swanson, S.A.; Nigro, Debora A.; Matsuoka, S.M.

    2009-01-01

    We studied the distribution of birds breeding within five ecological landforms in Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve, a 10,194-km2 roadless conservation unit on the Alaska-Canada border in the boreal forest zone. Passerines dominated the avifauna numerically, comprising 97% of individuals surveyed but less than half of the 115 species recorded in the Preserve. We used distance-sampling and discrete-removal models to estimate detection probabilities, densities, and population sizes across the Preserve for 23 species of migrant passerines and five species of resident passerines. Yellow-rumped Warblers (Dendroica coronata) and Dark-eyed Juncos (Junco hyemalis) were the most abundant species, together accounting for 41% of the migrant passerine populations estimated. White-winged Crossbills (Loxia leucoptera), Boreal Chickadees (Poecile hudsonica), and Gray Jays (Perisoreus canadensis) were the most abundant residents. Species richness was greatest in the Floodplain/Terrace landform flanking the Yukon River but densities were highest in the Subalpine landform. Species composition was related to past glacial history and current physiography of the region and differed notably from other areas of the northwestern boreal forest. Point-transect surveys, augmented with auxiliary observations, were well suited to sampling the largely passerine avifauna across this rugged landscape and could be used across the boreal forest region to monitor changes in northern bird distribution and abundance. ?? 2009 The Wilson Ornithological Society.

  16. Mates of Competitive Females: The Relationships between Female Aggression, Mate Quality, and Parental Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristal E. Cain

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Though rarely mate-limited, females in a wide variety of species express traits commonly associated with mate competition in males. Recent research has shown that these competitive traits (ornaments, armaments, and intense aggression often function in the context of female-female competition for nonsexual reproductive resources and are often positively related to reproductive success. Increased success could occur because competitive females acquire limited ecological resources (nest sites, territories, etc. or because they pair with high quality males, that is, older, more ornamented, or more parental males. Further, males paired with aggressive/low care females may compensate by increasing their paternal efforts. Here, I examined patterns of social pairing and parental care in free-living dark-eyed juncos (Junco hyemalis, a biparental songbird. I found no detectable relationship between female competitive behavior (aggression and male quality (age, size, or ornamentation or male provisioning. Thus, neither of the mate choice hypotheses (females compete for males or males prefer aggressive females was supported. Instead, these results suggest that females compete for nonsexual resources and mate quality is a secondary consideration. I also found a negative relationship between male and female provisioning rates, suggesting that partners adjust their level of parental effort in response to their partner’s efforts.

  17. Insecticide resistance of adults and nymphs of Asian citrus psyllid populations from Apatzingán Valley, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo, Saúl; Martínez, Ana M; Figueroa, José I; Chavarrieta, Juan M; Viñuela, Elisa; Rebollar-Alviter, Ángel; Miranda, Mario A; Valle, Javier; Pineda, Samuel

    2017-07-18

    Control of the Asian citrus psyllid Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, the most important pest of citrus worldwide, is based on the use of insecticides, though unsatisfactory results have recently been reported. In this study, insecticide resistance of D. citri to three insecticides (bifenthrin, malathion, and chlorpyrifos) was examined. Three populations (designated Dci-CParácuaro, Dci-El Junco, and Dci-Antúnez) of both adults and fourth-instar D. citri individuals were collected in 2014 at two different times and on one occasion, respectively, from three locations (Crucero de Parácuaro, El Junco, and Antúnez). These locations represent the major commercial Mexican lemon production areas in the Apatzingán Valley in the state of Michoacán, Mexico. The three populations of D. citri adults and fourth-instar nymphs at the different collection times showed low levels of resistance (≤7-fold) to bifenthrin, but were very resistant to malathion (≤345- and ≤432-fold for adults and fourth instars, respectively) and chlorpyrifos (≤2435- and ≤1424-fold for adults and fourth instars, respectively). Resistance levels to the tested insecticides were highly variable but homogeneous among seasons and localities. Resistance management programmes that include crop sanitation, use of biological and cultural control practices, and rotation of insecticide classes should be established, particularly in areas where D. citri has developed resistance to malathion and chlorpyrifos. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. Adaptive introgression across species boundaries in Heliconius butterflies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Pardo-Diaz

    Full Text Available It is widely documented that hybridisation occurs between many closely related species, but the importance of introgression in adaptive evolution remains unclear, especially in animals. Here, we have examined the role of introgressive hybridisation in transferring adaptations between mimetic Heliconius butterflies, taking advantage of the recent identification of a gene regulating red wing patterns in this genus. By sequencing regions both linked and unlinked to the red colour locus, we found a region that displays an almost perfect genotype by phenotype association across four species, H. melpomene, H. cydno, H. timareta, and H. heurippa. This particular segment is located 70 kb downstream of the red colour specification gene optix, and coalescent analysis indicates repeated introgression of adaptive alleles from H. melpomene into the H. cydno species clade. Our analytical methods complement recent genome scale data for the same region and suggest adaptive introgression has a crucial role in generating adaptive wing colour diversity in this group of butterflies.

  19. High Cadence Observations and Analysis of Spicular-type Events Using CRISP Onboard SST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetye, J.; Doyle, J. G.; Scullion, E.; Nelson, C. J.; Kuridze, D.

    2016-04-01

    We present spectroscopic and imaging observations of apparent ultra-fast spicule-like features observed with CRisp Imaging SpectroPolarimeter (CRISP) at the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope (SST). The data shows spicules with an apparent velocity above 500 km s-1, very short lifetimes of up to 20 s and length/height around 3500 km. The spicules are seen as dark absorption structures in the Hα wings ±516 mÅ, ±774 mÅ and ±1032 mÅ which suddenly appear and disappear from the FOV. These features show a time delay in their appearance in the blue and red wings by 3-5 s. We suggest that their appearance/disappearance is due to their Doppler motion in and out of the 60 mÅ filter. See Fig. 1 for the evolution of the event at two line positions.

  20. Simple theory of diffuse structure in continuous ultraviolet spectra of polyatomic molecules. III- Application to the Wulf-Chappuis band system of ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braunstein, M.; Pack, R. T.

    1992-05-01

    A simple model for the photodissociation absorption spectra of bent symmetric triatomic molecules to the Wulf-Chappuis band system of ozone (10,000-22,000/cm) is applied to assign the electronic states and the diffuse vibrational bands involved. The conical intersection between the two lowest 1A-double prime states is treated in an approximate way, and the role of the lowest excited triplet states is explored. The results indicate that the Wulf band is probably due to the 3A2 state of ozone which gains intensity through spin-orbit coupling. The 1 1A-double prime (1A2) state gives rise to the featureless red wing of the Chappuis band. Most of the structure in the Chappuis band is reproduced in the model and is due to the 2 1A-double prime (1B1) state as was previously supposed.

  1. Gas stream in Algol. [mass transfer in binary star systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cugier, H.; Chen, K.-Y.

    1977-01-01

    Additional absorption features in the red wings of the Mg II resonance lines near 2800 A are found in observations of Algol made from the Copernicus satellite. The absorption features were clearly seen only during a part of the primary eclipse, in the phase interval 0.90-0.03. The observations are interpreted as being produced by a stream of matter flowing from Algol B in the direction of Algol A. The measured Doppler shifts of the features give the value of 150 km/s as the characteristic velocity of matter in the stream. The mass transfer connected with the stream is estimated to be of the order of 10 to the -13th power solar mass per year.

  2. optix drives the repeated convergent evolution of butterfly wing pattern mimicry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Robert D; Papa, Riccardo; Martin, Arnaud; Hines, Heather M; Counterman, Brian A; Pardo-Diaz, Carolina; Jiggins, Chris D; Chamberlain, Nicola L; Kronforst, Marcus R; Chen, Rui; Halder, Georg; Nijhout, H Frederik; McMillan, W Owen

    2011-08-26

    Mimicry--whereby warning signals in different species evolve to look similar--has long served as a paradigm of convergent evolution. Little is known, however, about the genes that underlie the evolution of mimetic phenotypes or to what extent the same or different genes drive such convergence. Here, we characterize one of the major genes responsible for mimetic wing pattern evolution in Heliconius butterflies. Mapping, gene expression, and population genetic work all identify a single gene, optix, that controls extreme red wing pattern variation across multiple species of Heliconius. Our results show that the cis-regulatory evolution of a single transcription factor can repeatedly drive the convergent evolution of complex color patterns in distantly related species, thus blurring the distinction between convergence and homology.

  3. Multiwavelength Analysis of Network Bright Points - Coordinated Observations SOHO-GBO JOP No 37

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falchi, A.; Cauzzi, G.; Falciani, R.; Vial, J.-C.

    1999-09-01

    We analyze the temporal behaviour of Network Bright Points (NBPs) using a set of data acquired during coordinated observations between ground based observatories (mainly at the NSO/Sacramento Peak) and the SUMER and MDI instruments onboard SOHO. We find that, at any time, all NBPs present in the NaD_2 images are co-spatial within 1" with locations of enhanced magnetic field density, and that not all the NBPs identified in the low chromosphere can be identified at higher levels. We calculate the intensity power spectrum for each NBP in several low-chromospheric signatures, such as the red wing of Hα, NaD_2 and Hα line center. The power spectra show no power at the 5.5 mHz frequency, while they display an enhancement at frequencies below 2 mHz, corresponding to periods between 8 and 20 minutes.

  4. Synthetic line and continuum linear-polarisation signatures of axisymmetric type II supernova ejecta

    CERN Document Server

    Dessart, Luc

    2011-01-01

    We present synthetic single-line and continuum linear-polarisation signatures due to electron scattering in axially-symmetric Type II supernovae (SNe) which we calculate using a Monte Carlo and a long-characteristic radiative-transfer code. Aspherical ejecta are produced by prescribing a latitudinal scaling or stretching of SN ejecta inputs obtained from 1-D non-LTE time-dependent calculations. We study polarisation signatures as a function of inclination, shape factor, wavelength, line identity, post-explosion time. At early times, cancellation and optical-depth effects make the polarisation intrinsically low, causing complicated sign reversals with inclination or continuum wavelength, and across line profiles. While the line polarisation is positive (negative) for an oblate (prolate) morphology at the peak and in the red wing, the continuum polarisation may be of any sign. These complex polarisation variations are produced not just by the asymmetric distribution of scatterers but also of the flux. Our early...

  5. Radiative emission of solar features in Ca II K

    CERN Document Server

    Criscuoli, S; Fontenla, J; Giorgi, F; Rast, M; Solanki, S; Uitenbroek, H

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the radiative emission of different types of solar features in the spectral range of the Ca II K line. We analyzed full-disk 2k x 2k observations from the PSPT Precision Solar Photometric Telescope. The data were obtained by using three narrow-band interference filters that sample the Ca II K line with different pass bands. Two filters are centered in the line core, the other in the red wing of the line. We measured the intensity and contrast of various solar features, specifically quiet Sun (inter-network), network, enhanced network, plage, and bright plage (facula) regions. Moreover, we compared the results obtained with those derived from the numerical synthesis performed for the three PSPT filters with a widely used radiative code on a set of reference semi-empirical atmosphere models.

  6. On the origin of reverse polarity patches found by Hinode in sunspot penumbrae

    CERN Document Server

    Almeida, J Sanchez

    2009-01-01

    The satellite Hinode has recently revealed penumbral structures with a magnetic polarity opposite to the main sunspot polarity. They may be a direct confirmation of magnetic field lines and mass flows returning to the solar interior throughout the penumbra, a configuration previously inferred from interpretation of observed Stokes profile asymmetries. The paper points out the relationship between the reverse polarity features found by Hinode, and the model Micro-Structured Magnetic Atmospheres (MISMAs) proposed for sunspots. We show how the existing model MISMAs produce strongly redshifted reverse polarity structures as found by Hinode. Ad hoc model MISMAs also explain the asymmetric Stokes profiles observed by Hinode. The same modeling may be consistent with magnetograms of dark cored penumbral filaments if the dark cores are associated with the reverse polarity. Such hypothetical relationship will show up only in the far red wings of the spectral lines.

  7. Experimental fine-structure branching ratios for Na-rare-gas optical collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Havey, M.D.; Delahanty, F.T.; Vahala, L.L.; Copeland, G.E.

    1986-10-01

    Experimental ratios for branching into the fine-structure levels of the Na 3p multiplet, as a consequence of an optical collision with He, Ne, Ar, Kr, or Xe, are reported. The process studied is Na(3s /sup 2/S/sub 1/2/)+scrR+nh..nu -->..Na(3p /sup 2/P/sub j/)+scrR+(n-1)h..nu.., where scrR represents a rare-gas atom and where the laser frequency ..nu.. is tuned in the wings of the Na resonance transitions. The branching ratios are defined as I(D1)/I(D2) where I(D1) and I(D2) are measured intensities of the atomic Na D1 and D2 lines. The ratios are determined for detunings ranging from about 650 cm/sup -1/ in the blue wing to 170 cm/sup -1/ in the red wing of the Na 3p multiplet. The branching is found to be strongly detuning dependent in the vicinity of the NaAr, NaKr, and NaXe near-red-wing satellites. The blue-wing branching ratios show a detuning-dependent approach to a recoil, or sudden statistical, limit of 0.5, irrespective of the rare gas. Fine-structure changing cross sections have also been measured for resonant excitation of the Na 3p /sup 2/P/sub j/ state; the results are consistent with cross sections obtained from wing excitation.

  8. “Las relaciones masónicas entre Asturias e Hispanoamérica en los siglos XIX y XX. Estado de la cuestión”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yván Pozuelo Andrés

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available La emigración asturiana se traslado de forma numerosa a los territorios hispanoameri canos durante el siglo XIX y XX. Se emprende a través de este primer estudio el camino para averiguar todo lo relacionado entre masonerías y asturianos tanto desde el Principado como de los países latinoamericanos. Se contempla las dificultades de dicho proyecto y un estado de la cuestión. Se incluyen las reseñas biográficas de Rafael Calzada, Juan Pablo García Álvarez, Augusto Barcia Trelles, Manuel Fernández Juncos y José Victory.

  9. Next-generation sequencing reveals phylogeographic structure and a species tree for recent bird divergences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McCormack, John E.; Maley, James M.; Hird, Sarah M.

    2012-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies are revolutionizing many biological disciplines but have been slow to take root in phylogeography. This is partly due to the difficulty of using NGS to sequence orthologous DNA fragments for many individuals at low cost. We explore cases of recent...... divergence in four phylogenetically diverse avian systems using a method for quick and cost-effective generation of primary DNA sequence data using pyrosequencing. NGS data were processed using an analytical pipeline that reduces many reads into two called alleles per locus per individual. Using single...... nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) mined from the loci, we detected population differentiation in each of the four bird systems, including: a case of ecological speciation in rails (Rallus); a rapid postglacial radiation in the genus Junco; recent in situ speciation among hummingbirds (Trochilus) in Jamaica...

  10. Contribuição para o conhecimento das comunidades anfíbias no sul de Portugal Contributions to the knowledge of the amphibian communities in the South of Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marízia Menezes Dias Pereira

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available As comunidades anfíbias pioneiras da bacia hidrográfica do Rio Sado (Setor Mariânico-Monchiquense, Subprovíncia Luso-Extremadurense e Setor Ribatagano-Sadense, Subprovíncia Sadense-Divisório Portuguesa foram objeto do presente estudo. Destacando-se a composição florística de cada fitocenose, bem como os dados referentes à sua ecologia, corologia e sintaxonomia, são apresentadas as principais comunidades vegetais anfíbias identificadas: Junco capitati-Isoetetum hystricis Braun-Blanquet 1936, Junco pygmaei-Isoetetum velati Rivas Goday 1956, Periballio laevis-Illecebretum verticillati Rivas Goday 1954, Loto subbiflori-Chaetopogonetum fasciculati Rivas-Martínez & Costa in Rivas-Martínez, Costa, Castroviejo & E. Valdés 1980, Hyperico elodis-Rhynchosporetum rugosae Neto, Capelo, J.C. Costa & Lousã in Neto 1997, Anagallido tenellae-Juncetum bulbosi Braun-Blanquet 1967, Utriculario exoletae-Sphagnetum auriculati Neto, Capelo, J.C. Costa & Lousã 1996 e Cirsio palustris-Juncetum rugosi Neto, Capelo, J.C. Costa & Lousã 1996. Este estudo mostrou que essas comunidades vegetais são, em sua maioria, relictos, com áreas de distribuição restritas e encontram-se fortemente pressionadas pela crescente ação antrópica e pelas alterações climáticas. Embora com características claramente atlânticas, foram sendo invadidas por espécies mediterrânicas, cujo domínio foi progressivamente aumentando desde o período Atlântico (7800-5700 B.P., durante o qual se verificou o seu ótimo.The pioneer amphibian communities of the Sado river basin (Marianic-Monchiquensean Sector, Lusitan-Extremadurean and Subprovince Ribatagan-Sadensean Sector, Sadensean-Divinding Portuguese Subprovince were subject of the present study. The main plant communities were identified (Junco capitati-Isoetetum hystricis Braun-Blanquet 1936, Junco pygmaei-Isoetetum velati Rivas Goday 1956, Periballio laevis-Illecebretum verticillati Rivas Goday 1954, Loto subbiflori

  11. 3 mega-pixel InSb detector with 10μm pitch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershon, G.; Albo, A.; Eylon, M.; Cohen, O.; Calahorra, Z.; Brumer, M.; Nitzani, M.; Avnon, E.; Aghion, Y.; Kogan, I.; Ilan, E.; Shkedy, L.

    2013-06-01

    SCD has developed a new 1920x1536 / 10 μm digital Infrared detector for the MWIR window named Blackbird. The Blackbird detector features a Focal Plane Array (FPA) that incorporates two technological building blocks developed over the past few years. The first one is a 10 μm InSb pixel based on the matured planar technology. The second building block is an innovative 10 μm ReadOut Integrated Circuit (ROIC) pixel. The InSb and the ROIC arrays are connected using Flip-Chip technology by means of indium bumps. The digital ROIC consists a matrix of 1920x1536 pixels and has an analog to digital (A/D) converter per-channel (total of 1920x2 A/Ds). It allows for full frame readout at a high frame rate of up to 120 Hz. Such an on-chip A/D conversion eliminates the need for several A/D converters with fairly high power consumption at the system level. The ROIC power consumption at maximum bandwidth is less than 400 mW. It features a wide range of pixel-level functionality such as several conversion gain options and a 2x2 pixel binning. The ROIC design makes use of the advanced and matured CMOS technology, 0.18 μm, which allows for high functionality and relatively low power consumption. The FPA is mounted on a Cold-Finger by a specially designed ceramic substrate. The whole assembly is housed in a stiffened Dewar that withstands harsh environmental conditions while minimizing the environment heat load contribution to the heat load of the detector. The design enables a 3-megapixel detector with overall low size, weight, and power (SWaP) with respect to comparable large format detectors. In this work we present in detail the characteristic performance of the new Blackbird detector.

  12. Postglacial population expansion drives the evolution of long-distance migration in a songbird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milá, Borja; Smith, Thomas B; Wayne, Robert K

    2006-11-01

    The evolution of long-distance migratory behavior from sedentary populations is a central problem in studies of animal migration. Three crucial issues that remain unresolved are: (1) the biotic and abiotic factors promoting evolution of migratory behavior, (2) the geographic origin of ancestral sedentary populations, and (3) the time scale over which migration evolves. We test the role of postglacial population expansions during the Quaternary in driving the evolution of songbird migration against prevailing views favoring the role of intraspecific competition. In contrast to previous attempts to investigate these questions using interspecific phylogenies, we adopt an intraspecific approach and examine the phylogeography of a North American songbird, the chipping sparrow (Spizella passerina), which exhibits both long-distance migratory behavior in temperate North America and sedentary behavior in Mexico and Central America. We show that migratory populations descend from sedentary populations in southern Mexico and that migration has evolved as a result of a northward population expansion into temperate North America since the last glacial maximum 18,000 years ago. Migration appears to have evolved rapidly in some species as populations colonized areas of high seasonality in the temperate zone. The phylogeography of the yellow-eyed junco (Junco phaeonotus), a strictly sedentary species, provides a null model supporting the view that northward range expansions were driven solely by environmental factors and not by a predisposition to evolve migratory behavior. These results provide the strongest evidence to date that historical climate patterns can drive the rapid evolution of avian migration in natural populations, and they suggest a general mechanism for the repeated evolution of migration within and across bird lineages.

  13. Breeding Dispersal by Birds in a Dynamic Urban Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzluff, John M.; DeLap, Jack H.; Oleyar, M. David; Whittaker, Kara A.; Gardner, Beth

    2016-01-01

    Changes in land cover during urbanization profoundly affect the diversity of bird communities, but the demographic mechanisms affecting diversity are poorly known. We advance such understanding by documenting how urbanization influences breeding dispersal—the annual movement of territorial adults—of six songbird species in the Seattle, WA, USA metropolitan area. We color-banded adults and mapped the centers of their annual breeding activities from 2000–2010 to obtain 504 consecutive movements by 337 adults. By comparing movements, annual reproduction, and mate fidelity among 10 developed, 5 reserved, and 11 changing (areas cleared and developed during our study) landscapes, we determined that adaptive breeding dispersal of sensitive forest species (Swainson’s Thrush and Pacific wren), which involves shifting territory and mate after reproductive failure, was constrained by development. In changing lands, sensitive forest specialists dispersed from active development to nearby forested areas, but in so doing suffered low annual reproduction. Species tolerant of suburban lands (song sparrow, spotted towhee, dark-eyed junco, and Bewick’s wren) dispersed adaptively in changing landscapes. Site fidelity ranged from 0% (Pacific wren in changing landscape) to 83% (Bewick’s wren in forest reserve). Mate fidelity ranged from 25% (dark-eyed junco) to 100% (Bewick’s wren). Variation in fidelity to mate and territory was consistent with theories positing an influence of territory quality, asynchronous return from migration, prior productivity, and reproductive benefits of retaining a familiar territory. Costly breeding dispersal, as well as reduced reproductive success and lowered survival cause some birds to decline in the face of urbanization. In contrast, the ability of species that utilize edges and early successional habitats to breed successfully, disperse to improve reproductive success after failure, and survive throughout the urban ecosystem enables them

  14. Conjunction error rates on a continuous recognition memory test: little evidence for recollection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Todd C; Atchley, Paul

    2002-03-01

    Two experiments examined conjunction memory errors on a continuous recognition task where the lag between parent words (e.g., blackmail, jailbird) and later conjunction lures (blackbird) was manipulated. In Experiment 1, contrary to expectations, the conjunction error rate was highest at the shortest lag (1 word) and decreased as the lag increased. In Experiment 2 the conjunction error rate increased significantly from a 0- to a 1-word lag, then decreased slightly from a 1- to a 5-word lag. The results provide mixed support for simple familiarity and dual-process accounts of recognition. Paradoxically, searching for an item in memory does not appear to be a good encoding task.

  15. 10μm pitch family of InSb and XBn detectors for MWIR imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershon, G.; Avnon, E.; Brumer, M.; Freiman, W.; Karni, Y.; Niderman, T.; Ofer, O.; Rosenstock, T.; Seref, D.; Shiloah, N.; Shkedy, L.; Tessler, R.; Shtrichman, I.

    2017-02-01

    There has been a growing demand over the past few years for infrared detectors with a smaller pixel dimension. On the one hand, this trend of pixel shrinkage enables the overall size of a given Focal Plan Array (FPA) to be reduced, allowing the production of more compact, lower power, and lower cost electro-optical (EO) systems. On the other hand, it enables a higher image resolution for a given FPA area, which is especially suitable in infrared systems with a large format that are used with a wide Field of View (FOV). In response to these market trends SCD has developed the Blackbird family of 10 μm pitch MWIR digital infrared detectors. The Blackbird family is based on three different Read- Out Integrated Circuit (ROIC) formats: 1920×1536, 1280×1024 and 640×512, which exploit advanced and mature 0.18 μm CMOS technology and exhibit high functionality with relatively low power consumption. Two types of 10 μm pixel sensing arrays are supported. The first is an InSb photodiode array based on SCD's mature planar implanted p-n junction technology, which covers the full MWIR band, and is designed to operate at 77K. The second type of sensing array covers the blue part of the MWIR band and uses the patented XBn-InAsSb barrier detector technology that provides electro-optical performance equivalent to planar InSb but at operating temperatures as high as 150 K. The XBn detector is therefore ideal for low Size, Weight and Power (SWaP) applications. Both sensing arrays, InSb and XBn, are Flip-chip bonded to the ROICs and assembled into custom designed Dewars that can withstand harsh environmental conditions while minimizing the detector heat load. A dedicated proximity electronics board provides power supplies and timing to the ROIC and enables communication and video output to the system. Together with a wide range of cryogenic coolers, a high flexibility of housing designs and various modes of operation, the Blackbird family of detectors presents solutions for EO

  16. Estimating Bird / Aircraft Collision Probabilities and Risk Utilizing Spatial Poisson Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-10

    the “big sky , little plane” theory and as such, there are extensive mitigation and alert/advisory models and systems in place throughout the world to...16 Coyote 15 17 6 15 20 American Kestrel 16 10 16 16 14 Shorebirds 17 19 14 17 12 Crows - Ravens 18 16 15 18 12 Blackbirds - Starl ing 19 18 18 19 9...Date Time Zone Species ID Number Observed Habitat Behavior Observation Method 10/2/2011 08:29:31 Airfield Canada Geese 16 Sky Overfl ight Visua l 10

  17. Inefficient co-feeding transmission of Borrelia afzelii in two common European songbirds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heylen, Dieter J. A.; Sprong, Hein; Krawczyk, Aleksandra; Van Houtte, Natalie; Genné, Dolores; Gomez-Chamorro, Andrea; van Oers, Kees; Voordouw, Maarten J.

    2017-01-01

    The spirochete bacterium Borrelia afzelii is the most common cause of Lyme borreliosis in Europe. This tick-borne pathogen can establish systemic infections in rodents but not in birds. However, several field studies have recovered larval Ixodes ricinus ticks infected with B. afzelii from songbirds suggesting successful transmission of B. afzelii. We reviewed the literature to determine which songbird species were the most frequent carriers of B. afzelii-infected I. ricinus larvae and nymphs. We tested experimentally whether B. afzelii is capable of co-feeding transmission on two common European bird species, the blackbird (Turdus merula) and the great tit (Parus major). For each bird species, four naïve individuals were infested with B. afzelii-infected I. ricinus nymphal ticks and pathogen-free larval ticks. None of the co-feeding larvae tested positive for B. afzelii in blackbirds, but a low percentage of infected larvae (3.33%) was observed in great tits. Transstadial transmission of B. afzelii DNA from the engorged nymphs to the adult ticks was observed in both bird species. However, BSK culture found that these spirochetes were not viable. Our study suggests that co-feeding transmission of B. afzelii is not efficient in these two songbird species. PMID:28054584

  18. Shrinkage and growth compensation in common sunflowers: refining estimates of damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedgwick, James A.; Oldemeye, John L.; Swenson, Elizabeth L.

    1986-01-01

    Shrinkage and growth compensation of artificially damaged common sunflowers (Helianthus annuus) were studied in central North Dakota during 1981-1982 in an effort to increase accuracy of estimates of blackbird damage to sunflowers. In both years, as plants matured damaged areas on seedheads shrank at a greater rate than the sunflower heads themselves. This differential shrinkage resulted in an underestimation of the area damaged. Sunflower head and damaged-area shrinkage varied widely by time and degree of damage and by size of the seedhead damaged. Because variation in shrinkage by time of damage was so large, predicting when blackbird damage occurs may be the most important factor in estimating seed loss. Yield'occupied seed area was greater (P < 0.05) for damaged than undamaged heads and tended to increase as degree of damage inflicted increased, indicating growth compensation was occurring in response to lost seeds. Yields of undamaged seeds in seedheads damaged during early seed development were higher than those of heads damaged later. This suggested that there was a period of maximal response to damage when plants were best able to redirect growth to seeds remaining in the head. Sunflowers appear to be able to compensate for damage of ≤ 15% of the total hear area. Estimates of damage can be improved by applying empirical results of differential shrinkage and growth compensations.

  19. Sulfur, carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen isotope geochemistry of the Idaho cobalt belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Craig A.; Bookstrom, Arthur A.; Slack, John F.

