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Sample records for jump 3-rm squat

  1. Choice of jumping strategy in two standard jumps, squat and countermovement jump--effect of training background or inherited preference?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Susanne; Voigt, M; Simonsen, Erik Bruun

    1999-01-01

    Six male subjects, three professional ballet dancers and three elite volleyball players, performed maximal vertical jumps from 1) a static preparatory position (squat jump), 2) starting with a countermovement (countermovement jump) and 3) a specific jump for ballet and for volleyball, respectively....... The jumps were recorded on highspeed film (500 Hz) combined with registration of ground reaction forces, and net joint moments were calculated by inverse dynamics. The purpose was to investigate the choice of strategy in two standard jumps, squat jump and countermovement jump. The volleyball jump...... was performed with a sequential strategy and the ballet jump was performed with a simultaneous strategy. In the two standard jumps, the choice of strategy was individual and not related to training background. This was additionally confirmed in a test of seven ballet dancers and seven volleyball players....

  2. Could the deep squat jump predict weightlifting performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizcaya, Francisco J; Viana, Oscar; del Olmo, Miguel Fernandez; Acero, Rafael Martin

    2009-05-01

    This research was carried out with the aim of describing the deep squat jump (DSJ) and comparing it with the squat (SJ) and countermovement (CMJ) jumps, to introduce it as a strength testing tool in the monitoring and control of training in strength and power sports. Forty-eight male subjects (21 weightlifters, 12 triathletes, and 15 physical education students) performed 3 trials of DSJ, SJ, and CMJ with a 1-minute rest among them. For the weightlifters, snatch and clean and jerk results during the Spanish Championship 2004 and the 35th EU Championships 2007 were collected to study the relationship among vertical jumps and weightlifters' performance. A 1-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed significant differences between groups in the vertical jumps, with the highest jumps for the weightlifters and the lowest for the triathletes. An ANOVA for repeated measures (type of jump) showed better results for DSJ and CMJ than SJ in all groups. A linear regression analysis was performed to determine the association between weightlifting and vertical jump performances. Correlations among the weightlifting performance and the vertical jumps were also calculated and determined using Pearson r. Results have shown that both CMJ and DSJ are strongly correlated with weightlifting ability. Therefore, both measures can be useful for coaches as a strength testing tool in the monitoring and control of training in weightlifting.

  3. Kinematics and Kinetics of Squats, Drop Jumps and Imitation Jumps of Ski Jumpers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauli, Carole A; Keller, Melanie; Ammann, Fabian; Hübner, Klaus; Lindorfer, Julia; Taylor, William R; Lorenzetti, Silvio

    2016-03-01

    Squats, drop jumps, and imitation jumps are commonly used training exercises in ski jumping to enhance maximum force, explosive force, and sport-specific skills. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the kinetics and kinematics of training exercises in ski jumping and to find objective parameters in training exercises that most correlate with the competition performance of ski jumpers. To this end, barbell squats, drop jumps, and imitation jumps were measured in a laboratory environment for 10 elite ski jumpers. Force and motion data were captured, and the influence of maximum vertical force, force difference, vertical take-off velocity, knee moments, knee joint power, and a knee valgus/varus index was evaluated and correlated with their season jump performance. The results indicate that, especially for the imitation jumps, a good correlation exists between the vertical take-off velocity and the personal jump performance on the hill (R = 0.718). Importantly, however, the more the athletes tended toward a valgus knee alignment during the measured movements, the worse their performance (R = 0.729 imitation jumps; R = 0.685 squats). Although an evaluation of the athletes' lower limb alignment during competitive jumping on the hill is still required, these preliminary data suggest that performance training should additionally concentrate on improving knee alignment to increase ski jumping performance.

  4. Humans adjust control to initial squat depth in vertical squat jumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobbert, Maarten F; Casius, L J Richard; Sijpkens, Igor W T; Jaspers, Richard T

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain insight into the control strategy that humans use in jumping. Eight male gymnasts performed vertical squat jumps from five initial postures that differed in squat depth (P1-P5) while kinematic data, ground reaction forces, and electromyograms (EMGs) of leg muscles were collected; the latter were rectified and smoothed to obtain SREMGs. P3 was the preferred initial posture; in P1, P2, P4, and P5 height of the mass center was +13, +7, -7 and -14 cm, respectively, relative to that in P3. Furthermore, maximum-height jumps from the initial postures observed in the subjects were simulated with a model comprising four body segments and six Hill-type muscles. The only input was the onset of stimulation of each of the muscles (Stim). The subjects were able to perform well-coordinated squat jumps from all postures. Peak SREMG levels did not vary among P1-P5, but SREMG onset of plantarflexors occurred before that of gluteus maximus in P1 and > 90 ms after that in P5 (P < 0.05). In the simulation study, similar systematic shifts occurred in Stim onsets across the optimal control solutions for jumps from P1-P5. Because the adjustments in SREMG onsets to initial posture observed in the subjects were very similar to the adjustments in optimal Stim onsets of the model, it was concluded that the SREMG adjustments were functional, in the sense that they contributed to achieving the greatest jump height possible from each initial posture. For the model, we were able to develop a mapping from initial posture to Stim onsets that generated successful jumps from P1-P5. It appears that to explain how subjects adjust their control to initial posture there is no need to assume that the brain contains an internal dynamics model of the musculoskeletal system.

  5. Validation of jump squats as a practical measure of post-activation potentiation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nibali, Maria L; Chapman, Dale W; Robergs, Robert A; Drinkwater, Eric J

    2013-01-01

    .... We assessed the evoked muscle twitch properties of the knee extensors and jump squat kinetics of 8 physically trained males in response to a 5-repetition-maximum back squat conditioning stimulus (CS...

  6. A biomechanical comparison of the vertical jump, power clean, and jump squat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKenzie, Sasho James; Lavers, Robert J; Wallace, Brendan B

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the kinetics, kinematics, and muscle activation patterns of the countermovement jump, the power clean, and the jump squat with the expectation of gaining a better understanding of the mechanism of transfer from the power clean to the vertical jump. Ground reaction forces, electromyography, and joint angle data were collected from 20 trained participants while they performed the three movements. Relative to the power clean, the kinematics of the jump squat were more similar to those of the countermovement jump. The order in which the ankle, knee, and hip began extending, as well as the subsequent pattern of extension, was different between the power clean and countermovement jump. The electromyography data demonstrated significant differences in the relative timing of peak activations in all muscles, the maximum activation of the rectus femoris and biceps femoris, and in the activation/deactivation patterns of the vastus medialis and rectus femoris. The greatest rate of force development during the upward phase of these exercises was generated during the power clean (17,254 [Formula: see text]), which was significantly greater than both the countermovement jump (3836 [Formula: see text]) and jump squat (3517 [Formula: see text]) conditions (P < .001, [Formula: see text]).

  7. Effect of Instructions on Selected Jump Squat Variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talpey, Scott W; Young, Warren B; Beseler, Bradley

    2016-09-01

    Talpey, SW, Young, WB, and Beseler, B. Effect of instructions on selected jump squat variables. J Strength Cond Res 30(9): 2508-2513, 2016-The purpose of this study was to compare 2 instructions on the performance of selected variables in a jump squat (JS) exercise. The second purpose was to determine the relationships between JS variables and sprint performance. Eighteen male subjects with resistance training experience performed 2 sets of 4 JS with no extra load with the instructions to concentrate on (a) jumping for maximum height and (b) extending the legs as fast as possible to maximize explosive force. Sprint performance was assessed at 0- to 10-m and 10- to 20-m distances. From the JS jump height, peak power, relative peak power, peak force, peak velocity, and countermovement distance were measured from a force platform and position transducer system. The JS variables under the 2 instructions were compared with paired t-tests, and the relationships between these variables and sprint performance were determined with Pearson's correlations. The jump height instruction produced greater mean jump height and peak velocity (p 0.05). Jump height was the variable that correlated most strongly with 10-m time and 10- to 20-m time under both instructions. The height instruction produced a stronger correlation with 10-m time (r = -0.455), but the fast leg extension JS produced a greater correlation with 10-20 time (r = -0.545). The results indicate that instructions have a meaningful influence on JS variables and therefore need to be taken into consideration when assessing or training athletes.

  8. Difference in the recruitment of hip and knee muscles between back squat and plyometric squat jump.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norihide Sugisaki

    Full Text Available Athletes who aim to improve both muscular endurance and power often perform exercises that involve similar joint actions under different lifting conditions, such as changes in the load or speed, which are implemented at different times during a periodized exercise program or simultaneously. The prescribed exercises are considered to recruit the same muscles even if the lifting conditions differ to each other. The present study aimed to clarify this by examining whether the recruitment of individual hip and knee muscles during the squat exercise differs between lifting conditions adopted for muscular endurance and power training regimens. Moderately trained men performed back squats (BS, with a load of approximately 60% of one repetition maximum, as a muscular endurance training exercise, and they performed plyometric squat jumping (PSJ for power training. During each exercise, the lower limb joint torques and the recruitment of five hip and knee muscles were determined with inverse-dynamics and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, respectively. While the maximal and mean knee joint torques were greater during PSJ than during BS (p<0.01, the T2 values for the quadriceps femoris muscle did not differ between the exercises. In contrast, the T2 values of the gluteus maximus and hip adductor muscles were higher during PSJ (p<0.05 than during BS, although there was no significant difference in the mean hip extension torque between the two exercises. The current results indicate that the individual use of the agonist muscles differs between BS and PSJ, and it does not always correspond with the joint kinetics during the exercises. Therefore, in addition to the exercise type, the lifting condition should also be taken into consideration as a determinant of the major muscles trained during a resistance exercise.

  9. Towards a neuronal network controller for vertical jumping from different initial squat depths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobbert, Maarten F

    2010-01-01

    In this study, a forward dynamic simulation model of the human musculoskeletal system was used to explore various strategies of generating muscle stimulation patterns for vertical squat jumping. It was shown that a simple mapping from joint angles to muscle stimulation onsets yielded successful control, albeit not optimal control, for jumps from different initial squat depths. Furthermore, it was shown that this mapping could be implemented in a straightforward way in a simple network of Hodgkin-Huxley type neurons.

  10. Jump-Squat Performance and Its Relationship With Relative Training Intensity in High-Level Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Reyes, Pedro; Pareja-Blanco, Fernando; Balsalobre-Fernández, Carlos; Cuadrado-Peñafiel, Víctor; Ortega-Becerra, Manuel A; González-Badillo, Juan J

    2015-11-01

    To examine the relationship between the relative load in full squats and the height achieved in jump-squat (JS) exercises and to determine the load that maximizes the power output of high-level athletes. Fifty-one male high-level track-and-field athletes (age 25.2 ± 4.4 y, weight 77. ± 6.2 kg, height 179.9 ± 5.6 cm) who competed in sprinting and jumping events took part in the study. Full-squat 1-repetition-maximum (1-RM) and JS height (JH) with loads from 17 to 97 kg were measured in 2 sessions separated by 48 h. Individual regression analyses showed that JH (R2 = .992 ± .005) and the jump decrease (JD) that each load produced with respect to the unloaded countermovement jump (CMJ) (R2 = .992 ± 0.007) are highly correlated with the full-squat %1-RM, which means that training intensities can be prescribed using JH and JD values. The authors also found that the load that maximizes JS's power output was 0%RM (ie, unloaded CMJ). These results highlight the close relationship between JS performance and relative training intensity in terms of %1-RM. The authors also observed that the load that maximizes power output was 0%1-RM. Monitoring jump height during JS training could help coaches and athletes determine and optimize their training loads.

  11. THE ACUTE EFFECTS OF BACK SQUATS ON VERTICAL JUMP PERFORMANCE IN MEN AND WOMEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavin L. Moir

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate the acute effects of performing back squats on subsequent performance during a series of vertical jumps in men and women. Twelve men and 12 women were tested on three separate occasions, the first of which was used to determine their 1-repetition maximum (1-RM parallel back squat. Following this, subjects performed a potentiation and a control treatment in a counterbalanced order. The potentiation treatment culminated with subjects performing parallel back squats with a load equivalent to 70% 1- RM for three repetitions, following which they performed one countermovement vertical jump (CMJ for maximal height every three minutes for a total of 10 jumps. During the control treatment, subjects performed only the CMJs. Jump height (JH and vertical stiffness (VStiff were calculated for each jump from the vertical force signal recorded from a force platform. There were no significant changes in JH or VStiff following the treatments and no significant differences in the responses between men and women (p > 0.05. Correlations between normalized 1-RM back squat load and the absolute change in JH and VStiff were small to moderate for both men and women, with most correlations being negative. Large variations in response to the back squats were noted in both men and women. The use of resistance exercises performed prior to a series of vertical jumps can result in improvements in performance in certain individuals, although the gains tend to be small and dependent upon the mechanical variable measured. There does not seem to be any differences between men and women in the response to dynamic potentiation protocols

  12. The Effect of an Altitude Training Camp on Swimming Start Time and Loaded Squat Jump Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ramos, Amador; Štirn, Igor; Padial, Paulino; Argüelles-Cienfuegos, Javier; De la Fuente, Blanca; Calderón, Carmen; Bonitch-Góngora, Juan; Tomazin, Katja; Strumbelj, Boro; Strojnik, Vojko; Feriche, Belén

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of an altitude training (AT) camp on swimming start time and loaded squat jump performance. To accomplish this goal, 13 international swimmers (8 women, 5 men) were allocated to both the control (Sea Level Training, SLT) and experimental conditions (AT, 2320 m above sea level) that were separated by a one year period. All tests (15 m freestyle swimming start and loaded squat jumps with additional loads of 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% of swimmers' body weight) were performed before and after a concurrent 3-week strength and endurance training program prescribed by the national coach. Following the SLT camp, significant impairments in swimming start times to 10 (+3.1%) and 15 m (+4.0%) were observed (P camp (-0.89%; P > 0.05). Trivial changes in peak velocity were obtained during the loaded squat jump after both training periods (effect sizes: effectiveness of power-oriented resistance training in the development of explosive actions.

  13. EFFECTS OF MAXIMAL SQUAT EXERCISE TESTING ON VERTICAL JUMP PERFORMANCE IN AMERICAN COLLEGE FOOTBALL PLAYERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay R. Hoffman

    2007-03-01

    on the first day of pre-season training camp. All athletes provided their informed consent as part of their sport requirements consistent with the college's Institutional Review Board's policies for use of human subjects in research. They were familiar with all testing protocols and had performed these assessments for the previous 2 - 6 years. All athletes reported to the athletic training facility for strength and vertical jump testing and performed a 5-min warm-up (pedaling at 60 rpm at 300 kg·m·min-1 interspersed with five all-out sprints during the last 5-s of each minute on a cycle ergometer prior to testing. Following the warm-up the athletes performed two countermovement vertical jumps. The higher of the two trials was recorded. The athletes then performed a 1-RM strength test for the barbell back squat exercise. Following a 5-minute rest interval, each athlete performed an additional countermovement vertical jump trial. The 1-RM squat test was performed using methods previously described by Hoffman, 2006. Each athlete performed a warm-up set using a resistance that was approximately 40-60% of his perceived maximum, and then performed three-to- four subsequent trials to determine the 1-RM. A 3 - 5 minute rest period was provided between each trial. The squat exercise required the athlete to place an Olympic bar across the trapezius muscle at a self-selected location. The athlete then descended to the parallel position which was attained when the greater trochanter of the femur reached the same level as the knee. The athlete then ascended until full knee extension. Trials not meeting the range of motion criteria were discarded.The counter-movement vertical jump height was measured using a VertecTM (Sports Imports, Columbus, OH. Prior to testing, each athlete's standing vertical reach height was determined. Vertical jump height was calculated by subtracting the standing reach height from the jump height. Power outputs were calculated based upon the formula of

  14. Effect of squat depth on performance and biomechanical parameters of countermovement vertical jump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Ghedini Gheller

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of different squat depths in the performance and biomechanical parameters at counter movement jump (CMJ. Twenty-two male volleyball or basketball players volunteered to participate in this study and all were currently competing at the college level. The CMJ was performed in three different conditions: 1 with relative knee flexion at the end of counter movement phase smaller than 90° (90°, and; 3 preferred position (PREF. During the CMJ, kinematic, kinetic, and electromyography parameters were assessed. ANOVA for repeated measures with post-hoc Bonferroni´s test was used for variables comparison, with a significance level set at p≤0.05. The higher performance was on PREF and 90°. Average and peak power, as well as absolute and normalized peak forces, were higher in >90° CMJ. The peak velocity of CG and angular velocities of hip and knee were higher in the 90°. Recuts femoris and biceps femoris did not show difference in any jump phases. In conclusion, the knee flexion interferes the performance and the biomechanical variables at the CMJ. The highest jumps were got at a deeper squat, so this technique could be used for athletes in order to optimize the vertical jump performance in the training and competitions.

  15. The MARS for squat, countermovement, and standing long jump performance analyses: are measures reproducible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hébert-Losier, Kim; Beaven, C Martyn

    2014-07-01

    Jump tests are often used to assess the effect of interventions because their outcomes are reported valid indicators of functional performance. In this study, we examined the reproducibility of performance parameters from 3 common jump tests obtained using the commercially available Kistler Measurement, Analysis and Reporting Software (MARS). On 2 separate days, 32 men performed 3 squat jumps (SJs), 3 countermovement jumps (CMJs), and 3 standing long jumps (LJs) on a Kistler force-plate. On both days, the performance measures from the best jump of each series were extracted using the MARS. Changes in the mean scores, intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs), and coefficients of variations (CVs) were computed to quantify the between-day reproducibility of each parameter. Moreover, the reproducibility quantifiers specific to the 3 separate jumps were compared using nonparametric tests. Overall, an acceptable between-day reproducibility (mean ± SD, ICC, and CV) of SJ (0.88 ± 0.06 and 7.1 ± 3.8%), CMJ (0.84 ± 0.17 and 5.9 ± 4.1%), and LJ (0.80 ± 0.13 and 8.1 ± 4.1%) measures was found using the MARS, except for parameters directly relating to the rate of force development (i.e., time to maximal force) and change in momentum during countermovement (i.e., negative force impulse) where reproducibility was lower. A greater proportion of the performance measures from the standing LJs had low ICCs and/or high CVs values most likely owing to the complex nature of the LJ test. Practitioners and researchers can use most of the jump test parameters from the MARS with confidence to quantify changes in the functional ability of individuals over time, except for those relating to the rate of force development or change in momentum during countermovement phases of jumps.

  16. Reliability of squat and countermovement jump tests in children 6 to 8 years of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acero, Rafael Martin; Fernández-del Olmo, Miguel; Sánchez, Jose Andres; Otero, Xose Luis; Aguado, Xavier; Rodríguez, Ferran A

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the reliability of the squat jump test (SJ) and countermovement jump test (CMJ), in fifty-six children (30 girls and 26 boys) with ages ranging from 6 to 8 years. Each subject performed two evaluation sessions (T1, T2) with seven days between tests. The results show that the CMJ test has a high intratrial reproducibility in T1 and T2 measured through intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC ≥ 0.95). The ICC for the SJ test had a high value (0.99) only in T1. The variability for both tests among children under 9 years of age is higher than those reported for adult subjects in other studies. The intersession reliability was questionable with a high methodical error (ME= 9.86-15.1%, for the SJ and CMJ, respectively) and a significant worsening of the results of CMJ in T2 (p < .05).

  17. Humans make near-optimal adjustments of control to initial body configuration in vertical squat jumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobbert, Maarten F; Richard Casius, L J; Kistemaker, Dinant A

    2013-05-01

    We investigated adjustments of control to initial posture in squat jumping. Eleven male subjects jumped from three initial postures: preferred initial posture (PP), a posture in which the trunk was rotated 18° more backward (BP) and a posture in which it was rotated 15° more forward (FP) than in PP. Kinematics, ground reaction forces and electromyograms (EMG) were collected. EMG was rectified and smoothed to obtain smoothed rectified EMG (srEMG). Subjects showed adjustments in srEMG histories, most conspicuously a shift in srEMG-onset of rectus femoris (REC): from early in BP to late in FP. Jumps from the subjects' initial postures were simulated with a musculoskeletal model comprising four segments and six Hill-type muscles, which had muscle stimulation (STIM) over time as input. STIM of each muscle changed from initial to maximal at STIM-onset, and STIM-onsets were optimized using jump height as criterion. Optimal simulated jumps from BP, PP and FP were similar to jumps of the subjects. Optimal solutions primarily differed in STIM-onset of REC: from early in BP to late in FP. Because the subjects' adjustments in srEMG-onsets were similar to adjustments of the model's optimal STIM-onsets, it was concluded that the former were near-optimal. With the model we also showed that near-maximum jumps from BP, PP and FP could be achieved when STIM-onset of REC depended on initial hip joint angle and STIM-onsets of the other muscles were posture-independent. A control theory that relies on a mapping from initial posture to STIM-onsets seems a parsimonious alternative to theories relying on internal optimal control models. Copyright © 2013 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Acute effect of whole-body vibration on high velocity squat and jump performance

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    Carlos Ugrinowitsch

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to assess the acute effect of whole-body vibration (WBV on power production of the lower limbs during squat exercise and on vertical jump height. The performance of 30 strength-trained subjects was assessed during high velocity squat exercise (HVS and countermovement vertical jump (CMJ before and after being submitted to four different vibration protocols in a counterbalanced random manner. The HVS and CMJ assessments were performed 3 min before and 6, 9 and 12 min after the WBV interventions, and 6 min before and 9 and 15 min after the interventions, respectively. The different WBV protocols did not change relative peak or average power production during HVS and CMJ. However, time exerted a main effect, with a decrease in CMJ height at 3 min (-2% and 15 min (-3.1% after treatment. These results suggest that the WBV protocols employed in this study do not induce acute improvement in performance. However, this finding does not rule out the application of WBV as a useful strategy for training or warm-up routines.

  19. Effects of a Six-Week Hip Thrust vs. Front Squat Resistance Training Program on Performance in Adolescent Males: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Bret; Vigotsky, Andrew D; Schoenfeld, Brad J; Beardsley, Chris; McMaster, Daniel T; Reyneke, Jan H T; Cronin, John B

    2017-04-01

    Contreras, B, Vigotsky, AD, Schoenfeld, BJ, Beardsley, C, McMaster, DT, Reyneke, JHT, and Cronin, JB. Effects of a six-week hip thrust vs. front squat resistance training program on performance in adolescent males: A randomized controlled trial. J Strength Cond Res 31(4): 999-1008, 2017-The barbell hip thrust may be an effective exercise for increasing horizontal force production and may thereby enhance performance in athletic movements requiring a horizontal force vector, such as horizontal jumping and sprint running. The ergogenic ability of the squat is well known. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of 6-week front squat and hip thrust programs in adolescent male athletes. Vertical jump height, horizontal jump distance, 10- and 20-m sprint times, and isometric midthigh pull peak force were among the measured performance variables, in addition to front squat and hip thrust 3 repetition maximum (3RM) strength. Magnitude-based effect sizes revealed potentially beneficial effects for the front squat in both front squat 3RM strength and vertical jump height when compared with the hip thrust. No clear benefit for one intervention was observed for horizontal jump performance. Potentially beneficial effects were observed for the hip thrust compared with the front squat in 10- and 20-m sprint times. The hip thrust was likely superior for improving normalized isometric midthigh pull strength and very likely superior for improving hip thrust 3RM and isometric midthigh pull strength. These results support the force vector theory.

  20. Fast Regulation of Vertical Squat Jump during push-off in skilled jumpers

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    Patrick FARGIER

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The height of a maximum Vertical Squat Jump (VSJ reflects the useful power produced by a jumper during the push-off phase. In turn this partly depends on the coordination of the jumper's segmental rotations at each instant. The physical system constituted by the jumper has been shown to be very sensitive to perturbations and furthermore the movement is realised in a very short time (ca. 300ms, compared to the timing of known feedback loops. However, the dynamics of the segmental coordination and its efficiency in relation to energetics at each instant of the push-off phase still remained to be clarified. Their study was the main purpose of the present research.Eight young adult volunteers (males performed maximal VSJ. They were skilled in jumping according to their sport activities (track and field or volleyball. A video analysis on the kinematics of the jump determined the influence of the jumpers’ segments rotation on the vertical velocity and acceleration of the body mass center (MC. The efficiency in the production of useful power at the jumpers’ MC level, by the rotation of the segments, was measured in consequence. The results showed a great variability in the segmental movements of the eight jumpers, but homogeneity in the overall evolution of these movements with three consecutive types of coordination in the second part of the push-off (lasting roughly 0.16 s.Further analyses gave insights on the regulation of the push-off, suggesting that very fast regulation(s of the VSJ may be supported by: (a the adaptation of the motor cerebral programming to the jumper’s physical characteristics; (b the control of the initial posture; and (c the jumper’s perception of the position of his MC relative to the ground reaction force during push-off to reduce energetic losses.

  1. Fast Regulation of Vertical Squat Jump during Push-Off in Skilled Jumpers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fargier, Patrick; Massarelli, Raphael; Rabahi, Tahar; Gemignani, Angelo; Fargier, Emile

    2016-01-01

    The height of a maximum Vertical Squat Jump (VSJ) reflects the useful power produced by a jumper during the push-off phase. In turn this partly depends on the coordination of the jumper's segmental rotations at each instant. The physical system constituted by the jumper has been shown to be very sensitive to perturbations and furthermore the movement is realized in a very short time (ca. 300 ms), compared to the timing of known feedback loops. However, the dynamics of the segmental coordination and its efficiency in relation to energetics at each instant of the push-off phase still remained to be clarified. Their study was the main purpose of the present research. Eight young adult volunteers (males) performed maximal VSJ. They were skilled in jumping according to their sport activities (track and field or volleyball). A video analysis on the kinematics of the jump determined the influence of the jumpers' segments rotation on the vertical velocity and acceleration of the body mass center (MC). The efficiency in the production of useful power at the jumpers' MC level, by the rotation of the segments, was measured in consequence. The results showed a great variability in the segmental movements of the eight jumpers, but homogeneity in the overall evolution of these movements with three consecutive types of coordination in the second part of the push-off (lasting roughly 0.16 s). Further analyses gave insights on the regulation of the push-off, suggesting that very fast regulation(s) of the VSJ may be supported by: (a) the adaptation of the motor cerebral programming to the jumper's physical characteristics; (b) the control of the initial posture; and (c) the jumper's perception of the position of his MC relative to the ground reaction force, during push-off, to reduce energetic losses. PMID:27486404

  2. Acute effect of whole body vibration on isometric strength, squat jump, and flexibility in well-trained combat athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cem Kurt

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of whole body vibration (WBV training on maximal strength, squat jump, and flexibility of well-trained combat athletes. Twelve female and 8 male combat athletes (age: 22.8 ± 3.1 years, mass: 65.4 ± 10.7 kg, height: 168.8 ± 8.8 cm, training experience: 11.6 ± 4.7 years, training volume: 9.3 ± 2.8 hours/week participated in this study. The study consisted of three sessions separated by 48 hours. The first session was conducted for familiarization. In the subsequent two sessions, participants performed WBV or sham intervention in a randomized, balanced order. During WBV intervention, four isometric exercises were performed (26 Hz, 4 mm. During the sham intervention, participants performed the same WBV intervention without vibration treatment (0 Hz, 0 mm. Hand grip, squat jump, trunk flexion, and isometric leg strength tests were performed after each intervention. The results of a two-factor (pre-post[2] × intervention[2] repeated measures ANOVA revealed a significant interaction (p = 0.018 of pre-post × intervention only for the hand grip test, indicating a significant performance increase of moderate effect (net increase of 2.48%, d = 0.61 after WBV intervention. Squat jump, trunk flexion, and isometric leg strength performances were not affected by WBV. In conclusion, the WBV protocol used in this study potentiated hand grip performance, but did not enhance squat jump, trunk flexion, or isometric leg strength in well-trained combat athletes.

  3. Acute Effects of Loaded Half-Squat Jumps on Sprint Running Speed in Track and Field Athletes and Soccer Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderka, Marián; Krčmár, Matúš; Longová, Katarína; Walker, Simon

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the acute responses to a jump squat protocol designed to induce postactivation potentiation on sprint running performance in experienced track and field athletes and soccer players. Twenty-five regional level athletes (12 track and field: ∼17 years; ∼177 cm; ∼73 kg and 13 soccer: ∼18 years; ∼175 cm; ∼72 kg) performed 2 test sessions assessing 40-m sprint running performance in a balanced, crossover design. Dual-beam light timing gates measured 0-20 and 20-40 m sprint times before and after either 9 minutes of sitting (control) or 2 sets of 6 repetition half-squat jump with the load eliciting maximum power (experimental) conditions. Sprint performance was significantly enhanced over both 0-20 m (3.09 ± 0.07 to 3.04 ± 0.08 seconds; Δ ∼1.5%; p ≤ 0.05) and 20-40 m (2.42 ± 0.09 to 2.39 ± 0.09 seconds; Δ ∼1%; p ≤ 0.05) in track and field athletes only. Also, the magnitude of enhanced sprint performance was related to baseline 0-20 m sprint performance (r = 0.44; p = 0.028; n = 25). It seems that using loaded half-squat jumps to enhance sprint performance could be used in training of high-level young athletes.

  4. Measurement of pelvic motion is a prerequisite for accurate estimation of hip joint work in maximum height squat jumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blache, Yoann; Bobbert, Maarten; Argaud, Sebastien; Pairot de Fontenay, Benoit; Monteil, Karine M

    2013-08-01

    In experiments investigating vertical squat jumping, the HAT segment is typically defined as a line drawn from the hip to some point proximally on the upper body (eg, the neck, the acromion), and the hip joint as the angle between this line and the upper legs (θUL-HAT). In reality, the hip joint is the angle between the pelvis and the upper legs (θUL-pelvis). This study aimed to estimate to what extent hip joint definition affects hip joint work in maximal squat jumping. Moreover, the initial pelvic tilt was manipulated to maximize the difference in hip joint work as a function of hip joint definition. Twenty-two male athletes performed maximum effort squat jumps in three different initial pelvic tilt conditions: backward (pelvisB), neutral (pelvisN), and forward (pelvisF). Hip joint work was calculated by integrating the hip net joint torque with respect to θUL-HAT (WUL-HAT) or with respect to θUL-pelvis (WUL-pelvis). θUL-HAT was greater than θUL-pelvis in all conditions. WUL-HAT overestimated WULpelvis by 33%, 39%, and 49% in conditions pelvisF, pelvisN, and pelvisB, respectively. It was concluded that θUL-pelvis should be measured when the mechanical output of hip extensor muscles is estimated.

  5. Peak power in the hexagonal barbell jump squat and its relationship to jump performance and acceleration in elite rugby union players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Thomas S; Tobin, Daniel P; Delahunt, Eamonn

    2015-05-01

    Recent research suggests that jump squats with a loaded hexagonal barbell are superior for peak power production to comparable loads in a traditional barbell loaded jump squat. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between relative peak power output during performance of the hexagonal barbell jump squat (HBJS), countermovement jump (CMJ) height, and linear acceleration speed in rugby union players. Seventeen professional rugby union players performed 10- and 20-m sprints, followed by a set of 3 unloaded CMJs and a set of 3 HBJS at a previously determined optimal load corresponding with peak power output. The relationship between HBJS relative peak power output, 10- and 20-m sprint time, and CMJ height was investigated using correlation analysis. The contribution of HBJS relative peak power output and CMJ height to 10- and 20-m sprint time was investigated using standard multiple regression. Strong, significant, inverse correlations were observed between HBJS relative peak power output, 10-m sprint time (r = -0.70, p < 0.01), and 20-m sprint time (r = -0.75, p < 0.01). A strong, significant, positive correlation was observed between HBJS relative peak power output and CMJ height (r = 0.80, p < 0.01). Together, HBJS relative peak power output and CMJ height explained 46% of the variance in 10-m sprint time while explaining 59% of the variance in 20-m sprint time. The findings of the current study demonstrate a significant relationship between relative peak power in the HBJS and athletic performance as quantified by CMJ height and 10- and 20-m sprint time.

  6. Squat jump training at maximal power loads vs. heavy loads: effect on sprint ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Nigel K; Cronin, John B; Hopkins, Will G; Hansen, Keir T

    2008-11-01

    Training at a load maximizing power output (Pmax) is an intuitively appealing strategy for enhancement of performance that has received little research attention. In this study we identified each subject's Pmax for an isoinertial resistance training exercise used for testing and training, and then we related the changes in strength to changes in sprint performance. The subjects were 18 well-trained rugby league players randomized to two equal-volume training groups for a 7-week period of squat jump training with heavy loads (80% 1RM) or with individually determined Pmax loads (20.0-43.5% 1RM). Performance measures were 1RM strength, maximal power at 55% of pretraining 1RM, and sprint times for 10 and 30 m. Percent changes were standardized to make magnitude-based inferences. Relationships between changes in these variables were expressed as correlations. Sprint times for 10 m showed improvements in the 80% 1RM group (-2.9 +/- 3.2%) and Pmax group (-1.3 +/- 2.2%), and there were similar improvements in 30-m sprint time (-1.9 +/- 2.8 and -1.2 +/- 2.0%, respectively). Differences in the improvements in sprint time between groups were unclear, but improvement in 1RM strength in the 80% 1RM group (15 +/- 9%) was possibly substantially greater than in the Pmax group (11 +/- 8%). Small-moderate negative correlations between change in 1RM and change in sprint time (r approximately -0.30) in the combined groups provided the only evidence of adaptive associations between strength and power outputs, and sprint performance. In conclusion, it seems that training at the load that maximizes individual peak power output for this exercise with a sample of professional team sport athletes was no more effective for improving sprint ability than training at heavy loads, and the changes in power output were not usefully related to changes in sprint ability.

  7. Mechanical Differences between Barbell and Body Optimum Power Loads in the Jump Squat Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loturco Irineu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study compared the values of bar-peak force (PFBar and power (PPBar, body-peak force (PFBody and power (PPBody and bar-mean propulsive power (MPPBar in different jump-squat (JS conditions: unloaded condition (UC; bar-loaded condition (BLC and optimum bar-MPP condition (OBC. Twenty-five soccer players performed the JS using a bar with negligible mass (UC, using the Smith-machine bar (BLC and using the load capable of maximizing the bar-MPP (OBC. The PFBody was significantly higher in the UC (2847.9 ± 489.1 N than in the OBC (2655.4 ± 444.3 N. The UC presented greater PPBody (3775.9 ± 631.5 W than the BLC (3359.7 ± 664.3 W and OBC (3357.8 ± 625.3 W. The OBC presented higher values of PFBar, PPBar and MPPBar (676.2 ± 109.4 W than the BLC (MPPBar = 425.8 ± 53.7 W (all p < 0.05. In the OBC (compared to the UC, the body peak-power presented a reduction of ≈ 11%, while generating bar-power output from ≈ 59 to 73% higher than the BLC. While the fact that the body-peak power is maximized in the UC denotes a mechanical phenomenon, the bar-optimum load represents an intensity at which both components of the power equation (force and velocity are optimized. This has important implications for sports training.

  8. The acute effect of lower-body training on average power output measured by loaded half-squat jump exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matúš Krčmár

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: High muscular power output is required in many athletic endeavors in order for success to be achieved. In the scientific community postactivation potentiation and its effect on performance are often discussed. There are many studies where the effect of resistance exercise on motor performance (such as vertical jump performance and running speed has been investigated but only a few of them studied power output. Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the acute responses to a 2 set loaded half-squat jumps and 2 set loaded back half-squat protocols designed to induce the acute maximum average power output during loaded half-squat jumps. Methods: A randomized cross-over design was used. 11 participants of this study performed 3 trials in randomized order separated by at least 48 hours where maximum average power output was measured. The specific conditioning activities were comprised of 2 sets and 4 repetitions of half-squat jumps, 2 sets and 4 repetitions of back half-squat exercises and a control protocol without an intervention by specific a conditioning activity. Participants were strength trained athletes with different sport specializations (e.g. ice-hockey, volleyball. Mean age of the athletes was 22 ± 1.8 years, body mass 80 ± 7.1 kg and body height 185 ± 6.5 cm. Analysis of variance with repeated measures was used to determine differences between pre- and post-condition in each protocol, as well as between conditioning protocols, and also effect size was used to evaluate practical significance. Results: Maximum average power was significantly enhanced after application of the half-squat jump condition protocol (1496.2 ± 194.5 to 1552 ± 196.1 W, Δ ~ 3.72%, p < .001 and after application of the back half-squat protocol (1500.7 ± 193.2 to 1556 ± 191.2 W, Δ ~ 3.68%, p < .001 after 10 min of rest. Power output after control protocol was

  9. INVESTIGATING OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SPRINT AND JUMP PERFORMANCE WITH POWER PARAMETERS DURING PROPULSIVE PHASE OF FULL BACK SQUAT EXERCISE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İbrahim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The basic purpose of this study was to investigate of the relationships with sprint and jump performance of power parameters during propulsive phase of full back squat exercise and to determine which variable was associated with which loading loading. For this purpose, thirty-two men amateur athletes (age: 20.4 ± 1.98 years; height: 179.3 ± 7.23 cm; weight: 73.5 ± 9.85 kg who actively involved in sports and have a basic level of force participated in voluntarily to this study. In the study, one repetition maximum (1RM full back squat (SQ strength test, vertical jump test, 5 meters and 30 meters sprint test were applied. The descriptive statistics and pearson correlation analysis was used for statistical evaluation of datas. According to statistical analysis results; It was concluded that there are mean level, negative and statistically a significant relationship between mean propulsive power (MPP values (r = - ,607, p 0.05.

  10. Validation of the Microsoft Kinect® camera system for measurement of lower extremity jump landing and squatting kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltoukhy, Moataz; Kelly, Adam; Kim, Chang-Young; Jun, Hyung-Pil; Campbell, Richard; Kuenze, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Cost effective, quantifiable assessment of lower extremity movement represents potential improvement over standard tools for evaluation of injury risk. Ten healthy participants completed three trials of a drop jump, overhead squat, and single leg squat task. Peak hip and knee kinematics were assessed using an 8 camera BTS Smart 7000DX motion analysis system and the Microsoft Kinect® camera system. The agreement and consistency between both uncorrected and correct Kinect kinematic variables and the BTS camera system were assessed using interclass correlations coefficients. Peak sagittal plane kinematics measured using the Microsoft Kinect® camera system explained a significant amount of variance [Range(hip) = 43.5-62.8%; Range(knee) = 67.5-89.6%] in peak kinematics measured using the BTS camera system. Across tasks, peak knee flexion angle and peak hip flexion were found to be consistent and in agreement when the Microsoft Kinect® camera system was directly compared to the BTS camera system but these values were improved following application of a corrective factor. The Microsoft Kinect® may not be an appropriate surrogate for traditional motion analysis technology, but it may have potential applications as a real-time feedback tool in pathological or high injury risk populations.

  11. Squat Jump Performance during Growth in Both Sexes: Comparison with Cycling Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dore, Eric; Bedu, Mario; Van Praagh, Emmanuel

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to investigate leg muscle power and compare two activities (jumping and cycling) in 383 girls and 407 boys ages 9-19 years. Results in anthropometric characteristics and jumping performance were comparable until midadolescence, and sex differences were observed. Lean leg volume (LLV) was the reason for…

  12. Influence of muscle-tendon unit structure on rate of force development during the squat, countermovement, and drop jumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earp, Jacob E; Kraemer, William J; Cormie, Prue; Volek, Jeffery S; Maresh, Carl M; Joseph, Michael; Newton, Robert U

    2011-02-01

    Previous research has highlighted the importance of muscle and tendon structure to stretch shortening cycle performance. However, the relationships between muscle and tendon structure to performance are highly dependent on the speed and intensity of the movement. The purpose of this study was to determine if muscle and tendon structure is associated with the rate of force development (RFD) throughout static squat jump (SJ), countermovement jump (CMJ), and drop jump (DJ; 30-cm height). Twenty-five strength- and power-trained men participated in the study. Using ultrasonography, vastus lateralis (VL) and gastrocnemius (GAS) pennation (PEN) and fascicle length (FL), and Achilles tendon (AT) thickness and length were measured. Subjects then performed SJ, CMJ, and DJ, during which RFD was calculated over time 5 distinct time intervals. During CMJs, early RFD could be predicted between 0 and 10 milliseconds by both GAS-FL (r² = 0.213, β = 0.461) and AT-length (r² = 0.191, β = 20.438). Between 10 and 30 milliseconds GAS-FL was a significant predictor of CMJ-RFD (r² = 0.218, β = 0.476). During DJ, initial RFD (0-10 milliseconds) could be significantly predicted by GAS-FL (r² = 0.185, β = 20.434), VL-PEN (r² = 0.189, β = 0.435), and GAS-PEN (r² = 0.188, β = 0.434). These findings suggest that longer ATs may have increased elasticity, which can decrease initial RFD during CMJ; thus, their use in talent identification is not recommended. The GAS fascicle length had an intensity-dependent relationship with RFD, serving to positively predict RFD during early CMJs and an inverse predictor during early DJs. During DDJs, subjects with greater PEN were better able to redirected initial impact forces. Although both strength and plyometric training have been shown to increase FL, only heavy strength training has been shown to increase PEN. Thus, when a high eccentric load or multiple jumps are required, heavy strength training might be used to elicit muscular adaptations

  13. Respuestas agudas al entrenamiento de fuerza con cargas pesadas y al entrenamiento mediante estiramiento sobre el rendimiento en squat jump y countermovement jump. Acute affects of strenght training from heavy loads and static stretching training on squat jump and countermovement jump.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navarro Valdivielso, Fernando José

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available ResumenEl objetivo de este estudio es examinar los efectos agudos del entrenamiento con cargas pesadas, y del estiramiento estático sobre sujetos no entrenados y determinar si tiene un efecto positivo sobre el rendimiento en SJ y CMJ. 20 sujetos divididos en dos grupos (grupo de fuerza n:10 y grupo de estiramientos n:10. El grupo de fuerza realizó 3 series de 3 repeticiones con la máxima carga que puede soportar en 3RM y 3 min descanso entre serie. En el grupo de estiramientos los sujetos realizaban 3 series de 3 ejercicios de estiramientos correspondientes a flexores de rodilla, extensores de cadera y gemelos manteniendo el estiramiento pasivo durante 15 segundos en cada ejercicio. SJ y CMJ fueron medidos antes y después del ejercicio. La altura de salto se incrementó significativamente en el SJ después de los ejercicios de estiramiento (pAbstractThe purpose of this study were to examine the acute effects of strength training using heavy loads and static stretching for 15 seconds on SJ and CMJ. A population sample of 20 subjects was studied which was divided into two groups (strength training (ST n=10- and static stretching training (SS n=10- ST group performed 3 sets of 3RM load with 3 min rest between all sets. SS group performed 3 stretching exercises, with each exercise held for 15 second repetitions. The stretches included a seated bilateral hamstring stretch; Standing unilateral quadriceps stretch and standing unilateral calf stretch. Vertical jump performance was measured before and after exercise. The height jump in SJ increased significantly after static stretching training (p

  14. Effect of unloading and loading on power in simulated countermovement and squat jumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobbert, Maarten F

    2014-06-01

    In the literature, substantial decreases in power output in jumping have been described for both unloading and loading, and these have been attributed to the intrinsic force-velocity-power relationship of muscle. The purpose of this study was to gain a solid understanding of how and why unloading and loading affect power output during jumping. Vertical jumps were simulated with a model of the musculoskeletal system, consisting of four rigid segments actuated by six muscles. Muscle stimulation over time was optimized to ensure maximal performance in each loading condition. It was found that, in contrast to what is reported in the literature, unloading by an extra vertical force of -60% of body weight caused a small increase in the peak of the rate of change of the effective energy of the center of mass (dEeff/dt). Loading by an extra vertical force of +60% of body weight caused a decrease in peak dEeff/dt, but this decrease was much smaller than that described in the literature. The small variations in peak dEeff/dt among loading conditions in the simulated jumps were only in part due to the intrinsic force-velocity-power relationship of muscle. Why did the effects of unloading and loading in the simulation model deviate from effects reported in subjects? One possible explanation is that subjects tend to make a smaller countermovement when loaded; in the simulation model, making a smaller countermovement caused a major reduction in peak dEeff/dt. A second possible explanation is that subjects cannot quickly optimize their control and therefore produce submaximal power output in unfamiliar loading conditions. The effects of unloading and loading are due only in part to the intrinsic force-velocity-power relationship of muscle.

  15. Relación entre la fuerza máxima en squat y acciones de salto, sprint y golpeo de balón. (Relationship among maximal strength in squat exercise, jump, sprint and kicking ball performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Arija Blázquez

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available ResumenEl objetivo del presente estudio fue analizar las posibles relaciones entre la fuerza máxima en squat y accionesexplosivas de salto, sprint y golpeo de balón. Para ello, se contó con una muestra formada por estudiantes de Ciencias del Deporte (N= 16; 19,6 ± 1,7 años de sexo masculino (con escasa experiencia en el entrenamiento de fuerza, que llevaron a cabo un test de 1RM en squat (calculándose el peso levantado, la fuerza media total y la fuerza dinámica máxima, tests de salto vertical (SJ, CMJ y CMJa, un test de sprint de 20 m (con mediciones de tiempo cada 5 m, y un test de golpeo con el pie donde se calculaba la velocidad del balón. Se encontraron coeficientes de correlación moderados (entre 0,52 y 0,67 y significativos de las medidas de fuerza máxima y las alturas de salto, mientras que los coeficientes obtenidos entre los tiempos de sprint y dichas medidas de fuerza máxima se situaron entre -0,06 y -0,32, no siendo ninguno de ellos significativo; al igual que tampoco fueron significativos los coeficientes de correlación de las medidas de fuerza máxima y la velocidad de tiro, se situaron entre 0,25 y 0,34. Por tanto, la relación entre la fuerza máxima en squat y la altura de salto en sujetos con escasa experiencia en el entrenamiento de fuerza resultó moderada, mientras que no parece existir relación con el tiempo de sprint y la velocidad de tiro.AbstractThe purpose of the present study was to analyze the possible relationships between maximal strength insquat exercise and jump, sprint and kicking ball actions. Sixteen males sport science students (19,6 ± 1,7years, with little experience in strength training, performed a 1RM in squat exercise (from which liftedweight, the total average- and maximal-dynamic strength was assessed, vertical jump (SJ, CMJ and CMJa, a 20 m sprint test (with time measurement every 5 m, and a kicking ball test where the velocity of the ball was calculated. Moderate (0,52 - 0,67 and

  16. THE RELIABILITY OF 1- AND 3RM TESTS OF UNILATERAL STRENGTH IN TRAINED AND UNTRAINED MEN AND WOMEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russ Hoff

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the reliability of the 1- and 3RM tests for the modified unilateral squat. Thirty untrained (22 women, 8 men and 22 trained (12 women, 10 men subjects participated in the study. The trained group had a minimum of 1 year lower-body training experience but had not participated in unilateral training prior to the study. After practicing proper technique with light loads, the subjects used the barbell squat to complete a 1- and 3RM pretest and posttest. In each group half of the subjects completed the 1RM tests prior to the 3RM tests while half of the subjects completed the 3RM tests first. A rest period of 48 hours was allowed between each test. Twenty subjects, randomly selected from the two groups, completed a third session of the 1RM test 3 days after the 1RM posttest. Intraclass correlation coefficients were recorded. Differences between pre- and posttest measures were determined by the paired-sample t-test. The 1- and 3RM tests were found to be significantly reliable for trained men, r = 0.98 and r = 0.97, untrained men, r = 0.99 and r = 0.97, trained women r = 0.99 and r = 0.94, and untrained women, r = 0.97 and r = 0.87, respectively. Posttest scores for the 1- and 3RM tests significantly improved above baseline levels in each group (p < 0.05. Strength scores did not significantly increase during the third 1RM test (p = 0.22. The data indicate that the modified unilateral squat can be measured with high reliability using the 1- and 3RM tests. The improved posttest scores indicate that a pretest session should take place before recording baseline measurements

  17. Détermination du rôle moteur complexe lombo-pelvi-fémoral sur la performance d'un mouvement explosif : approche expérimentale et simulation appliquées au squat jump

    OpenAIRE

    Blache, Yoann

    2012-01-01

    The lumbo-pelvic-hip complex is an important structure of the human body. Its function of balancing the bodyhas been pointed out in many studies. While its motor function has rarely been investigated, especially duringexplosive movements involving a global extension of the whole body. Thus, the purpose of this work was to evaluatethe role of the lumbo-pelvic-hip complex during squat jumping. To this end, an experimental approach (kinematics,kinetics and electromyographic) as well as a simulat...

  18. Relações entre diferentes parâmetros de força e a performance do squat jump em atletas treinados

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário Cardoso Marques

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available O squat jump (SJ tem sido extensivamente usado para controlar o treino, contudo, estudos realizados em atletas treinados são escassos. Assim, a principal questão de estudo foi: quais os parâmetros de força que melhor podem explicar a performance do SJ em atletas treinados? Trinta e cinco atletas realizaram 3 SJ com uma barra de 17 kg. A força exercida contra o solo foi medida com uma plataforma sincronizada com um medidor linear de posição. Somente o melhor salto foi analisado. A análise do SJ foi dividida em duas fases: concêntrica 1 que foi definida desde o início do movimento até se alcançar a máxima velocidade positiva; e a concêntrica 2 definida o momento em que acaba a fase concêntrica 1 até se atingir a velocidade de saída. Não foi observada nenhuma relação entre a performance do SJ e o impulso durante a fase concêntrica 1. Todavia, observou-se uma correlação moderada mas significativa (r = .63 entre a altura do SJ e o impulso da fase concêntrica 2. Para além disso, uma associação moderada significativa (r = .56 foi igualmente observada entre o SJ e a força explosiva produzida durante a fase concêntrica 1. O SJ revelou ainda relações significativas com o pico de potência e potência média, mas somente durante a fase concêntrica 1 (r = .57. Em suma, é importante que os valores de força, de potência e de força explosiva sejam mantidos durante a fase inicial do salto, isto é, durante a fase concêntrica 1, promovendo uma maior impulsão vertical.

  19. Do force-time and power-time measures in a loaded jump squat differentiate between speed performance and playing level in elite and elite junior rugby union players?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Keir T; Cronin, John B; Pickering, Stuart L; Douglas, Lee

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the discriminative ability of rebound jump squat force-time and power-time measures in differentiating speed performance and competition level in elite and elite junior rugby union players. Forty professional rugby union players performed 3 rebound jump squats with an external load of 40 kg from which a number of force-time and power-time variables were acquired and analyzed. Additionally, players performed 3 sprints over 30 m with timing gates at 5, 10, and 30 m. Significant differences (p rugby union players; however, a number of force and power variables including peak force, PP, force at 100 milliseconds from minimum force, and force and impulse 200 milliseconds from minimum force were significantly (p rugby union players. For speed development in rugby union players, training strategies should aim to optimize the athlete's power to weight ratio, and lower body resistance training should focus on movement velocity. For player development to transition elite junior players to elite status, adding lean mass is likely to be most beneficial.

  20. Theoretical study of the ${}^{4}\\rm{He}(\\gamma,p)^3\\rm{H}$ and ${}^{4}\\rm{He}(\\gamma,n)^3\\rm{He}$ reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Dinur, Nir Nevo; Barnea, Nir

    2013-01-01

    {\\it Ab initio} calculation of the total cross section for the reactions $^{4}\\rm{He}(\\gamma,p)^3\\rm{H}$ and $^{4}\\rm{He}(\\gamma,n)^3\\rm{He}$ is presented, using state-of-the-art nuclear forces. The Lorentz integral transform (LIT) method is applied, which allows exact treatment of the final state interaction (FSI). The dynamic equations are solved using the effective interaction hyperspherical harmonics (EIHH) method. In this calculation of the cross sections the three-nucleon force is fully taken into account, except in the source term of the LIT equation for the FSI transition matrix element.

  1. A Better ARED Squat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, E. E.; Newby, N. J.; Ploutz-Snyder, L.

    2014-01-01

    The 0-G ARED squat under loads the legs relative to the 1g ARED squat. In 1g the knee extensor/flexor muscles are primarily engaged due to the body's center of gravity is behind the knees during the motion of the squat. As body weight does not play a sufficient role 0 G, a crewmember's load exposure is limited by the load delivered by ARED through the exercise bar. Prescription loads for lowerbody resistance exercise in microgravity aim to include 1-G exercise bar load in addition to the crewmember's Earth body weight (BW); however, pressure points from the bar and the 1BW increased load at the shoulders translating to higher loads on the back have been a historical limitation for shoulders, requiring a decrease in exercise load at the start of the mission. Analogous to crewmembers, bed rest subjects report limitations of exercising with high loads on the back while performing squats on the horizontal exercise fixture (HEF), a custom exercise device that serves as an analog to 0-G ARED. Improvements for increasing loads on the HEF squat were suggested by distributing total exercise load between the hips and the bar1. The same is recommended for the 0-G ARED squat, with using current equipment on the ISS, which include the T2 running harness and T2 bungees. Quantification of this improvement has been accessed through computational modeling. The purpose of this study is to characterize joint torque during a squat with a distribution in exercise load on the ARED in 0 G. The analysis used existing models from NASA's Digital Astronaut Project. The biomechanics squat model was integrated with the ARED model and T2 bungees. The spring constant for the bungees were derived from ground testing. Forward dynamic simulation was performed for various conditions including anchor point attachments on the footplate of the ARED, bar load, hip load, and gravitational environment. The model confirms joint torques at knees is lower relative to 1G conditions primarily because the load

  2. Usefulness of the jump-and-reach test in assessment of vertical jump performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzel, Hans-Joachim; Chagas, Mauro H; Szmuchrowski, Leszek A; Araujo, Silvia R; Campos, Carlos E; Giannetti, Marcus R

    2010-02-01

    The objective was to estimate the reliability and criterion-related validity of the Jump-and-Reach Test for the assessment of squat, countermovement, and drop jump performance of 32 male Brazilian professional volleyball players. Performance of squat, countermovement, and drop jumps with different dropping heights was assessed on the Jump-and-Reach Test and the measurement of flight time, then compared across different jump trials. The very high reliability coefficients of both assessment methods and the lower correlation coefficients between scores on the assessments indicate a very high consistency of each method but only moderate covariation, which means that they measure partly different items. As a consequence, the Jump-and-Reach Test has good ecological validity in situations when reaching height during the flight phase is critical for performance (e.g., basketball and volleyball) but only limited accuracy for the assessment of vertical impulse production with different jump techniques and conditions.

  3. 不同下肢力量训练形式对原地纵跳成绩的影响%Effects of Different methods of squat training on vertical jump

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周菲

    2012-01-01

    本文通过文献资料珐、实验法和教理统计珐,以西安体育学院2010级20名休闲体育专业的学生为研究对象(A粗【单纯向心收缩】10人,B组【离心+向心收缩】10人),分别采用两种不同肌肉收缩形式进行为期8周的下肢力量训练。实验前后采用瑞士KILSTER9287C型三堆渊力台,对实验对象的静止纵跳、反弹从跳进行动力学分析。%This paper through the literature material method, experimental method and mathematical statistics, the Xi'an sports institute 2010 level 20 leisure sports professional students as the research object (group A [pure radial shrinkage[ 10 people, group B [centrifugal and centripetal contraction[ 10 people), respectively by means of two kinds of different muscle contraction form for 8 weeks of lower limb strength training. Before and after the experiment by Swiss KILSTER9287C type 3 d measuring force platform, the experimental object static vertical jump, jump to rebound longitudinal dynamics analysis.

  4. Relationship between 1RM back squat test results and explosive movements in professional basketball players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saša Jakovljević

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were related to the research of the relations between the abilities of professional basketball players in the performance of one repetition maximum (1RM back squat and explosive movements, such as 5, 10 and 20-metre running, and vertical jump; as well as the detection and comparison of these abilities between players who play on the outside and inside positions. The study involved 35 professional basketball players (22 outside and 13 inside who were selected as candidates for the national team of Bulgaria. Independent variables of muscular strength were obtained by applying the 1RM back squat test (142.06 ± 29.31 kg, and were normalized with respect to the body mass (1RM Squat/kg (1.51 ± 0.25 and by applying suitable allometric exponent (1RM SquatAl (6.86 ± 1.16. Dependent variables were obtained using two tests: 20-metre run (times registered at 5 and 10 metres and vertical jump (used to calculate the variable peak anaerobic power (PAPW. The results indicated that none of the variables of strength were significantly related to the speed performance, while moderate correlations occurred between the normalized strength variables (1RM Squat/kg and 1RM SquatAl and vertical jump (r = 0.310 and r = 0.308 / p < 0.05. The results obtained show greater correlation (r = 0.660 / p < 0.01 in the ability to deliver power when performing squat and mechanical work performed in vertical jumps. Outside and inside players were significantly different in three variables only: peak anaerobic power, body height and body weight.

  5. Muscle activation history at different vertical jumps and its influence on vertical velocity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kopper, Bence; Csende, Zsolt; Safar, Sandor; Hortobagyi, Tibor; Tihanyi, Jozsef

    In the present study we investigated displacement, time, velocity and acceleration history of center of mass (COM) and electrical activity of knee extensors to estimate the dominance of the factors influencing the vertical velocity in squat jumps (SJs), countermovement jumps (CMJs) and drop jumps

  6. Muscle activation history at different vertical jumps and its influence on vertical velocity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kopper, Bence; Csende, Zsolt; Safar, Sandor; Hortobagyi, Tibor; Tihanyi, Jozsef

    2013-01-01

    In the present study we investigated displacement, time, velocity and acceleration history of center of mass (COM) and electrical activity of knee extensors to estimate the dominance of the factors influencing the vertical velocity in squat jumps (SJs), countermovement jumps (CMJs) and drop jumps (D

  7. EFFECTS OF BODY MASS-BASED SQUAT TRAINING IN ADOLESCENT BOYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohei Takai

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of body mass-based squat training on body composition, muscular strength and motor fitness in adolescent boys. Ninety-four boys (13.7 ± 0.6 yrs, 1.60 ± 0.09 m, 50.2 ± 9.6 kg participated in this study and were randomly assigned to training (n = 36 or control (n = 58 groups. The training group completed body mass-based squat exercise training (100 reps/day, 45 sessions for 8 weeks. Body composition and muscle thickness at the thigh anterior were determined by a bioelectrical impedance analyzer and ultrasound apparatus, respectively. Maximal voluntary knee extension strength and sprint velocity were measured using static myometer and non-motorized treadmill, respectively. Jump height was calculated using flight time during jumping, which was measured by a matswitch system. The 8-wk body mass-based squat training significantly decreased percent body fat (4.2% and significantly increased the lean body mass (2.7%, muscle thickness (3.2% and strength of the knee extensors (16.0%, compared to control group. The vertical jump height was also significantly improved by 3.4% through the intervention. The current results indicate that body mass-based squat training for 8 weeks is a feasible and effective method for improving body composition and muscular strength of the knee extensors, and jump performance in adolescent boys.

  8. Lift-off dynamics in a simple jumping robot

    CERN Document Server

    Aguilar, Jeffrey; Wiesenfeld, Kurt; Goldman, Daniel I

    2012-01-01

    We study vertical jumping in a simple robot comprising an actuated mass-spring arrangement. The actuator frequency and phase are systematically varied to find optimal performance. Optimal jumps occur above and below (but not at) the robot's resonant frequency $f_0$. Two distinct jumping modes emerge: a simple jump which is optimal above $f_0$ is achievable with a squat maneuver, and a peculiar stutter jump which is optimal below $f_0$ is generated with a counter-movement. A simple dynamical model reveals how optimal lift-off results from non-resonant transient dynamics.

  9. Double Spin Asymmetries of Inclusive Hadron Electroproductions from a Transversely Polarized $^3\\rm{He}$ Target

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Y X; Aniol, K; Annand, J R M; Averett, T; Benmokhtar, F; Bertozzi, W; Bradshaw, P C; Bosted, P; Camsonne, A; Canan, M; Cates, G D; Chen, C; Chen, J -P; Chen, W; Chirapatpimol, K; Chudakov, E; Cisbani, E; Cornejo, J C; Cusanno, F; Dalton, M; Deconinck, W; de Jager, C W; De Leo, R; Deng, X; Deur, A; Ding, H; Dolph, P A M; Dutta, C; Dutta, D; Fassi, L El; Frullani, S; Gao, H; Garibaldi, F; Gaskell, D; Gilad, S; Gilman, R; Glamazdin, O; Golge, S; Guo, L; Hamilton, D; Hansen, O; Higinbotham, D W; Holmstrom, T; Huang, J; Huang, M; Ibrahim, H F; Iodice, M; Jiang, X; Jin, G; Jones, M K; Katich, J; Kelleher, A; Kim, W; Kolarkar, A; Korsch, W; LeRose, J J; Li, X; Li, Y; Lindgren, R; Liyanage, N; Long, E; Lu, H -J; Margaziotis, D J; Markowitz, P; Marrone, S; McNulty, D; Meziani, Z -E; Michaels, R; Moffit, B; Camacho, C Muñoz; Nanda, S; Narayan, A; Nelyubin, V; Norum, B; Oh, Y; Osipenko, M; Parno, D; Peng, J -C; Phillips, S K; Posik, M; Puckett, A J R; Qian, X; Qiang, Y; Rakhman, A; Ransome, R; Riordan, S; Saha, A; Sawatzky, B; Schulte, E; Shahinyan, A; Shabestari, M H; Širca, S; Stepanyan, S; Subedi, R; Sulkosky, V; Tang, L -G; Tobias, W A; Urciuoli, G M; Vilardi, I; Wang, K; Wojtsekhowski, B; Wang, Y; Yan, X; Yao, H; Ye, Y; Ye, Z; Yuan, L; Zhan, X; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y -W; Zhao, B; Zheng, X; Zhu, L; Zhu, X; Zong, X

    2015-01-01

    We report the measurement of beam-target double-spin asymmetries ($A_\\text{LT}$) in the inclusive production of identified hadrons, $\\vec{e}~$+$~^3\\text{He}^{\\uparrow}\\rightarrow h+X$, using a longitudinally polarized 5.9 GeV electron beam and a transversely polarized $^3\\rm{He}$ target. Hadrons ($\\pi^{\\pm}$, $K^{\\pm}$ and proton) were detected at 16$^{\\circ}$ with an average momentum $$=2.35 GeV/c and a transverse momentum ($p_{T}$) coverage from 0.60 to 0.68 GeV/c. Asymmetries from the $^3\\text{He}$ target were observed to be non-zero for $\\pi^{\\pm}$ production when the target was polarized transversely in the horizontal plane. The $\\pi^{+}$ and $\\pi^{-}$ asymmetries have opposite signs, analogous to the behavior of $A_\\text{LT}$ in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering.

  10. Increased medial foot loading during drop jump in subjects with patellofemoral pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathleff, Michael S; Richter, Camilla; Brushøj, Christoffer; Bencke, Jesper; Bandholm, Thomas; Hölmich, Per; Thorborg, Kristian

    2014-10-01

    To compare medial-to-lateral plantar forces during drop jump and single leg squat in individuals with and without patellofemoral pain. This cross-sectional study compared 23 young adults with patellofemoral pain to 20 age- and sex-matched controls without knee pain. The plantar pressure distribution was collected during drop jump and single leg squat using pressure-sensitive Pedar insoles, inserted into a standard flat shoe. The primary outcome was the medial-to-lateral force, quantified as the peak force under the medial forefoot as the percentage of force under the total forefoot during drop jump. Secondary outcomes included peak medial-to-lateral force during single leg squat and mean forces during drop jump and single leg squat. The primary outcome showed that individuals with patellofemoral pain had a 22% higher medial-to-lateral peak force during drop jump, (p=0.03). Secondary outcomes showed 32% higher medial-to-lateral peak force during single leg squat (p=0.01) and 19-23% higher medial-to-lateral mean force during drop jump and single leg squat (p=0.02-0.04). These findings indicate that individuals with patellofemoral pain display a more medially oriented loading pattern of the forefoot compared to individuals without knee pain. This loading pattern may be associated with the distribution of forces acting on the patellofemoral joint and suggest treatment of PFP should consider interventions that target normalisation of foot loading. III.

  11. Low-load Slow Movement Squat Training Increases Muscle Size and Strength but Not Power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usui, S; Maeo, S; Tayashiki, K; Nakatani, M; Kanehisa, H

    2016-04-01

    We tested a hypothesis that low-load squat training with slow movement and tonic force generation (LST) would increase muscle size and strength but not necessarily power. Healthy young men were assigned to LST [50% one-repetition maximum (1-RM) load, 3 s for lowering/lifting without pause: n=9] or low-load normal speed (LN: 50% 1-RM load, 1 s for lowering/lifting with 1-s pause; n=7) groups. Both groups underwent an 8-week squat training program (10 repetitions/set, 3 sets/day, and 3 days/week) using the assigned methods. Before and after the intervention, quadriceps femoris muscle thickness, maximal torque during isometric hip extension and knee extension, 1-RM squat, lifting power from squatting position and rate of electromyography rise (RER) in knee extensors during the task, leg extension power and vertical jump height were measured. After the intervention, the LN group showed no changes in all the variables. The LST group significantly (Pmuscle thickness (6-10%), isometric hip extension torque (18%) and 1-RM squat (10%), but not isometric knee extension torque, lifting power and RER, leg extension power and vertical jump height. These results suggest that LST can increase muscle size and task-related strength, but has little effect on power production during dynamic explosive movements.

