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Sample records for isjl education fellows

  1. Fellows as teachers: a model to enhance pediatric resident education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backes, Carl H; Reber, Kris M; Trittmann, Jennifer K B; Huang, Hong; Tomblin, Jordanna; Moorehead, Pamela A; Bauer, John A; Smith, Charles V; Mahan, John D

    2011-01-01

    Pressures on academic faculty to perform beyond their role as educators has stimulated interest in complementary approaches in resident medical education. While fellows are often believed to detract from resident learning and experience, we describe our preliminary investigations utilizing clinical fellows as a positive force in pediatric resident education. Our objectives were to implement a practical approach to engage fellows in resident education, evaluate the impact of a fellow-led education program on pediatric resident and fellow experience, and investigate if growth of a fellowship program detracts from resident procedural experience. This study was conducted in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) where fellows designed and implemented an education program consisting of daily didactic teaching sessions before morning clinical rounds. The impact of a fellow-led education program on resident satisfaction with their NICU experience was assessed via anonymous student evaluations. The potential value of the program for participating fellows was also evaluated using an anonymous survey. The online evaluation was completed by 105 residents. Scores were markedly higher after the program was implemented in areas of teaching excellence (4.44 out of 5 versus 4.67, pteaching skills and enhanced knowledge of neonatal pathophysiology as the most valuable aspects of their participation in the education program. The anonymous survey revealed that 87.5% of participating residents believed that NICU fellows were very important to their overall training and education. While fellows are often believed to be a detracting factor to residency training, we found that pediatric resident attitudes toward the fellows were generally positive. In our experience, in the specialty of neonatology a fellow-led education program can positively contribute to both resident and fellow learning and satisfaction. Further investigation into the value of utilizing fellows as a positive force in

  2. Fellows as teachers: a model to enhance pediatric resident education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles V. Smith

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Pressures on academic faculty to perform beyond their role as educators has stimulated interest in complementary approaches in resident medical education. While fellows are often believed to detract from resident learning and experience, we describe our preliminary investigations utilizing clinical fellows as a positive force in pediatric resident education. Our objectives were to implement a practical approach to engage fellows in resident education, evaluate the impact of a fellow-led education program on pediatric resident and fellow experience, and investigate if growth of a fellowship program detracts from resident procedural experience.This study was conducted in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU where fellows designed and implemented an education program consisting of daily didactic teaching sessions before morning clinical rounds. The impact of a fellow-led education program on resident satisfaction with their NICU experience was assessed via anonymous student evaluations. The potential value of the program for participating fellows was also evaluated using an anonymous survey.The online evaluation was completed by 105 residents. Scores were markedly higher after the program was implemented in areas of teaching excellence (4.44 out of 5 versus 4.67, p<0.05 and overall resident learning (3.60 out of 5 versus 4.61, p<0.001. Fellows rated the acquisition of teaching skills and enhanced knowledge of neonatal pathophysiology as the most valuable aspects of their participation in the education program. The anonymous survey revealed that 87.5% of participating residents believed that NICU fellows were very important to their overall training and education.While fellows are often believed to be a detracting factor to residency training, we found that pediatric resident attitudes toward the fellows were generally positive. In our experience, in the specialty of neonatology a fellow-led education program can positively contribute to both

  3. The Advanced Technology Environmental Education Center Summer Fellows Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depken, Diane E.; Zeman, Catherine L.; Lensch, Ellen Kabat; Brown, Edward J.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the background, activities, and outcomes of the Advanced Technology Environmental Education Center (ATEEC) and its Summer Fellows Institutes as a model for disciplinary and cross-disciplinary infusion of environmental science and technology content, curriculum, and methods into the classroom. Presents experiences, themes, and activities…

  4. Augmenting Fellow Education Through Spaced Multiple-Choice Questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsoumian, Alice E; Yun, Heather C

    2018-01-01

    The San Antonio Uniformed Services Health Education Consortium Infectious Disease Fellowship program historically included a monthly short-answer and multiple-choice quiz. The intent was to ensure medical knowledge in relevant content areas that may not be addressed through clinical rotations, such as operationally relevant infectious disease. After completion, it was discussed in a small group with faculty. Over time, faculty noted increasing dissatisfaction with the activity. Spaced interval education is useful in retention of medical knowledge and skills by medical students and residents. Its use in infectious disease fellow education has not been described. To improve the quiz experience, we assessed the introduction of spaced education curriculum in our program. A pre-intervention survey was distributed to assess the monthly quiz with Likert scale and open-ended questions. A multiple-choice question spaced education curriculum was created using the Qstream(R) platform in 2011. Faculty development on question writing was conducted. Two questions were delivered every 2 d. Incorrectly and correctly answered questions were repeated after 7 and 13 d, respectively. Questions needed to be answered correctly twice to be retired. Fellow satisfaction was assessed at semi-annual fellowship reviews over 5 yr and by a one-time repeat survey. Pre-intervention survey of six fellows indicated dissatisfaction with the time commitment of the monthly quiz (median Likert score of 2, mean 6.5 h to complete), neutral in perceived utility, but satisfaction with knowledge retention (Likert score 4). Eighteen fellows over 5 yr participated in the spaced education curriculum. Three quizzes with 20, 39, and 48 questions were designed. Seventeen percentage of questions addressed operationally relevant topics. Fifty-nine percentage of questions were answered correctly on first attempt, improving to 93% correct answer rate at the end of the analysis. Questions were attempted 2,999 times

  5. Attitudes toward neuroscience education among psychiatry residents and fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Lawrence K; Akil, Mayada; Widge, Alik; Roberts, Laura Weiss; Etkin, Amit

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the attitudes of psychiatry trainees toward neuroscience education in psychiatry residency and subsequent training in order to inform neuroscience education approaches in the future. This online survey was designed to capture demographic information, self-assessed neuroscience knowledge, attitudes toward neuroscience education, preferences in learning modalities, and interest in specific neuroscience topics. Volunteers were identified through the American Psychiatric Association, which invited 2,563 psychiatry trainees among their members. Four hundred thirty-six trainees completed the survey. Nearly all agreed that there is a need for more neuroscience education in psychiatry residency training (94%) and that neuroscience education could help destigmatize mental illness (91%). Nearly all (94%) expressed interest in attending a 3-day course on neuroscience. Many neuroscience topics and modes of learning were viewed favorably by participants. Residents in their first 2 years of training expressed attitudes similar to those of more advanced residents and fellows. Some differences were found based on the level of interest in a future academic role. This web-based study demonstrates that psychiatry residents see neuroscience education as important in their training and worthy of greater attention. Our results suggest potential opportunities for advancing neuroscience education.

  6. Evaluation of a web-based portal to improve resident education by neonatology fellows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwini Lakshmanan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Integration of web-based educational tools into medical training has been shown to increase accessibility of resources and optimize teaching. We developed a web-based educational portal (WBEP to support teaching of pediatric residents about newborn medicine by neonatology fellows. Objectives: 1 To compare residents’ attitudes about their fellow-led education in the NICU pre- and post-WBEP; including assessment of factors that impact their education and usefulness of teaching tools. 2 To compare fellow utilization of various teaching modalities pre- and post-WBEP. Design/methods: We queried residents about their attitudes regarding fellow-led education efforts and various teaching modalities in the NICU and logistics potentially impacting effectiveness. Based on these data, we introduced the WBEP – a repository of teaching tools (e.g., mock code cases, board review questions, journal articles, case-based discussion scenarios for use by fellows to supplement didactic sessions in a faculty-based curriculum. We surveyed residents about the effectiveness of fellow teaching pre- and post-WBEP implementation and the type of fellow-led teaching modalities that were used. Results: After analysis of survey responses, we identified that residents cited fellow level of interest as the most important factor impacting their education. Post-implementation, residents described greater utilization of various teaching modalities by fellows, including an increase in use of mock codes (14% to 76%, p<0.0001 and journal articles (33% to 59%, p=0.02. Conclusions: A web-based resource that supplements traditional curricula led to greater utilization of various teaching modalities by fellows and may encourage fellow involvement in resident teaching.

  7. MESSENGER Educator Fellows Taking the Nation on a Ride to the Innermost Planet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhala, H. A.; Goldstein, J. J.; Chapman, C. R.; Edmonds, J. P.; Hallau, K. G.; Hirshon, B.; Weir, H. M.; Solomon, S. C.

    2011-12-01

    Exploration of the mysterious planet Mercury offers an unprecedented opportunity for teachers, students, and citizens to tag along for the ride, and the MESSENGER (MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging) Educator Fellows are making sure classrooms across the U.S. are treated to quite a show. The Fellows, a nationally selected team of 30 master science educator volunteers, conduct workshops to teachers on how to bring educational materials developed in support of the mission into the classroom. The goal of the program is to provide teachers and school districts with exceptional educational materials and professional development strongly tied to the space science curriculum, and the materials are designed to inspire the next generation of America's scientists and engineers through NASA missions. Since the program's inception in 2003, more than 17,000 educators have been trained by the Fellows. On the basis of data gathered from the Fellows, this figure could translate to over two million student experiences. The success of the Fellowship program can also be gauged by determining how well it has maintained its volunteer corps over the years. The Fellows, selected to the program through a national announcement of opportunity every two years, reflect a geographically and institutionally diverse mix of individuals from a variety of settings such as science centers, museums, school districts, and universities. The Fellows sign up to the program for two years at a time, and at the end of their term they have the option to reapply. To keep the number of Fellows at 30 in each cadre, new Fellows are recruited to replace those who have retired. The current, fourth cadre of Fellows includes 30 individuals in 19 states and territories. Of these, seven have been in the program since the first cadre, and the other 23 include Fellows from the second, third, and fourth recruitment campaigns in 2006, 2008, and 2010. The current cadre is conducting its work

  8. Postgraduate Education in Quality Improvement Methods: Initial Results of the Fellows' Applied Quality Training (FAQT) Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winchester, David E; Burkart, Thomas A; Choi, Calvin Y; McKillop, Matthew S; Beyth, Rebecca J; Dahm, Phillipp

    2016-06-01

    Training in quality improvement (QI) is a pillar of the next accreditation system of the Accreditation Committee on Graduate Medical Education and a growing expectation of physicians for maintenance of certification. Despite this, many postgraduate medical trainees are not receiving training in QI methods. We created the Fellows Applied Quality Training (FAQT) curriculum for cardiology fellows using both didactic and applied components with the goal of increasing confidence to participate in future QI projects. Fellows completed didactic training from the Institute for Healthcare Improvement's Open School and then designed and completed a project to improve quality of care or patient safety. Self-assessments were completed by the fellows before, during, and after the first year of the curriculum. The primary outcome for our curriculum was the median score reported by the fellows regarding their self-confidence to complete QI activities. Self-assessments were completed by 23 fellows. The majority of fellows (15 of 23, 65.2%) reported no prior formal QI training. Median score on baseline self-assessment was 3.0 (range, 1.85-4), which was significantly increased to 3.27 (range, 2.23-4; P = 0.004) on the final assessment. The distribution of scores reported by the fellows indicates that 30% were slightly confident at conducting QI activities on their own, which was reduced to 5% after completing the FAQT curriculum. An interim assessment was conducted after the fellows completed didactic training only; median scores were not different from the baseline (mean, 3.0; P = 0.51). After completion of the FAQT, cardiology fellows reported higher self-confidence to complete QI activities. The increase in self-confidence seemed to be limited to the applied component of the curriculum, with no significant change after the didactic component.

  9. Graduate medical education in humanism and professionalism: a needs assessment survey of pediatric gastroenterology fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, Katharine C; Kesselheim, Jennifer C; Herrick, Daniel B; Woolf, Alan D; Leichtner, Alan M

    2014-01-01

    The deterioration of humanism and professionalism during graduate medical training is an acknowledged concern, and programs are required to provide professionalism education for pediatric fellows. We conducted a needs assessment survey in a national sample of 138 first- and second-year gastroenterology fellows (82% response rate). Most believed that present humanism and professionalism education met their needs, but this education was largely informal (eg, role modeling). Areas for formal education desired by >70% included competing demands of clinical practice versus research, difficult doctor-patient relationships, depression/burnout, angry parents, medical errors, work-life balance, and the patient illness experience. These results may guide curricula to formalize humanism and professionalism education in pediatric gastroenterology fellowships.

  10. A Nephrology Fellows' Communication Skills Course: An Educational Quality Improvement Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Robert A; Jackson, Vicki A; Norwich, Diana; Schell, Jane O; Schaefer, Kristen; Ship, Amy N; Sullivan, Amy M

    2016-08-01

    Nephrology fellows need expertise navigating challenging conversations with patients throughout the course of advanced kidney disease. However, evidence shows that nephrologists receive inadequate training in this area. This study assessed the effectiveness of an educational quality improvement intervention designed to enhance fellows' communication with patients who have advanced kidney disease. Quality improvement project. Full-day annual workshops (2013-2014) using didactics, discussion, and practice with simulated patients. Content focused on delivering bad news, acknowledging emotion, discussing care goals in dialysis decision making when prognosis is uncertain, and addressing dialysis therapy withdrawal and end of life. Participants were first-year nephrology fellows from 2 Harvard-affiliated training programs (N=26). Study assessed the effectiveness of an intervention designed to enhance fellows' communication skills. Primary outcomes were changes in self-reported patient communication skills, attitudes, and behaviors related to discussing disease progression, prognostic uncertainty, dialysis therapy withdrawal, treatments not indicated, and end of life; responding to emotion; eliciting patient goals and values; and incorporating patient goals into recommendations. Surveys measured prior training, pre- and postcourse perceived changes in skills and values, and reported longer term (3-month) changes in communication behaviors, using both closed- and open-ended items. Response rates were 100% (pre- and postsurveys) and 68% (follow-up). Participants reported improvement in all domains, with an overall mean increase of 1.1 (summed average scores: precourse, 2.8; postcourse, 3.9 [1-5 scale; 5 = "extremely well prepared"]; Pskills taught, such as "Ask-Tell-Ask" and using open-ended questions. Self-reported data may overestimate actual changes; small sample size and the programs' affiliation with a single medical school may limit generalizability. A day

  11. Pediatric anesthesiology fellow education: is a simulation-based boot camp feasible and valuable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambardekar, Aditee P; Singh, Devika; Lockman, Justin L; Rodgers, David L; Hales, Roberta L; Gurnaney, Harshad G; Nathan, Aruna; Deutsch, Ellen S

    2016-05-01

    Pediatric anesthesiologists must manage crises in neonates and children with timely responses and limited margin for error. Teaching the range of relevant skills during a 12-month fellowship is challenging. An experiential simulation-based curriculum can augment acquisition of knowledge and skills. To develop a simulation-based boot camp (BC) for novice pediatric anesthesiology fellows and assess learner perceptions of BC activities. We hypothesize that BC is feasible, not too basic, and well received by fellows. Skills stations, team-based in situ simulations, and group discussions of complex cases were designed. Stations were evaluated by anonymous survey; fellows rated usefulness in improving knowledge, self-confidence, technical skill, and clinical performance using a Likert scale (1 strongly disagree to 5 strongly agree). They were also asked if stations were too basic or too short. Median and interquartile range (IQR) data were calculated and noted as median (IQR). Fellows reported the difficult airway station and simulated scenarios improved knowledge, self-confidence, technical skill, and clinical performance. They disagreed that stations were too basic or too short with exception of the difficult airway session, which was too short [4 (4-3)]. Fellows believed the central line station improved knowledge [4 (4-3)], technical skills [4 (4-4)], self-confidence [4 (4-3)], and clinical performance [4 (4-3)]; scores trended toward neutral likely because the station was perceived as too basic [3.5 (4-3)]. An interactive session on epinephrine and intraosseous lines was valued. Complicated case discussion was of educational value [4 (5-4)], the varied opinions of faculty were helpful [4 (5-4)], and the session was neither too basic [2 (2-2)] nor too short [2 (2-2)]. A simulation-based BC for pediatric anesthesiology fellows was feasible, perceived to improve confidence, knowledge, technical skills, and clinical performance, and was not too basic. © 2016 John Wiley

  12. Pathology resident and fellow education in a time of disruptive technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziai, James M; Smith, Brian R

    2012-12-01

    The development of disruptive technologies is changing the practice of pathology. Their implementation challenges traditional educational paradigms. Training programs must adapt to these heuristic needs. The dual explosion of new medical knowledge and innovative methodologies adds new practice aspects to the pathologist's areas of expertise. This transformation potentially challenges the traditional core model of training. It raises questions as to how pathology should incorporate future expanding subspecialty needs into educational and practice models. This article examines the impact of these disruptive technologies on resident and fellow education and explores alternative educational and practice models that may better accommodate pathology's future. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. An assessment of residents' and fellows' personal finance literacy: an unmet medical education need.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Fahd A; White, Andrew J; Hiller, Katherine M; Amini, Richard; Jeffe, Donna B

    2017-05-29

    This study aimed to assess residents' and fellows' knowledge of finance principles that may affect their personal financial health. A cross-sectional, anonymous, web-based survey was administered to a convenience sample of residents and fellows at two academic medical centers.  Respondents answered 20 questions on personal finance and 28 questions about their own financial planning, attitudes, and debt. Questions regarding satisfaction with one's financial condition and investment-risk tolerance used a 10-point Likert scale (1=lowest, 10=highest).  Of 2,010 trainees, 422 (21%) responded (median age 30 years; interquartile range, 28-33). The mean quiz score was 52.0% (SD = 19.1). Of 299 (71%) respondents with student loan debt, 144 (48%) owed over $200,000.  Many respondents had other debt, including 86 (21%) with credit card debt. Of 262 respondents with retirement savings, 142 (52%) had saved less than $25,000. Respondents' mean satisfaction with their current personal financial condition was 4.8 (SD = 2.5) and investment-risk tolerance was 5.3 (SD = 2.3). Indebted trainees reported lower satisfaction than trainees without debt (4.4 vs. 6.2, F (1,419) = 41.57, p < .001).   Knowledge was moderately correlated with investment-risk tolerance (r=0.41, p < .001), and weakly correlated with satisfaction with financial status (r=0.23, p < .001). Residents and fellows had low financial literacy and investment-risk tolerance, high debt, and deficits in their financial preparedness.  Adding personal financial education to the medical education curriculum would benefit trainees.  Providing education in areas such as budgeting, estate planning, investment strategies, and retirement planning early in training can offer significant long-term benefits.

  14. Training Pediatric Fellows in Palliative Care: A Pilot Comparison of Simulation Training and Didactic Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Katharine E; Cohen, Harvey J; Sourkes, Barbara M; Good, Julie J; Halamek, Louis P

    2017-10-01

    Pediatric fellows receive little palliative care (PC) education and have few opportunities to practice communication skills. In this pilot study, we assessed (1) the relative effectiveness of simulation-based versus didactic education, (2) communication skill retention, and (3) effect on PC consultation rates. Thirty-five pediatric fellows in cardiology, critical care, hematology/oncology, and neonatology at two institutions enrolled: 17 in the intervention (simulation-based) group (single institution) and 18 in the control (didactic education) group (second institution). Intervention group participants participated in a two-day program over three months (three simulations and videotaped PC panel). Control group participants received written education designed to be similar in content and time. (1) Self-assessment questionnaires were completed at baseline, post-intervention and three months; mean between-group differences for each outcome measure were assessed. (2) External reviewers rated simulation-group encounters on nine communication domains. Within-group changes over time were assessed. (3) The simulation-based site's PC consultations were compared in the six months pre- and post-intervention. Compared to the control group, participants in the intervention group improved in self-efficacy (p = 0.003) and perceived adequacy of medical education (p < 0.001), but not knowledge (p = 0.20). Reviewers noted nonsustained improvement in four domains: relationship building (p = 0.01), opening discussion (p = 0.03), gathering information (p = 0.01), and communicating accurate information (p = 0.04). PC consultation rate increased 64%, an improvement when normalized to average daily census (p = 0.04). This simulation-based curriculum is an effective method for improving PC comfort, education, and consults. More frequent practice is likely needed to lead to sustained improvements in communication competence.

  15. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Specialization: Wireless Communication, Engineering Physics ... of the Academy will be held from 2–4 November 2018 in Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi ... List of Fellows and Honorary Fellow elected during 2017 (effective 2018).

  16. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Specialization: Electronics, Data Communication, Theoretical Physics and Theoretical ... will be held from 2–4 November 2018 in Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi ... List of Fellows and Honorary Fellow elected during 2017 (effective 2018).

  17. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Specialization: Radio & Space Science and Radio Communication ... of the Academy will be held from 2–4 November 2018 in Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi ... List of Fellows and Honorary Fellow elected during 2017 (effective 2018).

  18. Stress and burnout among critical care fellows: preliminary evaluation of an educational intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashani, Kianoush; Carrera, Perliveh; De Moraes, Alice Gallo; Sood, Amit; Onigkeit, James A; Ramar, Kannan

    2015-01-01

    Despite a demanding work environment, information on stress and burnout of critical care fellows is limited. To assess 1) levels of burnout, perceived stress, and quality of life in critical care fellows, and 2) the impact of a brief stress management training on these outcomes. In a tertiary care academic medical center, 58 critical care fellows of varying subspecialties and training levels were surveyed to assess baseline levels of stress and burnout. Twenty-one of the 58 critical care fellows who were in the first year of training at the time of this initial survey participated in a pre-test and 1-year post-test to determine the effects of a brief, 90-min stress management intervention. Based on responses (n=58) to the abbreviated Maslach Burnout Inventory, reported burnout was significantly lower in Asian fellows (p=0.04) and substantially higher among graduating fellows (versus new and transitioning fellows) (p=0.02). Among the intervention cohort, burnout did not significantly improve--though two-thirds of fellows reported using the interventional techniques to deal with stressful situations. Fellows who participated in the intervention rated the effectiveness of the course as 4 (IQR=3.75-5) using the 5-point Likert scale. In comparison with the new and transitioning trainees, burnout was highest among graduating critical care fellows. Although no significant improvements were found in first-year fellows' burnout scores following the single, 90-min training intervention, participants felt the training did provide them with tools to apply during stressful situations.

  19. Implementing the leadership development plans of faculty education fellows: a structured approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Ellen F; Wesner, Marilyn; Karnchanomai, Ornpawee; Haywood, Yolanda

    2012-09-01

    The literature about medical education faculty fellowship programs, which have grown in popularity, quantifies program characteristics, provides exemplars, and reports on delivery strategies. Evaluation is generally limited to satisfaction measures, with a few longitudinal studies of postprogram achievements, but none on the process of making these changes.The authors describe the development of faculty members' postfellowship leadership plans and a structured process to support plan implementation. They also compare the implementation of initiatives specified in individual leadership development plans of two cohorts of faculty. The participants were graduates of a fellowship program at the George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences. One cohort participated in a structured process of monthly reciprocal peer coaching, followed by journaling and quarterly interviews with the program director; a second cohort functioned as a comparison with no structured process supporting them. (Study years are not provided because they could inadvertently lead to the identification of the participants.) Despite similar implementation challenges expressed by both cohorts, the cohort participating in the structured process implemented 23% more of their planned initiatives, including 2 times as many educational leadership initiatives and 3.5 times as many initiatives related to developing new curriculum. The combination of plan development, reciprocal peer coaching, journaling, and interview discussions provided faculty with focus, structure, and personal support. This structured process supporting leadership plan development and implementation can be easily transferred to other fellowship programs in medical education, adapted for use with residents and fellows, and used in similar development programs.

  20. Quality improvement education incorporated as an integral part of critical care fellows training at the Mayo Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashani, Kianoush B; Ramar, Kannan; Farmer, J Christopher; Lim, Kaiser G; Moreno-Franco, Pablo; Morgenthaler, Timothy I; Dankbar, Gene C; Hale, Curt W

    2014-10-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education emphasizes quality improvement (QI) education in residency/fellowship training programs. The Mayo Clinic Combined Critical Care Fellowship (CCF) program conducted a pilot QI education program to incorporate QI training as a required curriculum for the 2010-2011 academic year. CCF collaborated with the Mayo Quality Academy to customize and teach the existing Mayo Quality Fellows curriculum to the CCF fellows with the help of two quality coaches over five months starting July 2010. All fellows were to achieve Bronze and Silver certification prior to graduation. Silver required passing four written exams and submitting a health care QI project. Five projects were selected on the basis of the Impact-Effort Prioritization matrix, and DMAIC (Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, and Control) methodology was used to complete the projects. The primary outcome was to assess learners' satisfaction, knowledge, and skill transfer. All 20 fellows were Bronze certified, and 14 (70%) were Silver certified by the time of graduation. All five QI projects were completed and showed positive impacts on patient safety and care. Surveys showed improved learner satisfaction. Graduates felt the QI training improved their QI skills and employment and career advancement. The QI curriculum had appropriate content and teaching pace and did not significantly displace other important clinical core curriculum topics. The pilot was successfully implemented in the CCF program and now is in the fourth academic year as an established and integral part of the fellowship core curriculum.

  1. Stress and burnout among critical care fellows: preliminary evaluation of an educational intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kianoush Kashani

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite a demanding work environment, information on stress and burnout of critical care fellows is limited. Objectives: To assess 1 levels of burnout, perceived stress, and quality of life in critical care fellows, and 2 the impact of a brief stress management training on these outcomes. Methods: In a tertiary care academic medical center, 58 critical care fellows of varying subspecialties and training levels were surveyed to assess baseline levels of stress and burnout. Twenty-one of the 58 critical care fellows who were in the first year of training at the time of this initial survey participated in a pre-test and 1-year post-test to determine the effects of a brief, 90-min stress management intervention. Results: Based on responses (n=58 to the abbreviated Maslach Burnout Inventory, reported burnout was significantly lower in Asian fellows (p=0.04 and substantially higher among graduating fellows (versus new and transitioning fellows (p=0.02. Among the intervention cohort, burnout did not significantly improve – though two-thirds of fellows reported using the interventional techniques to deal with stressful situations. Fellows who participated in the intervention rated the effectiveness of the course as 4 (IQR=3.75–5 using the 5-point Likert scale. Conclusions: In comparison with the new and transitioning trainees, burnout was highest among graduating critical care fellows. Although no significant improvements were found in first-year fellows’ burnout scores following the single, 90-min training intervention, participants felt the training did provide them with tools to apply during stressful situations.

  2. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 2015 Section: Engineering & Technology. Ravishankar, Prof. Narayanan Ph.D. (IISc), FRSC. Date of birth: 12 February 1970. Specialization: Nanomaterials, Electron Microscopy, Energy Applications Address: Materials Research Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru 560 012, Karnataka

  3. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1934 Section: Engineering & Technology. Rau, M A Govinda. Date of birth: 26 August 1901. Date of death: 19 November 1954. Specialization: Chemical Engineering. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  4. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1937 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Krishnamurthy, L S . YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. 29th Mid-year meeting. Posted on 19 January 2018.

  5. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Discussion Meetings · Public Lectures · Lecture Workshops · Refresher Courses · Symposia. Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1945 Section: Engineering & Technology. Deshpande, D L . FNA. Date of birth: 2 September 1909. Date of death: 5 April 1961.

  6. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1974 Section: Engineering & Technology. Kelkar, Dr Purushottam Kashinath Ph.D. (Liverpool). Date of birth: 1 June 1909. Date of death: 23 October 1990. Specialization: Electrical Engineering. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  7. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1951 Section: Medicine. Viswanathan, Dharmavodani Krishnaiyar FNA. Date of birth: 1 March 1901. Date of death: 27 March 1960. Specialization: Public Health, Malaria. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  8. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1950 Section: Medicine. Rao, Mattegunta Venkata Radhakrishna FNA. Date of birth: 1 November 1903. Date of death: 26 October 1971. Specialization: Pathology, Nutrition. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  9. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1949 Section: Engineering & Technology. Thacker, Maneklal Sankalchand D.Engg., FNA. Date of birth: 3 December 1904. Date of death: 6 July 1979. Specialization: Engineering. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  10. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1934 Section: Mathematical Sciences. Rao, Chintakindi Venkata Hanumantha FNA. Date of birth: 29 October 1892. Date of death: 2 September 1947. Specialization: Pure Mathematics, Geometry. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  11. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1936 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Kalamkar, Ramachandra Jaykrishna Ph.D. Date of birth: 28 August 1903. Date of death: 24 May 1974. Specialization: Agricultural Sciences. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  12. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1974 Section: Mathematical Sciences. Ramanujam, Dr Chidambaram Padmanabhan. Date of birth: 9 January 1938. Date of death: 27 October 1974. Specialization: Algebra. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  13. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1935 Section: Chemistry. Desai, Shirishkant Varjray Ph.D. (London), D.Sc. (London). Date of birth: 1900. Date of death: 1984. Specialization: Biochemistry, Microbiology. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  14. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1935 Section: Chemistry. Siddiqi, Salimuzzaman Council Service: 1943-46. Date of birth: 19 October 1897. Date of death: 14 April 1994. Specialization: Natural Products Chemistry. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  15. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1940 Section: Engineering & Technology. Ishaq, Prof. Mohammad FNA. Date of birth: 1 April 1901. Date of death: 22 March 1960. Specialization: Molecular Spectroscopy. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  16. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1952 Section: Animal Sciences. Gnanamuthu, Chinnadurai Pittendrigh D.Sc. Date of birth: 29 April 1901. Date of death: 18 March 1969. Specialization: Animal Physiology, Animal Ecology. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  17. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1952 Section: Chemistry. Mehta, Subodhchandra Manmukhram M.Sc., FNA. Date of birth: 4 May 1902. Date of death: 29 March 1970. Specialization: Physical Chemistry, Inorganic Chemistry. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  18. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1948 Section: Chemistry. Subramanian, Toppur Seethapathy D.Sc. (Liverpool). Date of birth: 24 September 1911. Date of death: 19 September 1987. Specialization: Biochemistry. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  19. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1949 Section: Plant Sciences. Ramakrishnan, T S . Date of birth: 25 August 1899. Date of death: 2 December 1971. Specialization: Mycology, Plant Pathology. YouTube · Twitter · Facebook · Blog ...

  20. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Date of birth: 3 December 1947. Specialization: Protein Chemistry, Protein Folding, Function & Design for Therapeutics, Immunity & Neurosciences Address: Honorary Professor & CSIR Bhatnagar Fellow, Molecular Biophysics Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru 560 012, Karnataka Contact: Office: (080) 2293 2714, ...

  1. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1934 Section: Engineering & Technology. Visvesvaraya, M D.Sc. 1936-37. Date of birth: 15 September 1861. Date of death: 14 April 1962. Specialization: Civil Engineering. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  2. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1934 Section: Medicine. Krishnan, Kumarapuram Vythilinga FNA. Date of birth: 4 July 1896. Date of death: 30 March 1978. Specialization: Microbiology, Rural Hygiene. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  3. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1976 Section: Chemistry. Nasipuri, Prof. Dhanonjoy Ph.D. and D.Sc. (Calcutta), FNA. Date of birth: 1 April 1925. Date of death: 28 December 2009. Specialization: Synthetic & Mechanistic Organic Chemistry and Stereochemistry Last known address: Suite No. 46, Surendranath Housing Society, 238, ...

  4. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1935 Section: Mathematical Sciences. Narlikar, Prof. Vishnu Vasudeva M.A. (Cantab), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 26 September 1908. Date of death: 1 April 1991. Specialization: General Relativity and Field Theories Last known address: 701, Bhaskara, Colaba Housing Colony, Homi Bhabha Road, ...

  5. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1935 Section: Physics. Rao, Kotcherlakota Rangadhama FNA. Specialization: Spectroscopy. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. 29th Mid-year meeting. Posted on 19 January 2018. The 29th Mid-year meeting of the Academy will be held from 29–30 June ...

  6. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1956 Section: Chemistry. Rao, Prof. Mandikal Ramanna Aswathanarayana. Date of birth: 7 November 1910. Date of death: 24 May 1992. Specialization: Inorganic and Physical Chemistry Last known address: c/o Sri M.A. Raghuram, No. 446, IV Main Road, HMT Layout, Anandnagar, Bengaluru 560 ...

  7. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1971 Honorary. Stoicheff, Prof. Boris Peter FRS, OC. Date of birth: 1 June 1924. Date of death: 15 April 2010. Last known address: Emeritus University Professor and, Professor, Department of Physics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A7, Canada. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  8. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1957 Section: Plant Sciences. Desikachary, Prof. Thamarapu Vedantha D.Sc. (Madras), FNA. Date of birth: 18 September 1919. Date of death: 5 November 2005. Specialization: Phycology Last known address: 67, Palm Beach Dr., Patterson Lakes, Victoria 3197, Australia.

  9. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1962 Honorary. Szigeti, Prof. Gyorgy. Date of birth: 29 January 1905. Date of death: 26 November 1978. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. 29th Mid-year meeting. Posted on 19 January 2018. The 29th Mid-year meeting of the Academy will be held from ...

  10. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Public Lectures · Lecture Workshops · Refresher Courses · Symposia. Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1985 Honorary. Cotton, Prof. Frank Albert. Date of birth: 9 April 1930. Date of death: 20 February 2007. Last known address: Department of Chemistry, Texas A & M University, College Station, TX 77843, U.S.A..

  11. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1976 Section: Chemistry. Devaprabhakara, Dr Devadas Ph.D. (Texas). Date of birth: 13 November 1932. Date of death: 12 January 1978. Specialization: Organic Chemistry, Chemistry of Allenes. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  12. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1934 Section: Mathematical Sciences. Madhava, Krishna Bindu M.A. (Madras), A.I.A. (London), FNA. Date of birth: 13 March 1895. Date of death: 26 April 1984. Specialization: Statistics and Actuarial Science. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  13. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1974 Section: General Biology. Krishna Murti, Dr Coimbatore Ramadorai Ph.D. (Bombay), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 3 March 1923. Date of death: 30 June 1990. Specialization: Nutrition, Biochemical Toxicology and Applied Biochemistry. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  14. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1947 Section: Plant Sciences. Dorasami, L S . Ph.D. (London). Specialization: Plant Breeding. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. 29th Mid-year meeting. Posted on 19 January 2018. The 29th ...

  15. New Fellows and Honorary Fellows

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1936 Section: Mathematical Sciences. Madhavarao, Bengaluru Srinivasarao D.Sc. (Calcutta), FNA 1937-61; Vice President 1956-61; Secretary 1938-55. Date of birth: 29 May 1900. Date of death: 10 June 1987. Specialization: Theoretical Physics and Abstract Algebra. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook ...

  16. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1939 Section: Engineering & Technology. Ramaswami, Erode Krishnaswami B.Sc. Eng. (London). Date of birth: 12 February 1894. Date of death: 22 April 1979. Specialization: Mechanical Engineering ... PSGRK College for Women, Coimbatore, 22–24 June 2016. MORE ...

  17. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1953 Section: Plant Sciences. Venkateswarlu, Jillella D.Sc. (Andhra), FNA. Date of birth: 21 March 1912. Date of death: 20 May 1978. Specialization: Plant Morphology and Cytogenetics. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  18. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1958 Section: Medicine. Sen, Prafulla Kumar M.S., FNA. Date of birth: 7 December 1915. Date of death: 22 July 1982. Specialization: Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. 29th Mid-year meeting. Posted on 19 January 2018.

  19. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1943 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Rana, Khadag Narsingh Jung Bahadur. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. 29th Mid-year meeting. Posted on 19 January 2018. The 29th Mid-year meeting of the Academy will be held from 29–30 June 2018 in ...

  20. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1934 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Rama Rao, Lakshmiswara 1934-61; Vice President 1952-55; Secretary 1946-52. Date of birth: 23 March 1896. Date of death: 11 November 1974. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  1. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1975 Section: Medicine. Grewal, Dr Ripdaman Singh M.B.B.S. (Panjab), D.Phil. (Oxon). Date of birth: 3 December 1922. Date of death: 13 April 2009. Specialization: Pharmacology Last known address: 659, Sector 16-D, Chandigarh 160 015. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  2. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1934 Section: Animal Sciences. Ramanujan, S G Manavala. Date of birth: 26 August 1893. Specialization: Entomology. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. 29th Mid-year meeting. Posted on 19 January 2018. The 29th Mid-year meeting of the Academy ...

  3. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1941 Section: Medicine. Kini, Mangalore Gopala M.B.B.S., FNA. Date of birth: 5 August 1893. Date of death: 22 August 1952. Specialization: Orthopaedic Surgery, Anesthetic Technique. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  4. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1934 Section: Physics. Shastry, Therizhandur Panchapagasa Bhaskara. Date of birth: 12 April 1889. Date of death: 26 June 1950. Specialization: Astronomy. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. 29th Mid-year meeting. Posted on 19 January 2018.

  5. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1934 Section: Plant Sciences. Kapur, Shankar Nath FNA. Date of birth: 20 August 1895. Date of death: 10 January 1972. Specialization: Forestry. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. 29th Mid-year meeting. Posted on 19 January 2018. The 29th Mid-year ...

  6. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1975 Section: General Biology. Maitra, Prof. Pabitra Kumar D.Phil. (Calcutta), FNA. Date of birth: 1 November 1932. Date of death: 4 September 2007. Specialization: Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Genetics Last known address: CJ-257, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700 091. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook ...

  7. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1974 Section: Engineering & Technology. Krishna, Dr Maddaly Gopala Ph.D. (Leeds). Date of birth: 18 July 1922. Date of death: 5 June 1978. Specialization: Fuel Technology and Chemical Engineering. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  8. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1949 Section: Engineering & Technology. Nabar, Govind Malhar. Date of birth: 2 July 1904. Date of death: 20 July 1986. Specialization: Textile Chemistry. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. 29th Mid-year meeting. Posted on 19 January 2018. The 29th ...

  9. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1977 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Ganguly, Dr Anil Kumar D.Sc. (Calcutta), FNA. Date of birth: 1 November 1918. Date of death: 17 January 1988. Specialization: Environmental Sciences, Radiation Physics. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  10. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1935 Section: Mathematical Sciences. Mahalanobis, Prasanta Chandra M.A. (Cantab), Hon. D.Sc. (Calcutta), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 29 June 1893. Date of death: 28 June 1972. Specialization: Statistics. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  11. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1974 Section: Chemistry. Palit, Dr Santi Ranjan D.Sc., FNA. Date of birth: 24 March 1912. Date of death: 13 September 1981. Specialization: Polymers. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. 29th Mid-year meeting. Posted on 19 January 2018. The 29th ...

  12. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1945 Section: Plant Sciences. Kadam, Baburao Sankararao Ph.D. (Cornell), FNA. Date of birth: 25 October 1903. Date of death: 24 July 1985. Specialization: Plant Breedings, Cytogenetics. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  13. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1975 Section: Physics. Kothari, Dr Daulat Singh Ph.D. (Cantab), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 6 July 1906. Date of death: 4 February 1993. Specialization: Statistical Mechanics and Astrophysics Last known address: 101, Bhopalpura, Udaipur 313 001. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook ...

  14. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1936 Section: Engineering & Technology. Rao, Keshaviah Aswath Narain. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. 29th Mid-year meeting. Posted on 19 January 2018. The 29th Mid-year meeting of the Academy will be held from 29–30 June 2018 in Infosys, ...

  15. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1934 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Mathur, Krishna Kumar FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 30 July 1893. Date of death: 18 July 1936. Specialization: Mining. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. 29th Mid-year meeting. Posted on 19 January 2018.

  16. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1975 Section: Engineering & Technology. Ramakrishna, Dr Basava Sri Ph.D. (Illinois Inst. Tech.) Date of birth: 17 October 1921. Date of death: 12 February 2011. Specialization: Acoustics Last known address: 68, Second Cross, Ganganagar, Bengaluru 560 032. YouTube; Twitter ...

  17. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1940 Section: Medicine. Menon, T Bhaskara. Specialization: Pathology. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. 29th Mid-year meeting. Posted on 19 January 2018. The 29th Mid-year meeting of the Academy will be held from 29–30 June 2018 in Infosys, ...

  18. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1940 Section: Mathematical Sciences. Ram Behari, Ph.D. (Dublin), FNA. Date of birth: 25 April 1897. Date of death: 14 December 1981. Specialization: Differential Geometry and Theory of Relativity. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  19. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1952 Section: Medicine. Rao, S Raghavender 1940-56. Date of death: 1954. Specialization: Epidemiology. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. 29th Mid-year meeting. Posted on 19 January 2018. The 29th Mid-year meeting of the Academy will be held ...

  20. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1981 Section: General Biology. Sushil Kumar, Prof. Ph.D. (IARI), FNA, FNASc, FNAAS. Date of birth: 14 December 1940. Specialization: Plant-Microbe Interactions, Genetics, Food Crops and Medicinal & Aromatic Plants Address: 4/11, Sarv Priya Vihar, New Delhi 110 016, U.T.

  1. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1934 Section: Engineering & Technology. Taylor, Edward McKenzie 1940-43. Date of birth: 1889. Specialization: Agriculture. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. 29th Mid-year meeting. Posted on 19 January 2018. The 29th Mid-year meeting of the ...

  2. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1934 Section: Chemistry. Singh, Bawa Kartar FNA 1940-43; Vice President 1934-40. Date of birth: 17 April 1886. Date of death: 15 June 1960. Specialization: Stereochemistry. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  3. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1972 Section: Engineering & Technology. Kumaraswamy, Ponnambalam B.E. (Hons). Date of birth: 4 October 1930. Date of death: 9 March 1988. Specialization: Hydraulics, Hydrology and Computer Simulation. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  4. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1974 Section: Engineering & Technology. Rao, Dr Dhanvada Madhava Ph.D. (London). Date of birth: 4 July 1932. Date of death: 29 December 2010. Specialization: Aerodynamics and Fluid Mechanics Last known address: No. 406, Tides Run, Yorktown, Virginia 23692, USA.

  5. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1974 Section: Engineering & Technology. Pandalai, Prof. Krishnan Aditya Vaman D.Ae.E. (New York). Date of birth: 16 February 1928. Date of death: 20 May 1999. Specialization: Aircraft Structural Mechanics and Composites Last known address: 77/2, Velachery Road, Madras ...

  6. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1975 Section: Plant Sciences. Rama Das, Prof. Vallabhaneni Sita D.Phil. (Oxon), FNA, FNAAS. Date of birth: 5 February 1933. Specialization: C4Plants, Light Regime in C4Plants and Photosynthesis Last known address: 9, Vijetha Apartments, Nalanda College Road, Gayatri Nagar, Vijayawada 520 ...

  7. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1990 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Mookherjee, Prof. Asoke Ph.D. (IIT, Kharagpur), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 23 May 1931. Specialization: Ore Geology, Geochemistry and Mineral Economics Last known address: Flat E-2, 178, Regent Estate, Kolkata 700 092. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook ...

  8. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 2001 Section: Chemistry. Singh, Prof. Anil Kumar Ph.D. (IIT, Kanpur), FNASc. Date of birth: 2 April 1952. Specialization: Bio-organic Chemistry, Photochemistry and Photobiology Address: A-1603, Lake Primerose, Lake Homes, Powai, Mumbai 400 076, Maharashtra Contact:

  9. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1988 Section: Animal Sciences. Sheth, Prof. Anil Ramanbhai Ph.D. (Bombay), FNA. Date of birth: 5 August 1933. Date of death: 13 March 1994. Specialization: Reproductive Endocrinology, Biochemistry and Fertility Control Last known address: Fulchand Nivas, First Floor, Chowpatty, Bombay 400 ...

  10. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1956 Section: Animal Sciences. Subrahmanyan, Dr Ramakrishnan Ph.D. (Liverpool). Date of birth: 31 January 1919. Date of death: 5 March 2006. Specialization: Marine Biology and Algology Last known address: 2, Second main Road, Indian Bank Colony, Ambattur, Chennai 600 ...

  11. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1974 Section: General Biology. Ramachandran, Dr Lakshminarayanapuram Krishnaiyer Ph.D. (Madras), FNA. Date of birth: 28 March 1928. Date of death: 11 August 1988. Specialization: Proteins, Antibiotics and Endocrines. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  12. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1936 Honorary. Spemann, Prof. Hans Nobel Laureate (Medicine) - 1935. Date of birth: 27 June 1869. Date of death: 12 September 1941. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. 29th Mid-year meeting. Posted on 19 January 2018. The 29th Mid-year meeting ...

  13. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1956 Honorary. Urey, Prof. Harold Clayton Nobel Laureate (Chemistry) - 1934. Date of birth: 29 April 1893. Date of death: 5 January 1981. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. 29th Mid-year meeting. Posted on 19 January 2018. The 29th Mid-year meeting ...

  14. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1955 Honorary. Wyckoff, Prof. Ralph Walter Graystone. Date of birth: 9 August 1897. Date of death: 3 November 1994. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. 29th Mid-year meeting. Posted on 19 January 2018. The 29th Mid-year meeting of the Academy will ...

  15. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1961 Honorary. Karman, Prof. Theodore von. Date of birth: 11 May 1881. Date of death: 6 May 1963. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. 29th Mid-year meeting. Posted on 19 January 2018. The 29th Mid-year meeting of the Academy will be held from ...

  16. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 2017 Section: Chemistry. Sunoj, Prof. Raghavan B Ph.D. (IISc), FRSC. Date of birth: 3 April 1974. Specialization: Computational Chemistry, Theoretical Chemistry Address: Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Powai, Mumbai 400 076, Maharashtra Contact:

  17. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 2003 Section: Medicine. Sinha, Prof. Subrata M.D. (AIIMS), Ph.D. (MRC, UK), FNA, FNASc, FAMS. Date of birth: 4 January 1958. Specialization: Molecular Oncology and Immunology, Neurobiology of Dyslexia Address: Department of Biochemistry, All India Institute of Medical ...

  18. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 2011 Section: Physics. Das, Prof. Amita Ph.D. (IIT, Kanpur). Date of birth: 3 August 1965. Specialization: Strongly Coupled & Dusty Plasma Systems, Laser Plasma Interactions, Plasma Physics, Turbulence, Electron Magnetohydrodynamics Address: Institute for Plasma Research, ...

  19. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1934 Section: Plant Sciences. Singh, Bhola Nath D.Sc. (London), FNA. Date of birth: 22 September 1898. Date of death: 7 June 1984. Specialization: Plant Physiology, Agronomy. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  20. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Discussion Meetings · Public Lectures · Lecture Workshops · Refresher Courses · Symposia. Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1934 Section: Plant Sciences. Parija, Prankrishna M.A. (Cantab), D.Sc. (Hon.), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 1 April 1891. Date of death: 2 June 1978. Specialization: Plant Physiology and ...

  1. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1954 Honorary. Laue, Prof. Max Theodor Felix von. Nobel Laureate (Physics) - 1914. Date of birth: 9 October 1897. Date of death: 24 April 1960. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. 29th Mid-year meeting. Posted on 19 January 2018. The 29th Mid-year ...

  2. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 2006 Honorary. Klein, Michael L FRS. Date of birth: 1940. Address: Director, ICMS, Temple University, CST, SERC Building, 704E, 1925 North 12th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19122, U.S.A.. Contact: Office: (+1-215) 898 8571. Fax: (+1-215) 898 8296. Email: mlklein@temple.edu.

  3. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1934 Section: Plant Sciences. Iyengar, Mandayam Osuri Parthasarathy Ph.D., FNA 1934-35, 1938-40. Date of birth: 15 December 1886. Date of death: 10 December 1963. Specialization: Algology. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  4. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1934 Section: Engineering & Technology. Palacios, Gonzalo. Date of birth: 20 November 1894. Date of death: 3 April 1967. Specialization: Architecture. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. 29th Mid-year meeting. Posted on 19 January 2018. The 29th ...