    2012-01-01

    Cobalt-copper ± gold deposits of the Idaho cobalt belt, including the deposits of the Blackbird district, have been analyzed for their sulfur, carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen isotope compositions to improve the understanding of ore formation. Previous genetic hypotheses have ranged widely, linking the ores to the sedimentary or diagenetic history of the host Mesoproterozoic sedimentary rocks, to Mesoproterozoic or Cretaceous magmatism, or to metamorphic shearing. The δ34S values are nearly uniform throughout the Blackbird dis- trict, with a mean value for cobaltite (CoAsS, the main cobalt mineral) of 8.0 ± 0.4‰ (n = 19). The data suggest that (1) sulfur was derived at least partly from sedimentary sources, (2) redox reactions involving sulfur were probably unimportant for ore deposition, and (3) the sulfur was probably transported to sites of ore for- mation as H2S. Hydrogen and oxygen isotope compositions of the ore-forming fluid, which are calculated from analyses of biotite-rich wall rocks and tourmaline, do not uniquely identify the source of the fluid; plausible sources include formation waters, metamorphic waters, and mixtures of magmatic and isotopically heavy meteoric waters. The calculated compositions are a poor match for the modified seawaters that form vol- canogenic massive sulfide (VMS) deposits. Carbon and oxygen isotope compositions of siderite, a mineral that is widespread, although sparse, at Blackbird, suggest formation from mixtures of sedimentary organic carbon and magmatic-metamorphic carbon. The isotopic compositions of calcite in alkaline dike rocks of uncertain age are consistent with a magmatic origin. Several lines of evidence suggest that siderite postdated the emplacement of cobalt and copper, so its significance for the ore-forming event is uncertain. From the stable isotope perspective, the mineral deposits of the Idaho cobalt belt contrast with typical VMS and sedimentary exhalative deposits. They show characteristics of deposit

  20. Potential Sensitivity of Québec's Breeding Birds to Climate Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Luc DesGranges

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We examined the relationship between climatic factors and the distribution of breeding birds in southern Québec, Canada to identify the species whose distribution renders them potentially sensitive to climate change in the study area. We determined the degree of association between the distribution of 65 breeding bird species (601 presence-absence squares of the Atlas of the Breeding Birds of Québec and climate variables (212 climatological stations in operation for at least 20 years over the period 1953-1984 by statistically correcting for the effects of several factors that are correlated with bird distribution. Factors considered were the nature and scale of land cover patterns that included vegetation types and landscape characterization, geographical coordinates, and elevation. Canonical Correspondence Analysis (CCA was used to investigate the effect of climatic variables on breeding bird distribution. Independent variables accounted for a total of 29.1% of the variation in the species matrix. A very large portion of the variance explained by climate variables was shared with spatial variables, reflecting the relationships among latitude, longitude, elevation, and climate. After correcting for the effect of land cover variables, climatic variables still explained 11.4% of the variation in the species matrix, with temperature, i.e., warmer summers and milder winters, having a greater influence than precipitation, i.e., wetter summers. Of the 65 species, 14 appeared to be particularly climate-sensitive. Eight are insectivorous neotropical migrants and six species are at the northern limit of their range in the study area. The opposite is largely true for the eight others; they are practically absent from the southern part of the study area, except for the Dark-eyed Junco (Junco hyemalis, which is widespread there. The White-breasted Nuthatch (Sitta carolinensis is the only resident species that seemed responsive to climatic variables, i

  1. Fatty acids composition of fruits of selected Central European sedges (Carex L. Cyperaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janyszek, Magdalena

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Fatty acids in the fruits of 13 sedge species (Carex L., Cyperaceae were analyzed. The oil contents in the fruits of the studied sedges ranged from 3.73 and 46.52%. In the studied fruit oils 14 different fatty acids were identified. The main unsaturated fatty acids were: linoleic, α-linolenic, oleic, oleopalmitic n-7; oleopalmitic n-9, octadecenic, and eicosenoic acids. The following acids were found in the greatest quantities: linoleic, oleic, α-linolenic and palmitic acids. Based on the fatty acid composition, studied taxa can be divided in two groups. The first group (C. flava, C. pseudocyperus, C. riparia, C. leporina is a very good source of linoleic acid. The second group, including the remaining species, is a good source of α-linolenic acid. The highest oleic acid contents were observed in C. vulpina. The studied material has shown a low concentration of saturated fatty acids, among which palmitic acid was the main one.Results of the analyses allow for the inclusion of the studied species among plants whose fruits are characterized by a high content of unsaturated fatty acids.Los ácidos grasos de frutos de 13 especies de juncos (Carex L., Cyperaceae fueron analizados. El contenido de aceite en los frutos de juncos estudiados vario desde un 3.73 a un 46.52%. En los aceites de los frutos estudiados fueron identificados 14 ácidos grasos diferentes. Los principales ácidos grasos insaturados fueron los ácidos linoleico, α-linolenico, oleico, n-7 palmitoleico, n-9 palmitoleico, octadecenoico y eicosanoico. Los siguientes ácidos grasos fueron encontrados en mayor cantidad: ácido linoleico, ácido oleico, ácido α-linolenico, y ácido palmítico. Basado en la composición de ácidos grasos, las especies estudiadas pueden ser divididas en dos grupos. El primer grupo (C. flava, C. pseudocyperus, C. riparia, C. leporina es una muy buena fuente de ácido linoleico. El segundo grupo, que incluye las especies restantes, es una buena fuente

  2. Mechanisms associated with an advance in the timing of seasonal reproduction in an urban songbird

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fudickar, Adam M.; Greives, Timothy J; Abolins-Abols, Mikas; Atwell, Jonathan W.; Meddle, Simone L.; Friis, Guillermo; Stricker, Craig A.; Ketterson, Ellen D.

    2017-01-01

    The colonization of urban environments by animals is often accompanied by earlier breeding and associated changes in seasonal schedules. Accelerated timing of seasonal reproduction in derived urban populations is a potential cause of evolutionary divergence from ancestral populations if differences in physiological processes that regulate reproductive timing become fixed over time. We compared reproductive development in free-living and captive male dark-eyed juncos deriving from a population that recently colonized a city (~35 years) and ceased migrating to that of conspecifics that live in sympatry with the urban population during winter and spring but migrate elsewhere to breed. We predicted that the earlier breeding sedentary urban birds would exhibit accelerated reproductive development in the spring along the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis as compared to migrants. We found that free-living sedentary urban and migrant juncos differed at the level of the pituitary when measured as baseline luteinizing hormone (LH) levels, but not in increased LH when challenged with Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone (GnRH). Among captives held in a common garden, and at the level of the gonad, we found that sedentary urban birds produced more testosterone in response to GnRH than migrants living in the same common environment, suggesting greater gonadal sensitivity in the derived urban population. Greater gonadal sensitivity could arise from greater upstream activation by LH or FSH or from reduced suppression of gonadal development by the adrenal axis. We compared abundance of gonadal transcripts for LH receptor (LHR), follicle stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR), glucocorticoid receptor (GR), and mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) in the common-garden, predicting either more abundant transcripts for LHR and FSHR or fewer transcripts for GR and MR in the earlier breeding sedentary urban breeders, as compared to the migrants. We found no difference in the expression of

  3. Mechanisms Associated with an Advance in the Timing of Seasonal Reproduction in an Urban Songbird

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam M. Fudickar

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The colonization of urban environments by animals is often accompanied by earlier breeding and associated changes in seasonal schedules. Accelerated timing of seasonal reproduction in derived urban populations is a potential cause of evolutionary divergence from ancestral populations if differences in physiological processes that regulate reproductive timing become fixed over time. We compared reproductive development in free-living and captive male dark-eyed juncos deriving from a population that recently colonized a city (~35 years and ceased migrating to that of conspecifics that live in sympatry with the urban population during winter and spring but migrate elsewhere to breed. We predicted that the earlier breeding sedentary urban birds would exhibit accelerated reproductive development in the spring along the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG axis as compared to migrants. We found that free-living sedentary urban and migrant juncos differed at the level of the pituitary when measured as baseline luteinizing hormone (LH levels, but not in increased LH when challenged with Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone (GnRH. Among captives held in a common garden, and at the level of the gonad, we found that sedentary urban birds produced more testosterone in response to GnRH than migrants living in the same common environment, suggesting greater gonadal sensitivity in the derived urban population. Greater gonadal sensitivity could arise from greater upstream activation by LH or FSH or from reduced suppression of gonadal development by the adrenal axis. We compared abundance of gonadal transcripts for LH receptor (LHR, follicle stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR, glucocorticoid receptor (GR, and mineralocorticoid receptor (MR in the common-garden, predicting either more abundant transcripts for LHR and FSHR or fewer transcripts for GR and MR in the earlier breeding sedentary urban breeders, as compared to the migrants. We found no difference in the

  4. Mapping the Circumstellar Environment of T Tauri with Fluorescent H_2 Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Walter, F M; Brown, A; Ardila, D R; Gahm, G F; Johns-Krull, C M; Lissauer, J J; Simon, M; Valenti, J A; Walter, Frederick M.; Herczeg, Gregory; Brown, Alexander; Ardila, David R.; Gahm, Goesta F.; Johns-Krull, Christopher M.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Simon, Michal; Valenti, Jeff A.

    2003-01-01

    We have obtained three long-slit, far UV spectra of the pre-main sequence system T Tauri. These HST/STIS spectra show a strong and variable on-source spectrum composed of both fluoresced H_2 and stellar chromospheric lines. Extended H_2 emission is seen up to 10" from the T Tau system. The on-source and extended H_2 are both pumped by H I Lyman alpha. The on-source H_2 is pumped by the red wing of a broad, self-absorbed Ly-alpha line, while the progressions seen in the extended gas are pumped from near line center. This suggests that the extended H_2 is pumped locally, and not by the stellar Ly-alpha line. The H_2 to the north and west coincides with the evacuated cavity bounded by the optical reflection nebulosity; to the south the extended H_2 coincides with the HH 255 outflow from the embedded infrared companion T Tau S. The spatial profile of the extended gas shows a prominent dip coincident with the position of T Tau S. This may be absorption by a disk associated with T Tau S. There is no evidence for ab...

  5. Kinematics from spectral lines for AGN outflows based on time-independent radiation-driven wind theory

    CERN Document Server

    Ramírez, José M

    2011-01-01

    We build a bulk velocity-dependent photoionization model of the warm absorber of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 3783. By adopting functional forms for velocity of the flow and its particle density with radius, appropriate for radiation driven winds, we compute the ionization, temperature, line Doppler shift, and line optical depths as a function of distance. By doing this we obtain detailed profiles for the entire absorption line spectrum. The model reproduces the observed relationship between the gas ionization and the velocity shift of the line centroids as well as the asymmetry of the absorption lines in the X-ray spectrum of NGC 3783. It is found that the distribution of asymmetry requires the presence of two outflows: a higher ionization component responsible for the blue wings of the high ionization lines and the red wings of the low ionization oxygen lines, and a lower ionization flow that makes up for the blue wings of the oxygen lines. Our model predicts a relationship between the X-rays and the UV absorbe...

  6. Far-UV Absorption Lines in the Remnant of SN 1006

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, C C; Hamilton, A J S; Fesen, R A; Leventhal, M; Sarazin, C L; Wu, Chi-Chao; Hamilton, Andrew J.S.; Fesen, Robert A.; Leventhal, Marvin; Sarazin, Craig

    1997-01-01

    We have obtained a far-ultraviolet spectrum (1150 - 1600 Ang.) of a hot subdwarf star behind the remnant of SN 1006 with the Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) on the Hubble Space Telescope. The high-quality spectrum is used to test previous identifications of the strong absorption features discovered with the International Ultraviolet Explorer. These features have FWHM = 4000 (+/- 300) km/sec and are not at the rest wavelengths of known interstellar lines, as opposed to the broader (8000 km/sec FWHM) Fe II lines from the remnant centered at zero km/sec in near-UV FOS spectra. We confirm that the broad absorption features are principally due to redshifted Si II, Si III, and Si IV lines, which are centered at a radial velocity of 5100 (+/- 200) km/sec. The Si II 1260.4 profile is asymmetric, with a nearly flat core and sharp red wing, unlike the Si II 1526.7 and Si IV 1393.8, 1402.8 profiles. One possible explanation is additional absorption from another species. Previous work has suggested that S II 1250.6, 1253...

  7. Charge exchange spectroscopy as a fast ion diagnostic on TEXTORa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delabie, E.; Jaspers, R. J. E.; von Hellermann, M. G.; Nielsen, S. K.; Marchuk, O.

    2008-10-01

    An upgraded charge exchange spectroscopy diagnostic has been taken into operation at the TEXTOR tokamak. The angles of the viewing lines with the toroidal magnetic field are close to the pitch angles at birth of fast ions injected by one of the neutral beam injectors. Using another neutral beam for active spectroscopy, injected counter the direction in which fast ions injected by the first beam are circulating, we can simultaneously measure a fast ion tail on the blue wing of the Dα spectrum while the beam emission spectrum is Doppler shifted to the red wing. An analysis combining the two parts of the spectrum offers possibilities to improve the accuracy of the absolute (fast) ion density profiles. Fast beam modulation or passive viewing lines cannot be used for background subtraction on this diagnostic setup and therefore the background has to be modeled and fitted to the data together with a spectral model for the slowing down feature. The analysis of the fast ion Dα spectrum obtained with the new diagnostic is discussed.

  8. An introgressed wing pattern acts as a mating cue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Angela P; Pardo-Diaz, Carolina; Enciso-Romero, Juan; Muñoz, Astrid; Jiggins, Chris D; Salazar, Camilo; Linares, Mauricio

    2015-06-01

    Heliconius butterflies provide good examples of both homoploid hybrid speciation and ecological speciation. In particular, examples of adaptive introgression have been detected among the subspecies of Heliconius timareta, which acquired red color pattern elements from H. melpomene. We tested whether the introgression of red wing pattern elements into H. timareta florencia might also be associated with incipient reproductive isolation (RI) from its close relative, H. timareta subsp. nov., found in the eastern Andes. No choice experiments show a 50% reduction in mating between females of H. t. subsp. nov. and males of H .t. florencia, but not in the reciprocal direction. In choice experiments using wing models, males of H. timareta subsp. nov. approach and court red phenotypes less than their own, whereas males of H. t. florencia prefer models with a red phenotype. Intrinsic postzygotic isolation was not detected in crosses between these H. timareta races. These results suggest that a color pattern trait gained by introgression is triggering RI between H. timareta subsp. nov. and H. t. florencia.

  9. Discovery of Red-Skewed K_alpha iron line in Cyg X-2 with Suzaku

    CERN Document Server

    Shaposhnikov, Nikolai; Laurent, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    We report on the Suzaku observation of neutron star low-mass X-ray binary Cygnus X-2 which reveals a presence of the iron K_alpha emission line. The line profile shows a significant red wing. This discovery increases the number of neutron star sources where red-skewed iron lines were observed and strongly suggests that this phenomenon is common not only in black holes but also in other types of accreting compact objects. We examine the line profile in terms of models which attribute its production to the relativistic effects due to reflection of X-ray radiation from a cold accretion disk and also as a result of the line formation in the extended wind/outflow configuration. Both models are able to adequately represent the observed line profile. We consider the results of line modeling in the context of subsecond variability. While we were unable to conclusively disqualify one of the models, we find that the wind paradigm has several advantages over the relativistic disk reflection model.

  10. Quiet-Sun imaging asymmetries in NaI D1 compared with other strong Fraunhofer lines

    CERN Document Server

    Rutten, R J; van der Voort, L H M Rouppe; de Wijn, A G; Carlsson, M; Hansteen, V

    2011-01-01

    Imaging spectroscopy of the solar atmosphere using the NaI D1 line yields marked asymmetry between the blue and red line wings: sampling a quiet-Sun area in the blue wing displays reversed granulation, whereas sampling in the red wing displays normal granulation. The MgI b2 line of comparable strength does not show this asymmetry, nor does the stronger CaII 8542 line. We demonstrate the phenomenon with near-simultaneous spectral images in NaI D1, MgI b2, and CaII 8542 from the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope. We then explain it with line-formation insights from classical 1D modeling and with a 3D magnetohydrodynamical simulation combined with NLTE spectral line synthesis that permits detailed comparison with the observations in a common format. The cause of the imaging asymmetry is the combination of correlations between intensity and Dopplershift modulation in granular overshoot and the sensitivity to these of the steep profile flanks of the NaI D1 line. The MgI b2 line has similar core formation but much wider ...

  11. A mismatch between the perceived fighting signal and fighting ability reveals survival and physiological costs for bearers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac González-Santoyo

    Full Text Available Signals of fighting indicate an animal's intention to attack and so they serve to prevent costly aggressive encounters. However, according to theory, a signal that is different in design (i.e. a novel signal but that fails to inform fighting intentions will result in negative fitness consequences for the bearer. In the present study we used males of the territorial damselfly Hetaerina americana, which have a red wing spot during territory defense that has evolved as a signal of fighting ability. By producing a novel signal (covering the red spot with blue ink in territory owners, we investigated: a the behavioral responses by conspecific males; b survival cost and c three physiological mediators of impaired survival: muscular fat reserves, muscle mass and immune ability. We predicted that males with the novel signal would be attacked more often by conspecifics as the former would fail to convey fighting ability and intentions adequately. This will result in lower survival and physiological condition for the novel signal bearers. We found that, compared to control males (males whose red spot was not changed, experimental males had reduced survival, were less able to hold a territory, and had a reduced muscle mass. It seems that spot modified males were not able to effectively communicate their territory tenancy, which may explain why they lost their defended sites. Our results provide support for theoretical models that a novel signal that fails to informing fighting ability may lead to a fitness cost for bearers.

  12. Near-Infrared Imaging Polarimetry of S106 Cluster-Forming Region with SIRPOL

    CERN Document Server

    Saito, Hiro; Kandori, Ryo; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Hashimoto, Jun; Nakajima, Yasushi; Sato, Yaeko; Nagata, Tetsuya; Nagayama, Takahiro; Kato, Daisuke

    2008-01-01

    We present the results of wide-field JHKs polarimetry toward the HII region S106 using the IRSF (Infrared Survey Facility) telescope. Our polarimetry data revealed an extended (up to ~ 5') polarized nebula over S106. We confirmed the position of the illuminating source of most of the nebula as consistent with S106 IRS4 through an analysis of polarization vectors. The bright portion of the polarized intensity is consistent with the red wing component of the molecular gas. Diffuse polarized intensity emission is distributed along the north--south molecular gas lanes. We found the interaction region between the radiation from S106 IRS4 and the dense gas. In addition, we also discovered two small polarization nebulae, SIRN1 and SIRN2, associated with a young stellar objects (YSO). Aperture polarimetry of point-like sources in this region was carried out for the first time. The regional magnetic field structures were derived using point-like source aperture polarimetry, and the magnetic field structure position an...

  13. Relativistic iron K X-ray Reverberation in NGC 4151

    CERN Document Server

    Zoghbi, A; Reynolds, C S; Cackett, E M

    2011-01-01

    Recent X-ray observations have enabled the study of reverberation delays in AGN for the first time. All the detections so far are in sources with a strong soft excess, and the measured delay is between the hard (1-3 keV) direct continuum and the soft excess (0.5-1 keV), interpreted as the reflection continuum smeared by relativistic effects. There is however an inherent ambiguity in identifying and studying the details of the lines in the soft excess. Here we report the first detection of reverberation in the iron K band in any AGN. Using XMM-Newton observations of NGC 4151, we find delays of order 2000 s on time-scales of 10e5 s between the 5-6 keV band and 2-3 and 7-8 keV bands, with a broad lag profile resembling a relativistically-broadened iron line. The peak of the lag spectra shifts to lower energies at higher frequencies, consistent with the red wing of the line being emitted at smaller radii, as expected from reflection off the inner accretion disk. This is a first detection of a broad iron line usin...

  14. X-ray spectroscopic study of charge exchange phenomena in plasma-wall interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renner O.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Jets of energetic ions launched at laser-burnt-through foils represent an efficient tool for investigation of plasma interaction with solid surfaces (plasma-wall interaction, PWI and for description of transient phenomena occurring close to the walls. Highly charged ions approaching the secondary target interpenetrate the near surface layer, collide with the counter-propagating matter and capture a large number of electrons. This results in a creation of atoms in highly excited Rydberg states or hollow ions with multiple inner vacancies; plasma jet and target ions may also undergo charge exchange (CE processes. We report PWI experiments with Al/Si(PMMA and Al/C targets irradiated at normal or oblique laser incidence. The distinct dip structures observed in red wings of Al Lyγ self-emission is interpreted in terms of CE between C6+ and Al12+ in the near-wall zone. The spectroscopic identification of CE phenomena is supported by results of analytical and numerical calculations.

  15. Fabry-P\\'erot based Narrow Band Imager for Solar Filament Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Dhara, Sajal Kumar; Banyal, Ravinder Kumar

    2015-01-01

    We have recently developed a narrow band imager (NBI) using an air gap based Fabry-P\\'erot (FP) interferometer at the Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore. Narrow band imaging is achieved by using an FP interferometer working in combination with an order sorting pre-filter. The NBI can be tuned to a different wavelength position on the line profile by changing the plate separation of the FP. The interferometer has a 50 mm clear aperture with a bandpass of $\\sim$247.8 m\\AA and a free spectral range of $\\sim$5.3\\AA at $\\lambda$ = 656.3 nm. The developed NBI is used to observe the solar filament in the H$\\alpha$ wavelength. The instrument is being used to image the Sun at chromospheric height and it is also able to scan the H$\\alpha$ spectral line profile at different wavelength positions. We have also made Doppler velocity maps at chromospheric height by taking the blue and red wing images at $\\pm$176 m\\AA wavelength positions separately away from the line center of the spectral line. In this paper, we p...

  16. Development of a high-speed H-alpha camera system for the observation of rapid fluctuations in solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiplinger, Alan L.; Dennis, Brian R.; Orwig, Larry E.; Chen, P. C.

    1988-01-01

    A solid-state digital camera was developed for obtaining H alpha images of solar flares with 0.1 s time resolution. Beginning in the summer of 1988, this system will be operated in conjunction with SMM's hard X-ray burst spectrometer (HXRBS). Important electron time-of-flight effects that are crucial for determining the flare energy release processes should be detectable with these combined H alpha and hard X-ray observations. Charge-injection device (CID) cameras provide 128 x 128 pixel images simultaneously in the H alpha blue wing, line center, and red wing, or other wavelength of interest. The data recording system employs a microprocessor-controlled, electronic interface between each camera and a digital processor board that encodes the data into a serial bitstream for continuous recording by a standard video cassette recorder. Only a small fraction of the data will be permanently archived through utilization of a direct memory access interface onto a VAX-750 computer. In addition to correlations with hard X-ray data, observations from the high speed H alpha camera will also be correlated and optical and microwave data and data from future MAX 1991 campaigns. Whether the recorded optical flashes are simultaneous with X-ray peaks to within 0.1 s, are delayed by tenths of seconds or are even undetectable, the results will have implications on the validity of both thermal and nonthermal models of hard X-ray production.

  17. Relativistic emission lines from accreting black holes - The effect of disk truncation on line profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, A; Mueller, Andreas; Camenzind, Max

    2004-01-01

    Relativistic emission lines generated by thin accretion disks around rotating black holes are an important diagnostic tool for testing gravity near the horizon. The iron K-line is of special importance for the interpretation of the X-ray emission of Seyfert galaxies, quasars and galactic X-ray binary systems. A generalized kinematic model is presented which includes radial drifts and non-Keplerian rotations for the line emitters. The resulting line profiles are obtained with an object-oriented ray tracer operating in the curved Kerr background metric. The general form of the Doppler factor is presented which includes all kinds of poloidal and toroidal motions near the horizon. The parameters of the model include the spin parameter, the inclination, the truncation and outer radius of the disk, velocity profiles for rotation and radial drift, the emissivity profile and a multi-species line-system. The red wing flux is generally reduced when radial drift is included as compared to the pure Keplerian velocity fie...

  18. Microlensing of the broad-line region in the quadruply imaged quasar HE0435-1223

    CERN Document Server

    Braibant, L; Sluse, D; Anguita, T; García-Vergara, C J

    2014-01-01

    Using infrared spectra of the z = 1.693 quadruply lensed quasar HE0435-1223 acquired in 2009 with the spectrograph SINFONI at the ESO Very Large Telescope, we have detected a clear microlensing effect in images A and D. While microlensing affects the blue and red wings of the H{\\alpha} line profile in image D very differently, it de-magnifies the line core in image A. The combination of these different effects sets constraints on the line-emitting region; these constraints suggest that a rotating ring is at the origin of the H{\\alpha} line. Visible spectra obtained in 2004 and 2012 indicate that the MgII line profile is microlensed in the same way as the H{\\alpha} line. Our results therefore favour flattened geometries for the low-ionization line-emitting region, for example, a Keplerian disk. Biconical models cannot be ruled out but require more fine-tuning. Flux ratios between the different images are also derived and confirm flux anomalies with respect to estimates from lens models with smooth mass distrib...

  19. Temporal Evolution of Chromospheric Evaporation: Case Studies of the M1.1 Flare on 2014 September 6 and X1.6 Flare on 2014 September 10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Hui; Young, Peter R.; Reeves, Katharine K.; Chen, Bin; Liu, Wei; McKillop, Sean

    2015-10-01

    With observations from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph, we track the complete evolution of ˜11 MK evaporation flows in an M1.1 flare on 2014 September 6 and an X1.6 flare on 2014 September 10. These hot flows, as indicated by the blueshifted Fe xxi 1354.08 Å line, evolve smoothly with a velocity decreasing exponentially from ˜200 km s-1 to almost stationary within a few minutes. We find a good correlation between the flow velocity and energy deposition rate as represented by the hard X-ray flux observed with the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager, or time derivative of the soft X-ray flux observed with the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites and the HINODE X-ray Telescope, which is in general agreement with models of nonthermal electron heating. The maximum blueshift of Fe xxi appears approximately at the same time as or slightly after the impulsive enhancement of the ultraviolet continuum and the Mg ii 2798.8 Å line emission, demonstrating that the evaporation flow is closely related to heating of the lower chromosphere. Finally, while the hot Fe xxi 1354.08 Å line is entirely blueshifted with no obvious rest component, cool chromospheric and transition region lines like Si iv 1402.77 Å are often not entirely redshifted but just reveal an obvious red wing enhancement at the ribbons, suggesting that the speed of chromospheric condensation might be larger than previously thought.

  20. Ellerman Bombs with Jets: Cause and Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Reid, A; Scullion, E; Doyle, J G; Shelyag, S; Gallagher, P

    2015-01-01

    Ellerman Bombs (EBs) are thought to arise as a result of photospheric magnetic reconnection. We use data from the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope (SST), to study EB events on the solar disk and at the limb. Both datasets show that EBs are connected to the foot-points of forming chromospheric jets. The limb observations show that a bright structure in the H$\\alpha$ blue wing connects to the EB initially fuelling it, leading to the ejection of material upwards. The material moves along a loop structure where a newly formed jet is subsequently observed in the red wing of H$\\alpha$. In the disk dataset, an EB initiates a jet which propagates away from the apparent reconnection site within the EB flame. The EB then splits into two, with associated brightenings in the inter-granular lanes (IGLs). Micro-jets are then observed, extending to 500 km with a lifetime of a few minutes. Observed velocities of the micro-jets are approximately 5-10 km s$^{-1}$, while their chromospheric counterparts range from 50-80 km s$^{-1}$....

  1. Hα Line Profile Asymmetries and the Chromospheric Flare Velocity Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuridze, D.; Mathioudakis, M.; Simões, P. J. A.; Rouppe van der Voort, L.; Carlsson, M.; Jafarzadeh, S.; Allred, J. C.; Kowalski, A. F.; Kennedy, M.; Fletcher, L.; Graham, D.; Keenan, F. P.

    2015-11-01

    The asymmetries observed in the line profiles of solar flares can provide important diagnostics of the properties and dynamics of the flaring atmosphere. In this paper the evolution of the Hα and Ca ii λ8542 lines are studied using high spatial, temporal, and spectral resolution ground-based observations of an M1.1 flare obtained with the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope. The temporal evolution of the Hα line profiles from the flare kernel shows excess emission in the red wing (red asymmetry) before flare maximum and excess in the blue wing (blue asymmetry) after maximum. However, the Ca ii λ8542 line does not follow the same pattern, showing only a weak red asymmetry during the flare. RADYN simulations are used to synthesize spectral line profiles for the flaring atmosphere, and good agreement is found with the observations. We show that the red asymmetry observed in Hα is not necessarily associated with plasma downflows, and the blue asymmetry may not be related to plasma upflows. Indeed, we conclude that the steep velocity gradients in the flaring chromosphere modify the wavelength of the central reversal in the Hα line profile. The shift in the wavelength of maximum opacity to shorter and longer wavelengths generates the red and blue asymmetries, respectively.

  2. Ellerman Bombs with Jets: Cause and Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, A.; Mathioudakis, M.; Scullion, E.; Doyle, J. G.; Shelyag, S.; Gallagher, P.

    2015-05-01

    Ellerman Bombs (EBs) are thought to arise as a result of photospheric magnetic reconnection. We use data from the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope to study EB events on the solar disk and at the limb. Both data sets show that EBs are connected to the foot points of forming chromospheric jets. The limb observations show that a bright structure in the Hα blue wing connects to the EB initially fueling it, leading to the ejection of material upwards. The material moves along a loop structure where a newly formed jet is subsequently observed in the red wing of Hα. In the disk data set, an EB initiates a jet which propagates away from the apparent reconnection site within the EB flame. The EB then splits into two, with associated brightenings in the inter-granular lanes. Micro-jets are then observed, extending to 500 km with a lifetime of a few minutes. Observed velocities of the micro-jets are approximately 5-10 km s-1, while their chromospheric counterparts range from 50 to 80 km s-1. MURaM simulations of quiet Sun reconnection show that micro-jets with properties similar to those of the observations follow the line of reconnection in the photosphere, with associated Hα brightening at the location of increased temperature.

  3. Multi-Epoch Observations of the Redwing Excess in the Spectrum of 3C279

    CERN Document Server

    Punsly, Brian

    2012-01-01

    It has been previously determined that there is a highly significant correlation between the spectral index from 10 GHz to 1350 $\\AA$ and the amount of excess luminosity in the red wing of quasar CIV $\\lambda$1549 broad emission lines (BELs). Ostensibly, the prominence of the red excess is associated with the radio jet emission mechanism and is most pronounced for lines of sight close to the jet axis. Studying the scant significant differences in the UV spectra of radio loud and radio quiet quasars might provide vital clues to the origin of the unknown process that creates powerful relativistic jets that appear in only about ten percent of quasars. In this study, the phenomenon is explored with multi-epoch observations of the MgII $\\lambda$2798 broad line in 3C 279 which has one of the largest known redwing excesses in a quasar spectrum. The amount of excess that is detected appears to be independent of all directly observed optical continuum, radio or submm properties (fluxes or polarizations). The only tren...