  12. Strength, body composition, and functional outcomes in the squat versus leg press exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Fabrício E; Schoenfeld, Brad J; Ocetnik, Skyler; Young, Jonathan; Vigotsky, Andrew; Contreras, Bret; Krieger, James W; Miller, Michael G; Cholewa, Jason

    2016-10-13

    The purpose of this study was to compare strength, body composition, and functional outcome measures following performance of the back squat, leg press, or a combination of the two exercises. Subjects were pair-matched based on initial strength levels and then randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups: A squat-only group (SQ) that solely performed squats for the lower body; a leg press-only group (LP) that solely performed leg presses for the lower body, or; a combined squat and leg press group (SQ-LP) that performed both squats and leg presses for the lower body. All other RT variables were held constant. The study period lasted 10 weeks with subjects performing 2 lower body workouts per week comprising 6 sets per session at loads corresponding to 8-12 RM with 90 to 120 second rest intervals. Results showed that SQ had greater transfer to maximal squat strength compared to the leg press. Effect sizes favored SQ and SQ-LP versus LP with respect to countermovement jump while greater effect sizes for dynamic balance were noted for SQ-LP and LP compared to SQ, although no statistical differences were noted between conditions. These findings suggest that both free weights and machines can improve functional outcomes, and that the extent of transfer may be specific to the given task.

  13. COMPARISON BETWEEN FORMULAS OF MAXIMUM SHIP SQUAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PETRU SERGIU SERBAN

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Ship squat is a combined effect of ship’s draft and trim increase due to ship motion in limited navigation conditions. Over time, researchers conducted tests on models and ships to find a mathematical formula that can define squat. Various forms of calculating squat can be found in the literature. Among those most commonly used are of Barrass, Millward, Eryuzlu or ICORELS. This paper presents a comparison between the squat formulas to see the differences between them and which one provides the most satisfactory results. In this respect a cargo ship at different speeds was considered as a model for maximum squat calculations in canal navigation conditions.

  14. Decline eccentric squats increases patellar tendon loading compared to standard eccentric squats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsgaard, M; Aagaard, P; Roikjaer, S

    2006-01-01

    Recent studies have shown excellent clinical results using eccentric squat training on a 25 degrees decline board to treat patellar tendinopathy. It remains unknown why therapeutic management of patellar tendinopathy using decline eccentric squats offer superior clinical efficacy compared...

  15. Does gymnastics practice improve vertical jump reliability from the age of 8 to 10 years?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marina, Michel; Torrado, Priscila

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to confirm whether gymnastics practice from a young age can induce greater vertical jump reliability. Fifty young female gymnasts (8.84 ± 0.62 years) and 42 females in the control group (8.58 ± 0.92 years) performed the following jump tests on a contact mat: squat jump, countermovement jump, countermovement jump with arm swing and drop jump from heights of 40 and 60 cm. The two testing sessions had three trials each and were separated by one week. A 2 (groups) × 2 (sessions) × 3 (trials) repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) and a test-retest correlation analysis were used to study the reliability. There was no systematic source of error in either group for non-plyometric jumps such as squat jump, countermovement jump, and countermovement jump with arm swing. A significant group per trial interaction revealed a learning effect in gymnasts' drop jumps from 40 cm height. Additionally, the test-retest correlation analysis and the higher minimum detectable error suggest that the quick drop jump technique was not fully consolidated in either group. At an introductory level of gymnastics and between the ages of 8-10 years, the condition of being a gymnast did not lead to conclusively higher reliability, aside from better overall vertical jump performance.

  16. Jumping Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sannino, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    We propose an alternative paradigm to the conjectured Miransky scaling potentially underlying the physics describing the transition from the conformally broken to the conformally restored phase when tuning certain parameters such as the number of flavors in gauge theories. According to the new...... paradigm the physical scale and henceforth also the massive spectrum of the theory jump at the lower boundary of the conformal window. In particular we propose that a theory can suddenly jump from a Quantum Chromodynamics type spectrum, at the lower boundary of the conformal window, to a conformal one...... without particle interpretation. The jumping scenario, therefore, does not support a near-conformal dynamics of walking type. We will also discuss the impact of jumping dynamics on the construction of models of dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking....

  17. Influence of stretching on warm up in jump and speed

    OpenAIRE

    Gálvez Ruiz, Pablo; Tapia Flores, A; Jurado Lavanant, A

    2013-01-01

    El objetivo del estudio es determinar si la realización de estiramientos pasivos, incluidos como parte del calentamiento, influyen en el rendimiento de la fuerza explosiva, en este caso en varios tests de salto vertical: Squat Jump (SJ), Countermouvement Jump (CMJ) y Reactive Jump (RJ); y también en un test de velocidad de 30 metros (mts.) con salida lanzada de 5 mts. Para ello, 9 jugadores del Málaga Club de Fútbol de categoría juvenil (18,22 ± 0,441 años) realizaron 2 protocolos de...

  18. Effects of a Low-Load Gluteal Warm-Up on Explosive Jump Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Comyns Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a low-load gluteal warm-up protocol on countermovement and squat jump performance. Research by Crow et al. (2012 found that a low-load gluteal warm-up could be effective in enhancing peak power output during a countermovement jump. Eleven subjects performed countermovement and squat jumps before and after the gluteal warm-up protocol. Both jumps were examined in separate testing sessions and performed 30 seconds, and 2, 4, 6 & 8 minutes post warm-up. Height jumped and peak ground reaction force were the dependent variables examined in both jumps, with 6 additional variables related to fast force production being examined in the squat jump only. All jumps were performed on a force platform (AMTI OR6-5. Repeated measures analysis of variance found a number of significant differences (p ≤ 0.05 between baseline and post warm-up scores. Height jumped decreased significantly in both jumps at all rest intervals excluding 8 minutes. Improvement was seen in 7 of the 8 recorded SJ variables at the 8 minute interval. Five of these improvements were deemed statistically significant, namely time to peak GRF (43.0%, and time to the maximum rate of force development (65.7% significantly decreased, while starting strength (63.4%, change of force in first 100 ms of contraction (49.1% and speed strength (43.6% significantly increased. The results indicate that a gluteal warm-up can enhance force production in squat jumps performed after 8 minutes recovery. Future research in this area should include additional warm-up intervention groups for comparative reasons.

  19. Visual Vection does not Perturb Squatting Posture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dietrich Gilles

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Vision contributes fundamentally to the control of the standing posture. The illusion of self motion falsely perceived (vection increases postural sway while standing. In this paper we examine the effect of vection on both standing and deep squatting with the hypothesis that the squatting posture should not be disturbed by the conflict of sensory information due to vection. The results show that standing posture only was affected by the visual stimuli. The widespread use of squatting for work as well as rest could be due in part to this lack of effect of sensory perturbation on postural stability.

  20. Potentiation Effects of Half-Squats Performed in a Ballistic or Nonballistic Manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchomel, Timothy J; Sato, Kimitake; DeWeese, Brad H; Ebben, William P; Stone, Michael H

    2016-06-01

    Suchomel, TJ, Sato, K, DeWeese, BH, Ebben, WP, and Stone, MH. Potentiation effects of half-squats performed in a ballistic or nonballistic manner. J Strength Cond Res 30(6): 1652-1660, 2016-This study examined and compared the acute effects of ballistic and nonballistic concentric-only half-squats (COHSs) on squat jump performance. Fifteen resistance-trained men performed a squat jump 2 minutes after a control protocol or 2 COHSs at 90% of their 1 repetition maximum (1RM) COHS performed in a ballistic or nonballistic manner. Jump height (JH), peak power (PP), and allometrically scaled peak power (PPa) were compared using three 3 × 2 repeated-measures analyses of variance. Statistically significant condition × time interaction effects existed for JH (p = 0.037), PP (p = 0.041), and PPa (p = 0.031). Post hoc analysis revealed that the ballistic condition produced statistically greater JH (p = 0.017 and p = 0.036), PP (p = 0.031 and p = 0.026), and PPa (p = 0.024 and p = 0.023) than the control and nonballistic conditions, respectively. Small effect sizes for JH, PP, and PPa existed during the ballistic condition (d = 0.28-0.44), whereas trivial effect sizes existed during the control (d = 0.0-0.18) and nonballistic (d = 0.0-0.17) conditions. Large statistically significant relationships existed between the JH potentiation response and the subject's relative back squat 1RM (r = 0.520; p = 0.047) and relative COHS 1RM (r = 0.569; p = 0.027) during the ballistic condition. In addition, large statistically significant relationship existed between JH potentiation response and the subject's relative back squat strength (r = 0.633; p = 0.011), whereas the moderate relationship with the subject's relative COHS strength trended toward significance (r = 0.483; p = 0.068). Ballistic COHS produced superior potentiation effects compared with COHS performed in a nonballistic manner. Relative strength may contribute to the elicited potentiation response after ballistic and

  1. Effect of different knee starting angles on intersegmental coordination and performance in vertical jumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheller, Rodrigo G; Dal Pupo, Juliano; Ache-Dias, Jonathan; Detanico, Daniele; Padulo, Johnny; dos Santos, Saray G

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to analyze the effect of different knee starting angles on jump performance, kinetic parameters, and intersegmental coupling coordination during a squat jump (SJ) and a countermovement jump (CMJ). Twenty male volleyball and basketball players volunteered to participate in this study. The CMJ was performed with knee flexion at the end of the countermovement phase smaller than 90° (CMJ(90)), and in a preferred position (CMJ(PREF)), while the SJ was performed from a knee angle of 70° (SJ(70)), 90° (SJ(90)), 110° (SJ(110)), and in a preferred position (SJ(PREF)). The best jump performance was observed in jumps that started from a higher squat depth (CMJ(power was observed in the SJ(110) and CMJ(>90). Analysis of continuous relative phase showed that thigh-trunk coupling was more in-phase in the jumps (CMJ and SJ) performed with a higher squat depth, while the leg-thigh coupling was more in-phase in the CMJ(>90) and SJ(PREF). Jumping from a position with knees more flexed seems to be the best strategy to achieve the best performance. Intersegmental coordination and jump performance (CMJ and SJ) were affected by different knee starting angles.

  2. Long Jump

    CERN Document Server

    Dorobantu, V

    2012-01-01

    When the laws of Physics are taken seriously, the sports can benefit in getting better results, as was the case of the high jump in Flop style, so that the athlete sprints diagonally towards the bar,then curve and leap backwards over it. The jumper, in this case, has the center of mass under the bar, fact which allows improvement of the performance.

  3. Isokinetic knee extension and vertical jumping: are they related?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iossifidou, Anna; Baltzopoulos, Vasilios; Giakas, Giannis

    2005-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine joint power generation during a concentric knee extension isokinetic test and a squat vertical jump. The isokinetic test joint power was calculated using four different methods. Five participants performed concentric knee extensions at 0.52, 1.57, 3.14 and 5.23 rad x s(-1) on a Lido isokinetic dynamometer. The squat vertical jump was performed on a Kistler force plate. Kinematic data from both tests were collected and analysed using an ELITE optoelectronic system. An inverse dynamics model was applied to measure knee joint moment in the vertical jump. Knee angular position data from the kinematic analysis in the isokinetic test were used to derive the actual knee angular velocity and acceleration, which, in turn, was used to correct the dynamometer moment for inertial effects. Power was measured as the product of angular velocity and moment at the knee joint in both tests. Significant differences (P knee joint power in the two tests (squat vertical jump: 2255 +/- 434 W; isokinetic knee extension: 771 +/- 81 W). Correlation analysis revealed that there is no relationship between the peak knee joint power during the vertical jump and the slow velocity isokinetic tests. Higher isokinetic velocity tests show better relationships with the vertical jump but only if the correct method for joint power calculation is used in the isokinetic test. These findings suggest that there are important differences in muscle activation and knee joint power development that must be taken into consideration when isokinetic tests are used to predict jumping performance.

  4. Evaluation of proper height for squatting stool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hwa S; Jung, Hyung-Shik

    2008-05-01

    Many jobs and activities in people's daily lives have them in squatting postures. Jobs such as housekeeping, farming and welding require various squatting activities. It is speculated that prolonged squatting without any type of supporting stool would gradually and eventually impose musculoskeletal injuries on workers. This study aims to examine the proper height of the stool according to the position of working materials for the squatting worker. A total of 40 male and female college students and 10 female farmers participated in the experiment to find the proper stool height. Student participants were asked to sit and work in three different positions: floor level of 50 mm; ankle level of 200 mm; and knee level of 400 mm. They were then provided with stools of various heights and asked to maintain a squatting work posture. For each working position, they were asked to write down their thoughts on a preferred stool height. A Likert summated rating method as well as pairwise ranking test was applied to evaluate user preference for provided stools under conditions of different working positions. Under a similar experimental procedure, female farmers were asked to indicate their body part discomfort (BPD) on a body chart before and after performing the work. Statistical analysis showed that comparable results were found from both evaluation measures. When working position is below 50 mm, the proper stool height is 100 or should not be higher than 150 mm. When working position is 200 mm, the proper stool height is 150 mm. When working position is 400 mm, the proper stool height is 200 mm. Thus, it is strongly recommended to use proper height of stools with corresponding working position. Moreover, a wearable chair prototype was designed so that workers in a squatting posture do not have to carry and move the stool from one place to another. This stool should ultimately help to relieve physical stress and hence promote the health of squatting workers. This study sought

  5. Relationships Between Sprint, Jumping and Strength Abilities, and 800 M Performance in Male Athletes of National and International Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bachero-Mena Beatriz

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This study analysed the relationships between sprinting, jumping and strength abilities, with regard to 800 m running performance. Fourteen athletes of national and international levels in 800 m (personal best: 1:43-1:58 min:ss completed sprint tests (20 m and 200 m, a countermovement jump, jump squat and full squat test as well as an 800 m race. Significant relationships (p < 0.01 were observed between 800 m performance and sprint tests: 20 m (r = 0.72 and 200 m (r = 0.84. Analysing the 200 m run, the magnitude of the relationship between the first to the last 50 m interval times and the 800 m time tended to increase (1st 50 m: r = 0.71; 2nd 50 m: r = 0.72; 3rd 50 m: r = 0.81; 4th 50 m: r = 0.85. Performance in 800 m also correlated significantly (p < 0.01-0.05 with strength variables: the countermovement jump (r = -0.69, jump squat (r = -0.65, and full squat test (r = -0.58. Performance of 800 m in high-level athletes was related to sprint, strength and jumping abilities, with 200 m and the latest 50 m of the 200 m being the variables that most explained the variance of the 800 m performance.

  6. MENINGKATKAN HASIL BELAJAR LOMPAT JAUH GAYA JONGKOK MELALUI PERMAINAN JUMP BOX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Khafidin S

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim in this study was to determine the learning outcome long jump squat style through play approach jump box on fourth grade students N Yamansari 01 2013/2014 academic year. This research is a classroom action research. This study consisted of two cycles. Each cycle consists of planning, action, observation and reflection. This research was conducted in the District 01 Elementary School Yamansari Lebaksiu Tegal with research subjects IV class with 40 students consisting of 21 male students and 19 female students. The research instrument used is the observation sheet student activity, teacher observation sheet activities and practice tests. Technique data analysis was done descriptively and through hitingan predetermined formula. The results showed that the learning outcomes long jump squat style by using a jump box game this looks positive impact on students' mastery learning outcomes that exceed a predetermined KKM is 75 has risen in the first cycle of learning completeness reached 72.50% with a mean value -rata 78, while in the second cycle learning completeness reached 92.50% with an average value of 81.67. It can be concluded that learning style long jump squat jump box game approach has a positive influence, which can improve learning outcomes, interest and motivation to learn.

  7. Relationships among jumping performances and sprint parameters during maximum speed phase in sprinters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kale, Mehmet; Aşçi, Alper; Bayrak, Coşkun; Açikada, Caner

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships among jumping performances and speed parameters during maximum speed phase in sprinters. Twenty-one men sprinters volunteered to participate at the beginning of the preparation training phase. All tests-including 100-m sprint running, squat jump (SJ), countermovement jump (CMJ), drop jump (DJ), 60-second repetitive jump (RJ), standing long jump (SLJ), standing triple jump (STJ), standing quintuple jump (SQJ), and standing 10-stride jump (STENJ)-were done on switching mats. Flight (FT) and contact times (CT) during the vertical jump tests and 10-m split times during 100-m sprint running were measured by a 2-channel precision timing system (PTS) connected to the mats. The trace marking method was used for measuring the stride length (SL) through 60 m in 100-m sprint running. Stride frequency (SF), maximum velocity (Vmax), jump height for all vertical jumps, and lower-body power in DJ and RJ were calculated. Statistical analysis showed that the highest significant correlation was found between Vmax and DJ height (r = 0.69; p sprint running and SJ (r = 0.39; p sprint running than the other vertical and horizontal jump tests at the beginning of the preparation training phase.

  8. Increased medial foot loading during drop jump in subjects with patellofemoral pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathleff, Michael S; Richter, Camilla; Brushøj, Christoffer

    2014-01-01

    pressure distribution was collected during drop jump and single leg squat using pressure-sensitive Pedar insoles, inserted into a standard flat shoe. The primary outcome was the medial-to-lateral force, quantified as the peak force under the medial forefoot as the percentage of force under the total...

  9. Biomechanics of front and back squat exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braidot, A. A.; Brusa, M. H.; Lestussi, F. E.; Parera, G. P.

    2007-11-01

    Squat constitutes one of the most popular exercises to strengthen the muscles of the lower limbs. It is considered one of the most widely spread exercises for muscle sport training and is part of the competition movements comprised within olympic weight-lifting. In physical rehabilitation, squats are used for muscular recovery after different injuries of the lower limbs, especially the knee. In previous anterior cruciate ligament injuries, the mini-squats are generally used, in a knee flexion motion range from 0° to 50° because in this range the shear forces, the tibiofemoral and patellofemoral compression forces decrease related to greater flexion angles. The aim of this work is to make a comparative bidimensional study of the kinematic and dynamic variables of the excecution of the parallel squat exercise with the front and back bar. It is observed in the knee a better development of energy with the front bar, allowing a better muscular exercise with the same load. The mean power absorbed by the hip with the back bar is considerably greater, associated to the speed of the gesture.

  10. Biomechanics of front and back squat exercises

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braidot, A A [Laboratorio de Biomecanica FI-UNER. Ruta 11 Km 10 Oro Verde Entre Rios (Argentina); Brusa, M H [Laboratorio de Biomecanica FI-UNER. Ruta 11 Km 10 Oro Verde Entre Rios (Argentina); Lestussi, F E [Laboratorio de Biomecanica FI-UNER. Ruta 11 Km 10 Oro Verde Entre Rios (Argentina); Parera, G P [Licenciatura en KinesiologIa y FisiatrIa Universidad Abierta Interamericana. Sede Regional Rosario (Argentina)

    2007-11-15

    Squat constitutes one of the most popular exercises to strengthen the muscles of the lower limbs. It is considered one of the most widely spread exercises for muscle sport training and is part of the competition movements comprised within olympic weight-lifting. In physical rehabilitation, squats are used for muscular recovery after different injuries of the lower limbs, especially the knee. In previous anterior cruciate ligament injuries, the mini-squats are generally used, in a knee flexion motion range from 0 deg. to 50 deg. because in this range the shear forces, the tibiofemoral and patellofemoral compression forces decrease related to greater flexion angles. The aim of this work is to make a comparative bidimensional study of the kinematic and dynamic variables of the excecution of the parallel squat exercise with the front and back bar. It is observed in the knee a better development of energy with the front bar, allowing a better muscular exercise with the same load. The mean power absorbed by the hip with the back bar is considerably greater, associated to the speed of the gesture.

  11. Vertical jumping tests in volleyball: reliability, validity, and playing-position specifics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattler, Tine; Sekulic, Damir; Hadzic, Vedran; Uljevic, Ognjen; Dervisevic, Edvin

    2012-06-01

    Vertical jumping is known to be important in volleyball, and jumping performance tests are frequently studied for their reliability and validity. However, most studies concerning jumping in volleyball have dealt with standard rather than sport-specific jumping procedures and tests. The aims of this study, therefore, were (a) to determine the reliability and factorial validity of 2 volleyball-specific jumping tests, the block jump (BJ) test and the attack jump (AJ) test, relative to 2 frequently used and systematically validated jumping tests, the countermovement jump test and the squat jump test and (b) to establish volleyball position-specific differences in the jumping tests and simple anthropometric indices (body height [BH], body weight, and body mass index [BMI]). The BJ was performed from a defensive volleyball position, with the hands positioned in front of the chest. During an AJ, the players used a 2- to 3-step approach and performed a drop jump with an arm swing followed by a quick vertical jump. A total of 95 high-level volleyball players (all men) participated in this study. The reliability of the jumping tests ranged from 0.97 to 0.99 for Cronbach's alpha coefficients, from 0.93 to 0.97 for interitem correlation coefficients and from 2.1 to 2.8 for coefficients of variation. The highest reliability was found for the specific jumping tests. The factor analysis extracted one significant component, and all of the tests were highly intercorrelated. The analysis of variance with post hoc analysis showed significant differences between 5 playing positions in some of the jumping tests. In general, receivers had a greater jumping capacity, followed by libero players. The differences in jumping capacities should be emphasized vis-a-vis differences in the anthropometric measures of players, where middle hitters had higher BH and body weight, followed by opposite hitters and receivers, with no differences in the BMI between positions.

  12. Light-load maximal lifting velocity full squat training program improves important physical and skill characteristics in futsal players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Torrelo, Julio; Rodríguez-Rosell, David; González-Badillo, Juan José

    2017-05-01

    This study aimed to compare the effect of 6 weeks of resistance training or combined resistance training and change of direction exercises on physical performance and motor skills in futsal players. Thirty-four futsal players were divided into full squat group (SG, n = 12), combined full squat and change of direction exercises group (S+CDG, n = 12) and control group (CG, n = 10). The resistance training for SG consisted of full squat with low load (~45-58% 1RM) and low volume (4-6 repetitions), whereas the S+CDG performed the same resistance training program combined with loaded change of direction. Sprint time in 10 and 20 m, change of direction test, countermovement vertical jump (CMJ) height, maximal strength and force-velocity relationship in full squat exercise, kicking speed ball (BSmean) and repeated sprint ability (RSAmean) were selected as testing variables. Both experimental groups showed significant improvements for CMJ, BSmean and all strength parameters. Only SG resulted in significant sprint gains, whereas S+CDG also achieved significant improvements in RSAmean. The CG remained unchanged after training period. No significant differences were found between both experimental groups. These findings suggest that only 12 sessions of either lightweight resistance training alone, lifting the load at maximal intended velocity or combined with change of direction exercises is enough to improve several physical and skills capacities critical to futsal performance in adult players.

  13. Galatheid squat lobster species from Chinese waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chao; Li, Xinzheng

    2013-11-01

    Five galatheid squat lobster species belonging to four genera of two galatheid families are reported for the first time from Chinese waters, namely Lauriea simulata Macpherson and Robainas-Barcia, 2013, Phylladiorhynchus ikedai (Miyake and Baba, 1965), Phylladiorhynchus integrirostris (Dana, 1852), Babamunida sp., and Raymunida elegantissima (de Man, 1902). The genera Lauriea Baba, 1971 and Babamunida Cabezas, Macpherson, and Machordom, 2008 have not previously been recorded from Chinese waters.

  14. Squat Ground Reaction Force on a Horizontal Squat Device, Free Weights, and Smith Machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott-Pandorf, Melissa M.; Newby, Nathaniel J.; Caldwell, Erin; DeWitt, John K.; Peters, Brian T.

    2010-01-01

    Bed rest is an analog to spaceflight and advancement of exercise countermeasures is dependent on the development of exercise equipment that closely mimic actual upright exercise. The Horizontal Squat Device (HSD) was developed to allow a supine exerciser to perform squats that mimic upright squat exercise. PURPOSE: To compare vertical ground reaction force (GRFv) on the HSD with Free Weight (FW) or Smith Machine (SM) during squat exercise. METHODS: Subjects (3F, 3M) performed sets of squat exercise with increasing loads up to 1-repetition (rep) maximum. GRF data were collected and compared with previous GRF data for squat exercise performed with FW & SM. Loads on the HSD were adjusted to magnitudes comparable with FW & SM by subtracting the subject s body weight (BW). Peak GRFv for 45-, 55-, 64-, & 73-kg loads above BW were calculated. Percent (%) difference between HSD and the two upright conditions were computed. Effect size was calculated for the 45-kg load. RESULTS: Most subjects were unable to lift >45 kg on the HSD; however, 1 subject completed all loads. Anecdotal evidence suggested that most subjects shoulders or back failed before their legs. The mean % difference are shown. In the 45-kg condition, effect sizes were 0.37 & 0.83 (p>0.05) for HSD vs. FW and HSD vs. SM, respectively, indicating no differences between exercise modes. CONCLUSION: When BW was added to the target load, results indicated that vertical forces were similar to those in FW and SM exercise. The exercise prescription for the HSD should include a total external resistance equivalent to goal load plus subject BW. The HSD may be used as an analog to upright exercise in bed rest studies, but because most subjects were unable to lift >45 kg, it may be necessary to prescribe higher reps and lower loads to better target the leg musculature

  15. Squat exercise to estimate knee megaprosthesis rehabilitation: a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study evaluated a specific rehabilitation protocol using a half squat after total knee reconstruction with distal femur megaprosthesis and tibial allograft-prosthesis composite. [Subject and Methods] Squat execution was recorded by a three-dimensional system before and after a specific rehabilitation program on a 28-year-old patient. Squat duration, body center of mass trajectory, and vertical range of motion were determined. Step width and joint angles and symmetry (hip flexio...

  16. The acute effect of vibration applications on jumping performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şener Soylu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently, vibration has become very popular as a method of exercise and training and drawn attention of researchers. The aim of this study was to analyses the acute affect of vibration applications as a method of exercise and training on jumping performance. In this study experimental group consists of 25 subjects who are studying at Physical Education and Sports Department of Sakarya University (age 22.2±1.7 years, height 179.2±4.8 cm. body weight 71.5±9.0 kg. This study included a vibration at density of 35 Hz (3x30 sec. frequency  that result from  aerobic exercise that has low density and b just  methods of aerobic exercise (without any vibration that has  low density. Subjects have taken the tests of countermovement and squat jumping after 2 minutes of each application. All applications and tests have been done in nonconsecutive days in a random scheme. In statistical analysis Wilcoxon has been applied in nonparametric scheme. For counter movement jumping; height of jumping,  the difference between before and after  the application of vibration related to the point of peak power and average power has been found significiant (respectively, p<0.05; p<0.05; p<0.01. In addition to this, no statistical difference was found for squat vertical jumping before and after the application of vibration related to the point of peak power and average power (respectively, p>0.05; p>0.05; p>0.05. As a result, it is concluded that vibration that is applied at the range of 35 Hz frequency could increase the performance of acute countermovement jumping

  17. SQUAT ASSESSMENT FOR SAFE NAVIGATION OF RIVER NILE CRUISERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moustafa M. M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years a great deal of research efforts in ship hydromechanics have been devoted to practical navigation problems in moving larger ships safely into existing harbors and inland waterways. An area of particular concern is the prediction of ship squat in shallow or restricted waters at different speeds. Squat may cause grounding of the ship which result in severe damage to the ship, and consequently higher repair bills and off hire losses. River Nile cruisers are encountering squat every movement due to lacking water depth and stand up to grounding risk day after day. In this paper a series of simple but practical useful theoretical models concerning ship squat problems in shallow waterways are discussed. Luxor-Aswan is a selected waterway for the present study. In the course of this study, characteristics of Luxor-Aswan waterway and main feature of existing Nile cruisers are outlined. Finally, theoretical squat analysis of a candidate Nile cruiser has been presented. The results show the position and magnitude of maximum squat, grounding speed has been also identified. It has been found that masters awareness of squat phenomenon and its prediction for each specific vessel is of great concern for vessel safety. This work can be useful for ship designers, naval architects and naval officers, who have to be aware of squat effects, with a specific end goal to avoid any squat related accidents.

  18. Custom-Made Foot Orthoses Decrease Medial Foot Loading During Drop Jump in Individuals With Patellofemoral Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathleff, Michael S; Richter, Camilla; Brushøj, Christoffer

    2016-01-01

    with 12 weeks of follow-up. SETTING: Hospital setting. PARTICIPANTS: 23 adults with PFP. INTERVENTIONS: Custom-made foot orthoses. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Foot loading (plantar pressure) was collected from the most painful side during drop jump and single leg squat using pressure sensitive Pedar insoles...

  19. Risk, Jumps, and Diversification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bollerslev, Tim; Law, Tzuo Hann; Tauchen, George

    We test for price discontinuities, or jumps, in a panel of high-frequency intraday returns for forty large-cap stocks and an equiweighted index from these same stocks. Jumps are naturally classified into two types: common and idiosyncratic. Common jumps affect all stocks, albeit to varying degree...

  20. Jumping in Arithmetic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Albert

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we study a new relation between sentences: the jump relation. The idea of the jump relation is based on an analysis of Feferman's Theorem that the inconsistency of a theory U is interpretable over U. The jump relation is based on a converse of Feferman's Theorem: if a sentence is inter

  1. USEFULNESS AND METABOLIC IMPLICATIONS OF A 60-SECOND REPEATED JUMPS TEST AS A PREDICTOR OF ACROBATIC JUMPING PERFORMANCE IN GYMNASTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferran Antoni Rodriguez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gymnastics floor exercises are composed of a set of four to five successive acrobatic jumps usually called a �series�. The aims of the study were: 1 to relate the acrobatic gymnastics performance of these series with a repeated jumps test of similar duration (R60, 2 to study the relation between R60 and physiological parameters (heart rate and blood lactate, and the performance obtained in different kinds of jumps, 3 to confirm whether R60, executed without a damped jumping technique, can be considered an anaerobic lactic power test. Twenty male and twenty-four female gymnasts performed three repeated jumps tests for 5 s (R5, 10 s (R10 and 60 s (R60 and vertical jumps, such as drop jumps (DJ, squat jumps (SJ and countermovement jumps (CMJ. We assessed heart rate (HR and blood lactate during R10 and R60. The average values of the maximal blood lactate concentration (Lmax after R10 (males = 2.5±0.6 mmol.l-1; females = 2.1±0.8 mmol.l-1 confirm that anaerobic glycolysis is not activated to a high level. In R60, the Lmax (males = 7.5±1.7 mmol.l-1; females = 5.9±2.1 mmol.l-1 that was recorded does not validate R60 as an anaerobic lactic power test. We confirmed the relation between the average power obtained in R60 (R60Wm and the acrobatic performance on the floor. The inclusion in the multiple regression equation of the best power in DJ and the best flight-contact ratio (FC in R5 confirms the influence of other non-metabolic components on the variability in R60 performance, at least in gymnasts.

  2. Detection of early squats by axle box acceleration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molodova, M.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis discusses a new method for detection of short track irregularities, particularly squats, with axle box acceleration (ABA) measurements. A squat is a surface initiated short track defect, associated with high frequency vibrations of the wheel-rail system. High stresses in the contact

  3. The effects of a maximal power training cycle on the strength, maximum power, vertical jump height and acceleration of high-level 400-meter hurdlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsalobre-Fernández, Carlos; Tejero-González, Carlos M; Del Campo-Vecino, Juan; Alonso-Curiel, Dionisio

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of a power training cycle on maximum strength, maximum power, vertical jump height and acceleration in seven high-level 400-meter hurdlers subjected to a specific training program twice a week for 10 weeks. Each training session consisted of five sets of eight jump-squats with the load at which each athlete produced his maximum power. The repetition maximum in the half squat position (RM), maximum power in the jump-squat (W), a squat jump (SJ), countermovement jump (CSJ), and a 30-meter sprint from a standing position were measured before and after the training program using an accelerometer, an infra-red platform and photo-cells. The results indicated the following statistically significant improvements: a 7.9% increase in RM (Z=-2.03, p=0.021, δc=0.39), a 2.3% improvement in SJ (Z=-1.69, p=0.045, δc=0.29), a 1.43% decrease in the 30-meter sprint (Z=-1.70, p=0.044, δc=0.12), and, where maximum power was produced, a change in the RM percentage from 56 to 62% (Z=-1.75, p=0.039, δc=0.54). As such, it can be concluded that strength training with a maximum power load is an effective means of increasing strength and acceleration in high-level hurdlers.

  4. Relationships Between Potentiation Effects After Ballistic Half-Squats and Bilateral Symmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchomel, Timothy J; Sato, Kimitake; DeWeese, Brad H; Ebben, William P; Stone, Michael H

    2016-05-01

    The purposes of this study were to examine the effect of ballistic concentric-only half-squats (COHS) on subsequent squat-jump (SJ) performances at various rest intervals and to examine the relationships between changes in SJ performance and bilateral symmetry at peak performance. Thirteen resistance-trained men performed an SJ immediately and every minute up to 10 min on dual force plates after 2 ballistic COHS repetitions at 90% of their 1-repetition-maximum COHS. SJ peak force, peak power, net impulse, and rate of force development (RFD) were compared using a series of 1-way repeated-measures ANOVAs. The percent change in performance at which peak performance occurred for each variable was correlated with the symmetry index scores at the corresponding time point using Pearson correlation coefficients. Statistical differences in peak power (P = .031) existed between rest intervals; however, no statistically significant pairwise comparisons were present (P > .05). No statistical differences in peak force (P = .201), net impulse (P = .064), and RFD (P = .477) were present between rest intervals. The relationships between changes in SJ performance and bilateral symmetry after the rest interval that produced the greatest performance for peak force (r = .300, P = .319), peak power (r = -.041, P = .894), net impulse (r = -.028, P = .927), and RFD (r = -.434, P = .138) were not statistically significant. Ballistic COHS may enhance SJ performance; however, the changes in performance were not related to bilateral symmetry.

  5. The acute effect of vibration applications on jumping performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suat Yıldız

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently, vibration has become very popular as a method of exercise and training and drawn attention of researchers. The aim of this study was to analyses the acute affect of vibration applications as a method of exercise and training on jumping performance.In this study experimental group consists of 25 subjects who are studying at Physical Education and Sports Department of Sakarya University (age 22.2±1.7 years, height 179.2±4.8 cm. body weight 71.5±9.0 kg. This study included a vibration at density of 35 Hz (3x30 sec. frequency that result from aerobic exercise that has low density and b just methods of aerobic exercise (without any vibration that has low density. Subjects have taken the tests of countermovement and squat jumping after 2 minutes of each application. All applications and tests have been done in nonconsecutive days in a random scheme. In statistical analysis Wilcoxon has been applied in nonparametric scheme.For counter movement jumping; height of jumping, the difference between before and after the application of vibration related to the point of peak power and average power has been found significiant (respectively, p0.05; p>0.05; p>0.05.As a result, it is concluded that vibration that is applied at the range of 35 Hz frequency could increase the performance of acute countermovement jumping.

  6. Kinematic, kinetic and EMG patterns during downward squatting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionisio, Valdeci Carlos; Almeida, Gil Lúcio; Duarte, Marcos; Hirata, Rogério Pessoto

    2008-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the kinematic, kinetic, and electromyographic pattern before, during and after downward squatting when the trunk movement is restricted in the sagittal plane. Eight healthy subjects performed downward squatting at two different positions, semisquatting (40 degrees knee flexion) and half squatting (70 degrees knee flexion). Electromyographic responses of the vastus medialis oblique, vastus medialis longus, rectus femoris, vastus lateralis, biceps femoris, semitendineous, gastrocnemius lateralis, and tibialis anterior were recorded. The kinematics of the major joints were reconstructed using an optoelectronic system. The center of pressure (COP) was obtained using data collected from one force plate, and the ankle and knee joint torques were calculated using inverse dynamics. In the upright position there were small changes in the COP and in the knee and ankle joint torques. The tibialis anterior provoked the disruption of this upright position initiating the squat. During the acceleration phase of the squat the COP moved posteriorly, the knee joint torque remained in flexion and there was no measurable muscle activation. As the body went into the deceleration phase, the knee joint torque increased towards extension with major muscle activities being observed in the four heads of the quadriceps. Understanding these kinematic, kinetic and EMG strategies before, during and after the squat is expected to be beneficial to practitioners for utilizing squatting as a task for improving motor function.

  7. [Effects of Reactive Jump Training in Handball Players Regarding Jump Height and Power Development in the Triceps Surae Muscle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rensing, N; Westermann, A; Möller, D; von Piekartz, H

    2015-12-01

    Studies have shown changes in the technical and physical demands in modern handball. The game has increased considerably in speed, power and dynamics. Jump training has, therefore, become ever more important in the training of the athletes. These developments contribute to the fact that handball is now one of the most injury-prone types of sport, with the lower extremities being most frequently affected. Reactive jump training is not only used in training by now, but also increasingly in injury prevention. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of reactive jump training with handball players. 21 regional league handball players were randomly divided into an intervention group (n = 12) and a control group (n = 9). The intervention group completed a six-week reactive jump training programme while the control group went through a non-specific training programme. Jump height (squat and counter movement jump), isokinetic and isometric maximum power as well as muscle activity served as measuring parameters. A comparison of the intervention and control groups revealed that the reactive jump training led to significant improvements in jump height. The isometric and isokinetic maximum power measurements and the electromyographic activities of the triceps surae muscle demonstrated an improvement in the values within the intervention group. However, this improvement was not significant compared with the control group. Likewise both jumps correlated with the muscle activity of the soleus muscle as shown by electromyography. A moderate correlation was noticed between the isokinetic maximum power measurement and the electromyographic activity of the soleus and gastrocnemius medialis muscles. Furthermore, the correlations of the isometric and isokinetic maximum power meas-urements resulted in a strong correlation coefficient. This study revealed a significant increase in jump height after reactive jump training. There was no significant difference in

  8. Steerable Miniature Jumping Robot

    OpenAIRE

    Kovac, Mirko; Schlegel, Manuel; Zufferey, Jean-Christophe; Floreano, Dario

    2010-01-01

    Jumping is used in nature by many small animals to locomote in cluttered environments or in rough terrain. It offers small systems the benefit of overcoming relatively large obstacles at a low energetic cost. In order to be able to perform repetitive jumps in a given direction, it is important to be able to upright after landing, steer and jump again. In this article, we review and evaluate the uprighting and steering principles of existing jumping robots and present a novel spherical robot w...

  9. THE EFFECT OF LANDING SURFACE ON THE PLANTAR KINETICS OF CHINESE PARATROOPERS USING HALF-SQUAT LANDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Li

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to determine the effect of landing surface on plantar kinetics during a half-squat landing. Twenty male elite paratroopers with formal parachute landing training and over 2 years of parachute jumping experience were recruited. The subjects wore parachuting boots in which pressure sensing insoles were placed. Each subject was instructed to jump off a platform with a height of 60 cm, and land on either a hard or soft surface in a half-squat posture. Outcome measures were maximal plantar pressure, time to maximal plantar pressure (T-MPP, and pressure-time integral (PTI upon landing on 10 plantar regions. Compared to a soft surface, hard surface produced higher maximal plantar pressure in the 1st to 4th metatarsal and mid-foot regions, but lower maximal plantar pressure in the 5th metatarsal region. Shorter T- MPP was found during hard surface landing in the 1st and 2nd metatarsal and medial rear foot. Landing on a hard surface landing resulted in a lower PTI than a soft surface in the 1stphalangeal region. For Chinese paratroopers, specific foot prosthesis should be designed to protect the1st to 4thmetatarsal region for hard surface landing, and the 1stphalangeal and 5thmetatarsal region for soft surface landing

  10. Azimuthal-angle dependence of charged-pion-interferometry measurements with respect to 2$^{\\rm nd}$- and $3^{\\rm rd}$-order event planes in Au$+$Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=200$ GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Adare, A; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Al-Bataineh, H; Alexander, J; Aoki, K; Aramaki, Y; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Barish, K N; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Baumann, C; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, A; Berdnikov, Y; Bickley, A A; Bok, J S; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Butsyk, S; Camacho, C M; Campbell, S; Chen, C -H; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cole, B A; Connors, M; Constantin, P; Csanád, M; Csörgő, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Das, K; Datta, A; David, G; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Donadelli, M; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Ellinghaus, F; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Fadem, B; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Jr., \\,; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fusayasu, T; Garishvili, I; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gonin, M; Goto, Y; de Cassagnac, R Granier; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Gunji, T; Gustafsson, H -Å; Haggerty, J S; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Han, R; Hanks, J; Hartouni, E P; Haslum, E; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Hill, J C; Hohlmann, M; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hornback, D; Huang, S; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Ide, J; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Ivanischev, D; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jin, J; Johnson, B M; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kamin, J; Kang, J H; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kempel, T; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kim, B I; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kim, E -J; Kim, S H; Kim, Y -J; Kinney, E; Kiriluk, K; Kiss, Á; Kistenev, E; Kochenda, L; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Kunde, G J; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Lee, J; Lee, K; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Leitner, E; Lenzi, B; Li, X; Liebing, P; Levy, L A Linden; Liška, T; Litvinenko, A; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Love, B; Luechtenborg, R; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; Means, N; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mignerey, A C; Mikeš, P; Miki, K; Milov, A; Mishra, M; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Moukhanova, T V; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Niida, T; Nouicer, R; Nyanin, A S; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Oka, M; Okada, K; Onuki, Y; Oskarsson, A; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, I H; Park, J; Park, S K; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Pei, H; Peng, J -C; Pereira, H; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Proissl, M; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Richardson, E; Roach, D; Roche, G; Rolnick, S D; Rosati, M; Rosen, C A; Rosendahl, S S E; Rosnet, P; Rukoyatkin, P; Ružička, P; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakashita, K; Samsonov, V; Sano, S; Sato, T; Sawada, S; Sedgwick, K; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Semenov, A Yu; Seto, R; Sharma, D; Shein, I; Shibata, T -A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shoji, K; Shukla, P; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Sim, K S; Singh, B K; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Slunečka, M; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Sparks, N A; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sukhanov, A; Sziklai, J; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tanabe, R; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarafdar, S; Taranenko, A; Tarján, P; Themann, H; Thomas, T L; Todoroki, T; Togawa, M; Toia, A; Tomášek, L; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Vale, C; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Vazquez-Zambrano, E; Veicht, A; Velkovska, J; Vértesi, R; Vinogradov, A A; Virius, M; Vrba, V; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, D; Watanabe, K; Watanabe, Y; Wei, F; Wei, R; Wessels, J; White, S N; Winter, D; Wood, J P; Woody, C L; Wright, R M; Wysocki, M; Xie, W; Yamaguchi, Y L; Yamaura, K; Yang, R; Yanovich, A; Ying, J; Yokkaichi, S; You, Z; Young, G R; Younus, I; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zolin, L

    2014-01-01

    Charged-pion-interferometry measurements were made with respect to the 2$^{\\rm nd}$- and 3$^{\\rm rd}$-order event plane for Au$+$Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=200$ GeV. A strong azimuthal-angle dependence of the extracted Gaussian-source radii was observed with respect to both the 2$^{\\rm nd}$- and 3$^{\\rm rd}$-order event planes. The results for the 2$^{\\rm nd}$-order dependence indicate that the initial eccentricity is reduced during the medium evolution, but not reversed in the final state, which is consistent with previous results. In contrast, the results for the 3$^{\\rm rd}$-order dependence indicate that the initial triangular shape is significantly reduced and potentially reversed by the end of the medium evolution, and that the 3$^{\\rm rd}$-order oscillations are largely dominated by the dynamical effects from triangular flow.

  11. EFFECTS OF ELECTROSTIMULATION AND PLYOMETRIC TRAINING PROGRAM COMBINATION ON JUMP HEIGHT IN TEENAGE ATHLETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio J. Martínez-López

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of eight- week (2 days/week training periods of plyometric exercises (PT and neuromuscular electrostimulation (EMS on jump height in young athletes. Squat jump (SJ, counter movement jump (CMJ and drop jump (DJ were performed to assess the effects of the training protocols 98 athletes (100 & 200m and 100m & 110m hurdles voluntarily took part in this study, 51 males (52% and 47 females (48%, 17.91 ± 1.42 years old, and 5.16 ± 2.56 years of training experience. The participants were randomly assigned to four different groups according to the frequency and the timing of the stimulation. Analysis of covariance was used to analyze the effects of every training program on jump height. Our findings suggest that compared to control (Plyometrics (PT only, the combination of 150Hz EMS + PT simultaneously combined in an 8 week (2days/week training program, we could observe significant jump height improvements in the different types of strength: explosive, explosive-elastic, and explosive-elastic-reactive. The combination of PT after < 85 Hz EMS did not show any jump height significant increase in sprinters. In conclusion, an eight week training program (with just two days per week of EMS combined with plyometric exercises has proven useful for the improvement of every kind of vertical jump ability required for sprint and hurdles disciplines in teenage athletes

  12. Optimal Ski Jump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebilas, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    Consider a skier who goes down a takeoff ramp, attains a speed "V", and jumps, attempting to land as far as possible down the hill below (Fig. 1). At the moment of takeoff the angle between the skier's velocity and the horizontal is [alpha]. What is the optimal angle [alpha] that makes the jump the longest possible for the fixed magnitude of the…

  13. Jumping Good Fun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nye, Susan B.

    2010-01-01

    Jumping rope is an activity that can be fun and enjoyable for all students. It requires minimal activity space, can be performed individually or in small groups, and is an inexpensive way to engage students in a lifelong physical activity. Jumping rope is commonly used by coaches and athletes for training purposes to improve aerobic endurance,…

  14. Jumping Good Fun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nye, Susan B.

    2010-01-01

    Jumping rope is an activity that can be fun and enjoyable for all students. It requires minimal activity space, can be performed individually or in small groups, and is an inexpensive way to engage students in a lifelong physical activity. Jumping rope is commonly used by coaches and athletes for training purposes to improve aerobic endurance,…

  15. Estimation of Jump Tails

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bollerslev, Tim; Todorov, Victor

    We propose a new and flexible non-parametric framework for estimating the jump tails of Itô semimartingale processes. The approach is based on a relatively simple-to-implement set of estimating equations associated with the compensator for the jump measure, or its "intensity", that only utilizes ...

  16. Single Spin Asymmetries in Charged Kaon Production from Semi-Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering on a Transversely Polarized $^3{\\rm{He}}$ Target

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Y X; Allada, K; Aniol, K; Annand, J R M; Averett, T; Benmokhtar, F; Bertozzi, W; Bradshaw, P C; Bosted, P; Camsonne, A; Canan, M; Cates, G D; Chen, C; Chen, J -P; Chen, W; Chirapatpimol, K; Chudakov, E; Cisbani, E; Cornejo, J C; Cusanno, F; Dalton, M M; Deconinck, W; de Jager, C W; De Leo, R; Deng, X; Deur, A; Ding, H; Dolph, P A M; Dutta, C; Dutta, D; Fassi, L El; Frullani, S; Gao, H; Garibaldi, F; Gaskell, D; Gilad, S; Gilman, R; Glamazdin, O; Golge, S; Guo, L; Hamilton, D; Hansen, O; Higinbotham, D W; Holmstrom, T; Huang, J; Huang, M; Ibrahim, H F; Iodice, M; Jiang, X; Jin, G; Jones, M K; Katich, J; Kelleher, A; Kim, W; Kolarkar, A; Korsch, W; LeRose, J J; Li, X; Li, Y; Lindgren, R; Liyanage, N; Long, E; Lu, H -J; Margaziotis, D J; Markowitz, P; Marrone, S; McNulty, D; Meziani, Z -E; Michaels, R; Moffit, B; Camacho, C Muñoz; Nanda, S; Narayan, A; Nelyubin, V; Norum, B; Oh, Y; Osipenko, M; Parno, D; Peng, J -C; Phillips, S K; Posik, M; Puckett, A J R; Qian, X; Qiang, Y; Rakhman, A; Ransome, R; Riordan, S; Saha, A; Sawatzky, B; Schulte, E; Shahinyan, A; Shabestari, M H; Širca, S; Stepanyan, S; Subedi, R; Sulkosky, V; Tang, L -G; Tobias, A; Urciuoli, G M; Vilardi, I; Wang, K; Wojtsekhowski, B; Yan, X; Yao, H; Ye, Y; Ye, Z; Yuan, L; Zhan, X; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y -W; Zhao, B; Zheng, X; Zhu, L; Zhu, X; Zong, X

    2014-01-01

    We report the first measurement of target single spin asymmetries of charged kaons produced in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering of electrons off a transversely polarized $^3{\\rm{He}}$ target. Both the Collins and Sivers moments, which are related to the nucleon transversity and Sivers distributions, respectively, are extracted over the kinematic range of 0.1$<$$x_{bj}$$<$0.4 for $K^{+}$ and $K^{-}$ production. While the Collins and Sivers moments for $K^{+}$ are consistent with zero within the experimental uncertainties, both moments for $K^{-}$ favor negative values. The Sivers moments are compared to the theoretical prediction from a phenomenological fit to the world data. While the $K^{+}$ Sivers moments are consistent with the prediction, the $K^{-}$ results differ from the prediction at the 2-sigma level.

  17. Effect of potentiating exercise volume on vertical jump parameters in recreationally trained men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamoui, Andy V; Brown, Lee E; Coburn, Jared W; Judelson, Daniel A; Uribe, Brandon P; Nguyen, Diamond; Tran, Tai; Eurich, Alea D; Noffal, Guillermo J

    2009-08-01

    High-force activities have demonstrated postactivation potentiation (PAP) and may enhance performance in athletes; however, the efficacy of high-force activities to generate PAP in recreationally trained men remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of high-force back squat volume on vertical jump (VJ) height, ground reaction force (GRF), impulse (IMP), and takeoff velocity (TOV) in recreationally trained men. Sixteen recreationally trained men (age 24.56 +/- 2.10 years, height 174.53 +/- 8.54 cm, mass 84.59 +/- 14.75 kg, and 1 repetition maximum [1RM] back squat 124.71 +/- 17.58 kg) with at least 1 year of back squat experience completed 5 testing sessions separated by a minimum of 72 hours' rest. On session 1, subjects completed VJ testing without a potentiating exercise intervention (control condition) in a test-retest fashion (3 VJs, 5 minutes seated rest, and 3 more VJs) and performed 1RM back squat testing. Subjects completed the subsequent 4 testing sessions in a test-retest fashion (3 VJs, experimental condition, 5 minutes seated rest, and 3 more VJs) in random order. The 4 experimental conditions required subjects to perform the back squat using a load of 85% 1RM with volumes of 1 x 2, 1 x 3, 1 x 4, or 1 x 5. Analysis of variance revealed no significant (p > 0.05) condition by time interactions for any dependent variable; however, there were significant (p post 2,094.53 +/- 390.99 N) and IMP (pre 210.88 +/- 100.97 Nxs, > post 204.63 +/- 106.14 Nxs) but not for VJ or TOV. These results suggest that 85% 1RM back squat volume assignments do not produce a VJ potentiation response in recreationally trained men.

  18. Body size and countermovement depth confound relationship between muscle power output and jumping performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markovic, Srdjan; Dragan, Mirkov; Nedeljkovic, Aleksandar; Jaric, Slobodan

    2013-01-01

    A number of studies based on maximum vertical jumps have presumed that the maximum jump height reveals the maximum power of lower limb muscles, as well as the tested muscle power output predicts the jumping performance. The objective of the study was to test the hypothesis that both the body size and countermovement depth confound the relationship between the muscle power output and performance of maximum vertical jumps. Sixty young and physically active males were tested on the maximum countermovement (CMJ) and squat jumps (SJ). The jumping performance (Hmax), peak (Ppeak) and the average power output (Pavg) during the concentric phase, countermovement depth (only in CMJ) and body mass as an index of body size were assessed. To assess the power-performance relationship, the correlations between Hmax with both Ppeak and Pavg were calculated without and with controlling for the effects of body mass, as well as for the countermovement depth. The results revealed moderate power-performance relationships (range 0.55jumps. When controlled for body mass, the same values were markedly higher (0.61jumps). When controlled for both the body mass and countermovement depth, CMJ revealed r=0.88 and r=0.77 for Ppeak and Pavg, respectively. Both jumps revealed stronger relationships with Ppeak than with Pavg (p<0.05) when controlled for either body mass or both body mass and countermovement depth. We conclude that both body size (in CMJ and SJ) and countermovement depth (in CMJ) confound the relationship between the muscle power output with the performance of maximum vertical jumps. Regarding routine assessments of muscle power from jumping performance and vice versa, the use of CMJ is recommended, while Ppeak, rather than Pavg, should be the variable of choice. PMID:24280557

  19. EFFECTS OF WHOLE BODY VIBRATION ON STRENGTH AND JUMPING PERFORMANCE IN VOLLEYBALL AND BEACH VOLLEYBALL PLAYERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zmijewski, P.; Jimenez-Olmedo, J.M.; Jové-Tossi, M.A.; Martínez-Carbonell, A.; Suárez-Llorca, C.; Andreu-Cabrera, E.

    2014-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to examine the effects of 6-week strength training with whole body vibration (WBV) on leg strength and jumping performance in volleyball and beach volleyball players. Twenty-three sub-elite male volleyball (VB; n=12) and beach volleyball players (BVB; n=11) aged 21.2±3.0 years were divided into two groups and subjected to 6 weeks of strength training (three one-hour sessions per week): (I) 12 players (6 VB and 6 BVB players) underwent training with WBV (30-40 Hz, 1.7-2.5 mm, 3.0-5.7 g), and (II) 11 players (6 VB and 5 BVB players) underwent traditional strength training. Squat jump (SJ) and countermovement squat jump (CMJ) measurements by the Ergo Tester contact platform and maximum leg press test (1RM) were conducted. Three-factor (2 time x 2 WBV use x 2 discipline) analysis of variance for SJ, CMJ and 1RM revealed a significant time main effect (pvolleyball and beach volleyball players increases leg strength more and leads to greater improvement in jump performance than traditional strength training, but greater improvements can be expected in beach volleyball players than in volleyball players. PMID:25187676

  20. Lower Extremity Muscle Activation and Kinematics of Catchers When Throwing Using Various Squatting and Throwing Postures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Chien Peng, Kuo-Cheng Lo, Lin-Hwa Wang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the differences in joint motions and muscle activities of the lower extremities involved in various squatting postures. The motion capture system with thirty-one reflective markers attached on participants was used for motion data collection. The electromyography system was applied over the quadriceps, biceps femoris, tibialis anterior, and gastrocnemius muscles of the pivot and stride leg. The joint extension and flexion in wide squatting are greater than in general squatting (p = 0.005. Knee joint extension and flexion in general squatting are significantly greater than in wide squatting (p = 0.001. The adduction and abduction of the hip joint in stride passing are significantly greater than in step squatting (p = 0.000. Furthermore, the adduction and abduction of the knee joint in stride passing are also significantly greater than in step squatting (p = 0.000. When stride passing is performed, the muscle activation of the hamstring of the pivot foot in general squatting is significantly greater than in wide squatting (p < 0.05, and this difference continues to the stride period. Most catchers use a general or wide squatting width, exclusive of a narrow one. Therefore, the training design for strengthening the lower extremity muscles should consider the appropriateness of the common squat width to enhance squat-up performance. For lower limb muscle activation, wide squatting requires more active gastrocnemius and tibialis anterior muscles. Baseball players should extend the knee angle of the pivot foot before catching the ball.

  1. Quantum Walk with Jumps

    CERN Document Server

    Lavička, H; Kiss, T; Lutz, E; Jex, I

    2011-01-01

    We analyze a special class of 1-D quantum walks (QWs) realized using optical multi-ports. We assume non-perfect multi-ports showing errors in the connectivity, i.e. with a small probability the multi- ports can connect not to their nearest neighbor but to another multi-port at a fixed distance - we call this a jump. We study two cases of QW with jumps where multiple displacements can emerge at one timestep. The first case assumes time-correlated jumps (static disorder). In the second case, we choose the positions of jumps randomly in time (dynamic disorder). The probability distributions of position of the QW walker in both instances differ significantly: dynamic disorder leads to a Gaussian-like distribution, while for static disorder we find two distinct behaviors depending on the parity of jump size. In the case of even-sized jumps, the distribution exhibits a three-peak profile around the position of the initial excitation, whereas the probability distribution in the odd case follows a Laplace-like discre...

  2. Jumping on water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ho-Young

    2016-11-01

    Water striders can jump on water as high as they can jump on land. Quick jumps allow them to avoid sudden dangers such as predators' attacks, and therefore understanding how they make such a dramatic motion for survival can shed light on the ultimate level of semi-aquatic motility achievable through evolution. However, the mechanism of their vertical jumping from a water surface has eluded hydrodynamic explanations so far. By observing movements of water strider legs and theoretically analyzing their dynamic interactions with deforming liquid-air interface, we have recently found that different species of jumping striders always tune their leg rotation speed with a force just below that required to break the water surface to reach the maximum take-off velocity. Here, we start with discussing the fundamental theories of dynamics of floating and sinking of small objects. The theories then enable us to analyze forces acting on a water strider while it presses down the water surface to fully exploit the capillary force. We further introduce a 68-milligram at-scale robotic insect capable of jumping on water without splash, strikingly similar to the real strider, by utilizing the water surface just as a trampoline.

  3. The existence of a sticking region in free weight squats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Tillaar, Roland; Andersen, Vidar; Saeterbakken, Atle Hole

    2014-09-29

    The aim of this study was to investigate the existence of the sticking region in two legged free weight squats. Fifteen resistance-training males (age 24 ± 4 years, body mass 82 ± 11 kg, body height 179 ± 6 cm) with 6 ± 3 years of resistance-training experience performed 6-RM in free weight squats. The last repetition was analyzed for the existence of a sticking region. Only in 10 out of 15 participants a sticking region was observed. The observed sticking region was much shorter than in the bench press. Furthermore, rectus femoris decreased the EMG activity in contrast to increased EMG activity in biceps femoris around the sticking and surrounding region. No significant change in EMG activity was found for the lateral and medial vastus muscles. It is suggested that a combination of these muscle activity changes could be one of the causes of the existence of the sticking region in free weight squats.

  4. Effects of fatigue of plantarflexors on control and performance in vertical jumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobbert, Maarten F; van der Krogt, Marjolein M; van Doorn, Hemke; de Ruiter, Cornelis J

    2011-04-01

    We investigated the effects of a mismatch between control and musculoskeletal properties on performance in vertical jumping. Six subjects performed maximum-effort vertical squat jumps before (REF) and after the plantarflexors of the right leg had been fatigued (FAT) while kinematic data, ground reaction forces, and EMG of leg muscles were collected. Inverse dynamics was used to calculate the net work at joints, and EMG was rectified and smoothed to obtain the smoothed rectified EMG (SREMG). The jumps of the subjects were also simulated with a musculoskeletal model comprising seven body segments and 12 Hill-type muscles, and having as only input muscle stimulation. Jump height was approximately 6 cm less in FAT jumps than in REF jumps. In FAT jumps, peak SREMG level was reduced by more than 35% in the right plantarflexors and by approximately 20% in the right hamstrings but not in any other muscles. In FAT jumps, the net joint work was reduced not only at the right ankle (by 70%) but also at the right hip (by 40%). Because the right hip was not spanned by fatigued muscles and the reduction in SREMG of the right hamstrings was relatively small, this indicated that the reduction in performance was partly due to a mismatch between control and musculoskeletal properties. The differences between REF and FAT jumps of the subjects were confirmed and explained by the simulation model. Reoptimization of control for the FAT model caused performance to be partly restored by approximately 2.5 cm. The reduction in performance in FAT jumps was partly due to a mismatch between control and musculoskeletal properties.

  5. Monitoring markers of muscle damage during a 3 week periodized drop-jump exercise programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamandulis, Sigitas; Skurvydas, Albertas; Snieckus, Audrius;

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine changes in indirect markers of muscle damage during 3 weeks of stretch-shortening exercise with a progressively increasing load and continued modulation of various key training variables. Eight healthy untrained men performed a drop-jump programme involving a ......-stimulation-evoked torque decreased acutely after each training session relative to pre-exercise values (P ......The aim of this study was to examine changes in indirect markers of muscle damage during 3 weeks of stretch-shortening exercise with a progressively increasing load and continued modulation of various key training variables. Eight healthy untrained men performed a drop-jump programme involving...... a progressive increase in load impact with respect to the number of jumps performed, drop (platform) height, squat depth amplitude, and addition of weights. Maximal concentric and isometric knee extensor strength were assessed immediately before and 10 min after each training session. Voluntary and 100 Hz...

  6. Kinetic parameters as determinants of vertical jump performance. DOI: 10.5007/1980-0037.2012v14n1p41

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saray Giovana dos Santos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to identify force and velocity parameters related to vertical jump performance in counter movement jump (CMJ and squat jump (SJ, and to compare these parameters between sprint runners and volleyball players. Twenty-four male athletes (12 regional/national-level sprint runners and 12 national-level volleyball players participated in this study. The athletes performed CMJ and SJ on a force platform. The following variables were analyzed: jump performance (jump height and power, peak velocity (PV, absolute and relative maximum force (Fmax, rate of force development (RFD, and time to reach maximum force (TFmax. In CMJ, jump height was correlated with PV (r=0.97 and normalized Fmax (r=0.47, whereas jump power was significantly correlated with all variables, except for Fmax (r=0.12. In SJ, PV and normalized Fmax were significantly correlated with jump height (r=0.95 and r=0.51, respectively and power (r=0.80 and r=0.87, respectively. In addition, TFmax was inversely correlated with power (r=-0.49. Runners presented higher performance variables (height and power, normalized Fmax and PV than volleyball players in both CMJ and SJ. In conclusion, velocity and maximum force were the main determinants of height and power in the two types of vertical jump. However, explosive force (RFD and TFmax was also important for power production in vertical jumps. Finally, runners presented a better vertical jump performance than volleyball players.

  7. Four weeks of optimal load ballistic resistance training at the end of season attenuates declining jump performance of women volleyball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Robert U; Rogers, Ryan A; Volek, Jeff S; Häkkinen, Keijo; Kraemer, William J

    2006-11-01

    Anecdotal and research evidence is that vertical jump performance declines over the competitive volleyball season. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether a short period of ballistic resistance training would attenuate this loss. Fourteen collegiate women volleyball players were trained for 11 weeks with periodized traditional and ballistic resistance training. There was a 5.4% decrease (p ballistic training period (midseason to end of season), but values were not different from start to end of season. These changes in overall jump performance were reflective of changes in underlying neuromuscular performance variables: in particular, power output and peak velocity during loaded jump squats, countermovement jumps, and drop jumps. During the first 7 weeks of traditional heavy resistance training, it appears that the neuromuscular system is depressed, perhaps by the combination of training, game play, and skills practice precluding adequate recovery. Introduction of a novel training stimulus in the form of ballistic jump squats and reduction of heavy resistance training of the leg extensors stimulated a rebound in performance, in some cases to exceed the athlete's ability at the start of the season. Periodization of in-season training programs similar to that used in this study may provide volleyball players with good vertical jump performance for the crucial end-of-season games.

  8. Dynamic Wheel/Rail Rolling Contact at Singular Defects with Application to Squats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao , X.

    2012-01-01

    Squats, as a kind of short wavelength rail surface defects, have become one of the main rolling contact fatigue problems in railways worldwide. The purpose of this work is to better understand the squatting phenomenon, contribute to reduction and even prevention of squat occurrence, and thereby redu

  9. Influence of dorsiflexion shoes on neuromuscular fatigue of the plantar flexors after combined tapping-jumping exercises in volleyball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapole, Thomas; Ahmaidi, Said; Gaillien, Benjamin; Leprêtre, Pierre-Marie

    2013-07-01

    Dorsiflexion shoes could be useful to increase jumping performance. The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of wearing shoes inducing moderate dorsiflexion (2°) on neuromuscular fatigue induced by volleyball exercises involving multiple stretch-shortening cycles. Squat jump (SJ) and countermovement jump (CMJ) performance, and plantar flexors isometric voluntary and evoked contractile properties were assessed in 10 unfamiliarized trained volleyball players before and after a 10-minute intensive combined tapping-jumping volleyball exercise performed, in blinded randomized conditions, with neutral (0°) or moderate dorsiflexion (2°). No significant difference was observed on SJ performance in neutral and moderate dorsiflexion conditions. However, CMJ height was initially lower with 2° dorsiflexion compared with 0° (p volleyball exercise also induced a significant decrease in maximal voluntary contraction (p volleyball players.

  10. The ingestion of a caffeinated energy drink improves jump performance and activity patterns in elite badminton players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abian, Pablo; Del Coso, Juan; Salinero, Juan José; Gallo-Salazar, Cesar; Areces, Francisco; Ruiz-Vicente, Diana; Lara, Beatriz; Soriano, Lidon; Muñoz, Victor; Abian-Vicen, Javier

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a caffeine-containing energy drink to enhance physical and match performance in elite badminton players. Sixteen male and elite badminton players (25.4 ± 7.3 year; 71.8 ± 7.9 kg) participated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled and randomised experiment. On two different sessions, badminton players ingested 3 mg of caffeine per kg of body mass in the form of an energy drink or the same drink without caffeine (placebo). After 60 min, participants performed the following tests: handgrip maximal force production, smash jump without and with shuttlecock, squat jump, countermovement jump and the agility T-test. Later, a 45-min simulated badminton match was played. Players' number of impacts and heart rate was measured during the match. The ingestion of the caffeinated energy drink increased squat jump height (34.5 ± 4.7 vs. 36.4 ± 4.3 cm; P energy drink may be an effective nutritional aid to increase jump performance and activity patterns during game in elite badminton players.

  11. Spinning hydraulic jump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abderrahmane, Hamid; Kasimov, Aslan

    2013-11-01

    We report an experimental observation of a new symmetry breaking of circular hydraulic jump into a self-organized structure that consists of a spinning polygonal jump and logarithmic-spiral waves of fluid elevation downstream. The waves are strikingly similar to spiral density waves in galaxies. The fluid flow exhibits counterparts of salient morphological features of galactic flows, in particular the outflow from the center, jets, circum-nuclear rings, gas inflows toward the galactic center, and vortices. The hydrodynamic instability revealed here may have a counterpart that plays a role in the formation and sustainability of spiral arms in galaxies.

  12. Biomechanical analysis of the single-leg decline squat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwerver, J.; Bredeweg, S. W.; Hof, A. L.