  5. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1941 Section: General Biology. Samuel, Gnanabishagam. Date of birth: 26 May 1898. Date of death: 1975. Specialization: Tuberculosis. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. 29th Mid-year meeting. Posted on 19 January 2018. The 29th Mid-year meeting of ...

  6. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1960 Section: Plant Sciences. Thind, Dr Kartar Singh Ph.D. (Wisconsin), FNA. Date of birth: 30 October 1917. Date of death: 3 December 1991. Specialization: Mycology and Plant Pathology Last known address: 2086, Sector 15C, Chandigarh 160 015. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook ...

  7. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1981 Section: Medicine. Krishna Murty, Prof. Kuppachi M.D. (Andhra). Date of birth: 13 November 1926. Date of death: 10 May 2001. Specialization: Internal Medicine, Cardiology and Haematology Last known address: Consultant in Medicine, Sri Satya Sai General Hospital, Prasanthi Nilayam 515 ...

  8. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1956 Section: Medicine. Patel, Dr Jamnadas Chaturbhai M.D., Ph.D. (London), M.R.C.P.. Date of birth: 2 August 1908. Date of death: 11 May 2003. Specialization: Diabetes, Internal Medicine and Tetanus Last known address: 'Backbay View', 3, New Queens Road, Mumbai 400 ...

  9. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1975 Section: Medicine. Ganatra, Dr Ramanik Dhirajlal M.B.B.S. (Bombay). Date of birth: 14 October 1928. Date of death: 2 April 1999. Specialization: Nuclear Medicine Last known address: 604, Kamala Apartments, 8A, Dhobi Galli, Versova Road, Andheri, Bombay 400 058.

  10. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1971 Section: Animal Sciences. Rao, Dr Kandula Pampapathi. Date of birth: 9 March 1930. Date of death: 23 June 1973. Specialization: Arthropods. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. 29th Mid-year meeting. Posted on 19 January 2018. The 29th ...

  11. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1974 Section: Medicine. Varadarajan, Dr Manakkal Ganesa M.D. (Madras), FAMS, FAIM. Date of birth: 9 November 1917. Date of death: 5 October 2004. Specialization: Radiology Last known address: 42, Bheemanna Mudali Garden Street, Chennai 600 018. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  12. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1934 Section: Physics. Raman, Chandrasekhara Venkata FNA 1934-70; President 1934-70. Date of birth: 7 November 1888. Date of death: 21 November 1970. Specialization: Wave Optics, Light & X-ray Scattering, Crystallography, Vibration & Musical Instruments. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  13. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1955 Section: Chemistry. Rao, Shimoga Nadiga Gundu B.Sc. (Bangalore), FNA. Date of birth: 26 November 1909. Date of death: 7 September 1985. Specialization: Sugar Technology and Industrial Chemistry. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  14. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1943 Section: Chemistry. Kane, Dr Govind Pandurang Ph.D. (London) 1962-64. Date of birth: 2 March 1911. Date of death: 25 June 1991. Specialization: Chemical Technology and Engineering Last known address: Flat 2B, Shree Pant Bhuwan, Mama Warekar Bridge, Bombay 400 ...

  15. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1939 Section: Plant Sciences. Raghavan, Tupil Srinivasa Ph.D. (London) 1946-49. Date of birth: 29 September 1905. Date of death: 30 January 1986. Specialization: Cytomorphology, Cytogenetics and Cytotaxonomy. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  16. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1984 Section: Medicine. Venkoba Rao, Dr Antapur M.D., Ph.D. and D.Sc. (Madras), FAMS, FRC Psych., FNA. Date of birth: 20 August 1927. Date of death: 25 October 2005. Specialization: Psychological Medicine Last known address: 'Tilak', 506, Fourth Main Road, K K Nagar, Madurai 625 020.

  17. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1952 Section: Engineering & Technology. Govinda Rao, Dr Naladurga Srinivasarao B.E., FNA. Date of birth: 6 February 1907. Date of death: 22 December 1995. Specialization: Hydraulics, Hydropower Development and Irrigation Engineering Last known address: Apartment No.

  18. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1952 Section: Physics. Nilakantan, P D.Sc. 1962-64. Date of birth: 19 April 1910. Date of death: 18 April 1964. Specialization: Crystal Magnetism. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. 29th Mid-year meeting. Posted on 19 January 2018. The 29th Mid-year ...

  19. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1934 Section: Physics. Rao, Subbarao Ramachandra FNA. Date of birth: 15 May 1899. Date of death: 28 February 1983. Specialization: Magnetism. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. 29th Mid-year meeting. Posted on 19 January 2018. The 29th ...

  20. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1934 Section: Physics. Krishnan, Kariamanikkam Srinivasa D.Sc., FNA, FNASc 1936-61; Vice President 1940-43, 1946-49. Date of birth: 4 December 1898. Date of death: 14 June 1961. Specialization: Raman Effect, Crystal Magnetism, Magnetochemistry, Magnetic Anisotropy.

  1. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1961 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Rao, Mr Kokarachedu Nagabhushana M.Sc. (Mysore). Date of birth: 13 September 1913. Date of death: 1 January 1991. Specialization: Mathematical Physics, Meteorology, Hydrology and Geomagnetism Last known address: 23/1, First Floor, 7th Main Road ...

  2. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1934 Section: Plant Sciences. Sahni, Birbal FNA 1934-49; Vice President 1934-49. Date of birth: 14 November 1891. Date of death: 10 April 1949. Specialization: Palaeobotany. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  3. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1935 Section: Chemistry. Doss, Kadarundalige Sitarama Gururaja D.Sc. (Madras), FNA 1971-73. Date of birth: 10 August 1906. Date of death: 18 October 1989. Specialization: Electrochemistry, Sugar Technology. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  4. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1935 Section: Chemistry. Rao, Argula Nagaraja. Date of birth: 15 November 1906. Specialization: Sugar Technology. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. 29th Mid-year meeting. Posted on 19 January 2018. The 29th Mid-year meeting of the Academy will ...

  5. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Refresher Courses · Symposia · Live Streaming. Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1948 Section: Animal Sciences. Seshaiya, Rebala Venkata M.A., FNA. Date of birth: 8 February 1898. Date of death: 28 February 1973. Specialization: Cytology, Classical Embryology, Chemical Embryology, Anatomy, Physiology, ...

  6. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1937 Honorary. Wood, Prof. Robert Williams. Date of birth: 2 May 1868. Date of death: 11 August 1955. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. 29th Mid-year meeting. Posted on 19 January 2018. The 29th Mid-year meeting of the Academy will be held from ...

  7. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1940 Section: Plant Sciences. Uppal, Badri Nath Ph.D. (Iowa), FNA. Date of birth: 28 June 1900. Date of death: 22 November 1989. Specialization: Plant Pathology, Microbiology and Agriculture. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  8. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1974 Section: Plant Sciences. Venkataraman, Dr Gopalasamudram Sitaram D.Sc. (Banaras), FNA. Date of birth: 1 February 1930. Date of death: 3 October 1998. Specialization: Algology and Microbiology Last known address: 19A, 29th Street, Nanganallur, Madras 600 061.

  9. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1974 Section: Engineering & Technology. Srinath, Prof. Laxmipuram Srinivasachar Ph.D. (Illinois), FNAE. Date of birth: 15 March 1927. Date of death: 13 September 2012. Specialization: Experimental Mechanics, Engineering Design and Reliability Engineering Last known address: H-401, ETA Star, ...

  10. Perceptions of 24/7 In-house Attending Coverage on Fellow Education and Autonomy in a Pediatric Cardiothoracic Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Sonal T; Owens, Gabe E; Rajput, Shaili H; Charpie, John R; Kidwell, Kelley M; Mullan, Patricia B

    2015-01-01

    The 24/7 in-house attending coverage is emerging as the standard of care in intensive care units. Implementation costs, workforce feasibility, and patient outcomes resulting from changes in physician staffing are widely debated topics. Understanding the impact of staffing models on the learning environment for medical trainees and faculty is equally warranted, particularly with respect to trainee education and autonomy. This study aims to elicit the perceptions of pediatric cardiology fellows and attendings toward 24/7 in-house attending coverage and its effect on fellow education and autonomy. We surveyed pediatric cardiology fellows and attendings practicing in the pediatric cardiothoracic intensive care unit (PCTU) of a large, university-affiliated medical center, using structured Likert response items and open-ended questions, prior to and following the transition to 24/7 in-house attending coverage. All (100%) trainees and faculty completed all surveys. Both prior to and following transition to 24/7 in-house attending coverage, all fellows, and the majority of attendings agreed that the overnight call experience benefited fellow education. At baseline, trainees identified limited circumstances in which on-site attending coverage would be critical. Preimplementation concerns that 24/7 in-house attending coverage would negatively affect the education of fellows were not reflected following actual implementation of the new staffing policy. However, based upon open-ended questions, fellow autonomy was affected by the new paradigm, with fellows and attendings reporting decreased "appropriateness" of autonomy after implementation. Our prospective study, showing initial concerns about limiting the learning environment in transitioning to 24/7 in-house attending coverage did not result in diminished perceptions of the educational experience for our fellows but revealed an expected decrease in fellow autonomy. The study indirectly facilitated open discussions about

  11. Researcher or Fellow Citizen?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Alex Young; Caviglia, Francesco

    2018-01-01

    The idea of a team of researchers working at advancing knowledge represents a strong role model for STEM education. The article suggests that an alternative role model – a community of fellow citizens engaged in solving problems of how to better live together – can be an equally compelling model...... for the Humanities. Mode 1 knowledge building rooted in learning within the disciplines is compared with a mode 2 focusing on context-specific knowledge, transdisciplinarity and collaborative rationality as essential ingredients of a new role model for the humanities: The fellow citizen. Two cases – a collaborative...

  12. Providing Our Fellows in Training with Education on Inflammatory Bowel Disease Health Maintenance to Improve the Quality of Care in Our Health Care System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ann Joo; Kraemer, Dale F; Smotherman, Carmen; Eid, Emely

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) quality measures were established in an effort to standardize IBD health care. Despite effort to improve clinical performance, considerable variations in practice still exist. To further improve IBD health care, we propose incorporating an in-service educational session on IBD health maintenance to provide trainees with increasing awareness and knowledge on IBD management. Fifty electronic medical charts were randomly selected, and the level of quality documentation was assessed for 15 core IBD quality measures. Data were reported as the percentage of charts meeting audit criteria (compliance score). Fellows then attended an in-service educational session to review IBD quality measures and reinforce practice expectations. A second audit was then performed on an additional 50 patient charts to determine whether documentation practices improved after the educational session. We found a positive correlation between an in-service educational session and fellows' compliance with IBD health maintenance. Overall, the fellows' compliance score increased by 18% (before intervention, 65%; after intervention, 83%; P bases for IBD health maintenance. Incorporating a standard curriculum on IBD health maintenance provides fellows in training with increased awareness and guidance on managing the unique preventive care needs of patients with IBD.

  13. The Surgery Fellow's Education Workshop: A Pilot Study to Determine the Feasibility of Training Senior Learners to Teach in the Operating Room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambani, Sapan N; Lypson, Monica L; Englesbe, Michael J; Santen, Sally; Kasten, Steven; Mullan, Patricia; Lee, Cheryl T

    2016-01-01

    In 2013, we developed an education workshop to enhance the teaching skills of surgical fellows. We sought to investigate the feasibility of the monthly educational workshop format and its effect on participant teaching skills. Surgical and medical education faculty created a broadly applicable curriculum developed from evidence-based teaching principles, delivered across 8 monthly 90-minute weekday sessions. Workshop feasibility and effect were assessed using evaluations, attendance records, and a variety of self-reported surveys. Each session was associated with a specified education action plan to be completed between sessions. A total of 13 fellows intended to participate. More than 60% attendance was achieved in 7 of 8 sessions. In all, 11 of 13 fellows were engaged (actual attendance or excused absence) across 75% or more of the sessions. Mean participant satisfaction scores ranged from 4.0 to 4.9 on a 5 point Likert scale across 87.5% of sessions. Postworkshop surveys showed increased understanding of the following: (1) knowledge gaps related to education; (2) the role of education for academic surgeons; (3) educational tools to improve teaching performance; and (4) perceived knowledge and attitudes about teaching in the operating room. An action plan was performed in 43% of cases; the most common reason for nonparticipation was lack of time (38%). Our pilot supports the feasibility of an educational workshop series to enhance fellow's educational skills in the area of intraoperative teaching. Participant engagement and satisfaction were high in this self-selected group of initial trainees. Sessions were effective, resulting in a thoughtful self-assessment of teaching skills. Copyright © 2016 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. All rights reserved.

  14. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Pramana – Journal of Physics · Proceedings – Mathematical Sciences · Resonance – Journal of Science Education · Sadhana · Current Science ... Specialization: Embryology, Plant Anatomy,Economic Botany ... Summer Research Fellowship Programme 2018 ... Advanced Instructional School In Stochastic Processes.

  15. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Pramana – Journal of Physics · Proceedings – Mathematical Sciences · Resonance – Journal of Science Education · Sadhana · Current Science ... Specialization: Pteridology, Anatomy, Palynology and Evolution ... Summer Research Fellowship Programme 2018 ... Advanced Instructional School In Stochastic Processes.

  16. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Mathematical Sciences · Resonance – Journal of Science Education · Sadhana · Current Science ... Specialization: Mammalian Reproduction & Embryology, Anatomy, Physiology and Biology of Bats Last known ... Summer Research Fellowship Programme 2018 ... Advanced Instructional School In Stochastic Processes.

  17. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... of Physics · Proceedings – Mathematical Sciences · Resonance – Journal of Science Education · Sadhana · Current Science ... Specialization: Plant Morphology, General Biology, Taxonomy and Floral Anatomy ... Summer Research Fellowship Programme 2018 ... Advanced Instructional School In Stochastic Processes.

  18. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Pramana – Journal of Physics · Proceedings – Mathematical Sciences · Resonance – Journal of Science Education · Sadhana · Current Science ... Specialization: Palaeobotany, Pteridophytes and Plant Anatomy ... Summer Research Fellowship Programme 2018 ... Advanced Instructional School In Stochastic Processes.

  19. Nutrition education for pediatric gastroenterology, hepatology, and nutrition fellows: Survey of NASPGHAN fellowship training programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    The aim of the study was to assess the methodology and content of nutrition education during gastroenterology fellowship training and the variability among the different programs. A survey questionnaire was completed by 43 fellowship training directors of 62 active programs affiliated to the North A...

  20. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Theory Of Evolution. Posted on 23 January 2018. Joint Statement by the Three Science Academies of India on the teaching of the theory of evolution more. ... ASTROPHYSICS: An Observational View of the Universe. Math Art and Design: MAD about Math, Math Education and Outreach. Math and Finance ...

  1. Research Fellows | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research Fellows Research Fellows Our research fellows advise on the strategic direction of science and technology research at NREL and ensure our work meets the highest standards for quality and objectivity. Find all research staff by visiting our various research program areas. Photo of Mowafak Al

  2. Radiation safety among cardiology fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Candice; Vasaiwala, Samip; Haque, Faizul; Pratap, Kiran; Vidovich, Mladen I

    2010-07-01

    Cardiology fellows can be exposed to high radiation levels during procedures. Proper radiation training and implementation of safety procedures is of critical importance in lowering physician health risks associated with radiation exposure. Participants were cardiology fellows in the United States (n = 2,545) who were contacted by e-mail to complete an anonymous survey regarding the knowledge and practice of radiation protection during catheterization laboratory procedures. An on-line survey engine, SurveyMonkey, was used to distribute and collect the results of the 10-question survey. The response rate was 10.5%. Of the 267 respondents, 82% had undergone formal radiation safety training. Only 58% of the fellows were aware of their hospital's pregnancy radiation policy and 60% knew how to contact the hospital's radiation safety officer. Although 52% of the fellows always wore a dosimeter, 81% did not know their level of radiation exposure in the previous year and only 74% of fellows knew the safe levels of radiation exposure. The fellows who had received formal training were more likely to be aware of their pregnancy policy, to know the contact information of their radiation safety officer, to be aware of the safe levels of radiation exposure, to use dosimeters and RadPad consistently, and to know their own level of radiation exposure in the previous year. In conclusion, cardiology fellows have not been adequately educated about radiation safety. A concerted effort directed at physician safety in the workplace from the regulatory committees overseeing cardiology fellowships should be encouraged. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Developing “the Wings to Really Fly”: The Experiences of Four Postdoctoral Research Fellows within an Australian University Faculty of Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuija A. Turunen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Postdoctoral research fellowships are a recent phenomenon in teacher education and little has been documented about them. This paper presents findings from a study in which the experiences of research fellows in a rural university were investigated. The data were gathered as audio recordings from peer mentoring meetings, notes from these meetings, individual reflective journals, and interviews conducted with six key informants. The analysis highlights that the experience of research fellowships was marked by a need to negotiate four competing, though not necessarily exclusive, demands related to the institute’s research productivity, its research culture and teaching, and personal professional goals. A range of institutional practices and individual characteristics mediated these negotiations.

  4. 2011 Einstein Fellows Chosen

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    ASA has announced the selection of the 2011 Einstein Fellows who will conduct research related to NASA's Physics of the Cosmos program, which aims to expand our knowledge of the origin, evolution, and fate of the Universe. The Einstein Fellowship provides support to the awardees for three years, and the Fellows may pursue their research at a host university or research center of their choosing in the United States. The new Fellows will begin their programs in the fall of 2011. The new Einstein Fellows and their host institutions are listed below: * Akos Bogdan (Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Cambridge, Mass.) * Samuel Gralla (University of Maryland, College Park, Md.) * Philip Hopkins (University of California at Berkeley) * Matthew Kunz (Princeton University, Princeton, N.J.) * Laura Lopez (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Mass.) * Amy Reines (National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, Virg.) * Rubens Reis (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor) * Ken Shen (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, Calif.) * Jennifer Siegal-Gaskins (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena) * Lorenzo Sironi (Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.) NASA has two other astrophysics theme-based fellowship programs: the Sagan Fellowship Program, which supports research into exoplanet exploration, and the Hubble Fellowship Program, which supports research into cosmic origins. More information on the Einstein Fellowships can be found at: http://cxc.harvard.edu/fellows/

  5. Competency Testing for Pediatric Cardiology Fellows Learning Transthoracic Echocardiography: Implementation, Fellow Experience, and Lessons Learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Jami C; Geva, Tal; Brown, David W

    2015-12-01

    There is currently great interest in measuring trainee competency at all levels of medical education. In 2007, we implemented a system for assessing cardiology fellows' progress in attaining imaging skills. This paradigm could be adapted for use by other cardiology programs. Evaluation consisted of a two-part exercise performed after years 1 and 2 of pediatric cardiology training. Part 1: a directly observed evaluation of technical skills as fellows imaged a normal subject (year 1) and a patient with complex heart disease (year 2). Part 2: fellows interpreted and wrote reports for two echocardiograms illustrating congenital heart disease. These were graded for accuracy and facility with communicating pertinent data. After 5 years of testing, fellows were surveyed about their experience. In 5 years, 40 fellows were tested at least once. Testing identified four fellows who underperformed on the technical portion and four on the interpretive portion. Surveys were completed by 33 fellows (83 %). Most (67 %) felt that intermittent observation by faculty was inadequate for assessing skills and that procedural volume was a poor surrogate for competency (58 %). Posttest feedback was constructive and valuable for 90, and 70 % felt the process helped them set goals for skill improvement. Overall, fellows felt this testing was fair and should continue. Fellow performance and responses identified programmatic issues that were creating barriers to learning. We describe a practical test to assess competency for cardiology fellows learning echocardiography. This paradigm is feasible, has excellent acceptance among trainees, and identifies trainees who need support. Materials developed could be easily adapted to help track upcoming ACGME-mandated metrics.

  6. IAEA fellows report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1962-04-15

    More than 500 scientists and technicians had completed their studies abroad under IAEA's fellowship programme at the end of 1961. At the same time, some 300 fellows were studying at universities, research institutions and atomic energy establishments in Member States. It is the policy of the Agency to keep in touch with fellows also after their training has been completed and they have returned home to put into practice what they have learnt during their time of study. The short reports which most of the former fellowship holders send to the Agency's secretariat give a good indication of the usefulness of the training and the extent to which the newly acquired knowledge is being constructively absorbed in the fellow's native country

  7. Leopold Fellows meet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Dennis L.

    Communicating the results of environmental science research to nonscientists was the focus of a week-long meeting of fellows of the Aldo Leopold Leadership Program (ALLP) in June. Participating were 20 mid-career university facultymembers, the first group of ALLP fellows to be selected.Discussions were held on the role of scientists in society, techniques for effective leadership, improving communications skills, and working productively with news media. The training program considers both print and broadcast media as well as other outreach vehicles. The meeting was held at Kah Nee Ta Resort on the Warm Springs Indian Reservation, Warm Springs, Oregon, June 15-21, 1999.

  8. Essential learning tools for continuing medical education for physicians, geneticists, nurses, allied health professionals, mental health professionals, business administration professionals, and reproductive endocrinology and infertility (REI) fellows: the Midwest Reproductive Symposium International.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Gretchen G; Jeelani, Roohi; Beltsos, Angeline; Kearns, William G

    2018-04-01

    Essential learning tools for continuing medical education are a challenge in today's rapidly evolving field of reproductive medicine. The Midwest Reproductive Symposium International (MRSi) is a yearly conference held in Chicago, IL. The conference is targeted toward physicians, geneticists, nurses, allied health professionals, mental health professionals, business administration professionals, and reproductive endocrinology and infertility (REI) fellows engaged in the practice of reproductive medicine. In addition to the scientific conference agenda, there are specific sessions for nurses, mental health professionals, and REI fellows. Unique to the MRSi conference, there is also a separate "Business Minds" session to provide education on business acumen as it is an important element to running a department, division, or private clinic.

  9. State of education regarding ultrasound-guided interventions during pain fellowships in Korea: a survey of recent fellows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung Tae; Kim, Sae Young; Byun, Gyung Jo; Shin, Byung Chul; Lee, Jin Young; Choi, Eun Joo; Choi, Jong Bum; Hong, Ji Hee; Choi, Seung Won

    2017-01-01

    Background Recently, the use of ultrasound (US) techniques in regional anesthesia and pain medicine has increased significantly. However, the current extent of training in the use of US-guided pain management procedures in Korea remains unknown. The purpose of the present study was to assess the current state of US training provided during Korean Pain Society (KPS) pain fellowship programs through the comparative analysis between training hospitals. Methods We conducted an anonymous survey of 51 pain physicians who had completed KPS fellowships in 2017. Items pertained to current US practices and education, as well as the types of techniques and amount of experience with US-guided pain management procedures. Responses were compared based on the tier of the training hospital. Results Among the 51 respondents, 14 received training at first- and second-tier hospitals (Group A), while 37 received training at third-tier hospitals (Group B). The mean total duration of pain training during the 1-year fellowship was 7.4 months in Group A and 8.4 months in Group B. Our analysis revealed that 36% and 40% of respondents in Groups A and B received dedicated US training, respectively. Most respondents underwent US training in patient-care settings under the supervision of attending physicians. Cervical root, stellate ganglion, piriformis, and lumbar plexus blocks were more commonly performed by Group B than by Group A (P < 0.05). Conclusions Instruction regarding US-guided pain management interventions varied among fellowship training hospitals, highlighting the need for the development of educational standards that mandate a minimum number of US-guided nerve blocks or injections during fellowships in interventional pain management. PMID:29123624

  10. Clinical nutrition knowledge of gastroenterology fellows: is there anything omitted?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslamian, Ghazaleh; Jacobson, Kevan; Hekmatdoost, Azita

    2013-01-01

    Despite the increased emphasis on chronic non-communicable diseases, there are notable deficits about nutrition education in many medicine training programs particularly gastroenterology fellowship programs. In the present cross-sectional study, we examined the nutritional knowledge related to clinical nutrition among Iranian gastroenterology fellows. Thirty-six gastroenterology fellows currently enrolled in a gastroenterology fellowship program completed a questionnaire, including two sections. The first of which assessed the gastroenterology fellows experience about nutrition training, nutrition management of patients with gastrointestinal (GI) disorders and evaluating perceived nutrition education needs. The second section consisted of multiple choice questions that assessed nutritional knowledge. A total of 32 gastroenterology fellows completed the first section. The majority of gastroenterology fellows failed to partake in any nutrition education during their fellowship training particularly for inpatients despite the availability to participate in the nutrition training especially for the purpose of nutrition support. Mean correct response rates for the second section was 38%. The highest mean score was seen in nutrition assessment (48.1%), followed by scores of 40.5% in nutrition support, 37.0% nutrition in GI disease, and 25.0% in micro and macronutrients. Iranian gastroenterology fellows have serious deficits in their nutrition knowledge. This study paves the way for the development of an education program to improve nutritional knowledge of gastroenterology fellows.

  11. Fellows, Associates & Students Programmes

    CERN Document Server

    2005-01-01

    The present document reviews the CERN Fellows, Associates and Students Programmes emphasizing the developments since 2000, when the previous review was presented to the Scientific Policy Committee, Finance Committee and Council (CERN/2325), and makes proposals for the coming five years. In summary, it is proposed to â?¢ Simplify the payment scheme for the Paid Scientific Associates Programme, which will no longer depend on candidateâ??s home support and age; â?¢ Broaden the scope of the Fellowship Programme, in order to facilitate the recruitment of young graduates in computing and engineering. Age-related eligibility conditions and payment levels will be replaced with experience-based criteria; â?¢ Modify subsistence rates for the Doctoral and Technical Student Programme in order to harmonize CERNâ??s payment levels with those offered by other research establishments. This document is presented for discussion and recommendation by the Scientific Policy Committee and approval by the Council. Additiona...

  12. Oncology Fellows' Career Plans, Expectations, and Well-Being: Do Fellows Know What They Are Getting Into?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanafelt, Tait D.; Raymond, Marilyn; Horn, Leora; Moynihan, Tim; Collichio, Frances; Chew, Helen; Kosty, Michael P.; Satele, Daniel; Sloan, Jeff; Gradishar, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the career plans, professional expectations, and well-being of oncology fellows compared with actual experiences of practicing oncologists. Methods US oncology fellows taking the 2013 Medical Oncology In-Training Examination (MedOnc ITE) were invited to participate in an optional postexamination survey. The survey evaluated fellows' career plans and professional expectations and measured burnout, quality of life (QOL), fatigue, and satisfaction with work-life balance (WLB) using standardized instruments. Fellows' professional expectations and well-being were compared with actual experiences of US oncologists assessed simultaneously. Results Of the 1,637 oncology fellows in the United States, 1,373 (83.9%) took the 2013 MedOnc ITE. Among these, 1,345 (97.9%) completed the postexamination survey. The frequency of burnout among fellows decreased from 43.3% in year 1 to 31.7% in year 2 and 28.1% in year 3 (P ITE scores. Fellows with greater educational debt were more likely to pursue private practice and less likely to plan an academic career. Conclusion Oncology fellows entering practice trade one set of challenges for another. Unrealized expectations regarding work hours may contribute to future professional dissatisfaction, burnout, and challenges with WLB. PMID:25049326

  13. Geritalk: communication skills training for geriatric and palliative medicine fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Amy S; Back, Anthony L; Arnold, Robert M; Goldberg, Gabrielle R; Lim, Betty B; Litrivis, Evgenia; Smith, Cardinale B; O'Neill, Lynn B

    2012-02-01

    Expert communication is essential to high-quality care for older patients with serious illness. Although the importance of communication skills is widely recognized, formal curricula for teaching communication skills to geriatric and palliative medicine fellows is often inadequate or unavailable. The current study drew upon the educational principles and format of an evidence-based, interactive teaching method to develop an intensive communication skills training course designed specifically to address the common communication challenges that geriatric and palliative medicine fellows face. The 2-day retreat, held away from the hospital environment, included large-group overview presentations, small-group communication skills practice, and development of future skills practice commitment. Faculty received in-depth training in small-group facilitation techniques before the course. Geriatric and palliative medicine fellows were recruited to participate in the course and 100% (n = 18) enrolled. Overall satisfaction with the course was very high (mean 4.8 on a 5-point scale). After the course, fellows reported an increase in self-assessed preparedness for specific communication challenges (mean increase 1.4 on 5-point scale, P communication skills program, customized for the specific needs of geriatric and palliative medicine fellows, improved fellows' self-assessed preparedness for challenging communication tasks and provided a model for ongoing deliberate practice of communication skills. © 2012, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2011, The American Geriatrics Society.

  14. Geritalk: Communication Skills Training for Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine Fellows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Amy S.; Back, Anthony L.; Arnold, Robert M.; Goldberg, Gabrielle R.; Lim, Betty B.; Litrivis, Evgenia; Smith, Cardinale B.; O’Neill, Lynn B.

    2011-01-01

    Expert communication is essential to high quality care for older patients with serious illness. While the importance of communication skills is widely recognized, formal curricula for teaching communication skills to geriatrics and palliative medicine fellows is often inadequate or unavailable. We drew upon the educational principles and format of an evidence-based, interactive teaching method, to develop an intensive communication skills training course designed specifically to address the common communication challenges faced by geriatrics and palliative medicine fellows. The 2-day retreat, held away from the hospital environment, included large-group overview presentations, small-group communication skills practice, and development of future skills practice commitment. Faculty received in-depth training in small-group facilitation techniques prior to the course. Geriatrics and palliative medicine fellows were recruited to participate in the course and 100% (n=18) enrolled. Overall satisfaction with the course was very high (mean 4.8 on 5-point scale). Compared to before the course, fellows reported an increase in self-assessed preparedness for specific communication challenges (mean increase 1.4 on 5-point scale, pcommunication skills program, tailored to the specific needs of geriatrics and palliative medicine fellows, improved fellows’ self-assessed preparedness for challenging communication tasks and provided a model for ongoing deliberate practice of communication skills. PMID:22211768

  15. Perceptions of the Inpatient Training Experience: A Nationwide Survey of Gastroenterology Program Directors and Fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Navin L; Perencevich, Molly L; Trier, Jerry S

    2017-10-01

    Inpatient training is a key component of gastroenterology (GI) fellowship programs nationwide, yet little is known about perceptions of the inpatient training experience. To compare the content, objectives and quality of the inpatient training experience as perceived by program directors (PD) and fellows in US ACGME-accredited GI fellowship programs. We conducted a nationwide, online-based survey of GI PDs and fellows at the conclusion of the 2016 academic year. We queried participants about (1) the current models of inpatient training, (2) the content, objectives, and quality of the inpatient training experience, and (3) the frequency and quality of educational activities on the inpatient service. We analyzed five-point Likert items and rank assessments as continuous variables by an independent t test and compared proportions using the Chi-square test. Survey response rate was 48.4% (75/155) for PDs and a total of 194 fellows completed the survey, with both groups reporting the general GI consult team (>90%) as the primary model of inpatient training. PDs and fellows agreed on the ranking of all queried responsibilities of the inpatient fellow to develop during the inpatient service. However, fellows indicated that attendings spent less time teaching and provided less formal feedback than that perceived by PDs (p < 0.0001). PDs rated the overall quality of the inpatient training experience (p < 0.0001) and education on the wards (p = 0.0003) as better than overall ratings by fellows. Although GI fellows and PDs agree on the importance of specific fellow responsibilities on the inpatient service, fellows report experiencing less teaching and feedback from attendings than that perceived by PDs. Committing more time to education and assessment may improve fellows' perceptions of the inpatient training experience.

  16. Fellow's Apéro

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Let's get together, meet each other, exchange experiences and ideas, and share useful information on CERN and the Staff Association. Join us for Fellow's Apéro, organised by the Staff Association on Tuesday 21 February at 16.30 in Restaurant 1. There will be drinks and snacks for everybody! We look forward to seeing you there! Please confirm your participation on Doodle http://doodle.com/poll/skvm7ucm2z78i6bt or alternatively on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/events/1862757017340069/. Your delegates in the Staff Association, Barbora & Jiri

  17. Effectiveness of hands-on tutoring and guided self-directed learning versus self-directed learning alone to educate critical care fellows on mechanical ventilation - a pilot project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramar, Kannan; De Moraes, Alice Gallo; Selim, Bernardo; Holets, Steven; Oeckler, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Physicians require extensive training to achieve proficiency in mechanical ventilator (MV) management of the critically ill patients. Guided self-directed learning (GSDL) is usually the method used to learn. However, it is unclear if this is the most proficient approach to teaching mechanical ventilation to critical care fellows. We, therefore, investigated whether critical care fellows achieve higher scores on standardized testing and report higher satisfaction after participating in a hands-on tutorial combined with GSDL compared to self-directed learning alone. First-year Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine (PCCM) fellows ( n =6) and Critical Care Internal Medicine (CCIM) ( n =8) fellows participated. Satisfaction was assessed using the Likert scale. MV knowledge assessment was performed by administering a standardized 25-question multiple choice pre- and posttest. For 2 weeks the CCIM fellows were exposed to GSDL, while the PCCM fellows received hands-on tutoring combined with GSDL. Ninety-three percentage (6 PCCM and 7 CCIM fellows, total of 13 fellows) completed all evaluations and were included in the final analysis. CCIM and PCCM fellows scored similarly in the pretest (64% vs. 52%, p =0.13). Following interventions, the posttest scores increased in both groups. However, no significant difference was observed based on the interventions (74% vs. 77%, p =0.39). The absolute improvement with the hands-on-tutoring and GSDL group was higher than GSDL alone (25% vs. 10%, p =0.07). Improved satisfaction scores were noted with hands-on tutoring. Hands-on tutoring combined with GSDL and GSDL alone were both associated with an improvement in posttest scores. Absolute improvement in test and satisfaction scores both trended higher in the hands-on tutorial group combined with GSDL group.

  18. Effectiveness of hands-on tutoring and guided self-directed learning versus self-directed learning alone to educate critical care fellows on mechanical ventilation – a pilot project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kannan Ramar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Physicians require extensive training to achieve proficiency in mechanical ventilator (MV management of the critically ill patients. Guided self-directed learning (GSDL is usually the method used to learn. However, it is unclear if this is the most proficient approach to teaching mechanical ventilation to critical care fellows. We, therefore, investigated whether critical care fellows achieve higher scores on standardized testing and report higher satisfaction after participating in a hands-on tutorial combined with GSDL compared to self-directed learning alone. Methods: First-year Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine (PCCM fellows (n=6 and Critical Care Internal Medicine (CCIM (n=8 fellows participated. Satisfaction was assessed using the Likert scale. MV knowledge assessment was performed by administering a standardized 25-question multiple choice pre- and posttest. For 2 weeks the CCIM fellows were exposed to GSDL, while the PCCM fellows received hands-on tutoring combined with GSDL. Results: Ninety-three percentage (6 PCCM and 7 CCIM fellows, total of 13 fellows completed all evaluations and were included in the final analysis. CCIM and PCCM fellows scored similarly in the pretest (64% vs. 52%, p=0.13. Following interventions, the posttest scores increased in both groups. However, no significant difference was observed based on the interventions (74% vs. 77%, p=0.39. The absolute improvement with the hands-on-tutoring and GSDL group was higher than GSDL alone (25% vs. 10%, p=0.07. Improved satisfaction scores were noted with hands-on tutoring. Conclusions: Hands-on tutoring combined with GSDL and GSDL alone were both associated with an improvement in posttest scores. Absolute improvement in test and satisfaction scores both trended higher in the hands-on tutorial group combined with GSDL group.

  19. Accessing Fellow Academics as Research Participants: Constraints, Collegiality, and “Academic Citizenship”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongyan Li

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I discuss some constraints and implications in accessing fellow academics as research participants, a topic that has rarely been addressed thus far in the literature. I will point out that a lack of cooperation from fellow academics may defeat our research purposes, and will survey some studies involving U.S., European, and Chinese academics as research participants to illustrate education researchers’ efforts to work with fellow academics against the odds. By referencing my personal experience of engaging with Chinese academics, I will then discuss the role of personal contacts in research and reflect upon various constraints in accessing fellow academics as research participants. I will suggest that, when we do participate in a fellow researcher’s project, the incentive is a desire to support our peers in the spirit of “academic citizenship.”

  20. Health Care Economics: A Study Guide for Neuroradiology Fellows, Part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, S L; Tu, R; Javan, R; Taheri, M R

    2018-01-01

    Few resources are available in the medical literature for a comprehensive review of current health care economics as it relates to radiologists, specifically framed by topics defined by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education in the evaluation of neuroradiology fellows. Therefore, we present a comprehensive review article as a study guide for fellows to learn from and gain competence in the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education neuroradiology milestones on health care economics. © 2018 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  1. Minding the Gaps in Cancer Pain Management Education: A Multicenter Study of Clinical Residents and Fellows in a Low- Versus High-Resource Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odonkor, Charles Amoatey; Osei-Bonsu, Ernest; Tetteh, Oswald; Haig, Andy; Mayer, Robert Samuel; Smith, Thomas J

    2016-12-01

    Inadequate pain management training has been reported as a major cause of undertreatment of cancer pain. Yet, past research has not comprehensively compared the quality of cancer pain management education among physicians in training in high-resource countries (HRCs) with those in low-resource countries (LRCs). The purpose of this study was to examine and compare gaps in cancer pain management education among physician trainees in an HRC (United States) versus an LRC (Ghana). A cross section of physicians at four major academic medical centers completed surveys about the adequacy of cancer pain training. Participation in the study was completely voluntary, and paper or online surveys were completed anonymously. The response rate was 60% (N = 120). Major gaps were identified in cancer pain management education across the spectrum of medical school training. Training was rated as inadequate (by approximately 80% of trainees), although approximately 10% more trainees in HRCs versus LRCs felt this way; 35% said residency training was inadequate in both settings; and 50% in LRCs versus 44% in HRCs said fellowship training was less than good. On the basis of the lowest group means, the three key areas of perceived deficits included interventional pain procedures (2.34 ± 1.12), palliative care interventions (2.39 ± 1.12), and managing procedural and postoperative pain (2.94 ± 0.97), with significant differences in the distribution of deficits in 15 cancer-pain competencies between LRCs and HRCs ( P < .05). This study identifies priority areas that could be targeted synergistically by LRCs and HRCs to advance cancer care globally. The findings underscore differential opportunities to broaden and improve competencies in cancer pain management via exchange training, in which physicians from HRCs spend time in LRCs and vice versa.

  2. Palliative Care Training in Cardiology Fellowship: A National Survey of the Fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabbouseh, Noura M; Kaushal, Shivtej; Peltier, Wendy; Johnston, Fabian M

    2018-02-01

    To address perspectives of cardiology fellows on the current state of palliative education and palliative and hospice resource utilization within their fellowship experiences. We conducted an online national survey of cardiology fellows during the 2015 to 2016 academic year. Survey questions aimed to assess perceived importance of palliative care education, level of palliative care education during fellowship, and the structure of palliative care support at respondent institutions. Responses were collected anonymously. A total of 519 programs, including subspecialty programs, were contacted. We received 365 responses, a number that represents roughly 14% of all cardiology fellows nationwide during the 2015 to 2016 academic year. Fellows reported discordance in the quality of education between general cardiology and palliative care principles as it relates to care of the patient approaching the end of life. Fellows infrequently received explicit training nor were observed or mentored in delivering end-of-life discussions. Respondents reported an underutilization of palliative care and hospice resources during fellowship training and also a perception that attending faculty were not routinely addressing goals of care. Our survey results highlight a need for enhanced palliative care and end-of-life training experiences for cardiology fellows and also suggest underutilization of hospice and palliative care resources for patients with advanced cardiac diseases. These findings create a platform for future work that might: (1) confirm this training deficit, (2) lead to exploration of educational models that could reconcile this deficit, and (3) potentially help improve palliative care support for patients and families facing advanced heart disease.

  3. Communication skills training curriculum for pulmonary and critical care fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCallister, Jennifer W; Gustin, Jillian L; Wells-Di Gregorio, Sharla; Way, David P; Mastronarde, John G

    2015-04-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requires physicians training in pulmonary and critical care medicine to demonstrate competency in interpersonal communication. Studies have shown that residency training is often insufficient to prepare physicians to provide end-of-life care and facilitate patient and family decision-making. Poor communication in the intensive care unit (ICU) can adversely affect outcomes for critically ill patients and their family members. Despite this, communication training curricula in pulmonary and critical care medicine are largely absent in the published literature. We evaluated the effectiveness of a communication skills curriculum during the first year of a pulmonary and critical care medicine fellowship using a family meeting checklist to provide formative feedback to fellows during ICU rotations. We hypothesized that fellows would demonstrate increased competence and confidence in the behavioral skills necessary for facilitating family meetings. We evaluated a 12-month communication skills curriculum using a pre-post, quasiexperimental design. Subjects for this study included 11 first-year fellows who participated in the new curriculum (intervention group) and a historical control group of five fellows who had completed no formal communication curriculum. Performance of communication skills and self-confidence in family meetings were assessed for the intervention group before and after the curriculum. The control group was assessed once at the beginning of their second year of fellowship. Fellows in the intervention group demonstrated significantly improved communication skills as evaluated by two psychologists using the Family Meeting Behavioral Skills Checklist, with an increase in total observed skills from 51 to 65% (P ≤ 0.01; Cohen's D effect size [es], 1.13). Their performance was also rated significantly higher when compared with the historical control group, who demonstrated only 49% of observed skills

  4. Training Psychiatry Addiction Fellows in Acupuncture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, Kelly; Bryant, Katurah; Ikomi, Jolomi; LaPaglia, Donna

    2015-01-01

    Objective Acupuncture has been studied as an adjunct for addictions treatment. Because many hospitals, outpatient clinics, and facilities are integrating acupuncture treatment, it is important that psychiatrists remain informed about this treatment. This manuscript describes the National Acupuncture Detoxification Association (NADA) protocol and its inclusion as part of the curriculum for psychiatry addictions fellows. Methods Psychiatry and psychology fellows completed the NADA training (N = 20) and reported on their satisfaction with the training. Results Overall, participants stated that they found the training beneficial and many were integrating acupuncture within their current practice. Conclusions Results support the acceptability of acupuncture training among psychiatry fellows in this program. PMID:26048457

  5. Training Psychiatry Addiction Fellows in Acupuncture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, Kelly; Bryant, Katurah; Ikomi, Jolomi; LaPaglia, Donna

    2016-06-01

    Acupuncture has been studied as an adjunct for addiction treatments. Because many hospitals, outpatient clinics, and facilities are integrating acupuncture treatment, it is important that psychiatrists remain informed about this treatment. This manuscript describes the National Acupuncture Detoxification Association (NADA) protocol and its inclusion as part of the curriculum for psychiatry addictions fellows. Psychiatry and psychology fellows completed the NADA training (n = 20) and reported on their satisfaction with the training. Overall, participants stated that they found the training beneficial and many were integrating acupuncture within their current practice. Results support the acceptability of acupuncture training among psychiatry fellows in this program.

  6. Information for New Trainees and Fellows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellows and cancer research trainees will find information to support their onboarding at NCI, including stipend and tax information and NIH rules and regulations. Learn more about orientation for NCI trainees.

  7. Peer Review in Radiology: A Resident and Fellow Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenville, Jeffrey; Doucette-Preville, David; Vlachou, Paraskevi A; Mnatzakanian, Gevork N; Raikhlin, Antony; Colak, Errol

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore Canadian radiology residents' and fellows' understanding, attitudes, opinions, and preferences toward peer review. An Internet-based anonymous questionnaire designed to understand one's familiarity, attitudes, opinions, and preferences toward peer review was distributed to radiology residents and fellows across Canada. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, and answers were stratified by level of training. A total of 136 trainees responded to the survey with 92 completed survey responses available for descriptive statistics. Approximately half of respondents are familiar with peer review (49%), and 39% of trainees are involved in peer review. Most respondents (92%) expressed an interest in learning more about peer review; believe that it should be incorporated into the residency training curriculum (86%), be mandatory (72%), and that current participation will increase odds of future participation (91%). Most trainees (80%) are comfortable advising one another about errors, but less comfortable advising staff (21%). Residents and fellows welcome the opportunity to learn more about peer review and believe it should be incorporated into the residency training curriculum. Understanding the attitudes and perceptions held by trainees regarding peer review is important, as a means to optimize education and maximize current and future participation in peer review. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Pediatric radiology fellows' experience with intussusception reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stein-Wexler, Rebecca; Bateni, Cyrus; Wootton-Gorges, Sandra L.; Li, Chin-Shang

    2011-01-01

    Intussusception reduction allows young children to avoid surgery. However, graduating residents have had relatively little training in intussusception reduction and, for the most part, consider themselves ill-prepared to perform this procedure. The goal of this study was to assess the extent of training in intussusception reduction during one year of a pediatric radiology fellowship and to determine whether graduating fellows consider themselves adequately trained in this technique. Pediatric radiology fellows were surveyed during June 2010 and asked to characterize their fellowship, to indicate the number of intussusception reductions performed (both the total number and those performed with faculty oversight but without active faculty involvement), and to assess the adequacy of their training. There were 31 responses, representing almost 1/3 of current fellows. Pediatric radiology fellows perform on average 6.9 reductions, 3.8 of which are with faculty oversight but without active faculty involvement. Ninety percent consider themselves well-trained in the technique, whereas 10% are uncertain (none consider their training inadequate). Almost all pediatric radiology fellows consider their training in intussusception reduction to be adequate. (orig.)

  9. Postdoctoral Fellow | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Highly motivated postdoctoral fellows sought to work on tumor immunology with a strong background in biology preferentially cellular immunology. The tumor immunology group in the laboratory is exploring mechanisms of improving vaccines and immunotherapy for cancer, especially by discovering new principles to enhance and steer T cell immune responses. The group is focusing on negative immunoregulatory mechanisms used for immune evasion by cancer cells. The postdoctoral fellow will work on a project to understand the negative regulatory mechanisms of tumor immunity especially the mechanisms initiated by NKT cells. Group members also have an opportunity to gain knowledge of HIV/mucosal immunology by interacting with the HIV research group in the lab.

  10. Pediatric Anesthesiology Fellows' Perception of Quality of Attending Supervision and Medical Errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzon, Hubert A; Hajduk, John; De Oliveira, Gildasio; Suresh, Santhanam; Nizamuddin, Sarah L; McCarthy, Robert; Jagannathan, Narasimhan

    2018-02-01

    . Interestingly, fellows' perception of quality of faculty supervision was not associated with the frequency of reported errors. The current results with a narrow CI suggest the need to evaluate other potential factors that can be associated with the high frequency of reported errors by pediatric fellows (eg, fatigue, burnout). The identification of factors that lead to medical errors by pediatric anesthesiology fellows should be a main research priority to improve both trainee education and best practices of pediatric anesthesia.

  11. The effects of the addition of a pediatric surgery fellow on the operative experience of the general surgery resident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raines, Alexander; Garwe, Tabitha; Adeseye, Ademola; Ruiz-Elizalde, Alejandro; Churchill, Warren; Tuggle, David; Mantor, Cameron; Lees, Jason

    2015-06-01

    Adding fellows to surgical departments with residency programs can affect resident education. Our specific aim was to evaluate the effect of adding a pediatric surgery (PS) fellow on the number of index PS cases logged by the general surgery (GS) residents. At a single institution with both PS and GS programs, we examined the number of logged cases for the fellows and residents over 10 years [5 years before (Time 1) and 5 years after (Time 2) the addition of a PS fellow]. Additionally, the procedure related relative value units (RVUs) recorded by the faculty were evaluated. The fellows averaged 752 and 703 cases during Times 1 and 2, respectively, decreasing by 49 (P = 0.2303). The residents averaged 172 and 161 cases annually during Time 1 and Time 2, respectively, decreasing by 11 (P = 0.7340). The total number of procedure related RVUs was 4627 and 6000 during Times 1 and 2, respectively. The number of cases logged by the PS fellows and GS residents decreased after the addition of a PS fellow; however, the decrease was not significant. Programs can reasonably add an additional PS fellow, but care should be taken especially in programs that are otherwise static in size.