  4. Material Supply and Magnetic Configuration of an Active Region Filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, P.; Fang, C.; Chen, P. F.; Yang, K.; Hao, Q.; Cao, Wenda

    2016-11-01

    It is important to study the fine structures of solar filaments with high-resolution observations, since it can help us understand the magnetic and thermal structures of the filaments and their dynamics. In this paper, we study a newly formed filament located inside the active region NOAA 11762, which was observed by the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory from 16:40:19 UT to 17:07:58 UT on 2013 June 5. As revealed by the Hα filtergrams, cool material is seen to be injected into the filament spine with a speed of 5-10 km s-1. At the source of the injection, brightenings are identified in the chromosphere, which are accompanied by magnetic cancellation in the photosphere, implying the importance of magnetic reconnection in replenishing the filament with plasmas from the lower atmosphere. Counter-streamings are detected near one endpoint of the filament, with the plane-of-the-sky speed being 7-9 km s-1 in the Hα red-wing filtergrams and 9-25 km s-1 in the blue-wing filtergrams. The observations are indicative that this active region filament is supported by a sheared arcade without magnetic dips, and the counter-streamings are due to unidirectional flows with alternative directions, rather than due to the longitudinal oscillations of filament threads as in many other filaments.

  5. Halpha line profile asymmetries and the chromospheric flare velocity field

    CERN Document Server

    Kuridze, D; Simões, P J A; van der Voort, L Rouppe; Carlsson, M; Jafarzadeh, S; Allred, J C; Kowalski, A F; Kennedy, M; Fletcher, L; Graham, D; Keenan, F P

    2015-01-01

    The asymmetries observed in the line profiles of solar flares can provide important diagnostics of the properties and dynamics of the flaring atmosphere. In this paper the evolution of the Halpha and Ca II 8542 {\\AA} lines are studied using high spatial, temporal and spectral resolution ground-based observations of an M1.1 flare obtained with the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope. The temporal evolution of the Halpha line profiles from the flare kernel shows excess emission in the red wing (red asymmetry) before flare maximum, and excess in the blue wing (blue asymmetry) after maximum. However, the Ca II 8542 {\\AA} line does not follow the same pattern, showing only a weak red asymmetry during the flare. RADYN simulations are used to synthesise spectral line profiles for the flaring atmosphere, and good agreement is found with the observations. We show that the red asymmetry observed in Halpha is not necessarily associated with plasma downflows, and the blue asymmetry may not be related to plasma upflows. Indeed, w...

  6. Análise espermática de perdizes (Rhynchotus rufescens criadas em cativeiro e suplementadas com selênio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Almeida de Araújo Góes

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Due to the commercial importance of the red-winged tinamou (Rhynchotus rufescens, for the past few years, the employment of reproductive biotechnologies has been attempted. Thirty animals were randomly assigned into two groups: control group (no selenium and treatment group (supplemented with 0,2 a 0,8 mg selenium/ 1000 kg ration. Animals were allocated at the FCAV - UNESP/Jaboticabal (2007-2008. Semen collections were performed by digital manipulation and divided in pools of at least 150 µL. After the immediate evaluation of motility, vigour, concentration and morphology, an aliquot of 20 µL was diluted in 300 µL of physiologic solution in order to test acrosome and membrane integrities, which were performed by counting 200 cells for each test. Cells were evaluated as follows: 1 Intact acrosome: lilac acrosome; Non-intact acrosome: pink acrosome; 2 Live cells: non stained; Dead: stained. Data was statistically analysed using the SAS System for Windows. No differences were found between treatment and control groups for volume, motility, vigour, mean number of spermatozoa per animal, concentration, Intact acrosome, Intact membrane. The difference found on midpiece sperm defect (Se = 1,33 ± 0,53 and control = 3,78 ± 0,69, p = 0.0107 may be due to the damages caused by the selenium deficiency to the architecture of the midpiece, which compromises sperm mobility and fertilization capacity.

  7. Seeing-Induced Errors in Solar Doppler Velocity Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Padinhatteeri, Sreejith; Sankarasubramanian, K; 10.1007/s11207-010-9597-1

    2010-01-01

    Imaging systems based on a narrow-band tunable filter are used to obtain Doppler velocity maps of solar features. These velocity maps are created by taking the difference between the blue- and red-wing intensity images of a chosen spectral line. This method has the inherent assumption that these two images are obtained under identical conditions. With the dynamical nature of the solar features as well as the Earth's atmosphere, systematic errors can be introduced in such measurements. In this paper, a quantitative estimate of the errors introduced due to variable seeing conditions for ground-based observations is simulated and compared with real observational data for identifying their reliability. It is shown, under such conditions, that there is a strong cross-talk from the total intensity to the velocity estimates. These spurious velocities are larger in magnitude for the umbral regions compared to the penumbra or quiet-sun regions surrounding the sunspots. The variable seeing can induce spurious velocitie...

  8. Seeing induced cross-talks in filter-based velocity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreejith, P.; Sridharan, R.; Sankarasubramanian, K.

    Narrow band imaging using Universal Birefringent Filter (UBF) can be used to measure velocity features on the Sun. Velocity maps, in filter-based observations, are created by taking the intensity differences between the blue and red wing images of a chosen spectral line. In the case of variable seeing, there is a large probability that one of the (red- or blue-) wing images can be affected more compared to the other. Such differential seeing leads to spurious velocity values which are contributed due to cross-talk from the intensity, and found to be more pronounced in umbra and penumbra of sunspots. Simulations are carried out to estimate and understand the sources of the cross-talk. Variable seeing conditions are created using the Adaptive Optics Performance Evaluator (AOPE) software. The point-spread-function (PSF) produced by the AOPE is used to generate the red- and blue-wing images. In this paper, we also discuss the advantages of using AO corrected images in such variable seeing scenario.

  9. M-shell resolved high-resolution X-ray spectroscopic study of transient matter evolution driven by hot electrons in kJ-laser produced plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condamine, F. P.; Šmíd, M.; Renner, O.; Dozières, M.; Thais, F.; Angelo, P.; Rosmej, F. B.

    2017-03-01

    Hot electrons represent a key subject for high intensity laser produced plasmas and atomic physics. Simulations of the radiative properties indicate a high sensitivity to hot electrons, that in turn provides the possibility for their detailed characterization by high-resolution spectroscopic methods. Of particular interest is X-ray spectroscopy due to reduced photo-absorption in dense matter and their efficient generation by hot electrons (inner-shell ionization/excitation). Here, we report on an experimental campaign conducted at the ns, kJ laser facility PALS at Prague in Czech Republic. Thin copper foils have been irradiated with 1ω pulses. Two spherically bent quartz Bragg crystal spectrometers with high spectral (λ/Δλ > 5000) and spatial resolutions (Δx = 30µm) have been set up simultaneously to achieve a high level of confidence for the complex Kα emission group. In particular, this group, which shows a strong overlap between lines, can be resolved in several substructures. Furthermore, an emission on the red wing of the Kα2 transition (λ = 1.5444A) could be identified with Hartree-Fock atomic structure calculations. We discuss possible implications for the analysis of non-equilibrium phenomena and present first simulations.

  10. Berry phases and profiles of line wings and rainbow satellites induced by optical collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciuryło, R.; Szudy, J.; Baylis, W. E.

    2015-09-01

    The concept of Berry phase is included in an analysis of the intensity distribution in far wings of pressure-broadened spectral lines emitted or absorbed by atoms placed in an external cone-rotating electric field. Particular attention is focused on frequency regions where rainbow satellite bands appear. A classical-path treatment that employs the time-dependent Schrödinger equation is used to derive an expression for the line shape, and it uses a dipole transition moment calculated with quasimolecular wave functions given by the Berry version of the adiabatic approximation. It is found that in the presence of an external rotating electric field, the intensity distribution in far wings can be expressed in terms of the universal line shape function of the unified Franck-Condon theory once energy shifts due to Stark and Berry effects are taken into account. We show that the influence of Berry phase in the profiles of the far wings can be manifested either in the form of deviations of observed profiles from the quasistatic distribution or the appearance of additional features in the vicinity of the maximum of the rainbow satellite band. As an example, the modification of the rainbow satellite at 162.3 nm in the red wing of the self-broadened Lyman-α line of hydrogen, caused by an external rotating electric field, is considered.

  11. Variability of the spectrum of the galaxy kaz 701

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazarian, M. A.; Petrosyan, G. V.

    2011-09-01

    Results from a spectrophotometric study of the galaxy Kaz 701 are presented. Spectra of this galaxy were obtained on the 2.6-m telescope at the Byurakan Observatory with the SCORPIO spectral camera. In the spectra of Kaz 701, strong Hα, [OIII] λλ5007, 4959, and Hβ emission were observed, and the [SII]λλ6731, 6717 lines were observed with moderate intensities, while the [NII]λ6584 line was scarcely noticeable in the spectra obtained in 2004, but was much more intense in the spectra of 2009. The lines observed in the spectrum of this galaxy are typical of type Sy2 galaxies. A component was observed in the red wings of both the Hα and Hβ lines in the data of 2004, but, although these lines were stronger, these components were absent in the spectra taken in 2009. The relative intensities, equivalent widths, and half widths of these lines are given. These data, obtained in different observation periods (2004 and 2009), differ greatly; that is, the emission is variable.

  12. The Functional Basis of Wing Patterning in Heliconius Butterflies: The Molecules Behind Mimicry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronforst, Marcus R.; Papa, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    Wing-pattern mimicry in butterflies has provided an important example of adaptation since Charles Darwin and Alfred Russell Wallace proposed evolution by natural selection >150 years ago. The neotropical butterfly genus Heliconius played a central role in the development of mimicry theory and has since been studied extensively in the context of ecology and population biology, behavior, and mimicry genetics. Heliconius species are notable for their diverse color patterns, and previous crossing experiments revealed that much of this variation is controlled by a small number of large-effect, Mendelian switch loci. Recent comparative analyses have shown that the same switch loci control wing-pattern diversity throughout the genus, and a number of these have now been positionally cloned. Using a combination of comparative genetic mapping, association tests, and gene expression analyses, variation in red wing patterning throughout Heliconius has been traced back to the action of the transcription factor optix. Similarly, the signaling ligand WntA has been shown to control variation in melanin patterning across Heliconius and other butterflies. Our understanding of the molecular basis of Heliconius mimicry is now providing important insights into a variety of additional evolutionary phenomena, including the origin of supergenes, the interplay between constraint and evolvability, the genetic basis of convergence, the potential for introgression to facilitate adaptation, the mechanisms of hybrid speciation in animals, and the process of ecological speciation. PMID:25953905

  13. Properties of Supersonic Evershed Downflows

    CERN Document Server

    Pozuelo, Sara Esteban; Rodriguez, Jaime de la Cruz

    2016-01-01

    We study supersonic Evershed downflows in a sunspot penumbra by means of high spatial resolution spectropolarimetric data acquired in the Fe I 617.3 nm line with the CRISP instrument at the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope. Physical observables, such as Dopplergrams calculated from line bisectors and Stokes V zero-crossing wavelengths, and Stokes V maps in the far red wing, are used to find regions where supersonic Evershed downflows may exist. We retrieve the LOS velocity and the magnetic field vector in these regions using two-component inversions of the observed Stokes profiles with the help of the SIR code. We follow these regions during their lifetime to study their temporal behavior. Finally, we carry out a statistical analysis of the detected supersonic downflows to characterize their physical properties. Supersonic downflows are contained in compact patches moving outward, which are located in the mid and outer penumbra. They are observed as bright, roundish structures at the outer end of penumbral filamen...

  14. Hα line profile variability in the B8Ia-type supergiant Rigel (β Ori)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, N. D.; Rother, R.; Kurschat, N.

    2008-04-01

    Hα observations of Rigel obtained on 184 nights during the past ten years with the 1-m telescope and ´echelle spectrograph of Ritter Observatory are surveyed. The line profiles were classified in terms of morphology. About 1/4 of them are of P Cygni type, about 15% inverse P Cygni, about 25% double-peaked, about 1/3 pure absorption, and a few are single emission lines. Transformation of the profile from one type to another typically takes a few days. Although the line stays in absorption for extended intervals, only one high-velocity absorption event of the intensity reported by Kaufer et al. (1996a) was observed, in late 2006. Late in this event, Hα absorption occurred farther to the red than the red wing of a plausible photospheric absorption component, an indication of infalling material. In general, as the absorption events come to an end, the emission typically returns with an inverse P Cygni profile. The Hα profile class shows no obvious correlation with the radial velocity of C II λ6578, a photospheric absorption line.

  15. Line Emission from Optically Thick RelativisticAccretion Tori

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuerst, Steven V.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Mullard Space Sci. Lab.; Wu, Kinwah; /Mullard Space Sci. Lab.

    2007-09-14

    We calculate line emission from relativistic accretion tori around Kerr black holes and investigate how the line profiles depend on the viewing inclination, spin of the central black hole, parameters describing the shape of the tori, and spatial distribution of line emissivity on the torus surface. We also compare the lines with those from thin accretion disks. Our calculations show that lines from tori and lines from thin disks share several common features. In particular, at low and moderate viewing inclination angles they both have asymmetric double-peaked profiles with a tall, sharp blue peak and a shorter red peak which has an extensive red wing. At high viewing inclination angles they both have very broad, asymmetric lines which can be roughly considered as single-peaked. Torus and disk lines may show very different red and blue line wings, but the differences are due to the models for relativistic tori and disks having differing inner boundary radii. Self-eclipse and lensing play some role in shaping the torus lines, but they are effective only at high inclination angles. If inner and outer radii of an accretion torus are the same as those of an accretion disk, their line profiles show substantial differences only when inclination angles are close to 90{sup o}, and those differences are manifested mostly at the central regions of the lines instead of the wings.

  16. A SURVEY OF H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, AND CO ICE FEATURES TOWARD BACKGROUND STARS AND LOW-MASS YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS USING AKARI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noble, J. A. [Aix-Marseille Université, PIIM UMR 7345, F-13397 Marseille (France); Fraser, H. J. [Department of Physical Sciences, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Aikawa, Y. [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Kobe University, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Pontoppidan, K. M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Sakon, I., E-mail: helen.fraser@open.ac.uk [Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0003 (Japan)

    2013-10-01

    We present near-infrared spectroscopic observations of 19 molecular clouds made using the AKARI satellite, and the data reduction pipeline written to analyze those observations. The 2.5-5 μm spectra of 30 objects—22 field stars behind quiescent molecular clouds and 8 low-mass young stellar objects in cores—were successfully extracted using the pipeline. Those spectra are further analyzed to calculate the column densities of key solid phase molecular species, including H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, CO, and OCN{sup –}. The profile of the H{sub 2}O ice band is seen to vary across the objects observed and we suggest that the extended red wing may be an evolutionary indicator of both dust and ice mantle properties. The observation of 22 spectra with fluxes as low as < 5 mJy toward background stars, including 15 where the column densities of H{sub 2}O, CO, and CO{sub 2} were calculated, provides valuable data that could help to benchmark the initial conditions in star-forming regions prior to the onset of star formation.

  17. Collimation and asymmetry of the hot blast wave from the recurrent nova V745 Scorpii

    CERN Document Server

    Drake, Jeremy J; Laming, J Martin; Starrfield, Sumner; Kashyap, Vinay; Orlando, Salvatore; Page, Kim L; Hernanz, M; Ness, J-U; Gehrz, R D; van Rossum, Daan; Woodward, Charles E

    2016-01-01

    The recurrent symbiotic nova V745 Sco exploded on 2014 February 6 and was observed on February 22 and 23 by the Chandra X-ray Observatory Transmission Grating Spectrometers. By that time the supersoft source phase had already ended and Chandra spectra are consistent with emission from a hot, shock-heated circumstellar medium with temperatures exceeding 10^7K. X-ray line profiles are more sharply peaked than expected for a spherically-symmetric blast wave, with a full width at zero intensity of approximately 2400 km/s, a full width at half maximum of 1200 +/- 30 km/s and an average net blueshift of 165 +/- 10 km/s. The red wings of lines are increasingly absorbed toward longer wavelengths by material within the remnant. We conclude that the blast wave was sculpted by an aspherical circumstellar medium in which an equatorial density enhancement plays a role, as in earlier symbiotic nova explosions. Expansion of the dominant X-ray emitting material is aligned close to the plane of the sky and most consistent wit...

  18. An Improved Red Spectrum of the Methane or T Dwarf SDSS 1624+0029: The Role of the Alkali Metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebert; Reid; Burrows; Burgasser; Kirkpatrick; Gizis

    2000-04-20

    A Keck II low-resolution spectrum shortward of 1 µm is presented for SDSS 1624+0029, the first field methane or T dwarf discovered in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Significant flux is detected down to the spectrum's short-wavelength limit of 6200 Å. The spectrum exhibits a broad absorption feature centered at 7700 Å, which we interpret as the K i lambdalambda7665, 7699 resonance doublet. The observed flux declines shortward of 7000 Å, most likely owing to the red wing of the Na i doublet. Both Cs i doublet lines are detected more strongly than in an earlier red spectrum. Neither Li i absorption nor Halpha emission are detected. An exploratory model fit to the spectrum suggests that the shape of the red spectrum can be primarily accounted for by the broad wings of the K i and Na i doublets. This behavior is consistent with the argument proffered by Burrows, Marley, & Sharp that strong alkali absorption is principally responsible for depressing T dwarf spectra shortward of 1 µm. In particular, there seems no compelling reason at this time to introduce dust or an additional opacity source in the atmosphere of the Sloan object. The width of the K i and strengths of the Cs i lines also indicate that the Sloan object is warmer than Gl 229B.

  19. CLASH-VLT: spectroscopic confirmation of a z=6.11 quintuply lensed galaxy in the Frontier Fields Cluster RXC J2248.7-4431

    CERN Document Server

    Balestra, I; Rosati, P; Monna, A; Grillo, C; Nonino, M; Mercurio, A; Biviano, A; Bradley, L; Coe, D; Fritz, A; Postman, M; Seitz, S; Scodeggio, M; Zheng, W; Ziegler, B; Zitrin, A; Annunziatella, M; Bartelmann, M; Benitez, N; Broadhurst, T; Bouwens, R; Czoske, O; Donahue, M; Ford, H; Girardi, M; Infante, L; Kelson, D; Koekemoer, A; Kuchner, U; Lemze, D; Lombardi, M; Maier, C; Medezinski, E; Melchior, P; Meneghetti, M; Merten, J; Moustakas, L; Presotto, V; Smit, R; Tozzi, P; Umetsu, K

    2013-01-01

    We present VIsible Multi-Object Spectrograph (VIMOS) observations of a z 6 galaxy quintuply imaged by the Frontier Fields galaxy cluster RXC J2248.7-4431 (z=0.348). This sub-L^*, high-z galaxy has been recently discovered by Monna et al. (2013) using dropout techniques with the 16-band HST photometry acquired as part of the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH). Obtained as part of the CLASH-VLT survey, the VIMOS medium-resolution spectra of this source show a very faint continuum between ~8700A and ~9300A and a prominent emission line at 8643A, which can be readily identified with Lyman-alpha at z=6.110. The emission line exhibits an asymmetric profile, with a more pronounced red wing. The rest-frame equivalent width of the line is EW=79+-10A. After correcting for magnification, the star-formation rate (SFR) estimated from the Lya line is SFR(Lya)=11 M_{sol}/yr and that estimated from the UV data is SFR(UV)=3 M$_{sol}/yr. We estimate that the effective radius of the source is R_e6 M$_{sol}...

  20. The broad emission-line region: the confluence of the outer accretion disc with the inner edge of the dusty torus

    CERN Document Server

    Goad, M R; Ruff, A J

    2012-01-01

    (Abridged) We investigate the observational characteristics of BLR geometries in which the BLR clouds bridge the gap, both in distance and scale height, between the outer accretion disc and the hot dust, forming an effective surface of a "bowl". The gas dynamics are dominated by gravity, and we include the effects of transverse Doppler shift, gravitational redshift and scale-height dependent macro-turbulence. Our simple model reproduces many of the phenomena observed in broad emission-line variability studies, including (i) the absence of response in the core of the optical recombination lines on short timescales, (ii) the enhanced red-wing response on short timescales, (iii) differences between the measured delays for the HILs and LILs, and (iv) identifies turbulence as a means of producing Lorentzian profiles (esp. for LILs) in low inclination systems, and for suppressing significant continuum--emission-line delays between the line wings and line core (esp. in LILs). A key motivation of this work was to rev...

  1. Excitation of an Outflow From the Lower Solar Atmosphere and a Co-Temporal EUV Transient Brightening

    CERN Document Server

    Nelson, C J

    2013-01-01

    We analyse an absorption event within the H$\\alpha$ line wings, identified as a surge, and the co-spatial evolution of an EUV brightening, with spatial and temporal scales analogous to a small blinker. We conduct a multi-wavelength, multi-instrument analysis using high-cadence, high-resolution data, collected by the Interferometric BIdimensional Spectrometer on the Dunn Solar Telescope, as well as the space-borne Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager instruments onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory. One large absorption event situated within the plage region trailing the lead sunspot of AR 11579 is identified within the H-alpha line wings. This event is found to be co-spatially linked to a medium-scale (around 4 arcseconds in diameter) brightening within the transition region and corona. This ejection appears to have a parabolic evolution, first forming in the H-alpha blue wing before fading and reappearing in the H-alpha red wing, and comprises of a number of smaller fibril even...

  2. Early Dust Formation and a Massive Progenitor for SN 2011ja?

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, J E; Clayton, Geoffrey C; Montiel, E; Wesson, R; Sugerman, Ben E K; Barlow, M J; Matsuura, M; Drass, H

    2015-01-01

    SN 2011ja was a bright (I = -18.3) Type II supernova occurring in the nearby edge on spiral galaxy NGC 4945. Flat-topped and multi-peaked H-alpha and H-beta spectral emission lines appear between 64 - 84 days post-explosion, indicating interaction with a disc-like circumstellar medium inclined 30-45 degrees from edge-on. After day 84 an increase in the H- and K-band flux along with heavy attenuation of the red wing of the emission lines are strong indications of early dust formation, likely located in the cool dense shell created between the forward shock of the SN ejecta and the reverse shock created as the ejecta plows into the existing CSM. Radiative transfer modeling reveals both ~1.5 x 10^-4 Msun of pre-existing dust located ~ 10^16.7 cm away and ~ 5 x 10^-5 Msun of newly formed dust. Spectral observations after 1.5 years reveal the possibility that the fading SN is located within a young (3-6 Myr) massive stellar cluster, which when combined with tentative 56Ni mass estimates of 0.2 Msun may indicate a ...

  3. Charge carrier photogeneration and recombination in ladder-type poly(para-phenylene): Interplay between impurities and external electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulbinas, V.; Hertel, D.; Yartsev, A.; Sundström, V.

    2007-12-01

    Charge carrier generation and decay in m -LPPP polymer films were examined by means of femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy in the time window of 100fs-15ns . Two modes of polaron formation with distinct behavior were identified, impurity induced in the absence of an external electric field and electric field induced in pristine film. While field induced charge generation is relatively slow, occurring throughout the excited state lifetime, the rate of impurity induced charge generation is much faster and depends on excitation wavelength; it occurs on the several hundred femtosecond time scale under excitation within the main absorption band, but excitation into the red wing of the absorption band results in charge generation within less than 100fs . Polaron decay through geminate electron-hole recombination occurs with widely distributed lifetimes, from ˜0.8ns to microseconds; the polarons characterized by the shortest decay time have a redshifted absorption spectrum (as compared to more long-lived polarons) and are attributed to tightly bound polaron pairs.

  4. Discovery of high-frequency iron K lags in Ark 564 and Mrk 335

    CERN Document Server

    Kara, E; Cackett, E M; Uttley, P; Wilkins, D R; Zoghbi, A

    2013-01-01

    We use archival XMM-Newton observations of Ark 564 and Mrk 335 to calculate the frequency dependent time-lags for these two well-studied sources. We discover high-frequency Fe K lags in both sources, indicating that the red wing of the line precedes the rest frame energy by roughly 100 s and 150 s for Ark 564 and Mrk 335, respectively. Including these two new sources, Fe K reverberation lags have been observed in seven Seyfert galaxies. We examine the low-frequency lag-energy spectrum, which is smooth, and shows no feature of reverberation, as would be expected if the low-frequency lags were produced by distant reflection off circumnuclear material. The clear differences in the low and high frequency lag-energy spectra indicate that the lags are produced by two distinct physical processes. Finally, we find that the amplitude of the Fe K lag scales with black hole mass for these seven sources, consistent with a relativistic reflection model where the lag is the light travel delay associated with reflection of ...

  5. Iron line profiles in Suzaku spectra of bare Seyfert galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Patrick, A R; Porquet, D; Markowitz, A G; Lobban, A P; Terashima, Y

    2010-01-01

    We methodically model the broad-band Suzaku spectra of a small sample of six 'bare' Seyfert galaxies: Ark 120, Fairall 9, MCG-02-14-009, Mrk 335, NGC 7469 and SWIFT J2127.4+5654. The analysis of bare Seyferts allows a consistent and physical modelling of AGN due to a weak amount of any intrinsic warm absorption, removing the degeneracy between the spectral curvature due to warm absorption and the red-wing of the Fe K region. Through effective modelling of the broad-band spectrum and investigating the presence of narrow neutral or ionized emission lines and reflection from distant material, we obtain an accurate and detailed description of the Fe K line region using models such as laor, kerrdisk and kerrconv. Results suggest that ionized emission lines at 6.7 keV and 6.97 keV (particularly Fe XXVI) are relatively common and the inclusion of these lines can greatly affect the parameters obtained with relativistic models i.e. spin, emissivity, inner radius of emission and inclination. Moderately broad components...

  6. Analysis of the coronal green line profiles: evidence of excess blueshifts

    CERN Document Server

    Raju, K P; Ashok, N M

    2011-01-01

    The coronal green line (Fe XIV 5303 A) profiles were obtained from Fabry-Perot interferometric observations of the solar corona during the total solar eclipse of 21 June 2001 from Lusaka, Zambia. The instrumental width is about 0.2 A and the spectral resolution is about 26000. About 300 line profiles were obtained within a radial range of 1.0-1.5 R\\odot and position angle coverage of about 240\\circ. The line profiles were fitted with single Gaussian and their intensity, Doppler velocity, and line width have been obtained. Also obtained are the centroids of the line profiles which give a measure of line asymmetry. The histograms of Doppler velocity show excess blueshifts while the centroids reveal a pre-dominant blue wing in the line profiles. It has been found that the centroids and the Doppler velocities are highly correlated. This points to the presence of multiple components in the line profiles with an excess of blueshifted components. We have then obtained the(Blue-Red) wing intensity which clearly revea...

  7. Line shift, line asymmetry, and the 6Li/7Li isotopic ratio determination

    CERN Document Server

    Cayrel, Roger; Chand, Hum; Bonifacio, Piercarlo; Spite, Monique; Spite, François; Petitjean, Patrick; Ludwig, Hans-Günter; Caffau, Elisabetta

    2007-01-01

    Context: Line asymmetries are generated by convective Doppler shifts in stellar atmospheres, especially in metal-poor stars, where convective motions penetrate to higher atmospheric levels. Such asymmetries are usually neglected in abundance analyses. The determination of the 6Li/7Li isotopic ratio is prone to suffering from such asymmetries, as the contribution of 6Li is a slight blending reinforcement of the red wing of each component of the corresponding 7Li line, with respect to its blue wing. Aims: The present paper studies the halo star HD 74000 and estimates the impact of convection-related asymmetries on the Li isotopic ratio determination. Method: Two methods are used to meet this aim. The first, which is purely empirical, consists in deriving a template profile from another element that can be assumed to originate in the same stellar atmospheric layers as Li I, producing absorption lines of approximately the same equivalent width as individual components of the 7Li I resonance line. The second metho...

  8. The broad Fe K line profile in NGC 4151

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, J; Wang, T; Wang, Junxian.; Zhou, Youyuan.; Wang, Tinggui.

    1999-01-01

    We present an analysis of the Fe K line profile of NGC 4151 by using long ASCA observation data obtained in May 1995. The unprecedented good data quality, which is much better in the energy band around 6.4 keV than that of the famous 4.2-day ASCA observation of MCG -6-30-15 in July 1994, offers a unique opportunity to study the details of Fe K line profile. Apart from those characteristics already noticed in earlier ASCA observations on this object (Yaqoob et al. 1995): a broad and skewed profile, with a strong peak at about 6.4 keV and a large red wing extending to $\\sim$4 - 5 keV, which is remarkably similar to that of MCG -6-30-15, we also find a weak blue wing extending to about 8 keV, thanks to the good quality of the data. When fitted by a relativistic accretion disk line plus a narrow core at 6.4 keV, the data constrain the accretion disk to be nearly face-on, contrary to the edge-on geometry inferred from optical and UV observations. However, the extended blue wing can not be well fitted even after we...

  9. Undercover EUV Solar Jets Observed by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, N -H

    2016-01-01

    It is well-known that extreme ultraviolet emission emitted at the solar surface is absorbed by overlying cool plasma. Especially in active regions dark lanes in EUV images suggest that much of the surface activity is obscured. Simultaneous observations from IRIS, consisting of UV spectra and slit-jaw images give vital information with sub-arcsecond spatial resolution on the dynamics of jets not seen in EUV images. We studied a series of small jets from recently formed bipole pairs beside the trailing spot of active region 11991, which occurred on 2014 March 5 from 15:02:21 UT to 17:04:07 UT. There were collimated outflows with bright roots in the SJI 1400 {\\AA} (transition region) and 2796 {\\AA} (upper chromosphere) that were mostly not seen in AIA 304 {\\AA} (transition region) and AIA 171 \\AA\\ (lower corona) images. The Si IV spectra show strong blue-wing but no red-wing enhancements in the line profiles of the ejecta for all recurrent jets indicating outward flows without twists. We see two types of Mg II l...