    Background: The single-leg squat on a 25 decline board has been described as a clinical assessment tool and as a rehabilitation exercise for patients with patellar tendinopathy. Several assumptions have been made about its working mechanism on patellar load and patellofemoral forces, but these are

  13. Biomechanical analysis of the single-leg decline squat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwerver, J.; Bredeweg, S. W.; Hof, A. L.

    2007-01-01

    Background: The single-leg squat on a 25 decline board has been described as a clinical assessment tool and as a rehabilitation exercise for patients with patellar tendinopathy. Several assumptions have been made about its working mechanism on patellar load and patellofemoral forces, but these are n

  14. Biomechanical analysis of the single-leg decline squat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwerver, J.; Bredeweg, S. W.; Hof, A. L.

    2007-01-01

    Background: The single-leg squat on a 25 decline board has been described as a clinical assessment tool and as a rehabilitation exercise for patients with patellar tendinopathy. Several assumptions have been made about its working mechanism on patellar load and patellofemoral forces, but these are n

  15. Praktik Trademark Squatting dalam Proses Pendaftaran Merek di Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widya Justitia

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui dan menganalisis mengapa praktik trademark squatting dapat terjadi dalam proses pendaftaran merek beserta cara mengatasinya. Selanjutnya, penelitian ini juga membahas mengenai konsepsi ideal terkait proses pendaftaran merek di Indonesia guna menghindari dan meminimalisasi praktik trademark squatting. Penelitian ini merupakan penelitian kualitatif yang bersifat yuridis empiris dan data yang terkumpul dianalisa dengan metode deskriptif kualitatif. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa praktik trademark squatting merupakan suatu tindakan mendaftarkan merek milik orang lain yang belum terdaftar, sehingga membuat pemilik merek yang sebenarnya tidak dapat lagi mendaftarkan mereknya. Setelah itu, pelaku menjual sertifikat hak atas merek tersebut kepada pemilik aslinya dengan harga melebihi biaya permohonan pendaftaran merek pada umumnya. Kendala yang ditemui dalam proses pendaftaran merek di Indonesia adalah kurangnya sumber daya manusia dalam menangani jumlah permohonan pendaftaran merek yang mencapai ribuan setiap harinya. Hal ini berdampak pada tidak optimalnya proses pendaftaran merek di Indonesia yaitu dengan menggagas suatu sistem yang bernama first to file based on use guna mengoptimalisasikan perlindungan pemilik merek, pertimbangan untuk meratifikasi Madrid System juga merupakan salah satu opsi lain untuk mencegah praktik trademark squatting. Abstract The purpose of this research is to identify and analyze why the practice of trademark squatting could occur in Indonesia's trademark registration process along with the constraints found in the trademark registration process in Indonesia and how to overcome them. Furthermore, it will also discuss the ideal conception related to trademark registration process to avoid and minimize the practice of trademark squatting. This research is an empirical legal research and all data were analyzed with qualitative methods. The results showed that trademark squatting is

  16. Short-term effects of complex and contrast training in soccer players' vertical jump, sprint, and agility abilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maio Alves, José Manuel Vilaça; Rebelo, António Natal; Abrantes, Catarina; Sampaio, Jaime

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the short-term effects of complex and contrast training (CCT) on vertical jump (squat and countermovement jump), sprint (5 and 15 m), and agility (505 Agility Test) abilities in soccer players. Twenty-three young elite Portuguese soccer players (age 17.4 +/- 0.6 years) were divided into 2 experimental groups (G1, n = 9, and G2, n = 8) and 1 control group (G3, n = 6). Groups G1 and G2 have done their regular soccer training along with a 6-week strength training program of CCT, with 1 and 2 training sessions.wk, respectively. G3 has been kept to their regular soccer training program. Each training session from the CCT program was organized in 3 stations in which a general exercise, a multiform exercise, and a specific exercise were performed. The load was increased by 5% from 1 repetition maximum each 2 weeks. Obtained results allowed identifying (a) a reduction in sprint times over 5 and 15 m (9.2 and 6.2% for G1 and 7.0 and 3.1%, for G2; p < 0.05) and () an increase on squat and jump (12.6% for G1 and 9.6% for G2; p < 0.05). The results suggested that the CCT induced the performance increase in 5 and 15 m sprint and in squat jump. Vertical jump and sprint performances after CCT program were not influenced by the number of CCT sessions per week (1 or 2 sessions.wk). From the obtained results, it was suggested that the CCT is an adequate training strategy to develop soccer players' muscle power and speed.

  17. The effect of landing surface on the plantar kinetics of chinese paratroopers using half-squat landing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Wu, Ji; Zheng, Chao; Huang, Rong Rong; Na, Yuhong; Yang, Fan; Wang, Zengshun; Wu, Di

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the effect of landing surface on plantar kinetics during a half-squat landing. Twenty male elite paratroopers with formal parachute landing training and over 2 years of parachute jumping experience were recruited. The subjects wore parachuting boots in which pressure sensing insoles were placed. Each subject was instructed to jump off a platform with a height of 60 cm, and land on either a hard or soft surface in a half-squat posture. Outcome measures were maximal plantar pressure, time to maximal plantar pressure (T-MPP), and pressure-time integral (PTI) upon landing on 10 plantar regions. Compared to a soft surface, hard surface produced higher maximal plantar pressure in the 1(st) to 4(th) metatarsal and mid-foot regions, but lower maximal plantar pressure in the 5(th) metatarsal region. Shorter T- MPP was found during hard surface landing in the 1(st) and 2(nd) metatarsal and medial rear foot. Landing on a hard surface landing resulted in a lower PTI than a soft surface in the 1(st)phalangeal region. For Chinese paratroopers, specific foot prosthesis should be designed to protect the1(st) to 4(th)metatarsal region for hard surface landing, and the 1(st)phalangeal and 5(th)metatarsal region for soft surface landing. Key PointsUnderstanding plantar kinetics during the half-squat landing used by Chinese paratroopers can assist in the design of protective footwear.Compared to landing on a soft surface, a hard surface produced higher maximal plantar pressure in the 1(st) to 4(th) metatarsal and mid-foot regions, but lower maximal plantar pressure in the 5(th) metatarsal region.A shorter time to maximal plantar pressure was found during a hard surface landing in the 1(st) and 2(nd) metatarsals and medial rear foot.Landing on a hard surface resulted in a lower pressure-time integral than landing on a soft surface in the 1(st) phalangeal region.For Chinese paratroopers, specific foot prosthesis should be designed to protect

  18. The effects of tapering on power-force-velocity profiling and jump performance in professional rugby league players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lacey, James; Brughelli, Matt; McGuigan, Michael; Hansen, Keir; Samozino, Pierre; Morin, Jean-Benoit

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a preseason taper on individual power-force-velocity profiles and jump performance in professional National Rugby League players. Seven professional rugby league players performed concentric squat jumps using ascending loads of 25, 50, 75, 100% body mass before and after a 21-day step taper leading into the in-season. Linear force-velocity relationships were derived, and the following variables were obtained: maximum theoretical velocity (V0), maximum theoretical force (F0), and maximum power (Pmax). The players showed likely-to-very likely increases in F0 (effect size [ES] = 0.45) and Pmax (ES = 0.85) from pre to posttaper. Loaded squat jump height also showed likely-to-most likely increases at each load (ES = 0.83-1.04). The 21-day taper was effective at enhancing maximal power output and jump height performance in professional rugby players, possibly as a result of a recovery from fatigue and thus increased strength capability after a prolonged preseason training period. Rugby league strength and conditioning coaches should consider reducing training volume while maintaining intensity and aerobic conditioning (e.g., step taper) leading into the in-season.

  19. Undular Hydraulic Jump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Castro-Orgaz

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The transition from subcritical to supercritical flow when the inflow Froude number Fo is close to unity appears in the form of steady state waves called undular hydraulic jump. The characterization of the undular hydraulic jump is complex due to the existence of a non-hydrostatic pressure distribution that invalidates the gradually-varied flow theory, and supercritical shock waves. The objective of this work is to present a mathematical model for the undular hydraulic jump obtained from an approximate integration of the Reynolds equations for turbulent flow assuming that the Reynolds number R is high. Simple analytical solutions are presented to reveal the physics of the theory, and a numerical model is used to integrate the complete equations. The limit of application of the theory is discussed using a wave breaking condition for the inception of a surface roller. The validity of the mathematical predictions is critically assessed using physical data, thereby revealing aspects on which more research is needed

  20. Fast unilateral isometric knee extension torque development and bilateral jump height.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ruiter, Cornelis J; Van Leeuwen, Daniel; Heijblom, Arjan; Bobbert, Maarten F; de Haan, Arnold

    2006-10-01

    We hypothesized that the initial rate (first 40 ms) of unilateral knee extensor torque development during a maximally fast isometric contraction would depend on the subjects' ability for fast neural activation and that it would predict bilateral jumping performance. Nine males (21.8 +/- 0.9 yr, means +/- SD) performed unilateral fast isometric knee extensions (120 degrees knee angle) without countermovement on a dynamometer and bilateral squat jumps (SJ) and countermovement jumps (CMJ) starting from 90 and 120 degrees knee angles (full extension = 180 degrees ). The dynamometer contractions started either from full relaxation or from an isometric pre-tension (15% maximal isometric torque, Tmax). Torque time integral for the first 40 ms after torque onset (TTI-40, normalized to Tmax) and averaged normalized rectified knee extensor EMG for 40 ms before fast torque onset (EMG-40) were used to quantify initial torque rise and voluntary muscle activation. TTI-40 without pre-tension (range: 0.02-0.19% Tmax per second) was significantly lower than TTI-40 with pre-tension, and both were significantly (r = 0.81 and 0.80) related to EMG-40. During jumping, similar significant positive relations were found between jump height and knee extensor EMG during the first 100 ms of the rise in ground reaction force. There also were significant positive linear relations between dynamometer TTI-40 and jump height (r = 0.75 (SJ 90), 0.84 (SJ 120), 0.76 (CMJ 90), and 0.86 (CMJ 120)) but not between dynamometer Tmax and jump height (-0.16 < r < 0.02). One-legged TTI-40 to a large extent explained the variation in jump height. The ability to produce a high efferent neural drive before muscle contraction seemed to dominate performance in both the simple single-joint isometric task and the complex multijoint dynamic task.

  1. The role of human ankle plantar flexor muscle-tendon interaction and architecture in maximal vertical jumping examined in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farris, Dominic James; Lichtwark, Glen A; Brown, Nicholas A T; Cresswell, Andrew G

    2016-02-01

    Humans utilise elastic tendons of lower limb muscles to store and return energy during walking, running and jumping. Anuran and insect species use skeletal structures and/or dynamics in conjunction with similarly compliant structures to amplify muscle power output during jumping. We sought to examine whether human jumpers use similar mechanisms to aid elastic energy usage in the plantar flexor muscles during maximal vertical jumping. Ten male athletes performed maximal vertical squat jumps. Three-dimensional motion capture and a musculoskeletal model were used to determine lower limb kinematics that were combined with ground reaction force data in an inverse dynamics analysis. B-mode ultrasound imaging of the lateral gastrocnemius (GAS) and soleus (SOL) muscles was used to measure muscle fascicle lengths and pennation angles during jumping. Our results highlighted that both GAS and SOL utilised stretch and recoil of their series elastic elements (SEEs) in a catapult-like fashion, which likely serves to maximise ankle joint power. The resistance of supporting of body weight allowed initial stretch of both GAS and SOL SEEs. A proximal-to-distal sequence of joint moments and decreasing effective mechanical advantage early in the extension phase of the jumping movement were observed. This facilitated a further stretch of the SEE of the biarticular GAS and delayed recoil of the SOL SEE. However, effective mechanical advantage did not increase late in the jump to aid recoil of elastic tissues. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  2. Effectiveness of Different Rest Intervals Following Whole-Body Vibration on Vertical Jump Performance between College Athletes and Recreationally Trained Females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole C. Dabbs

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of different rest intervals following whole-body vibration on counter-movement vertical jump performance. Sixteen females, eight recreationally trained and eight varsity athletes volunteered to participate in four testing visits separated by 24 h. Visit one acted as a familiarization visit where subjects were introduced to the counter-movement vertical jump and whole-body vibration protocols. Visits 2–4 contained 2 randomized conditions. Whole-body vibration was administered in four bouts of 30 s with 30 s rest between bouts. During whole-body vibration subjects performed a quarter squat every 5 s, simulating a counter-movement vertical jump. Whole-body vibration was followed by three counter-movement vertical jumps with five different rest intervals between the vibration exposure and jumping. For a control condition, subjects performed squats with no whole-body vibration. There was a significant (p < 0.05 main effect for time for vertical jump height, peak power output, and relative ground reaction forces, where a majority of individuals max jump from all whole-body vibration conditions was greater than the control condition. There were significant (p < 0.05 group differences, showing that varsity athletes had a greater vertical jump height and peak power output compared to recreationally trained females. There were no significant (p > 0.05 group differences for relative ground reaction forces. Practitioners and/or strength and conditioning coaches may utilize whole-body vibration to enhance acute counter-movement vertical jump performance after identifying individuals optimal rest time in order to maximize the potentiating effects.

  3. Effects of school-based squat training in adolescent girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimoto, Takaya; Takai, Yohei; Fukunaga, Yuko; Fujita, Eiji; Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Kanehisa, Hiroaki

    2016-06-01

    For adolescent girls, less information on the effects of school-based exercise training is available from earlier studies. This study aimed to determine the effects of school-based squat training on body composition and muscular strength in adolescent girls. Fifty-two girls (13.8±0.6 years) were randomly assigned to the training and control groups. The training group conducted an 8-week body mass-based squat exercise training (100 reps/day, 45 sessions) as a part of after-school activity. Body composition (bioelectrical impedance analyzer), muscle thickness at the thigh anterior (ultrasound), and maximal isometric knee extension strength (myometer) were determined before and after the intervention. The magnitude of maturation was assessed using Tanner stage criteria of pubic hair before the intervention. After the intervention, percent body fat decreased in the training group, but increased in the control group. The relative changes in lean body mass, muscle thickness and muscular strength were similar between both groups. In the training group, the relative change in knee extension strength was correlated to the magnitude of maturation before the intervention. For adolescent girls, an 8-week body mass-based squat training is feasible for lowering percent body fat. In addition, the strength improvement for the knee extensors partially depends on the magnitude of maturation at start of the intervention.

  4. Effects Of Whole Body Vibration On Vertical Jump Performance Following Exercise Induced Muscle Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole C. Dabbs

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Enhancing vertical jump performance is critical for many sports. Following high intensity training, individuals often experience exercise induced muscle damage (EIMD. Many recovery modalities have been tested with conflicting results. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effect of whole-body vibration (WBV on vertical jump performance following EIMD. 27 females volunteered for 7 sessions and were randomly assigned to a treatment or control group and administered each testing day. Vertical jump performance was assessed via vertical jump height (VJH, peak power output (PPO, rate of force development (RFD, relative ground reaction force (GRFz, and peak activation ratio of the vastus medialis (VM via electromyography (EMG before and after 3 days of EIMD via split squats. Two testing sets were collected each day, consisting of pre measures followed by WBV or control, and then post second measures. A 2x8 (group x time mixed factor analysis of variance (ANOVA was conducted for each variable. No significant interactions or group differences were found in any variable. Significant main effects for time were found in any variable, indicating performance declined following muscle damage. These results indicate that WBV does not aid in muscle recovery or vertical jump performance following EIMD.

  5. Does performance of hang power clean differentiate performance of jumping, sprinting, and changing of direction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Naruhiro; Newton, Robert U; Andrews, Warren A; Kawamori, Naoki; McGuigan, Michael R; Nosaka, Kazunori

    2008-03-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to investigate whether the athlete who has high performance in hang power clean, a common weightlifting exercise, has high performances in sprinting, jumping, and changing of direction (COD). As the secondary purpose, relationships between hang power clean performance, maximum strength, power and performance of jumping, sprinting, and COD also were investigated. Twenty-nine semiprofessional Australian Rules football players (age, height, and body mass [mean +/- SD]: 21.3 +/- 2.7 years, 1.8 +/- 0.1 m, and 83.6 +/- 8.2 kg) were tested for one repetition maximum (1RM) hang power clean, 1RM front squat, power output during countermovement jump with 40-kg barbell and without external load (CMJ), height of CMJ, 20-m sprint time, and 5-5 COD time. The subjects were divided into top and bottom half groups (n = 14 for each group) based on their 1RM hang power clean score relative to body mass, then measures from all other tests were compared with one-way analyses of variance. In addition, Pearson's product moment correlations between measurements were calculated among all subjects (n = 29). The top half group possessed higher maximum strength (P hang power clean, jumping, sprinting, COD, maximum strength, and power. Therefore, it seems likely there are underlying strength qualities that are common to the hang power clean, jumping, and sprinting.

  6. Comparison of the Capacity of Different Jump and Sprint Field Tests to Detect Neuromuscular Fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gathercole, Rob J; Sporer, Ben C; Stellingwerff, Trent; Sleivert, Gord G

    2015-09-01

    Different jump and sprint tests have been used to assess neuromuscular fatigue, but the test with optimal validity remains to be established. The current investigation examined the suitability of vertical jump (countermovement jump [CMJ], squat jump [SJ], drop jump [DJ]) and 20-m sprint (SPRINT) testing for neuromuscular fatigue detection. On 6 separate occasions, 11 male team-sport athletes performed 6 CMJ, SJ, DJ, and 3 SPRINT trials. Repeatability was determined on the first 3 visits, with subsequent 3 visits (0-, 24-, and 72-hour postexercise) following a fatiguing Yo-Yo running protocol. SPRINT performance was most repeatable (mean coefficient of variation ≤2%), whereas DJ testing (4.8%) was significantly less repeatable than CMJ (3.0%) and SJ (3.5%). Each test displayed large decreases at 0-hour (33 of 49 total variables; mean effect size = 1.82), with fewer and smaller decreases at 24-hour postexercise (13 variables; 0.75), and 72-hour postexercise (19 variables; 0.78). SPRINT displayed the largest decreases at 0-hour (3.65) but was subsequently unchanged, whereas SJ performance recovered by 72-hour postexercise. In contrast, CMJ and DJ performance displayed moderate (12 variables; 1.18) and small (6 variables; 0.53) reductions at 72-hour postexercise, respectively. Consequently, the high repeatability and immediate and prolonged fatigue-induced changes indicated CMJ testing as most suitable for neuromuscular fatigue monitoring.

  7. FUNCTIONAL AND NEUROMUSCULAR CHANGES IN THE HAMSTRINGS AFTER DROP JUMPS AND LEG CURLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nejc Sarabon

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to use a holistic approach to investigate changes in jumping performance, kinaesthesia, static balance, isometric strength and fast stepping on spot during a 5-day recovery period, following an acute bout of damaging exercise consisted of drop jumps and leg curls, where specific emphasis was given on the hamstring muscles. Eleven young healthy subjects completed a series of highly intensive damaging exercises for their hamstring muscles. Prior to the exercise, and during the 5-day recovery period, the subjects were tested for biochemical markers (creatine kinase, aspartate aminotransferase, and lactate dehydrogenase, perceived pain sensation, physical performance (squat jump, counter movement jump, maximal frequency leg stamping, maximal isometric torque production and maximally explosive isometric torque production, kinaesthesia (active torque tracking and static balance. We observed significant decreases in maximal isometric knee flexion torque production, the rate of torque production, and majority of the parameters for vertical jump performance. No alterations were found in kinaesthesia, static balance and fast stepping on spot. The highest drop in performance and increase in perceived pain sensation generally occurred 24 or 48 hours after the exercise. Damaging exercise substantially alters the neuromuscular functions of the hamstring muscles, which is specifically relevant for sports and rehabilitation experts, as the hamstrings are often stretched to significant lengths, in particular when the knee is extended and hip flexed. These findings are practically important for recovery after high-intensity trainings for hamstring muscles

  8. Metelkova mon amour Reflections on the (Non-Culture of Squatting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasna Babić

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In some circles in Slovenia the name Autonomous Cultural Center Metelkova City is considered to be almost a synonym of squatting. Although Metelkova was not the first public squat, it definitely remains the oldest of those still around. Drawing comparisons with the international squatting movement, the squatter community in Metelkova is analyzed on different levels: to what extent it nurtures the culture of squatting, and what was and remains the role that Metelkova plays in a wider Slovenian context in terms of developing and sustaining the squatting culture. The article ends with the conclusion that the squatter movement in Metelkova (and elsewhere in Slovenia has so far failed to fully develop, nurture and maintain strict guidelines and principles, and that this can be attributed to the lack of squatting tradition, the large number of people involved in the project, and the internal division among them on the legalization issue.

  9. Ridge jump process in Iceland

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia, Sebastian

    2010-01-01

    Eastward ridge jumps bring the volcanic zones of Iceland back to the centre of the hotspot in response to the absolute westward drift of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Mantellic pulses triggers these ridge jumps. One of them is occurring in Southern Iceland, whereas the exact conditions of the last ridge jump in Northern Iceland remain controversial. The diachronous evolution of these two parts of Iceland may be related to the asymmetric plume-ridge interaction when comparing Northern and Southern I...

  10. and the CMJ jump height

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Struzik Artur

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Study aim: The elastic potential energy accumulated in the musculotendinous units during the countermovement phase of a jump adds up to the energy supplied by the contracting muscles used in the take-off phase. Consequently, the total mechanical energy used during the jump may reach higher values. Stiffness represents a quantitative measure of a body’s elastic properties. Therefore, the aim of this study was to establish the relationship between leg stiffness and the countermovement jump height.

  11. Changes in Sprint and Jump Performances After Traditional, Plyometric, and Combined Resistance Training in Male Youth Pre- and Post-Peak Height Velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Rhodri S; Radnor, John M; De Ste Croix, Mark B A; Cronin, John B; Oliver, Jon L

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of 6-week training interventions using different modes of resistance (traditional strength, plyometric, and combined training) on sprinting and jumping performances in boys before and after peak height velocity (PHV). Eighty school-aged boys were categorized into 2 maturity groups (pre- or post-PHV) and then randomly assigned to (a) plyometric training, (b) traditional strength training, (c) combined training, or (d) a control group. Experimental groups participated in twice-weekly training programs for 6 weeks. Acceleration, maximal running velocity, squat jump height, and reactive strength index data were collected pre- and postintervention. All training groups made significant gains in measures of sprinting and jumping irrespective of the mode of resistance training and maturity. Plyometric training elicited the greatest gains across all performance variables in pre-PHV children, whereas combined training was the most effective in eliciting change in all performance variables for the post-PHV cohort. Statistical analysis indicated that plyometric training produced greater changes in squat jump and acceleration performances in the pre-PHV group compared with the post-PHV cohort. All other training responses between pre- and post-PHV cohorts were not significant and not clinically meaningful. The study indicates that plyometric training might be more effective in eliciting short-term gains in jumping and sprinting in boys who are pre-PHV, whereas those who are post-PHV may benefit from the additive stimulus of combined training.

  12. Exploring Lightning Jump Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronis, Themis; Carey, Larry D.; Schultz, Christopher J.; Schultz, Elise; Calhoun, Kristin; Goodman, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    This study is concerned with the characteristics of storms exhibiting an abrupt temporal increase in the total lightning flash rate (i.e., lightning jump, LJ). An automated storm tracking method is used to identify storm "clusters" and total lightning activity from three different lightning detection systems over Oklahoma, northern Alabama and Washington, D.C. On average and for different employed thresholds, the clusters that encompass at least one LJ (LJ1) last longer, relate to higher Maximum Expected Size of Hail, Vertical Integrated Liquid and lightning flash rates (area-normalized) than the clusters that did not exhibit any LJ (LJ0). The respective mean values for LJ1 (LJ0) clusters are 80 min (35 min), 14 mm (8 mm), 25 kg per square meter (18 kg per square meter) and 0.05 flash per min per square kilometer (0.01 flash per min per square kilometer). Furthermore, the LJ1 clusters are also characterized by slower decaying autocorrelation functions, a result that implies a less "random" behavior in the temporal flash rate evolution. In addition, the temporal occurrence of the last LJ provides an estimate of the time remaining to the storm's dissipation. Depending of the LJ strength (i.e., varying thresholds), these values typically range between 20-60 min, with stronger jumps indicating more time until storm decay. This study's results support the hypothesis that the LJ is a proxy for the storm's kinematic and microphysical state rather than a coincidental value.

  13. More Puddle Jumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attari, Babak; Weislogel, Mark; Wollman, Andrew; Chen, Yongkang; Snyder, Trevor

    2016-11-01

    Large droplets and puddles jump spontaneously from sufficiently hydrophobic surfaces during routine drop tower tests. The simple low-cost passive mechanism can in turn be used as an experimental device to investigate dynamic droplet phenomena for drops up to 10,000 times larger than their normal terrestrial counterparts. We provide or confirm quick and qualitative design guides for such 'drop shooters' as employed in drop tower tests including relationships to predict droplet ejection durations and velocities as functions of drop volume, surface texture, surface contour, wettability pattern, drop volume, and fluid properties including contact angle. The latter are determined via profile image comparisons with numerical equilibrium interface computations. Water drop volumes of 0.04 to 400 mL at ejection speeds of -0.007 to 0.12 m/s are demonstrated. An example application of the puddle jump method is made to the classic problem of regime mapping for low-gravity phase change heat transfer for large impinging drops. Many other candidate problems might be identified.

  14. Is the effect of a countermovement on jump height due to active state development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobbert, Maarten F; Casius, L J Richard

    2005-03-01

    To investigate whether the difference in jump height between countermovement jumps (CMJ) and squat jumps (SJ) could be explained by a difference in active state during propulsion. Simulations were performed with a model of the human musculoskeletal system comprising four body segments and six muscles. The model's only input was STIM, the stimulation of muscles, which could be switched "off" or "on." After switching "on," STIM increased to its maximum at a fixed rate of change (dSTIM/dt). For various values of dSTIM/dt, stimulation switch times were optimized to produce a maximum height CMJ. From this CMJ, the configuration at the lowest height of the center of gravity (CG) was selected and used as static starting configuration for simulation of SJ. Next, STIM-switch times were optimized to find the maximum height SJ. Simulated CMJ and SJ closely resembled jumps of human subjects. Maximum jump height of the model was greater in CMJ than in SJ, with the difference ranging from 0.4 cm at infinitely high dSTIM/dt to about 2.5 cm at the lowest dSTIM/dt investigated. The greater jump height in CMJ was due to a greater work output of the hip extensor muscles. These muscles could produce more force and work over the first 30% of their shortening range in CMJ, due to the fact that they had a higher active state in CMJ than in SJ. The greater jump height in CMJ than in SJ could be explained by the fact that in CMJ active state developed during the preparatory countermovement, whereas in SJ it inevitably developed during the propulsion phase, so that the muscles could produce more force and work during shortening in CMJ.

  15. The effects of rope or weighted rope jump training on strength, coordination and proprioception in adolescent female volleyball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer, D; Duzgun, I; Baltaci, G; Karacan, S; Colakoglu, F

    2011-06-01

    The aim was to assess the effects of a 12-week "rope jumping" and "weighted rope jumping" training programs on functional parameters including multi-joint coordination and proprioception, strength, endurance in adolescent female volleyball players. Pretest posttest experimental design. Weighted Rope Training group (N.=9; 15±1 years), Rope Training group (N.=9; 14.1±1.3 years) and Controls (N.=7; 14.4±1.3 years). Motor coordination, proprioception, strength and endurance of the lower extremities with concentric and eccentric performances in closed kinetic chain on multi joint system assessed by the Monitorized Squat system. Absolute average error (cm) and the standard deviation for coordination and proprioception, Peak Force (N), Total Work (Nm), Average Power (Nm/s), Maximal Speed for strength and endurance tests were calculated. Kruskal-Wallis and Mann Whitney U test were utilized. Weighted rope jump group had significant decrease for the deviation results of coordination on the concentric and eccentric phases for both legs (PRope jump and weighted rope jump groups had significantly lower results on non visible second movement deviation (PRope Training group in comparison to controls (PRope Training and control groups improved in concentric maximal speed (PRope Training group (Prope jump to training programs improves joint repositioning and coordination. Weighted Rope Training group got greater gains for coordination and eccentric endurance parameters for lower extremities in a closed kinetic chain.

  16. Hydraulic jumps in a channel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonn, D.; Andersen, Anders Peter; Bohr, Tomas

    2009-01-01

    We present a study of hydraulic jumps with flow predominantly in one direction, created either by confining the flow to a narrow channel with parallel walls or by providing an inflow in the form of a narrow sheet. In the channel flow, we find a linear height profile upstream of the jump as expected...

  17. Assessment of musculoskeletal system in women with jumping mechanography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannis Dionyssiotis

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Yannis Dionyssiotis1,2, Antonios Galanos1, Georgios Michas1, Georgios Trovas1, Georgios P Lyritis11Laboratory for Research of the Musculoskeletal System, University of Athens, KAT Hospital, Kifissia, Greece; 2Rehabilitation Department, Rhodes General Hospital, Rhodes, GreeceAbstract: The purpose of this study was to investigate and add reference data about the musculoskeletal system in women. The mechanography system of the Leonardo™ platform (Novotec, Germany was used to measure parameters of movement (velocity, force, power in 176 healthy Greek women aged 20–79 years, separated according to age decade in six groups: group 1 (n = 12, 20–29 years; group 2 (n = 14, 30–39 years; group 3 (n = 33, 40–49 years; group 4 (n = 59, 50–59 years including 21 postmenopausal; group 5 (n = 31, 60–69 years including 12 postmenopausal; and group 6 (n = 27, 70–79 years all postmenopausal. This system measures forces applied to the plate over time, calculates through acceleration the vertical velocity of center of gravity and using force and velocity it calculates power of vertical movements. All women performed a counter-movement jump (brief squat before the jump with freely moving arms. Weight was recorded on the platform before the jump and height was measured with a wall-mounted ruler. Body weight and body mass index were gradually increased; on the contrary height and all movement parameters except force (velocity, power were statistically decreased during aging and after menopause.Keywords: biomechanics, ground reaction force, power, women, menopause

  18. Electrostatic charging of jumping droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miljkovic, Nenad; Preston, Daniel J.; Enright, Ryan; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2013-09-01

    With the broad interest in and development of superhydrophobic surfaces for self-cleaning, condensation heat transfer enhancement and anti-icing applications, more detailed insights on droplet interactions on these surfaces have emerged. Specifically, when two droplets coalesce, they can spontaneously jump away from a superhydrophobic surface due to the release of excess surface energy. Here we show that jumping droplets gain a net positive charge that causes them to repel each other mid-flight. We used electric fields to quantify the charge on the droplets and identified the mechanism for the charge accumulation, which is associated with the formation of the electric double layer at the droplet-surface interface. The observation of droplet charge accumulation provides insight into jumping droplet physics as well as processes involving charged liquid droplets. Furthermore, this work is a starting point for more advanced approaches for enhancing jumping droplet surface performance by using external electric fields to control droplet jumping.

  19. Jump conditions in transonic equilibria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guazzotto, L.; Betti, R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Jardin, S. C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    In the present paper, the numerical calculation of transonic equilibria, first introduced with the FLOW code in Guazzotto et al.[Phys. Plasmas 11, 604 (2004)], is critically reviewed. In particular, the necessity and effect of imposing explicit jump conditions at the transonic discontinuity are investigated. It is found that 'standard' (low-{beta}, large aspect ratio) transonic equilibria satisfy the correct jump condition with very good approximation even if the jump condition is not explicitly imposed. On the other hand, it is also found that high-{beta}, low aspect ratio equilibria require the correct jump condition to be explicitly imposed. Various numerical approaches are described to modify FLOW to include the jump condition. It is proved that the new methods converge to the correct solution even in extreme cases of very large {beta}, while they agree with the results obtained with the old implementation of FLOW in lower-{beta} equilibria.

  20. Measurement errors when estimating the vertical jump height with flight time using photocell devices: the example of Optojump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Attia

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Common methods to estimate vertical jump height (VJH are based on the measurements of flight time (FT or vertical reaction force. This study aimed to assess the measurement errors when estimating the VJH with flight time using photocell devices in comparison with the gold standard jump height measured by a force plate (FP. The second purpose was to determine the intrinsic reliability of the Optojump photoelectric cells in estimating VJH. For this aim, 20 subjects (age: 22.50±1.24 years performed maximal vertical jumps in three modalities in randomized order: the squat jump (SJ, counter-movement jump (CMJ, and CMJ with arm swing (CMJarm. Each trial was simultaneously recorded by the FP and Optojump devices. High intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs for validity (0.98-0.99 and low limits of agreement (less than 1.4 cm were found; even a systematic difference in jump height was consistently observed between FT and double integration of force methods (-31% to -27%; p 1.2. Intra-session reliability of Optojump was excellent, with ICCs ranging from 0.98 to 0.99, low coefficients of variation (3.98%, and low standard errors of measurement (0.8 cm. It was concluded that there was a high correlation between the two methods to estimate the vertical jump height, but the FT method cannot replace the gold standard, due to the large systematic bias. According to our results, the equations of each of the three jump modalities were presented in order to obtain a better estimation of the jump height.

  1. Vertical jump performance of professional male and female volleyball players: effects of playing position and competition level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattler, Tine; Hadžić, Vedran; Dervišević, Edvin; Markovic, Goran

    2015-06-01

    Vertical jump (VJ) performance is an important element for successful volleyball practice. The aims of the study were (a) to explore the overall VJ performance of elite volleyball players of both sexes, (b) to explore the differences in VJ performance among different competition levels and different playing positions, and (c) to evaluate the sex-related differences in the role of the arm swing and 3-step approach with arm swing on the jump height. We assessed the VJ capacity in 253 volleyball players (113 males and 140 females) from Slovenian first and second Volleyball Division. The height of squat jump (SJ), countermovement jump, block jump, and attack jump was tested using an Optojump system. We observed significant differences (p ≤ 0.05) in VJ height between different levels of play that were most pronounced in the SJ. Position-related differences in VJ performance were observed in male players between receivers and setters (p ≤ 0.05), whereas in females, VJ performance across different playing positions seems equal. Finally, we found that male players significantly better use the arm swing during VJ than females (p ≤ 0.05), whereas the use of eccentric part of the jump and approach before the spike to improve VJ performance seem to be equally mastered activity in both sexes. These results could assist coaches in the development of jumping performance in volleyball players. Furthermore, presented normative data for jump heights of elite male and female volleyball players could be useful in selection and profiling of young volleyball players.

  2. Modifying the Functional Movement Screen Deep Squat Test: The Effect of Foot and Arm Positional Variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillian, Danny J; Rynders, Zach G; Trudeau, Tyler R

    2016-04-01

    The functional movement screen (FMS) was developed as an evaluation tool for assessing the fundamental movement patterns believed to be prerequisites for functional activity. However, some of the FMS component movements, such as the deep overhead squat test (DST), likely represent novel motor challenges on which poor performance might reflect inexperience with the task rather than a movement impairment. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of positional variations on DST scores in a population of young, healthy adults. We hypothesized that self-selecting foot positioning, removal of an overhead component, or changing both aspects of the DST would result in improvement in FMS scores. Twenty healthy subjects completed 4 squatting conditions in a counterbalanced sequence to eliminate carry over effects: DST, modified squat with hands at chest level and feet in the DST position (DSTO), modified squat with arms in the DST position and self-selected foot placement (DSTF), and modified squat with hands at chest level and self-selected foot placement (DSTB). A Friedman's analysis of variance and Wilcoxon signed-ranks' post hoc analysis revealed a significant difference between all squat conditions (p = 0.036), between DSTB-DST groups (p DST groups (p = 0.004), and DSTO-DSTB groups (p = 0.046). Each modified squat condition had an average score higher than the DST. These findings suggest that the FMS DST might underestimate an individual's ability to squat during functional tasks that involve self-selected foot and arm placement.

  3. Trunk position modulates anterior cruciate ligament forces and strains during a single-leg squat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kulas, Anthony S.; Hortobagyi, Tibor; DeVita, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Background: Although the squat exercise and its variations are commonly prescribed for anterior cruciate ligament rehabilitation, whether trunk position affects these ligament forces and strains during the squat is unclear. Our purpose was to evaluate the effects of trunk position on anterior crucia

  4. Tendinopathy alters ultrasound transmission in the patellar tendon during squatting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wearing, S C; Hooper, S L; Smeathers, J E; Pourcelot, P; Crevier-Denoix, N; Brauner, T

    2016-12-01

    Measurement of loading patterns of the patellar tendon during activity is important in understanding tendon injury. We used transmission-mode ultrasonography to investigate patellar tendon loading during squatting in adults with and without tendinopathy. It was hypothesized that axial ultrasonic velocity, a surrogate measure of the elastic modulus of tendon, would be lower in tendinopathy. Ultrasound velocity was measured in both patellar tendons of adults with unilateral patellar tendinopathy (n = 9) and in healthy controls (n = 16) during a bilateral squat maneuver. Sagittal knee movement was measured simultaneously with an electrogoniometer. Statistical comparisons between healthy and injured tendons were made using two-way mixed-design ANOVAs. Axial ultrasound velocity in both symptomatic and asymptomatic patellar tendons in tendinopathy was approximately 15% higher than in healthy tendons at the commencement (F1,23  = 5.2, P tendinopathy and highlight fresh avenues for its clinical management. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Kinematics of the trunk and the lower extremities during restricted and unrestricted squats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    List, Renate; Gülay, Turgut; Stoop, Mirjam; Lorenzetti, Silvio

    2013-06-01

    Squatting is a common strength training exercise used for rehabilitation, fitness training, and in preparation for competition. Knowledge about the loading and the motion of the back during the squat exercise is crucial to avoid overuse or injury. The aim of this study was the measurement and comparison of the kinematics of the lower leg, trunk, and spine during unrestricted and restricted (knees are not allowed beyond toes) squats. A total of 30 subjects performed unrestricted and restricted barbell squats with an extra load of 0, 25, and 50% bodyweight. Motion was tracked using a 12-camera Vicon system. A newly developed marker set with 24 trunk and 7 pelvic markers allowed us to measure 3D segmental kinematics between the pelvic and the lumbar regions, between the lumbar and the thoracic segments, and the sagittal curvatures of the lumbar and the thoracic spine. In an unrestricted squat, the angle of the knee is larger and the range of motion (ROM) between the lumbar and the thoracic segments is significantly smaller compared with a restricted squat (p studied subjects showed significantly increased ROM for thoracic curvature during restricted squats. The unrestricted execution of a squat leads to a larger ROM in the knee and smaller changes in the curvature of the thoracic spine and the range of smaller segmental motions within the trunk. This execution in turn leads to lower stresses in the back. To strengthen the muscles of the leg, the unrestricted squat may be the best option for most people. Thus, practitioners should not be overly strict in coaching against anterior knee displacement during performance of the squat.

  6. Frequency Jump Detection and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    CUMULATIVE SUM JUMP DETECTION The Cumulative Sum ( CUSUM ) is a classic change-point analysis technique that uses the cumulative sum of the...sum and y is the average of the data. The CUSUM slope indicates the value of the data with respect to the overall average. A flat cumulative sum...sudden change in the CUSUM slope indicates a jump in the data. The CUSUM plot for a data set having a single jump will have a V or inverted V shape

  7. Search for supersymmetry in events with four or more leptons in $\\sqrt{s}=13\\,{\\rm TeV}$ pp collisions using $13.3\\,{\\rm fb}^{−1}$ of ATLAS data.

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Results from a search for supersymmetry in events with four or more leptons including electrons and muons are presented. The analysis uses a data sample corresponding to $13.3\\,{\\rm fb}^{−1}$ of proton--proton collisions delivered by the Large Hadron Collider at $\\sqrt{s}=13\\,{\\rm TeV}$ and recorded by the ATLAS detector. No significant deviations are observed in data from Standard Model predictions and results are used to set upper limits on the event yields from processes beyond the Standard Model. Exclusion limits at the 95% confidence level are placed in a simplified model of chargino production with indirect RPV decays,

  8. Acute effects of countermovement jumping and sprinting on shot put performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzis, Gerasimos; Karampatsos, Giorgos; Kyriazis, Thomas; Kavouras, Stavros A; Georgiadis, Giorgos

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the acute effects of countermovement jumping and sprinting on shot put performance in experienced shot putters. Ten shot putters (best performance 13.16-20.36 m) participated in the study. After a standard warm-up including jogging, stretching, and 4-6 submaximal puts, they performed 3 shot put attempts with maximum effort, separated with 1.5-minute interval. Three minutes later, they performed 3 maximal consecutive countermovement jumps (CMJs). Immediately after jumping, they performed 3 shot put attempts with maximum effort, separated with a 1.5-minute interval. One week later, they carried out a similar protocol, at similar external conditions, but they performed a bout of 20-m sprinting instead of the CMJs, to potentiate shot put performance. Muscular strength (1 repetition maximum in squat, snatch, bench press, incline bench press) and body composition (dual x-ray absorptiometry) were measured during the same training period (±10 days from the jumping and sprinting protocols). Shot put performance was significantly increased after the CMJs (15.45 ± 2.36 vs. 15.85 ± 2.41 m, p = 0.0003). Similarly, shot put performance was significantly increased after sprinting (15.34 ± 2.41 vs. 15.90 ± 2.46 m, p = 0.0007). The increase in performance after sprinting was significantly higher compared with the increase after jumping (2.64 ± 1.59 vs. 3.74 ± 1.88%, p = 0.02). In conclusion, the results of this study indicate that a standard warm-up protocol followed by 3 maximal bouts of shot put and either 3 consecutive countermovement jumps or a bout of 20-m sprinting induce an acute increase in shot put performance in experienced shot putters.

  9. Effect of Static and Dynamic Stretching on the Diurnal Variations of Jump Performance in Soccer Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chtourou, Hamdi; Aloui, Asma; Hammouda, Omar; Chaouachi, Anis; Chamari, Karim; Souissi, Nizar

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The present study addressed the lack of data on the effect of different types of stretching on diurnal variations in vertical jump height - i.e., squat-jump (SJ) and countermovement-jump (CMJ). We hypothesized that dynamic stretching could affect the diurnal variations of jump height by producing a greater increase in short-term maximal performance in the morning than the evening through increasing core temperature at this time-of-day. Methods Twenty male soccer players (age, 18.6±1.3 yrs; height, 174.6±3.8 cm; body-mass, 71.1±8.6 kg; mean ± SD) completed the SJ and CMJ tests either after static stretching, dynamic stretching or no-stretching protocols at two times of day, 07:00 h and 17:00 h, with a minimum of 48 hours between testing sessions. One minute after warming-up for 5 minutes by light jogging and performing one of the three stretching protocols (i.e., static stretching, dynamic stretching or no-stretching) for 8 minutes, each subject completed the SJ and CMJ tests. Jumping heights were recorded and analyzed using a two-way analysis of variance with repeated measures (3 [stretching]×2 [time-of-day]). Results The SJ and CMJ heights were significantly higher at 17:00 than 07:00 h (pstretching protocol. These daily variations disappeared (i.e., the diurnal gain decreased from 4.2±2.81% (pstretching due to greater increases in SJ and CMJ heights in the morning than the evening (8.4±6.36% vs. 4.4±2.64%, pstretching on the diurnal variations of SJ and CMJ heights was observed. Conclusion Dynamic stretching affects the typical diurnal variations of SJ and CMJ and helps to counteract the lower morning values in vertical jump height. PMID:23940589

  10. Comparison Of Two Systems Designed To Measure Vertical Jump Height. [Comparación de dos sistemas diseñados para medir altura de salto vertical].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Santos-Lozano

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The vertical jump height is commonly employed to assess indirectly the lower body strength and power. Traditional methods to assess the vertical jump height are been replaced by new emerging technologies as optical mat platform. The aim of the present study was checked the agreement between one traditional contact mat (Globus Ergo Tester and an optical mat (Optojump System, and to investigate the interchangeability of this 2 commercial systems estimating vertical jump in different types of jump (Squat Jump, Counter Movement Jump and Abalakov. Significantly differences between methods in each jump condition were reported, high Inter-class Correlation Coefficients values (ranged between 0.972 to 0.990 were found between methods in each jump condition and the coefficient of variation values were ranged from 6.18 to 7.32. T-test revealed significantly differences between the limits of agreement at 95% in all jumps between methods jump heights. The results of this study show that the Optojump, as optical mat, reported lower values than the Globus Ergo Tester, a contact mat. There are evidences that Optojump and Globus Ergo Tester are not interchangeably. Resumen La altura de salto vertical es empleada para evaluar la potencia y fuerza del tren inferior. Los métodos tradicionales para evaluar el salto vertical están siendo sustituidos por nuevas tecnologías emergentes como las plataformas ópticas. El objetivo del presente estudio fue comprobar el grado de concordancia entre una plataforma de contacto (Globus Ergo Tester y una óptica (Optojump System, e investigar si pueden ser utilizadas de manera intercambiable estimando distintos tipos de salto vertical (Squat Jump, Counter Movement Jump y Abalakov. Los resultados mostraron diferencias significativas entre los métodos estimando altura de salto vertical, un elevado valor de Coeficiente de Correlación (entre 0.972-0.990 y un Coeficiente de Variación comprendido entre 6.18 y 7.32. Las pruebas T

  11. Performance changes and relationship between vertical jump measures and actual sprint performance in elite sprinters with visual impairment throughout a Parapan American games training season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loturco, Irineu; Winckler, Ciro; Kobal, Ronaldo; Cal Abad, Cesar C; Kitamura, Katia; Veríssimo, Amaury W; Pereira, Lucas A; Nakamura, Fábio Y

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to estimate the magnitude of variability and progression in actual competitive and field vertical jump test performances in elite Paralympic sprinters with visual impairment in the year leading up to the 2015 Parapan American Games, and to investigate the relationships between loaded and unloaded vertical jumping test results and actual competitive sprinting performance. Fifteen Brazilian Paralympic sprinters with visual impairment attended seven official competitions (four national, two international and the Parapan American Games 2015) between April 2014 and August 2015, in the 100- and 200-m dash. In addition, they were tested in five different periods using loaded (mean propulsive power [MPP] in jump squat [JS] exercise) and unloaded (squat jump [SJ] height) vertical jumps within the 3 weeks immediately prior to the main competitions. The smallest important effect on performances was calculated as half of the within-athlete race-to-race (or test-to-test) variability and a multiple regression analysis was performed to predict the 100- and 200-m dash performances using the vertical jump test results. Competitive performance was enhanced during the Parapan American Games in comparison to the previous competition averages, overcoming the smallest worthwhile enhancement in both the 100- (0.9%) and 200-m dash (1.43%). In addition, The SJ and JS explained 66% of the performance variance in the competitive results. This study showed that vertical jump tests, in loaded and unloaded conditions, could be good predictors of the athletes' sprinting performance, and that during the Parapan American Games the Brazilian team reached its peak competitive performance.

  12. Performance changes and relationship between vertical jump measures and actual sprint performance in elite sprinters with visual impairment throughout a Parapan American games training season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irineu eLoturco

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to estimate the magnitude of variability and progression in actual competitive and field vertical jump test performances in elite Paralympic sprinters with visual impairment in the year leading up to the 2015 Parapan American Games, and to investigate the relationships between loaded and unloaded vertical jumping test results and actual competitive sprinting performance. Fifteen Brazilian Paralympic sprinters with visual impairment attended seven official competitions (four national, two international and the Parapan American Games 2015 between April 2014 and August 2015, in the 100- and 200-m dash. In addition, they were tested in five different periods using loaded (mean propulsive power [MPP] in jump squat [JS] exercise and unloaded (squat jump [SJ] height vertical jumps within the 3 weeks immediately prior to the main competitions. The smallest important effect on performances was calculated as half of the within-athlete race-to-race (or test-to-test variability and a multiple regression analysis was performed to predict the 100- and 200-m dash performances using the vertical jump test results. Competitive performance was enhanced during the Parapan American Games in comparison to the previous competition averages, overcoming the smallest worthwhile enhancement in both the 100- (0.9% and 200-m dash (1.43%. In addition, The SJ and JS explained 66% of the performance variance in the competitive results. This study showed that vertical jump tests, in loaded and unloaded conditions, could be good predictors of the athletes’ sprinting performance, and that during the Parapan American Games the Brazilian team reached its peak competitive performance.

  13. Realized Jump Risk and Equity Return in China

    OpenAIRE

    Guojin Chen; Xiaoqun Liu; Peilin Hsieh; Xiangqin Zhao

    2014-01-01

    We utilize the realized jump components to explore a new jump (including nonsystematic jump and systematic jump) risk factor model. After estimating daily realized jumps from high-frequency transaction data of the Chinese A-share stocks, we calculate monthly jump size, monthly jump standard deviation, and monthly jump arrival rate and then use those monthly jump factors to explain the return of the following month. Our empirical results show that the jump tail risk can explain the equity retu...

  14. Rook Jumping Maze Design Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neller, Todd W.; Fisher, Adrian; Choga, Munyaradzi T.; Lalvani, Samir M.; McCarty, Kyle D.

    We define the Rook Jumping Maze, provide historical perspective, and describe a generation method for such mazes. When applying stochastic local search algorithms to maze design, most creative effort concerns the definition of an objective function that rates maze quality. We define and discuss several maze features to consider in such a function definition. Finally, we share our preferred design choices, make design process observations, and note the applicability of these techniques to variations of the Rook Jumping Maze.

  15. RELIABILITY AND VALIDITY OF AN ACCELEROMETRIC SYSTEM FOR ASSESSING VERTICAL JUMPING PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.-A. Choukou

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The validity of an accelerometric system (Myotest© for assessing vertical jump height, vertical force and power, leg stiffness and reactivity index was examined. 20 healthy males performed 3ד5 hops in place”, 3ד1 squat jump” and 3× “1 countermovement jump” during 2 test-retest sessions. The variables were simultaneously assessed using an accelerometer and a force platform at a frequency of 0.5 and 1 kHz, respectively. Both reliability and validity of the accelerometric system were studied. No significant differences between test and retest data were found (p<0.05, showing a high level of reliability. Besides, moderate to high intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs (from 0.74 to 0.96 were obtained for all variables whereas weak to moderate ICCs (from 0.29 to 0.79 were obtained for force and power during the countermovement jump. With regards to validity, the difference between the two devices was not significant for 5 hops in place height (1.8 cm, force during squat (-1.4 N · kg-1 and countermovement (0.1 N · kg-1 jumps, leg stiffness (7.8 kN · m-1 and reactivity index (0.4. So, the measurements of these variables with this accelerometer are valid, which is not the case for the other variables. The main causes of non-validity for velocity, power and contact time assessment are temporal biases of the takeoff and touchdown moments detection.

  16. Aberrant femoral torsion presenting with frog-leg squatting mimicking gluteal muscle contracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Chia-Ling; Tsai, Meng-Yuan; Chang, Wei-Ning; Chen, Clement Kuen-Huang

    2012-04-01

    Patients with frog-leg squatting have restricted internal rotation and adduction of the affected hips during sitting or squatting. In the surgical literature, the cause generally has been presumed to arise from and be pathognomonic for gluteal muscle contracture. However, we have encountered patients with frog-leg squatting but without gluteal muscle contracture. We therefore raised the following questions: What are the imaging features of patients with frog-leg squatting? Do conditions other than gluteal muscle contracture manifest frog-leg squatting? We retrospectively reviewed the MR images of 67 patients presenting with frog-leg squatting from April 1998 to July 2010. There were four females and 63 males; their mean age was 22.2 years (range, 4-50 years). During MRI readout, we observed aberrant axes of some femoral necks and obtained additional CT to measure femoral torsion angles in 59 of the 67 patients. MR images of 27 (40%) patients had signs of gluteal muscle contracture. Twenty-two (33%) patients (40 femora) had aberrant femoral torsion, including diminished anteversion (range, 6°-0°; average, 3.9°) in 11 femora of eight patients and femoral retroversion (range, muscle contracture or aberrant femoral torsion. The observation of aberrant femoral torsion was not anticipated before imaging studies. In addition to gluteal muscle contracture, aberrant femoral torsion can be a cause of frog-leg squatting. Level II, diagnostic study. See the guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  17. Age-related changes in kinematics of the knee joint during deep squat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukagawa, Shingo; Leardini, Alberto; Callewaert, Barbara; Wong, Pius D; Labey, Luc; Desloovere, Kaat; Matsuda, Shuichi; Bellemans, Johan

    2012-06-01

    Researchers frequently use the deep knee squat as a motor task in order to evaluate the kinematic performance after total knee arthroplasty. Many authors reported about the kinematics of a normal squatting motion, however, little is known on what the influence of aging is. Twenty-two healthy volunteers in various age groups (range 21-75 years) performed a deep knee squat activity while undergoing motion analysis using an optical tracking system. The influence of aging was evaluated with respect to kinematics of the trunk, hip, knee and ankle joints. Older subjects required significantly more time to perform a deep squat, especially during the descending phase. They also had more knee abduction and delayed peak knee flexion. Older subjects were slower in descend than ascend during the squat. Although older subjects had a trend towards less maximal flexion and less internal rotation of the knee compared to younger subjects, this difference was not significant. Older subjects also showed a trend towards more forward leaning of the trunk, resulting in increased hip flexion and anterior thoracic tilt. This study confirmed that some aspects of squat kinematics vary significantly with age, and that the basic methodology employed here can successfully detect these age-related trends. Older subjects had more abduction of the knee joint, and this may indicate the load distribution of the medial and lateral condyles could be different amongst ages. Age-matched control data are therefore required whenever the performance of an implant is evaluated during a deep knee squat.

  18. Teknik Squat dan Stoop Menggunakan Electromyography pada Pekerjaan Manual Materials Handling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Wayan Surata

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Manual materials handling has been identified as the most common cause of work-related musculoskeletal disorders. Among the manual material handling activities, lifting has long been regarded as an activity associated with a high risk of low-back pain. Lifting studies have mainly focused on the squat and stoop lifting techniques as an effort to improve the protection of workers from low back discomfort. However, neither is ideal and the benefits of one technique over another have proved inconclusive. The purpose of this study was to examine and compare the squat and stoop lifting techniques through analysis of muscles activation by using electromyography. Six volunteers participated in the study, and were required to lift a weight with squat and stoop techniques, with two types of loading at 1,7 kg and 6,7 kg. Observations were made on the rectus femoris, biceps femoris, and multifidus muscles. The results of study showed that the squat technique had higher levels of muscle activation compared to stoop technique on rectus femoris muscle. On the contrary, squat technique had lower muscle activation compared to stoop technique on biceps fermoris muscle. Meanwhile, both techniques squat and stoop had the same level of muscle activation on multifidus muscle. Conclusion, squat and stoop lifting techniques had the same opportunities to use.

  19. The geometric curvature of the lumbar spine during restricted and unrestricted squats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebling Campos, Mário; Furtado Alaman, Laizi I; Seffrin-Neto, Aldo A; Vieira, Carlos A; Costa de Paula, Marcelo; Barbosa de Lira, Claudio A

    2017-06-01

    The main purpose of this study was to analyze the behavior of the geometric curvature of the lumbar spine during restricted and unrestricted squats, using a novel investigative method. The rationale for our hypothesis is that the lumbar curvature has different patterns at different spine levels depending on the squat technique used. Spine motion was collected via stereo-photogrammetric analysis in nineteen participants (11 males, 8 females). The reconstructed spine points at the upright neutral position and at the deepest position of the squat exercise were projected onto the sagittal plane of the trunk, a polynomial was fitted to the data, and were quantified the two-dimensional geometric curvature at lower, central and higher lumbar levels, besides the inclination of trunk and lumbosacral region, the overall geometric curvature and overall angle of the lumbar spine. The mean values for each variable were analysed with paired t-test (Pposture to deepest point of the movement, but for the lower lumbar the flexion is less intense if the knees travel anteriorly past the toes. The trunk and the lumbosacral region lean forward in both squat techniques and these effects are also reduced in unrestricted squats. The data collected in the study are evidence that during barbell squats the lumbar curvature has different patterns at different spinal levels depending on the exercise technique. The lower lumbar spine appears to be less overloaded during unrestricted squats.

  20. The Effect of Depth Jumps and Weight Training on Leg Strength and Vertical Jump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clutch, David; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Two experiments examined the results of depth jumping programs to determine: (1) whether certain depth jumping routines, when combined with weight training, are better than others; and (2) the effect of depth jumping on athletes already in training. Results indicated that depth jumping is effective, but no more so than regular jumping routines.…

  1. Galatheoid squat lobsters (Crustacea: Decapoda: Anomura from Korean waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Nyun Kim

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ten species of Galatheoidea (squat lobsters, belonging to two families, were collected in the Korean exclusive economic zone: Galathea balssi Miyake and Baba, 1964, Galathea orientalis Stimpson, 1858, Galathea pubescens Stimpson, 1858, and Galathea rubromaculata Miyake and Baba, 1967 belonging to Galatheidae; Bathymunida brevirostris Yokoya, 1933, Cervimunida princeps Benedict, 1902, Munida caesura Macpherson and Baba, 1993, Munida japonica Stimpson, 1858, Munida pherusa Macpherson and Baba, 1993, and Paramunida scabra (Henderson, 1885 belonging to Munididae. The present study comprises the morphological description of these ten species, including drawings and color photographs, a brief review of their regional records, and a key for their identification. Although all species are common in Japanese waters, G. balssi, G. rubromaculata, B. brevirostris, C. princeps, M. caesura, and M. pherusa are new to Korean marine fauna.

  2. Estimated Muscle Loads During Squat Exercise in Microgravity Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fregly, Christopher D.; Kim, Brandon T.; Li, Zhao; DeWitt, John K.; Fregly, Benjamin J.

    2012-01-01

    Loss of muscle mass in microgravity is one of the primary factors limiting long-term space flight. NASA researchers have developed a number of exercise devices to address this problem. The most recent is the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED), which is currently used by astronauts on the International Space Station (ISS) to emulate typical free-weight exercises in microgravity. ARED exercise on the ISS is intended to reproduce Earth-level muscle loads, but the actual muscle loads produced remain unknown as they cannot currently be measured directly. In this study we estimated muscle loads experienced during squat exercise on ARED in microgravity conditions representative of Mars, the moon, and the ISS. The estimates were generated using a subject-specific musculoskeletal computer model and ARED exercise data collected on Earth. The results provide insight into the capabilities and limitations of the ARED machine.

  3. Test-retest reliability of jump execution variables using mechanography: A comparison of jump protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechanography during the vertical jump test allows for evaluation of force-time variables reflecting jump execution, which may enhance screening for functional deficits that reduce physical performance and determining mechanistic causes underlying performance changes. However, utility of jump mechan...

  4. Gravity current jump conditions, revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungarish, Marius; Hogg, Andrew J.

    2016-11-01

    Consider the flow of a high-Reynolds-number gravity current of density ρc in an ambient fluid of density ρa in a horizontal channel z ∈ [ 0 , H ] , with gravity in - z direction. The motion is often modeled by a two-layer formulation which displays jumps (shocks) in the height of the interface, in particular at the leading front of the dense layer. Various theoretical models have been advanced to predict the dimensionless speed of the jump, Fr = U /√{g' h } ; g' , h are reduced gravity and jump height. We revisit this problem and using the Navier-Stokes equations, integrated over a control volume embedding the jump, derive balances of mass and momentum fluxes. We focus on understanding the closures needed to complete this model and we show the vital need to understand the pressure head losses over the jump, which we show can be related to the vorticity fluxes at the boundaries of the control volume. Our formulation leads to two governing equations for three dimensionless quantities. Closure requires one further assumption, depending on which we demonstrate that previous models for gravity current fronts and internal bores can be recovered. This analysis yield new insights into existing results, and also provides constraints for potential new formulae.

  5. Coalescence-induced nanodroplet jumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Hyeongyun; Xu, Chenyu; Sotelo, Jesus; Chun, Jae Min; Yokoyama, Yukihiro; Enright, Ryan; Miljkovic, Nenad

    2016-10-01

    Water vapor condensation on superhydrophobic surfaces has received much attention in recent years due to the ability of such surfaces to shed microscale water droplets via coalescence-induced droplet jumping, resulting in heat transfer, anti-icing, and self-cleaning performance enhancement. Here we report the coalescence-induced removal of water nanodroplets (R ≈500 nm ) from superhydrophobic carbon nanotube (CNT) surfaces. The two-droplet coalescence time is measured for varying droplet Ohnesorge numbers, confirming that coalescence prior to jumping is governed by capillary-inertial dynamics. By varying the conformal hydrophobic coating thickness on the CNT surface, the minimum jumping droplet radius is shown to increase with increasing solid fraction and decreasing apparent advancing contact angle, allowing us to explore both hydrodynamic limitations stemming from viscous dissipation and surface adhesion limitations. We find that, even for the smallest nanostructure length scale (≤100 nm) and lowest surface adhesions, nonideal surface interactions and the evolved droplet morphology play defining roles in limiting the minimum size for jumping on real surfaces. The outcomes of this work demonstrate the ability to passively shed nanometric water droplets, which has the potential to further increase the efficiency of systems that can harness jumping droplets for a wide range of energy and water applications.

  6. Upper limb kinematical analysis of an elite weight lifter in the squat snatch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Gang; Qian, Liwei; Wang, Dongmei; Wei, Gaofeng; Chang, Daofang; Wang, Chengtao; Mi, Weijian

    2014-01-01

    The kinematical parameters such as translational acceleration and angular acceleration in the upper limb of a weightlifter may change regularly during different phases of squat snatch. This study aims to make this question clear. At first, the joint coordinate system (JCS) of human upper limb based on the anatomical landmarks is defined. Then a novel method for calculating the kinematical parameters was brought forward, which was based on analyzing the relative position of the JCS to world coordinate system during an instantaneous situation and the relationship among each JCS at different times during squat snatch. Motion capture system is used to gather the data of the upper limb in an elite weightlifter during squat snatch (the mass of the barbell is 20 kg) and the method mentioned before is applied to analyze the data. Finally, the law of the change of kinematical parameters in each phase of squat snatch is found.

  7. Students' Knowledge Concerning the Correct Squat and the Elements of the Methodology of Teaching It

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Czaprowski, Dariusz; Kędra, Agnieszka; Biernat, Ryszard

    2012-01-01

    ... are simultaneously indicated.The aim of the work was to define the knowledge of students concerning the methodology of teaching the correct squat and to present methodological fundamentals in this field.Material/Methods...

  8. Computational Prediction of Muscle Moments During ARED Squat Exercise on the International Space Station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fregly, Benjamin J; Fregly, Christopher D; Kim, Brandon T

    2015-12-01

    Prevention of muscle atrophy caused by reduced mechanical loading in microgravity conditions remains a challenge for long-duration spaceflight. To combat leg muscle atrophy, astronauts on the International Space Station (ISS) often perform squat exercise using the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED). While the ARED is effective at building muscle strength and volume on Earth, NASA researchers do not know how closely ARED squat exercise on the ISS replicates Earth-level squat muscle moments, or how small variations in exercise form affect muscle loading. This study used dynamic simulations of ARED squat exercise on the ISS to address these two questions. A multibody dynamic model of the complete astronaut-ARED system was constructed in OpenSim. With the ARED base locked to ground and gravity set to 9.81 m/s², we validated the model by reproducing muscle moments, ground reaction forces, and foot center of pressure (CoP) positions for ARED squat exercise on Earth. With the ARED base free to move relative to the ISS and gravity set to zero, we then used the validated model to simulate ARED squat exercise on the ISS for a reference squat motion and eight altered squat motions involving changes in anterior-posterior (AP) foot or CoP position on the ARED footplate. The reference squat motion closely reproduced Earth-level muscle moments for all joints except the ankle. For the altered squat motions, changing the foot position was more effective at altering muscle moments than was changing the CoP position. All CoP adjustments introduced an undesirable shear foot reaction force that could cause the feet to slip on the ARED footplate, while some foot and CoP adjustments introduced an undesirable sagittal plane foot reaction moment that would cause the astronaut to rotate off the ARED footplate without the use of some type of foot fixation. Our results provide potentially useful information for achieving desired increases or decreases in specific muscle moments

  9. Effects of 12-weeks resistance training on sprint and jump performance in competitive adolescent rugby union players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harries, Simon K; Lubans, David R; Buxton, Anthony; MacDougall, Thomas H J; Callister, Robin

    2017-07-17

    Sprint performance is an important characteristic for success in many sports, including rugby union. Resistance training is used to increase muscular fitness (i.e. strength, endurance and power) and may also be effective for improving sprint and jump performances. The aims of this study were to examine the effects of resistance training using two different periodized programs (linear and daily undulating) on sprint and jump performance and explore relationships between performance measures. Sixteen male (16.9 ± 1.0 y) adolescent rugby union players participated in 12 weeks of resistance training. A further 10 male (15.5 ± 1.0 y) participants were recruited as a control group. Assessments of strength (box squat), 10 and 20 m sprint (electronically timed), and jump height (maximal unloaded (body mass only) and loaded (body mass + 10 kg) countermovement jumps) were conducted before and after 12 weeks training. Large to very large increases in 1RM box squat (linear: 33.9%; p < 0.001; ES = 1.64; daily undulating: 44.5%; p < 0.001; ES = 2.33) were observed after training. Small decreases were seen in 10 (linear: -1.6%; p = 0.171; ES = -0.84; daily undulating: -2.5%; p = 0.038; ES = -0.36) and 20 m (linear: -0.5%; p = 0.506; ES = -0.20; daily undulating: -1.7%; p = 0.047; ES = -0.27) sprint times. Small-to-moderate associations between changes in lower body strength and improvements in 10 and 20 m sprint times were found. Resistance training increases lower body strength in adolescent rugby union players and increases in lower body strength may transfer to improved sprinting performance with improvements following daily undulating periodized resistance training slightly superior.