  12. Women’s Health Training in Gastroenterology Fellowship: A National Survey of Fellows and Program Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberson, Erica; Richie, Kelly; Lindstrom, Mary J.; Esposti, Silvia Degli; Wald, Arnold

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims The Gastroenterology Core Curriculum requires training in women’s digestive disorders; however, requirements do not necessarily produce knowledge and competence. Our study goals were: (1) to compare perceptions of education, fellow-reported levels of competence, and attitudes towards training in women’s gastrointestinal (GI) health issues during fellowship between gastroenterology fellows and program directors, and (2) to determine the barriers for meeting training requirements. Methods A national survey assessing four domains of training was conducted. All GI program directors in the United States (n = 153) and a random sample of gastroenterology fellows (n = 769) were mailed surveys. Mixed effects linear modeling was used to estimate all mean scores and to assess differences between the groups. Cronbach’s alpha was used to assess the consistency of the measures which make up the means. Results Responses were received from 61% of program directors and 31% of fellows. Mean scores in perceived didactic education, clinical experiences, and competence in women’s GI health were low and significantly differed between the groups (P < 0.0001). Fellows’ attitudes towards women’s GI health issues were more positive compared to program directors’ (P = 0.004). Barriers to training were: continuity clinic at a Veteran’s Administration hospital, low number of pregnant patients treated, low number of referrals from obstetrics and gynecology, and lack of faculty interest in women’s health. Conclusions (1) Fellows more so than program directors perceive training in women’s GI health issues to be low. (2) Program directors more so than fellows rate fellows to be competent in women’s GI health. (3) Multiple barriers to women’s health training exist. PMID:21267780

  13. Teaching geriatric fellows how to teach: a needs assessment targeting geriatrics fellowship program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Veronica; Yukawa, Michi; Aronson, Louise; Widera, Eric

    2014-12-01

    The entire healthcare workforce needs to be educated to better care for older adults. The purpose of this study was to determine whether fellows are being trained to teach, to assess the attitudes of fellowship directors toward training fellows to be teachers, and to understand how to facilitate this type of training for fellows. A nine-question survey adapted from a 2001 survey issued to residency program directors inquiring about residents-as-teachers curricula was developed and administered. The survey was issued electronically and sent out three times over a 6-week period. Of 144 ACGME-accredited geriatric fellowship directors from geriatric, internal medicine, and family medicine departments who were e-mailed the survey, 101 (70%) responded; 75% had an academic affiliation, 15% had a community affiliation, and 10% did not report. Academic and community programs required their fellows to teach, but just 55% of academic and 29% of community programs offered teaching skills instruction as part of their fellowship curriculum; 67% of academic programs and 79% of community programs felt that their fellows would benefit from more teaching skill instruction. Program directors listed fellow (39%) and faculty (46%) time constraints as obstacles to creation and implementation of a teaching curriculum. The majority of fellowship directors believe that it is important for geriatric fellows to become competent educators, but only approximately half of programs currently provide formal instruction in teaching skills. A reproducible, accessible curriculum on teaching to teach that includes a rigorous evaluation component should be created for geriatrics fellowship programs. © 2014, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2014, The American Geriatrics Society.

  14. Assessment of Abilities of Gastroenterology Fellows to Provide Information to Patients With Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Noami; Lucero, Catherine; Villanueva, Gerald; Poles, Michael; Gillespie, Colleen; Zabar, Sondra; Weinshel, Elizabeth

    2017-07-01

    Patient education is critical in ensuring patient compliance and good health outcomes. Fellows must be able to effectively communicate with their patients, delivering enough information for the patient to understand their medical problem and maximize patient compliance. We created an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) with 4 liver disease cases to assess fellows' knowledge and ability to inform standardized patients (SPs) about their clinical condition. We developed 4 cases highlighting different aspects of liver disease and created a 4-station OSCE: hepatitis B, acute hepatitis C, new diagnosis of cirrhosis, and an end-stage cirrhotic nontransplant candidate. The SP with hepatitis B was minimizing the fact that she could not read English. The acute hepatitis C SP was a nursing student who is afraid that having hepatitis C might jeopardize her career. The SP with the new diagnosis of alcoholic cirrhosis needed to stop drinking, and the end-stage liver disease patient had to grapple with his advanced directives. Twelve fellows from 4 GI training programs participated. Our focus was to assess the fellows' knowledge about liver diseases and the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education competencies of health literacy, shared decision making, advanced directives, and goals of care. The goal for the fellows was to communicate effectively with the SPs, and acknowledge that each patient had an emotionally charged issue to overcome. The SPs used a checklist to rate fellows' performance. Faculty and the SPs observed the cases and provided feedback. The fellows were surveyed on their performance regarding the case. The majority of fellows were able to successfully summarize findings and discuss a plan with the patient in the new diagnosis of cirrhosis (76.92%) and hepatitis C case (100%), but were less successful in the hepatitis B case (30.77%) and the end-of-life case (41.67%). Overall, a small percentage of fellows reflected that they did a good

  15. Orion: a web-based application designed to monitor resident and fellow performance on-call.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itri, Jason N; Kim, Woojin; Scanlon, Mary H

    2011-10-01

    Radiology residency and fellowship training provides a unique opportunity to evaluate trainee performance and determine the impact of various educational interventions. We have developed a simple software application (Orion) using open-source tools to facilitate the identification and monitoring of resident and fellow discrepancies in on-call preliminary reports. Over a 6-month period, 19,200 on-call studies were interpreted by 20 radiology residents, and 13,953 on-call studies were interpreted by 25 board-certified radiology fellows representing eight subspecialties. Using standard review macros during faculty interpretation, each of these reports was classified as "agreement", "minor discrepancy", and "major discrepancy" based on the potential to impact patient management or outcome. Major discrepancy rates were used to establish benchmarks for resident and fellow performance by year of training, modality, and subspecialty, and to identify residents and fellows demonstrating a significantly higher major discrepancy rate compared with their classmates. Trends in discrepancies were used to identify subspecialty-specific areas of increased major discrepancy rates in an effort to tailor the didactic and case-based curriculum. A series of missed-case conferences were developed based on trends in discrepancies, and the impact of these conferences is currently being evaluated. Orion is a powerful information technology tool that can be used by residency program directors, fellowship programs directors, residents, and fellows to improve radiology education and training.

  16. Women Fellows of INSA | Women in Science | Initiatives | Indian ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Initiatives; Women in Science; Women Fellows of INSA. Women Fellows of INSA. INSA - Indian National Science Academy ... Charusita Chakravarty, one of the stars of our community of women scientists, at a young age of 52, after a ...

  17. An Intensive, Simulation-Based Communication Course for Pediatric Critical Care Medicine Fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Erin M; Hamilton, Melinda F; Watson, R Scott; Claxton, Rene; Barnett, Michael; Thompson, Ann E; Arnold, Robert

    2017-08-01

    Effective communication among providers, families, and patients is essential in critical care but is often inadequate in the PICU. To address the lack of communication education pediatric critical care medicine fellows receive, the Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh PICU developed a simulation-based communication course, Pediatric Critical Care Communication course. Pediatric critical care medicine trainees have limited prior training in communication and will have increased confidence in their communication skills after participating in the Pediatric Critical Care Communication course. Pediatric Critical Care Communication is a 3-day course taken once during fellowship featuring simulation with actors portraying family members. Off-site conference space as part of a pediatric critical care medicine educational curriculum. Pediatric Critical Care Medicine Fellows. Didactic sessions and interactive simulation scenarios. Prior to and after the course, fellows complete an anonymous survey asking about 1) prior instruction in communication, 2) preparedness for difficult conversations, 3) attitudes about end-of-life care, and 4) course satisfaction. We compared pre- and postcourse surveys using paired Student t test. Most of the 38 fellows who participated over 4 years had no prior communication training in conducting a care conference (70%), providing bad news (57%), or discussing end-of-life options (75%). Across all four iterations of the course, fellows after the course reported increased confidence across many topics of communication, including giving bad news, conducting a family conference, eliciting both a family's emotional reaction to their child's illness and their concerns at the end of a child's life, discussing a child's code status, and discussing religious issues. Specifically, fellows in 2014 reported significant increases in self-perceived preparedness to provide empathic communication to families regarding many aspects of discussing critical care, end

  18. Disruptive behavior in the workplace: Challenges for gastroenterology fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srisarajivakul, Nalinee; Lucero, Catherine; Wang, Xiao-Jing; Poles, Michael; Gillespie, Colleen; Zabar, Sondra; Weinshel, Elizabeth; Malter, Lisa

    2017-05-14

    To assess first-year gastroenterology fellows' ability to address difficult interpersonal situations in the workplace using objective structured clinical examinations (OSCE). Two OSCEs ("distracted care team" and "frazzled intern") were created to assess response to disruptive behavior. In case 1, a fellow used a colonoscopy simulator while interacting with a standardized patient (SP), nurse, and attending physician all played by actors. The nurse and attending were instructed to display specific disruptive behavior and disregard the fellow unless requested to stop the disruptive behavior and focus on the patient and procedure. In case 2, the fellow was to calm an intern managing a patient with massive gastrointestinal bleeding. The objective in both scenarios was to assess the fellows' ability to perform their duties while managing the disruptive behavior displayed by the actor. The SPs used checklists to rate fellows' performances. The fellows completed a self-assessment survey. Twelve fellows from four gastrointestinal fellowship training programs participated in the OSCE. In the "distracted care team" case, one-third of the fellows interrupted the conflict and refocused attention to the patient. Half of the fellows were able to display professionalism despite the heated discussion nearby. Fellows scored lowest in the interprofessionalism portion of post-OSCE surveys, measuring their ability to handle the conflict. In the "frazzled intern" case, 68% of fellows were able to establish a calm and professional relationship with the SP. Despite this success, only half of the fellows were successfully communicate a plan to the SP and only a third scored "well done" in a domain that focused on allowing the intern to think through the case with the fellow's guidance. Fellows must receive training on how to approach disruptive behavior. OSCEs are a tool that can assess fellow skills and set a culture for open discussion.

  19. International Fellows of NCI at Frederick | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Each year, the Employee Diversity Team (EDT) acknowledges members of the NCI at Frederick Community for their achievements and contributions towards the mission of facility.  Historically, the team has profiled the “Women of NCI at Frederick,” but this year, the team decided to instead shed light on the diverse and successful individuals who make up the international fellows community.

  20. The Direct and Mediating Roles of Positive Emotions on Work Engagement among Postdoctoral Fellows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloria, Christian T.; Steinhardt, Mary A.

    2017-01-01

    Universities increasingly value the contribution of postdoctoral fellows (postdocs) toward organizational success, yet this group is often the most overlooked and underserved compared to others in higher education (namely, students, faculty, and staff). Despite the stressful and challenging nature of the profession, it is critical for postdocs to…

  1. Training fellows in paediatric cardiology: the Harvard experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, David W; Allan, Catherine K; Newburger, Jane W

    2016-12-01

    The Fellowship Program of the Department of Cardiology at Boston Children's Hospital seeks to train academically oriented leaders in clinical care and laboratory and clinical investigation of cardiovascular disease in the young. The core clinical fellowship involves 3 years in training, comprising 24 months of clinical rotations and 12 months of elective and research experience. Trainees have access to a vast array of research opportunities - clinical, basic, and translational. Clinical fellows interested in basic science may reverse the usual sequence and start their training in the laboratory, deferring clinical training for 1 or more years. An increasing number of clinical trainees apply to spend a fourth year as a senior fellow in one of the subspecialty areas of paediatric cardiology. From the founding of the Department to the present, we have maintained a fundamental and unwavering commitment to training and education in clinical care and research in basic science and clinical investigation, as well as to the training of outstanding young clinicians and investigators.

  2. What should a fellow-in-training expect at national cardiovascular conferences? The interventional cardiology fellows' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiramijyan, Sarkis; Didier, Romain; Koifman, Edward; Negi, Smita I

    It has become challenging for cardiovascular fellows-in-training (FIT) to determine which national cardiovascular conference (NCC) to attend given the broad range of meetings and the breadth of information offered. The aim of this study was to report our own experiences of the utility and individual strengths of the NCCs and to further understand the interventional cardiology (IC) FITs' viewpoint regarding the benefits of the individual NCCs. A survey was formulated with questions and scenarios regarding topics deemed to be of highest importance for an IC-FIT. The survey emphasized experiences regarding the utility and benefits of the NCCs, time management, optimization of acquired education, and specific interests in clinical and research topics. The completely anonymous survey was sent via an email format to a total of 234, majority of IC (fourth and fifth years) and a minority of general (third year), FITs. A completed survey response was received from 131 of the fellows (56%). The results demonstrated that the IC-FITs endorsed that the small, focused sub-specialty interventional meetings vs. the large society general meetings were more beneficial in regard to the didactic education offered. In addition, the IC-FITs indicated that pre-planning for the meetings is the most beneficial approach in optimizing one's education and that the caliber of expert faculty, case-based and live-case presentations are among the most important aspects of the meetings. Interventional cardiology FITs prefer the small sub-specialty interventional meetings over the large society general NCCs in regard to the benefits of didactic learning. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Measuring pediatric hematology-oncology fellows' skills in humanism and professionalism: A novel assessment instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesselheim, Jennifer C; Agrawal, Anurag K; Bhatia, Nita; Cronin, Angel; Jubran, Rima; Kent, Paul; Kersun, Leslie; Rao, Amulya Nageswara; Rose, Melissa; Savelli, Stephanie; Sharma, Mukta; Shereck, Evan; Twist, Clare J; Wang, Michael

    2017-05-01

    Educators in pediatric hematology-oncology lack rigorously developed instruments to assess fellows' skills in humanism and professionalism. We developed a novel 15-item self-assessment instrument to address this gap in fellowship training. Fellows (N = 122) were asked to assess their skills in five domains: balancing competing demands of fellowship, caring for the dying patient, confronting depression and burnout, responding to challenging relationships with patients, and practicing humanistic medicine. An expert focus group predefined threshold scores on the instrument that could be used as a cutoff to identify fellows who need support. Reliability and feasibility were assessed and concurrent validity was measured using three established instruments: Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), Flourishing Scale (FS), and Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy (JSPE). For 90 participating fellows (74%), the self-assessment proved feasible to administer and had high internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's α = 0.81). It was moderately correlated with the FS and MBI (Pearson's r = 0.41 and 0.4, respectively) and weakly correlated with the JSPE (Pearson's r = 0.15). Twenty-eight fellows (31%) were identified as needing support. The self-assessment had a sensitivity of 50% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 31-69) and a specificity of 77% (95% CI: 65-87) for identifying fellows who scored poorly on at least one of the three established scales. We developed a novel assessment instrument for use in pediatric fellowship training. The new scale proved feasible and demonstrated internal consistency reliability. Its moderate correlation with other established instruments shows that the novel assessment instrument provides unique, nonredundant information as compared to existing scales. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. A pharmacogenetics service experience for pharmacy students, residents, and fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozda, Katarzyna; Labinov, Yana; Jiang, Ruixuan; Thomas, Margaret R; Wong, Shan S; Patel, Shitalben; Nutescu, Edith A; Cavallari, Larisa H

    2013-10-14

    To utilize a comprehensive, pharmacist-led warfarin pharmacogenetics service to provide pharmacy students, residents, and fellows with clinical and research experiences involving genotype-guided therapy. First-year (P1) through fourth-year (P4) pharmacy students, pharmacy residents, and pharmacy fellows participated in a newly implemented warfarin pharmacogenetics service in a hospital setting. Students, residents, and fellows provided genotype-guided dosing recommendations as part of clinical care, or analyzed samples and data collected from patients on the service for research purposes. Students', residents', and fellows' achievement of learning objectives was assessed using a checklist based on established core competencies in pharmacogenetics. The mean competency score of the students, residents, and fellows who completed a clinical and/or research experience with the service was 97% ±3%. A comprehensive warfarin pharmacogenetics service provided unique experiential and research opportunities for pharmacy students, residents, and fellows and sufficiently addressed a number of core competencies in pharmacogenetics.

  5. Variation in National ACGME Case Log Data for Pediatric Orthopaedic Fellowships: Are Fellow Coding Practices Responsible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Philip K; Woiczik, Marcella; Karol, Lori; Sankar, Wudbhav N

    The introduction of the 80-hour work week for Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) accredited fellowship programs initiated many efforts to optimize surgical training. One particular area of interest is on recording and tracking surgical experiences. The current standard is logging cases based on Current Procedural Terminology codes, which are primarily designed for billing. Proposed guidelines from the ACGME regarding logging exist, but their implementation is unknown, as is the variation in case volume across fellowship programs. The purpose of this study was to investigate variability in the national case log data, and explore potential sources of variation using fellow surveys. National ACGME case log data for pediatric orthopaedic fellowships from 2012 to 2015 were reviewed, with particular attention to the domains of spine, pelvis/hip, arthroscopy, trauma, and other (which includes clubfoot casting). To explore potential sources of case log variability, a survey on case logging behavior was distributed to all pediatric orthopaedic fellows for the academic year 2015 to 2016. Reported experiences based on ACGME case logs varied widely between fellows with percentage difference of up to 100% in all areas. Similarly, wide variability is present in coding practices of pediatric orthopaedic fellows, who often lack formal education on the topic of appropriate coding/logging. In the survey, hypothetical case scenarios had an absolute difference in recorded codes of up to 13 and a percentage difference of up to 100%. ACGME case log data for pediatric orthopaedic fellowships demonstrates wide variability in reported surgical experiences. This variability may be due, in part, to differences in logging practices by individual fellows. This observation makes meaningful interpretation of national data on surgical volume challenging. Proposed surgical experience minimums should be interpreted in light of these data, and may not be advisable unless

  6. Assessment of the need for a cardiac morphology curriculum for paediatric cardiology fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Lindsay S; Klein, Melissa; James, Jeanne; FitzGerald, Michael

    2017-07-01

    Expert knowledge of cardiac malformations is essential for paediatric cardiologists. Current cardiac morphology fellowship teaching format, content, and nomenclature are left up to the discretion of the individual fellowship programmes. We aimed to assess practices and barriers in morphology education, perceived effectiveness of current curricula, and preferences for a standardised fellow morphology curriculum. A web-based survey was developed de novo and administered anonymously via e-mail to all paediatric cardiology fellowship programme directors and associate directors in the United States of America; leaders were asked to forward the survey to fellows. A total of 35 directors from 32 programmes (51%) and 66 fellows responded. Curriculum formats varied: 28 (88%) programmes utilised pathological specimens, 25 (78%) invited outside faculty, and 16 (50%) utilised external conferences. Director nomenclature preferences were split - 6 (19%) Andersonian, 8 (25%) Van Praaghian, and 18 (56%) mixed. Barriers to morphology education included time and inconsistent nomenclature. One-third of directors reported that <90% of recent fellow graduates had adequate abilities to apply segmental anatomy, identify associated cardiac lesions, or communicate complex CHD. More structured teaching, protected time, and specimens were suggestions to improve curricula. Almost 75% would likely adopt/utilise an online morphology curriculum. Cardiac morphology training varies in content and format among fellowships. Inconsistent nomenclature exists, and inadequate morphology knowledge is perceived to contribute to communication failures, both have potential patient safety implications. There is an educational need for a common, online cardiac morphology curriculum that could allow for fellow assessment of competency and contribute to more standardised communication in the field of paediatric cardiology.

  7. Fellows in the Middle: Fabulous Field Trips

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Mary Lou

    2008-05-01

    Montclair State University's NSF GK-12 Program focuses on grades 7 and 8 in five urban public school districts in northern New Jersey. Each year four fieldtrips are taken by the students, middle school teachers, and graduate student Fellows. Many interdisciplinary hands-on lessons are written for use before, during and after each trip with this year's theme of Earth history. The Sterling Hill Mine trip evoked lessons on geology, economics, crystal structure, density, and pH. A virtual trip (webcam link) to scientists in the rainforest of Panama prompted critical thinking, categorizing layers and animals, and construction of model food webs. In the field trip to the NJ School of Conservation the students will build model aquifers, measure tree heights, and measure stream flow to compare to their Hackensack River. Finally the students will travel to MSU for a Math/Science Day with research talks, lab tours, hands-on activities, and a poster session. In January 2008 seventeen teachers, Fellows, and grant personnel took a field trip to China to set up collaborations with researchers and schools in Beijing and Xi'an, including the Beijing Ancient Observatory. All field trips are fabulous! Next year (IYA) our theme will be planetary science and will feature field trips to the Newark Museum's Dreyfuss Planetarium, BCC Buehler Challenger & Science Center, and star parties. We look forward to invigorating middle school science and mathematics with exciting astronomy. Funded by NSF #0638708

  8. NASA Announces 2009 Astronomy and Astrophysics Fellows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    WASHINGTON -- NASA has selected fellows in three areas of astronomy and astrophysics for its Einstein, Hubble, and Sagan Fellowships. The recipients of this year's post-doctoral fellowships will conduct independent research at institutions around the country. "The new fellows are among the best and brightest young astronomers in the world," said Jon Morse, director of the Astrophysics Division in NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington. "They already have contributed significantly to studies of how the universe works, the origin of our cosmos and whether we are alone in the cosmos. The fellowships will serve as a springboard for scientific leadership in the years to come, and as an inspiration for the next generation of students and early career researchers." Each fellowship provides support to the awardees for three years. The fellows may pursue their research at any host university or research center of their choosing in the United States. The new fellows will begin their programs in the fall of 2009. "I cannot tell you how much I am looking forward to spending the next few years conducting research in the U.S., thanks to the fellowships," said Karin Oberg, a graduate student in Leiden, The Netherlands. Oberg will study the evolution of water and ices during star formation when she starts her fellowship at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory in Cambridge, Mass. People Who Read This Also Read... Milky Way's Super-efficient Particle Accelerators Caught in The Act Cosmic Heavyweights in Free-for-all Galaxies Coming of Age in Cosmic Blobs Cassiopeia A Comes Alive Across Time and Space A diverse group of 32 young scientists will work on a wide variety of projects, such as understanding supernova hydrodynamics, radio transients, neutron stars, galaxy clusters and the intercluster medium, supermassive black holes, their mergers and the associated gravitational waves, dark energy, dark matter and the reionization process. Other research topics include

  9. Characteristics of American Psychological Association Division 40 (clinical neuropsychology) Fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson-Greene, Doug; Collins, K C

    2011-11-01

    Fellow status is an honor bestowed on American Psychological Association (APA) members who have made unusual and outstanding contributions to the field of psychology that have had a national impact. Thus far no studies have examined the characteristics of the individuals who have received this honor. This study examined publicly available data for 157 Division 40 Fellows. Fellows comprise 3.7% of the 4273 members of the division compared to 5.7% of the entire APA membership. Fellows are predominantly male (73%). All but two fellows had earned a Ph.D. with the average time since granting of the doctoral degree of 17.1 ± 6 years (median=16 years) with a range of 7-40 years post-degree. Slightly over half of the fellows hold board certification (53%) in the American Board of Professional Psychology. The largest group of fellows reports their primary employment currently as a university-affiliated medical setting (48%). These data serve to characterize current Division 40 Fellows for the field of neuropsychology and may provide useful information to assist prospective fellow applicants.

  10. Implementation of a Comprehensive Curriculum in Personal Finance for Medical Fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Or, Yuval D; Fessler, Henry E; Desai, Dipan A; Zakaria, Sammy

    2018-01-01

    Many residents and fellows complete graduate medical education having received minimal unbiased financial planning guidance. This places them at risk of making ill-informed financial decisions, which may lead to significant harm to them and their families. Therefore, we sought to provide fellows with comprehensive unbiased financial education and empower them to make timely, constructive financial decisions. A self-selected cohort of cardiovascular disease, pulmonary and critical care, and infectious disease fellows (n = 18) at a single institution attended a live, eight-hour interactive course on personal finance. The course consisted of four two-hour sessions delivered over four weeks, facilitated by an unbiased business school faculty member with expertise in personal finance. Prior to the course, all participants completed a demographic survey. After course completion, participants were offered an exit survey evaluating the course, which also asked respondents for any tangible financial decisions made as a result of the course learning.  Results: Participants included 12 women and six men, with a mean age of 33 and varying amounts of debt and financial assets. Twelve respondents completed the exit survey, and all "Strongly Agreed" that courses on financial literacy are important for trainees. In addition, 11 reported that the course helped them make important financial decisions, providing 21 examples. Fellows derive a significant benefit from objective financial literacy education. Graduate medical education programs should offer comprehensive financial literacy education to all graduating trainees, and that education should be provided by an unbiased expert who has no incentive to sell financial products and services.

  11. An active learning curriculum improves fellows' knowledge and faculty teaching skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inra, Jennifer A; Pelletier, Stephen; Kumar, Navin L; Barnes, Edward L; Shields, Helen M

    2017-01-01

    Traditional didactic lectures are the mainstay of teaching for graduate medical education, although this method may not be the most effective way to transmit information. We created an active learning curriculum for Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) gastroenterology fellows to maximize learning. We evaluated whether this new curriculum improved perceived knowledge acquisition and knowledge base. In addition, our study assessed whether coaching faculty members in specific methods to enhance active learning improved their perceived teaching and presentation skills. We compared the Gastroenterology Training Exam (GTE) scores before and after the implementation of this curriculum to assess whether an improved knowledge base was documented. In addition, fellows and faculty members were asked to complete anonymous evaluations regarding their learning and teaching experiences. Fifteen fellows were invited to 12 lectures over a 2-year period. GTE scores improved in the areas of stomach ( p active learning curriculum. Scores in hepatology, as well as biliary and pancreatic study, showed a trend toward improvement ( p >0.05). All fellows believed the lectures were helpful, felt more prepared to take the GTE, and preferred the interactive format to traditional didactic lectures. All lecturers agreed that they acquired new teaching skills, improved teaching and presentation skills, and learned new tools that could help them teach better in the future. An active learning curriculum is preferred by GI fellows and may be helpful for improving transmission of information in any specialty in medical education. Individualized faculty coaching sessions demonstrating new ways to transmit information may be important for an individual faculty member's teaching excellence.

  12. Providing a setup and opportunities for better training of postdoctoral research fellows in an academic environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghayur Muhammad

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Thousands of young researchers come from different parts of the world every year to take up postdoctoral (postdoc research fellowship positions in the developed countries. In the US alone, there were 48,601 postdocs in the year 2005 working in different labs in the fields of science, health and engineering. Many pursue this option for lack of other alternatives. Expectedly, these individuals face a lot of difficulties in making this transition from being a student to becoming an employee of an institution. Many institutions are prepared to make this transition and period of stay easy for their fellows while others are not equipped at all. The presence of a postdoc office (established by an institution or an association (formed by the fellows can be of immense help to postdocs. Additionally, the availability of institutional professional development and leadership programs can also help to nurture and polish postdoc fellows into future faculty members and valuable members of the community at large. To name a few, these professional development programs can focus on communication and presentation skills, medical education, teaching and learning, bioethics and mentorship. There is an urgent need to address some or all of these issues so that better training environment and opportunities are available to this group of postdoc fellows.

  13. From Communication Skills to Skillful Communication: A Longitudinal Integrated Curriculum for Critical Care Medicine Fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roze des Ordons, Amanda L; Doig, Christopher J; Couillard, Philippe; Lord, Jason

    2017-04-01

    Communication with patients and families in critical care medicine (CCM) can be complex and challenging. A longitudinal curricular model integrating multiple techniques within classroom and clinical milieus may facilitate skillful communication across diverse settings. In 2014-2015, the authors developed and implemented a curriculum for CCM fellows at the Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, to promote the longitudinal development of skillful communication. A departmental needs assessment informed curriculum development. Five 4-hour classroom sessions were developed: basic communication principles, family meetings about goals and transitions of care, discussing patient safety incidents, addressing conflict, and offering organ donation. Teaching methods-including instructor-led presentations incorporating a consistent framework for approaching challenging conversations, simulation and clinical practice, and feedback from peers, trained facilitators, family members, and clinicians-supported integration of skills into the clinical setting and longitudinal development of skillful communication. Seven fellows participated during the first year of the curriculum. CCM fellows engaged enthusiastically in the program, commented that the framework provided was helpful, and highly valued the opportunity to practice challenging communication scenarios, learn from observing their peers, and receive immediate feedback. More detailed accounts of fellows', patients', and family members' experiences will be obtained to guide curricular development. The curriculum will be expanded to involve other members of the multidisciplinary intensive care unit team, and faculty education initiatives will be offered to enhance the quality of the feedback provided. The impact of the curriculum on initial skill development, retention, and progression will be assessed.

  14. NSF GK-12 Fellows as Mentors for K-12 Teachers Participating in Field Research Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellins, K.; Perry, E.

    2005-12-01

    The University of Texas Institute for Geophysics (UTIG) recognizes the value of providing educational opportunities to K-12 teachers who play a critical role in shaping the minds of young people who are the future of our science. To that end, UTIG established the "Texas Teachers in the Field" program in 2000 to formalize the participation of K-12 teachers in field programs that included UTIG scientists. In 2002, "Texas Teachers in the Field" evolved through UTIG's involvement in a University of Texas at Austin GK-12 project led by the Environmental Sciences Institute, which enabled UTIG to partner a subset of GK-12 Fellows with teachers participating in geophysical field programs. During the three years of the GK-12 project, UTIG successfully partnered four GK-12 Fellows with five K-12 teachers. The Fellows served as mentors to the teachers, as liaisons between UTIG scientists leading field programs and teachers and their students, and as resources in science, mathematics, and technology instruction. Specifically, Fellows prepared teachers and their students for the field investigations, supervised the design of individual Teacher Research Experience (TRE) projects, and helped teachers to develop standards-aligned curriculum resources related to the field program for use in their own classrooms, as well as broader distribution. Although all but one TRE occurred during the school year, Texas school districts and principals were willing to release teachers to participate because the experience and destinations were so extraordinary (i.e., a land-based program in Tierra del Fuego, Argentina; and research cruises to the Southeast Caribbean Sea and Hess Deep in the Pacific Ocean) and carried opportunities to work with scientists from around the world. This exceptional collaboration of GK-12 Fellows, K-12 teachers and research scientists enriches K-12 student learning and promotes greater enthusiasm for science. The level of mentoring, preparation and follow-up provided

  15. 1989”1990 AGU Congressional Fellow report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Barbara J.

    Describing the last 3 months on the Subcommittee on International Scientific Cooperation of the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Science, Space, and Technology is no easy task. I have learned a great deal about many issues and about the workings of Congress; yet this knowledge has not been gained in a necessarily straightforward or logical manner.Although my status on the Subcommittee is that of a Fellow, in effect I am expected to function as a regular staff member. I immediately became involved in the preparation of two hearings, the first on science and technology initiatives for Poland and Hungary, and the second on the Human Genome Project. At these hearings, I learned firsthand about important aspects of science-related issues that concern Congress, namely, intellectual property rights, U.S. competitiveness in the science and technology arena with other countries, Japan, in particular; and big science versus small science funding.

  16. Women Fellows of IASc | Women in Science | Initiatives | Indian ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Initiatives; Women in Science; Women Fellows of IASc ... The Academy governing council had in the past two women Fellows over the years and in ... young age of 52, after a valiant battle with cancer, today on 29th March 2016 in Delhi.

  17. Diversity in the Emerging Critical Care Workforce: Analysis of Demographic Trends in Critical Care Fellows From 2004 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane-Fall, Meghan B; Miano, Todd A; Aysola, Jaya; Augoustides, John G T

    2017-05-01

    Diversity in the physician workforce is essential to providing culturally effective care. In critical care, despite the high stakes and frequency with which cultural concerns arise, it is unknown whether physician diversity reflects that of critically ill patients. We sought to characterize demographic trends in critical care fellows, who represent the emerging intensivist workforce. We used published data to create logistic regression models comparing annual trends in the representation of women and racial/ethnic groups across critical care fellowship types. United States Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education-approved residency and fellowship training programs. Residents and fellows employed by Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education-accredited training programs from 2004 to 2014. None. From 2004 to 2014, the number of critical care fellows increased annually, up 54.1% from 1,606 in 2004-2005 to 2,475 in 2013-2014. The proportion of female critical care fellows increased from 29.5% (2004-2005) to 38.3% (2013-2014) (p workforce reflect underrepresentation of women and racial/ethnic minorities. Trends highlight increases in women and Hispanics and stable or decreasing representation of non-Hispanic underrepresented minority critical care fellows. Further research is needed to elucidate the reasons underlying persistent underrepresentation of racial and ethnic minorities in critical care fellowship programs.

  18. Attitudes and Perceptions of Surgical Oncology Fellows on ACGME Accreditation and the Complex General Surgical Oncology Certification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, David Y; Flaherty, Devin C; Lau, Briana J; Deutsch, Gary B; Kirchoff, Daniel D; Huynh, Kelly T; Lee, Ji-Hey; Faries, Mark B; Bilchik, Anton J

    2015-11-01

    With the first qualifying examination administered September 15, 2014, complex general surgical oncology (CGSO) is now a board-certified specialty. We aimed to assess the attitudes and perceptions of current and future surgical oncology fellows regarding the recently instituted Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) accreditation. A 29-question anonymous survey was distributed to fellows in surgical oncology fellowship programs and applicants interviewing at our fellowship program. There were 110 responses (79 fellows and 31 candidates). The response rate for the first- and second-year fellows was 66 %. Ninety-percent of the respondents were aware that completing an ACGME-accredited fellowship leads to board eligibility in CGSO. However, the majority (80 %) of the respondents stated that their decision to specialize in surgical oncology was not influenced by the ACGME accreditation. The fellows in training were concerned about the cost of the exam (90 %) and expressed anxiety in preparing for another board exam (83 %). However, the majority of the respondents believed that CGSO board certification will be helpful (79 %) in obtaining their future career goals. Interestingly, candidate fellows appeared more focused on a career in general complex surgical oncology (p = 0.004), highlighting the impact that fellowship training may have on organ-specific subspecialization. The majority of the surveyed surgical oncology fellows and candidates believe that obtaining board certification in CGSO is important and will help them pursue their career goals. However, the decision to specialize in surgical oncology does not appear to be motivated by ACGME accreditation or the new board certification.

  19. Covering Science as a Mass Media Fellow

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMeeking, Gavin R.

    2006-03-01

    I remember my first unpleasant biology lab dissection in high school. I am not sure if the experience was worse for me or for the unfortunate fetal pig we dissected that day. The sights and smells of that fateful morning forever put me on a path toward the physical sciences, and probably have a lot to do with my ending up as a graduate student in atmospheric chemistry instead of at some medical school cutting up dead bodies. So imagine my horror after encountering the leg of a dead horse as I walked into a bioengineering laboratory to report on a story about artificial joint research. Subjecting myself to such biological horrors, though, was part of my duties as an AGU-sponsored American Association for the Advancement of Science Mass Media Fellow. The program places graduate students and recent graduates from scientific fields in major media outlets throughout the country. The aim of the program is to give science-trained individuals a taste of a career in science journalism as well as to help scientists develop better communication skills.

  20. What I expect from an orthopaedic traumatology fellow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee Chip Routt, Milton; Stark, Delbert H

    2014-09-01

    After 2.5 decades working with a variety of orthopaedic traumatology fellows, I have learned that several qualities and behaviors are important to a successful experience. Most fellows possess them, but some do not. Those that do usually integrate quickly onto the team and are rewarded with enriched teaching and clinical experiences. Some that do not may be able to adjust or alter their behaviors and eventually fit in. Some cannot adjust and their experiences suffer. I realize that no 2 individuals are the same, so my expectations of a fellow serve as a relationship foundation to then build their experiences upon. Their qualities and behaviors guide our relationship.

  1. Postgraduate fellows as teaching assistants in human anatomy: an experimental teaching model at a Chinese research university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiao; Wang, Lin; Guo, Kaihua; Liu, Shu; Li, Feng; Chu, Guoliang; Zhou, Li-Hua

    2011-01-01

    Postgraduate fellowship training programs are expanding at Chinese universities. This growing cadre of advanced trainees calls for the development of new learning and training models wherein postgraduate fellows have an ample opportunity to teach more junior learners, thereby expanding their own knowledge base and competitiveness for future employment. Educational reform at Sun Yat-Sen University has recently allowed postgraduate fellows to act as teaching assistants for undergraduate anatomy courses. This model is common in western countries but is novel in China. Copyright © 2010 American Association of Anatomists.

  2. Evaluating the Clinical Learning Environment: Resident and Fellow Perceptions of Patient Safety Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bump, Gregory M; Calabria, Jaclyn; Gosman, Gabriella; Eckart, Catherine; Metro, David G; Jasti, Harish; McCausland, Julie B; Itri, Jason N; Patel, Rita M; Buchert, Andrew

    2015-03-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education has begun to evaluate teaching institutions' learning environments with Clinical Learning Environment Review visits, including trainee involvement in institutions' patient safety and quality improvement efforts. We sought to address the dearth of metrics that assess trainee patient safety perceptions of the clinical environment. Using the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPSC), we measured resident and fellow perceptions of patient safety culture in 50 graduate medical education programs at 10 hospitals within an integrated health system. As institution-specific physician scores were not available, resident and fellow scores on the HSOPSC were compared with national data from 29 162 practicing providers at 543 hospitals. Of the 1337 residents and fellows surveyed, 955 (71.4%) responded. Compared with national practicing providers, trainees had lower perceptions of patient safety culture in 6 of 12 domains, including teamwork within units, organizational learning, management support for patient safety, overall perceptions of patient safety, feedback and communication about error, and communication openness. Higher perceptions were observed for manager/supervisor actions promoting patient safety and for staffing. Perceptions equaled national norms in 4 domains. Perceptions of patient safety culture did not improve with advancing postgraduate year. Trainees in a large integrated health system have variable perceptions of patient safety culture, as compared with national norms for some practicing providers. Administration of the HSOPSC was feasible and acceptable to trainees, and may be used to track perceptions over time.

  3. Oncology fellows’ career plans, expectations, and well-being: do fellows know what they are getting into?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanafelt, Tait D; Raymond, Marilyn; Horn, Leora; Moynihan, Tim; Collichio, Frances; Chew, Helen; Kosty, Michael P; Satele, Daniel; Sloan, Jeff; Gradishar, William J

    2014-09-20

    To evaluate the career plans, professional expectations, and well-being of oncology fellows compared with actual experiences of practicing oncologists. US oncology fellows taking the 2013 Medical Oncology In-Training Examination (MedOnc ITE) were invited to participate in an optional postexamination survey. The survey evaluated fellows’ career plans and professional expectations and measured burnout, quality of life (QOL), fatigue, and satisfaction with work-life balance (WLB) using standardized instruments. Fellows’ professional expectations and well-being were compared with actual experiences of US oncologists assessed simultaneously. Of the 1,637 oncology fellows in the United States, 1,373 (83.9%) took the 2013 MedOnc ITE. Among these, 1,345 (97.9%) completed the postexamination survey. The frequency of burnout among fellows decreased from 43.3% in year 1 to 31.7% in year 2 and 28.1% in year 3 (P work hours were 5 to 6 hours per week fewer than oncologists’ actual reported work hours. Levels of burnout (P = .02) and educational debt (P career. Oncology fellows entering practice trade one set of challenges for another. Unrealized expectations regarding work hours may contribute to future professional dissatisfaction, burnout, and challenges with WLB.

  4. Professor Anne Khademian named National Academy of Public Administration Fellow

    OpenAIRE

    Chadwick, Heather Riley

    2009-01-01

    Anne Khademian, professor with Virginia Tech's Center for Public Administration and Policy, School of Public and International Affairs, at the Alexandria, Va., campus has been elected a National Academy of Public Administration (NAPA) Fellow.

  5. Women Fellows of INAE | Women in Science | Initiatives | Indian ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Women Fellows of INAE. INAE - Indian National Academy of Engineering. Ms. Alpa Sheth Civil Engineering. Prof. Bharathi Bhat Electronics & Communication Engineering. Prof. Dipanwita Roy Chowdhury Computer Engineering and Information Technology. Prof. Kamala Krithivasan Computer Engineering and Information ...

  6. Understanding Surgical Resident and Fellow Perspectives on Their Operative Performance Feedback Needs: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, Ricardo J; Sarmiento, Samuel; Meyer, Meredith L; Rosson, Gedge D; Cooney, Damon S; Lifchez, Scott D; Cooney, Carisa M

    2018-04-20

    Operative performance feedback is essential for surgical training. We aimed to understand surgical trainees' views on their operative performance feedback needs and to characterize feedback to elucidate factors affecting its value from the resident perspective. Using a qualitative research approach, 2 research fellows conducted semistructured, one-on-one interviews with surgical trainees. We analyzed recurring themes generated during interviews related to feedback characteristics, as well as the extent to which performance rating tools can help meet trainees' operative feedback needs. Departments or divisions of general or plastic surgery at 9 US academic institutions. Surgical residents and clinical fellows in general or plastic surgery. We conducted 30 interviews with 9 junior residents, 14 senior residents, and 7 clinical fellows. Eighteen (60%) participants were in plastic and 12 (40%) were in general surgery. Twenty-four participants (80%) reported feedback as very or extremely important during surgical training. All trainees stated that verbal, face-to-face feedback is the most valuable, especially if occurring during (92%) or immediately after (65%) cases. Of those trainees using performance rating tools (74%), most (57%) expressed positive views about them but wanted the tools to complement and not replace verbal feedback in surgical education. Trainees value feedback more if received within 1 week or the case. Verbal, face-to-face feedback is very or extremely important to surgical trainees. Residents and fellows prefer to receive feedback during or immediately after a case and continue to value feedback if received within 1 week of the event. Performance rating tools can be useful for providing formative feedback and documentation but should not replace verbal, face-to-face feedback. Considering trainee views on feedback may help reduce perceived gaps in feedback demand-versus-supply in surgical training, which may be essential to overcoming current

  7. Effectiveness of the AAOS Leadership Fellows Program for Orthopaedic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Charles S; Tabrizi, Shervin; Kramer, Jeffrey; Yule, Arthur C; Ahn, Brian S

    2010-11-17

    Effective physician leadership is critical to the future success of healthcare organizations. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) Leadership Fellows Program is a one-year program designed to train young orthopaedic surgeons to become future leaders in orthopaedics. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of the AAOS Leadership Fellows Program on the leadership skills and achievements of its participants. Graduates of the Leadership Fellows Program were compared with a control group of previous applicants who were not accepted to the program (applicants) in a retrospective cohort comparison study. A subjective survey of leadership skills was used to assess the confidence of the two cohorts in eight areas of leadership. In addition, an updated curriculum vitae from each of sixty leadership fellows from the classes of 2003 through 2009 and from each of forty-seven applicants was retrospectively reviewed for evidence of leadership. The updated curriculum vitae of the leadership fellows was evaluated for leadership activity attained prior to and following participation in the program, while the updated curriculum vitae of applicants was evaluated for leadership activity attained prior to and following the last year of application to the program. Curricula vitae were assessed for demonstration of national leadership, academic rank, hospital administrative rank, and research experience. On the leadership survey, the graduates of the Leadership Fellows Program scored higher than the applicants in seven of eight categories. The review of the curricula vitae demonstrated that, prior to the Leadership Fellows Program, the leadership fellows were more likely than the applicants to have an academic practice and hold an academic rank. The difference between the two cohorts in administrative rank and leadership of national committees was not significant. Following the program, the leadership fellows were more likely to chair national committees (p

  8. Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses for Cardiology Fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fares, Munes; Alahdab, Fares; Alsaied, Tarek

    2016-07-01

    Participating in a scholarly activity is one of the training requirements for cardiology fellows. However, it can be very challenging to complete a research project during such a busy period of clinical training. To help the cardiology fellows in choosing and starting off a research project, a light has been shed on the process of conducting a systematic review, and the importance of this research activity, as well as its limitations. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Endoscopic training: A nationwide survey of French fellows in gastroenterology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiot, Aurélien; Conroy, Guillaume; Le Baleur, Yann; Winkler, Jérôme; Palazzo, Maxime; Treton, Xavier

    2018-04-01

    During their 4 years of training, French fellows in gastroenterology should acquire theoretical and practical competency in gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy. To evaluate the delivery of endoscopy training to French GI fellows and perception of learning. A nationwide electronic survey was carried out of French GI fellows using an anonymous, 17-item electronic questionnaire. A total of 291 out of 484 (60%) GI fellows responded to the survey. Only 40% of subjects had access to theoretical training and/or virtual simulators. Only 49% and 35% of fourth year fellows had reached the threshold numbers of EGD and colonoscopies recommended by the European section and Board of gastroenterology and hepatology. Sixty-two percent and 57% of trainees reported having insufficient knowledge in interpreting gastric and colic lesions. Access to dedicated endoscopy activity for at least 8 weeks during the year was the only independent factor associated with the achievement of the recommended annual threshold number of procedures. The access of fellows to theoretical training and to preclinical virtual simulators is still insufficient. Personalized support and regular assessment of cognitive and technical acquisition over the 4 years of training seems to be necessary. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Health Care Economics: A Study Guide for Neuroradiology Fellows, Part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, S L; Tu, R; Javan, R; Taheri, M R

    2018-01-01

    In this second article, we continue the review of current health care economics as it relates to radiologists, specifically framed by topics defined by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education in the evaluation of neuroradiology fellows. The discussion in this article is focused on topics pertaining to levels 4 and 5, which are the more advanced levels of competency defined by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Neuroradiology Milestones on Health Care Economics and System Based Practice. © 2018 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  11. ISOLDE PH team, from left to right: Jennifer Weterings (user support), Susanne Kreim (research fellow), Marek Pfützner (scientific associate), Maria Garcia Borge (team leader), Elisa Rapisarda (research fellow) , Magdalena Kowalska (physics coordinator), Jan Kurcewicz (applied fellow), Monika Stachura (applied fellow). Not in the photo: Kara Lynch (PhD student).

    CERN Multimedia

    Visual Media Office

    2013-01-01

    ISOLDE PH team, from left to right: Jennifer Weterings (user support), Susanne Kreim (research fellow), Marek Pfützner (scientific associate), Maria Garcia Borge (team leader), Elisa Rapisarda (research fellow) , Magdalena Kowalska (physics coordinator), Jan Kurcewicz (applied fellow), Monika Stachura (applied fellow). Not in the photo: Kara Lynch (PhD student).

  12. River-Based Experiential Learning: the Bear River Fellows Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, D. E.; Shirley, B.; Roark, M. F.