  10. The Redder the Better: Wing Color Predicts Flight Performance in Monarch Butterflies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Andrew K.; Chi, Jean; Bradley, Catherine; Altizer, Sonia

    2012-01-01

    The distinctive orange and black wings of monarchs (Danaus plexippus) have long been known to advertise their bitter taste and toxicity to potential predators. Recent work also showed that both the orange and black coloration of this species can vary in response to individual-level and environmental factors. Here we examine the relationship between wing color and flight performance in captive-reared monarchs using a tethered flight mill apparatus to quantify butterfly flight speed, duration and distance. In three different experiments (totaling 121 individuals) we used image analysis to measure body size and four wing traits among newly-emerged butterflies prior to flight trials: wing area, aspect ratio (length/width), melanism, and orange hue. Results showed that monarchs with darker orange (approaching red) wings flew longer distances than those with lighter orange wings in analyses that controlled for sex and other morphometric traits. This finding is consistent with past work showing that among wild monarchs, those sampled during the fall migration are darker in hue (redder) than non-migratory monarchs. Together, these results suggest that pigment deposition onto wing scales during metamorphosis could be linked with traits that influence flight, such as thorax muscle size, energy storage or metabolism. Our results reinforce an association between wing color and flight performance in insects that is suggested by past studies of wing melansim and seasonal polyphenism, and provide an important starting point for work focused on mechanistic links between insect movement and color. PMID:22848463

  11. The functional basis of wing patterning in Heliconius butterflies: the molecules behind mimicry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronforst, Marcus R; Papa, Riccardo

    2015-05-01

    Wing-pattern mimicry in butterflies has provided an important example of adaptation since Charles Darwin and Alfred Russell Wallace proposed evolution by natural selection >150 years ago. The neotropical butterfly genus Heliconius played a central role in the development of mimicry theory and has since been studied extensively in the context of ecology and population biology, behavior, and mimicry genetics. Heliconius species are notable for their diverse color patterns, and previous crossing experiments revealed that much of this variation is controlled by a small number of large-effect, Mendelian switch loci. Recent comparative analyses have shown that the same switch loci control wing-pattern diversity throughout the genus, and a number of these have now been positionally cloned. Using a combination of comparative genetic mapping, association tests, and gene expression analyses, variation in red wing patterning throughout Heliconius has been traced back to the action of the transcription factor optix. Similarly, the signaling ligand WntA has been shown to control variation in melanin patterning across Heliconius and other butterflies. Our understanding of the molecular basis of Heliconius mimicry is now providing important insights into a variety of additional evolutionary phenomena, including the origin of supergenes, the interplay between constraint and evolvability, the genetic basis of convergence, the potential for introgression to facilitate adaptation, the mechanisms of hybrid speciation in animals, and the process of ecological speciation. Copyright © 2015 by the Genetics Society of America.

  12. V2051 Oph after superoutburst: out-of-plane material and the superhump light source

    CERN Document Server

    Papadaki, Christina; Steeghs, Danny; Schmidtobreick, Linda

    2008-01-01

    We performed a detailed spectroscopic analysis of the dwarf nova V2051 Oph at the end of its 1999 superoutburst. We studied and interpreted the simultaneous behaviour of various emission lines. We obtained high-resolution echelle spectroscopic data at ESO's NTT with EMMI, covering the spectral range of 4000--7500 Angstrom. The analysis was performed using standard IRAF tools. The indirect imaging technique of Doppler tomography was applied, in order to map the accretion disc and distinguish between the different emission sources. The spectra are characterised by strong Balmer emission, together with lines of HeI and the iron triplet FeII 42. All lines are double-peaked, but the blue-to-red peak strength and central absorption depth vary. The primary's velocity was found to be 84.9 km/sec. The spectrograms of the emission lines reveal the prograde rotation of a disc-like emitting region and, for the Balmer and HeI lines, an enhancement of the red-wing during eclipse indicates a bright spot origin. The modulati...

  13. The solar photospheric abundance of hafnium and thorium. Results from CO5BOLD 3D hydrodynamic model atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Caffau, Elisabetta; Ludwig, H -G; Bonifacio, P; Steffen, M; Behara, N T

    2008-01-01

    Context: The stable element hafnium (Hf) and the radioactive element thorium (Th) were recently suggested as a suitable pair for radioactive dating of stars. The applicability of this elemental pair needs to be established for stellar spectroscopy. Aims: We aim at a spectroscopic determination of the abundance of Hf and Th in the solar photosphere based on a \\cobold 3D hydrodynamical model atmosphere. We put this into a wider context by investigating 3D abundance corrections for a set of G- and F-type dwarfs. Method: High-resolution, high signal-to-noise solar spectra were compared to line synthesis calculations performed on a solar CO5BOLD model. For the other atmospheres, we compared synthetic spectra of CO5BOLD 3D and associated 1D models. Results: For Hf we find a photospheric abundance A(Hf)=0.87+-0.04, in good agreement with a previous analysis, based on 1D model atmospheres. The weak Th ii 401.9 nm line constitutes the only Th abundance indicator available in the solar spectrum. It lies in the red wing...

  14. Ab initio Stellar Astrophysics: Reliable Modeling of Cool White Dwarf Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Kowalski, Piotr M

    2010-01-01

    Over the last decade {\\it ab initio} modeling of material properties has become widespread in diverse fields of research. It has proved to be a powerful tool for predicting various properties of matter under extreme conditions. We apply modern computational chemistry and materials science methods, including density functional theory (DFT), to solve lingering problems in the modeling of the dense atmospheres of cool white dwarfs ($T_{\\rm eff}\\rm <7000 \\, K$). Our work on the revision and improvements of the absorption mechanisms in the hydrogen and helium dominated atmospheres resulted in a new set of atmosphere models. By inclusion of the Ly-$\\rm \\alpha$ red wing opacity we successfully fitted the entire spectral energy distributions of known cool DA stars. In the subsequent work we fitted the majority of the coolest stars with hydrogen-rich models. This finding challenges our understanding of the spectral evolution of cool white dwarfs. We discuss a few examples, including the cool companion to the pulsar...

  15. Gravitational lens system SDSS J1339+1310: microlensing factory and time delay

    CERN Document Server

    Goicoechea, Luis J

    2016-01-01

    We spectroscopically re-observed the gravitational lens system SDSS J1339+1310 using OSIRIS on the GTC. We also monitored the $r$-band variability of the two quasar images (A and B) with the LT over 143 epochs in the period 2009$-$2016. These new data in both the wavelength and time domains have confirmed that the system is an unusual microlensing factory. The C$\\scriptsize{\\rm{IV}}$ emission line is remarkably microlensed, since the microlensing magnification of B relative to that for A, $\\mu_{\\rm{BA}}$, reaches a value of 1.4 ($\\sim$ 0.4 mag) for its core. Moreover, the B image shows a red wing enhancement of C$\\scriptsize{\\rm{IV}}$ flux (relative to A), and $\\mu_{\\rm{BA}}$ = 2 (0.75 mag) for the C$\\scriptsize{\\rm{IV}}$ broad-line emission. Regarding the nuclear continuum, we find a chromatic behaviour of $\\mu_{\\rm{BA}}$, which roughly varies from $\\sim$ 5 (1.75 mag) at 7000 \\AA\\ to $\\sim$ 6 (1.95 mag) at 4000 \\AA. We also detect significant microlensing variability in the $r$ band, and this includes a numb...

  16. The redder the better: wing color predicts flight performance in monarch butterflies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew K Davis

    Full Text Available The distinctive orange and black wings of monarchs (Danaus plexippus have long been known to advertise their bitter taste and toxicity to potential predators. Recent work also showed that both the orange and black coloration of this species can vary in response to individual-level and environmental factors. Here we examine the relationship between wing color and flight performance in captive-reared monarchs using a tethered flight mill apparatus to quantify butterfly flight speed, duration and distance. In three different experiments (totaling 121 individuals we used image analysis to measure body size and four wing traits among newly-emerged butterflies prior to flight trials: wing area, aspect ratio (length/width, melanism, and orange hue. Results showed that monarchs with darker orange (approaching red wings flew longer distances than those with lighter orange wings in analyses that controlled for sex and other morphometric traits. This finding is consistent with past work showing that among wild monarchs, those sampled during the fall migration are darker in hue (redder than non-migratory monarchs. Together, these results suggest that pigment deposition onto wing scales during metamorphosis could be linked with traits that influence flight, such as thorax muscle size, energy storage or metabolism. Our results reinforce an association between wing color and flight performance in insects that is suggested by past studies of wing melansim and seasonal polyphenism, and provide an important starting point for work focused on mechanistic links between insect movement and color.

  17. Dust evolution, a global view: III. Core/mantle grains, organic nano-globules, comets and surface chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. P.

    2016-12-01

    Within the framework of The Heterogeneous dust Evolution Model for Interstellar Solids (THEMIS), this work explores the surface processes and chemistry relating to core/mantle interstellar and cometary grain structures and their influence on the nature of these fascinating particles. It appears that a realistic consideration of the nature and chemical reactivity of interstellar grain surfaces could self-consistently and within a coherent framework explain: the anomalous oxygen depletion, the nature of the CO dark gas, the formation of `polar ice' mantles, the red wing on the 3 μm water ice band, the basis for the O-rich chemistry observed in hot cores, the origin of organic nano-globules and the 3.2 μm `carbonyl' absorption band observed in comet reflectance spectra. It is proposed that the reaction of gas phase species with carbonaceous a-C(:H) grain surfaces in the interstellar medium, in particular the incorporation of atomic oxygen into grain surfaces in epoxide functional groups, is the key to explaining these observations. Thus, the chemistry of cosmic dust is much more intimately related with that of the interstellar gas than has previously been considered. The current models for interstellar gas and dust chemistry will therefore most likely need to be fundamentally modified to include these new grain surface processes.

  18. Accounting for highly excited states in detailed opacity calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Pain, Jean-Christophe

    2015-01-01

    In multiply-charged ion plasmas, a significant number of electrons may occupy high-energy orbitals. These "Rydberg" electrons, when they act as spectators, are responsible for a number of satellites of X-ray absorption or emission lines, yielding a broadening of the red wing of the resonance lines. The contribution of such satellite lines may be important, because of the high degeneracy of the relevant excited configurations which give these large Boltzmann weights. However, it is in general difficult to take these configurations into account since they are likely to give rise to a large number of lines. We propose to model the perturbation induced by the spectators in a way similar to the Partially-Resolved-Transition-Array approach recently published by C. Iglesias. It consists in a partial detailed-line-accounting calculation in which the effect of the Rydberg spectators is included through a shift and width, expressed in terms of the canonical partition functions, which are key-ingredients of the Super-Tr...

  19. Detection of forbidden line components of lithium-like carbon in stellar spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Werner, K; Hoyer, D; Quinet, P

    2016-01-01

    We report the first identification of forbidden line components from an element heavier than helium in the spectrum of astrophysical plasmas. As yet, these components were identified only in laboratory plasmas and not in astrophysical objects. Forbidden components are well known for neutral helium lines in hot stars, particularly in helium-rich post-AGB stars and white dwarfs. We discovered that two hitherto unidentified lines in the ultraviolet spectra of hot hydrogen-deficient (pre-) white dwarfs can be identified as forbidden line components of triply ionized carbon (C IV). The forbidden components (3p-4f and 3d-4d) appear in the blue and red wings of the strong, Stark broadened 3p-4d and 3d-4f lines at 1108 Angstroem and 1169 Angstroem, respectively. They are visible over a wide effective temperature range (60,000-200,000 K) in helium-rich (DO) white dwarfs and PG1159 stars that have strongly oversolar carbon abundances.

  20. Mercury residues in tissues of dead and surviving birds fed methylmercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finley, M.T.; Stickel, W.H.; Christensen, R.E.

    1979-01-01

    Concentrations of mercury in passerine birds fed diets containing 40 ppm methylmercury were similar in tissues of birds that died from mercury poisoning and in those that were sacrificed after half the group had died. Residues were higher in tissues of birds that died, but the differences were not statistically significant. Residue levels were highest in livers, followed by kidneys and brains. Levels of mercury were similar in breast muscle, carcass, and whole body. Mercury levels were highest in redwinged blackbirds, lowest in grackles, and intermediate in starlings and cowbirds. Mercury concentrations exceeded 20 ppm in all tissues of all species and were similar to levels reported in wild birds known to have died of mercury poisoning.

  1. Recovery of a mining-damaged stream ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher A. Mebane

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper presents a 30+ year record of changes in benthic macroinvertebrate communities and fish populations associated with improving water quality in mining-influenced streams. Panther Creek, a tributary to the Salmon River in central Idaho, USA suffered intensive damage from mining and milling operations at the Blackbird Mine that released copper (Cu, arsenic (As, and cobalt (Co into tributaries. From the 1960s through the 1980s, no fish and few aquatic invertebrates could be found in 40 km of mine-affected reaches of Panther Creek downstream of the metals contaminated tributaries, Blackbird and Big Deer Creeks. Efforts to restore water quality began in 1995, and by 2002 Cu levels had been reduced by about 90%, with incremental declines since. Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss were early colonizers, quickly expanding their range as areas became habitable when Cu concentrations dropped below about 3X the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s biotic ligand model (BLM based chronic aquatic life criterion. Anadromous Chinook Salmon (O. tshawytscha and steelhead (O. mykiss have also reoccupied Panther Creek. Full recovery of salmonid populations occurred within about 12-years after the onset of restoration efforts and about 4-years after the Cu chronic criteria had mostly been met, with recovery interpreted as similarity in densities, biomass, year class strength, and condition factors between reference sites and mining-influenced sites. Shorthead Sculpin (Cottus confusus were slower than salmonids to disperse and colonize. While benthic macroinvertebrate biomass has increased, species richness has plateaued at about 70 to 90% of reference despite the Cu criterion having been met for several years. Different invertebrate taxa had distinctly different recovery trajectories. Among the slowest taxa to recover were Ephemerella, Cinygmula and Rhithrogena mayflies, Enchytraeidae oligochaetes, and Heterlimnius aquatic beetles. Potential

  2. Epidemic Spread of Usutu Virus in Southwest Germany in 2011 to 2013 and Monitoring of Wild Birds for Usutu and West Nile Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Ute; Jöst, Hanna; Müller, Kerstin; Fischer, Dominik; Rinder, Monika; Tietze, Dieter Thomas; Danner, Klaus-Jürgen; Becker, Norbert; Skuballa, Jasmin; Hamann, Hans-Peter; Bosch, Stefan; Fast, Christine; Eiden, Martin; Schmidt-Chanasit, Jonas; Groschup, Martin H

    2015-08-01

    Mosquito-borne viruses are becoming an increasing threat for Europe. One of these viruses is Usutu virus (USUV), a single-stranded RNA virus belonging to the Japanese encephalitis virus group within the family Flaviviridae. Since the occurrence of USUV among wild birds in June, 2011, infected Blackbirds (Turdus merula) have frequently been found dead in southwest Germany, cumulating in a massive die-off. Moreover, other bird species (Strigiformes) in this region have been affected. In a first study, 209 of over 600 dead birds (wild birds and birds kept in aviaries) collected from 2011 to 2013 carried USUV, more than 88% of them Blackbirds. USUV had already been detected in 2010, one year before the epizooty, in a mosquito-based surveillance program in Germany. The main epidemic area of the USUV outbreak in wild birds in southwest Germany has been similar for the last three years. In a second study during 2011 to 2013, 902 live migratory and resident birds (representing 87 bird species belonging to 14 bird orders) from four different sampling sites were bled and tested serologically and by qPCR for West Nile virus (WNV) and USUV infections. No USUV or WNV genomes were detected. Some migratory birds (mainly long-distance migrants and some partial migrants) carried neutralizing antibodies against WNV as discriminated by USUV and WNV cross-neutralization tests. Only few resident birds showed relevant USUV-specific neutralizing antibodies. The occurrence of USUV in the Upper Rhine valley area of southwest Germany is a proof of principle for the incursion and spread of other arthropod-borne (arbo)-viruses along these routes. Therefore, monitoring studies in birds and mosquitoes for the presence of arboviruses in these areas are indispensable.

  3. Boldness behavior and stress physiology in a novel urban environment suggest rapid correlated evolutionary adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Gonçalo C.; Whittaker, Danielle J.; Campbell-Nelson, Samuel; Robertson, Kyle W.; Ketterson, Ellen D.

    2012-01-01

    Novel or changing environments expose animals to diverse stressors that likely require coordinated hormonal and behavioral adaptations. Predicted adaptations to urban environments include attenuated physiological responses to stressors and bolder exploratory behaviors, but few studies to date have evaluated the impact of urban life on codivergence of these hormonal and behavioral traits in natural systems. Here, we demonstrate rapid adaptive shifts in both stress physiology and correlated boldness behaviors in a songbird, the dark-eyed junco, following its colonization of a novel urban environment. We compared elevation in corticosterone (CORT) in response to handling and flight initiation distances in birds from a recently established urban population in San Diego, California to birds from a nearby wildland population in the species' ancestral montane breeding range. We also measured CORT and exploratory behavior in birds raised from early life in a captive common garden study. We found persistent population differences for both reduced CORT responses and bolder exploratory behavior in birds from the colonist population, as well as significant negative covariation between maximum CORT and exploratory behavior. Although early developmental effects cannot be ruled out, these results suggest contemporary adaptive evolution of correlated hormonal and behavioral traits associated with colonization of an urban habitat. PMID:22936840

  4. A phylogenetic analysis of the emberizid sparrows based on three mitochondrial genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Rebecca J; Spicer, Greg S

    2003-10-01

    Previous molecular phylogenetic studies have examined the taxonomic relationships among a number of typical emberizid sparrow genera. To help clarify these relationships, we sequenced a 1673 base pair fragment for the complete sequence of three mitochondrial genes: adenosine triphosphatase (Atp8 and Atp6) and cytochrome oxidase subunit III (COIII) for 38 sparrow species, along with Passerina amoena (Cardinalidae) and Piranga ludoviciana (Thraupidae) which were selected as the outgroups. Our analysis confirms the monophyly of traditional genera such as Junco, Melospiza, and Zonotrichia. Although Calcarius and Plectrophenax are often thought to be putative emberizids, all our analyses placed these genera basal to all other sparrows examined. As observed with Calcarius, Spizella did not form a monophyletic group, with S. arborea being the sister-taxon to Passerella iliaca. Our analyses also suggest that Aimophila ruficeps is probably more closely related to the "brown towhees" (Pipilo aberti, P. crissalis, and P. fuscus) than its putative congeners. The genus Ammodramus was also not monophyletic, since it appears that Passerculus sandwichensis is more closely related to A. henslowii and A. leconteii then either one is related to its congener A. savannarum. Finally, our analyses exhibited other unsuspected associations, such as the sister-taxon relationships between Amphispiza bilineata and the Chondestes grammacus/Calamospiza melanocorys clade, and Amphispiza belli and Pooecetes gramineus.

  5. Extração de nutrientes por macrófitas cultivadas com lixiviado de aterro de resíduos sólidos urbanos Nutrient extraction by macrophytes cultivated in a solid waste landfill leachate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Alexandre Varella Escosteguy

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available A absorção de nutrientes por plantas tem sido utilizada para remoção de íons em solos ou outros meios contaminados. Neste trabalho, avaliou-se a capacidade de extração de nutrientes das macrófitas taboa (Typha sp. e junco (Eleocharis sp., cultivadas em monocultivo e consorciadas, em meio contendo brita e lixiviado de aterro de resíduos sólidos urbanos. O cultivo foi em caixas de madeira, contendo brita e lixiviado, em estufa plástica, durante cinco meses. Foram avaliados os teores e as quantidades extraídas, por planta e por área, de macro (N, P, K, Ca, Mg e S e micronutrientes (Fe, Mn, Cu e Zn das macrófitas, além da produção de matéria seca e população de plantas. Essas variáveis foram determinadas na parte aérea das plantas, coletada em cinco cortes, efetuados uma vez por mês. Em geral, os teores e as quantidades extraídas de nutrientes, por planta e por área, não variaram entre o monocultivo e o consórcio, exceto as quantidades extraídas por área de P, K e Zn, que foram maiores no consórcio. A extração de macronutrientes foi maior na taboa e decresceu na ordem: K > N > Ca > P ~ Mg > S (taboa e K > N > P ~ Ca ~ Mg ~ S (junco, e a de micronutrientes, na ordem: Mn > Fe> Zn > Cu. A quantidade extraída de K foi 648 (taboa e 159 kg ha-1 (junco, enquanto a de Mn foi de 6,6 (taboa e 1,4 kg ha-1 (junco. As quantidades de nutrientes extraídas variaram de acordo com o teor deles na parte aérea e a produção de matéria seca das macrófitas, sendo secundária a importância da população de plantas, em ambos os tipos de cultivo. A quantidade de nutrientes extraídos do lixiviado pela taboa foi expressiva, principalmente de K, N e Mn.Plant nutrient extraction has been used to remove inorganic ions from soil or other polluted media. In this study, the nutrient extraction capacity of the macrophytes Typha sp. and Eleocharis sp., cultivated as monoculture and as consortium, was evaluated in a growing medium containing

  6. Textile production in the Bronze Age: an assemblage of splindes or bobbins of yarn from the site of Terlinques (Villena, Alicante

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    Jover Maestre, Francisco Javier

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available The archeological field work on the Bronze Age site of Terlinques (Villena, Alicante has given an exceptional sample of spindles or bobbins of rush fibre of yarn in a room destroyed by a violent fire. A meticulous study of these special objects and their process of analysis and restoration yields new perspectives on knowledge in first stages of textile production during Bronze Age in Eastern Spain.

    Los trabajos arqueológicos que se llevan a cabo en el yacimiento de la Edad del Bronce de Terlinques (Villena, Alicante han proporcionado un excepcional conjunto de husos o bobinas de hilo de junco. Éstos se hallaban almacenados en el interior de una habitación destruida por un violento incendio. El detenido estudio de estos singulares objetos y su proceso de análisis y restauración nos permite aproximamos, desde nuevas perspectivas, al conocimiento de la producción textil en las etapas iniciales de la Edad del Bronce en el Levante de la Península Ibérica.

  7. Sustentabilidade Rural no Semiárido Cearense. Uma análise social, biofísica e microeconômica

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    Déa de Lima Vidal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Six rural communities in semiarid Ceará were analyzed for sociological, microeconomic and biophysical sustainability indicators. The collection in situ of original data was carried out through questionnaires that allowed the elaboration of twenty one variables in total. Tapera, Junco and Tiassol were evident more sustainable in relation to biophysical indicators because they use their available surfaces in more diverse way associating crop production to livestock activities of small ruminants. However, the economic and sociological indicators, except for holder age and wage labor, were not statistically different between these communities. Only one community showed up sustainable for all the indicators because it is the more diverse and plural practicing agriculture by combining cereal crops, forage, vegetable garden and orchard with small ruminant livestock with exclusive family labor. Even featuring a smaller total area its ability to diversify agricultural and livestock became viable. In that community the rural units from the latest settlement are managed by intermediate age holders with the second largest number of successors. Finally, its microeconomic results indicate the expanded capacity of productive assets reproduction in these semiarid agroecosystem.

  8. Metastatic gastric cancer – focus on targeted therapies

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    Meza-Junco J

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Judith Meza-Junco, Michael B SawyerDepartment of Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta, CanadaAbstract: Gastric cancer (GC is currently the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide; unfortunately, most patients will present with locally advanced or metastatic disease. Despite recent progress in diagnosis, surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, prognosis remains poor. A better understanding of GC biology and signaling pathways is expected to improve GC therapy, and the integration of targeted therapies has recently become possible and appears to be promising. This article focuses on anti-Her-2 therapy, specifically trastuzumab, as well as other epidermal growth factor receptor antagonists such as cetuximab, panitumub, matuzumab, nimotzumab, gefitinib, and erlotinib. Additionally, drugs that target angiogenesis pathways are also under investigation, particulary bevacizumab, ramucirumab, sorafenib, sunitinib, and cediranib. Other targeted agents in preclinical or early clinical development include mTOR inhibitors, anti c-MET, polo-like kinase 1 inhibitors, anti-insulin-like growth factor, anti-heat shock proteins, and small molecules targeting Hedgehog signaling.Keywords: gastric cancer, targeted therapy, antiangiogenesis drugs, anti-EGFR drugs

  9. Ectoparasites of bats (Mammalia: Chiroptera) in Atlantic forest fragments in north-eastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezerra, Rayanna Hellem Santos; de Vasconcelos, Pedro Fonseca; Bocchiglieri, Adriana

    2016-10-01

    In Brazil, most studies involving parasites of bats (bat flies) treat the mid-west, south-east, and south of the country. This work aimed to characterize the ectoparasites community associated with bats in the Atlantic forest in the state of Sergipe, north-eastern Brazil. Sampling was conducted between January and June 2013 in the Serra de Itabaiana National Park (PNSI) and between November 2013 and June 2015 in the Wildlife Refuge Mata do Junco (RVSMJ). Parasitological indexes were determined, and the influence of host sex and the seasonality in prevalence rates and mean intensity for the most abundant parasites was evaluated. Some 129 parasites were collected in PNSI and 296 in RVSMJ, and 100 and 70.6 %, respectively, belong to the family Streblidae. The differences in parasitological rates in Sergipe in relation to other studies may be associated with the environmental characteristics and the composition of the host community. The influence of sex and the seasonal prevalence of Speiseria ambigua and Trichobius joblingi, associated with Carollia perspicillata, may be associated with a lower rate of female captures and low sampling in the dry season. This is a pioneer study in Sergipe that reveals the occurrence of 16 species of streblids and representatives of Acari and Basilia spp., highlighting the need for more studies to increase the wealth and understanding of host-parasite associations in the state.

  10. The occurrence of blood protozoa in North American birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, C.M.

    1957-01-01

    This report is based on review of literature and examination of a great number of blood smears from native birds in North America, particularly Passeriformes and Anseriformes. Haemoproteus and Leucocytozoon occur most frequently, although various species of Plasmodium and, occasionally, other less known forms are recognized. Prevalence of these parasites in wild birds is related to season of year and age of host. Highest incidence occurs in spring and summer. Relapse of Haemoproteus and Leucocytozoon is common in the spring. Blood smears of adult wood ducks, on the Atlantic flyway, in April and May show a high prevalence of Haemoproteus, while smears at other times are usually negative. Although the author (Herman, 1938) demonstrated that young redwings in Massachusetts primarily acquired Plasmodium infections after leaving the nest, in many cases infection is acquired by the nestling. Nestling magpies in northeastern California acquire a high incidence of infection with several parasites. The hypothesis, expressed by Manwell and Herman (1935), that a higher prevalence of infection can be expected in more southerly ranging species, is subject to question. Smears taken during the winter demonstrate higher parasite prevalence in birds at the southern limits of their range, such as juncos and white-throated sparrows, than do smears of other species with more southern range. Little is known of significance of these parasites to survival of the host, although O'Roke ( 1934) reported a high loss for ducklings from Leucocytozoon and there have been occasional reports of fatality in other species.

  11. Valoración del cambio ambiental según los “junqueros” y “leñateros” en el sector sur de la región rioplatense (Argentina

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    Pablo C. Stampella

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Mediante un abordaje etnoecológico, se realizaron 24 entrevistas a informantes calificados de los partidos de Magdalena y Punta Indio, en el litoral rioplatense, con el objetivo de recopilar y evaluar las narrativas de junqueros y leñateros locales respecto del cambio ambiental y su impacto en sus vidas cotidianas. Estas actividades extractivas (obtención de leña y recolección de juncos fueron muy importantes en esta zona, aunque en la actualidad sufren una merma, sobre todo en la actividad junquera, debido principalmente a dos acontecimientos que marcaron el rumbo de la actividad: derrame de petróleo y cambios en los sistemas productivos. En la actividad leñera se registraron cambios principalmente como producto de la creación de la Reserva de Biosfera “Parque Costero del Sur”, sin embargo, a diferencia de los junqueros, la abundancia del recurso leñatero y la reformulación en las prácticas y estrategias de selección hizo posible la permanencia de la actividad a pesar de los cambios sufridos en el área de estudio. Las actividades ejercidas por los informantes influyeron en las narrativas sobre su valoración del cambio ambiental, dado que se reconocieron pocos cambios en común, principalmente, en relación con el clima y la fauna.

  12. Use of observed wild bird activity on poultry farms and a literature review to target species as high priority for avian influenza testing in 2 regions of Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Theresa E; Ribble, Carl; Stephen, Craig; Kelton, David; Toews, Lorraine; Osterhold, Jason; Wheeler, Hazel

    2012-02-01

    The risk of avian influenza outbreaks in poultry is partially dependent on the probability of contact between domestic poultry and wild birds shedding avian influenza (AI) virus. The major objective of this study was to document wild bird activity on poultry farms to determine which wild bird species should be targeted for AI surveillance in Canada. We collected data in 2 major poultry producing regions of Canada, southwestern Ontario and the Fraser Valley of British Columbia, on the relative abundance of various wild bird species found on poultry farms and on how these species utilized habitat around poultry farms. We reviewed the published literature to determine what was known about AI pathobiology in the species we observed. From these results we created a list of 10 wild bird species that are a priority for further study. These species are the European starling, barn swallow, rock dove, American crow, northwestern crow, American robin, dark-eyed junco, song sparrow, horned lark, and common grackle. Abundance of these and other species varied between provinces and seasons.