  10. How far can Tarzan jump?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shima, Hiroyuki

    2012-11-01

    The tree-based rope swing is a popular recreational facility, often installed in outdoor areas. Hanging from a rope, users drop from a high platform and then swing at great speed like ‘Tarzan’, finally jumping ahead to land on the ground. The question naturally arises, how far can Tarzan jump using the swing? In this paper, I present an introductory analysis of the mechanics of the Tarzan swing, a large pendulum-like swing with Tarzan himself attached as weight. This enables determination of how much further forward Tarzan can jump using a given swing apparatus. The discussion is based on elementary mechanics and is, therefore, expected to provide rich opportunities for investigations using analytic and numerical methods.

  11. How far can Tarzan jump?

    CERN Document Server

    Shima, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    The tree-based rope swing is a popular recreation facility, often installed in outdoor areas, giving pleasure to thrill-seekers. In the setting, one drops down from a high platform, hanging from a rope, then swings at a great speed like "Tarzan", and finally jumps ahead to land on the ground. The question now arises: How far can Tarzan jump by the swing? In this article, I present an introductory analysis of the Tarzan swing mechanics, a big pendulum-like swing with Tarzan himself attached as weight. The analysis enables determination of how farther forward Tarzan can jump using a given swing apparatus. The discussion is based on elementary mechanics and, therefore, expected to provide rich opportunities for investigations using analytic and numerical methods.

  12. ACUTE EFFECTS OF DIFFERENT SELF-MASSAGE VOLUMES ON THE FMS™ OVERHEAD DEEP SQUAT PERFORMANCE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Estêvão Rios; Škarabot, Jakob; Vigotsky, Andrew D; Brown, Amanda Fernandes; Gomes, Thiago Matassoli; Novaes, Jefferson da Silva

    2017-02-01

    The Functional Movement Screen (FMS™) is a battery of tests designed to assess movement competency; the overhead deep squat test, specifically, has been shown to be an accurate predictor of overall FMS™ scores. Self-massage (SM) is a ubiquitous warm-up utilized to increase joint range of motion and, therefore, may be effective for improving performance of the overhead deep squat test. To examine how different doses (30, 60, 90, and 120 seconds) of SM of different areas of the body (plantar fascia, latissimus dorsi, and lateral thigh) affects the score obtained on an overhead deep squat test. Twenty recreationally active females were recruited to be tested on four occasions: sessions one and two consisted of baseline testing, session three consisted of SM applied to the lateral thigh, and session four consisted of SM applied to the lateral torso and plantar fascia. In all SM conditions, at least 90 seconds was required for a change in deep squat score from baseline; therefore, it is concluded that SM the lateral torso, plantar fascia, and lateral thigh for 90 seconds or more are effective interventions for acutely improving overhead deep squat scores. Self-massage appears to be an effective modality for inducing acute improvements in the performance of the FMS™ overhead deep squat in all conditions tested. 2b.

  13. ACUTE EFFECTS OF DIFFERENT SELF‐MASSAGE VOLUMES ON THE FMS™ OVERHEAD DEEP SQUAT PERFORMANCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Škarabot, Jakob; Vigotsky, Andrew D; Brown, Amanda Fernandes; Gomes, Thiago Matassoli; Novaes, Jefferson da Silva

    2017-01-01

    Background The Functional Movement Screen (FMS™) is a battery of tests designed to assess movement competency; the overhead deep squat test, specifically, has been shown to be an accurate predictor of overall FMS™ scores. Self‐massage (SM) is a ubiquitous warm‐up utilized to increase joint range of motion and, therefore, may be effective for improving performance of the overhead deep squat test. Purpose To examine how different doses (30, 60, 90, and 120 seconds) of SM of different areas of the body (plantar fascia, latissimus dorsi, and lateral thigh) affects the score obtained on an overhead deep squat test. Methods Twenty recreationally active females were recruited to be tested on four occasions: sessions one and two consisted of baseline testing, session three consisted of SM applied to the lateral thigh, and session four consisted of SM applied to the lateral torso and plantar fascia. Results In all SM conditions, at least 90 seconds was required for a change in deep squat score from baseline; therefore, it is concluded that SM the lateral torso, plantar fascia, and lateral thigh for 90 seconds or more are effective interventions for acutely improving overhead deep squat scores. Conclusion Self‐massage appears to be an effective modality for inducing acute improvements in the performance of the FMS™ overhead deep squat in all conditions tested. Level of evidence 2b PMID:28217420

  14. Biomechanical Modeling Analysis of Loads Configuration for Squat Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Christopher A.; Thompson, William K.; Lewandowski, Beth E.; Jagodnik, Kathleen; De Witt, John K.

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Long duration space travel will expose astronauts to extended periods of reduced gravity. Since gravity is not present to assist loading, astronauts will use resistive and aerobic exercise regimes for the duration of the space flight to minimize loss of bone density, muscle mass and aerobic capacity that occurs during exposure to a reduced gravity environment. Unlike the International Space Station (ISS), the area available for an exercise device in the next generation of spacecraft for travel to the Moon or to Mars is limited and therefore compact resistance exercise device prototypes are being developed. The Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) currently on the ISS is being used as a benchmark for the functional performance of these new devices. Biomechanical data collection and computational modeling aid the device design process by quantifying the joint torques and the musculoskeletal forces that occur during exercises performed on the prototype devices. METHODS The computational models currently under development utilize the OpenSim [1] software platform, consisting of open source code for musculoskeletal modeling, using biomechanical input data from test subjects for estimation of muscle and joint loads. The OpenSim Full Body Model [2] is used for all analyses. The model incorporates simplified wrap surfaces, a new knee model and updated lower body muscle parameters derived from cadaver measurements and magnetic resonance imaging of young adults. The upper body uses torque actuators at the lumbar and extremity joints. The test subjects who volunteer for this study are instrumented with reflective markers for motion capture data collection while performing squat exercising on the Hybrid Ultimate Lifting Kit (HULK) prototype device (ZIN Technologies, Middleburg Heights, OH). Ground reaction force data is collected with force plates under the feet, and device loading is recorded through load cells internal to the HULK. Test variables include

  15. Alzheimer's Deaths Jump 55 Percent: CDC

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_165941.html Alzheimer's Deaths Jump 55 Percent: CDC More patients also ... News) -- As more baby boomers age, deaths from Alzheimer's disease have jumped 55 percent, and in a ...

  16. Inherent enumerability of strong jump-traceability

    CERN Document Server

    Diamondstone, David; Turetsky, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    We show that every strongly jump-traceable set obeys every benign cost function. Moreover, we show that every strongly jump-traceable set is computable from a computably enumerable strongly jump-traceable set. This allows us to generalise properties of c.e.\\ strongly jump-traceable sets to all such sets. For example, the strongly jump-traceable sets induce an ideal in the Turing degrees; the strongly jump-traceable sets are precisely those that are computable from all superlow Martin-L\\"{o}f random sets; the strongly jump-traceable sets are precisely those that are a base for $\\text{Demuth}_{\\text{BLR}}$-randomness; and strong jump-traceability is equivalent to strong superlowness.

  17. Comparative Effects of In-Season Full-Back Squat, Resisted Sprint Training, and Plyometric Training on Explosive Performance in U-19 Elite Soccer Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Hoyo, Moises; Gonzalo-Skok, Oliver; Sañudo, Borja; Carrascal, Claudio; Plaza-Armas, Jose R; Camacho-Candil, Fernando; Otero-Esquina, Carlos

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of 3 different low/moderate load strength training methods (full-back squat [SQ], resisted sprint with sled towing [RS], and plyometric and specific drills training [PLYO]) on sprinting, jumping, and change of direction (COD) abilities in soccer players. Thirty-two young elite male Spanish soccer players participated in the study. Subjects performed 2 specific strength training sessions per week, in addition to their normal training sessions for 8 weeks. The full-back squat protocol consisted of 2-3 sets × 4-8 repetitions at 40-60% 1 repetition maximum (∼ 1.28-0.98 m · s(-1)). The resisted sprint training was compounded by 6-10 sets × 20-m loaded sprints (12.6% of body mass). The plyometric and specific drills training was based on 1-3 sets × 2-3 repetitions of 8 plyometric and speed/agility exercises. Testing sessions included a countermovement jump (CMJ), a 20-m sprint (10-m split time), a 50-m (30-m split time) sprint, and COD test (i.e., Zig-Zag test). Substantial improvements (likely to almost certainly) in CMJ (effect size [ES]: 0.50-0.57) and 30-50 m (ES: 0.45-0.84) were found in every group in comparison to pretest results. Moreover, players in PLYO and SQ groups also showed substantial enhancements (likely to very likely) in 0-50 m (ES: 0.46-0.60). In addition, 10-20 m was also improved (very likely) in the SQ group (ES: 0.61). Between-group analyses showed that improvements in 10-20 m (ES: 0.57) and 30-50 m (ES: 0.40) were likely greater in the SQ group than in the RS group. Also, 10-20 m (ES: 0.49) was substantially better in the SQ group than in the PLYO group. In conclusion, the present strength training methods used in this study seem to be effective to improve jumping and sprinting abilities, but COD might need other stimulus to achieve positive effects.

  18. Field monitoring of rail squats using 3D ultrasonic mapping technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaewunruen, S., E-mail: sakdirat.kaewunruen@transport.nsw.gov.au [NSW, Transport, Sydney (Australia); Ishida, M., E-mail: ishida-mk@n-koei.jp [Nippon Koei Co. Ltd., Railway Div., Railway Engineering Dept., Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2014-11-15

    Rail squats and studs are typically classified as the propagation of any cracks .that have grown longitudinally through the subsurface. Some of the cracks could propagate to the bottom of rails transversely, which have branched from the initial longitudinal cracks with a depression of rail surface. The rail defects are commonly referred to as 'squats' when they were initiated from a damage layer caused by rolling contact fatigue, and as 'studs' when they were associated with a white etching layer caused by the transformation from pearlitic steel due to friction heat generated by wheel sliding or excessive traction. Such above-mentioned rail defects have been often observed in railway tracks catered for either light passenger or heavy freight traffics and for low, medium or high speed trains all over the world for over 60 years except some places such as sharp curves where large wear takes place under severe friction between the wheel flange and rail gauge face. It becomes a much-more significant issue when the crack grows and sometimes flakes off the rail (by itself or by insufficient rail grinding), resulting in a rail surface irregularity. Such rail surface defects induce wheel/rail impact and large amplitude vibration of track structure and poor ride quality. In Australia, Europe, and Japan, rail squats/studs have occasionally turned into broken rails. The root cause and preventive solution to this defect are still under investigation from the fracture mechanics and material sciences point of view. Some patterns of squat/stud development related to both curve and tangent track geometries have been observed and squat growth has been monitored for individual squats using ultrasonic mapping techniques. This paper highlights the field monitoring of squat/stud distribution and its growth. Squat/stud growth has been detected and scanned using the ultrasonic measurement device on a grid applied to the rail surface. The depths of crack paths at each

  19. Lateral Squats Significantly Decrease Sprint Time in Collegiate Baseball Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason B. White

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose was to examine the effect of prior performance of dumbbell lateral squats (DBLS on an agility movement-into-a-sprint (AMS test. Twelve collegiate, resistance-trained, baseball athletes participated in three sessions separated by three days. Session One consisted of AMS baseline test, DBLS 5-RM test, and experimental protocol familiarization. Subjects were randomly assigned the protocol order for Sessions Two and Three, which consisted of warm up followed by 1-min sitting (no-DBLS or performing the DBLS for 1 × 5 repetitions @ 5RM for each leg. Four minutes of slow recovery walking preceded the AMS test, which consisted of leading off a base and waiting for a visual stimulus. In reaction to stimulus, subjects exerted maximal effort while moving to the right by either pivoting or drop stepping and sprinting for 10 yards (yd. In Session Three, subjects switched protocols (DBLS, no-DBLS. Foot contact time (FCT, stride frequency (SF, stride length (SL, and 10-yd sprint time were measured. There were no differences between conditions for FCT, SF, or SL. Differences existed between DBLS (1.85 ± 0.09 s and no-DBLS (1.89 ± 0.10 s for AMS (p = 0.03. Results from the current study support the use of DBLS for performance enhancement prior to performing the AMS test.

  20. Model for polygonal hydraulic jumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martens, Erik Andreas; Watanabe, Shinya; Bohr, Tomas

    2012-01-01

    ) near the free surface in the jump region. The model consists of mass conservation and radial force balance between hydrostatic pressure and viscous stresses on the roller surface. In addition, we consider the azimuthal force balance, primarily between pressure and viscosity, but also including...

  1. Jumping property of Lyapunov values

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛锐; 王铎

    1996-01-01

    A sufficient condition for fcth Lyapunov value to be zero for planar polynomial vector fields is given, which extends the result of "jumping property’ of Lyapunov values obtained by Wang Duo to more general cases. A concrete example that the origin cannot be weak focus of order 1, 2, 4, 5, 8 is presented.

  2. A jump forwards with mathematics and physics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Heck; P. Uylings

    2011-01-01

    We jump on human body motions such as bouncing on a jumping stick, hopping, and making kangaroo jumps. Students can record the movements with a digital camera and use their video clips to investigate the motions with suitable video analysis and modelling software. We discuss some mathematical models

  3. Strawberry Shortcake and Other Jumping Rope Ideas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Polly K.; Taylor, Michaell K.

    Information, guidelines, and activities for jumping rope are given. A short history of jumping rope explains how it evolved from a spring ritual for men to a play activity involving mostly young girls. Physical and cultural reasons are given as to why jumping rope has been more a sport for girls than for boys. Research studies are noted which show…

  4. Strawberry Shortcake and Other Jumping Rope Ideas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Polly K.; Taylor, Michaell K.

    Information, guidelines, and activities for jumping rope are given. A short history of jumping rope explains how it evolved from a spring ritual for men to a play activity involving mostly young girls. Physical and cultural reasons are given as to why jumping rope has been more a sport for girls than for boys. Research studies are noted which show…

  5. Mesopause jumps at Antarctic latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lübken, Franz-Josef; Höffner, Josef; Becker, Erich; Latteck, Ralph; Murphy, Damian

    2016-04-01

    Recent high resolution temperature measurements by resonance lidar at Davis (69°S) occasionally showed a sudden mesopause altitude increase by ˜5 km and an associated mesopause temperature decrease by ˜10 K. We present further observations which are closely related to this 'mesopause jump', namely the increase of mean height of polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE) observed by a VHF radar, very strong westward winds in the upper mesosphere measured by an MF radar, and relatively large eastward winds in the stratosphere taken from reanalysis. We compare to similar observations in the Northern Hemisphere, namely at ALOMAR (69°N) where such mesopause jumps have never been observed. We present a detailed explanation of mesopause jumps. They occur only when stratospheric winds are moderately eastward and mesospheric winds are very large (westward). Under these conditions, gravity waves with comparatively large eastward phase Speeds can pass the stratosphere and propagate to the lower thermosphere because their vertical wavelengths in the mesosphere are rather large which implies reduced dynamical stability. When finally breaking in the lower thermosphere, these waves drive an enhanced residual circulation that causes a cold and high-altitude mesopause. The conditions for a mesopause jump occur only in the Southern Hemisphere (SH) and are associated with the late breakdown of the polar vortex. Mesopause jumps are primarily, but not only, observed prior and close to solstice. We also show that during the onset of PMSE in the SH, stratospheric zonal winds are still eastward (up to 30 m/s), and that the onset is not closely related to the Transition of the stratospheric circulation.

  6. The effect of squat depth on multiarticular muscle activation in collegiate cross-country runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorsuch, Joshua; Long, Janey; Miller, Katie; Primeau, Kyle; Rutledge, Sarah; Sossong, Andrew; Durocher, John J

    2013-09-01

    The squat is a closed-chain lower body exercise commonly performed by many athletes. Muscle activity has been examined during partial and parallel squats in male weightlifters, but not in male and female runners. Therefore, this study measured muscle activity with surface electromyography (EMG) during partial and parallel squats in 20 Division I collegiate cross-country runners (10 males and 10 females) in a randomized crossover design. We hypothesized the parallel squat would increase extensor muscle activitation (i.e. hamstrings and erector spinae). Furthermore, we sought to determine if changes in muscle activity were different between males and females. Participants performed 6 repetitions using their 10 repetition maximum loads for each condition during EMG testing. EMG was performed on the right rectus femoris, biceps femoris, lumbar erector spinae, and lateral head of the gastrocnemius. Rectus femoris activity (0.18 ± 0.01 vs. 0.14 ± 0.01 mV) and erector spinae activity (0.16 ± 0.01 vs. 0.13 ± 0.01 mV) were significantly higher (p 0.05). During preliminary isokinetic testing, both male and female runners demonstrated deficient hamstrings-to-quadriceps ratios, which would not likely improve by performing parallel squats based on our EMG findings. Despite the reduced load of the parallel squat, rectus femoris and erector spinae activity were elevated. Thus, parallel squats may help runners to train muscles vital for uphill running and correct posture, while preventing injury by using lighter weights through a larger range of motion.

  7. Acute Effect of Countermovement Jumping on Throwing Performance in Track and Field Athletes During Competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karampatsos, Giorgos P; Korfiatis, Panagiotis G; Zaras, Nikolaos D; Georgiadis, Giorgos V; Terzis, Gerasimos D

    2017-02-01

    Karampatsos, GP, Korfiatis, PG, Zaras, ND, Georgiadis, GV, and Terzis, GD. Acute effect of countermovement jumping on throwing performance in track and field athletes during competition. J Strength Cond Res 32(1): 359-364, 2017-The purpose of the study was to investigate whether performing 3 consecutive countermovement jumps (CMJs) just before an attempt enhances performance in track and field throwers during competition. Twelve shot putters, 8 hammer throwers, 9 discus throwers, and 3 javelin throwers of both sexes participated in the study. They performed 3 maximal CMJs 85 ± 12 seconds before the second, fourth, and sixth attempt during 3 different official competitions of national level. Maximal strength (1 repetition maximum [1RM]) in squat and bench press was measured 1 week after the competition. Mean throwing performance was significantly higher after the CMJs intervention (2.66 ± 4.3%, range of increase 0.02-18.98%, p = 0.0001). Similarly, maximum throwing performance was significantly higher after the CMJs (2.76 ± 3.29%, range of increase 0.09-13.93%, p = 0.0009). All but 2 athletes increased their best performance after the CMJs. The percentage increase in performance was similar between sexes (male athletes 2.56 ± 3.01%; female athletes 3.06 ± 3.76%, p = 0.677), but it was higher for the "lighter throws" (discus and javelin throw: 4.66 ± 4.11%) compared with the "heavier throws" (shot and hammer throw: 1.62 ± 2.04%, p = 0.008). The percentage increase in performance was not significantly correlated with 1RM squat or bench press, anthropometric characteristics, and personal best performance. These results suggest that performing 3 CMJs approximately 1 minute before an attempt may increase track and field throwing performance during competition.

  8. Changes in Indirect Markers of Muscle Damage and Tendons After Daily Drop Jumping Exercise with Rapid Load Increase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidas Paleckis, Mantas Mickevičius, Audrius Snieckus, Vytautas Streckis, Mati Pääsuke, Saulius Rutkauskas, Rasa Steponavičiūtė, Albertas Skurvydas, Sigitas Kamandulis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess changes in indirect markers of muscle damage and type I collagen degradation, as well as, patellar and Achilles tendon morphological differences during nine daily drop-jumps sessions with constant load alternated with rapid increases in load to test the hypothesis that frequent drop-jump training results in negative muscular and tendon adaptation. Young men (n = 9 performed daily drop jump workouts with progression every 3 days in terms of number of jumps, platform height and squat amplitude. Voluntary and electrically evoked knee extensor torque, muscle soreness, blood plasma creatine kinase (CK activity and carboxyterminal cross-linked telopeptide (ICTP, patellar and Achilles tendon thickness and cross-sectional area (CSA were assessed at different time points during the training period and again on days 1, 3, 10 and 17 after the training. The findings were as follows: (1 steady decline in maximal muscle strength with major recovery within 24 hours after the first six daily training sessions; (2 larger decline in electrically induced muscle torque and prolonged recovery during last three training sessions; (3 increase in patellar and Achilles tendons CSA without change in thickness towards the end of training period; (4 increase in jump height but not in muscle strength after whole training period. Our findings suggest that frequent drop-jump sessions with constant load alternated with rapid increases in load do not induce severe muscle damage or major changes in tendons, nonetheless, this type of loading is not advisable for muscle strength improvement.

  9. Analysis of kinematic data and determination of ground reaction force of foot in slow squat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu-Shu Zhang; Yuan Guo; Mei-Wen An; Wei-Yi Chen

    2013-01-01

    In the present paper,the ground reaction force (GRF) acting on foot in slow squat was determined through a force measuring system,and at the same time,the kinematic data of human squat were obtained by analyzing the photographed image sequences.According to the height and body weight,six healthy volunteers were selected,three men in one group and the other three women in another group,and the fundamental parameters of subjects were recorded,including body weight,height and age,etc.Based on the anatomy characteristics,some markers were placed on the right side of joints.While the subject squatted at slow speed on the force platform,the ground reaction forces on the forefoot and heel for each foot were obtained through calibrated force platform.The analysis results show that the reaction force on heel is greater than that on forefoot,and double feet have nearly constant force.Moreover,from processing and analyzing the synchronously photographed image sequences in squat,the kinematic data of human squat were acquired,including mainly the curves of angle,angular velocity and angular acceleration varied with time for knee,hip and ankle joints in a sagittal plane.The obtained results can offer instructive reference for photographing and analyzing the movements of human bodies,diagnosing some diseases,and establishing in the future appropriate mathematical models for the human motion.

  10. Analysis of kinematic data and determination of ground reaction force of foot in slow squat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu-Shu; Guo, Yuan; An, Mei-Wen; Chen, Wei-Yi

    2013-02-01

    In the present paper, the ground reaction force (GRF) acting on foot in slow squat was determined through a force measuring system, and at the same time, the kinematic data of human squat were obtained by analyzing the photographed image sequences. According to the height and body weight, six healthy volunteers were selected, three men in one group and the other three women in another group, and the fundamental parameters of subjects were recorded, including body weight, height and age, etc. Based on the anatomy characteristics, some markers were placed on the right side of joints. While the subject squatted at slow speed on the force platform, the ground reaction forces on the forefoot and heel for each foot were obtained through calibrated force platform. The analysis results show that the reaction force on heel is greater than that on forefoot, and double feet have nearly constant force. Moreover, from processing and analyzing the synchronously photographed image sequences in squat, the kinematic data of human squat were acquired, including mainly the curves of angle, angular velocity and angular acceleration varied with time for knee, hip and ankle joints in a sagittal plane. The obtained results can offer instructive reference for photographing and analyzing the movements of human bodies, diagnosing some diseases, and establishing in the future appropriate mathematical models for the human motion.

  11. The role of rate of force development on vertical jump performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLellan, Christopher P; Lovell, Dale I; Gass, Gregory C

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine a) the relationship between rate of force development (RFD) and vertical jump (VJ) performance during a counter movement jump (CMJ), and b) the reliability of RFD recorded during the CMJ and squat jump (SJ) forms of the VJ. Twenty-three physically active men aged 23 ± 3.9 years participated in the study. Subjects completed 3 unloaded CMJ and 3 unloaded SJ in random order on a force plate. The RFD was measured during CMJ and SJ movements with vertical jump displacement (VJD) measured simultaneously during the CMJ only. Subjects incorporated arm swing to their CMJ technique to reach up as high as possible, and VJD was measured. All SJ were executed with both hands on the hips throughout the full range of movement. Peak rate of force development (PRFD), peak force (PF), and time to peak force (TPF) were significantly correlated to VJD during the CMJ (r = 0.68, r = 0.51, and r = -0.48, respectively). The RFD and TPF during the CMJ and SJ were associated with low test-retest reliability (coefficient of variation [CV]: 11.8-7.9%). Peak and average power, PF, and VJD produced high test-retest reliability (CV: 2.8-5.1%) during both the CMJ and SJ movements. Our results indicate that PRFD, a measure of explosive strength, and PF, a measure of maximal strength, are the primary contributors to VJD during the CMJ in physically active men. However, caution must be used when interpreting data using PRFD because of its low retest reliability.

  12. The Effects of Eccentric Contraction Duration on Muscle Strength, Power Production, Vertical Jump, and Soreness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mike, Jonathan N; Cole, Nathan; Herrera, Chris; VanDusseldorp, Trisha; Kravitz, Len; Kerksick, Chad M

    2017-03-01

    Mike, JN, Cole, N, Herrera, C, VanDusseldorp, T, Kravitz, L, and Kerksick, CM. The effects of eccentric contraction duration on muscle strength, power production, vertical jump, and soreness. J Strength Cond Res 31(3): 773-786, 2017-Previous research has investigated the effects of either eccentric-only training or comparing eccentric and concentric exercise on changes related to strength and power expression, but no research to date has investigated the impact of altering the duration of either the concentric or the eccentric component on these parameters. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to assess the duration of eccentric (i.e., 2-second, 4-second vs. 6-second) muscle contractions and their effect on muscle strength, power production, vertical jump, and soreness using a plate-loaded barbell Smith squat exercise. Thirty college-aged men (23 ± 3.5 years, 178 ± 6.8 cm, 82 ± 12 kg, and 11.6 ± 5.1% fat) with 3.0 ± 1.0 years of resistance training experience and training frequency of 4.3 ± 0.9 days per week were randomized and assigned to 1 of 3 eccentric training groups that incorporated different patterns of contraction. For every repetition, all 3 groups used 2-second concentric contractions and paused for 1 second between the concentric and eccentric phases. The control group (2S) used 2-second eccentric contractions, whereas the 4S group performed 4-second eccentric contractions and the 6S group performed 6-second eccentric contractions. All repetitions were completed using the barbell Smith squat exercise. All participants completed a 4-week training protocol that required them to complete 2 workouts per week using their prescribed contraction routine for 4 sets of 6 repetitions at an intensity of 80-85% one repetition maximum (1RM). For all performance data, significant group × time (G × T) interaction effects were found for average power production across all 3 sets of a squat jump protocol (p = 0.04) while vertical jump did not reach

  13. Jumps of the eta invariant

    CERN Document Server

    Farber, M S; Farber, Michael S.; Levine, Jerome P.

    1994-01-01

    We study the eta-invariant, defined by Atiyah-Patodi-Singer a real valued invariant of an oriented odd-dimensional Riemannian manifold equipped with a unitary representation of its fundamental group. When the representation varies analytically, the corresponding eta-invariant may have an integral jump, known also as the spectral flow. The main result of the paper establishes a formula for this spectral jump in terms of the signatures of some homological forms, defined naturally by the path of representations. These signatures may also be computed by means of a spectral sequence of Hermitian forms,defined by the deformation data. Our theorem on the spectral jump has a generalization to arbitrary analytic families of self-adjoint elliptic operators. As an application we consider the problem of homotopy invariance of the rho-invariant. We give an intrinsic homotopy theoretic definition of the rho-invariant, up to indeterminacy in the form of a locally constant function on the space of unitary representations. In...

  14. Force- and power-time curve comparison during jumping between strength-matched male and female basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Paige E; Goodman, Courtney L; Capps, Christopher R; Triplett, N Travis; Erickson, Travis M; McBride, Jeffrey M

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare force- and power-time curve variables during jumping between Division I strength-matched male and female basketball athletes. Males (n = 8) and females (n = 8) were strength matched by testing a one-repetition maximum (1RM) back squat. 1RM back squat values were normalised to body mass in order to demonstrate that strength differences were a function of body mass alone. Subjects performed three countermovement jumps (CMJ) at maximal effort. Absolute and relative force- and power-time curve variables from the CMJs were analysed between males and females. Average force- and power-time curves were generated for all subjects. Jump height was significantly greater (p ≤ .05) in males than females. Absolute force was higher in males during the concentric phase, but not significantly different (p ≥ .05) when normalised to body mass. Significance was found in absolute concentric impulse between sexes, but not when analysed relative to body mass. Rate of force development, rate of power development, relative peak force, and work were not significantly different between sexes. Males had significantly greater impulse during the eccentric phase as well as peak power (PP) during the concentric phase of the CMJ than did females in both absolute and relative terms. It is concluded that sex differences are not a determining factor in measured force during a CMJ when normalised to body mass between strength-matched subjects. However, eccentric phase impulse and concentric phase PP appear to be influenced by sex differences independent of matching strength levels.

  15. Analysis of vastus lateralis and vastus medialis oblique muscle activation during squat exercise with and without a variety of tools in normal adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tae-kyung; Park, So-mi; Yun, Sae-bom; Lee, Ae-ran; Lee, Yun-seob; Yong, Min-sik

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The present study investigated the effects of squat exercises with and without a variety of tools including a gym ball, wedge, and elastic band on the vastus lateralis and vastus medialis oblique muscles. [Subjects and Methods] A total of twenty healthy subjects with no history of neurological, musculoskeletal injury, or pain in the lower extremities were recruited. All subjects performed four types of exercise (conventional squat exercise, squat exercise with a gym ball, squat exercise with a wedge, squat exercise with an elastic band). [Results] There were no significant differences between exercises in comparison of the vastus lateralis muscle activity. In the squat exercise with a wedge, significantly higher activity of the vastus medialis oblique muscle was found compared with in the squat exercise with an elastic band. [Conclusion] The present study suggests that the conventional squat exercise can be one of the useful interventions for patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome. PMID:27134414

  16. Of Other Spaces, of Other Times – Towards New Materialist Politics of Squatting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Rogowska-Stangret

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the article the author reflects on the meaning of politics in a newmaterialist framework. She concentrates predominantly on two political dimentions – space and time. With reference to that, the author develops the concept of politics of squatting. Its spatial aspect is investigated along the lines of the notion of heterotopia, coined by Michel Foucault, and its temporal aspect is analyzed through the concept of heterochrony (Foucault and Darwinian evolution as interpreted by Elizabeth Grosz. The concept of politics of squatting is then juxtaposed with nomadism (vide Rosi Braidotti. Finally, the author provides a case study by elaborating on the anti-gender campaign that began in 2012-2013 in Poland from the perspective of politics of squatting.

  17. Price jumps on European stock markets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Hanousek

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the dynamics of price jumps and the impact of the European debt crisis using the high-frequency data reported by selected stock exchanges on the European continent during the period January 2008 to June 2012. We employ two methods to identify price jumps: Method 1 minimizes the probability of false jump detection (the Type-II Error-Optimal price jump indicator and Method 2 maximizes the probability of successful jump detection (the Type-I Error-Optimal price jump indicator. We show that individual stock markets exhibited differences in price jump intensity before and during the crisis. We also show that in general the variance of price jump intensity could not be distinguished as different in the pre-crisis period from that during the crisis. Our results indicate that, contrary to common belief, the intensity of price jumps does not uniformly increase during a period of financial distress. However, there do exist differences in price jump dynamics across stock markets and investors have to model emerging and mature markets differently to properly reflect their individual dynamics.

  18. Effects of Strength Training Combined with Specific Plyometric exercises on body composition, vertical jump height and lower limb strength development in elite male handball players: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Alberto; Mourão, Paulo; Abade, Eduardo

    2014-06-28

    The purpose of the present study was to identify the effects of a strength training program combined with specific plyometric exercises on body composition, vertical jump (VJ) height and strength development of lower limbs in elite male handball players. A 12-week program with combined strength and specific plyometric exercises was carried out for 7 weeks. Twelve elite male handball players (age: 21.6 ± 1.73) competing in the Portuguese Major League participated in the study. Besides the anthropometric measurements, several standardized jump tests were applied to assess VJ performance together with the strength development of the lower limbs in an isokinetic setting. No significant changes were found in body circumferences and diameters. Body fat content and fat mass decreased by 16.4 and 15.7% respectively, while lean body mass increased by 2.1%. Despite small significance, there was in fact an increase in squat jump (SJ), counter movement jump (CMJ) and 40 consecutive jumps after the training period (6.1, 3.8 and 6.8%, respectively). After the applied protocol, peak torque increased in lower limb extension and flexion in the majority of the movements assessed at 90ºs-1. Consequently, it is possible to conclude that combining general strength-training with plyometric exercises can not only increase lower limb strength and improve VJ performance but also reduce body fat content.

  19. The role of interaction torque and muscle torque in the control of downward squatting

    OpenAIRE

    Fujisawa, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Hiroto; Murakami, Kenichi; Kawakami, Shingo; Suzuki, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purposes of this study were first to analyze the multijoint dynamics of downward squatting, and to examine the contribution of interaction torque and muscle torque to net torque, and second, to examine mechanisms of movement control. [Subjects] The subjects were 31 healthy men with a mean age of 21.0 ± 1.2 years (range, 19–24 years). [Methods] Squatting tasks with the trunk in two positions, an erect and anterior tilt position, were performed by the subjects. Net, interaction, m...

  20. Effect of static and dynamic stretching on the diurnal variations of jump performance in soccer players.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamdi Chtourou

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The present study addressed the lack of data on the effect of different types of stretching on diurnal variations in vertical jump height - i.e., squat-jump (SJ and countermovement-jump (CMJ. We hypothesized that dynamic stretching could affect the diurnal variations of jump height by producing a greater increase in short-term maximal performance in the morning than the evening through increasing core temperature at this time-of-day. METHODS: Twenty male soccer players (age, 18.6±1.3 yrs; height, 174.6±3.8 cm; body-mass, 71.1±8.6 kg; mean ± SD completed the SJ and CMJ tests either after static stretching, dynamic stretching or no-stretching protocols at two times of day, 07:00 h and 17:00 h, with a minimum of 48 hours between testing sessions. One minute after warming-up for 5 minutes by light jogging and performing one of the three stretching protocols (i.e., static stretching, dynamic stretching or no-stretching for 8 minutes, each subject completed the SJ and CMJ tests. Jumping heights were recorded and analyzed using a two-way analysis of variance with repeated measures (3 [stretching]×2 [time-of-day]. RESULTS: The SJ and CMJ heights were significantly higher at 17:00 than 07:00 h (p<0.01 after the no-stretching protocol. These daily variations disappeared (i.e., the diurnal gain decreased from 4.2±2.81% (p<0.01 to 1.81±4.39% (not-significant for SJ and from 3.99±3.43% (p<0.01 to 1.51±3.83% (not-significant for CMJ after dynamic stretching due to greater increases in SJ and CMJ heights in the morning than the evening (8.4±6.36% vs. 4.4±2.64%, p<0.05 for SJ and 10.61±5.49% vs. 6.03±3.14%, p<0.05 for CMJ. However, no significant effect of static stretching on the diurnal variations of SJ and CMJ heights was observed. CONCLUSION: Dynamic stretching affects the typical diurnal variations of SJ and CMJ and helps to counteract the lower morning values in vertical jump height.

  1. Δ-matroid and jump system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh N. Kabadi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of Δ-matroid is a nontrivial, proper generalization of the concept of matroid and has been further generalized to the concept of jump system. In this paper, we show that jump systems are, in some sense, equivalent to Δ-matroids. Using this equivalence and the Δ-matroid theory, we give simple proofs and extensions of many of the results on jump systems.

  2. Time change, jumping measure and Feller measure

    OpenAIRE

    He, Ping

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we shall investigate some potential theory for time change of Markov processes. Under weak duality, it is proved that the jumping measure and Feller measure are actually independent of time change, and the jumping measure of a time changed process induced by a PCAF supported on $V$ coincides with the sum of the Feller measure on $V$ and the trace of the original jumping measure on $V$.

  3. The aerodynamics of jumping rope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aristoff, Jeffrey; Stone, Howard

    2011-03-01

    We present the results of a combined theoretical and experimental investigation of the motion of a rotating string that is held at both ends (i.e. a jump rope). In particular, we determine how the surrounding fluid affects the shape of the string at high Reynolds numbers: the string bends toward the axis of rotation, thereby reducing its total drag. We derive a pair of coupled non-linear differential equations that describe the shape, the numerical solution of which compares well with asymptotic approximations and experiments. Implications for successful skipping will be discussed.

  4. Dynamic jump intensities and risk premiums

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Peter; Ornthanalai, Chayawat; Jacobs, Kris

    2012-01-01

    We build a new class of discrete-time models that are relatively easy to estimate using returns and/or options. The distribution of returns is driven by two factors: dynamic volatility and dynamic jump intensity. Each factor has its own risk premium. The models significantly outperform standard...... models without jumps when estimated on S&P500 returns. We find very strong support for time-varying jump intensities. Compared to the risk premium on dynamic volatility, the risk premium on the dynamic jump intensity has a much larger impact on option prices. We confirm these findings using joint...... estimation on returns and large option samples....

  5. Laminar circular hydraulic jumps without separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Ratul; Tomar, Gaurav; Govindarajan, Rama

    2009-11-01

    The traditional inviscid criterion for the occurrence of a planar, standing hydraulic jump is to have the Froude number decrease downstream and go through a value of 1 at some location. Here, upstream propagating, small-amplitude, long, non-dispersive gravity waves are trapped, and non-linear steepening is said to result in a near-discontinuous height profile, but it is not clear how. Such a condition on the Froude number is shown in the present axisymmetric Navier-Stokes computations to hold for a circular jump as well. The relevance of non-linear steepening to a circular jump is therefore a question we wish to answer. In circular jumps, moreover, a region of recirculation is usually observed underneath the jump, underlining the importance of viscosity in this process. This led Tani (J. Phys. Soc. Japan, 1949) to hypothesise that boundary-layer separation was the cause of the circular jump. This hypothesis has been debated extensively and the possibility of circular jumps without separation hinted at. In our simulations, we are able to obtain circular hydraulic jumps without any flow separation. This, and the necessity or otherwise of viscosity in jump formation will be discussed.

  6. A Molecular Jump Mechanism of Water Reorientation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Damien Laage; James T. Hynes

    2006-01-01

    .... This water reorientation mechanism involves large-amplitude angular jumps, rather than the commonly accepted sequence of small diffusive steps, and therefore calls for reinterpretation of many...

  7. Heavy Resistance Training in Hypoxia enhances 1RM Squat Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathew William Hunter Inness

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose:To determine if heavy resistance training in hypoxia (IHRT is more effective at improving strength, power and increasing lean mass than the same training in normoxia.Methods:A pair-matched, placebo-controlled study design included 20 resistance-trained participants assigned to IHRT (FIO2 0.143 or placebo (FIO2 0.20, (n=10 per group. Participants were matched for strength and training. Both groups performed 20 sessions over 7 weeks either with IHRT or placebo. All participants were tested for 1RM, 20-m sprint, body composition and countermovement jump pre-, mid- and post-training and compared via magnitude-based inferences.Presentation of Results:Groups were not clearly different for any test at baseline. Training improved both absolute (IHRT: 13.1 ± 3.9%, effect size (ES 0.60, placebo 9.8 ± 4.7%, ES 0.31 and relative 1RM (IHRT: 13.4 ± 5.1%, ES 0.76, placebo 9.7 ± 5.3%, ES 0.48 at mid. Similarly, at post both groups increased absolute (IHRT: 20.7 ± 7.6%, ES 0.74, placebo 14.1 ± 6.0%, ES 0.58 and relative 1RM (IHRT: 21.6 ± 8.5%, ES 1.08, placebo 13.2 ± 6.4%, ES 0.78. Importantly, the change in IHRT was greater than placebo at mid for both absolute (4.4% greater change, 90% Confidence Interval (CI 1.0:8.0%, ES 0.21, and relative strength (5.6% greater change, 90% CI 1.0:9.4%, ES 0.31 (relative. There was also a greater change for IHRT at post for both absolute (7.0% greater change, 90% CI 1.3:13%, ES 0.33, and relative 1RM (9.2% greater change, 90% CI 1.6:14.9%, ES 0.49. Only IHRT increased countermovement jump peak power at Post (4.9%, ES 0.35, however the difference between IHRT and placebo was unclear (2.7%, 90% CI -2.0:7.6%, ES 0.20 with no clear differences in speed or body composition throughout.Conclusion:Heavy resistance training in hypoxia is more effective than placebo for improving absolute and relative strength.

  8. Control of cracking in R.C. Structures: Numerical simulation of a squat shear wall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damoni, C.; Belletti, B.; Lilliu, G.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper the behavior of a squat shear wall subjected to monotonic shear loading is investigated. The study fits into the experimental program driven by CEOS.fr on modeling of the behavior of the tested mocks-ups (monotonic and cycling loading-under prevented or free shrinkage). The shear wall

  9. Squatting-Related Tibiofemoral Shear Reaction Forces and a Biomechanical Rationale for Femoral Component Loosening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashvin Thambyah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous gait studies on squatting have described a rapid reversal in the direction of the tibiofemoral joint shear reaction force when going into a full weight-bearing deep knee flexion squat. The effects of such a shear reversal have not been considered with regard to the loading demand on knee implants in patients whose activities of daily living require frequent squatting. In this paper, the shear reversal effect is discussed and simulated in a finite element knee implant-bone model, to evaluate the possible biomechanical significance of this effect on femoral component loosening of high flexion implants as reported in the literature. The analysis shows that one of the effects of the shear reversal was a switch between large compressive and large tensile principal strains, from knee extension to flexion, respectively, in the region of the anterior flange of the femoral component. Together with the known material limits of cement and bone, this large mismatch in strains as a function of knee position provides new insight into how and why knee implants may fail in patients who perform frequent squatting.

  10. Crawling and/or Squatting: A Saleable Work Skill. Occupation Simulation Packet. Grades K-2nd.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Margery

    This teacher's guide for grades K-2 contains simulated work experiences for students using the isolated skill concept, crawling and/or squatting. Teacher instructions include objectives, evaluation, and sequence of activities. The guide contains pre-tests and post-tests with instructions and answer keys. Three pre-skill activities are suggested,…

  11. Corticosteroid injections, eccentric decline squat training and heavy slow resistance training in patellar tendinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsgaard, M; Kovanen, V; Aagaard, P

    2009-01-01

    A randomized-controlled single-blind trial was conducted to investigate the clinical, structural and functional effects of peritendinous corticosteroid injections (CORT), eccentric decline squat training (ECC) and heavy slow resistance training (HSR) in patellar tendinopathy. Thirty-nine male...

  12. Modelling the joint torques and loadings during squatting at the Smith machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biscarini, Andrea; Benvenuti, Paolo; Botti, Fabio; Mastrandrea, Francesco; Zanuso, Silvano

    2011-03-01

    An analytical biomechanical model was developed to establish the relevant properties of the Smith squat exercise, and the main differences from the free barbell squat. The Smith squat may be largely patterned to modulate the distributions of muscle activities and joint loadings. For a given value of the included knee angle (θ(knee)), bending the trunk forward, moving the feet forward in front of the knees, and displacing the weight distribution towards the forefoot emphasizes hip and lumbosacral torques, while also reducing knee torque and compressive tibiofemoral and patellofemoral forces (and vice versa). The tibiofemoral shear force φ(t) displays more complex trends that strongly depend on θ(knee). Notably, for 180° ≥ θ(knee) ≥ 130°, φ(t) and cruciate ligament strain forces can be suppressed by selecting proper pairs of ankle and hip angles. Loading of the posterior cruciate ligament increases (decreases) in the range 180° ≥ θ(knee) ≥ 150° (θ(knee) ≤ 130°) with knee extension, bending the trunk forward, and moving the feet forward in front of the knees. In the range 150° > θ(knee) > 130°, the behaviour changes depending on the foot weight distribution. The conditions for the development of anterior cruciate ligament strain forces are explained. This work enables careful use of the Smith squat in strengthening and rehabilitation programmes.

  13. SQUAT: A web tool to mine human, murine and avian SAGE data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Besson Jérémy

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is an increasing need in transcriptome research for gene expression data and pattern warehouses. It is of importance to integrate in these warehouses both raw transcriptomic data, as well as some properties encoded in these data, like local patterns. Description We have developed an application called SQUAT (SAGE Querying and Analysis Tools which is available at: http://bsmc.insa-lyon.fr/squat/. This database gives access to both raw SAGE data and patterns mined from these data, for three species (human, mouse and chicken. This database allows to make simple queries like "In which biological situations is my favorite gene expressed?" as well as much more complex queries like: ≪what are the genes that are frequently co-over-expressed with my gene of interest in given biological situations?≫. Connections with external web databases enrich biological interpretations, and enable sophisticated queries. To illustrate the power of SQUAT, we show and analyze the results of three different queries, one of which led to a biological hypothesis that was experimentally validated. Conclusion SQUAT is a user-friendly information retrieval platform, which aims at bringing some of the state-of-the-art mining tools to biologists.

  14. Kinematic and Electromyographic Activity Changes during Back Squat with Submaximal and Maximal Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan U. Yavuz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the possible kinematic and muscular activity changes with maximal loading during squat maneuver. Fourteen healthy male individuals, who were experienced at performing squats, participated in this study. Each subject performed squats with 80%, 90%, and 100% of the previously established 1 repetition maximum (1RM. Electromyographic (EMG activities were measured for the vastus lateralis, vastus medialis, rectus femoris, semitendinosus, biceps femoris, gluteus maximus, and erector spinae by using an 8-channel dual-mode portable EMG and physiological signal data acquisition system (Myomonitor IV, Delsys Inc., Boston, MA, USA. Kinematical data were analyzed by using saSuite 2D kinematical analysis program. Data were analyzed with repeated measures analysis of variance (p<0.05. Overall muscle activities increased with increasing loads, but significant increases were seen only for vastus medialis and gluteus maximus during 90% and 100% of 1RM compared to 80% while there was no significant difference between 90% and 100% for any muscle. The movement pattern in the hip joint changed with an increase in forward lean during maximal loading. Results may suggest that maximal loading during squat may not be necessary for focusing on knee extensor improvement and may increase the lumbar injury risk.

  15. Relationship between hip and core strength and frontal plane alignment during a single leg squat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickler, Laurie; Finley, Margaret; Gulgin, Heather

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between frontal plane kinematics of the single leg squat and strength of the trunk and hip in females. Forty healthy females participated in this study. An isometric "make" test using a dynamometer was used to assess peak force normalized to body weight for hip abduction, hip extension, hip external rotation, and a sidelying plank test. Two-dimensional software was used to analyze the frontal plane projection angle (FPPA) and pelvic angle during a single leg squat to 60°. All 4 strength factors were significantly correlated with the FPPA, ranging from r = 0.396 to r = 0.466. During multiple regression analysis, hip abduction strength was the greatest predictor of the variation in FPPA at r(2) = 0.22, p = 0.002. Thus, hip abduction strength accounted for 22% of the variation in the FPPA during the single leg squat. The only strength factor demonstrating a significant correlation with the pelvic angle was hip extension strength (r = 0.550, p core musculature on the impact on the FPPA during a single squat, with focus on the hip abductors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. An explicit integration finite element method for impact noise generation at squat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Z.; Li, Z.; Dollevoet, R.P.B.J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a full finite element (FE) interaction model of wheel-track to study the wheel-rail impact noise caused by squat. The wheel, the rail and some other track components are modeled with finite elements in three dimensions, where necessary and appropriate. Realistic contact geometry,

  17. Effects of external loading on lumbar extension moment during squat lifting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iman Vahdat

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The main objective of this study has been qualitative investigation of the effects of external loading on the lumbar extension moment during squat lifting. Findings of this study may allow to determine the factor with the most considerable effect on the lumbar extension moment and may help determine the lumbar spine risk factors at temporo-spatial coordination during squat lifting. Material and Methods: Twelve healthy men volunteered to perform slow and fast squat lifting of a box of varied mass (4 kg, 8 kg and 12 kg. The eight-channel electromyography was applied to detect the activities of abdominal (rectus abdominis and external oblique and lower back muscles (iliocostalis lumborum and multifidus. The lumbar extension moment was calculated using 3D linked segment model. Ground reaction forces and kinematic data were recorded using a Vicon system with 2 parallel Kistler force-plates. Results: Significant increases (both p-values 0.05 were detected between the lumbar angles related to the lower trunk muscles peak activities and lumbar angle related to the peak lumbar extension moment in most of the lifts. Conclusions: According to the findings, the inertial force of the lifted box is the most important factor that affects the lumbar extension moment during squat lifting. Moreover, critical lumbar angles are seemingly those ones in which the lifted box reaches the peak acceleration. Int J Occup Med Environ Health 2017;30(4:665–679

  18. Deconstructing the power resistance relationship for squats: A joint-level analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farris, D J; Lichtwark, G A; Brown, N A T; Cresswell, A G

    2016-07-01

    Generating high leg power outputs is important for executing rapid movements. Squats are commonly used to increase leg strength and power. Therefore, it is useful to understand factors affecting power output in squatting. We aimed to deconstruct the mechanisms behind why power is maximized at certain resistances in squatting. Ten male rowers (age = 20 ± 2.2 years; height = 1.82 ± 0.03 m; mass = 86 ± 11 kg) performed maximal power squats with resistances ranging from body weight to 80% of their one repetition maximum (1RM). Three-dimensional kinematics was combined with ground reaction force (GRF) data in an inverse dynamics analysis to calculate leg joint moments and powers. System center of mass (COM) velocity and power were computed from GRF data. COM power was maximized across a range of resistances from 40% to 60% 1RM. This range was identified because a trade-off in hip and knee joint powers existed across this range, with maximal knee joint power occurring at 40% 1RM and maximal hip joint power at 60% 1RM. A non-linear system force-velocity relationship was observed that dictated large reductions in COM power below 20% 1RM and above 60% 1RM. These reductions were due to constraints on the control of the movement.

  19. Lower extremity joint kinetics and lumbar curvature during squat and stoop lifting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Youngho

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this study, kinematics and kinetics of the lower extremity joint and the lumbar lordosis during two different symmetrical lifting techniques(squat and stoop were examined using the three-dimensional motion analysis. Methods Twenty-six young male volunteers were selected for the subjects in this study. While they lifted boxes weighing 5, 10 and 15 kg by both squat and stoop lifting techniques, their motions were captured and analyzed using the 3D motion analysis system which was synchronized with two forceplates and the electromyographic system. Joint kinematics was determined by the forty-three reflective markers which were attached on the anatomical locations based on the VICON Plug-in-Gait marker placement protocol. Joint kinetics was analyzed by using the inverse dynamics. Paired t-test and Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare the differences of variables between two techniques, and among three different weights. Correlation coefficient was calculated to explain the role of lower limb joint motion in relation to the lumbar lordosis. Results There were not significant differences in maximum lumbar joint moments between two techniques. The hip and ankle contributed the most part of the support moment during squat lifting, and the knee flexion moment played an important role in stoop lifting. The hip, ankle and lumbar joints generated power and only the knee joint absorbed power in the squat lifting. The knee and ankle joints absorbed power, the hip and lumbar joints generated power in the stoop lifting. The bi-articular antagonist muscles' co-contraction around the knee joint during the squat lifting and the eccentric co-contraction of the gastrocnemius and the biceps femoris were found important for maintaining the straight leg during the stoop lifting. At the time of lordotic curvature appearance in the squat lifting, there were significant correlations in all three lower extremity joint moments with the lumbar joint

  20. The short-term effect of whole-body vibration training on vertical jump, sprint, and agility performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, Darryl J; Legg, Stephen J; Hooker, Michael J

    2004-11-01

    Previous studies have suggested that short-term whole-body vibration (WBV) training produces neuromuscular improvement similar to that of power and strength training. However, it is yet to be determined whether short-term WBV exposure produces neurogenic enhancement for power, speed, and agility. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect short-term WBV training had on vertical jump, sprint, and agility performance in nonelite athletes. Twenty-four sport science students (16 men and 8 women) were randomly assigned to 2 groups: WBV training or control. Each group included 8 men and 4 women. Countermovement jump (CMJ) height, squat jump (SJ) height, sprint speed over 5, 10, and 20 m, and agility (505, up and back) were performed by each participant before and after 9 days of either no training (control) or WBV training. Perceived discomfort of every participant was recorded after daily WBV exposure and nonexposure. There were no significant differences between WBV and control groups for CMJ, SJ, sprints, and agility. Perceived discomfort differed between the first and subsequent days of WBV training (p < 0.05); however, there was no difference between the WBV and control groups. It is concluded that short-term WBV training did not enhance performance in nonelite athletes.

  1. The Effects of Supplementary Low-Load Blood Flow Restriction Training on Morphological and Performance-Based Adaptations in Team Sport Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Brendan R; Peiffer, Jeremiah J; Goods, Paul S R

    2017-08-01

    Scott, BR, Peiffer, JJ, and Goods, PSR. The effects of supplementary low-load blood flow restriction training on morphological and performance-based adaptations in team sport athletes. J Strength Cond Res 31(8): 2147-2154, 2017-Low-load resistance training with blood flow restriction (BFR) may be a method to enhance muscular development even in trained athletes. This study aimed to assess whether supplemental low-load BFR training can improve muscle size, strength, and physical performance characteristics in team sport athletes. Twenty-one semiprofessional Australian football athletes were assessed for 3-repetition maximum (3RM) and muscular endurance in the back squat, vastus lateralis muscle architecture, and performance in sprint and vertical jump tasks. Participants then undertook a 5-week training program, consisting of normal high-load resistance training supplemented by low-load squats with (LLBFR) or without (LL) BFR. Participants also performed regular conditioning and football training during this period. After the training intervention, participants again completed the pretraining testing battery. Squat 3RM and endurance increased from pretraining levels in both LL (3RM = 12.5% increase; endurance = 24.1% increase; p ≤ 0.007) and LLBFR (3RM = 12.3% increase; endurance = 21.2% increase; p = 0.007) groups, though there were no between-group differences. No post-training changes were observed for muscle architecture, or performance in sprinting and jumping tasks. Although squat 3RM and endurance performance increased in both groups, adding BFR during supplemental exercise did not enhance these responses. Similarly, there were no large differences in the assessments of sprint, acceleration, and jumping performance between the groups after training. These findings suggest that although LLBFR did not negatively affect adaptive responses to resistance training, this training strategy may not provide added benefit for healthy Australian football athletes

  2. Reliability of Maximal Back Squat and Power Clean Performances in Inexperienced Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comfort, Paul; McMahon, John J

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the study was to determine between-session reliability of maximal weight lifted during the back squat and power clean, in inexperienced athletes, and to identify the smallest detectable difference between sessions. Forty-four collegiate athletes (men: n = 32; age: 21.5 ± 2.0 years; height: 180.0 ± 6.1 cm; body mass: 81.01 ± 7.42 kg; women: n = 12; age: 21.0 ± 1.9 years; height: 169.0 ± 5.2 cm; body mass: 62.90 ± 7.46 kg) participated in this study. One repetition maximum (1RM) back squat and power cleans were each performed twice on separate days, 3-5 days apart. Paired samples' t tests revealed no significant differences between trial 1 and trial 2 of the power clean (70.55 ± 24.24 kg, 71.22 ± 23.87 kg, p > 0.05, power = 0.99) and the back squat (130.32 ± 34.05 kg, 129.82 ± 34.07 kg, p > 0.05, power = 1.0). No differences in reliability or measurement error were observed between men and women. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) demonstrated a high reliability (ICC = 0.997, p clean with an R of 0.987; similarly, high reliability was observed for between-session back squat performances (ICC = 0.994, p 5% to identify a meaningful change in both maximal back squat and power clean performance.

  3. Effects of Different Magnitudes of Whole-Body Vibration on Dynamic Squatting Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín, Pedro J; García Rioja, Javier; Bernardo-Filho, Mario; Hazell, Tom J

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects (a) of different whole-body vibration (WBV) accelerations when applied simultaneously during a set of squats on performance and perceived exertion and (b) of different linear increases and decreases of vibrations during the squats. It is a randomized, crossover experimental design. Undergraduate students (3 female; 16 male) participated. Each participant completed 5 laboratory sessions in this study (4 familiarization and 1 test session). The test session then had each participant complete one 20-second set of dynamics quarter-squats for 5 separate conditions followed by 5 minutes of rest. Squatting was performed at maximum speed from full extension knee with plantar-flexion ankle to a knee angle of 70° (0° = anatomic position) with dorsiflexion ankle. All sets were performed on the WBV platform in random order, where the 5 different conditions were (a) no WBV-sham, (b) 30 Hz (30 Hz low amplitude), (c) 50 Hz (50 Hz high amplitude), (d) 30-50 Hz (increasing frequency from 30 to 50 Hz; 1 Hz per second with high amplitude), and (e) 50-30 Hz (decreasing frequency from 50 to 30 Hz; 1 Hz per second). There was a significant decrease in the mean velocity of squatting performed during the 30- to 50-Hz condition compared with all other conditions (p ≤ 0.05). There were a significantly lower amount of repetitions performed during the 30- to 50-Hz exposure compared with the no-WBV and 30-Hz conditions. There was a significantly lower Rating of Perceived Exertion (RPE) during the 30-Hz condition compared with the no-WBV, 50-Hz, 30-50-Hz, and 50-30-Hz conditions.

  4. Electroencephalographic recordings during parachute jump sessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, P; Jouffray, L; Rodi, M; Gottesmann, C

    1980-04-01

    Electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings of experienced parachutists were done by means of telemetry before, during, and after jumps of up to 3500m. During free-fall and after stabilization, alpha rhythm was recorded from several alpha reactive subjects when they closed their eyes. No pathological EEG recordings were obtained during the different phases of the jump.

  5. Jump Detection in the Danish Stock Market

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høg, Esben

    2002-01-01

    It is well known in financial economics that stock market return data are often modelled by a diffusion process with some regular drift function. Occasionally, however, sudden changes or jumps occur in the return data. Wavelet scaling methods are used to detect jumps and cusps in stock market...

  6. Rope Jumping: A Preliminary Developmental Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickstrom, Ralph L.

    The basic movement pattern used in skilled individual rope jumping performance was determined and used as a model against which to evaluate the rope jumping form used by children at various levels of skills development. The techniques of adults and nursery school children were filmed and analyzed. The specific causes of unsuccessful attempts were…

  7. Separation and pattern formation in hydraulic jumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Tomas; Ellegaard, C.; Hansen, A. Espe;

    1998-01-01

    We present theory and experiments on the circular hydraulic jump in the stationary regime. The theory can handle the situation in which the fluid flows over an edge far away from the jump. In the experiments the external height is controlled, and a series of transitions in the flow structure appe...

  8. Internal hydraulic jumps with large upstream shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogden, Kelly; Helfrich, Karl

    2015-11-01

    Internal hydraulic jumps in approximately two-layered flows with large upstream shear are investigated using numerical simulations. The simulations allow continuous density and velocity profiles, and a jump is forced to develop by downstream topography, similar to the experiments conducted by Wilkinson and Wood (1971). High shear jumps are found to exhibit significantly more entrainment than low shear jumps. Furthermore, the downstream structure of the flow has an important effect on the jump properties. Jumps with a slow upper (inactive) layer exhibit a velocity minimum downstream of the jump, resulting in a sub-critical downstream state, while flows with the same upstream vertical shear and a larger barotropic velocity remain super-critical downstream of the jump. A two-layer theory is modified to account for the vertical structure of the downstream density and velocity profiles and entrainment is allowed through a modification of the approach of Holland et al. (2002). The resulting theory can be matched reasonably well with the numerical simulations. However, the results are very sensitive to how the downstream vertical profiles of velocity and density are incorporated into the layered model, highlighting the difficulty of the two layer approximation when the shear is large.

  9. Strong jump traceability and Demuth randomness

    CERN Document Server

    Greenberg, Noam

    2011-01-01

    We solve the covering problem for Demuth randomness, showing that a computably enumerable set is computable from a Demuth random set if and only if it is strongly jump-traceable. We show that on the other hand, the class of sets which form a base for Demuth randomness is a proper subclass of the class of strongly jump-traceable sets.

  10. Anthropometric profile, vertical jump, and throwing velocity in elite female handball players by playing positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila, Helena; Manchado, Carmen; Rodriguez, Nuria; Abraldes, José Arturo; Alcaraz, Pedro Emilio; Ferragut, Carmen

    2012-08-01

    Women's handball is a sport, which has seen an accelerated development over the last decade. Although anthropometric and physical characteristics have been studied for male sports teams, in women's handball, studies are scarce. The aim of this study was twofold: first, to describe the anthropometric characteristics, throwing velocity, hand grip, and muscular power of the lower limbs in female handball players and second, to identify the possible differences in these parameters in terms of individual playing positions (center, back, wing, pivot, and goalkeeper). A total of 130 elite female Spanish handball players participated in the study (age 25.74 ± 4.84 years; playing experience 14.92 ± 4.88 years). Anthropometric assessment was performed for all the subjects following the International Society for the Advancement of Kinanthropometry protocols. Furthermore, all the subjects performed a vertical jump test (squat jump and countermovement jump). Hand grip and throwing velocity in several situations were also assessed. A 1-way analysis of variance and a Tukey post hoc test were used to study the differences among individual playing positions. Wings were less heavy, shorter, and showed a smaller arm span than did goalkeepers, backs and pivots (p ≤ 0.001). Additionally, pivots were heavier than centers. Backs and pivots exhibited higher muscular mass than did wings. Total players' somatotype was mesomorphy endomorphy (3.89-4.28-2.29). Centers showed higher throwing velocity levels than did wings in 9-m throws from just behind the line, with a goalkeeper. Backs exhibited higher hand-grip values than did wings. Statistical differences have been established between wings and other specific playing positions, especially with pivot and backs. Coaches can use this information to select players for the different specific positions.

  11. Stochastic stability properties of jump linear systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiangbo; Loparo, Kenneth A.; Ji, Yuandong; Chizeck, Howard J.

    1992-01-01

    Jump linear systems are defined as a family of linear systems with randomly jumping parameters (usually governed by a Markov jump process) and are used to model systems subject to failures or changes in structure. The authors study stochastic stability properties in jump linear systems and the relationship among various moment and sample path stability properties. It is shown that all second moment stability properties are equivalent and are sufficient for almost sure sample path stability, and a testable necessary and sufficient condition for second moment stability is derived. The Lyapunov exponent method for the study of almost sure sample stability is discussed, and a theorem which characterizes the Lyapunov exponents of jump linear systems is presented.

  12. A review on the basketball jump shot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Victor H A; Rodacki, André L F; Satern, Miriam N

    2015-06-01

    The ability to shoot an effective jump shot in the sport of basketball is critical to a player's success. In an attempt to better understand the aspects related to expert performance, researchers have investigated successful free throws and jump shots of various basketball players and identified movement variables that contribute to their success. The purpose of this study was to complete a systematic review of the scientific literature on the basketball free throw and jump shot for the purpose of revealing the critical components of shooting that coaches, teachers, and players should focus on when teaching, learning, practising, and performing a jump shot. The results of this review are presented in three sections: (a) variables that affect ball trajectory, (b) phases of the jump shot, and

  13. Jumping from the Brooklyn Bridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, R J; Pizzi, W F; Richman, H; Tiefenbrun, J

    1987-07-01

    In an attempt to identify factors contributing to survival of free fall and impact, we evaluated the records of four patients who survived a jump from the Brooklyn Bridge into the East River in New York Harbor between 1977 and 1985. All four patients were male and ranged in age from 22 to 67 years. They had free falls of between 41.0 and 48.8 meters. All of the patients were brought to the hospital within 24 minutes of entering the water. Three of the four had emergency surgical treatment and the fourth patient had only minor injuries. All four patients survived the suicide attempts. The length of the hospital stay ranged from two to 26 days.

  14. RPE and Velocity Relationships for the Back Squat, Bench Press, and Deadlift in Powerlifters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helms, Eric R; Storey, Adam; Cross, Matt R; Brown, Scott R; Lenetsky, Seth; Ramsay, Hamish; Dillen, Carolina; Zourdos, Michael C

    2017-02-01

    Helms, ER, Storey, A, Cross, MR, Browm, SR, Lenetsky, S, Ramsay, H, Dillen, C, and Zourdos, MC. RPE and velocity relationships for the back squat, bench press, and deadlift in powerlifters. J Strength Cond Res 31(2): 292-297, 2017-The purpose of this study was to compare average concentric velocity (ACV) and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) based on repetitions in reserve on the squat, bench press, and deadlift. Fifteen powerlifters (3 women and 12 men, mean age 28.4 ± 8.5 years) worked up to a one repetition maximum (1RM) on each lift. Rating of perceived exertion was recorded on all sets, and the ACV was recorded for all sets performed at 80% of estimated 1RM and higher, up to 1RM. Rating of perceived exertion at 1RM on squat, bench press, and deadlift was 9.6 ± 0.5, 9.7 ± 0.4, and 9.6 ± 0.5, respectively and was not significantly different (p > 0.05). The ACV at 1RM on squat, bench press and deadlift was 0.23 ± 0.05, 0.10 ± 0.04, and 0.14 ± 0.05 m·second, respectively. Squat was faster than both bench press and deadlift (p > 0.001), and deadlift was faster than bench press (p = 0.05). Very strong relationships (r = 0.88-0.91) between percentage 1RM and RPE were observed on each lift. The ACV showed strong (r = -0.79 to -0.87) and very strong (r = -0.90 to 92) inverse relationships with RPE and percentage 1RM on each lift, respectively. We conclude that RPE may be a useful tool for prescribing intensity for squat, bench press, and deadlift in powerlifters, in addition to traditional methods such as percentage of 1RM. Despite high correlations between percentage 1RM and ACV, a "velocity load profile" should be developed to prescribe intensity on an individual basis with appropriate accuracy.