    2012-12-01

    The Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Outdoor Recreation, and Parks and Recreation programs at Utah State University (USU) have partnered to offer a new, unique river-based experiential learning opportunity for undergraduates called the Bear River Fellows Program. The program allows incoming freshmen Fellows to experience a river first hand during a 5-day/4-night river trip on the nearby Bear River two weeks before the start of their first Fall semester. As part of the program, Fellows will navigate the Bear River in canoes, camp along the banks, interact with local water and environmental managers, collect channel cross section, stream flow, vegetation cover, and topological complexity data, meet other incoming freshmen, interact with faculty and graduate students, develop boating and leadership skills, problem solve, and participate as full members of the trip team. Subsequently, Fellows will get paid as undergraduate researchers during their Fall and Spring Freshman semesters to analyze, synthesize, and present the field data they collect. The program is a collaborative effort between two USU academic units and the (non-academic) division of Student Services and supports a larger National Science Foundation funded environmental modelling and management project for the lower Bear River, Utah watershed. We have advertised the program via Facebook and emails to incoming USU freshmen, received 35 applications (60% women), and accepted 5 Fellows into the program (3 female and 2 male). The river trip departs August 14, 2012. The poster will overview the Bear River Fellows Program and present qualitative and preliminary outcomes emerging from the trip and Fellows' work through the Fall semester with the field data they collect. We will also undertake more rigorous and longer longitudinal quantitative evaluation of Program outcomes (for example, in problem-solving and leadership) both in Spring 2013 and in subsequent 2013 and 2014 offerings of the

  13. The Impact of Communication Skills Training on Cardiology Fellows' and Attending Physicians' Perceived Comfort with Difficult Conversations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlacher, Kathryn; Arnold, Robert M; Reitschuler-Cross, Eva; Teuteberg, Jeffrey; Teuteberg, Winifred

    2017-07-01

    Cardiologists need to decide which treatments are appropriate for seriously ill patients and whether they align with patient goals. Reconciling medical options with patients' wishes requires skilled communication. Although there is evidence that communication is teachable, few cardiologists receive formal training. To demonstrate that providing communication skills training to cardiologists is feasible and improves their perceived preparedness (PP) for leading difficult conversations. CardioTalk is a workshop to improve communication through short didactic sessions followed by interactions with standardized patients. Competencies include giving bad news, defining goals of care, responding to emotion, supporting religious beliefs, and withdrawing therapies. Settings/Subjects: First year cardiology fellows, heart failure fellows, and cardiac intensive care unit attendings. Surveys evaluated the curriculum's efficacy and learners' PP before and after the workshop. Eight cardiology attendings and 20 cardiology fellows participated. Eighty-nine percent reported having any prior education in communication. Fellows reported more prior education than attendings (100% vs. 62.5%, p = 0.017). Level of PP improved in all competencies for all learners. Ninety-six percent of respondents would recommend the training to peers. All attendings felt that it should be required for cardiologists in the cardiac intensive care unit and reported improved preparedness to teach communication to learners. All learners improved in levels of PP in communication competencies. CardioTalk is the first described training program that prepares cardiologists for the challenges they face when having conversations with seriously ill patients.

  14. The Critical Care Communication project: improving fellows' communication skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Robert M; Back, Anthony L; Barnato, Amber E; Prendergast, Thomas J; Emlet, Lillian L; Karpov, Irina; White, Patrick H; Nelson, Judith E

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an evidence-based communication skills training workshop to improve the communication skills of critical care fellows. Pulmonary and critical care fellows (N = 38) participated in a 3-day communication skills workshop between 2008 and 2010 involving brief didactic talks, faculty demonstration of skills, and faculty-supervised small group skills practice sessions with simulated families. Skills included the following: giving bad news, achieving consensus on goals of therapy, and discussing the limitations of life-sustaining treatment. Participants rated their skill levels in a pre-post survey in 11 core communication tasks using a 5-point Likert scale. Of 38 fellows, 36 (95%) completed all 3 days of the workshop. We compared pre and post scores using the Wilcoxon signed rank test. Overall, self-rated skills increased for all 11 tasks. In analyses by participant, 95% reported improvement in at least 1 skill; with improvement in a median of 10 of 11 skills. Ninety-two percent rated the course as either very good/excellent, and 80% recommended that it be mandatory for future fellows. This 3-day communication skills training program increased critical care fellows' self-reported family meeting communication skills. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The fellow eye of patients with phakic lattice retinal detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folk, J C; Arrindell, E L; Klugman, M R

    1989-01-01

    A retrospective study was performed to determine whether the prophylactic treatment of areas of lattice degeneration, holes, or breaks reduced the risk of subsequent new breaks or detachment in the fellow undetached phakic eyes of patients with a phakic lattice retinal detachment (RD). Three hundred eighty-eight consecutive patients who presented to the University of Iowa between 1959 and 1984 were followed for a mean of 7.9 +/- 5.8 years after the detachment in the first eye. Fellow eyes which received no prophylactic treatment had a 2.5 times greater risk of a new break or RD over 7 years than eyes receiving full prophylactic treatment (19.4 versus 7.5%; P = 0.0002). Fellow eyes receiving no treatment also had a greater risk of a new RD over 7 years than eyes receiving full treatment (5.1 versus 1.8%; P = 0.0125). These results do not allow us to make recommendations concerning which fellow eyes, if any, should be prophylactically treated. On the one hand, prophylactic treatment did significantly reduce the risk of new breaks and detachments. On the other hand, however, prophylactic treatment reduced the risk of new RD alone in the fellow eye only from 5.1 to 1.8% over 7 years. In addition, prophylactic treatment did not reduce the risk of detachment in the higher risk eyes with high myopia or extensive lattice.

  16. New fellows | Announcements | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... of Medical Sciences, New Delhi; S K Bhowmik, Indian Institute of Technology, ... Souvik Mahapatra, Indian Institute of Technology, Mumbai; Prabal K Maiti, Indian ... Math Art and Design: MAD about Math, Math Education and Outreach.

  17. Maternal-Fetal Medicine Physician and Fellow Perceptions of Business in Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Blake; Iriye, Brian; Ghamsary, Mark

    2018-01-01

     Principles of practice management provide a foundation for clinical success and performance improvement. Scant data exist regarding maternal-fetal medicine (MFM) physicians' knowledge of these topics. We hypothesize that physicians enter practice with inadequate education in practice management.  Surveys were emailed to members of the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine rating their knowledge and capabilities in practice management topics, and respondents assessed their current institution's business in the medical curriculum.  A total of 325 (14.4%) physicians responded: 63 fellows in training and 262 MFM physician subspecialists. Practicing physicians reported learning most of their knowledge "in practice after fellowship" (85%) or "never at all" (10%). Only 3% of respondents had adequate business education during fellowship, and only 5% felt prepared to teach business principles. However, 85% of those surveyed agreed that this material should be taught during the fellowship. Among MFM subspecialists and fellows in training at institutions with fellowships, 60% reported no current curriculum for practice management, and those with current curricula reported it had "limited" or "no value" (76%).  There is a significant desire for practice management curricula during MFM fellowship, and current training is insufficient. With many MFM physicians ill-prepared to teach these principles, professional education from other financial fields, and standardized education in practice management from current expert sources is needed. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  18. A jolly good call for Marie Curie Fellows

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    A new funding opportunity to train young researchers has just been announced by the European Commission. One of the calls within FP7 Marie Curie Actions requests proposals for Initial Training Network (ITN) projects, with a deadline of 22 December 2009. Project proposals are strongly encouraged at CERN and authors can receive support and guidance from the Marie Curie Steering Group. Winnie Wong: "I wouldn’t have considered a PhD if I hadn’t been a Marie Curie fellow" Dan Savu: "It’s the best of both worlds: training plus working in an international organisation" ITN projects have one key aim: training. Academic and industrial partners work together to form a network to recruit and train Marie Curie Fellows. Fellows are young researchers (typically PhD-level) from any country who combine project-based research with tailor-made training programmes, ...

  19. New fellows | Announcements | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aninda J Bhattacharyya, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru; Suvendra N Bhattacharyya, CSIR-Indian Institute of Chemical Biology, Kolkata; Mitali Chatterjee, Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education & Research, Kolkata; Prasanta K Das, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Kolkata; Swapan K Datta, ...

  20. Meet ORISE Research Fellow Nisha S. Sipes, Ph.D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisha S. Sipes is an ORISE Research Fellow in EPA’s innovative National Center for Computational Toxicology. She and her colleagues are changing the way toxicity testing is done by researching ways to make it faster, more efficient, and more informative

  1. 34 CFR 1100.20 - How is a fellow selected?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... LITERACY NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR LITERACY: LITERACY LEADER FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM How Does the Director Award a Fellowship? § 1100.20 How is a fellow selected? (a) The Director selects applications for fellowships on the basis of the selection criteria in § 1100.21 and any priorities that have been published in the Federal...

  2. Former Nonproliferation Graduate Fellow Served at U.S. Mission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brim, Cornelia P.

    2014-10-01

    Because of her training and professional experiences, Rosalyn Leitch, a Security Specialist at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and former Nonproliferation Graduate Fellow with NIS (2012-2013) was able to transition into temporary assignment as UNVIE Acting Nuclear Security Attaché from November 2013 through February 2014.

  3. Practicing Statistics by Creating Exercises for Fellow Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebermeier, Sarah; Reiss, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    This article outlines the execution of a workshop in which students were encouraged to actively review the course contents on descriptive statistics by creating exercises for their fellow students. In a first-year statistics course in psychology, 39 out of 155 students participated in the workshop. In a subsequent evaluation, the workshop was…

  4. Fellow eye treatment in excimer photo refractive keratectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rao Srinivas

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To describe symmetry of response in fellow eyes of patients undergoing photorefractive keratectomy (PRK for myopia, analyse the risk factors leading to asymmetry in response and to determine if delayed treatment of the second eye increases safety and predictability of PRK. Methods: Retrospective review of case records of 133 patients who underwent bilateral myopic PRK and had a minimum follow up of 6 months in both eyes. Results: Postoperative uncorrected visual acuity, spherical equivalent (SE refraction within ±1D of emmetropia, best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA and corneal haze were not significantly different in fellow eyes of patients undergoing PRK for myopia. Of 87 eyes in group 1 (myopia <6D, 96.6% had uncorrected visual acuity ≥6/ 12, 89.7% were within ±1D of emmetropia, none lost ≥1 line BCVA, and none had haze ≥grade 3. Similar results for 98 eyes in group II (myopia 6 to 9.9D were 75.6%, 55.1%, 2.0% and 2.0% respectively. For 81 eyes in group III (myopia ≥ 10D the results were 42.7%, 33.3%, 8.6%, and 4.9% respectively. Among 84 patients with similar preoperative myopia in both eyes, 54 (64.3% patients had a postoperative SE difference ≤ ID in fellow eyes. Risk factors for asymmetric response among fellow eyes included increasing preoperative myopia (p<0.001 and dissimilar treatment technique in the two eyes (p=0.03. Corneal haze did not increase significantly after the third postoperative month. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that considerable symmetry of response exists in fellow eyes of patients undergoing myopic PRK. Early PRK in the fellow eye of patients with < 6 D myopia is safe and allows quick visual rehabilitation of the patient. In patients with myopia ≥6D, a 3-month interval before treating the second eye may improve the safety of the procedure.

  5. Using employee experts to offer an interprofessional diabetes risk reduction program to fellow employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Thomas L; Gillespie, Nicole D; Skrabal, Maryann Z; Faulkner, Michele A; Skradski, Jessica J; Ferguson, Liz A; Pagenkemper, Joni J; Moore, Geri A; Jorgensen, Diane

    2013-03-01

    A recent increase in the incidence of diabetes and pre-diabetes is causing many employers to spend more of their healthcare benefit budgets to manage the conditions. A self-insured university in the USA has implemented an interprofessional diabetes mellitus risk reduction program using its own employee faculty and staff experts to help fellow employees manage their diabetes and pre-diabetes. The interprofessional team consists of five pharmacists, a dietitian, an exercise physiologist, a health educator and a licensed mental health practitioner. In addition, the participant's physician serves as a consultant to the program, as does a human resources healthcare benefits specialist and a wellness coordinator. The volunteer program takes place at the worksite during regular business hours and is free of charge to the employees. The faculty and staff delivering the program justify the cost of their time through an interprofessional educational model that the program will soon provide to university students.

  6. Training residents/fellows in paediatric cardiology: the Emory experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Robert M

    2016-12-01

    Pediatric cardiology fellowship is a very busy time, with new responsibilities, new knowledge, new technology and fast pace. Above and beyond the science and art of pediatric cardiology, we emphasize that our cardiology fellows are in the middle of the "people business", with additional roles and responsibilities as they serve their patients and communities. This manuscript provides insight into these opportunities for our pediatric cardiac professionals.

  7. Astronaut Stephen Oswald and fellow crew members on middeck

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Astronaut Stephen S. Oswald (center), STS-67 mission commander, is seen with two of his fellow crew members and an experiment which required a great deal of his time on the middeck of the Earth orbiting Space Shuttle Endeavour. Astronaut John M. Grunsfeld inputs mission data on a computer while listening to a cassette. Astronaut William G. Gregory (right edge of frame), pilot, consults a check list. The Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE), not in use here, can be seen in upper center.

  8. Leading the Way to America's Future: A Monograph about the Launch and Implementation of the Kellogg MSI Leadership Fellows Program, 2002-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Institute for Higher Education Policy, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The basic objective of the Kellogg MSI Leadership Fellows Program is to develop a new cadre of skilled leaders who understand the unique and important context of leadership for Minority Serving Institutions (MSIs). These institutions have taken on responsibility for educating large numbers of students of color. A college or university is…

  9. CERN Fellows, don’t splash that cash!

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2013-01-01

    When their CERN contracts expire and they leave the Organization, Fellows recoup the amounts paid into the Pension Fund by and for them every month. If they invest this money well, right from the outset, it can grow into a nice little nest-egg by the time they reach retirement age.   As employed members of the CERN personnel, Fellows are members of the Organization’s Pension Fund. Accordingly, a specific amount is withheld from their salary every month (see first box) and, as the months go by, this gradually accumulates into their transfer value (i.e. their capital). When their contracts expire, Fellows may opt to transfer that money directly into another pension fund (subject to the national laws of the destination country and, unfortunately, not possible everywhere), or take it in cash. This is because only employed members of the personnel who have at least five years of service with the Organization are entitled to remain beneficiaries of the CERN Pension Fund for life*. But the capi...

  10. The Science Teaching Fellows Program: A Model for Online Faculty Development of Early Career Scientists Interested in Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brancaccio-Taras, Loretta; Gull, Kelly A; Ratti, Claudia

    2016-12-01

    The American Society for Microbiology (ASM) has a history of providing a wide range of faculty development opportunities. Recently, ASM developed the Science Teaching Fellows Program (STF) for early career biologists and postdoctoral students to explore student-centered teaching and develop the skills needed to succeed in positions that have a significant teaching component. Participants were selected to STF through a competitive application process. The STF program consisted of a series of six webinars. In preparation for each webinar, participants completed a pre-webinar assignment. After each webinar, fellows practiced what they learned by completing a post-webinar assignment. In a survey used to assess the impact of STF, participants reported greater knowledge of the webinar-based instructional topics and a sense of being part of an educational community and were more confident about varied teaching methods.

  11. Residents' and Fellows' Knowledge and Attitudes About Eating Disorders at an Academic Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kristen; Accurso, Erin C; Kinasz, Kathryn R; Le Grange, Daniel

    2017-06-01

    This study examined physician residents' and fellows' knowledge of eating disorders and their attitudes toward patients with eating disorders. Eighty physicians across disciplines completed a survey. The response rate for this survey across disciplines was 64.5 %. Participants demonstrated limited knowledge of eating disorders and reported minimal comfort levels treating patients with eating disorders. Psychiatry discipline (p = 0.002), eating disorder experience (p = 0.010), and having ≥4 eating disorder-continuing medical education credits (p = 0.037) predicted better knowledge of anorexia nervosa but not bulimia nervosa. Psychiatry residents (p = 0.041), and those who had treated at least one eating disorder patient (p = 0.006), reported significantly greater comfort treating patients with eating disorders. These results suggest that residents and fellows from this sample may benefit from training to increase awareness and confidence necessary to treat patients with eating disorders. Sufficient knowledge and comfort are critical since physicians are often the first health care provider to have contact with patients who have undiagnosed eating disorders.

  12. Ethics and professionalism education during neonatal-perinatal fellowship training in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, C L; Geis, G M; Kesselheim, J C; Sayeed, S

    2015-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the perceived adequacy of ethics and professionalism education for neonatal-perinatal fellows in the United States, and to measure confidence of fellows and recent graduates when navigating ethical issues. Neonatal-Perinatal Fellowship Directors, fellows and recent graduates were surveyed regarding the quality and type of such education during training, and perceived confidence of fellows/graduates in confronting ethical dilemmas. Forty-six of 97 Directors (47%) and 82 of 444 fellows/graduates (18%) completed the surveys. Over 97% of respondents agreed that ethics training is 'important/very important'. Only 63% of Directors and 37% of fellows/graduates rated ethics education as 'excellent/very good' (P=0.004). While 96% of Directors reported teaching of ethics, only 70% of fellows/graduates reported such teaching (Pethics and professionalism for fellows is important, yet currently insufficient; a more standardized curriculum may be beneficial to ensure that trainees achieve competency.

  13. [Man and his fellow-creatures under ethical aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teutsch, Gotthard M

    2005-01-01

    's excessive meat consumption as a "cruel necessity". Klaus Peter Joern also enters into Schweitzer's fundamental argumentation in his "A good bye to the disparagement of our fellow creatures". Quotation: "It just cannot go on that Christianity lets the validity of the commandment of love end at the behaviour towards humans, simply because that is the tradition. We rather have to, in this instance, deny the authority of the Bible it's due respect, as this has deemed Schweitzer already inevitable." The killing of animals, irrespective of the motives, remains a critical issue in the understanding (or the lack thereof) with regard to the dignity of all creation. Manuela Linnemann, Charles Patterson, Evelyn Ofensberger and the German Veterinary Association for the Protection of Animals have dealt with this issue extensively. As always, more space is taken up by publications dealing with legal questions and developments. In particular, the conference report of the Protestant Academy at Bad Boll should be mentioned "Animal protection on good constitution". Contributions to this report, edited by the academy, include Hans Georg Kluge's "The governmental aim 'animal protection' and it's implementation in jurisdiction" and Johannes Caspar's "effects of the governmental goal 'animal protection' in the protected area of unconditional fundamental rights". Regarding animal experiments, the last two position papers commissioned by the Foundation for animal-free research (FFVFF), dealing with perspectives of 3R research, have been published within the period of time covered by this report. Alternatives in basic research (with once again rising numbers of experimental animals) and in biomedical education are the themes dealt with by Franz P. Gruber and his co-authors Thomas Hartung and David Dewhurst.

  14. May we eat our fellow creatures? Virtues and animal ethics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myskja, B.K.; Gjerris, Mickey

    2016-01-01

    for veganism holds that industrial meat production is by necessity cruel and partaking in it is not virtuous. Diamond agrees that fellow creatures should not be regarded as stages in the production of a meat product but she admits that this attitude to animals as worthy of respect and compassion does...... not necessarily lead to veganism. We suggest that one possible case of virtuous non-veganism is eating domestic animals that lead good lives and are humanely slaughtered. Another could be eating wild animals that could be worse off unless some of them are killed through humane hunting practices...

  15. 800 Fellows at CERN: Make your voice heard!

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2018-01-01

    The financial and social conditions of the CERN personnel are determined in agreement between the CERN Management and the Staff Association (SA), the statutory body representing the personnel. The Staff Association is mandated to serve and defend the economic, social, professional and moral interests of its members and the entire CERN personnel. Fellows are members of the personnel employed by CERN (MPE), and should be listened to and heard during discussions that concern their financial and social conditions and, more widely, their working and employment conditions. The Staff Association wants to hear from you! At the end of 2017, 50 delegates were elected to the Staff Council, including four fellows. These delegates are your spokespersons within the Staff Association and, as such, they represent you in relations with the Management and the Member States. How can you make a difference? In 2015, during the latest five-yearly review, the aim of which was to review the financial and social conditions of the mem...

  16. Presidential Management Fellows (PMF) Talent Acquisition System, PMF-TAS (ACCESS CONTROLLED)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — Application and Assessment system for Presidential Management Fellows (PMF) and PMF Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) programs. This sytem is access...

  17. The SAFE-T assessment tool: derivation and validation of a web-based application for point-of-care evaluation of gastroenterology fellow performance in colonoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Navin L; Kugener, Guillaume; Perencevich, Molly L; Saltzman, John R

    2018-01-01

    Attending assessment is a critical part of endoscopic education for gastroenterology fellows. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a concise assessment tool to evaluate real-time fellow performance in colonoscopy administered via a web-based application. The Skill Assessment in Fellow Endoscopy Training (SAFE-T) tool was derived as a novel 5-question evaluation tool that captures both summative and formative feedback adapted into a web-based application. A prospective study of 15 gastroenterology fellows (5 fellows each from years 1 to 3 of training) was performed using the SAFE-T tool. An independent reviewer evaluated a subset of these procedures and completed the SAFE-T tool and Mayo Colonoscopy Skills Assessment Tool (MCSAT) for reliability testing. Twenty-six faculty completed 350 SAFE-T evaluations of the 15 fellows in the study. The mean SAFE-T overall score (year 1, 2.00; year 2, 3.84; year 3, 4.28) differentiated each sequential fellow year of training (P case complexity score, with straightforward cases compared with average cases (4.07 vs 3.50, P cases compared with challenging cases (3.50 vs 3.08, P = .0134). In dual-observed procedures, the SAFE-T tool showed excellent inter-rater reliability with a kappa agreement statistic of 0.898 (P  0.90, P tool, a concise and web-based means of assessing real-time gastroenterology fellow performance in colonoscopy. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Society News: Workshop helps new GJI authors; Free eBook for schools; EGU awards medal; AGU elects Fellow; Support your Society; New Fellows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Early-career researchers and postgraduates are invited to attend an Author Workshop at the 2012 European Geosciences Union General Assembly in Vienna. The following were elected Fellows of the Society on 10 February 2012:

  19. [Man and his fellow-creatures under ethical aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teutsch, Gotthard M

    2003-01-01

    It may not be spectacular, but the compilation of a new comment on the German Animal Protection Law before the background of the new constitution is the most important medium and long-term event since the inclusion of animal protection into the constitution in Germany. The comment was also occasion to mark the ethically motivated change in the awareness of society, which has strengthened continuously since the eighties, not only entering the law as the "responsibility of mankind for animals as fellow creatures" but also posing a question to the ethicists, who have since been searching for answers. Eisenhart von Loeper who wrote the "Introduction to the law on the relationship between man and animal" and the comment on the first principle paragraph followed these endeavours of theology and philosophy. Under point 6.3 of this report on the literature some important results are summarised under the keywords "species-spanning humanity", "fellow creaturism", "anthropocentrism-criticism", "principle of equality" and "equity and rights of animals". Significant differences are evident in the comparison of the different concepts that have been developed in animal ethics, also regarding the expanse of the demands made for the benefit of the animals. The general opinion in philosophy that animal ethics and animal protection can only apply to the higher developed animals points towards a tendency to consider only a kind of "animal elite" morally relevant and worthy of protection and to exclude the mass of others as soulless automats by keeping the status quo and exposing them to indiscriminate use by humans. Species-spanning equality must be decidedly demanded.

  20. Fellows' Perceptions of a Mandatory Reflective Electronic Portfolio in a Geriatric Medicine Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Jorge G.; Qadri, Syeda S.; Karides, Marina; Castillo, Carmen; Milanez, Marcos; Roos, Bernard A.

    2009-01-01

    Electronic portfolios (ePortfolios) can be useful for evaluating and documenting mastery of competencies. We investigated geriatric medicine fellows' perceptions of an ePortfolio. We conducted surveys and focus groups followed by quantitative and qualitative data analysis. Our study revealed that fellows considered the ePortfolio acceptable and…

  1. Frequency of lattice degeneration and retinal breaks in the fellow eye in retinal detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorentzen, S E

    1988-04-01

    The fellow eye of 100 consecutively admitted cases of retinal detachment was studied with three-mirror examination for the presence of lattice degeneration and retinal breaks. Lattice degeneration was found in 18% and retinal breaks in 20% of fellow eyes.

  2. NREL Senior Research Fellow Honored by The Journal of Physical Chemistry |

    Science.gov (United States)

    News | NREL 7 » NREL Senior Research Fellow Honored by The Journal of Physical Chemistry News Release: NREL Senior Research Fellow Honored by The Journal of Physical Chemistry January 10, 2007 The Journal of Physical Chemistry B. The Dec. 21 issue was titled The Arthur J. Nozik Festschrift (Volume 110

  3. Assessment of Medical Student and Resident/Fellow Knowledge, Comfort, and Training With Sexual History Taking in LGBTQ Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Victoria; Blondeau, Whitney; Bing-You, Robert G

    2015-05-01

    Sexual health is an important aspect of overall health. Barriers to taking an adequate patient sexual history exist. Few studies have explored medical learners' comfort, knowledge, and training surrounding taking sexual histories with lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, questioning/queer (LGBTQ) patients specifically. A 10-question survey was offered to medical students and resident/fellows at one US institution. Survey questions reflected participants' knowledge, comfort, and training related to sexual history taking with attention to LGBTQ care. A total of 159 surveys were returned (rate of 42%). A significantly lower level of comfort existed with taking sexual histories and managing sexual health issues in the LGBTQ segment of the patient population versus all patients, especially in the advanced training group. Participants recognized the importance of understanding their patients' overall sexual health, though medical students rated this as more important than the resident/fellow group did. A correlation existed between both comfort with taking sexual histories and discussing safe sexual practices and management of sexual issues, suggesting that further training would be helpful in this area. Twenty percent of the respondents reported receiving no training at all in eliciting sexual histories in LGBTQ patients. The most preferred format in this study for future training was interviewing standardized patients. Medical students and resident/fellows reported a significantly lower level of comfort with sexual history-taking and management of sexual issues in the LGBTQ population. A comprehensive training format that not only views sexual health as an integral part of overall patient health, but also integrates LGBTQ care, is needed in medical education.

  4. Does training of fellows affect peri-operative outcomes of robot-assisted partial nephrectomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khene, Zine-Eddine; Peyronnet, Benoit; Bosquet, Elise; Pradère, Benjamin; Robert, Corentin; Fardoun, Tarek; Kammerer-Jacquet, Solène-Florence; Verhoest, Grégory; Rioux-Leclercq, Nathalie; Mathieu, Romain; Bensalah, Karim

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the impact of fellows' involvement on the peri-operative outcomes of robot-assisted partial nephrectomy (RAPN). We analysed 216 patients who underwent RAPN for a small renal tumour. We stratified our cohort into two groups according to the involvement of a fellow surgeon during the procedure: expert surgeon operating alone (expert group) and fellow operating under the supervision of the expert surgeon (fellow group). Peri-operative data were compared between the two groups. Linear and logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the impact of fellows' involvement on peri-operative and postoperative outcomes. Trifecta and margins ischaemia complications (MIC) score achievement rates were used to assess the quality of surgery in both the expert and fellow groups. Trifecta was defined as a combination of warm ischaemia time negative surgical margins and no peri-operative complications. MIC score was defined as negative surgical margins, ischaemia time Training fellows to perform RAPN is associated with longer operating time and WIT but does not appear to compromise other peri-operative outcomes. © 2017 The Authors BJU International © 2017 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Final evaluation of the 2005 to 2007 National Pediatric Emergency Medicine Fellows' Conferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, David M; Knapp, Jane F; Jeffe, Donna B

    2009-05-01

    Evaluate the effectiveness of the 2005 to 2007 National Pediatric Emergency Medicine (PEM) Fellows Conference series in achieving predefined objectives in the domains of scholarship, leadership, and partnership. Conference attendees included fellows in the existing PEM fellowship programs. Self-administered preconference and postconference questionnaires measured knowledge, research-related confidence, beliefs about institutional support for Emergency Medical Services for Children (EMSC) research, and intentions to engage in 7 specific behaviors relating to scholarship, leadership, and partnership. Pearson product-moment correlations measured relationships among continuous variables. Repeated-measures analysis of variance measured change between preconference and postconference measures. Hierarchical multiple linear regression models identified predictors of postconference intentions to engage in each of the 7 specific behaviors, controlling for preconference intention. Approximately one third of all PEM fellows attended the conference each year. Preconference and postconference questionnaires were completed by at least 70% of attendees each year. Because several fellows attended more than one conference, data were analyzed from the first conference that a fellow attended. In each year, we observed significant increases in attendees' conference-specific knowledge, confidence, and intentions to continue in EMSC research, join national collaborative research networks, and establish national mentoring relationships. The National PEM Fellows' Conference is an effective means to increasing fellows' knowledge about scholarship, leadership, and partnership in EMSC and increasing their confidence and intentions to conduct research in EMSC.

  6. Summary reports of doctoral research fellows in 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-07-01

    JNC (Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute) has been promoting the fellowship program for young scientists to encourage their expertise from 1997. The objective of this program is to raise the talented persons for future JNC activities. This report summarized the status on the 17 themes of researches implemented by young research fellows in 1999. The report includes the list of individual titles and the site and supporting staffs of JNC. The individual reports given by 17 authors describe its time schedule, status, achievements and own publications in the prearranged format. Topics include the followings; Those are giant resonance structures of short lifetime nuclei, growth of cavities in structural materials, calculation methods of photonuclear interaction cross-section, stability and radioactivity diffusion of bentonite, plant ecology of radioactivity in uranium mines, numerical simulations on the TRUEX process, advanced nondestructive testing of materials, physical properties of actinides obtained by band theory, de-oxidisation capability in pyrite to decrease oxygen in bentonite, investigation on equilibrium fast reactor recycling, behaviors of underground water in the Tono Mine, effects of radiation induced educts on swelling, simulation on fuel-coolant interaction after severe accidents, and resonance ionization mass spectrometry for the JOYO reactor to detect failed fuel locations. (Tanaka, Y.)

  7. The effects of placing an operational research fellow within the Viet Nam National Tuberculosis Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoa, N B; Nhung, N V; Kumar, A M V; Harries, A D

    2016-12-21

    In April 2009, an operational research fellow was placed within the Viet Nam National Tuberculosis Control Programme (NTP). Over the 6 years from 2010 to 2015, the OR fellow co-authored 21 tuberculosis research papers (as principal author in 15 [71%]). This constituted 23% of the 91 tuberculosis papers published in Viet Nam during this period. Of the 21 published papers, 16 (76%) contributed to changes in policy ( n = 8) and practice ( n = 8), and these in turn improved programme performance. Many papers also contributed important evidence for better programme planning. Highly motivated OR fellows embedded within NTPs can facilitate high-quality research and research uptake.

  8. Announcing the 2016 Toxins Travel Awards for Post-Doctoral Fellows and Ph.D. Students

    OpenAIRE

    Tesh, Vernon L.

    2016-01-01

    With the goal of promoting the development of early career investigators in the field of toxinology, Toxins welcomed applications for the 2016 Toxins Travel Awards for post-doctoral fellows and Ph.D. students. [...

  9. Announcing the 2016 Toxins Travel Awards for Post-Doctoral Fellows and Ph.D. Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernon L. Tesh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available With the goal of promoting the development of early career investigators in the field of toxinology, Toxins welcomed applications for the 2016 Toxins Travel Awards for post-doctoral fellows and Ph.D. students. [...

  10. Maury Nussbaum reappointed as Hal G. Prillaman Professor Fellow in Industrial and Systems Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Owczarski, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Maury Nussbaum, professor of industrial and systems engineering in the College of Engineering at Virginia Tech, has been reappointed as the Hal G. Prillaman Professor Fellow in Industrial and Systems Engineering by the Virginia Tech Board of Visitors.

  11. Heather Switzer named American Association of University Women American Dissertation Fellow

    OpenAIRE

    Chadwick, Heather Riley

    2008-01-01

    Heather Switzer, planning, governance, and globalization doctoral student in the School of Public and International Affairs at Virginia Tech, has been named an American Association of University Women American Dissertation Fellow.

  12. General surgery training without laparoscopic surgery fellows: the impact on residents and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linn, John G; Hungness, Eric S; Clark, Sara; Nagle, Alexander P; Wang, Edward; Soper, Nathaniel J

    2011-10-01

    To evaluate resident case volume after discontinuation of a laparoscopic surgery fellowship, and to examine disparities in patient care over the same time period. Resident case logs were compared for a 2-year period before and 1 year after discontinuing the fellowship, using a 2-sample t test. Databases for bariatric and esophageal surgery were reviewed to compare operative time, length of stay (LOS), and complication rate by resident or fellow over the same time period using a 2-sample t test. Increases were seen in senior resident advanced laparoscopic (Mean Fellow Year = 21 operations vs Non Fellow Year = 61, P surgery. Operative time for complex operations may increase in the absence of a fellow. Other patient outcomes are not affected by this change. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Quantitative Evaluation of the Community Research Fellows Training Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy eD'Agostino McGowan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Context: The Community Research Fellows Training (CRFT program is a community-based participatory research (CBPR initiative for the St. Louis area. This fifteen week program, based on a Master in Public Health curriculum, was implemented by the Division of Public Health Sciences at Washington University School of Medicine in partnership with the Siteman Cancer Center. Objectives: We measure the knowledge gained by participants and evaluate participant and faculty satisfaction of the CRFT program both in terms of meeting learning objectives and actively engaging the community in the research process.Participants: We conducted analyses on 44 community members who participated in the CRFT program and completed the baseline and follow-up knowledge assessments.Main Outcome Measures: Knowledge gain is measured by a baseline and follow-up assessment given at the first and final session. Additionally, pre- and post-tests are given after the first 12 sessions. To measure satisfaction, program evaluations are completed by both the participants and faculty after each topic. Mid-way through the program, a mid-term assessment was administered to assess the program’s community engagement. We analyzed the results from the assessments, pre- and post-tests, and evaluations.Results: The CRFT participants’ knowledge increased at follow-up as compared with baseline on average by a 16.5 point difference (p<0.0001. Post-test scores were higher than pre-test scores for 11 of the 12 sessions. Both participants and faculty enjoyed the training and rated all session well.Conclusions: The CRFT program was successful in increasing community knowledge, in participant satisfaction, and in faculty satisfaction. This success has enhanced the infrastructure for CBPR as well as led to CBPR pilot projects that address health disparities in the St. Louis Greater Metropolitan Area.

  14. An active learning curriculum improves fellows' knowledge and faculty teaching skills: a medical student perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad M

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Mubariz Ahmad, Nourah AlHennawi, Maaham AhmedManchester Medical School, The University of Manchester, Manchester, UKWe read with great interest the article by Inra et al1 which discusses the benefits of using an active learning curriculum to improve faculty teaching skills and help fellows retain more knowledge compared to traditional teaching methods. As current medical students, we can vouch for the effectiveness of this approach in improving the way material can be taught, hence would like to offer our perspective on this.  Authors’ replyJennifer A Inra,1,2 Stephen Pelletier,2 Navin L Kumar,1,2 Edward L Barnes,3,4 Helen M Shields1,21Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Endoscopy, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, 2Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, 3Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, 4University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC, USAWe appreciate the thoughtful comments received from Ahmed et al regarding our article “An active learning curriculum improves fellows’ knowledge and faculty teaching”.1 The educational literature supports the recommendation that the optimal timing for a lecture is 10-15 minutes, as a student’s attention may wander or wane after that time.2 This ideal time limit stems from a paperby Hartley in 1978, which recommends this optimal time frame.3View the original paper by Inra and colleagues  

  15. The undergraduate research fellows program: a unique model to promote engagement in research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vessey, Judith A; DeMarco, Rosanna F

    2008-01-01

    Well-educated nurses with research expertise are needed to advance evidence-based nursing practice. A primary goal of undergraduate nursing curricula is to create meaningful participatory experiences to help students develop a research skill set that articulates with rapid career advancement of gifted, young graduates interested in nursing research and faculty careers. Three research enrichment models-undergraduate honors programs, research assistant work-for-hire programs, and research work/mentorship programs-to be in conjunction with standard research content are reviewed. The development and implementation of one research work/mentorship program, the Boston College undergraduate research fellows program (UGRF), is explicated. This process included surveying previous UGRFs followed by creating a retreat and seminars to address specific research skill sets. The research skill sets included (a) how to develop a research team, (b) accurate data retrieval, (c) ethical considerations, (d) the research process, (e) data management, (f) successful writing of abstracts, and (g) creating effective poster presentations. Outcomes include evidence of involvement in research productivity and valuing of evidenced-based practice through the UGRF mentorship process with faculty partners.

  16. Benchmarking Telestroke Proficiency: Page-to-Needle Time Among Neurovascular Fellows and Attendings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagolino-Cole, Amanda L; Bozorgui, Shima; Ankrom, Christy M; Bambhroliya, Arvind B; Cossey, Tiffany D; Trevino, Alyssa D; Savitz, Sean I; Wu, Tzu-Ching; Vahidy, Farhaan S

    2017-09-01

    Formal telestroke training for neurovascular fellows (NVFs) is necessary because of growing use of telestroke technologies in the management of acute ischemic stroke; yet, educational approaches and training benchmarks are not formalized. Time between telestroke consultant page and tissue-type plasminogen activator administration (page-to-needle time, PTNT) can provide an objective measure of proficiency. We compared PTNT between NVFs and neurovascular attendings (NVAs) and evaluated changes in PTNT with experience. We identified suspected acute ischemic stroke patients in our telestroke registry from July 2013 to December 2015 who received tissue-type plasminogen activator. Using multivariable quantile regression, we estimated the difference and 95% confidence interval in median PTNT between NVFs and NVAs. We also report the coefficient of change in PTNT over increasing number of telestroke consults. NVFs evaluated 53.7% of 618 tissue-type plasminogen activator cases over telestroke. NVAs had significantly shorter PTNT compared with NVFs, with a difference in median PTNT of -9 minutes (95% confidence interval, -12.3 to -5.7). This difference persisted when adjusted for relative tissue-type plasminogen activator contraindications. For each additional telestroke consult, PTNT decreased by 0.07 minutes for NVFs or NVAs ( P =0.02 and importance of integrating telestroke training into supervised neurovascular fellowships to increase proficiency prior to independent practice and suggest that PTNT can be a benchmark for tracking proficiency. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Scientific Production of Research Fellows at the Zagreb University School of Medicine, Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polašek, Ozren; Kolčić, Ivana; Buneta, Zoran; Čikeš, Nada; Pećina, Marko

    2006-01-01

    Aim To evaluate scientific production among research fellows employed at the Zagreb University School of Medicine and identify factors associated with their scientific output. Method We conducted a survey among research fellows and their mentors during June 2005. The main outcome measure was publication success, defined for each fellow as publishing at least 0.5 articles per employment year in journals indexed in the Current Contents bibliographic database. Bivariate methods and binary logistic regression were used in data analysis. Results A total of 117 fellows (response rate 95%) and 83 mentors (100%) were surveyed. The highest scientific production was recorded among research fellows employed in public health departments (median 3.0 articles, interquartile range 4.0), compared with those from pre-clinical (median 0.0, interquartile range 2.0) and clinical departments (median 1.0, interquartile range 2.0) (Kruskal-Wallis, P = 0.003). A total of 36 (29%) research fellows published at least 0.5 articles per employment year and were considered successful. Three variables were associated with fellows’ publication success: mentor’s scientific production (odds ratio [OR], 3.14; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.31-7.53), positive mentor’s assessment (OR, 3.15; 95% CI, 1.10-9.05), and fellows’ undergraduate publication in journals indexed in the Current Contents bibliographic database (OR, 4.05; 95% CI, 1.07-15.34). Conclusion Undergraduate publication could be used as one of the main criteria in selecting research fellows. One of the crucial factors in a fellow’s scientific production and career advancement is mentor’s input, which is why research fellows would benefit most from working with scientifically productive mentors. PMID:17042070

  18. Burnout, career satisfaction, and well-being among US neurology residents and fellows in 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Kerry H; Shanafelt, Tait D; Keran, Christopher M; Busis, Neil A; Foster, Laura A; Molano, Jennifer Rose V; O'Donovan, Cormac A; Ratliff, Jeffrey B; Schwarz, Heidi B; Sloan, Jeff A; Cascino, Terrence L

    2017-08-01

    To study prevalence of and factors contributing to burnout, career satisfaction, and well-being in US neurology residents and fellows. A total of 938 US American Academy of Neurology member neurology residents and fellows were surveyed using standardized measures of burnout, career satisfaction, and well-being from January 19 to March 21, 2016. Response rate was 37.7% (354/938); about 2/3 of responders were residents and 1/3 were fellows. Median age of participants was 32 years and 51.1% were female. Seventy-three percent of residents and 55% of fellows had at least one symptom of burnout, the difference largely related to higher scores for depersonalization among residents. For residents, greater satisfaction with work-life balance, meaning in work, and older age were associated with lower risk of burnout; for fellows, greater satisfaction with work-life balance and effective support staff were associated with lower risk of burnout. Trainees experiencing burnout were less likely to report career satisfaction. Career satisfaction was more likely among those reporting meaning in work and more likely for those working in the Midwest compared with the Northeast region. Burnout is common in neurology residents and fellows. Lack of work-life balance and lack of meaning in work were associated with reduced career satisfaction and increased risk of burnout. These results should inform approaches to reduce burnout and promote career satisfaction and well-being in US neurology trainees. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  19. Creation and Assessment of a Bad News Delivery Simulation Curriculum for Pediatric Emergency Medicine Fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumpitazi, Corrie E; Rees, Chris A; Chumpitazi, Bruno P; Hsu, Deborah C; Doughty, Cara B; Lorin, Martin I

    2016-05-01

    Background  Bad news in the context of health care has been broadly defined as significant information that negatively alters people's perceptions of the present or future. Effectively delivering bad news (DBN) in the setting of the emergency department requires excellent communication skills. Evidence shows that bad news is frequently given inadequately. Studies show that trainees need to devote more time to developing this skill through formalized training. This program's objectives were to utilize trained standardized patients in a simulation setting to assist pediatric emergency medicine (PEM) fellows in the development of effective, sensitive, and compassionate communication with patients and family members when conveying bad news, and to recognize and respond to the patient/parent's reaction to such news. Methods PEM fellows participated in a novel curriculum utilizing simulated patients (SPs) acting as the patient's parent and immersive techniques in a realistic and supportive environment. A baseline survey was conducted to ascertain participant demographics and previous experience with simulation and DBN. Experienced, multi-disciplinary faculty participated in a training workshop with the SPs one week prior to course delivery. Three scenarios were developed for bad news delivery. Instructors watched via remote video feed while the fellows individually interacted with the SPs and then participated in a confidential debriefing. Fellows later joined for group debriefing. Fellow characteristics, experience, and self-perceived comfort pre/post-course were collected.   Results Baseline data demonstrated that 78% of fellows reported DBN two or more times per month. Ninety-three percent of fellows in this study were present during the delivery of news about the death of a child to a parent or family member in the six-month period preceding this course. Fellows' self-reported comfort level in DBN to a patient/family and dealing with patient and parent emotions

  20. SoTL Research Fellows: Collaborative Pathfinding through Uncertain Terrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Marquis

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available From 2014-2016, Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL Research Fellows at a mid-sized Canadian research-intensive, medical-doctoral university undertook to study their own formation as scholars of teaching and learning, as well as benefits and challenges of their cross-appointment to our central teaching and learning institute from their home academic departments. Findings from surveys and focus groups identified themes such as identity, community, access, transfer, and structural elements (each with benefits and challenges to practice. Our autoethnographic work confirms assertions in the literature about the uneasy relation between SoTL and traditional scholarship, while also bearing out the need for departmental support, and for key interventions along the path from novice to practitioner identity. Some discussion of the ambassador or translator role that can flow from such arrangements is included. De 2014 à 2016, les chercheurs en Avancement des connaissances en enseignement et en apprentissage (ACEA d’une université canadienne médicale-doctorale de taille moyenne ayant un coefficient de recherche élevé ont entrepris une étude portant sur leur propre formation en tant que chercheurs érudits en matière d’enseignement et d’apprentissage, ainsi que sur les avantages et les défis de leur nomination conjointe à notre institut central d’enseignement et d’apprentissage tout en enseignant dans leur propre département universitaire. Les résultats des sondages et des groupes de discussion ont permis d’identifier certains thèmes tels que l’identité, la communauté, l’accès, le transfert, ainsi que des éléments structuraux (chacun présentant des avantages et des défis concernant la pratique. Notre travail autoethnographique confirme les assertions présentes dans la documentation existante concernant la relation difficile qui existe entre l’ACEA et la recherche traditionnelle, tout en tenant compte de la n

  1. Assessment of email communication skills of rheumatology fellows: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhuper, Sonal; Siva, Chokkalingam; Fresen, John L; Petruc, Marius; Velázquez, Celso R

    2010-01-01

    Physician–patient email communication is gaining popularity. However, a formal assessment of physicians' email communication skills has not been described. We hypothesized that the email communication skills of rheumatology fellows can be measured in an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) setting using a novel email content analysis instrument which has 18 items. During an OSCE, we asked 50 rheumatology fellows to respond to a simulated patient email. The content of the responses was assessed using our instrument. The majority of rheumatology fellows wrote appropriate responses scoring a mean (±SD) of 10.6 (±2.6) points (maximum score 18), with high inter-rater reliability (0.86). Most fellows were concise (74%) and courteous (68%) but not formal (22%). Ninety-two percent of fellows acknowledged that the patient's condition required urgent medical attention, but only 30% took active measures to contact the patient. No one encrypted their messages. The objective assessment of email communication skills is possible using simulated emails in an OSCE setting. The variable email communication scores and incidental patient safety gaps identified, suggest a need for further training and defined proficiency standards for physicians' email communication skills. PMID:20962134

  2. The fellow eye in patients with unilateral retinal detachment: findings and prophylactic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laatikainen, L

    1985-10-01

    During a 4-year period, 1978-1981, 312 patients were operated on for unilateral rhegmatogenous detachment of the retina. Of the fellow eyes, 11% showed moderate (VA 0.15-0.4) and 5% severe (VA less than or equal to 0.1) visual impairment. Of the fellow eyes 49% were myopic (- 1.0 D. or more), and aphakia was present in 14%. Details of the peripheral fundus were adequately recordable for 260 fellow eyes. Degenerations considered to predispose to retinal detachment were found in 98 eyes (38%): lattice degeneration in 54 (21%), granular tuft in 17 (7%), retinal tear(s) in 12 (5%), and retinoschisis in 15 (6%). Prophylactic treatment of predisposing degenerations was performed in 91 of the 98 eyes using cryo- or photocoagulation (argon laser). No intra- or permanent post-operative complications were noticed. One of the treated fellow eyes (1.1%) detached 10 months after prophylactic treatment due to new tears. In the untreated group, 6 of the 221 eyes detached (2.7%). The difference was not statistically significant, but the groups were not comparable because 93% of the eyes showing predisposing degenerations were treated. None of the eyes treated for retinal breaks or lattice degeneration has detached. In these cases prophylactic treatment of the fellow eye is recommended. In most eyes cryocoagulation seems to be preferable to photocoagulation.

  3. "I don't know what I was expecting": Home visits by neonatology fellows for infants discharged from the NICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Janice E; Tschudy, Megan M; Hussey-Gardner, Brenda; Jennings, Jacky M; Boss, Renee D

    2017-12-01

    When families transition from the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) to the home, they become responsible for their infant's daily medical needs. Though neonatology physicians prepare families for hospital discharge, it is unclear how much clinicians understand about how their teaching and instructions translate into home care. The goal of this study was to evaluate the influence of a home visiting program on neonatology fellows' understanding of family needs soon after hospital discharge. Neonatology fellows conducted a home visit for an infant recently discharged. Before the visit, fellows reviewed their original discharge instructions, along with information about the family's neighborhood. During the home visit, fellows reviewed their discharge planning with families and discussed any challenges experienced. Afterwards, fellows completed a semi-structured interview; these transcriptions were manually coded for themes. Fellows identified several common women/family discharge challenges. These challenges fall into four domains: (1) inadequate discharge preparation, (2) medicalization of the home, (3) family adjustment to new "normal," and (4) the relevance of social context to discharge planning. Most (90%) fellows reported the home visit experience would affect their future NICU discharge practices and all agreed that home visits should be a part of neonatology training. Home visits allowed neonatology fellows to examine how their discharge preparation did, or did not, meet the family's needs. Incorporating home visits into neonatology training could help fellows learn about the relevance of social and community factors that are difficult to assess in the inpatient setting. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Preparing for an Academic Career Workshops: Resources for Graduate Students and Post-Doctoral Fellows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, R. W.; MacDonald, R.