  13. Beneficios de la cobertura muerta para el cultivo del tomate (Solanumlycopersicum L. en Sancti Spíritus, Cuba.

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    Kolima Peña Calzada

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de la investigación fue evaluar la utilización de biomasa vegetal como cobertura muerta del suelo en el cultivo del tomate. Se realizaron dos experimentos en dos agroecosistemas y se utilizó como cobertura biomasa vegetal de ambas fincas. Los experimentos fueron montados en bloque al azar con tres y cuatro repeticiones. El experimento 1 constó de tres tratamientos, uno cubierto con guinea (PanicummaximaPers., otro con junco de laguna (ScirpuslacustrisL. y un Control. En el 2 se aplicaron cuatro tratamientos, uno cubierto con restos de cosecha de arroz (Oryza sativa L. otro con guinea (Panicum máxima, otro con hojas de plátano (Musa paradisiaca L. y un Control. Se realizaron mediciones de temperatura de suelo durante 8 semanas, a las 8:00 horas a las 11:00 horas a las 14:00 horas y 17:00 horas. Además se evaluaron las características morfoagronómicas del cultivo (número de frutos por planta, diámetro y masa de los mismos y el rendimiento productivo. Las características morfoagronómicas mostraron los mejores resultados en los tratamientos cubiertos. Los rendimientos en ambos experimentos fueron estadísticamente superiores donde se utilizó la cobertura del suelo.

  14. Water and ammonia abundances in S140 with the Odin satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, C. M.; Olberg, M.; . Hjalmarson, Å.; Spaans, M.; Black, J. H.; Frisk, U.; Liljeström, T.; Olofsson, A. O. H.; Poelman, D. R.; Sandqvist, Aa.

    2009-02-01

    Aims: We investigate the effect of the physical environment on water and ammonia abundances across the S140 photodissociation region (PDR) with an embedded outflow. Methods: We used the Odin satellite to obtain strip maps of the ground-state rotational transitions of ortho-water and ortho-ammonia, as well as CO(5-4) and 13CO(5-4) across the PDR, and H218O in the central position. A physi-chemical inhomogeneous PDR model was used to compute the temperature and abundance distributions for water, ammonia, and CO. A multi-zone escape probability method then calculated the level populations and intensity distributions. These results are compared to a homogeneous model computed with an enhanced version of the RADEX code. Results: H2O, NH{3}, and 13CO show emission from an extended PDR with a narrow line width of 3 km s-1. Like CO, the water line profile is dominated by outflow emission, but mainly in the red wing. Even though CO shows strong self-absorption, no signs of self-absorption are seen in the water line. The H218O molecule is not detected. The PDR model suggests that the water emission arises mainly from the surfaces of optically thick, high-density clumps with n(H_2) ⪆ 106 cm-3 and a clump water abundance, with respect to H2, of 5 × 10-8. The mean water abundance in the PDR is 5 × 10-9 and between 4 × 10-8-4 × 10-7 in the outflow derived from a simple two-level approximation. The RADEX model points to a somewhat higher average PDR water abundance of 1 × 10-8. At low temperatures deep in the cloud, the water emission is weaker, likely due to adsorption onto dust grains, while ammonia is still abundant. Ammonia is also observed in the extended clumpy PDR, likely from the same high density and warm clumps as water. The average ammonia abundance is about the same as for water: 4 × 10-9 and 8 × 10-9 given by the PDR model and RADEX, respectively. The differences between the models most likely arise from uncertainties in density, beam-filling, and volume

  15. Radiation-damped profiles of extremely high column density neutral hydrogen: implications of cosmic reionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Kiehunn

    2017-01-01

    Incorporating the time-dependent second-order perturbation theory for the Lyman scattering cross-section, we investigate the intergalactic absorption profiles of extremely high column density systems near the end of cosmic reionization. Assuming a representative set of the redshift distribution of neutral hydrogen, we quantitatively examined the impact of inhomogeneous density on the intrinsic absorption profiles. The cumulative absorption by neutral patches in the line of sight mainly affects the far off-centre region of the red damping wing, but the effect is not significant. The shape of the line centre can be modified by the near-zone distribution due to high opacities of the near-resonance scattering. On the other hand, the HWHM (half width at half-maximum) as an effective line width is relatively less sensitive to the local inhomogeneity. Specifically, when the two local damping wings of Lyα and Lyβ are close in spectra of the strongly damped systems, accurate profiles of both lines are required. In the case of N_{H I}≲ 10^{21} { cm^{-2}}, the two-level approximation is marginally applicable for the damping wing fit within 5 - 7 per cent errors. However, as the local column density reaches N_{H I}˜ 10^{22.3} { cm^{-2}}, this classical approximation yields a relative error of a 10 per cent overestimation in the red wing and a 20 per cent underestimation in the blue wing of Lyα. If severe extinction by the Lyα forests is carefully subtracted, the intrinsic absorption profile will provide a better constraint on the local ionized states. For practical applications, an analytic fitting function for the Lyβ scattering is derived.

  16. UV spectral variability in the Herbig Ae star HR 5999. 11: The accretion interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, M. R.; Grady, C. A.; The, P. S.

    1993-01-01

    We report recent IUE high- and low-dispersion observations with the IUE long wavelength camera (LWP) and short wavelength camera (SWP) of the Herbig Ae star HR 5999. We have found a dramatic change in the structure of the Mg II h and k lines (2795.5, 2802.7 A) along with some continuum flux excesses especially at the short end of the SWP camera. LWP high dispersion observations of HR 5999 obtained between 1979 and 1990, at times of comparatively low UV continuum fluxes, exhibit P Cygni type m profiles in the Mg II resonance doublet. In contrast, observations made from September 1990 through March 16-18, 1992, with high W continuum fluxes, present Mg II lines with reverse P Cygni profiles indicative of some active episodic accretion. Accreting gas can also be detected in the additional red wings of the various Fe II and Mn II absorption lines, with velocities up to +300-350 km/s (September 1990). By September 10, 1992 the Mg II profile had returned to the type III P Cygni profile similar to those from earlier spectra. The correlation between the presence of large column densities of accreting gas and the continuum light variations supports suggestions by several authors that HR 5999 is surrounded by an optically thick, viscously heated accretion disk. Detection of accreting gas in the line of sight to HR 5999 permits us to place constraints on our viewing geometry for this system. A discussion is included comparing the spectral and physical similarities between HR 5999 and the more evolved proto-planetary candidate system, beta Pictoris.

  17. Health assessment of captive tinamids (Aves, Tinamiformes) in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Marcus Vinícius Romero; Ferreira Júnior, Francisco Carlos; Andery, Danielle de Assis; Fernandes, André Almeida; de Araújo, Alessandra Vitelli; de Resende, José Sérgio; Donatti, Rogério Venâncio; Martins, Nelson Rodrigo da Silva

    2012-09-01

    Ninety-five (95) captive tinamids (Aves, Tinamiformes) of species Crypturellus obsoletus (brown tinamou), Crypturellus parvirostris (small-billed tinamou), Crypturellus tataupa (Tataupa tinamou), Crypturellus undulatus (undulated tinamou), Rhynchotus rufescens (red-winged tinamou), and Tinamus solitarius (solitary tinamou) were evaluated for diseases of mandatory control in the Brazilian Poultry Health Program (PNSA). Antibodies were detected by serum agglutination test (SAT) in 4 birds for Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) and in 27 birds for Salmonella Pullorum (SP) and Salmonella Gallinarum (SG). However, by hemagglutination inhibition (HI), sera were negative to MG and Mycoplasma synoviae (MS). Bacteriology was negative for SP and SG. No antibody was detected by HI to avian paramyxovirus type 1. However, antibodies to infectious bursal disease virus were detected in 9.4% (9/95) by ELISA. Fecal parasitology and necropsy revealed Capillaria spp. in 44.2% (42/95), Eimeria rhynchoti in 42.1% (40/95), Strongyloides spp. in 100% (20/20), Ascaridia spp., and unknown sporozoa in small-billed tinamou. Ectoparasites were detected in 42.1% (40/95) by inspection, and collected for identification. The louse Strongylocotes lipogonus (Insecta: Phthiraptera) was found on all Rhynchotus rufescens. An additional four lice species were found on 14 individuals. Traumatic lesions included four individual R. rufescens (4/40, 10%) with rhinotheca fracture, one with mandible fracture and three with posttraumatic ocular lesions (3/40, 7.5%). One C. parvirostris had phalangeal loss, another had tibiotarsal joint ankylosis and another had an open wound on the foot. Results suggest that major poultry infections/ diseases may not be relevant in tinamids, and that this group of birds, as maintained within distances for biosecurity purposes, may not represent a risk to commercial poultry. Ecto- and endoparasites were common, disseminated, and varied; regular monitoring of flocks is recommended

  18. Self-consistent Black Hole Accretion Spectral Models and the Forgotten Role of Coronal Comptonization of Reflection Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, James F.; García, Javier A.; Eikmann, Wiebke; McClintock, Jeffrey E.; Brenneman, Laura W.; Dauser, Thomas; Fabian, Andrew C.

    2017-02-01

    Continuum and reflection spectral models have each been widely employed in measuring the spins of accreting black holes. However, the two approaches have not been implemented together in a photon-conserving, self-consistent framework. We develop such a framework using the black hole X-ray binary GX 339-4 as a touchstone source, and we demonstrate three important ramifications. (1) Compton scattering of reflection emission in the corona is routinely ignored, but is an essential consideration given that reflection is linked to the regimes with strongest Comptonization. Properly accounting for this causes the inferred reflection fraction to increase substantially, especially for the hard state. Another important impact of the Comptonization of reflection emission by the corona is the downscattered tail. Downscattering has the potential to mimic the relativistically broadened red wing of the Fe line associated with a spinning black hole. (2) Recent evidence for a reflection component with a harder spectral index than the power-law continuum is naturally explained as Compton-scattered reflection emission. (3) Photon conservation provides an important constraint on the hard state’s accretion rate. For bright hard states, we show that disk truncation to large scales R\\gg {R}{ISCO} is unlikely as this would require accretion rates far in excess of the observed \\dot{M} of the brightest soft states. Our principal conclusion is that when modeling relativistically broadened reflection, spectral models should allow for coronal Compton scattering of the reflection features, and when possible, take advantage of the additional constraining power from linking to the thermal disk component.

  19. Gravitational lens system SDSS J1339+1310: microlensing factory and time delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goicoechea, L. J.; Shalyapin, V. N.

    2016-12-01

    We spectroscopically re-observed the gravitational lens system SDSS J1339+1310 using OSIRIS on the GTC. We also monitored the r-band variability of the two quasar images (A and B) with the LT over 143 epochs in the period 2009-2016. These new data in both the wavelength and time domains have confirmed that the system is an unusual microlensing factory. The C iv emission line is remarkably microlensed, since the microlensing magnification of B relative to that for A, μBA, reaches a value of 1.4 ( 0.4 mag) for its core. Moreover, the B image shows a red wing enhancement of C iv flux (relative to A), and μBA = 2 (0.75 mag) for the C iv broad-line emission. Regarding the nuclear continuum, we find a chromatic behaviour of μBA, which roughly varies from 5 (1.75 mag) at 7000 Å to 6 (1.95 mag) at 4000 Å. We also detect significant microlensing variability in the r band, and this includes a number of microlensing events on timescales of 50-100 d. Fortunately, the presence of an intrinsic 0.7 mag dip in the light curves of A and B, permitted us to measure the time delay between both quasar images. This delay is ΔtAB = 47 d (1σ confidence interval; A is leading), in good agreement with predictions of lens models. Tables 1-3 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/596/A77

  20. High-cadence observations of spicular-type events and their wave-signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetye, Juie

    2016-05-01

    We present, a statistical study of spectral images, taken from the CRISP instrument at the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope in H-alpha 656.28 nm of fast spicules with Doppler velocities in the range of -41km/s to +41 km/s. Remarkably, many of these spicules display apparent velocities above 500 km/s, very short lifetimes of up to 20 s combined with width or thickness of 100 km and apparent lengths of around 3500 km. Here we present, the other spectral properties of these events in the H-alpha line scan. Most features showed signature in multiple line position as we scan along the line scan. In around 89 % of the cases, there is temporal offset by 3.7 s to 5 s between the red-wing and blue-wing signatures. Another result is that 25% of cases are repetitive i.e. appear at the same location but they are not co-temporal or necessarily periodic in nature. Putting all the evidence together, we interpret the observations as mass motions (of flux tubes) that appear in the field-of-view of CRISP’s 0.0060 nm filters in the line of sight, along their projection as we scan. Further we observed transverse motion associated with these structures, which in some cases could be related to high-frequency kink-waves. We describe some cases showing this motion and the energies associated with them. The current work presented already tests the limits of current telescopes in terms of the temporal and spatial resolution. DKIST VTF instrument, having 3 times more spatial resolution than CRISP and much higher temporal resolution, we can being to understand the nature of such fine-scale transient phenomena in greater details.

  1. NST and IRIS multi-wavelength observations of an M1.0 class solar flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas Domínguez, Santiago; Sadykov, Viacheslav; Kosovichev, Alexander; Sharykin, Ivan; Struminsky, Alexei; Zimovets, Ivan

    2015-08-01

    Although solar flares are the most energetic events in the Solar System and have direct impact in the interplanetary space and ultimately in our planet, there are still many unresolved issues concerning their generation, the underlying processes of particle acceleration involved, the effect at different layer in the solar atmosphere, among others. This work presents new coordinated observations from the New Solar Telescope (NST) and the space telescope IRIS that acquired simultaneous observations of an M1.0 class flare occurred on 12 June, 2014 in active region NOAA 12087. NST filtergrams using the TiO filter, together with chromospheric data from the Halpha line allow us to study the evolution of the event from the first signs of the intensification of the intensity in the region. We focused on a small portion where the intensity enhancement in Halpha (blue and red wings) seems to be triggered, and discovered a rapid expansion of a flux-rope structure near the magnetic neutral line, in the sequence of high-resolution photospheric images. IRIS observations evidenced strong emission of the chromospheric and transition region lines during the flare. Jet-like structures are detected before the initiation of the flare in chromospheric lines and strong non-thermal emission in the transition region at the beginning of the impulsive phase. Evaporation flows with velocities up to 50 km/s occurred in the hot chromospheric plasma. We interpreted the result in terms of the “gentle” evaporation that occurs after accelerated particles heat the chromosphere.

  2. Properties of Supersonic Evershed Downflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozuelo, S. Esteban; Bellot Rubio, L. R.; de la Cruz Rodríguez, J.

    2016-12-01

    We study supersonic Evershed downflows in a sunspot penumbra by means of high spatial resolution spectropolarimetric data acquired in the Fe i 617.3 nm line with the CRISP instrument at the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope. Physical observables, such as Dopplergrams calculated from line bisectors and Stokes V zero-crossing wavelengths, and Stokes V maps in the far red-wing, are used to find regions where supersonic Evershed downflows may exist. We retrieve the line-of-sight velocity and the magnetic field vector in these regions using two-component inversions of the observed Stokes profiles with the help of the SIR code. We follow these regions during their lifetime to study their temporal behavior. Finally, we carry out a statistical analysis of the detected supersonic downflows to characterize their physical properties. Supersonic downflows are contained in compact patches moving outward, which are located in the mid- and outer penumbra. They are observed as bright, roundish structures at the outer end of penumbral filaments that resemble penumbral grains. The patches may undergo fragmentations and mergings during their lifetime; some of them are recurrent. Supersonic downflows are associated with strong and rather vertical magnetic fields with a reversed polarity compared to that of the sunspot. Our results suggest that downflows returning back to the solar surface with supersonic velocities are abruptly stopped in dense deep layers and produce a shock. Consequently, this shock enhances the temperature and is detected as a bright grain in the continuum filtergrams, which could explain the existence of outward-moving grains in the mid- and outer penumbra.

  3. Advances In Understanding Solar And Stellar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Adam F.

    2016-07-01

    Flares result from the sudden reconnection and relaxation of magnetic fields in the coronae of stellar atmospheres. The highly dynamic atmospheric response produces radiation across the electromagnetic spectrum, from the radio to X-rays, on a range of timescales, from seconds to days. New high resolution data of solar flares have revealed the intrinsic spatial properties of the flaring chromosphere, which is thought to be where the majority of the flare energy is released as radiation in the optical and near-UV continua and emission lines. New data of stellar flares have revealed the detailed properties of the broadband (white-light) continuum emission, which provides straightforward constraints for models of the transformation of stored magnetic energy in the corona into thermal energy of the lower atmosphere. In this talk, we discuss the physical processes that produce several important spectral phenomena in the near-ultraviolet and optical as revealed from new radiative-hydrodynamic models of flares on the Sun and low mass stars. We present recent progress with high-flux nonthermal electron beams in reproducing the observed optical continuum color temperature of T 10,000 K and the Balmer jump properties in the near-ultraviolet. These beams produce dense, heated chromospheric condensations, which can explain the shape and strength of the continuum emission in M dwarf flares and the red-wing asymmetries in the chromospheric emission lines in recent observations of solar flares from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph. Current theoretical challenges and future modeling directions will be discussed, as well as observational synergies between solar and stellar flares.

  4. Radiation Damped Profiles of Extremely High Column Density Neutral Hydrogen : Implications of Cosmic Reionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Kiehunn

    2016-09-01

    Incorporating the time-dependent second-order perturbation theory for the Lyman scattering cross-section, we investigate the intergalactic absorption profiles of extremely high column density systems near the end of cosmic reionization. Assuming a representative set of the redshift distribution of neutral hydrogen, we quantitatively examined the impact of inhomogeneous density on the intrinsic absorption profiles. The cumulative absorption by neutral patches in the line-of-sight mainly affects the far off-center region of the red damping wing, but the effect is not significant. The shape of the line-center can be modified by the near-zone distribution due to high opacities of the near-resonance scattering. On the other hand, the HWHM (half width at half maximum) as an effective line-width is relatively less sensitive to the local inhomogeneity. Specifically, when the two local damping wings of Lyα and Lyβ are close in spectra of the strongly damped systems, accurate profiles of both lines are required. In the case of N HI ≲ 1021 cm-2, the two-level approximation is marginally applicable for the damping wing fit within 5 - 7% errors. However, as the local column density reaches N HI ˜ 1022.3 cm-2, this classical approximation yields a relative error of a 10% overestimation in the red wing and a 20% underestimation in the blue wing of Lyα. If severe extinction by the Lyα forests is carefully subtracted, the intrinsic absorption profile will provide a better constraint on the local ionized states. For practical applications, an analytic fitting function for the Lyβ scattering is derived.

  5. Gemini NIFS survey of feeding and feedback processes in nearby active galaxies - I. Stellar kinematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riffel, Rogemar A.; Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa; Riffel, Rogerio; Dahmer-Hahn, Luis G.; Diniz, Marlon R.; Schönell, Astor J.; Dametto, Natacha Z.

    2017-09-01

    We use the Gemini Near-Infrared Integral Field Spectrograph (NIFS) to map the stellar kinematics of the inner few hundred parsecs of a sample of 16 nearby Seyfert galaxies, at a spatial resolution of tens of parsecs and spectral resolution of 40 km s- 1. We find that the line-of-sight (LOS) velocity fields for most galaxies are well reproduced by rotating disc models. The kinematic position angle (PA) derived for the LOS velocity field is consistent with the large-scale photometric PA. The residual velocities are correlated with the hard X-ray luminosity, suggesting that more luminous active galactic nuclei have a larger impact in the surrounding stellar dynamics. The central velocity dispersion values are usually higher than the rotation velocity amplitude, what we attribute to the strong contribution of bulge kinematics in these inner regions. For 50 per cent of the galaxies, we find an inverse correlation between the velocities and the h3 Gauss-Hermitte moment, implying red wings in the blueshifted side and blue wings in the redshifted side of the velocity field, attributed to the movement of the bulge stars lagging the rotation. Two of the 16 galaxies (NGC 5899 and Mrk 1066) show an S-shape zero velocity line, attributed to the gravitational potential of a nuclear bar. Velocity dispersion (σ) maps show rings of low-σ values (˜50-80 km s- 1) for four objects and `patches' of low σ for six galaxies at 150-250 pc from the nucleus, attributed to young/ intermediate age stellar populations.

  6. VERY LARGE TELESCOPE/X-SHOOTER SPECTROSCOPY OF THE CANDIDATE BLACK HOLE X-RAY BINARY MAXI J1659-152 IN OUTBURST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, Ramanpreet; Kaper, Lex; Ellerbroek, Lucas E.; Russell, David M.; Altamirano, Diego; Wijnands, Rudy; Yang Yijung; Van der Horst, Alexander; Van der Klis, Michiel [Astronomical Institute ' Anton Pannekoek' , University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1098 XH Amsterdam (Netherlands); D' Avanzo, Paolo [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, via E. Bianchi 46, 23807 Merate (Italy); De Ugarte Postigo, Antonio; Fynbo, Johan P. U. [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, Juliane Maries Vej 30, Copenhagen 2100 (Denmark); Flores, Hector [GEPI, Paris Observatory, CNRS, University of Paris-Diderot, 5 Place Jules Janssen, 92195 Meudon (France); Goldoni, Paolo [Laboratoire Astroparticule et Cosmologie, 10 rue A. Domon et L. Duquet, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France); Thoene, Christina C. [IAA-CSIC, Glorieta de la Astronomia s/n, 18008 Granada (Spain); Kouveliotou, Chryssa [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Wiersema, Klaas [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Kuulkers, Erik, E-mail: r.kaur@uva.nl [European Space Agency, European Space Astronomy Centre, P.O. Box 78, 28691 Villanueva de la Canada, Madrid (Spain)

    2012-02-20

    We present the optical to near-infrared spectrum of MAXI J1659-152 during the onset of its 2010 X-ray outburst. The spectrum was obtained with X-shooter on the ESO Very Large Telescope early in the outburst simultaneous with high-quality observations at both shorter and longer wavelengths. At the time of the observations, the source was in the low-hard state. The X-shooter spectrum includes many broad ({approx}2000 km s{sup -1}), double-peaked emission profiles of H, He I, and He II, characteristic signatures of a low-mass X-ray binary during outburst. We detect no spectral signatures of the low-mass companion star. The strength of the diffuse interstellar bands results in a lower limit to the total interstellar extinction of A{sub V} {approx_equal} 0.4 mag. Using the neutral hydrogen column density obtained from the X-ray spectrum we estimate A{sub V} {approx_equal} 1 mag. The radial velocity structure of the interstellar Na I D and Ca II H and K lines results in a lower limit to the distance of {approx}4 {+-} 1 kpc, consistent with previous estimates. With this distance and A{sub V} , the dereddened spectral energy distribution represents a flat disk spectrum. The two 10 minute X-shooter spectra show significant variability in the red wing of the emission-line profiles, indicating a global change in the density structure of the disk, though on a timescale much shorter than the typical viscous timescale of the disk.

  7. Divergence with gene flow across a speciation continuum of Heliconius butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supple, Megan A; Papa, Riccardo; Hines, Heather M; McMillan, W Owen; Counterman, Brian A

    2015-09-24

    A key to understanding the origins of species is determining the evolutionary processes that drive the patterns of genomic divergence during speciation. New genomic technologies enable the study of high-resolution genomic patterns of divergence across natural speciation continua, where taxa pairs with different levels of reproductive isolation can be used as proxies for different stages of speciation. Empirical studies of these speciation continua can provide valuable insights into how genomes diverge during speciation. We examine variation across a handful of genomic regions in parapatric and allopatric populations of Heliconius butterflies with varying levels of reproductive isolation. Genome sequences were mapped to 2.2-Mb of the H. erato genome, including 1-Mb across the red color pattern locus and multiple regions unlinked to color pattern variation. Phylogenetic analyses reveal a speciation continuum of pairs of hybridizing races and incipient species in the Heliconius erato clade. Comparisons of hybridizing pairs of divergently colored races and incipient species reveal that genomic divergence increases with ecological and reproductive isolation, not only across the locus responsible for adaptive variation in red wing coloration, but also at genomic regions unlinked to color pattern. We observe high levels of divergence between the incipient species H. erato and H. himera, suggesting that divergence may accumulate early in the speciation process. Comparisons of genomic divergence between the incipient species and allopatric races suggest that limited gene flow cannot account for the observed high levels of divergence between the incipient species. Our results provide a reconstruction of the speciation continuum across the H. erato clade and provide insights into the processes that drive genomic divergence during speciation, establishing the H. erato clade as a powerful framework for the study of speciation.

  8. Undercover EUV Solar Jets Observed by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, N.-H.; Innes, D. E.

    2016-12-01

    It is well-known that extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission emitted at the solar surface is absorbed by overlying cool plasma. Especially in active regions, dark lanes in EUV images suggest that much of the surface activity is obscured. Simultaneous observations from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph, consisting of UV spectra and slit-jaw images (SJI), give vital information with sub-arcsecond spatial resolution on the dynamics of jets not seen in EUV images. We studied a series of small jets from recently formed bipole pairs beside the trailing spot of active region 11991, which occurred on 2014 March 5 from 15:02:21 UT to 17:04:07 UT. Collimated outflows with bright roots were present in SJI 1400 Å (transition region) and 2796 Å (upper chromosphere) that were mostly not seen in Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) 304 Å (transition region) and AIA 171 Å (lower corona) images. The Si iv spectra show a strong blue wing enhancement, but no red wing, in the line profiles of the ejecta for all recurrent jets, indicating outward flows without twists. We see two types of Mg ii line profiles produced by the jets spires: reversed and non-reversed. Mg ii lines remain optically thick, but turn optically thin in the highly Doppler shifted wings. The energy flux contained in each recurrent jet is estimated using a velocity differential emission measure technique that measures the emitting power of the plasma as a function of the line-of-sight velocity. We found that all the recurrent jets release similar energy (108 erg cm-2 s-1) toward the corona and the downward component is less than 3%.

  9. The birds of Sehlabathebe National Park, Lesotho

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Kopij

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available A total of 117 bird species has been recorded in Sehlabathebe National Park, south-east Lesotho, consisting of 29 vagrants, 18 visitors and 70 breeding and probable breeding residents. For each species status was determined and abundance roughly estimated. Quantitative studies on breeding bird communities were carried out by means of the line transect method on four transects with the total length ca 30 km in the park and on two transects with the total length of ca 20 km outside the park. In the park, dominant species were represented by the Stonechat Saxicola torquata, Ayres’ Cisticola Cisticola ayresii, Yellow-rumped Widow Euplectes capensis and Wailing Cisticola Cisticola lais. Outside the park dominants were represented by Cape Weaver Ploceus capensis, Cape Sparrow Passer melanurus, Cape Canary Serinus canicollis, Common Quail Coturnix coturnix, Stonechat, Cape Bunting Emberiza capensis and Drakensberg Siskin Pseudochloroptila symonsi. Characteristic, high-altitude species in the park included Drakensberg Siskin, Mountain Pipit Anthus hoeschi, Orange-breasted Rockjumper Chaetops auriantius, Banded Martin Riparia cincta and Sentinel Rock Thrush Monticola explorator. Species such as the Laughing Dove Streptopelia senegalensis, Sicklewinged Chat Cercomela sinuata, Mountain Chat Oenanthe monticola, Thick-billed Lark Galerida magnirostris, Red-winged Starling Onychognathus morio, Alpine Swift Apus melba Cape Sparrow, Grey-headed Sparrow Passer diffusus, Red Bishop Euplectes orix and Golden Bishop Euplectes afer were absent or occurred in very low densities in the park, although they are widespread and common in the Maluti/Drakensberg grasslands (including areas neighbouring to the park. The lack of trees and shrubs for nesting, the lack of cultivated fields as feeding places and competition with related species both for food and nesting sites, may partly play a role in this regard.