  15. The effect of sodium bicarbonate ingestion on back squat and bench press exercise to failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Michael J; Weldon, Anthony; Price, Michael J

    2014-05-01

    This study examined the acute effects of NaHCO3 ingestion on repetitions to failure and rating of perceived exertion in the back squat and bench press in trained men. Eight resistance-trained men took part in this double-blind, randomized crossover experimental study whereby they ingested NaHCO3 (0.3 g·kg(-1) body mass) or placebo (sodium chloride NaCl: 0.045 g·kg(-1) body mass) solution 60 minutes before completing a bout of resistance exercise (3 sets of bench press and back squat exercise to failure at an intensity of 80% 1 repetition maximum). Experimental conditions were separated by at least 48 hours. Participants completed more repetitions to failure in the back squat after NaHCO3 ingestion (p = 0.04) but not for bench press (p = 0.679). Mean ± SD of total repetitions was 31.3 ± 15.3 and 24.6 ± 16.2 for back squat and 28.7 ± 12.2 and 26.7 ± 10.2 for bench press in NaHCO3 and placebo conditions, respectively. Repetitions to failure decreased as set increased for the back squat and bench press (p = 0.001, both). Rating of perceived exertion significantly increased with set for the back squat and bench press (p = 0.002, both). There was no significant change in blood lactate across time or between conditions. There were however treatment × time interactions for blood pH (p = 0.014) and blood HCO3 concentration (p = 0.001). After ingestion, blood pH and HCO3 (p = 0.008) concentrations were greater for the NaHCO3 condition compared with the placebo condition (p < 0.001). The results of this study suggest that sodium bicarbonate ingestion can enhance resistance exercise performance using a repetition to failure protocol in the first exercise in a resistance exercise session.

  16. Differences in Lower Extremity and Trunk Kinematics between Single Leg Squat and Step Down Tasks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cara L Lewis

    Full Text Available The single leg squat and single leg step down are two commonly used functional tasks to assess movement patterns. It is unknown how kinematics compare between these tasks. The purpose of this study was to identify kinematic differences in the lower extremity, pelvis and trunk between the single leg squat and the step down. Fourteen healthy individuals participated in this research and performed the functional tasks while kinematic data were collected for the trunk, pelvis, and lower extremities using a motion capture system. For the single leg squat task, the participant was instructed to squat as low as possible. For the step down task, the participant was instructed to stand on top of a box, slowly lower him/herself until the non-stance heel touched the ground, and return to standing. This was done from two different heights (16 cm and 24 cm. The kinematics were evaluated at peak knee flexion as well as at 60° of knee flexion. Pearson correlation coefficients (r between the angles at those two time points were also calculated to better understand the relationship between each task. The tasks resulted in kinematics differences at the knee, hip, pelvis, and trunk at both time points. The single leg squat was performed with less hip adduction (p ≤ 0.003, but more hip external rotation and knee abduction (p ≤ 0.030, than the step down tasks at 60° of knee flexion. These differences were maintained at peak knee flexion except hip external rotation was only significant in the 24 cm step down task (p ≤ 0.029. While there were multiple differences between the two step heights at peak knee flexion, the only difference at 60° of knee flexion was in trunk flexion (p < 0.001. Angles at the knee and hip had a moderate to excellent correlation (r = 0.51-0.98, but less consistently so at the pelvis and trunk (r = 0.21-0.96. The differences in movement patterns between the single leg squat and the step down should be considered when selecting a

  17. Jumping without using legs: the jump of the click-beetles (Elateridae is morphologically constrained.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gal Ribak

    Full Text Available To return to their feet, inverted click-beetles (Elateridae jump without using their legs. When a beetle is resting on its dorsal side, a hinge mechanism is locked to store elastic energy in the body and releases it abruptly to launch the beetle into the air. While the functional morphology of the jumping mechanism is well known, the level of control that the beetle has over this jumping technique and the mechanical constraints governing the jumps are not entirely clear. Here we show that while body rotations in air are highly variable, the jumps are morphologically constrained to a constant "takeoff" angle (79.9°±1.56°, n = 9 beetles that directs 98% of the jumping force vertically against gravity. A physical-mathematical model of the jumping action, combined with measurements from live beetle, imply that the beetle may control the speed at takeoff but not the jumping angle. In addition, the model shows that very subtle changes in the exact point of contact with the ground can explain the vigorous rotations of the body seen while the beetle is airborne. These findings suggest that the evolution of this unique non-legged jumping mechanism resulted in a jumping technique that is capable of launching the body high into the air but it is too constrained and unstable to allow control of body orientation at landing.

  18. Realized Jump Risk and Equity Return in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guojin Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We utilize the realized jump components to explore a new jump (including nonsystematic jump and systematic jump risk factor model. After estimating daily realized jumps from high-frequency transaction data of the Chinese A-share stocks, we calculate monthly jump size, monthly jump standard deviation, and monthly jump arrival rate and then use those monthly jump factors to explain the return of the following month. Our empirical results show that the jump tail risk can explain the equity return. For the large capital-size stocks, large cap stock portfolios, and index, one-month lagged jump risk factor significantly explains the asset return variation. Our results remain the same even when we add the size and value factors in the robustness tests.

  19. A STUDY TO DETERMINE THE ELECTROMYOGRAPHIC ACTIVITY OF VASTUS MEDIALIS OBLIQUE MUSCLE DURING SQUATS ON DIFFERENT SURFACES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunjal Parekh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the study was to examine the effects of squat exercises performed on different surfaces on the activity of the Vastus Medialis Oblique (VMO muscle. Method: Forty healthy subjects performed squat exercises for five seconds each on three different support surfaces: concrete floor, foam, and rubber discs. As the subjects performed the squat exercises on each surface, data on the activity of the vastus medialis oblique was collected using electromyography. Results: The activity of the vastus medialis oblique and was found to be statistically significantly higher (p<0.05 on rubber discs than when the squats were performed on concrete floor or foam. Conclusion: The activation of vastus medialis obilique is more on unstable surfaces. Hence they are more suitable strengthening of VMO.

  20. Bubble visualization in a simulated hydraulic jump

    CERN Document Server

    Witt, Adam; Shen, Lian

    2013-01-01

    This is a fluid dynamics video of two- and three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics simulations carried out at St. Anthony Falls Laboratory. A transient hydraulic jump is simulated using OpenFOAM, an open source numerical solver. A Volume of Fluid numerical method is employed with a realizable k-epsilon turbulence model. The goal of this research is to model the void fraction and bubble size in a transient hydraulic jump. This fluid dynamics video depicts the air entrainment characteristics and bubble behavior within a hydraulic jump of Froude number 4.82.

  1. Reap what you sow! - But what about SPC squatting? (Under Review)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schovsbo, Jens Hemmingsen; Klinge, Ulla Callesen; Minssen, Timo

    2017-01-01

    Abstract: Despite an avalanche of recent court decisions on the European system for supplementary protection certificates (SPCs), the issue of third party SPC applications - also known as “SPC squatting” – has never been sufficiently clarified. Considering the ambiguous stipulations in the SPC...... Regulations, as well as the practical and theoretical significance of this issue, the lack of judicial guidance is problematic. It is important to address such situations for the sake of legal certainty and in order to enable companies to make strategic decisions. SPC squatting also involves a crucial debate...... about the rationales underlying the SPC system and the question whether such activities are compatible with the very goals of the Regulations. This paper provides an overview on the legal status quo with regard to SPC squatting and discusses if - and if so, under what circumstances - such practices...

  2. The effect of dicyclomine hydrochloride, an anticholinergic agent, on heart rate variability and squatting test inhealthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmaeil Akbari

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available (Received 14 September, 2009 ; Accepted 19 November, 2009AbstractBackground and purpose: Squatting test and heart rate variability (HRV are currently being used to evaluate cardiovascular autonomic nervous function. HRV indexes are able to measure vagal function, while squatting test is able to measure both sympathetic and vagal functions. Our objective in this research is to evaluate the influence of injective dicyclomine hydrochloride (DCH-an M1 receptor selective antagonist- on autonomic nervous system function regarding HRV indexes and squatting test.Materials and methods: Fifteen healthy males 19-24 year-old volunteers were involved in this single blind research. Each volunteer was referred two times every week and in each session the DCH (20 mg / 2ml or placebo (2 ml is injected to the muscle and between 30 to 40 minutes after injection, the uncontrolled normal breathing test and squatting test were conducted. After that, those parameters which show cardiac vagus and sympatic activity were measured in these tests.Results: Administration of single dose of DCH didn’t cause any side effects; only one case of dry mouth is monitored. An increase in HRV indexes in uncontrolled normal breathing test, increase in vagal ratio, and decrease in sympathetic ratio in squatting test all caused by DCH.Conclusion: Although DCH is an anticholinergic agent, in muscular administration with 20 mg dose, regarding HRV parameters and squatting test, it shows cholinergic effects. J Mazand Univ Med Sci 2009; 19(72: 10-17 (Persian.

  3. In Vivo Noninvasive Evaluation of Abnormal Patellar Tracking During Squatting in Patients with Patellofemoral Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Nicole A.; Press, Joel M.; Koh, Jason L.; Hendrix, Ronald W.; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2009-01-01

    Background: Patellofemoral pain syndrome is one of the most common knee problems and may be related to abnormal patellar tracking. Our purpose was to compare, in vivo and noninvasively, the patellar tracking patterns in symptomatic patients with patellofemoral pain and those in healthy subjects during squatting. We tested the hypothesis that patients with patellofemoral pain exhibit characteristic patterns of patellar tracking that are different from those of healthy subjects.

  4. Upward squatting in individuals with and without patellofemoral pain syndrome: a biomechanical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionisio, Valdeci C; Marconi, Nádia F; dos Santos, Irlei; Almeida, Gil L

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of the study was to test the hypothesis on whether individuals with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) try to avoid knee position during upward squatting so as not to aggravate this syndrome. Also, we tested whether PFPS would generate changes in the kinetic and electromyographic (EMG) strategies used to perform this task. Eight healthy subjects and 8 subjects with PFPS, but without a history of pain for at least 30 days, took part in the experiment. They were asked to perform upward squatting with knees initially flexed at 60° (very flexed) until reaching an upright position. Angle, velocity, and acceleration (kinematic) were reconstructed for knee and ankle joints. The torques at these joints were calculated using inverse dynamics, taking into account anthropometric and inertial characteristics of each subject, including records from force data. Only activities of major muscles were recorded. The kinetic and EMG profiles were quantified during acceleration and deceleration phases of the upward squatting. Both healthy and PFPS subjects used the same kinetic and EMG strategies to perform the upward squatting, even though the magnitude of the muscle activities were decreased for the latter group. Compared to the control group, the PFPS subjects presented larger joint ankle torques and smaller knee joint torques. However, the subjects avoided keeping their knees very flexed at the initial position. Group differences in the kinetic and EMG strategies can be explained by differences in the initial position, suggesting a protective strategy used by subjects with PFPS. Therefore, for these subjects, coaches and therapists should avoid using this exercise when the knee is required to move above 40° flexion.

  5. The Crown Bite Jumping Herbst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Reuel

    2003-01-01

    The Crown Bite Jumping Herbst Appliance is evaluated and combined with Straight Wire Arch Fixed Orthodontics in treatment of Class II, Division I malocclusions. This article will evaluate a combined orthodontic approach of "straightening teeth" and an orthognathic approach of "moving jaws or making skeletal changes." Orthodontic treatment cannot be accomplished well without establishing a healthy temporomandibular joint. This is defined by Keller as a joint that is "noiseless, painless and has a normal range of motion without deviation and deflection." It is not prudent to separate orthodontic treatment as its own entity without being aware of the changes in the temporomandibular joint before, during and after treatment. In other words, "If you're doing orthodontics you're doing TMJ treatment." One should treat toward a healthy, beautiful face asking, "Will proposed treatment achieve this goal?" Treatment should be able to be carried out in an efficient manner, minimizing treatment time, be comfortable and affordable for the patient, and profitable for the dentist. The finished treatment should meet Andrews' Six Keys of Occlusion, or Loudon's Twelve Commandments. Above all, do no harm to the patient. We think that a specific treatment plan can embrace these tenets. The focus will be to show Class II treatment using a modified Herbst Appliance and fixed straight wire orthodontics.

  6. Volatility jumps and their economic determinants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caporin, Massimiliano; Rossi, Eduardo; Santucci de Magistris, Paolo

    that there is a positive probability of jumps in volatility. A common factor in the volatility jumps is shown to be related to a set of financial covariates (such as variance risk premium, S&P500 volume, credit-default swap, and federal fund rates). The credit-default swap on US banks and variance risk premium have...... predictive power on expected jump moves, thus confirming the common interpretation that sudden and large increases in equity volatility can be anticipated by credit deterioration of the US bank sector as well as changes in the market expectations of future risks. Finally, the model is extended to incorporate...... the credit-default swap and the variance risk premium in the dynamics of the jump size and intensity....

  7. 'Gay times': identity, locality, memory, and the Brixton squats in 1970's London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Matt

    2013-01-01

    Through a thick description of a gay squatting community in south London in the 1970s, this piece explores the ways in which local histories complicate broader accounts of gay life, politics, and culture. Such a focus alerts us to the impact of personal encounters, of local politics, and material circumstances, of coincident local communities, of jobs (or the lack of them), and of major local events (like the Brixton riots of 1981). The local focus and the oral history sources also illuminate the complex ways in which unspoken and often unconscious imperatives associated with ethnicity, class, and the familial, social, and cultural contexts of our upbringings are played out under new and changing circumstances. Taking this approach fractures homogenizing assumptions about gay identity and community--even of a self-identified gay community like this squatting collective. It can also decentre sexuality as a primary category of identity and analysis as other factors come into sharper focus and shed light on the ebb and flow of identification and on the ways in which broader histories are woven into everyday lives. The piece thus considers different scales of analysis, the limits of identification, the inclusions and exclusions enacted when communities come together and identities coalesce, the continuities and discontinuities between broader and counter cultures (especially in relation to ideas and lived experiences of home), and the way memories of the squats and of the 1970s are modulated by subsequent national and gay politics, by AIDS, and by a profound sense of loss.

  8. Jump Horse Safety: Reconciling Public Debate and Australian Thoroughbred Jump Racing Data, 2012-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruse, Karen; Davison, Aidan; Bridle, Kerry

    2015-10-22

    Thoroughbred jump racing sits in the spotlight of contemporary welfare and ethical debates about horse racing. In Australia, jump racing comprises hurdle and steeplechase races and has ceased in all but two states, Victoria and South Australia. This paper documents the size, geography, composition, and dynamics of Australian jump racing for the 2012, 2013, and 2014 seasons with a focus on debate about risks to horses. We found that the majority of Australian jump racing is regional, based in Victoria, and involves a small group of experienced trainers and jockeys. Australian jump horses are on average 6.4 years of age. The jump career of the majority of horses involves participating in three or less hurdle races and over one season. Almost one quarter of Australian jump horses race only once. There were ten horse fatalities in races over the study period, with an overall fatality rate of 5.1 fatalities per 1000 horses starting in a jump race (0.51%). There was significant disparity between the fatality rate for hurdles, 0.75 fatalities per 1000 starts (0.075%) and steeplechases, 14 fatalities per 1000 starts (1.4%). Safety initiatives introduced by regulators in 2010 appear to have significantly decreased risks to horses in hurdles but have had little or no effect in steeplechases. Our discussion considers these Animals 2015, 5 1073 data in light of public controversy, political debate, and industry regulation related to jump horse safety.

  9. Jump Horse Safety: Reconciling Public Debate and Australian Thoroughbred Jump Racing Data, 2012–2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Ruse

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Thoroughbred jump racing sits in the spotlight of contemporary welfare and ethical debates about horse racing. In Australia, jump racing comprises hurdle and steeplechase races and has ceased in all but two states, Victoria and South Australia. This paper documents the size, geography, composition, and dynamics of Australian jump racing for the 2012, 2013, and 2014 seasons with a focus on debate about risks to horses. We found that the majority of Australian jump racing is regional, based in Victoria, and involves a small group of experienced trainers and jockeys. Australian jump horses are on average 6.4 years of age. The jump career of the majority of horses involves participating in three or less hurdle races and over one season. Almost one quarter of Australian jump horses race only once. There were ten horse fatalities in races over the study period, with an overall fatality rate of 5.1 fatalities per 1000 horses starting in a jump race (0.51%. There was significant disparity between the fatality rate for hurdles, 0.75 fatalities per 1000 starts (0.075% and steeplechases, 14 fatalities per 1000 starts (1.4%. Safety initiatives introduced by regulators in 2010 appear to have significantly decreased risks to horses in hurdles but have had little or no effect in steeplechases. Our discussion considers these Animals 2015, 5 1073 data in light of public controversy, political debate, and industry regulation related to jump horse safety.

  10. Portfolio Selection with Jumps under Regime Switching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Zhao

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate a continuous-time version of the mean-variance portfolio selection model with jumps under regime switching. The portfolio selection is proposed and analyzed for a market consisting of one bank account and multiple stocks. The random regime switching is assumed to be independent of the underlying Brownian motion and jump processes. A Markov chain modulated diffusion formulation is employed to model the problem.

  11. Preschool-aged children's jumps: imitation performances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labiadh, Lazhar; Ramanantsoa, Marie-Martine; Golomer, Eveline

    2010-04-01

    Imitative behavior underlaid by perception and action links during children's development in complex locomotor skills has been the object of relatively few studies. In order to explore children's motor coordination modes, 130 children divided into five age groups from 3.5 to 7.5 years were instructed to imitate jumping tasks in spontaneous motor situation and in various imitative contexts by an adult providing verbal orders and gestural demonstrations. Their conformity to the model, stability and variability scores were coded from a video analysis when they performed jumps with obstacles. To evaluate their postural-motor control level, the durations of the preparatory phase and jumping flights were also timed. Results showed that all age groups generated the demonstrator's goal but not necessarily the same coordination modes of jumping. In imitation with temporal proximity, the model helped the youngest age groups to adopt his coordination modes and stabilized only the oldest age groups' performances starting from 5.5 years old, without effect on learning imitation. Differences between the youngest and oldest children in the jump duration suggested that the reproduction of a complex motor activity such as jumping with a one foot take-off would require resolution and adjustment of main postural stability.

  12. Analysis of the load on the knee joint and vertebral column with changes in squatting depth and weight load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Hagen; Wirth, Klaus; Klusemann, Markus

    2013-10-01

    It has been suggested that deep squats could cause an increased injury risk of the lumbar spine and the knee joints. Avoiding deep flexion has been recommended to minimize the magnitude of knee-joint forces. Unfortunately this suggestion has not taken the influence of the wrapping effect, functional adaptations and soft tissue contact between the back of thigh and calf into account. The aim of this literature review is to assess whether squats with less knee flexion (half/quarter squats) are safer on the musculoskeletal system than deep squats. A search of relevant scientific publications was conducted between March 2011 and January 2013 using PubMed. Over 164 articles were included in the review. There are no realistic estimations of knee-joint forces for knee-flexion angles beyond 50° in the deep squat. Based on biomechanical calculations and measurements of cadaver knee joints, the highest retropatellar compressive forces and stresses can be seen at 90°. With increasing flexion, the wrapping effect contributes to an enhanced load distribution and enhanced force transfer with lower retropatellar compressive forces. Additionally, with further flexion of the knee joint a cranial displacement of facet contact areas with continuous enlargement of the retropatellar articulating surface occurs. Both lead to lower retropatellar compressive stresses. Menisci and cartilage, ligaments and bones are susceptible to anabolic metabolic processes and functional structural adaptations in response to increased activity and mechanical influences. Concerns about degenerative changes of the tendofemoral complex and the apparent higher risk for chondromalacia, osteoarthritis, and osteochondritis in deep squats are unfounded. With the same load configuration as in the deep squat, half and quarter squat training with comparatively supra-maximal loads will favour degenerative changes in the knee joints and spinal joints in the long term. Provided that technique is learned accurately

  13. USE OF WHOLE-BODY VIBRATION AS A MODE OF WARMING UP BEFORE COUNTER MOVEMENT JUMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique G. Artero

    2007-12-01

    vibrating platform (Galileo 900, Novotec, Pforzheim, Germany. Since a suitable protocol of WBV has not been definitely established (Cormie et al., 2006, participants were randomly allocated into five groups with different vibration protocols. The proportion of males (from 30.8 to 36.8 % was similar in the five groups. Vibration amplitude was fixed at ± 3 mm (i.e., peak-to-peak of 6 mm for all groups, while frequency and duration ranged from 20 to 30 Hz and 90 or 120 s, respectively (Table 1. The time over the platform was equally distributed in three positions: 1st isometric squat at a knee angle of approximately 120º, standing on the toes; 2nd isometric squat at a knee angle of approximately 120º, standing on the whole foot; and 3rd dynamic half squats (lower limit: 90º knee angle at a fixed rhythm marked by a metronome (2.4 s per squat. Sport shoes were required during the entire vibration stimulus and all CMJ tests.The interaction between sex, WBV protocol- group and CMJ performance was analysed by means of two-way repeated measures analysis of the variance (ANOVA. Since no significant interaction was found, males and females, as well as the five groups were analyzed together by repeated measured analysis of covariance (ANCOVA, with sex and WBV protocol-group as covariates. All the residuals showed a satisfactory pattern. Pairwise comparisons were performed with Bonferroni adjustment. The analysis was performed using the SPSS software v 15.0.1., and the level of significance was set at 5%.The CMJ performance significantly decreased immediately after WBV was applied (p < 0.001. This decrease did not differ among the five WBV protocols used, and ranged between 1.1 cm for the 20 Hz - 90 s group and 2.7 cm for the 20 Hz - 120 s group. In the jumps performed one and two min after WBV, the performance was recovered up to the level achieved in the absence of WBV. Since the effect of the five different WBV protocols on CMJ performance did not significantly differ, the

  14. Strength performance in youth: trainability of adolescents and children in the back and front squats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiner, Michael; Sander, Andre; Wirth, Klaus; Caruso, Oliver; Immesberger, Peter; Zawieja, Martin

    2013-02-01

    A basic question for many athletic coaches pertains to the maximum attainable strength level for youth athletes. The aim of this investigation was to establish reference values for the strength performance in the front and back squats in youth athletes. The strength performance in front and back squats of 141 elite youth soccer players was tested by a 1 repetition maximum (1RM) and 1RM related to bodyweight (SREL). The subjects aged between 11 and 19 years and were divided into 2 groups and 4 subgroups (A = younger than 19 years, B = younger than 17 years, C = younger than 15 years, and D = younger than 13 years). For approximately 2 years, one group (control group [CG]) only participated in routine soccer training and the other group (strength training group [STG]) participated in an additional strength training program along with the routine soccer training. Additionally, the strength performance in a 5RM in both squat variants of 105 young elite weightlifters (National Weightlifting Organization Baden Württemberg, [BWG]) was examined to show the high level of trainability of children and adolescents and to determine the reference strength values for young athletes. The STG performed in the parallel front squat SREL in the subgroups A 1.7 +/- 0.2, B 1.6 +/- 0.2, C 1.4 +/-0.2 and D 0.9 +/- 0.3. The STG had significantly (p < 0.001) higher strength values in 1RM and SREL than CG. The BWG had higher strength values than STG, but the BWG was not part of the statistical analysis because of the different test protocols (1RM vs. 5RM). Our data show that the SREL in parallel squat for young elite athletes with long-term training experience should be a minimum of 2.0 for 16- to 19-year-olds, 1.5 for 13- to 15-year-olds, and 0.7 for 11- to 12-year-olds.

  15. Performance analysis of jump-gliding locomotion for miniature robotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidyasagar, A; Zufferey, Jean-Christohphe; Floreano, Dario; Kovač, M

    2015-03-26

    Recent work suggests that jumping locomotion in combination with a gliding phase can be used as an effective mobility principle in robotics. Compared to pure jumping without a gliding phase, the potential benefits of hybrid jump-gliding locomotion includes the ability to extend the distance travelled and reduce the potentially damaging impact forces upon landing. This publication evaluates the performance of jump-gliding locomotion and provides models for the analysis of the relevant dynamics of flight. It also defines a jump-gliding envelope that encompasses the range that can be achieved with jump-gliding robots and that can be used to evaluate the performance and improvement potential of jump-gliding robots. We present first a planar dynamic model and then a simplified closed form model, which allow for quantification of the distance travelled and the impact energy on landing. In order to validate the prediction of these models, we validate the model with experiments using a novel jump-gliding robot, named the 'EPFL jump-glider'. It has a mass of 16.5 g and is able to perform jumps from elevated positions, perform steered gliding flight, land safely and traverse on the ground by repetitive jumping. The experiments indicate that the developed jump-gliding model fits very well with the measured flight data using the EPFL jump-glider, confirming the benefits of jump-gliding locomotion to mobile robotics. The jump-glide envelope considerations indicate that the EPFL jump-glider, when traversing from a 2 m height, reaches 74.3% of optimal jump-gliding distance compared to pure jumping without a gliding phase which only reaches 33.4% of the optimal jump-gliding distance. Methods of further improving flight performance based on the models and inspiration from biological systems are presented providing mechanical design pathways to future jump-gliding robot designs.

  16. JUMP KINETIC DETERMINANTS OF SPRINT ACCELERATION PERFORMANCE FROM STARTING BLOCKS IN MALE SPRINTERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter S. Maulder

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to identify the jump kinetic determinants of sprint acceleration performance from a block start. Ten male (mean ± SD: age 20 ± 3 years; height 1.82 ± 0.06 m; weight 76.7 ± 7.9 kg; 100 m personal best: 10.87 + 0.36 s {10.37 - 11.42} track sprinters at a national and regional competitive level performed 10 m sprints from a block start. Anthropometric dimensions along with squat jump (SJ, countermovement jump (CMJ, continuous straight legged jump (SLJ, single leg hop for distance, and single leg triple hop for distance measures of power were also tested. Stepwise multiple regression analysis identified CMJ average power (W/kg as a predictor of 10 m sprint performance from a block start (r = 0.79, r2 = 0.63, p<0.01, SEE = 0.04 (s, %SEE = 2.0. Pearson correlation analysis revealed CMJ force and power (r = -0.70 to -0.79; p = 0.011 - 0.035 and SJ power (r = -0.72 to -0.73; p = 0.026 - 0.028 generating capabilities to be strongly related to sprint performance. Further linear regression analysis predicted an increase in CMJ average and peak take-off power of 1 W/kg (3% & 1.5% respectively to both result in a decrease of 0.01 s (0.5% in 10 m sprint performance. Further, an increase in SJ average and peak take-off power of 1 W/kg (3.5% & 1.5% respectively was predicted to result in a 0.01 s (0.5% reduction in 10 m sprint time. The results of this study seem to suggest that the ability to generate power both elastically during a CMJ and concentrically during a SJ to be good indicators of predicting sprint performance over 10 m from a block start

  17. Jump Horse Safety: Reconciling Public Debate and Australian Thoroughbred Jump Racing Data, 2012–2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruse, Karen; Davison, Aidan; Bridle, Kerry

    2015-01-01

    Simple Summary This paper documents the dynamics of Australian thoroughbred jump racing in the 2012, 2013, and 2014 seasons with the aim of informing debate about risks to horses and the future of this activity. We conclude that the safety of Australian jump racing has improved in recent years but that steeplechases are considerably riskier for horses than hurdle races. Abstract Thoroughbred jump racing sits in the spotlight of contemporary welfare and ethical debates about horse racing. In Australia, jump racing comprises hurdle and steeplechase races and has ceased in all but two states, Victoria and South Australia. This paper documents the size, geography, composition, and dynamics of Australian jump racing for the 2012, 2013, and 2014 seasons with a focus on debate about risks to horses. We found that the majority of Australian jump racing is regional, based in Victoria, and involves a small group of experienced trainers and jockeys. Australian jump horses are on average 6.4 years of age. The jump career of the majority of horses involves participating in three or less hurdle races and over one season. Almost one quarter of Australian jump horses race only once. There were ten horse fatalities in races over the study period, with an overall fatality rate of 5.1 fatalities per 1000 horses starting in a jump race (0.51%). There was significant disparity between the fatality rate for hurdles, 0.75 fatalities per 1000 starts (0.075%) and steeplechases, 14 fatalities per 1000 starts (1.4%). Safety initiatives introduced by regulators in 2010 appear to have significantly decreased risks to horses in hurdles but have had little or no effect in steeplechases. Our discussion considers these data in light of public controversy, political debate, and industry regulation related to jump horse safety. PMID:26506396

  18. Jumping to conclusions in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evans SL

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Simon L Evans,1 Bruno B Averbeck,2 Nicholas Furl31School of Psychology, University of Sussex, Brighton, East Sussex, UK; 2Laboratory of Neuropsychology, National Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA; 3Department of Psychology, Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham, Surrey, UKAbstract: Schizophrenia is a mental disorder associated with a variety of symptoms, including hallucinations, delusions, social withdrawal, and cognitive dysfunction. Impairments on decision-making tasks are routinely reported: evidence points to a particular deficit in learning from and revising behavior following feedback. In addition, patients tend to make hasty decisions when probabilistic judgments are required. This is known as “jumping to conclusions” (JTC and has typically been demonstrated by presenting participants with colored beads drawn from one of two “urns” until they claim to be sure which urn the beads are being drawn from (the proportions of colors vary in each urn. Patients tend to make early decisions on this task, and there is evidence to suggest that a hasty decision-making style might be linked to delusion formation and thus be of clinical relevance. Various accounts have been proposed regarding what underlies this behavior. In this review, we briefly introduce the disorder and the decision-making deficits associated with it. We then explore the evidence for each account of JTC in the context of a wider decision-making deficit and then go on to summarize work exploring JTC in healthy controls using pharmacological manipulations and functional imaging. Finally, we assess whether JTC might have a role in therapy.Keywords: ketamine, decision making, delusions, fMRI, urn task

  19. Effectiveness of an Individualized Training Based on Force-Velocity Profiling during Jumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Reyes, Pedro; Samozino, Pierre; Brughelli, Matt; Morin, Jean-Benoît

    2017-01-01

    each individual) was more efficient at improving jumping performance (i.e., unloaded squat jump height) than a traditional resistance training common to all subjects regardless of their FVimb. Although improving both FVimb and Pmax has to be considered to improve ballistic performance, the present results showed that reducing FVimb without even increasing Pmax lead to clearly beneficial jump performance changes. Thus, FVimb could be considered as a potentially useful variable for prescribing optimal resistance training to improve ballistic performance. PMID:28119624

  20. The effect of wind on jumping distance in ski jumping--fairness assessed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virmavirta, Mikko; Kivekäs, Juha

    2012-09-01

    The special wind compensation system recently adopted by Fédération Internationale de Ski (FIS; International Ski Federation) to consider the effects of changing wind conditions has caused some controversy. Here, the effect of wind on jumping distance in ski jumping was studied by means of computer simulation and compared with the wind compensation factors used by FIS during the World Cup season 2009/2010. The results showed clearly that the effect of increasing head/tail wind on jumping distance is not linear: +17.4 m/-29.1 m, respectively, for a wind speed of 3 m/s. The linear formula used in the trial period of the wind compensation system was found to be appropriate only for a limited range of jumping distances as the gradient of the landing slope slows down the rate of distance change in long jumps.

  1. Efecto agudo de la técnica Active Isolated Stretching y del reposo sobre la capacidad de salto. [Acute effect of Active Isolated Stretching technique and of rest on the jumping capacity].

    OpenAIRE

    Jesús López-Bedoya; Leopoldo Ariza-Vargas; Alejandro Robles-Fuentes; Mercedes Vernetta-Santana

    2015-01-01

    El objetivo de este estudio fue analizar el efecto agudo de la técnica de estiramiento active isolated stretching (AIS) y el efecto del reposo en sedestación sobre la altura de salto registrada mediante el test Squat Jump (SJ) y Counter Movement Jump (CMJ). Un total de 22 varones con un rango de edad entre 21 y 24 años (edad 22,9 ± 2,03 años; masa corporal 69,7 ± 5,60 kg; altura 173,6 ± 7,37cm) completaron el estudio. Se utilizó un diseño intragrupo pretest-postest con dos situaciones experi...

  2. Relationship of Two Vertical Jumping Tests to Sprint and Change of Direction Speed among Male and Female Collegiate Soccer Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaiah T. McFarland

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In collegiate level soccer acceleration, maximal velocity and agility are essential for successful performance. Power production is believed to provide a foundation for these speed qualities. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship of change of direction speed, acceleration, and maximal velocity to both the counter movement jump (CMJ and squat jump (SJ in collegiate soccer players. Thirty-six NCAA Division II soccer players (20 males and 16 females were tested for speed over 10 and 30 m, CODS (T-test, pro agility and power (CMJ, SJ. Independent t-tests (p ≤ 0.05 were used to derive gender differences, and Pearson’s correlations (p ≤ 0.05 calculated relationships between the different power and speed tests. Female subjects displayed moderate-to-strong correlations between 30 m, pro agility and T-test with the CMJ (r = −0.502 to −0.751, and SJ (r = −0.502 to −0.681. Moderate correlations between 10 and 30 m with CMJ (r = −0.476 and −0.570 and SJ (r = −0.443 and −0.553, respectively were observed for males. Moderate to strong relationships exist between speed and power attributes in both male and female collegiate soccer players, especially between CMJ and maximal velocity. Improving stretch shortening cycle (SSC utilization may contribute to enhanced sport-specific speed.

  3. Filtering and control of stochastic jump hybrid systems

    CERN Document Server

    Yao, Xiuming; Zheng, Wei Xing

    2016-01-01

    This book presents recent research work on stochastic jump hybrid systems. Specifically, the considered stochastic jump hybrid systems include Markovian jump Ito stochastic systems, Markovian jump linear-parameter-varying (LPV) systems, Markovian jump singular systems, Markovian jump two-dimensional (2-D) systems, and Markovian jump repeated scalar nonlinear systems. Some sufficient conditions are first established respectively for the stability and performances of those kinds of stochastic jump hybrid systems in terms of solution of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs). Based on the derived analysis conditions, the filtering and control problems are addressed. The book presents up-to-date research developments and novel methodologies on stochastic jump hybrid systems. The contents can be divided into two parts: the first part is focused on robust filter design problem, while the second part is put the emphasis on robust control problem. These methodologies provide a framework for stability and performance analy...

  4. A locust-inspired miniature jumping robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitsev, Valentin; Gvirsman, Omer; Ben Hanan, Uri; Weiss, Avi; Ayali, Amir; Kosa, Gabor

    2015-11-25

    Unmanned ground vehicles are mostly wheeled, tracked, or legged. These locomotion mechanisms have a limited ability to traverse rough terrain and obstacles that are higher than the robot's center of mass. In order to improve the mobility of small robots it is necessary to expand the variety of their motion gaits. Jumping is one of nature's solutions to the challenge of mobility in difficult terrain. The desert locust is the model for the presented bio-inspired design of a jumping mechanism for a small mobile robot. The basic mechanism is similar to that of the semilunar process in the hind legs of the locust, and is based on the cocking of a torsional spring by wrapping a tendon-like wire around the shaft of a miniature motor. In this study we present the jumping mechanism design, and the manufacturing and performance analysis of two demonstrator prototypes. The most advanced jumping robot demonstrator is power autonomous, weighs 23 gr, and is capable of jumping to a height of 3.35 m, covering a distance of 1.37 m.

  5. Mechanical jumping power in young athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viitasalo, J T; Osterback, L; Alen, M; Rahkila, P; Havas, E

    1987-09-01

    Mechanical jumping power was determined for 286 young male athletes representing six sports events and ranging in calendar and skeletal ages from 8.8 to 17.1 and from 7.8 to 18.1 years, respectively. The subjects performed successive maximal vertical jumps on a contact mat for 30 s. The number of jumps and their cumulative flight time after 15 and 30 s were used for calculations of mechanical power. The jumping performances of the young athletes were found to be reproducible from the age of 10-12 years in respect to the angular displacement of the knee and duration of contact. Absolute mechanical power, as well as power related to body weight, increased with calendar and skeletal ages. Of the anthropometric characteristics, the circumference of the thigh and body weight showed the highest correlation with mechanical power; subjects with the greatest thigh circumference and body weight having the lowest mechanical power. The subjects were divided into 'power' (track and field, gymnastics) and 'endurance' (skiing, orienteering) groups. The former reached higher mechanical power values than the latter. Mechanical power for the second 15-s jumping period was on average 4.7% lower than for the first. The events did not differ from each other in respect of the decrease in power.

  6. A 3D Human-Machine Integrated Design and Analysis Framework for Squat Exercises with a Smith Machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Haerin; Jung, Moonki; Lee, Ki-Kwang; Lee, Sang Hun

    2017-02-06

    In this paper, we propose a three-dimensional design and evaluation framework and process based on a probabilistic-based motion synthesis algorithm and biomechanical analysis system for the design of the Smith machine and squat training programs. Moreover, we implemented a prototype system to validate the proposed framework. The framework consists of an integrated human-machine-environment model as well as a squat motion synthesis system and biomechanical analysis system. In the design and evaluation process, we created an integrated model in which interactions between a human body and machine or the ground are modeled as joints with constraints at contact points. Next, we generated Smith squat motion using the motion synthesis program based on a Gaussian process regression algorithm with a set of given values for independent variables. Then, using the biomechanical analysis system, we simulated joint moments and muscle activities from the input of the integrated model and squat motion. We validated the model and algorithm through physical experiments measuring the electromyography (EMG) signals, ground forces, and squat motions as well as through a biomechanical simulation of muscle forces. The proposed approach enables the incorporation of biomechanics in the design process and reduces the need for physical experiments and prototypes in the development of training programs and new Smith machines.

  7. Single-leg squats can predict leg alignment in dancers performing ballet movements in “turnout”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hopper LS

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Luke S Hopper,1 Nahoko Sato,2 Andries L Weidemann1 1Western Australian Academy of Performing Arts, Edith Cowan University, Mt Lawley, WA, Australia; 2Department of Physical Therapy, Nagoya Gakuin University, Seto, Japan Abstract: The physical assessments used in dance injury surveillance programs are often adapted from the sports and exercise domain. Bespoke physical assessments may be required for dance, particularly when ballet movements involve “turning out” or external rotation of the legs beyond that typically used in sports. This study evaluated the ability of the traditional single-leg squat to predict the leg alignment of dancers performing ballet movements with turnout. Three-dimensional kinematic data of dancers performing the single-leg squat and five ballet movements were recorded and analyzed. Reduction of the three-dimensional data into a one-dimensional variable incorporating the ankle, knee, and hip joint center positions provided the strongest predictive model between the single-leg squat and the ballet movements. The single-leg squat can predict leg alignment in dancers performing ballet movements, even in “turned out” postures. Clinicians should pay careful attention to observational positioning and rating criteria when assessing dancers performing the single-leg squat. Keywords: injury, motion capture, clinical assessment

  8. Single-leg squats can predict leg alignment in dancers performing ballet movements in “turnout”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, Luke S; Sato, Nahoko; Weidemann, Andries L

    2016-01-01

    The physical assessments used in dance injury surveillance programs are often adapted from the sports and exercise domain. Bespoke physical assessments may be required for dance, particularly when ballet movements involve “turning out” or external rotation of the legs beyond that typically used in sports. This study evaluated the ability of the traditional single-leg squat to predict the leg alignment of dancers performing ballet movements with turnout. Three-dimensional kinematic data of dancers performing the single-leg squat and five ballet movements were recorded and analyzed. Reduction of the three-dimensional data into a one-dimensional variable incorporating the ankle, knee, and hip joint center positions provided the strongest predictive model between the single-leg squat and the ballet movements. The single-leg squat can predict leg alignment in dancers performing ballet movements, even in “turned out” postures. Clinicians should pay careful attention to observational positioning and rating criteria when assessing dancers performing the single-leg squat. PMID:27895518

  9. Muscle activation and knee biomechanics during squatting and lunging after lower extremity fatigue in healthy young women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longpré, Heather S; Acker, Stacey M; Maly, Monica R

    2015-02-01

    Muscle activations and knee joint loads were compared during squatting and lunging before and after lower extremity neuromuscular fatigue. Electromyographic activations of the rectus femoris, vastus lateralis and biceps femoris, and the external knee adduction and flexion moments were collected on 25 healthy women (mean age 23.5 years, BMI of 23.7 kg/m(2)) during squatting and lunging. Participants were fatigued through sets of 50 isotonic knee extensions and flexions, with resistance set at 50% of the peak torque achieved during a maximum voluntary isometric contraction. Fatigue was defined as a decrease in peak isometric knee extension or flexion torque ≥25% from baseline. Co-activation indices were calculated between rectus femoris and biceps femoris; and between vastus lateralis and biceps femoris. Fatigue decreased peak isometric extension and flexion torques (pknee adduction and flexion moments during lunging (p<0.05). Quadriceps activations were greater during lunging than squatting (p<0.05). Thus, fatigue altered the recruitment strategy of the quadriceps during squatting and lunging. Lunging challenges quadriceps activation more than squatting in healthy, young women.

  10. The Effect of Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage After a Bout of Accentuated Eccentric Load Drop Jumps and the Repeated Bout Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridgeman, Lee A; Gill, Nicholas D; Dulson, Deborah K; McGuigan, Michael R

    2017-02-01

    Bridgeman, LA, Gill, ND, Dulson, DK, and McGuigan, MR. The effect of exercise induced muscle damage after a bout of accentuated eccentric load drop jumps and the repeated bout effect. J Strength Cond Res 31(2): 386-394, 2017-Although previous studies have investigated exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) after a bout of unloaded drop jumps (DJs), none have investigated the effects of accentuated eccentric load (AEL) DJs on EIMD. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of 30 and 50 AEL DJs on strength, jump performance, muscle soreness, and blood markers. Eight resistance trained athletes participated in this study. In week 1, baseline countermovement jump (CMJ), squat jump (SJ), concentric and eccentric peak force (PF), creatine kinase, and muscle soreness were assessed. Subjects then completed 30 AEL DJs and baseline measures were retested immediately postintervention, 1, 24, and 48 hours later. Two weeks later, the subjects completed the same protocol with an increase in AEL DJ volume (50). Subjects' SJ height was reduced in week 1 compared with week 3, postintervention, 1, 24, and 48 hours later (ES = -0.34, -0.44, -0.38, and -0.40). Subjects' CMJ height was reduced in week 1 compared with week 3, postintervention, 1, and 24 hours later (ES = -0.37, -0.29, and -0.39). Concentric PF was reduced in week 1 compared with week 3, postintervention and 24 and 48 hours later (ES = -0.02, -0.23, and -0.32). Eccentric PF was reduced in week 1 compared with week 3, postintervention, 24, and 48 hours later (ES = -0.24, -0.16, and -0.50). In this sample, 30 AEL DJs attenuated the effects of EIMD following which 50 AEL DJs completed 2 weeks later.

  11. Kinematics and Kinetics of Squat and Deadlift Exercises with Varying Stance Widths

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitt, John K.; Fincke, Renita S.; Logan, Rachel L.

    2011-01-01

    The primary motion of squat and deadlift exercise involves flexion and extension of the hips, knees, and ankles, but each exercise can be performed with variations in stance width. These variations may result in differing kinematics and ground reaction forces (GRF), which may in turn affect joint loading. PURPOSE: The purpose of this investigation was to compare ankle, knee, and hip kinematics and kinetics of normal squat (NS), wide-stance squat (WS), normal deadlift (ND), and sumo deadlift (SD). We hypothesized that hip joint kinematics and work at each joint would differ between exercise variations. METHODS: Six subjects (3 m/3 f; 70.0 plus or minus 13.7 kg; 168 plus or minus 9.9 cm) performed each lift in normal gravity on the ground-based version of the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) used on the International Space Station. The ARED provided resistance with a combination vacuum tube/flywheel mechanism designed to replicate the gravitational and inertial forces of free weights. Subjects completed each lift with their 10-repetition maximum load. Kinematic data were collected at 250 Hz by a 12-camera motion-capture system (Smart-D, BTS Bioengineering, Milan, Italy), and GRF data were collected at 1000 Hz with independent force platforms for each leg (Model 9261, Kistler Instruments AG, Winterhur, Switzerland). All data were captured simultaneously on a single workstation. The right leg of a single lift for each motion was analyzed. Modeling software (OpenSim 2.2.0, Simbios, Palo Alto, CA) determined joint kinematics and net positive and negative work at each lower extremity joint. Total work was found as the sum of work across all joints and was normalized by system mass. Effect sizes and their 95% confidence intervals were computed between conditions. RESULTS: Peak GRF were similar for each lift. There were no differences between conditions in hip flexion range of motion (ROM). For hip adduction ROM, there were no differences between the NS, WS, and SD

  12. Nonlinear regimes on polygonal hydraulic jumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Nicolas

    2016-11-01

    This work extends previous leading and higher order results on the polygonal hydraulic jump in the framework of inertial lubrication theory. The rotation of steady polygonal jumps is observed in the transition from one wavenumber to the next one, induced by a change in height of an external obstacle near the outer edge. In a previous publication, the study of stationary polygons is considered under the assumption that the reference frame rotates with the polygons when the number of corners change, in order to preserve their orientation. In this research work I provide a Hamiltonian approach and the stability analysis of the nonlinear oscillator that describe the polygonal structures at the jump interface, in addition to a perturbation method that enables to explain, for instance, the diversity of patterns found in experiments. GRASP, Institute of Physics, University of Liege, Belgium.

  13. Aerodynamic Jump for Long Rod Penetrators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark L. Bundy

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available Aerodynamic jump for a non-spinning kinetic energy penetrator is neither a discontinuous change in the ,direction of motion at the origin of free night, nor is it the converse, i.e. a cumulativer~direc4on over a domain of infinite extent. Rather aerodynamic jump, for such a projectile, is a localised redirection of the centre of gravity motion, caused ~ the force of lift due to yaw over ther4latively short region from entry into free flight until the yaw reaches its first maximum. The primary objective of this paper is to provide answtfrs to the questions like what is aerodynamic jump, what liauses it, !lnd wh~t aspects df the flight trajectory does it refer to, or account for .

  14. Measuring postural control during mini-squat posture in men with early knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrella, M; Gramani-Say, K; Serrão, P R M S; Lessi, G C; Barela, J A; Carvalho, R P; Mattiello, S M

    2017-02-06

    Studies have suggested a compromised postural control in individuals with knee osteoarthritis (OA) evidenced by larger and faster displacement of center of pressure (COP). However, quantification of postural control in the mini-squat posture performed by patients with early knee OA and its relation to muscle strength and self-reported symptoms have not been investigated. The main aim of this cross-sectional, observational, controlled study was to determine whether postural control in the mini-squat posture differs between individuals with early knee OA and a control group (CG) and verify the relation among knee extensor torque (KET) and self-reported physical function, stiffness and pain. Twenty four individuals with knee OA grades I and II (OAG) (mean age: 52.35±5.00) and twenty subjects without knee injuries (CG) (mean age: 51.40±8.07) participated in this study. Participants were assessed in postural control through a force plate (Bertec Mod. USA), which provided information about the anterior-posterior (AP) and medial-lateral (ML) COP displacement during the mini-squat, in isometric, concentric and eccentric knee extensor torque (KET) (90°/s) through an isokinetic dynamometer (BiodexMulti-Joint System3, Biodex Medical Incorporation, New York, NY, USA), and in self-reported symptoms through the WOMAC questionnaire. The main outcomes measured were the AP and ML COP amplitude and velocity of displacement; isometric, concentric, and eccentric KET and self-reported physical function, stiffness and pain. No significant differences were found between groups for postural control (p>0.05). Significant lower eccentric KET (p=0.01) and higher scores for the WOMAC subscales of pain (p=postural instability and the need to include quadriceps muscle strengthening, especially by eccentric contractions. The relationship between the self-reported symptoms and a lower and slower COP displacement suggest that the postural control strategy during tasks with a semi-flexed knee

  15. Bilateral differences in the net joint torques during the squat exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Sean P; Salem, George J

    2007-11-01

    Bilateral movements are common in human movement, both as exercises and as daily activities. Because the movement patterns are similar, it is often assumed that there are no bilateral differences (BDs; differences between the left and right sides) in the joint torques that are producing these movements. The aim of this investigation was to test the assumption that the joint torques are equal between the left and right lower extremities by quantifying BDs during the barbell squat. Eighteen recreationally trained men (n = 9) and women (n = 9) completed 3 sets of 3 repetitions of the squat exercise, under 4 loading conditions: 25, 50, 75, and 100% of their 3 repetition maximum, while instrumented for biomechanical analysis. The average net joint moment (ANJM) and maximum flexion angle (MFA) for the hip, knee, and ankle as well as the average vertical ground reaction force (AVGRF) and the average distance from the ankle joint center to the center of pressure (ADCOP) were calculated. Group mean and individual data were analyzed (alpha = 0.05). At each joint, there was a significant main effect for side and load, no main effect for gender, with few significant interactions. The hip ANJM was 12.4% larger on the left side, the knee ANJM was 13.2% larger on the right side, and the ankle ANJM was 16.8% larger on the left side. Differences in MFAs between sides were less than 2 degrees for all 3 joints (all p > 0.20 except for the knee at 75% [p = 0.024] and 100% [p = 0.025]), but the AVGRF and the ADCOP were 6% and 11% larger on the left side. Few subjects exhibited the pattern identified with the group mean data, and no subject exhibited nonsignificant BDs for all 3 joints. These findings suggest that joint torques should not be assumed to be equal during the squat and that few individual subjects follow the pattern exhibited by group mean data.

  16. Postactivation Potentation Effects From Accommodating Resistance Combined With Heavy Back Squats on Short Sprint Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyland, Timothy P; Van Dorin, Joshua D; Reyes, G Francis Cisco

    2015-11-01

    Applying accommodating resistance combined with isoinertial resistance has been demonstrated to be effective in improving neuromuscular attributes important for sport performance. The main purpose of this study was to determine whether short sprints can be acutely enhanced after several sets of back squats with or without accommodating resistance. Twenty recreationally resistance-trained males (age: 23.3 ± 4.4 years; height: 178.9 ± 6.5 cm; weight: 88.3 ± 10.8 kg) performed pre-post testing on 9.1-m sprint time. Three different interventions were implemented in randomized order between pre-post 9.1-m sprints. On 3 separate days, subjects either sat for 5 minutes (CTRL), performed 5 sets of 3 repetitions at 85% of their 1 repetition maximum (1RM) with isoinertial load (STND), or performed 5 sets of 3 repetitions at 85% of their 1RM, with 30% of the total resistance coming from elastic band tension (BAND) between pre-post 9.1-m sprint testing. Posttesting for 9.1-m sprint time occurred immediately after the last set of squats (Post-Immediate) and on every minute for 4 minutes after the last set of squats (Post-1min, Post-2min, Post-3min, and Post-4min). Repeated-measures analysis of variance statistical analyses revealed no significant changes in sprint time across posttesting times during the CTRL and STND condition. During the BAND condition, sprint time significantly decreased from Post-Immediate to Post-4min (p = 0.002). The uniqueness of accommodating resistance could create an optimal postactivation potentiation effect to increase neuromuscular performance. Coaches and athletes can implement heavy accommodating resistance exercises to their warm-up when improving acute sprint time is desired.

  17. Planarity of 3,4-jump Graphs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏二玲; 刘颜佩

    2004-01-01

    For a graph G of size ε≥1 and its edge-induced subgraphs H1 and H2 of size γ(1 < γ < ε), H1 is said to be obtained from H2 by an edge jump if there exist four distinct vertices u, v, ω and x in G such that (u,v)∈E(H2), (ω,x)∈E(G) - E(H2) and H1=H2 - (u, v) + (ω, x). In this article, the γ-jump graphs(r≥3) are discussed. A graph H is said to be an γ-jump graph of G if its vertices correspond to the edge induced graph of size γ in G and two vertices are adjacent if and only if one of the two corresponding subgraphs can be obtained from the other by an edge jump. For k≥2, the k-th iterated γ-jump graph Jrk(G) is defined as Jγ(Jγk-1 (G)), where Jγ1 (G) = Jγ(G). An infinite sequence {Gi} of graphs is planar if every graph Gi is planar. It is shown that there does not exist a graph G for which the sequence {J3k(G)} is planar, where k is any positive integer. Meanwhile, lim gen(J3k(G)) =∞, where gen(G) denotes the genus of a graph G, if the sequence k→∞J3k(G) is defined for every positive integer k. As for the 4-jump graph of a graph G,{J4k(G)} is planar if and only if G = C5. For γ≥5, whether the fix graph of the sequence {Jγk(G))exists is determined.

  18. Effects of Strength Training on Squat and Sprint Performance in Soccer Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styles, William J; Matthews, Martyn J; Comfort, Paul

    2016-06-01

    Styles, WJ, Matthews, MJ, and Comfort, P. Effects of strength training on squat and sprint performance in soccer players. J Strength Cond Res 30(6): 1534-1539, 2016-Researchers have demonstrated that increases in strength result in increases in athletic performance, although the development of strength is still neglected in some sports. Our aim was to determine whether a simple in-season strength training program would result in increases in maximal squat strength and short sprint performance, in professional soccer players. Professional soccer players (n = 17, age = 18.3 ± 1.2 years, height = 1.79 ± 0.06 m, body mass [BM] = 75.5 ± 6.1 kg) completed 1 repetition maximum (1RM) back squat and sprint tests (5, 10, and 20 m) before and after a 6-week (×2 week) in-season strength training (85-90% 1RM) intervention. Strength training resulted in significant improvements in absolute and relative strength (before = 125.4 ± 13.8 kg, after = 149.3 ± 16.2 kg, p ≤ 0.001, Cohen's d = 0.62; 1RM/BM before: 1.66 ± 0.24 kg·kg, after = 1.96 ± 0.29 kg·kg, p ≤ 0.001, Cohen's d = 0.45; respectively). Similarly, there were small yet significant improvements in sprint performance over 5 m (before = 1.11 ± 0.04 seconds, after = 1.05 ± 0.05 seconds, p ≤ 0.001, Cohen's d = 0.55), 10 m (before = 1.83 ± 0.05 seconds, after = 1.78 ± 0.05 seconds, p ≤ 0.001, Cohen's d = 0.45), and 20 m (before = 3.09 ± 0.07 seconds, after = 3.05 ± 0.05 seconds, p ≤ 0.001, Cohen's d = 0.31). Changes in maximal squat strength seem to be reflected in improvements in short sprint performance highlighting the importance of developing maximal strength to improve short sprint performance. Moreover, this demonstrates that these improvements can be achieved during the competitive season in professional soccer players.

  19. Spectral Analysis of Diffusions with Jump Boundary

    CERN Document Server

    Kolb, Martin

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we consider one-dimensional diffusions with constant coefficients in a finite interval with jump boundary and a certain deterministic jump distribution. We use coupling methods in order to identify the spectral gap in the case of a large drift and prove that that there is a threshold drift above which the bottom of the spectrum no longer depends on the drift. As a Corollary to our result we are able to answer two questions concerning elliptic eigenvalue problems with non-local boundary conditions formulated previously by Iddo Ben-Ari and Ross Pinsky.

  20. Aerodynamic Jump for Long Rod Penetrators

    OpenAIRE

    Mark L. Bundy

    2000-01-01

    Aerodynamic jump for a non-spinning kinetic energy penetrator is neither a discontinuous change in the ,direction of motion at the origin of free night, nor is it the converse, i.e. a cumulativer~direc4on over a domain of infinite extent. Rather aerodynamic jump, for such a projectile, is a localised redirection of the centre of gravity motion, caused ~ the force of lift due to yaw over ther4latively short region from entry into free flight until the yaw reaches its first maximum. The primary...

  1. Analysis of lateral stress on paratrooper's ankle joint under simulated squat-style landing attitude%模拟空降兵半蹲式跳伞着陆踝关节侧方应力分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王鹏; 伍骥; 郑超; 黄蓉蓉; 吴迪; 李毅; 滕泽

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the internal and external maximum malleolus stresses when they landing from different heights with squat-style.Methods The subjects were 18 male professional paratroopers,wearing military special parachute boots,respectively jumped from 60 cm and 150 cm height platforms and landed with squat-style attitude to test their internal and external maximum malleolus stresses.Results For 60 cm height jumping,the average maximum stress of internal malleolus was 328.71 kPa,the average maximum stress of external malleolus was 205.92 kPa,the average maximum stress of internal malleolus was significantly greater than that of the external malleolus (t=4.005,P<0.01).For 150 cm height jumping,the average maximum stress of internal malleolus was 365.39 kPa,the average maximum stress of external malleolus was 77.28 kPa.The average maximum stress of internal malleolus was significantly greater than that of the external malleolus (t=13.935,P<0.01).Conclusions The height does not significantly affect the variation of internal and external maximum malleolus stress as the paratroopers landing with squat-style.The left and right maximum internal malleolus stress is respectively greater than the left and right maximum external malleolus stress.The stress differences lead to paratroopers' excessive foot pronation and are the major biomechanical mechanisms that caused ankle injury.%目的 研究空降兵在不同高度以半蹲式着陆时,内、外踝关节的最大应力关系. 方法 18名男性伞兵穿06伞兵作训靴,踝关节佩戴贴片式应力传感器,分别从60 cm及150 cm两种不同高度平台跳落,模拟空降兵跳伞半蹲式着陆,检测比较内、外踝关节所受的最大应力. 结果 60 cm高度模拟空降兵跳伞半蹲式着陆,双足内踝最大应力平均值为328.71 kPa,外踝最大应力平均值为205.92 kPa,内踝最大应力平均值显著大于外踝最大应力平均值(t=4.005,P<0.01).150 cm高度模拟空降兵跳伞半蹲

  2. Is the institutionalization of urban movements inevitable? : A comparison of the opportunities for sustained squatting in New York City and Amsterdam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.D. Pruijt (Hans)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractAbstract: In this article the opportunity structures of New York City and Amsterdam for organized squatting are compared. New York City knew two distinct squatting waves, with an intermission of several years. The literature on US urban movements predicts transformation through

  3. A Comparison of Gluteus Maximus, Biceps Femoris, and Vastus Lateralis Electromyography Amplitude in the Parallel, Full, and Front Squat Variations in Resistance-Trained Females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Bret; Vigotsky, Andrew D; Schoenfeld, Brad J; Beardsley, Chris; Cronin, John

    2016-02-01

    Front, full, and parallel squats are some of the most popular squat variations. The purpose of this investigation was to compare mean and peak electromyography (EMG) amplitude of the upper gluteus maximus, lower gluteus maximus, biceps femoris, and vastus lateralis of front, full, and parallel squats. Thirteen healthy women (age = 28.9 ± 5.1 y; height = 164 ± 6.3 cm; body mass = 58.2 ± 6.4 kg) performed 10 repetitions of their estimated 10-repetition maximum of each respective variation. There were no statistical (P ≤ .05) differences between full, front, and parallel squats in any of the tested muscles. Given these findings, it can be concluded that the front, full, or parallel squat can be performed for similar EMG amplitudes. However, given the results of previous research, it is recommended that individuals use a full range of motion when squatting, assuming full range can be safely achieved, to promote more favorable training adaptations. Furthermore, despite requiring lighter loads, the front squat may provide a similar training stimulus to the back squat.

  4. The effects of posterior cruciate ligament deficiency on posterolateral corner structures under gait- and squat-loading conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, K-T.; Koh, Y-G.; Jung, M.; Nam, J-H.; Son, J.; Lee, Y.H.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The aim of the current study was to analyse the effects of posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) deficiency on forces of the posterolateral corner structure and on tibiofemoral (TF) and patellofemoral (PF) contact force under dynamic-loading conditions. Methods A subject-specific knee model was validated using a passive flexion experiment, electromyography data, muscle activation, and previous experimental studies. The simulation was performed on the musculoskeletal models with and without PCL deficiency using a novel force-dependent kinematics method under gait- and squat-loading conditions, followed by probabilistic analysis for material uncertain to be considered. Results Comparison of predicted passive flexion, posterior drawer kinematics and muscle activation with experimental measurements showed good agreement. Forces of the posterolateral corner structure, and TF and PF contact forces increased with PCL deficiency under gait- and squat-loading conditions. The rate of increase in PF contact force was the greatest during the squat-loading condition. The TF contact forces increased on both medial and lateral compartments during gait-loading conditions. However, during the squat-loading condition, the medial TF contact force tended to increase, while the lateral TF contact forces decreased. The posterolateral corner structure, which showed the greatest increase in force with deficiency of PCL under both gait- and squat-loading conditions, was the popliteus tendon (PT). Conclusion PCL deficiency is a factor affecting the variability of force on the PT in dynamic-loading conditions, and it could lead to degeneration of the PF joint. Cite this article: K-T. Kang, Y-G. Koh, M. Jung, J-H. Nam, J. Son, Y.H. Lee, S-J. Kim, S-H. Kim. The effects of posterior cruciate ligament deficiency on posterolateral corner structures under gait- and squat-loading conditions: A computational knee model. Bone Joint Res 2017;6:31–42. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.61.BJR-2016-0184.R1

  5. Recovery Outline: New Mexico Jumping Mouse (Zapus hudsonius luteus)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this recovery outline is to provide an interim strategy to guide the conservation and recovery of the New Mexico meadow jumping mouse (jumping mouse)...

  6. Validity and inter-rater reliability of medio-lateral knee motion observed during a single-limb mini squat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ageberg, Eva; Bennell, Kim L; Hunt, Michael A

    2010-01-01

    Muscle function may influence the risk of knee injury and outcomes following injury. Clinical tests, such as a single-limb mini squat, resemble conditions of daily life and are easy to administer. Fewer squats per 30 seconds indicate poorer function. However, the quality of movement, such as the ......, such as the medio-lateral knee motion may also be important. The aim was to validate an observational clinical test of assessing the medio-lateral knee motion, using a three-dimensional (3-D) motion analysis system. In addition, the inter-rater reliability was evaluated....

  7. Understanding the Physics of Bungee Jumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, Andre; Uylings, Peter; Kedzierska, Ewa

    2010-01-01

    Changing mass phenomena like the motion of a falling chain, the behaviour of a falling elastic bar or spring, and the motion of a bungee jumper surprise many a physicist. In this article we discuss the first phase of bungee jumping, when the bungee jumper falls, but the bungee rope is still slack. In instructional material this phase is often…

  8. Jumping Rope at Day of Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Sarah Dastugue, 11, leaps in the air as Libby Knox, 9, swings a jump rope. The children were participants in Nickelodeon's Worldwide Day of Play celebration at Stennis Space Center (SSC) on Oct. 1. On the day of the event, children all over the world participate in physical activities as part of the celebration.

  9. Understanding the physics of bungee jumping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heck, A.; Uylings, P.; Kędzierska, E.

    2010-01-01

    Changing mass phenomena like the motion of a falling chain, the behaviour of a falling elastic bar or spring, and the motion of a bungee jumper surprise many a physicist. In this article we discuss the first phase of bungee jumping, when the bungee jumper falls, but the bungee rope is still slack.

  10. Jumping on the Social Media Bandwagon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakeslee, Lori

    2012-01-01

    Should a school district jump on the social media bandwagon? Yes! Social media provide a low-cost way to communicate school district priorities, influence decision makers, and tell its story without filters. Equally important, social media are where constituents are spending a lot of their time. With more than 800 million members, Facebook is an…

  11. Jumping on the Social Media Bandwagon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakeslee, Lori

    2012-01-01

    Should a school district jump on the social media bandwagon? Yes! Social media provide a low-cost way to communicate school district priorities, influence decision makers, and tell its story without filters. Equally important, social media are where constituents are spending a lot of their time. With more than 800 million members, Facebook is an…

  12. Jumping-droplet electrostatic energy harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miljkovic, Nenad; Preston, Daniel J.; Enright, Ryan; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2014-07-01

    Micro- and nanoscale wetting phenomena have been an active area of research due to its potential for improving engineered system performance involving phase change. With the recent advancements in micro/nanofabrication techniques, structured surfaces can now be designed to allow condensing coalesced droplets to spontaneously jump off the surface due to the conversion of excess surface energy into kinetic energy. In addition to being removed at micrometric length scales (˜10 μm), jumping water droplets also attain a positive electrostatic charge (˜10-100 fC) from the hydrophobic coating/condensate interaction. In this work, we take advantage of this droplet charging to demonstrate jumping-droplet electrostatic energy harvesting. The charged droplets jump between superhydrophobic copper oxide and hydrophilic copper surfaces to create an electrostatic potential and generate power during formation of atmospheric dew. We demonstrated power densities of ˜15 pW/cm2, which, in the near term, can be improved to ˜1 μW/cm2. This work demonstrates a surface engineered platform that promises to be low cost and scalable for atmospheric energy harvesting and electric power generation.

  13. DISCONTINUOUS FLOW OF TURBID DENSITY CURRENTS Ⅱ. INTERNAL HYDRAULIC JUMP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiahua FAN

    2005-01-01

    Traveling and stationary internal hydraulic jumps in density currents with positive or negative entrainment coefficients were analyzed based on simple assumptions. An expression of internal hydraulic jumps with entrainment coefficients was derived. Experimental data, published in literature, of stationary internal hydraulic jumps in turbid, thermal and saline density currents including measured values of water entrainment were used to compare with theory. Comparison was also made of traveling internal hydraulic jumps between measured data and theory.

  14. Lower Extremity Joint Angle Tracking with Wireless Ultrasonic Sensors during a Squat Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yongbin; Soh, Cheong Boon; Gunawan, Erry; Low, Kay-Soon; Thomas, Rijil

    2015-04-23

    This paper presents an unrestrained measurement system based on a wearable wireless ultrasonic sensor network to track the lower extremity joint and trunk kinematics during a squat exercise with only one ultrasonic sensor attached to the trunk. The system consists of an ultrasound transmitter (mobile) and multiple receivers (anchors) whose positions are known. The proposed system measures the horizontal and vertical displacement, together with known joint constraints, to estimate joint flexion/extension angles using an inverse kinematic model based on the damped least-squares technique. The performance of the proposed ultrasonic measurement system was validated against a camera-based tracking system on eight healthy subjects performing a planar squat exercise. Joint angles estimated from the ultrasonic system showed a root mean square error (RMSE) of 2.85° ± 0.57° with the reference system. Statistical analysis indicated great agreements between these two systems with a Pearson's correlation coefficient (PCC) value larger than 0.99 for all joint angles' estimation. These results show that the proposed ultrasonic measurement system is useful for applications, such as rehabilitation and sports.