    2004-12-01

    The professional development program, "On the Cutting Edge", offers annual multi-day workshops for graduate students and post-doctoral fellows interested in pursuing academic careers. Goals are to prepare participants to become more effective teachers, stronger candidates for academic positions, and more aware of the realities of academic jobs. Insights that participants especially hope to gain from these workshops include feedback on the application process, especially an understanding of how search committees work; the different realities of balancing teaching, research, and personal life in a range of academic institutions; and expectations for tenure. The ten-person leadership team represents, by design, a wide range of academic career paths and institutions, and provides approximately 1:6 leader: participant ratio. Specific sessions include research on learning, an introduction to course and lab design, effective teaching and assessment strategies, developing a teaching statement, time management and early career faculty success, and moving research forward into new settings. Optional workshop sessions and discussions include the following topics: dual-career couples; families and careers; teaching portfolios; effective negotiation strategies; tenure and promotion; effective field trips; getting started in undergraduate research; opportunities in K-12 education; career options beyond faculty positions. Highlights of the workshop are faculty panel discussions about career paths and the academic job search. By workshop end, participants complete a goal setting and action planning activity. Two years of evaluation data suggest our goals are being met. Participants particularly appreciate the practical ideas and the opportunity to interact with, and learn from, a diverse leadership team and other participants.

  5. Health and Aging Policy Fellows Program: Shaping a Healthy Future for Older Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pincus, Harold Alan; Pike, Kathleen M; Spaeth-Rublee, Brigitta; Elinson, Lynn

    2017-09-01

    As the size of the elderly population increases, so do the challenges of and barriers to high-quality, affordable health care. The Health and Aging Policy Fellows (HAPF) Program is designed to provide health and aging professionals with the skills and experience to help lead the effort in reducing these barriers and shaping a healthy and productive future for older Americans. Since its inception in 2008, the program has affected not only the fellows who participate, but also the field of health and aging policy. Work needs to be done to sustain this program so that more fellows can participate and sound policies for the elderly population can continue to be shaped and improved. This report describes the HAPF Program, including its background (rationale, description, partners, progress, effect), lessons learned, challenges and solutions, and policy implications. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  6. From the Classroom to Washington: Einsteins on Education Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Kent H., Ed.; Byers, Elizabeth A., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    The Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars was delighted to host a group of current and former Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellows as they celebrated the 20th anniversary of the fellowship program. Outstanding math and science teachers in America's K-12 schools, the Einstein Fellows spend a year (or sometimes two) working on…

  7. Intensive educational course in allergy and immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elizalde, A; Perez, E E; Sriaroon, P; Nguyen, D; Lockey, R F; Dorsey, M J

    2012-09-01

    A one-day intensive educational course on allergy and immunology theory and diagnostic procedure significantly increased the competency of allergy and immunology fellows-in-training. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  8. Fellow Eye Macular Edema Improvement after Intravitreal Bevacizumab for Radiation Retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isis A. S. Brito

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation retinopathy (RR is a progressive, chronic condition directly related to the amount of radiation administered to the retina. We report a 37-year-old patient with medulloblastoma that was treated with external beam radiation and presented to us with bilateral cystoid macular edema. He was treated with monthly bevacizumab injections only in his worst seeing eye. There was a significant improvement in his fellow eye, with marked retinal thickness reduction. Therefore, we present clinical evidence of systemic absorption and fellow eye activity of the drug (bevacizumab. One must be aware of distant side effects after intravitreal injections.

  9. Culture Competence in the Training of Geriatric Medicine Fellows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Marianne K. G.

    2007-01-01

    With the aging and diversifying of the elder population in the United States, there is a pressing need for an organized and effective curriculum in cultural competence. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requires that the curriculum for Geriatric Medicine Fellowship training include cultural competency training.…

  10. Barriers and facilitators to implementing addiction medicine fellowships: a qualitative study with fellows, medical students, residents and preceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimas, J; Small, W; Ahamad, K; Cullen, W; Mead, A; Rieb, L; Wood, E; McNeil, R

    2017-09-20

    Although progress in science has driven advances in addiction medicine, this subject has not been adequately taught to medical trainees and physicians. As a result, there has been poor integration of evidence-based practices in addiction medicine into physician training which has impeded addiction treatment and care. Recently, a number of training initiatives have emerged internationally, including the addiction medicine fellowships in Vancouver, Canada. This study was undertaken to examine barriers and facilitators of implementing addiction medicine fellowships. We interviewed trainees and faculty from clinical and research training programmes in addiction medicine at St Paul's Hospital in Vancouver, Canada (N = 26) about barriers and facilitators to implementation of physician training in addiction medicine. We included medical students, residents, fellows and supervising physicians from a variety of specialities. We analysed interview transcripts thematically by using NVivo software. We identified six domains relating to training implementation: (1) organisational, (2) structural, (3) teacher, (4) learner, (5) patient and (6) community related variables either hindered or fostered addiction medicine education, depending on context. Human resources, variety of rotations, peer support and mentoring fostered implementation of addiction training. Money, time and space limitations hindered implementation. Participant accounts underscored how faculty and staff facilitated the implementation of both the clinical and the research training. Implementation of addiction medicine fellowships appears feasible, although a number of barriers exist. Research into factors within the local/practice environment that shape delivery of education to ensure consistent and quality education scale-up is a priority.

  11. High-Impact Social Work Scholars: A Bibliometric Examination of SSWR and AASWSW Fellows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, David R.; Kremer, Kristen P.; Vaughn, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to identify and describe the bibliometric contributions of high-impact social work faculty. Methods: Toward this end, we used a sample comprising fellows (N = 143) affiliated with the Society for Social Work and Research (SSWR) and the American Academy of Social Work and Social Welfare (AASWSW). To quantify…

  12. 'The Gentle Art of Letting the Other Fellow Have Your Own Way ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    'The Gentle Art of Letting the Other Fellow Have Your Own Way': Viewpoints on a Media Narrative used to Promote the Proposed N2 Toll Road. ... We highlight the importance of developing 'media literacy' – reading skills which enable the critical deconstruction of media texts. We explore, more specifically, the public ...

  13. 2012 APPA Fellow Encourages Colleagues to Say Yes to Opportunities to Serve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler-Carter, Ruth E.

    2012-01-01

    It should be no surprise that the 2012 APPA Fellow is William (Bill) Elvey, P.E., FMP. He has served the association from the grassroots level up through its highest ranks and created a still-continuing legacy of excellence and engagement--his theme when serving as APPA President--that has led to new services, programs, and partnerships for the…

  14. Perceptions, attitudes, and experiences of hematology/oncology fellows toward incorporating geriatrics in their training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggiore, Ronald J; Gorawara-Bhat, Rita; Levine, Stacie K; Dale, William

    2014-01-01

    The aging of the U.S. population continues to highlight emerging issues in providing care generally for older adults and specifically for older adults with cancer. The majority of patients with cancer in the U.S. are currently 65 years of age or older; therefore, training and research in geriatrics and geriatric oncology are viewed to be integral in meeting the needs of this vulnerable population. Yet, the ways to develop and integrate best geriatrics training within the context of hematology/oncology fellowship remain unclear. Toward this end, the current study seeks to evaluate the prior and current geriatric experiences and perspectives of hematology/oncology fellows. To gain insight into these experiences, focus groups of hematology/oncology fellows were conducted. Emergent themes included: 1) perceived lack of formal geriatric oncology didactics among fellows; 2) a considerable amount of variability exists in pre-fellowship geriatric experiences; 3) shared desire to participate in a geriatric oncology-based clinic; 4) differences across training levels in confidence in managing older adults with cancer; and 5) identification of specific criteria on how best to approach older adults with cancer in a particular clinical scenario. The present findings will help guide future studies in evaluating geriatrics among hematology/oncology fellows across institutions. They will also have implications in the development of geriatrics curricula and competencies specific to hematology/oncology training. © 2013.

  15. Virginia Tech announces AdvanceVT awards seed grants; names leadership fellows

    OpenAIRE

    Cox, Clara B.

    2004-01-01

    AdvanceVT, a comprehensive program that promotes and enhances the careers of women in science and engineering at Virginia Tech, has awarded its first seed grants and named its first leadership fellows as part of an ongoing effort to increase the number of women electing to pursue or remain in academic careers.

  16. Foreign Language Writing Fellows Programs: A Model for Improving Advanced Writing Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Delys Waite; Nielson, Rex P.; Kurzer, Kendon

    2016-01-01

    Within the growing field of scholarly literature on foreign language (FL) writing pedagogy, few studies have addressed pedagogical questions regarding the teaching of writing to advanced language learners. Writing fellows peer tutoring programs, although typically associated with first language writing instruction, likely can benefit and support…

  17. Special Workshop of Marie Curie Fellows on Research and Training in Physics and Technology

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    2002-01-01

    Photo 0210004_1: Prof. Ugo Amaldi, University of Milano Bicocca and Tera Foundation, Italy. Addressing the Marie Curie Workshop held at CERN 3-4 October 2002. Title of this talk:"Research Developments on Medical Physics". Photo 0210004_2: Marie Curie Fellows at CERN. Participating in Marie Curie Workshop held at CERN 3-4 October 2002.

  18. Museum-Based Teacher Professional Development: Peabody Fellows in Earth Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, Jane; Ague, Jay J.; Rath, Kenneth A.; Heiser, David M.; Sirch, James N.

    2012-01-01

    The Peabody Fellows in Earth Science program was a professional development opportunity for middle and high school teachers to enhance their knowledge of, and teaching skills in, the Earth sciences. It combined a summer institute and academic year workshops with the production of new curricular resources on the interpretation of landforms in…

  19. Advanced surgical skills for exposure in trauma: a new surgical skills cadaver course for surgery residents and fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhls, Deborah A; Risucci, Donald A; Bowyer, Mark W; Luchette, Fred A

    2013-02-01

    Surgical education is changing owing to workforce and economic demands. Simulation and other technical teaching methods are used to acquire skills transferable to the operating room. Operative management of traumatic injuries has declined, making it difficult to acquire and maintain competence. The ASSET course was developed by the Committee on Trauma's Surgical Skills Committee to fill a surgical skills need in resident and fellow education. Using a human cadaver, standardized rapid exposure of vital structures in the extremities, neck, thorax, abdomen, retroperitoneum, and pelvis is taught. A retrospective analysis of 79 participants in four ASSET courses was performed. Operative experience data were collected, and self-efficacy questionnaires (SEQs) were administered before and after the course. Course evaluations and instructor evaluation data were analyzed. Student's and paired samples t tests as well as analysis of variance and Spearman ρ correlation coefficient analysis were performed using α at p ASSET course would teach new surgical techniques and that learner self-assessed ability would improve. Participants included 27 PGY-4, 20 PGY-5, 24 PGY-6 or PGY-7 and PGY-8 at other levels of training. Self-assessed confidence improved in all body regions (p knowledge rated at 4.8 and learning new techniques at 4.72. A standardized cadaver-based surgical exposures course offered to senior surgical residents adds new surgical skills and improves participant self-assessed ability to perform emergent surgical exposure of vital structures.

  20. Embryo transfer simulation improves pregnancy rates and decreases time to proficiency in Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility fellow embryo transfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitmann, Ryan J; Hill, Micah J; Csokmay, John M; Pilgrim, Justin; DeCherney, Alan H; Deering, Shad

    2017-05-01

    To design and evaluate an ET simulator to train Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility (REI) fellows' techniques of ET. Simulation model development and retrospective cohort analysis. Not applicable. Patients undergoing IVF. Simulation model evaluation and implementation of ET simulation training. Pregnancy rates. The REI fellow and faculty evaluation responses (n = 19/21 [90%]) of the model demonstrated realistic characteristics, with evaluators concluding the model was suitable for training in almost all evaluated areas. A total of 12 REI fellows who performed ET were analyzed: 6 before ET trainer and 6 after ET trainer. Pregnancy rates were 31% in the initial 10 ETs per fellow before simulator vs. 46% after simulator. One of six pre-ET trainer fellows (17%) had pregnancy rates ≥40% in their first 10 ETs; whereas four of six post-ET trainer fellows had pregnancy rates ≥40% in their first 10 ETs. The average number of ETs to obtain >40% pregnancy efficiency was 27 ETs before trainer vs. 15 ETs after trainer. Pregnancy rates were similar in the two groups after 20 ETs, and collective terminal pregnancy rates were >50% after 40 ETs. Embryo transfer simulation improved REI fellow pregnancy rates in their first 10 transfers and led to a more rapid ET proficiency. These data suggest potential value in adopting ET simulation, even in programs with a robust history of live ET in fellowship training. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. The fellow eye of patients with phakic rhegmatogenous retinal detachment from atrophic holes of lattice degeneration without posterior vitreous detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, C R; Gupta, A; Schwartz, S D; Kreiger, A E

    2004-11-01

    Primary phakic rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) without posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) represents a unique clinical entity that behaves differently from RRD associated with PVD. While previous studies have reported the long term findings in the fellow eye of patients with RRD and PVD, the outcome of the fellow eye of patients with RRD without PVD is not known. Consecutive patients with RRD not associated with PVD were studied retrospectively. The authors evaluated the fellow eye for retinal detachment or other vision threatening pathology. 27 patients (mean age 32 years) were studied with follow up of between 9 and 326 months (mean 111 months). 24 (89%) were myopic. Bilateral retinal detachment occurred in eight patients (30%). On initial examination, 17 patients (63%) had retinal findings (including lattice degeneration, atrophic holes, and/or cystic retinal tufts) in the fellow eye that might predispose them to retinal detachment. 14 vision threatening events or diagnoses occurred (nine of which were rhegmatogenous in nature) in the fellow eye including eight retinal detachments, one traumatic PVD without retinal tears, one retinal tear after PVD, one diagnosis of pigmentary glaucoma needing trabeculectomy, two visually significant cataracts, and one diagnosis of chorioretinitis. 23 patients (85%) maintained visual acuity better than 20/50, with most retaining 20/20 vision in the fellow eye. Patients who experience RRD without PVD are at risk of developing vision threatening events in the contralateral eye and, as such, the fellow eye should be followed carefully.

  2. Validity of Level of Supervision Scales for Assessing Pediatric Fellows on the Common Pediatric Subspecialty Entrustable Professional Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mink, Richard B; Schwartz, Alan; Herman, Bruce E; Turner, David A; Curran, Megan L; Myers, Angela; Hsu, Deborah C; Kesselheim, Jennifer C; Carraccio, Carol L

    2018-02-01

    Entrustable professional activities (EPAs) represent the routine and essential activities that physicians perform in practice. Although some level of supervision scales have been proposed, they have not been validated. In this study, the investigators created level of supervision scales for EPAs common to the pediatric subspecialties and then examined their validity in a study conducted by the Subspecialty Pediatrics Investigator Network (SPIN). SPIN Steering Committee members used a modified Delphi process to develop unique scales for six of the seven common EPAs. The investigators sought validity evidence in a multisubspecialty study in which pediatric fellowship program directors and Clinical Competency Committees used the scales to evaluate fellows in fall 2014 and spring 2015. Separate scales for the six EPAs, each with five levels of progressive entrustment, were created. In both fall and spring, more than 300 fellows in each year of training from over 200 programs were assessed. In both periods and for each EPA, there was a progressive increase in entrustment levels, with second-year fellows rated higher than first-year fellows (P < .001) and third-year fellows rated higher than second-year fellows (P < .001). For each EPA, spring ratings were higher (P < .001) than those in the fall. Interrater reliability was high (Janson and Olsson's iota = 0.73). The supervision scales developed for these six common pediatric subspecialty EPAs demonstrated strong validity evidence for use in EPA-based assessment of pediatric fellows. They may also inform the development of scales in other specialties.

  3. International Atomic Energy Agency fellows: Where are they now? The Department of Technical Cooperation's report on the fellowship survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    In order to assess the impact and the quality of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) fellowship programme, the Department of Technical Cooperation conducted a survey among former fellows from the years 2001 and 2002. These fellows have all completed the fellowship training, and have had time to judge in what way their training is useful to their work in their home country. As a result of this survey, further surveys could be conducted to serve as a continuous systematic assessment of the fellowship and other programmes. Former fellows from the years 2001 and 2002 were asked to fill out a questionnaire containing questions regarding the following: Where are the former fellows now and what are they doing? How did the fellows rate the quality of the fellowship programme? How did the fellows rate the impact of the training they received through the fellowship programme, the impact on their home institution, and the impact on the TC project and their home country? The survey period was 11 February - 4 March 2005. Reaching a sufficient number of former fellows from the years 2001 and 2002 posed some difficulties. The National Liaison Officers contributed greatly in finding the former fellows' current contact information. Out of the 2067 fellows who were in the field in the years 2001 and 2002, 613 participated in the survey (meaning, 30% of all fellows from those years and 50% of those reached by email or fax). The results of the survey given below represent only the survey participants' opinions, not those of all former fellows from the years 2001 and 2002. To ensure that the results are representative of all fellows, a follow-up study of seven countries is currently being done. The IAEA fellowship programme contributes successfully to knowledge and technology transfer to fellows' home institutions, their home countries and the TC projects they are involved in, as evidenced by the following survey results: 94% of the fellows who participated in the survey

  4. The DOE fellows program-a workforce development initiative for the US department of energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagos, Leonel E. [Applied Research Center, Florida International University, 10555 West Flagler St, EC2100, Miami, Florida (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) oversees one of the largest and most technically challenging cleanup programs in the world. The mission of DOE-EM is to complete the safe cleanup of the environmental legacy from five decades of nuclear weapons development and government-sponsored nuclear energy research. Since 1995, Florida International University's Applied Research Center (FIU-ARC) has supported the DOE-EM mission and provided unique research capabilities to address some of these highly technical and difficult challenges. This partnership has allowed FIU-ARC to create a unique infrastructure that is critical for the training and mentoring of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) students and has exposed many STEM students to 'hands-on' DOE-EM applied research, supervised by the scientists and engineers at ARC. As a result of this successful partnership between DOE and FIU, DOE requested FIU-ARC to create the DOE-FIU Science and Technology Workforce Development Initiative in 2007. This innovative program was established to create a 'pipeline' of minority STEM students trained and mentored to enter DOE's environmental cleanup workforce. The program was designed to help address DOE's future workforce needs by partnering with academic, government and private companies (DOE contractors) to mentor future minority scientists and engineers in the research, development, and deployment of new technologies and processes addressing DOE's environmental cleanup challenges. Since its inception in 2007, the program has trained and mentored 78 FIU STEM minority students. Although, the program has been in existence for only six years, a total of 75 internships have been conducted at DOE National Laboratories, DOE sites, DOE Headquarters and field offices, and DOE contractors. Over 100 DOE Fellows have participated in the Waste Management (WM) Symposia since 2008 with a total of 84 student

  5. The DOE fellows program-a workforce development initiative for the US department of energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagos, Leonel E.

    2013-01-01

    The US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) oversees one of the largest and most technically challenging cleanup programs in the world. The mission of DOE-EM is to complete the safe cleanup of the environmental legacy from five decades of nuclear weapons development and government-sponsored nuclear energy research. Since 1995, Florida International University's Applied Research Center (FIU-ARC) has supported the DOE-EM mission and provided unique research capabilities to address some of these highly technical and difficult challenges. This partnership has allowed FIU-ARC to create a unique infrastructure that is critical for the training and mentoring of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) students and has exposed many STEM students to 'hands-on' DOE-EM applied research, supervised by the scientists and engineers at ARC. As a result of this successful partnership between DOE and FIU, DOE requested FIU-ARC to create the DOE-FIU Science and Technology Workforce Development Initiative in 2007. This innovative program was established to create a 'pipeline' of minority STEM students trained and mentored to enter DOE's environmental cleanup workforce. The program was designed to help address DOE's future workforce needs by partnering with academic, government and private companies (DOE contractors) to mentor future minority scientists and engineers in the research, development, and deployment of new technologies and processes addressing DOE's environmental cleanup challenges. Since its inception in 2007, the program has trained and mentored 78 FIU STEM minority students. Although, the program has been in existence for only six years, a total of 75 internships have been conducted at DOE National Laboratories, DOE sites, DOE Headquarters and field offices, and DOE contractors. Over 100 DOE Fellows have participated in the Waste Management (WM) Symposia since 2008 with a total of 84 student

  6. Outbreak of parvovirus B19 infection among anesthesiology and surgical fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara-Medrano, Reynaldo; Martínez-Reséndez, Michel Fernando; Garza-González, Elvira; Medina-Torres, Ana Gabriela; Camacho-Ortiz, Adrián

    2016-09-01

    A human parvovirus B19 outbreak was detected in personnel assigned to a surgical area (anesthesiology fellows and an otorhinolaryngology fellow) in a university hospital. The attack rate between susceptible members was higher than previous reports. Diagnosis was determined by polymerase chain reaction for human parvovirus B19 in serum of 1 subject and immunoglobulin M/immunoglobulin G antibody titer in the remaining subjects. Medical personnel were put on leave of absence until resolution of symptoms and laboratory confirmation of health. No cases of infection were detected in hospitalized patients or other health care workers on follow-up. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Prophylactic treatment of the fellow eye of patients with retinal detachment: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avitabile, Teresio; Bonfiglio, Vincenza; Reibaldi, Michele; Torrisi, Benedetto; Reibaldi, Alfredo

    2004-03-01

    Controversy exists over the prophylactic treatment of predisposing lesions to prevent retinal detachment. Seven hundred sixty consecutive phakic fellow eyes with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment in the first eye were examined by the same vitreoretinal surgeon before detachment surgery and for a follow-up period ranging from 1 to 72 months, with a mean of 36 months. During this period, in 305 fellow eyes (40.1%) predisposing retinal lesions were present and prophylactic treatments (photocoagulation, cryotherapy or scleral buckle) were performed independently of vitreous status. The results were then compared with the incidence of bilateral RD without prophylaxis reported in Folk and Burton's study of 1982; the two study's data were well matched and showed no significant difference in regards to age, sex, incidence myopia > or =-2.5 and incidence of lattice degeneration. The objective was to investigate whether or not prophylactic treatment is able to avert retinal detachment in the fellow eye. The age of the patients with peripheral retinal lesions was correlated inversely with the presence of myopia. Nine eyes out of 305 eyes treated (2.9%) developed a retinal detachment, reducing the rate of bilateral retinal detachment to 1.2% (9 eyes out of 760). This incidence of bilaterality (1.2%) was lower than the incidence of retinal detachment in fellow eyes not prophylactically treated as reported in the literature, and there exists a highly statistically significant difference between this study's data of 1.2% after prophylaxis and a 13.4% rate of bilaterality as reported by Folk without prophylaxis (P=0.0000).

  8. Manual Skill Acquisition During Transesophageal Echocardiography Simulator Training of Cardiology Fellows: A Kinematic Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyal, Robina; Montealegre-Gallegos, Mario; Mitchell, John D; Kim, Han; Bergman, Remco; Hawthorne, Katie M; O'Halloran, David; Wong, Vanessa; Hess, Phillip E; Mahmood, Feroze

    2015-12-01

    To investigate whether a transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) simulator with motion analysis can be used to impart proficiency in TEE in an integrated curriculum-based model. A prospective cohort study. A tertiary-care university hospital. TEE-naïve cardiology fellows. Participants underwent an 8-session multimodal TEE training program. Manual skills were assessed at the end of sessions 2 and 8 using motion analysis of the TEE simulator's probe. At the end of the course, participants performed an intraoperative TEE; their examinations were video captured, and a blinded investigator evaluated the total time and image transitions needed for each view. Results are reported as mean±standard deviation, or median (interquartile range) where appropriate. Eleven fellows completed the knowledge and kinematic portions of the study. Five participants were excluded from the evaluation in the clinical setting because of interim exposure to TEE or having participated in a TEE rotation after the training course. An increase of 12.95% in post-test knowledge scores was observed. From the start to the end of the course, there was a significant reduction (pcardiology fellows can be complemented with kinematic analyses to objectify acquisition of manual skills during simulator-based training. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Special Workshop of Marie Curie Fellows on Research and Training in Physics and Technology

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    2002-01-01

    Photo 0210006_07a: Prof. L. Maiani, Director General of CERN. Addressing the Marie Curie Worshop held at CERN 3-4 October 2002. Title of this talk:"Function of Large-scale Facilities and Centres of Excellence". Photo 0210006_14a: Prof. L. Maiani, Director General of CERN. Addressing the Marie Curie Worshop held at CERN 3-4 October 2002. Title of this talk:"Function of Large-scale Facilities and Centres of Excellence". Photo 0210006_22: Dr. David Plane (CERN) introducing Dr. Theodore Papazoglou from the European Commission. Addressing the Marie Curie Worshop held at CERN 3-4 October 2002. Title of this talk:"Marie Curie Fellowships in the 6th Framework Programme". Photo 0210006_28a: Dr. Nora Brambilla, Vice-President of Marie Curie Fellow Association, INFN and Dept. of Physics, University of Milan. Addressing the Marie-Curie Worshop held at CERN 3-4 October 2002. Title of this talk:"Marie Curie Fellows Association". Photo 0210006_29a: Dr. Nora Brambilla, Vice-President of Marie Curie Fellow Association, INFN a...

  10. Facebook activity of residents and fellows and its impact on the doctor-patient relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moubarak, Ghassan; Guiot, Aurélie; Benhamou, Ygal; Benhamou, Alexandra; Hariri, Sarah

    2011-02-01

    Facebook is an increasingly popular online social networking site. The purpose of this study was to describe the Facebook activity of residents and fellows and their opinions regarding the impact of Facebook on the doctor-patient relationship. An anonymous questionnaire was emailed to 405 residents and fellows at the Rouen University Hospital, France, in October 2009. Of the 202 participants who returned the questionnaire (50%), 147 (73%) had a Facebook profile. Among responders, 138 (99%) displayed their real name on their profile, 136 (97%) their birthdates, 128 (91%) a personal photograph, 83 (59%) their current university and 76 (55%) their current position. Default privacy settings were changed by 61% of users, more frequently if they were registered for >1 year (p=0.02). If a patient requested them as a 'friend', 152 (85%) participants would automatically decline the request, 26 (15%) would decide on an individual basis and none would automatically accept the request. Eighty-eight participants (48%) believed that the doctor-patient relationship would be altered if patients discovered that their doctor had a Facebook account, but 139 (76%) considered that it would change only if the patient had open access to their doctor's profile, independent of its content. Residents and fellows frequently use Facebook and display personal information on their profiles. Insufficient privacy protection might have an impact the doctor-patient relationship.

  11. [Clinical and communication simulation workshop for fellows in gastroenterology: the trainees' perspective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Alon; Melzer, Ehud; Bar-Meir, Simon; Eliakim, Rami; Ziv, Amitai

    2006-11-01

    The continuing development in computer-based medical simulators provides an ideal platform for simulator-assisted training programs for medical trainees. Computer-based endoscopic simulators provide a virtual reality environment for training endoscopic procedures. This study illustrates the use of a comprehensive training model combining the use of endoscopic simulators with simulated (actor) patients (SP). To evaluate the effectiveness of a comprehensive simulation workshop from the trainee perspective. Four case studies were developed with emphasis on communication skills. Three workshops with 10 fellows in each were conducted. During each workshop the trainees spent half of the time in SP case studies and the remaining half working with computerized endoscopic simulators with continuous guidance by an expert endoscopist. Questionnaires were completed by the fellows at the end of the workshop. Seventy percent of the fellows felt that the endoscopic simulator was close or very close to reality for gastroscopy and 63% for colonoscopy. Eighty eight percent thought the close guidance was important for the learning process with the simulator. Eighty percent felt that the case studies were an important learning experience for risk management. Further evaluation of multi-modality simulation workshops in gastroenterologist training is needed to identify how best to incorporate this form of instruction into training for gastroenterologists.

  12. Being a fellow patient to a critically ill patient leads to feelings of anxiety - An interview study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Jannie; Bonnevie Lundby, Trine; Danielsen, Anne Kjaergaard

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To explore in-patients’ experiences being a fellow patient to patients who become critically ill. Design The study was designed as a qualitative phenomenological study. Setting The study was conducted in a surgical ward of a hospital in Denmark. Subjects Fifteen fellow patients...... to patients, who became critically ill. Results Three key themes emerged from the analysis of the data: patients’ interaction, anxiety, and professional support. These findings demonstrated the importance of understanding how patients experienced being a fellow patient to patients, who become critically ill......, their views on interacting with such a patient, how the patients who become critically ill influenced them, and what kind of support they needed from the health professionals. Conclusion The findings highlighted the different emotions and feelings experienced by fellow patients. It showed how the impact...

  13. Dysfunction in the fellow eyes of strabismic and anisometropic amblyopic children assessed by visually evoked potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Pinheiro Andrade

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: To evaluate visual acuity and transient pattern reversal (PR visual evoked potentials (VEPs in the fellow eyes of children with strabismic and/or anisometropic amblyopia. Methods: Children diagnosed with strabismic and/or anisometropic amblyopia were recruited for electrophysiological assessment by VEPs. Monocular grating and optotype acuity were measured using sweep-VEPs and an Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study chart, respectively. During the same visit, transient PR-VEPs of each eye were recorded using stimuli subtending with a visual angle of 60', 15', and 7.5'. Parameters of amplitude (in μV and latency (in ms were determined from VEP recordings. Results: A group of 40 strabismic and/or anisometropic amblyopic children (22 females: 55%, mean age= 8.7 ± 2.2 years, median= 8 years was examined. A control group of 19 healthy children (13 females: 68.4%, mean age= 8.2 ± 2.6 years, median= 8 years was also included. The fellow eyes of all amblyopes had significantly worse optotype acuity (p=0.021 than the control group, regardless of whether they were strabismic (p=0.040 or anisometropic (p=0.048. Overall, grating acuity was significantly worse in the fellow eyes of amblyopes (p=0.016 than in healthy controls. Statistically prolonged latency for visual angles of 15' and 7.5' (p=0.018 and 0.002, respectively was found in the strabismic group when compared with the control group. For the smaller visual stimulus (7.5', statistically prolonged latency was found among all fellow eyes of amblyopic children (p<0.001. Conclusions: The fellow eyes of amblyopic children showed worse optotype and grating acuity, with subtle abnormalities in the PR-VEP detected as prolonged latencies for smaller size stimuli when compared with eyes of healthy children. These findings show the deleterious effects of amblyopia in several distinct visual functions, mainly those related to spatial vision.

  14. Evaluation of satisfaction with work-life balance among U.S. Gynecologic Oncology fellows: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szender, J Brian; Grzankowski, Kassondra S; Eng, Kevin H; Odunsi, Kunle; Frederick, Peter J

    2016-04-01

    To characterize the state of satisfaction with work-life balance (WLB) among gynecologic oncology fellows in training, risk factors for dissatisfaction, and the impact of dissatisfaction on career plans. A cross-sectional evaluation of gynecologic oncology fellows was performed using a web-based survey. Demographic data, fellowship characteristics, and career plans were surveyed. The primary outcomes were satisfaction with WLB and career choices. p balance.

  15. Effectiveness of Integrating Simulation with Art-Based Teaching Strategies on Oncology Fellows' Performance Regarding Breaking Bad News.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakhforoshha, Afsaneh; Emami, Seyed Amir Hossein; Shahi, Farhad; Shahsavari, Saeed; Cheraghi, Mohammadali; Mojtahedzadeh, Rita; Mahmoodi-Bakhtiari, Behrooz; Shirazi, Mandana

    2018-02-21

    The task of breaking bad news (BBN) may be improved by incorporating simulation with art-based teaching methods. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of an integrating simulation with art-based teaching strategies, on fellows' performance regarding BBN, in Iran. The study was carried out using quasi-experimental methods, interrupted time series. The participants were selected from medical oncology fellows at two teaching hospitals of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS), Iran. Participants were trained through workshop, followed by engaging participants with different types of art-based teaching methods. In order to assess the effectiveness of the integrating model, fellows' performance was rated by two independent raters (standardized patients (SPs) and faculty members) using the BBN assessment checklist. This assessment tool measured seven different domains of BBN skill. Segmented regression was used to analyze the results of study. Performance of all oncology fellows (n = 19) was assessed for 228 time points during the study, by rating three time points before and three time points after the intervention by two raters. Based on SP ratings, fellows' performance scores in post-training showed significant level changes in three domains of BBN checklist (B = 1.126, F = 3.221, G = 2.241; p art-based teaching strategies may help oncology fellows to improve their communication skills in different facets of BBN performance. Iranian Registry of Clinical Trials ID: IRCT2016011626039N1.

  16. A nationwide survey of training satisfaction and employment prospects among Greek gastroenterology fellows during the economic recession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkolfakis, Paraskevas; Tziatzios, Georgios; Papadopoulos, Vasilios; Dimitriadis, George D; Georgopoulos, Sotirios D; Triantafyllou, Konstantinos

    2017-01-01

    This study assessed Greek gastroenterology fellows' satisfaction regarding training, working conditions, quality of life and future employment perspectives. Greek gastroenterology fellows completed an anonymous multiple-choice electronic questionnaire designed to rate their satisfaction using a five-step Likert scale in two major domains: 1) fellowship program (training, working conditions, research activity, acquisition of endoscopic competencies, quality of life); and 2) professional expectations. Pareto analysis was used to determine the factors that had the most negative effect on fellows' satisfaction. In 2016, over a two-month period, 121 invitations were distributed and 70 (58%) fellows responded. Overall, responders reported a low level of satisfaction with their training programs: the mean total satisfaction score was 42.94±11.55 (range 15-75). Pareto analysis revealed that the main factors negatively affecting satisfaction were financial remuneration, routine or menial work, and uncertainty about professional future (98.6%, 94.3% and 92.9% unfavorable answers, respectively). Of the total participants, 53% felt tired or very tired and 44.3% of them reported high levels of stress following a normal working day. Although the majority of the fellows did not regret choosing gastroenterology fellowship training, 34.4% of them would choose a different training environment, if possible. Our study revealed that Greek gastroenterology fellows are dissatisfied with their training programs and with their professional perspectives. It also detected the issues that contribute most to this unfavorable outcome.

  17. Lapse in embryo transfer training does not negatively affect clinical pregnancy rates for reproductive endocrinology and infertility fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kresowik, Jessica; Sparks, Amy; Duran, Eyup H; Shah, Divya K

    2015-03-01

    To compare rates of clinical pregnancy (CPR) and live birth (LBR) following embryo transfer (ET) performed by reproductive endocrinology and infertility (REI) fellows before and after a prolonged lapse in clinical training due to an 18-month research rotation. Retrospective cohort study. Not applicable. All women undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) and IVF-intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) cycles with ET performed by REI fellows from August 2003 to July 2012. Eighteen-month lapse in clinical training of REI fellows. CPR and LBR before and after the lapse in clinical training were calculated and compared per fellow and as a composite group. Alternating logistic regression models were used to calculate the odds of clinical pregnancy and live birth following transfers performed before and after the lapse in training. Unadjusted odds of clinical pregnancy and live birth were similar between the two time periods both for individual fellows and for the composite group. Alternate logistic regression analysis revealed no significant difference in CPR (odds ratio [OR] 0.94, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.83-1.07) or LBR (OR 1.05, 95% CI 0.94-1.18) after the lapse in training compared with before. A research rotation is common in REI fellowship training programs. This prolonged departure from clinical training does not appear to negatively affect pregnancy outcome following fellow ET. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Fellow travellers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, E. P.; Skirnisson, K.; McGovern, T. H.

    2012-01-01

    Background: House mice (Mus musculus) are commensals of humans and therefore their phylogeography can reflect human colonization and settlement patterns. Previous studies have linked the distribution of house mouse mitochondrial (mt) DNA clades to areas formerly occupied by the Norwegian Vikings ...

  19. Robotic surgical education: a collaborative approach to training postgraduate urologists and endourology fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirheydar, Hossein; Jones, Marklyn; Koeneman, Kenneth S; Sweet, Robert M

    2009-01-01

    Currently, robotic training for inexperienced, practicing surgeons is primarily done vis-à-vis industry and/or society-sponsored day or weekend courses, with limited proctorship opportunities. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of an extended-proctorship program at up to 32 months of follow-up. An extended-proctorship program for robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy was established at our institution. The curriculum consisted of 3 phases: (1) completing an Intuitive Surgical 2-day robotic training course with company representatives; (2) serving as assistant to a trained proctor on 5 to 6 cases; and (3) performing proctored cases up to 1 year until confidence was achieved. Participants were surveyed and asked to evaluate on a 5-point Likert scale their operative experience in robotics and satisfaction regarding their training. Nine of 9 participants are currently performing robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALP) independently. Graduates of our program have performed 477 RALP cases. The mean number of cases performed within phase 3 was 20.1 (range, 5 to 40) prior to independent practice. The program received a rating of 4.2/5 for effectiveness in teaching robotic surgery skills. Our robotic program, with extended proctoring, has led to an outstanding take-rate for disseminating robotic skills in a metropolitan community.

  20. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srinivasan, Prof. Narayanaswamy Ph.D. (IISc), FNASc. Date of birth: 1 April 1962. Specialization: Protein Functions, Structures & Evolution, Bioinformatics in Genomics and Metabolism & Signal Transduction Address: Professor, Molecular Biophysics Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru 560 012, Karnataka Contact:

  1. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    FNASc., Hon. FIEI, Hon. FNA Engg., for Assoc. US Natl Acad. Engg.,. Council Service: 1971-91, President: 1977-79, Vice President: 1974-76. Date of birth: 25 September 1920. Date of death: 3 January 2002. Specialization: Aerospace Engineering and Fluid Mechanics Last known address: Member, Space Commission, ...

  2. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bhalchandra Madhav M.Sc. (Bombay), FNA. Date of birth: 14 September 1927. Date of death: 21 December 2014. Specialization: Theoretical Particle Physics Last known address: 705 Vigyan, Scientists' Co-operative Housing Society, Plot No. 23, Sector 17, Vashi, Navi Mumbai 400 703. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  3. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ph.D. (London), D.Sc. (h.c.), FNA, Nom. MP (Rajya Sabha) for Science Council Service: 1971-79; Vice-President: 1977-79. Date of birth: 28 January 1925. Date of death: 24 September 2004. Specialization: Nuclear Physics, Reactor Physics & Design, European Music and Philosophy Last known address: National Institute ...

  4. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    : 1977-82. Date of birth: 8 June 1938. Specialization: Theoretical Physics, Quantum Mechanics and History & Philosophy of Science Address: 51, New Cosmos, Juhu-Varsova Link Road, Andheri (West), Mumbai 400 053, Maharashtra Contact:

  5. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D.Sc. (Andhra). Date of birth: 20 September 1928. Date of death: 6 February 2012. Specialization: Atomic & Molecular Spectroscopy, Lasers, Spectrochemical Analysis and Solar Energy Utilization Last known address: Flat No. 401, Sharath Apartments, 6th Cross, K.R. Layout, J.P. Nagar 6th Phase, Bengaluru 560 078.

  6. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wisconsin), FNA, FNAAS. Date of birth: 10 October 1921. Date of death: 6 December 2004. Specialization: Genetics, Cytogenetics and Forest Tree Breeding Last known address: 12-A, 1st Cross Road, V Layout, Ramalinga Nagar, K K Pudur Post, ...

  7. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nanjundappa Ph.D. (Canada), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 10 August 1932. Specialization: Fluid Mechanics, Magnetohydrodynamics, Electrodynamics, Stability of Flows, Heat & Mass Transfer, Biomechanics, Dispersion Phenomena Address: 492/G, 7th Cross, 7th Block, Jayanagar, Bengaluru 560 070, Karnataka Contact:

  8. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Date of birth: 16 September 1931. Specialization: Group Representations, Quantum Optics, Elementary Particle Physics, Quantum Field Theory, Quantum Computing & Statistical Mechanics Address: Professor, Department of Physics, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712, USA Contact: Office: (+1-512) 471 5229

  9. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1986 Section: Mathematical Sciences. Singhi, Prof. Navin Kumar Madhavprasad Ph. D. (Mumbai), FNA. Date of birth: 19 March 1949. Specialization: Discrete Mathematics, Designs and Finite Geometries Address: Distinguished Professor, Department of Mathematics, Indian Institute of Technology, Powai, Mumbai ...

  10. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Specialization: Chemical Reaction Engineering, Fluidization and Organic Synthesis Engineering ... Department of Chemical Engineering, Iowa State University, 1031, Sweeney Hall, Ames, Iowa 50011-2230, ... Upcoming Refresher Courses.

  11. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Date of birth: 29 October 1912. Date of death: 25 January 1990. Specialization: Nutrition, Liver Diseases and Tropical & Communicable Diseases. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. 29th Mid-year meeting. Posted on 19 January 2018. The 29th Mid-year meeting of the Academy will be held from ...

  12. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    , Padubidri Subbaraya FNA. Date of birth: 29 October 1917. Date of death: 8 September 1970. Specialization: Nutrition. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. 29th Mid-year meeting. Posted on 19 January 2018.

  13. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madras), FNA. Date of birth: 13 July 1909. Date of death: 20 July 1996. Specialization: Biochemistry, Nutrition, Food Science and Technology Last known address: 132, 6A Cross, 9th Main Road, Rajmahal Vilas Extension, Bangalore 560 080.

  14. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Date of birth: 8 August 1953. Specialization: Materials & Structural Test Technology, Fatigue & Fracture Testing for Strength & Endurance, and Field Data Acquisition Address: Director, R&D, BISS, 41A, 1st A Cross, AECS, RMV Extension, Second Stage, Bengaluru 560 094, Karnataka Contact: Office: (080) 2836 0184

  15. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1939 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Ramaswamy, Dr Chandrasekhara Ph.D. (Delhi). Date of birth: 20 August 1907. Date of death: 17 August 1991. Specialization: Atmospheric Physics, Meteorology, and Hydrometeorology Last known address: C/o Prof. R C Sekhar, Institute for Rural Management, P.B. 60, ...

  16. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1974 Section: Engineering & Technology. Sarma, Prof. Isukapalli Gopala Ph.D. (Wisconsin). Date of birth: 21 September 1936. Date of death: 10 September 1996. Specialization: Digital Control Systems, Analysis and Simulation of Discrete Event Systems and Flight Vehicle Guidance Last known address: ...

  17. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1995 Section: Engineering & Technology. Nakra, Prof. Bahadur Chand Ph.D. (London), FNA, FNAE, FNASc. Date of birth: 31 March 1939. Date of death: 12 April 2016. Specialization: Vibration Engineering, System Dynamics & Controls and Instrumentation, Mechatronics Last known address: P-12, New Colony, ...

  18. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Krishnamurthy, Prof. Edayathumangalam Venkatarama Ph.D. (Madras). Date of birth: 18 June 1934. Date of death: 26 October 2012. Specialization: Parallel & Distributed Computing, Complex Systems and Computational Intelligence Last known address: CS Labs, Building 115, ANU College of Engineering and Computer ...

  19. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ravi, Prof. Vasanthapuram MD (JIPMER), FAMS. Date of birth: 30 November 1955. Specialization: Neurovirology, Viral Diagnostics, Molecular Epidemiology of Viral Infections Address: Department of Neurovirology, National Institute of Mental Health & Neurosciences, Hosur Road, Bengaluru 560 029, Karnataka Contact:

  20. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    : 30 January 1922. Date of death: 12 December 2003. Specialization: Neurology, Neurosurgery and Neurosciences Last known address: 27, Second Main Road, CIT Colony, Mylapore, Chennai 600 004. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  1. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    : Chronobiology, Evolution, Animal Behaviour Last known address: Professor & Chairman, Chronobiology Lab., EOB Unit, JN Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Jakkur P.O., Bengaluru 560 064, Karnataka. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook ...

  2. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Date of birth: 1 July 1925. Date of death: 4 August 2007. Specialization: Physical Oceanography and Meteorology Last known address: c/o Sri R. Parthasarathy, 418, Palm Meadows, Phase 2, Airport-Whitefield Road, Ramagundanahalli, Bengaluru 560 066. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  3. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ramanathan, Kalpathy Ramakrishnan D.Sc., FNA 1936-37, 1940-52, 1956-61; Vice President 1943-46. Date of birth: 28 February 1893. Date of death: 31 December 1984. Specialization: Meteorology, Hydrology, Aeronology, Geophysics and Sun-Earth Relationships. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  4. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1975 Section: Physics. Venkataraman, Prof. Balu Ph.D. (Columbia). Date of birth: 17 December 1929. Date of death: 28 October 2010. Specialization: Chemical Physics Last known address: A-4/1, Century Enclave, 54(Old), 8(New), Kalakshetra Road, Thiruvanmiyur, Chennai 600 041. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook ...

  5. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Krishnamurti, Prof. Dharmaraja D.Sc. (Madras). Date of birth: 30 March 1929. Date of death: 13 May 2003. Specialization: Raman & Infrared Spectroscopy and Solid State Physics Last known address: No. 292, 13th Cross, II Stage, West of Chord Road, Mahalakshmipuram, Bengaluru 560 086. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook ...

  6. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1976 Section: Chemistry. Ghatak, Prof. Usha Ranjan Ph.D. (Calcutta), FNA. Date of birth: 26 February 1931. Date of death: 18 June 2005. Specialization: Synthetic Organic Chemistry and Bio-Organic Chemistry Last known address: 23/B, Naktala Lane (D.P.P. Road), Kolkata 700 047. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook ...

  7. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Date of birth: 15 August 1946. Date of death: 4 June 2014. Specialization: Algebraic Geometry Last known address: 8th Floor, Flat No. 82, Panorama, 203, Walkeshwar Road, Mumbai 400 006. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. 29th Mid-year meeting. Posted on 19 January 2018. The 29th ...

  8. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mani, Dr Kalyanasundaram Subra M.D. (Madras). Date of birth: 18 October 1928. Date of death: 28 March 2001. Specialization: Neurology Last known address: Consultant Neurologist, Neurological Clinic, No.1, Old Veterinary Hospital Road, Basavanagudi, Bengaluru 560 004. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  9. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mitra, Prof. Sujit Kumar Ph.D. (North Carolina), FNA. Date of birth: 23 January 1932. Date of death: 18 March 2004. Specialization: Mathematical Statistics Last known address: Distinguished Scientist Emeritus, Indian Statistical Institute, 7, SJS Sansanwal Marg, New Delhi 110 016. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  10. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Date of birth: 1896. Date of death: 1 April 1990. Specialization: Cotton Root-Rot Last known address: 2017, Maple, Evanston, Illinois 60201, USA. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. 29th Mid-year meeting. Posted on 19 January 2018. The 29th Mid-year meeting of the Academy will be held from ...