  10. Buccal habits: frequency and clinic appearance in children between 5 and 11 years Hábitos bucales: frecuencia y manifestaciones clínicas en niños de 5 a 11 años

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maureen Janette Más García

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The first step to treat incorrect habits is to detect the cause. Many of them derive from usual situations that, once detected and correctly managed, can contribute to the spontaneous suppression of the incorrect habit. Objective: To characterize a group of children between 5 and 11 years with buccal deforming habits. Methods: Observational, descriptive, correlational study including 176 children from three clinics of the quarter “Junco Sur” in Cienfuegos developed from June 2005 to June 2006. The clinical examination was performed in children, and their parents or tutors were interviewed. The frequency of buccal deforming habits was determined, as well as the presence of dental maxillofacial defects. Results: Deforming habits were identified in 60, 2% of the children; the most frequent were baby bottle suction (48%, finger suction (24% at six years old and lingual protraction at eight years (36,1% in girls. The dental maxillary-facial defects occurred in the 42,6% and there was a prevalence of vestibule-version at eight years (44,4%, augmented ridge at 10 years (35,4% and bilabial incompetence at 11 years (13,3%, all of them in girls. There was prevalence in Angle´s Class I with 60, 1%. Conclusion: Buccal deforming habits are a health problem in the studied universe.Fundamento: Para tratar malos hábitos, el primer paso es la detección del agente causal. Muchos se derivan de situaciones comunes que al ser detectadas y adecuadamente tratadas pueden contribuir a la desaparición espontánea del mal hábito. Objetivo: Caracterizar un grupo de niños de 5 a 11 años portadores de hábitos deformantes bucales. Métodos: Estudio observacional, descriptivo, correlacional que incluyó 176 niños de tres consultorios del Consejo Popular “Junco Sur” de Cienfuegos, desarrollado de junio de 2005 a

  11. Context-dependent neural activation: internally and externally guided rhythmic lower limb movement in individuals with and without neurodegenerative disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeleine Eve Hackney

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s Disease (PD is a neurodegenerative disorder that has received considerable attention in allopathic medicine over the past decades. However, it is clear that, to date, pharmacological and surgical interventions do not fully address symptoms of PD and patients’ quality of life. As both an alternative therapy and as an adjuvant to conventional approaches, several types of rhythmic movement (e.g., movement strategies, dance, tandem biking, tai chi have shown improvements to motor symptoms, lower limb control and postural stability in people with PD (Amano, Nocera, Vallabhajosula, Juncos, Gregor, Waddell et al., 2013; Earhart, 2009; M. E. Hackney & Earhart, 2008; Kadivar, Corcos, Foto, & Hondzinski, 2011; Morris, Iansek, & Kirkwood, 2009; Ridgel, Vitek, & Alberts, 2009. However, while these programs are increasing in number, still little is known about the neural mechanisms underlying motor improvements attained with such interventions. Studying limb motor control under task specific contexts can help determine the mechanisms of rehabilitation effectiveness. Both internally guided (IG and externally guided (EG movement strategies have evidence to support their use in rehabilitative programs. However, there appears to be a degree of differentiation in the neural substrates involved in IG versus EG designs. Because of the potential task specific benefits of rhythmic training within a rehabilitative context, this report will consider the use of IG and EG movement strategies, and observations produced by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI and other imaging techniques. This review will present findings from lower limb imaging studies, under IG and EG conditions for populations with and without movement disorders. We will discuss how these studies might inform movement disorders rehabilitation (in the form of rhythmic, music-based movement training and highlight research gaps. We believe better understanding of lower limb neural

  12. Feeding Habits of Introduced Black Rats, Rattus rattus, in Nesting Colonies of Galapagos Petrel on San Cristobal Island, Galapagos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjorie Riofrío-Lazo

    Full Text Available Introduced rodents are responsible for ecosystem changes in islands around the world. In the Galapagos archipelago, their effects on the native flora and fauna are adverse, including the extinction of endemic rodents in some islands and the reduction in the reproductive success of the Galapagos petrel (Pterodroma phaeopygia in its nesting zones. Understanding the feeding behavior of introduced rodents and their trophic interactions with native and non-native species on islands, can assist in the design of management strategies and conservation plans of invasive and endemic species respectively. Four petrel nesting colonies were monitored during June 2013 on San Cristóbal Island (El Plátano, El Junco, San Joaquín, and La Comuna. The feeding habits of black rats were evaluated by analyzing stomach contents and stable isotopes in hair. Three species of introduced rodents were captured. R. rattus was the most abundant at all sites (n=43, capture success (CS = 55.8%, followed by the house mouse, Mus musculus (n = 17, CS = 37.8%, and the Norwegian rat, R. norvegicus (n = 4, CS = 4.5%, captured only at La Comuna. The omnivorous black rat ate mostly plants (98% and arthropods (2%. Intact seeds of Miconia robinsoniana were the main food at all sites (relative abundance=72.1%, present in 95% of the analyzed stomachs, showing the black rats' possible role in the archipelago as endemic seed dispersers. There was no evidence of petrel's intake; however, its possible consumption is not discarded at all. The δ15N and δ13C analysis corroborated the primarily herbivorous diet of black rats. The isotopic signatures of the three rodent species reflect the inter- and intra-specific differential use of food resources. Black rat showed a wider diet in La Comuna, which was related to a lower availability of its primary prey and its ability to adapt to the available resources in its habitat.

  13. Familiasenred: un entorno virtual de participación de las familias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis A. García

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available La plataforma Familiasenred.es nace como una estrategia, dentro del Plan Canario de Formación para la Familia, que ofrece una alternativa formativa a padres y madres a través de las TICs. Montada en un entorno Moodle desde el año 2009, solo en el 2012 se han ofrecido 168 acciones formativas (62 online, 30 semipresencial y 76 presencial que se traducen en más de 1.680 horas de formación sobre diferentes temas relacionados con la familia y la educación de los/as hijos/as. El objetivo del estudio será contrastar los resultados obtenidos en el estudio de García, Castro, Junco y Hernández (2011 acerca de la influencia de la participación de los/as alumnos/as sobre los niveles de satisfacción, y cómo la participación modula dicha influencia. La población objeto de estudio serán los/as 5.083 usuarios/as de la plataforma Familiasenred.es del 2012. Para ello, se empleará una escala de satisfacción de elaboración propia, reducida de la inicial, compuesta de once ítems tipo Likert. Ésta será administrada durante el mes de Diciembre de 2012, de forma voluntaria y una vez finalizada la propuesta formativa 2011-2012. Con los datos obtenidos del paso de pruebas, se llevará a cabo un análisis comparativo entre los niveles de satisfacción del alumnado, su participación en la plataforma y la participación docente.

  14. Obesity, hypertension, and chronic kidney disease

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    Hall ME

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Michael E Hall,1,2 Jussara M do Carmo,2 Alexandre A da Silva,2 Luis A Juncos,1,2 Zhen Wang,2 John E Hall2 1Department of Medicine, 2Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Mississippi Center for Obesity Research, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS, USA Abstract: Obesity is a major risk factor for essential hypertension, diabetes, and other comorbid conditions that contribute to development of chronic kidney disease. Obesity raises blood pressure by increasing renal tubular sodium reabsorption, impairing pressure natriuresis, and causing volume expansion via activation of the sympathetic nervous system and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and by physical compression of the kidneys, especially when there is increased visceral adiposity. Other factors such as inflammation, oxidative stress, and lipotoxicity may also contribute to obesity-mediated hypertension and renal dysfunction. Initially, obesity causes renal vasodilation and glomerular hyperfiltration, which act as compensatory mechanisms to maintain sodium balance despite increased tubular reabsorption. However, these compensations, along with increased arterial pressure and metabolic abnormalities, may ultimately lead to glomerular injury and initiate a slowly developing vicious cycle that exacerbates hypertension and worsens renal injury. Body weight reduction, via caloric restriction and increased physical activity, is an important first step for management of obesity, hypertension, and chronic kidney disease. However, this strategy may not be effective in producing long-term weight loss or in preventing cardiorenal and metabolic consequences in many obese patients. The majority of obese patients require medical therapy for obesity-associated hypertension, metabolic disorders, and renal disease, and morbidly obese patients may require surgical interventions to produce sustained weight loss. Keywords: visceral adiposity, type II diabetes, sodium reabsorption

  15. Reinventing the Rose of Fire: Anarchism and the Movements against Corporate Globalization in Barcelona

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Juris

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo investiga las intersecciones entre la praxis del anarquismo clásico y el activismo de las organizaciones anti-globalización en Barcelona. Esto se inserta dentro de un debate favorable entre dos claves literarias, poniendo mis argumentos en contraste, todavía últimamente relacionados en diversas direcciones. Primero, en diálogo con la obra de José Álvarez-Junco sobre los “dos anarquismos” en España, me sugirió que los movimientos anti-globalización en Cataluña no sólo reflejan los principios tradicionales del anarquismo, que son claramente comunitarias.  En segundo lugar, contribuyo a las recientes discusiones en torno a los vínculos entre anarquismo y movimiento anti-globalización.Palabras clave: anarquismo, movimiento anti-globalización, Barcelona__________________________ABSTRACT:This article explores the intersections between classic anarchist praxis and contemporary anti-corporate globalization activism in Barcelona. It engages in a sympathetic debate with two key literatures, pushing my argument in contrasting, yet ultimately related directions. First, in conversation with José Alvarez-Junco’s work on the “two anarchisms” in Spain,  I suggest that anti-corporate globalization movements in Catalonia not only reflect traditional anarchist principles, these are distinctly communitarian. Second, I also contribute to recent discussions regarding the links between anarchism and anti-corporate globalization among politically engaged scholars.Keywords: anarchism, anti-globalization movement, Barcelona

  16. Feeding Habits of Introduced Black Rats, Rattus rattus, in Nesting Colonies of Galapagos Petrel on San Cristóbal Island, Galapagos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riofrío-Lazo, Marjorie; Páez-Rosas, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Introduced rodents are responsible for ecosystem changes in islands around the world. In the Galapagos archipelago, their effects on the native flora and fauna are adverse, including the extinction of endemic rodents in some islands and the reduction in the reproductive success of the Galapagos petrel (Pterodroma phaeopygia) in its nesting zones. Understanding the feeding behavior of introduced rodents and their trophic interactions with native and non-native species on islands, can assist in the design of management strategies and conservation plans of invasive and endemic species respectively. Four petrel nesting colonies were monitored during June 2013 on San Cristóbal Island (El Plátano, El Junco, San Joaquín, and La Comuna). The feeding habits of black rats were evaluated by analyzing stomach contents and stable isotopes in hair. Three species of introduced rodents were captured. R. rattus was the most abundant at all sites (n=43, capture success (CS) = 55.8%), followed by the house mouse, Mus musculus (n = 17, CS = 37.8%), and the Norwegian rat, R. norvegicus (n = 4, CS = 4.5%), captured only at La Comuna. The omnivorous black rat ate mostly plants (98%) and arthropods (2%). Intact seeds of Miconia robinsoniana were the main food at all sites (relative abundance=72.1%, present in 95% of the analyzed stomachs), showing the black rats' possible role in the archipelago as endemic seed dispersers. There was no evidence of petrel's intake; however, its possible consumption is not discarded at all. The δ15N and δ13C analysis corroborated the primarily herbivorous diet of black rats. The isotopic signatures of the three rodent species reflect the inter- and intra-specific differential use of food resources. Black rat showed a wider diet in La Comuna, which was related to a lower availability of its primary prey and its ability to adapt to the available resources in its habitat.

  17. Relationships between egg-recognition and egg-ejection in a grasp-ejector species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, Manuel; Ruiz-Raya, Francisco; Roncalli, Gianluca; Ibáñez-Álamo, Juan Diego

    2017-01-01

    Brood parasitism frequently leads to a total loss of host fitness, which selects for the evolution of defensive traits in host species. Experimental studies have demonstrated that recognition and rejection of the parasite egg is the most common and efficient defence used by host species. Egg-recognition experiments have advanced our knowledge of the evolutionary and coevolutionary implications of egg recognition and rejection. However, our understanding of the proximate mechanisms underlying both processes remains poor. Egg rejection is a complex behavioural process consisting of three stages: egg recognition, the decision whether or not to reject the putative parasitic egg and the act of ejection itself. We have used the blackbird (Turdus merula) as a model species to explore the relationship between egg recognition and the act of egg ejection. We have manipulated the two main characteristics of parasitic eggs affecting egg ejection in this grasp-ejector species: the degree of colour mimicry (mimetic and non-mimetic, which mainly affects the egg-recognition stage of the egg-rejection process) and egg size (small, medium and large, which affects the decision to eject), while maintaining a control group of non-parasitized nests. The behaviour of the female when confronted with an experimental egg was filmed using a video camera. Our results show that egg touching is an indication of egg recognition and demonstrate that blackbirds recognized (i.e., touched) non-mimetic experimental eggs significantly more than mimetic eggs. However, twenty per cent of the experimental eggs were touched but not subsequently ejected, which confirms that egg recognition does not necessarily mean egg ejection and that accepting parasitic eggs, at least sometimes, is the consequence of acceptance decisions. Regarding proximate mechanisms, our results show that the delay in egg ejection is not only due to recognition problems as usually suggested, given that experimental eggs are not

  18. Bioenergy and biodiversity: Intensified biomass extraction from hedges impairs habitat conditions for birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauerbrei, Ralf; Aue, Birgit; Krippes, Christian; Diehl, Eva; Wolters, Volkmar

    2017-02-01

    Biomass is increasingly used as an alternative source for energy in Europe. Woody material cut from hedges is considered to provide a suitable complement to maize and oilseed rape, which are currently the dominant biomass sources. Since shrubs and trees are also important habitats for birds, however, coppicing of hedges at the landscape scale may adversely affect the diversity of the avifauna. To evaluate this risk, we estimated the response of hedge birds to three management scenarios differing in cutting intensity and hedge selection. The analysis was done using hedge data of the Lautertal municipality (n = 339 hedges; Vogelsberg area, Hesse, Germany). It focused on 25 bird species, which are all listed in the hedge programme of the German Ornithological Stations. Information on the preferences of these birds for certain hedge features such as height or width was gathered by an extensive literature review. A cluster analysis on the consolidated literature data allowed us to identify three groups of birds according to their preference for certain hedge attributes. Two groups, which included Yellowhammer (Emberiza citrinella L.) (i) and Blackbird (Turdus merula L.) (ii), favoured trees located in hedges, but differed in their preference for hedge shape, with (i) being attracted by long and broad hedges and (ii) by high hedges. The third group, which included the Whitethroat (Sylvia communis L.), preferred small hedges with gaps and medium vegetation density. Spatially explicit suitability models based on these data allowed us to predict the status quo of hedge suitability for these species groups. Field surveys proved the accuracy of the predictions to be sufficient, since the hedge suitability predicted was significantly and positively correlated to the occurrence of 9 out of the 12 testable focal species. Our models predicted biomass extraction to almost always reduce hedge suitability for the three bird groups. Concerning the Yellowhammer and the Blackbird

  19. Transport of Ixodid ticks and tick-borne pathogens by migratory birds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunnar eHasle

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Birds, particularly passerines, can be parasitized by Ixodid ticks, which may be infected with tick-borne pathogens, like Borrelia spp., Babesia spp., Anaplasma, Rickettsia/Coxiella, and tick-borne encephalitis virus. The prevalence of ticks on birds varies over years, season, locality and different bird species. The prevalence of ticks on different species depends mainly on the degree of feeding on the ground. In Europe, the Turdus spp., especially the blackbird, Turdus merula, appears to be most important for harboring ticks. Birds can easily cross barriers, like fences, mountains, glaciers, desserts and oceans, which would stop mammals, and they can move much faster than the wingless hosts. Birds can potentially transport tick-borne pathogens by transporting infected ticks, by being infected with tick-borne pathogens and transmit the pathogens to the ticks, and possibly act as hosts for transfer of pathogens between ticks through co-feeding. Knowledge of the bird migration routes and of the spatial distribution of tick species and tick-borne pathogens is crucial for understanding the possible impact of birds as spreaders of ticks and tick-borne pathogens. Successful colonization of new tick species or introduction of new tick-borne pathogens will depend on suitable climate, vegetation and hosts. Although it has never been demonstrated that a new tick species, or a new tick pathogen, actually has been established in a new locality after being seeded there by birds, evidence strongly suggests that this could occur.

  20. Transport of ixodid ticks and tick-borne pathogens by migratory birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasle, Gunnar

    2013-01-01

    Birds, particularly passerines, can be parasitized by Ixodid ticks, which may be infected with tick-borne pathogens, like Borrelia spp., Babesia spp., Anaplasma, Rickettsia/Coxiella, and tick-borne encephalitis virus. The prevalence of ticks on birds varies over years, season, locality and different bird species. The prevalence of ticks on different species depends mainly on the degree of feeding on the ground. In Europe, the Turdus spp., especially the blackbird, Turdus merula, appears to be most important for harboring ticks. Birds can easily cross barriers, like fences, mountains, glaciers, desserts and oceans, which would stop mammals, and they can move much faster than the wingless hosts. Birds can potentially transport tick-borne pathogens by transporting infected ticks, by being infected with tick-borne pathogens and transmit the pathogens to the ticks, and possibly act as hosts for transfer of pathogens between ticks through co-feeding. Knowledge of the bird migration routes and of the spatial distribution of tick species and tick-borne pathogens is crucial for understanding the possible impact of birds as spreaders of ticks and tick-borne pathogens. Successful colonization of new tick species or introduction of new tick-borne pathogens will depend on suitable climate, vegetation and hosts. Although it has never been demonstrated that a new tick species, or a new tick pathogen, actually has been established in a new locality after being seeded there by birds, evidence strongly suggests that this could occur.

  1. Epidemiological aspects of lice (Menacanthus species) infections in laying hen flocks from the State of Minas Gerais, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende, L Do Carmo; Martins, N R Da Silva; Teixeira, C M; Oliveira, P R De; Cunha, L M

    2016-01-01

    The epidemiology of chicken lice species such as Menacanthus stramineus, M. cornutus and M. pallidulus were studied during an observational, analytical and sectional survey, to determine predisposing factors for their occurrence in laying hen farms in the State of Minas Gerais, Brazil. A total of 431 houses on 43 farms were visited in 2012. M. cornutus, M. stramineus and M. pallidulus occurred in 20.9%, 11.6% and 11.6% of farms, respectively. The frequencies of occurrence of M. cornutus, M. stramineus and M.pallidulus in poultry houses were 10.4%, 8.8% and 3.7%, respectively. The epidemiological determinants for the occurrence of these species were investigated using Poisson or logistic regression models. The region of the farm, the recent use of acaricides and the presence of birds, such as saffron finch (Sicalis flaveola), feral pigeon (Columba livia) and Guira cuckoo (Guira guira) around the farms were related to the epidemiology of M. cornutus. Infestation by M. stramineus was associated with age of birds, number of birds per cage and the presence of Guira cuckoo and Chopi blackbird (Gnorimopsar chopi) near the poultry houses. The occurrence of M. pallidulus was influenced by the type of facilities, presence of cattle egret (Bubulcus ibis) and free-range domestic hens around the farm. The use of wire mesh nets in the houses and of forced moulting did not influence lice infestation.

  2. Current versus historical population sizes in vertebrate species with high gene flow: a comparison based on mitochondrial DNA lineages and inbreeding theory for neutral mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avise, J C; Ball, R M; Arnold, J

    1988-07-01

    Using inbreeding theory as applied to neutral alleles inherited maternally, we generate expected probability distributions of times to identity by descent for random pairs of mitochondrial genotypes within a population or within an entire species characterized by high gene flow. For comparisons with these expectations, empirical distributions of times to most recent common ancestry were calculated (by conventional mtDNA clock calibrations) from mtDNA haplotype distances observed within each of three vertebrate species--American eels, hardhead catfish, and redwinged blackbirds. These species were chosen for analysis because census population size in each is currently large and because both genetic and life-history data are consistent with the postulate that historical gene flow within these species has been high. The observed molecular distances among mtDNA lineages were two to three orders of magnitude lower than predicted from census sizes of breeding females, suggesting that rate of mtDNA evolution is decelerated in these species and/or that long-term effective population size is vastly smaller than present-day population size. Several considerations point to the latter possibility as most likely. The genetic structure of any species is greatly influenced by historical demography; even for species that are currently abundant, mtDNA gene lineages appear to have been channeled through fairly small numbers of ancestors.

  3. Goshawk prey have more bacteria than non-prey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, A P; Peralta-Sánchez, J M; Nielsen, J T; López-Hernández, E; Soler, J J

    2012-03-01

    1. Predators often prey on individuals that are sick or otherwise weakened. Although previous studies have shown higher abundance of parasites in prey, whether prey have elevated loads of micro-organisms remains to be determined. 2. We quantified the abundance of bacteria and fungi on feathers of woodpigeons Columba palumbus L., jays Garrulus glandarius L. and blackbirds Turdus merula L. that either fell prey to goshawks Accipiter gentilis L. or were not depredated. 3. We found an almost three-fold increase in bacterial load of prey compared with non-prey, while there was no significant difference between prey and non-prey in level of fungal infection of the plumage. 4. The results were not confounded by differences in size or mass of feathers, date of collection of feathers, or date of analysis of feathers for micro-organisms. 5. These findings suggest a previously unknown contribution of bacteria to risk of predation, with important implications for behaviour, population ecology and community ecology. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2011 British Ecological Society.

  4. Sources of blood meals of sylvatic Triatoma guasayana near Zurima, Bolivia, assayed with qPCR and 12S cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucero, David E; Ribera, Wilma; Pizarro, Juan Carlos; Plaza, Carlos; Gordon, Levi W; Peña, Reynaldo; Morrissey, Leslie A; Rizzo, Donna M; Stevens, Lori

    2014-12-01

    In this study we compared the utility of two molecular biology techniques, cloning of the mitochondrial 12S ribosomal RNA gene and hydrolysis probe-based qPCR, to identify blood meal sources of sylvatic Chagas disease insect vectors collected with live-bait mouse traps (also known as Noireau traps). Fourteen T. guasayana were collected from six georeferenced trap locations in the Andean highlands of the department of Chuquisaca, Bolivia. We detected four blood meals sources with the cloning assay: seven samples were positive for human (Homo sapiens), five for chicken (Gallus gallus) and unicolored blackbird (Agelasticus cyanopus), and one for opossum (Monodelphis domestica). Using the qPCR assay we detected chicken (13 vectors), and human (14 vectors) blood meals as well as an additional blood meal source, Canis sp. (4 vectors). We show that cloning of 12S PCR products, which avoids bias associated with developing primers based on a priori knowledge, detected blood meal sources not previously considered and that species-specific qPCR is more sensitive. All samples identified as positive for a specific blood meal source by the cloning assay were also positive by qPCR. However, not all samples positive by qPCR were positive by cloning. We show the power of combining the cloning assay with the highly sensitive hydrolysis probe-based qPCR assay provides a more complete picture of blood meal sources for insect disease vectors.

  5. Ventilation patterns of the songbird lung/air sac system during different behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackelprang, Rebecca; Goller, Franz

    2013-10-01

    Unidirectional, continuous airflow through the avian lung is achieved through an elaborate air sac system with a sequential, posterior to anterior ventilation pattern. This classical model was established through various approaches spanning passively ventilated systems to mass spectrometry analysis of tracer gas flow into various air sacs during spontaneous breathing in restrained ducks. Information on flow patterns in other bird taxa is missing, and these techniques do not permit direct tests of whether the basic flow pattern can change during different behaviors. Here we use thermistors implanted into various locations of the respiratory system to detect small pulses of tracer gas (helium) to reconstruct airflow patterns in quietly breathing and behaving (calling, wing flapping) songbirds (zebra finch and yellow-headed blackbird). The results illustrate that the basic pattern of airflow in these two species is largely consistent with the model. However, two notable differences emerged. First, some tracer gas arrived in the anterior set of air sacs during the inspiration during which it was inhaled, suggesting a more rapid throughput through the lung than previously assumed. Second, differences in ventilation between the two anterior air sacs emerged during calling and wing flapping, indicating that adjustments in the flow pattern occur during dynamic behaviors. It is unclear whether this modulation in ventilation pattern is passive or active. This technique for studying ventilation patterns during dynamic behaviors proves useful for establishing detailed timing of airflow and modulation of ventilation in the avian respiratory system.

  6. The History and Promise of Combined Cycle Engines for Access to Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Casie

    2010-01-01

    For the summer of 2010, I have been working in the Aerodynamics and Propulsion Branch at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center studying combined-cycle engines, a high speed propulsion concept. Combined cycle engines integrate multiple propulsion systems into a single engine capable of running in multiple modes. These different modes allow the engine to be extremely versatile and efficient in varied flight conditions. The two most common types of combined cycle engines are Rocket-Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) and Turbine Based Combined Cycle (TBCC). The RBCC essentially combines a rocket and ramjet engine, while the TBCC integrates a turbojet and ramjet1. These two engines are able to switch between different propulsion modes to achieve maximum performance. Extensive conceptual and ground test studies of RBCC engines have been undertaken; however, an RBCC engine has never, to my knowledge, been demonstrated in flight. RBCC engines are of particular interest because they could potentially power a reusable launch vehicle (RLV) into space. The TBCC has been flight tested and shown to be effective at reaching supersonic speeds, most notably in the SR-71 Blackbird2.

  7. Sources of blood meals of sylvatic Triatoma guasayana near Zurima, Bolivia, assayed with qPCR and 12S cloning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David E Lucero

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study we compared the utility of two molecular biology techniques, cloning of the mitochondrial 12S ribosomal RNA gene and hydrolysis probe-based qPCR, to identify blood meal sources of sylvatic Chagas disease insect vectors collected with live-bait mouse traps (also known as Noireau traps. Fourteen T. guasayana were collected from six georeferenced trap locations in the Andean highlands of the department of Chuquisaca, Bolivia.We detected four blood meals sources with the cloning assay: seven samples were positive for human (Homo sapiens, five for chicken (Gallus gallus and unicolored blackbird (Agelasticus cyanopus, and one for opossum (Monodelphis domestica. Using the qPCR assay we detected chicken (13 vectors, and human (14 vectors blood meals as well as an additional blood meal source, Canis sp. (4 vectors.We show that cloning of 12S PCR products, which avoids bias associated with developing primers based on a priori knowledge, detected blood meal sources not previously considered and that species-specific qPCR is more sensitive. All samples identified as positive for a specific blood meal source by the cloning assay were also positive by qPCR. However, not all samples positive by qPCR were positive by cloning. We show the power of combining the cloning assay with the highly sensitive hydrolysis probe-based qPCR assay provides a more complete picture of blood meal sources for insect disease vectors.

  8. The diversity and biogeography of late Pleistocene birds from the lowland Neotropics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steadman, David W.; Oswald, Jessica A.; Rincón, Ascanio D.

    2015-05-01

    The Neotropical lowlands sustain the world's richest bird communities, yet little that we know about their history is based on paleontology. Fossils afford a way to investigate distributional shifts in individual species, and thus improve our understanding of long-term change in Neotropical bird communities. We report a species-rich avian fossil sample from a late Pleistocene tar seep (Mene de Inciarte) in northwestern Venezuela. A mere 175 identified fossils from Mene de Inciarte represent 73 species of birds, among which six are extinct, and eight others no longer occur within 100 km. These 14 species consist mainly of ducks (Anatidae), snipe (Scolopacidae), vultures/condors (Vulturidae), hawks/eagles (Accipitridae), and blackbirds (Icteridae). Neotropical bird communities were richer in the late Pleistocene than today; their considerable extinction may be related to collapse of the large mammal fauna at that time. The species assemblage at Mene de Inciarte suggests that biogeographic patterns, even at continental scales, have been remarkably labile over short geological time frames. Mene de Inciarte is but one of 300 + tar seeps in Venezuela, only two of which have been explored for fossils. We may be on the cusp of an exciting new era of avian paleontology in the Neotropics.

  9. Memory conjunction clusters: Influence of familiarity and recollection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leding, Juliana K

    2016-07-01

    In the memory conjunction paradigm, the number of times that constituents of conjunction lures were studied and the method of presentation were varied. In two experiments, participants were presented with eight parent items that could be recombined at test to form a conjunction lure. The constituents that were shared between the parent items and the conjunction lures were either presented in the same words (e.g., blackmail and jailbird presented four times each for the conjunction lure blackbird) or in different words (e.g., the targets footstool, footlocker, foothill, footbridge, baseball, softball, basketball, and golfball for the conjunction lure football). In both experiments, rates of false recognition were higher in the Different condition as opposed to the Same condition. These results provide evidence that participants in the Same condition were able to utilise a recall-to-reject strategy by remembering the repeatedly presented parent word. In the Different condition, participants were not able to utilise that strategy and instead relied on the familiarity of the repeatedly presented constituents which led to higher rates of false recognition.

  10. Characteristics of Salmonella spp. Isolated from Wild Birds Confiscated in Illegal Trade Markets, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matias, Carlos Alexandre Rey; Pereira, Ingrid Annes; de Araújo, Maiara dos Santos; Santos, André Felipe Mercês; Lopes, Rudi Pereira; Christakis, Sandra; Rodrigues, Dália dos Prazeres; Siciliano, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of Salmonella spp. was investigated in 109 wild birds poached in the illegal wildlife trade in Rio de Janeiro; most of them are passerines from Thraupidae family and three from Psittacidae. One strain of Salmonella ser. Typhimurium and two strains of Salmonella ser. Panama were isolated from passerine species and all of them showed resistance to multiple antimicrobial drugs, like ampicillin, ceftriaxone, ceftiofur, tetracycline, gentamicin, nalidixic acid, ciprofloxacin, and enrofloxacin. PFGE showed 100% similarity among the Salmonella ser. Typhimurium strain isolated from a Temminck's seedeater (Sporophila falcirostris) and the strains isolated from a human outbreak, in southern Brazil. The two Salmonella ser. Panama strains isolated from two chestnut-capped blackbirds (Chrysomus ruficapillus) present in the same catch showed the same clonal origin and have never been associated with epizooties and human outbreaks. Potential for dissemination of resistant Salmonella through situations offered by captive management and the isolation of the same strain from wild birds and human sources may become a problem for the conservation of natural populations and to public health.

  11. Gnezdilke Parka Škocjanske jame (Kras, JZ Slovenija/ The breeding birds of Škocjan Caves Park (Kras, SW Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figelj Jernej

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study done in 2011 and 2012 was to identify the number of breeding bird species, to provide population estimates as well as to evaluate the conservational importance of Škocjan Caves Park for birds. Common bird species were surveyed using the territory mapping method. Rare species and nocturnally active species were surveyed using species-specific methods: observation, the playback method and the line transect method. 81 species were registered, 49 of which bred within the boundaries of the Park. The most abundant breeding species were Blackcap Sylvia atricapilla (260-320 breeding pairs, Robin Erithacus rubecula (250-310 breeding pairs, Blackbird Turdus merula (230-280 breeding pairs, Chaffinch Fringilla coelebs (230-280 breeding pairs and Marsh Tit Poecile palustris (200-240 breeding pairs. Qualifying species for the Special Protected Area (SPA Kras (SI5000023 also bred within the Park: Peregrine Falcon Falco peregrinus, Nightjar Caprimulgus europaeus, Scops Owl Otus scops and Woodlark Lululla arborea. Eagle Owl Bubo bubo was also registered, but breeding attempts during the study period were unsuccessful due to the negative influence of several factors. One of the largest colonies of Alpine Swifts Apus melba, a rare and localized species in Slovenia, is also of conservation concern.