  15. Option Valuation with Observable Volatility and Jump Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Peter; Feunou, Bruno; Jeon, Yoontae

    Under very general conditions, the total quadratic variation of a jump-diffusion process can be decomposed into diffusive volatility and squared jump variation. We use this result to develop a new option valuation model in which the underlying asset price exhibits volatility and jump intensity dy...

  16. Determination of jumps for functions via derivative Gabor series

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Ying-ying; SHI Xian-liang

    2009-01-01

    Recently, Shi Xianliang and Hu Lan published the method of concentration factors for determination of jumps of functions via MCM conjugate wavelets. Usually, it is difficult to calculate the Hilbert transform of general window functions. The aim of this paper is to discuss determination of jumps for functions based on derivative Gabor series. The results will simplify the calculation of jump values.

  17. The relationship between bimalleolar stress and BMI in simulated parachute jump experiment%模拟跳伞踝关节压力与体质指数的相关性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶玉国; 伍骥; 郑超; 黄蓉蓉; 李毅; 李松林; 薛静; 陈渲宇

    2014-01-01

    目的 探讨跳伞半蹲式着陆时内、外踝压力大小与受试者体质指数之间的相关性.方法 测量13名现役军事跳伞员的身高、体重,计算BMI.受试者分别从0.6m高平台跳下,模拟跳伞半蹲式着陆,记录着陆时双足内、外踝所受压力. 结果 在模拟跳伞半蹲式着陆时双足内踝所受平均压力明显高于外踝(t=9.605、9.392,P<0.01).左足内踝、右足内踝、左足外踝、右足外踝所受平均压力与体质指数之间的相关系数分别为0.898、0.890、0.824、0.833,且均具有直线相关性.结论 模拟跳伞半蹲式着陆时内、外踝所受压力与体质指数呈正相关.为降低跳伞着陆时踝关节损伤风险,空降兵应积极控制体重.%Objective To investigate the relationship between bimalleolar stress and BMI of parachutists in simulated parachute jump experiment with half-squat posture.Methods Height and weight of 13 active service parachutists were measured and their BMI was calculated.All parachutists jumped from 0.6 m height platform and simulated landing with half-squat posture.The bimalleolar stress in this process was recorded.Results In the simulated parachute jump experiment,the mean stress of internal malleolus between two feet was higher than external malleolus stress (t=9.605,9.392,P<0.01).Correlation coefficient of BMI and left side internal malleolus,right side internal malleolus,left side external malleolus,and right side external malleolus pressure was respectively 0.898,0.890,0.824,0.833 and all showed linear relationship.Conclusions Bimalleolar stress has positive correlation with BMI in simulated half-squat parachute jump experiment.In order to reduce the risk of ankle joint injury during the landing,parachutist should control weight.

  18. Dynamics of Coalescence-Induced Jumping Water Droplets

    CERN Document Server

    Miljkovic, Nenad; Enright, Ryan; Wang, Evelyn N

    2013-01-01

    This fluid dynamics video shows the different interaction mechanisms of coalescence-induced droplet jumping during condensation on a nanostructured superhydrophobic surface. High speed imaging was used to show jumping behavior on superhydrophobic copper oxide and carbon nanotube surfaces. Videos demonstrating multi-jumping droplets, jumping droplet return to the surface, and droplet-droplet electrostatic repulsions were analyzed. Experiments using external electric fields in conjunction with high speed imaging in a custom built experimental chamber were used to show that all coalescence-induced jumping droplets on superhydrophobic surfaces become positively charged upon leaving the surface, which is detailed in the video.

  19. Muscle Activation Differs between Three Different Knee Joint-Angle Positions during a Maximal Isometric Back Squat Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Henrique Marchetti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare muscle activation of the lower limb muscles when performing a maximal isometric back squat exercise over three different positions. Fifteen young, healthy, resistance-trained men performed an isometric back squat at three knee joint angles (20°, 90°, and 140° in a randomized, counterbalanced fashion. Surface electromyography was used to measure muscle activation of the vastus lateralis (VL, vastus medialis (VM, rectus femoris (RF, biceps femoris (BF, semitendinosus (ST, and gluteus maximus (GM. In general, muscle activity was the highest at 90° for the three quadriceps muscles, yet differences in muscle activation between knee angles were muscle specific. Activity of the GM was significantly greater at 20° and 90° compared to 140°. The BF and ST displayed similar activation at all joint angles. In conclusion, knee position alters muscles activation of the quadriceps and gluteus maximus muscles. An isometric back squat at 90° generates the highest overall muscle activation, yet an isometric back squat at 140° generates the lowest overall muscle activation of the VL and GM only.

  20. Influence of Different Hip Joint Centre Locations on Hip and Knee Joint Kinetics and Kinematics During the Squat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinclair Jonathan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Identification of the hip joint centre (HJC is important in the biomechanical examination of human movement. However, there is yet to be any published information regarding the influence of different HJC locations on hip and knee joint kinetics during functional tasks. This study aimed to examine the influence of four different HJC techniques on 3- D hip and knee joint kinetics/kinematics during the squat. Hip and knee joint kinetics/kinematics of the squat were obtained from fifteen male participants using an eight camera motion capture system. The 3-D kinetics/kinematics of the squat were quantified using four hip joint centre estimation techniques. Repeated measures ANOVAs were used to compare the discrete parameters as a function of each HJC location. The results show that significant differences in joint angles and moment parameters were evident at both the hip and knee joint in the coronal and transverse planes. These observations indicate that when calculating non-sagittal joint kinetics/kinematics during the squat, researchers should carefully consider their HJC method as it may significantly affect the interpretation of their data.

  1. Effects of lifting the non-paretic foot on muscle activity during the semi-squat exercise in hemiplegic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Kyu; Yu, Il-Young; Jung, In-Gui; Oh, Jae-Seop

    2015-06-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the electromyographic activity of the quadriceps in hemiplegic patients during the downward, maintenance, and upward phases of squat exercises performed with the feet parallel and with the non-paretic foot lifted. [Subjects] A total of 17 hemiplegic patients (9 males and 8 females) volunteered for this study. [Methods] All subjects performed squat exercises with the knees flexed to 30° and with the feet parallel (shoulder-width apart) or with lifting of the non-paretic foot (normalized to 25% of the knee height). [Results] The activity of the rectus femoris, vastus medialis oblique, and vastus lateralis muscles was significantly higher during squat exercises performed with the non-paretic foot lifted than with the feet parallel to each other. The activity of all muscles during the maintenance phase of the exercises was greater than that during the downward and upward phases. [Conclusion] Lifting the non-paretic foot during squats may represent an effective exercise for motor function rehabilitation in hemiplegic patients.

  2. The effects of isometric wall squat exercise on heart rate and blood pressure in a normotensive population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldring, Natalie; Wiles, Jonathan D; Coleman, Damian

    2014-01-01

    The isometric wall squat could be utilised in home-based training aimed at reducing resting blood pressure, but first its suitability must be established. The aim of this study was to determine a method of adjusting wall squat intensity and explore the cardiovascular responses. Twenty-three participants performed one 2 minute wall squat on 15 separate occasions. During the first ten visits, ten different knee joint angles were randomly completed from 135° to 90° in 5° increments; five random angles were repeated in subsequent visits. Heart rate and blood pressure (systolic, diastolic and mean arterial pressure) were measured. The heart rate and blood pressure parameters produced significant inverse relationships with joint angle (r at least -0.80; P exercise modes that have reduced resting blood pressure (135° heart rate: 76 ± 10 beats ∙ min(-1); systolic: 134 ± 14 mmHg; diastolic: 76 ± 6 mmHg and 90° heart rate: 119 ± 20 beats ∙ min(-1); systolic: 196 ± 18 mmHg; diastolic: 112 ± 13 mmHg). The wall squat may have a useful role to play in isometric training aimed at reducing resting blood pressure.

  3. Effect of early training on the jumping technique of horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaría, Susana; Bobbert, Maarten F; Back, Willem; Barneveld, Ab; van Weeren, P Rene

    2005-03-01

    To investigate the effects of early training for jumping by comparing the jumping technique of horses that had received early training with that of horses raised conventionally. 40 Dutch Warmblood horses. The horses were analyzed kinematically during free jumping at 6 months of age. Subsequently, they were allocated into a control group that was raised conventionally and an experimental group that received 30 months of early training starting at 6 months of age. At 4 years of age, after a period of rest in pasture and a short period of training with a rider, both groups were analyzed kinematically during free jumping. Subsequently, both groups started a 1-year intensive training for jumping, and at 5 years of age, they were again analyzed kinematically during free jumping. In addition, the horses competed in a puissance competition to test maximal performance. Whereas there were no differences in jumping technique between experimental and control horses at 6 months of age, at 4 years, the experimental horses jumped in a more effective manner than the control horses; they raised their center of gravity less yet cleared more fences successfully than the control horses. However, at 5 years of age, these differences were not detected. Furthermore, the experimental horses did not perform better than the control horses in the puissance competition. Specific training for jumping of horses at an early age is unnecessary because the effects on jumping technique and jumping capacity are not permanent.

  4. Biomechanical Analysis of the Jump Shot in Basketball

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Struzik Artur

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Basketball players usually score points during the game using the jump shot. For this reason, the jump shot is considered to be the most important element of technique in basketball and requires a high level of performance. The aim of this study was to compare the biomechanical characteristics of the lower limbs during a jump shot without the ball and a countermovement jump without an arm swing. The differences between variables provide information about the potential that an athlete can utilise during a game when performing a jump shot. The study was conducted among 20 second-league basketball players by means of a Kistler force plate and the BTS SMART system for motion analysis. The variables measured included the take-off time, mean power, peak power, relative mean power, jump height, maximum landing force and calculated impact ratio. Surprisingly, more advantageous variables were found for the jump shot. This finding suggests a very high performance level in the jump shot in the studied group and a maximum utilisation of their motor abilities. Both types of jumps were characterised by high mean and peak power values and average heights. The high forces at landing, which result in considerable impact ratios, may have prompted the studied group to land softly. Use of the countermovement jump without an arm swing is recommended to assess and predict the progression of player’s jumping ability

  5. Scaled Jump in Gravity-Reduced Virtual Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, MyoungGon; Cho, Sunglk; Tran, Tanh Quang; Kim, Seong-Pil; Kwon, Ohung; Han, JungHyun

    2017-04-01

    The reduced gravity experienced in lunar or Martian surfaces can be simulated on the earth using a cable-driven system, where the cable lifts a person to reduce his or her weight. This paper presents a novel cable-driven system designed for the purpose. It is integrated with a head-mounted display and a motion capture system. Focusing on jump motion within the system, this paper proposes to scale the jump and reports the experiments made for quantifying the extent to which a jump can be scaled without the discrepancy between physical and virtual jumps being noticed by the user. With the tolerable range of scaling computed from these experiments, an application named retargeted jump is developed, where a user can jump up onto virtual objects while physically jumping in the real-world flat floor. The core techniques presented in this paper can be extended to develop extreme-sport simulators such as parasailing and skydiving.

  6. Capture of Trojans by Jumping Jupiter

    CERN Document Server

    Nesvorny, David; Morbidelli, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    Jupiter Trojans are thought to be survivors of a much larger population of planetesimals that existed in the planetary region when planets formed. They can provide important constraints on the mass and properties of the planetesimal disk, and its dispersal during planet migration. Here we tested a possibility that the Trojans were captured during the early dynamical instability among the outer planets (aka the Nice model), when the semimajor axis of Jupiter was changing as a result of scattering encounters with an ice giant. The capture occurs in this model when Jupiter's orbit and its Lagrange points become radially displaced in a scattering event and fall into a region populated by planetesimals (that previously evolved from their natal transplanetary disk to ~5 AU during the instability). Our numerical simulations of the new capture model, hereafter jump capture, satisfactorily reproduce the orbital distribution of the Trojans and their total mass. The jump capture is potentially capable of explaining the ...

  7. Force Outputs during Squats Performed Using a Rotational Inertia Device under Stable versus Unstable Conditions with Different Loads.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jairo Vázquez-Guerrero

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to compare the force outputs achieved during a squat exercise using a rotational inertia device in stable versus unstable conditions with different loads and in concentric and eccentric phases. Thirteen male athletes (mean ± SD: age 23.7 ± 3.0 years, height 1.80 ± 0.08 m, body mass 77.4 ± 7.9 kg were assessed while squatting, performing one set of three repetitions with four different loads under stable and unstable conditions at maximum concentric effort. Overall, there were no significant differences between the stable and unstable conditions at each of the loads for any of the dependent variables. Mean force showed significant differences between some of the loads in stable and unstable conditions (P < 0.010 and peak force output differed between all loads for each condition (P < 0.045. Mean force outputs were greater in the concentric than in the eccentric phase under both conditions and with all loads (P < 0.001. There were no significant differences in peak force between concentric and eccentric phases at any load in either stable or unstable conditions. In conclusion, squatting with a rotational inertia device allowed the generation of similar force outputs under stable and unstable conditions at each of the four loads. The study also provides empirical evidence of the different force outputs achieved by adjusting load conditions on the rotational inertia device when performing squats, especially in the case of peak force. Concentric force outputs were significantly higher than eccentric outputs, except for peak force under both conditions. These findings support the use of the rotational inertia device to train the squatting exercise under unstable conditions for strength and conditioning trainers. The device could also be included in injury prevention programs for muscle lesions and ankle and knee joint injuries.

  8. Sex Differences in Countermovement Jump Phase Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J. McMahon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The countermovement jump (CMJ is commonly used to explore sex differences in neuromuscular function, but previous studies have only reported gross CMJ measures or have partly examined CMJ phase characteristics. The purpose of this study was to explore differences in CMJ phase characteristics between male and female athletes by comparing the force-, power-, velocity-, and displacement-time curves throughout the entire CMJ, in addition to gross measures. Fourteen men and fourteen women performed three CMJs on a force platform from which a range of kinetic and kinematic variables were calculated via forward dynamics. Jump height (JH, reactive strength index modified, relative peak concentric power, and eccentric and concentric displacement, velocity, and relative impulse were all greater for men (g = 0.58–1.79. Relative force-time curves were similar between sexes, but relative power-, velocity-, and displacement-time curves were greater for men at 90%–95% (immediately before and after peak power, 47%–54% (start of eccentric phase and 85%–100% (latter half of concentric phase, and 65%–87% (bottom of countermovement and initial concentric phase of normalized jump time, respectively. The CMJ distinguished between sexes, with men demonstrating greater JH through applying a larger concentric impulse and, thus, achieving greater velocity throughout most of the concentric phase, including take-off.

  9. Quantum jumps of a fluxonium qubit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vool, U.; Pop, I. M.; Sliwa, K.; Abdo, B.; Brecht, T.; Shankar, S.; Hatridge, M.; Schoelkopf, R. J.; Mirrahimi, M.; Glazman, L.; Devoret, M. H.

    2014-03-01

    The fluxonium qubit has recently been shown to have energy relaxation time (T1) of the order of 1 ms, limited by quasiparticle dissipation. With the addition of a Josephson Parametric Converter (JPC) to the experiment, trajectories corresponding to quantum jumps between the ground and 1st excited state can be measured, thus allowing the observation of the qubit decay in real time instead of that of an ensemble average. Our measurement fidelity with the JPC is in excess of 98% for an acquisition time of 5 us and we can thus continuously monitor the quantum jumps of the qubit in equilibrium with its environment in a time much shorter than its average relaxation time. We observe in our sample a jump statistics that varies from being completely Poissonian with a long (500 us) mean time in the ground state to being highly non-Poissonian with short (100 us) mean time in the ground state. The changes between these regimes occur on time scales of seconds, minutes and even hours. We have studied this effect and its relation to quasiparticle dynamics by injecting quasiparticles with a short intense microwave pulse and by seeding quasiparticle-trapping vortices with magnetic field. Work supported by: IARPA, ARO, and NSF.

  10. Effect of range of motion in heavy load squatting on muscle and tendon adaptations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloomquist, K; Langberg, Henning; Karlsen, Stine;

    2013-01-01

    ), jump performance, muscle architecture and cross-sectional area (CSA) of the thigh muscles, as well as CSA and collagen synthesis in the patellar tendon, were assessed before and after the intervention. The DS group increased 1 RM in both the SS and DS with ~20 ± 3 %, while the SS group achieved a 36...

  11. Modelling and Analysis on Biomechanical Dynamic Characteristics of Knee Flexion Movement under Squatting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianping Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The model of three-dimensional (3D geometric knee was built, which included femoral-tibial, patellofemoral articulations and the bone and soft tissues. Dynamic finite element (FE model of knee was developed to simulate both the kinematics and the internal stresses during knee flexion. The biomechanical experimental system of knee was built to simulate knee squatting using cadaver knees. The flexion motion and dynamic contact characteristics of knee were analyzed, and verified by comparing with the data from in vitro experiment. The results showed that the established dynamic FE models of knee are capable of predicting kinematics and the contact stresses during flexion, and could be an efficient tool for the analysis of total knee replacement (TKR and knee prosthesis design.

  12. Corticosteroid injections, eccentric decline squat training and heavy slow resistance training in patellar tendinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsgaard, M.; Kovanen, V.; Aagaard, P.

    2009-01-01

    A randomized-controlled single-blind trial was conducted to investigate the clinical, structural and functional effects of peritendinous corticosteroid injections (CORT), eccentric decline squat training (ECC) and heavy slow resistance training (HSR) in patellar tendinopathy. Thirty-nine male...... patients were randomized to CORT, ECC or HSR for 12 weeks. We assessed function and symptoms (VISA-p questionnaire), tendon pain during activity (VAS), treatment satisfaction, tendon swelling, tendon vascularization, tendon mechanical properties and collagen crosslink properties. Assessments were made at 0...... weeks, 12 weeks and at follow-up (half-year). All groups improved in VISA-p and VAS from 0 to 12 weeks (P tendon swelling decreased (-13 +/- 9% and -12 +/- 13%, P

  13. POTENTIAL FOR NON-CONTACT ACL INJURY BETWEEN STEP-CLOSE-JUMP AND HOP-JUMP TASKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-I Wang

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to compare the kinematics and kinetics during the landing of hop-jump and step-close-jump movements in order to provide further inferring that the potential risk of ACL injuries. Eleven elite male volleyball players were recruited to perform hop-jump and step-close-jump tasks. Lower extremity kinematics and ground reaction forces during landing in stop-jump tasks were recorded. Lower extremity kinetics was calculated by using an inverse dynamic process. Step-close-jump tasks demonstrated smaller peak proximal tibia anterior shear forces during the landing phase. In step-close-jump tasks, increasing hip joint angular velocity during initial foot-ground contact decreased peak posterior ground reaction force during the landing phase, which theoretically could reduce the risk of ACL injury

  14. An Efficient Interpolation Technique for Jump Proposals in Reversible-Jump Markov Chain Monte Carlo Calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Farr, Will M

    2011-01-01

    Selection among alternative theoretical models given an observed data set is an important challenge in many areas of physics and astronomy. Reversible-jump Markov chain Monte Carlo (RJMCMC) is an extremely powerful technique for performing Bayesian model selection, but it suffers from a fundamental difficulty: it requires jumps between model parameter spaces, but cannot retain a memory of the favored locations in more than one parameter space at a time. Thus, a naive jump between parameter spaces is unlikely to be accepted in the MCMC algorithm and convergence is correspondingly slow. Here we demonstrate an interpolation technique that uses samples from single-model MCMCs to propose inter-model jumps from an approximation to the single-model posterior of the target parameter space. The interpolation technique, based on a kD-tree data structure, is adaptive and efficient in arbitrary dimensions. We show that our technique leads to dramatically improved convergence over naive jumps in an RJMCMC, and compare it ...

  15. An efficient interpolation technique for jump proposals in reversible-jump Markov chain Monte Carlo calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, W M; Mandel, I; Stevens, D

    2015-06-01

    Selection among alternative theoretical models given an observed dataset is an important challenge in many areas of physics and astronomy. Reversible-jump Markov chain Monte Carlo (RJMCMC) is an extremely powerful technique for performing Bayesian model selection, but it suffers from a fundamental difficulty and it requires jumps between model parameter spaces, but cannot efficiently explore both parameter spaces at once. Thus, a naive jump between parameter spaces is unlikely to be accepted in the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm and convergence is correspondingly slow. Here, we demonstrate an interpolation technique that uses samples from single-model MCMCs to propose intermodel jumps from an approximation to the single-model posterior of the target parameter space. The interpolation technique, based on a kD-tree data structure, is adaptive and efficient in modest dimensionality. We show that our technique leads to improved convergence over naive jumps in an RJMCMC, and compare it to other proposals in the literature to improve the convergence of RJMCMCs. We also demonstrate the use of the same interpolation technique as a way to construct efficient 'global' proposal distributions for single-model MCMCs without prior knowledge of the structure of the posterior distribution, and discuss improvements that permit the method to be used in higher dimensional spaces efficiently.

  16. The high-bar and low-bar back-squats: A biomechanical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassbrook, Daniel J; Brown, Scott R; Helms, Eric R; Duncan, J Scott; Storey, Adam G

    2017-02-08

    No prior study has compared the joint angle and ground reaction force (Fv) differences between the high-bar back-squat (HBBS) and low-bar back-squat (LBBS) above 90% 1RM. Six male powerlifters (height: 179.2 ± 7.8 cm; bodyweight: 87.1 ± 8.0 kg; age: 27.3 ± 4.2 years) of international level, six male Olympic weightlifters (height: 176.7 ± 7.7 cm; bodyweight: 83.1 ± 13 kg; age: 25.3 ± 3.1 years) of national level, and six recreationally trained male athletes (height: 181.9 ± 8.7 cm; bodyweight: 87.9 ± 15.3 kg; age: 27.7 ± 3.8 years) performed the LBBS, HBBS, and both LBBS and HBBS (respectively) up to and including 100% 1RM. Small to moderate (d = 0.2-0.5) effect size differences were observed between the powerlifters and Olympic weightlifters in joint angles and Fv, although none were statistically significant. However, significant joint angle results were observed between the experienced powerlifters/weightlifters and the recreationally trained group. Our findings suggest that practitioners seeking to place emphasis on the stronger hip musculature should consider the LBBS. Also, when the goal is to lift the greatest load possible, the LBBS may be preferable. Conversely, the HBBS is more suited to replicate movements that exhibit a more upright torso position, such as the snatch and clean, or to place more emphasis on the associated musculature of the knee joint.

  17. Effects of fatigue from resistance training on barbell back squat biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, David R; Szivak, Tunde K; Comstock, Brett A; Dunn-Lewis, Courtenay; Apicella, Jenna M; Kelly, Neil A; Creighton, Brent C; Flanagan, Shawn D; Looney, David P; Volek, Jeff S; Maresh, Carl M; Kraemer, William J

    2014-04-01

    Exhaustive resistance training programs that have been previously referred to as extreme conditioning protocols have increased in popularity in military and civilian populations in recent years. However, because of their highly fatiguing nature, proprioception is likely altered during such programs that would significantly affect the safety and efficacy of such programs. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to assess the alterations in movement patterns that result from extreme conditioning protocols and to evaluate if these protocols can be deemed safe and effective. Twelve men (age 24 ± 4.2 years, height 173.1 ± 3.6 cm, weight 76.9 ± 7.8 kg, body fat percentage 9.0 ± 2.2%) and 13 women (age 24.5 ± 3.8 years, height 166.9 ± 8.5 cm, weight 66.1 ± 9.2 kg, body fat percentage 18.6 ± 4.0%) with at least 6 months of resistance training experience involving barbell bench press, barbell deadlift, and barbell back squat performed a highly fatiguing resistance training workout. During the barbell back squat, a 2-dimensional analysis was performed where the knee and hip angles were recorded throughout the 55 repetitions of the workout. At the early stages of the protocol, knee angle was significantly lower in men and in women demonstrating less knee flexion. Also, hip angle was significantly lower early in the program in men and in women, demonstrating a greater forward lean. The technique changes that occur in high repetition sets do not favor optimal strength development and may increase the risk of injury, clearly questioning the safety and efficacy of such resistance training programming. This is likely a display of self-preservation by individuals who are faced with high repetition programs.

  18. Trunk muscle activation in the back and hack squat at the same relative loads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, David R; Lambert, Michael I; Hunter, Angus M

    2017-07-12

    The hack squat (HS) is likely to produce a greater 1 repetition maximum (1RM) compared to the back squat (BS). This can be attributed to the support of the trunk during the HS compared to no support during BS. This support however, may compromise trunk muscle activation (TMA), therefore producing different training adaptations. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to compare 1RM in BS and HS and TMA at 4 relative loads, 65, 75, 85 and 95% of maximal system mass. Ten males completed 3 test sessions:1) BS and HS 1RM, 2) HS & BS neuromuscular test familiarization, and, 3) Neuromuscular test for 3 reps at 4 loads for BS and HS. BS TMA was significantly greater (p<0.05) than HS for all muscles and phases except rectus abdominus in concentric phase. TMA increased (p<0.05) with load in all muscles for both exercises and phases apart from lumbar sacral erector spinae in HS eccentric phase. Mean HS 1RM and submaximal loads were significantly (p<0.0001) higher than the equivalent BS loads. Duration of the eccentric phase was higher (p<0.01) in HS than BS but not different in concentric phase. Duration increased significantly (p<0.01) with load in both exercises and both phases. Despite higher absolute tests loads in HS, TMA was higher in BS. TMA is sensitive to load in both exercises. BS is more effective than HS in activating the muscles of the trunk and therefore arguably more effective in developing trunk strength and stability for dynamic athletic performance.

  19. Biogeography of the deep-sea galatheid squat lobsters of the Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macpherson, Enrique; Richer de Forges, Bertrand; Schnabel, Kareen; Samadi, Sarah; Boisselier, Marie-Catherine; Garcia-Rubies, Antoni

    2010-02-01

    We analyzed the distribution patterns of the galatheid squat lobsters (Crustacea, Decapoda, Galatheidae) of the Pacific Ocean. We used the presence/absence data of 402 species along the continental slope and continental rise (200-2000 m) obtained from 54 cruises carried out in areas around the Philippines, Indonesia, Solomon, Vanuatu, New Caledonia, Fiji, Tonga, Wallis and Futuna and French Polynesia. The total number of stations was ca. 3200. We also used published data from other expeditions carried out in the Pacific waters, and from an exhaustive search of ca. 600 papers on the taxonomy and biogeography of Pacific species. We studied the existence of biogeographic provinces using multivariate analyses, and present data on latitudinal and longitudinal patterns of species richness, rate of endemism and the relationship between body sizes with the size of the geographic ranges. Latitudinal species richness along the Western and Eastern Pacific exhibited an increase from higher latitudes towards the Equator. Longitudinal species richness decreased considerably from the Western to the Central Pacific. Size frequency distribution for body size was strongly shifted toward small sizes and endemic species were significantly smaller than non-endemics. This study concludes that a clear separation exists between the moderately poor galatheid fauna of the Eastern Pacific and the rich Western and Central Pacific faunas. Our results also show that the highest numbers of squat lobsters are found in the Coral Sea (Solomon-Vanuatu-New Caledonia islands) and Indo-Malay-Philippines archipelago (IMPA). The distribution of endemism along the Pacific Ocean indicates that there are several major centres of diversity, e.g. Coral Sea, IMPA, New Zealand and French Polynesia. The high proportion of endemism in these areas suggests that they have evolved independently.

  20. The Mechanics and Trajectory Control in Locust Jumping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Longbao Han; Zhouyi Wang; Aihong Ji; Zhendong Dai

    2013-01-01

    Locusts (Locusta migratoria manilensis) are characterised by their flying ability and abiding jump ability.Research on the jumping mechanics and behavior of locusts plays an important role in elucidating the mechanism of hexapod locomotion.The jump gestures of locusts were observed using high-speed video camera at 250 fps.The reaction forces of the hindlegs were measured using two three-dimensional sensors,in case the two hindlegs attached on separated sensor plates.The jump gestures and reaction forces were used to illustrate the locust jumping mechanism.Results show that the trajectory control is achieved by rapid rolling and yawing movements of the locust body,caused by the forelegs,midlegs and hindlegs in different jumping phases.The final jump trajectory was not determined until hind tarsi left platform.The horizontal co-impulse between two hindlegs might play a key role in jump stability and accuracy.Besides,the angle between two hindlegs affects the control of jump trajectory but has a little effect on the elevation angle of a jump,which is controlled mechanically by the initial position of the hindlegs.This research lays the groundwork for the probable design and development of biomimetic robotics.

  1. Acute effects of a warm-up including active, passive, and dynamic stretching on vertical jump performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Felipe L P; Carvalho, Mauro C G A; Simão, Roberto; Gomes, Thiago M; Costa, Pablo B; Neto, Ludgero B; Carvalho, Rodrigo L P; Dantas, Estélio H M

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the acute effects of 3 different stretching methods combined with a warm-up protocol on vertical jump performance. Sixteen young tennis players (14.5 ± 2.8 years; 175 ± 5.6 cm; 64.0 ± 11.1 kg) were randomly assigned to 4 different experimental conditions on 4 successive days. Each session consisted of a general and specific warm-up, with 5 minutes of running followed by 10 jumps, accompanied by one of the subsequent conditions: (a) Control Condition (CC)-5 minutes of passive rest; (b) Passive Stretching Condition (PSC)-5 minutes of passive static stretching; (c) Active Stretching Condition (ASC)-5 minutes of active static stretching; and (d) Dynamic Stretching Condition (DC)-5 minutes of dynamic stretching. After each intervention, the subjects performed 3 squat jumps (SJs) and 3 countermovement jumps (CMJs), which were measured electronically. For the SJ, 1-way repeated measures analysis of variance (CC × PSC × ASC × DC) revealed significant decreases for ASC (28.7 ± 4.7 cm; p = 0.01) and PSC (28.7 ± 4.3 cm; p = 0.02) conditions when compared with CC (29.9 ± 5.0 cm). For CMJs, there were no significant decreases (p > 0.05) when all stretching conditions were compared with the CC. Significant increases in SJ performance were observed when comparing the DC (29.6 ± 4.9 cm; p = 0.02) with PSC (28.7 ± 4.3 cm). Significant increases in CMJ performance were observed when comparing the conditions ASC (34.0 ± 6.0 cm; p = 0.04) and DC (33.7 ± 5.5 cm; p = 0.03) with PSC (32.6 ± 5.5 cm). A dynamic stretching intervention appears to be more suitable for use as part of a warm-up in young athletes.

  2. Promoting balance and jumping skills in children with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wai-Yi; Ju, Yun-Huei

    2002-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the changes in balance and qualitative and quantitative jumping performances by 20 children with Down syndrome (3 to 6 years) on jumping lessons. 30 typical children ages 3 to 6 years were recruited as a comparison group. Before the jumping lesson, a pretest was given subjects for balance and jumping skill measures based on the Motor Proficiency and Motor Skill Inventory, respectively. Subjects with Down syndrome received 3 sessions on jumping per week for 6 weeks but not the typical children. Then, a posttest was administered to all subjects. Analysis of covariance showed the pre- and posttest differences on scores for floor walk, beam walk, and horizontal and vertical jumping by subjects with Down syndrome were significantly greater than those for the typical children.

  3. Theoretical Modeling of Internal Hydraulic Jump in Density Currents

    CERN Document Server

    Firoozabadi, Bahar; Aryanfar, Asghar; Afshin, Hossein

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an analytical framework for internal hydraulic jumps. Density jumps or internal hydraulic jumps occur when a supper critical flow of water discharges into a stagnant layer of water with slightly different density. The approach used here is control volume method which is also used to analyze ordinary hydraulic jumps. The important difference here is that entrainment is taken into account. Using conservation equations with the aid of some simplifying assumptions we come to an equation that gives jump downstream height as function of jump upstream characteristics and the entrainment. To determine the magnitude of downstream height we use an experimental equation for calculating the entrainment. Finally we verify our framework by comparing the height that we gain from the derived equation with some experimental data.

  4. A-jump in horizontal inverted semicircular open channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.M.H. Rashwan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The hydraulic jump is a transitional state from supercritical to subcritical flow. The phenomenon of the hydraulic jump has been widely studied because of its frequent occurrence in nature and because of its uses in many practical applications. In the present study the momentum principle is used to derive an equation expressed the hydraulic jump (A-jump occurred in a short horizontal reach of an inverted semicircular open channel. The derived equation indicates that the initial water depth and the tail water depth (conjugate depths are functions of the critical water depth. Various elements of the hydraulic jump are expressed in dimensionless case. The procedure of dimensionless ratios described in the present paper can be used to determine various elements of A-jump in an inverted semicircular channel when either the discharge and the relative initial depth (or tail water depth is known or the discharge and the relative dissipated energy are known.

  5. A Jump-Diffusion Model with Stochastic Volatility and Durations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Wei; Pelletier, Denis

    Market microstructure theories suggest that the durations between transactions carry information about volatility. This paper puts forward a model featuring stochastic volatility, stochastic conditional duration, and jumps to analyze high frequency returns and durations. Durations affect price...... jumps in two ways: as exogenous sampling intervals, and through the interaction with volatility. We adopt a bivariate Ornstein-Ulenbeck process to model intraday volatility and conditional duration. We develop a MCMC algorithm for the inference on irregularly spaced multivariate processes with jumps....... The algorithm provides smoothed estimates of the latent variables such as spot volatility, conditional duration, jump times, and jump sizes. We apply this model to IBM data and find that volatility and conditional duration are interdependent. We also find that jumps play an important role in return variation...

  6. Robust Stabilization for Uncertain Linear Delay Markow Jump System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟麦英; 汤兵勇; 黄小原

    2001-01-01

    Markov jump linear systems are defined as a family of linear systems with randomly Markov jumping parameters and are used to model systems subject to failures or changes in structure. The robust stabilization problem of jump linear delay system with umcerratnty was studied. By using of linear matrix inequalities, the existence conditions of robust stabilizing and the state feedback controller designing methods are also presented and proved. Finally, an illustrated example shows the effectiveness of this approach.

  7. Approximation of Jump Diffusions in Finance and Economics

    OpenAIRE

    Nicola Bruti-Liberati; Eckhard Platen

    2006-01-01

    In finance and economics the key dynamics are often specified via stochastic differential equations (SDEs) of jump-diffusion type. The class of jump-diffusion SDEs that admits explicit solutions is rather limited. Consequently, discrete time approximations are required. In this paper we give a survey of strong and weak numerical schemes for SDEs with jumps. Strong schemes provide pathwise approximations and therefore can be employed in scenario analysis, filtering or hedge simulation. Weak sc...

  8. Times and Sizes of Jumps in the Mexican Interest Rate

    OpenAIRE

    José Antonio Núñez Mora; Arturo Lorenzo Valdés

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the role of jumps in a continuous-time short-term interest rate model for Mexico. A filtering algorithm provides estimates of jumps times and sizes in the time series of Mexican cetes for the 1998-2006 period. The empirical results indicate that the inclusion of jumps in the diffusion model represents a better alternative than not to include them.

  9. Multiobjective Optimization Methodology A Jumping Gene Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, KS

    2012-01-01

    Complex design problems are often governed by a number of performance merits. These markers gauge how good the design is going to be, but can conflict with the performance requirements that must be met. The challenge is reconciling these two requirements. This book introduces a newly developed jumping gene algorithm, designed to address the multi-functional objectives problem and supplies a viably adequate solution in speed. The text presents various multi-objective optimization techniques and provides the technical know-how for obtaining trade-off solutions between solution spread and converg

  10. Planar jumping-drop thermal diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boreyko, Jonathan B.; Zhao, Yuejun; Chen, Chuan-Hua

    2011-12-01

    Phase-change thermal diodes rectify heat transport much more effectively than solid-state ones, but are limited by either the gravitational orientation or one-dimensional configuration. Here, we report a planar phase-change diode scalable to large areas with an orientation-independent diodicity of over 100, in which water/vapor is enclosed by parallel superhydrophobic and superhydrophilic plates. The thermal rectification is enabled by spontaneously jumping dropwise condensate which only occurs when the superhydrophobic surface is colder than the superhydrophilic surface.

  11. Understanding the physics of bungee jumping

    OpenAIRE

    Heck, A; Uylings, P.; Kędzierska, E.

    2010-01-01

    Changing mass phenomena like the motion of a falling chain, the behaviour of a falling elastic bar or spring, and the motion of a bungee jumper surprise many a physicist. In this article we discuss the first phase of bungee jumping, when the bungee jumper falls, but the bungee rope is still slack. In instructional material this phase is often considered a free fall, but when the mass of the bungee rope is taken into account, the bungee jumper reaches acceleration greater than g. This result i...

  12. Quantifying show jumping horse rider expertise using IMUs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, M; Doyle, J; Cahill, E; Caulfield, B; McCarthy Persson, U

    2010-01-01

    Horse rider ability has long been measured using horse performance, competition results and visual observation. Scientific methods of measuring rider ability on the flat are emerging such as measuring position angles and harmony of the horse-rider system. To date no research has quantified rider ability in show jumping. Kinematic analysis and motion sensors have been used in sports other than show jumping to measure the quality of motor control patterns in humans. The aim of this study was to quantify rider ability in show jumping using body-mounted IMUs. Preliminary results indicate that there are clear differences in experienced and novice riders during show jumping.

  13. Distance perception in the spiny mouse Acomys cahirinus: vertical jumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, M; Skolnick, A J; Hernandez, T P; Tobach, E

    1992-12-01

    Acomys cahirinus, a precocial muroid, that has shown precise jumping in the natural habitat, did not jump from 25 cm in a laboratory situation. To investigate this further, A. cahirinus were observed jumping from platforms at two different heights, onto different sized checkered substrates and from a visual cliff. Adult animals discriminated between platforms that were 6.4 cm and 25.4 cm above the substrate and between small and large checkered patterns on the floor. Most adult animals and neonates jumped down on the shallow side of the visual cliff. Animals developed individual patterns of jumping over a series of trials, with some jumping often, some rarely, and others jumping only from the low platform. Good distance perception was indicated when they did not jump from heights, and by their making appropriate postural adjustment when they did jump from heights and landed without mishap. Different spacing of trials indicated that height was a more effective stimulus for animals which had all four conditions on the same day, while floor pattern was more effective for animals with each of the four conditions on a separate day.

  14. Long memory behavior of returns after intraday financial jumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behfar, Stefan Kambiz

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, characterization of intraday financial jumps and time dynamics of returns after jumps is investigated, and will be analytically and empirically shown that intraday jumps are power-law distributed with the exponent 1 finance, it is important to be able to distinguish between jumps and continuous sample path price movements, and this can be achieved by introducing a statistical test via calculating sums of products of returns over small period of time. In the case of having jump, the null hypothesis for normality test is rejected; this is based on the idea that returns are composed of mixture of normally-distributed and power-law distributed data (∼ 1 /r 1 + μ). Probability of rejection of null hypothesis is a function of μ, which is equal to one for 1 high returns after jumps are the effect; we show that returns caused by jump decay as power-law distribution. To test this idea empirically, we average over the time dynamics of all days; therefore the superposed time dynamics after jump represent a power-law, which indicates that there is a long memory with a power-law distribution of return after jump.

  15. Biomechanics research in ski jumping, 1991-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwameder, Hermann

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, I review biomechanics research in ski jumping with a specific focus on publications presented between 1991 and 2006 on performance enhancement, limiting factors of the take-off, specific training and conditioning, aerodynamics, and safety. The first section presents a brief description of ski jumping phases (in-run, take-off, early flight, stable flight, and landing) regarding the biomechanical and functional fundamentals. The most important and frequently used biomechanical methods in ski jumping (kinematics, ground reaction force analyses, muscle activation patterns, aerodynamics) are summarized in the second section. The third section focuses on ski jumping articles and research findings published after the establishment of the V-technique in 1991, as the introduction of this technique has had a major influence on performance enhancement, ski jumping regulations, and the construction of hill profiles. The final section proposes topics for future research in the biomechanics of ski jumping, including: take-off and early flight and the relative roles of vertical velocity and forward somersaulting angular momentum; optimal jumping patterns utilizing the capabilities of individual athletes; development of kinematic and kinetic feedback systems for hill jumps; comparisons of simulated and hill jumps; effect of equipment modifications on performance and safety enhancement.

  16. Competitive Lotka-Volterra Population Dynamics with Jumps

    CERN Document Server

    Bao, Jianhai; Yin, Geroge; Yuan, Chenggui

    2011-01-01

    This paper considers competitive Lotka-Volterra population dynamics with jumps. The contributions of this paper are as follows. (a) We show stochastic differential equation (SDE) with jumps associated with the model has a unique global positive solution; (b) We discuss the uniform boundedness of $p$th moment with $p>0$ and reveal the sample Lyapunov exponents; (c) Using a variation-of-constants formula for a class of SDEs with jumps, we provide explicit solution for 1-dimensional competitive Lotka-Volterra population dynamics with jumps, and investigate the sample Lyapunov exponent for each component and the extinction of our $n$-dimensional model.

  17. pH jump induced α-helix folding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donten M. L.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available pH can be used to impact the folding equilibrium of peptides and proteins. This fact is utilized, similarly to temperature jumps, in pH jump experiments employing laser time-resolved spectroscopy to study the function and structural dynamics of these molecules. Here the application of pH jumps in folding experiments was investigated. Experiments with poly-L-glutamic acid alpha-helix formation shown the critical aspects of pH jump experiments and yielded direct information about the folding kinetics monitored with the amide I IR band.

  18. Effect of drop jump technique on the reactive strength index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Struzik Artur

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The basic drill of plyometric training aimed at improving lower limb power and jump height is a drop jump. This exercise can be performed using different techniques, which substantially affects jump variables. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare the values of the reactive strength index (RSI for countermovement drop jumps (CDJs and bounce drop jumps (BDJs. The study was carried out in a group of 8 male youth basketball players. The tests were conducted using the AMTI BP600900 force plate to measure ground reaction forces and the Noraxon MyoMotion system to record kinematic data. Each player performed two CDJs and two BDJs from the height of 15, 30, 45 and 60 cm. The RSI was calculated as a ratio of jump height and contact time. Moreover, the RSI was determined for the amortization and take-off phases separately. Significant differences (p < 0.05 between RSI values for CDJs and BDJs were recorded for jumps from 30, 45 and 60 cm. Differences in RSI values for jumps from 15 cm were not significant. Furthermore, CDJ height values were significantly higher (p < 0.05 than the values recorded for BDJs. Times of contact, amortization and take-off during BDJs were significantly shorter (p < 0.05 than the respective values obtained for CDJs. Therefore, the use of the RSI to monitor plyometric training should be based on the drop jump technique that is commonly performed by basketball players.

  19. Development of a Minimally Actuated Jumping-Rolling Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanhtam Ho

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents development of a hybrid mobile robot in order to take advantage of both rolling and jumping locomotion on the ground. According to the unique design of the mechanism, the robot is able to execute both jumping and rolling skilfully by using only one DC motor. Changing the centre of gravity enables rolling of the robot and storage of energy is utilized for jumping. Mechanism design and control logic are validated by computer simulation. Simulation results show that the robot can jump nearly 1.3 times its diameter and roll at the speed of 3.3 times its diameter per second.

  20. Exploiting knowledge of jump-up and jump-down frequencies to determine the parameters of a Duffing oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramlan, Roszaidi; Brennan, Michael J.; Kovacic, Ivana; Mace, Brian R.; Burrow, Stephen G.

    2016-08-01

    This work concerns the application of certain non-linear phenomena - jump frequencies in a base-excited Duffing oscillator - to the estimation of the parameters of the system. First, approximate analytical expressions are derived for the relationships between the jump-up and jump-down frequencies, the damping ratio and the cubic stiffness coefficient. Then, experimental results, together with the results of numerical simulations, are presented to show how knowledge of these frequencies can be exploited.

  1. Uroptychus atlanticus, a new species of squat lobster (Crustacea: Decapoda: Anomura: Chirostylidae) from the western Atlantic Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Keiji; Wicksten, Mary K

    2017-02-02

    A new species of squat lobster, Uroptychus atlanticus, is described on the basis of a female specimen taken at a depth of 713-841 m in the southeastern Gulf of Mexico. The new species is readily distinguished from all known species of the genus from the western Atlantic by the very spinose carapace and pereopods, and a transverse row of spines on each of the abdominal tergites 1 and 2.

  2. A study on muscle activity and ratio of the knee extensor depending on the types of squat exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jeong-Il; Park, Joon-Su; Choi, Hyun; Jeong, Dae-Keun; Kwon, Hye-Min; Moon, Young-Jun

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] For preventing the patellofemoral pain syndrome, this study aims to suggest a proper squat method, which presents selective muscle activity of Vastus Medialis Oblique and muscle activity ratios of Vastus Medialis Oblique/Vastus Lateralis by applying squat that is a representative weight bearing exercise method in various ways depending on the surface conditions and knee bending angles. [Subjects and Methods] An isometric squat that was accompanied by hip adduction, depending on the surface condition and the knee joint flexion angle, was performed by 24 healthy students. The muscle activity and the ratio of muscle activity were measured. [Results] In a comparison of muscle activity depending on the knee joint flexion angle on a weight-bearing surface, the vastus medialis oblique showed a significant difference at 15° and 60°. Meanwhile, in a comparison of the muscle activity ratio between the vastus medialis oblique and the vastus lateralis depending on the knee joint flexion angle on a weight-bearing surface, significant differences were observed at 15° and 60°. [Conclusion] An efficient squat exercise posture for preventing the patellofemoral pain syndrome is to increase the knee joint bending angle on a stable surface. But it would be efficient for patients with difficulties in bending the knee joint to keep a knee joint bending angle of 15 degrees or less on an unstable surface. It is considered that in future, diverse studies on selective Vastus Medialis Oblique strengthening exercise methods would be needed after applying them to patients with the patellofemoral pain syndrome. PMID:28210036

  3. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN MAXIMUM UNILATERAL SQUAT STRENGTH AND BALANCE IN YOUNG ADULT MEN AND WOMEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin McCurdy

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between unilateral squat strength and measures of static balance to compare balance performance between the dominant and non-dominant leg. Seventeen apparently healthy men (mean mass 90.5 ± 20.9 kg and age 21.7 ± 1.8 yrs and 25 women (mean mass 62.2 ± 14.5 kg and age 21.9 ± 1.3 yrs completed the study. Weight bearing unilateral strength was measured with a 1RM modified unilateral squat on the dominant and non-dominant leg. The students completed the stork stand and wobble board tests to determine static balance on the dominant and non-dominant leg. Maximum time maintained in the stork stand position, on the ball of the foot with the uninvolved foot against the involved knee with hands on the hips, was recorded. Balance was measured with a 15 second wobble board test. No significant correlations were found between the measurements of unilateral balance and strength (r values ranged between -0.05 to 0.2 for the men and women. Time off balance was not significantly different between the subjects' dominant (men 1.1 ± 0.4 s; women 0.3 ± 0.1 s and non-dominant (men 0.9 ± 0.3 s; women 0.3 ± 0.1 s leg for the wobble board. Similar results were found for the time balanced during the stork stand test on the dominant (men 26.4 ± 6.3 s; women 24.1 ± 5.6 s and non-dominant (men 26.0 ± 5.7 s; women 21.3 ± 4.1 s leg. The data indicate that static balance and strength is unrelated in young adult men and women and gains made in one variable after training may not be associated with a change in performance of the other variable. These results also suggest that differences in static balance performance between legs can not be determined by leg dominance. Similar research is needed to compare contralateral leg balance in populations who participate in work or sport activities requiring repetitive asymmetrical use. A better understanding of contralateral balance performance will help

  4. Jump dynamics due to jump datum of compressible viscous Navier-Stokes flows in a bounded plane domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kweon, Jae Ryong

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, when the initial density has a jump across an interior curve in a bounded domain, we show unique existence, piecewise regularity and jump discontinuity dynamics for the density and the velocity vector governed by the Navier-Stokes equations of compressible viscous barotropic flows. A critical difficulty is in controlling the gradient of the pressure across the jump curve. This is resolved by constructing a vector function associated with the pressure jump value on the convecting curve and extending it to the whole domain.

  5. Understanding the physics of bungee jumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, André; Uylings, Peter; Kędzierska, Ewa

    2010-01-01

    Changing mass phenomena like the motion of a falling chain, the behaviour of a falling elastic bar or spring, and the motion of a bungee jumper surprise many a physicist. In this article we discuss the first phase of bungee jumping, when the bungee jumper falls, but the bungee rope is still slack. In instructional material this phase is often considered a free fall, but when the mass of the bungee rope is taken into account, the bungee jumper reaches acceleration greater than g. This result is contrary to the usual experience with free falling objects and therefore hard to believe for many a person, even an experienced physicist. It is often a starting point for heated discussions about the quality of the experiments and the physics knowledge of the experimentalist, or it may even prompt complaints about the quality of current physics education. But experiments do reveal the truth and students can do them supported by information and communication technology (ICT) tools. We report on a research project done by secondary school students and use their work to discuss how measurements with sensors, video analysis of self-recorded high-speed video clips and computer modelling allow study of the physics of bungee jumping.

  6. Jumping and Landing Techniques in Elite Women’s Volleyball

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillman, Mark D.; Hass, Chris J.; Brunt, Denis; Bennett, Gregg R.

    2004-01-01

    Volleyball has become one of the most widely played participant sports in the world. Participation requires expertise in many physical skills and performance is often dependent on an individual’s ability to jump and land. The incidence of injury in volleyball is similar to the rates reported for sports that are considered more physical contact sports. Though the most common source of injury in volleyball is the jump landing sequence, little research exists regarding the prevalence of jumping and landing techniques. The purpose of this study was to quantify the number of jumps performed by female volleyball players in competitive matches and to determine the relative frequency of different jump-landing techniques. Videotape recordings of two matches among four volleyball teams were analyzed for this study. Each activity was categorized by jump type (offensive spike or defensive block) and phase (jump or landing). Phase was subcategorized by foot use patterns (right, left, or both). Each of the players averaged nearly 22 jump-landings per game. Foot use patterns occurred in unequal amounts (p < 0.001) with over 50% of defensive landings occurring on one foot. Coaches, physical educators, and recreation providers may utilize the findings of this inquiry to help prevent injuries in volleyball. Key Points The incidence of injury in volleyball is nearly equivalent to injury rates reported for ice hockey and soccer. Most injuries in volleyball occur during the jump landing sequence, but few data exist regarding jump landing techniques for elite female players. Our data indicate that the vast majority of jumps utilize two feet, but approximately half of landings occur with only one foot. Coaches, physical educators, and recreation providers may utilize the findings of this inquiry to prevent possible injuries in athletes, students, or those who participate in volleyball for recreational purposes. PMID:24497818

  7. Neuromuscular function during drop jumps in young and elderly males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piirainen, Jarmo M; Linnamo, Vesa; Sippola, Niina; Avela, Janne

    2012-12-01

    The Hoffman reflex (H-reflex), indicating alpha-motoneuron pool activity, has been shown to be task - and in resting conditions - age dependent. How aging affects H-reflex activity during explosive movements is not clear at present. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of aging on H-reflexes during drop jumps, and its possible role in drop jump performance. Ten young (26.8 ± 2.7 years) and twenty elderly (64.2 ± 2.7 years) subjects participated in the study. Maximal drop jump performance and soleus H-reflex response (H/M jump) 20 ms after ground contact were measured in a sledge ergometer. Maximal H-reflex, maximal M-wave, Hmax/Mmax-ratio and H-reflex excitability curves were measured during standing rest. Although in young the H-reflex response (Hmax/Mmax) was 6.5% higher during relaxed standing and 19.7% higher during drop jumps (H jump/M jump) than in the elderly group, these differences were not statistically significant. In drop jumps, the elderly subjects had lower jumping height (30.4%, p push-off force (18.0%, p push-off time (31.0% p push-off force (r = 0.833, p push-off time (r = -0.857, p strategies in drop jumps. However, it does not fully explain age related differences in jumping performance, since age related differences in H-reflex activity were non-significant. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Chasing maximal performance: a cautionary tale from the celebrated jumping frogs of Calaveras County.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astley, H C; Abbott, E M; Azizi, E; Marsh, R L; Roberts, T J

    2013-11-01

    Maximal performance is an essential metric for understanding many aspects of an organism's biology, but it can be difficult to determine because a measured maximum may reflect only a peak level of effort, not a physiological limit. We used a unique opportunity provided by a frog jumping contest to evaluate the validity of existing laboratory estimates of maximum jumping performance in bullfrogs (Rana catesbeiana). We recorded video of 3124 bullfrog jumps over the course of the 4-day contest at the Calaveras County Jumping Frog Jubilee, and determined jump distance from these images and a calibration of the jump arena. Frogs were divided into two groups: 'rental' frogs collected by fair organizers and jumped by the general public, and frogs collected and jumped by experienced, 'professional' teams. A total of 58% of recorded jumps surpassed the maximum jump distance in the literature (1.295 m), and the longest jump was 2.2 m. Compared with rental frogs, professionally jumped frogs jumped farther, and the distribution of jump distances for this group was skewed towards long jumps. Calculated muscular work, historical records and the skewed distribution of jump distances all suggest that the longest jumps represent the true performance limit for this species. Using resampling, we estimated the probability of observing a given jump distance for various sample sizes, showing that large sample sizes are required to detect rare maximal jumps. These results show the importance of sample size, animal motivation and physiological conditions for accurate maximal performance estimates.

  9. Modeling financial contagion using mutually exciting jump processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aït-Sahalia, Y.; Cacho-Diaz, J.; Laeven, R.J.A.

    2013-01-01

    We propose a model designed to capture the dynamics of asset returns, with periods of crises that are characterized by contagion. In the model, a jump in one region of the world increases the intensity of jumps both in the same region (self-excitation) as well as in other regions (mutual

  10. Modeling financial contagion using mutually exciting jump processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aït-Sahalia, Y.; Cacho-Diaz, J.; Laeven, R.J.A.

    2015-01-01

    We propose a model to capture the dynamics of asset returns, with periods of crises that are characterized by contagion. In the model, a jump in one region of the world increases the intensity of jumps both in the same region (self-excitation) as well as in other regions (cross-excitation),

  11. How Can We Tell if Frogs Jump Further?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, Gordon B.; Tom, Brian D. M.

    2011-01-01

    How effective is training frogs to jump? This is perhaps the most frequent question in biology that is subjected to statistical analysis: does a treatment make a difference? One can examine whether there is indeed a training effect, by first assuming the opposite. That is, the authors assume that training has no effect on the mean distance jumped.…

  12. Teaching Jump Rope to Children with Visual Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Lauren J.; Schedlin, Haley; Pierce, Tristan

    2009-01-01

    This article presents strategies for jumping rope for children with visual impairments. Giving choices related to the types of rope and the use of mats is important. In addition, using appropriate instructional strategies and modifications will make jumping rope a skill that the children will enjoy and will lead to their involvement in other…

  13. Jump Tails, Extreme Dependencies, and the Distribution of Stock Returns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bollerslev, Tim; Todorov, Viktor

    We provide a new framework for estimating the systematic and idiosyncratic jump tail risks in financial asset prices. The theory underlying our estimates are based on in-fill asymptotic arguments for directly identifying the systematic and idiosyncratic jumps, together with conventional long...

  14. The Triple Jump: Assessing Problem Solving in Psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Gorman, Ethna C.; Trimble, Peter; Smyth, Joe

    1998-01-01

    Describes an attempt to assess a final-year course in psychiatry using the Triple Jump. In this course, students on placement in psychiatric units perfect psychiatry skills that were acquired during the previous year by direct contact with patients. The Triple Jump is used to assess problem-solving skills in management strategy on cases. (PVD)

  15. Feller Property for a Special Hybrid Jump-Diffusion Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinying Tong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the stochastic stability for a hybrid jump-diffusion model, where the switching here is a phase semi-Markovian process. We first transform the process into a corresponding jump-diffusion with Markovian switching by the supplementary variable technique. Then we prove the Feller and strong Feller properties of the model under some assumptions.

  16. A time inhomogeneous Cox-Ingersoll-Ross diffusion with jumps

    CERN Document Server

    Hoepfner, Reinhard

    2009-01-01

    We consider a time inhomogeneous Cox-Ingersoll-Ross diffusion with positive jumps. We exploit a branching property to prove existence of a unique strong solution under a restrictive condition on the jump measure. We give Laplace transforms for the transition probabilities, with an interpretation in terms of limits of mixtures over Gamma laws.

  17. How Can We Tell if Frogs Jump Further?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, Gordon B.; Tom, Brian D. M.

    2011-01-01

    How effective is training frogs to jump? This is perhaps the most frequent question in biology that is subjected to statistical analysis: does a treatment make a difference? One can examine whether there is indeed a training effect, by first assuming the opposite. That is, the authors assume that training has no effect on the mean distance jumped.…

  18. Tuning Superhydrophobic Nanostructures to Enhance Jumping-Droplet Condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulroe, Megan; Srijanto, Bernadeta; Collier, Patrick; Boreyko, Jonathan

    2016-11-01

    It was recently discovered that condensation growing on a nanostructured superhydrophobic surface can spontaneously jump off the surface when two or more droplets coalesce together. The minimum droplet size for jumping to occur is of order 10 microns, but it is unclear whether this is the true lower limit of jumping droplets or simply a limitation of current superhydrophobic surfaces. Here, we analyze the dynamics of jumping droplets on six different superhydrophobic surfaces where the topography of the nanopillars was systematically varied. The critical diameter for jumping to occur was observed to be highly dependent upon the height and diameter of the nanopillars; surfaces with very tall and slender nanopillars enabled jumping droplets at a smaller critical size of order 1 micron. An energetic model of the incipient growth of condensate shows that the nanostructure topology affects the rate of increase of a growing droplet's apparent contact angle, with jumping being enabled at very large angles. These findings indicate that the true upper limit to the performance of jumping-droplet condensers has not yet been reached and can be further improved using advanced nanofabrication techniques.

  19. Empirical likelihood inference for diffusion processes with jumps

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the empirical likelihood inference for the jump-diffusion model. We construct the confidence intervals based on the empirical likelihood for the infinitesimal moments in the jump-diffusion models. They are better than the confidence intervals which are based on the asymptotic normality of point estimates.

  20. A Safe and Effective Modification of Thomson's Jumping Ring Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waschke, Felix; Strunz, Andreas; Meyn, Jan-Peter

    2012-01-01

    The electrical circuit of the jumping ring experiment based on discharging a capacitor is optimized. The setup is scoop proof at 46 V and yet the ring jumps more than 9 m high. The setup is suitable for both lectures and student laboratory work in higher education. (Contains 1 table, 8 figures and 3 footnotes.)

  1. Evaluation of Metabolic Stress between Jumping at Different Cadences on the Digi-Jump Machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Thomas S; Navalta, James W; Callahan, Zachary J

    The American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) recommends that healthy adults achieve a minimum of thirty minutes of moderate intensity aerobic exercise five days per week. While cycling, walking, and jogging are commonly observed methods of achieving these recommendations, another option may be repetitive jumping. The purpose of this study was to examine the metabolic responses between repetitive jumping at a cadence of 120 jumps per minute (JPMs) vs. 100 JPMs when utilizing the Digi-Jump machine. Twenty-eight subjects completed two jumping trials, one at 120 JPMs and one at 100 JPMs. Subjects jumped until volitional exhaustion, or for a maximum of fifteen minutes. Oxygen uptake (VO2), heart rate (HR), respiratory exchange ratio (RER), and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) were assessed each minute of each exercise trial. RPE was differentiated, in that subjects reported perceived exertion of their total body, their upper-leg, and their lower leg. Results of this study indicated that there was no significant difference between the two trials for VO2, HR, or total body RPE. Differences were reported between trials for peak and average RER, with the 120 JPM trial eliciting a lower RER for both (peak: 1.08 ± .087 vs. 1.17 ± .1 p=.000; average: .99 ± .076 vs. 1.04 ± .098 p=.002), peak upper leg RPE (120: 15.29 ± 3.89 vs. 100: 16.75 ± 2.52 p=.022), and average lower leg RPE (120: 15.04 ± 2.55 vs. 100: 13.94 ± 2.02 p=.019). Also, there was a significant difference in exercise duration between the trials, with subjects able to exercise longer during the 120 JPM trial (12.4 ± 3.42 mins vs. 9.68 ± 4.31 mins p=.000). These data indicate that while the physiological stress may not be different between the two trials as indicated by VO2 and HR, the 120 JPM trial appears less strenuous as evidenced by RER values and by subjects' ability to exercise longer at that cadence.

  2. Validity and Reliability of the PUSH Wearable Device to Measure Movement Velocity During the Back Squat Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsalobre-Fernández, Carlos; Kuzdub, Matt; Poveda-Ortiz, Pedro; Campo-Vecino, Juan Del

    2016-07-01

    Balsalobre-Fernández, C, Kuzdub, M, Poveda-Ortiz, P, and Campo-Vecino, Jd. Validity and reliability of the PUSH wearable device to measure movement velocity during the back squat exercise. J Strength Cond Res 30(7): 1968-1974, 2016-The purpose of this study was to analyze the validity and reliability of a wearable device to measure movement velocity during the back squat exercise. To do this, 10 recreationally active healthy men (age = 23.4 ± 5.2 years; back squat 1 repetition maximum [1RM] = 83 ± 8.2 kg) performed 3 repetitions of the back squat exercise with 5 different loads ranging from 25 to 85% 1RM on a Smith Machine. Movement velocity for each of the total 150 repetitions was simultaneously recorded using the T-Force linear transducer (LT) and the PUSH wearable band. Results showed a high correlation between the LT and the wearable device mean (r = 0.85; standard error of estimate [SEE] = 0.08 m·s) and peak velocity (r = 0.91, SEE = 0.1 m·s). Moreover, there was a very high agreement between these 2 devices for the measurement of mean (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] = 0.907) and peak velocity (ICC = 0.944), although a systematic bias between devices was observed (PUSH peak velocity being -0.07 ± 0.1 m·s lower, p ≤ 0.05). When measuring the 3 repetitions with each load, both devices displayed almost equal reliability (Test-retest reliability: LT [r = 0.98], PUSH [r = 0.956]; ICC: LT [ICC = 0.989], PUSH [ICC = 0.981]; coefficient of variation [CV]: LT [CV = 4.2%], PUSH [CV = 5.0%]). Finally, individual load-velocity relationships measured with both the LT (R = 0.96) and the PUSH wearable device (R = 0.94) showed similar, very high coefficients of determination. In conclusion, these results support the use of an affordable wearable device to track velocity during back squat training. Wearable devices, such as the one in this study, could have valuable practical applications for strength and conditioning coaches.

  3. MORPHOMETRIC ANALYSIS OF VERTICAL GROOVE ON ANTERIOR SURFACE OF TIBIAL LATERAL CONDYLE AND ITS RELATION WITH SQUATTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narinder

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Seventy dry tibiae of adult and unknown sex were collected from the department of Anatomy Government Medical College Jammu. The region under the course of the ligamentum patellae of every tibia was carefully examined and studied for the presence or absence of a vertical groove and its characteristics like shape, length and depth were noted. In India, one of the commonest mode of sitting is squatting. Squatters are known to show certain adap tational features in the lower extremities like vertical groove on the anterior surface of lateral condyle of tibia. This groove is produced on the tibia by pressure of the tendon of quadriceps femoris (ligamentum patellae. The pressure of the tendon of q uadriceps femoris occurs due to great deal of flexion of knee joint, occuring during squatting. Squatting is one of the frequently used exercise in the field of strength and conditioning. It is also an integral component in the sport of competitive weight lifting and power lifting and regarded as a supreme test of lower body strength. (1,2 INTRODUCTION: A vertical groove is present is present on the anterior surface of tibial lateral condyle in squatters. In India most of the people have a habit of sitting down by squatting. During squatting there is excessive flexion of the knee joint which exerts a great deal of pressure on the strong tendon of quadriceps femoris (ligamentum patellae which is inserted on the tibial tuberosity. The pressure so exerted lead s to the formation of a groove on the unattached part of the ligamentum patella. This vertical groove so formed is also called as quadracipital groove. (3 It is shallow but distinct with a prominent lateral lip and extends proximally in a vertical directio n. It is inverted “J” shaped as described by Hughes and Sunderland 1946. (4 The lateral lip is prominent due to lateral angulation between femur and tibia. If the groove is absent then either the person is a non - squatter (eg Europeans or is weak

  4. The Effect of Standard Strength vs. Contrast Strength Training on the Development of Sprint, Agility, Repeated Change of Direction, and Jump in Junior Male Soccer Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammami, Mehréz; Negra, Yassine; Shephard, Roy J; Chelly, Mohamed Souhaiel

    2017-04-01

    Hammami, M, Negra, Y, Shephard, RJ, and Chelly, MS. The effect of standard strength vs. contrast strength training on the development of sprint, agility, repeated change of direction, and jump in junior male soccer players. J Strength Cond Res 31(4): 901-912, 2017-The aim was to compare the impact of 2 differing strength training (ST) programs on the athletic performance of junior male soccer players at a critical phase during their competitive season. Participants aged 16.0 ± 0.5 years were randomly assigned between control (C, n = 12), standard ST (n = 16), and contrast strength training (CST, n = 16), each performed twice a week. Athletic performance was assessed before and after the intervention using 8 tests: 40-m sprint, 4 × 5-m sprint (S4 × 5), 9-3-6-3-9 m sprint with 180° turns (S180°), 9-3-6-3-9 m sprint with backward and forward running (SBF), repeated shuttle sprint ability (RSSA), repeated change of direction (RCOD), squat jump (SJ), and countermovement jump (CMJ). The control group's (CG) performance tended to improve in some tests and decrease in others, but these changes were not statistically significant. Both training programs enhanced all sprint performances relative to controls (p ≤ 0.05). The strength training group (SG) and the CST group (CSG) increased significantly in S180°, SBF, and S4 × 5 relative to CG, although the S4 × 5 also increased in CSG relative to SG (p ≤ 0.05). No intergroup difference of RSSA performance was observed. The RCOD parameters increased significantly in CSG relative to both SG and CG (p ≤ 0.05). The SJ and CMJ height increased significantly in both experimental groups (p < 0.000). We conclude that during the competitive season, some measures of athletic performance in male soccer players were increased more by 8 weeks of CST than by ST.