  11. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Reddy, Prof. Amulya Kumar Narayana Ph.D. (London). Date of birth: 21 October 1930. Date of death: 7 May 2006. Specialization: Rural Technology, Energy Analysis, Electrochemistry and S & T Policy Last known address: 25/5, Bore Bank Road, Benson Town, Bengaluru 560 046. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  12. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... 5 July 1933. Date of death: 19 September 2004. Specialization: X-ray Crystallography, Molecular Biophysics, Wide Line NMR and Informatics Last known address: INSA Senior Scientist, Dept. of Crystallography &, Biophysics, University of Madras, Guindy Campus, Chennai 600 025. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  13. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Malhotra, Prof. Prince Kumar Ph.D. (Bombay), FNA. Date of birth: 20 April 1935. Date of death: 7 March 1992. Specialization: High Energy Physics and Cosmic Ray Physics Last known address: Tata Institute of Fundamental, Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Bombay 400 005. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  14. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... 1 March 1923. Date of death: 20 August 2003. Specialization: Solid State Physics, Low Temperature Physics and Inter-relation between Fundamental Physical Constants Last known address: Department of Physics, University of New Orleans, Lakefront, New Orleans, LA 70148, USA. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  15. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kamal Nath M.B.B.S. & M.D. (Lucknow), FNA, FAMS. Date of birth: 17 November 1929. Date of death: 21 June 2015. Specialization: Neurophysiology, Behaviour, Biocontrols and Hospital Planning Last known address: 503, 6th A Main, 12th Cross, HIG Colony, RMV II Stage, Bengaluru 560 094. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook ...

  16. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rindani, Dr Tansukh Harshadray M.D., D.Sc. (Bombay), FAMS. Date of birth: 17 April 1917. Date of death: 24 October 2012. Specialization: Endocrinology, Physiology and Stress Last known address: 2/52, Gulmohar, New MIG Colony, Kher Nagar, Bandra East, Mumbai 400 051. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  17. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ganapathi, Dr Krishnamurthy D.Sc. (Madras), FNA. Date of birth: 18 August 1911. Date of death: 15 October 2004. Specialization: Microbial Biochemistry, Fermentation Technology and Chemotherapy Last known address: c/o Dr L. Sankaran, 5809, Ipswich Road, Bethesda, MD 20814, USA. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook ...

  18. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Date of birth: 19 September 1927. Date of death: 6 April 2002. Specialization: Biochemistry, Microbiology and Toxicology Last known address: 42, Palmcrest Co-op. Hsg. Soc. Ltd, 191/192, St. Paul Road, Bandra (West), Mumbai 400 050. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  19. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ph.D. (Cornell), FNA, F.R.S.S.. Date of birth: 4 April 1928. Date of death: 16 May 2003. Specialization: Genetics, Biometry, Mutation Breeding, Interdisciplinary Research Management, Human & Natural Resource Development and Policy Planning in Agriculture Last known address: 5087, Sector B, Pocket 7, Vasant Kunj, ...

  20. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    organic Chemistry, Supramolecular Self Assemblies, Enzymology, Soft Nanocomposite in Cellular Transportation Address: Department of Biological Chemistry, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700 032, W.B.

  1. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SV Univ.), FNASc, FNA. Date of birth: 1 July 1957. Specialization: Environmental Microbiology, Biodegradation, Bioremediation Address: Department of Animal Biology, School of Life Sciences, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500 046, A.P.

  2. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1976 Section: General Biology. Jacob, Prof. Tazhuthaveetil Mathai Ph.D. (Madras), FNA. Date of birth: 6 June 1927. Date of death: 6 June 2014. Specialization: Synthetic Organic Chemistry, Molecular Biology and Immunology Last known address: 51, 10th Cross, II Stage, West of Chord Road, Bengaluru 560 086.

  3. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Date of birth: 15 February 1904. Date of death: 23 February 1991. Specialization: Insect Parasitism, Biological Control of Insect Pests & Noxious Weeds, Apiculture, Sericulture and General Entomology Last known address: Sri Girija Shankar Nivas, B-122, Sravodaya Enclave, Sri Aurobindo Marg, New Delhi 110 017.

  4. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Date of birth: 11 December 1953. Specialization: Surface Engineering, Development of Normal Coating Technologies, High Temperature Deformation & Fracture and High Strain Rate Deformation & Ballistic Penetration Address: Department of Metallurgical & Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Chennai ...

  5. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rodriguez, Dr Placid Ph.D. (IISc), FNAE, FNASc. Council Service: 2001-2003. Date of birth: 5 October 1940. Date of death: 31 August 2008. Specialization: Mechanical Metallurgy, Nuclear Materials and Materials Science & Engineering Last known address: Flat 2B, Aditya Apartments, 38, Balakrishna Road, Valmiki Nagar, ...

  6. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vijay Kumar Ph.D. (Bombay), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 21 January 1944. Date of death: 16 March 1999. Specialization: Radio Astronomy and Cosmology Last known address: National Centre for Radio Astrophys, Tata Inst. of Fundamental Research, Poona University Campus, Post Bag No. 3, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411 007.

  7. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Date of birth: 1 February 1969. Specialization: QSO Spectroscopy, Cosmology and Structure Formation Address: Scientist H, Inter-University Centre for Astronomy & Astrophysics, Post Bag 4, Ganeshkhind, Pune University Campus, Pune 411 007, Maharashtra Contact: Office: (020) 2560 4220. Residence: (020) 2560 4412

  8. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Address: Professor, Inter-University Centre for Astronomy & Astrophysics, Post Bag 4, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411 007, Maharashtra Contact: Office: (020) 2560 4212. Residence: (020) 2560 4407. Mobile: 94226 44463. Fax: (020) 2560 4699. Email: tarun@iucaa.in, tarun.souradeep@gmail.com. http://www.iucaa.in/~tarun.

  9. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Date of birth: 25 October 1944. Specialization: Industrial Catalysis, Petroleum Refining and Petrochemical Production and Green Chemistry Address: Consultant, Industrial Catalysis, Residency C-6, Phase 3, Dakshin Avenue, Unamanchery, Kolapakkam 600 127, T.N.. Contact: Mobile: 98401 03865

  10. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Date of birth: 20 April 1955. Specialization: Cancer Biology, Genomics, Human Genetics Address: Molecular Biology Research & Diagnostic Laboratory, Saroj Gupta Cancer Centre & Research Institute, M.G. Road, Thakurpukur, Kolkata 700 063, W.B.. Contact: Office: (033) 2453 2781-83/2115. Residence: (033) 2358 1528

  11. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2009 Section: General Biology. Roy, Dr Rajendra Prasad Ph.D. (IISc), FNASc, FNA. Date of birth: 26 January 1962. Specialization: Protein Chemistry and Chemical Biology Address: Staff Scientist VII, National Institute of Immunology, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110 067, U.T.. Contact: Office: (011) 2670 3698

  12. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1998 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Srivastava, Prof. Deepak Chandra Ph.D. (ISM, Dhanbad), FNASc, FNA. Date of birth: 1 October 1956. Specialization: Structural Geology and Fluid Inclusions Address: Head, Department of Earth Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee 247 667, Uttarakhand

  13. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Council Service: 1974-76, 1980-82; Vice-President: 1980-82. Date of birth: 14 February 1929. Date of death: 1 December 2012. Specialization: Earth & Planetary Sciences, Nuclear Physics and Geochemistry Last known address: Scripps Institute of Oceanography, Geosciences Research Division, 0244, La Jolla, California ...

  14. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Date of birth: 16 March 1971. Specialization: Low Temperature Elemental & Isotope Geochemistry, Biogeochemistry of Trace Elements & Isotopes, Earth Surface & Ocean Processes Address: Geosciences Division, Physical Research Laboratory, Navrangpura, Ahmedabad 380 009, Gujarat Contact: Office: (079) 2631 4307

  15. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1974 Section: Engineering & Technology. Lal, Prof. Shankar Ph.D. (CIT). Date of birth: 25 June 1923. Date of death: 25 September 1991. Specialization: Fluid Mechanics, Heat Transfer and Solid Mechanics Last known address: Dept. of Mechanical & Industrial, Engineering, University of Roorkee, Roorkee 247 667.

  16. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pandurang Vasudeo D.Sc. (London), FNA 1946-49. Date of birth: 27 July 1911. Date of death: 28 January 1997. Specialization: Statistics, Nutrition, Environment and Behavioural Traits Last known address: Adjunct Professor of Biometry,, Health & Nutrition, Interdiscipli-, nary School of Health Sciences, University of Poona, ...

  17. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Date of birth: 17 March 1952. Specialization: Particle Physics Address: Palit Professor of Physics, University of Calcutta, 92, APC Road, Kolkata 700 009, W.B.. Contact: Office: (033) 2352 5631. Residence: (033) 2473 7519. Mobile: 98312 43624. Email: amitavaraychaudhuri@yahoo.com. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  18. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Siddiqi, Dr Imran Ph.D. (Oregon), FNA. Date of birth: 7 September 1957. Specialization: Genetics, Plant Development, Genetic Recombination Address: Scientist EII, Centre for Cellular & Molecular Biology, Uppal Road, Hyderabad 500 007, A.P.. Contact: Office: (040) 2719 2570. Residence: (040) 2715 8119. Mobile: 98666 ...

  19. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    error. The page your are looking for can not be found! Please check the link or use the navigation bar at the top. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Theory Of Evolution. Posted on 23 January 2018. Joint Statement by the Three Science Academies of India on the teaching of the theory of evolution

  20. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Saha, Prof. Ajit Kumar Ph.D. (Calcutta and Toronto), FNA. Date of birth: 25 May 1925. Date of death: 27 April 1997. Specialization: Petrology, Geochemistry, Precambrian Geology and Environmental Geology Last known address: Emeritus Professor of Geology, Department of Geology, Presidency College, Calcutta 700 073.

  1. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Saldanha, Prof. Cecil John Ph.D. (Bombay). Date of birth: 27 December 1926. Date of death: 7 April 2002. Specialization: Angiosperm Taxonomy, Floristics and Ecology Last known address: Director, Centre for Taxonomic Studies, St. Joseph's College, Bengaluru 560 025. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  2. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    . YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. 29th Mid-year meeting. Posted on 19 January 2018. The 29th Mid-year meeting of the Academy will be held from 29–30 June 2018 in Infosys, Mysuru. Theory Of Evolution.

  3. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lucknow), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 5 August 1923. Date of death: 19 January 2012. Specialization: Cenophytic Palaeobotany and Palynology Last known address: B-21, Sector A, Mahanagar, Lucknow 226 006. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  4. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... FNA, FTWAS Council Service: 1968-85; Vice-President: 1971-73; President: 1974-76. Date of birth: 28 August 1928. Date of death: 22 November 2016. Specialization: Cosmic Rays, Particle Physics Last known address: C-178, First Floor, Sarvodaya Enclave, New Delhi 110 017, U.T.. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  5. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kanungo, Prof. Madhu Sudan Ph.D. (Illinois), FNA, FNASc, FAMS. Date of birth: 1 April 1927. Date of death: 26 July 2011. Specialization: Biochemistry & Molecular Biology of Development & Ageing and Neuroscience Last known address: 9GF, Old Medical Enclave, Banaras Hindu University Campus, Varanasi 221 005.

  6. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1974 Section: Medicine. Sundaram, Dr Krishna M.D. (Mumbai), FNA. Date of birth: 12 November 1926. Date of death: 20 May 2008. Specialization: Radiation Biology, Nuclear Medicine and Immunology Last known address: A-72, Sreevatsa Garden, Mettupalyam Road, Thundayulur Post, Coimbatore 641 034.

  7. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2005 Section: Medicine. Sundar, Prof. Shyam M.D. (Banaras), FNASc, FRCP (London), FNA, FAMS, FTWAS. Date of birth: 30 November 1953. Specialization: Medicine, Infectious Diseases and Visceral Leishmaniasis Address: Professor of Medicine, Institute of Medical Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, ...

  8. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Date of birth: 19 June 1952. Specialization: X-ray Instrumentation for Astronomy, Active Galactic Nuclei and Cataclysmic Variables, Stellar Coronae, Hot Interstellar & Intracluster Media and Supernova Remnants Address: 28A, Bank Colony, Patiala 147 001, Panjab Contact: Mobile: 90048 38965. Email: kulinderpal@gmail.

  9. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 29 October 1914. Date of death: 20 January 2002. Specialization: Medicinal Chemistry Last known address: B-1, Pamposh Enclave, Greater Kailash-1, New Delhi 110 048. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  10. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ravi Martanda M.B.B.S. (Madras), D.Sc. (h.c.), FRCS Council Service: 1971-76; Vice-President: 1974-76. Date of birth: 7 September 1922. Date of death: 10 March 2015. Specialization: Neurosurgery Last known address: A-803, Vaishnavi Splendour, 6th Cross, 80 Feet Road, RMV Extension, Sanjay Nagar, Bengaluru 560 ...

  11. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    . Date of birth: 8 October 1922. Date of death: 7 April 2001. Specialization: Crystallography, Biophysics, Biomolecular Structure, Theoretical Physics and Mathematical Logic Last known address: Cottage No. 2, Voluntary Health Services, Adyar, ...

  12. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Specialization: Computational Chemistry, Non-Covalent Interactions, Biomolecular Simulations Address: Senior Principal Scientist, Chemical Laboratory, Central Leather Research Institute, Adyar, Chennai 600 020, T.N.. Contact: Office: (044) 2441 1630, (044) 2443 7150. Residence: (044) 2238 3031. Mobile: 98402 64151

  13. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Specialization: Superconductivity, Magnetism, Low Temperature Scanning, Tunnelling Microscopy/Spectroscopy, High Frequency Electrodynamics of Superconductors Address: Department of Condensed Matter Physics & Materials Science, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400 005, ...

  14. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mahadevan, Dr Perurmadom Ramaiyer Ph.D. (Princeton). Date of birth: 20 May 1928. Date of death: 27 April 2003. Specialization: Molecular Biology, Mycobacteria, Leprosy and Industrial Biotechnology Last known address: Maanya Biotech Limited, Plot No. 151A, Road No. 12, MLAs' Colony, Banjara Hills, Hyderabad 500 ...

  15. New Fellows and Honorary Fellows

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ethical Guidelines and Procedures document. Posted on 17 January 2017. A revised version of the document 'Scientific Values: Ethical Guidelines and Procedures' has been produced by the Academy's Panel on Scientific Values. For more details, see the Academy Committee on Scientific Values page.

  16. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... December 1923. Address: Department of Physics, Joseph Henry Laboratories, Princeton University, Jadwin Hall, Post Box 708, Princeton, NJ 08544-0708, U.S.A.. Contact: Office: (+1-609) 258 5850. Residence: (+1-609) 454 5075. Fax: (+1-609) 258 1006. Email: pwa@princeton.edu. YouTube · Twitter · Facebook · Blog ...

  17. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    . Date of birth: 3 April 1955. Specialization: Wild Life Ecology, Forest Ecology and Climate Change Address: Professor, Centre for Ecological Sciences, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru 560 012, Karnataka Contact: Office: (080) 2360 0382, ...

  18. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1984 Section: Engineering & Technology. Kalam, Prof. Avul Pakir Jainulabdeen Abdul D.M.I.T. (Aero Engg.) (Madras), D.Sc.(h.c.), D.Engg. (h.c.), FNASc. Date of birth: 15 October 1931. Date of death: 27 July 2015. Specialization: Composite Material Technology and Rocket Technology Last known address: 10, ...

  19. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gowariker, Dr Vasant Ranchhod Ph.D. (Birmingham), D.Sc. (h.c.), FNAE. Date of birth: 25 March 1933. Date of death: 2 January 2015. Specialization: Propellant & Rocket Technology, Heat, Mass & Momentum Transfer Phenomena, Sugar Technology and Chemical Fertilizers Last known address: I-101, Vanaraji Heights, ...

  20. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bombay), D.Sc. (Oxon), FNA. Date of birth: 28 September 1918. Date of death: 25 May 1999. Specialization: Organic Chemistry, Dyestuff Technology and Rural Development through Science & Technology Last known address: 101, Anand Park ...

  1. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    . (Univ. Calif., Berkeley), FNA. Date of birth: 1 January 1935. Date of death: 15 November 2004. Specialization: Genetics, Cell Biology and Cytogenetics Last known address: Professor, Genetic Research Unit, Department of Zoology, University ...

  2. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madras). Date of birth: 1 January 1926. Date of death: 23 October 1994. Specialization: Laser and Spectroscopy, Crystal Physics and Ferro-Electricity Last known address: Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru 560 012.

  3. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M.B.B.S. & Ph.D. (Calcutta), M.D. (Banaras), FNA, FAMS. Date of birth: 1 January 1942. Date of death: 5 August 2015. Specialization: Medical Microbiology, Pathogenicity, Nosocomial Infections, Infection Control and Antimicrobial Therapy Last known address: Udita, 09-0303, Nabami, 1050/1, Survey Park, Kolkata 700 075.

  4. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2008 Section: Medicine. Somasundaram, Prof. Kumaravel Ph.D. (MKU), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 8 October 1962. Specialization: Cancer Biology, Genetics and Virology Address: Microbiology & Cell Biology Laboratory, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru 560 012, Karnataka Contact: Office: (080) 2360 7171

  5. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Upcoming Refresher Courses. Topology 02 to 14 May, 2018. Ramanujan Institute for Advanced Study in Mathematics, University of Madras Register Mathematics 11 to 25 June, 2018. Dayanand Science College, Latur (M.S.) Register Experimental Physics 14 to 29 June, 2018. Birla Institute of Technology, Mesra, Ranchi

  6. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kapur, Prof. Ravinder Lal Ph.D. (Edinburgh).,., FRC Psych. Date of birth: 7 July 1938. Date of death: 24 November 2006. Specialization: Psychiatry, Psychiatric Epidemiology and Yoga Last known address: Emeritus Professor, National Institute of Advanced Studies, Indian Institute of Science Campus, Bengaluru 560 012.

  7. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2000 Section: General Biology. Sinha, Prof. Pratima Ph.D. (Bombay), FNASc. Date of birth: 14 November 1952. Specialization: Molecular Genetics of Yeast and Molecular Biology Address: D7/9, SF, Exclusive Floors, DLR City, Phase 5, Gurgaon 122 009, Haryana Contact: Residence: (0124) 403 8150

  8. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Chemistry Last known address: Distinguished Scientist, Organic Chemistry Division III, Indian Institute of Chemical Technology, Uppal Road, Hyderabad 500 607, A.P. ... 19 January 2018. The 29th Mid-year meeting of the Academy will be held from 29–30 June 2018 in Infosys, Mysuru ... Mathematics 11 to 25 June, 2018

  9. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1974 Section: Chemistry ... Date of death: 11 July 2004. Specialization: Inorganic & Organometallic Chemistry, Metal Alkoxides and Sol-Gel Chemistry ... The 29th Mid-year meeting of the Academy will be held from 29–30 June 2018 ...

  10. Open cholecystectomy: Exposure and confidence of surgical trainees and new fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Beth M; Lambrianides, Andreas L; Dulhunty, Joel M

    2018-03-01

    The laparoscopic approach to cholecystectomy has overtaken open procedures in terms of frequency, despite open procedures playing an important role in certain clinical situations. This study explored exposure and confidence of Australasian surgical trainees and new fellows in performing an open versus laparoscopic cholecystectomy. An online survey was disseminated via the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons to senior general surgery trainees (years 3-5 of surgical training) and new fellows (fellowship within the previous 5 years). The survey included questions regarding level of experience and confidence in performing an open cholecystectomy and converting from a laparoscopic to an open approach. A total of 135 participants responded; 58 (43%) were surgical trainees, 58 (43%) were fellows and 19 (14%) did not specify their level of training. Respondents who were involved in more than 20 open cholecystectomy procedures as an assistant or independent operator compared with those less exposed were more likely to feel confident to independently perform an elective open cholecystectomy (87.8% vs. 57.3%, P = 0.001), independently convert from a laparoscopic to open cholecystectomy (87.8% vs. 58.7%, P = 0.001) and independently perform an open cholecystectomy as a surgical consultant based on their level of exposure as a trainee (73.2% vs. 45.3%, P = 0.004). This study suggests the need to ensure surgical trainees are exposed to sufficient open cholecystectomies to enable confidence and skill with performing these procedures when indicated. Greater recognition of the need for exposure during training, including meaningful simulation, may assist. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. High-Fidelity Contrast Reaction Simulation Training: Performance Comparison of Faculty, Fellows, and Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, Kyle; Staib, Lawrence; Arango, Jennifer; Kirsch, John; Arici, Mel; Kappus, Liana; Pahade, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Reactions to contrast material are uncommon in diagnostic radiology, and vary in clinical presentation from urticaria to life-threatening anaphylaxis. Prior studies have demonstrated a high error rate in contrast reaction management, with smaller studies using simulation demonstrating variable data on effectiveness. We sought to assess the effectiveness of high-fidelity simulation in teaching contrast reaction management for residents, fellows, and attendings. A 20-question multiple-choice test assessing contrast reaction knowledge, with Likert-scale questions assessing subjective comfort levels of management of contrast reactions, was created. Three simulation scenarios that represented a moderate reaction, a severe reaction, and a contrast reaction mimic were completed in a one-hour period in a simulation laboratory. All participants completed a pretest and a posttest at one month. A six-month delayed posttest was given, but was optional for all participants. A total of 150 radiologists participated (residents = 52; fellows = 24; faculty = 74) in the pretest and posttest; and 105 participants completed the delayed posttest (residents = 31; fellows = 17; faculty = 57). A statistically significant increase was found in the one-month posttest (P < .00001) and the six-month posttest scores (P < .00001) and Likert scores (P < .001) assessing comfort level in managing all contrast reactions, compared with the pretest. Test scores and comfort level for moderate and severe reactions significantly decreased at six months, compared with the one-month posttest (P < .05). High-fidelity simulation is an effective learning tool, allowing practice of "high-acuity" situation management in a nonthreatening environment; the simulation training resulted in significant improvement in test scores, as well as an increase in subjective comfort in management of reactions, across all levels of training. A six-month refresher course is suggested, to maintain knowledge and comfort level in

  12. External dacryocystorhinostomy in consultants and fellows - a comparison of the causes of failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, L; Fearnley, T; Al-Maskari, A; El-Hindy, N; Kalantzis, G; Chang, B Y

    2015-01-01

    Failure of primary dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) often requires revision surgery to inspect the cause of failure and re-establish anatomic patency. This study aims to specifcally compare the anatomical causes of failure noted during revision DCR of primary external DCR (EX-DCR) and compare the difference between consultants and fellows. A retrospective review of 37 patients who underwent revision of a primary external approach DCR over a 7-year-period in a University Hospital. All primary surgery was performed by either a consultant surgeon or senior oculoplastic fellow. Details of the initial pathology prior to primary DCR and grade of operating surgeon were collected along with perioperative surgical findings. The cause of failure of the initial surgery was classified according to perioperative findings. Failure was classified as either inappropriately sized/located ostium or fibrous/membranous soft tissue obstruction of the newly created ostium. The cause of failure of the initial surgery was soft tissue obstruction in 43.3% and an inappropriately sized/located ostium in 56.7%. In those patients whose primary surgery was performed by a consultant, 73.3% were found to have a soft tissue obstruction and 26.7% were found to have an inappropriately sized/ located ostium. In contrast, if initial surgery was performed by a fellow, 22.7% were found to have a soft tissue obstruction and 77.3% an inappropriately sized/ located ostium (p =0.002). Where the primary surgeon has been a trainee there is a trend toward inadequately sized or located ostium being the most likely causative factor in failure of primary EX-DCR.  Hippokratia 2015; 19 (3): 216-218.

  13. Comparison of Quality Oncology Practice Initiative (QOPI) Measure Adherence Between Oncology Fellows, Advanced Practice Providers, and Attending Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jason; Zhang, Tian; Shah, Radhika; Kamal, Arif H; Kelley, Michael J

    2015-12-01

    Quality improvement measures are uniformly applied to all oncology providers, regardless of their roles. Little is known about differences in adherence to these measures between oncology fellows, advance practice providers (APP), and attending physicians. We investigated conformance across Quality Oncology Practice Initiative (QOPI) measures for oncology fellows, advance practice providers, and attending physicians at the Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center (DVAMC). Using data collected from the Spring 2012 and 2013 QOPI cycles, we abstracted charts of patients and separated them based on their primary provider. Descriptive statistics and the chi-square test were calculated for each QOPI measure between fellows, advanced practice providers (APPs), and attending physicians. A total of 169 patients were reviewed. Of these, 31 patients had a fellow, 39 had an APP, and 99 had an attending as their primary oncology provider. Fellows and attending physicians performed similarly on 90 of 94 QOPI metrics. High-performing metrics included several core QOPI measures including documenting consent for chemotherapy, recommending adjuvant chemotherapy when appropriate, and prescribing serotonin antagonists when prescribing emetogenic chemotherapies. Low-performing metrics included documentation of treatment summary and taking action to address problems with emotional well-being by the second office visit. Attendings documented the plan for oral chemotherapy more often (92 vs. 63%, P=0.049). However, after the chart audit, we found that fellows actually documented the plan for oral chemotherapy 88% of the time (p=0.73). APPs and attendings performed similarly on 88 of 90 QOPI measures. The quality of oncology care tends to be similar between attendings and fellows overall; some of the significant differences do not remain significant after a second manual chart review, highlighting that the use of manual data collection for QOPI analysis is an imperfect system, and there may

  14. Work satisfaction, quality of life, and leisure time of neonatology fellows and senior neonatologists in Israel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moshe Michael

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives To examine work satisfaction, quality of life, and leisure time of neonatology fellows and senior neonatologists in Israel. Methods A validated questionnaire was delivered during the second half of 2008 to all the neonatology fellows and senior neonatologists in Israel. Descriptive analysis, parametric Student’s t-test, and aparametric Mann Whitney and χ2 tests were conducted. Results Of 114 practicing neonatologists in that period in Israel (including both seniors and fellows, 112 (98.25% participated in the study. The majority of neonatologists were male (53.2%, married (91.7%, 40–60 years old (69.7%, and studied in Israeli medical schools (62.0%. Most did their pediatric residencies and fellowships in Israel (97.2% and 75.7%, respectively. The average number of night/on-call shifts of fellows and senior neonatologists was 8.8 per month (SD ± 3.425 and the number of active on-call shifts was 4.04 (SD ± 3.194. The satisfaction level of neonatologists in Israeli medical centers with patient care, self-reward, work relations, and quality of life was high, but their satisfaction level with workload, income and prestige, and leisure time was low. The general index of work satisfaction and the general index of indices were both high in relation to the mid-range values. The majority of neonatologists stated that they would choose to practice medicine again. Most of them would encourage medical students to choose the same specialty they had chosen. Only a few neonatologists were contemplating changing their choice of specialty. Most neonatologists want to continue practicing medicine; however, a significant number will not recommend that their children do so. Conclusions The satisfaction level of neonatologists in Israel is high, mainly due to satisfaction with their work. High satisfaction levels promise high quality patient care, as well as high satisfaction levels of patients and their families. However

  15. A summary report on researches carried out by post-doctoral fellows on fiscal year 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-07-01

    The Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) introduced the post-doctoral fellows system since fiscal year 1997, to intend to promote talents encouragement by supplying researching environments to young researchers with scholarship of doctor. This system aims not only to independently promote his own research theme certified by JNC by a young researcher with rich initiatives within a period of two or three years to obtain business as a researcher, but also to effectively progress a researching business of JNC. This report contains summaries on 17 items researching results on fiscal year 2001, of which 6 items are finished on this fiscal year. (G.K.)

  16. Incidence of choroidal neovascularization in the fellow eye in the comparison of age-related macular degeneration treatments trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Maureen G; Daniel, Ebenezer; Shah, Ankoor R; Grunwald, Juan E; Hagstrom, Stephanie A; Avery, Robert L; Huang, Jiayan; Martin, Revell W; Roth, Daniel B; Castellarin, Alessandro A; Bakri, Sophie J; Fine, Stuart L; Martin, Daniel F

    2013-10-01

    To assess the influence of drug; dosing regimen; and traditional, nontraditional, and genetic risk factors on the incidence of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in the fellow eye of patients treated for CNV with ranibizumab or bevacizumab. Cohort study of patients enrolled in a multicenter, randomized clinical trial. Patients with no CNV in the fellow eye at the time of enrollment in the Comparison of Age-Related Macular Degeneration Treatments Trials (CATT). Eligibility criteria for the clinical trial required that study eyes have evidence on fluorescein angiography and optical coherence tomography of CNV secondary to age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and visual acuity between 20/25 and 20/320. Treatment for the study eye was assigned randomly to either ranibizumab or bevacizumab and to 3 different regimens for dosing over a 2-year period. The genotypes for 4 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with risk of AMD were determined. Only patients without CNV in the fellow eye at baseline were considered at risk. The CATT ophthalmologists examined patients every 4 weeks through 2 years and recorded treatment for CNV in the fellow eye. Development of CNV in the fellow eye. Among 1185 CATT participants, 727 (61%) had no CNV in the fellow eye at enrollment. At 2 years, CNV had developed in 75 (20.6%) of 365 patients treated with ranibizumab and in 60 (16.6%) of 362 patients treated with bevacizumab (absolute difference, 4.0%; 95% confidence interval [CI], -1.7% to 9.6%; P = 0.17). The risk ratio for pro re nata dosing relative to monthly dosing was 1.1 (95% CI, 0.8-1.6). Greater elevation of the retinal pigment epithelium and fluid in the foveal center of the study eye were associated with increased incidence of CNV in the fellow eye. Incidence was not associated with genotype on rs1061170 (CFH), rs10490924 (ARMS2), rs11200638 (HTRA1), and rs2230199 (C3; P>0.35). Through 2 years, there was no statistically significant difference between ranibizumab and

  17. In-hospital fellow coverage reduces communication errors in the surgical intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Mallory; Alban, Rodrigo F; Hardy, James P; Oxman, David A; Garcia, Edward R; Hevelone, Nathanael; Frendl, Gyorgy; Rogers, Selwyn O

    2014-06-01

    Staff coverage strategies of intensive care units (ICUs) impact clinical outcomes. High-intensity staff coverage strategies are associated with lower morbidity and mortality. Accessible clinical expertise, team work, and effective communication have all been attributed to the success of this coverage strategy. We evaluate the impact of in-hospital fellow coverage (IHFC) on improving communication of cardiorespiratory events. A prospective observational study performed in an academic tertiary care center with high-intensity staff coverage. The main outcome measure was resident to fellow communication of cardiorespiratory events during IHFC vs home coverage (HC) periods. Three hundred twelve cardiorespiratory events were collected in 114 surgical ICU patients in 134 study days. Complete data were available for 306 events. One hundred three communication errors occurred. IHFC was associated with significantly better communication of events compared to HC (Pcommunicated 89% of events during IHFC vs 51% of events during HC (PCommunication patterns of junior and midlevel residents were similar. Midlevel residents communicated 68% of all on-call events (87% IHFC vs 50% HC, Pcommunicated 66% of events (94% IHFC vs 52% HC, PCommunication errors were lower in all ICUs during IHFC (Pcommunication errors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Retinitis pigmentosa inversa with unilateral high myopia with fellow eye optic disc pitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Saumil; Rush, Ryan; Narayanan, Raja

    2011-01-01

    To report a possible rare association of bilateral retinitis pigmentosa inversa (RPI) with unilateral high myopia with fellow eye optic disc pitting. A 55-year-old man with a history of reduced vision in the right eye since childhood presented with gradually decreasing vision in the left eye. On examination, a -23.00 diopter refractive error and diffuse chorioretinal atrophy consistent with pathologic myopia was found in the right eye. An optic disc pit with posterior pole pigmentary alterations thought to be consequent to a previous neurosensory detachment was found in the left eye. Though the retinal arteriolar attenuation seen in both eyes with an inconsistent history of night blindness since childhood pointed towards the possibility of a concurrently existing rod or rod-cone dystrophy, the posterior pole pigmentary alterations characteristic of RPI were clearly masked by the above pathologies. Optical coherence tomography demonstrated prominent foveal atrophy and an optic disc pit in the left eye. Electroretinography (ERG) demonstrated moderately attenuated amplitudes with prolonged implicit times of rod and cone responses bilaterally. The patient was diagnosed with bilateral RPI and anisometropic amblyopia in the right eye. This report documents a unique constellation of findings which include bilateral RPI and unilateral high myopia with an optic disc pit in the fellow eye. An ERG confirmation of a dystrophic etiology should be sought in suspicious cases, especially when findings are masked by the concurrent presence of other pathologies.

  19. Ombud's Corner: fellows and students – a win-win equation

    CERN Multimedia

    Sudeshna Datta-Cockerill

    2014-01-01

    The hundreds of Fellows and students working at CERN bring precious new blood into the Laboratory. At the same time, CERN offers them invaluable work experience that will have a significant impact on their future careers. It is important that we all work together to make this a win-win situation with lasting positive effects for all concerned over the years to come.   Fellows and students are just setting out on a great professional adventure.  Some of them are very young, others are a bit more experienced … and what happens during this early period can have vast consequences on their approach to work and indeed on their overall careers. They all come here with their hard earned skills and a high degree of motivation, ready to make the most out of an internship at CERN. Sometimes, they are called to integrate into well-established units; at other times, they are asked to join complex collaborations. Almost always they have to deal with new information, new cultures, new t...

  20. Do Pain Medicine Fellowship Programs Provide Education in Practice Management? A Survey of Pain Medicine Fellowship Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przkora, Rene; Antony, Ajay; McNeil, Andrew; Brenner, Gary J; Mesrobian, James; Rosenquist, Richard; Abouleish, Amr E

    2018-01-01

    We hypothesized that there is a gap between expectations and actual training in practice management for pain medicine fellows. Our impression is that many fellowships rely on residency training to provide exposure to business education. Unfortunately, pain management and anesthesiology business education are very different, as the practice settings are largely office- versus hospital-based, respectively. Because it is unclear whether pain management fellowships are providing practice management education and, if they do, whether the topics covered match the expectations of their fellows, we surveyed pain medicine program directors and fellows regarding their expectations and training in business management. A survey. Academic pain medicine fellowship programs. After an exemption was obtained from the University of Texas Medical Branch Institutional Review Board (#13-030), an email survey was sent to members of the Association of Pain Program Directors to be forwarded to their fellows. Directors were contacted 3 times to maximize the response rate. The anonymous survey for fellows contained 21 questions (questions are shown in the results). Fifty-nine of 84 program directors responded and forwarded the survey to their fellows. Sixty fellows responded, with 56 answering the survey questions. The responder rate is a limitation, although similar rates have been reported in similar studies. The majority of pain medicine fellows receive some practice management training, mainly on billing documentation and preauthorization processes, while most do not receive business education (e.g., human resources, contracts, accounting/financial reports). More than 70% of fellows reported that they receive more business education from industry than from their fellowships, a result that may raise concerns about the independence of our future physicians from the industry. Our findings support the need for enhanced and structured business education during pain fellowship. Business

  1. Topography and Higher Order Corneal Aberrations of the Fellow Eye in Unilateral Keratoconus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksoy, Sibel; Akkaya, Sezen; Özkurt, Yelda; Kurna, Sevda; Açıkalın, Banu; Şengör, Tomris

    2017-10-01

    Comparison of topography and corneal higher order aberrations (HOA) data of fellow normal eyes of unilateral keratoconus patients with keratoconus eyes and control group. The records of 196 patients with keratoconus were reviewed. Twenty patients were identified as unilateral keratoconus. The best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), topography and aberration data of the unilateral keratoconus patients' normal eyes were compared with their contralateral keratoconus eyes and with control group eyes. For statistical analysis, flat and steep keratometry values, average corneal power, cylindrical power, surface regularity index (SRI), surface asymmetry index (SAI), inferior-superior ratio (I-S), keratoconus prediction index, and elevation-depression power (EDP) and diameter (EDD) topography indices were selected. Mean age of the unilateral keratoconus patients was 26.05±4.73 years and that of the control group was 23.6±8.53 years (p>0.05). There was no statistical difference in BCVA between normal and control eyes (p=0.108), whereas BCVA values were significantly lower in eyes with keratoconus (p=0.001). Comparison of quantitative topographic indices between the groups showed that all indices except the I-S ratio were significantly higher in the normal group than in the control group (p<0.05). The most obvious differences were in the SRI, SAI, EDP, and EDD values. All topographic indices were higher in the keratoconus eyes compared to the normal fellow eyes. There was no difference between normal eyes and the control group in terms of spherical aberration, while coma, trefoil, irregular astigmatism, and total HOA values were higher in the normal eyes of unilateral keratoconus patients (p<0.05). All HOA values were higher in keratoconus eyes than in the control group. According to our study, SRI, SAI, EDP, EDD values, and HOA other than spherical aberration were higher in the clinically and topographically normal fellow eyes of unilateral keratoconus patients when compared

  2. Reasons of Aggressive Behaviour Against School Fellows, Its Frequency, Forms: Reaction of Schoolchildren, Teachers and Parents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdas Pruskus

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The present article, which is based on conducted research data, analyzes an attitude of schoolchildren, teachers and parents towards the reasons of schoolchildren’s aggressive behaviour, its frequency and forms. Different factors and motives that stimulate the aggressiveness of schoolchildren, who go to the city, village and different professional (arts and technology schools are examined. Schoolchildren’s approach towards violence against school fellows and themselves is being discussed, as well as reaction of teachers and parents to this phenomenon. The article reveals opinion of schoolchildren, teachers, and parents about the means used to prevent violence towards schoolchildren and existing ways that can be used to make preventive means to be more effective.

  3. Brief report on the research by JNC postdoctoral fellows for 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-08-01

    The Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) commenced a JNC Postdoctoral Fellowship Program in 1997 in order to raise capable researchers by providing an appropriate research environment to young postdoctoral researchers, which means that fiscal year 2002 was the sixth year of the program. The purpose of this program is to provide young researchers full of originality with opportunities to perform research independently on themes related to leading research, and basic and fundamental research of JNC, selected by the researchers themselves and approved by JNC, for a period of two or three years and also to promote the efficiency of JNC's research. This report includes a summary of the results of the research on sixteen themes performed by JNC Postdoctoral Fellows in the fiscal year 2002. Of these, research into four themes ended in 2002. (author)

  4. Bioengineering/Biophysicist Post-doctoral Fellow | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    A post-doctoral fellow position is available in the Tissue Morphodynamics Unit headed by Dr. Kandice Tanner at the National Cancer Institute. The Tanner lab combines biophysical and cell biological approaches to understand the interplay between tissue architecture and metastasis. We use a combination of imaging modalities, cell biology and animal models. It is expected that as a member of this lab, one will have an opportunity to be exposed to all these areas. We value a vibrant and collaborative environment where lab members share ideas, reagents and expertise and want to work on fundamental problems in the establishment of metastatic lesions. Our lab is located in the NIH main campus in Bethesda. The research facilities at NIH are outstanding and the lab has state-of-the-art equipment such as multi-photon and confocal microscopes, FACS facilities and animal vivarium.

  5. Donor Lung Procurement by Surgical Fellow with an Expectation of High Rate of Lung Utilisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smail, Hassiba; Saxena, Pankaj; Wallinder, Andreas; Lin, Enjarn; Snell, Gregory I; Hobson, Jamie; Zimmet, Adam D; Marasco, Silvana F; McGiffin, David C

    2017-12-22

    There is an ever increasing demand for donor lungs in patients waiting for transplantation. Lungs of many potential donors will be rejected if the standard criteria for donor assessment are followed. We have expanded our donor lung pool by accepting marginal donors and establishing a donation after circulatory death program. We have achieved comparable results using marginal donors and accepting donor lungs following donation after circulatory death. We present our assessment and technical guidelines on lung procurement taking into consideration an increasingly complex cohort of lung donors. These guidelines form the basis of the lung procurement training program involving surgical Fellows at the Alfred Hospital in Melbourne, Australia. Copyright © 2017 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The discovery of microorganisms by Robert Hooke and Antoni Van Leeuwenhoek, fellows of the Royal Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gest, Howard

    2004-05-01

    The existence of microscopic organisms was discovered during the period 1665-83 by two Fellows of The Royal Society, Robert Hooke and Antoni van Leeuwenhoek. In Micrographia (1665), Hooke presented the first published depiction of a microganism, the microfungus Mucor. Later, Leeuwenhoek observed and described microscopic protozoa and bacteria. These important revelations were made possible by the ingenuity of Hooke and Leeuwenhoek in fabricating and using simple microscopes that magnified objects from about 25-fold to 250-fold. After a lapse of more than 150 years, microscopy became the backbone of our understanding of the roles of microbes in the causation of infectious diseases and the recycling of chemical elements in the biosphere.

  7. Validation of the Family Meeting Behavioral Skills Checklist. An Instrument to Assess Fellows' Communication Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustin, Jillian L; Way, David P; Wells-Di Gregorio, Sharla; McCallister, Jennifer W

    2016-08-01

    Fellows in pulmonary and critical care medicine are required to show competency in facilitating family meetings for critically ill patients. There are many assessment measures available for evaluating physician-patient communication (e.g., the SEGUE Framework [Set the stage, Elicit information, Give information, Understand the patient's perspective, End the encounter]) and some designed for family meetings. However, no validated measure exists that is specifically designed to assess communication skills during family meetings with surrogate decision makers in intensive care settings. We developed the Family Meeting Behavioral Skills Checklist (FMBSC) to measure advanced communication skills of fellows in family meetings of critically ill patients based on a literature review and consensus of an interdisciplinary group of communications experts. We evaluated the psychometric properties of the FMBSC. We digitally recorded 16 pulmonary/critical care fellows performing a simulated family meeting for a critically ill patient at the end of 1 year of fellowship training. Two clinical health psychologists evaluated each recording independently using the FMBSC Rating Scale and the SEGUE Framework. Judges recorded the number of skills performed using the checklist and employed a summary rating scale to judge the level of performance for each of nine subsets of skills. Each instrument was scored and converted to percentage scores. The FMBSC and SEGUE Framework items were summed and converted to percentage scores for each category and as a total for each instrument. The rating scale items on the FMBSC were also summed and converted to a percentage score. Four primary analyses were conducted to evaluate interjudge reliability, internal consistency, and concurrent validity. Interrater reliability was higher for the FMBSC (intraclass correlation [ICC2,2] = 0.57) than for the SEGUE instrument (ICC2,2 = 0.32) or the FMBSC Rating Scale (ICC2,2 = 0.23). The FMBSC

  8. Concussion knowledge among Sport Chiropractic Fellows from the Royal College of Chiropractic Sports Sciences (Canada).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, Mohsen; Bogumil, Mary Emma; Vora, Khushboo

    2017-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the degree of knowledge that sports chiropractors have in regard to concussion diagnosis and management. A concussion knowledge survey was administered to Sport Chiropractic Fellows of the Royal College of Chiropractic Sports Sciences - Canada (RCCSS(C)) (n=44) via SurveyMonkey.com. Sports chiropractors scored statistically higher on the survey when compared to chiropractic residents (mean =5.57 vs. 5.25; t=2.12; p=0.04) and to fourth year chiropractic interns (mean = 5.57 vs 5.2; t=2.45; p=0.02). Additionally, with our modified scoring, the sports chiropractors scored 85.3%. A few knowledge gaps were identified in the sample population. Sports chiropractors demonstrated the skills and knowledge to diagnose concussion and excel at identifying the definition and mechanism of concussion, but knowledge gaps regarding diagnosis and management of concussion were found in the sample population.

  9. Radiation risks knowledge in resident and fellow in paediatrics: a questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, Sergio; Marchese, Paola; Magistrelli, Andrea; Tomà, Paolo; Matranga, Domenica; Midiri, Massimo; Ugazio, Alberto G; Corsello, Giovanni

    2015-03-22

    Analyse through a multi-choice anonymous questionnaire the knowledge's level in paediatric residents and fellows in two different main Italian hospital, looking mainly to the information to patients and relatives related to risks of ionizing radiation used in common radiological investigations in children. 65 multi choice questionnaires were distributed to paediatric residents and fellows of two different hospitals, an University Hospital (A.O.U.P. "P. Giaccone"- University of Palermo) and a national reference centre for paediatrics (Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesù - Rome). The questionnaire included twelve multiple-choice questions with the aim of analyzing the knowledge about ionizing radiation related risks in infants and children who undergo common diagnostic radiology investigations. The data obtained were processed using software Stata/MP version 11.2. In order to measure the level of expertise of each interviewee a binary indicator was built. The value 1 was assigned if the percentage of correct answers exceeds the median of the distribution and 0 for values not exceeding the median. The association between the level of competence and demographic characteristics (gender, age) and training experience was measured by means of α(2) test. 51/65 questionnaires were completed, returned and analysed (87.7%). Only 18 surveyed (35%), (95% IC = [22%-48%]) can be defined as competent in radiation risk knowledge for common radiological investigations, considering the percentage of correct answers at least of 50% (sufficient knowledge was given with a minimum score of 8 correct answers out of 12). The study demonstrates an urgent need to implement the radiation protection knowledge in the training programme of paediatricians, that improve if just a short targeted training is performed.

  10. Perception versus reality: elucidating motivation and expectations of current fellowship council minimally invasive surgery fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Jeffrey R; Pryor, Aurora D; Truitt, Michael S; Jeyarajah, D Rohan

    2018-04-17

    The aim of our study is to determine minimally invasive trainee motivation and expectations for their respective fellowship. Minimally Invasive Surgery (MIS) is one of the largest non-ACGME post-residency training pathways though little is known concerning the process of residents choosing MIS as a fellowship focus. As general surgery evolves, it is important to understand resident motivation in order to better prepare them for a surgical career. A survey invitation was sent to current trainees in the Minimally Invasive and related pathways through the Fellowship Council. The participants were asked to complete a web-based questionnaire detailing demographics, experiences preparing for fellowship, motivation in choosing an MIS fellowship, and expectations for surgical practice after fellowship. Sixty-seven MIS trainees responded to the survey out of 151 invitations (44%). The Fellowship Council website, mentors, and other fellows were cited as the most helpful source of information when applying for fellowship. Trainees were active in surgical societies as residents, with 78% having membership in the ACS and 60% in SAGES. When deciding to pursue MIS as a fellowship, the desire to increase laparoscopic training was the most important factor. The least important reasons cited were lack of laparoendoscopic training in residency and desire to learn robotic surgery. The majority of trainees believed their laparoscopic skill set was above that of their residency cohort (81%). The most desired post-fellowship employment model is hospital employee (46%) followed by private practice (27%). Most fellows plan on marketing themselves as MIS surgeons (90%) or General Surgeons (78%) when in practice. Residents who choose MIS as a fellowship have a strong exposure to laparoscopy and want to become specialists in their field. Mentors and surgical societies including ACS and SAGES play a vital role in preparing residents for fellowship and practice.