  12. Impact of alternative electrical stunning parameters on the ability of broilers to recover consciousness and meat quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourassa, D V; Bowker, B C; Zhuang, H; Wilson, K M; Harris, C E; Buhr, R J

    2017-09-01

    Broilers in the United States are typically electrically stunned using low voltage-high frequency (12-38 V, ≥400 Hz) DC or AC water bath stunners. In the European Union, however, broilers are required to be electrocuted using high voltage-low frequency (50-150 V, 50-350 Hz) AC. Low voltage stunned broilers regain consciousness in the absence of bleeding. In contrast, high voltage stunned broilers die due to induction of cardiac fibrillation. For birds stunned with low voltage systems, concerns have been raised regarding animal welfare during bleeding. This work evaluated the impact of extended DC stunning duration and alternative stunning methods (DC+AC combination) on the recovery of bird consciousness and meat quality. In the absence of bleeding, broilers that were DC stunned for extended times (60, 90, or 120 s), 63, 10, or 0% of broilers, respectively, were able to recover consciousness. Alternative stunning protocols included water bath stunning broilers at 15 or 25 V DC for 10 s followed by plate stunning at 100, 110, or 120 V AC for 5 s. Prior to shackling, live body weight and shank width were measured and during stunning, maximum mA for both DC and AC stuns were recorded. All of the alternative stunning protocols (DC+AC) resulted in non-recoverable stunning. The maximum mA recorded during both DC and AC stunning were moderately/strongly (r = 0.54-0.81) correlated to body weight and poorly/moderately (r = 0.27-0.74) correlated to shank width. No significant differences for carcass or meat quality characteristics (hemorrhages, red wing tips, broken clavicles, pH, cook loss, a* and b* color values, and MORS shear energy) were detected between control (15 or 25 V DC only) and treatment groups (DC+AC combination stunning). The only significant different meat quality parameter was L* values where the lowest voltage group (15 V DC) had the darkest fillets (53.27) and the 15 V DC+100 V AC group had the lightest fillets (55.61) with all other groups

  13. High-cadence observations of spicular-type events on the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetye, J.; Doyle, J. G.; Scullion, E.; Nelson, C. J.; Kuridze, D.; Henriques, V.; Woeger, F.; Ray, T.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Chromospheric observations taken at high-cadence and high-spatial resolution show a range of spicule-like features, including Type-I, Type-II (as well as rapid blue-shifted excursions (RBEs) and rapid red-shifted excursions (RREs) which are thought to be on-disk counterparts of Type-II spicules) and those which seem to appear within a few seconds, which if interpreted as flows would imply mass flow velocities in excess of 1000 km s-1. Aims: This article seeks to quantify and study rapidly appearing spicular-type events. We also compare the multi-object multi-frame blind deconvolution (MOMFBD) and speckle reconstruction techniques to understand if these spicules are more favourably observed using a particular technique. Methods: We use spectral imaging observations taken with the CRisp Imaging SpectroPolarimeter (CRISP) on the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope. Data was sampled at multiple positions within the Hα line profile for both an on-disk and limb location. Results: The data is host to numerous rapidly appearing features which are observed at different locations within the Hα line profile. The feature's durations vary between 10-20 s and lengths around 3500 km. Sometimes, a time delay in their appearance between the blue and red wings of 3-5 s is evident, whereas, sometimes they are near simultaneous. In some instances, features are observed to fade and then re-emerge at the same location several tens of seconds later. Conclusions: We provide the first statistical analysis of these spicules and suggest that these observations can be interpreted as the line-of-sight (LOS) movement of highly dynamic spicules moving in and out of the narrow 60 mÅ transmission filter that is used to observe in different parts of the Hα line profile. The LOS velocity component of the observed fast chromospheric features, manifested as Doppler shifts, are responsible for their appearance in the red and blue wings of Hα line. Additional work involving data at other

  14. TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE STRONGLY INTERACTING WITH THEIR CIRCUMSTELLAR MEDIUM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silverman, Jeffrey M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); Nugent, Peter E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Gal-Yam, Avishay; Arcavi, Iair; Ben-Ami, Sagi [Benoziyo Center for Astrophysics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Sullivan, Mark [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Howell, D. Andrew; Graham, Melissa L. [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States); Filippenko, Alexei V.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Clubb, Kelsey I. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Cao, Yi; Horesh, Assaf; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R. [Cahill Center for Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Chornock, Ryan; Foley, Ryan J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Coil, Alison L. [Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Griffith, Christopher V. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Kasliwal, Mansi M., E-mail: jsilverman@astro.as.utexas.edu [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Science, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); and others

    2013-07-01

    Owing to their utility for measurements of cosmic acceleration, Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are perhaps the best-studied class of SNe, yet the progenitor systems of these explosions largely remain a mystery. A rare subclass of SNe Ia shows evidence of strong interaction with their circumstellar medium (CSM), and in particular, a hydrogen-rich CSM; we refer to them as SNe Ia-CSM. In the first systematic search for such systems, we have identified 16 SNe Ia-CSM, and here we present new spectra of 13 of them. Six SNe Ia-CSM have been well studied previously, three were previously known but are analyzed in depth for the first time here, and seven are new discoveries from the Palomar Transient Factory. The spectra of all SNe Ia-CSM are dominated by H{alpha} emission (with widths of {approx}2000 km s{sup -1}) and exhibit large H{alpha}/H{beta} intensity ratios (perhaps due to collisional excitation of hydrogen via the SN ejecta overtaking slower-moving CSM shells); moreover, they have an almost complete lack of He I emission. They also show possible evidence of dust formation through a decrease in the red wing of H{alpha} 75-100 days past maximum brightness, and nearly all SNe Ia-CSM exhibit strong Na I D absorption from the host galaxy. The absolute magnitudes (uncorrected for host-galaxy extinction) of SNe Ia-CSM are found to be -21.3 mag {<=} M{sub R} {<=} -19 mag, and they also seem to show ultraviolet emission at early times and strong infrared emission at late times (but no detected radio or X-ray emission). Finally, the host galaxies of SNe Ia-CSM are all late-type spirals similar to the Milky Way, or dwarf irregulars like the Large Magellanic Cloud, which implies that these objects come from a relatively young stellar population. This work represents the most detailed analysis of the SN Ia-CSM class to date.

  15. Iron K Features in the Quasar E 1821+643: Evidence for Gravitationally Redshifted Absorption?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaqoob, Tahir; Serlemitsos, Peter

    2005-01-01

    We report a Chandra high-energy grating detection of a narrow, redshifted absorption line superimposed on the red wing of a broad Fe K line in the z = 0.297 quasar E 1821+643. The absorption line is detected at a confidence level, estimated by two different methods, in the range approx. 2 - 3 sigma. Although the detection significance is not high enough to exclude a non-astrophysical origin, accounting for the absorption feature when modeling the X-ray spectrum implies that the Fe-K emission line is broad, and consistent with an origin in a relativistic accretion disk. Ignoring the apparent absorption feature leads to the conclusion that the Fe-K emission line is narrower, and also affects the inferred peak energy of the line (and hence the inferred ionization state of Fe). If the absorption line (at approx. 6.2 keV in the quasar frame) is real, we argue that it could be due to gravitationally redshifted Fe XXV or Fe XXVI resonance absorption within approx. 10 - 20 gravitational radii of the putative central black hole. The absorption line is not detected in earlier ASCA and Chandra low-energy grating observations, but the absorption line is not unequivocally ruled out by these data. The Chandra high-energy grating Fe-K emission line is consistent with an origin predominantly in Fe I-XVII or so. In an ASCA observation eight years earlier, the Fe-K line peaked at approx. 6.6 keV, closer to the energies of He-like Fe triplet lines. Further, in a Chandra low-energy grating observation the Fe-K line profile was double-peaked, one peak corresponding to Fe I-XVII or so, the other peak to Fe XXVI Ly alpha. Such a wide range in ionization state of Fe is not ruled out by the HEG and ASCA data either, and is suggestive of a complex structure for the line-emitter.

  16. Gordie Howe's "Miraculous Treatment": Case Study of Twitter Users' Reactions to a Sport Celebrity's Stem Cell Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Li; Rachul, Christen; Guo, Zhaochen; Caulfield, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Former Detroit Red Wing Gordie Howe received stem cell (SC) treatment in Mexico in December 2014 for a stroke he suffered in October 2014. The news about his positive response to the SC treatment prompted discussion on social networks like Twitter. This study aims to provide information about discussions that took place on Twitter regarding Howe's SC treatment and SC treatment in general. In particular, this study examines whether tweets portrayed a positive or negative attitude towards Howe's SC treatment, whether or not tweets mention that the treatment is unproven, and whether the tweets mention risks associated with the SC treatment. This is an infodemiology study, harnessing big data published on the Internet for public health research and analysis of public engagement. A corpus of 2783 tweets about Howe's SC treatment was compiled using a program that collected English-language tweets from December 19, 2014 at 00:00 to February 7, 2015 at 00:00. A content analysis of the corpus was conducted using a coding framework developed through a two-stage process. 78.87% (2195/2783) of tweets mentioned improvements to Howe's health. Only one tweet explicitly mentioned that Howe's SC treatment was unproven, and 3 tweets warned that direct-to-consumer SC treatments lacked scientific evidence. In addition, 10.31% (287/2783) of tweets mentioned challenges with SC treatment that have been raised by scientists and researchers, and 3.70% (103/2783) of tweets either defined Howe as a "stem cell tourist" or claimed that his treatment was part of "stem cell tourism". In general, 71.79% (1998/2783) of tweets portrayed a positive attitude towards Howe's SC treatment. Our study found the responses to Howe's treatment on Twitter to be overwhelmingly positive. There was far less attention paid to the lack of scientific evidence regarding the efficacy of the treatment. Unbalanced and uncritical discussion on Twitter regarding SC treatments is another example of inaccurate

  17. Coupled blind signal separation and spectroscopic database fitting of the mid infrared PAH features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, M. J. F.; Berné, O.; Boersma, C.; Allamandola, L. J.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    2011-08-01

    asymmetric broad feature at 11.3 μm with an extended red wing. By combining the NASA Ames PAH IR Spectroscopic Database fit with the BSS method, the independent results of each method can be confirmed and some limitations of each method are overcome. This work is based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under a contract with NASA.

  18. Evidence for two-loop interaction from IRIS and SDO observations of penumbral brightenings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alissandrakis, C. E.; Koukras, A.; Patsourakos, S.; Nindos, A.

    2017-07-01

    Aims: We investigate small scale energy release events which can provide clues on the heating mechanism of the solar corona. Methods: We analyzed spectral and imaging data from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS), images from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatoty (SDO), and magnetograms from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) aboard SDO. Results: We report observations of small flaring loops in the penumbra of a large sunspot on July 19, 2013. Our main event consisted of a loop spanning 15'', from the umbral-penumbral boundary to an opposite polarity region outside the penumbra. It lasted approximately 10 min with a two minute impulsive peak and was observed in all AIA/SDO channels, while the IRIS slit was located near its penumbral footpoint. Mass motions with an apparent velocity of 100 km s-1 were detected beyond the brightening, starting in the rise phase of the impulsive peak; these were apparently associated with a higher-lying loop. We interpret these motions in terms of two-loop interaction. IRIS spectra in both the C ii and Si iv lines showed very extended wings, up to about 400 km s-1, first in the blue (upflows) and subsequently in the red wing. In addition to the strong lines, emission was detected in the weak lines of Cl i, O i and C i, as well as in the Mg ii triplet lines. Absorption features in the profiles of the C ii doublet, the Si iv doublet and the Mg ii h and k lines indicate the existence of material with a lower source function between the brightening and the observer. We attribute this absorption to the higher loop and this adds further credibility to the two-loop interaction hypothesis. Tilts were detected in the absorption spectra, as well as in the spectra of Cl i, O i, and C i lines, possibly indicating rotational motions from the untwisting of magnetic flux tubes. Conclusions: We conclude that the absorption features in the C ii, Si iv and Mg ii profiles originate in a higher

  19. Comparación de la calidad del humus de material vegetal con el de residuos orgánicos domésticos, resultado del compostaje mediante el sistema de pilas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Pablo Rodriguez Miranda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available La investigación se fundamentó en el compostaje del material vegetal de humedales artificiales, puestos en marcha en un proyecto piloto de tratamiento de aguas residuales para la Quebrada Mi Padre de Jesús ubicada a los alrededores de la Facultad de Medio Ambiente y Recursos Naturales de la Universidad Distrital Francisco José de Caldas, realizado en el año 2010. Teniendo en cuenta que estos residuos vegetales, terminan su vida útil en los humedales y no tienen algún uso específico, se generó una alternativa de aprovechamiento de estos residuos, en la producción de compost o abono orgánico. Surge entonces la necesidad de encontrar un método que haga posible su notable reducción, transformación y aprovechamiento de tal manera que se genere un impacto positivo en el ámbito ambiental, económico, social y sanitario. En este caso el compostaje se empleó como técnica para la biodegradación de los residuos vegetales de las especies Buchón de Agua (Eichhornia crassipes, Buchón Cucharita (Limnobium laevigatum. y Junco (Schoenoplectus californicus, transformándolos en un abono orgánico; de igual forma se biodegradaron residuos vegetales de plaza de mercado, que fueron recolectados de la Plaza de mercado de Paloquemao ubicada en la ciudad de Bogotá, empleando la misma técnica con el propósito de tener un punto comparativo en la calidad final de los abonos, con respecto a lo estipulado en la norma NTC 5167 cuarta actualización, referente a parámetros químicos, físicos, microbiológicos con los que deben cumplir los abonos generados a partir de residuos orgánicos de origen animal y vegetal.

  20. Almacenamiento de carbono en especies predominantes de flora en el lago Chinchaycocha

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    Ronald Medrano Yanqui

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Evaluar la cantidad de carbono que almacenan las especies predominantes de flora del lago Chinchaycocha. Métodos: La investigación fue de tipo básica, de corte transversal y con un nivel exploratorio-comparativo. El estudio se hizo en tres ecosistemas dentro del humedal: bofedal, pajonal y totoral, las áreas fueron identificadas con ayuda de imágenes satelitales Landsat. El procedimiento estuvo basado en la recolección de muestras divididas en: biomasa aérea, biomasa radicular y muestras de suelo, hallándose el contenido de carbono de cada una. Resultados: En el totoral se obtuvo que Schoenoplectus californicus Var. Tatora almacena 30,65 tC/ha y Juncos arcticus Var. Andicola 8,70 tC/ha. En el pajonal Deyeuxia recta Kunth almacena 7,02 tC/ha en su biomasa aérea y 8,41 tC/ha en su biomasa radicular. En el bofedal: Plantago tubulosa almacena 0,81 t C/ha en su biomasa aérea y 1,88 t C/ha en su biomasa radicular, Eleocharis albibracteata almacena 0,22 t C/ha en su biomasa aérea y 2,95 tC/ha en su biomasa radicular, y Limosella australis almacena 0,22 tC/ha en su biomasa aérea y 0,38 tC/ha en su biomasa radicular. En el almacenamiento de carbono en suelos se determinó 774,76 tC/ ha en pajonales y 684,58 tC/ha en bofedales. Conclusiones: Se concluye que en el lago Chinchaycocha el ecosistema que brinda mayor almacenamiento de carbono es el totoral, seguido por el pajonal y en menor proporción el bofedal. Asimismo los suelos son considerados los mayores sumideros de carbono.

  1. Pabellón del club náutico de Sevilla

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    de la Peña Neila, Antonio

    1963-03-01

    Full Text Available This lightweight pavillion is a provisional design, until the permanent Social Headquarters of the Nautical Club of Seville is built. Its plan layout is L shaped, and it faces south and west, so that its main frontage has maximum sunshine during the colder months. As it was anticipated that this building should have multiple uses, so that it could serve as dining room, meeting, and lecture hall, etc., it was decided to suspend from the ceiling a kind of reed woven curtains, which due to their lightness and flexibility, make it easy to subdivide in various ways the building, according to particular requirements. An ondulated canopy and screens, which gyrate about a vertical axis, have been fitted on the outside. These are covered with cane material. Inside, the walls are white, except for a number of lines made with tiles. There is also a picture, and a stand with the sporting trophies; this being the only ornamentation. The furniture is mostly made of cloth and cane, and a number of plants is also distributed about the building, thereby contributing to create a «winter garden» atmosphere, which is highly compatible with the general layout.Este pabellón Iigero se ha construido, como solución de emergencia, basta edificar el Local Social definitivo del Club Nautico de Sevilla, Su planta en forma de ángulo y la orientación sur y oeste de las «fachadas principales» aseguran el aprovechamiento al máximo del soleamiento en los meses fríos. Como se pensó que este local tuviera múltiples utilizaciones —sirviendo de comedor, local de reunión, banquetes, conferencias, etc.— se han empleado unas esterillas de junco, colgadas del techo, que, dada su ligereza y movilidad, permiten efectuar las subdivisiones y variaciones oportunas con un esfuerzo mínimo. Exteriormente existen una visera ondulada y unas pantallas giratorias, en sentido vertical, cubiertas de cañas, e, interiormente, las paredes blancas interrumpidas por unas líneas de cer

  2. Changes in patch features may exacerbate or compensate for the effect of habitat loss on forest bird populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrach, Ainhoa; Larrinaga, Asier R; Santamaría, Luis

    2011-01-01

    One and a half centuries after Darwin visited Chiloe Island, what he described as "…an island covered by one great forest…" has lost two-thirds of its forested areas. At this biodiversity hotspot, forest surface is becoming increasingly fragmented due to unregulated logging, clearing for pastures and replacement by exotic tree plantations. Decrease in patch size, increased isolation and "edge effects" can influence the persistence of forest species in remnant fragments. We assessed how these variables affect local density for six forest birds, chosen to include the most important seed dispersers (four species) and bird pollinators (two species, one of which acts also as seed disperser), plus the most common insectivore (Aphrastura spinicauda). Based on cue-count point surveys (8 points per fragment), we estimated bird densities for each species in 22 forest fragments of varying size, shape, isolation and internal-habitat structure (e.g. tree size and epiphyte cover). Bird densities varied with fragment connectivity (three species) and shape (three species), but none of the species was significantly affected by patch size. Satellite image analyses revealed that, from 1985 to 2008, forested area decreased by 8.8% and the remaining forest fragments became 16% smaller, 58-73% more isolated and 11-50% more regular. During that period, bird density estimates for the northern part of Chiloé (covering an area of 1214.75 km(2)) decreased for one species (elaenia), increased for another two (chucao and hummingbird) and did not vary for three (rayadito, thrust and blackbird). For the first three species, changes in patch features respectively exacerbated, balanced and overcame the effects of forest loss on bird population size (landscape-level abundance). Hence, changes in patch features can modulate the effect of habitat fragmentation on forest birds, suggesting that spatial planning (guided by spatially-explicit models) can be an effective tool to facilitate their

  3. Changes in patch features may exacerbate or compensate for the effect of habitat loss on forest bird populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ainhoa Magrach

    Full Text Available One and a half centuries after Darwin visited Chiloe Island, what he described as "…an island covered by one great forest…" has lost two-thirds of its forested areas. At this biodiversity hotspot, forest surface is becoming increasingly fragmented due to unregulated logging, clearing for pastures and replacement by exotic tree plantations. Decrease in patch size, increased isolation and "edge effects" can influence the persistence of forest species in remnant fragments. We assessed how these variables affect local density for six forest birds, chosen to include the most important seed dispersers (four species and bird pollinators (two species, one of which acts also as seed disperser, plus the most common insectivore (Aphrastura spinicauda. Based on cue-count point surveys (8 points per fragment, we estimated bird densities for each species in 22 forest fragments of varying size, shape, isolation and internal-habitat structure (e.g. tree size and epiphyte cover. Bird densities varied with fragment connectivity (three species and shape (three species, but none of the species was significantly affected by patch size. Satellite image analyses revealed that, from 1985 to 2008, forested area decreased by 8.8% and the remaining forest fragments became 16% smaller, 58-73% more isolated and 11-50% more regular. During that period, bird density estimates for the northern part of Chiloé (covering an area of 1214.75 km(2 decreased for one species (elaenia, increased for another two (chucao and hummingbird and did not vary for three (rayadito, thrust and blackbird. For the first three species, changes in patch features respectively exacerbated, balanced and overcame the effects of forest loss on bird population size (landscape-level abundance. Hence, changes in patch features can modulate the effect of habitat fragmentation on forest birds, suggesting that spatial planning (guided by spatially-explicit models can be an effective tool to facilitate

  4. Frequency of zoonotic bacteria among illegally traded wild birds in Rio de Janeiro

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    Carlos Alexandre Rey Matias

    Full Text Available Abstract The illegal wildlife trade may increase the risk of infectious disease transmission, and it may not only cause disease outbreaks in humans but also threaten livestock, native wild populations, and ecosystems' health. Bird species may act as carriers in the transmission of enteric pathogens. However, epidemiological studies on zoonotic bacteria in wild birds are rare in Brazil. From March 2011 to March 2012, we investigated the frequency of Enterobacteriaceae in cloacal swab samples from 109 birds of the passerine and Psittacidae families. These birds were recovered from illegal trade in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and sent to a rehabilitation center. Gram-negative bacteria were isolated from 86 wild birds (78.9%. A mean (±SD of 1.68 (±1.30 different bacterial species were isolated per bird, with a maximum of five bacterial species from three bird species. The most frequently isolated bacteria were Escherichia coli, followed by Enterobacter spp., Klebsiella pneumoniae and other enteric bacteria. Salmonella ser. Typhimurium was isolated from a Temminck's seedeater (Sporophila falcirostris, and two Salmonella ser. Panama were isolated from two specimens of chestnut-capped blackbird (Chrysomus ruficapillus. Of the 70 selected bacterial isolates, 60 exhibited antibiotic resistance. The resistance patterns varied from one to nine of the antibiotics tested. Resistance to ceftiofur was the most prevalent, followed by ampicillin and ceftriaxone. The dissemination potential of resistant strains in situations typically seen in the management of captive birds may become a problem for the conservation of natural bird populations and for public health.

  5. Generalized avian dispersal syndrome contributes to Chinese tallow tree (Sapium sebiferum, Euphorbiaceae) invasiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renne, I.J.; Barrow, W.C.; Johnson, Randall L.A.; Bridges, W.C.

    2002-01-01

    Plants possessing generalized dispersal syndromes are likely to be more invasive than those relying on specialist dispersal agents. To address this issue on a local and regional scale, avian seed dispersal of the invasive alien Chinese tallow tree (Sapium sebiferum (L.) Roxb.) was assessed in forests and spoil areas of South Carolina and along forest edges in Louisiana during the 1997-99 fruiting seasons. Tallow trees in these floristically distinct habitats had a few common and many casual visitors, and considerable species overlap among habitats was found. However, bird species differed in the importance of dispersing and dropping seeds among habitats. Important dispersal agents common to forests and spoil areas of South Carolina included Northern Flicker, American Robin and Redwinged Blackbird, whereas Red-bellied Woodpecker and European Starling were important in the former and latter habitat, respectively. In Louisiana, Red-bellied Woodpecker, American Robin, Northern Cardinal and Eastern Bluebird dispersed many seeds. Nearly all species foraging on seeds were winter residents. Estimated numbers of seeds dispersed and dropped were higher in spoil areas of South Carolina than in Louisiana because of higher numbers of individuals per visit, higher seed consumption and seed dropping rates, and longer foraging durations. Within South Carolina, more seeds were dispersed and dropped in spoil areas than in forests because of higher numbers of birds per visit. These findings show that among habitats, tallow tree attracts diverse but variable coteries of dispersal agents that are qualitatively similar in seed usage patterns. We suggest that its generalized dispersal syndrome contributes to effective seed dispersal by many bird species throughout its range. Effects of differential avian use among locales may include changes in local bird communities, and differing tallow tree demographics and invasion patterns.

  6. Avian malaria in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoener, E R; Banda, M; Howe, L; Castro, I C; Alley, M R

    2014-07-01

    Avian malaria parasites of the genus Plasmodium have the ability to cause morbidity and mortality in naïve hosts, and their impact on the native biodiversity is potentially serious. Over the last decade, avian malaria has aroused increasing interest as an emerging disease in New Zealand with some endemic avian species, such as the endangered mohua (Mohua ochrocephala), thought to be particularly susceptible. To date, avian malaria parasites have been found in 35 different bird species in New Zealand and have been diagnosed as causing death in threatened species such as dotterel (Charadrius obscurus), South Island saddleback (Philesturnus carunculatus carunculatus), mohua, hihi (Notiomystis cincta) and two species of kiwi (Apteryx spp.). Introduced blackbirds (Turdus merula) have been found to be carriers of at least three strains of Plasmodium spp. and because they are very commonly infected, they are likely sources of infection for many of New Zealand's endemic birds. The spread and abundance of introduced and endemic mosquitoes as the result of climate change is also likely to be an important factor in the high prevalence of infection in some regions and at certain times of the year. Although still limited, there is a growing understanding of the ecology and epidemiology of Plasmodium spp. in New Zealand. Molecular biology has played an important part in this process and has markedly improved our understanding of the taxonomy of the genus Plasmodium. This review presents our current state of knowledge, discusses the possible infection and disease outcomes, the implications for host behaviour and reproduction, methods of diagnosis of infection, and the possible vectors for transmission of the disease in New Zealand.

  7. Which forest bird species are the main hosts of the tick, Ixodes ricinus, the vector of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, during the breeding season?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsot, M; Henry, P-Y; Vourc'h, G; Gasqui, P; Ferquel, E; Laignel, J; Grysan, M; Chapuis, J-L

    2012-07-01

    Wild birds are important hosts for vector-borne pathogens, especially those borne by ticks. However, few studies have been conducted on the role of different bird species within a community as hosts of vector-borne pathogens. This study addressed individual and species factors that could explain the burden of Ixodes ricinus on forest birds during the reproductive periods of both vectors and hosts. The goal was to identify which bird species contribute the most to the tick population at the community level. Birds were mist-netted on four plots in 2008 and on seven plots in 2009 in two forests (Sénart and Notre Dame, near Paris, France). The dependence of the tick load per bird upon environmental conditions (questing nymph density, year and plot) and on host species traits (species, age, sex, body size, vertical space use, level of innate and acquired immunity) was analysed. Finally, the relative contribution of each bird species to the local dynamics of ticks was estimated, while accounting for their respective abundance. Tick burden differed markedly between bird species and varied according to questing nymph density. Bird species with a high body mass, those that forage low in the vegetation, and those that had a high innate immune response and a high spleen mass were more likely to have a high tick burden. Four species (the Common Blackbird, Turdus merula, the European Robin, Erithacus rubecula, the Song Thrush, Turdus philomelos, and the Winter Wren, Troglodytes troglodytes) hosted more than 90% of the ticks in the local bird community. These species, and particularly T. merula which was host to a high proportion of the nymphs, are likely to contribute significantly to the circulation of pathogens for which they are competent, such as the agent of Lyme borreliosis.

  8. Seasonal Changes in Colour: A Comparison of Structural, Melanin- and Carotenoid-Based Plumage Colours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delhey, Kaspar; Burger, Claudia; Fiedler, Wolfgang; Peters, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Background Plumage coloration is important for bird communication, most notably in sexual signalling. Colour is often considered a good quality indicator, and the expression of exaggerated colours may depend on individual condition during moult. After moult, plumage coloration has been deemed fixed due to the fact that feathers are dead structures. Still, many plumage colours change after moult, although whether this affects signalling has not been sufficiently assessed. Methodology/Principal Findings We studied changes in coloration after moult in four passerine birds (robin, Erithacus rubecula; blackbird, Turdus merula; blue tit, Cyanistes caeruleus; and great tit, Parus major) displaying various coloration types (melanin-, carotenoid-based and structural). Birds were caught regularly during three years to measure plumage reflectance. We used models of avian colour vision to derive two variables, one describing chromatic and the other achromatic variation over the year that can be compared in magnitude among different colour types. All studied plumage patches but one (yellow breast of the blue tit) showed significant chromatic changes over the year, although these were smaller than for a typical dynamic trait (bill colour). Overall, structural colours showed a reduction in relative reflectance at shorter wavelengths, carotenoid-based colours the opposite pattern, while no general pattern was found for melanin-based colours. Achromatic changes were also common, but there were no consistent patterns of change for the different types of colours. Conclusions/Significance Changes of plumage coloration independent of moult are probably widespread; they should be perceivable by birds and have the potential to affect colour signalling. PMID:20644723

  9. Development and Production of Array Barrier Detectors at SCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klipstein, P. C.; Avnon, E.; Benny, Y.; Berkowicz, E.; Cohen, Y.; Dobromislin, R.; Fraenkel, R.; Gershon, G.; Glozman, A.; Hojman, E.; Ilan, E.; Karni, Y.; Klin, O.; Kodriano, Y.; Krasovitsky, L.; Langof, L.; Lukomsky, I.; Nevo, I.; Nitzani, M.; Pivnik, I.; Rappaport, N.; Rosenberg, O.; Shtrichman, I.; Shkedy, L.; Snapi, N.; Talmor, R.; Tessler, R.; Weiss, E.; Tuito, A.

    2017-09-01

    XB n or XB p barrier detectors exhibit diffusion-limited dark currents comparable with mercury cadmium telluride Rule-07 and high quantum efficiencies. In 2011, SemiConductor Devices (SCD) introduced "HOT Pelican D", a 640 × 512/15- μm pitch InAsSb/AlSbAs XB n mid-wave infrared (MWIR) detector with a 4.2- μm cut-off and an operating temperature of ˜150 K. Its low power (˜3 W), high pixel operability (>99.5%) and long mean time to failure make HOT Pelican D a highly reliable integrated detector-cooler product with a low size, weight and power. More recently, "HOT Hercules" was launched with a 1280 × 1024/15- μm format and similar advantages. A 3-megapixel, 10- μm pitch version ("HOT Blackbird") is currently completing development. For long-wave infrared applications, SCD's 640 × 512/15- μm pitch "Pelican-D LW" XB p type II superlattice (T2SL) detector has a ˜9.3- μm cut-off wavelength. The detector contains InAs/GaSb and InAs/AlSb T2SLs, and is fabricated into focal plane array (FPA) detectors using standard production processes including hybridization to a digital silicon read-out integrated circuit (ROIC), glue underfill and substrate thinning. The ROIC has been designed so that the complete detector closely follows the interfaces of SCD's MWIR Pelican-D detector family. The Pelican-D LW FPA has a quantum efficiency of ˜50%, and operates at 77 K with a pixel operability of >99% and noise equivalent temperature difference of 13 mK at 30 Hz and F/2.7.