  5. Effects of in-season short-term aerobic and high-intensity interval training program on repeated sprint ability and jump performance in handball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermassi, Souhail; Ingebrigtsen, Jørgen; Schwesig, René; Fieseler, Georg; Delank, Karl S; Chamari, Karim; Shephard, Roy J; Chelly, Mohamed S

    2016-11-16

    This study examined the effects of a 7-week in-season aerobic and high-intensity interval-training program on performance tests linked to successful handball play (e.g., repeated sprint and jumping ability). Thirty participants (age 17.0 ± 1.2 years, body mass 81.1 ± 3.4 kg, height 1.82± 0.07 m) performed a Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Test level 1 (Yo-Yo IR1), a squat (SJ) and a countermovement jump test (CMJ), as well as a repeated sprint ability test (RSA). From this, maximal aerobic speed (MAS, reached at the end of the Yo-Yo IR1), jumping ability, best time in a single sprint trial (RSAbest), total time (RSATT) and the performance decrement (RSAdec) during all sprints were calculated. Later, subjects were randomly assigned to a control group (CG; n=15) performing their normal training schedule (5 weekly sessions of ~90 min of handball training) or an experimental group (EG; n=15). The EG performed two 30 min sessions per week of high-intensity aerobic exercises at 100-130% of MAS in addition to their normal training schedule. Demonstrated a significant improvement in MAS (d=4.1), RSAbest (d=1.9), RSATT (d=1.5) and RSAdec (d=2.3) after the training period. Also, significant interaction effects (time x group) were found for all parameters as the EG significantly improved performances in all tests after training. The greatest interaction effects were observed in MAS (2=0.811) and CMJ (2=0.759). No relevant changes in test performances were found in the CG (mean d=-0.02). These results indicate that individually speed controlled aerobic and interval training is effective for improving specific handball performance.

  6. Biomechanical Analysis on Vertical Jump Height According to Different Foot Dorsiflexions%足不同背屈纵跳高度的生物力学分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨多多; 苏美华

    2012-01-01

    This paper has designed three squat jump exercises which make the foot dorsiflexions show the angle of 5°,10° and 15°,exploring the effect of different foot's dorsiflexions on vertical high jump.The results show that all three different foot dorsiflexions can increase vertical jump height,among which 5° is the most effective,increasing 15.8 cm of height on average,while 10° and 15° increase 12.2 cm and 10 cm respectively,fully demonstrating that the muscle is elongated in advance to give play to strength.At the same time,it indicates that the muscle's different working states have different influence on muscle's covergent force.%研究设计了3个可以使足呈5°、10°和15°背屈角度的蹲跳练习,探讨足不同背屈对纵跳高度的影响,结果显示足不同背屈都能提高跳起高度,5°时最高,平均增加了15.8cm,10°和15°时有所减少,分别增加12.2cm和10cm,充分显示出肌肉预拉长对发挥肌肉力量的作用,同时也表明肌肉的不同工作状态对肌肉收缩力的影响不同。

  7. The hydraulic jump and ripples in liquid helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rolley, E. [Laboratoire de Physique Statistique de l' ENS, associe au CNRS et aux Universites Paris 6 et Paris 7, 24 rue Lhomond, 75005 Paris (France)]. E-mail: rolley@lps.ens.fr; Guthmann, C. [Laboratoire de Physique Statistique de l' ENS, associe au CNRS et aux Universites Paris 6 et Paris 7, 24 rue Lhomond, 75005 Paris (France); Pettersen, M.S. [Washington and Jefferson College, 60 S. Lincoln St., Washington, PA 15301 (United States)

    2007-05-01

    We have studied the characteristics of the circular hydraulic jump using liquid helium. Surprisingly, the radius of the jump does not change at the superfluid transition. We think that the flow is still dissipative below the lambda point because the velocity exceeds the critical one. The jump radius R{sub j} is compared with various models. In our parameter range, we find that the jump can be treated as a shock, and that capillary effects are important. Below the superfluid transition, we observed a standing capillary wave between the impact of the jet and the jump. Assuming that the superfluid flow can be described with an effective viscosity, we calculate the wave vector and thus obtain the value of the liquid thickness, which is in reasonable agreement with predictions. However, the spatial variation of the wave amplitude depends much more strongly on temperature than we calculate.

  8. 模拟高空跳伞“分腿”半蹲式着陆对双足垂直作用力的影响%The perpendicular ground reactive force on paratrooper's feet in " straddling" half-squat landing simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡袒; 郑超; 伍骥; 黄蓉蓉; 吴迪; 李毅; 王隆风; 王林飞

    2016-01-01

    Objective To analyze the characteristics of perpendicular ground reaction force on paratrooper's feet in "straddling" half-squat parachute landing simulation,and to provide a theoretical basis for further the exploration of parachute landing injury mechanisms and the prevention.Methods Eighteen active service paratroopers,who were wearing Model-06 parachute boots,jumped from 30 cm or 60 cm height and landed on a tri-axial force measuring platform with "straddling" half-squat or standard half-squat landing posture.When with "straddling" half-squat landing every paratrooper was marked by bigger and smaller force foot according to the measured perpendicular ground reaction force.The forces on feet determined by different jumping height were analyzed by paired sample t-test and those with different landing postures were tested by the analysis of variance.Results ①The difference of maximal perpendicular ground reaction force showed significance between paratrooper's feet as they were in "straddling" half-squat landing and it got larger with the height increase (t=5.80,7.31,P<0.01);There also existed significant difference in the maximal action buffer time (P<0.05).The maximal action buffer time of the "straddling" half-squat landing was significantly longer than that of the standard half-squat parachute landing (F=11.11,22.12,P<0.01).Conclusions With the " straddling" half-squat landing simulation,paratrooper experience significant different maximal perpendicular ground reaction force on their feet and the difference get bigger as height increased.It indicates that such landing approach can lead to the instability of landing due to the unbalanced forces acted on feet and may easily result in landing injury.%目的 分析伞兵“分腿”半蹲式着陆时双足受到的垂直反作用力的特点,为进一步探究跳伞着陆损伤机制及预防损伤提供理论基础. 方法 18名现役伞兵穿06伞兵作训靴,模拟“分腿”半蹲式、标准半蹲

  9. Effects of isometric scaling on vertical jumping performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten F Bobbert

    Full Text Available Jump height, defined as vertical displacement in the airborne phase, depends on vertical takeoff velocity. For centuries, researchers have speculated on how jump height is affected by body size and many have adhered to what has come to be known as Borelli's law, which states that jump height does not depend on body size per se. The underlying assumption is that the amount of work produced per kg body mass during the push-off is independent of size. However, if a big body is isometrically downscaled to a small body, the latter requires higher joint angular velocities to achieve a given takeoff velocity and work production will be more impaired by the force-velocity relationship of muscle. In the present study, the effects of pure isometric scaling on vertical jumping performance were investigated using a biologically realistic model of the human musculoskeletal system. The input of the model, muscle stimulation over time, was optimized using jump height as criterion. It was found that when the human model was miniaturized to the size of a mouse lemur, with a mass of about one-thousandth that of a human, jump height dropped from 40 cm to only 6 cm, mainly because of the force-velocity relationship. In reality, mouse lemurs achieve jump heights of about 33 cm. By implication, the unfavourable effects of the small body size of mouse lemurs on jumping performance must be counteracted by favourable effects of morphological and physiological adaptations. The same holds true for other small jumping animals. The simulations for the first time expose and explain the sheer magnitude of the isolated effects of isometric downscaling on jumping performance, to be counteracted by morphological and physiological adaptations.

  10. Effects of isometric scaling on vertical jumping performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobbert, Maarten F

    2013-01-01

    Jump height, defined as vertical displacement in the airborne phase, depends on vertical takeoff velocity. For centuries, researchers have speculated on how jump height is affected by body size and many have adhered to what has come to be known as Borelli's law, which states that jump height does not depend on body size per se. The underlying assumption is that the amount of work produced per kg body mass during the push-off is independent of size. However, if a big body is isometrically downscaled to a small body, the latter requires higher joint angular velocities to achieve a given takeoff velocity and work production will be more impaired by the force-velocity relationship of muscle. In the present study, the effects of pure isometric scaling on vertical jumping performance were investigated using a biologically realistic model of the human musculoskeletal system. The input of the model, muscle stimulation over time, was optimized using jump height as criterion. It was found that when the human model was miniaturized to the size of a mouse lemur, with a mass of about one-thousandth that of a human, jump height dropped from 40 cm to only 6 cm, mainly because of the force-velocity relationship. In reality, mouse lemurs achieve jump heights of about 33 cm. By implication, the unfavourable effects of the small body size of mouse lemurs on jumping performance must be counteracted by favourable effects of morphological and physiological adaptations. The same holds true for other small jumping animals. The simulations for the first time expose and explain the sheer magnitude of the isolated effects of isometric downscaling on jumping performance, to be counteracted by morphological and physiological adaptations.

  11. Dynamics and stability of directional jumps in the desert locust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvirsman, Omer

    2016-01-01

    Locusts are known for their ability to jump large distances to avoid predation. The jump also serves to launch the adult locust into the air in order to initiate flight. Various aspects of this important behavior have been studied extensively, from muscle physiology and biomechanics, to the energy storage systems involved in powering the jump, and more. Less well understood are the mechanisms participating in control of the jump trajectory. Here we utilise video monitoring and careful analysis of experimental directional jumps by adult desert locusts, together with dynamic computer simulation, in order to understand how the locusts control the direction and elevation of the jump, the residual angular velocities resulting from the jump and the timing of flapping-flight initiation. Our study confirms and expands early findings regarding the instrumental role of the initial body position and orientation. Both real-jump video analysis and simulations based on our expanded dynamical model demonstrate that the initial body coordinates of position (relative to the hind-legs ground-contact points) are dominant in predicting the jumps’ azimuth and elevation angles. We also report a strong linear correlation between the jumps’ pitch-angular-velocity and flight initiation timing, such that head downwards rotations lead to earlier wing opening. In addition to offering important insights into the bio-mechanical principles of locust jumping and flight initiation, the findings from this study will be used in designing future prototypes of a bio-inspired miniature jumping robot that will be employed in animal behaviour studies and environmental monitoring applications. PMID:27703846

  12. Dynamics and stability of directional jumps in the desert locust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer Gvirsman

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Locusts are known for their ability to jump large distances to avoid predation. The jump also serves to launch the adult locust into the air in order to initiate flight. Various aspects of this important behavior have been studied extensively, from muscle physiology and biomechanics, to the energy storage systems involved in powering the jump, and more. Less well understood are the mechanisms participating in control of the jump trajectory. Here we utilise video monitoring and careful analysis of experimental directional jumps by adult desert locusts, together with dynamic computer simulation, in order to understand how the locusts control the direction and elevation of the jump, the residual angular velocities resulting from the jump and the timing of flapping-flight initiation. Our study confirms and expands early findings regarding the instrumental role of the initial body position and orientation. Both real-jump video analysis and simulations based on our expanded dynamical model demonstrate that the initial body coordinates of position (relative to the hind-legs ground-contact points are dominant in predicting the jumps’ azimuth and elevation angles. We also report a strong linear correlation between the jumps’ pitch-angular-velocity and flight initiation timing, such that head downwards rotations lead to earlier wing opening. In addition to offering important insights into the bio-mechanical principles of locust jumping and flight initiation, the findings from this study will be used in designing future prototypes of a bio-inspired miniature jumping robot that will be employed in animal behaviour studies and environmental monitoring applications.

  13. Jumping Jupiter can explain Mercury's orbit

    CERN Document Server

    Roig, Fernando; DeSouza, Sandro Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    The orbit of Mercury has large values of eccentricity and inclination that cannot be easily explained if this planet formed on a circular and coplanar orbit. Here, we study the evolution of Mercury's orbit during the instability related to the migration of the giant planets in the framework of the jumping Jupiter model. We found that some instability models are able to produce the correct values of Mercury's eccentricity and inclination, provided that relativistic effects are included in the precession of Mercury's perihelion. The orbital excitation is driven by the fast change of the normal oscillation modes of the system corresponding to the perihelion precession of Jupiter (for the eccentricity), and the nodal regression of Uranus (for the inclination).

  14. The Voter Model and Jump Diffusion

    CERN Document Server

    Majmudar, Jimit; Baumgaertner, Bert O; Tyson, Rebecca C

    2015-01-01

    Opinions, and subsequently opinion dynamics, depend not just on interactions among individuals, but also on external influences such as the mass media. The dependence on local interactions, however, has received considerably more attention. In this paper, we use the classical voter model as a basis, and extend it to include external influences. We show that this new model can be understood using the theory of jump diffusion processes. We derive results pertaining to fixation probability and expected consensus time of the process, and find that the contribution of an external influence significantly dwarfs the contribution of the node-to-node interactions in terms of driving the social network to eventual consensus. This result suggests the potential importance of ``macro-level'' phenomena such as the media influence as compared to the ``micro-level'' local interactions, in modelling opinion dynamics.

  15. Heel-Raised Foot Posture Do Not Affect Trunk And Lower Extremity Biomechanics During A Barbell Back Squat In Recreational Weightlifters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Szu-Ping; Gillis, Carrie; Ibarra, Javier J; Oldroyd, Derek; Zane, Ryan

    2017-06-19

    It is claimed that weightlifting shoes with a raised heel may lead to a more upright trunk posture, and thus reduce the risk of back injuries during a barbell back squat. These proclaimed biomechanical effects have not been thoroughly investigated. The purpose of this study was to compare trunk and lower extremity biomechanics during barbell back squats in 3 foot postures.14 recreational weightlifters (7 male and 7 female) between the ages of 18-50 performed barbell back squats in 3 conditions (barefoot on a flat surface, barefoot on a heel-raised platform, and wearing heel-raised weightlifting shoes) at 80% of their 1-RM. Surface electromyography (EMG) was used to assess the activation of the knee extensors and paraspinal muscles at L3 and T12 spinal levels. A 3D motion capture system and an electrogoniometer recorded the kinematics of the thoracic spine, lumbar spine, and knee during the back squat to a depth where the hip was at least at the same level to the knee.Resultsindicated that none of the heel-raised foot postures significantly affected trunk and lower extremity muscle activation [thoracolumbar paraspinal (p=0.52), lumbar paraspinal (p=0.179), knee extensor (p=0.507)] or the trunk angles [thoracolumbar spine (p=0.348), lumbar spine (p=0.283)] during the squat.Our results demonstrated that during barbell back squats, heel-raised foot postures do not significantly affect spinal and knee extensor muscle activations, and trunk and knee kinematics. Heel-raised weightlifting shoes are unlikely to provide significant protection against back injuries for recreational weightlifters during the barbell back squat.

  16. CAPTURE OF TROJANS BY JUMPING JUPITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nesvorny, David [Department of Space Studies, Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut St., Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States); Vokrouhlicky, David [Institute of Astronomy, Charles University, V Holesovickach 2, 180 00 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Morbidelli, Alessandro [Departement Cassiopee, University of Nice, CNRS, Observatoire de la Cote d' Azur, Nice, F-06304 (France)

    2013-05-01

    Jupiter Trojans are thought to be survivors of a much larger population of planetesimals that existed in the planetary region when planets formed. They can provide important constraints on the mass and properties of the planetesimal disk, and its dispersal during planet migration. Here, we tested a possibility that the Trojans were captured during the early dynamical instability among the outer planets (aka the Nice model), when the semimajor axis of Jupiter was changing as a result of scattering encounters with an ice giant. The capture occurs in this model when Jupiter's orbit and its Lagrange points become radially displaced in a scattering event and fall into a region populated by planetesimals (that previously evolved from their natal transplanetary disk to {approx}5 AU during the instability). Our numerical simulations of the new capture model, hereafter jump capture, satisfactorily reproduce the orbital distribution of the Trojans and their total mass. The jump capture is potentially capable of explaining the observed asymmetry in the number of leading and trailing Trojans. We find that the capture probability is (6-8) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} for each particle in the original transplanetary disk, implying that the disk contained (3-4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} planetesimals with absolute magnitude H < 9 (corresponding to diameter D = 80 km for a 7% albedo). The disk mass inferred from this work, M{sub disk} {approx} 14-28 M{sub Earth}, is consistent with the mass deduced from recent dynamical simulations of the planetary instability.

  17. [INFLUENCE OF BODY COMPOSITION ON VERTICAL JUMP PERFORMANCE ACCORDING WITH THE AGE AND THE PLAYING POSITION IN FOOTBALL PLAYERS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chena Sinovas, Marcos; Pérez-López, Alberto; Álvarez Valverde, Irene; Bores Cerezal, Antonio; Ramos-Campo, Domingo Jesús; Rubio-Arias, Jacobo Ángel; Valadés Cerrato, David

    2015-07-01

    Introducción: la detección de jóvenes talentos en fútbol tiene un carácter multifactorial. Entre estos factores, la composición corporal y el salto vertical han mostrado su utilidad tanto en la detección de talentos como en el control del rendimiento y la recuperación de lesiones. Por ello, el objetivo de este estudio fue describir el perfil antropométrico y el rendimiento de salto en futbolistas de todas las categorías de formación en base a su demarcación en el terreno de juego. Métodos: participaron en el estudio cuatrocientos treinta y cuatro jóvenes futbolistas españoles de 7 a 25 años de edad (13,4 ± 3,45 años; 156 ± 17 cm; 47,9 ± 15,4 kg), con un mínimo de tres sesiones semanales de 1,5 horas por sesión. Todos ellos fueron clasificados en función de la edad o la categoría (U9, U11, U13, U15, U17 y U25) y la demarcación en el terreno de juego (porteros, defensas, centrocampistas y delanteros). Se evaluó la composición corporal por medio del método antropométrico y se registró la altura del salto del Squat Jump (SJ), del Counter Movement Jump (CMJ) y del Abalakov Jump (CMJA). Resultados: se encontraron diferencias significativas en las variables antropométrica y de salto vertical en base a la demarcación para las categorías U13, U15 y U25. Los porteros de la categoría U13 mostraron una mayor masa magra, tejido apendicular, área muscular del muslo y del brazo que el resto de las demarcaciones (P rendimiento de salto que el resto de demarcaciones para el CMJA, que los centrocampistas y delanteros para el CMJ y que los centrocampistas para el SJ (P < 0,05). Conclusión: la utilización del salto vertical y el perfil antropométrico como factores en la detección de jóvenes talentos en fútbol debería tener en cuenta no solo la edad biológica y el desarrollo muscular de los sujetos, sino también la demarcación en el terreno de juego.

  18. Hydraulic jumps within pyroclastic density currents and their sedimentary record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douillet, G.; Mueller, S.; Kueppers, U.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2013-12-01

    This contribution presents a complete and comprehensive formulation of the hydraulic jump phenomenon and reviews sedimentary structures that may be associated with them. Beginning from the general fluid phenomenon, we then focus on examples from pyroclastic density currents in order to infer dynamic parameters on the parent flows. A hydraulic jump is a fluid dynamics phenomenon that corresponds to the sudden increase of the thickness of a flow accompanied by a decrease of its velocity and/or density. A hydraulic jump is the expression of the transition of the flow from two different flow regimes: supercritical to subcritical. This entrains a change in the energy balance between kinetic energy and gravity potential energy. Recently, the terms of 'pneumatic jumps' have been used for similar phenomenon driven within a gas phase, and granular jumps for dense granular flows. It is thought that such strong changes in the flow conditions may leave characteristic structures in the sedimentary record. Indeed, the main variables influencing the sedimentation rate are the flow velocity, particle concentration and turbulence level, all of them strongly affected by a hydraulic jump. Structures deposited by hydraulic/pneumatic jumps have been called cyclic steps and chute and pool structures. Chute and pools represent the record of a single supercritical to subcritical transition, whereas cyclic steps are produced by stable trains of hydraulic jumps and subsequent re-accelerations. Pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) are gas and pyroclasts flows. As such, they can be subjected to granular and pneumatic jumps and their deposit have often been interpreted as containing records of jumps. Steep sided truncations covered by lensoidal layers have been interpreted as the record of internal jumps within density stratified flows. Fines-depleted breccias at breaks in slope are thought to result from the enhanced turbulence at a jump of the entire flow. Sudden increases in thickness of

  19. A COMPARISON OF PAIRS FIGURE SKATERS IN REPEATED JUMPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William A. Sands

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Trends in pairs figure skating have shown that increasingly difficult jumps have become an essential aspect of high-level performance, especially in the latter part of a competitive program. We compared a repeated jump power index in a 60 s repeated jump test to determine the relationship of repeated jump test to competitive rank and to measure 2D hip, knee, and ankle angles and angular velocities at 0, 20, 40, and 60 s. Eighteen National Team Pairs Figure Skaters performed a 60 s repeated jump test on a large switch-mat with timing of flight and ground durations and digital video recording. Each 60-s period was divided into 6, 10-s intervals, with power indexes (W/kg calculated for each 10-s interval. Power index by 10-s interval repeated measures ANOVAs (RMANOVA showed that males exceeded females at all intervals, and the highest power index interval was during 10 to 20 s for both sexes. RMANOVAs of angles and angular velocities showed main effects for time only. Power index and jumping techniques among figure skaters showed rapid and steady declines over the test duration. Power index can predict approximately 50% of competitive rank variance, and sex differences in jumping technique were rare

  20. Effects of Foam Rolling on Vertical Jump Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Jones

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Foam rolling is a popular activity utilized by strength and conditioning coaches as it is believed to increase muscle length and break up fibrous adhesions located in connective tissue. However, there is little research investigating the effects of foam rolling on athletic performance. Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of lower body foam rolling on vertical jump performance. Methods: Twenty males (age 24.05 ± 2.02 years; height 177.43 ± 6.31 cm; mass 81.41 ± 8.76 kg volunteered to participate. Subjects completed three days of testing, separated by at least twenty-four hours. Day one consisted of baseline vertical jumps on a force plate, followed by familiarization with foam rolling and control protocols. Subjects returned on days two and three and performed 30-second bouts of lower body foam rolling or mimicked foam rolling movements on a skateboard followed by vertical jumps on a force plate. The highest jump from each day was used for statistical analyses. Results: Repeated measures ANOVAs revealed no significant differences in Jump height, impulse, relative ground reaction force, or take-off velocity between conditions. Conclusion: 30-second bouts of lower body foam rolling do not improve vertical jump performance. Keywords: Dynamic Warm-Up, Foam Rolling, Vertical Jump

  1. Condensed droplet jumping: Capillary to inertial energy transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enright, Ryan; Miljkovic, Nenad; Morris, Michael; Wang, Evelyn

    2013-03-01

    When condensed droplets coalesce on a superhydrophobic nanostructured surface, the resulting droplet can jump from the surface due to the release of excess surface energy. This behavior has been shown to follow a simple inertial-capillary scaling. However, questions remain regarding the nature of the energy conversion process linking the excess surface energy of the system before coalescence and the kinetic energy of the jumping droplet. Furthermore, the primary energy dissipation mechanisms limiting this jumping behavior remain relatively unexplored. In this work, we present new experimental data from a two-camera setup capturing the trajectory of jumping droplets on nanostructured surfaces with a characteristic surface roughness length scale on the order of 10 nm. Coupled with a model developed to capture the main details of the bridging flow during coalescence, our findings suggest that: 1. the excess surface energy available for jumping is a fraction of that suggested by simple scaling due to incomplete energy transfer, 2. internal viscous dissipation is not a limiting factor on the jumping process at droplet sizes on the order of 10 μm and 3. jumping performance is strongly affected by forces associated with the external flow and fields around the droplet. This work suggests bounds on the heat transfer performance of superhydrophobic condensation surfaces.

  2. Aerial jumping in the Trinidadian guppy (Poecilia reticulata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Daphne; Bierman, Hilary S

    2013-01-01

    Many fishes are able to jump out of the water and launch themselves into the air. Such behavior has been connected with prey capture, migration and predator avoidance. We found that jumping behavior of the guppy Poecilia reticulata is not associated with any of the above. The fish jump spontaneously, without being triggered by overt sensory cues, is not migratory and does not attempt to capture aerial food items. Here, we use high speed video imaging to analyze the kinematics of the jumping behavior P. reticulata. Fish jump from a still position by slowly backing up while using its pectoral fins, followed by strong body trusts which lead to launching into the air several body lengths. The liftoff phase of the jump is fast and fish will continue with whole body thrusts and tail beats, even when out of the water. This behavior occurs when fish are in a group or in isolation. Geography has had substantial effects on guppy evolution, with waterfalls reducing gene flow and constraining dispersal. We suggest that jumping has evolved in guppies as a behavioral phenotype for dispersal.

  3. Aerial jumping in the Trinidadian guppy (Poecilia reticulata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daphne Soares

    Full Text Available Many fishes are able to jump out of the water and launch themselves into the air. Such behavior has been connected with prey capture, migration and predator avoidance. We found that jumping behavior of the guppy Poecilia reticulata is not associated with any of the above. The fish jump spontaneously, without being triggered by overt sensory cues, is not migratory and does not attempt to capture aerial food items. Here, we use high speed video imaging to analyze the kinematics of the jumping behavior P. reticulata. Fish jump from a still position by slowly backing up while using its pectoral fins, followed by strong body trusts which lead to launching into the air several body lengths. The liftoff phase of the jump is fast and fish will continue with whole body thrusts and tail beats, even when out of the water. This behavior occurs when fish are in a group or in isolation. Geography has had substantial effects on guppy evolution, with waterfalls reducing gene flow and constraining dispersal. We suggest that jumping has evolved in guppies as a behavioral phenotype for dispersal.

  4. Effect of set configuration on hemodynamics and cardiac autonomic modulation after high-intensity squat exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias-Soler, Eliseo; Boullosa, Daniel A; Carballeira, Eduardo; Sánchez-Otero, Tania; Mayo, Xian; Castro-Gacio, Xabier; Dopico, Xurxo

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effect of two different high-intensity resistance exercise (RE) set configurations on the following: systolic blood pressure (SBP), rate pressure product (RPP), heart rate (HR) variability (HRV), and HR complexity (HRC). Ten well-trained males performed three parallel squat sets until failure (traditional training; TT) with the four repetitions maximum load (4RM), and a rest of 3 min between sets. Thereafter, participants performed a cluster training session (CT) of equated load but with resting time distributed between each repetition. Dependent variables were recorded before, during, and after RE. Mean SBP (25·7 versus 10·9% percentage increase; P = 0·016) and RPP (112·5 versus 69·9%; P = 0·01) were significantly higher in TT. The decrease in HRV after exercise and the drop of HRC during exercise were similar in CT and TT. Change of standard deviation of normal RR intervals after TT correlated with change in SBP (r = 0·803; P = 0·009) while the change of Sample Entropy during exercise correlated with the increment of RPP during CT (ρ = -0·667; P = 0·05). This study suggests that set configuration influences acute cardiovascular responses during RE. When intensity, volume and work-to-rest ratio are equated, CT is less demanding in terms of SBP and RPP. A greater hemodynamic response during exercise would be associated with a faster parasympathetic recovery. © 2014 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Whole-Body Vibration While Squatting and Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness in Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabbs, Nicole C; Black, Christopher D; Garner, John

    2015-12-01

    Research into alleviating muscle pain and symptoms in individuals after delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) has been inconsistent and unsuccessful in demonstrating a useful recovery modality. To investigate the effects of short-term whole-body vibration (WBV) on DOMS over a 72-hour period after a high-intensity exercise protocol. Randomized controlled clinical trial. University laboratory. Thirty women volunteered to participate in 4 testing sessions and were assigned randomly to a WBV group (n = 16; age = 21.0 ± 1.9 years, height = 164.86 ± 6.73 cm, mass = 58.58 ± 9.32 kg) or a control group (n = 14; age = 22.00 ± 1.97 years, height = 166.65 ± 8.04 cm, mass = 58.69 ± 12.92 kg). Participants performed 4 sets to failure of single-legged split squats with 40% of their body weight to induce muscle soreness in the quadriceps. The WBV or control treatment was administered each day after DOMS. Unilateral pressure-pain threshold (PPT), range of motion (ROM), thigh circumference, and muscle-pain ratings of the quadriceps were collected before and for 3 days after high-intensity exercise. Each day, we collected 3 sets of measures, consisting of 1 measure before the WBV or control treatment protocol (pretreatment) and 2 sets of posttreatment measures. We observed no interactions for PPT, thigh circumference, and muscle pain (P > .05). An interaction was found for active ROM (P = .01), with the baseline pretreatment measure greater than the measures at baseline posttreatment 1 through 48 hours posttreatment 2 in the WBV group. For PPT, a main effect for time was revealed (P .05). The WBV treatment approach studied did not aid in alleviating DOMS after high-intensity exercise. Further research is needed in various populations.

  6. Optimizing the Distribution of Leg Muscles for Vertical Jumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Jeremy D; Bobbert, Maarten F; van Soest, Arthur J; Gribble, Paul L; Kistemaker, Dinant A

    2016-01-01

    A goal of biomechanics and motor control is to understand the design of the human musculoskeletal system. Here we investigated human functional morphology by making predictions about the muscle volume distribution that is optimal for a specific motor task. We examined a well-studied and relatively simple human movement, vertical jumping. We investigated how high a human could jump if muscle volume were optimized for jumping, and determined how the optimal parameters improve performance. We used a four-link inverted pendulum model of human vertical jumping actuated by Hill-type muscles, that well-approximates skilled human performance. We optimized muscle volume by allowing the cross-sectional area and muscle fiber optimum length to be changed for each muscle, while maintaining constant total muscle volume. We observed, perhaps surprisingly, that the reference model, based on human anthropometric data, is relatively good for vertical jumping; it achieves 90% of the jump height predicted by a model with muscles designed specifically for jumping. Alteration of cross-sectional areas-which determine the maximum force deliverable by the muscles-constitutes the majority of improvement to jump height. The optimal distribution results in large vastus, gastrocnemius and hamstrings muscles that deliver more work, while producing a kinematic pattern essentially identical to the reference model. Work output is increased by removing muscle from rectus femoris, which cannot do work on the skeleton given its moment arm at the hip and the joint excursions during push-off. The gluteus composes a disproportionate amount of muscle volume and jump height is improved by moving it to other muscles. This approach represents a way to test hypotheses about optimal human functional morphology. Future studies may extend this approach to address other morphological questions in ethological tasks such as locomotion, and feature other sets of parameters such as properties of the skeletal

  7. Optimizing the Distribution of Leg Muscles for Vertical Jumping.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy D Wong

    Full Text Available A goal of biomechanics and motor control is to understand the design of the human musculoskeletal system. Here we investigated human functional morphology by making predictions about the muscle volume distribution that is optimal for a specific motor task. We examined a well-studied and relatively simple human movement, vertical jumping. We investigated how high a human could jump if muscle volume were optimized for jumping, and determined how the optimal parameters improve performance. We used a four-link inverted pendulum model of human vertical jumping actuated by Hill-type muscles, that well-approximates skilled human performance. We optimized muscle volume by allowing the cross-sectional area and muscle fiber optimum length to be changed for each muscle, while maintaining constant total muscle volume. We observed, perhaps surprisingly, that the reference model, based on human anthropometric data, is relatively good for vertical jumping; it achieves 90% of the jump height predicted by a model with muscles designed specifically for jumping. Alteration of cross-sectional areas-which determine the maximum force deliverable by the muscles-constitutes the majority of improvement to jump height. The optimal distribution results in large vastus, gastrocnemius and hamstrings muscles that deliver more work, while producing a kinematic pattern essentially identical to the reference model. Work output is increased by removing muscle from rectus femoris, which cannot do work on the skeleton given its moment arm at the hip and the joint excursions during push-off. The gluteus composes a disproportionate amount of muscle volume and jump height is improved by moving it to other muscles. This approach represents a way to test hypotheses about optimal human functional morphology. Future studies may extend this approach to address other morphological questions in ethological tasks such as locomotion, and feature other sets of parameters such as properties of

  8. A Comparison of Gluteus Maximus, Biceps Femoris, and Vastus Lateralis Electromyographic Activity in the Back Squat and Barbell Hip Thrust Exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Bret; Vigotsky, Andrew D; Schoenfeld, Brad J; Beardsley, Chris; Cronin, John

    2015-12-01

    The back squat and barbell hip thrust are both popular exercises used to target the lower body musculature; however, these exercises have yet to be compared. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare the surface electromyographic (EMG) activity of the upper and lower gluteus maximus, biceps femoris, and vastus lateralis between the back squat and barbell hip thrust. Thirteen trained women (n = 13; age = 28.9 years; height = 164 cm; mass = 58.2 kg) performed estimated 10-repetition maximums (RM) in the back squat and barbell hip thrust. The barbell hip thrust elicited significantly greater mean (69.5% vs 29.4%) and peak (172% vs 84.9%) upper gluteus maximus, mean (86.8% vs 45.4%) and peak (216% vs 130%) lower gluteus maximus, and mean (40.8% vs 14.9%) and peak (86.9% vs 37.5%) biceps femoris EMG activity than the back squat. There were no significant differences in mean (99.5% vs 110%) or peak (216% vs 244%) vastus lateralis EMG activity. The barbell hip thrust activates the gluteus maximus and biceps femoris to a greater degree than the back squat when using estimated 10RM loads. Longitudinal training studies are needed to determine if this enhanced activation correlates with increased strength, hypertrophy, and performance.

  9. Geochronological and taxonomic revisions of the middle Eocene Whistler Squat Quarry (Devil's Graveyard Formation, Texas) and implications for the early Uintan in Trans-Pecos Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campisano, Christopher J; Kirk, E Christopher; Townsend, K E Beth; Deino, Alan L

    2014-01-01

    The Whistler Squat Quarry (TMM 41372) of the lower Devil's Graveyard Formation in Trans-Pecos Texas is a middle Eocene fossil locality attributed to Uintan biochronological zone Ui1b. Specimens from the Whistler Squat Quarry were collected immediately above a volcanic tuff with prior K/Ar ages ranging from ∼47-50 Ma and below a tuff previously dated to ∼44 Ma. New 40Ar/39Ar analyses of both of the original tuff samples provide statistically indistinguishable ages of 44.88±0.04 Ma for the lower tuff and 45.04±0.10 Ma for the upper tuff. These dates are compatible with magnetically reversed sediments at the site attributable to C20r (43.505-45.942 Ma) and a stratigraphic position above a basalt dated to 46.80 Ma. Our reanalysis of mammalian specimens from the Whistler Squat Quarry and a stratigraphically equivalent locality significantly revises their faunal lists, confirms the early Uintan designation for the sites, and highlights several biogeographic and biochronological differences when compared to stratotypes in the Bridger and Uinta Formations. Previous suggestions of regional endemism in the early Uintan are supported by the recognition of six endemic taxa (26% of mammalian taxa) from the Whistler Squat Quarry alone, including three new taxa. The revised faunal list for the Whistler Squat Quarry also extends the biostratigraphic ranges of nine non-endemic mammalian taxa to Ui1b.

  10. Jumping numbers and ordered tree structures on the dual graph

    CERN Document Server

    Hyry, Eero

    2010-01-01

    Let R be a two-dimensional regular local ring having an algebraically closed residue field and let a be a complete ideal of finite colength in R. In this article we investigate the jumping numbers of a by means of the dual graph of the minimal log resolution of the pair (X,a). Our main result is a combinatorial criterium for a positive rational number to be a jumping number. In particular, we associate to each jumping number certain ordered tree structures on the dual graph.

  11. Nonstandard analysis and jump conditions for converging shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baty, Roy S.; Farassat, F.; Tucker, Don H.

    2008-06-01

    Nonstandard analysis is an area of modern mathematics that studies abstract number systems containing both infinitesimal and infinite numbers. This article applies nonstandard analysis to derive jump conditions for one-dimensional, converging shock waves in a compressible, inviscid, perfect gas. It is assumed that the shock thickness occurs on an infinitesimal interval and the jump functions in the thermodynamic and fluid dynamic parameters occur smoothly across this interval. Predistributions of the Heaviside function and the Dirac delta measure are introduced to model the flow parameters across a shock wave. The equations of motion expressed in nonconservative form are then applied to derive unambiguous relationships between the jump functions for the flow parameters.

  12. [Autogenic training in psychophysiological preparation for parachute jumps].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshetnikov, M M

    1978-01-01

    The efficiency of specific psychophysiological preparation--autogenic training--to parachute jumps was measured in two groups of cadets (test subjects and controls). Hetero- and autogenic training was carried out according to a scheme specially developed for this type of activity. The study of questionnaires and physiological data demonstrated that the specific psychophysiological preparation by means of autogenic training for a certain type of activity helped to develop active self-control over one's own state and emotions, alleviated tension, arrested adverse neurotic manifestations (sleep disturbances, depression, anxiety), contributed to the feeling of confidence in the successful completion of the jump and promoted positive tuning towards subsequent jumps.

  13. Stochastic mutualism model with Lévy jumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qun; Jiang, Daqing; Shi, Ningzhong; Hayat, Tasawar; Alsaedi, Ahmed

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we consider a stochastic mutualism model with Lévy jumps. First of all, we show that the positive solution of the system is stochastically ultimate bounded. Then under a simple assumption, we establish sufficient and necessary conditions for the stochastic permanence and extinction of the system. The results show an important property of the Lévy jumps: they are unfavorable for the permanence of the species. Moreover, when there are no Lévy jumps, we show that there is a unique ergodic stationary distribution of the corresponding system under certain conditions. Some numerical simulations are introduced to validate the theoretical results.

  14. RESEARCH ON JUMPING SEQUENCE PLANNING ISSUES OF HOPPING ROBOTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIUZhuang-zhi; ZHUJian-ying

    2004-01-01

    The wheeled or crawled robots often suffer from big obstacles or ditches, so a hopping robot needs to fit the tough landform in the field environments. In order to jump over obstacles rapidly, a jumping sequence must be generated based on the landform information from sensors or user input. The planning method for planar mobile robots is compared with that of hopping robots. Several factors can change the planning result. Adjusting these coefficients, a heuristic searching algorithm for the jumping sequence is developed on a simplified landform. Calculational result indicates that the algorithm can achieve safety and efficient control sequences for a desired goal.

  15. Jump-Down Performance Alterations after Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reschke, M. F.; Kofman, I. S.; Cerisano, J. M.; Fisher, E. A.; Peters, B. T.; Miller, C. A.; Harm, D. L.; Bloomberg, J. J.

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Successful jump performance requires functional coordination of visual, vestibular, and somatosensory systems, which are affected by prolonged exposure to microgravity. Astronauts returning from space flight exhibit impaired ability to coordinate effective landing strategies when jumping from a platform to the ground. This study compares jump strategies used by astronauts before and after flight, changes to those strategies within a test session, and recoveries in jump-down performance parameters across several postflight test sessions. These data were obtained as part of an ongoing interdisciplinary study (Functional Task Test, FTT) designed to evaluate both astronaut postflight functional performance and related physiological changes. METHODS: Seven astronauts from short-duration (Shuttle) and three from long-duration (International Space Station) flights performed 3 two-footed jumps from a platform 30 cm high onto a force plate that measured the ground reaction forces and center-of-pressure displacement from the landings. Neuromuscular activation data were collected from the medial gastrocnemius and anterior tibialis of both legs using surface electromyography electrodes. Two load cells in the platform measured the load exerted by each foot during the takeoff phase of the jump. Data were collected in 2 preflight sessions, on landing day (Shuttle only), and 1, 6, and 30 days after flight. RESULTS: Postural settling time was significantly increased on the first postflight test session and many of the astronauts tested were unable to maintain balance on their first jump landing but recovered by the third jump, showing a learning progression in which performance improvements could be attributed to adjustments in takeoff or landing strategy. Jump strategy changes were evident in reduced air time (time between takeoff and landing) and also in increased asymmetry in foot latencies on takeoff. CONCLUSIONS: The test results revealed significant decrements

  16. Detection of weak frequency jumps for GNSS onboard clocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xinming; Gong, Hang; Ou, Gang

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, a weak frequency jump detection method is developed for onboard clocks in global navigation satellite systems (GNSS). A Kalman filter is employed to facilitate the onboard real-time processing of atomic clock measurements, whose N-step prediction residuals are used to construct the weak frequency jump detector. Numerical simulations show that the method can successfully detect weak frequency jumps. The detection method proposed in this paper is helpful for autonomous integrity monitoring of GNSS satellite clocks, and can also be applied to other frequency anomalies with an appropriately modified detector.

  17. Jump diffusion models and the evolution of financial prices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Annibal; de Castro, Marcio T.; da Silva, Sergio; Gleria, Iram

    2011-08-01

    We analyze a stochastic model to describe the evolution of financial prices. We consider the stochastic term as a sum of the Wiener noise and a jump process. We point to the effects of the jumps on the return time evolution, a central concern of the econophysics literature. The presence of jumps suggests that the process can be described by an infinitely divisible characteristic function belonging to the De Finetti class. We then extend the De Finetti functions to a generalized nonlinear model and show the model to be capable of explaining return behavior.

  18. Asymptotic Distribution of the Jump Change-Point Estimator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Changchun TAN; Huifang NIU; Baiqi MIAO

    2012-01-01

    The asymptotic distribution of the change-point estimator in a jump changepoint model is considered.For the jump change-point model Xi =a + θI{[nTo] < i ≤n} + εi,where εi (i =1,…,n) are independent identically distributed random variables with Eεi=0 and Var(εi) < oo,with the help of the slip window method,the asymptotic distribution of the jump change-point estimator (T) is studied under the condition of the local alternative hypothesis.

  19. Quantum jumps induced by matter-wave fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Torres, J M; Zippilli, S; Morigi, G

    2010-01-01

    We theoretically study the occurrence of quantum jumps in the resonance fluorescence of a trapped atom. Here, the atom is laser cooled in a configuration of level such that the occurrence of a quantum jump is associated to a change of the vibrational center-of-mass motion by one phonon. The statistics of the occurrence of the dark fluorescence period is studied as a function of the physical parameters and the corresponding features in the spectrum of resonance fluorescence are identified. We discuss the information which can be extracted on the atomic motion from the observation of a quantum jump in the considered setup.

  20. Rate Theory for Correlated Processes: Double Jumps in Adatom Diffusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, J.; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel; Sethna, J.

    1997-01-01

    We study the rate of activated motion over multiple barriers, in particular the correlated double jump of an adatom diffusing on a missing-row reconstructed platinum (110) surface. We develop a transition path theory, showing that the activation energy is given by the minimum-energy trajectory...... which succeeds in the double jump. We explicitly calculate this trajectory within an effective-medium molecular dynamics simulation. A cusp in the acceptance region leads to a root T prefactor for the activated rate of double jumps. Theory and numerical results agree....

  1. Aeromechanics of the Spider Cricket Jump: How to Jump 60+ Times Your Body Length and Still Land on Your Feet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Emily; Deshler, Nicolas; Gorman, David; Neves, Catarina; Mittal, Rajat

    2015-11-01

    Flapping, gliding, running, crawling and swimming have all been studied extensively in the past and have served as a source of inspiration for engineering designs. In the current project, we explore a mode of locomotion that straddles ground and air: jumping. The subject of our study is among the most proficient of long-jumpers in Nature: the spider cricket of the family Rhaphidophoridae, which can jump more than 60 times its body length. Despite jumping this immense distance, these crickets usually land on their feet, indicating an ability to control their posture during ``flight.'' We employ high-speed videogrammetry, to examine the jumps and to track the crickets' posture and appendage orientation throughout their jumps. Simple aerodynamic models are developed to predict the aerodynamic forces and moment on the crickets during `flight`. The analysis shows that these wingless insects employ carefully controlled and coordinated positioning of the limbs during flight so as to increase jump distance and to stabilize body posture during flight. The principles distilled from this study could serve as an inspiration for small jumping robots that can traverse complex terrains.

  2. Kinematic and sEMG Analysis of the Back Squat at Different Intensities With and Without Knee Wraps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Willy A; Brown, Lee E; Soares, Enrico G; da Silva, Josinaldo J; de O Silva, Fernando H D; Serpa, Érica P; Corrêa, Daniel A; Vilela Junior, Guanis de B; Lopes, Charles R; Marchetti, Paulo H

    2015-09-01

    The purposes of this study were to measure the acute effects of knee wraps (KWs) on knee and hip joint kinematics, dynamic muscle activation from the vastus lateralis (VL) and gluteus maximus (GM), and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) during the back squat exercise at 2 different intensities. Fourteen resistance-trained men (age: 24 ± 4 years, height: 176 ± 6 cm, body mass: 81 ± 11 kg, back squat 1 repetition maximum [1RM]: 107 ± 30 kg, 3 ± 1 year of back squat experience) performed 1 set of 3 repetitions under 4 different conditions, to a depth of approximately 90 degrees of knee joint flexion, and in random order: KWs at 60% 1RM (KW60), KWs at 90% 1RM (KW90), without knee wraps (NWs) at 60% 1RM (NW60), and NWs at 90% 1RM (NW90). The dependent variables obtained were vertical and horizontal bar displacement, peak joint angle in the sagittal plane (hip and knee joints), concentric and eccentric muscle activation (by integrated electromyography) from the VL and GM, and RPE. For muscle activity, there were significant decreases in the VL NWs at 60% 1RM (p = 0.013) and a significant increase NWs at 90% 1RM (p = 0.037). There was a significant increase in VL muscle activity at 90% 1RM, when compared with 60% 1RM (KW: p = 0.001, effect size (ES) = 1.51 and NW: p knee flexion NWs for both intensities: 60% 1RM (p < 0.001) and 90% 1RM (p = 0.018). For normalized vertical barbell displacement, there were significant differences between intensities when using KWs (p = 0.022). There were significant differences in RPE between 60 and 90% 1RM for each condition: KWs (p < 0.001) and NWs (p < 0.001). In conclusion, the use of KWs results in decreased muscle activation of the VL at the same intensity (90% 1RM).

  3. Testability Synthesis for Jumping Carry Adders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-In Henry Chen

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Synthesis for testability ensures that the synthesized circuit is testable by exploring the fundamental relationship between don't care and redundancy. With the exploration of the relationship, redundancy removal can be applied to improve the testability, reduce the area and improve the speed of a synthesized circuit. The test generation problems have been adequately solved, therefore an innovative testability synthesis strategy is necessary for achieving the maximum fault coverage and area reduction for maximum speed. This paper presents a testability synthesis methodology applicable to a top–down design method based on the identification and removal of redundant faults. Emphasis has been placed on the testability synthesis of a high-speed binary jumping carry adder. A synthesized 32-bit testable adder implemented by a 1.2 μm CMOS technology performs addition in 4.09 ns. Comparing with the original synthesized circuit, redundancy removal yields a 100% testable design with a 15% improvement in speed and a 25% reduction in area.

  4. Vortex jump behavior in coupled nanomagnetic heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, S.; Phatak, C., E-mail: cd@anl.gov [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Petford-Long, A. K. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, 2220 Campus Drive, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Heinonen, O. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Rd, Evanston, Illinois 60208-3112 (United States)

    2014-11-24

    The spin configuration and magnetic behavior in patterned nanostructures can be controlled by manipulating the interplay between the competing energy terms. This in turn requires fundamental knowledge of the magnetic interactions at the local nanometer scale. Here, we report on the spin structure and magnetization behavior of patterned discs containing exchange coupled ferromagnetic layers with additional exchange bias to an antiferromagnetic layer. The magnetization reversal was explored by direct local visualization of the domain behavior using in-situ Lorentz transmission electron microscopy, from which quantitative magnetic induction maps were reconstructed. The roles of the main competing energy terms were elucidated and the reversal mechanism was identified as a coupled phenomenon of incoherent rotation in the exchange-biased layer and localized vortex nucleation and discontinuous propagation in the free layer, including an anomalous jump in the trajectory. The observations were supported by micromagnetic simulations and modeled phase shift simulations. The work presented here provides fundamental insights into opportunities for macroscopic control of the energy landscape of magnetic heterostructures for functional applications.

  5. Ethics in radiology: wait lists queue jumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Natalie; Reid, Lynette; MacSwain, Sarah; Clarke, James R

    2013-08-01

    Education in ethics is a requirement for all Royal College residency training programs as laid out in the General Standards of Accreditation for residency programs in Canada. The ethical challenges that face radiologists in clinical practice are often different from those that face other physicians, because the nature of the physician-patient interaction is unlike that of many other specialties. Ethics education for radiologists and radiology residents will benefit from the development of teaching materials and resources that focus on the issues that are specific to the specialty. This article is intended to serve as an educational resource for radiology training programs to facilitate teaching ethics to residents and also as a continuing medical education resource for practicing radiologists. In an environment of limited health care resources, radiologists are frequently asked to expedite imaging studies for patients and, in some respects, act as gatekeepers for specialty care. The issues of wait lists, queue jumping, and balancing the needs of individuals and society are explored from the perspective of a radiologist.

  6. A jumping shape memory alloy under heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuiyuan; Omori, Toshihiro; Wang, Cuiping; Liu, Yong; Nagasako, Makoto; Ruan, Jingjing; Kainuma, Ryosuke; Ishida, Kiyohito; Liu, Xingjun

    2016-02-16

    Shape memory alloys are typical temperature-sensitive metallic functional materials due to superelasticity and shape recovery characteristics. The conventional shape memory effect involves the formation and deformation of thermally induced martensite and its reverse transformation. The shape recovery process usually takes place over a temperature range, showing relatively low temperature-sensitivity. Here we report novel Cu-Al-Fe-Mn shape memory alloys. Their stress-strain and shape recovery behaviors are clearly different from the conventional shape memory alloys. In this study, although the Cu-12.2Al-4.3Fe-6.6Mn and Cu-12.9Al-3.8Fe-5.6Mn alloys possess predominantly L2(1) parent before deformation, the 2H martensite stress-induced from L2(1) parent could be retained after unloading. Furthermore, their shape recovery response is extremely temperature-sensitive, in which a giant residual strain of about 9% recovers instantly and completely during heating. At the same time, the phenomenon of the jumping of the sample occurs. It is originated from the instantaneous completion of the reverse transformation of the stabilized 2H martensite. This novel Cu-Al-Fe-Mn shape memory alloys have great potentials as new temperature-sensitive functional materials.

  7. Triple jump examinations for dental student assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navazesh, Mahvash; Rich, Sandra K; Chopiuk, Nasrin Bahari; Keim, Robert G

    2013-10-01

    The triple jump examination (TJE) attempts to assess a higher level of learning with demand for analysis, critical thinking, and resolution of problems presented by written scenarios based on patient care situations. The purpose of this study was to examine the internal consistency, scale reliability, and interrater reliability of the TJE used at the Ostrow School of Dentistry, University of Southern California. On the sample of 2,227 examinations administered by seventy-seven raters across a three-year time period, the Cronbach's coefficient alpha for internal consistency of the overall TJE was found to be good (a=0.869). The internal consistency of the three subscales was found to be acceptable (a=0.731), good (a=0.820), and good (a=0.820). Average and single measures intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) for scale reliability were significant at p<0.001, indicating strong interrater reliability. There were no statistically significant differences (p≤0.05) in the mean scores assigned on the TJE between rater groups defined by rater experience level with the TJE. A very high level of agreement among rater pairs was also observed. Across the entire three-year study period, with over 19,152 ratings, the seventy-seven raters were in general agreement 99.5 percent of the time and in exact agreement 77.2 percent of the time.

  8. SOLUTION TO BSDE WITH NONHOMOGENEOUS JUMPS UNDER LOCALLY LIPSCHITZIAN CONDITION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the existence and uniqueness of the solution to a quasilinear backward stochastic differential equation with Poisson jumps. By introducing a series of approximate equations, we can show that BSDE has a unique adapted solution.

  9. Spontaneous Jumping of Coalescing Drops on a Superhydrophobic Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boreyko, Jonathan; Chen, Chuan-Hua

    2009-11-01

    When micrometric drops coalesce in-plane on a superhydrophobic surface, a surprising out-of-plane jumping motion was observed. Such jumping motion triggered by drop coalescence was reproduced on a Leidenfrost surface. High-speed imaging revealed that this jumping motion results from the elastic interaction of the bridged drops with the superhydrophobic/Leidenfrost surface. Experiments on both the superhydrophobic and Leidenfrost surfaces compare favorably to a simple scaling model relating the kinetic energy of the merged drop to the surface energy released upon coalescence. The spontaneous jumping motion on water repellent surfaces enables the autonomous removal of water condensate independently of gravity; this process is highly desirable for sustained dropwise condensation.

  10. Spontaneous Jumping of Coalescing Drops on a Superhydrophobic Surface

    CERN Document Server

    Boreyko, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    When micrometric drops coalesce in-plane on a superhydrophobic surface, a surprising out-of-plane jumping motion was observed. Such jumping motion triggered by drop coalescence was reproduced on a Leidenfrost surface. High-speed imaging revealed that this jumping motion results from the elastic interaction of the bridged drops with the superhydrophobic/Leidenfrost surface. Experiments on both the superhydrophobic and Leidenfrost surfaces compare favorably to a simple scaling model relating the kinetic energy of the merged drop to the surface energy released upon coalescence. The spontaneous jumping motion on water repellent surfaces enables the autonomous removal of water condensate independently of gravity; this process is highly desirable for sustained dropwise condensation.

  11. Jump Testing and the Speed of Market Adjustment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Torben B.

    Asymptotic properties of jump tests rely on the property that any jump occurs within a single time interval no matter what the observation frequency is. Market microstructure effects in relation to news-induced revaluation of the underlying variable is likely to make this an unrealistic assumption...... for high-frequency transaction data. To capture these microstructure effects, this paper suggests a model in which market prices adjust gradually to jumps in the underlying effcient price. A case study illustrates the empirical relevance of the model, and the performance of different jump tests...... is investigated here and in a simulation study. Evidence indicates that tests based on the largest of scaled price increments perform better than tests comparing measures of variability. Resolving the matter by testing at lower frequencies turns out to be less straightforward....

  12. Stick-jump mode in surface droplet dissolution

    CERN Document Server

    Dietrich, Erik; Zhang, Xuehua; Zandvliet, Harold J W; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-01-01

    The analogy between evaporating surface droplets in air to dissolving long-chain alcohol droplets in water is worked out. We show that next to the three known modi for surface droplet evaporation or dissolution (constant contact angle mode, constant contact radius mode, and stick-slide mode), a fourth mode exists for small droplets on supposedly smooth substrates, namely the stick-jump mode: intermittent contact line pinning causes the droplet to switch between sticking and jumping during the dissolution. We present experimental data and compare them to theory to predict the dissolution time in this stick-jump mode. We also explain why these jumps were easily observed for microscale droplets but not for larger droplets.

  13. METRIC TESTS CHARACTERISTIC FOR ESTIMATING JUMPING FOR VOLLEYBALL PLAYERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toplica Stojanović

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available With goal to establish metric tests characteristics for estimating jumping for volleyball players, it was organized a pilot research on pattern of 23 volleyball players from cadet team and 23 students from high-school. For needs of this research four tests are valid for estimation, jump in block with left and right leg and jump in spike with left and right leg. Each test has been taken three times, so that we could with test-re test method determine their reliability, and with factor analysis their validity. Data were processed by multivariate analysis (item analysis, factor analysis from statistical package „Statistica 6.0 for windows“. On the results of research and discussion we can say that the tests had high coefficient of reliability, as well as factor validity, and these tests can be used to estimate jumping for volleyball players.

  14. Bird Flu Strain May Have Jumped from Cat to Human

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162717.html Bird Flu Strain May Have Jumped From Cat to ... would be the first known transmission of this bird flu strain from cat to human, officials said. ...

  15. Spontaneous azimuthal breakout and instability at the circular hydraulic jump

    CERN Document Server

    Ray, Arnab K; Basu, Abhik; Bhattacharjee, Jayanta K

    2015-01-01

    We consider a shallow, two-dimensional flow of a liquid in which the radial and the azimuthal dynamics are coupled to each other. The steady and radial background flow of this system creates an axially symmetric circular hydraulic jump. On this background we apply time-dependent perturbations of the matter flow rate and the azimuthal flow velocity, with the latter strongly localized at the hydraulic jump. The perturbed variables depend spatially on both the radial and azimuthal coordinates. Linearization of the perturbations gives a coupled system of wave equations. The characteristic equations extracted from these wave equations show that under a marginally stable condition a spontaneous breaking of axial symmetry occurs at the position of the hydraulic jump. Departure from the marginal stability shows further that a linear instability develops in the azimuthal direction, resulting in an azimuthal transport of liquid at the hydraulic jump. The time for the growth of azimuthal instability is scaled by viscosi...

  16. The fluid dynamics of swimming by jumping in copepods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Houshuo; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Copepods swim either continuously by vibrating their feeding appendages or erratically by repeatedly beating their swimming legs resulting in a series of small jumps. The two swimming modes generate different hydrodynamic disturbances and therefore expose the swimmers differently to rheotactic...... limited and temporally ephemeral owing to jump-impulsiveness and viscous decay. In contrast, continuous steady swimming generates two well-extended long-lasting momentum jets both in front of and behind the swimmer, as suggested by the well-known steady stresslet model. Based on the observed jump-swimming...... kinematics of a small copepod Oithona davisae, we further showed that jump-swimming produces a hydrodynamic disturbance with much smaller spatial extension and shorter temporal duration than that produced by a same-size copepod cruising steadily at the same average translating velocity. Hence, small copepods...

  17. The fluid dynamics of swimming by jumping in copepods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Houshuo; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Copepods swim either continuously by vibrating their feeding appendages or erratically by repeatedly beating their swimming legs resulting in a series of small jumps. The two swimming modes generate different hydrodynamic disturbances and therefore expose the swimmers differently to rheotactic...... limited and temporally ephemeral owing to jump-impulsiveness and viscous decay. In contrast, continuous steady swimming generates two well-extended long-lasting momentum jets both in front of and behind the swimmer, as suggested by the well-known steady stresslet model. Based on the observed jump-swimming...... kinematics of a small copepod Oithona davisae, we further showed that jump-swimming produces a hydrodynamic disturbance with much smaller spatial extension and shorter temporal duration than that produced by a same-size copepod cruising steadily at the same average translating velocity. Hence, small copepods...

  18. Jump diffusion models and the evolution of financial prices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueiredo, Annibal; Castro, Marcio T. de [Institute of Physics, University of Brasilia (Brazil); Silva, Sergio da [Department of Economics, Federal University of Santa Catarina (Brazil); Gleria, Iram, E-mail: iram@pq.cnpq.br [Institute of Physics, Federal University of Alagoas (Brazil)

    2011-08-08

    We analyze a stochastic model to describe the evolution of financial prices. We consider the stochastic term as a sum of the Wiener noise and a jump process. We point to the effects of the jumps on the return time evolution, a central concern of the econophysics literature. The presence of jumps suggests that the process can be described by an infinitely divisible characteristic function belonging to the De Finetti class. We then extend the De Finetti functions to a generalized nonlinear model and show the model to be capable of explaining return behavior. -- Highlights: → We analyze a stochastic model to describe the evolution of financial prices. → The stochastic term is considered as a sum of the Wiener noise and a jump process. → The process can be described by an infinitely divisible characteristic function belonging to the De Finetti class. → We extend the De Finetti functions to a generalized nonlinear model.

  19. Detection of Dew-Point by substantial Raman Band Frequency Jumps (A new Method)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne Brunsgaard; Berg, Rolf W.; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    Detection of Dew-Point by substantial Raman Band Frequency Jumps (A new Method). See poster at http://www.kemi.dtu.dk/~ajo/rolf/jumps.pdf......Detection of Dew-Point by substantial Raman Band Frequency Jumps (A new Method). See poster at http://www.kemi.dtu.dk/~ajo/rolf/jumps.pdf...

  20. Fundamental Studies of Jumping-Drop Thermal Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-29

    Reverse mode with liquid trapped by the colder superhydrophilic surface. ............... 2 Figure 2. Fabrication of the jumping-drop thermal diode...mode, Figure 1b), liquid water is trapped by it and no phase-change heat transfer takes place; heat mainly escapes through ineffective conduction...self- propelled jumping drops returning the working fluid from the colder superhydrophobic surface; (b) Reverse mode with liquid trapped by the colder

  1. ANALYSIS OF INCOMPLETE STOCK MARKET WITH JUMP-DIFFUSION UNCERTAINTY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiuli Chao; Indrajit Bardhan

    2002-01-01

    This paper studies incomplete stock market that includes discontinuous priceprocesses. The discontinuity is modeled by very general point processes admitting onlystochastic intensities. Prices are driven by jump-diffusion uncertainty and have randombut predictable jumps. The space of risk-neutral measures that are associated with themarket is identified and related to fictitious completions. The construction of replicatingportfolios is discussed, and convex duality methods are used to prove existence of optimalconsumption and investment policies for a problem of utility maximization.

  2. Nonlinear H∞ filtering for interconnected Markovian jump systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Xiaomei; Zheng Yufan

    2006-01-01

    The problem of nonlinear H∞ filtering for interconnected Markovian jump systems is discussed. The aim of this note is the design of a nonlinear Markovian jump filter such that the resulting error system is exponentially meansquare stable and ensures a prescribed H∞ performance. A sufficient condition for the solvability of this problem is given in terms of linear matrix inequalities(LMIs). A simulation example is presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed design approach.

  3. Psycho-physiological response in an automatic parachute jump

    OpenAIRE

    Clemente Suárez, Vicente Javier; Robles Pérez, José Juan; Fernández Lucas, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Parachute jump is an extreme activity that elicits an intense stress response that affects jumpers' body systems being able to put them at risk. The present research analysed modifications in blood oxygen saturation (BOS), heart rate (HR), cortisol, glucose, lactate, creatine kinase (CK), muscles strength, cortical arousal, autonomic modulation, pistol magazine reload time (PMRT) and state anxiety before and after an automatic open parachute jump in 38 male Spanish soldiers (25.6 ± 5.9 years)...

  4. Gravity-free hydraulic jumps and metal femtocups

    OpenAIRE

    Govindarajan, Rama; Mathur, Manikandan; DasGupta, Ratul; Selvi, N. R.; John, Neena Susan; Kulkarni, G. U.

    2006-01-01

    Hydraulic jumps created by gravity are seen every day in the kitchen sink. We show that at small scales a circular hydraulic jump can be created in the absence of gravity, by surface tension. The theory is motivated by our experimental finding of a height discontinuity in spreading submicron molten metal droplets created by pulsed-laser ablation. By careful control of initial conditions, we show that this leads to solid femtolitre cups of gold, silver, copper, niobium and tin.

  5. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamic of Hydraulic Jumps in Spillways

    OpenAIRE

    Jonsson, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    This thesis focus on the complex natural phenomena of hydraulic jumps using the numerical method Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH). A hydraulic jump is highly turbulent and associated with turbulent energy dissipation, air entrainment, surface waves and spray and strong dissipative processes. It can be found not only in natural streams and in engineered open channels, but also in your kitchen sink at home. The dissipative features are utilized in hydropower spillways and stilling basins t...

  6. Gravity-free hydraulic jumps and metal femtoliter cups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, Manikandan; DasGupta, Ratul; Selvi, N R; John, Neena Susan; Kulkarni, G U; Govindarajan, Rama

    2007-04-20

    Hydraulic jumps created by gravity are seen everyday in the kitchen sink. We show that at small scales a circular hydraulic jump can be created in the absence of gravity by surface tension. The theory is motivated by our experimental finding of a height discontinuity in spreading submicron molten metal droplets created by pulsed-laser ablation. By careful control of initial conditions, this leads to solid femtoliter cups of gold, silver, copper, niobium, and tin.

  7. On the Spectral Gap of Brownian Motion with Jump Boundary

    CERN Document Server

    Kolb, Martin

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we consider the Brownian motion with jump boundary and present a new proof of a recent result of Li, Leung and Rakesh concerning the exact convergence rate in the one-dimensional case. Our methods are different and mainly probabilistic relying on coupling methods adapted to the special situation under investigation. Moreover, we answer a question raised by Ben-Ari and Pinsky concerning the dependence of the spectral gap on the jump distribution in a multi-dimensional setting.

  8. Forecasting Exchange Rate Volatility in the Presence of Jumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busch, Thomas; Christensen, Bent Jesper; Nielsen, Morten Ørregaard

    of exchange rate futures options, allowingcalculation of option implied volatility. We find that implied volatility is an informationallyefficient but biased forecast of future realized exchange rate volatility. Furthermore,we show that log-normality is an even better distributional approximation...... for impliedvolatility than for realized volatility in this market. Finally, we show that the jump componentof future realized exchange rate volatility is to some extent predictable, and thatoption implied volatility is the dominant forecast of the future jump component....

  9. A drop jumps to weightlessness: a lecture demo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, V. V.; Varaksina, E. I.; Saranin, V. A.

    2017-04-01

    The paper discusses the lecture demonstration of the phenomenon in which a drop lying on a solid unwettable substrate jumps when making the transition to weightlessness. An elementary theory of the phenomenon is given. A jump speed estimate is obtained for small and large drops. The natural vibrational frequency of a flying drop is determined. A full-scale model of Einstein’s elevator is described. Experimental and theoretical results are found to agree satisfactorily.

  10. Importance sampling for jump processes and applications to finance

    OpenAIRE

    Badouraly Kassim, Laetitia; Lelong, Jérôme; Loumrhari, Imane

    2013-01-01

    International audience; Adaptive importance sampling techniques are widely known for the Gaussian setting of Brownian driven diffusions. In this work, we want to extend them to jump processes. Our approach relies on a change of the jump intensity combined with the standard exponential tilting for the Brownian motion. The free parameters of our framework are optimized using sample average approximation techniques. We illustrate the efficiency of our method on the valuation of financial derivat...