  11. Post-Cataract Surgery Optic Neuropathy: Prevalence, Incidence, Temporal Relationship, and Fellow Eye Involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Ahmadreza; Kanagalingam, Sivashakthi; Diener-West, Marie; Miller, Neil R

    2017-03-01

    To reassess the prevalence and incidence of post-cataract surgery optic neuropathy (PCSON) in the modern era. Retrospective cohort study. Setting: Single-center tertiary care practice. All patients with a diagnosis of nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) seen in the Wilmer Eye Network system between January 1, 2010 and December 31, 2014 were included. Inclusion was based on the following: (1) a history of an acute unilateral decrease in vision, (2) a visual field defect consistent with NAION, (3) a relative afferent pupillary defect, (4) observed optic disc swelling, and (5) no other etiology being found. The prevalence and incidence of PCSON and the temporal association between surgery and onset of PCSON. The secondary outcome was the risk of PCSON in the fellow eye of patients with prior unilateral spontaneous NAION. One hundred eighty-eight patients had developed NAION during the study period. Of these, 18 (9.6%) had undergone cataract surgery (CS) during the year prior to developing NAION. There was no significant temporal pattern associated with the distribution of NAION cases (P = .28). The incidence of PCSON in patients who had noncomplex CS was 10.9 cases per 100 000 (95% CI, 1.3, 39.4). Our data indicate that both the prevalence and incidence of NAION after modern CS are comparable to those of the general population and that there is no significant temporal relationship between modern CS and the subsequent development of NAION in the operated eye. Thus, although this study has inherent biases owing to its retrospective nature, concern regarding an increased risk of PCSON in the fellow eye in patients who have experienced it or spontaneous NAION in 1 eye may be unwarranted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Strategic Alliances in Education: The Knowledge Engineering Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westera, Wim; van den Herik, Jaap; van de Vrie, Evert

    2004-01-01

    The field of higher education shows a jumble of alliances between fellow institutes. The alliances are strategic in kind and serve an economy-of-scales concept. A large scale is a prerequisite for allocating the budgets for new educational methods and technologies in order to keep the educational services up-to-date. All too often, however,…

  13. Neovascular age-related macular degeneration without drusen in the fellow eye : clinical spectrum and therapeutic outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chung, Wing H; van Dijk, Elon H C; Mohabati, Danial; Dijkman, Greet; Yzer, Suzanne; de Jong, Eiko K; Fauser, Sascha; Schlingemann, Reinier O; Hoyng, Carel B; Boon, Camiel J F

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the clinical characteristics and therapeutic outcome of patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) in 1 eye, without drusen in the fellow eye. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Medical records of 381 patients were analyzed to identify the cases. The main outcomes

  14. Neovascular age-related macular degeneration without drusen in the fellow eye: clinical spectrum and therapeutic outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chung, Wing H.; van Dijk, Elon H. C.; Mohabati, Danial; Dijkman, Greet; Yzer, Suzanne; de Jong, Eiko K.; Fauser, Sascha; Schlingemann, Reinier O.; Hoyng, Carel B.; Boon, Camiel J. F.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical characteristics and therapeutic outcome of patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) in 1 eye, without drusen in the fellow eye. Patients and methods: Medical records of 381 patients were analyzed to identify the cases. The main outcomes

  15. How oncology fellows discuss transitions in goals of care: a snapshot of approaches used prior to training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, Anthony L; Michaelsen, Kate; Alexander, Stewart; Hopley, Elizabeth; Edwards, Kelly; Arnold, Robert M

    2010-04-01

    The moment when a physician raises the possibility of discontinuing palliative chemotherapy at the end of life is a critical moment in the illness, and a difficult conversation. Expert recommendations cite the importance of giving bad news in these situations but there is limited research addressing how physicians should discuss transitions in goals of care from disease-modifying therapy to end-of-life care. While existing research includes survey data and observational studies of oncologist outpatient visits with patient who have advanced cancer, there are no studies that characterize actual physician communication behaviors when the physician tried to initiate a transitions conversation with a patient who has advanced cancer. In this study, we examined the communication approaches used by oncology fellows discussing transitions with a standardized patient using audiorecordings collected prior to an intensive communication skills workshop. In this preworkshop encounter, each oncology fellow had the task of discussing a transition in goals of care with a patient who was experiencing cancer progression despite treatment with existing evidence-based therapies. We used qualitative methodology to characterize the approaches used by oncology fellows in 20 of these pre-workshop conversations. We identified two themes in the approaches that fellows used: (1) the limitations of biomedical disease-modifying treatments and (2) the possibility of a new direction for medical care when disease-modifying treatments have been exhausted. We found that for each theme, fellows tended to emphasize a logical frame or an experiential frame. Understanding these frames could be useful in designing future communication skills training interventions.

  16. Technical compliance to standard guidelines for lumbar puncture and myelography: survey of academic neuroradiology attendings and fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi C; Chandler, Alexander J; Kagetsu, Nolan J

    2014-05-01

    To assess technical compliance among neuroradiology attendings and fellows to standard guidelines for lumbar puncture and myelography to minimize procedural complications such as iatrogenic meningitis and spinal headache. We surveyed academic neuroradiology attendings and fellows in the e-mail directory of the Association of Program Directors in Radiology. We queried use of face masks, use of noncutting needles, and dural puncture practices. All data were collected anonymously. A total of 110 survey responses were received: 75 from neuroradiology attendings and 34 from fellows, which represents a 14% response rate from a total of 239 fellows. Forty-seven out of 101 (47%) neuroradiologists do not always wear a face mask during myelograms, and 50 out of 105(48%) neuroradiologists do not always wear a face mask during lumbar punctures, placing patients at risk for iatrogenic meningitis. Ninety-six out of 106 neuroradiologists (91%) use the Quincke cutting needle by default, compared to only 17 out of 109 neuroradiologists (16%) who have ever used noncutting needles proven to reduce spinal headache. Duration of postprocedure bed rest does not influence incidence of spinal headache and may subject patients to unnecessary monitoring. Only 15 out of 109 (14%) neuroradiologists in our study do not prescribe bed rest. There was no statistically significant difference in practice between attendings and fellows. Iatrogenic meningitis and spinal headache are preventable complications of dural puncture that neuroradiologists can minimize by conforming to procedural guidelines. Wearing face masks and using noncutting spinal needles will reduce patient morbidity and lower hospitalization costs associated with procedural complications. Copyright © 2014 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Promotion of Wellness and Mental Health Awareness Among Physicians in Training: Perspective of a National, Multispecialty Panel of Residents and Fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daskivich, Timothy J; Jardine, Dinchen A; Tseng, Jennifer; Correa, Ricardo; Stagg, Brian C; Jacob, Kristin M; Harwood, Jared L

    2015-03-01

    Physicians in training are at high risk for depression, and physicians in practice have a substantially elevated risk of suicide compared to the general population. The graduate medical education community is currently mobilizing efforts to improve resident wellness. We sought to provide a trainee perspective on current resources to support resident wellness and resources that need to be developed to ensure an optimal learning environment. The ACGME Council of Review Committee Residents, a 29-member multispecialty group of residents and fellows, conducted an appreciative inquiry exercise to (1) identify existing resources to address resident wellness; (2) envision the ideal learning environment to promote wellness; and (3) determine how the existing infrastructure could be modified to approach the ideal. The information was aggregated to identify consensus themes from group discussion. National policy on resident wellness should (1) increase awareness of the stress of residency and destigmatize depression in trainees; (2) develop systems to identify and treat depression in trainees in a confidential way to reduce barriers to accessing help; (3) enhance mentoring by senior peers and faculty; (4) promote a supportive culture; and (5) encourage additional study of the problem to deepen our understanding of the issue. A multispecialty, national panel of trainees identified actionable goals to broaden efforts in programs and sponsoring institutions to promote resident wellness and mental health awareness. Engagement of all stakeholders within the graduate medical education community will be critical to developing a comprehensive solution to this important issue.

  18. Let’s Talk Critical. Development and Evaluation of a Communication Skills Training Program for Critical Care Fellows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, S. Jean; Howes, Jennifer M.; Keene, Adam B.; Fausto, James A.; Pinto, Priya A.; Gong, Michelle Ng

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Although expert communication between intensive care unit clinicians with patients or surrogates improves patient- and family-centered outcomes, fellows in critical care medicine do not feel adequately trained to conduct family meetings. Objectives: We aimed to develop, implement, and evaluate a communication skills program that could be easily integrated into a U.S. critical care fellowship. Methods: We developed four simulation cases that provided communication challenges that critical care fellows commonly face. For each case, we developed a list of directly observable tasks that could be used by faculty to evaluate fellows during each simulation. We developed a didactic curriculum of lectures/case discussions on topics related to palliative care, end-of-life care, communication skills, and bioethics; this month-long curriculum began and ended with the fellows leading family meetings in up to two simulated cases with direct observation by faculty who were not blinded to the timing of the simulation. Our primary measures of effectiveness were the fellows’ self-reported change in comfort with leading family meetings after the program was completed and the quality of the communication as measured by the faculty evaluators during the family meeting simulations at the end of the month. Measurements and Main Results: Over 3 years, 31 critical care fellows participated in the program, 28 of whom participated in 101 family meeting simulations with direct feedback by faculty facilitators. Our trainees showed high rates of information disclosure during the simulated family meetings. During the simulations done at the end of the month compared with those done at the beginning, our fellows showed significantly improved rates in: (1) verbalizing an agenda for the meeting (64 vs. 41%; Chi-square, 5.27; P = 0.02), (2) summarizing what will be done for the patient (64 vs. 39%; Chi-square, 6.21; P = 0.01), and (3) providing a follow-up plan (60 vs. 37%; Chi

  19. When fellow customers behave badly: Witness reactions to employee mistreatment by customers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershcovis, M Sandy; Bhatnagar, Namita

    2017-11-01

    In 3 experiments, we examined how customers react after witnessing a fellow customer mistreat an employee. Drawing on the deontic model of justice, we argue that customer mistreatment of employees leads witnesses (i.e., other customers) to leave larger tips, engage in supportive employee-directed behaviors, and evaluate employees more positively (Studies 1 and 2). We also theorize that witnesses develop less positive treatment intentions and more negative retaliatory intentions toward perpetrators, with anger and empathy acting as parallel mediators of our perpetrator- and target-directed outcomes, respectively. In Study 1, we conducted a field experiment that examined real customers' target-directed reactions to witnessed mistreatment in the context of a fast-food restaurant. In Study 2, we replicated Study 1 findings in an online vignette experiment, and extended it by examining more severe mistreatment and perpetrator-directed responses. In Study 3, we demonstrated that employees who respond to mistreatment uncivilly are significantly less likely to receive the positive outcomes found in Studies 1 and 2 than those who respond neutrally. We discuss the implications of our findings for theory and practice. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. Next generation leadership: a profile of self-rated competencies among administrative resident and fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfand, Brad; Cherlin, Emily; Bradley, Elizabeth H

    2005-01-01

    Healthcare executives and program faculty have voiced concerns that early careerists lack needed competencies for future leadership in the increasingly complex healthcare industry. However, empirical studies of early careerists' competency levels are limited. We sought to describe administrative fellows' and residents' (n = 78, response rate 73.6%) self-rated competency in several key areas and assess how these ratings differed by individuals' gender, age, prior work experience, year of graduate training, and type of degree program. Respondents rated their competence particularly high (41.7% of respondents rated themselves "A") in the domain of interpersonal and emotional intelligence, which included being an effective team leader and member, coaching and developing others, self-awareness, and self-regulation. Lower ratings were in the domains of facilities management and in development and fundraising. Compared to males, females rated their competency in the financial skills domain lower (P-value = 0.04). Age, prior work experience, year of graduate training, and type of degree program were not significantly associated with self-rated competency in any area. These results provide early evidence that may help program faculty and preceptors consider pedagogical approaches that reflect students' vocalized needs and may help to design strategies that effectively cultivate next generation leadership.

  1. “Back to Bedside”: Residents' and Fellows' Perspectives on Finding Meaning in Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hipp, Dustin M.; Rialon, Kristy L.; Nevel, Kathryn; Kothari, Anai N.

    2017-01-01

    Background Physician burnout is common and associated with significant consequences for physicians and patients. One mechanism to combat burnout is to enhance meaning in work. Objective To provide a trainee perspective on how meaning in work can be enhanced in the clinical learning environment through individual, program, and institutional efforts. Methods “Back to Bedside” resulted from an appreciative inquiry exercise by 37 resident and fellow members of the ACGME's Council of Review Committee Residents (CRCR), which was guided by the memoir When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi. The exercise was designed to (1) discover current best practices in existing learning environments; (2) dream of ideal ways to enhance meaning in work; (3) design solutions that move toward this optimal environment; and (4) support trainees in operationalizing innovative solutions. Results Back to Bedside consists of 5 themes for how the learning environment can enhance meaning in daily work: (1) more time at the bedside, engaged in direct patient care, dialogue with patients and families, and bedside clinical teaching; (2) a shared sense of teamwork and respect among multidisciplinary health professionals and trainees; (3) decreasing the time spent on nonclinical and administrative responsibilities; (4) a supportive, collegial work environment; and (5) a learning environment conducive to developing clinical mastery and progressive autonomy. Participants identified actions to achieve these goals. Conclusions A national, multispecialty group of trainees developed actionable recommendations for how clinical learning environments can be improved to combat physician burnout by fostering meaning in work. These improvements can be championed by trainees. PMID:28439376

  2. "Back to Bedside": Residents' and Fellows' Perspectives on Finding Meaning in Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hipp, Dustin M; Rialon, Kristy L; Nevel, Kathryn; Kothari, Anai N; Jardine, Lcdr Dinchen A

    2017-04-01

    Physician burnout is common and associated with significant consequences for physicians and patients. One mechanism to combat burnout is to enhance meaning in work. To provide a trainee perspective on how meaning in work can be enhanced in the clinical learning environment through individual, program, and institutional efforts. "Back to Bedside" resulted from an appreciative inquiry exercise by 37 resident and fellow members of the ACGME's Council of Review Committee Residents (CRCR), which was guided by the memoir When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi. The exercise was designed to (1) discover current best practices in existing learning environments; (2) dream of ideal ways to enhance meaning in work; (3) design solutions that move toward this optimal environment; and (4) support trainees in operationalizing innovative solutions. Back to Bedside consists of 5 themes for how the learning environment can enhance meaning in daily work: (1) more time at the bedside, engaged in direct patient care, dialogue with patients and families, and bedside clinical teaching; (2) a shared sense of teamwork and respect among multidisciplinary health professionals and trainees; (3) decreasing the time spent on nonclinical and administrative responsibilities; (4) a supportive, collegial work environment; and (5) a learning environment conducive to developing clinical mastery and progressive autonomy. Participants identified actions to achieve these goals. A national, multispecialty group of trainees developed actionable recommendations for how clinical learning environments can be improved to combat physician burnout by fostering meaning in work. These improvements can be championed by trainees.

  3. Optic Disc and Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness Evaluation of the Fellow Eyes in Non-Arteritic Ischemic Optic Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medine Yılmaz Dağ

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To examine the fellow eyes in unilateral non-arteritic ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION and to compare their optic disc parameters and peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL thickness with age-and refraction-matched normal controll subjects, using Heidelberg Retinal Tomograph 2 (HRT II. Materials and Methods: The fellow eyes of 40 patients with typical unilateral NAION (study group and one randomly chosen eye of 42 age-, sex-, and refraction-matched normal control subjects were enrolled in the study. Optic disc morphologic features (average disc area, cup area, rim area, disc volume, rim volume, cup/disc area ratio, cup depth and peripapillary RNFL thickness were evaluated using HRT II, a confoal scanning ophtalmoscopy. Results: In the study group, there were 26 (65% men and 14 (35% women, whereas there were 27 (64% men and 15 (36% women in the control group (Chi square test, p=0.89. Mean age of the patients in the study and control groups was 59.4±10.3 and 57.7±9.1 years, respectively (T test, p=0.72. There was not any statistically significant difference regarding mean spheric equivalent between the two groups (Mann-Whitney U-test, p=0.203. The NAION unaffected fellow eyes had significantly smaller disc areas, cup areas, cup volumes, cup-disc area ratios (vertical and lineer, and cup depths than the control eyes (Mann-Whitney U-test; p<0.05, whereas there was no significant difference in the RNFL thickness between the two. Conclusion: A comparison of the fellow eyes in patients with unilateral NAION and the control eyes showed a significant difference in optic disc parameters and the morphology of RNFL. These differences could be important in the pathogenesis of NAION and needs to have further investigated. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2015; 45: 111-114

  4. National Science Foundation Grant Implementation: Perceptions of Teachers and Graduate Fellows in One School Regarding the Barriers and Successes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, Sharon Durham

    The purpose of this qualitative case study was to examine the perceptions of partner teachers and graduate fellows in 1 school regarding the barriers and successes made during their participation in a National Science Foundation Grant. This study included 9 partner teachers and 7 graduate fellows who participated in the Science First! NSF GK-12 Grant. There were 16 participants in this study. This study was conducted at North Side Elementary and East Tennessee State University. Partner teachers and graduate fellows were interviewed to gain perceptions of the barriers and successes of their participation in the implementation of the Science First! grant at North Side and East Tennessee State University from 2008-2013. A list of possible participants in the study was provided from the grant leadership team. The 16 participants in the study were chosen through purposeful sampling. During data analysis, 4 themes arose as successes and 4 themes arose as barriers. The success themes were (a) relationships, (b) mutual appreciation, (c) increased academic depth, and (d) professional growth. The barriers were (a) communication, (b) time, (c) expectations, and (d) preparation. Based on the research, the following conclusions were presented. The coordination of a major NSF-GK12 grant can provide STEM support and academic rigor for a high poverty school with leadership. Positive relationships between the graduate fellows and partner teachers as well as the 2 participating institutions are critical in fostering successful grant implementation. Professional growth through the grant partnerships was obtained. The participants gained a mutual appreciation for the roles and responsibilities of each other. There are ups and downs in implementing a large grant at 1 elementary school with a university, but the rewards of the potential to influence teacher practices in STEM and student learning are great. Recommendations from the study findings may assist future grant award winners or

  5. The Science Teaching Fellows Program: A Model for Online Faculty Development of Early Career Scientists Interested in Teaching?

    OpenAIRE

    Brancaccio-Taras, Loretta; Gull, Kelly A.; Ratti, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    The American Society for Microbiology (ASM) has a history of providing a wide range of faculty development opportunities. Recently, ASM developed the Science Teaching Fellows Program (STF) for early career biologists and postdoctoral students to explore student-centered teaching and develop the skills needed to succeed in positions that have a significant teaching component. Participants were selected to STF through a competitive application process. The STF program consisted of a series of s...

  6. A qualitative study on mindfulness-based stress reduction for breast cancer patients: how women experience participating with fellow patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellekens, Melanie P J; Jansen, Ellen T M; Willemse, Heidi H M A; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W M; Prins, Judith B; Speckens, Anne E M

    2016-04-01

    Peer support groups for cancer patients show mixed findings regarding effectiveness on psychological wellbeing. When embedded in a psychosocial intervention, such as mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR), peer support might be of more benefit to participants. This study is a qualitative exploration of how women with breast cancer experience the possible benefits and impediments of participating with fellow patients in an MBSR training. Five focus groups (n = 37) and three individual interviews (n = 3) were conducted with breast cancer patients who participated in MBSR. The qualitative data were analysed with the constant comparative method in order to develop a grounded theory. We could identify a process where at the start of MBSR, patients experienced anticipatory fear for facing the suffering of fellow patients, especially for those who could not be cured anymore. In most women, this fear gradually subsided during the first two sessions. The atmosphere in the MBSR training was experienced as safe and supportive, providing a context where participants could connect with and trust one another. In turn, this facilitated participants to learn from one another. Our findings do not only show that the peer group facilitates the learning process in MBSR, but the MBSR also seemed to provide an atmosphere that promotes the experienced social support in participants. In addition, the results emphasize the importance for mindfulness teachers to acknowledge and explore the fear for facing fellow patients in the group. Future research should examine whether the results are generalizable to patients with other cancer types.

  7. Florence Nightingale, Statistician: Implications for Teachers of Educational Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Marti H.; Stallings, William M.

    This paper presents an overview of Florence Nightingale's statistical background and accomplishments; discusses Victorian statistics, Nightingale's education and statistical contributions; and concludes with implications for professors and students of educational research. Florence Nightingale (1820-1910), the first woman elected as a fellow of…

  8. World Business Leaders Interaction in Higher Education: A Novel Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronel, Gustavo; Mathai, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a disruptive approach that offers higher education students and faculty the experience of learning from world business leaders and interacting with fellow members at their institutions. The World Business Forum event was transmitted live to 36 higher education institutions in 19 countries. Webcast and social media…

  9. Global Health Education in Gastroenterology Fellowship: A National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirapinyo, Pichamol; Hunt, Rachel S; Tabak, Ying P; Proctor, Deborah D; Makrauer, Frederick L

    2016-12-01

    Interest in global health (GH) education is increasing across disciplines. To assess exposure to and perception of GH training among gastroenterology fellows and program directors across the USA. Design: Electronic survey study. The questionnaire was circulated to accredited US gastroenterology fellowship programs, with the assistance of the American Gastroenterological Association. Gastroenterology program directors and fellows. The questionnaire was returned by 127 respondents (47 program directors, 78 fellows) from 55 training programs (36 % of all training programs). 61 % of respondents had prior experience in GH. 17 % of programs offered GH curriculum with international elective (13 %), didactic (9 %), and research activity (7 %) being the most common. Fellows had adequate experience managing hepatitis B (93 %), cholangiocarcinoma (84 %), and intrahepatic duct stones (84 %). 74, 69 and 68 % reported having little to no experience managing hepatitis E, tuberculosis mesenteritis, or epidemic infectious enteritis, respectively. Most fellows would participate in an elective in an underserved area locally (81 %) or a 4-week elective abroad (71 %), if available. 44 % of fellows planned on working or volunteering abroad after fellowship. Barriers to establishing GH curriculum included funding (94 %), scheduling (88 %), and a lack of standardized objectives (78 %). Lack of interest, however, was not a concern. Fellows (49 %), more than faculty (29 %) (χ 2  = 21.9; p = 0.03), believed that GH education should be included in fellowship curriculum. Program directors and trainees recognize the importance of GH education. However, only 17 % of ACGME-approved fellowship programs offer the opportunity. Global health curriculum may enhance gastroenterology training.

  10. Getting Started in Academic Careers: On the Cutting Edge Resources for Graduate Students, Postdoctoral Fellows, and Early Career Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, R.; Ormand, C.; Manduca, C. A.; Wright-Dunbar, R.; Allen-King, R.

    2007-12-01

    The professional development program,'On the Cutting Edge', offers on-line resources and annual multi-day workshops for graduate students and post-doctoral fellows interested in pursuing academic careers. Pre- workshop surveys reveal that early career faculty, post-docs, and graduate students have many questions about teaching (e.g., what are effective teaching strategies, how to design a course, how to prepare a syllabus, how to teach large courses), research (e.g., initiate and fund future research, set up and manage a lab, obtain equipment), and career management (e.g., understand tenure requirements, balance all it all). The graduate students and post-docs also have questions about jobs and the job search process. Their questions show a lack of familiarity with the nature of academic positions at different kinds of educational institutions (two-year colleges, primarily undergraduate institutions, and research universities). In particular, they are uncertain about what educational setting will best fit their values and career goals and how teaching loads and research expectations vary by institution. Common questions related to the job search process include where to find job listings (the most common question in recent years), when to start the job search process, how to stand out as an applicant, and how to prepare for interviews. Both groups have questions about how to develop new skills: how to develop, plan and prepare a new course (without it taking all of their time), how to expand beyond their PhD (or postdoc) research projects, how to develop a research plan, and where to apply for funding. These are important topics for advisors to discuss with all of their students and postdocs who are planning on careers in academia. On the Cutting Edge offers workshops and web resources to help current and future faculty navigate these critical stages of their careers. The four-day workshop for Early Career Geoscience Faculty: Teaching, Research, and Managing Your

  11. Imaging skills for transthoracic echocardiography in cardiology fellows: The value of motion metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montealegre-Gallegos, Mario; Mahmood, Feroze; Kim, Han; Bergman, Remco; Mitchell, John D.; Bose, Ruma; Hawthorne, Katie M.; O’Halloran, T. David; Wong, Vanessa; Hess, Philip E.; Matyal, Robina

    2016-01-01

    Background: Proficiency in transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) requires an integration of cognitive knowledge and psychomotor skills. Whereas cognitive knowledge can be quantified, psychomotor skills are implied after repetitive task performance. We applied motion analyses to evaluate psychomotor skill acquisition during simulator-based TTE training. Methods and Results: During the first month of their fellowship training, 16 cardiology fellows underwent a multimodal TTE training program for 4 weeks (8 sessions). The program consisted of online and live didactics as well as simulator training. Kinematic metrics (path length, time, probe accelerations) were obtained at the start and end of the course for 8 standard TTE views using a simulator. At the end of the course TTE image acquisition skills were tested on human models. After completion of the training program the trainees reported improved self-perceived comfort with TTE imaging. There was also an increase of 8.7% in post-test knowledge scores. There was a reduction in the number of probe accelerations [median decrease 49.5, 95% CI = 29-73, adjusted P < 0.01], total time [median decrease 10.6 s, 95% CI = 6.6-15.5, adjusted P < 0.01] and path length [median decrease 8.8 cm, 95% CI = 2.2-17.7, adjusted P < 0.01] from the start to the end of the course. During evaluation on human models, the trainees were able to obtain all the required TTE views without instructor assistance. Conclusion: Simulator-derived motion analyses can be used to objectively quantify acquisition of psychomotor skills during TTE training. Such an approach could be used to assess readiness for clinical practice of TTE. PMID:27052064

  12. Air Versus Sulfur Hexafluoride Gas Tamponade in Descemet Membrane Endothelial Keratoplasty: A Fellow Eye Comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Marchtaler, Philipp V; Weller, Julia M; Kruse, Friedrich E; Tourtas, Theofilos

    2018-01-01

    To perform a fellow eye comparison of outcomes and complications when using air or sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) gas as a tamponade in Descemet membrane endothelial keratoplasty (DMEK). One hundred thirty-six eyes of 68 consecutive patients who underwent uneventful DMEK in both eyes for Fuchs endothelial corneal dystrophy were included in this retrospective study. Inclusion criteria were air tamponade (80% of the anterior chamber volume) in the first eye and 20% SF6 gas tamponade (80% of the anterior chamber volume) in the second eye; and same donor tissue culture condition in both eyes. All eyes received laser iridotomy on the day before DMEK. Main outcome measures included preoperative and postoperative best-corrected visual acuity, endothelial cell density, corneal volume, rebubbling rate, and rate of postoperative pupillary block caused by the air/gas bubble. Thirteen of 68 eyes (19.1%) with an air tamponade needed rebubbling compared with 4 of 68 eyes (5.9%) with an SF6 gas tamponade (P = 0.036). Postoperative pupillary block necessitating partial release of air/gas occurred in 1 eye (1.5%) with an air tamponade and 3 eyes (4.4%) with an SF6 gas tamponade (P = 0.301). There were no significant differences in preoperative and postoperative best-corrected visual acuity, endothelial cell density, and corneal volume within 3-month follow-up. Our results confirm the previously reported better graft adhesion when using an SF6 gas tamponade in DMEK without increased endothelial cell toxicity. The rate of pupillary block in eyes with an SF6 gas tamponade was comparable to that with an air tamponade. As a consequence, we recommend using SF6 gas as the tamponade in DMEK.

  13. Imaging skills for transthoracic echocardiography in cardiology fellows: The value of motion metrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Montealegre-Gallegos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Proficiency in transthoracic echocardiography (TTE requires an integration of cognitive knowledge and psychomotor skills. Whereas cognitive knowledge can be quantified, psychomotor skills are implied after repetitive task performance. We applied motion analyses to evaluate psychomotor skill acquisition during simulator-based TTE training. Methods and Results: During the first month of their fellowship training, 16 cardiology fellows underwent a multimodal TTE training program for 4 weeks (8 sessions. The program consisted of online and live didactics as well as simulator training. Kinematic metrics (path length, time, probe accelerations were obtained at the start and end of the course for 8 standard TTE views using a simulator. At the end of the course TTE image acquisition skills were tested on human models. After completion of the training program the trainees reported improved self-perceived comfort with TTE imaging. There was also an increase of 8.7% in post-test knowledge scores. There was a reduction in the number of probe accelerations [median decrease 49.5, 95% CI = 29-73, adjusted P < 0.01], total time [median decrease 10.6 s, 95% CI = 6.6-15.5, adjusted P < 0.01] and path length [median decrease 8.8 cm, 95% CI = 2.2-17.7, adjusted P < 0.01] from the start to the end of the course. During evaluation on human models, the trainees were able to obtain all the required TTE views without instructor assistance. Conclusion: Simulator-derived motion analyses can be used to objectively quantify acquisition of psychomotor skills during TTE training. Such an approach could be used to assess readiness for clinical practice of TTE.

  14. Launching an Academic Career: On the Cutting Edge Resources for Geoscience Graduate Students, Post-doctoral Fellows, and Early Career Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, R. M.; Ormand, C. J.; MacDonald, H.; Dunbar, R. W.; Allen-King, R. M.; Manduca, C. A.

    2010-12-01

    Launching an academic career presents a number of challenges. A recent article in the Chronicle of Higher Education depicts academia as an “ivory sweatshop,” citing rising standards for tenure. Most graduate programs provide minimal training for life beyond graduate school. The professional development program “On the Cutting Edge” fills this gap by providing workshops and web resources on academic careers for graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and early career faculty. These workshops and web resources address a wide range of topics related to teaching, research, and managing one’s career, tailored for each group. The Preparing for an Academic Career in the Geosciences workshop to help graduate students and postdoctoral fellows make the transition into an academic career has been offered annually since 2003. It provides a panel on academic careers in different institutional settings, sessions on research on learning, various teaching strategies, design of effective teaching activities, moving research forward to new settings, effective teaching and research statements, the job search process, negotiation, and presenting oneself to others. Complementary online resources (http://serc.carleton.edu/NAGTWorkshops/careerprep/index.html) focus on these topics. The workshops and web resources offer guidance for each step of the job search process, for developing and teaching one’s own courses, and for making the transition from being a research student to being in charge of a research program. Online resources also include case studies of successful dual career couples, documenting their job search strategies. A four-day workshop for Early Career Geoscience Faculty: Teaching, Research, and Managing Your Career, offered annually since 1999, provides sessions on teaching strategies, course design, developing a strategic plan for research, supervising student researchers, navigating departmental and institutional politics, preparing for tenure, time and

  15. Education on, Exposure to, and Management of Vascular Anomalies During Otolaryngology Residency and Pediatric Otolaryngology Fellowship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Robert; Jabbour, Noel; Balakrishnan, Karthik; Bauman, Nancy; Darrow, David H; Elluru, Ravindhra; Grimmer, J Fredrik; Perkins, Jonathan; Richter, Gresham; Shin, Jennifer

    2016-07-01

    The field of vascular anomalies presents diverse challenges in diagnosis and management. Although many lesions involve the head and neck, training in vascular anomalies is not universally included in otolaryngology residencies and pediatric otolaryngology (POTO) fellowships. To explore the education in, exposure to, and comfort level of otolaryngology trainees with vascular anomalies. A survey was distributed to 39 POTO fellows and 44 residents in postgraduate year 5 who matched into POTO fellowships from April 22 through June 16, 2014. Survey responses from trainees on exposure to, education on, and comfort with vascular anomalies. Forty-four residents in postgraduate year 5 who applied to POTO fellowships and 39 POTO fellows were emailed the survey. Fourteen respondents were unable to be contacted owing to lack of a current email address. Thirty-six of 69 residents and fellows (18 fellows and 18 residents [52%]) responded to the survey. Twenty-seven trainees (75%) reported no participation in a vascular anomalies clinic during residency; 6 of these 27 individuals (22%) trained at institutions with a vascular anomalies clinic but did not participate in the clinic, and 28 of the 36 respondents (78%) reported that they had less than adequate or no exposure to vascular anomalies in residency. Among POTO fellows, 11 of 17 (65%) did not participate in a vascular anomalies clinic during fellowship, even though 8 of the 11 had a vascular anomalies clinic at their fellowship program. During fellowship training, 12 of 18 fellows (67%) reported that they had adequate exposure to vascular anomalies. Only 20 respondents (56%) felt comfortable distinguishing among diagnoses of vascular anomalies, and only 4 residents (22%) and 9 fellows (50%) felt comfortable treating patients with vascular anomalies. All fellows believed that training in vascular anomalies was important in fellowship, and 100% of respondents indicated that increased exposure to diagnosis and management of

  16. Education

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Belue, Lisa

    2002-01-01

    .... Unequal access to quality education leaves millions ill equipped for today's workplace. The "No Child Left Behind Act" is an effective point of departure, yet it too fails to adequately address the myriad issues affecting quality education...

  17. Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    1 EDUCATION ABSTRACT United States schools are better than ever, but they are not assuring competitive advantage . Unequal access to quality...Development Network, Washington, DC Defense Logistics Agency, Corporate Planning (J-1), Ft Belvoir, VA International : Department for Education and...influencing all aspects of the US education system in an effort to improve student achievement, enhance national competitive advantage , and promote

  18. Transplant surgery fellow perceptions about training and the ensuing job market-are the right number of surgeons being trained?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, D J; Magee, J C; Gifford, K; Merion, R M; Roberts, J P; Klintmalm, G B G; Stock, P G

    2011-02-01

    The American Society of Transplant Surgeons (ASTS) sought whether the right number of abdominal organ transplant surgeons are being trained in the United States. Data regarding fellowship training and the ensuing job market were obtained by surveying program directors and fellowship graduates from 2003 to 2005. Sixty-four ASTS-approved programs were surveyed, representing 139 fellowship positions in kidney, pancreas and/or liver transplantation. One-quarter of programs did not fill their positions. Forty-five fellows graduated annually. Most were male (86%), aged 31-35 years (57%), married (75%) and parents (62%). Upon graduation, 12% did not find transplant jobs (including 8% of Americans/Canadians), 14% did not get jobs for transplanting their preferred organ(s), 11% wished they focused more on transplantation and 27% changed jobs early. Half fellows were international medical graduates; 45% found US/Canadian transplant jobs, particularly 73% with US/Canadian residency training. Fellows reported adequate exposure to training volume, candidate selection, pre/postoperative care and organ procurement, but not to donor management/selection, outpatient care and core didactics. One-sixth noted insufficient 'mentoring/preparation for a transplantation career'. Currently, there seem to be enough trainees to fill entry-level positions. One-third program directors believe that there are too many trainees, given the current and foreseeable job market. ASTS is assessing the total workforce of transplant surgeons and evolving manpower needs. ©2011 The Authors Journal compilation©2011 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  19. Radical Trachelectomy for Early-Stage Cervical Cancer: A Survey of the Society of Gynecologic Oncology and Gynecologic Oncology Fellows-in-Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchill, Sara J; Armbruster, Shannon; Schmeler, Kathleen M; Frumovitz, Michael; Greer, Marilyn; Garcia, Jaime; Redworth, Glenda; Ramirez, Pedro T

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to survey gynecologic oncologists and fellows-in-training regarding the role of radical trachelectomy (RT) and conservative surgery in patients with early-stage cervical cancer. From June 2012 to September 2012, the Society of Gynecologic Oncology member practitioners (n = 1353) and gynecologic oncology fellows (n = 156) were sent group-specific surveys investigating current practice, training, and the future of RT for early-stage cervical cancer management. Twenty-two percent of practitioners (n = 303) and 24.4% of fellows (n = 38) completed the surveys. Of the practitioners, 50% (n = 148) report performing RT, 98% (n = 269) support RT as treatment for squamous carcinoma, and 71% (n = 195) confirm the use of RT for adenocarcinoma. Most practitioners offer RT treatment for stages IA2 to IB1 smaller than 2 cm (n = 209, 76.8%) regardless of grade (77.7%) or lymph vascular space invasion (n = 211, 79.3%). Only 8% (n = 23) of practitioners feel that RT is appropriate for stage IBI larger than 2 cm. Respectively, both practitioners and fellows most frequently perform robotic-assisted (47.0%, n = 101 and 59.1%, n = 13) and abdominal (40.5%, n = 87 and 68.2%, n = 15) RT approaches. After training, fellows project the use of robotic-assisted (71%, n = 22) or abdominal methods (58.1%, n = 18). Overall, 75% (n = 227) of practitioners and 60% (n = 23) of fellows speculate that over the next 5 years, less radical procedures will be used to manage early-stage cervical cancer. Our findings suggest that practitioners and fellows believe RT remains an option for early-stage cervical cancer patients. However, a significant proportion of all respondents believe that less radical surgery may be a future consideration for patients with low-risk early-stage cervical cancer.

  20. A Longitudinal, Experiential Quality Improvement Curriculum Meeting ACGME Competencies for Geriatrics Fellows: Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Kathryn E.; Rogers, Matthew T.; Lovato, James F.; Fernandez, Helen M.

    2013-01-01

    Quality improvement (QI) initiatives are critical in the care of older adults who are more vulnerable to substandard care. QI education meets aspects of core Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education competencies and prepares learners for the rising focus on performance measurement in health care. The authors developed, implemented, and…

  1. Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    program) steadily declined from 15% in 1970 to 10.7% in 2001.16 Data from the National Center for Education Statistics show that the number of...academic institutions, and corporate education and training institutions. By size, it’s defined in terms of distribution of funds, facilities , and...of students entering four-year colleges and universities require some remedial education .”9 Given statistics such as these, concerns for the US

  2. Interactive Methods for Teaching Action Potentials, an Example of Teaching Innovation from Neuroscience Postdoctoral Fellows in the Fellowships in Research and Science Teaching (FIRST) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keen-Rhinehart, E.; Eisen, A.; Eaton, D.; McCormack, K.

    2009-01-01

    Acquiring a faculty position in academia is extremely competitive and now typically requires more than just solid research skills and knowledge of one’s field. Recruiting institutions currently desire new faculty that can teach effectively, but few postdoctoral positions provide any training in teaching methods. Fellowships in Research and Science Teaching (FIRST) is a successful postdoctoral training program funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) providing training in both research and teaching methodology. The FIRST program provides fellows with outstanding interdisciplinary biomedical research training in fields such as neuroscience. The postdoctoral research experience is integrated with a teaching program which includes a How to Teach course, instruction in classroom technology and course development and mentored teaching. During their mentored teaching experiences, fellows are encouraged to explore innovative teaching methodologies and to perform science teaching research to improve classroom learning. FIRST fellows teaching neuroscience to undergraduates have observed that many of these students have difficulty with the topic of neuroscience. Therefore, we investigated the effects of interactive teaching methods for this topic. We tested two interactive teaching methodologies to determine if they would improve learning and retention of this information when compared with standard lectures. The interactive methods for teaching action potentials increased understanding and retention. Therefore, FIRST provides excellent teaching training, partly by enhancing the ability of fellows to integrate innovative teaching methods into their instruction. This training in turn provides fellows that matriculate from this program more of the characteristics that hiring institutions desire in their new faculty. PMID:23493377

  3. Professionalism and Communication Education in Pediatric Critical Care Medicine: The Learner Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, David A; Fleming, Geoffrey M; Winkler, Margaret; Lee, K Jane; Hamilton, Melinda F; Hornik, Christoph P; Petrillo-Albarano, Toni; Mason, Katherine; Mink, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Communication and professionalism are often challenging to teach, and the impact of the use of a given approach is not known. We undertook this investigation to establish pediatric critical care medicine (PCCM) trainee perception of education in professionalism and communication and to compare their responses from those obtained from PCCM fellowship program directors. The Education in Pediatric Intensive Care (E.P.I.C.) Investigators used the modified Delphi technique to develop a survey examining teaching of professionalism and communication. After piloting, the survey was sent to all 283 PCCM fellows in training in the United States. Survey response rate was 47% (133 of 283). Despite high rates of teaching overall, deficiencies were noted in all areas of communication and professionalism assessed. The largest areas of deficiency included not being specifically taught how to communicate: as a member of a nonclinical group (reported in 24%), across a broad range of socioeconomic and cultural backgrounds (19%) or how to provide consultation outside of the intensive care unit (17%). Only 50% of fellows rated education in communication as "very good/excellent." However, most felt confident in their communication abilities. For professionalism, fellows reported not being taught accountability (12%), how to conduct a peer review (12%), and how to handle potential conflict between personal beliefs, circumstances, and professional values (10%). Fifty-seven percent of fellows felt that their professionalism education was "very good/excellent," but nearly all expressed confidence in these skills. Compared with program directors, fellows reported more deficiencies in both communication and professionalism. There are numerous components of communication and professionalism that PCCM fellows perceive as not being specifically taught. Despite these deficiencies, fellow confidence remains high. Substantial opportunities exist to improve teaching in these areas. Copyright © 2015

  4. Diversity, Geosciences, and Societal Impact: Perspectives From a Geoscientist, Workforce Development Specialist, and Former Congressional Science Fellow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    In order for the United States to remain competitive in the STEM fields, all available interested citizens must be engaged, prepared, and retained in the geoscience workforce. The misperception that the geosciences do little to support the local community and give back to fellow citizens contributes to the lack of diversity in the field. Another challenge is that the assumptions of career paths for someone trained in geosciences are often limited to field work, perpetuated by visuals found in media, popular culture and recruiting materials and university websites. In order to combat these views it is critical that geoscientists make visible both the diverse career opportunities for those trained in geoscience and the relevance of the field to societal issues. In order to make a substantive change in the number of underrepresented minorities pursuing and working in geosciences we must rethink how we describe our work, its impacts and its relevance to society. At UNAVCO, we have undertaken this charge to change they way the future generation of geoscientists views opportunities in our field. This presentation will include reflections of a trained geoscientist taking a non-field/research career path and the opportunities it has afforded as well as the challenges encountered. The presentation will also highlight how experience managing a STEM program for middle school girls, serving as a Congressional Science Fellow, and managing an undergraduate research internship program is aiding in shaping the Geoscience Workforce Initiative at UNAVCO.

  5. Prophylactic treatment to the fellow eye of patients with phakic lattice retinal detachment: analysis of failures and risks of treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folk, J C; Bennett, S R; Klugman, M R; Arrindell, E L; Boldt, H C

    1990-01-01

    The authors performed a retrospective analysis on 296 phakic patients who had bilateral lattice degeneration and a retinal detachment in one eye. The analysis was done to determine the complications of full prophylactic treatment to lattice and breaks in the fellow eye and to explain the reasons that this treatment sometimes did not prevent new retinal breaks or detachments. The patients were followed for a mean +/- SD of 7.415 +/- 5.422 years after their first detachment. Twenty-four new tears occurred in the fellow eyes during this time, seven (29.2%) of which were away from areas of visible lattice. Prophylactic treatment did not appear to cause new tears or increase the risk of detachment if a new tear occurred. It also did not compromise the surgical repair in those patients who had eyes in which new breaks or detachments developed. The risk of visual loss was similar in those patients receiving prophylactic treatment compared with those not receiving treatment.

  6. A qualitative analysis of an interactive online discussion by health professions educators on education research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damodar, Komaladevi S; Lingaraj, Jayalakshmi; Kumar, Latha R; Chacko, Thomas V

    2012-01-01

    In view of increasing demand for reforms in medical education in India, it is important to generate evidence through education research to increase the relevance and improve the quality of medical education. Education research is still at a nascent stage in India for a number of reasons. This study elicited health professions educators' views about the dearth of education research in Southeast Asia and what is needed to improve it. Qualitative content analysis of an interactive, online discussion on 'education research' between PSG-FAIMER Regional Institute fellows and faculty was carried out. Forty-four health professionals exchanged approximately 492 email messages during the discussion. One main concern expressed within the group was that the medical curriculum was not in tune with the health care needs of the society and reforms in the curriculum should be based on research. Most fellows felt that their work in education research was not appreciated in their schools. Participants felt that education research was done for altruistic reasons and only by self-motivated faculty. Participants also said that regulatory bodies were not concerned about the quality of education and its related research. Measures that could improve education research also emerged during the discussions. Interactive online discussions elicited important issues about education research in India. Participants noted that there is no recognition or rewards to encourage faculty to conduct education research. They also said that there is need to educate faculty about changes elsewhere in medical education and to make them more aware of education research generally.

  7. Education

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Birmingham, Rob

    2003-01-01

    Over the past century, the US education system facilitated the development of history's greatest economic and military power, and that same system continues to provide adequate human resources for our national security...

  8. Teaching in Medical Education | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many postdoctoral fellows are considering an academic career at a medical school. In addition to conducting research, new faculty members must learn effective teaching methodologies. This course will focus on good teaching practices, including basic strategies for developing and organizing a course. The purpose of the "Teaching in Medical Education (TIME)" course is to

  9. What Makes Useful Evidence for Educational Leadership Practice? An Interview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addae-Kyeremeh, Eric; Fox, Alison

    2018-01-01

    This article presents a transcript of an interview with Eric Addae-Kyeremeh, a Senior Lecturer in Leadership and Management and a Chartered Fellow of both The Chartered Management Institute and BCS, The Chartered Institute for IT. He is currently the Associate Head of School Innovation in the School of Education, Childhood, Youth and Sport with…

  10. Impact of around-the-clock in-house cardiology fellow coverage on door-to-balloon time in an academic medical center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohan LC

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Luke C Kohan,1,* Vijaiganesh Nagarajan,1,* Michael A Millard,2 Michael J Loguidice,2 Nancy M Fauber,1 Ellen C Keeley1 1Division of Cardiology, 2Department of Medicine, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA * These authors contributed equally to this work Objectives: To assess if a change in our cardiology fellowship program impacted our ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI program. Background: Fellows covering the cardiac care unit were spending excessive hours in the hospital while on call, resulting in increased duty hours violations. A night float fellow system was started on July 1, 2012, allowing the cardiac care unit fellow to sign out to a night float fellow at 5:30 pm. The night float fellow remained in-house until the morning. Methods: We performed a retrospective study assessing symptom onset to arrival, arterial access to first device, and door-to-balloon (D2B times, in consecutive STEMI patients presenting to our emergency department before and after initiation of the night float fellow system. Results: From 2009 to 2013, 208 STEMI patients presented to our emergency department and underwent primary percutaneous coronary intervention. There was no difference in symptom onset to arrival (150±102 minutes vs 154±122 minutes, p=0.758, arterial access to first device (12±8 minutes vs 11±7 minutes, p=0.230, or D2B times (50±32 minutes vs 52±34 minutes, p=0.681 during regular working hours. However, there was a significant decrease in D2B times seen during off-hours (72±33 minutes vs 49±15 minutes, p=0.007. There was no difference in in-hospital mortality (11% vs 8%, p=0.484 or need for intra-aortic balloon pump placement (7% vs 8%, p=0.793. Conclusion: In academic medical centers, in-house cardiology fellow coverage during off-hours may expedite care of STEMI patients. Keywords: door-to-balloon time, 24/7 in-house call, cardiology fellow

  11. 45 CFR 2400.45 - Special consideration: Junior Fellows' Plan of Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... degrees in education are strongly encouraged to pursue master's degrees in history or political science. Those applicants who hold undergraduate degrees in history, political science, government, or any other subjects may take some teaching methods and related courses, although the Foundation will not pay for them...