  10. Natural selection of the major histocompatibility complex (Mhc) in Hawaiian honeycreepers (Drepanidinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvi, S.I.; Tarr, C.L.; Mcintosh, C.E.; Atkinson, C.T.; Fleischer, R.C.

    2004-01-01

    The native Hawaiian honeycreepers represent a classic example of adaptive radiation and speciation, but currently face one the highest extinction rates in the world. Although multiple factors have likely influenced the fate of Hawaiian birds, the relatively recent introduction of avian malaria is thought to be a major factor limiting honeycreeper distribution and abundance. We have initiated genetic analyses of class II ?? chain Mhc genes in four species of honeycreepers using methods that eliminate the possibility of sequencing mosaic variants formed by cloning heteroduplexed polymerase chain reaction products. Phylogenetic analyses group the honeycreeper Mhc sequences into two distinct clusters. Variation within one cluster is high, with dN > d S and levels of diversity similar to other studies of Mhc (B system) genes in birds. The second cluster is nearly invariant and includes sequences from honeycreepers (Fringillidae), a sparrow (Emberizidae) and a blackbird (Emberizidae). This highly conserved cluster appears reminiscent of the independently segregating Rfp-Y system of genes defined in chickens. The notion that balancing selection operates at the Mhc in the honeycreepers is supported by transpecies polymorphism and strikingly high dN/dS ratios at codons putatively involved in peptide interaction. Mitochondrial DNA control region sequences were invariant in the i'iwi, but were highly variable in the 'amakihi. By contrast, levels of variability of class II ?? chain Mhc sequence codons that are hypothesized to be directly involved in peptide interactions appear comparable between i'iwi and 'amakihi. In the i'iwi, natural selection may have maintained variation within the Mhc, even in the face of what appears to a genetic bottleneck.

  11. State of the Art in Beta Titanium Alloys for Airframe Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, James D.; Briggs, Robert D.; Boyer, Rodney R.; Tamirisakandala, Sesh; Russo, Patrick; Shchetnikov, Nikolay; Fanning, John C.

    2015-06-01

    Beta titanium alloys were recognized as a distinct materials class in the 1950s, and following the introduction of Ti-13V-11Cr-3Al in the early 1960s, intensive research occurred for decades thereafter. By the 1980s, dozens of compositions had been explored and sufficient work had been accomplished to warrant the first major conference in 1983. Metallurgists of the time recognized beta alloys as highly versatile and capable of remarkable property development at much lower component weights than steels, coupled with excellent corrosion resistance. Although alloys such as Ti-15V-3Al-3Sn-3Cr, Ti-10V-2Fe-3Al and Ti-3AI-8V-6Cr-4Mo-4Zr (Beta C) were commercialized into well-known airframe systems by the 1980s, Ti-13V-11Cr-3Al was largely discarded following extensive employment on the SR-71 Blackbird. The 1990s saw the implementation of specialty beta alloys such as Beta 21S and Alloy C, in large part for their chemical and oxidation resistance. It was also predicted that by the 1990s, cost would be the major limitation on expansion into new applications. This turned out to be true and is part of the reason for some stagnation in commercialization of new such compositions over the past two decades, despite a good understanding of the relationships among chemistry, processing, and performance and some very attractive offerings. Since then, only a single additional metastable beta alloy, Ti-5Al-5V-5Mo-3Cr-0.5Fe, has been commercialized in aerospace, although low volumes of other chemistries have found a place in the biomedical implant market. This article examines the evolution of this important class of materials and the current status in airframe applications. It speculates on challenges for expanding their use.

  12. Development of 10μm pitch XBn detector for low SWaP MWIR applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkedy, Lior; Brumer, Maya; Klipstein, Philip; Nitzani, Michal; Avnon, Eran; Kodriano, Yaron; Lukomsky, Inna; Shtrichman, Itay

    2016-05-01

    Shrinking the pixel size in advanced infrared Focal Plane Array (FPA) detectors allows either a reduction in the system size for the same number of pixels, or an increase in the pixel count for the same focal plane area. Smaller pitch and increased pixel count enables new applications such as long range surveillance, advanced Search and Track, missile warning, persistent surveillance, and infrared spectroscopy. In the last two decades SCD has followed this path of reducing the pixel size in InSb detectors for Mid-Wave Infrared (MWIR) applications, developing and manufacturing FPAs from 30μm down to 10μm pitch. The Blackbird InSb detector with 1920×1536/10μm format was introduced in 2013. Modern electro-optical systems are also designed towards a more compact, low power, and lower cost solution compared with traditional systems. In order to meet these requirements, detectors are being developed to work at Higher Operating Temperatures (HOT). In the last few years SCD has introduced 15μm pitch MWIR detectors based on the novel XBn-InAsSb technology, which enables outstanding electro-optical performance at temperatures as high as 150K. Two XBn FPA formats were developed and are now in production: 640×512/15μm and 1280×1024/15μm. Following the above trends, SCD is currently developing a 10μm XBn pixel, designed to operate at 150K with performance similar to the mature 15μm pixel. In this paper we present results from XBn FPA test devices, where the XBn array is flip-chip bonded to a Readout Integrated Circuit (ROIC) with a 10μm pitch. Test measurements in a laboratory Dewar at 150K demonstrate dark currents of 250fA, quantum efficiency greater than 70%, pixel operability of higher than 99.5%, and excellent array uniformity.

  13. À propos de l' influence de la langue Portugaise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando V. Peixoto da Fonseca

    1986-12-01

    Full Text Available Sur les mots castillans d'origine portugaise, le Prof. Rodrigo de Sá Noguiera écrit: "Il y a une série de mots castillans d'origine claire ou probable portugaise, que le Dictionnaire de l'Académie Espagnole dans la plupart des cas ou omet, ou considère comme d'origine différente". Ceux d'origine claire portugaise, ajoute cet étymologiste, sont ceux qui phonétiquement n'auraient pu avoir en espagnol la forme qu'ils revêtent dans cette langue, tandis qu'ils sont d'accord avec les règles de notre phonétique historique, existant, en outre, sous la même forme (p. ex. chato ou sembllable (p. ex. follaje dans la langue portugaise. Les suivants se trouvent dans ce cas: achantarse, achubascarse, afeitar, aldorta, brinco, barroco, canela, caramelo, cariño, chamada, chapa, chato, chaveta, chinela, chocal!o, chocho, chopa, choza, chubasco, chumacera, chus, chusma, cobra, conchabar, cortiña, desvaído, desvergoñadamente, fado, follaje, fuera, macho, malla, mermelada, morriña, nonio, pintada, vaivén, vergoña. Les vocables d'origine probable (et souvent sûre sont les exotiques, lesquels, dans l'opinion de Sá Nogueira, citée plus haut, ont pénétré dans l'espagnol à travers le portugais. Cet auteur en étudie les suivants: abada, albino, almadía, ananás, bambu, banana, bengala, betel, biombo, bonzo, cacatúa, cachimbo, cacimba, cafre, carcunda, carimbo, catinga, cha, coco, cobra, cornaca, fetiche, jangada, junco, macaco, malagueta, mandarín, mandinga, mandioca, manga, marimba, monzón, naire, pagoda et palanquín. Il est certain qu'ils sont beaucoup plus nombreux, ainsi que l'on s'en rend compte par les ouvrages de Monseigneur Sebastião Rodolfo Dalgado et Georg Friederici. Quant au mot chapéu, dit le Prof. Sá Nogueira, il est difficile de garantir si l'espagnol l'a reçu du portugais, ou si le contraire a eu lieu, et c'est également compliqué le problème du mot castillan jeito, à acception differénte de la nôtre, raison pour

  14. Práticas territoriais indígenas entre a flexibilidade e a fixação

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Kent

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Em sua busca pelo reconhecimento de seus territórios costumeiros, as populações indígenas das Américas têm progressivamente lançado mão de técnicas modernas para a definição precisa de territórios. Isto resultou em tensões entre suas práticas muitas vezes altamente flexíveis e as modalidades mais fixas de territorialidade produzidas por tais técnicas. O objetivo deste artigo é explorar essas tensões e suas consequências sociais por meio da análise das práticas territoriais dos Uros, um grupo indígena que habita ilhas flutuantes nos juncais do lago andino Titicaca. Tais práticas serão analisadas tanto no nível da comunidade quanto em suas relações conflitantes com as comunidades vizinhas na costa do lago e com uma área protegida administrada pelo Estado peruano. As práticas territoriais internas dos Uros revelam elevados níveis de mobilidade física e flexibilidade social, resultantes do constante fundir e separar das ilhas artificiais de junco. No entanto, seu envolvimento com o Estado e suas práticas territoriais têm resultado em profundas transformações em seus arranjos com as comunidades ribeirinhas. Em especial, redundou numa transformação dos territórios flexíveis, vagamente definidos e compartilhados, em territórios fixos, claramente definidos e exclusivos. Por fim, analisarei conflitos que emergiram entre os Uros quando seus líderes tentaram aplicar mecanismos de fixação territorial, de forma a controlar a constante fusão e separação das ilhas flutuantes.In their quest for the recognition of their customary territories, indigenous populations of the Americas have increasingly made use of modern techniques for the precise definition of territories. This has resulted in tensions between their often highly flexible territorial practices and the more fixed modalities of territoriality produced through such techniques. The objective of this article is to explore such tensions and their social

  15. THE NEXT GENERATION VIRGO CLUSTER SURVEY. IV. NGC 4216: A BOMBARDED SPIRAL IN THE VIRGO CLUSTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paudel, Sanjaya; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Ferriere, Etienne [Laboratoire AIM Paris-Saclay, CNRS/INSU, Universite Paris Diderot, CEA/IRFU/SAp, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Cote, Patrick; Ferrarese, Laura; Gwyn, Stephen D. J.; MacArthur, Lauren A. [National Research Council of Canada, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Cuillandre, Jean-Charles [Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Corporation, Kamuela, HI 96743 (United States); Mihos, J. Christopher [Department of Astronomy, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Vollmer, Bernd [Observatoire Astronomique, Universite de Strasbourg and CNRS UMR 7550, 11 rue de l' Universite, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Balogh, Michael L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1 (Canada); Carlberg, Ray G. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Boissier, Samuel; Boselli, Alessandro [Aix Marseille Universite, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388 Marseille (France); Durrell, Patrick R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Youngstown State University, One University Plaza, Youngstown, OH 44555 (United States); Emsellem, Eric; Michel-Dansac, Leo [Universite de Lyon 1, CRAL, Observatoire de Lyon, CNRS UMR 5574, 9 av. Charles Andre, F-69230 Saint-Genis Laval (France); Mei, Simona; Van Driel, Wim, E-mail: sanjaya.paudel@cea.fr [GEPI, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, Universite Paris Diderot, 5 Place J. Janssen, F-92190 Meudon Cedex (France)

    2013-04-20

    The final stages of mass assembly of present-day massive galaxies are expected to occur through the accretion of multiple satellites. Cosmological simulations thus predict a high frequency of stellar streams resulting from this mass accretion around the massive galaxies in the Local Volume. Such tidal streams are difficult to observe, especially in dense cluster environments, where they are readily destroyed. We present an investigation into the origins of a series of interlaced narrow filamentary stellar structures, loops and plumes in the vicinity of the Virgo Cluster, edge-on spiral galaxy, NGC 4216 that were previously identified by the Blackbird telescope. Using the deeper, higher-resolution, and precisely calibrated optical CFHT/MegaCam images obtained as part of the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS), we confirm the previously identified features and identify a few additional structures. The NGVS data allowed us to make a physical study of these low surface brightness features and investigate their origin. The likely progenitors of the structures were identified as either already cataloged Virgo Cluster Catalog dwarfs or newly discovered satellites caught in the act of being destroyed. They have the same g - i color index and likely contain similar stellar populations. The alignment of three dwarfs along an apparently single stream is intriguing, and we cannot totally exclude that these are second-generation dwarf galaxies being born inside the filament from the debris of an original dwarf. The observed complex structures, including in particular a stream apparently emanating from a satellite of a satellite, point to a high rate of ongoing dwarf destruction/accretion in the region of the Virgo Cluster where NGC 4216 is located. We discuss the age of the interactions and whether they occurred in a group that is just falling into the cluster and shows signs of the so-called pre-processing before it gets affected by the cluster environment, or in a

  16. Defining a monophyletic Cardinalini: a molecular perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klicka, John; Burns, Kevin; Spellman, Garth M

    2007-12-01

    Within the New World nine-primaried oscine assemblage, feeding morphology and behavior have long been used as a guideline for assigning membership to subgroups. For example, birds with stout, conical bills capable of crushing heavy seeds have generally been placed within the tribe Cardinalini (cardinal-grosbeaks). Many workers have tried to characterize this group more definitively, using a variety of morphological characters; however, the characters used often conflicted with one another. Previous molecular studies addressing the monophyly of Cardinalini have had only limited sampling within the group. In this study, we analyze mtDNA sequence data from all genera and 34 of the 42 Cardinalini species (sensu [Sibley, C.G., Monroe, B.L., 1990. Distribution and Taxonomy of the Birds of the World, Yale University Press, New Haven, CT]) to address the monophyly of the group and to reconstruct the most complete phylogeny of this tribe published to date. We found strong support for a redefined Cardinalini that now includes some members previously placed within Thraupini (tanagers; the genera Piranga, Habia, Chlorothraupis, and Amaurospiza) and some members previously placed within the Parulini (wood-warblers; the genus Granatellus). In addition, some genera traditionally considered members of the Cardinalini are shown to have affinities with other groups (the genera Porphyrospiza, Parkerthraustes, and Saltator). Our redefined Cardinalini contains 48 species, six more than are listed in Sibley and Monroe's (1990) taxonomy of the group. Within the nine-primaried oscine assemblage, the Cardinalini are more closely related to the Thraupini (tanagers) than they are to the Emberizini (sparrows), Parulini (wood-warblers), or Icterini (blackbirds), consistently forming a monophyletic group with Thraupini across all analyses. The reconfigured Cardinalini is comprised of five well-supported, major clades: (1) a "masked" clade (Piranga, Cardinalis, Caryothraustes, Periporphyrus, and

  17. Spectroscopic Measurement Techniques for Aerospace Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danehy, Paul M.; Bathel, Brett F.; Johansen, Craig T.; Cutler, Andrew D.; Hurley, Samantha

    2014-01-01

    The conditions that characterize aerospace flows are so varied, that a single diagnostic technique is not sufficient for its measurement. Fluid dynamists use knowledge of similarity to help categorize and focus on different flow conditions. For example, the Reynolds number represents the ratio of inertial to viscous forces in a flow. When the velocity scales, length scales, and gas density are large and the magnitude of the molecular viscosity is low, the Reynolds number becomes large. This corresponds to large scale vehicles (e.g Airbus A380), fast moving objects (e.g. artillery projectiles), vehicles in dense fluids (e.g. submarine in water), or flows with low dynamic viscosity (e.g. skydiver in air). In each of these cases, the inertial forces dominate viscous forces, and unsteady turbulent fluctuations in the flow variables are observed. In contrast, flows with small length scales (e.g. dispersion of micro-particles in a solid rocket nozzle), slow moving objects (e.g. micro aerial vehicles), flows with low density gases (e.g. atmospheric re-entry), or fluids with a large magnitude of viscosity (e.g. engine coolant flow), all have low Reynolds numbers. In these cases, viscous forces become very important and often the flows can be steady and laminar. The Mach number, which is the ratio of the velocity to the speed of sound in the medium, also helps to differentiate types of flows. At very low Mach numbers, acoustic waves travel much faster than the object, and the flow can be assumed to be incompressible (e.g. Cessna 172 aircraft). As the object speed approaches the speed of sound, the gas density can become variable (e.g. flow over wing of Learjet 85). When the object speed is higher than the speed of sound (Ma > 1), the presences of shock waves and other gas dynamic features can become important to the vehicle performance (e.g. SR-71 Blackbird). In the hypersonic flow regime (Ma > 5), large changes in temperature begin to affect flow properties, causing real

  18. Birds of the St. Croix River valley: Minnesota and Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faanes, Craig A.

    1981-01-01

    The St. Croix River Valley encompasses nearly 11,550 km2 in east-central Minnesota and northwestern Wisconsin. A wide range of habitats are available for birds including upland oak, lowland deciduous, maple-basswood, lowland and upland coniferous forests, natural basin wetlands, and grasslands. Situated in the north-central region of the United States, the valley is a biological 'crossroads' for many species. Because of the mixed affinities of plant communities, the valley includes the northern and southern range limits for a number of species. Also, because the valley lies near the forest-prairie transition zone, many typical western breeding species (e.g. pintail, western meadowlark, yellow-headed blackbird) breed in proximity to typical eastern species such as tufted titmouse, eastern meadowlark, and cardinal. From 1966 to 1980, I conducted extensive surveys of avian distribution and abundance in the St. Croix River Valley. I have supplemented the results of these surveys with published and unpublished observations contributed by many ornithologists. These additional data include compilations from Christmas Bird Counts sponsored by the National Audubon Society and from the Breeding Bird Survey coordinated by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Three hundred fourteen species have been recorded in the study area; data are presented on the migration period, nesting season distribution, winter distribution, relative abundance, and habitat use of each species. Recognizing the uniqueness of the area, and its importance not only to wildlife but also to man, the U.S. Congress designated the St. Croix a National Scenic Riverway. This action provided a considerable degree of protection to lands along and directly adjacent to the river. Unfortunately, no similar legal measure exists to protect lands away from the river. With the exception of the northern quarter of the St. Croix River Valley, agricultural interests have made significant inroads into the habitat base. The

  19. Analysis of Microstructural Evolution and Fracture Mechanisms in Ti-5Al-5V-5Mo-3Cr-0.4Fe in Response to Electron Beam Welding and Post Weld Heat Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabol, Joseph C.

    Within the last half-century, advances in Ti and Ti alloys have increased their popularity in the aerospace industry as well as in commercial products. Some Ti alloys have even replaced steels and Ni-base alloys due to their high strength and superior corrosion resistance. Of the various Ti alloys, near-beta and metastable beta alloys have become more common since their first large-scale use in the SR-71 Blackbird. In particular, TIMET's Ti-5Al-5V-5Mo-3Cr (Timetal Ti555, Ti-5553) gained high attainable strengths, excellent forging characteristics, and increased sensitivity to heat treatments compared to other beta-Ti alloys. Ti-5553 has become widely known for its desirable attributes and has since become the baseline for the next generation of metastable beta and near-beta Ti alloys. However, as well known as Ti-5553 is in the aerospace and Ti industry, its responses to welding have, for the most part, gone uncharacterized. The work presented in this dissertation investigates the influence of electron beam welding and post weld heat treatments on the microstructural, mechanical, and fracture responses of Ti-5553. In this study, Ti-5553 was electron beam welded and heat-treated in accordance to three predetermined heat treatments: 700°C for 4 hours followed by air cooling to room temperature, 804°C for 1 hour followed by air cooling to room temperature, and 804°C for 1 hour followed by air cooling to room temperature then aging at 600°C for 4 hours followed by air cooling to room temperature. Subsequently, the mechanical properties, microstructure, solute partitioning, precipitate identities, and fracture characteristics were evaluated. With the use of traditional techniques and new technology it was shown that electron beam welded Ti-5553 in the as-welded condition and three post weld heat treatment conditions exhibited varying properties, distinctive to each of the corresponding microstructures. It was also found that the o-phase played a large role in the

  20. Un registro de 6 000 años de manifestaciones intensas del fenómeno de El Niño en sedimentos de lagunas de las islas Galápagos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    1998-01-01

    ’enregistrement de Bainbridge, nous disposons d’autres carottes susceptibles de retracer l’histoire du phénomène El Niño. Une carotte du lac de cratère de Genovesa (6 000 ± 50 ans montre des fluctuations dans la teneur en phosphore (provenant du Guano de fous aux pattes rouges qui nichent autour du cratère et de pollen de Bursea (plante qui ne fleurit que quand il pleut. Les sédiments du lac de El Junco dans l’île de San Cristobal montrent des fluctuations des espèces de diatomées qui indiquent des variations du niveau de ce lac au cours des derniers 550 ans (daté à l’aide de Pb 210. Des carottes prélevées dans deux lagons côtiers des îles Isabela et Santiago montrent, grâce à la présence de diatomées marines et d’espèces foraminifères, des fluctuations du niveau de l’océan. Muchos de los modelos que se están desarrollando con el propósito de obtener un pronóstico efectivo del fenómeno de El Niño requieren datos históricos sobre el comportamiento del clima, y es especialmente importante para climatólogos el obtener datos de gran antigüedad. En los sedimentos de lagunas de las Islas Galápagos encontramos uno de los registros más antiguos y completos de la frecuencia con la que los eventos de más intensidad de El Niño han ocurrido. Las lluvias torrenciales que El Niño trae causan que la salinidad del agua en lagunas salobres de las islas baje considerablemente. Es posible detectar estos cambios en los sedimentos de las lagunas mediante análisis de mineralogía y geoquímica. Además una capa de agua dulce que se forma en la superficie de estas lagunas durante épocas de lluvia, causa que la composición de especies de algas microscópicas (diatomeas cambie. Las diatomeas tienen paredes celulares de silicio que permiten que la comunidad entera se preserve como fósil en los sedimentos. Un núcleo de sedimentos de 4,17 m, obtenido en la laguna salobre del cráter de Bainbridge al sureste de la Isla Santiago, nos proporciona una historia

  1. La vegetación azonal paramunade la Cordillera Oriental colombiana: síntesis fitosociológica preliminar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rangel Churio Orlando

    2006-06-01

    toda la cordillera, seguidas por las alianzas Crassolion  venezuelense, Junco- Elatinion y Calamagrostion ligulatae, ausentes solo en unas pocas áreas; en cuanto a asociaciones, la vegetación del Gentiano-Plantaginetum y del Crassuletum venezuelense posee la distribución más amplia. La vegetación de la alianza
    Oreobolio-Plantagion presenta la distribución altitudinal más amplia de la vegetación azonal (franja extrazonal a
    superpáramo, 3.150-4.350 m, seguida por la vegetación del Egerio-Myriophyllion (páramo bajo a superpáramo,
    3.350-4.435 m. En cuanto a flora, la mayor riqueza de géneros presentes en la vegetación acuática la poseen
    las familias Asteraceae (siete, Poaceae (seis, Cyperaceae (cinco y Scrophulariaceae (cuatro; los géneros con mayor número de morfoespecies en este tipo de vegetación son Isoetes (ocho, Juncus (siete y Eleocharis (cinco. Las familias con mayor representación de géneros en la vegetación terrestre son Asteraceae y Poaceae (25 y 15 respectivamente, seguidas por Scrophulariaceae (nueve y Cyperaceae (siete; los géneros más ricos en morfoespecies son Carex (12, Campylopus, Hypericum, Monticalia y Lachemilla (cada una con 11 morfoespecies. Especies como Crassula venezuelensis, Werneria pygmaea, Plantago rigida,  alamagrostis ligulata, Puya santosii, Blechnum loxense, Aragoa abietina, Chusquea tessellata y varias de los géneros Eleocharis, Isoetes, Carex y Sphagnum cobran gran importancia en el proceso sucesional entre comunidades acuáticas y etapas iniciales de colmatación hasta las fases avanzadas de terrización, transicionales a tipos propios de vegetación zonal.

  2. Don Gonzalo Jimenez de Quesada. El Fundador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro López Pardo

    1989-09-01

    , Gracias a estos fracasos debió enrolarse en la expedición de Don Pedro Fernández de Lugo- como Teniente y Justicia Mayor, para dirigirse al enigmático Nuevo Mundo.

    Vendrá en su mente el recuerdo del vistoso desembarco de las tropas en Santa Martha, en gra contraste con los harapos que vestirían esas mismas tropas más tarde al enfrentarse al territorio americano. Recordará vivamente Don Gonzalo cómo su idea de seguir adelante para conquistar el corazón de América dio muchos ánimos a la gente y fue así como para su empresa logró reunir ochocientos soldados, de a pie y a caballo, acompañados por muchos indios. También dotó una pequeña flotilla que debía subir por el Río Grande de la Magdalena.

    Aquí vendría una parte negra de los ensueños del Mariscal, una pesadilla de fracasos y sufrimientos que comenzó el6 de abril de 1536. Su flota zozobró quedando tan sólo dos naves. Su tropa, que iba por tierra, guiada por expertos Capitanes: Suárez Rendón, Juan del Junco, Antón de Olaya, Juan de Céspedes, etc., sufre todas las inclemencias del tiempo, debe atravesar pantanos, cruzar selvas, hacer caminos al aundar. Las fieras, no menos terribles que las flechas de algunas tribus indígenas, van terminando con la soldadesca. El hambre les lleva a comer de todo. Fiebres desconocidas los asaltaban. Porque, pensaría Don Gonzalo, que en este enfrentamiento de dos mundos, que se desconocen, se causan admiración, se temen, no sólo van a intercambiar disparos y dardos, espejos por esmeraldas, religión por agüeros, sino también a intercambiar enfermedades, que destruyeron a los unos y a los otros.

    Volverá a la mente del adelantado, quien en el fondo estimaba a los indios, la variada conducta de las distintas tribus, los unos los atacan, ocultándose entre el follaje, otros muchos les huyen como a bestias salvajes, otros los reciben como a los dioses blancos prometidos. Pero quizás el recuerdo más impresionante sea el episodio que sucedi

  3. SR-71 Pilot Rogers E. Smith

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    Research pilot Rogers E. Smith is shown here in front of the SR-71 Blackbird he flew for NASA. Rogers was one of the two original NASA research pilots assigned to the SR-71 high speed research program at NASA's Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Smith has been a NASA research pilot at Dryden since 1982. Data from the SR-71 program will be used to aid designers of future supersonic aircraft and propulsion systems. The SR-71 is capable of flying more than 2200 mph (Mach 3+) and at altitudes of over 80,000 feet. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground, much like sharp thunderclaps, when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that would reduce the 'peak' overpressures of sonic booms and minimize the startling affect they produce on the ground. One of the first major experiments to be flown in the NASA SR-71 program was a laser air data collection system. It used laser light instead of air pressure to produce airspeed and attitude reference data

  4. Ore genesis constraints on the Idaho Cobalt Belt from fluid inclusion gas, noble gas isotope, and ion ratio analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstra, Albert H.; Landis, Gary P.

    2012-01-01

    The Idaho cobalt belt is a 60-km-long alignment of deposits composed of cobaltite, Co pyrite, chalcopyrite, and gold with anomalous Nb, Y, Be, and rare-earth elements (REEs) in a quartz-biotite-tourmaline gangue hosted in Mesoproterozoic metasedimentary rocks of the Lemhi Group. It is the largest cobalt resource in the United States with historic production from the Blackbird Mine. All of the deposits were deformed and metamorphosed to upper greenschist-lower amphibolite grade in the Cretaceous. They occur near a 1377 Ma anorogenic bimodal plutonic complex. The enhanced solubility of Fe, Co, Cu, and Au as chloride complexes together with gangue biotite rich in Fe and Cl and gangue quartz containing hypersaline inclusions allows that hot saline fluids were involved. The isotopes of B in gangue tourmaline are suggestive of a marine source, whereas those of Pb in ore suggest a U ± Th-enriched source. The ore and gangue minerals in this belt may have trapped components in fluid inclusions that are distinct from those in post-ore minerals and metamorphic minerals. Such components can potentially be identified and distinguished by their relative abundances in contrasting samples. Therefore, we obtained samples of Co and Cu sulfides, gangue quartz, biotite, and tourmaline and post-ore quartz veins as well as Cretaceous metamorphic garnet and determined the gas, noble gas isotope, and ion ratios of fluid inclusion extracts by mass spectrometry and ion chromatography. The most abundant gases present in extracts from each sample type are biased toward the gas-rich population of inclusions trapped during maximum burial and metamorphism. All have CO2/CH4 and N2/Ar ratios of evolved crustal fluids, and many yield a range of H2-CH4-CO2-H2S equilibration temperatures consistent with the metamorphic grade. Cretaceous garnet and post-ore minerals have high RH and RS values suggestive of reduced sulfidic conditions. Most extracts have anomalous 4He produced by decay of U and Th and

  5. Discovery of Nearest Known Brown Dwarf

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Surveys (SSS) optical photographic plates (I-band, centred at wavelength 0.7 µm) on which this very high proper motion object was discovered. The lower image is the 'Quicklook atlas' infrared image (Ks-band, 2.1 µm) from the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS). Epsilon Indi B is much brighter in the near-infrared than at optical wavelengths, indicating that it is a very cool object. Both images cover roughly 7 x 5 arcmin. Imagine you are a professional ornithologist, recently returned home from an expedition to the jungles of South America, where you spent long weeks using your high-powered telephoto lenses searching for rare species of birds. Relaxing, you take a couple of wide-angle snapshots of the blooming flowers in your back garden, undistracted by the common blackbird flying across your viewfinder. Only later, when carefully comparing those snaps, you notice something tiny and unusually coloured, flittering close behind the blackbird: you've discovered an exotic, rare bird, right there at home. In much the same way, a team of astronomers [2] has just found one of the closest neighbours to the Sun, an exotic 'failed star' known as a 'brown dwarf', moving rapidly across the sky in the southern constellation Indus (The Indian). Interestingly, at a time when telescopes are growing larger and are equipped with ever more sophisticated electronic detectors, there is still much to be learned by combining old photographic plates with this modern technology. Photographic plates taken by wide-field ("Schmidt") telescopes over the past decades have been given a new lease on life through being digitised by automated measuring machines, allowing computers to trawl effectively through huge and invaluable data archives that are by far not yet fully exploited [3]. For the Southern Sky, the Institute for Astronomy in Edinburgh (Scotland, UK) has recently released scans made by the SuperCOSMOS machine of plates spanning several decades in three optical passbands. These data are