  11. Temperature Jump Pyrolysis Studies of RP 2 Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-09

    Briefing Charts 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 15 December 2016 – 11 January 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Temperature Jump Pyrolysis Studies of RP-2 Fuel...Rev. 8- 98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. 239.18 1 TEMPERATURE JUMP PYROLYSIS STUDIES OF RP-2 FUEL Owen Pryor1, Steven D. Chambreau2, Ghanshyam L...Mixture Distribution A: Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. PA Clearance 17026 4 RP-2 Pyrolysis /Combustion Chemistries? • Recent

  12. IN VIVO KINEMATICS OF THE ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT DEFICIENT KNEE DURING WIDE-BASED SQUAT USING A 2D/3D REGISTRATION TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Miyaji

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL deficiency increases the risk of early osteoarthritis (OA. Studies of ACL deficient knee kinematics would be important to reveal the disease process and therefore to find mechanisms which would potentially slow OA progression. The purpose of this study was to determine if in vivo kinematics of the anterior cruciate ligament deficient (ACLD knee during a wide-based squat activity differ from kinematics of the contralateral intact knee. Thirty-three patients with a unilateral ACLD knee consented to participate in this institutional review board approved study with the contralateral intact knee serving as the control. In vivo knee kinematics during the wide-based squat were analyzed using a 2D/3D registration technique utilizing CT-based bone models and lateral fluoroscopy. Comparisons were performed using values between 0 and 100° flexion both in flexion and extension phases of the squat activity. Both the ACLD and intact knees demonstrated increasing tibial internal rotation with knee flexion, and no difference was observed in tibial rotation between the groups. The tibia in the ACLD knee was more anterior than that of the contralateral knees at 0 and 5° flexion in both phases (p < 0.05. Tibiofemoral medial contact points of the ACLD knees were more posterior than that of the contralateral knees at 5, 10 and 15° of knee flexion in the extension phase of the squat activity (p < 0.05. Tibiofemoral lateral contact points of the ACLD knees were more posterior than that of the contralateral knees at 0° flexion in the both phases (p < 0.05. The kinematics of the ACLD and contralateral intact knees were similar during the wide-based squat except at the low flexion angles. Therefore, we conclude the wide-based squat may be recommended for the ACLD knee by avoiding terminal extension

  13. Dynamic Jump Intensities and Risk Premiums in Crude Oil Futures and Options Markets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Peter; Jacobs, Kris; Li, Bingxin

    2016-01-01

    and dynamic jump intensities in these markets. Allowing for jumps is crucial for modeling crude oil futures and futures options, and we find evidence in favor of time-varying jump intensities. During crisis periods, jumps occur more frequently. The properties of the jump processes implied by the option data......Options on crude oil futures are the most actively traded commodity options. We develop a class of computationally efficient discrete-time jump models that allow for closed-form option valuation, and we use crude oil futures and options data to investigate the economic importance of jumps...

  14. Electric-Field-Enhanced Jumping-Droplet Condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miljkovic, Nenad; Preston, Daniel; Enright, Ryan; Limia, Alexander; Wang, Evelyn

    2013-11-01

    When condensed droplets coalesce on a superhydrophobic surface, the resulting droplet can jump due to the conversion of surface energy into kinetic energy. This frequent out-of-plane droplet jumping has the potential to enhance condensation heat and mass transfer. In this work, we demonstrated that these jumping droplets accumulate positive charge that can be used to further increase condensation heat transfer via electric fields. We studied droplet jumping dynamics on silanized nanostructured copper oxide surfaces. By characterizing the droplet trajectories under various applied external electric fields (0 - 50 V/cm), we show that condensation on superhydrophobic surfaces results in a buildup of negative surface charge (OH-) due to dissociated water ion adsorption on the superhydrophobic coating. Consequently, the opposite charge (H3O +) accumulates on the coalesced jumping droplet. Using this knowledge, we demonstrate electric-field-enhanced jumping droplet condensation whereby an external electric field opposes the droplet vapor flow entrainment towards the condensing surface to increase the droplet removal rate and overall surface heat transfer by 100% when compared to state-of-the-art dropwise condensing surfaces. This work not only shows significant condensation heat transfer enhancement through the passive charging of condensed droplets, but promises a low cost approach to increase efficiency for applications such as atmospheric water harvesting and dehumidification.

  15. Kinematic structure at the early flight position in ski jumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vodičar, Janez; Coh, Milan; Jošt, Bojan

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of our research was to establish the variability of correlation between the length of the jumps and selected multi-item kinematic variables (n=9) in the early flight phase technique of ski jumping. This study was conducted on a sample of elite Slovenian ski jumpers (N=29) who participated in the experiment on a jumping hill in Hinterzarten, Germany (HS95m) on the 20(th) of August, 2008. The highest and most significant correlations (p=0.01) with the length of the ski jump were found in the multi-item variable height of flying, which was also expressed with the highest level of stability of the explained total variance (TV) on the first factor (TV=69.13%). The most important characteristic of the aerodynamic aspect of early flight was the variable angle between the body chord and the horizontal axis with significantly high correlations (pski and left leg (TV=50.13%), had an explained common variance on the first factor greater than 50% of total variance. The results indicated that some kinematic parameters of ski jumping early flight technique were more important for success considering the length of the jump.

  16. Kinetic asymmetries between forward and drop jump landing tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgana Alves de Britto

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Landing asymmetry is a risk factor for knee anterior cruciate ligament injury. The aim of this study was to identify kinetic asymmetries in healthy recreational athletes performing different jump-landing techniques. Twelve recreational athletes engaged in regular training underwent kinetic evaluation using two 3D force plates and were analyzed for: (a three-dimensional peak forces, (b time to peak vertical force, and (c initial phase asymmetries. All data were collected during performance of unilateral and bilateral trials of forward and drop jump tasks. Forward jump-landing tasks elicited greater kinetic asymmetry than drop-landing tasks. Regardless of jump-landing technique, the preferred leg experienced higher forces than the non-preferred leg. The initial landing phase showed more kinetic asymmetries than the later phase when peak vertical forces occur. It was concluded that when screening athletes for kinetic asymmetries that may predispose them to injury, forward jump-landing tasks and the early landing phase might show more kinetic asymmetries than drop jump-landing tasks and the late landing phase, respectively.

  17. The $k$-Tuple Jumping Champions among Consecutive Primes

    CERN Document Server

    Xiaosheng, Wu

    2011-01-01

    For any real $x$ and any integer $k\\ge1$, we say that a set $\\mathcal{D}_{k}$ of $k$ distinct integers is a $k$-tuple jumping champion if it is the most common differences that occurs among $k+1$ consecutive primes less than or equal to $x$. For $k=1$, it's known as the jumping champion introduced by J. H. Conway. In 1999 A. Odlyzko, M. Rubinstein, and M. Wolf announced the Jumping Champion Conjecture that the jumping champions greater than 1 are 4 and the primorials 2, 6, 30, 210, 2310,.... They also made a weaker and possibly more accessible conjecture that any fixed prime $p$ divides all sufficiently large jumping champions. These two conjectures were proved by Goldston and Ledoan under the assumption of appropriate forms of the Hardy-Littlewood conjecture recently. In the present paper we consider the situation for any $k\\ge2$ and prove that any fixed prime $p$ divides every element of all sufficiently large $k$-tuple jumping champions under the assumption that the Hardy-Littlewood prime $k+1$-tuple conje...

  18. Can jumping capacity of adult show jumping horses be predicted on the basis of submaximal free jumps at foal age? A longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobbert, Maarten F; Santamaría, Susana; van Weeren, P René; Back, Wim; Barneveld, Albert

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify performance characteristics of good jumping horses, and to determine whether these were already detectable at foal age. Kinematic data were collected of horses performing free jumps over a 0.60 m high fence at six months of age and of these same horses jumping with a rider over a 1.15 m high fence at five years of age. At five years of age the horses were divided into three groups on the basis of a puissance competition: a group of seven best jumpers that made no errors and in the end cleared a 1.50 m high fence, a group of nine worst jumpers that were unable to clear a 1.40 m high fence, and an intermediate group of 13 horses. Longitudinal kinematic data was available for all seven best jumpers and for six of the nine worst jumpers. Average values of variables for the best jumpers were compared with those of the worst jumpers for the jumps over 1.15 m. In the group of best jumpers, the forelimbs were shorter at forelimb clearance due to increased elbow flexion, and the hind limbs were further retroflexed at hind limb clearance. The same superior technique in clearing fences with the limbs was also found in this group at six months of age. Nevertheless, for individual horses it turned out to be too far-fetched to predict adult jumping capacity on the basis of kinematic variables collected during submaximal jumps at foal age.

  19. Structural-Parameter-Based Jumping-Height-and-Distance Adjustment and Obstacle Sensing of a Bio-Inspired Jumping Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zhang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Jumping-height-and-distance (JHD active adjustment capability is important for jumping robots to overcome different sizes of obstacle. This paper proposes a new structural parameter-based JHD active adjustment approach for our previous jumping robot. First, the JHD adjustments, modifying the lengths of different legs of the robot, are modelled and simulated. Then, three mechanisms for leg-length adjustment are proposed and compared, and the screw-and-nut mechanism is selected. And for adjusting of different structural parameters using this mechanism, the one with the best JHD adjusting performance and the lowest mechanical complexity is adopted. Thirdly, an obstacle-distance-and-height (ODH detection method using only one infrared sensor is designed. Finally, the performances of the proposed methods are tested. Experimental results show that the jumping-height-and distance adjustable ranges are 0.11 m and 0.96 m, respectively, which validates the effectiveness of the proposed JHD adjustment method.

  20. The effect of patellar taping on EMG activity of vasti muscles during squatting in individuals with patellofemoral pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostamand, Javid; Bader, Dan L; Hudson, Zöe

    2011-01-01

    Although patellar taping has been shown to reduce pain in participants with patellofemoral pain syndrome, the mechanisms of pain reduction have not completely been established following its application. The purpose of this study was to evaluate EMG activity of vastus medialis and vastus lateralis following the application of patellar taping during a functional single leg squat. Both vastus medialis obliquus-vastus lateralis onset and vastus medialis obliquus/vastus lateralis amplitude of 18 participants with patellofemoral pain syndrome and 18 healthy participants as controls were measured using an EMG unit. This procedure was performed on the affected knee of participants with patellofemoral pain syndrome, before, during, and after patellar taping during unilateral squatting. The same procedure was also performed on the unaffected knees of both groups. The mean values of vastus medialis obliquus-vastus lateralis onset prior to taping (2.54 ms, s = 4.35) were decreased significantly following an immediate application of tape (-3.22 ms, s = 3.45) and after a prolonged period of taping (-6.00 ms, s = 3.40 s) (P patellofemoral pain syndrome prior to taping (P patellofemoral pain syndrome and controls during different conditions of taping (P > 0.05). Decreased values of vastus medialis obliquus-vastus lateralis onset may contribute to patellar realignment and explain the mechanism of pain reduction following patellar taping in participants with patellofemoral pain syndrome.

  1. A comparison of pairs figure skaters in repeated jumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sands, William A; Kimmel, Wendy L; McNeal, Jeni R; Murray, Steven Ross; Stone, Michael H

    2012-01-01

    Trends in pairs figure skating have shown that increasingly difficult jumps have become an essential aspect of high-level performance, especially in the latter part of a competitive program. We compared a repeated jump power index in a 60 s repeated jump test to determine the relationship of repeated jump test to competitive rank and to measure 2D hip, knee, and ankle angles and angular velocities at 0, 20, 40, and 60 s. Eighteen National Team Pairs Figure Skaters performed a 60 s repeated jump test on a large switch-mat with timing of flight and ground durations and digital video recording. Each 60-s period was divided into 6, 10-s intervals, with power indexes (W/kg) calculated for each 10-s interval. Power index by 10-s interval repeated measures ANOVAs (RMANOVA) showed that males exceeded females at all intervals, and the highest power index interval was during 10 to 20 s for both sexes. RMANOVAs of angles and angular velocities showed main effects for time only. Power index and jumping techniques among figure skaters showed rapid and steady declines over the test duration. Power index can predict approximately 50% of competitive rank variance, and sex differences in jumping technique were rare. Key pointsThe repeated jumps test can account for about 50% of the variance in pairs ranks.Changes in technique are largely due to fatigue, but the athletes were able to maintain a maximum flexion knee angle very close to the desired 90 degrees. Changes in angular velocity and jump heights occurred as expected, again probably due to fatigue.As expected from metabolic information, the athletes' power indexes peak around 20s and decline thereafter. Coaches should be aware of this time as a boundary beyond which fatigue becomes more manifest, and use careful choreographic choices to provide rest periods that are disguised as less demanding skating elements to afford recovery.The repeated jumps test may be a helpful off-ice test of power-endurance for figure skaters.

  2. Jump ergometer in sport performance testing Výskokový ergometr v diagnostice sportovní výkonnosti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dušan Hamar

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The papers deals with the application of the jump ergometer in the evaluation of neuromuscular performance. Altogether 288 athletes of different sport specializations (mean age 18.9 ± 6.4 years, height 172.2 ± 4.3 cm, and weight 62.4 ± 4.9 kg underwent various tests on the jump ergometer, such as 10-, 60-, and 90-second repeated jumps, squat and countermovement jumps without and with an additional load, and drop jumps from different heights with and without bending the knees. The diagnostic system FiTRO Jumper consisting of a special contact switch mattress connected by means of an interface to a computer was used. Jump parameters (power in the active phase of take off and height of the jump were calculated from the flight and contact times. Results showed that the system may be applied for the assessment of explosive power of the lower extremities, strength endurance of the lower extremities, utilization of the stretch shortening cycle, distribution of fast twitch fibers, optimal drop jump height for plyometric training, and training effects, namely in sports such as basketball, volleyball, soccer, tennis, gymnastics, rock and roll, figure skating, track and field, ski jumping, weight lifting, etc. Práce poukazuje na možnosti uplatnění výskokového ergometru při posuzovaní odrazových schopností dolních končetin. Celkem 288 sportovců s různou specializací (průměrný věk 18,9 ± 6,4 let, výška 172,2 ± 4,3 cm, hmotnost 62,4 ± 4,9 kg absolvovalo testy na výskokovém ergometru, a to 10, 60 a 90sekundový test opakovaných snožných výskoků, výskoky bez a s protipohybem s hmotností vlastního těla, resp. s dodatečnou váhou, jakož i seskoky z různych výšek do rovných, resp. pokrčených dolních končetin. Parametry odrazových schopností (výkon v aktivní fázi odrazu a výška výskoku byly registrovány pomocí diagnostického systému FiTRO Jumper sestávajícího z odrazové doby napojené prost

  3. Scaling and jumping: gravity loses grip on small jumpers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Melanie N; Bobbert, Maarten F; Knoek van Soest, A J

    2006-06-21

    There are several ways to quantify jumping performance, a common definition being the height gained by the body's centre of mass (CM) in the airborne phase. Under this definition, jump height is determined by take-off velocity. According to the existing literature on jumping and scaling, take-off velocity, and hence jumping performance is independent of size because the energy that differently sized geometrically scaled jumpers can generate with their muscles is proportional to their mass. In this article it is shown, based on a simple energy balance, that it is incorrect to presume that jump height does not depend on size. Contrary to common belief, size as such has does have an effect on take-off velocity, putting small jumpers at a mechanical advantage, as is shown analytically. To quantify the effect of size on take-off velocity, a generic jumper model was scaled geometrically and evaluated numerically. While a 70-kg jumper took off at 2.65 m/s and raised its CM by 0.36 m after take-off, a perfectly geometrically similar jumper of 0.7 g reached a take-off velocity of 3.46 m/s and raised its CM by 0.61 m. The reason for the better performance of small jumpers is their higher efficacy in transforming the energy generated by the actuators into energy due to vertical velocity of the CM. Considering the ecological and evolutionary relevance of different definitions of jump height, size-dependent efficacy might explain why habitual jumping is especially prominent among small animals such as insects.

  4. The validity and reliability of an iPhone app for measuring vertical jump performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsalobre-Fernández, Carlos; Glaister, Mark; Lockey, Richard Anthony

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to analyse the concurrent validity and reliability of an iPhone app (called: My Jump) for measuring vertical jump performance. Twenty recreationally active healthy men (age: 22.1 ± 3.6 years) completed five maximal countermovement jumps, which were evaluated using a force platform (time in the air method) and a specially designed iPhone app. My jump was developed to calculate the jump height from flight time using the high-speed video recording facility on the iPhone 5 s. Jump heights of the 100 jumps measured, for both devices, were compared using the intraclass correlation coefficient, Pearson product moment correlation coefficient (r), Cronbach's alpha (α), coefficient of variation and Bland-Altman plots. There was almost perfect agreement between the force platform and My Jump for the countermovement jump height (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.997, P iPhone 5 s app.

  5. Views on "Squatting to Teach Students"%对“蹲下来看学生”的看法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    覃斌

    2011-01-01

    本文对“蹲下来看学生”阐述了笔者的一些看法,旨在真正实现“以生为本”。%This paper expounds the author's views on "squatting to teach students", hoping to realize a student-orientation setting.

  6. Function and functional groupings of the complex mouth apparatus of the squat lobsters Munida sarsi Huus and M. tenuimana G.O. Sars (Crustacea: Decapoda)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garm, A; Høeg, J T

    2001-01-01

    Like all other decapods, the anomuran squat lobsters Munida sarsi and M. tenuimana have a mouth apparatus composed of six pairs of mouthparts plus labrum and paragnaths (upper and lower lips). To study the functional significance of this complexity, we examined the mouthparts with scanning electron...

  7. Effect of limiting ankle-dorsiflexion range of motion on lower extremity kinematics and muscle-activation patterns during a squat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macrum, Elisabeth; Bell, David Robert; Boling, Michelle; Lewek, Michael; Padua, Darin

    2012-05-01

    Limitations in gastrocnemius/soleus flexibility that restrict ankle dorsiflexion during dynamic tasks have been reported in individuals with patellofemoral pain (PFP) and are theorized to play a role in its development. To determine the effect of restricted ankle-dorsiflexion range of motion (ROM) on lower extremity kinematics and muscle activity (EMG) during a squat. The authors hypothesized that restricted ankle-dorsiflexion ROM would alter knee kinematics and lower extremity EMG during a squat. Cross-sectional. 30 healthy, recreationally active individuals without a history of lower extremity injury. Each participant performed 7 trials of a double-leg squat under 2 conditions: a no-wedge condition (NW) with the foot flat on the floor and a wedge condition (W) with a 12° forefoot angle to simulate reduced plantar-flexor flexibility. 3-dimensional hip and knee kinematics, medial knee displacement (MKD), and ankle-dorsiflexion angle. EMG of vastus medialis oblique (VMO), vastus lateralis (VL), lateral gastrocnemius (LG), and soleus (SOL). One-way repeated-measures ANOVAs were performed to determine differences between the W and NW conditions. Compared with the NW condition, the wedge produced decreased peak knee flexion (P .05). Altering ankle-dorsiflexion starting position during a double-leg squat resulted in increased knee valgus and MKD, as well as decreased quadriceps activation and increased soleus activation. These changes are similar to those seen in people with PFP.

  8. Function and functional groupings of the complex mouth apparatus of the squat lobsters Munida sarsi Huus and M. tenuimana G.O. Sars (Crustacea: Decapoda)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garm, A; Høeg, J T

    2001-01-01

    Like all other decapods, the anomuran squat lobsters Munida sarsi and M. tenuimana have a mouth apparatus composed of six pairs of mouthparts plus labrum and paragnaths (upper and lower lips). To study the functional significance of this complexity, we examined the mouthparts with scanning electr...

  9. Mechanical parameters and flight phase characteristics in aquatic plyometric jumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louder, Talin J; Searle, Cade J; Bressel, Eadric

    2016-09-01

    Plyometric jumping is a commonly prescribed method of training focused on the development of reactive strength and high-velocity concentric power. Literature suggests that aquatic plyometric training may be a low-impact, effective supplement to land-based training. The purpose of the present study was to quantify acute, biomechanical characteristics of the take-off and flight phase for plyometric movements performed in the water. Kinetic force platform data from 12 young, male adults were collected for counter-movement jumps performed on land and in water at two different immersion depths. The specificity of jumps between environmental conditions was assessed using kinetic measures, temporal characteristics, and an assessment of the statistical relationship between take-off velocity and time in the air. Greater peak mechanical power was observed for jumps performed in the water, and was influenced by immersion depth. Additionally, the data suggest that, in the water, the statistical relationship between take-off velocity and time in air is quadratic. Results highlight the potential application of aquatic plyometric training as a cross-training tool for improving mechanical power and suggest that water immersion depth and fluid drag play key roles in the specificity of the take-off phase for jumping movements performed in the water.

  10. Jump point detection for real estate investment success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Eddie C. M.; Yu, Carisa K. W.; Ip, Wai-Cheung

    2010-03-01

    In the literature, studies on real estate market were mainly concentrating on the relation between property price and some key factors. The trend of the real estate market is a major concern. It is believed that changes in trend are signified by some jump points in the property price series. Identifying such jump points reveals important findings that enable policy-makers to look forward. However, not all jump points are observable from the plot of the series. This paper looks into the trend and introduces a new approach to the framework for real estate investment success. The main purpose of this paper is to detect jump points in the time series of some housing price indices and stock price index in Hong Kong by applying the wavelet analysis. The detected jump points reflect to some significant political issues and economic collapse. Moreover, the relations among properties of different classes and between stocks and properties are examined. It can be shown from the empirical result that a lead-lag effect happened between the prices of large-size property and those of small/medium-size property. However, there is no apparent relation or consistent lead in terms of change point measure between property price and stock price. This may be due to the fact that globalization effect has more impact on the stock price than the property price.

  11. Unilateral jump behavior in young professional female ballet dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golomer, E; Féry, Y A

    2001-09-01

    In the field of dance, lateral body actions should be differently influenced by training. Classes should develop symmetrical jump behavior by the alternate working of the two body sides. In contrast, asymmetrical training effect linked to hemispheric laterality should be also expected. Indeed, for aesthetic reasons, the preferred led has to give the jump direction while the other leg has to carry out the impulsion during take-off. In addition, and for functional reasons, the preferred leg also has to ensure a soft landing and to avoid imbalance upon landing. To address the question, we studied ten professional right-footed female ballet dancers in a unilateral experimental task: the maximal vertical jump (MVJ). The MVJ height was compared for each leg in ten trials. In addition, the side of the leg usually involved in a choreographic bilateral task was determined. All these right-footed dancers selected their left leg as the impulsion leg for the choreographic jump so as to reserve the right leg for the expression of the artistic gesture linked to emotional laterality. However, ANOVA did not show differences between the right and left legs in MVJ. In these young ballerinas, jump actions of the two body sides seem to develop symmetrically by class training effects.

  12. Volatility Forecasting: Downside Risk, Jumps and Leverage Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Audrino

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We provide empirical evidence of volatility forecasting in relation to asymmetries present in the dynamics of both return and volatility processes. Using recently-developed methodologies to detect jumps from high frequency price data, we estimate the size of positive and negative jumps and propose a methodology to estimate the size of jumps in the quadratic variation. The leverage effect is separated into continuous and discontinuous effects, and past volatility is separated into “good” and “bad”, as well as into continuous and discontinuous risks. Using a long history of the S & P500 price index, we find that the continuous leverage effect lasts about one week, while the discontinuous leverage effect disappears after one day. “Good” and “bad” continuous risks both characterize the volatility persistence, while “bad” jump risk is much more informative than “good” jump risk in forecasting future volatility. The volatility forecasting model proposed is able to capture many empirical stylized facts while still remaining parsimonious in terms of the number of parameters to be estimated.

  13. CONNECTION OF FUNCTIONAL ABILITIES WITH JUMPING AND THROWING ATHLETIC DISCIPLINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Stanojević

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the connection between functional abilities with results of jumping and throwing athletic disciplines with athletes. The sample was taken from a population of elementary school students from Prokuplje region, 13 and 14 old, included in regular physical education classes. The sample consisted of 200 male athletes involved in the training process in sports clubs at least three times a week in addition to physical education classes. For assessment of functional abilities six functional tests were used: resting heart rate, Cooper test, heart rate in the first minute after Cooper test, heart rate in the second minute after Cooper test, systolic arterial blood pressure, diastolic arterial blood pressure. For assessment of jumping and throwing athletic disciplines four tests were used: long jump, high jump, shot put and javelin. Data analysis was performed with canonical correlation and regression analysis. The results showed a statistically significant correlation between functional abilities with all of tests in jumping and throwing athletic disciplines.

  14. Biological Jumping Mechanism Analysis and Modeling for Frog Robot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meng Wang; Xi-zhe Zang; Ji-zhuang Fan; Jie Zhao

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a mechanical model of jumping robot based on the biological mechanism analysis of frog. By biological observation and kinematic analysis the frog jump is divided into take-off phase, aerial phase and landing phase. We find the similar trajectories of hindlimb joints during jump, the important effect of foot during take-off and the role of forelimb in supporting the body. Based on the observation, the frog jump is simplified and a mechanical model is put forward. The robot leg is represented by a 4-bar spring/linkage mechanism model, which has three Degrees of Freedom (DOF) at hip joint and one DOF (passive) at tarsometatarsal joint on the foot. The shoulder and elbow joints each has one DOF for the balancing function of arm.The ground reaction force of the model is analyzed and compared with that of frog during take-off. The results show that the model has the same advantages of low likelihood of premature lift-off and high efficiency as the frog. Analysis results and the model can be employed to develop and control a robot capable of mimicking the jumping behavior of flog.

  15. Decoding Lower Limb Muscle Activity and Kinematics from Cortical Neural Spike Trains during Monkey Performing Stand and Squat Movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xuan; Ma, Chaolin; Huang, Jian; Zhang, Peng; Xu, Jiang; He, Jiping

    2017-01-01

    Extensive literatures have shown approaches for decoding upper limb kinematics or muscle activity using multichannel cortical spike recordings toward brain machine interface (BMI) applications. However, similar topics regarding lower limb remain relatively scarce. We previously reported a system for training monkeys to perform visually guided stand and squat tasks. The current study, as a follow-up extension, investigates whether lower limb kinematics and muscle activity characterized by electromyography (EMG) signals during monkey performing stand/squat movements can be accurately decoded from neural spike trains in primary motor cortex (M1). Two monkeys were used in this study. Subdermal intramuscular EMG electrodes were implanted to 8 right leg/thigh muscles. With ample data collected from neurons from a large brain area, we performed a spike triggered average (SpTA) analysis and got a series of density contours which revealed the spatial distributions of different muscle-innervating neurons corresponding to each given muscle. Based on the guidance of these results, we identified the locations optimal for chronic electrode implantation and subsequently carried on chronic neural data recordings. A recursive Bayesian estimation framework was proposed for decoding EMG signals together with kinematics from M1 spike trains. Two specific algorithms were implemented: a standard Kalman filter and an unscented Kalman filter. For the latter one, an artificial neural network was incorporated to deal with the nonlinearity in neural tuning. High correlation coefficient and signal to noise ratio between the predicted and the actual data were achieved for both EMG signals and kinematics on both monkeys. Higher decoding accuracy and faster convergence rate could be achieved with the unscented Kalman filter. These results demonstrate that lower limb EMG signals and kinematics during monkey stand/squat can be accurately decoded from a group of M1 neurons with the proposed

  16. Cardiorespiratory and Metabolic Responses to Loaded Half Squat Exercise Executed at an Intensity Corresponding to the Lactate Threshold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maté-Muñoz, José Luis; Domínguez, Raúl; Barba, Manuel; Monroy, Antonio J; Rodríguez, Bárbara; Ruiz-Solano, Pedro; Garnacho-Castaño, Manuel V

    2015-09-01

    This study was designed to identify the blood lactate threshold (LT2) for the half squat (HS) and to examine cardiorespiratory and metabolic variables during a HS test performed at a work intensity corresponding to the LT2. Twenty-four healthy men completed 3 test sessions. In the first, their one-repetition maximum (1RM) was determined for the HS. In the second session, a resistance HS incremental-load test was performed to determine LT2. Finally, in the third session, subjects performed a constant-load HS exercise at the load corresponding to the LT2 (21 sets of 15 repetitions with 1 min of rest between sets). In this last test, blood samples were collected for lactate determination before the test and 30 s after the end of set (S) 3, S6, S9, S12, S15, S18 and S21. During the test, heart rate (HR) was telemetrically monitored and oxygen consumption (VO2), carbon dioxide production (VCO2), minute ventilation (VE), respiratory exchange ratio (RER), ventilatory equivalent for O2 (VE·VO2 (-1)) and ventilatory equivalent for CO2 (VE·VCO2 (-1)) were monitored using a breath-by-breath respiratory gas analyzer. The mean LT2 for the participants was 24.8 ± 4.8% 1RM. Blood lactate concentrations showed no significant differences between sets 3 and 21 of exercise (p = 1.000). HR failed to vary between S6 and S21 (p > 1.000). The respiratory variables VO2, VCO2, and VE·VCO2 (-1) stabilized from S3 to the end of the constant-load HS test (p = 0.471, p = 0.136, p = 1.000), while VE and VE·VO2 (-1) stabilized from S6 to S21. RER did not vary significantly across exercise sets (p = 0.103). The LT2 was readily identified in the incremental HS test. Cardiorespiratory and metabolic variables remained stable during this resistance exercise conducted at an exercise intensity corresponding to the LT2. These responses need to be confirmed for other resistance exercises and adaptations in these responses after a training program also need to be addressed. Key pointsIt can be

  17. Decoding Lower Limb Muscle Activity and Kinematics from Cortical Neural Spike Trains during Monkey Performing Stand and Squat Movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xuan; Ma, Chaolin; Huang, Jian; Zhang, Peng; Xu, Jiang; He, Jiping

    2017-01-01

    Extensive literatures have shown approaches for decoding upper limb kinematics or muscle activity using multichannel cortical spike recordings toward brain machine interface (BMI) applications. However, similar topics regarding lower limb remain relatively scarce. We previously reported a system for training monkeys to perform visually guided stand and squat tasks. The current study, as a follow-up extension, investigates whether lower limb kinematics and muscle activity characterized by electromyography (EMG) signals during monkey performing stand/squat movements can be accurately decoded from neural spike trains in primary motor cortex (M1). Two monkeys were used in this study. Subdermal intramuscular EMG electrodes were implanted to 8 right leg/thigh muscles. With ample data collected from neurons from a large brain area, we performed a spike triggered average (SpTA) analysis and got a series of density contours which revealed the spatial distributions of different muscle-innervating neurons corresponding to each given muscle. Based on the guidance of these results, we identified the locations optimal for chronic electrode implantation and subsequently carried on chronic neural data recordings. A recursive Bayesian estimation framework was proposed for decoding EMG signals together with kinematics from M1 spike trains. Two specific algorithms were implemented: a standard Kalman filter and an unscented Kalman filter. For the latter one, an artificial neural network was incorporated to deal with the nonlinearity in neural tuning. High correlation coefficient and signal to noise ratio between the predicted and the actual data were achieved for both EMG signals and kinematics on both monkeys. Higher decoding accuracy and faster convergence rate could be achieved with the unscented Kalman filter. These results demonstrate that lower limb EMG signals and kinematics during monkey stand/squat can be accurately decoded from a group of M1 neurons with the proposed

  18. Changes in selected biochemical, muscular strength, power, and endurance measures during deliberate overreaching and tapering in rugby league players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutts, A; Reaburn, P; Piva, T J; Murphy, A

    2007-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of overreaching on muscle strength, power, endurance and selected biochemical responses in rugby league players. Seven semi-professional rugby league players (.VO(2max) = 56.1 +/- 1.7 mL . kg (-1) . min (-1); age = 25.7 +/- 2.6 yr; BMI = 27.6 +/- 2.0) completed 6 weeks of progressive overload training with limited recovery periods. A short 7-day stepwise reduction taper immediately followed the overload period. Measures of muscular strength, power and endurance and selected biochemical parameters were taken before and after overload training and taper. Multistage fitness test running performance was significantly reduced (12.3 %) following the overload period. Although most other performance measures tended to decrease following the overload period, only peak hamstring torque at 1.05 rad . s (-1) was significantly reduced (p taper, a significant increase in peak hamstring torque and isokinetic work at both slow (1.05 rad . s (-1)) and fast (5.25 rad . s (-1)) movement velocities were observed. Minimum clinically important performance decreases were measured in a multistage fitness test, vertical jump, 3-RM squat and 3-RM bench press and chin-up (max) following the overload period. Following the taper, minimum clinically important increases in the multistage fitness test, vertical jump, 3-RM squat and 3-RM bench press and chin-up (max) and 10-m sprint performance were observed. Compared to resting measures, the plasma testosterone to cortisol ratio, plasma glutamate, plasma glutamine to glutamate ratio and plasma creatine kinase activity demonstrated significant changes at the end of the overload training period (p < 0.05). These results suggest that muscular strength, power and endurance were reduced following the overload training, indicating a state of overreaching. The most likely explanation for the decreased performance is increased muscle damage via a decrease in the anabolic-catabolic balance.

  19. Effects of kettlebell training on postural coordination and jump performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jay, Kenneth; Jakobsen, Markus Due; Sundstrup, Emil

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a worksite intervention using kettlebell training to improve postural reactions to perturbation and jump performance.This single-blind randomized controlled trial involved 40 adults (n=40) from occupations with a high....... The outcome measures were postural reactions to sudden perturbation and maximal countermovement jump height.Compared to the control group, the training group significant decreased stopping time following perturbation (-109ms, 95% CI [-196:-21]). Jump height increased significantly in the training group (1.5cm......, 95% CI [0.5:2.5]), but this was non-significantly different from control.Kettlebell training improves postural reactions to sudden perturbation. Future studies should investigate whether kettlebell training can reduce the risk of low-back injury in occupations with manual material handling or patient...

  20. Physiological arousal and perception of bodily state during parachute jumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schedlowski, M; Tewes, U

    1992-01-01

    Heart rate and respiration rate were recorded with a portable data recording system before and during a parachute jump in 36 male sport parachutists with differing degrees of experience. The recordings were analyzed at 12 psychologically relevant points in time along with the subjective ratings of physical arousal. Novice parachutists showed a higher degree of self-rated arousal during jumps. However, the two groups displayed nearly parallel curves for heart and respiration rates, differing significantly from each other only in the level of their respective heart rates. Furthermore, experienced jumpers seem to be better informed about their state of physiological arousal during the jump than are novice jumpers. These results do not confirm the proposed anxiety inhibition process, postulated by Epstein (1967).

  1. Condensation and jumping relay of droplets on lotus leaf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Cunjing; Hao, Pengfei; Yao, Zhaohui; Song, Yu; Zhang, Xiwen; He, Feng

    2013-07-01

    Dynamic behavior of micro water droplet condensed on a lotus leaf with two-tier roughness is studied. Under laboratory environment, the contact angle of the micro droplet on single micro papilla increases smoothly from 80° to 160° during the growth of condensed water. The best-known "self-cleaning" phenomenon will be lost. A striking observation is the out-of-plane jumping relay of condensed droplets triggered by falling droplets, as well as its sustained speed obtained in continuous jumping relays. The underlying mechanism can be used to enhance the automatic removal of dropwise condensation without the help from any external force. The surface tension energy dissipation is the main reason controlling the critical size of jumping droplet and its onset velocity of rebounding.

  2. Dynamical Jumps in a Shape Memory Alloy Oscillator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. S. Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamical response of systems with shape memory alloy (SMA elements presents a rich behavior due to their intrinsic nonlinear characteristic. SMA’s nonlinear response is associated with both adaptive dissipation related to hysteretic behavior and huge changes in properties caused by phase transformations. These characteristics are attracting much technological interest in several scientific and engineering fields, varying from medical to aerospace applications. An important characteristic associated with dynamical response of SMA system is the jump phenomenon. Dynamical jumps result in abrupt changes in system behavior and its analysis is essential for a proper design of SMA systems. This paper discusses the nonlinear dynamics of a one degree of freedom SMA oscillator presenting pseudoelastic behavior and dynamical jumps. Numerical simulations show different aspects of this kind of behavior, illustrating its importance for a proper understanding of nonlinear dynamics of SMA systems.

  3. Aerodynamic Jump: A Short Range View for Long Rod Projectiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Bundy

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available It is shown that aerodynamic jump for a nonspinning kinetic energy penetrator is not – as conventional definitions may infer – a discontinuous change in the direction of motion at the origin of free flight, nor is it the converse, a cumulative redirection over a domain of infinite extent. Rather, with the aid of an alternative kinematical definition, it is shown that aerodynamic jump for such a projectile is a localized redirection of the center-of-gravity motion, caused by the force of lift due to yaw over the relatively short region from entry into free flight until the yaw reaches its first maximum. A rigorous proof of this statement is provided, but the primary objective of this paper is to provide answers to the questions: what is aerodynamic jump, what does it mean, and what aspects of the flight trajectory does it refer to, or account for.

  4. Multiple Tune Jumps to Overcome Horizontal Depolarizing Resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H.; Ahrens, L. A.; Bai, M.; Brown, K. A.; Dutheil, Y.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J. W.; Lin, F.; Mackay, W. W.; Meot, F.; Poblaguev, A.; Ranjbar, V.; Roser, T.; Schoefer, V.; Tepikian, S.; Tsoupas, N.; Yip, K.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.

    2016-02-01

    Imperfection and vertical intrinsic depolarizing resonances have been overcome by the two partial Siberian snakes in the Alternative Gradient Synchrotron(AGS). The relatively weak but numerous horizontal resonances are the main source of polarization loss in the AGS. A pair of horizontal tune jump quads have been used to overcome these weak resonances. The locations of the two quads have to be chosen such that the disturbance to the beam optics is minimum. The emittance growth has to be mitigated for this method to work. In addition, this technique needs very accurate jump timing. Using two partial Siberian snakes, with vertical tune inside the spin tune gap and 80% polarization at AGS injection, polarized proton beam had reached 1.5 × 1011 proton per bunch with 65% polarization. With the tune jump timing optimized and emittance preserved, more than 70% polarization with 2 × 1011 protons per bunch has been achieved.

  5. Condensation and jumping relay of droplets on lotus leaf

    CERN Document Server

    Lv, Cunjing; Yao, Zhaohui; Song, Yu; Zhang, Xiwen; He, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic behavior of micro water droplet condensed on a lotus leaf with two-tier roughness is studied. Under laboratory environment, the contact angle of the micro droplet on single micro papilla increases smoothly from 80 deg to 160 deg during the growth of condensed water. The best-known "self-clean" phenomenon, will be lost. A striking observation is the out-of-plane jumping relay of condensed droplets triggered by falling droplets, as well as its sustained speed obtained in continuous jumping relays, enhance the automatic removal of dropwise condensation without the help from any external force. The surface tension energy dissipation is the main reason controlling the critical size of jumping droplet and its onset velocity of rebounding.

  6. Vertical Jump Biomechanics Altered With Virtual Overhead Goal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Kevin R; Nguyen, Anh-Dung; Hegedus, Eric J; Taylor, Jeffrey B

    2017-04-01

    Virtual environments with real-time feedback can simulate extrinsic goals that mimic real life conditions. The purpose was to compare jump performance and biomechanics with a physical overhead goal (POG) and with a virtual overhead goal (VOG). Fourteen female subjects participated (age: 18.8 ± 1.1 years, height: 163.2 ± 8.1 cm, weight 63.0 ± 7.9 kg). Sagittal plane trunk, hip, and knee biomechanics were calculated during the landing and take-off phases of drop vertical jump with different goal conditions. Repeated-measures ANOVAs determined differences between goal conditions. Vertical jump height displacement was not different during VOG compared with POG. Greater hip extensor moment (P biomechanical testing, screening, and training conditions.

  7. Coalescence-induced jumping of droplet: Inertia and viscosity effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farokhirad, Samaneh; Morris, Jeffrey F.; Lee, Taehun

    2015-10-01

    The problem of coalescence-induced self-propelled jumping of droplet is studied using three-dimensional numerical simulation. The focus is on the effect of inertia and in particular the effect of air density on the behavior of the merged droplet during jumping. A lattice Boltzmann method is used for two identical, static micro-droplets coalescing on a homogeneous substrate with contact angle ranging from 0∘ to 180∘. The results reveal that the effect of air density is significant on detachment of the merged droplet from the substrate at the later stage of the jumping process; the larger the air density, the larger the jumping height of the droplet. Analysis of streamlines and vorticity contours is performed for density ratios ranging from 60 to 800. These show a generation of vortical structures inside and around the droplet. The intensity of these structures gets weaker after droplet departure as the air inertia is decreased. The results are also presented in terms of phase diagrams of the merged droplet jumping for different Ohnesorge numbers (Oh) and surface wettabilities for both small and large density ratios. The critical value of contact angle where the merged droplet jumps away from the substrate is independent of density ratio and has a value around 150∘. However, the critical value of Oh depends on both density ratio and wettability of the surface for contact angles greater than 150∘. In this range of contact angle, the diagrams show two distinct dynamical regimes for different density ratios, namely, inertial and viscous regimes.

  8. AirJump: Using Interfaces to Instantly Perform Simultaneous Extractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Scott M; Pezzi, Hannah M; LaVanway, Alex J; Guckenberger, David J; Anderson, Meghan A; Beebe, David J

    2016-06-22

    Analyte isolation is an important process that spans a range of biomedical disciplines, including diagnostics, research, and forensics. While downstream analytical techniques have advanced in terms of both capability and throughput, analyte isolation technology has lagged behind, increasingly becoming the bottleneck in these processes. Thus, there exists a need for simple, fast, and easy to integrate analyte separation protocols to alleviate this bottleneck. Recently, a new class of technologies has emerged that leverages the movement of paramagnetic particle (PMP)-bound analytes through phase barriers to achieve a high efficiency separation in a single or a few steps. Specifically, the passage of a PMP/analyte aggregate through a phase interface (aqueous/air in this case) acts to efficiently "exclude" unbound (contaminant) material from PMP-bound analytes with higher efficiency than traditional washing-based solid-phase extraction (SPE) protocols (i.e., bind, wash several times, elute). Here, we describe for the first time a new type of "exclusion-based" sample preparation, which we term "AirJump". Upon realizing that much of the contaminant carryover stems from interactions with the sample vessel surface (e.g., pipetting residue, wetting), we aim to eliminate the influence of that factor. Thus, AirJump isolates PMP-bound analyte by "jumping" analyte directly out of a free liquid/air interface. Through careful characterization, we have demonstrated the validity of AirJump isolation through comparison to traditional washing-based isolations. Additionally, we have confirmed the suitability of AirJump in three important independent biological isolations, including protein immunoprecipitation, viral RNA isolation, and cell culture gene expression analysis. Taken together, these data sets demonstrate that AirJump performs efficiently, with high analyte yield, high purity, no cross contamination, rapid time-to-isolation, and excellent reproducibility.

  9. Effect of two complex training protocols of back squats in blood indicators of muscular damage in military athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda, Álvaro Huerta; Ríos, Luis Chirosa; Barrilao, Rafael Guisado; Ríos, Ignacio Chirosa; Serrano, Pablo Cáceres

    2016-05-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to determine the variations in the blood muscular damage indicators post application of two complex training programs for back squats. [Subjects and Methods] Seven military athletes were the subjects of this study. The study had a quasi-experimental cross-over intra-subject design. Two complex training protocols were applied, and the variables to be measured were cortisol, metabolic creatine kinase, and total creatine kinase. For the statistical analysis, Student's t-test was used. [Results] Twenty-four hours post effort, a significant decrease in cortisol level was shown for both protocols; however, the metabolic creatine kinase and total creatine kinase levels showed a significant increase. [Conclusion] Both protocols lowered the indicator of main muscular damage in the blood supply (cortisol). This proved that the work weight did not generate significant muscular damage in the 24-hour post-exercise period.

  10. Sponsored parachute jumps--can they cause prolonged pain?

    OpenAIRE

    Straiton, N; Sterland, J

    1986-01-01

    A survey of parachute injuries sustained in 1984 at a local parachute club was made using hospital notes and a questionnaire. The overall injury rate was 0.2%. The injury rate in first time jumpers was 1.1%. The injuries often resulted in a prolonged hospital stay, time off work and residual pain and disability. Injury rates may be reduced by more prolonged and intensive training preceding the first jumps. Those people not interested in parachuting as a regular sport and who jump once only in...

  11. Sponsored parachute jumps--can they cause prolonged pain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straiton, N; Sterland, J

    1986-06-01

    A survey of parachute injuries sustained in 1984 at a local parachute club was made using hospital notes and a questionnaire. The overall injury rate was 0.2%. The injury rate in first time jumpers was 1.1%. The injuries often resulted in a prolonged hospital stay, time off work and residual pain and disability. Injury rates may be reduced by more prolonged and intensive training preceding the first jumps. Those people not interested in parachuting as a regular sport and who jump once only in order to raise money for charity are at risk of serious injury and perhaps should consider less dangerous alternatives.

  12. ASCAN Helms simulates parachute jump during VAFB training exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    1990 Group 13 Astronaut Candidate (ASCAN) Susan J. Helms simulates a parachute jump during ground egress and parasail training exercises at Vance Air Force Base (VAFB), Enid, Oklahoma. With her arms folded against her chest, Helms jumps from a brick platform onto the ground. In line behind her are Charles J. Precourt followed by Leroy Chiao. The training is designed to prepare the ASCANs for proper survival measures to take in the event of an emergency aboard the T-38 jet trainer aircraft they will frequently use once they become full-fledged astronauts. ASCANs completed the VAFB training courses from 07-29-90 through 07-31-90.

  13. Hydrodynamics and energetics of jumping copepod nauplii and copepodids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wadhwa, Navish; Andersen, Anders Peter; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    , we measured the swimming kinematics and fluid flow around jumping Acartia tonsa at different stages of its life cycle, using particle image velocimetry and particle tracking velocimetry. We found that the flow structures around nauplii and copepodids are topologically different, with one and two...... vortex rings, respectively. Our measurements suggest that copepodids cover a larger distance compared to their body size in each jump and are also hydrodynamically quieter, as the flow disturbance they create attenuates faster with distance. Also, copepodids are energetically more efficient than nauplii...

  14. Aerodynamic Jump: A Short Range View for Long Rod Projectiles

    OpenAIRE

    Mark Bundy

    2001-01-01

    It is shown that aerodynamic jump for a nonspinning kinetic energy penetrator is not – as conventional definitions may infer – a discontinuous change in the direction of motion at the origin of free flight, nor is it the converse, a cumulative redirection over a domain of infinite extent. Rather, with the aid of an alternative kinematical definition, it is shown that aerodynamic jump for such a projectile is a localized redirection of the center-of-gravity motion, caused by the force of lift ...

  15. Jumps into democracy: The transition in the Polity Index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paldam, Martin; Gundlach, Erich

    The Democratic Transition is the process of regime change from authoritarian at the traditional level of development to democratic at the modern level. This process is analyzed on 7,565 pairs of income and political regime data. Regimes are normally in local status quo equilibrium, so they have s......-run changes are due to triggering events that cause regime jumps. Triggering events are almost random, while most jumps are in the direction of the tension. This mechanism integrates the short and the long run to give the transition....

  16. Tunneling of the blocked wave in a circular hydraulic jump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Jayanta K.

    2017-02-01

    The formation of a circular hydraulic jump in a thin liquid layer involves the creation of a horizon where the incoming wave (surface ripples) is blocked by the fast flowing fluid. That there is a jump at the horizon is due to the viscosity of the fluid which is not relevant for the horizon formation. By using a tunneling formalism developed for the study of the Hawking radiation from black holes, we explicitly show that there will be an exponentially small tunneling of the blocked wave across the horizons as anticipated in studies of "analog gravity".

  17. Pricing Participating Products under a Generalized Jump-Diffusion Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tak Kuen Siu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a model for valuing participating life insurance products under a generalized jump-diffusion model with a Markov-switching compensator. It also nests a number of important and popular models in finance, including the classes of jump-diffusion models and Markovian regime-switching models. The Esscher transform is employed to determine an equivalent martingale measure. Simulation experiments are conducted to illustrate the practical implementation of the model and to highlight some features that can be obtained from our model.

  18. Actionable Information, Repeatability, Quantum Jumps, and the Wavepacket Collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Zurek, Wojciech H

    2013-01-01

    Unknown quantum state cannot be discovered as the measured system is re-prepared -- it jumps into an eigenstate of the measured observable. This impossibility to find out a quantum state and other symptoms of the wavepacket collapse follow (as was recently demonstrated for pure states of measured systems) from unitarity (that doesn't, however, allow for a literal collapse) and from the repeatability of measurements. Here we extend this result to mixtures and decohering systems. This accounts for quantum jumps in a macroscopic and open (but ultimately quantum) apparatus.

  19. Effects of two different half-squat training programs on fatigue during repeated cycling sprints in soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanis, Gregory C; Papaspyrou, Aggeliki; Souglis, Athanasios G; Theos, Apostolos; Sotiropoulos, Aristomenis; Maridaki, Maria

    2011-07-01

    This study compared the effects of two different half-squat training programs on the repeated-sprint ability of soccer players during the preseason. Twenty male professional soccer players were divided into 2 groups: One group (S-group) performed 4 sets of 5 repetitions with 90% of their 1-repetition maximum (1RM), and the other group (H-group) performed 4 sets of 12 repetitions with 70% of 1RM, 3 times per week for 6 weeks, in addition to their common preseason training program. Repeated-sprint ability was assessed before and after training by 10 × 6-second cycle ergometer sprints separated by 24 seconds of passive recovery. Maximal half-squat strength increased significantly in both groups (p < 0.01), but this increase was significantly greater in the S-group compared with the H-group (17.3 ± 1.9 vs. 11.0 ± 1.9%, p < 0.05). Lean leg volume (LLV) increased only in the H-group. Total work over the 10 sprints improved in both groups after training, but this increase was significantly greater in the second half (8.9 ± 2.6%) compared with the first half of the sprint test (3.2 ± 1.7%) only in the S-group. Mean power output (MPO) expressed per liter of LLV was better maintained during the last 6 sprints posttraining only in the S-group, whereas there was no change in MPO per LLV in the H-group over the 10 sprints. These results suggest that resistance training with high loads is superior to a moderate-load program, because it increases strength without a change in muscle mass and also results in a greater improvement in repeated sprint ability. Therefore, resistance training with high loads may be preferable when the aim is to improve maximal strength and fatigue during sprinting in professional soccer players.

  20. EMG and heart rate responses decline within 5 days of daily whole-body vibration training with squatting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Rosenberger

    Full Text Available In this study, we examined the acute effects of a 5-day daily whole-body vibration (WBV training on electromyography (EMG responses of the m. rectus femoris and m. gastrocnemius lateralis, heart rate (HR, continuously recorded, and blood lactate levels. The purpose of the study was to investigate the adaptation of muscle activity, heart rate and blood lactate levels during 5 days of daily training. Two groups of healthy male subjects performed either squat exercises with vibration at 20 Hz on a side alternating platform (SE+V, n = 20, age  = 31.9±7.5 yrs., height  = 178.8±6.2 cm, body mass  = 79.2±11.4 kg or squat exercises alone (SE, n = 21, age  = 28.4±7.3 years, height  = 178.9±7.4 cm, body mass  = 77.2±9.7 kg. On training day 1, EMG amplitudes of the m. rectus femoris were significantly higher (P<0.05 during SE+V than during SE. However, this difference was no longer statistically significant on training days 3 and 5. The heart rate (HR response was significantly higher (P<0.05 during SE+V than during SE on all training days, but showed a constant decline throughout the training days. On training day 1, blood lactate increased significantly more after SE+V than after SE (P<0.05. On the following training days, this difference became much smaller but remained significantly different. The specific physiological responses to WBV were largest on the initial training day and most of them declined during subsequent training days, showing a rapid neuromuscular and cardiovascular adaptation to the vibration stimulus.

  1. The cerebro-cardiovascular response to periodic squat-stand maneuvers in healthy subjects: a time-domain analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Sam C; Ball, Naomi; Haunton, Victoria Joanna; Robinson, Thompson G; Panerai, Ronney B

    2017-09-08

    Squat-stand maneuvers (SSMs) have been used to improve the coherence of transfer function analysis (TFA) estimates during the assessment of dynamic cerebral autoregulation (dCA). There is a need to understand the influence of peripheral changes resulting from SSMs on cerebral blood flow, which might confound estimates of dCA. 29 healthy subjects underwent recordings at rest (5 min standing) and 15 SSMs (0.05Hz). Heart rate (3-lead ECG), end-tidal CO2 (capnography), blood pressure (Finometer), cerebral blood velocity (CBV, transcranial Doppler, MCA) and the angle of the thigh (tilt sensor) were measured continuously. The response of CBV to SSMs was decomposed into the relative contributions of mean arterial pressure (MAP), resistance area product (RAP) and critical closing pressure (CrCP). Upon squatting, a rise in MAP (83.6 ± 21.1 % contribution) is followed by increased CBV. A dCA response can be detected, determined by adjustments in RAP and CrCP (left hemisphere) with peak contributions of 24.8 ± 12.7 % and 27.4 ± 22.8 %, respectively, at different times during SSMs. No interhemispheric differences were detected. During standing, the contributions of MAP, RAP and CrCP change considerably. The changes of CBV subcomponents during repeated SSMs indicate a complex response of CBVms. to SSMs that can only be partially explained by myogenic mechanis More work is needed to clarify the potential contribution of other co-factors, such as breath-to-breath changes in pCO2, HR, stroke volume and the neurogenic component of dynamic CA. Copyright © 2017, American Journal of Physiology-Heart and Circulatory Physiology.

  2. Suicides by jumping from a height in Hong Kong: a review of coroner court files.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Paul W C; Caine, Eric D; Lee, Carmen K M; Beautrais, Annette; Yip, Paul S F

    2014-02-01

    Jumping from a height is the most common method for suicide in Hong Kong and other urban cities, but it remains understudied locally and internationally. We used Coroner records in exploring the ecological factors associated with these deaths and the personal characteristics of persons who jumped to their death (hereafter, "jumping suicides"). We compared suicides by jumping with all other suicides and examined the suicides that occurred at ten different jumping sites. The Coroner's files of all suicides in Hong Kong from 2002 to 2007 included 6,125 documented deaths. 2,964 (48.4%) involved jumping during the study period. Eighty-three percent (83%) of suicide jumps occurred in residential buildings, and of these, 61% occurred from the decedent's own home. Jumping suicides differed from non-jumping suicides in terms of their socio-demographic characteristics (e.g., for male: 60.8 vs. 67.3% of jumping suicide and non-jumping suicides, p suicides, p suicides (p suicide prevention. Installation of physical barriers, one of the mean restriction strategies, at common places for suicide has strong evidence to avert suicides without substitution effects. There seems to be challenges to implement physical barriers to prevent residential jumping suicides. Simply applying physical barriers to preclude jumping in Hong Kong appears to be difficult given its ubiquitous "high-rise" residential dwellings. Hence, we also need to develop alternative strategies aimed at preventing people from becoming suicidal.

  3. Species status assessment report New Mexico meadow jumping mouse (Zapus hudsonius luteus)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The New Mexico meadow jumping mouse (Zapus hudsonius luteus) (jumping mouse) lives in dense riparian herbaceous vegetation along streams from southern Colorado to...

  4. Application of biological feedback for estimation of anaerobic performance in jumping test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovalenko S.O.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : - To determine the effect of biofeedback to determine the level of anaerobic performance of healthy young men. Material: The characteristics of physical performance in 60-seconds jumping test without and with visual and audible biofeedback (BFB are determined at 23 healthy young men. Results : Significant individual peculiarities are found in performance features of 60-seconds jumping test both without and with BFB. The groups of performance indexes are maximum jumping height; jumping frequency and achieved performance level; correlation of jumping phases and achieved capacity of a separate jump; jumping dynamics during the test. The positive effect mostly on performance in BFB regime is found in the group of persons with low level of physical performance. Conclusion : The application of BFB in 60-seconds jumping test is proved to increase the objective character of measuring anaerobic performance.

  5. Aerobic Requirements for and Heart Rate Responses to Variations in Rope Jumping Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis, Ken; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Highly skilled ropejumpers can maintain their exercise intensity by varying their jumping technique. Research on heart rate responses and aerobic requirements of different jumping techniques is discussed. Methodology and data are reported. (Author/JL)

  6. The "how" and "why" of the ancient Greek long jump with weights: a five-fold symmetric jump in a row?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenoir, Matthieu; De Clercq, Dirk; Laporte, Willy

    2005-10-01

    A plausible explanation for the ancient long jump records from Greek antiquity is sought on the basis of pictorial and written sources, and corroborated with practical tests. Ancient sources report that athletes jumped more than 15 m with weights in their hands, which enabled them to jump further than without these weights. It is proposed that the ancient Greek long jump was a continuous succession of five standing broad jumps, in which the landing phase of one jump was also the countermovement for the next jump. Four trained athletes jumped further with (14.64 +/- 0.76 m, range 13.64-15.63 m) than without weights (13.88 +/- 0.70 m, range 12.60-14.75 m; P = 0.001). These results show that this technique is executable, fits with ancient written and pictorial sources, and allows trained modern athletes to jump distances well over 15 m. The extra distance jumped when using weights may be due to changes in the position of the jumper's centre of mass at take-off and at landing, and an increase in take-off velocity stemming from several biomechanical mechanisms.

  7. Mechanically induced ankle inversion during human walking and jumping.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuijzen, P.H.J.A.; Grüneberg, C.; Duysens, J.E.J.

    2002-01-01

    A new method to study sudden ankle inversions during human walking and jumping is presented. Ankle inversions of 25 degrees were elicited using a box containing a trap door. During the gait task, subjects walked at a speed of 4 km/h. At a pre-programmed delay after left heel strike, an electromagnet

  8. Structural estimation of jump-diffusion processes in macroeconomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Posch, Olaf

    2009-01-01

    This paper shows how to solve and estimate a continuous-time dynamic stochastic general equilibrium (DSGE) model with jumps. It also shows that a continuous-time formulation can make it simpler (relative to its discrete-time version) to compute and estimate the deep parameters using the likelihoo...

  9. Jump Conditions for Maxwell Equations and Their Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-28

    critical issues in computational modeling of electromagnetic systems containing sliding contacts, such as railguns , is the relationship between...an armature is propelled by electromagnetic force. Two stationary conductors (rails) are connected to a capacitor bank. An armature, typically a solid...experimental results. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Maxwell equation, computational electromagnetics , jump condition 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17

  10. Environmentally transmitted parasites: Host-jumping in a heterogeneous environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caraco, Thomas; Cizauskas, Carrie A; Wang, Ing-Nang

    2016-05-21

    Groups of chronically infected reservoir-hosts contaminate resource patches by shedding a parasite׳s free-living stage. Novel-host groups visit the same patches, where they are exposed to infection. We treat arrival at patches, levels of parasite deposition, and infection of the novel host as stochastic processes, and derive the expected time elapsing until a host-jump (initial infection of a novel host) occurs. At stationarity, mean parasite densities are independent of reservoir-host group size. But within-patch parasite-density variances increase with reservoir group size. The probability of infecting a novel host declines with parasite-density variance; consequently larger reservoir groups extend the mean waiting time for host-jumping. Larger novel-host groups increase the probability of a host-jump during any single patch visit, but also reduce the total number of visits per unit time. Interaction of these effects implies that the waiting time for the first infection increases with the novel-host group size. If the reservoir-host uses resource patches in any non-uniform manner, reduced spatial overlap between host species increases the waiting time for host-jumping.

  11. Delayed Frost Growth on Jumping-Drop Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boreyko, Jonathan B [ORNL; Collier, Pat [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Self-propelled jumping drops are continuously removed from a condensing superhydrophobic surface to enable a micrometric steady-state drop size. Here, we report that subcooled condensate on a chilled superhydrophobic surface are able to repeatedly jump off the surface before heterogeneous ice nucleation occurs. Frost still forms on the superhydrophobic surface due to ice nucleation at neighboring edge defects, which eventually spreads over the entire surface via an inter-drop frost wave. The growth of this inter-drop frost front is shown to be up to three times slower on the superhydrophobic surface compared to a control hydrophobic surface, due to the jumping-drop effect dynamically minimizing the average drop size and surface coverage of the condensate. A simple scaling model is developed to relate the success and speed of inter-drop ice bridging to the drop size distribution. While other reports of condensation frosting on superhydrophobic surfaces have focused exclusively on liquid-solid ice nucleation for isolated drops, these findings reveal that the growth of frost is an inter-drop phenomenon that is strongly coupled to the wettability and drop size distribution of the surface. A jumping-drop superhydrophobic condenser was found to be superior to a conventional dropwise condenser in two respects: preventing heterogeneous ice nucleation by continuously removing subcooled condensate, and delaying frost growth by minimizing the success of interdrop ice bridge formation.

  12. Delayed frost growth on jumping-drop superhydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boreyko, Jonathan B; Collier, C Patrick

    2013-02-26

    Self-propelled jumping drops are continuously removed from a condensing superhydrophobic surface to enable a micrometric steady-state drop size. Here, we report that subcooled condensate on a chilled superhydrophobic surface are able to repeatedly jump off the surface before heterogeneous ice nucleation occurs. Frost still forms on the superhydrophobic surface due to ice nucleation at neighboring edge defects, which eventually spreads over the entire surface via an interdrop frost wave. The growth of this interdrop frost front is shown to be up to 3 times slower on the superhydrophobic surface compared to a control hydrophobic surface, due to the jumping-drop effect dynamically minimizing the average drop size and surface coverage of the condensate. A simple scaling model is developed to relate the success and speed of interdrop ice bridging to the drop size distribution. While other reports of condensation frosting on superhydrophobic surfaces have focused exclusively on liquid-solid ice nucleation for isolated drops, these findings reveal that the growth of frost is an interdrop phenomenon that is strongly coupled to the wettability and drop size distribution of the surface. A jumping-drop superhydrophobic condenser minimized frost formation relative to a conventional dropwise condenser in two respects: preventing heterogeneous ice nucleation by continuously removing subcooled condensate, and delaying frost growth by limiting the success of interdrop ice bridge formation.

  13. Jump Patterns: Percussive Dance and the Path to Math

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Malke

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes an innovative collaboration with an elementary school math teacher that leads to original student choreography and engaging mathematical thinking. Using a tool the author created called Jump Patterns, students at Fox Hill Elementary School in Indianapolis, Indiana, engage in a robust, creative, choreographic…

  14. A logarithmic interpretation of Edixhoven's jumps for Jacobians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Dennis; Halle, Lars Halvard; Nicaise, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Let A be an abelian variety over a discretely valued field. Edixhoven has defined a filtration on the special fiber of the N\\'eron model of A that measures the behaviour of the N\\'eron model under tame base change. We interpret the jumps in this filtration in terms of lattices of logarithmic...

  15. The Hydraulic Jump: Finding Complexity in Turbulent Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vondracek, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Students who do not progress to more advanced science disciplines in college generally do not realize that seemingly simple physical systems are--when studied in detail--more complex than one might imagine. This article presents one such phenomenon--the hydraulic jump--as a way to help students see the complexity behind the seemingly simple, and…

  16. Anticipating the Species Jump: Surveillance for Emerging Viral Threats

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    broken skin or injection). Tropism is the affinity that a given virus has for particular host cell receptors, cells or tissues. Fusion/Entry...be a descendant of a cat virus ( feline panleukopenia virus, FPV) that jumped from cats to dogs within five years prior to its emergence. Since that

  17. The Viability Property of Controlled Jump Diffusion Processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi Ge PENG; Xue Hong ZHU

    2008-01-01

    In this paper,we first give a comparison theorem of viscosity solution to some nonlinear second order integrodifferential equation.And then using the comparison theorem,we obtain a necessary and sufficient condition for the viability property of some controlled jump diffusion processes which can keep the solution within a constraint K.

  18. Jumping across the gap - a series of atrial extrastimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swamy, Mahadeva; Katyal, Deepak; Raja J, Kaushal

    2015-01-01

    The "gap phenomenon" is an interesting phenomenon in electrophysiology arising from the differences in refractory periods at two or more levels of the atrioventricular (AV) conduction system. We present a patient with dual AV nodal physiology in whom the AH jump mediates the gap phenomenon. We also briefly discuss the other mechanisms of gap phenomenon that have been described in this setting.

  19. Hydraulic Jump and Energy Dissipation with Sluice Gate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngkyu Kim

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Movable weirs have been developed to address the weaknesses of conventional fixed weirs. However, the structures for riverbed protection downstream of movable weirs are designed using the criteria of fixed weirs in most cases, and these applications cause problems, such as scour and deformation of structures, due to misunderstanding the difference between different types of structures. In this study, a hydraulic experiment was conducted to examine weir type-specific hydraulic phenomena, compare hydraulic jumps and downstream flow characteristics according to different weir types, and analyze hydraulic characteristics, such as changes in water levels, velocities and energy. Additionally, to control the flow generated by a sluice gate, energy dissipators were examined herein for their effectiveness in relation to different installation locations and heights. As a result, it was found that although sluice gates generated hydraulic jumps similar to those of fixed weirs, their downstream supercritical flow increased to eventually elongate the overall hydraulic jumps. In energy dissipator installation, installation heights were found to be sensitive to energy dissipation. The most effective energy dissipator height was 10% of the downstream free surface water depth in this experiment. Based on these findings, it seems desirable to use energy dissipators to reduce energy, as such dissipators were found to be effective in reducing hydraulic jumps and protecting the riverbed under sluice gates.

  20. Mechanically induced ankle inversion during human walking and jumping.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuijzen, P.H.J.A.; Grüneberg, C.; Duysens, J.E.J.

    2002-01-01

    A new method to study sudden ankle inversions during human walking and jumping is presented. Ankle inversions of 25 degrees were elicited using a box containing a trap door. During the gait task, subjects walked at a speed of 4 km/h. At a pre-programmed delay after left heel strike, an electromagnet