  12. Training of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Fellows in Autism and Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrus, Natasha; Veenstra-VanderWeele, Jeremy; Hellings, Jessica A.; Stigler, Kimberly A.; Szymanski, Ludwik; King, Bryan H.; Carlisle, L. Lee; Cook, Edwin H., Jr.; Pruett, John R., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with autism spectrum disorders and intellectual disability can be clinically complex and often have limited access to psychiatric care. Because little is known about post-graduate clinical education in autism spectrum disorder and intellectual disability, we surveyed training directors of child and adolescent psychiatry fellowship…

  13. Neovascular age-related macular degeneration without drusen in the fellow eye: clinical spectrum and therapeutic outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung WH

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Wing H Chung,1 Elon H C van Dijk,1 Danial Mohabati,1 Greet Dijkman,1 Suzanne Yzer,2 Eiko K de Jong,3 Sascha Fauser,4 Reinier O Schlingemann,5–7 Carel B Hoyng,3 Camiel J F Boon1,5 1Department of Ophthalmology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, 2Rotterdam Eye Hospital, Rotterdam, 3Department of Ophthalmology, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, the Netherlands; 4Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital of Cologne, Cologne, Germany; 5Department of Ophthalmology, 6Ocular Angiogenesis Group, Departments of Ophthalmology and Cell Biology and Histology, Academic Medical Center, 7Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, Amsterdam, the Netherlands Purpose: To investigate the clinical characteristics and therapeutic outcome of patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD in 1 eye, without drusen in the fellow eye. Patients and methods: Medical records of 381 patients were analyzed to identify the cases. The main outcomes included Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA and change in central retinal thickness (CRT. These parameters were reviewed at baseline, first follow-up visit, and after 6, 12, and 24 months. Results: Out of 381 patients, 29 cases (8% were included (of whom 3 had polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy [PCV] who were treated with anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF therapy which was supplemented by photodynamic therapy (PDT in the PCV patients. Overall, no statistically significant change in mean BCVA was observed during follow-up. BCVA improved or remained stable (defined as a gain in BCVA, a stable BCVA, or a loss of <5 ETDRS letters in 22 patients (76%, and 7 patients (23% had lost ≥5 ETDRS letters at final follow-up. A gain of ≥15 ETDRS letters at final follow-up was seen in 5 patients (17%. Mean CRT had decreased significantly with 99 µm (P<0.001 at 24 months after the

  14. Medical improvisation training to enhance the antenatal counseling skills of neonatologists and neonatal fellows: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Taylor; Fu, Belinda; Gray, Megan; Umoren, Rachel

    2017-08-01

    Neonatologists must be skilled at providing antenatal counseling to expectant parents of premature infants at the limits of viability. We conducted a medical improvisation workshop with the objective of enhancing antenatal counseling skills. Pre- and postworkshop questionnaires were collected to examine the impact of the training. A follow-up survey was distributed 3 months after the workshop to examine the impact of the training on antenatal counseling skills. Nine neonatologists and three neonatal fellows participated in the workshop. Participants reported the skills learned in the workshop could enhance the quality of antenatal counseling. On follow-up survey, 90% of subjects reported improvements in the quality of their antenatal counseling. Participation in a medical improvisation workshop resulted in enhancements of self-perceived antenatal counseling skills. Medical improvisation training may provide a feasible and effective method of communication training for neonatologists. Further research into this innovative method are needed.

  15. The 2015 Class of Hospice and Palliative Medicine Fellows-From Training to Practice: Implications for HPM Workforce Supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupu, Dale; Salsberg, Ed; Quigley, Leo; Wu, Xiaoli

    2017-05-01

    A relatively new specialty, hospice and palliative medicine (HPM), is unusual in that physicians can enter from 10 different specialties. This study sought to understand where HPM physicians were coming from, where they were going to practice, and the job market for HPM physicians. Describe characteristics of the incoming supply of HPM physicians, their practice plans, and experience finding initial jobs. In October 2015, we conducted an online survey of physicians who completed accredited HPM fellowships the previous June. We had electronic mail addresses for 195 of the 243 graduating fellows. About 112 HPM fellows responded (58% of those invited). The most common prior training was internal medicine (45%), followed by family medicine (23%), pediatrics (12%), and emergency medicine (10%). More than 40% had practiced medicine before their HPM training. After graduation, 97% were providing 20 or more hours per week of patient care, with most hours in palliative care. About 72% devoted more than 20 hours per week to palliative care, whereas only 13% worked that much in hospice care. About 81% reported no difficulty finding a satisfactory practice position. About 98% said that they would recommend HPM to others, and 63% took the time to provide written comments that were highly positive about the specialty. New HPM physicians are finding satisfying jobs. They are enthusiastic in recommending the specialty to others. Most are going into palliative medicine, leaving questions about how the need for hospice physicians will be filled. Although jobs appear to be numerous, there are practice areas with more limited opportunities. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, G.P.

    1992-01-01

    One of the major problems facing countries with nuclear power and nuclear waste management programs is that of promoting public confidence in the waste management system. This paper discusses the need for education in the field of radioactive waste management as a means for speaking the same language and as the gateway to the solution, no matter what the ultimate solution may be

  17. Education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The Education Program aims to develop human resources through scientific training programs and to provide and disseminate scientific information in nuclear and correlated areas. IPEN is responsible for the graduate program in the nuclear area at University of Sao Paulo, the Nuclear Technology Program IPEN/USP

  18. Education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The Education Program aims to develop human resources through scientific training programs and to provide and disseminate scientific information in nuclear and correlated areas. IPEN is responsible for the graduate program in the nuclear area at University of Sao Paulo, the Nuclear Technology Program IPEN/USP, Brazil

  19. Global Application of the Assessment of Communication Skills of Paediatric Endocrinology Fellows in the Management of Differences in Sex Development Using the ESPE E-Learning.Org Portal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kranenburg, Laura J C; Reerds, Sam T H; Cools, Martine

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Information sharing in chronic conditions such as disorders of/differences in sex development (DSD) is essential for a comprehensive understanding by parents and patients. We report on a qualitative analysis of communication skills of fellows undergoing training in paediatric endocrin...

  20. Attitudes of U.S. Psychiatry Residents and Fellows towards Mental Illness and its Causes: a Comparison Study with Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiles, Catherine; Stefanovics, Elina; Rosenheck, Robert

    2018-01-13

    Stigma towards people with mental illness remains a burden for patients and healthcare providers. This study at a large US university examined the attitudes of psychiatry residents and fellows towards mental illness and its causes, and whether their attitudes differed from the medical student attitudes previously studied utilizing the same survey method. An electronic questionnaire examining attitudes toward people with mental illness, causes of mental Illness, and treatment efficacy was used to survey the attitudes of psychiatry residents and fellows. Exploratory factor analysis derived from the authors' medical student survey was used to examine attitudinal factors. The study response rate was 54.2% (n = 94). Factor analysis employed three factors previously identified reflecting social acceptance of mental illness, belief in supernatural causes, and belief in biopsychosocial causes. Residents and fellows reporting more personal experiences with mental illness, both as a group and when compared with medical students, were significantly more willing to socialize with the mentally ill. Respondents who had more professional (work) experience other than medical school or post-graduate training were less likely to believe in supernatural causes of mental illness. Female residents and fellows were more willing to socialize with the mentally ill, and were less likely to believe in supernatural causes for mental illness than their male counterparts. In our study, increased social acceptance of the mentally ill relates to having personal experiences, advanced training in psychiatry, and female gender. Both professional experiences outside of training and female gender reduced the belief in supernatural causes.

  1. Non-Academic Jobs for Fellows in Law Firms, Patent and Trademark Office and Scientific Intellectual Property | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    This workshop helps CCR fellows and staff scientists learn about and better position themselves for potential job opportunities at law firms, patent and trademark, and intellectual property protection across the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries. Guest speakers will shed light on how to best position yourself for obtaining these types of positions and how to improve

  2. A Deficiency of Nutrition Education and Practice in Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devries, Stephen; Agatston, Arthur; Aggarwal, Monica; Aspry, Karen E; Esselstyn, Caldwell B; Kris-Etherton, Penny; Miller, Michael; O'Keefe, James H; Ros, Emilio; Rzeszut, Anne K; White, Beth A; Williams, Kim A; Freeman, Andrew M

    2017-11-01

    Nutrition is one of the foundations of cardiovascular guidelines for risk reduction and treatment. However, little is known about whether cardiologists, cardiology fellows-in-training, and cardiovascular team members have the nutrition education and knowledge necessary to implement these guidelines. The aim of this study was to describe the educational experiences, attitudes, and practices relating to nutrition among cardiovascular professionals. Surveys completed by cardiologists, fellows-in-training, and cardiovascular team members inquired about their personal dietary habits, history of nutrition education, and attitudes regarding nutrition interventions. A total of 930 surveys were completed. Among cardiologists, 90% reported receiving no or minimal nutrition education during fellowship training, 59% reported no nutrition education during internal medicine training, and 31% reported receiving no nutrition education in medical school. Among cardiologists, 8% described themselves as having "expert" nutrition knowledge. Nevertheless, fully 95% of cardiologists believe that their role includes personally providing patients with at least basic nutrition information. The percentage of respondents who ate ≥5 servings of vegetables and fruits per day was: 20% (cardiologists), 21% (fellows-in-training), and 26% (cardiovascular team members). A large proportion of cardiovascular specialists have received minimal medical education and training in nutrition, and current trainees continue to experience significant education and training gaps. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Ombuds’ corner: Let's not confuse students and fellows with missing staff

    CERN Multimedia

    Vincent Vuillemin

    2013-01-01

    One of the main missions of CERN is education. Several programmes are dedicated to training students. Others, like the Fellowship programme, offer graduates to start a career and become professionals in their fields. All these young and fresh people provide very valuable contributions to our Organization.   At the same time, it is important to remember that they (especially the students) are here to learn from our professional staff for their future career. This is the correct exchange: they bring their dedicated work to our projects and they gain experience by working with our staff. There’s no better way to learn than on-the-job. However they should not be considered as missing staff, with the exact same requirements expected from the CERN staff. Potential missing staff in some areas is a separate issue, and educational programmes are not designed to make up for it. On-the-job learning and training are not separated but dynamically linked together, benefiting to both par...

  4. Development of Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD) in the Fellow Eye of Patients with AMD Treated by Treat-and-Extend Intravitreal Therapy with Aflibercept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimura, Kensuke; Matsumoto, Hidetaka; Morimoto, Masahiro; Akiyama, Hideo

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the development of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) in the fellow eye in patients with unilateral nAMD treated by a treat-and-extend (TAE) regimen with intravitreal aflibercept injections. We retrospectively studied 104 patients with treatment-naïve unilateral nAMD. We assessed best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and exudative changes in the treated eyes and development of nAMD in the fellow eye for 2 years. The subjects included 46 patients with typical AMD (tAMD), 44 with polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (PCV), and 14 with retinal angiomatous proliferation (RAP). BCVA was significantly improved after the loading phase in all subtypes. Forty-six patients (44.2%) had no recurrence within 2 years after the loading phase, including 12 (26.1%) with tAMD, 23 (52.2%) with PCV, and 11 (78.6%) with RAP (p < 0.01). Eleven patients (10.6%) developed nAMD in the fellow eye within 2 years, including 4 (8.7%) with tAMD, 0 (0%) with PCV, and 7 (50.0%) with RAP (p < 0.001). Patients with RAP had significantly more frequent development of nAMD in the fellow eye compared to other subtypes, while they showed significantly less recurrence during the TAE regimen with intravitreal aflibercept injections. Development of nAMD in the fellow eye should be monitored in RAP when the injection interval is extended. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Dermatology education on the Web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McColl, Ian

    2003-01-01

    Conventional dermatology teaching favours a didactic, factual approach, rather than a problem-solving approach. A Web-based education system that uses a problem-solving approach offers many advantages. Several international Websites now provide continuing education to specialist dermatologists. These are all 'discretionary' Websites, that is, they are visited by choice; 'obligatory' educational Websites are those tied to a university medical faculty or postgraduate college and which host either online tasks that must be completed or unique examinable material. An interactive education Website, named Dermconsult, has been established unofficially for fellows of the Australasian College of Dermatologists and registrars in training. However, a successful Website will require backing from certifying organizations. Continuing medical education will need to be compulsory for potential users if an educational Website is to be successful.

  6. The Effects of Vocational Leadership Development for Individuals Who Participated in the Ohio Vocational Education Leadership Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leimbach, Gale John

    The effects of vocational leadership development were studied for 23 Fellows enrolled in the 1992 Ohio Vocational Education Leadership Institute (OVELI). A literature review focused on four components: leadership styles, educational leadership development, vocational leadership development, and visionary leadership development. The Leadership…

  7. Opinion Mining in Online Reviews About Distance Education Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Jaskolski, Janik; Siegberg, Fabian; Tibroni, Thomas; Cimiano, Philipp; Klinger, Roman

    2016-01-01

    The popularity of distance education programs is increasing at a fast pace. En par with this development, online communication in fora, social media and reviewing platforms between students is increasing as well. Exploiting this information to support fellow students or institutions requires to extract the relevant opinions in order to automatically generate reports providing an overview of pros and cons of different distance education programs. We report on an experiment involving distance e...

  8. Perspectives on Canadian core fellowship training in pediatric anesthesia: a survey of graduate fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, James D; Crawford, Mark W

    2015-10-01

    Educators in anesthesia have an obligation to ensure that fellowship programs are training anesthesiologists to meet the highest standards of performance in clinical and academic practice. The objective of this survey was to characterize the perspectives of graduates of Canadian core fellowship programs in pediatric anesthesia (during a ten-year period starting in 2003) on the adequacies and inadequacies of fellowship training. We conducted an electronic survey of graduates from eight departments of pediatric anesthesia in Canada who completed one-year core fellowship training in pediatric anesthesia from 2003 to 2013. A novel survey design was implemented, and the content and structure of the design were tested before distribution. Data were collected on respondents' demographics, details of training and practice settings, perceived self-efficacy in subspecialty practices, research experience, and perspectives on one-year core fellowship training in pediatric anesthesia. Descriptive statistics and 95% confidence intervals were determined. The survey was sent to 132 anesthesiologists who completed core fellowship training in pediatric anesthesia in Canada. Sixty-five (49%) completed and eligible surveys were received. Most of the anesthesiologists surveyed perceived that 12 months of core fellowship training are sufficient to acquire the knowledge and critical skills needed to practice pediatric anesthesia. Subspecialty areas most frequently perceived to require improved training included pediatric cardiac anesthesia, chronic pain medicine, and regional anesthesia. This survey reports perceived deficiencies in domains of pediatric anesthesia fellowship training. These findings should help guide the future development of core and advanced fellowship training programs in pediatric anesthesia.

  9. Transforming distance education curricula through distributive leadership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike Keppell

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines a core leadership strategy for transforming learning and teaching in distance education through flexible and blended learning. It focuses on a project centred on distributive leadership that involves collaboration, shared purpose, responsibility and recognition of leadership irrespective of role or position within an organisation. Distributive leadership was a core principle in facilitating the transformation of learning and teaching through a Teaching Fellowship Scheme that empowered leaders across a regional distance education university. In parallel, a design-based research project analysed the perceptions of the Teaching Fellows in relation to blended learning, time/space, peer learning, innovation and equity issues in relation to distance education.

  10. Structural changes of macula and optic disk of the fellow eye in patients with nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duman, R; Yavas, G F; Veliyev, I; Dogan, M; Duman, R

    2018-05-10

    The aim was to assess the ganglion cell complex (GCC) thickness, retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness and optic disk features in the affected eyes (AE) and unaffected fellow eyes (FE) of subjects with unilateral nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) and to compare with healthy control eyes (CE) using spectral domain-optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). This study included 28 patients and age, sex and refraction-matched 28 control subjects. Mean GCC thickness and peripapillary RNFL thickness in four quadrants measured by cirrus SD-OCT were evaluated in both AE and FE of patients and CE. In addition, optic disk measurements obtained with OCT were evaluated. Mean GCC thickness was significantly lower in AE compared with both FE and CE (P optic disk cupping compared with both FE and CE (P optic disk features between the CE and FE. And significantly greater optic disk cupping in the AE compared with both FE and CE supports the acquired enlargement of cupping after the onset of NAION.

  11. How well do we prepare pediatric radiologists regarding child abuse? Results of a survey of recently trained fellows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennington, Debra J.; Lonergan, Gael J.; Mendelson, Kenneth L.

    2004-01-01

    Pediatric radiologists serve an important role in the radiologic diagnosis, investigation, and in legal proceedings in cases of child abuse. The Society for Pediatric Radiology should evaluate and insure the adequacy of training of pediatric radiologists for this important role. The Society for Pediatric Radiology Committee on Child Abuse, 2002, conducted a 24-question survey to evaluate the scope and perceived adequacy of training received by pediatric radiology fellows regarding the radiologic diagnosis of child abuse and the associated legal process. Eighty-four surveys were mailed to radiologists who had completed a year in pediatric radiology fellowship training during the years 1999 and 2000. There were 33 surveys returned for an overall response of 39%. Respondents' perception of adequacy of training was best for the radiologic diagnosis of child abuse. The majority perceived they were not well trained in the investigative and legal processes regarding child abuse. The majority would welcome standardized training. Current pediatric radiology training programs do not sufficiently prepare pediatric radiologists for their role in the legal system regarding child abuse. A standardized program to train pediatric radiologists about the imaging diagnosis of child abuse and their role in the legal system is recommended. (orig.)

  12. How well do we prepare pediatric radiologists regarding child abuse? Results of a survey of recently trained fellows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennington, Debra J.; Lonergan, Gael J. [Austin Radiological Association, 6101 West Courtyard Drive, Bldg. 5, TX 78730, Austin (United States); Mendelson, Kenneth L. [South Shore Hospital, Weymouth, Massachusetts (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Pediatric radiologists serve an important role in the radiologic diagnosis, investigation, and in legal proceedings in cases of child abuse. The Society for Pediatric Radiology should evaluate and insure the adequacy of training of pediatric radiologists for this important role. The Society for Pediatric Radiology Committee on Child Abuse, 2002, conducted a 24-question survey to evaluate the scope and perceived adequacy of training received by pediatric radiology fellows regarding the radiologic diagnosis of child abuse and the associated legal process. Eighty-four surveys were mailed to radiologists who had completed a year in pediatric radiology fellowship training during the years 1999 and 2000. There were 33 surveys returned for an overall response of 39%. Respondents' perception of adequacy of training was best for the radiologic diagnosis of child abuse. The majority perceived they were not well trained in the investigative and legal processes regarding child abuse. The majority would welcome standardized training. Current pediatric radiology training programs do not sufficiently prepare pediatric radiologists for their role in the legal system regarding child abuse. A standardized program to train pediatric radiologists about the imaging diagnosis of child abuse and their role in the legal system is recommended. (orig.)

  13. Education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-07-01

    The Education Program of IPEN aims to develop human resources through scientific training programs and to provide and disseminate scientific information in nuclear and correlated areas. IPEN is responsible for the graduate program in the nuclear area at University of Sao Paulo: the Nuclear Technology Program IPEN/USP. Since its creation, in 1976, the Program was evaluated with grade A by the Federal Government Evaluation (CAPES), the highest in this classification. In 2003 CAPES changed the evaluation criteria; since then, it has been considered a program of Excellence, with grade 6. Levels 6 and 7 are granted only to those programs having internationally recognized expertise. Level 6 was maintained in the last evaluation considering the period 2010-2012. Along its 37 years the Nuclear Technology Program awarded 2,217 titles: 1,511 masters and 706 doctoral degrees. The institution is also responsible for the Professional Master Degree - Lasers in Dentistry, in partnership with the School of Dentistry from University of Sao Paulo. IPEN has a Scientific Initiation Program for undergraduate students aiming to stimulate young people to enter the scientific research career. This program allows the student to have the opportunity to develop a specially assigned study under the guidance of a supervisor. CNEN and CNPq are the main funding agencies supporting this Program. The institute also offers, since 2000, undergraduate disciplines for students of University of Sao Paulo. A total of 33 disciplines have been approved by the University. In the period considered over 1,000 students attended the courses. There is also a Scholarship Program for graduate students, funded by CNPq, CAPES and IPEN. Scholarships funded by FAPESP and CNEN are also available on demand, according to the conditions set forth in the respective notices. Concerning scientific information support, there is available a central specialized library, which offers, beyond traditional collections and services

  14. Education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The Education Program of IPEN aims to develop human resources through scientific training programs and to provide and disseminate scientific information in nuclear and correlated areas. IPEN is responsible for the graduate program in the nuclear area at University of Sao Paulo: the Nuclear Technology Program IPEN/USP. Since its creation, in 1976, the Program was evaluated with grade A by the Federal Government Evaluation (CAPES), the highest in this classification. In 2003 CAPES changed the evaluation criteria; since then, it has been considered a program of Excellence, with grade 6. Levels 6 and 7 are granted only to those programs having internationally recognized expertise. Level 6 was maintained in the last evaluation considering the period 2010-2012. Along its 37 years the Nuclear Technology Program awarded 2,217 titles: 1,511 masters and 706 doctoral degrees. The institution is also responsible for the Professional Master Degree - Lasers in Dentistry, in partnership with the School of Dentistry from University of Sao Paulo. IPEN has a Scientific Initiation Program for undergraduate students aiming to stimulate young people to enter the scientific research career. This program allows the student to have the opportunity to develop a specially assigned study under the guidance of a supervisor. CNEN and CNPq are the main funding agencies supporting this Program. The institute also offers, since 2000, undergraduate disciplines for students of University of Sao Paulo. A total of 33 disciplines have been approved by the University. In the period considered over 1,000 students attended the courses. There is also a Scholarship Program for graduate students, funded by CNPq, CAPES and IPEN. Scholarships funded by FAPESP and CNEN are also available on demand, according to the conditions set forth in the respective notices. Concerning scientific information support, there is available a central specialized library, which offers, beyond traditional collections and services

  15. Retinal Capillary Network and Foveal Avascular Zone in Eyes with Vein Occlusion and Fellow Eyes Analyzed With Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhi, Mehreen; Filho, Marco A Bonini; Louzada, Ricardo N; Kuehlewein, Laura; de Carlo, Talisa E; Baumal, Caroline R; Witkin, Andre J; Sadda, Srinivas R; Sarraf, David; Reichel, Elias; Duker, Jay S; Waheed, Nadia K

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate the perifoveolar retinal capillary network at different depths and to quantify the foveal avascular zone (FAZ) in eyes with retinal vein occlusion (RVO) compared with their fellow eyes and healthy controls using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography angiography (SD-OCTA). We prospectively recruited 23 patients with RVO including 15 eyes with central RVO (CRVO) and 8 eyes with branch RVO (BRVO), their fellow eyes, and 8 age-matched healthy controls (8 eyes) for imaging on prototype OCTA software within RTVue-XR Avanti. The 3 × 3 mm and 6 × 6 mm en face angiograms of superficial and deep retinal capillary plexuses were segmented. Perifoveolar retinal capillary network was analyzed and FAZ was quantified. Decrease in vascular perfusion at the deep plexus was observed in all eyes with CRVO (8/8, 100%) and BRVO (6/6, 100%) without cystoid macular edema, and in 8 of 15 (53%) and 2 of 8 (25%) of the fellow eyes, respectively. Vascular tortuosity was observed in 13 of 15 (87%) CRVO and 5 of 8 (63%) BRVO eyes. Collaterals were seen in 10 of 15 (67%) CRVO and 5 of 8 (63%) BRVO eyes. Mean FAZ area was larger in eyes with RVO than their fellow eyes (1.13 ± 0.25 mm2 versus 0.58 ± 0.28 mm2; P = 0.007) and controls (1.13 ± 0.25 mm2 versus 0.30 ± 0.09 mm2; P network and is able to quantify the FAZ in RVO. Longitudinal studies may be considered to evaluate the clinical utility of OCTA in RVO and other retinal vascular diseases.

  16. Prevalence of bullying, discrimination and sexual harassment among trainees and Fellows of the College of Intensive Care Medicine of Australia and New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesh, Bala; Corke, Charlie; Raper, Raymond; Pinder, Mary; Stephens, Dianne; Joynt, Gavin; Morley, Peter; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Bevan, Rob; Freebairn, Ross; Varghese, Benoj; Ashbolt, Michael; Hawker, Felicity; Jacobe, Stephen; Yong, Sarah

    2016-12-01

    Anecdotal reports about bullying behaviour in intensive care emerged during College of Intensive Care Medicine (CICM) hospital accreditation visits. Bullying, discrimination and sexual harassment (BDSH) in the medical profession, particularly in surgery, were widely reported in the media recently. This prompted the College to formally survey its Fellows and trainees to identify the prevalence of these behaviours in the intensive care workplace. An online survey of all trainees (n = 951) and Fellows (n = 970) of the CICM. The survey response rate was 51% (Fellows, 60%; trainees, 41%). The overall prevalences of bullying, discrimination and sexual harassment were 32%, 12% and 3%, respectively. The proportions of Fellows and trainees who reported being bullied and discriminated against were similar across all age groups. Women reported a greater prevalence of sexual harassment (odds ratio [OR], 2.97 [95% CI, 1.35-6.51]; P = 0.006) and discrimination (OR, 2.10 [95% CI, 1.39-3.17]; P = 0.0004) than men. Respondents who obtained their primary medical qualification in Asia or Africa appeared to have been at increased risk of discrimination (OR, 1.88 [95% CI, 1.15-3.05]; P = 0.03). Respondents who obtained their degree in Australia, New Zealand or Hong Kong may have been at increased risk of being bullied. In all three domains of unprofessional behaviour, the perpetrators were predominantly consultants (70% overall), and the highest proportion of these was ICU consultants. The occurrence of BDSH appears to be common in the intensive care environment in Australia and New Zealand.

  17. EDUCATIONAL SOCIAL SOFTWARE FOR CONTEXT-AWARE LEARNING Collaborative Methods and Human Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reviewed by Dr. Adile Askim KURT

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This book was edited by, Niki Lambropoulos a HCI research fellow at London South Bank University and Margarida Romero a researcher on learning innovation and educational psychology, and published by Information Science Reference in 2009. The book, which 26 authors from nine different countries contributed to, includes four sections and 14 chapters.

  18. 75 FR 63242 - Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA) Request for Grant Proposals: Junior Faculty...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-14

    ... acquire a first-hand understanding of the U.S. system of higher education. The JFDP will encourage fellows... are subject to audit. The basis for determining the value of cash and in-kind contributions must be in... pre-arrival information and orientation to participants, monitoring of participants, proper...

  19. 77 FR 74517 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Comment Request; Education and Human Resources Project...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-14

    ... and track the impact of NSF funding that focuses on the Nation's science, technology, engineering, and... beyond). EHR also focuses on broadening participation in STEM learning and careers among United States... Engineering (HBCU-RISE) Monitoring System. Graduate STEM Fellows in K-12 Education 1,626 1,626 3,941 (GK-12...

  20. Survey of Publication Outlets in Early Childhood Education: Descriptive Data, Review Processes, and Advice to Authors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amodei, Michelle L.; Jalongo, Mary Renck; Myers, Jacqueline; Onchwari, Jacqueline; Gargiulo, Richard M.

    2013-01-01

    Publishing outlets in the field of early childhood vary widely in terms of emphasis on theory, practice, and research as they relate to the care and education of the very young; these outlets also have different readerships (i.e., primarily for teachers, the teachers of their teachers, or the fellow scholars/researchers). Included in the mixture…

  1. On Thursday 14 September 2006, members of CERN Management welcomed recently-recruited staff members and fellows at the trimester session of the Induction Programme (photographed here with Enrico CHIAVERI, Department HR).

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    On Thursday 14 September 2006, members of CERN Management welcomed recently-recruited staff members and fellows at the trimester session of the Induction Programme (photographed here with Enrico CHIAVERI, Department HR).

  2. His Majesty Carl XVI Gustav, King of Sweden, Honorary President of the World Scout Foundation, and about 80 fellows, on the occasion of the 48th World Baden-Powell Fellowship Event on Saturday, 18th September 2004

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    2004-01-01

    His Majesty Carl XVI Gustav, King of Sweden, Honorary President of the World Scout Foundation, and about 80 fellows, on the occasion of the 48th World Baden-Powell Fellowship Event on Saturday, 18th September 2004

  3. Bacteriophages in the human gut: Our fellow travelers throughout life and potential biomarkers of heath or disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhshinejad, Babak; Ghiasvand, Saeedeh

    2017-08-15

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is populated by a huge variety of viruses. Bacterial viruses (bacteriophages) constitute the largest and the most unrecognized part of virome. The total bacteriophage community of the human gut is called phageome. Phages colonize the gut from the earliest moments of life and become our fellow travelers throughout life. Phageome seems to be unique to each individual and shows a high degree of interpersonal variation. In the healthy gut, a vast majority of phages have a lysogenic lifestyle. These prophages serve as a major respository of mobile genetic elements in the gut and play key roles in the exchange of genetic material between bacterial species via horizontal gene transfer (HGT). But, imbalance in the gut microbial community during dysbiosis, caused by diseases or environmental stresses such as antibiotics, is accompanied by induction of prophages leading to a decreased ratio of symbionts to pathobionts. Based on this, a diseased gut is transformed from an environment predominantly occupied by prophages to an ecosystem mostly inhabited by lytic phages. A growing body of evidence has provided support for the notion that phageome structure and composition change dependent on the physiological or pathological status of the body. This has been demonstrated by pronounced quantitative and qualitative differences between the phageome of healthy individuals and patients. Although many aspects of the contribution made by phages to human biology remain to be understood, recent findings favor the suggestion that phageome might represent potential to serve as a biomarker of health or disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. FELLOWS ADDRESS California Dreaming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooten, van Kees

    2017-01-01

    California was the first jurisdiction to mandate a reduction in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 80% below 1990 levels by 2050. This target was subsequently endorsed by the G8 in 2009 and the European Commission in 2014, and is the guiding principle of the 2015 Paris Agreement. To achieve these

  5. CERN fellows and visitors

    CERN Multimedia

    Penney, R. W.

    1963-01-01

    This article describes the Fellowship and Visitor Programme as it is at present, detailing the various headings under which the visitors come and indicating the methods by which they are chosen. The way in which their work is integrated into the general scientific activity of CERN is discussed briefly.

  6. Delaware GK-12: Improvement of Science Education in Vocational Technical High Schools Through Collaborative Learning and Coteaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, J.; Skalak, K.; Watson, G.; Scantlebury, K.; Allen, D.; Quillen, A.

    2006-12-01

    With funding from the National Science Foundation, the University of Delaware (UD) in partnership with the New Castle County Vocational Technical School District (NCCoVoTech) in Delaware has initiated a GK-12 Program. In each of year this program, nine full time UD graduate students in the sciences, who have completed all or most of their coursework, will be selected to serve as fellows. Participation in the GK-12 program benefits the graduate fellows in many ways. In addition to gaining general insight into current issues of science education, the fellows enhance their experience as scientific researchers by directly improving their ability to effectively communicate complex quantitative and technical knowledge to an audience with multiple and diverse learning needs. In the first year of this project, fellows have been paired with high school science teachers from NCCoVoTech. These pairs, along with the principal investigators (PIs) of this program have formed a learning community that is taking this opportunity to examine and to reflect on current issues in science education while specifically addressing critical needs in teaching science in vocational technical high schools. By participating in summer workshops and follow-up meetings facilitated by the PIs, the fellows have been introduced to a number of innovative teaching strategies including problem-based learning (PBL). Fellow/teacher pairs have begun to develop and teach PBL activities that are in agreement with State of Delaware science standards and that support student learning through inquiry. Fellows also have the opportunity to engage in coteaching with their teacher partner. In this "teaching at the elbow of another", fellows will gain a better understanding of and appreciation for the complexities and nuances of teaching science in vocational technical high schools. While not taught as a stand-alone course in NCCoVoTech high schools, earth science topics are integrated into the science curriculum at

  7. Hedberg Research Conference on Fundamental Controls on Flow in Carbonates: Request for Travel Support for Post-Doctoral Fellows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pyrak-Nolte, Laura J. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2013-04-28

    , geomechanics, numerical modeling, physical experiments, sedimentology, well-testing, statistics, mathematics, visualization, etc.) who encompass experience as well as the latest advances in these multi-faceted fields. One of the goals was to include early career scientists and engineers (post-doctoral fellows, assistant professors, etc.). With this grant 10 early career scientists and engineers were supported to attend the conference. This reports contains a brief overview of the conference and the list of support participants supported by this grant. Full details of the outcomes of the conference are given in the publication found in the Attachment section of this report.

  8. Increasing Research Capacity in Underserved Communities: Formative and Summative Evaluation of the Mississippi Community Research Fellows Training Program (Cohort 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Fastring

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe Mississippi Community Research Fellows Training Program (MSCRFTP is a 15-week program conducted in Jackson, MS, USA consisting of training in the areas of evidence-based public health, research methods, research ethics, and cultural competency. The purpose of the program was to increase community knowledge and understanding of public health research, develop community-based projects that addressed health disparity in the participants’ community, increase individual and community capacity, and to engage community members as equal partners in the research process.MethodsA comprehensive evaluation of the MSCRFTP was conducted that included both quantitative and qualitative methods. All participants were asked to complete a baseline, midterm, and final assessment as part of their program requirements. Knowledge gained was assessed by comparing baseline assessment responses to final assessment responses related to 27 key content areas addressed in the training sessions. Assessments also collected participants’ attitudes toward participating in research within their communities, their perceived influence over community decisions, and their perceptions of community members’ involvement in research, satisfaction with the program, and the program’s impact on the participants’ daily practice and community work.ResultsTwenty-one participants, the majority of which were female and African-American, completed the MSCRFTP. Knowledge of concepts addressed in 15 weekly training sessions improved significantly on 85.2% of 27 key areas evaluated (p < 0.05. Two mini-grant community based participatory research projects proposed by participants were funded through competitive application. Most participants agreed that by working together, the people in their community could influence decisions that affected the community. All participants rated their satisfaction with the overall program as “very high” (76.2%, n = 16 or

  9. Clinical characteristics of reticular pseudodrusen in the fellow eye of patients with unilateral neovascular age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogg, Ruth E; Silva, Rufino; Staurenghi, Giovanni; Murphy, George; Santos, Ana R; Rosina, Chiara; Chakravarthy, Usha

    2014-09-01

    To describe associations between reticular pseudodrusen, individual characteristics, and retinal function. Cohort study. We recruited 105 patients (age range, 52-93 years) who had advanced neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in only 1 eye from 3 clinical centers in Europe. Minimum follow-up was 12 months. The eye selected for study was the fellow eye without advanced disease. Clinical measures of vision were distance visual acuity, near visual acuity, and results of the Smith-Kettlewell low-luminance acuity test (SKILL). Fundus imaging included color photography, red-free imaging, blue autofluorescence imaging, fluorescein angiography, indocyanine green angiography, and optical coherence tomography using standardized protocols. These were used to detect progression to neovascular AMD in the study eye during follow-up. All imaging outputs were graded for the presence or absence of reticular pseudodrusen (RPD) using a multimodal approach. Choroidal thickness was measured at the foveal center and at 2 other equidistant locations from the fovea (1500 μm) nasally and temporally. Metrics on retinal thickness and volume were obtained from the manufacturer-supplied automated segmentation readouts. Presence of RPD, distance visual acuity, near visual acuity, SKILL score, choroidal thickness, retinal thickness, and retinal volume. Reticular pseudodrusen was found in 43 participants (41%) on 1 or more imaging method. The SKILL score was significantly worse in those with reticular drusen (mean score ± standard deviation [SD, 38±12) versus those without (mean score ± SD, 33±9) (P = 0.034). Parafoveal retinal thickness, parafoveal retinal volume, and all of the choroidal thickness parameters measured were significantly lower in those with reticular drusen than in those without. The presence of RPD was associated with development of neovascular AMD when corrected for age and sex (odds ratio, 5.5; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-28.8; P = 0.042). All participants

  10. Support for Students, Postdoctoral Fellows and Trainees to Attend Radiochemistry-­Related Symposia at Pacifichem 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilbur, Daniel Scott [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2016-02-06

    This project was undertaken to meet the growing need for training personnel who will be involved in professional careers requiring knowledge of radiochemistry, such as those working in radionuclide production, and in biological, industrial, medical and environmental fields that use radionuclides in their work. The goal of the project was to provide financial assistance to students and trainees from academic and government institutions (US preferred) to attend selected radiochemistry-­related symposia at the Pacifichem 2015 meeting held in Honolulu, Hawaii in December 2015. The funding, meant to provide a portion of an awardee’s travel cost, was specifically directed at attendance to the following symposia: #363, Isotope production-­ Providing Important Materials for Research and Applications; #215, Chemistry of Molecular Imaging, and #11, Chemistry for Development of Theranostic Radiopharmaceuticals. Those symposia were held December 16th (am & pm: #11, #363), December 17th (am: #11, #363; pm: #275) and December 18th (am & pm: #275). Pacifichem meetings are held every 5 years in Honolulu, Hawaii. The meetings are joint sponsored by a number of Chemistry Societies from Pacific Rim countries. The meetings are composed of a large number of symposia (>300) on a wide variety of topics, which make them similar to small meetings within the larger overall meeting. Therefore, attendance at the three symposia within Pacifichem 2015 was similar to attending a meeting focused entirely on radiochemistry-­related topics. To obtain the financial assistance, the student/trainee: (a) had to be an undergraduate student, graduate student or Postdoctoral Fellow in a physical science department or National Laboratory; (b) had to submit a letter from their supervisor indicating that he/she will be enrolled as a student/trainee at the time of the meeting, and were committed to attending the meeting; and (c) had to submit a resume or curriculum vitae along with a brief statement of

  11. "More may mean less... " the role for simulation-based medical education in the cardiac catheterization laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerdahl, Daniel E; Henry, Timothy D

    2016-02-15

    Implementation of simulation-based medical education (SBME) can improve cardiovascular fellows' angiography skills and knowledge SBME focused on performing coronary angiography shortened procedure times and decreased the use of cine-fluoroscopy The ACGME mandate and SCAI's Simulation Committee recommendations suggest SBME will play an expanding and integral role in the field of cardiovascular medicine. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Bullying Affects More than Feelings: The Long-Term Implications of Victimization on Academic Motivation in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young-Jones, Adena; Fursa, Sophie; Byrket, Jacqueline S.; Sly, James S.

    2015-01-01

    Bullying has become a prominent topic within education due to recent media headlines in the United States and abroad. The impact of these occurrences ripples beyond the bully and victim to include administrators, parents, and fellow students. While previous research has concluded bullying behaviors decrease as a child progresses in school, more…

  13. The Impact of Learning about Technology via Action Research as a Professional Development Activity on Higher Education: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premdas, Leisa

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed method study was to determine the perceived impact of learning about technology via action research as a professional development activity on faculty and students in higher education. Nine faculty members--also Teaching and Technology Fellows representing various disciplines at St. John's University--were selected based…

  14. The role of computerized diagnostic proposals in the interpretation of the 12-lead electrocardiogram by cardiology and non-cardiology fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novotny, Tomas; Bond, Raymond; Andrsova, Irena; Koc, Lumir; Sisakova, Martina; Finlay, Dewar; Guldenring, Daniel; Spinar, Jindrich; Malik, Marek

    2017-05-01

    Most contemporary 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) devices offer computerized diagnostic proposals. The reliability of these automated diagnoses is limited. It has been suggested that incorrect computer advice can influence physician decision-making. This study analyzed the role of diagnostic proposals in the decision process by a group of fellows of cardiology and other internal medicine subspecialties. A set of 100 clinical 12-lead ECG tracings was selected covering both normal cases and common abnormalities. A team of 15 junior Cardiology Fellows and 15 Non-Cardiology Fellows interpreted the ECGs in 3 phases: without any diagnostic proposal, with a single diagnostic proposal (half of them intentionally incorrect), and with four diagnostic proposals (only one of them being correct) for each ECG. Self-rated confidence of each interpretation was collected. Availability of diagnostic proposals significantly increased the diagnostic accuracy (p<0.001). Nevertheless, in case of a single proposal (either correct or incorrect) the increase of accuracy was present in interpretations with correct diagnostic proposals, while the accuracy was substantially reduced with incorrect proposals. Confidence levels poorly correlated with interpretation scores (rho≈2, p<0.001). Logistic regression showed that an interpreter is most likely to be correct when the ECG offers a correct diagnostic proposal (OR=10.87) or multiple proposals (OR=4.43). Diagnostic proposals affect the diagnostic accuracy of ECG interpretations. The accuracy is significantly influenced especially when a single diagnostic proposal (either correct or incorrect) is provided. The study suggests that the presentation of multiple computerized diagnoses is likely to improve the diagnostic accuracy of interpreters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Global Application of the Assessment of Communication Skills of Paediatric Endocrinology Fellows in the Management of Differences in Sex Development Using the ESPE E-Learning.Org Portal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranenburg, Laura J C; Reerds, Sam T H; Cools, Martine; Alderson, Julie; Muscarella, Miriam; Magrite, Ellie; Kuiper, Martijn; Abdelgaffar, Shereen; Balsamo, Antonio; Brauner, Raja; Chanoine, Jean Pierre; Deeb, Asma; Fechner, Patricia; German, Alina; Holterhus, Paul Martin; Juul, Anders; Mendonca, Berenice B; Neville, Kristen; Nordenstrom, Anna; Oostdijk, Wilma; Rey, Rodolfo A; Rutter, Meilan M; Shah, Nalini; Luo, Xiaoping; Grijpink, Kalinka; Drop, Stenvert L S

    2017-01-01

    Information sharing in chronic conditions such as disorders of/differences in sex development (DSD) is essential for a comprehensive understanding by parents and patients. We report on a qualitative analysis of communication skills of fellows undergoing training in paediatric endocrinology. Guidelines are created for the assessment of communication between health professionals and individuals with DSD and their parents. Paediatric endocrinology fellows worldwide were invited to study two interactive online cases (www.espe-elearning.org) and to describe a best practice communication with (i) the parents of a newborn with congenital adrenal hyperplasia and (ii) a young woman with 46,XY gonadal dysgenesis. The replies were analysed regarding completeness, quality, and evidence of empathy. Guidelines for structured assessment of responses were developed by 22 senior paediatric endocrinologists worldwide who assessed 10 selected replies. Consensus of assessors was established and the evaluation guidelines were created. The replies of the fellows showed considerable variation in completeness, quality of wording, and evidence of empathy. Many relevant aspects of competent clinical communication were not mentioned; 15% (case 1) and 17% (case 2) of the replies were considered poor/insufficient. There was also marked variation between 17 senior experts in the application of the guidelines to assess communication skills. The guidelines were then adjusted to a 3-level assessment with empathy as a separate key item to better reflect the qualitative differences in the replies and for simplicity of use by evaluators. E-learning can play an important role in assessing communication skills. A practical tool is provided to assess how information is shared with patients with DSD and their families and should be refined by all stakeholders, notably interdisciplinary health professionals and patient representatives. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Global Application of the Assessment of Communication Skills of Paediatric Endocrinology Fellows in the Management of Differences in Sex Development Using the ESPE E-Learning.Org Portal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kranenburg, Laura J C; Reerds, Sam T H; Cools, Martine

    2017-01-01

    endocrinology. Guidelines are created for the assessment of communication between health professionals and individuals with DSD and their parents. METHODS: Paediatric endocrinology fellows worldwide were invited to study two interactive online cases (www.espe-elearning.org) and to describe a best practice...... as a separate key item to better reflect the qualitative differences in the replies and for simplicity of use by evaluators. CONCLUSIONS: E-learning can play an important role in assessing communication skills. A practical tool is provided to assess how information is shared with patients with DSD...

  17. Society News: Monica Grady awarded CBE; Grubb Parsons Lecture 2012; Join the RAS; Astronomy on radio for kids; New Fellows; Peter D Hingley

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    RAS Fellow Prof. Monica Grady has been made a Commander of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (CBE), in recognition of her services to space science. The RAS sponsors the annual Grubb Parsons Lecture, which this year took place on 6 June at the University of Durham. If you are a professional astronomer, geophysicist, or similar, a student studying these disciplines, or simply someone with a serious interest in them, we urge you to apply for membership of the RAS. Outreach is an important activity for the RAS. We recently supported an astronomy series called Deep Space High on the digital radio channel Fun Kids.

  18. Training the teachers. The clinician-educator track of the University of Washington Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine Fellowship Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Rosemary; Goodman, Richard B; Kritek, Patricia; Luks, Andrew M; Tonelli, Mark R; Benditt, Joshua

    2015-04-01

    The University of Washington was the first pulmonary and critical care medicine fellowship training program accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education to create a dedicated clinician-educator fellowship track that has its own National Residency Matching Program number. This track was created in response to increasing demand for focused training in medical education in pulmonary and critical care. Through the Veterans Health Administration we obtained a stipend for a clinician-educator fellow to dedicate 12 months to training in medical education. This takes place predominantly in the second year of fellowship and is composed of several core activities: fellows complete the University of Washington's Teaching Scholars Program, a professional development program designed to train leaders in medical education; they teach in a variety of settings and receive feedback on their work from clinician-educator faculty and the learners; and they engage in scholarly activity, which may take the form of scholarship of teaching, integration, or investigation. Fellows are guided throughout this process by a primary mentor and a mentoring committee. Since funding became available in 2009, two of the three graduates to date have successfully secured clinician-educator faculty positions. Graduates uniformly believe that the clinician-educator track met their training goals better than the research-based track would have.

  19. Training the Workforce: Description of a Longitudinal Interdisciplinary Education and Mentoring Program in Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Stacie; O'Mahony, Sean; Baron, Aliza; Ansari, Aziz; Deamant, Catherine; Frader, Joel; Leyva, Ileana; Marschke, Michael; Preodor, Michael

    2017-04-01

    The rapid increase in demand for palliative care (PC) services has led to concerns regarding workforce shortages and threats to the resiliency of PC teams. To describe the development, implementation, and evaluation of a regional interdisciplinary training program in PC. Thirty nurse and physician fellows representing 22 health systems across the Chicago region participated in a two-year PC training program. The curriculum was delivered through multiple conferences, self-directed e-learning, and individualized mentoring by expert local faculty (mentors). Fellows shadowed mentors' clinical practices and received guidance on designing, implementing, and evaluating a practice improvement project to address gaps in PC at their institutions. Enduring, interdisciplinary relationships were built at all levels across health care organizations. Fellows made significant increases in knowledge and self-reported confidence in adult and pediatric PC and program development skills and frequency performing these skills. Fellows and mentors reported high satisfaction with the educational program. This interdisciplinary PC training model addressed local workforce issues by increasing the number of clinicians capable of providing PC. Unique features include individualized longitudinal mentoring, interdisciplinary education, on-site project implementation, and local network building. Future research will address the impact of the addition of social work and chaplain trainees to the program. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Creating a Cadre of Fellowship-Trained Medical Educators, Part II: A Formal Needs Assessment to Structure Postgraduate Fellowships in Medical Education Scholarship and Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Jaime; Yarris, Lalena M; Santen, Sally A; Guth, Todd A; Rougas, Steven; Runde, Daniel P; Coates, Wendy C

    2017-08-01

    Education leaders at the 2012 Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference on education research proposed that dedicated postgraduate education scholarship fellowships (ESFs) might provide an effective model for developing future faculty as scholars. A formal needs assessment was performed to understand the training gap and inform the development of ESFs. A mixed-methods needs assessment was conducted of four emergency medicine national stakeholder groups in 2013: department chairs; faculty education/research leaders; existing education fellowship directors; and current education fellows/graduates. Descriptive statistics were reported for quantitative data. Qualitative data from semistructured interviews and free-text responses were analyzed using a thematic approach. Participants were 11/15 (73%) education fellowship directors, 13/20 (65%) fellows/graduates, 106/239 (44%) faculty education/research leaders, and a convenience sample of 26 department chairs. Department chairs expected new education faculty to design didactics (85%) and teach clinically (96%). Faculty education/research leaders thought new faculty were inadequately prepared for job tasks (83.7%) and that ESFs would improve the overall quality of education research (91.1%). Fellowship directors noted that ESFs provide skills, mentorship, and protected time for graduates to become productive academicians. Current fellows/graduates reported pursing an ESF to develop skills in teaching and research methodology. Stakeholder groups uniformly perceived a need for training in education theory, clinical teaching, and education research. These findings support dedicated, deliberate training in these areas. Establishment of a structure for scholarly pursuits prior to assuming a full-time position will effectively prepare new faculty. These findings may inform the development, implementation, and curricula of ESFs.